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Sample records for active site concentration

  1. Active-site concentrations of chemicals - are they a better predictor of effect than plasma/organ/tissue concentrations?

    PubMed

    Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta

    2010-03-01

    Active-site concentrations can be defined as the concentrations of unbound, pharmacologically active substances at the site of action. In contrast, the total concentrations of the drug in plasma/organ/tissue also include the protein- or tissue-bound molecules that are pharmacologically inactive. Plasma and whole tissue concentrations are used as predictors of effects and side effects because of their ease of sampling, while the concentrations of unbound drug in tissue are more difficult to measure. However, with the introduction of microdialysis and subsequently developed techniques, it has become possible to test the free drug hypothesis. The brain is an interesting organ in this regard because of the presence of the blood-brain barrier with its tight junctions and active efflux and influx transporters. We have proposed that research into brain drug delivery be divided into three main areas: the rate of delivery (PS, CL(in)), the extent of delivery (K(p,uu)) and the non-specific affinity of the drug to brain tissue, described by the volume of distribution of unbound drug in the brain (V(u,brain)). In this way, the concentration of unbound drug at the target site can be estimated from the total brain concentration and the plasma concentration after measuring the fraction of unbound drug. Results so far fully support the theory that active site concentrations are the best predictors when active transport is present. However, there is an urgent need to collect more relevant data for predicting active site concentrations in tissues with active transporters in their plasma membranes.

  2. Catalase evolved to concentrate H2O2 at its active site.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Laura; Sosa-Peinado, Alejandro; Hansberg, Wilhelm

    2010-08-01

    Catalase is a homo-tetrameric enzyme that has its heme active site deeply buried inside the protein. Its only substrate, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), reaches the heme through a 45 A-long channel. Large-subunit catalases, but not small-subunit catalases, have a loop (gate loop) that interrupts the major channel. Two accesses lead to a gate that opens the final section of the channel to the heme; gates from the R-related subunits are interconnected. Using molecular dynamic simulations of the Neurospora crassa catalase-1 tetramer in a box of water (48,600 molecules) or 6M H2O2, it is shown that the number of H2O2 molecules augments at the surface of the protein and in the accesses to the gate and the final section of the channel. Increase in H2O2 is due to the prevalence and distribution of amino acids that have an increased residency for H2O2 (mainly histidine, proline and charged residues), which are localized at the protein surface and the accesses to the gate. In the section of the channel from the heme to the gate, turnover rate of water molecules was faster than for H2O2 and increased residence sites for water and H2O2 were determined. In the presence of H2O2, the exclusion of water molecules from a specific site suggests a mechanism that could contend with the competing activity of water, allowing for catalase high kinetic efficiency.

  3. Dimethyl sulfoxide induced structural transformations and non-monotonic concentration dependence of conformational fluctuation around active site of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Roy, Susmita; Jana, Biman; Bagchi, Biman

    2012-03-21

    Experimental studies have observed significant changes in both structure and function of lysozyme (and other proteins) on addition of a small amount of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in aqueous solution. Our atomistic molecular dynamic simulations of lysozyme in water-DMSO reveal the following sequence of changes on increasing DMSO concentration. (i) At the initial stage (around 5% DMSO concentration) protein's conformational flexibility gets markedly suppressed. From study of radial distribution functions, we attribute this to the preferential solvation of exposed protein hydrophobic residues by the methyl groups of DMSO. (ii) In the next stage (10-15% DMSO concentration range), lysozome partially unfolds accompanied by an increase both in fluctuation and in exposed protein surface area. (iii) Between 15-20% concentration ranges, both conformational fluctuation and solvent accessible protein surface area suddenly decrease again indicating the formation of an intermediate collapse state. These results are in good agreement with near-UV circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence studies. We explain this apparently surprising behavior in terms of a structural transformation which involves clustering among the methyl groups of DMSO. (iv) Beyond 20% concentration of DMSO, the protein starts its final sojourn towards the unfolding state with further increase in conformational fluctuation and loss in native contacts. Most importantly, analysis of contact map and fluctuation near the active site reveal that both partial unfolding and conformational fluctuations are centered mostly on the hydrophobic core of active site of lysozyme. Our results could offer a general explanation and universal picture of the anomalous behavior of protein structure-function observed in the presence of cosolvents (DMSO, ethanol, tertiary butyl alcohol, dioxane) at their low concentrations.

  4. Plant/soil concentration ratios of 226Ra for contrasting sites around an active U mine-mill.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, S A; Whicker, F W

    1988-12-01

    Concentrations of 226Ra were determined in native vegetation and underlying substrate (soil and tailings) at various sites around a conventional open-pit, acid leach U production operation in Wyoming. Plant/soil concentration ratios (CRs) for 226Ra were estimated for various sites, including weathered tailings; a tailings impoundment shoreline; downwind from exposed tailings; a mine overburden reclamation area; and several background locations. Radium-226 concentrations for vegetation and substrate and CR values from the perturbed sites were elevated above background. The highest vegetation concentration (1.3 Bq g-1) was found in a grass which had invaded exposed, weathered tailings. Levels of 226Ra in soil and vegetation and CR values decreased with distance from the tailings impoundment edge. CR values varied significantly among sites, but few differences were found between plant species groups. The observed CR values ranged from 0.07 at the background and reclamation areas to 0.4 downwind from the tailings area. Average CR values for plants growing on exposed tailings and within one meter from the impoundment edge were 0.15 and 0.3, respectively. CR values of 226Ra for plants on tailings substrates were comparatively low in contrast to other radionuclides in the U chain. We speculate that in the case of sulfuric acid leached tailings-derived material, 226Ra is sequestered as sulfate, which is highly insoluble relative to the sulfates of the other elements (e.g., U and Th) resulting in reduced availability for plant uptake.

  5. List 9 - Active CERCLIS Sites:

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The List 9 displays the sequence of activities undertaken at active CERCLIS sites. An active site is one at which site assessment, removal, remedial, enforcement, cost recovery, or oversight activities are being planned or conducted.

  6. Methodology for calculating guideline concentrations for safety shot sites

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Residual plutonium (Pu), with trace quantities of depleted uranium (DU) or weapons grade uranium (WU), exists in surficial soils at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR), and the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) as the result of the above-ground testing of nuclear weapons and special experiments involving the detonation of plutonium-bearing devices. The special experiments (referred to as safety shots) involving plutonium-bearing devices were conducted to study the behavior of Pu as it was being explosively compressed; ensure that the accidental detonation of the chemical explosive in a production weapon would not result in criticality; evaluate the ability of personnel to manage large-scale Pu dispersal accidents; and develop criteria for transportation and storage of nuclear weapons. These sites do not pose a health threat to either workers or the general public because they are under active institutional control. The DOE is committed to remediating the safety shot sites so that radiation exposure to the public, both now and in the future, will be maintained within the established limits and be as low as reasonably achievable. Remediation requires calculation of a guideline concentration for the Pu, U, and their decay products that are present in the surface soil. This document presents the methodology for calculating guideline concentrations of weapons grade plutonium, weapons grade uranium, and depleted uranium in surface soils at the safety shot sites. Emphasis is placed on obtaining site-specific data for use in calculating dose to potential residents from the residual soil contamination.

  7. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Fungal Endophytes of Alpinia officinarum Rhizomes: Insights on Diversity and Variation across Growth Years, Growth Sites, and the Inner Active Chemical Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Shubin, Li; Juan, Huang; RenChao, Zhou; ShiRu, Xu; YuanXiao, Jin

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) technique, combined with the use of a clone library, was applied to assess the baseline diversity of fungal endophyte communities associated with rhizomes of Alpinia officinarum Hance, a medicinal plant with a long history of use. A total of 46 distinct T-RFLP fragment peaks were detected using HhaI or MspI mono-digestion-targeted, amplified fungal rDNA ITS sequences from A. officinarum rhizomes. Cloning and sequencing of representative sequences resulted in the detection of members of 10 fungal genera: Pestalotiopsis, Sebacina, Penicillium, Marasmius, Fusarium, Exserohilum, Mycoleptodiscus, Colletotrichum, Meyerozyma, and Scopulariopsis. The T-RFLP profiles revealed an influence of growth year of the host plant on fungal endophyte communities in rhizomes of this plant species; whereas, the geographic location where A. officinarum was grown contributed to only limited variation in the fungal endophyte communities of the host tissue. Furthermore, non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis across all of the rhizome samples showed that the fungal endophyte community assemblages in the rhizome samples could be grouped according to the presence of two types of active indicator chemicals: total volatile oils and galangin. Our present results, for the first time, address a diverse fungal endophyte community is able to internally colonize the rhizome tissue of A. officinarum. The diversity of the fungal endophytes found in the A. officinarum rhizome appeared to be closely correlated with the accumulation of active chemicals in the host plant tissue. The present study also provides the first systematic overview of the fungal endophyte communities in plant rhizome tissue using a culture-independent method. PMID:25536070

  9. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  10. Analysis of carbon dioxide concentration skewness at a rural site.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Isidro A; Sánchez, M Luisa; García, M Ángeles; Ozores, Marta; Pardo, Nuria

    2014-04-01

    This paper provides evidence that symmetry of CO2 concentration distribution may indicate sources or dispersive processes. Skewness was calculated by different procedures with CO2 measured at a rural site using a Picarro G1301 analyser over a two-year period. The usual skewness coefficient was considered together with fourteen robust estimators. A noticeable contrast was obtained between day and night, and skewness decreased linearly with the logarithm of the height. One coefficient was selected from its satisfactory relationship with the median concentration in daily evolution. Three analyses based on the kernel smoothing method were conducted with this coefficient to investigate its response to yearly and daily evolutions, wind direction, and wind speed. Left-skewed distributions were linked to thermal turbulence during midday, especially in spring-summer, or with high wind speeds. Almost symmetric distributions were associated with sources, such as the Valladolid City plume reinforced with spring emissions and the lack of emissions in summer in the remaining directions. Finally, right-skewed distributions were related to low wind speeds and stable stratification at night, furthered by strong emissions in spring. Skewness intervals were proposed and their average median concentrations were calculated such that the relationship between skewness and concentration depends on the analysis performed. Since some skewness coefficients may also be negative, they provide better information about sources or dispersive processes than concentration.

  11. Small mammal-heavy metal concentrations from mined and control sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, G.J.; Rongstad, O.J.

    1982-01-01

    Total body concentrations of zinc, copper, cadmium, lead, nickel, mercury and arsenic were determined for Peromyscus maniculatus and Microtus pennsylvanicus from an active zinc-copper mine near Timmins, Ontario, Canada, and a proposed zinc-copper mine near Crandon, Wisconsin, USA. Metal concentrations were evaluated with respect to area, species, sex and age groups. Metal concentrations in Peromyscus from the proposed mine site were not different from those collected in a third area where no mine or deposit exists. This is probably due to the 30 m of glacial material over the proposed mine site deposit. A statistical interaction between area, species, sex and age was observed for zinc and copper concentrations in small mammals we examined. Peromyscus from the mine site had consistently higher metal concentrations than Peromyscus from the control site. Greater total body cadmium and lead concentrations in adult?compared with juvenile?Peromyscus collected at the mine site suggests age-dependent accumulation of these toxic metals. Microtus did not exhibit this age-related response, and responded to other environmental metals more erratically and to a lesser degree. Differences in the response of these two species to environmental metal exposure may be due to differences in food habits. Nickel, mercury and arsenic concentrations in small mammals from the mine site were not different from controls. Heavy metal concentrations are also presented for Sorex cinereus, Blarina brevicauda and Zapus hudsonicus without respect to age and sex cohorts. Peromyscus may be a potentially important species for the monitoring of heavy metal pollution.

  12. Siting Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Mehos, M.; Owens, B.

    2005-01-01

    In 2002, Congress asked the U.S. Department of Energy to develop and scope out an initiative to fulfill the goal of having 1,000 megawatts (MW) of new parabolic trough, power tower, and dish engine solar capacity supplying the southwestern United States. In this paper, we present a review of the solar resource for Arizona, California, Nevada, and New Mexico. These four states have the greatest number of ''premium'' solar sites in the country and each has a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). We present information on the generation potential of the solar resources in these states. We also present regions within New Mexico that may be ideally suited for developing large-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) plants because of their proximity to load and their access to unconstrained transmission.

  13. Location analysis and strontium-90 concentrations in deer antlers on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, B L; Eberhardt, L E; Poston, T M

    1995-05-01

    The primary objective of this study was to examine the levels of strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) in deer antlers collected from near previously active reactor sites and distant from the reactor sites along that portion of the Columbia River which borders the Hanford Site. A second objective was to analyze the movements and home-ranges of mule deer residing within these areas and determine to what extent this information contributes to the observed {sup 90}Sr concentrations. {sup 90}Sr is a long-lived radionuclide (29.1 year half life) produced by fission in irradiated fuel in plutonium production reactors on the Hanford Site. It is also a major component of atmospheric fallout from weapons testing. Concentrations of radionuclides found in the developed environment onsite do not pose a health concern to humans or various wildlife routinely monitored. However, elevated levels of radionuclides in found biota may indicate routes of exposure requiring attention.

  14. DEMOLITIONS OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S CONCENTRATOR AND FINISHING FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Mcdonagh, P; Cathy Sizemore, C

    2007-01-17

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has produced Special Nuclear Materials (SNMs) starting in the early 1950's to the mid 1970's for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and from the mid 1970's to the present for the Department of Energy (DOE). In that time, over 1,000 facilities have been built in the sixteen (16) operational areas of the eight hundred (800) square kilometer site. Over the years, many of the facilities have been dispositioned by the DOE as inactive. In FY-03, DOE identified two hundred and forty-seven (247) (inactive or soon to be inactive) facilities that required demolition. Demolition work was scheduled to start in FY-04 and be completed in the first quarter of FY-07. Two-hundred and thirty-nine (239) of these facilities have been demolished employing Routine demolition techniques. This presentation reviews and discusses two (2) of the eight (8) Non-Routine demolitions Facilities, 420-D ''The Concentrator Facility'', and 421-D ''The Finishing Facility''.

  15. Measurements of particulate matter concentrations at a landfill site (Crete, Greece)

    SciTech Connect

    Chalvatzaki, E.; Kopanakis, I.; Kontaksakis, M.; Glytsos, T.; Kalogerakis, N.; Lazaridis, M.

    2010-11-15

    Large amounts of solid waste are disposed in landfills and the potential of particulate matter (PM) emissions into the atmosphere is significant. Particulate matter emissions in landfills are the result of resuspension from the disposed waste and other activities such as mechanical recycling and composting, waste unloading and sorting, the process of coating residues and waste transport by trucks. Measurements of ambient levels of inhalable particulate matter (PM{sub 10}) were performed in a landfill site located at Chania (Crete, Greece). Elevated PM{sub 10} concentrations were measured in the landfill site during several landfill operations. It was observed that the meteorological conditions (mainly wind velocity and temperature) influence considerably the PM{sub 10} concentrations. Comparison between the PM{sub 10} concentrations at the landfill and at a PM{sub 10} background site indicates the influence of the landfill activities on local concentrations at the landfill. No correlation was observed between the measurements at the landfill and the background sites. Finally, specific preventing measures are proposed to control the PM concentrations in landfills.

  16. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  17. Demolitions of the Savannah River Site's concentrator and finishing facilities

    SciTech Connect

    McDonagh, Paul

    2008-01-15

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has produced Special Nuclear Materials (SNMs) starting in the early 1950's to the mid 1970's for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and from the mid 1970's to the present for the Department of Energy (DOE). In that time, over 1,000 facilities have been built in the sixteen operational areas of the eight hundred square kilometer site. Over the years, many of the facilities have been dispositioned by the DOE as inactive. In FY-03, DOE identified two hundred and forty-seven (inactive or soon to be inactive) facilities that required demolition. Demolition work was scheduled to start in FY-04 and be completed in the first quarter of FY-07. Two-hundred and thirty-nine of these facilities have been demolished employing Routine demolition techniques. This presentation reviews and discusses two of the eight Non-Routine demolitions Facilities, 420-D 'The Concentrator Facility', and 421-D 'The Finishing Facility'. Facilities 420-D and 421-D were toppled by attaching rigging from the structural steel building frame to bulldozers and toppling the facilities over. The greatest advantage of this method is that it employs equipment that is on hand at SRS, saving time on locating and leasing offsite equipment as well as operator training. In addition, although the toppled structure does not land in the original facilities footprint, it does land in a contained area that is easily barricaded to prevent access during the operation. There are several disadvantages. First, there must be adequate area for the structure to topple into. Also if the wire rope size required to topple the structure is larger than two in., the ropes become extremely difficult to work with. Lastly, the yield strength of steel members is guaranteed by the manufacturer as a minimum strength, so its ultimate strength is unknown. This requires extremely conservative specifications sizing the bulldozers and any rigging equipment employed. Two hundred and forty-seven facilities have

  18. GAMMA DETECTOR RESPONSE/SOIL CONCENTRATION CORRELATION STUDY AT THE AAR MANUFACTURING, INC. SITE, LIVONIA, MICHIGAN

    SciTech Connect

    ALTIC, NICK A

    2013-03-22

    At the NRC's request, ORAU conducted surveys of the AAR Manufacturing site during the period of September 25 through September 27, 2012. The survey activities included walkover surveys and sampling activities. Once the survey team was onsite, the NRC personnel decided to forgo survey activities in the New Addition and the pickling area. Areas of the planned study boundary were inaccessible due to overgrowth/large pieces of concrete covering the soil surface; therefore, the study boundary was redefined. Gamma walkover scans of the site boundary and front yard identified multiple areas of elevated gamma radiation. As a result, two judgmental samples were collected. Sample results were above thorium background levels The answer to the PSQ relating to the relationship between thorium concentration in soil and NaI instrument response is Yes. NaI instrument response can be used as a predictor of Th-232 concentration in the 0 to 1 m layer. An R2 value of 0.79 was determined for the surface soil relationship, thus satisfying the DQOs. Moreover, the regression was cross-checked by comparing the predicted Th-232 soil core concentration to the average Th-232 concentration (Section 5.3.2). Based on the cross-check, the regression equation provides a reasonable estimate for the Th-232 concentration at the judgmental locations. Consideration must be given when applying this equation to other soil areas of the site. If the contamination was heterogeneously distributed, and not distributed in a discrete layer as it was in the study area, then using the regression equation to predict Th-232 concentration would not be applicable.

  19. Photovoltaic concentrator assembly with optically active cover

    DOEpatents

    Plesniak, Adam P

    2014-01-21

    A photovoltaic concentrator assembly that includes a housing that defines an internal volume and includes a rim, wherein the rim defines an opening into the internal volume, a photovoltaic cell positioned in the internal volume, and an optical element that includes an optically active body and a flange extending outward from the body, wherein the flange is sealingly engaged with the rim of the housing to enclose the internal volume.

  20. SITE SPECIFIC REFERENCE PERSON PARAMETERS AND DERIVED CONCENTRATION STANDARDS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Jannik, T.

    2013-03-14

    The purpose of this report is twofold. The first is to develop a set of behavioral parameters for a reference person specific for the Savannah River Site (SRS) such that the parameters can be used to determine dose to members of the public in compliance with Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 “Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment.” A reference person is a hypothetical, gender and age aggregation of human physical and physiological characteristics arrived at by international consensus for the purpose of standardizing radiation dose calculations. DOE O 458.1 states that compliance with the annual dose limit of 100 mrem (1 mSv) to a member of the public may be demonstrated by calculating the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) or to a representative person. Historically, for dose compliance, SRS has used the MEI concept, which uses adult dose coefficients and adult male usage parameters. Beginning with the 2012 annual site environmental report, SRS will be using the representative person concept for dose compliance. The dose to a representative person will be based on 1) the SRS-specific reference person usage parameters at the 95th percentile of appropriate national or regional data, which are documented in this report, 2) the reference person (gender and age averaged) ingestion and inhalation dose coefficients provided in DOE Derived Concentration Technical Standard (DOE-STD-1196-2011), and 3) the external dose coefficients provided in the DC_PAK3 toolbox. The second purpose of this report is to develop SRS-specific derived concentration standards (DCSs) for all applicable food ingestion pathways, ground shine, and water submersion. The DCS is the concentration of a particular radionuclide in water, in air, or on the ground that results in a member of the public receiving 100 mrem (1 mSv) effective dose following continuous exposure for one year. In DOE-STD-1196-2011, DCSs were developed for the ingestion of water, inhalation of

  1. Site-Specific Reference Person Parameters and Derived Concentration Standards for the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Daniel K.; Higley, Kathryn A.; Jannik, G. Timothy

    2014-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Order 458.1 states that the compliance with the 1 mSv annual dose constraint to a member of the public may be demonstrated by calculating dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) or to a representative person. Historically, the MEI concept was used for dose compliance at the Savannah River Site (SRS) using adult dose coefficients and adult male usage parameters. For future compliance, SRS plans to use the representative person concept for dose estimates to members of the public. The representative person dose will be based on the reference person dose coefficients from the U.S. DOE Derived Concentration Technical Standard and on usage parameters specific to SRS for the reference and typical person. Usage parameters and dose coefficients were determined for inhalation, ingestion and external exposure pathways. The parameters for the representative person were used to calculate and tabulate SRS-specific derived concentration standards (DCSs) for the pathways not included in DOE-STD-1196-2011.

  2. Site-Specific Reference Person Parameters and Derived Concentration Standards for the Savannah River Site

    DOE PAGES

    Stone, Daniel K.; Higley, Kathryn A.; Jannik, G. Timothy

    2014-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Order 458.1 states that the compliance with the 1 mSv annual dose constraint to a member of the public may be demonstrated by calculating dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) or to a representative person. Historically, the MEI concept was used for dose compliance at the Savannah River Site (SRS) using adult dose coefficients and adult male usage parameters. For future compliance, SRS plans to use the representative person concept for dose estimates to members of the public. The representative person dose will be based on the reference person dose coefficients from the U.S.more » DOE Derived Concentration Technical Standard and on usage parameters specific to SRS for the reference and typical person. Usage parameters and dose coefficients were determined for inhalation, ingestion and external exposure pathways. The parameters for the representative person were used to calculate and tabulate SRS-specific derived concentration standards (DCSs) for the pathways not included in DOE-STD-1196-2011.« less

  3. Concentration and temperature effects on ovostatin activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriarity, Debra M.

    1994-01-01

    Light scattering experiments performed at Mississippi State University using MSFC ovostatin preparations indicated that at low ovostatin concentrations, below 0.2 mg/ml, the protein was dissociating from a tetramer into dimers. Since the proposed mechanism of action involved the tetrameric form of the protein, we hypothesized that perhaps under the conditions of our assays at various O/T ratios the ovostatin was becoming dissociated into an inactive dimer. To examine this possibility we assayed the ovostatin activity as a function of ovostatin concentration and of temperature of the assay. Data are presented that show the results of these assays at 23 C, 30 C, 37 C and 42 C respectively. The data are highly suggestive that there is a decrease in ovostatin activity as the concentration of the protein falls below 0.06 mg/ml. This may not be of any physiological importance, however, since the concentration of ovostatin in the egg is about 0.5 mg/ml. Curiously, the dissociation of the tetramer into dimers does not show a significant temperature dependence as would be expected for an equilibrium reaction. Whether this is in fact the case, or whether the differences are so small as to not be discerned from the current data remains to be seen. Another aspect to consider is that in the egg the primary role of the ovostatin may or may not be as a protease inhibitor. Although the inhibition of collagenase by ovostatin may be an important aspect of embryogenesis, it is also possible that it functions as a binding protein for some substance. In this regard, all ovostatin preparations from MSFC have shown an approximately 88,000 MW protein associated with the ovostatin. The identity of this protein is not currently known and may be the subject of future studies.

  4. Carisoprodol concentrations from different anatomical sites: three overdose cases.

    PubMed

    Backer, R C; Zumwalt, R; McFeeley, P; Veasey, S; Wohlenberg, N

    1990-01-01

    Three cases involving overdoses of carisoprodol are presented. Concentrations of carisoprodol and its major metabolite meprobamate, were determined in urine, vitreous humor, heart, and femoral blood. All drugs were quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS).

  5. Site-specific reference person parameters and derived concentration standards for the Savannah River Site.

    PubMed

    Stone, Daniel K; Higley, Kathryn A; Jannik, G Timothy

    2014-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Order 458.1 states that the compliance with the 1 mSv annual dose constraint to a member of the public may be demonstrated by calculating dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) or to a representative person. Historically, the MEI concept was used for dose compliance at the Savannah River Site (SRS) using adult dose coefficients and adult male usage parameters. For future compliance, SRS plans to use the representative person concept for dose estimates to members of the public. The representative person dose will be based on the reference person dose coefficients from the U.S. DOE Derived Concentration Technical Standard and on usage parameters specific to SRS for the reference and typical person. Usage parameters and dose coefficients were determined for inhalation, ingestion and external exposure pathways. The reference intake for air, water, meat, dairy, freshwater fish, saltwater invertebrates, produce (fruits and vegetables), and grains for the 95th percentile are 17.4 m d, 2.19 L d, 220.6 g d, 674 cm d, 66.4 g d, 23.0 g d, 633.4 g d (448.5 g dand 631.7 g d) and 251.3 g d, respectively. For the 50th percentile: 13.4 m d, 0.809 L d, 86.4 g d, 187 cm d, 8.97 g d, 3.04 g d, 169.5 g d (45.9 g d and 145.6 g d), 101.3 g d, respectively. These parameters for the representative person were used to calculate and tabulate SRS-specific derived concentration standards (DCSs) for the pathways not included in DOE-STD-1196-2011.

  6. Regulatory site of inorganic pyrophosphatase. Nonhyperbolic kinetics of enzymatic reaction at low substrate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, A.R.; Baikov, A.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-08-10

    The initial rate of PP/sub 1/ hydrolysis by inorganic pyrophosphatase from baker's yeast was analyzed as a function of the concentrations of the Mg-PP/sub 1/ complex (substrate) and Mg/sup 2 +/ ions (activator) at substrate concentrations down to 0.1 ..mu..M. Lineweaver-Burk plots for the enzyme in equilibrium with Mg/sup 2 +/ ions were nonlinear at fixed Mg/sup 2 +/ concentrations, which cannot be explained within the framework of previously proposed models of the reaction. The nonlinearity is retained for the monomeric form of the enzyme and indicates that the enzyme has a regulatory site capable of tightly binding free PP/sub 1/ (K/sub d/ approx. 0.02 ..mu..M). A new model of the reaction is proposed in which Mg-PP/sub 1/, PP/sub 1/, and Mg/sup 2 +/ are bound to the enzyme in random order and filling of the regulatory site decreases the dissociation constant of the protein-Mg complex from 4.7 to 0.025 mM. It was concluded that PP/sub 1/ and Mg/sup 2 +/ are regulators of pyrophosphatase activity under physiological conditions.

  7. Element concentrations in growth rings of trees near an abandoned wood-preserving plant site at Jackson, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yanosky, T.M.; Carmichael, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    were detected in a silver maple growing next to the willow, but not in another silver maple growing 150 meters farther to the west. An oak growing in the southwestern part of the study area contained large concentrations of calcium and several trace elements, and some trees south of the abandoned site contained large concentrations of phosphorus or potassium. Concentrations of trace metals and nutrients in some trees may be related to wood-preserving activities at the site and possibly to remedial efforts conducted during the early to mid 1980's.However, the possibility cannot be discounted that large concentrations of some elements are from sources other than the wood-preserving facility, or in part from flooding of the South Fork Forked Deer River.

  8. Corrosion Research And Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  9. Corrosion Research and Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  10. Micelles Protect and Concentrate Activated Acetic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Zoe; House, C.

    2014-01-01

    As more and more exoplanets are discovered and the habitability of such planets is considered, one can turn to searching for the origin of life on Earth in order to better understand what makes a habitable planet. Activated acetic acid, or methyl thioacetate, has been proposed to be central to the origin of life on Earth, and also as an important energy currency molecule in early cellular evolution. We have investigated the hydrolysis of methyl thioacetate under various conditions. Its uncatalyzed rate of hydrolysis is about three orders of magnitude faster (K = 0.00663 s^-1; 100°C, pH 7.5, concentration = 0.33mM) than published rates for its catalyzed production making it unlikely to accumulate under prebiotic conditions. However, we also observed that methyl thioacetate was protected from hydrolysis when inside its own hydrophobic droplets. We found that methyl thioacetate protection from hydrolysis was also possible in droplets of hexane and in the membranes of nonanoic acid micelles. Thus, the hydrophobic regions of prebiotic micelles and early cell membranes could have offered a refuge for this energetic molecule increasing its lifetime in close proximity to the reactions for which it would be needed. Methyl thioacetate could thus be important for the origin of life on Earth and perhaps for better understanding the potential habitability of other planets.

  11. Concentrations of radionuclides in terrestrial vegetation on the Hanford site of potential interest to Native Americans

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, T.M.

    1995-03-01

    Concentrations of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs in Carey`s balsamroot (Balsamorhiza careyana) and Gray`s desert parsley (Lomatium grayi) were similar to concentrations observed in other plants collected on the Hanford Site and from offsite locations surrounding the Site as part of annual Hanford Site surveillance. Observed concentrations may be attributed to historic fallout more than to Hanford Site emissions, although the observation that 200 Area plants had slightly higher concentrations of {sup 137}Cs than 100 Area plants is consistent with other monitoring data of radioactivity in soil and vegetation collected onsite. The present concentrations of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs in balsamroot and parsley fluctuate around background levels with some of the higher observed concentrations of {sup 90}Sr found on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve. Analytical results and summary statistics by species and location are presented in the appendixes.

  12. Quantitative analysis of changes in blood concentrations and 'presumed effect-site concentration' of sevoflurane during one-lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Matsuse, S; Hara, Y; Ohkura, T; Yahagi, N

    2012-10-01

    During one-lung ventilation, ventilation-perfusion mismatch decreases the arterial concentration of inhaled anaesthetics due to the arterial-to-venous concentration difference. This study tested the hypothesis that in humans, the 'presumed effect-site concentration' (taken as the mid-point between the arterial and superior jugular venous concentrations) of inhaled anaesthetic falls during one-lung (vs two-lung) ventilation. Four patients scheduled for elective prostatectomy (two-lung ventilation) and four patients for elective thoracotomy (one-lung ventilation) were randomly selected and assigned to receive sevoflurane (vaporiser-dial setting, 1.5%). Sevoflurane concentrations were measured periodically from radial artery and superior jugular vein (via a catheter advanced cephalad from the jugular vein). During one-lung ventilation, the end-expiratory sevoflurane concentration was stable at ∼1.3% but the mean (SD) presumed effect-site concentration declined initially from 58 (6.7) to 43 (4.7) μg.ml(-1) (p=0.011) before slowly recovering. A period of insufficient depth of anaesthesia is thus a risk during one-lung ventilation.

  13. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  14. [Structural regularities in activated cleavage sites of thrombin receptors].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlik, I V; Verevka, S V

    1999-01-01

    Comparison of thrombin receptors activation splitting sites sequences testifies to their similarity both in activation splitting sites of protein precursors and protein proteinase inhibitors reactive sites. In all these sites corresponded to effectory sites P2'-positions are placed by hydrophobic amino-acids only. The regularity defined conforms with previous thesis about the role of effectory S2'-site in regulation of the processes mediated by serine proteinases.

  15. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  16. Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations and Emission Rates in New Manufactured and Site-Built Houses

    SciTech Connect

    Armin Rudd

    2008-10-30

    This study was conducted with the primary objective of characterizing and comparing the airborne concentrations and the emission rates of total VOCs and selected individual VOCs, including formaldehyde, among a limited number of new manufactured and site-built houses.

  17. BOREAS TGB-1 CH4 Concentration and Flux Data from NSA Tower Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Crill, Patrick; Varner, Ruth K.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-1 team made numerous measurements of trace gas concentrations and fluxes at various NSA sites. This data set contains half-hourly averages of ambient methane (CH4) measurements and calculated fluxes for the NSA-Fen in 1996 and the NSA-BP and NSA-OJP tower sites in 1994. The purpose of this study was to determine the CH4 flux from the study area by measuring ambient CH 4 concentrations. This flux can then be compared to the chamber flux measurements taken at the same sites. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files.

  18. A qualitative evaluation of radionuclide concentrations in Hanford Site Wildlife, 1983 through 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, T.M.; Cooper, A.T.

    1994-10-01

    Environmental monitoring has been conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State since 1945. Fish and wildlife have been monitored since 1945, however, a major emphasis on mammals did not occur until the 1970s. This report focuses on the 10-year period from 1983 through 1992. The objectives of this report are to evaluate {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs concentrations in Site wildlife populations and, when possible, evaluate trends in concentrations over this period of time. No distinct trends in radionuclide concentrations were apparent in most species sampled. Many measurements were at or below the analytical limit of detection. This evaluation found that concentrations of {sup 90}Sr in rabbit and deer bone were elevated in animals collected from areas adjacent to industrialized areas. Similarly, radionuclide concentrations in duck muscle from waterfowl collected at B Pond were elevated with {sup 137}Cs when compared to background concentrations. None of the measured concentrations were high enough to pose any risk to theoretical human consumers of game animals inhabiting the Hanford Site. Estimates of the annual dose from the consumption of 40 kg (88 lb) of Hanford Site wildlife were less than 0.001 times the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements and the DOE guideline of 100 mrem/yr.

  19. Root and foliar nutrient concentrations in loblolly pine: Effects of season, site, and fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.B. ); Campbell, R.G. ); Allen, H.L.; Davey, C.B. )

    1987-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations in the roots and foliage of plantation-grown loblolly pine were examined over a period of 18 months. Samples were collected from 4 sites on the lower coastal plain of North Carolina, each representing a distinct combination of soil moisture and soil fertility. The patterns in foliar and root nutrient concentrations followed similar trends over the course of this study. However, seasonal trends were irregular, suggesting that annual climatic variation may affect seasonal nutrient levels. Nutrient concentrations varied among sites, as did effects of fertilization (225 kg N ha{sup {minus}1}, 225 kg N ha{sup {minus}1} + 75 kg P ha{sup {minus}1}) on nutrient concentrations. Significant fertilizer effects on nutrient concentrations did not always result in increased volume growth. On some sites, root N and P concentrations appeared to be more sensitive to fertilizer-induced changes than did foliar nutrient levels and may have integrated site factors more effectively than foliar concentrations. Foliage seemed more sensitive of N deficiencies, while the roots detected P deficiencies more often.

  20. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-04

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases.

  1. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases. PMID:22020126

  2. Archaeological Activity Report: Post-Review Discoveries Within 45BN431 at Solid Waste Site 128-F-2

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Marceau; J. J. Sharpe

    2006-12-21

    During monitoring of remedial activities at Solid Waste Site 128-F-2 on August 19, 2005, a concentration of mussel shell was discovered in the west wall of a trench in the northen section of the waste site.

  3. Trends in suspended-sediment concentration at selected stream sites in Kansas, 1970-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Putnam, James E.; Pope, Larry M.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of erosion, transport, and deposition of sediment relative to streams and impoundments is important to those involved directly or indirectly in the development and management of water resources. Monitoring the quantity of sediment in streams and impoundments is important because: (1) sediment may degrade the water quality of streams for such uses as municipal water supply, (2) sediment is detrimental to the health of some species of aquatic animals and plants, and (3) accumulation of sediment in water-supply impoundments decreases the amount of storage and, therefore, water available for users. One of the objectives of the Kansas Water Plan is to reduce the amount of sediment in Kansas streams by 2010. During the last 30 years, millions of dollars have been spent in Kansas watersheds to reduce sediment transport to streams. Because the last evaluation of trends in suspended-sediment concentrations in Kansas was completed in 1985, 14 sediment sampling sites that represent 10 of the 12 major river basins in Kansas were reestablished in 2000. The purpose of this report is to present the results of time-trend analyses at the reestablished sediment data-collection sites for the period of about 1970?2002 and to evaluate changes in the watersheds that may explain the trends. Time-trend tests for 13 of 14 sediment sampling sites in Kansas for the period from about 1970 to 2002 indicated that 3 of the 13 sites tested had statistically significant decreasing suspended-sediment concentrations; however, only 2 sites, Walnut River at Winfield and Elk River at Elk Falls, had trends that were statistically significant at the 0.05 probability level. Increasing suspended-sediment concentrations were indicated at three sites although none were statistically significant at the 0.05 probability level. Samples from five of the six sampling sites located upstream from reservoirs indicated decreasing suspended-sediment concentrations. Watershed impoundments located in the

  4. Classical Nuclear Hormone Receptor Activity as a Mediator of Complex Concentration Response Relationships for Endocrine Active Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Cookman, Clifford J.; Belcher, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Nonmonotonic concentration response relationships are frequently observed for endocrine active ligands that act via nuclear receptors. The curve of best fit for nonmonotonic concentration response relationships are often inverted U-shaped with effects at intermediate concentrations that are different from effects at higher or lower concentrations. Cytotoxicity is a major mode of action responsible for inverted U-shaped concentration response relationships. However, evidence suggests that ligand selectivity, activation of multiple molecular targets, concerted regulation of multiple opposing endpoints, and multiple ligand binding sites within nuclear receptors also contribute to nonmonotonic concentration response relationships of endocrine active ligands. This review reports the current understanding of mechanisms involved in classical nuclear receptor mediated nonmonotonic concentration response relationships with a focus on studies published between 2012 and 2014. PMID:25299165

  5. Radionuclide concentrations in terrestrial vegetation and soil on and around the Hanford Site, 1983 through 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, T.M.; Antonio, E.J.; Cooper, A.T.

    1995-08-01

    This report reviews concentrations of {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, U isotopes, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am in soil and vegetation samples collected from 1983 through 1993 during routine surveillance of the Hanford Site. Sampling locations were grouped in study areas associated with operational areas on the Site. While radionuclide concentrations were very low and representative of background concentrations from historic fallout, some study areas on the Site contained slightly elevated concentrations compared to other study areas onsite and offsite. The 100 Areas had concentrations of {sup 60}Co comparable to the minimum detectable concentration of 0.02 pCi/g in soil. Concentrations of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am in 200 Area soils were slightly elevated. The 300 Area had a slight elevation of U in soil. These observations were expected because many of the sampling locations were selected to monitor specific facilities or operations at the operational areas. Generally, concentrations of the radionuclides studied were greater and more readily measured in soil samples compared to vegetation samples. The general pattern of concentrations of radionuclide concentrations in vegetation by area mirrored that observed in soil. Declines in {sup 90}Sr in soil appear to be attributed to radioactive decay and possibly downward migration out of the sampling horizon. The other radionuclides addressed in this report strongly sorb to soil and are readily retained in surface soil. Because of their long half-lives compared to the length of the study period, there was no significant indication that concentrations of U isotopes and Pu isotopes were decreasing over time.

  6. Statistical distributions of airborne PCB and pesticide concentrations measured at regional sites on the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Gatz, D.F.; Sweet, C.W.; Basu, I.; Harlin, K.S.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to report results of testing measured concentrations of total PCBs and ten chlorinated pesticides in air and precipitation in the Great Lakes area for goodness-of-fit to the log normal distribution. Samples were collected at sites on Lakes Superior, Michigan, Erie, and Ontario in 1991--1993. With very few exceptions, distributions of concentrations in the gas and particle phases and in precipitation were not significantly different from log normal.

  7. Mercury Concentrations in Birds from Two Atmospherically Contaminated Sites in North Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Schulwitz, Sarah E; Chumchal, Matthew M; Johnson, Jeff A

    2015-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous and highly toxic contaminant that can have negative effects on wildlife. Only a few studies have measured Hg concentrations in birds from the south central United States, and the potential threat of Hg contamination to birds in this region is largely unknown. In the present study, we assess Hg concentrations in blood and feathers from five bird species [eastern bluebird (Sialis sialis), Carolina wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus), wood duck (Aix sponsa), great egret (Ardea alba), and great blue heron (Ardea herodias)] that occupy different trophic levels at Caddo Lake and Lewisville Lake, located in northeast and north central Texas, respectively. Both sites are contaminated with Hg from the atmosphere. Adult passerines had higher Hg concentrations in their blood than conspecific nestlings. Mercury concentrations in feathers differed between species by more than an order of magnitude with large piscivorous species having higher concentrations than smaller insectivorous species. Mercury concentrations in eastern bluebirds were higher at Caddo Lake than Lewisville Lake. The present study represents one of the first studies of Hg concentrations in multiple bird species in north Texas and suggests that Hg concentrations in birds from atmospherically polluted sites in this region may be high enough to compromise fitness in those species.

  8. Ambient airborne solids concentrations including volcanic ash at Hanford, Washington sampling sites subsequent to the Mount St. Helens eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehmel, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    Airborne solids concentrations were measured on a near daily basis at two Hanford, Washington sites after the eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980. These sites are about 211 km east of Mount St. Helens. Collected airborne solids included resuspended volcanic ash plus normal ambient solids. Average airborne solids concentrations were greater at the Hanford meteorological station sampling site which is 24 km northwest of the Horn Rapids dam sampling site. These increased concentrations reflect the sampling site proximity to greater ash fallout depths. Both sites are in low ash fallout areas although the Hanford meteorological station site is closer to the greater ash fallout areas. Airborne solids concentrations were decreased by rain, but airborne solids concentrations rapidly increased as surfaces dried. Airborne concentrations tended to become nearly the same at both sampling sites only for July 12 and 13.

  9. Factors influencing the atmospheric concentrations of PCBs at an abandoned e-waste recycling site in South China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Wu, Xiaowei; Hou, Minmin; Zhao, Hongxia; Chen, Ruize; Luo, Chunling; Zhang, Gan

    2017-02-01

    The diurnal atmospheric concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were investigated at an abandoned e-waste recycling site in South China during winter and summer. Total PCB concentrations during winter and summer were 27.6-212 and 368-1704pg/m(3) in the particulate phase and 270-697 and 3000-15,500pg/m(3) in the gaseous phase, respectively. Both gaseous and particulate PCB concentrations and compositions exhibited significant difference between winter and summer samples, but no diurnal variations during the measurement period. The correlation analysis between PCB concentrations and meteorological conditions, including atmospheric temperature, humidity, and mixing layer height, suggested that the seasonal variability of atmospheric PCB concentrations was strongly temperature-dependent, while the diurnal variability was probably source-dependent. The temperature-driven variations can also be proved by the significant linear correlation between ln P and 1/T in the Clausius-Clapeyron plot. Although government has implemented controls to reduce e-waste pollution, both the relatively high concentrations of PCBs and the diurnal variation in the air suggested that emissions from occasional e-waste recycling activities may still exist in this recycling area. These results underline the importance of continuing e-waste recycling site management long after abandonment.

  10. Radionuclide concentrations in agricultural products near the Hanford Site, 1982 through 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, E.J.

    1994-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed monitoring data for agricultural products collected from 1982 through 1992 near the Hanford Site to determine radionuclide concentration trends. While samples were collected and analyzed, and results reported annual in Hanford Site environmental reports, an 11-year data set was reviewed for this report to increase the ability to assess trends and potential Hanford effects. Products reviewed included milk, chicken, eggs, beef, vegetables, fruit, wine, wheat, and alfalfa. To determine which radionuclides were detected sufficiently often to permit analysis for trends and effects, each radionuclide concentration and its associated uncertainty were ratioed. Radionuclides were considered routinely detectable if more than 50% of the ratios were between zero and one. Data for these radionuclides were then analyzed statistically, using analyses of variance. The statistical analyses indicated the following: for the most part, there were no measurable effects for Hanford operations; radionuclide concentrations in all products reviewed remained relatively low when compared to concentrations that would result in a 1-mrem effective dose equivalent to an individual; radionuclide concentrations are decreasing in general; however, {sup 90}Sr concentrations in all media and {sup 129}I in milk increased from 1982 to 1986, then decreased gradually for the remainder of the review period. The {sup 129}I concentrations may be correlated with processing of irradiated reactor fuel at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant.

  11. Comparison of mercury concentrations measured at several sites in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemr, F.; Angot, H.; Dommergue, A.; Magand, O.; Barret, M.; Weigelt, A.; Ebinghaus, R.; Brunke, E.-G.; Pfaffhuber, K. A.; Edwards, G.; Howard, D.; Powell, J.; Keywood, M.; Wang, F.

    2015-03-01

    Our knowledge of the distribution of mercury concentrations in air of the Southern Hemisphere was until recently based mostly on intermittent measurements made during ship cruises. In the last few years continuous mercury monitoring has commenced at several sites in the Southern Hemisphere, providing new and more refined information. In this paper we compare mercury measurements at several remote sites in the Southern Hemisphere made over a period of at least 1 year at each location. Averages of monthly medians show similar although small seasonal variations at both Cape Point and Amsterdam Island. A pronounced seasonal variation at Troll research station in Antarctica is due to frequent mercury depletion events in the austral spring. Due to large scatter and large standard deviations of monthly average median mercury concentrations at Cape Grim, no systematic seasonal variation could be found there. Nevertheless, the annual average mercury concentrations at all sites during the 2007-2013 period varied only between 0.85 and 1.05 ng m-3. Part of this variability is likely due to systematic measurement uncertainties which we propose can be further reduced by improved calibration procedures. We conclude that mercury is much more uniformly distributed throughout the Southern Hemisphere than the distributions suggested by measurements made onboard ships. This finding implies that smaller trends can be detected in shorter time periods. We also report a change in the trend sign at Cape Point from decreasing mercury concentrations in 1996-2004 to increasing concentrations since 2007.

  12. Complex Spontaneous Flows and Concentration Banding in Active Polar Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giomi, Luca; Marchetti, M. Cristina; Liverpool, Tanniemola B.

    2008-11-01

    We study the dynamical properties of active polar liquid crystalline films. Like active nematic films, active polar films undergo a dynamical transition to spontaneously flowing steady states. Spontaneous flow in polar fluids is, however, always accompanied by strong concentration inhomogeneities or “banding” not seen in nematics. In addition, a spectacular property unique to polar active films is their ability to generate spontaneously oscillating and banded flows even at low activity. The oscillatory flows become increasingly complicated for strong polarity.

  13. Analysis of radionuclide concentrations and movement patterns of Hanford-site mule deer

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhardt, L.E.; Hanson, E.E.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1982-10-01

    From 1980 through 1982, the movements of 37 radio-collared mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) were monitored for periods of 3 to 17 months on the Handord Site in southcentral Washington. The objectives were to compare radionuclide concentrations in deer residing near the 200 Area waste management sites with concentrations in deer occupying areas remote from waste management sites and to document movement patterns of Hanford Site deer with particular emphasis on offsite movements. Cesium-137 in deer muscle and liver and /sup 90/Sr concentrations in deer bone were statistically higher in deer living near the 200 Area than in control animals. During this study, the highest concentrations of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr in 200 Area deer were in those individuals residing in or immediately adjacent to radiation zones. Cesium-137 and /sup 90/Sr concentrations were more variable in deer residing near the 200 Area than in control animals, where only background (fallout) levels were observed. Movement patterns of Hanford site deer were analyzed to determine home range size and usage. The average home range was 0.39 +- 27 km/sup 2/. In addition, ten (27%) of the monitored deer made offsite movements during the study period. While most of these movements were made in the spring and summer, some fall and winter movements were noted. It was estimated that approximately 8% (95% confidence interval is from 0 to 21%) of the Hanford deer herd is harvested each year. As a result of the low harvest rate, the Hanford deer herd appears to have a disproportionate number of older animals, with 24% of the 17 examined deer older than 10.5 years.

  14. Radionuclide Concentrations in Terrestrial Vegetation and Soil Samples On and Around the Hanford Site, 1971 Through 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Mary Ann; Poston, Ted M.; Fritz, Brad G.; Bisping, Lynn E.

    2011-07-29

    Environmental monitoring is conducted on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to comply with DOE Orders and federal and state regulations. Major objectives of the monitoring are to characterize contaminant levels in the environment and to determine site contributions to the contaminant inventory. This report focuses on surface soil and perennial vegetation samples collected between 1971 and 2008 as part of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Surface Environmental Surveillance Project performed under contract to DOE. Areas sampled under this program are located on the Hanford Site but outside facility boundaries and on public lands surrounding the Hanford Site. Additional samples were collected during the past 8 years under DOE projects that evaluated parcels of land for radiological release. These data were included because the same sampling methodology and analytical laboratory were used for the projects. The spatial and temporal trends of six radionuclides collected over a 38-year period were evaluated. The radionuclides----cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239/240, and uranium (reported either as uranium-238 or total uranium)----were selected because they persist in the environment and are still being monitored routinely and reported in Hanford Site environmental reports. All these radionuclides were associated with plutonium production and waste management of activities occurring on the site. Other sources include fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, which ended in 1980, and the Chernobyl explosion in 1986. Uranium is also a natural component of the soil. This assessment of soil and vegetation data provides important information on the distribution of radionuclides in areas adjacent to industrial areas, established perimeter locations and buffer areas, and more offsite nearby and distant locations. The concentrations reflect a tendency for detection of some radionuclides close to where they were

  15. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  16. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  17. Changes in HTO and OBT activity concentrations in the Perch Lake aquatic ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Farrow, F; Bredlaw, M; Stuart, M

    2016-12-01

    Perch Lake, a small shallow shield lake located on the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site, contains elevated levels of tritium due to inputs from a nearby nuclear waste management area. The releases have been going on for many years but tritium levels in Perch Lake have been gradually decreasing since about year 2000. Lake water, sediments, aquatic plants, clams and fish were collected during the summer and fall of 2003 and 2013 at three locations in the lake. HTO activity concentrations were measured in all samples and OBT activity concentrations were measured in sediments, plants, clams and fish. In 2003, 2013, HTO activity concentrations in lake water were roughly uniform in time and space, except close to the shoreline where concentrations were fluctuating according to stream water and groundwater tritium levels in streams entering the lake. HTO activity concentrations of biota were similar to concentrations in lake water at the site where they were collected. OBT activity concentrations in biota were not always correlating with the lake water HTO levels. OBT to HTO ratios were found to be less than 1 for aquatic plants, around 1 for clams and fish and above 1 for birds reared on the shore of the lake.

  18. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  19. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  20. Ambient aerosol concentrations of sugars and sugar-alcohols at four different sites in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Dye, C.; Kiss, G.

    2007-08-01

    Sugars and sugar-alcohols are demonstrated to be important constituents of the ambient aerosol water-soluble organic carbon fraction, and to be tracers for primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP). In the present study, levels of four sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose, trehalose) and three sugar-alcohols (arabitol, inositol, mannitol) in ambient aerosols have been quantified using a novel HPLC/HRMS-TOF (High Performance Liquid Chromatography in combination with High Resolution Mass Spectrometry - Time of Flight) method to assess the contribution of PBAP to PM>sub>10 and PM2.5. Samples were collected at four sites in Norway at different times of the year in order to reflect the various contributing sources and the spatial and seasonal variation of the selected compounds. Sugars and sugar-alcohols were present at all sites investigated, underlining the ubiquity of these highly polar organic compounds. The highest concentrations were reported for sucrose, reaching a maximum concentration of 320 ng m-3 in PM10 and 55 ng m-3 in PM2.5. The mean concentration of sucrose was up to 10 times higher than fructose, glucose and the dimeric sugar trehalose. The mean concentrations of the sugar-alcohols were typically lower, or equal, to that of the monomeric sugars and trehalose. Peak concentrations of arabitol and mannitol did not exceed 30 ng m-3 in PM10, and for PM2.5 all concentrations were below 6 ng m-3. Sugars and sugar-alcohols were associated primarily with coarse aerosols except during wintertime at the suburban site in Elverum, where a shift towards sub micron aerosols was observed. It is proposed that this shift was due to the intensive use of wood burning for residential heating at this site during winter, confirmed by high concurrent concentrations of levoglucosan. Elevated concentrations of sugars in PM2.5 were observed during spring and early summer at the rural background site Birkenes. It is hypothesized that this was due to ruptured pollen.

  1. Volatile organic compound concentrations and emission rates in new manufactured and site-built houses.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, A T; Rudd, A F; Beal, D; Chandra, S

    2000-09-01

    Concentrations of 54 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and ventilation rates were measured in four new manufactured houses over 2-9.5 months following installation and in seven new site-built houses 1-2 months after completion. The houses were in four projects located in hot-humid and mixed-humid climates. They were finished and operational, but unoccupied. Ventilation rates ranged from 0.14-0.78 h-1. Several of the site-built houses had ventilation rates below the ASHRAE recommended value. In both manufactured and site-built houses, the predominant airborne compounds were alpha-pinene, formaldehyde, hexanal, and acetic acid. Formaldehyde concentrations were below or near 50 ppb with a geometric mean value for all houses of 40 ppb. Similarities in the types of VOCs and in VOC concentrations indicated that indoor air quality in the houses was impacted by the same or similar sources. Major identified sources included plywood flooring, latex paint and sheet vinyl flooring. One site-built house was operated at ventilation rates of 0.14 and 0.32 h-1. VOC emission rates calculated at the two conditions agreed within +/- 10% for the most volatile compounds. Generally, the ratios of emission rates at the low and high ventilation rates decreased with decreasing compound volatility. Changes in VOC emission rates in the manufactured houses over 2-9.5 months after installation varied by compound. Only several compounds showed a consistent decrease in emission rate over this period.

  2. Controlled Orientation of Active Sites in a Nanostructured Multienzyme Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Yang, Byungseop; Jung, Younghan; Cha, Jaehyun; Cho, Jinhwan; Choi, Eun-Sil; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-01-01

    Multistep cascade reactions in nature maximize reaction efficiency by co-assembling related enzymes. Such organization facilitates the processing of intermediates by downstream enzymes. Previously, the studies on multienzyme nanocomplexes assembled on DNA scaffolds demonstrated that closer interenzyme distance enhances the overall reaction efficiency. However, it remains unknown how the active site orientation controlled at nanoscale can have an effect on multienzyme reaction. Here, we show that controlled alignment of active sites promotes the multienzyme reaction efficiency. By genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and two compatible bioorthogonal chemistries, we conjugated mannitol dehydrogenase to formate dehydrogenase with the defined active site arrangement with the residue-level accuracy. The study revealed that the multienzyme complex with the active sites directed towards each other exhibits four-fold higher relative efficiency enhancement in the cascade reaction and produces 60% more D-mannitol than the other complex with active sites directed away from each other. PMID:28004799

  3. Comparison of mercury concentrations measured at several sites in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemr, F.; Angot, H.; Dommergue, A.; Magand, O.; Barret, M.; Weigelt, A.; Ebinghaus, R.; Brunke, E.-G.; Pfaffhuber, K.; Edwards, G.; Howard, D.; Powell, J.; Keywood, M.; Wang, F.

    2014-12-01

    Our knowledge of the distribution of mercury concentrations in air of the Southern Hemisphere was until recently based mostly on intermittent measurements made during ship cruises. In the last few years continuous mercury monitoring has commenced at several sites in the Southern Hemisphere providing new and more refined information. In this paper we compare mercury measurements at several sites in the Southern Hemisphere made over a period of at least one year at each location. Averages of monthly medians show similar although small seasonal variations at both Cape Point and Amsterdam Island. A pronounced seasonal variation at Troll Research Station in Antarctica is due to frequent mercury depletion events in the austral spring. Due to large scatter and large standard deviations of monthly average median mercury concentrations at Cape Grim no systematic seasonal variation could be found there. Nevertheless, the annual average mercury concentrations at all sites during the 2007-2013 period varied only between 0.85 and 1.05 ng m-3. Part of this variability is likely due to systematic measurement uncertainties which we propose can be further reduced by improved calibration procedures. We conclude that mercury is much more uniformly distributed throughout the Southern Hemisphere than the distributions suggested by measurements made onboard ships. This finding implies (a) that trends observed at one or a few sites in the Southern Hemisphere are likely to be representative for the whole hemisphere, and (b) that smaller trends can be detected in shorter time periods. We also report a change of the trend sign at Cape Point from decreasing mercury concentrations in 1996-2004 to increasing concentrations since 2007.

  4. Background concentrations of metals in wetland soils on and near the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.L.

    1997-09-01

    A study was conducted to determine the naturally occurring concentrations of metals in unimpacted wetland soils at the Savannah River Site located near Aiken, SC. Soil samples were collected from three broad categories of wetlands: (1) large stream floodplain wetlands, (2) small stream floodplain wetlands, and (3) upland bays and depressions. Samples were collected from 75 locations to a depth of 3.1 m. All samples were analyzed for selected metals using EPA protocol and standard methods. Additionally, the pH, exchange capacity, and total organic carbon content of each sample was determined. Standard summary statistics were calculated and results are presented for each constituent. Box plots were also created relating metals concentrations to grain size distribution. Metals concentrations were found to increase with increasing silt and clay content. This increase in concentration was attributed to increasing cation exchange capacity and increasing organic matter content.

  5. Low salt concentrations activate AMP-activated protein kinase in mouse macula densa cells.

    PubMed

    Cook, Natasha; Fraser, Scott A; Katerelos, Marina; Katsis, Frosa; Gleich, Kurt; Mount, Peter F; Steinberg, Gregory R; Levidiotis, Vicki; Kemp, Bruce E; Power, David A

    2009-04-01

    The energy-sensing kinase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is associated with the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter NKCC2 in the kidney and phosphorylates it on a regulatory site in vitro. To identify a potential role for AMPK in salt sensing at the macula densa, we have used the murine macula densa cell line MMDD1. In this cell line, AMPK was rapidly activated by isosmolar low-salt conditions. In contrast to the known salt-sensing pathway in the macula densa, AMPK activation occurred in the presence of either low sodium or low chloride and was unaffected by inhibition of NKCC2 with bumetanide. Assays using recombinant AMPK demonstrated activation of an upstream kinase by isosmolar low salt. The specific calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase inhibitor STO-609 failed to suppress AMPK activation, suggesting that it was not part of the signal pathway. AMPK activation was associated with increased phosphorylation of the specific substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) at Ser(79), as well as increased NKCC2 phosphorylation at Ser(126). AMPK activation due to low salt concentrations was inhibited by an adenovirus construct encoding a kinase dead mutant of AMPK, leading to reduced ACC Ser(79) and NKCC2 Ser(126) phosphorylation. This work demonstrates that AMPK activation in macula densa-like cells occurs via isosmolar changes in sodium or chloride concentration, leading to phosphorylation of ACC and NKCC2. Phosphorylation of these substrates in vivo is predicted to increase intracellular chloride and so reduce the effect of salt restriction on tubuloglomerular feedback and renin secretion.

  6. The vegetation-to-air concentration ratio in a specific activity atmospheric tritium model

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M.; Bauer, L.R.

    1994-03-01

    Specific activity models are frequently used to estimate the concentration of tritium oxide in vegetation. In such models, a single value represents the ratio (R) of the specific activity of tritium oxide in vegetation to the specific activity of atmospheric tritium oxide. Federal agencies such as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency have not established a consensus default for R. Literature on this topic suggests that a site-specific distribution of R should be developed when feasible. In this study, a distribution of R is established for the Savannah River Site. Environmental tritium concentrations in air and vegetation measured on and around the Savannah River Site over a 9-y period form the basis for the analysis. For dose assessments of chronic atmospheric tritium releases at the Savannah River Site, R is best parameterized by a normal distribution with a mean of 0.54 and one standard deviation of 0.10. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission default for R is approximately equal to the Savannah River Site site-specific estimate. Based on the results, the default value for R recognized by the Environmental Protection Agency overestimates tritium concentrations in vegetation and, therefore, doses from foodstuff consumption pathways at humid sites. For the Savannah River Site, the magnitude of the error is on the order of a factor of 2. This consideration may be important if an estimated dose approaches an as-low-as-reasonably-achievable or regulatory threshold. Conversely, without the benefit of site-specific data, ingestion doses may be underestimated in regions with dry climates. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. The vegetation-to-air concentration ratio in a specific activity atmospheric tritium model.

    PubMed

    Hamby, D M; Bauer, L R

    1994-03-01

    Specific activity models are frequently used to estimate the concentration of tritium oxide in vegetation. In such models, a single value represents the ratio (R) of the specific activity of tritium oxide in vegetation to the specific activity of atmospheric tritium oxide. Federal agencies such as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency have not established a consensus default for R. Literature on this topic suggests that a site-specific distribution of R should be developed when feasible. In this study, a distribution of R is established for the Savannah River Site. Environmental tritium concentrations in air and vegetation measured on and around the Savannah River Site over a 9-y period form the basis for the analysis. For dose assessments of chronic atmospheric tritium releases at the Savannah River Site, R is best parameterized by a normal distribution with a mean of 0.54 and one standard deviation of 0.10. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission default for R is approximately equal to the Savannah River Site site-specific estimate. Based on the results, the default value for R recognized by the Environmental Protection Agency overestimates tritium concentrations in vegetation and, therefore, doses from foodstuff consumption pathways at humid sites. For the Savannah River Site, the magnitude of the error is on the order of a factor of 2. This consideration may be important if an estimated dose approaches an as-low-as-reasonably-achievable or regulatory threshold. Conversely, without the benefit of site-specific data, ingestion doses may be underestimated in regions with dry climates.

  8. Perspective: On the active site model in computational catalyst screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Karsten; Plaisance, Craig P.; Oberhofer, Harald; Andersen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    First-principles screening approaches exploiting energy trends in surface adsorption represent an unparalleled success story in recent computational catalysis research. Here we argue that our still limited understanding of the structure of active sites is one of the major bottlenecks towards an ever extended and reliable use of such computational screening for catalyst discovery. For low-index transition metal surfaces, the prevalently chosen high-symmetry (terrace and step) sites offered by the nominal bulk-truncated crystal lattice might be justified. For more complex surfaces and composite catalyst materials, computational screening studies will need to actively embrace a considerable uncertainty with respect to what truly are the active sites. By systematically exploring the space of possible active site motifs, such studies might eventually contribute towards a targeted design of optimized sites in future catalysts.

  9. Diffusional correlations among multiple active sites in a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-04-07

    Simulations of the enzymatic dynamics of a model enzyme containing multiple substrate binding sites indicate the existence of diffusional correlations in the chemical reactivity of the active sites. A coarse-grain, particle-based, mesoscopic description of the system, comprising the enzyme, the substrate, the product and solvent, is constructed to study these effects. The reactive and non-reactive dynamics is followed using a hybrid scheme that combines molecular dynamics for the enzyme, substrate and product molecules with multiparticle collision dynamics for the solvent. It is found that the reactivity of an individual active site in the multiple-active-site enzyme is reduced substantially, and this effect is analyzed and attributed to diffusive competition for the substrate among the different active sites in the enzyme.

  10. Application of passive sampling for measuring dissolved concentrations of organic contaminants in the water column at three marine superfund sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    At contaminated sediment sites, including U.S. EPA Superfund sites, it is critical to measure water column concentrations of freely dissolved contaminants to understand the complete exposure of aquatic organisms to hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). However, historically a...

  11. Siting guidelines for concentrating solar power plants in the Sahel: Case study of Burkina Faso

    SciTech Connect

    Azoumah, Y.; Tapsoba, G.; Thiam, S.; Ramde, E.W.

    2010-08-15

    Selecting a site that meets the technical requirements for a concentrating solar power plant (CSP) is a very critical exercise. This paper points out crucial factors and provides guidelines regarding the selection of suitable sites. It especially focuses on Sahelian countries which have their own climatic peculiarities. These countries, characterized by low access to electricity, are well endowed in solar resources. They are potentially good locations for concentrating solar power plants since their mean daily solar radiation exceeds 5.5 kWh/m{sup 2}. CSP presents therefore, a good opportunity for them to increase in a sustainable manner, their energy supply. The guidelines developed in this paper are applied to Burkina Faso as a case study. (author)

  12. Concentration of Actinides in Plant Mounds at Safety Test Nuclear Sites in Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Shafer; Jenna Gommes

    2008-09-15

    Plant mounds or blow-sand mounds are accumulations of soil particles and plant debris around large shrubs and are common features in deserts in the southwestern United States. Believed to be an important factor in their formation, the shrubs create surface roughness that causes wind-suspended particles to be deposited and resist further suspension. Shrub mounds occur in some plant communities on the Nevada Test Site, the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and Tonopah Test Range (TTR), including areas of surface soil contamination from past nuclear testing. In the 1970s as part of early studies to understand properties of actinides in the environment, the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) examined the accumulation of isotopes of Pu, {sup 241}Am, and U in plant mounds at safety test sites. The NAEG studies found concentrations of these contaminants to be greater in shrub mounds than in the surrounding areas of desert pavement. For example, at Project 57 on the NTTR, it was estimated that 15 percent of the radionuclide inventory of the site was associated with shrub mounds, which accounted for 17 percent of the surface area of the site, a ratio of inventory to area of 0.85. At Clean Slate III at the TTR, 29 percent of the inventory was associated with approximately 32 percent of the site covered by shrub mounds, a ratio of 0.91. While the total inventory of radionuclides in intershrub areas was greater, the ratio of radionuclide inventory to area was 0.40 and 0.38, respectively, at the two sites. The comparison between the shrub mounds and adjacent desert pavement areas was made for only the top 5 cm since radionuclides at safety test sites are concentrated in the top 5 cm of intershrub areas. Not accounting for radionuclides associated with the shrub mounds would cause the inventory of contaminants and potential exposure to be underestimated. As part of its Environmental Restoration Soils Subproject, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear

  13. An experimental relationship between airflow and carbon dioxide concentrations at a rural site.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Isidro A; Sánchez, M Luisa; García, M Ángeles; Pardo, Nuria

    2015-11-15

    The influence of airflow on CO2 concentrations is considered. Two years of measurements recorded with a Picarro G1301 analyser during the night at a rural site were used. Three concentration groups were formed and were related to wind speed. Yearly, directional, and hourly evolution indicated that the isolated contribution of factors affecting CO2 concentrations proves hard to evaluate. Two approaches to airflow based on average wind and a rotating residual were considered. Around two thirds of observations corresponded to anticyclonic rotations. Firstly, circular hodographs of rotating residuals indicated that wavelengths were in the mesoscale range. The greatest concentrations were linked to the lowest wind speeds and no prevailing directions were revealed by the roundness calculation in a spatial analysis using hexagonal cells. Secondly, composite hodographs for anticyclonic turnings were calculated, the greatest concentrations being associated to hodographs with a pronounced curvature. Moreover, these were successfully parameterised using two models. A harmonic function was first used, which satisfactorily fitted hodographs linked to low and intermediate concentrations. The second model initially described the wind direction of residuals with the error function since its change was slow in early and late night-time. Residuals were later parameterised with a second order logarithmic spiral. This procedure successfully fitted the most curved hodographs of low and high concentrations.

  14. Robotics at Savannah River site: activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.S.

    1984-09-01

    The objectives of the Robotics Technology Group at the Savannah River Laboratory are to employ modern industrial robots and to develop unique automation and robotic systems to enhance process operations at the Savannah River site (SRP and SRL). The incentives are to improve safety, reduce personnel radiation exposure, improve product quality and productivity, and to reduce operating costs. During the past year robotic systems have been installed to fill chemical dilution vials in a SRP laboratory at 772-F and remove radioactive waste materials in the SRL Californium Production Facility at 773-A. A robotic system to lubricate an extrusion press has been developed and demonstrated in the SRL robotics laboratory and is scheduled for installation at the 321-M fuel fabrication area. A mobile robot was employed by SRP for a radiation monitoring task at a waste tank top in H-Area. Several other robots are installed in the SRL robotics laboratories and application development programs are underway. The status of these applications is presented in this report.

  15. Effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on denitrifying and nitrifying popualtions at terrestrial CO2 leakeage analogous sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christine, Dictor Marie; Catherine, Joulian; Valerie, Laperche; Stephanie, Coulon; Dominique, Breeze

    2010-05-01

    CO2 capture and geological storage (CCS) is recognized to be an important option for carbon abatement in Europe. One of the risks of CCS is the leakage from storage site. A laboratory was conducted on soil samples sampled near-surface from a CO2 leakage analogous site (Latera, Italy) in order to evaluate the impact of an elevated soil CO2 concentration on terrestrial bacterial ecosystems form near surface terrestrial environments and to determine a potential bacterial indicator of CO2 leakage from storage site. Surveys were conducted along a 50m long transect across the vent centre, providing a spectrum of CO2 flux rates, soil gas concentrations and compositions (Beaubien et al., 2007). A bacterial diversity studies, performed by CE-SSCP technique, on a soil profile with increasing CO2 soil concentrations (from 0.3% to 100%) showed that a change on bacterial diversity was noted when CO2 concentration was above 50 % of CO2. From this result, 3 soil samples were taken at 70 cm depth in 3 distinct zones (background soil CO2 content, soil CO2 content of 20% and soil CO2 content of 50%). Then theses soil samples were incubated under closed jars flushed with different air atmospheres (20, 50 and 90 % of CO2) during 18 months. At initial, 3, 6, 12 and 18 months, some soil samples were collected in order to estimate the denitrifying, nitrifying activities as a function of CO2 concentration content and times. Theses enzymatic activities were chosen because one occurs under anaerobic conditions (denitrification) and the other occurs under aerobic conditions (nitrification). Both of them were involved in the nitrogen cycle and are major actors of soil function and groundwater quality preservation. Metabolic diversity using BIOLOG Ecoplates was determined on every soil samples. Physico-chemical parameters (e.g. pH, bulk chemistry, mineralogy) were analyzed to have some information about the evolution of the soil during the incubation with increasing soil CO2 concentrations

  16. Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: why selenoproteins?

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Johansson, Linda; Bauer, Holger; Arscott, L David; Rauch, Susanne; Ballou, David P; Williams, Charles H; Schirmer, R Heiner; Arnér, Elias S J

    2003-10-28

    Selenium, an essential trace element for mammals, is incorporated into a selected class of selenoproteins as selenocysteine. All known isoenzymes of mammalian thioredoxin (Trx) reductases (TrxRs) employ selenium in the C-terminal redox center -Gly-Cys-Sec-Gly-COOH for reduction of Trx and other substrates, whereas the corresponding sequence in Drosophila melanogaster TrxR is -Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser-COOH. Surprisingly, the catalytic competence of these orthologous enzymes is similar, whereas direct Sec-to-Cys substitution of mammalian TrxR, or other selenoenzymes, yields almost inactive enzyme. TrxRs are therefore ideal for studying the biology of selenocysteine by comparative enzymology. Here we show that the serine residues flanking the C-terminal Cys residues of Drosophila TrxRs are responsible for activating the cysteines to match the catalytic efficiency of a selenocysteine-cysteine pair as in mammalian TrxR, obviating the need for selenium. This finding suggests that the occurrence of selenoenzymes, which implies that the organism is selenium-dependent, is not necessarily associated with improved enzyme efficiency. Our data suggest that the selective advantage of selenoenzymes is a broader range of substrates and a broader range of microenvironmental conditions in which enzyme activity is possible.

  17. Antiandrogenic activity of phthalate mixtures: Validity of concentration addition

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, Verena; Crettaz, Pierre; Oberli-Schrämmli, Aurelia; Fent, Karl

    2012-03-01

    Phthalates and bisphenol A have very widespread use leading to significant exposure of humans. They are suspected to interfere with the endocrine system, including the androgen, estrogen and the thyroid hormone system. Here we analyzed the antiandrogenic activity of six binary, and one ternary mixture of phthalates exhibiting complete antiandrogenic dose–response curves, and binary mixtures of phthalates and bisphenol A at equi-effective concentrations of EC{sub 10}, EC{sub 25} and EC{sub 50} in MDA-kb2 cells. Mixture activity followed the concentration addition (CA) model with a tendency to synergism at high and antagonism at low concentrations. Isoboles and the toxic unit approach (TUA) confirmed the additive to synergistic activity of the binary mixtures BBP + DBP, DBP + DEP and DEP + BPA at high concentrations. Both methods indicate a tendency to antagonism for the EC{sub 10} mixtures BBP + DBP, BBP + DEP and DBP + DEP, and the EC{sub 25} mixture of DBP + BPA. A ternary mixture revealed synergism at the EC{sub 50}, and weak antagonistic activity at the EC{sub 25} level by the TUA. A mixture of five phthalates representing a human urine composition and reflecting exposure to corresponding parent compounds showed no antiandrogenic activity. Our study demonstrates that CA is an appropriate concept to account for mixture effects of antiandrogenic phthalates and bisphenol A. The interaction indicates a departure from additivity to antagonism at low concentrations, probably due to interaction with the androgen receptor and/or cofactors. This study emphasizes that a risk assessment of phthalates should account for mixture effects by applying the CA concept. -- Highlights: ► Antiandrogenic activity of mixtures of 2 and 3 phthalates are assessed in MDA-kb2 cells. ► Mixture activities followed the concentration addition model. ► A tendency to synergism at high and antagonism at low levels occurred.

  18. Spatial variability of dissolved phosphorous concentrations and alkaline phosphatase activity in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Chang, J.; Ho, T.; Gong, G.

    2010-12-01

    The concentrations of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) and alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) have been determined at about 25 sampling stations in the East China Sea since 2003. The stations are mainly distributed from the Changjiang river mouth to northern Taiwan and east to the shelf break. In addition to the Changjiang discharge, we have found a specific nutrient source around a coastal site (122° 2’30’’ E, 28° 40’ N). Elevated DIP and nitrate concentrations have been constantly observed around the sampling station for 8 years, where the surface DIP concentrations are generally around 0.3 µM. The nutrient source may either originate from ground water discharge or coastal upwelling, where lower temperature has been observed in the water column around the station. In general, APA has been negatively correlated with DIP concentrations in the studies sites, with lowest APA around the high DIP station and the Changjiang river mouth.

  19. Concentrations of selected volatile organic compounds at kerbside and background sites in central London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valach, A. C.; Langford, B.; Nemitz, E.; MacKenzie, A. R.; Hewitt, C. N.

    2014-10-01

    Ground-level concentrations of nine volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured using a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) in central London at an urban background (North Kensington, NK, during 16th-25th Jan 2012) and a kerbside site (Marylebone Rd, MRd, during 25th Jan-7th Feb 2012) as part of the winter intensive observation period of the ClearfLo project. Site comparisons indicated that VOC concentrations at the urban background site were significantly lower than at the kerbside site (ratio MRd/NK of 2.3). At the kerbside site PTR-MS measurements of aromatics (benzene, toluene, C2- and C3-benzenes) were compared with the gas chromatography - flame ionization detector data from the UK Government's Automatic Hydrocarbon Network. Very good qualitative agreement was observed between the two methods (r = 0.90-0.91, p < 0.001, N = 260), although there was a significant offset between the instruments. This was partly due to issues with humidity dependent background measurements, but possibly also from isobaric interference of other compounds and their fragments, giving a positive bias to the PTR-MS data. Most compounds showed strong indications of traffic-related sources with double rush hour peaks in diurnal profiles and high correlations with known traffic-related compounds (r = 0.68-0.97 at NK, 0.48-0.87 at MRd, p < 0.001, NNK = 2202-2227, NMRd = 2705-2720) and CO (r = 0.80-0.96 at NK, 0.65-0.84 at MRd, p < 0.001, NNK = 223, NMRd = 256-274). Polar plots agreed with statistical analysis of wind direction dependency and identification of potential emission sources was attempted.

  20. Community Update on Site Activities, July 19, 2013

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In an effort to engage and inform community members interested in the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site cleanup, EPA will be issuing periodic topic-based fact sheets that will provide background information and updates about ongoing activities.

  1. Management practices that concentrate visitor activities: Camping impact management at Isle Royale National Park, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, J.L.; Farrell, T.A.

    2002-01-01

    This study assessed campsite conditions and the effectiveness of campsite impact management strategies at Isle Royale National Park, USA. Protocols for assessing indicators of vegetation and soil conditions were developed and applied to 156 campsites and 88 shelters within 36 backcountry campgrounds. The average site was 68 m2 and 83% of sites lost vegetation over areas less than 47 m2. Results reveal that management actions to spatially concentrate camping activities and reduce camping disturbance have been highly successful. Comparisons of disturbed area/overnight stay among other protected areas reinforces this assertion. These reductions in area of camping disturbance are attributed to a designated site camping policy, limitation on site numbers, construction of sites in sloping terrain, use of facilities, and an ongoing program of campsite maintenance. Such actions are most appropriate in higher use backcountry and wilderness settings.

  2. Athletic Activity and Hormone Concentrations in High School Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Wojtys, Edward M.; Jannausch, Mary L.; Kreinbrink, Jennifer L.; Harlow, Siobán D.; Sowers, MaryFran R.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Physical activity may affect the concentrations of circulating endogenous hormones in female athletes. Understanding the relationship between athletic and physical activity and circulating female hormone concentrations is critical. Objective: To test the hypotheses that (1) the estradiol-progesterone profile of high school adolescent girls participating in training, conditioning, and competition would differ from that of physically inactive, age-matched adolescent girls throughout a 3-month period; and (2) athletic training and conditioning would alter body composition (muscle, bone), leading to an increasingly greater lean–body-mass to fat–body-mass ratio with accompanying hormonal changes. Design: Cohort study. Settings: Laboratory and participants' homes. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 106 adolescent girls, ages 14–18 years, who had experienced at least 3 menstrual cycles in their lifetime. Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants were prospectively monitored throughout a 13-week period, with weekly physical activity assessments and 15 urine samples for estrogen, luteinizing hormone, creatinine, and progesterone concentrations. Each girl underwent body-composition measurements before and after the study period. Results: Seventy-four of the 98 girls (76%) who completed the study classified themselves as athletes. Body mass index, body mass, and fat measures remained stable, and 17 teenagers had no complete menstrual cycle during the observation period. Mean concentrations of log(estrogen/creatinine) were slightly greater in nonathletes who had cycles of <24 or >35 days. Mean log(progesterone/creatinine) concentrations in nonathletes were less in the first half and greater in the second half of the cycle, but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: A moderate level of athletic or physical activity did not influence urine concentrations of estrogen, progesterone, or luteinizing hormones. However, none of the

  3. The background levels of atmospheric tritium concentration in the environment at NIFS Toki site of Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Uda, T.; Tanaka, M.; Sugiyama, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Momoshima, N.

    2008-07-15

    Atmospheric tritium concentrations at the National Inst. for Fusion Science (NIFS) Toki site of Japan, where the Large Helical Device (LHD) has been operating, were measured considering future deuterium plasma experiments and environmental safety. The major chemical forms of atmospheric tritium are water (HTO), hydrogen (HT) and methane (CH{sub 3}T). Average tritium concentrations of HTO, HT and CH{sub 3}T observed from January 2003 to March 2006 were 9.0 mBq/m{sup 3}, 9.0 mBq/m{sup 3} and 2.0 mBq/m{sup 3}, respectively. To examine about the systematic error of the air sampling device, we cross-checked with the sampling device of Kumamoto Univ.. The values obtained with both devices were almost consistent. The HTO concentration principally depends on humidity in air. The HTO concentration in the collected water and the HT concentration tend to show seasonal variation. The atmospheric tritium levels measured at Toki were consistent comparing with another environmental values measured in Japan. The present atmospheric tritium monitoring would be useful for safety consideration. (authors)

  4. Factors Affecting Indoor Air Concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds at a Site of Subsurface Gasoline Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, M.L.; Bentley, A.J.; Dunkin, K.A.; Hodgson, A.T.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Sextro, R.G.; Daisey, J.M.

    1995-11-01

    We report a field study of soil gas transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into a slab-on-grade building found at a site contaminated with gasoline. Although the high VOC concentrations (30-60 g m{sup -3}) measured in the soil gas at depths of 0.7 m below the building suggest a potential for high levels of indoor VOC, the measured indoor air concentrations were lower than those in the soil gas by approximately six orders of magnitude ({approx} 0.03 mg m{sup -3}). This large ratio is explained by (1) the expected dilution of soil gas entering the building via ambient building ventilation (a factor of {approx}1000), and (2) an unexpectedly sharp gradient in soil gas VOC concentration between the depths of 0.1 and 0.7 m (a factor of {approx}1000). Measurements of the soil physical and biological characteristics indicate that a partial physical barrier to vertical transport in combination with microbial degradation provides a likely explanation for this gradient. These factors are likely to be important to varying degrees at other sites.

  5. Selenium and mercury concentrations in brood-stock walleye collected from three sites on Lake Oahe.

    PubMed

    Mauk, R J; Brown, M L

    2001-02-01

    A decline in the walleye Stizostedion vitreum sport fishery in lower Lake Oahe, South Dakota, was documented in the early 1980s and has been attributed to poor natural reproduction and/or recruitment. Contaminants were suspected of causing low natural reproduction/recruitment in lower Lake Oahe as well as low hatchability of eggs produced from broodstock walleyes taken from lower Lake Oahe. Concentrations of dissolved selenium in the Cheyenne River, which enters lower Lake Oahe, have increased considerably over the last 15 years. To determine whether selenium concentrations contributed to the reproduction problems in the lower Lake Oahe walleye population, adult walleye were collected during spawning operations in April 1994, 1995, and 1996 to obtain tissue samples. Muscle, liver, reproductive tissue, and unfertilized eggs were analyzed with a modified fluorometric method for determining selenium concentrations in plants. These tissues were also analyzed for mercury content using cold-vapor atomic absorption. No statistical differences (p < 0.05) in selenium or mercury concentrations among sites could be determined that would explain differential walleye egg hatchability. Correlation analysis determined significant inverse associations existed between the gonadal somatic index of male walleye and gonadal tissue selenium concentrations (r = -0.41, p = 0.0012). Both walleye sexes exhibited significant inverse associations between the hepatic somatic index (HSI) and liver selenium concentrations (males r = -0.33, p = 0.0095; and females r = -0.38, p = 0.0034). Positive relationships existed for female walleye selenium concentrations in the liver and the ovaries (r = 0.37, p = 0.003) and the liver and muscle tissue (r = 0.28, p = 0.027). Mercury concentrations in walleye ovaries were positively correlated with HSI (r = 0.30, p = 0.0012), length (r = 0.36, p = 0.0046), relative weight (r = 0.36, p = 0.0054), and muscle concentrations (r = 0.49, p = 0.0001). Mercury

  6. Comparison of sources of submicron particle number concentrations measured at two sites in Rochester, NY.

    PubMed

    Kasumba, John; Hopke, Philip K; Chalupa, David C; Utell, Mark J

    2009-09-01

    Sources contributing to the submicron particles (100-470 nm) measured between January 2002 and December 2007 at two different New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC) sites in Rochester, NY were identified and apportioned using a bilinear receptor model, positive matrix factorization (PMF). Measurements of aerosol size distributions and number concentrations for particles in the size range of 10-500 nm have been made since December 2001 to date in Rochester. The measurements are being made using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) consisting of a DMA and a CPC (TSI models 3071 and 3010, respectively). From December 2001 to March 2004, particle measurements were made at the NYS DEC site in downtown Rochester, but it was moved to the eastside of Rochester in May 2004. Each measurement period was divided into three seasons i.e., winter (December, January, and February), summer (June, July, and August), and the transitional periods (March, April, May, September, October, and November) so as to avoid experimental uncertainty resulting from too large season-to-season variability in ambient temperature and solar photon intensity that would lead to unstable/non-stationary size distributions. Therefore, the seasons were analyzed independently for possible sources. Ten sources were identified at both sites and these include traffic, nucleation, residential/commercial heating, industrial emissions, secondary nitrate, ozone- rich secondary aerosol, secondary sulfate, regionally transported aerosol, and a mixed source of nucleation and traffic. These results show that the measured total outdoor particle number concentrations in Rochester generally vary with similar temporal patterns, suggesting that the central monitoring site data can be used to estimate outdoor exposure in other parts of the city.

  7. A temporal and spatial assessment of TBT concentrations at dredged material disposal sites around the coast of England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Bolam, Thi; Barry, Jon; Law, Robin J; James, David; Thomas, Boby; Bolam, Stefan G

    2014-02-15

    Despite legislative interventions since the 1980s, contemporary concentrations of organotin compounds in marine sediments still impose restrictions on the disposal of dredged material in the UK. Here, we analyse temporal and spatial data to assess the effectiveness of the ban on the use of TBT paints in reducing concentrations at disposal sites. At a national scale, there was a statistically significant increase in the proportion of samples in which the concentration was below the limit of detection (LOD) from 1998 to 2010. This was observed for sediments both inside and outside the disposal sites. However, this temporal decline in organotin concentration is disposal site-specific. Of the four sites studied in detail, two displayed significant increases in proportion of samples below LOD over time. We argue that site-specificity in the effectiveness of the TBT ban results from variations in historical practices at source and unique environmental characteristics of each site.

  8. Antioxidant Activities of Functional Beverage Concentrates Containing Herbal Medicine Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon-Joo; Kim, Mi-Ok; Kim, Jung Hoan; Jeong, Sehyun; Kim, Min Hee; Yang, Su-Jin; Lee, Jongsung; Lee, Hae-Jeung

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the antioxidant activity of functional beverage concentrates containing herbal medicine extracts (FBCH) using various antioxidant assays, such as 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical scavenging activity, and reducing power assay. The total polyphenolic content of FBCH (81.45 mg/100 g) was higher than Ssanghwa tea (SHT, 37.56 mg/100 g). The antioxidant activities of FBCH showed 52.92% DPPH and 55.18% ABTS radical scavenging activities at 100 mg/mL, respectively. FBCH showed significantly higher antioxidant activities compared to the SHT (DPPH, 23.43%; ABTS, 22.21%; reducing power optical density; 0.23, P<0.05). In addition, intracellular reactive oxygen species generation significantly decreased in a concentration-dependent manner following FBCH treatment. These results suggest that the addition of herbal medicine extract contributes to the improved functionality of beverage concentrates.

  9. Natural activity concentrations in bottled drinking water and consequent doses.

    PubMed

    Kabadayi, Önder; Gümüs, Hasan

    2012-07-01

    The radioactivity concentrations of nuclides (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K in bottled drinking water from six different manufacturers from Turkey were measured using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The measurement was done using a coaxial high-purity germanium detector system coupled to Ortec-Dspect jr digital MCA system. The average measured activity concentrations of the nuclides (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K are found to be 0.781, 1.05 and 2.19 Bq l(-1), respectively. The measured activity concentrations have been compared with similar studies from different locations. The annual effective doses for ingestion of radionuclides in the water are found to be 0.0246 mSv for (238)U and 0.169 mSv for (232)Th.

  10. Investigation of off-site airborne transport of lead from a superfund removal action site using lead isotope ratios and concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pribil, Michael J.; Maddaloni, Mark A.; Staiger, Kimberly; Wilson, Eric; Magriples, Nick; Ali, Mustafa; Santella, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Lead (Pb) concentration and Pb isotopic composition of surface and subsurface soil samples were used to investigate the potential for off-site air transport of Pb from a former white Pb processing facility to neighboring residential homes in a six block area on Staten Island, NY. Surface and subsurface soil samples collected on the Jewett White Pb site were found to range from 1.122 to 1.138 for 206Pb/207Pb and 2.393 to 2.411 for 208Pb/207Pb. The off-site surface soil samples collected from residential backyards, train trestle, near site grass patches and background areas varied from 1.144 to 1.196 for 206Pb/207Pb and 2.427 to 2.464 for 208Pb/207Pb. Two soil samples collected along Richmond Terrace, where Jewett site soils accumulated after major rain events, varied from 1.136 to 1.147 for 206Pb/207Pb and 2.407 to 2.419 for 208Pb/207Pb. Lead concentration for on-site surface soil samples ranged from 450 to 8000 ug/g, on-site subsurface soil samples ranged from 90,000 to 240,000 ug/g and off-site samples varied from 380 to 3500 ug/g. Lead concentration and isotopic composition for the Staten Island off-site samples were similar to previously published data for other northeastern US cities and reflect re-suspension and re-mobilization of local accumulated Pb. The considerable differences in both the Pb isotopic composition and Pb concentration of on-site and off-site samples resulted in the ability to geochemically trace the transport of particulate Pb. Data in this study indicate minimal off-site surface transport of Pb from the Jewett site into the neighboring residential area.

  11. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2008-08-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes.

  12. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  13. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide.

  14. The concentration of criminal victimization and patterns of routine activities.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shih-Ya; Cuvelier, Steven J; Sheu, Chuen-Jim; Zhao, Jihong Solomon

    2012-06-01

    Although many repeat victimization studies have focused on describing the prevalence of the phenomenon, this study attempted to explain variations in the concentration of victimization by applying routine activities as a theoretical model. A multivariate analysis of repeat victimization based on the 2005 Taiwan criminal victimization data supported the general applicability of the routine activity model developed in Western culture for predicting repeat victimization. Findings that diverged from Western patterns included family income to assault, gender to robbery, and marital status, family income, and major activity to larceny incidents. These disparities illustrated the importance of considering the broader sociocultural context in the association between risk predictors and the concentration of criminal victimization. The contradictory results and nonsignificant variance also reflected untapped information on respondents' biological features and psychological tendencies. Future victimization research would do well to integrate measurements that are sensitive to salient sociocultural elements of the society being studied and individuals' biological and psychological traits.

  15. Cadmium, Chromium, and Copper Concentration plus Semen-Quality in Environmental Pollution Site, China

    PubMed Central

    LI, Yan; GAO, Qiaoyan; LI, Mingcai; LI, Mengyang; GAO, Xueming

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background The environmental pollution is one of the factors contributing to the decrease of sperm quality for human beings. The aim of this study was to assess cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), and copper (Cu) concentration of man in environmental pollution site, and explore relationships between men exposure to Cd, Cr, and Cu and semen-quality parameters in environmental pollution site. Methods Ninety five men were recruited through pollution area and controls in 2011. We measured semen quality using Computer-aided Semen Quality Analysis, and Cd, Cr, and Cu levels in seminal plasma using Graphite Gurnace Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to evaluate the correlation between Cd, Cr and Cu concentration in seminal plasma and semen quality. Results The mean of seminal plasma Cd, Cr, and Cu values in pollution area was higher than the controls. Seminal plasma Cr values displayed a significant negative correlation with total motility and normomorph sperm rate. Seminal plasma Cu values also displayed a negative correlation with normomorph sperm rate. Conclusions Male reproductive health may be threatened by environmental pollution, and it may be influence local population diathesis. PMID:26060677

  16. Monitoring cell concentration and activity by multiple excitation fluorometry.

    PubMed

    Li, J K; Asali, E C; Humphrey, A E; Horvath, J J

    1991-01-01

    Four key cellular metabolic fluorophores--tryptophan, pyridoxine, NAD(P)H, and riboflavin--were monitored on-line by a multiple excitation fluorometric system (MEFS) and a modified SLM 8000C scanning spectrofluorometer in three model yeast fermentation systems--bakers' yeast growing on glucose, Candida utilis growing on ethanol, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae RTY110/pRB58 growing on glucose. The measured fluorescence signals were compared with cell concentration, protein concentration, and cellular activity. The results indicate that the behavior and fluorescence intensity of various fluorophores differ in the various fermentation systems. Tryptophan fluorescence is the best signal for the monitoring of cell concentration in bakers' yeast and C. utilis fermentations. Pyridoxine fluoresce is the best signal for the monitoring of cell concentration in the S. cerevisiae RTY110/pRB58 fermentation. In bakers' yeast fermentations the pyridoxine fluorescence signal can be used to monitor cellular activity. The NAD(P)H fluorescence signal is a good indicator of cellular activity in the C. utilis fermentation. For this fermentation NAD(P)H fluorescence can be used to control ethanol feeding in a fed-batch process.

  17. Ozone concentrations at a selected high-elevation forest site downwind Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-JArdon, R.

    2013-05-01

    Torres-Jardón, R.*, Rosas-Pérez, I., Granada-Macías, L. M., Ruiz-Suárez, L. G. Centro de Ciencias de la Atmósfera, UNAM, México D. F. México * rtorres@unam.mx For many years, the vegetation of forest species such as Abies religiosa in natural parks located in the southwest mountains of Mexico City has attracted much attention since these parks have been experiencing a severe decline of unclear etiology. The high ozone levels in the area and the observed naked eye macroscopic, histological and cytological injuries on these species, strongly suggest an important contribution of tropospheric ozone to this deterioration process. Apart of historical short monitoring campaigns for measuring ozone levels in these mountains, it is known just a little is known about the present exposure levels at which the local vegetation is exposed. A continuous ozone analyzer has been in operation since 2011 at a high-elevation forest site (Parque Nacional Miguel Hidalgo, PNMH; 3110 m above mean sea level) located downwind of Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA), in order to characterize the local ozone diel amplitude and its seasonal trend, as well as the influence of MCMA on the local O3 concentrations. Hourly average ozone data in PNMH shows that in general, the diel of ozone concentrations in the forest site has a statistical significant correlation with the pattern of ozone levels observed in several monitoring sites (smog receptor sites) within the MCMA, although the high elevation O3 levels are relatively lower than those in the urban area (around 2200 m above mean sea level). It is possible that a part of the oxidants in the air masses are removed by sink deposition processes during the air mass transport across the hills. The diel amplitude of ozone concentrations is small in the cold season, increasing as the seasons advance to June. As in the city, the highest ozone concentrations occur in April or May and the lowest levels during the rainy season, which extends from

  18. Complement Factor H Binds at Two Independent Sites to C-reactive Protein in Acute Phase Concentrations*♦

    PubMed Central

    Okemefuna, Azubuike I.; Nan, Ruodan; Miller, Ami; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Factor H (FH) regulates the activation of C3b in the alternative complement pathway, both in serum and at host cell surfaces. It is composed of 20 short complement regulator (SCR) domains. The Y402H polymorphism in FH is a risk factor for age-related macular degeneration. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein that binds Ca2+. We established the FH-CRP interaction using improved analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and synchrotron x-ray scattering methods. Physiological FH and CRP concentrations were used in 137 mm NaCl and 2 mm Ca2+, in which the occurrence of denatured CRP was avoided. In solution, AUC revealed FH-CRP binding. The FH-CRP interaction inhibited the formation of higher FH oligomers, indicating that CRP blocked FH dimerization sites at both SCR-6/8 and SCR-16/20. SPR confirmed the FH-CRP interaction and its NaCl concentration dependence upon using either immobilized FH or CRP. The SCR-1/5 fragment of FH did not bind to CRP. In order of increasing affinity, SCR-16/20, SCR-6/8 (His-402), and SCR-6/8 (Tyr-402) fragments bound to CRP. X-ray scattering showed that FH became more compact when binding to CRP, which is consistent with CRP binding at two different FH sites. We concluded that FH and CRP bind at elevated acute phase concentrations of CRP in physiological buffer. The SCR-16/20 site is novel and indicates the importance of the FH-CRP interaction for both age-related macular degeneration and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:19850925

  19. Alteration of natural (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface by gas transport and water infiltration.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Sophie; Sun, Yunwei; Purtschert, Roland; Raghoo, Lauren; Pili, Eric; Carrigan, Charles R

    2016-05-01

    High (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas is proposed as a key evidence for the detection of underground nuclear explosion by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. However, such a detection is challenged by the natural background of (37)Ar in the subsurface, mainly due to Ca activation by cosmic rays. A better understanding and improved capability to predict (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface and its spatial and temporal variability is thus required. A numerical model integrating (37)Ar production and transport in the subsurface is developed, including variable soil water content and water infiltration at the surface. A parameterized equation for (37)Ar production in the first 15 m below the surface is studied, taking into account the major production reactions and the moderation effect of soil water content. Using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, a realistic and comprehensive probability distribution of natural (37)Ar activity concentrations in soil gas is proposed, including the effects of water infiltration. Site location and soil composition are identified as the parameters allowing for a most effective reduction of the possible range of (37)Ar activity concentrations. The influence of soil water content on (37)Ar production is shown to be negligible to first order, while (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas and its temporal variability appear to be strongly influenced by transient water infiltration events. These results will be used as a basis for practical CTBTO concepts of operation during an OSI.

  20. Stratigraphic Control on CCl4 and CHCl3 Concentrations in the 200 West Area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Winsor, Kelsey; Last, George V.

    2008-01-01

    An extensive subsurface contaminant plume of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is the focus of a remedial effort in the 200 West Area of Washington State’s Hanford Site. Remediation requires a high-resolution model of the region’s spatially variable lithofacies and of the effect these units have on CCl4 migration through the unconfined aquifer. To increase detail of previous models, a transect was chosen along the primary groundwater flow path in the most heavily contaminated area. Borehole logs of wells along this 3.7 km-long transect were systematized and used to create a cross section displaying lithofacies depth and continuity. Natural and spectral gamma geophysical logs were examined to pinpoint the depths of geologic units. Depth discrete concentrations of CCl4 and its reductive dechlorination product, chloroform (CHCl3), were overlain on this cross section. Comparison of stratigraphy to contaminant levels shows that peaks in CCl4 concentration occur in thin, fine-grained layers and other that fine-grained layers frequently form lower boundaries to regions of high concentration. Peaks in CCl4 concentrations are frequently located at different depths from those of CHCl3, suggesting that these concentrations are affected by dechlorination of CCl4. Transformation of CCl4 to CHCl3 appears to be more prevalent within reduced, iron-containing sediments. Influence of thin, fine-grained layers within the larger aquifer unit indicates that characterization of contamination in this locality should consider subsurface geology with at least as much resolution as provided in this study.

  1. Feather mercury concentrations in Southern Ocean seabirds: Variation by species, site and time.

    PubMed

    Becker, Peter H; Goutner, Vassilis; Ryan, Peter G; González-Solís, Jacob

    2016-09-01

    We studied mercury contamination in 25 seabird species breeding along a latitudinal gradient across the Southern Ocean, from Gough Island (40°S) through Marion Island (47°S) to Byers Peninsula (63°S). Total mercury concentrations in body feather samples of adults caught at breeding colonies from 2008 to 2011 were determined. Krill (Euphausia spp.) and other zooplankton consumers had low mercury concentrations (gentoo penguin Pygoscelis papua, chinstrap penguin Pseudomonas Antarctica, common diving petrel Pelecanoides urinatrix, broad-billed prion Pachyptila vittata; mean levels 308-753 ng g(-1)), whereas seabirds consuming squid or carrion had high mercury concentrations (ascending order: Kerguelen petrel Aphrodroma brevirostris, southern giant petrel Macronectes giganteus, soft-plumaged petrel Pterodroma mollis, sooty albatross Phoebetria fusca, Atlantic petrel Pterodroma incerta, northern giant petrel Macronectes halli, great-winged petrel Pterodroma macroptera; 10,720-28038 ng g(-1)). The two species with the highest mercury concentrations, northern giant petrels and great-winged petrels, bred at Marion Island. Among species investigated at multiple sites, southern giant petrels had higher mercury levels at Marion than at Gough Island and Byers Peninsula. Mercury levels among Byers Peninsula seabirds were low, in two species even lower than levels measured 10 years before at Bird Island, South Georgia. Replicate measurements after about 25 years at Gough Island showed much higher mercury levels in feathers of sooty albatrosses (by 187%), soft-plumaged petrels (53%) and Atlantic petrels (49%). Concentrations similar to the past were detected in southern giant petrels at Gough and Marion islands, and in northern giant petrels at Marion. There were no clear indications that timing of moult or migratory behavior affected mercury contamination patterns among species. Causes of inter-site or temporal differences in mercury contamination could not be verified

  2. The influence of sampling site and assay method on lactate concentration in response to rock climbing.

    PubMed

    Draper, Nick; Brent, Simon; Hale, Beverley; Coleman, Ian

    2006-11-01

    The sport of rock climbing has increased in popularity and as a focus for research. Previous studies have examined the physiological determinants for successful performance. Variation is evident between studies over lactate sampling sites and assay methods. The aim of this study was to examine the limits of agreement between the YSI 2300 analyser and the Lactate Pro for finger and ear capillary blood samples in a climbing context. Forty-five (31 males and 14 females) participants volunteered to complete the climbing trial. Blood samples were collected simultaneously from finger and ear pre, post and 5 min post climb. The repeatability results indicated a good agreement across samples. Modelling analysis indicated the use of a -0.175 mmol l(-1) adjustment to move from Lactate Pro to YSI finger concentrations. To move from finger to ear concentrations, using the Lactate Pro, modelling analysis suggested a regression equation of Y = 0.827x + 0.769 adjustment for pre climb samples and Y = 0.955x + 0.566 for post climb concentrations. To better understand the physiological demands of climbing further research on natural rock is required. Results from this study suggest the Lactate Pro and blood sampling from the ear lobe could be of benefit to future rock climbing field studies.

  3. Promoter-proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Pia K.; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites on transcription requires promoter proximity, as demonstrated using artificial constructs and supported by a genome-wide data set. Importantly, transcription down-regulation can be recapitulated in a gene context devoid of splice sites by placing a functional bona fide pA site/transcription terminator within ∼500 base pairs of the promoter. In contrast, promoter-proximal positioning of a pA site-independent histone gene terminator supports high transcription levels. We propose that optimal communication between a pA site-dependent gene terminator and its promoter critically depends on gene length and that short RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels. PMID:23028143

  4. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  5. Activation of the Escherichia coli marA/soxS/rob regulon in response to transcriptional activator concentration.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robert G; Bartlett, Emily S; Rosner, Judah L; Wall, Michael E

    2008-07-04

    The paralogous transcriptional activators MarA, SoxS, and Rob activate a common set of promoters, the marA/soxS/rob regulon of Escherichia coli, by binding a cognate site (marbox) upstream of each promoter. The extent of activation varies from one promoter to another and is only poorly correlated with the in vitro affinity of the activator for the specific marbox. Here, we examine the dependence of promoter activation on the level of activator in vivo by manipulating the steady-state concentrations of MarA and SoxS in Lon protease mutants and by measuring promoter activation using lacZ transcriptional fusions. We found that: (i) the MarA concentrations needed for half-maximal stimulation varied by at least 19-fold among the 10 promoters tested; (ii) most marboxes were not saturated when there were 24,000 molecules of MarA per cell; (iii) the correlation between the MarA concentration needed for half-maximal promoter activity in vivo and marbox binding affinity in vitro was poor; and (iv) the two activators differed in their promoter activation profiles. The marRAB and sodA promoters could both be saturated by MarA and SoxS in vivo. However, saturation by MarA resulted in greater marRAB and lesser sodA transcription than did saturation by SoxS, implying that the two activators interact with RNA polymerase in different ways at the different promoters. Thus, the concentration and nature of activator determine which regulon promoters are activated, as well as the extent of their activation.

  6. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  7. Active and regulatory sites of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Pesi, Rossana; Allegrini, Simone; Careddu, Maria Giovanna; Filoni, Daniela Nicole; Camici, Marcella; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2010-12-01

    Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II), which acts preferentially on 6-hydroxypurine nucleotides, is essential for the survival of several cell types. cN-II catalyses both the hydrolysis of nucleotides and transfer of their phosphate moiety to a nucleoside acceptor through formation of a covalent phospho-intermediate. Both activities are regulated by a number of phosphorylated compounds, such as diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap₄A), ADP, ATP, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) and phosphate. On the basis of a partial crystal structure of cN-II, we mutated two residues located in the active site, Y55 and T56. We ascertained that the ability to catalyse the transfer of phosphate depends on the presence of a bulky residue in the active site very close to the aspartate residue that forms the covalent phospho-intermediate. The molecular model indicates two possible sites at which adenylic compounds may interact. We mutated three residues that mediate interaction in the first activation site (R144, N154, I152) and three in the second (F127, M436 and H428), and found that Ap₄A and ADP interact with the same site, but the sites for ATP and BPG remain uncertain. The structural model indicates that cN-II is a homotetrameric protein that results from interaction through a specific interface B of two identical dimers that have arisen from interaction of two identical subunits through interface A. Point mutations in the two interfaces and gel-filtration experiments indicated that the dimer is the smallest active oligomerization state. Finally, gel-filtration and light-scattering experiments demonstrated that the native enzyme exists as a tetramer, and no further oligomerization is required for enzyme activation.

  8. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments at dredged material disposal sites around England: concentrations in 2013 and time trend information at selected sites 2008-2013.

    PubMed

    Rumney, Heather S; Bolam, Stefan G; Law, Robin J

    2015-03-15

    The maintenance of navigation channels to ports and the development of their facilities present a need to conduct dredging operations, and the subsequent disposal of dredged material at sea. Contaminant concentrations in candidate dredged material are determined and their possible impacts considered during the licensing process, which can result in the exclusion of some material from sea disposal. Monitoring of disposal sites is conducted in order to ensure that no undesirable impacts are occurring. In this study we consider the levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediments at a number of disposal sites monitored in 2013 and variations in concentrations over time at three sites during the period 2008-2013. These were assessed using established sediment quality guidelines. Elevated PAH concentrations were generally observed only within the boundaries of the disposal sites studied.

  9. The influence of thoron on instruments measuring radon activity concentration.

    PubMed

    Michielsen, N; Bondiguel, S

    2015-11-01

    Thoron, the isotope 220 of radon, is a radionuclide whose concentration may influence the measurement of the activity concentration of (222)Rn in the air. If in the case of continuous and active sampling measuring instruments, using a pump for example, the influence of thoron on radon measurement is obvious and is taken into account in the apparatus, it is often assumed that in the case of a passive sampling, by diffusion through a filter for example, this thoron influence is negligible. This is due to the very short radioactive half-life of thoron, 55.6 s (3.82 d for (222)Rn), and the assumption that the diffusion time of thoron in the detection chamber is long enough beside that of the thoron half-life. The objective of this study is to check whether this assumption is true or not for different kinds of commercial electronic apparatus used to measure radon activity concentration from soil to dwellings. First of all, the devices were calibrated in activity concentration of radon, and then they were exposed to a controlled thoron atmosphere. The experiments concerning the thoron aimed to investigate the sensitivity to thoron in the radon measuring mode of the apparatus. Results of these experiments show that all devices have a very quick answer to thoron atmosphere, even though the sensitivities vary from one instrument to another. Results clearly show that this influence on radon measurement due to the thoron is observed also after the exposition because of the decay of (212)Pb and its progenies. In conclusion, the sensitivity to thoron in the radon measuring mode depends strongly on the type of instruments. The results of the present investigation show that for some apparatus, the influence of thoron cannot be disregarded especially when measuring radon in soil.

  10. Activity concentrations and dose rates from decorative granite countertops.

    PubMed

    Llope, W J

    2011-06-01

    The gamma radiation emitted from a variety of commercial decorative granites available for use in U.S. homes has been measured with portable survey meters as well as an NaI(Th) gamma spectrometer. The (40)K, U-nat, and (232)Th activity concentrations were determined using a full-spectrum analysis. The dose rates that would result from two different arrangements of decorative granite slabs as countertops were explored in simulations involving an adult anthropomorphic phantom.

  11. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Cyanide (CN) is a well-studied toxic principle, known to inhibit heme-enzymes. • Inhibition is supposed to result from CN binding at the active site as a ligand. • Diverse heme enzymes’ CN inhibition profiles challenge prevailing mechanism. • Poor binding efficiency of CN at low enzyme concentrations and ligand pressures. • CN-based diffusible radicals cause ‘non-productive electron transfers’ (inhibition). - Abstract: The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins’ active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  12. Aerosol measurements at a high-elevation site: composition, size, and cloud condensation nuclei activity

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Beth; Zelenyuk, Alla; Beranek, Josef; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Hallar, Anna G.; McCubbin, Ian; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2013-12-09

    We present measurements of CCN concentrations and associated aerosol composition and size properties at a high-elevation research site in March 2011. CCN closure and aerosol hygroscopicity were assessed using simplified assumptions of bulk aerosol properties as well as a new method utilizing single particle composition and size to assess the importance of particle mixing state in CCN activation. Free troposphere analysis found no significant difference between the CCN activity of free tropospheric aerosol and boundary layer aerosol at this location. Closure results indicate that using only size and number information leads to adequate prediction, in the majority of cases within 50%, of CCN concentrations, while incorporating the hygroscopicity parameters of the individual aerosol components measured by single particle mass spectrometry adds to the agreement, in most cases within 20%, between predicted and measured CCN concentrations. For high-elevation continental sites, with largely aged aerosol and low amounts of local area emissions, a lack of chemical knowledge and hygroscopicity may not hinder models in predicting CCN concentrations. At sites influenced by fresh emissions or more heterogeneous particle types, single particle composition information may be more useful in predicting CCN concentrations and understanding the importance of particle mixing state on CCN activation.

  13. BAX Activation is Initiated at a Novel Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Suzuki, Motoshi; Davis, Marguerite L.; Pitter, Kenneth; Bird, Gregory H.; Katz, Samuel G.; Tu, Ho-Chou; Kim, Hyungjin; Cheng, Emily H.-Y.; Tjandra, Nico; Walensky, Loren D.

    2008-01-01

    BAX is a pro-apoptotic protein of the BCL-2 family stationed in the cytosol until activated by a diversity of stress stimuli to induce cell death. Anti-apoptotic proteins such as BCL-2 counteract BAX-mediated cell death. Although an interaction site that confers survival functionality has been defined for anti-apoptotic proteins, an activation site has not been identified for BAX, rendering its explicit trigger mechanism unknown. We previously developed Stabilized Alpha-Helix of BCL-2 domains (SAHBs) that directly initiate BAX-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis. Here we demonstrate by NMR analysis that BIM SAHB binds BAX at an interaction site that is distinct from the canonical binding groove characterized for anti-apoptotic proteins. The specificity of the BIM SAHB-BAX interaction is highlighted by point mutagenesis that abrogates functional activity, confirming that BAX activation is initiated at this novel structural location. Thus, we have now defined a BAX interaction site for direct activation, establishing a new target for therapeutic modulation of apoptosis. PMID:18948948

  14. Wet deposition of mercury at a remote site in the Tibetan Plateau: Concentrations, speciation, and fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jie; Kang, Shichang; Zhang, Qianggong; Yan, Haiyu; Guo, Junming; Jenkins, Matt G.; Zhang, Guoshuai; Wang, Kang

    2012-12-01

    Precipitation samples collected at a remote high elevation site (i.e., Nam Co Station, 4730 m a.s.l.) in the southern Tibetan Plateau were analyzed for total mercury (HgT) between July 2009 and 2011, particulate-bound mercury (HgP) between July 2010 and 2011 and methylmercury (MeHg) from July through August of 2009. The volume-weighted mean (VWM) concentrations and wet deposition fluxes of HgT and MeHg in precipitation were 4.8 ng L-1 and 1.75 μg m-2 yr-1, 0.031 ng L-1 and 0.01 μg m-2 yr-1, respectively. VWM HgT concentration was approximately two times higher during the non-monsoon season than during the monsoon season, while 83% of the HgT wet deposition fluxes occurred during the monsoon season. The HgT and MeHg concentrations are comparable to the reported data for some of the most remote alpine and polar regions worldwide (e.g., Churchill), but the wet deposition fluxes of HgT and MeHg were among the lowest in the world. Analysis of Hg speciation has presented that HgP and MeHg concentrations are high, making up 71.2% and 1.82% of the HgT on average (VWM), respectively. The high HgP%, as well as a significantly positive between HgT and HgP (R2 = 0.91; n = 44; p < 0.001), confirmed that atmospheric deposition of Hg in the Tibetan Plateau was occurring in the form of HgP. A decreasing trend in HgT concentrations with increasing amount of precipitation (R2 = 0.08; N = 101; p < 0.005) was found at Nam Co Station, indicative that scavenging of HgP from the atmosphere was an important mechanism contributing Hg to precipitation. The precipitation amount, rather than HgT concentration, was found to be the governing factor affecting HgT wet deposition flux. Moreover, a comparison between measured wet deposition flux of Hg at Nam Co Station and the estimates from environmental records indicated that both snowpits and lake sediments appear to be reliable archives for estimating historical Hg accumulation rates over the Tibetan Plateau.

  15. Magnetic Measurements and Heavy Metal Concentrations at Formosa Mine Superfund Site, Douglas County, OR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upton, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in the field of environmental magnetism have led to exciting new applications for this field. Magnetic minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and tend to have an affinity for heavy metals. It has been demonstrated that magnetic properties are often significantly related to concentrations of heavy metals and/or pollution loading index (PLI). As a result, magnetic techniques have been used as proxy for determining hot spots of several types of pollution produced from a diversity of anthropogenic sources. Magnetic measurements are non-destructive and relatively inexpensive compared to geochemical analyses. The utility of environmental magnetic methods varies widely depending on biological, chemical and physical processes that create and transform soils and sediments. Applications in the direction of mapping heavy metals have been studied and shown to be quite useful in countries such as China and India but to date, little research has been done in the US. As such, there is need to expand the scope of research to a wider range of soil types and land uses, especially within the US. This study investigates the application of environmental magnetic techniques to mapping of heavy metal concentrations and PLI at the Formosa Mine Superfund Site, an abandoned mine about 25 miles southwest of Roseburg, OR. Using hotspot analysis, correlation and cluster analyses, interactions between metals and magnetic parameters are examined in relation to environmental factors such as proximity to seeps and adits. Preliminary results suggest significant correlation of magnetic susceptibility with certain heavy metals, signifying that magnetic methods may be useful in mapping heavy metal hotspots at this site.

  16. Involvement of novel autophosphorylation sites in ATM activation.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Graham, Mark E; Peng, Cheng; Chen, Philip; Robinson, Phillip J; Lavin, Martin F

    2006-08-09

    ATM kinase plays a central role in signaling DNA double-strand breaks to cell cycle checkpoints and to the DNA repair machinery. Although the exact mechanism of ATM activation remains unknown, efficient activation requires the Mre11 complex, autophosphorylation on S1981 and the involvement of protein phosphatases and acetylases. We report here the identification of several additional phosphorylation sites on ATM in response to DNA damage, including autophosphorylation on pS367 and pS1893. ATM autophosphorylates all these sites in vitro in response to DNA damage. Antibodies against phosphoserine 1893 revealed rapid and persistent phosphorylation at this site after in vivo activation of ATM kinase by ionizing radiation, paralleling that observed for S1981 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation was dependent on functional ATM and on the Mre11 complex. All three autophosphorylation sites are physiologically important parts of the DNA damage response, as phosphorylation site mutants (S367A, S1893A and S1981A) were each defective in ATM signaling in vivo and each failed to correct radiosensitivity, genome instability and cell cycle checkpoint defects in ataxia-telangiectasia cells. We conclude that there are at least three functionally important radiation-induced autophosphorylation events in ATM.

  17. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  18. Effect of particle surface area on ice active site densities retrieved from droplet freezing spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beydoun, Hassan; Polen, Michael; Sullivan, Ryan C.

    2016-10-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation remains one of the outstanding problems in cloud physics and atmospheric science. Experimental challenges in properly simulating particle-induced freezing processes under atmospherically relevant conditions have largely contributed to the absence of a well-established parameterization of immersion freezing properties. Here, we formulate an ice active, surface-site-based stochastic model of heterogeneous freezing with the unique feature of invoking a continuum assumption on the ice nucleating activity (contact angle) of an aerosol particle's surface that requires no assumptions about the size or number of active sites. The result is a particle-specific property g that defines a distribution of local ice nucleation rates. Upon integration, this yields a full freezing probability function for an ice nucleating particle. Current cold plate droplet freezing measurements provide a valuable and inexpensive resource for studying the freezing properties of many atmospheric aerosol systems. We apply our g framework to explain the observed dependence of the freezing temperature of droplets in a cold plate on the concentration of the particle species investigated. Normalizing to the total particle mass or surface area present to derive the commonly used ice nuclei active surface (INAS) density (ns) often cannot account for the effects of particle concentration, yet concentration is typically varied to span a wider measurable freezing temperature range. A method based on determining what is denoted an ice nucleating species' specific critical surface area is presented and explains the concentration dependence as a result of increasing the variability in ice nucleating active sites between droplets. By applying this method to experimental droplet freezing data from four different systems, we demonstrate its ability to interpret immersion freezing temperature spectra of droplets containing variable particle concentrations. It is shown that general

  19. Characteristics of Zinc Phosphate Coating Activated by Different Concentrations of Nickel Acetate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, Khalid; Zuhailawati, H.; Rahmat, Azmi; Azizan, A.

    2017-02-01

    Activation pretreatment with nickel acetate solution at various concentrations was performed prior to the phosphating step to enhance the corrosion resistance of carbon steel substrates. The activation solution was studied over various concentrations: 10, 50, and 100 g/L. The effects of these concentrations on surface characteristics and microstructural evolution of the coated samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The electrochemical behavior was evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and immersion test in a 3.5 pct NaCl solution. Significant increases in the nucleation sites and surface coverage of zinc phosphate coating were observed as the concentration of activation solution reached 50 g/L. The electrochemical analysis revealed that the activation treatment with 50 g/L nickel acetate solution significantly improved the protection ability of the zinc phosphate coating. The corrosion current density of activated phosphate coating with 50 g/L was reduced by 64.64 and 13.22 pct, compared to the coatings obtained with activation solutions of 10 and 100 g/L, respectively.

  20. Intercomparison of high-volume PM10 samplers at a site with high-particulate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Purdue, L.J.; Rodes, C.E.; Rehme, K.A.; Holland, D.M.; Bond, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    Commercially available high-volume PM10 samplers were intercompared at a site in Phoenix characterized by high concentrations of coarse particles. Over a 21-day period, Sierra Andersen 321A (SA 321A) samplers gave PM10 measurements 58% higher than the Wedding IP10 (WED) samplers and 16% higher than a SA 321A sampler that had an oil coating on the internal impaction surfaces of the inlet. WED samplers that were subjected to a simple brush-cleaning procedure after each sampling period gave PM10 results 16% higher than the WED samplers not subjected to cleaning. The oiled SA 321A sampler gave PM10 values 15% higher than the cleaned WED samplers. The results demonstrate that the SA 321A overestimates PM10 when sampling in an environment with high coarse-particle concentrations. The over collection results from pass-through of large particles, and can be minimized by oiling the internal impaction surfaces of the inlet. The WED sampler underestimates PM10 after several days of sampling in such an environment.

  1. Geostatistical site characterization of hydraulic head and uranium concentration in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Buxton, B.E.; Wells, D.E.; Pate, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    The first case study presented in this paper describes an assessment of the spatial distribution and temporal changes in hydraulic head pressure in the groundwater beneath a retired federal government uranium processing facility. Analysis of the hydraulic heads involved ordinary kriging which was found to be a better mapping method than such alternatives as inverse-distance weighting, mainly because kriging provides measures of estimation uncertainty. The objective of this kriging was to provide estimated steady-state head values for use in calibrating a groundwater flow model for the site. In the second case study, the spatial distribution of potential uranium contamination in the aquifer was assessed with lognormal kriging. Uranium measurements for this analysis were available at roughly three-month intervals across a four-year time period. The objective of the analysis was to assess where the uranium concentrations were highest. A second objective, not addressed in this paper, was to determine if the concentrations were changing significantly during the four-year time period.

  2. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  3. Spectroscopic studies of the active site of galactose oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, P.F.; Brown, R.D. III; Koenig, S.H.

    1995-07-19

    X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopy have been used to probe the copper site structure in galactose oxidase at pH 4.5 and 7.0. the results suggest that there are no major differences in the structure of the tetragonal Cu(II) site at these pH values. Analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicates that four N,O scatterers are present at approximately 2 {Angstrom}; these are presumably the equatorial ligands. In addition, the EXAFS data establish that oxidative activation to produce the active-site tyrosine radical does not cause major changes in the copper coordination environment. Therefore results obtained on the one-electron reduced enzyme, containing Cu(II) but not the tyrosine radical, probably also apply to the catalytically active Cu(II)/tyrosine radical state. Solvent water exchange, inhibitor binding, and substrate binding have been probed via nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) measurements. The NMRD profile of galactose oxidase is quantitatively consistent with the rapid exchange of a single, equatorial water ligand with a Cu(II)-O separation of about 2.4 {Angstrom}. Azide and cyanide displace this coordinated water. The binding of azide and the substrate dihydroxyacetone produce very similar effects on the NMRD profile of galactose oxidase, indicating that substrates also bind to the active site Cu(II) in an equatorial position.

  4. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  5. Airborne concentrations of trivalent and hexavalent chromium from contaminated soils at unpaved and partially paved commercial/industrial sites

    SciTech Connect

    Falerios, M.; Schild, K. ); Sheehan, P.; Paustenbach, D.J. )

    1992-01-01

    This method described was used to quantify airborne Cr(VI) levels at both indoor and outdoor locations at 21 sites in Hudson County, New Jersey which have soils containing chromite ore processing residue. Of the 21 sites evaluated, nine were unpaved or partially paved industrial/commercial sites or roadways with a moderate to high level of heavy truck traffic. Most of the remainder were commercial facilities with partially paved or unpaved parking lots and only light vehicle traffic. In addition, 15 residential sites in the area which do not have contaminated soil were sampled to characterized background levels of Cr(VI). The overall arithmetic mean values for indoor and outdoor Cr(VI) in total suspended particulates at the 12 industrial sites were 3.0 ng/m{sup 3} and 9.9ng/m{sup 3}, respectively. The indoor Cr(VI) concentrations measured at the 15 residential sites ranged from 0.38 to 3.3 ng/m{sup 3}. Airborne Cr(VI) levels outdoors at sites with chromite ore residue appear to be primarily influenced by the level of local vehicle traffic. Measured outdoor concentrations at sites with light vehicle traffic were generally low, within the range of levels measured indoors at the residential sites, and not strongly influenced by Cr(VI) concentrations in surface soils. At sites with a high rate of vehicle traffic, outdoor Cr(VI) concentrations exceeded background levels only on days when surface soils were dry. The average concentrations measured at these sites were more than 5,000-times lower than the current occupational exposure limit for Cr(VI) (TLV = 0.05 mg/m{sup 3}).

  6. Plasma renin activities, angiotensin II concentrations, atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations and cardiopulmonary function values in dogs with severe heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, H; Kitoh, K; Inoue, H; Ohba, Y; Suzuki, F; Sasaki, Y

    2000-04-01

    Relationships among plasma renin activities (PRA), plasma angiotensin II (ATII) concentrations, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) concentrations and cardiopulmonary function values were examined in dogs with ascitic pulmonary heartworm disease and acute- and chronic-vena caval syndrome (CS). PRA, plasma ATII concentration and plasma ANP concentration tended to be higher or were significantly higher in dogs with ascites, acute- and chronic-CS. PRA correlated significantly with plasma ATII concentration, WBC count, ALP activity, plasma concentrations of urea nitrogen, creatinine, sodium, potassium, and chloride, right ventricular endodiastolic pressure and right atrial pressure. Plasma ATII concentration correlated significantly with WBC count, plasma concentrations of urea nitrogen, sodium, and potassium, right ventricular endodiastolic pressure and right atrial pressure. Plasma ANP concentration did not correlate with PRA or ATII concentration, but correlated significantly only with pulmonary arterial pressure.

  7. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  8. Electrochemical Evidence for Neuroglobin Activity on NO at Physiological Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Trashin, Stanislav; de Jong, Mats; Luyckx, Evi; Dewilde, Sylvia; De Wael, Karolien

    2016-09-02

    The true function of neuroglobin (Ngb) and, particularly, human Ngb (NGB) has been under debate since its discovery 15 years ago. It has been expected to play a role in oxygen binding/supply, but a variety of other functions have been put forward, including NO dioxygenase activity. However, in vitro studies that could unravel these potential roles have been hampered by the lack of an Ngb-specific reductase. In this work, we used electrochemical measurements to investigate the role of an intermittent internal disulfide bridge in determining NO oxidation kinetics at physiological NO concentrations. The use of a polarized electrode to efficiently interconvert the ferric (Fe(3+)) and ferrous (Fe(2+)) forms of an immobilized NGB showed that the disulfide bridge both defines the kinetics of NO dioxygenase activity and regulates appearance of the free ferrous deoxy-NGB, which is the redox active form of the protein in contrast to oxy-NGB. Our studies further identified a role for the distal histidine, interacting with the hexacoordinated iron atom of the heme, in oxidation kinetics. These findings may be relevant in vivo, for example, in blocking apoptosis by reduction of ferric cytochrome c, and gentle tuning of NO concentration in the tissues.

  9. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-06

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions.

  10. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C.; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F.; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W.; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa. Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  11. Probing the promiscuous active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase using synthetic substrates, homology modeling, and active site modification.

    PubMed

    Daniellou, Richard; Zheng, Hongyan; Langill, David M; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2007-06-26

    The active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase (IDH, EC 1.1.1.18) from Bacillus subtilis recognizes a variety of mono- and disaccharides, as well as 1l-4-O-substituted inositol derivatives. It catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the axial alcohol of these substrates with comparable kinetic constants. We have found that 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol does not act as a substrate for IDH, in contrast to structurally similar compounds such as those bearing substituted benzyl substituents in the same position. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol and 4-O-(2-naphthyl)methyl-myo-inositol, which is a substrate for IDH, shows a distinct difference in the preferred conformation of the aryl substituent. Conformational analysis of known substrates of IDH suggests that this conformational difference may account for the difference in reactivity of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol in the presence of IDH. A sequence alignment of IDH with the homologous glucose-fructose oxidoreductase allowed the construction of an homology model of inositol dehydrogenase, to which NADH and 4-O-benzyl-scyllo-inosose were docked and the active site energy minimized. The active site model is consistent with all experimental results and suggests that a conserved tyrosine-glycine-tyrosine motif forms the hydrophobic pocket adjoining the site of inositol recognition. Y233F and Y235F retain activity, while Y233R and Y235R do not. A histidine-aspartate pair, H176 and D172, are proposed to act as a dyad in which H176 is the active site acid/base. The enzyme is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate, and the mutants H176A and D172N show a marked loss of activity. Kinetic isotope effect experiments with D172N indicate that chemistry is rate-determining for this mutant.

  12. The active site structure and mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Arginine specific reagents showed irreversible inhibition of avian liver mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Potent protection against modification was elicited by CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} in the presence of other substrates. Labeling of enzyme with (7-{sup 14}C) phenylglyoxal showed that 1 or 2 arginines are involved in CO{sub 2} binding and activation. Peptide map studies showed this active site arginine residues is located at position 289. Histidine specific reagents showed pseudo first order inhibition of avian mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity. The best protection against modification was elicited by IDP or IDP and Mn{sup +2}. One histidine residue is at or near the phosphoenolpyruvate binding site as demonstrated in the increased absorbance at 240 nm and proton relaxation rate studies. Circular dichroism studies reveal that enzyme structure was perturbed by diethylpyrocarbonate modification. Metal binding studies suggest that this enzyme has only one metal binding site. The putative binding sites from several GTP and phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes are observed in P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase from different species.

  13. Factors, origin and sources affecting PM1 concentrations and composition at an urban background site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squizzato, Stefania; Masiol, Mauro; Agostini, Chiara; Visin, Flavia; Formenton, Gianni; Harrison, Roy M.; Rampazzo, Giancarlo

    2016-11-01

    PM1 is widely believed to provide better information on the anthropogenic fraction of particulate matter pollution than PM2.5. However, data on PM1 are still limited in Europe as well as comprehensive information about its chemical composition and source apportionment and this gap is more evident in the pollution hot-spots still remaining in Europe, such as the Po Valley (Northern Italy). Elemental and organic carbon, 7 water soluble inorganic ions and 17 elements were quantified in 117 PM1 samples collected at an urban background site in Venice-Mestre, a large city located in the eastern Po Valley, during winter (December 2013-February 2014) and summer (May-July 2014) periods. Results show a strong seasonality for PM1 mass concentration (averages ranging from 6 ± 2 in summer to 34 ± 24 μg m- 3 in winter) and for most of the analysed species. Components mainly related to road traffic, residential heating, biomass burning and secondary inorganic aerosol (ammonium nitrate) reached their highest levels in winter, while mineral dust and marine components were elevated in summer. PMF analysis revealed 7 potential sources. Secondary inorganic aerosol (33%) and biomass burning (33%) are the major contributor in winter followed by EC-primary emissions (16%), aged sulphate (6%), road traffic (7%), fossil fuel combustion (%) and marine aerosol (3%). During summer, these sources account for 12%, 14%, 20%, 22%, 8%, 14% and 10%, respectively. Some PM1 sources are located near the sampling site (residential area, traffic road, industrial area) but a major contribution of long range transport is observed when high pollution events occur. The results give useful insights into PM1 composition in an urban area and chemical profiles of sources helpful in the interpretation of receptor model results.

  14. Ambient airborne-solids concentrations including volcanic ash at Hanford, Washington sampling sites subsequent to the Mount St. Helens eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1981-06-01

    A major eruption of Mount St. Helens, state of Washington, USA, occurred on May 18, 1980. The resulting volcanic ash plume was transported to the east. The Hanford area, northwest of Richland, Washington, was within the southern edge of the fallout plume. Airborne solid concentrations and airborne particle size distributions were measured at two sites in the Hanford area, a southern and northern site. During the initial sampling day (May 19), the average concentration for respirable particles, < 5.5-..mu..m diameter, was 1430-..mu..g/m/sup 3/ at the southern site; the total collection was 2610-..mu..g/m/sup 3/. The respirable content of the total airborne solids was 55%. At both sites average airborne solid concentrations decreased to 10- to 20-..mu..g/m/sup 3/ in December.

  15. Dimerization in Highly Concentrated Solutions of Phosphoimidazolide Activated Monomucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    1997-08-01

    Phosphoimidazolide activated ribomononucleotides (*pN) are useful substrates for the non-enzymatic synthesis of polynucleotides. However, dilute neutral aqueous solutions of *pN typically yield small amounts of dimers and traces of polymers; most of *pN hydrolyzes to yield nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. Here we report the self-condensation of nucleoside 5'-phosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpN with N = cytidine, uridine or guanosine) in the presence of Mg2+ in concentrated solutions, such as might have been found in an evaporating lagoon on prebiotic Earth. The product distribution indicates that oligomerization is favored at the expense of hydrolysis. At 1.0 M, 2-MeImpU and 2-MeImpC produce about 65% of oligomers including 4% of the 3',5'-linked dimer. Examination of the product distribution of the three isomeric dimers in a self-condensation allows identification of reaction pathways that lead to dimer formation. Condensations in a concentrated mixture of all three nucleotides (U,C,G mixtures) is made possible by the enhanced solubility of 2-MeImpG in such mixtures. Although percent yield of internucleotide linked dimers is enhanced as a function of initial monomer concentration, pyrophosphate dimer yields remain practically unchanged at about 20% for 2-MeImpU, 16% for 2-MeImpC and 25% of the total pyrophosphate in the U,C,G mixtures. The efficiency by which oligomers are produced in these concentrated solutions makes the evaporating lagoon scenario a potentially interesting medium for the prebiotic synthesis of dimers and short RNAs.

  16. Dimerization in Highly Concentrated Solutions of Phosphoimidazolide Activated Mononucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    1997-01-01

    Phosphoimidazolide activated ribomononucleotides (*pN) are useful substrates for the non-enzymatic synthesis of polynucleotides. However, dilute neutral aqueous solutions of *pN typically yield small amounts of dimers and traces of polymers; most of *pN hydrolyzes to yield nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. Here we report the self-condensation of nucleoside 5'-phosphate 2- methylimidazolide (2-MeImpN with N = cytidine, uridine or guanosine) in the presence of Mg2(+) in concentrated solutions, such as might have been found in an evaporating lagoon on prebiotic Earth. The product distribution indicates that oligomerization is favored at the expense of hydrolysis. At 1.0 M, 2-MelmpU and 2-MelmpC produce about 65% of oligomers including 4% of the 3',5'-Iinked dimer. Examination of the product distribution of the three isomeric dimers in a self-condensation allows identification of reaction pathways that lead to dimer formation. Condensations in a concentrated mixture of all three nucleotides (U,C,G mixtures) is made possible by the enhanced solubility of 2-MeImpG in such mixtures. Although percent yield of intemucleotide linked dimers is enhanced as a function of initial monomer concentration, pyrophosphate dimer yields remain practically unchanged at about 20% for 2-MelmpU, 16% for 2-MeImpC and 25% of the total pyrophosphate in the U,C,G mixtures. The efficiency by which oligomers are produced in these concentrated solutions makes the evaporating lagoon scenario a potentially interesting medium for the prebiotic synthesis of dimers and short RNAs.

  17. Metal concentration and antioxidant activity of edible mushrooms from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sarikurkcu, Cengiz; Tepe, Bektas; Kocak, Mehmet Sefa; Uren, Mehmet Cemil

    2015-05-15

    This study presents information on the antioxidant activity and heavy metal concentrations of Polyporus sulphureus, Macrolepiota procera, Lycoperdon perlatum and Gomphus clavatus mushrooms collected from the province of Mugla in the South-Aegean Region of Turkey. Antioxidant activities of mushroom samples were evaluated by four complementary tests. All tests showed L. perlatum and G. clavatus to possess extremely high antioxidant potential. Antioxidant activity of the samples was strongly correlated with total phenolic-flavonoid content. In terms of heavy metal content, L. perlatum exceeded the legal limits for daily intake of Pb, Fe, Mn, Cr, Ni and Co contents (0.461, 738.00, 14.52, 1.27, 1.65, 0.417 mg/day, respectively) by a 60-kg consumer. Co contents of M. procera (0.026 mg/day) and P. sulphureus (0.030 mg/day) and Cd contents of G. clavatus (0.071 mg/day) were also above the legal limits. According to these results, L. perlatum should not be consumed, despite the potentially beneficial antioxidant activity. Additionally, M. procera and G. clavatus should not be consumed daily due to their high levels of Cd and Co.

  18. Relationships between airborne fungal spore concentration of Cladosporium and the summer climate at two sites in Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollins, P. D.; Kettlewell, P. S.; Atkinson, M. D.; Stephenson, D. B.; Corden, J. M.; Millington, W. M.; Mullins, J.

    Cladosporium conidia have been shown to be important aeroallergens in many regions throughout the world, but annual spore concentrations vary considerably between years. Understanding these annual fluctuations may be of value in the clinical management of allergies. This study investigates the number of days in summer when spore concentration exceeds the allergenic threshold in relation to regional temperature and precipitation at two sites in England and Wales over 27 years. Results indicate that number of days in summer when the Cladosporium spores are above the allergenic concentration is positively correlated with regional temperature and negatively correlated with precipitation for both sites over the study period. Further analysis used a winter North Atlantic Oscillation index to explore the potential for long-range forecasting of the aeroallergen. For both spore measurement sites, a positive correlation exists between the winter North Atlantic Oscillation index and the number of days in summer above the allergenic threshold for Cladosporium spore concentration.

  19. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Silicate Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts [1-3]. Nevertheless, among those structures K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. In this study, the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars were investigated in closer details. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. We give a potential explanation of the increased ice nucleation activity of K-feldspar. The ice nucleating sites are very much dependent on the alkali ion present by altering the water structure and the feldspar surface. The higher activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to the presence of potassium ions on the surface and surface bilayer. The alkali-ions have different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar. Chaotropic behavior of Calcium and Sodium ions are lowering the ice nucleation potential of the other feldspars, while kosmotropic Potassium has a neutral or even positive effect. Furthermore we investigated the influence of milling onto the ice nucleation of quartz particles. The ice nucleation activity can be increased by mechanical milling, by introducing more molecular, nucleation active defects to the particle surface. This effect is larger than expected by plane surface increase. [1] Atkinson et al. The Importance of Feldspar for Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust in Mixed-Phase Clouds. Nature 2013, 498, 355-358. [2] Yakobi-Hancock et al.. Feldspar Minerals as Efficient Deposition Ice Nuclei. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2013, 13, 11175-11185. [3] Zolles et al. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015 accepted.

  20. Mercury concentrations in water, and mercury and selenium concentrations in fish from Brownlee Reservoir and selected sites in Boise and Snake Rivers, Idaho and Oregon, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCoy, Dorene E.

    2014-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) analyses were conducted on samples of sport fish and water collected from six sampling sites in the Boise and Snake Rivers, and Brownlee Reservoir to meet National Pollution Discharge and Elimination System (NPDES) permit requirements for the City of Boise, Idaho. A water sample was collected from each site during October and November 2013 by the City of Boise personnel and was analyzed by the Boise City Public Works Water Quality Laboratory. Total Hg concentrations in unfiltered water samples ranged from 0.73 to 1.21 nanograms per liter (ng/L) at five river sites; total Hg concentration was highest (8.78 ng/L) in a water sample from Brownlee Reservoir. All Hg concentrations in water samples were less than the EPA Hg chronic aquatic life criterion in Idaho (12 ng/L). The EPA recommended a water-quality criterion of 0.30 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) methylmercury (MeHg) expressed as a fish-tissue residue value (wet-weight MeHg in fish tissue). MeHg residue in fish tissue is considered to be equivalent to total Hg in fish muscle tissue and is referred to as Hg in this report. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality adopted the EPA’s fish-tissue criterion and a reasonable potential to exceed (RPTE) threshold 20 percent lower than the criterion or greater than 0.24 mg/kg based on an average concentration of 10 fish from a receiving waterbody. NPDES permitted discharge to waters with fish having Hg concentrations exceeding 0.24 mg/kg are said to have a reasonable potential to exceed the water-quality criterion and thus are subject to additional permit obligations, such as requirements for increased monitoring and the development of a Hg minimization plan. The Idaho Fish Consumption Advisory Program (IFCAP) issues fish advisories to protect general and sensitive populations of fish consumers and has developed an action level of 0.22 mg/kg wet weight Hg in fish tissue. Fish consumption advisories are water body- and species-specific and are used to

  1. Face the Edges: Catalytic Active Sites of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Edges are special sites in nanomaterials. The atoms residing on the edges have different environments compared to those in other parts of a nanomaterial and, therefore, they may have different properties. Here, recent progress in nanomaterial fields is summarized from the viewpoint of the edges. Typically, edge sites in MoS2 or metals, other than surface atoms, can perform as active centers for catalytic reactions, so the method to enhance performance lies in the optimization of the edge structures. The edges of multicomponent interfaces present even more possibilities to enhance the activities of nanomaterials. Nanoframes and ultrathin nanowires have similarities to conventional edges of nanoparticles, the application of which as catalysts can help to reduce the use of costly materials. Looking beyond this, the edge structures of graphene are also essential for their properties. In short, the edge structure can influence many properties of materials. PMID:27980960

  2. Evaluation of activated carbon respirator filter effectiveness by concentration mapping of dimethyl methylphosphonate.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Brendan L; Billingsley, Brit G; Logue, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC) has been used extensively in personal protective equipment (PPE) to adsorb toxic substances for the purpose of protecting the user from exposure. The ability to evaluate localized carbon utilization in multiple PPE designs would help engineers develop more effective PPE. Therefore, a method to map dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a common PPE testing agent, concentrations throughout AC filters was developed and tested on DMMP-exposed filters, some purposefully occluded to simulate defective filters. DMMP concentrations were highest at the point of entry and dispersed outward in a radial pattern from that site, decreasing with distance from the point of exposure. Occluded filters were detected by observing DMMP adsorption inconsistent with unblocked filters and showed high concentrations of DMMP localized in unblocked areas of the filter. The DMMP mapping technique detailed in this study provides a tool for testing AC utilization inside DMMP-exposed PPE.

  3. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  4. Nest predation increases with parental activity: separating nest site and parental activity effects.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T E; Scott, J; Menge, C

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection. PMID:11413645

  5. Binding Site Concentration Explains the Differential Susceptibility of Chilo suppressalis and Sesamia inferens to Cry1A-Producing Rice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chao; Liu, Zewen; Chen, Fajun; Hou, Maolin; Peng, Yufa

    2014-01-01

    Chilo suppressalis and Sesamia inferens are two important lepidopteran rice pests that occur concurrently during outbreaks in paddy fields in the main rice-growing areas of China. Previous and current field tests demonstrate that the transgenic rice line Huahui 1 (HH1) producing a Cry1Ab-Cry1Ac hybrid toxin from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis reduces egg and larval densities of C. suppressalis but not of S. inferens. This differential susceptibility to HH1 rice correlates with the reduced susceptibility to Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins in S. inferens larvae compared to C. suppressalis larvae. The goal of this study was to identify the mechanism responsible for this differential susceptibility. In saturation binding assays, both Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins bound with high affinity and in a saturable manner to midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from C. suppressalis and S. inferens larvae. While binding affinities were similar, a dramatically lower concentration of Cry1A toxin binding sites was detected for S. inferens BBMV than for C. suppressalis BBMV. In contrast, no significant differences between species were detected for Cry1Ca toxin binding to BBMV. Ligand blotting detected BBMV proteins binding Cry1Ac or Cry1Ca toxins, some of them unique to C. suppressalis or S. inferens. These data support that reduced Cry1A binding site concentration is associated with a lower susceptibility to Cry1A toxins and HH1 rice in S. inferens larvae than in C. suppressalis larvae. Moreover, our data support Cry1Ca as a candidate for pyramiding efforts with Cry1A-producing rice to extend the activity range and durability of this technology against rice stem borers. PMID:24928872

  6. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  7. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  8. [Mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2012-04-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent for inhibiting arginine-auxotrophic tumors (such as melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas) in phase III clinical trials. In this work, we studied the molecular mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutation sites, A128, H404 and 1410, were introduced into wild-type ADI gene by QuikChange site-directed mutagenesis method, and four ADI mutants M1 (A128T), M2 (H404R), M3 (I410L), and M4 (A128T, H404R) were obtained. The ADI mutants were individually expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the enzymatic properties of the purified mutant proteins were determined. The results show that both A128T and H404R had enhanced optimum pH, higher activity and stability of ADI under physiological condition (pH 7.4), as well as reduced K(m) value. This study provides an insight into the molecular mechanism of the ADI activity, and also the experimental evidence for the rational protein evolution in the future.

  9. Evaluation of Diazinon and Chlorpyrifos Concentrations and Loads, and other Pesticide Concentrations, at Selected Sites in the San Joaquin Valley, California, April to August, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, Joseph L.; Munday, Cathy

    2003-01-01

    Twelve sites in the San Joaquin Valley of California were monitored weekly during the growing and irrigation season of 2001 for a total of 51 pesticides and pesticide degradation products, with primary interest on the concentration, load, and basin yield of organophosphorus insecticides, especially diazinon and chlorpyrifos. Diazinon was detected frequently, up to 100 percent of the time, at many of the sampling sites, but with generally low concentrations. For all sites, 75 percent of all measured diazinon concentrations were less than 0.02 mg/L, and 90 percent of all measured diazinon concentrations were less than 0.06 mg/L. The highest diazinon concentrations were measured in samples from two west-side tributaries to the San Joaquin River, Orestimba Creek, and Del Puerto Creek. The median concentration of chlorpyrifos was at or less than the laboratory reporting limit (0.005 mg/L) for most sites with the exceptions of two tributaries to the San Joaquin River: Orestimba Creek and the Tuolumne River. For all sites, 75 percent of all measured chlorpyrifos concentrations were less than 0.03 mg/L and 90 percent of all measured chlorpyrifos concentrations were less than 0.07 mg/L. The total load of diazinon out of the basin was just over 7 kilograms, which accounted for about 0.17 percent of the total agricultural applications. The diazinon load from the monitored upstream tributaries accounted for about 50 percent of the load at the mouth of the San Joaquin River. The streamflow from the selected monitored tributaries accounted for about 83 percent of the streamflow at the mouth of the San Joaquin River. The total load of chlorpyrifos out of the basin was 3.75 kilograms, and this accounted for approximately 0.007 percent of the total amount applied. Other pesticides that were frequently detected during this study included herbicides such as metolachlor, simazine, and trifluralin, and insecticides such as carbaryl, carbofuran, and propargite. At Orestimba Creek, DDE

  10. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J.; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  11. Nonionic surfactants enhancing bactericidal activity at their critical micelle concentrations.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Seiichi; Majima, Toshiaki; Tadenuma, Hirohiko; Suekuni, Tomonari; Sakai, Kenichi; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Bactericidal activities of benzalkonium chloride [also known as alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (ADBAC)] containing nonionic surfactants such as methyl ester ethoxylates (MEE) with the alkyl group C8-C14 and oxyethylene (EO) group of average adduct number 3-15 were measured against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Sample solutions containing MEE in the vicinity of the critical micelle concentration exhibited a dramatic decrease in viable bacterial counts. MEE with an alkyl group of C12 and an oxyethylene group of lower adduct number exhibited little viable bacterial counts than those having higher EO adduct numbers. MEE with reduced EO adduct numbers increased fluorescence intensity in E. coli using the viability stain SYTO 9. Our results show that MEE molecules with low EO adduct numbers exhibited bactericidal activity by increasing the permeability of the E. coli cell membrane. Sample solution containing ADBAC and MEE molecules with lower EO adduct numbers also displayed higher zeta potentials. Moreover, ADBAC molecules incorporated into micelles of MEE with lower EO adduct numbers were adsorbed onto the surface of E. coli, which augmented bactericidal activity.

  12. Assessment of thrombogenicity of activated and non-activated prothrombin concentrates in a rat model.

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, S.; Fareed, J.; Walenga, J.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro clotting activity of rats injected with different preparations of prothrombin concentrates was measured. Animals rendered deficient in vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors by early coumadin (warfarin) pretreatment, followed by injections of concentrate preparations were also evaluated. Findings indicate a dose-related response in abnormal coagulation changes demonstrable with each preparation and lack of protection of intravascular coagulation by coumadin anticoagulation. Furthermore, a role for in vivo factor VII activation of haemostasis following concentrate administration could not be elicited. PMID:3091059

  13. Determination of Background Concentrations of Inorganics in Soils and Sediments at Hazardous Waste Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this paper is to provide RPMs and others investigating hazardous waste sites a summary of the technical issues that need to be considered when determining if a site (i.e., hazardous waste site/area of concern) has elevated levels of ...

  14. Low Concentrations of Hydrogen Peroxide Activate the Antioxidant Defense System in Human Sperm Cells.

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, V V; Barinova, K V; Turovetskii, V B; Muronetz, V I; Schmalhausen, E V

    2015-09-01

    The effect of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (10-100 µM) on sperm motility and on the activity of the sperm enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDS) was investigated. Incubation of semen samples with 10 and 100 µM hydrogen peroxide increased the content of spermatozoa with progressive motility by 20 and 18%, respectively, and enhanced the activity of GAPDS in the sperm cells by 27 and 20% compared to a semen sample incubated without additions. It was also found that incubation with 10 µM hydrogen peroxide increased the content of reduced glutathione (GSH) in sperm cells by 50% on average compared to that in the control samples. It is supposed that low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide activate the pentose phosphate pathway, resulting in NADPH synthesis and the reduction of the oxidized glutathione by glutathione reductase yielding GSH. The formed GSH reduces the oxidized cysteine residues of the GAPDS active site, increasing the activity of the enzyme, which in turn enhances the content of sperm cells with progressive motility. Thus, the increase in motile spermatozoa in the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide can serve as an indicator of normal functioning of the antioxidant defense system in sperm cells.

  15. Air concentrations and wet deposition of major inorganic ions at five non-urban sites in China, 2001-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aas, Wenche; Shao, Min; Jin, Lei; Larssen, Thorjørn; Zhao, Dawei; Xiang, Renjun; Zhang, Jinhong; Xiao, Jinsong; Duan, Lei

    Air and precipitation measurements at five sites were undertaken from 2001 to 2003 in four different provinces in China, as part of the acid rain monitoring program IMPACTS. The sites were located in Tie Shan Ping (TSP) in Chongqing, Cai Jia Tang (CJT) in Hunan, Lei Gong Shan (LGS) and Liu Chong Guan (LCG) in Guizhou and Li Xi He (LXH) in Guangdong. The site characteristics are quite varied with TSP and LCG located relatively near big cites while the three others are situated in more regionally representative areas. The distances to urban centres are reflected in the air pollution concentrations, with annual average concentrations of SO 2 ranging from 0.5 to above 40 μg S m -3. The main components in the airborne particles are (NH 4) 2SO 4 and CaSO 4. Reduced nitrogen has a considerably higher concentration level than oxidised nitrogen, reflecting the high ammonia emissions from agriculture. The gas/particle ratio for the nitrogen compounds is about 1:1 at all the three intensive measurement sites, while for sulphur it varies from 2.5 to 0.5 depending on the distance to the emission sources. As in air, the predominant ions in precipitation are sulphate, calcium and ammonium. The volume weighted annual concentration of sulphate ranges from about 70 μeq l -1 at the most rural site (LGS) to about 200 μeq l -1 at TSP and LCG. The calcium concentration ranges from 25 to 250 μeq l -1, while the total nitrogen concentration is between 30 and 150 μeq l -1; ammonium is generally twice as high as nitrate. China's acid rain research has traditionally been focused on urban sites, but these measurements show a significant influence of long range transported air pollutants to rural areas in China. The concentration levels are significantly higher than seen in most other parts of the world.

  16. A hierarchical approach measures the aerial extent and concentration levels of PAH-contaminated shoreline sediments at historic industrial sites in Prince William Sound, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Page, David S; Brown, John S; Boehm, Paul D; Bence, A Edward; Neff, Jerry M

    2006-04-01

    A field study was conducted in 2003 to estimate the areal distribution and concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in intertidal sediments at sites of past human and industrial activity (HA sites) in Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska, the site of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. More than 50 HA sites, primarily in western PWS, were identified through analysis of historic records and prior field studies, and nine sites were selected for detailed surveys. The areal assessment process consisted of seven steps: (1) identify site from historic records and field surveys; (2) locate visual evidence of surface oil/tar at a site; (3) prepare a site map and lay out a sampling grid over the entire site with 10-m grid spacing; (4) excavate pits to 50 cm depth on the grid; (5) perform a field colorimetric test to estimate total PAH (TPAH) in sediments from the wall of each pit and record the results in the ranges <1 ppm; 1-10 ppm; >10 ppm TPAH; (6) expand grid size if necessary if elevated PAH levels are detected colorimetrically; (7) select 20 samples from each site for same-day shipboard PAH analysis by immunoassay (SDI RaPID PAH) and, based on these results, select sediment samples from each site for full PAH analysis in the laboratory to identify PAH sources. A total of 416 pits were dug at the nine sites. Nine acres of sediments with TPAH >2500 ppb dry wt. were mapped at the nine sites. TPAH concentrations obtained by immunochemical analysis of 181 samples from the nine sites ranged from 20 to 1,320,000 ppb (wet wt.). The contaminants are mixtures of petroleum products (2-3 ring PAH) and combustion products (4-6 ring PAH) unrelated to the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. Mussels and clams collected at these sites have elevated levels of PAH that are compositionally similar to the PAH in the sediments. These findings indicate that at least a portion of the sediment PAH is bioavailable. The PAH sources at these historic industrial sites are chronic. They

  17. MSK1 activity is controlled by multiple phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    McCOY, Claire E.; Campbell, David G.; Deak, Maria; Bloomberg, Graham B.; Arthur, J. Simon C.

    2004-01-01

    MSK1 (mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase) is a kinase activated in cells downstream of both the ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades. In the present study, we show that, in addition to being phosphorylated on Thr-581 and Ser-360 by ERK1/2 or p38, MSK1 can autophosphorylate on at least six sites: Ser-212, Ser-376, Ser-381, Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758. Of these sites, the N-terminal T-loop residue Ser-212 and the ‘hydrophobic motif’ Ser-376 are phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain of MSK1, and their phosphorylation is essential for the catalytic activity of the N-terminal kinase domain of MSK1 and therefore for the phosphorylation of MSK1 substrates in vitro. Ser-381 is also phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain, and mutation of Ser-381 decreases MSK1 activity, probably through the inhibition of Ser-376 phosphorylation. Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758 are phosphorylated by the N-terminal kinase domain; however, their function is not known. The activation of MSK1 in cells therefore requires the activation of the ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK cascades and does not appear to require additional signalling inputs. This is in contrast with the closely related RSK (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase) proteins, whose activity requires phosphorylation by PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1) in addition to phosphorylation by ERK1/2. PMID:15568999

  18. Site-specific profiles of estrogenic activity in agricultural areas of California's inland waters.

    PubMed

    Lavado, Ramon; Loyo-Rosales, Jorge E; Floyd, Emily; Kolodziej, Edward P; Snyder, Shane A; Sedlak, David L; Schlenk, Daniel

    2009-12-15

    To evaluate the occurrence and sources of compounds capable of feminizing fish in agriculturally impacted waterways of the Central Valley of California, water samples were extracted and subjected to chemical analyses as well as in vitro and in vivo measurements of vitellogenin in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Among the 16 sites sampled, 6 locations frequently exhibited elevated concentrations of estrogenic substances with 17beta-estradiol equivalents up to 242 ng/L in vitro and 12 microg/kg in vivo. The patterns of activity varied among sites, with two sites showing elevated activity only in vitro, two showing elevated activity only in vivo, and two showing elevated activity in both assays. Sequential elution of solid-phase extraction (SPE) disks followed by bioassay-guided fractionation was used to characterize water samples from the two locations where activity was observed in both bioassays. The highest estrogenic activity was observed in the most nonpolar fractions (80-100% methanol eluent) from the Napa River, while most of the activity in the Sacramento River Delta eluted in the 60% methanol eluent. Quantitative analyses of SPE extracts and additional HPLC fractionation of the SPE extracts by GC-MS/MS and LC-MS/MS indicated concentrations of steroid hormones, alkylphenol polyethoxylates, and herbicides that were at least 1-3 orders of magnitude below bioassay 17beta-estradiol equivalent calculations. Given the different patterns of activity and chemical properties of the estrogenic compounds, it appears that estrogenic activity in these agriculturally impacted surface waters is attributable to multiple compounds. Further investigation is needed to identify the compounds causing the estrogenic activity and to determine the potential impacts of these compounds on feral fish.

  19. Active-Site Monovalent Cations Revealed in a 1.55 Å Resolution Hammerhead Ribozyme Structure

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Michael; Schultz, Eric P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.

    2013-01-01

    We have obtained a 1.55 Å crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme derived from Schistosoma mansoni in conditions that permit detailed observations of Na+ ion binding in the ribozyme's active site. At least two such Na+ ions are observed. The first Na+ ion binds to the N7 of G10.1 and the adjacent A9 phosphate in a manner identical to that previously observed for divalent cations. A second Na+ ion binds to the Hoogsteen face of G12, the general base in the hammerhead cleavage reaction, thereby potentially dissipating the negative charge of the catalytically active enolate form of the nucleotide base. A potential but more ambiguous third site bridges the A9 and scissile phosphates in a manner consistent with previous predictions. Hammerhead ribozymes have been observed to be active in the presence of high concentrations of monovalent cations, including Na+, but the mechanism by which monovalent cations substitute for divalent cations in hammerhead catalysis remains unclear. Our results enable us to suggest that Na+ directly and specifically substitutes for divalent cations in the hammerhead active site. The detailed geometry of the pre-catalytic active site complex is also revealed with a new level of precision, thanks to the quality of the electron density maps obtained from what is currently the highest resolution ribozyme structure in the protein data bank. PMID:23711504

  20. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  1. Vitamin K epoxide reductase: homology, active site and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P

    2004-06-01

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) recycles reduced vitamin K, which is used subsequently as a co-factor in the gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid residues in blood coagulation enzymes. VKORC1, a subunit of the VKOR complex, has recently been shown to possess this activity. Here, we show that VKORC1 is a member of a large family of predicted enzymes that are present in vertebrates, Drosophila, plants, bacteria and archaea. Four cysteine residues and one residue, which is either serine or threonine, are identified as likely active-site residues. In some plant and bacterial homologues the VKORC1 homologous domain is fused with domains of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. These might reduce disulfide bonds of VKORC1-like enzymes as a prerequisite for their catalytic activities.

  2. Structure and nuclearity of active sites in Fe-zeolites: comparison with iron sites in enzymes and homogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zecchina, Adriano; Rivallan, Mickaël; Berlier, Gloria; Lamberti, Carlo; Ricchiardi, Gabriele

    2007-07-21

    Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite zeolites efficiently catalyse several oxidation reactions which find close analogues in the oxidation reactions catalyzed by homogeneous and enzymatic compounds. The iron centres are highly dispersed in the crystalline matrix and on highly diluted samples, mononuclear and dinuclear structures are expected to become predominant. The crystalline and robust character of the MFI framework has allowed to hypothesize that the catalytic sites are located in well defined crystallographic positions. For this reason these catalysts have been considered as the closest and best defined heterogeneous counterparts of heme and non heme iron complexes and of Fenton type Fe(2+) homogeneous counterparts. On this basis, an analogy with the methane monooxygenase has been advanced several times. In this review we have examined the abundant literature on the subject and summarized the most widely accepted views on the structure, nuclearity and catalytic activity of the iron species. By comparing the results obtained with the various characterization techniques, we conclude that Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite are not the ideal samples conceived before and that many types of species are present, some active and some other silent from adsorptive and catalytic point of view. The relative concentration of these species changes with thermal treatments, preparation procedures and loading. Only at lowest loadings the catalytically active species become the dominant fraction of the iron species. On the basis of the spectroscopic titration of the active sites by using NO as a probe, we conclude that the active species on very diluted samples are isolated and highly coordinatively unsaturated Fe(2+) grafted to the crystalline matrix. Indication of the constant presence of a smaller fraction of Fe(2+) presumably located on small clusters is also obtained. The nitrosyl species formed upon dosing NO from the gas phase on activated Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite, have been analyzed

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils and vegetation near an e-waste recycling site in South China: concentration, distribution, source, and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Tian, Zhongjing; Zhu, Haolin; Cheng, Zhineng; Kang, Meiling; Luo, Chunling; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2012-11-15

    This study determined the concentrations of PAHs generated from e-waste recycling activities and their potential impacts on soil, vegetation, and human health. The total PAH concentrations in soils and plants ranged from 127 to 10,600 and 199 to 2420 ng/g, respectively. Samples from an e-waste burning site had higher PAH concentrations than samples from adjacent locations. The PAHs in plants varied with plant species and tissue, and Lactuca sativa L. contained the highest PAHs of all the vegetable species. Various land use types showed different PAH concentrations in soils, with vegetable fields showing higher concentrations than paddy fields. Low molecular weight PAHs, such as phenanthrene, were the predominant congeners in soils, whereas high molecular weight PAHs, such as fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]anthracene, were enriched in plants relative to soils. Dissimilar PAH profiles in soil and the corresponding vegetation indicated that the uptake of PAHs by plants was selective. A source analysis showed that the contamination by PAHs originated primarily from the open burning of e-waste. The total daily intakes of PAHs and carcinogenic PAHs through vegetables at the e-waste dismantling site were estimated to be 279 and 108 ng/kg/d, respectively, indicating that the consumption of vegetables grown near e-waste recycling sites is risky and should be completely avoided.

  4. C2-C6 background hydrocarbon concentrations monitored at a roof top and green park site, in Dublin City centre.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, R T; Broderick, B M

    2007-09-01

    A 5 week monitoring campaign was carried out in Dublin City centre, to establish which site gave a more accurate background city centre estimation: a roof-top or green field site. This background represented a conservative estimate of HC exposure in Dublin City centre, useful for quantifying health effects related to this form of pollution and also for establishing a local background relative to the four surrounding main roads when the wind direction is travelling towards each road with the background receptor upwind. Over the entire monitoring campaign, the lowest concentrations and relative standard deviations were observed at the green field site, regardless of time of day or meteorological effects.

  5. Tracking Dissolved Methane Concentrations near Active Seeps and Gas Hydrates: Sea of Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, G. T.; Aoki, S.; Matsumoto, R.; Tomaru, H.; Owari, S.; Nakajima, R.; Doolittle, D. F.; Brant, B.

    2015-12-01

    A number of regions in the Sea of Japan are known for active gas venting and for gas hydrate exposures on the sea floor. In this investigation we employed several gas sensors mounted on a ROV in order to determine the concentrations of dissolved methane in the water near these sites. Methane concentrations were determined during two-second intervals throughout each ROV deployment during the cruise. The methane sensor deployments were coupled with seawater sampling using Niskin bottles. Dissolved gas concentrations were later measured using gas chromatography in order to compare with the sensor results taken at the same time. The observed maximum dissolved methane concentrations were much lower than saturation values, even when the ROV manipulators were in contact with gas hydrate. Nonetheless, dissolved concentrations did reach several thousands of nmol/L near gas hydrate exposures and gas bubbles, more than two orders of magnitude over the instrumental detection limits. Most of the sensors tested were able to detect dissolved methane concentrations as low as 10 nmol/L which permitted detection when the ROV approached methane plume sites, even from several tens of meters above the sea floor. Despite the low detection limits, the methane sensors showed variable response times when returning to low-background seawater (~5nM). For some of the sensors, the response time necessary to return to background values occurred in a matter of minutes, while for others it took several hours. Response time, as well as detection limit, should be an important consideration when selecting methane sensors for ROV or AUV investigations. This research was made possible, in part, through funding provided by the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI).

  6. Platelet activating factor raises intracellular calcium ion concentration in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Peritoneal cells from thioglycollate-stimulated mice were allowed to adhere to coverglasses for 2 h to give a dense monolayer of adherent cells greater than 95% of which were macrophages. After incubation with the tetra-acetoxymethyl ester of quin2, coverglasses were rinsed with Ca2+-free saline, oriented at a 45 degree angle in square cuvettes containing a magnetically driven stir bar, and analyzed for changes in quin2 fluorescence in a spectrofluorimeter. Such fluorescence, taken as an indication of intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i), increased as exogenous calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]o) was raised to 1 mM. At [Ca2+]o approximately equal to 10 microM, [Ca2+]i = 72 +/- 14 nM (n = 26); at [Ca2+]o = 1 mM, [Ca2+]i = 140-220 nM, levels not increased by N, N, N', N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine, a membrane-permeant chelator of heavy metals than can quench quin2. Addition of mouse alpha + beta fibroblast interferon, lipopolysaccharide, thrombin, collagen, vasopressin, ADP, compound 48/80, or U46619 did not change [Ca2+]i. However, addition of platelet activating factor (PAF) (2-20 ng/ml) raised [Ca2+]i by 480 nM within 1 min if [Ca2+]o = 1 mM. In the presence of 5 mM EGTA, PAF raised [Ca2+]i by 25 nM. This suggests that PAF causes influx of exogenous Ca2+, as well as releasing some Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Consistent with these results, when PAF was added to 1 mM Ca2+ in the presence of 100 microM Cd2+ or Mn2+ to block Ca2+ influx, [Ca2+]i increased by only intermediate amounts; at the times of such dampened peak response, [Ca2+]i could be raised within 1 min to normal PAF-stimulated levels by chelation of the exogenous heavy metals with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Normal PAF responses were observed in the presence of indomethacin. The lowest dose of PAF observed to raise [Ca2+]i was 0.1 ng/ml. Response of [Ca2+]i to 2-20 ng/ml PAF was transient, and second applications had no effect. The PAF response also was seen in

  7. Testing the applicability of rapid on-site enzymatic activity detection for surface water monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Philipp; Vogl, Wolfgang; Juri, Koschelnik; Markus, Epp; Maximilian, Lackner; Markus, Oismüller; Monika, Kumpan; Peter, Strauss; Regina, Sommer; Gabriela, Ryzinska-Paier; Farnleitner Andreas, H.; Matthias, Zessner

    2015-04-01

    bacteria. Therefore the applicability of on-site enzymatic activity determination as a direct surrogate or proxy parameter for microbiological standard assays and quantification of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentration could not be approved and further research in this field is necessary. Presently we conclude that rapid on-site detection of enzymatic activity is applicable for surface water monitoring and that it constitutes a complementary on-site monitoring parameter with high potential. Selection of the type of measured enzymatic activities has to be done on a catchment-specific basis and further work is needed to learn more about its detailed information characteristics in different habitats. The accomplishment of this method detecting continuous data of enzymatic activity in high temporal resolution caused by a target bacterial member is on the way of becoming a powerful tool for water quality monitoring, health related water quality- and early warning requirements.

  8. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  9. Concentric zones of active RhoA and Cdc42 around single cell wounds

    PubMed Central

    Benink, Hélène A.; Bement, William M.

    2005-01-01

    Rho GTPases control many cytoskeleton-dependent processes, but how they regulate spatially distinct features of cytoskeletal function within a single cell is poorly understood. Here, we studied active RhoA and Cdc42 in wounded Xenopus oocytes, which assemble and close a dynamic ring of actin filaments (F-actin) and myosin-2 around wound sites. RhoA and Cdc42 are rapidly activated around wound sites in a calcium-dependent manner and segregate into distinct, concentric zones around the wound, with active Cdc42 in the approximate middle of the F-actin array and active RhoA on the interior of the array. These zones form before F-actin accumulation, and then move in concert with the closing array. Microtubules and F-actin are required for normal zone organization and dynamics, as is crosstalk between RhoA and Cdc42. Each of the zones makes distinct contributions to the organization and function of the actomyosin wound array. We propose that similar rho activity zones control related processes such as cytokinesis. PMID:15684032

  10. Spatial and seasonal variations of atmospheric sulfur concentrations and dry deposition at 16 rural and suburban sites in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaosheng; Pan, Yuepeng; Goulding, Keith; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Xuejun; Zhang, Fusuo

    2016-12-01

    The large emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in China have raised worldwide concerns due to its contribution to acid rain and particulate pollution. Monitoring sulfur (S) concentrations and estimating its deposition are important for evaluating air quality and its effects on ecosystems and human health. To date atmospheric dry S deposition in China remains unclear due to the paucity of measurements, especially in rural regions where the ecosystems are sensitive to acid deposition. In this study, we monitored both SO2 and particulate SO42- (pSO42-) concentrations at 8 sites south and 8 sites north of the Huai River in rural and suburban parts of China between 2010 and 2012. The measured concentration of SO2 and pSO42- were combined with GEOS-Chem modeled dry deposition velocities to estimate dry S deposition inputs to the surfaces. SO2 and pSO42- concentrations were high from October/November to next March/April and they (esp. SO2) decreased sharply since March/April at the northern sites, reflecting elevated SO2 emissions by winter heating (which normally starts in October/November and ends in March/April in the north of the Huai River). However the southern sites did not show this trend. Annual dry deposition of SO2 plus pSO42- in this study ranged from 3.1 to 27.1 kg S ha-1 across all the sites in the year 2011 (except one site from May 2011 to April 2012) and showed large spatial variation. The sites in northern China had greater dry deposition due to the higher S concentrations compared with sites in southern China. We also found relatively low pSO42-/pNO3- ratios at most sites, reflecting NOx emissions had a larger influence than SO2 emissions on particle composition during the 2010-2012 period at the measurement sites. Our results suggest that dry S deposition is still important input to ecosystems in spite of slow reduction of Chinese national SO2 emissions since 2005. More research on both wet and dry S deposition and their impacts on the environment and

  11. Threshold occupancy and specific cation binding modes in the hammerhead ribozyme active site are required for active conformation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Giambaşu, George M.; Sosa, Carlos P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.; York, Darrin M.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between formation of active in-line attack conformations and monovalent (Na+) and divalent (Mg2+) metal ion binding in the hammerhead ribozyme has been explored with molecular dynamics simulations. To stabilize repulsions between negatively charged groups, different requirements of threshold occupancy of metal ions were observed in the reactant and activated precursor states both in the presence or absence of a Mg2+ in the active site. Specific bridging coordination patterns of the ions are correlated with the formation of active in-line attack conformations and can be accommodated in both cases. Furthermore, simulation results suggest that the hammerhead ribozyme folds to form an electronegative recruiting pocket that attracts high local concentrations of positive charge. The present simulations help to reconcile experiments that probe the metal ion sensitivity of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis and support the supposition that Mg2+, in addition to stabilizing active conformations, plays a specific chemical role in catalysis. PMID:19265710

  12. Transfer hydrogenation over sodium-modified ceria: Enrichment of redox sites active for alcohol dehydrogenation

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Nicholas C.; Boote, Brett W.; Naik, Pranjali; ...

    2017-01-17

    Ceria (CeO2) and sodium-modified ceria (Ce-Na) were prepared through combustion synthesis. Palladium was deposited onto the supports (Pd/CeO2 and Pd/Ce-Na) and their activity for the aqueous-phase transfer hydrogenation of phenol using 2-propanol under liquid flow conditions was studied. Pd/Ce-Na showed a marked increase (6×) in transfer hydrogenation activity over Pd/CeO2. Material characterization indicated that water-stable sodium species were not doped into the ceria lattice, but rather existed as subsurface carbonates. Modification of ceria by sodium provided more adsorption and redox active sites (i.e. defects) for 2-propanol dehydrogenation. This effect was an intrinsic property of the Ce-Na support and independent ofmore » Pd. The redox sites active for 2-propanol dehydrogenation were thermodynamically equivalent on both supports/catalysts. At high phenol concentrations, the reaction was limited by 2-propanol adsorption. Furthermore, the difference in catalytic activity was attributed to the different numbers of 2-propanol adsorption and redox active sites on each catalyst.« less

  13. Amoxicillin concentrations in relation to beta-lactamase activity in sputum during exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; VanderValk, Paul; van der Zanden, Rogier W; Nijdam, Lars; van der Palen, Job; Hendrix, Ron; Movig, Kris

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are often treated with antibiotics. Theoretically, to be maximally effective, the antibiotic concentration at sites of infection should exceed the minimum inhibitory concentration at which 90% of the growth of potential pathogens is inhibited (MIC90). A previous study showed that most hospitalized COPD patients had sputum amoxicillin concentrations concentrations had better clinical outcomes. Low amoxicillin concentrations can be caused by beta-lactamase activity in the lungs. This study investigated whether patients with sputum amoxicillin concentrations activity in sputum than patients with a concentration ≥MIC90. Methods In total, 23 patients hospitalized for acute exacerbations of COPD and treated with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid were included. Sputum and serum samples were collected at day 3 of treatment to determine beta-lactamase activity in sputum and amoxicillin concentrations in both sputum and serum. Results We found no difference in beta-lactamase activity between patients with sputum amoxicillin concentrations activity and sputum amoxicillin concentrations concentrations were activity did not differ between those with sputum amoxicillin concentrations concentrations

  14. [Measurement and data analysis of drug concentrations at the target site--potentials, limitations and fields of application].

    PubMed

    Schäftlein, André; el Talia, Maurice; Kloft, Charlotte

    2013-04-01

    Drug measurements in the blood are only surrogates for drug concentrations in peripheral tissues, which often represent the target sites of the drug. Due to drug specific and physiological characteristics, however, blood and target site concentrations may differ. For this reason, methods to measure drug concentrations at the target site have been developed during the last years. During the last decade, microdialysis has become the method of choice for the continuous study of unbound tissue concentrations of drugs. In order to fully exploit these measurements to quantify the concentration-time profile of the investigated drug, different tools of data analysis can be applied. The aim is to contribute to decision-making in selecting the optimal dose 1) for dosing schedules during the development program of new drugs and 2) for therapeutic usage for physicians and pharmacists. For these aims, the so called ,,nonlinear mixed effect (NLME) modelling approach" presents the method of choice as it determines the typical concentration-time profile of a drug as well as the variability within the investigated study population. Additionally, between-patient variability can be explained by patient-specific characteristics e.g. weight enabling dose individualisation within the whole investigated population. A systematic literature research in Pubmed for the use of antiinfectives in humans shows that the preferable methods of measuring concentrations at the target site (microdialysis) and data analysis (NLME) have rarely been used simultaneously. Hence, in future the benefit of linking both methods of choice should be further exploited in order to improve knowledge gain, to optimise antiinfective dosing regimens and to increase medication safety.

  15. Variation in concentrations of three mercury (Hg) forms at a rural and a suburban site in New York State.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun-Deok; Huang, Jiaoyan; Mondal, Sumona; Holsen, Thomas M

    2013-03-15

    Tekran® Hg speciation systems were used at a rural site (Huntington Forest, NY; HF) and a suburban site (Rochester, NY; ROC) to measure gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM), and fine particulate-bound mercury (PBM2.5) concentrations for two years (December 2007 to November 2009). Ancillary data were also available from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and the United States Environmental Protection Agency Clean Air Status and Trends Network. Seasonal GEM concentrations were similar at both sites and influenced by factors such as the planet boundary layer (PBL) height and mercury emissions from snow, soil, and point sources. In some seasons, O3 was negatively correlated with GEM at ROC and positively correlated with GEM at HF. At HF, O3 was correlated with GOM and was typically higher in the afternoon. The cause of this pattern may be photochemical reactions during the day, and the GOM diel pattern may also be due to deposition which is enhanced by dew formation during the night and early morning. PBM2.5 concentrations were higher in winter at both sites. This is indicative of local wood combustion for space heating in winter, increased sorption to particles at lower temperatures, and lower PBL in the winter. At the suburban site, 2 of 12 events with enhanced GEM/CO ratios were poorly correlated with SO2/GOM, implying that these two events were due either to long range transport or regional metallurgical industries in Canada.

  16. Target-classification approach applied to active UXO sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Shamatava, Irma; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study is designed to illustrate the discrimination performance at two UXO active sites (Oklahoma's Fort Sill and the Massachusetts Military Reservation) of a set of advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) inversion/discrimination models which include the orthonormalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS), joint diagonalization (JD), and differential evolution (DE) approaches and whose power and flexibility greatly exceed those of the simple dipole model. The Fort Sill site is highly contaminated by a mix of the following types of munitions: 37-mm target practice tracers, 60-mm illumination mortars, 75-mm and 4.5'' projectiles, 3.5'', 2.36'', and LAAW rockets, antitank mine fuzes with and without hex nuts, practice MK2 and M67 grenades, 2.5'' ballistic windshields, M2A1-mines with/without bases, M19-14 time fuzes, and 40-mm practice grenades with/without cartridges. The site at the MMR site contains targets of yet different sizes. In this work we apply our models to EMI data collected using the MetalMapper (MM) and 2 × 2 TEMTADS sensors. The data for each anomaly are inverted to extract estimates of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters associated with each buried target. (The latter include the total volume magnetic source or NVMS, which relates to size, shape, and material properties; the former includes location, depth, and orientation). The estimated intrinsic parameters are then used for classification performed via library matching and the use of statistical classification algorithms; this process yielded prioritized dig-lists that were submitted to the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) for independent scoring. The models' classification performance is illustrated and assessed based on these independent evaluations.

  17. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Altering Pollen Soluble Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Deborah J; Haque, Tamanna; Tudor, Richard L; Barron, Yoshimi; Zampronio, Cleidiane G; Cotton, Nicholas P J; de Graaf, Barend H J; White, Scott A; Cooper, Helen J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Harper, Jeffery F; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2017-03-01

    Protein phosphorylation regulates numerous cellular processes. Identifying the substrates and protein kinases involved is vital to understand how these important posttranslational modifications modulate biological function in eukaryotic cells. Pyrophosphatases catalyze the hydrolysis of inorganic phosphate (PPi) to inorganic phosphate Pi, driving biosynthetic reactions; they are essential for low cytosolic inorganic phosphate. It was suggested recently that posttranslational regulation of Family I soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (sPPases) may affect their activity. We previously demonstrated that two pollen-expressed sPPases, Pr-p26.1a and Pr-p26.1b, from the flowering plant Papaver rhoeas were inhibited by phosphorylation. Despite the potential significance, there is a paucity of data on sPPase phosphorylation and regulation. Here, we used liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry to map phosphorylation sites to the otherwise divergent amino-terminal extensions on these pollen sPPases. Despite the absence of reports in the literature on mapping phosphorylation sites on sPPases, a database survey of various proteomes identified a number of examples, suggesting that phosphorylation may be a more widely used mechanism to regulate these enzymes. Phosphomimetic mutants of Pr-p26.1a/b significantly and differentially reduced PPase activities by up to 2.5-fold at pH 6.8 and 52% in the presence of Ca(2+) and hydrogen peroxide over unmodified proteins. This indicates that phosphoregulation of key sites can inhibit the catalytic responsiveness of these proteins in concert with key intracellular events. As sPPases are essential for many metabolic pathways in eukaryotic cells, our findings identify the phosphorylation of sPPases as a potential master regulatory mechanism that could be used to attenuate metabolism.

  18. Evidence for segmental mobility in the active site of pepsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, J.; Strop, P.; Senn, H.; Foundling, S.; Kostka, V.

    1986-05-01

    The low hydrolytic activity (k/sub cat/ < 0.001 s/sup -1/) of chicken pepsin (CP) towards tri- and tetrapeptides is enhanced at least 100 times by modification of its single sulfhydryl group of Cys-115, with little effect on K/sub m/-values. Modification thus simulates the effect of secondary substrate binding on pepsin catalysis. The rate of Cys-115 modification is substantially decreased in the presence of some competitive inhibitors, suggesting its active site location. Experiments with CP alkylated at Cys-115 with Acrylodan as a fluorescent probe or with N-iodoacetyl-(4-fluoro)-aniline as a /sup 19/F-nmr probe suggest conformation change around Cys-115 to occur on substrate or substrate analog binding. The difference /sup 1/H-nmr spectra (500 MHz) of unmodified free and inhibitor-complexed CP reveal chemical shifts almost exclusively in the aromatic region. The effects of Cu/sup + +/ on /sup 19/F- and /sup 1/H-nmr spectra have been studied. Examination of a computer graphics model of CP based on E. parasitica pepsin-inhibitor complex X-ray coordinates suggests that Cys-115 is located near the S/sub 3//S/sub 5/ binding site. The results are interpreted in favor of segmental mobility of this region important for pepsin substrate binding and catalysis.

  19. First Principles Computational Study of the Active Site of Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Ivaylo; Klien, Micheal

    2004-01-14

    Ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to investigate the structural features of the active site of the binuclear enzyme rat liver arginase. Special emphasis was placed on the crucial role of the second shell ligand interactions. These interactions were systematically studied by performing calculations on models of varying size. It was determined that a water molecule, and not hydroxide, is the bridging exogenous ligand. The carboxylate ligands facilitate the close approach of the Mn (II) ions by attenuating the metal-metal electrostatic repulsion. Of the two metals, MnA was shown to carry a larger positive charge. Analysis of the electronic properties of the active site revealed that orbitals involving the terminal Asp234 residue, as well as the flexible -1,1 bridging Asp232, lie at high energies, suggesting weaker coordination. This is reflected in certain structural variability present in our models and is also consistent with recent experimental findings. Finally, implications of our findings for the biological function of the enzyme are delineated.

  20. High Concentrations of Organic Contaminants in Air from Ship Breaking Activities in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Nøst, Therese H; Halse, Anne K; Randall, Scott; Borgen, Anders R; Schlabach, Martin; Paul, Alak; Rahman, Atiqur; Breivik, Knut

    2015-10-06

    The beaches on the coast of Chittagong in Bangladesh are one of the most intense ship breaking areas in the world. The aim of the study was to measure the concentrations of organic contaminants in the air in the city of Chittagong, including the surrounding ship breaking areas using passive air samplers (N = 25). The compounds detected in the highest amounts were the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs), whereas dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were several orders of magnitude lower in comparison. PCBs, PAHs, and HCB were highest at sites near the ship breaking activities, whereas DDTs and SCCPs were higher in the urban areas. Ship breaking activities likely act as atmospheric emission sources of PCBs, PAHs, and HCB, thus adding to the international emphasis on responsible recycling of ships. Concentrations of PAHs, PCBs, DDTs, HCB, and SCCPs in ambient air in Chittagong are high in comparison to those found in similar studies performed in other parts of Asia. Estimated toxic equivalent quotients indicate elevated human health risks caused by inhalation of PAHs at most sites.

  1. Concentrations, sources, and risk assessment of polychlorinated biphenyls in vegetables near a waste-incinerator site, South China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lixuan; Li, Ning; Shao, Dingding; Kang, Yuan; Zhang, Qiuyun; Lu, Ping; Li, Laisheng; Luo, Jiwen; Guo, Xingmei

    2014-07-01

    Numerous studies have reported polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in soil, root, and aerial parts of vegetables. However, few studies have measured the contribution of PCBs bound to particles in air in relation to uptake by vegetables. In the present study, PCB concentrations were measured in five types of vegetables, soil, and settled air particle samples from two sites (at a domestic waste incinerator and at 20 km away from the incinerator) in Guangzhou, South China. ∑PCB concentrations in rhizosphere soil samples from the two sites ranged from 17.2-77.7 to 5.48-25.57 ng/g, respectively. ∑PCB concentrations in aerial parts of vegetables were greater than those in rhizosphere soils and roots with median values of 108 and 47.08 ng/g, respectively. Among the five types of vegetables studied, the highest concentration of PCBs was found in bitter lettuce. No significant correlation between PCBs in soil and roots or aerial parts of vegetables was observed. However, principal component analysis indicated that settled air particles were the dominant source of PCBs in the aerial parts of vegetables. In addition, similar PCB congener profiles were found in the aerial parts of vegetables and settled air particles. This suggests that foliar uptake of PCBs is an important pathway. Risk assessment indicated that human exposure to PCBs by way of dietary intake of vegetables from incinerator sites would result in high risk.

  2. C-H Activation on Co,O Sites: Isolated Surface Sites versus Molecular Analogs.

    PubMed

    Estes, Deven P; Siddiqi, Georges; Allouche, Florian; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Safonova, Olga V; Trigub, Alexander L; Koptyug, Igor V; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-11-16

    The activation and conversion of hydrocarbons is one of the most important challenges in chemistry. Transition-metal ions (V, Cr, Fe, Co, etc.) isolated on silica surfaces are known to catalyze such processes. The mechanisms of these processes are currently unknown but are thought to involve C-H activation as the rate-determining step. Here, we synthesize well-defined Co(II) ions on a silica surface using a metal siloxide precursor followed by thermal treatment under vacuum at 500 °C. We show that these isolated Co(II) sites are catalysts for a number of hydrocarbon conversion reactions, such as the dehydrogenation of propane, the hydrogenation of propene, and the trimerization of terminal alkynes. We then investigate the mechanisms of these processes using kinetics, kinetic isotope effects, isotopic labeling experiments, parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) NMR, and comparison with a molecular analog. The data are consistent with all of these reactions occurring by a common mechanism, involving heterolytic C-H or H-H activation via a 1,2 addition across a Co-O bond.

  3. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  4. Risk-Based Radionuclide Derived Concentration Guideline Levels For An Industrial Worker Exposed To Concrete-Slab End States At The Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    GERALD, JANNIK

    2005-04-25

    Dose and risk assessments are an integral part of decommissioning activities. Most human health risk assessments are performed for a reasonable maximum exposure to an individual with assumed intake and exposure parameters that depend on the end state of the decommissioning activities and the likely future use of the site. Regardless of how the potentially exposed individual is defined, the subsequent calculated human health risk is not a measurable quantity. To demonstrate compliance with risk-based acceptance or cleanliness criteria, facility-specific risk assessments usually are performed after final-verification sampling and analysis. Alternatively, conservative, a priori, guideline concentrations for residual contaminants can be calculated and rapidly compared to the subsequently measured contaminant concentrations to demonstrate compliance. In response to the request for accelerated cleanup at U.S. Department of Energy facilities, the Savannah River Site (SRS) is decommissioning its excess facilities through removal of the facility structures leaving only the concrete-slab foundations in place. Site-specific, risk-based derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) for radionuclides have been determined for a future industrial worker potentially exposed to residual contamination on these concrete slabs. When appropriate, these conservative DCGLs will be used at SRS in lieu of facility-specific risk assessments to further accelerate the decommissioning process. This paper discusses and describes the methods and scenario-specific parameters used to estimate the risk-based DCGLs for the SRS decommissioning end state.

  5. Gemcitabine adsorbed onto carbon particles increases drug concentrations at the injection site and in the regional lymph nodes in an animal experiment and a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Guo, F; Mao, X; Wang, J; Luo, F; Wang, Z

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated whether gemcitabine, adsorbed onto activated carbon particles (GEM-AC), increased the concentration of gemcitabine at the injection site and in the regional lymph nodes in an experimental animal model and a clinical study. The adsorption isotherm for GEM-AC was defined, and the concentration and distribution of gemcitabine in rats (n = 50) and in patients with pancreatic cancer (n = 8) was investigated. Drug concentrations in plasma, tumour samples, lymph nodes and at the injection site were measured after GEM-AC or gemcitabine solution (GEM-Sol) were subcutaneously injected into the left hind foot pad in rats, or into pancreatic tumours in patients. These experiments showed that GEM-AC was selectively delivered to the regional lymph nodes and the injection site, from which it slowly released greater amounts of gemcitabine to maintain the free concentration of gemcitabine at a relatively high level for a long period of time. The administration of GEM-AC might enhance the anticancer effects of gemcitabine.

  6. Extending neutron activation analysis to materials with high concentrations of neutron absorbing elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilian, Cornelia

    chemical element and the sample geometrical factor. Therefore, the remaining nuclear factor, considered as a product of nuclide composite nuclear characteristics and irradiation site characteristics, led to the introduction of a so-called epithermal neutron absorption cross-sections, sigmaabs,ep. This new nuclear parameter will allow the calculation of the epithermal self-shielding for all cylindrical samples activated in all types of irradiation sites. For the 13 cases studied, the epithermal self-shielding factor, Gep, was obtained from the experimental effective self-shielding factor, Geff, by extracting the thermal neutron self-shielding factor, calculated with the sigmoid formulation. A least-squares fit of the experimental Gep values as a function of the mass of element yielded sigmaabs,ep for each activated nuclide. In addition, for all nuclides commonly used in neutron activation analysis, sigmaabs,ep was calculated with the Martinho, Salgado and Goncalves sigmoid formulation, which uses the total cross-section values at the peaks of the resonances. A comparison of the calculated sigmaabs,ep with the 13 measured values reveals that the calculated values are accurate to about 20%. Finally, for all 76 nuclides commonly used in NAA, a spreadsheet program was written to use experimental or calculated sigmaabs,ep nuclear parameters to perform iterative self-shielding corrections of concentrations measured by neutron activation analysis. The user provides the parameters f and alpha of the neutron spectrum, the sample mass and dimensions, and the measured concentrations. In a typical case with 10% thermal self-shielding and 30% epithermal self-shielding, the corrected concentrations had uncertainties varying from 2% to 3%. Keywords. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis, epithermal, thermal, self-shielding factors. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  7. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  8. Subway construction activity influence on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fine particles: Comparison with a background mountainous site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shaofei; Li, Xuxu; Li, Qi; Yin, Yan; Li, Li; Chen, Kui; Liu, Dantong; Yuan, Liang; Pang, Xiaobing

    2015-07-01

    Intensive construction activities worsened the surrounding atmospheric environment in China. Eighteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fine particles (PM2.5) were collected at a subway construction site (SC) of Nanjing and compared with a regional background mountainous site (BM) to examine the influence of anthropogenic activities on concentrations, sources and health risks of PAHs. Average PAH concentrations at SC were higher than BM at a factor of about 5.9. All PAH species at SC were higher than BM, with the SC/BM ratios ranging from 1.3 (NaP) to 10.3 (BaP). PAH profiles differed for the two sites. The SC site had higher mass fractions of PAHs from coal combustion and vehicle emission, while the BM site held higher mass percentages of PAHs from long-range transported wood combustion and industrial activities. Lower temperature at BM may lead to the higher mass percentages of low ring PAHs. Coal combustion, traffic emissions and biomass burning were the common sources for PAHs at both SC and BM. Construction workers were exposed to higher BaPeq concentrations, nearly ten times of the background site and their lifetime cancer risk reached to 0.6 per 1,000,000 exposed worker, owing to the influence of coal combustion, vehicle emission and industrial activities at the surroundings of SC.

  9. Influence of traffic activity on heavy metal concentrations of roadside farmland soil in mountainous areas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Yan, Xuedong; Zeng, Chen; Zhang, Man; Shrestha, Suraj; Devkota, Lochan Prasad; Yao, Tandong

    2012-05-01

    Emission of heavy metals from traffic activities is an important pollution source to roadside farmland ecosystems. However, little previous research has been conducted to investigate heavy metal concentrations of roadside farmland soil in mountainous areas. Owing to more complex roadside environments and more intense driving conditions on mountainous highways, heavy metal accumulation and distribution patterns in farmland soil due to traffic activity could be different from those on plain highways. In this study, design factors including altitude, roadside distance, terrain, and tree protection were considered to analyze their influences on Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb concentrations in farmland soils along a mountain highway around Kathmandu, Nepal. On average, the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb at the sampling sites are lower than the tolerable levels. Correspondingly, pollution index analysis does not show serious roadside pollution owing to traffic emissions either. However, some maximum Zn, Cd, and Pb concentrations are close to or higher than the tolerable level, indicating that although average accumulations of heavy metals pose no hazard in the region, some spots with peak concentrations may be severely polluted. The correlation analysis indicates that either Cu or Cd content is found to be significantly correlated with Zn and Pb content while there is no significant correlation between Cu and Cd. The pattern can be reasonably explained by the vehicular heavy metal emission mechanisms, which proves the heavy metals' homology of the traffic pollution source. Furthermore, the independent factors show complex interaction effects on heavy metal concentrations in the mountainous roadside soil, which indicate quite a different distribution pattern from previous studies focusing on urban roadside environments. It is found that the Pb concentration in the downgrade roadside soil is significantly lower than that in the upgrade soil while the Zn concentration in the

  10. Influence of Traffic Activity on Heavy Metal Concentrations of Roadside Farmland Soil in Mountainous Areas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Yan, Xuedong; Zeng, Chen; Zhang, Man; Shrestha, Suraj; Devkota, Lochan Prasad; Yao, Tandong

    2012-01-01

    Emission of heavy metals from traffic activities is an important pollution source to roadside farmland ecosystems. However, little previous research has been conducted to investigate heavy metal concentrations of roadside farmland soil in mountainous areas. Owing to more complex roadside environments and more intense driving conditions on mountainous highways, heavy metal accumulation and distribution patterns in farmland soil due to traffic activity could be different from those on plain highways. In this study, design factors including altitude, roadside distance, terrain, and tree protection were considered to analyze their influences on Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb concentrations in farmland soils along a mountain highway around Kathmandu, Nepal. On average, the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb at the sampling sites are lower than the tolerable levels. Correspondingly, pollution index analysis does not show serious roadside pollution owing to traffic emissions either. However, some maximum Zn, Cd, and Pb concentrations are close to or higher than the tolerable level, indicating that although average accumulations of heavy metals pose no hazard in the region, some spots with peak concentrations may be severely polluted. The correlation analysis indicates that either Cu or Cd content is found to be significantly correlated with Zn and Pb content while there is no significant correlation between Cu and Cd. The pattern can be reasonably explained by the vehicular heavy metal emission mechanisms, which proves the heavy metals’ homology of the traffic pollution source. Furthermore, the independent factors show complex interaction effects on heavy metal concentrations in the mountainous roadside soil, which indicate quite a different distribution pattern from previous studies focusing on urban roadside environments. It is found that the Pb concentration in the downgrade roadside soil is significantly lower than that in the upgrade soil while the Zn concentration in the

  11. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  12. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  13. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  14. An active site water network in the plasminogen activator pla from Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-07-14

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 A. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  15. Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Their potential health risks and sources at three non-urban sites in Japan.

    PubMed

    Jadoon, Waqar A; Sakugawa, Hiroshi

    2016-09-18

    This investigation was undertaken to monitor particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) concentrations in order to determine their emission sources and potential human health risks in remote and rural areas of Japan. Seventeen PAHs in aerosol samples collected in remote (Kamihaya), coastal (Hiki) and inland (Higashi-Hiroshima) areas of Japan during 2013-2014 were analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Total PAH (Σ17PAH) concentrations in aerosol samples were in the range of 0.08-6.51 ng m(-3), 0.09-4.74 ng m(-3), and 0.21-6.53 ng m(-3) at Kamihaya, Hiki, and Higashi-Hiroshima sites, with mean concentrations of 1.63, 1.18, and 2.43 ng m(-3), respectively. Significant seasonal variation in concentrations occurred at Hiki and Higashi-Hiroshima, while no significant variation occurred at Kamihaya. Ambient air temperature greatly affected PAH concentrations in Higashi-Hiroshima, but had only moderate effects in Kamihaya and Hiki. Wind direction also influenced the concentrations of PAHs. Vehicle exhaust, industrial emissions, biomass combustion, and domestic heating and cooking were identified as the main PAH emission sources using principal component analysis. Backward trajectory calculations showed that domestically generated PAHs were significant in Kamihaya and Hiki, while in Higashi-Hiroshima concentrations were mainly influenced by long-range transport. The incremental lifetime lung cancer risk had values of 3.38 × 10(-5) and 1.84 × 10(-5) at Higashi-Hiroshima and Hiki, which are greater than the US EPA acceptable level (10(-6)). Typically, 5-6-ring PAHs contributed 95% to this overall health risk, of which benzo(a)pyrene was the largest contributor, followed by dibenz(a,h)anthracene at both residential sites. Clearly, stricter guidelines for PAHs need to be implemented at these sites to protect the population.

  16. Non-specific binding sites help to explain mixed inhibition in mushroom tyrosinase activities.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Sorour; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Fazli, Mostafa

    2016-10-21

    Inhibition and activation studies of tyrosinase could prove beneficial to agricultural, food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. Although non-competitive and mixed-inhibition are frequent modes observed in kinetics studies on mushroom tyrosinase (MT) activities, the phenomena are left unexplained. In this study, dual effects of phthalic acid (PA) and cinnamic acid (CA) on MT during mono-phenolase activity were demonstrated. PA activated and inhibited MT at concentrations lower and higher than 150 μM, respectively. In contrast, CA inhibited and activated MT at concentrations lower and higher than 5 μM. The mode of inhibition for both effectors was mixed-type. Complex kinetics of MT in the presence of a modulator could partly be ascribed to its mixed-cooperativity. However, to explain mixed-inhibition mode, it is necessary to demonstrate how the ternary complex of substrate/enzyme/effector is formed. Therefore, we looked for possible non-specific binding sites using MT tropolone-bound PDB (2Y9X) in the computational studies. When tropolone was in MTPa (active site), PA and CA occupied different pockets (named MTPb and MTPc, respectively). The close Moldock scores of PA binding posed in MTPb and MTPa suggested that MTPb could be a secondary binding site for PA. Similar results were obtained for CA. Ensuing results from 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations for 2Y9X-effector complexes indicated that the structures were gradually stabilized during simulation. Tunnel analysis by using CAVER Analyst and CHEXVIS resulted in identifying two distinct channels that assumingly participate in exchanging the effectors when the direct channel to MTPa is not accessible.

  17. Application of passive sampling for measuring dissolved concentrations of organic contaminants in the water column at three marine superfund sites.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Robert M; Lohmann, Rainer; Schubauer-Berigan, Joseph P; Reitsma, Pamela; Perron, Monique M; Lefkovitz, Lisa; Cantwell, Mark G

    2015-08-01

    Currently, there is an effort under way to encourage remedial project managers at contaminated sites to use passive sampling to collect freely dissolved concentrations (Cfree ) of hydrophobic organic contaminants to improve site assessments. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the use of passive sampling for measuring water column Cfree for several hydrophobic organic contaminants at 3 US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund sites. Sites investigated included New Bedford Harbor (New Bedford, MA, USA), Palos Verdes Shelf (Los Angeles, CA, USA), and Naval Station Newport (Newport, RI, USA); and the passive samplers evaluated were polyethylene, polydimethylsiloxane-coated solid-phase microextraction fibers, semipermeable membrane devices, and polyoxymethylene. In general, the different passive samplers demonstrated good agreement, with Cfree values varying by a factor of 2 to 3. Further, at New Bedford Harbor, where conventional water sample concentrations were also measured (i.e., grab samples), passive sampler-based Cfree values agreed within a factor of 2. These findings suggest that all of the samplers were experiencing and measuring similar Cfree during their respective deployments. Also, at New Bedford Harbor, a strong log-linear, correlative, and predictive relationship was found between polyethylene passive sampler accumulation and lipid-normalized blue mussel bioaccumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (r(2)  = 0.92, p < 0.05). The present study demonstrates the utility of passive sampling for generating scientifically accurate water column Cfree values, which is critical for making informed environmental management decisions at contaminated sediment sites.

  18. Lead concentration in soil from a small 15th-century industrial site: occupational and environmental health implications.

    PubMed

    Anyanwu, E

    1999-01-01

    Former industrial sites are often reclaimed for new homes and other occupational uses. Such sites may still contain toxic chemicals that could put the health of the community at risk. The persistence of these residual chemicals and their effects on human health must not be underestimated. Hence, there is a need to analyze such sites to ensure that the public health will not be put at risk. It is also essential that the levels of release of heavy metals into the environment be monitored and regulated. In this study the lead (Pb) concentration in soil from a small 15th-century industrial site was determined to assess and evaluate its occupational and environmental health implications. Concentrations of Pb measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and inductively coupled plasma-emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) techniques were 4,298.755 mg/L (SD 0.316; RSD 0.5%) and 4,300 mg/L (SD 0.3809; RSD 0.8%), respectively, both above the safe limit. It is concluded that reclaiming a disused industrial site without adequate soil analysis and proper remediation would be likely to pose occupational and environmental health risks.

  19. The relation of seismic activity and radon concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Kulali, Feride E-mail: iskender@fef.sdu.edu.tr; Akkurt, İskender E-mail: iskender@fef.sdu.edu.tr; Vogiannis, Efstratios

    2014-10-06

    Radon, which is the largest source of natural ionizing radiation, reaches to surface as gas or dissolved form in the ground water. Emanation of radon can has a profile is disposed to increasing or decreasing depending on the effects of meteorological events or crust movements. In this work, the radon concentration in soil gas, which is transported from soil to AlphaGUARD, is continuously measured in Mytilene (Greece). A graph of radon concentration is prepared for comparison with simultaneous earthquake data. As a consequence of comparison, we determined that the radon concentration indicates anomalies before the earthquakes.

  20. Seasonal and spatial trends in particle number concentrations and size distributions at the children's health study sites in Southern California.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manisha; Phuleria, Harish C; Bowers, Kenneth; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2006-01-01

    Continuous measurements of particle number (PN), particle mass (PM(10)) and gaseous copollutants (NO(x), CO and O3) were obtained at eight sites (urban, suburban and remote) in Southern California during years 2002 and 2003 in support of University of Southern California Children's Health Study. We report the spatial and temporal variation of PNs and size distributions within these sites. Higher average total PN concentrations are found in winter (November to February), compared to summer (July to September) and spring (March to June) in all urban sites. Contribution of local vehicular emissions is most evident in cooler months, whereas effects of long-range transport of particles are enhanced during warmer periods. The particle size profile is most represented by a combination of the spatial effects, for example, sources, atmospheric processes and meteorological conditions prevalent at each location. Afternoon periods in the warmer months are characterized by elevated number concentrations that either coincide or follow a peak in ozone concentrations, suggesting the formation of new particles by photochemistry. Results show no meaningful correlation between PN and mass, indicating that mass based standards may not be effective in controlling ultrafine particles. The study of the impact of the Union worker's strike at port of Long Beach in October 2002 revealed statistically significant increase in PN concentrations in the 60-200 nm range (P<0.001), which are indicative of contributions of emissions from the idling ships at the port.

  1. Variability in Saponin Content, Cancer Antiproliferative Activity and Physicochemical Properties of Concentrated Agave Sap.

    PubMed

    Santos-Zea, Liliana; Rosas-Pérez, Aratza Mireya; Leal-Díaz, Ana María; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A

    2016-08-01

    Concentrated agave sap (CAS) has gained popularity as an unrefined sweetener. It is obtained by boiling "aguamiel" that contains phytochemicals with diverse bioactivities. Saponins have been the most widely studied agave phytochemicals due to their cancer antiproliferative effect but their concentration may vary due to maturity of the agave plant and collection site. In this study, 18 CAS samples produced in different states of Mexico were analyzed using multivariate methods to determine which physicochemical or phytochemical parameters were responsible for variation. Additionally, extracts with different saponin profiles were tested to determine possible correlations with antiproliferative activity. Total soluble solids, pH, and water activity were similar to those reported for other agave sweeteners. Antioxidant capacity of samples was correlated to browning index. Eleven steroidal saponins were found in CAS samples and they were the main source of variability. Magueyoside B, a kammogenin tetraglycoside, was the most abundant saponin in all samples. With respect to bioactivity, multivariate analysis indicated that magueyoside B and a gentrogenin tetraglycoside were compounds strongly related with bioactivity. CAS from Hidalgo, Puebla, and Veracruz had higher concentration of magueyoside B than from the other kamogenin tetraglycoside found in the samples from other Mexican states. These results could be used as a first approach to characterize and standardize CAS to validate the potential health benefits derived from its consumption.

  2. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  3. A-line, bispectral index, and estimated effect-site concentrations: a prediction of clinical end-points of anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kreuer, Sascha; Bruhn, Jörgen; Larsen, Reinhard; Buchinger, Heiko; Wilhelm, Wolfram

    2006-04-01

    Autoregressive modeling with exogenous input of middle-latency auditory evoked potentials (A-Line AEP index, AAI) has been developed for monitoring depth of anesthesia. We investigated the prediction of recovery and dose-response relationship of desflurane and AAI or bispectral index (BIS) values. Twenty adult men scheduled for radical prostatectomy were recruited. To minimize opioid effects, analgesia was provided by a concurrent epidural in addition to the general anesthetic. Electrodes for AAI and BIS monitoring and a headphone for auditory stimuli were applied. Propofol and remifentanil were used for anesthetic induction. Maintenance of anesthesia was with desflurane only. For comparison to AAI and BIS monitor parameters, pharmacokinetic models for desflurane and propofol distribution and effect-site concentrations were used to predict clinical end-points (Prediction probability P(K)). Patients opened their eyes at an AAI value of 47 +/- 20 and a BIS value of 77 +/- 14 (mean +/- sd), and the prediction probability for eye opening was P(K) = 0.81 for AAI, P(K) = 0.89 for BIS, and P(K) = 0.91 for desflurane effect-site concentration. The opening of eyes was best predicted by the calculated desflurane effect-site concentration. The relationship between predicted desflurane effect-site concentration versus AAI and BIS was calculated by nonlinear regression analysis (r = 0.75 for AAI and r = 0.80 for BIS). The correlation between BIS and clinical end-points of anesthesia or the desflurane effect-compartment concentration is better than for the AAI.

  4. Characterization of the active site of ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munshi, C; Thiel, D J; Mathews, I I; Aarhus, R; Walseth, T F; Lee, H C

    1999-10-22

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase synthesizes two Ca(2+) messengers by cyclizing NAD to produce cyclic ADP-ribose and exchanging nicotinic acid with the nicotinamide group of NADP to produce nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Recombinant Aplysia cyclase was expressed in yeast and co-crystallized with a substrate, nicotinamide. x-ray crystallography showed that the nicotinamide was bound in a pocket formed in part by a conserved segment and was near the central cleft of the cyclase. Glu(98), Asn(107) and Trp(140) were within 3.5 A of the bound nicotinamide and appeared to coordinate it. Substituting Glu(98) with either Gln, Gly, Leu, or Asn reduced the cyclase activity by 16-222-fold, depending on the substitution. The mutant N107G exhibited only a 2-fold decrease in activity, while the activity of W140G was essentially eliminated. The base exchange activity of all mutants followed a similar pattern of reduction, suggesting that both reactions occur at the same active site. In addition to NAD, the wild-type cyclase also cyclizes nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide to cyclic GDP-ribose. All mutant enzymes had at least half of the GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity of the wild type, some even 2-3-fold higher, indicating that the three coordinating amino acids are responsible for positioning of the substrate but not absolutely critical for catalysis. To search for the catalytic residues, other amino acids in the binding pocket were mutagenized. E179G was totally devoid of GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity, and both its ADP-ribosyl cyclase and the base exchange activities were reduced by 10,000- and 18,000-fold, respectively. Substituting Glu(179) with either Asn, Leu, Asp, or Gln produced similar inactive enzymes, and so was the conversion of Trp(77) to Gly. However, both E179G and the double mutant E179G/W77G retained NAD-binding ability as shown by photoaffinity labeling with [(32)P]8-azido-NAD. These results indicate that both Glu(179) and Trp(77) are crucial for catalysis and

  5. A Review of Metal Concentrations Measured in Surface Soil Samples Collected on and Around the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G.

    2009-07-27

    The data used in this report was collected by two separate projects. The Surface Environmental Surveillance Project collected routine samples in 2008 at 41 locations on and around the Hanford Site, and had them analyzed for metals in addition to the normal radiological constituents. In 2004 and 2005, soil samples were collected at 117 locations on the Hanford Reach National Monument (HRNM) in support of the radiological release of that property. In 2008, archived HRNM soil samples were analyzed for metals to supplement the radiological analyses. Concentration results for 30 individual metals were generated by the analytical methods. Selenium and antimony were not measured at detectable concentrations in most of the samples. Mercury was detected in about half of the samples analyzed. All other constituents were measured at detectable concentrations in nearly all samples analyzed. The average concentrations measured in this study were well below the soil cleanup levels for unrestricted land use established by the Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA). In addition to the average concentration being less than the benchmark, the 90th percentile concentration was also lower than the benchmark for the metals included in the MTCA. The results indicate that the measured concentrations of metals in surface soil were within the expected natural range of concentrations.

  6. Underground Fiber-Optic Differential Absorption Instrument for Monitoring Carbon Dioxide Soil Gas Concentrations for Carbon Sequestration Site Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Humphries, S. D.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J. L.; Spangler, L. H.; Dobeck, L. M.

    2007-12-01

    The burning of fossil fuels has resulted in higher carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in the atmosphere with potential impacts on the Earth's climate. The use of fossil fuels is predicted to grow over the next several decades with the potential for further increasing the atmospheric concentration of CO2. A proposed method of diminishing the impacts of increased CO2 on the Earth's climate is to capture and store the CO2 in geologic storage sites. One issue with underground sequestration of CO2 is the ability to monitor sequestration sites to verify the integrity of the storage of the CO2. An underground fiber optic differential absorption instrument based on a tunable distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser is being developed at Montana State University to detect small changes in CO2 soil gas concentration in an effort to monitor the overall integrity of the sequestration storage site. The fiber optic instrument exploits the 2003-2006 nm region of the spectrum which contains four CO2 absorption lines. Light from the DFB laser is delivered to an underground absorption cell one meter in length via a single mode optical fiber. The normalized transmission is measured by tuning the DFB diode laser across these four absorption lines and the results are used to determine the CO2 soil gas concentration. A description of this instrument will be presented including the instrument design, operation, and performance characteristics. A field site for testing the performance of CO2 detection instruments and techniques has been developed by the Zero Emissions Research Technology (ZERT) group at Montana State University. The field site allows a controlled flow rate of CO2 to be released underground through a 100 m long horizontal pipe placed below the water table. Two release experiments were performed this past summer with flow rates of 0.1 and 0.3 tons CO2/day. The first release experiment lasted ten days while the second release lasted seven days. Measurements taken with the

  7. MULTI-SITE EVALUATIONS OF CANDIDATE METHODOLOGIES FOR DETERMINING COARSE PARTICULATE MATTER (PMC) CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comprehensive field studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of sampling methods for measuring the coarse fraction of PM10 in ambient air. Five separate sampling approaches were evaluated at each of three sampling sites. As the primary basis of comparison, a discrete ...

  8. MULTI-SITE EVALUATIONS OF CANDIDATE METHODOLOGIES FOR DETERMINING COARSE PARTICULATE MATTER (PMC) CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comprehensive field studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of sampling methods for measuring the coarse fraction of PM10 in ambient air. Five separate sampling approaches were evaluated at each of three sampling sites. As the primary basis of comparison, a discret...

  9. Determination of source, path, and site parameters from Yokohama High-concentration Seismograph Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, K.; Archuleta, R.

    2003-12-01

    The data from the Yokohama high-density accelerometer array have been used to try to separate path, source and site effects. The Yokohama array has 150 surface accelerometers and 9 borehole accelerometers located in a 20 km x 20 km region. The main objective of this study is to measure the variance of site effects for closely spaced sites on similar surficial geology. Since 1998, the array has recorded more than 30 earthquakes, 13 of these events were recorded at all borehole stations, and selected for our analysis (9 deep events and 4 shallow events). Using the data from these 13 events we estimate the seismic moment and corner frequency for each event, Qo, frequency dependence of Q, and the frequency dependent site effect. We use Boatwright's (1978) representation of the omega-squared spectrum for the source. The quality factor is assumed to be constant for frequencies less than 1.0 Hz while having a power law relation for frequencies greater than 1.0 Hz. Using a Heat Bath algorithm, we estimate the parameters for the source and path using only the borehole stations. Initially the borehole response is assumed to be unity and path attenuation fixed while Mo is determined by inverting the data for f… 1Hz. The difference between the observed and predicted spectrum at each borehole is then used as the site response of the borehole records and Qo, Q(f) and fc are determined by inverting the borehole data from the 9 deep events, keeping Mo fixed to the previously determined values. We iterate until changes in the residuals between observed and predicted spectra are negligible. Once stable values of Mo, fc and Q(f) are obtained, we invert only the source parameters (Mo and fc) using the 9 borehole stations for each of the 9 events individually. The same procedure is applied for 4 shallow events. Knowing Mo, fc, and Q(f), we can then determine the site response for the 150 surface stations by averaging the ratio between predicted and observed amplitude spectra. The Q

  10. Mutations inducing an active-site aperture in Rhizobium sp. sucrose isomerase confer hydrolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Alexandra; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Robert, Xavier; Rhimi, Moez; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Aghajari, Nushin

    2013-02-01

    Sucrose isomerase is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of sucrose isomers of high biotechnological and pharmaceutical interest. Owing to the complexity of the chemical synthesis of these isomers, isomaltulose and trehalulose, enzymatic conversion remains the preferred method for obtaining these products. Depending on the microbial source, the ratio of the sucrose-isomer products varies significantly. In studies aimed at understanding and explaining the underlying molecular mechanisms of these reactions, mutations obtained using a random-mutagenesis approach displayed a major hydrolytic activity. Two of these variants, R284C and F164L, of sucrose isomerase from Rhizobium sp. were therefore crystallized and their crystal structures were determined. The three-dimensional structures of these mutants allowed the identification of the molecular determinants that favour hydrolytic activity compared with transferase activity. Substantial conformational changes resulting in an active-site opening were observed, as were changes in the pattern of water molecules bordering the active-site region.

  11. Seawater Polluted with Highly Concentrated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Suppresses Osteoblastic Activity in the Scales of Goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuo; Sato, Masayuki; Nassar, Hossam F; Abdel-Gawad, Fagr Kh; Bassem, Samah M; Yachiguchi, Koji; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Endo, Masato; Sekiguchi, Toshio; Urata, Makoto; Hattori, Atsuhiko; Mishima, Hiroyuki; Shimasaki, Youhei; Oshima, Yuji; Hong, Chun-Sang; Makino, Fumiya; Tang, Ning; Toriba, Akira; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2016-08-01

    We have developed an original in vitro bioassay using teleost scale, that has osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and bone matrix as each marker: alkaline phosphatase (ALP) for osteoblasts and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) for osteoclasts. Using this scale in vitro bioassay, we examined the effects of seawater polluted with highly concentrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) on osteoblastic and osteoclastic activities in the present study. Polluted seawater was collected from two sites (the Alexandria site on the Mediterranean Sea and the Suez Canal site on the Red Sea). Total levels of PAHs in the seawater from the Alexandria and Suez Canal sites were 1364.59 and 992.56 ng/l, respectively. We were able to detect NPAHs in both seawater samples. Total levels of NPAHs were detected in the seawater of the Alexandria site (12.749 ng/l) and the Suez Canal site (3.914 ng/l). Each sample of polluted seawater was added to culture medium at dilution rates of 50, 100, and 500, and incubated with the goldfish scales for 6 hrs. Thereafter, ALP and TRAP activities were measured. ALP activity was significantly suppressed by both polluted seawater samples diluted at least 500 times, but TRAP activity did not change. In addition, mRNA expressions of osteoblastic markers (ALP, osteocalcin, and the receptor activator of the NF-κB ligand) decreased significantly, as did the ALP enzyme activity. In fact, ALP activity decreased on treatment with PAHs and NPAHs. We conclude that seawater polluted with highly concentrated PAHs and NPAHs influences bone metabolism in teleosts.

  12. Altered binding of thioflavin t to the peripheral anionic site of acetylcholinesterase after phosphorylation of the active site by chlorpyrifos oxon or dichlorvos

    SciTech Connect

    Sultatos, L.G. Kaushik, R.

    2008-08-01

    The peripheral anionic site of acetylcholinesterase, when occupied by a ligand, is known to modulate reaction rates at the active site of this important enzyme. The current report utilized the peripheral anionic site specific fluorogenic probe thioflavin t to determine if the organophosphates chlorpyrifos oxon and dichlorvos bind to the peripheral anionic site of human recombinant acetylcholinesterase, since certain organophosphates display concentration-dependent kinetics when inhibiting this enzyme. Incubation of 3 nM acetylcholinesterase active sites with 50 nM or 2000 nM inhibitor altered both the B{sub max} and K{sub d} for thioflavin t binding to the peripheral anionic site. However, these changes resulted from phosphorylation of Ser203 since increasing either inhibitor from 50 nM to 2000 nM did not alter further thioflavin t binding kinetics. Moreover, the organophosphate-induced decrease in B{sub max} did not represent an actual reduction in binding sites, but instead likely resulted from conformational interactions between the acylation and peripheral anionic sites that led to a decrease in the rigidity of bound thioflavin t. A drop in fluorescence quantum yield, leading to an apparent decrease in B{sub max}, would accompany the decreased rigidity of bound thioflavin t molecules. The organophosphate-induced alterations in K{sub d} represented changes in binding affinity of thioflavin t, with diethylphosphorylation of Ser203 increasing K{sub d}, and dimethylphosphorylation of Ser203 decreasing K{sub d}. These results indicate that chlorpyrifos oxon and dichlorvos do not bind directly to the peripheral anionic site of acetylcholinesterase, but can affect binding to that site through phosphorylation of Ser203.

  13. PCB in tissue concentrations in great blue heron occupying a Superfund site: Risk assessment implications

    SciTech Connect

    Halbrook, R.S.; Brewer, R.; Mitchell, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    Using existing ambient concentrations of chemicals and conservative assumptions, preliminary risk assessment has indicated that piscivorous wildlife along the Clinch River adjacent to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Oak Ridge, TN are potentially at risk from exposure to PCBs. Total PCB concentrations in great blue heron egg and chick liver tissue (7.69 {mu}g/g and 1.91 {mu}g/g, respectively) collected from a tributary to the Clinch River passing through the ORR, were significantly greater than concentrations in egg and chick liver tissue (1.24 {mu}g/g and 0.71 {mu}g/g, respectively) collected off the ORR. Mono and non-ortho CB congeners also were greater in heron tissues collected on the ORR compared to those collected off the ORR. Reproductive parameters (eggs/nest and chicks/nest) were not significantly different between locations. These data indicate that herons nesting on the ORR are exposed to PCBs, however, concentrations are insufficient to illicit a detectable adverse reproductive response in this species. Risk assessment implications are that piscivorous species utilizing habitats on the ORR are accumulating environmental contaminants greater than back ground concentrations for this region, however, only the most sensitive species are probably adversely effected. Continued monitoring will provide base-line data for evaluating natural resource damages and remediation decisions.

  14. Simple proxies for estimating the concentrations of monoterpenes and their oxidation products at a boreal forest site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontkanen, Jenni; Paasonen, Pauli; Aalto, Juho; Bäck, Jaana; Rantala, Pekka; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-10-01

    The oxidation products of monoterpenes likely have a crucial role in the formation and growth of aerosol particles in boreal forests. However, the continuous measurements of monoterpene concentrations are usually not available on decadal timescales, and the direct measurements of the concentrations of monoterpene oxidation product have so far been scarce. In this study we developed proxies for the concentrations of monoterpenes and their oxidation products at a boreal forest site in Hyytiälä, southern Finland. For deriving the proxies we used the monoterpene concentration measured with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) during 2006-2013. Our proxies for the monoterpene concentration take into account the temperature-controlled emissions from the forest ecosystem, the dilution caused by the mixing within the boundary layer and different oxidation processes. All the versions of our proxies captured the seasonal variation of the monoterpene concentration, the typical proxy-to-measurements ratios being between 0.8 and 1.3 in summer and between 0.6 and 2.6 in winter. In addition, the proxies were able to describe the diurnal variation of the monoterpene concentration rather well, especially in summer months. By utilizing one of the proxies, we calculated the concentration of oxidation products of monoterpenes by considering their production in the oxidation and their loss due to condensation on aerosol particles. The concentration of oxidation products was found to have a clear seasonal cycle, with a maximum in summer and a minimum in winter. The concentration of oxidation products was lowest in the morning or around noon and highest in the evening. In the future, our proxies for the monoterpene concentration and their oxidation products can be used, for example, in the analysis of new particle formation and growth in boreal environments.

  15. Lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells can be focused at sites of tumor growth by products of macrophage activation

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, R.J.; Gruber, S.A.; Sawyer, M.D.; Hoffman, R.; Ochoa, A.; Bach, F.H.; Simmons, R.L.

    1987-08-01

    Successful adoptive cancer immunotherapy presumably depends on the accumulation of tumoricidal leukocytes at the sites of tumor growth. Large numbers of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells can be generated in vitro by growth in high concentrations of interleukin-2 (IL-2), but relatively few arrive at the tumor site after intravenous injection. We hypothesize that the delivery of LAK cells to tumor sites may be augmented by previously demonstrated lymphocyte-recruiting factors, including activated macrophage products such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor. /sup 111/Indium-labeled LAK cells were injected intravenously into syngeneic mice bearing the macrophage activator endotoxin (LPS) in one hind footpad, and saline solution was injected into the contralateral footpad. Significantly more activity was recovered from the LPS-bearing footpad at all times during a 96-hour period. Recombinant IL-1 also attracted more LAK cells after injection into tumor-free hind footpads. Furthermore, LAK cells preferentially homed to hind footpads that were bearing 3-day established sarcomas after intralesional injections of LPS, IL-1, or tumor necrosis factor when compared with contralateral tumor-bearing footpads injected with saline solution alone. In preliminary experiments, mice with hind-footpad tumors appeared to survive longer after combined systemic IL-2 and LAK therapy if intralesional LPS was administered. These studies demonstrate that macrophage activation factors that have been shown capable of attracting circulating normal lymphocytes can also effectively attract LAK cells from the circulation. By the stimulation of macrophages at the sites of tumor growth, more LAK cells can be attracted. It is hoped that by focusing the migration of LAK cells to tumors, LAK cells and IL-2 would effect tumor regression more efficiently and with less toxicity.

  16. Magnesium-Dependent Active-Site Conformational Selection in the Diels-Alderase Ribozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Berezniak, Tomasz; Zahran, Mai; Imhof, Petra; Jaeschke, Andres; Smith, Jeremy C

    2010-10-01

    The Diels-Alderase ribozyme, an in vitro-evolved ribonucleic acid enzyme, accelerates the formation of carbon-carbon bonds between an anthracene diene and a maleimide dienophile in a [4 + 2] cycloaddition, a reaction with broad application in organic chemistry. Here, the Diels-Alderase ribozyme is examined via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in both crystalline and aqueous solution environments. The simulations indicate that the catalytic pocket is highly dynamic. At low Mg(2+) ion concentrations, inactive states with the catalytic pocket closed dominate. Stabilization of the enzymatically active, open state of the catalytic pocket requires a high concentration of Mg(2+) ions (e.g., 54 mM), with cations binding to specific phosphate sites on the backbone of the residues bridging the opposite strands of the pocket. The free energy profile for pocket opening at high Mg(2+) cation concentration exhibits a double minimum, with a barrier to opening of approximately 5.5 kJ/mol and the closed state approximately 3 kJ/mol lower than the open state. Selection of the open state on substrate binding leads to the catalytic activity of the ribozyme. The simulation results explain structurally the experimental observation that full catalytic activity depends on the Mg(2+) ion concentration

  17. Synthesis and characterization of a new fluorogenic active-site titrant of serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Livingston, D C; Brocklehurst, J R; Cannon, J F; Leytus, S P; Wehrly, J A; Peltz, S W; Peltz, G A; Mangel, W F

    1981-07-21

    The molecule 3',6'-bis(4-guanidinobenzoyloxy)-5-[N'-(4-carboxyphenyl)thioureido[spirop]isobenzofuran-1-(3H),9'-[9H]xanthen]-3-one, abbreviated FDE, was designed and synthesized as a fluorogenic active-site titrant for serine proteases. It is an analogue of p-nitrophenyl p-guanidino-benzoate (NPGB) in which a fluorescein derivative is substituted for p-nitrophenol. FDE and NPGB exhibit similar kinetic characteristics in an active-site titration of trypsin in phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.2. The rate of acylation with FDE is extremely fast (k2 = 1.05 s-1) and the rate of deacylation extremely slow (k3 = 1.66 X 10(-5) s-1). The Ks is 3.06 X 10(-6) M, and the Km(app) is 4.85 X 10(-11) M. With two of the serine proteases involved in fibrinolysis, the rate of acylation with FDE is also fast, K2 = 0.112 s-1 for urokinase and 0.799 s-1 for plasmin, and the rate of deacylation is slow, k3 = 3.64 X 10(-4) s-1 for urokinase and 6.27 X 10(-6) s-1 for plasmin. The solubility limit of FDE in phosphate-buffered saline is 1.3 X 10(-5) M, and the first-order rate constant for spontaneous hydrolysis is 5.1 X 10(-6) s-1. The major difference between FDE and NPGB is the detectability of the product in an active-site titration. p-Nitrophenol can be detected at concentrations no lower than 10(-6) M whereas fluorescein can be detected at concentrations as low as 10(-12) M. Thus, FDE should be useful in quantitatively assaying serine proteases as very low concentrations.

  18. Surface and Airborne Arsenic Concentrations in a Recreational Site near Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic, up to 7058 μg g-1 in topsoil and bedrock, and more than 0.03 μg m-3 in air on a 2-week basis, were measured in the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area (NDRA), a very popular off-road area near Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. The elevated arsenic concentrations in the topsoil and bedrock are correlated to outcrops of yellow sandstone belonging to the Muddy Creek Formation (≈ 10 to 4 Ma) and to faults crossing the area. Mineralized fluids moved to the surface through the faults and deposited the arsenic. A technique was developed to calculate airborne arsenic concentrations from the arsenic content in the topsoil. The technique was tested by comparing calculated with measured concentrations at 34 locations in the NDRA, for 3 periods of 2 weeks each. We then applied it to calculate airborne arsenic concentrations for more than 500 locations all over the NDRA. The highest airborne arsenic concentrations occur over sand dunes and other zones with a surficial layer of aeolian sand. Ironically these areas show the lowest levels of arsenic in the topsoil. However, they are highly susceptible to wind erosion and emit very large amounts of sand and dust during episodes of strong winds, thereby also emitting much arsenic. Elsewhere in the NDRA, in areas not or only very slightly affected by wind erosion, airborne arsenic levels equal the background level for airborne arsenic in the USA, approximately 0.0004 μg m-3. The results of this study are important because the NDRA is visited by more than 300,000 people annually. PMID:25897667

  19. Surface and Airborne Arsenic Concentrations in a Recreational Site near Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Dirk; Buck, Brenda J; Teng, Yuanxin; McLaurin, Brett T

    2015-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic, up to 7058 μg g(-1) in topsoil and bedrock, and more than 0.03 μg m(-3) in air on a 2-week basis, were measured in the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area (NDRA), a very popular off-road area near Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. The elevated arsenic concentrations in the topsoil and bedrock are correlated to outcrops of yellow sandstone belonging to the Muddy Creek Formation (≈ 10 to 4 Ma) and to faults crossing the area. Mineralized fluids moved to the surface through the faults and deposited the arsenic. A technique was developed to calculate airborne arsenic concentrations from the arsenic content in the topsoil. The technique was tested by comparing calculated with measured concentrations at 34 locations in the NDRA, for 3 periods of 2 weeks each. We then applied it to calculate airborne arsenic concentrations for more than 500 locations all over the NDRA. The highest airborne arsenic concentrations occur over sand dunes and other zones with a surficial layer of aeolian sand. Ironically these areas show the lowest levels of arsenic in the topsoil. However, they are highly susceptible to wind erosion and emit very large amounts of sand and dust during episodes of strong winds, thereby also emitting much arsenic. Elsewhere in the NDRA, in areas not or only very slightly affected by wind erosion, airborne arsenic levels equal the background level for airborne arsenic in the USA, approximately 0.0004 μg m(-3). The results of this study are important because the NDRA is visited by more than 300,000 people annually.

  20. Indoor-outdoor carbon monoxide concentrations at four sites in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, D.R.; Al-Dhowalia, K.H.; Mansour, M.E. )

    1989-08-01

    In Saudi Arabia, the major outdoor anthropogenic source of carbon monoxide (CO) is the 4,280,986 cars registered in the Kingdom last year. Of these vehicles, approximately 1,300,000 are registered in the Riyadh area. The major sources of indoor CO in Riyadh are gas cooking facilities, kerosene heaters, charcoal burners, hubble bubble pipes (water pipes), and tobacco smoking. The current Saudi Arabian Ambient Air Quality Standards (SAAQS) for CO are 10 mg/m{sup 3} (9 ppm) maximum for 8-hour average exposure, and 40 mg/m{sup 3} (35 ppm) for 1-hour average exposure. The allowable exceedance is twice per month. These standards are the same for the United States except no exceedance is allowed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the CO levels indoors and outdoors at four sites in Riyadh. Continuous sampling was conducted at four sites with Ecolyzer Series 200 Monitors, together with Rustrak Recorders Model 288.

  1. Application of Passive Sampling for Measuring Dissolved Concentrations of Organic Contaminants in the Water Column at Three U.S. EPA Marine Superfund Sites.

    EPA Science Inventory

    At contaminated sediment sites, including U.S. EPA Superfund sites, it is critical to measure water column concentrations of freely dissolved contaminants to understand the complete exposure of aquatic organisms to hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). Historically, acquiring...

  2. Application of Passive Sampling for Measuring Dissolved Concentrations of Organic Contaminants in the Water Column at Three U.S. EPA Marine Superfund Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    At contaminated sediment sites, including U.S. EPA Superfund sites, it is critical to measure water column concentrations of freely dissolved contaminants to understand the complete exposure of aquatic organisms to hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). Historically acquiring ...

  3. Diurnal variations of airborne pollen concentration and the effect of ambient temperature in three sites of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Ríos, B; Torres-Jardón, R; Ramírez-Arriaga, E; Martínez-Bernal, A; Rosas, I

    2016-05-01

    Pollen is an important cause of allergic respiratory ailments in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). However, very little is known if ambient air temperature correlates with the early blooming of plants observed in other urban areas around the world. A research study was conducted during the dry season of 2012-2013 at three representative sites of the MCMA with different urban characteristics with the aim to understand the relationships between the profusion and diversity of pollen against temperature and other meteorological variables and degree of urbanization. Pollen samples were collected using a Hirst-type trap sampler in the sites: Merced (highly urbanized), Iztapalapa (medium-high urbanized) and Coyoacan (moderately urbanized). Urbanization levels were determined using a composite index based on population density, proportion of surface covered by construction and asphalt, and urban heat island intensity. A set of representative pollen sampling tapes were assayed under a light microscope at magnification of ×1,000 and converted to grains per cubic meter. The most representative pollen types found in the three sites were, regardless of urbanization levels were: Fraxinus, Cupressaceae/Taxodiaceae, Casuarina, Alnus, Myrtaceae, and Pinus. Total pollen concentration was greatest in the moderately urbanized area, although earlier blooming took place at the highly urbanized zone. Total pollen concentration in the medium-high urbanized site has the lowest because the green areas in this zone of MCMA are few. In a diurnal basis, the most abundant pollen types peaked near midday or in the afternoon evening at the three sites. A Spearman test showed a positive correlation among bihourly pollen concentrations, temperature and relative humidity in all sites, but wind speed just correlated in Iztapalapa and Coyoacan. The results obtained suggest that Urban Heat Island Intensity can disturb flowering periods and pollen concentrations, largely in the highly urbanized

  4. Diurnal variations of airborne pollen concentration and the effect of ambient temperature in three sites of Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ríos, B.; Torres-Jardón, R.; Ramírez-Arriaga, E.; Martínez-Bernal, A.; Rosas, I.

    2016-05-01

    Pollen is an important cause of allergic respiratory ailments in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). However, very little is known if ambient air temperature correlates with the early blooming of plants observed in other urban areas around the world. A research study was conducted during the dry season of 2012-2013 at three representative sites of the MCMA with different urban characteristics with the aim to understand the relationships between the profusion and diversity of pollen against temperature and other meteorological variables and degree of urbanization. Pollen samples were collected using a Hirst-type trap sampler in the sites: Merced (highly urbanized), Iztapalapa (medium-high urbanized) and Coyoacan (moderately urbanized). Urbanization levels were determined using a composite index based on population density, proportion of surface covered by construction and asphalt, and urban heat island intensity. A set of representative pollen sampling tapes were assayed under a light microscope at magnification of ×1,000 and converted to grains per cubic meter. The most representative pollen types found in the three sites were, regardless of urbanization levels were: Fraxinus, Cupressaceae/Taxodiaceae, Casuarina, Alnus, Myrtaceae, and Pinus. Total pollen concentration was greatest in the moderately urbanized area, although earlier blooming took place at the highly urbanized zone. Total pollen concentration in the medium-high urbanized site has the lowest because the green areas in this zone of MCMA are few. In a diurnal basis, the most abundant pollen types peaked near midday or in the afternoon evening at the three sites. A Spearman test showed a positive correlation among bihourly pollen concentrations, temperature and relative humidity in all sites, but wind speed just correlated in Iztapalapa and Coyoacan. The results obtained suggest that Urban Heat Island Intensity can disturb flowering periods and pollen concentrations, largely in the highly urbanized

  5. Site-specific PEGylation of lidamycin and its antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Shang, Boyang; Hu, Lei; Shao, Rongguang; Zhen, Yongsu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, N-terminal site-specific mono-PEGylation of the recombinant lidamycin apoprotein (rLDP) of lidamycin (LDM) was prepared using a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) derivative (Mw 20 kDa) through a reactive terminal aldehyde group under weak acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The biochemical properties of mPEG-rLDP-AE, an enediyne-integrated conjugate, were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of mPEG-rLDP-AE was evaluated by MTT assays and in xenograft model. The results indicated that mPEG-rLDP-AE showed significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. After PEGylation, mPEG-rLDP still retained the binding capability to the enediyne AE and presented the physicochemical characteristics similar to that of native LDP. It is of interest that the PEGylation did not diminish the antitumor efficacy of LDM, implying the possibility that this derivative may function as a payload to deliver novel tumor-targeted drugs. PMID:26579455

  6. Concentration-dependent mobility, retardation, and speciation of iodine in surface sediment from the Savannah River Site.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Du, J; Xu, C; Schwehr, K A; Ho, Y-F; Li, H-P; Roberts, K A; Kaplan, D I; Brinkmeyer, R; Yeager, C M; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Santschi, P H

    2011-07-01

    Iodine occurs in multiple oxidation states in aquatic systems in the form of organic and inorganic species. This feature leads to complex biogeochemical cycling of stable iodine and its long-lived isotope, (129)I. In this study, we investigated the sorption, transport, and interconversion of iodine species by comparing their mobility in groundwaters at ambient concentrations of iodine species (10(-8) to 10(-7) M) to those at artificially elevated concentrations (78.7 μM), which often are used in laboratory analyses. Results demonstrate that the mobility of iodine species greatly depends on, in addition to the type of species, the iodine concentration used, presumably limited by the number of surface organic carbon binding sites to form covalent bonds. At ambient concentrations, iodide and iodate were significantly retarded (K(d) values as high as 49 mL g(-1)), whereas at concentrations of 78.7 μM, iodide traveled along with the water without retardation. Appreciable amounts of iodide during transport were retained in soils due to iodination of organic carbon, specifically retained by aromatic carbon. At high input concentration of iodate (78.7 μM), iodate was found to be reduced to iodide and subsequently followed the transport behavior of iodide. These experiments underscore the importance of studying iodine geochemistry at ambient concentrations and demonstrate the dynamic nature of their speciation during transport conditions.

  7. A European aerosol phenomenology -4: Harmonized concentrations of carbonaceous aerosol at 10 regional background sites across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalli, F.; Alastuey, A.; Areskoug, H.; Ceburnis, D.; Čech, J.; Genberg, J.; Harrison, R. M.; Jaffrezo, J. L.; Kiss, G.; Laj, P.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Perez, N.; Quincey, P.; Schwarz, J.; Sellegri, K.; Spindler, G.; Swietlicki, E.; Theodosi, C.; Yttri, K. E.; Aas, W.; Putaud, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    Although particulate organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) are important constituents of the suspended atmospheric particulate matter (PM), measurements of OC and EC are much less common and more uncertain than measurements of e.g. the ionic components of PM. In the framework of atmospheric research infrastructures supported by the European Union, actions have been undertaken to determine and mitigate sampling artefacts, and assess the comparability of OC and EC data obtained in a network of 10 atmospheric observatories across Europe. Positive sampling artefacts (from 0.4 to 2.8 μg C/m3) and analytical discrepancies (between -50% and +40% for the EC/TC ratio) have been taken into account to generate a robust data set, from which we established the phenomenology of carbonaceous aerosols at regional background sites in Europe. Across the network, TC and EC annual average concentrations range from 0.4 to 9 μg C/m3, and from 0.1 to 2 μg C/m3, respectively. TC/PM10 annual mean ratios range from 0.11 at a Mediterranean site to 0.34 at the most polluted continental site, and TC/PM2.5 ratios are slightly greater at all sites (0.15-0.42). EC/TC annual mean ratios range from 0.10 to 0.22, and do not depend much on PM concentration levels, especially in winter. Seasonal variations in PM and TC concentrations, and in TC/PM and EC/TC ratios, differ across the network, which can be explained by seasonal changes in PM source contributions at some sites.

  8. The active titration method for measuring local hydroxyl radical concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprengnether, Michele; Prinn, Ronald G.

    1994-01-01

    We are developing a method for measuring ambient OH by monitoring its rate of reaction with a chemical species. Our technique involves the local, instantaneous release of a mixture of saturated cyclic hydrocarbons (titrants) and perfluorocarbons (dispersants). These species must not normally be present in ambient air above the part per trillion concentration. We then track the mixture downwind using a real-time portable ECD tracer instrument. We collect air samples in canisters every few minutes for roughly one hour. We then return to the laboratory and analyze our air samples to determine the ratios of the titrant to dispersant concentrations. The trends in these ratios give us the ambient OH concentration from the relation: dlnR/dt = -k(OH). A successful measurement of OH requires that the trends in these ratios be measureable. We must not perturb ambient OH concentrations. The titrant to dispersant ratio must be spatially invariant. Finally, heterogeneous reactions of our titrant and dispersant species must be negligible relative to the titrant reaction with OH. We have conducted laboratory studies of our ability to measure the titrant to dispersant ratios as a function of concentration down to the few part per trillion concentration. We have subsequently used these results in a gaussian puff model to estimate our expected uncertainty in a field measurement of OH. Our results indicate that under a range of atmospheric conditions we expect to be able to measure OH with a sensitivity of 3x10(exp 5) cm(exp -3). In our most optimistic scenarios, we obtain a sensitivity of 1x10(exp 5) cm(exp -3). These sensitivity values reflect our anticipated ability to measure the ratio trends. However, because we are also using a rate constant to obtain our (OH) from this ratio trend, our accuracy cannot be better than that of the rate constant, which we expect to be about 20 percent.

  9. ATMOSPHERIC CONCENTRATIONS OF AMMONIA AND AMMONIUM AT AN AGRICULTURAL SITE IN THE SOUTHEAST UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we present approximately 1 year (October 1998 - September 1999) of 12-hour mean ammonia [NH3], ammonium [NH4(+)], hydrochloric acid [HCl], nitrate [NO3(-)], nitric acid [HNO3], nitrous acid [HNO2], sulfate [SO4(- -)], and sulfur dioxide [SO2] concentrations measure...

  10. Inactivation during denaturation of ribonuclease A by guanidinium chloride is accompanied by unfolding at the active site.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H J; Tsou, C L

    1995-01-01

    Inactivation of pancreatic RNAase A occurs in guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) at low concentrations before the unfolding of the molecule as a whole can be detected [Liu and Tsou (1987) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 916, 455-464]. We have now shown that the rate of digestion of the RNAase molecule by either trypsin or proteinase K increases significantly at low concentrations of GdmCl where the enzyme is largely inactivated, but fluorescence and absorption measurements reveal no conformational changes. N-Terminal sequence analysis of the peptide fragments generated shows that proteolysis occurs primarily at or near the active site. The decrease in activity of RNAase at low concentrations of GdmCl is therefore due to partial unfolding of the molecule, particularly at the active site and not to an inhibition by the denaturant. Images Figure 4 PMID:7832749

  11. Allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a using Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside and its combination.

    PubMed

    Rani, Nidhi; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; P T V, Lakshmi; Arunachalam, Annamalai

    2016-08-01

    Recent crystallographic study revealed the involvement of allosteric site in active site inhibition of penicillin binding protein (PBP2a), where one molecule of Ceftaroline (Cef) binds to the allosteric site of PBP2a and paved way for the other molecule (Cef) to bind at the active site. Though Cef has the potency to inhibit the PBP2a, its adverse side effects are of major concern. Previous studies have reported the antibacterial property of Quercetin derivatives, a group of natural compounds. Hence, the present study aims to evaluate the effect of Quercetin 3-o-rutinoside (Rut) in allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a. The molecular docking studies between allosteric site and ligands (Rut, Que, and Cef) revealed a better binding efficiency (G-score) of Rut (-7.790318) and Cef (-6.194946) with respect to Que (-5.079284). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies showed significant changes at the active site in the presence of ligands (Rut and Cef) at allosteric site. Four different combinations of Rut and Cef were docked and their G-scores ranged between -6.320 and -8.623. MD studies revealed the stability of the key residue (Ser403) with Rut being at both sites, compared to other complexes. Morphological analysis through electron microscopy confirmed that combination of Rut and Cefixime was able to disturb the bacterial cell membrane in a similar fashion to that of Rut and Cefixime alone. The results of this study indicate that the affinity of Rut at both sites were equally good, with further validations Rut could be considered as an alternative for inhibiting MRSA growth.

  12. Variance of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) concentrations in activated, concentrated platelets from healthy male donors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of autologous blood concentrates, such as activated, concentrated platelets, in orthopaedic clinical applications has had mixed results. Research on this topic has focused on growth factors and cytokines, with little directed towards matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which are involved in post-wound tissue remodeling. Methods In this study, the authors measured the levels of MMP-2, MMP-9 and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13 (ADAMTS13), in activated platelets derived from blood of healthy, male volunteers (n = 92), 19 to 60 years old. The levels of the natural inhibitors of these proteases, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), TIMP-2 and TIMP-4 were also assessed. Results Notably, there was no significant change in concentration with age in four of six targets tested. However, TIMP-2 and TIMP-4 demonstrated a statistically significant increase in concentration for subjects older than 30 years of age compared to those 30 years and younger (P = 0.04 and P = 0.04, respectively). Conclusion TIMP-2 and TIMP-4 are global inhibitors of MMPs, including MMP-2 (Gelatinase A). MMP-2 targets native collagens, gelatin and elastin to remodel the extracellular matrix during wound healing. A decreased availability of pharmacologically active MMP-2 may diminish the effectiveness of the use of activated, concentrated platelets from older patients, and may also contribute to longer healing times in this population. PMID:24766991

  13. DEVELOPING SITE-SPECIFIC DERIVED CONCENTRATION GUIDELINE LEVELS FOR MULTIPLE MEDIA AT THE CONNECTICUT YANKEE HADDAM NECK PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.W.; Smith, L.C.; Carr, R.K.; Carson, A.; Darois, E.

    2003-02-27

    As part of the license termination process, site-specific Derived Concentration Guideline Levels for the Haddam Neck Plant site are developed for soil, groundwater, concrete left standing, and concrete demolished that satisfy the radiological criteria for unrestricted use as defined in 10 CFR 20.1402. Background information on the license termination process and characteristics of the Haddam Neck Plant site are presented. The dose models and associated resident farmer and building occupancy scenarios, applicable pathways, and critical groups developed to establish the Derived Concentration Guideline Levels are described. A parameter assignment process is introduced wherein general population values are used to establish behavioral and metabolic parameters representative of an average member of the critical group, while the uncertainty associated with important physical parameters is considered. A key element of the parameter assignment process is the use of sensitivity analysis to identify the dose sensitive physical parameters and to ensure that such parameters are assigned conservative values. Structuring the parameter assignment process, completing the formal sensitivity analyses, and assigning conservative values to the sensitive physical parameters in a consistent way establishes a calculation framework that lead to Derived Concentration Guideline Levels with a uniform level of conservatism across all media and all radionuclides.

  14. Development of site-specific sediment no-effect concentrations based on synoptic chemical analyses and toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sferra, J.; Barber, T.; Fuchsman, P.; Sheehan, P.

    1995-12-31

    Site-specific maximum observed no-effect concentrations (MONECs) were developed using sediment chemistry and toxicity test data concomitantly collected from 33 sample locations in a river system adjacent to a RCRA facility in Ohio. Physical and chemical analyses included VOCs, SVOCs, metals, pesticides and PCBs, acid volatile sulfides and simultaneously extracted metals, ammonia, total organic carbon and grain size. Concentrations of hydrophobic, non-polar organic compounds were normalized to 1% total organic carbon contents, as the bioavailability of these compounds was considered to be primarily controlled by sediment organic carbon content through adsorption. Toxicity tests conducted using Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca were analyzed for impacts to survival and growth endpoints for both species. Samples were separated into two categories for each test endpoint, depending on whether toxicity was observed. MONECs were defined as the highest measured chemical concentration that did not produce a significant effect in toxicity tests. MONEC values were derived for each species and test endpoint, and the lowest of these four values was adopted as the site-specific MONEC for each chemical. Site-specific MONECs were used as a tool to assist in the identification of chemicals contributing to observed sediment toxicity.

  15. The role of dust storms in total atmospheric particle concentrations at two sites in the western U.S.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neff, Jason C.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Munson, Seth M.; Fernandez, Daniel; Belnap, Jayne

    2013-01-01

    Mineral aerosols are produced during the erosion of soils by wind and are a common source of particles (dust) in arid and semiarid regions. The size of these particles varies widely from less than 2 µm to larger particles that can exceed 50 µm in diameter. In this study, we present two continuous records of total suspended particle (TSP) concentrations at sites in Mesa Verde and Canyonlands National Parks in Colorado and Utah, USA, respectively, and compare those values to measurements of fine and coarse particle concentrations made from nearby samplers. Average annual concentrations of TSP at Mesa Verde were 90 µg m−3 in 2011 and at Canyonlands were 171 µg m−3 in 2009, 113 µg m−3 in 2010, and 134 µg m−3 in 2011. In comparison, annual concentrations of fine (diameter of 2.5 µm and below) and coarse (2.5–10 µm diameter) particles at these sites were below 10 µg m−3 in all years. The high concentrations of TSP appear to be the result of regional dust storms with elevated concentrations of particles greater than 10 µm in diameter. These conditions regularly occur from spring through fall with 2 week mean TSP periodically in excess of 200 µg m−3. Measurement of particles on filters indicates that the median particle size varies between approximately 10 µm in winter and 40 µm during the spring. These persistently elevated concentrations of large particles indicate that regional dust emission as dust storms and events are important determinants of air quality in this region.

  16. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site

    PubMed Central

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called ‘catalytic residues’ are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06181.001 PMID:25902402

  17. A split active site couples cap recognition by Dcp2 to activation

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N.; Jones, Brittnee N.; Hernandez, Gail A.; Gross, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Decapping by Dcp2 is an essential step in 5′-3′ mRNA decay. In yeast, decapping requires an open-to-closed transition in Dcp2, though the link between closure and catalysis remains elusive. Here we show using NMR that cap binds conserved residues on both the catalytic and regulatory domains of Dcp2. Lesions in the cap-binding site on the regulatory domain reduce the catalytic step two orders of magnitude and block formation of the closed state whereas Dcp1 enhances the catalytic step by a factor of ten and promotes closure. We conclude that closure occurs during the rate-limiting catalytic step of decapping, juxtaposing the cap-binding region of each domain to form a composite active site. This work suggests a model for regulation of decapping, where coactivators trigger decapping by stabilizing a labile composite active site. PMID:20711189

  18. Concentration dependent differential activity of signalling molecules in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caenorhabditis elegans employs specific glycosides of the dideoxysugar ascarylose (the ‘ascarosides’) for monitoring population density/ dauer formation and finding mates. A synergistic blend of three ascarosides, called ascr#2, ascr#3 and ascr#4 acts as a dauer pheromone at a high concentration na...

  19. Three-Dimensional Concentration Measurements around Actively Tracking Blue Crabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, B. D.; Jackson, J. L.; Weissburg, M. J.; Webster, D. R.

    2006-11-01

    Many aquatic arthropods locate food, suitable habitats, and mates solely through information extracted by chemical signals in their environment. Chemical plumes detected by larger animals are influenced by turbulence that creates an intermittent and unpredictable chemical stimulus environment. To link the stimulus pattern to behavior, we have developed a measurement system to quantify the instantaneous odor concentration surrounding a freely tracking blue crab through three-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence (3DLIF). A blue crab receives chemical stimulus at several locations, including the antennules near the mouth region and the distal tips of the legs and claws. Hence, three-dimensional measurements of the concentration field are required to link behavior to plume structure. During trials, crabs began their search 150 cm downstream of a source, and walking kinematics were recording simultaneously. The crabs were reversibly ``blindfolded'' during tracking to prevent aversive reactions to the intense laser light. Our experiments allow us to examine how hypothesized navigational cues, such as concentration bursts at the antennules and spatial asymmetry in concentration at the distributed chemosensory organs on the legs and claws, results in particular decisions during navigation.

  20. Tissue radionuclide concentrations in water birds and upland birds on the Hanford Site (USA) from 1971-2009.

    PubMed

    Delistraty, Damon; Van Verst, Scott

    2011-08-01

    Historical operations at the Hanford Site (Washington State, USA) have released a wide array of non-radionuclide and radionuclide contaminants into the environment. As a result, there is a need to characterize contaminant effects on site biota. Within this framework, the main purpose of our study was to evaluate radionuclide concentrations in bird tissue, obtained from the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). The database was sorted by avian group (water bird vs. upland bird), radionuclide (over 20 analytes), tissue (muscle, bone, liver), location (onsite vs. offsite), and time period (1971-1990 vs. 1991-2009). Onsite median concentrations in water birds were significantly higher (Bonferroni P < 0.05) than those in onsite upland birds for Cs-137 in muscle (1971-1990) and Sr-90 in bone (1991-2009), perhaps due to behavioral, habitat, or trophic species differences. Onsite median concentrations in water birds were higher (borderline significance with Bonferroni P = 0.05) than those in offsite birds for Cs-137 in muscle (1971-1990). Onsite median concentrations in the earlier time period were significantly higher (Bonferroni P < 0.05) than those in the later time period for Co-60, Cs-137, Eu-152, and Sr-90 in water bird muscle and for Cs-137 in upland bird muscle tissue. Median concentrations of Sr-90 in bone were significantly higher (Bonferroni P < 0.05) than those in muscle for both avian groups and both locations. Over the time period, 1971-2009, onsite median internal dose was estimated for each radionuclide in water bird and upland bird tissues. However, a meaningful dose comparison between bird groups was not possible, due to a dissimilar radionuclide inventory, mismatch of time periods for input radionuclides, and lack of an external dose estimate. Despite these limitations, our results contribute toward ongoing efforts to characterize ecological risk at the Hanford Site.

  1. Localization of the active site of an enzyme, bacterial luciferase, using two-quantum affinity modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benimetskaya, L. Z.; Gitelzon, I. I.; Kozionov, Andrew L.; Novozhilov, S. Y.; Petushkov, V. N.; Rodionova, N. S.; Stockman, Mark I.

    1991-11-01

    For the first time the method of two-quantum affinity modification has been employed to probe the structure of an enzyme, bacterial luciferase. Position of the flavin-binding site of this enzyme, which was previously unknown, has been established. The obtained data indicate that the flavin site is positioned on the (alpha) -subunit. The closest contact of the protein chain of the enzyme with the chromophoric group of the flavin takes place near 80 +/- 10 and 120 +/- 10 amino acid residues; the regions 50 +/- 10 and 215 +/- 10 are also close to the flavin. The established localization does not contradict suggestions on positions of the flavin and phosphate sites of the bacterial luciferase, which had earlier been made from the data on evolutionary stability of various luciferases. The present method can, in principle, be applied to a great number of enzymes, including all flavin-dependent enzymes. Enzymatic catalysis has high speed and specificity. Creation of a method of determination of the elements of the primary structure of a protein, making up the active site (in which substratum conversion occurs), could be a significant advance in clearing up mechanisms of enzymatic catalysis. It was proposed to localize active sites of the enzymes, whose substrata are chromophores, using this method of two-quantum affinity modification. An enzyme- substratum complex is irradiated with laser light of sufficiently long wavelength ((lambda) 300 nm) which is not directly absorbed by the enzyme. Two-quantum quasiresonant excitation of the substratum activates it to the state with energy 5-7 eV, which is then radiativelessly transferred to neighboring protein groups. This energy exceeds the energy of activation of peptide bond breakage. Therefore, the enzyme will be disrupted in the vicinity of its active site. In the present paper the above approach has been implemented for the first time. Information has been obtained about the position of the flavin-binding site of bacterial

  2. Active site structure and catalytic mechanism of phosphodiesterase for degradation of intracellular second messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2002-03-01

    Phosphodiesterases are clinical targets for a variety of biological disorders, because this superfamily of enzymes regulate intracellular concentration of cyclic nucleotides that serve as the second messengers playing a critical role in a variety of physiological processes. Understanding structure and mechanism of a phosphodiesterase will provide a solid basis for rational design of the more efficient therapeutics. Although a three-dimensional X-ray crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human phosphodiesterase 4B2B was recently reported, it was uncertain whether a critical bridging ligand in the active site is a water molecule or a hydroxide ion. The identity of this bridging ligand has been determined by performing first-principles quantum chemical calculations on models of the active site. All the results obtained indicate that this critical bridging ligand in the active site of the reported X-ray crystal structure is a hydroxide ion, rather than a water molecule, expected to serve as the nucleophile to initialize the catalytic degradation of the intracellular second messengers.

  3. Benzodiazepines: rat pinealocyte binding sites and augmentation of norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew, E.; Parfitt, A.G.; Sugden, D.; Engelhardt, D.L.; Zimmerman, E.A.; Klein, D.C.

    1984-02-01

    Studies of (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding to intact rat pineal cells were carried out in tissue culture preparations. The binding was saturable, reversible and proportional to the number of cells used. Scatchard analysis resulted in a linear plot (Kd . 23 nM, maximum binding sites (Bmax) . 1.56 pmol/mg of protein for cells in monolayer culture; Kd . 7 nM, Bmax . 1.3 pmol/mg of protein for cells in suspension culture). Inhibition constants (Ki) for clonazepam (500 nM), flunitrazepam (38 nM) and Ro-5-4864 (5 nM) indicated that the binding sites were probably of the ''peripheral'' type. In addition, the effects of diazepam on norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity were studied in organ culture and dissociated cell culture. Diazepam (10-50 microM) both prolonged and increased the magnitude of the norepinephrine-induced increase in NAT activity but did not affect the initial rate of rise of enzyme activity. The effect was dose-dependent and was also seen with clonazepam, flunitrazepam and Ro-5-4864, but not with Ro-15-1788. Diazepam, by itself, at these concentrations, had no effect on NAT, but enzyme activity was increased by higher concentrations (0.1-1 mM). Although a relationship between the (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding sites described here and the effect of benzodiazepines on NAT cannot be established from these studies, the data suggest that the benzodiazepines may alter melatonin levels through their action on NAT.

  4. Canada Geese at the Hanford Site – Trends in Reproductive Success, Migration Patterns, and Contaminant Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Mary Ann; Poston, Ted M.; Tiller, Brett L.; Stegen, Amanda; Hand, Kristine D.; Brandenberger, Jill M.

    2010-05-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has conducted several studies for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the status and condition of Canada geese on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. This report summarizes results of studies of Canada geese (Branta canadensis moffitti) at the Hanford Site dating back to the 1950s. Results include information on the nesting (reproductive) success of Canada geese using the Hanford Reach, review of the local and regional migration of this species using data from bird banding studies, and summary data describing monitoring and investigations of the accumulation of Hanford-derived and environmental contaminants by resident goose populations.

  5. Mineral dust and major ion concentrations in snowpit samples from the NEEM site, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jung-Ho; Hwang, Heejin; Hong, Sang Bum; Hur, Soon Do; Choi, Sung-Deuk; Lee, Jeonghoon; Hong, Sungmin

    2015-11-01

    Polar ice sheets conserve atmospheric aerosols at the time of snowfall, which can be used to reconstruct past climate and environmental conditions. We investigated mineral dust and major ion records in snowpit samples obtained from the northwestern Greenland ice sheet near the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) camp in June 2009. We analyzed the samples for mineral dust concentrations as well as stable water isotopes (δ18O, δD, and deuterium excess) and major ions (Cl-, SO42-, methanesulfonic acid (MSA), Na+, and Ca2+). Seasonal δ18O and δD cycles indicate that the snowpit samples covered a six-year period from spring 2003 to early summer 2009. Concentrations of mineral dust, nss-Ca2+, and nss-SO42- showed seasonal deposition events with maxima in the winter-spring layers. On the other hand, the Cl-/Na+ ratio and the concentrations of MSA exhibited maxima in the summer layers, making them useful indicators for the summer season. Moreover, an anomalous atmospheric mineral dust event was recorded at a depth of 165-170 cm corresponding to late winter 2005 to spring 2006. A back trajectory analysis suggests that a major contributor to the Greenland aerosol was an air mass passing over the Canadian Arctic and North America. Several trajectories point to Asian regions as a dust source. The mineral dust deposited at NEEM was strongly influenced by long-range atmospheric transport and dust input from arid source areas in northern China and Mongolia.

  6. Flexibility Matters: Cooperative Active Sites in Covalent Organic Framework and Threaded Ionic Polymer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Aguila, Briana; Perman, Jason; Nguyen, Nicholas; Ma, Shengqian

    2016-12-07

    The combination of two or more reactive centers working in concert on a substrate to facilitate the reaction is now considered state of the art in catalysis, yet there still remains a tremendous challenge. Few heterogeneous systems of this sort have been exploited, as the active sites spatially separated within the rigid framework are usually difficult to cooperate. It is now shown that this roadblock can be surpassed. The underlying principle of the strategy presented here is the integration of catalytic components with excellent flexibility and porous heterogeneous catalysts, as demonstrated by the placement of linear ionic polymers in close proximity to surface Lewis acid active sites anchored on the walls of a covalent organic framework (COF). Using the cycloaddition of the epoxides and CO2 as a model reaction, dramatic activity improvements have been achieved for the composite catalysts in relation to the individual catalytic component. Furthermore, they also clearly outperform the benchmark catalytic systems formed by the combination of the molecular organocatalysts and heterogeneous Lewis acid catalysts, while affording additional recyclability. The extraordinary flexibility and enriched concentration of the catalytically active moieties on linear polymers facilitate the concerted catalysis, thus leading to superior catalytic performance. This work therefore uncovers an entirely new strategy for designing bifunctional catalysts with double-activation behavior and opens a new avenue in the design of multicapable systems that mimic biocatalysis.

  7. Sec1p Binds to Snare Complexes and Concentrates at Sites of Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Chavela M.; Grote, Eric; Munson, Mary; Hughson, Frederick M.; Novick, Peter J.

    1999-01-01

    Proteins of the Sec1 family have been shown to interact with target-membrane t-SNAREs that are homologous to the neuronal protein syntaxin. We demonstrate that yeast Sec1p coprecipitates not only the syntaxin homologue Ssop, but also the other two exocytic SNAREs (Sec9p and Sncp) in amounts and in proportions characteristic of SNARE complexes in yeast lysates. The interaction between Sec1p and Ssop is limited by the abundance of SNARE complexes present in sec mutants that are defective in either SNARE complex assembly or disassembly. Furthermore, the localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Sec1p coincides with sites of vesicle docking and fusion where SNARE complexes are believed to assemble and function. The proposal that SNARE complexes act as receptors for Sec1p is supported by the mislocalization of GFP-Sec1p in a mutant defective for SNARE complex assembly and by the robust localization of GFP-Sec1p in a mutant that fails to disassemble SNARE complexes. The results presented here place yeast Sec1p at the core of the exocytic fusion machinery, bound to SNARE complexes and localized to sites of secretion. PMID:10427089

  8. Mercury concentrations and pools in four Sierra Nevada forest sites, and relationships to organic carbon and nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrist, D.; Johnson, D. W.; Lindberg, S. E.

    2009-05-01

    This study presents data on mercury (Hg) concentrations, stochiometric relations to carbon (C) and nitrogen (N), and Hg pool sizes in four Sierra Nevada forest sites of similar exposure and precipitation regimes, and hence similar atmospheric deposition, to evaluate how ecosystem parameters control Hg retention in ecosystems. In all four sites, the largest amounts of Hg reside in soils which account for 94-98% of ecosystem pools. Hg concentrations and Hg/C ratios increase in the following order: Green Needles/Leavessites and soil horizons (r2=0.83), but Hg concentrations are even more closely related to N with a similar slope to that observed in litter (r2=0.92). Soil N levels alone explain over 90% of Hg pool sizes across the four Sierra Nevada forest sites. This suggests that soil organic N and C groups provide sorption sites for Hg to retain atmospheric deposition. However, the patterns could be due to indirect relationships where high soil N and C levels reflect high ecosystem productivity which leads to corresponding high atmospheric Hg deposition inputs via leaf litterfall and plant senescence. Our results also show that two of the sites previously affected by prescribed burning and wildfires show significant depletion of above-ground Hg pools but that belowground Hg pools

  9. Mercury concentrations and pools in four Sierra Nevada forest sites, and relationships to organic carbon and nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrist, D.; Johnson, D. W.; Lindberg, S. E.

    2009-02-01

    This study presents data on Hg concentrations, stochiometric relations to carbon (C) and nitrogen (N), and Hg pool sizes in four Sierra Nevada forest sites of similar exposure and precipitation regimes, and hence similar atmospheric deposition, to evaluate how ecosystem parameters control Hg retention in ecosystems. In all four sites, the largest amounts of Hg reside in soils which account for 94-98% of ecosystem pools. Hg concentrations and Hg/C ratios increase in the following order: Green Needles/Leaves < Dry Needles/Leaves < Oi litter < Oe litter < Oa litter. Stochiometric relations show negative correlations between Hg and C (r2=0.58) and N and C (r2=0.64) in decomposing litter, but a positive correlation between litter Hg and N (r2=0.70). These inverse relations may reflect preferential retention of N and Hg over C during decomposition, or may be due to older age of decomposed litter layers which are exposed to longer-term atmospheric Hg deposition in the field. The results indicate that litter Hg levels depend on decomposition stage and may not follow generally observed positive relationships between Hg and organic C. Mineral soil layers show strong positive correlations of Hg to C across all sites and soil horizons (r2=0.83), but Hg concentrations are even more closely related to N with a similar slope to that observed in litter (r2=92%). Soil N levels alone explain over 90% of Hg pool sizes across the four Sierra Nevada forest sites. This suggest that soil organic N and C groups provide sorption sites for Hg to retain atmospheric deposition. However, the patterns could be due indirect relationships where high soil N and C levels reflect high ecosystem productivity which leads to corresponding high atmospheric Hg deposition inputs via leaf litterfall and plant senescence. Our results also show that two of the sites previously affected by prescribed burning and wildfires show significant depletion of above-ground Hg pools but that belowground Hg pools remain

  10. Relationship between site-specific nitrogen concentrations in mosses and measured wet bulk atmospheric nitrogen deposition across Europe.

    PubMed

    Harmens, Harry; Schnyder, Elvira; Thöni, Lotti; Cooper, David M; Mills, Gina; Leblond, Sébastien; Mohr, Karsten; Poikolainen, Jarmo; Santamaria, Jesus; Skudnik, Mitja; Zechmeister, Harald G; Lindroos, Antti-Jussi; Hanus-Illnar, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    To assess the relationship between nitrogen concentrations in mosses and wet bulk nitrogen deposition or concentrations in precipitation, moss tissue and deposition were sampled within a distance of 1 km of each other in seven European countries. Relationships for various forms of nitrogen appeared to be asymptotic, with data for different countries being positioned at different locations along the asymptotic relationship and saturation occurring at a wet bulk nitrogen deposition of ca. 20 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). The asymptotic behaviour was more pronounced for ammonium-N than nitrate-N, with high ammonium deposition at German sites being most influential in providing evidence of the asymptotic behaviour. Within countries, relationships were only significant for Finland and Switzerland and were more or less linear. The results confirm previous relationships described for modelled total deposition. Nitrogen concentration in mosses can be applied to identify areas at risk of high nitrogen deposition at European scale.

  11. Study on Metal Concentrations in Tissues of Mallard and Pochard from Two Major Wintering Sites in Southeastern Caspian Sea, Iran.

    PubMed

    Sinka-Karimi, Mohammad Hosein; Pourkhabbaz, Ali Reza; Hassanpour, Mehdi; Levengood, Jeffrey M

    2015-09-01

    We examined concentrations of cadmium, chromium, iron, lead and zinc in the kidney, liver, and pectoral muscle of Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos; n = 30) and Pochards (Aythya ferina; n = 30) from two important wintering sites in the southeastern Caspian Sea in the winter of 2012. Mean lead concentrations (µg g(-1) ww) in livers (2.36 ± 1.00) of Pochard and in kidneys (3.43 ± 0.91) of Mallard exceeded the exposure threshold levels in liver (1.5 µg g(-1) ww) and kidney (3 µg g(-1) ww) of waterfowl. Mean cadmium concentrations in livers (1.63 ± 0.66) of Pochards exceeded the background level of this metal in liver (1 µg g(-1) ww) of waterfowl. Chromium, iron and zinc concentrations were within the normal range as reported in other duck studies. Gender-related and inter-specific variation of metal concentrations in analyzed tissues were observed (t test, p < 0.05). Our results indicated that waterfowl using the Miankalah and Gomishan International Wetlands are being exposed to elevated concentrations of cadmium and lead.

  12. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  13. Rapid Response Concentration-Controlled Desorption of Activated Carbon to Dampen Concentration Fluctuations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Z A E M A M I P O U R , D I E G O C E V A L L O S , A N D M A R K J . R O O D * Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of...such as granular activated carbon (GAC) have been used as biofilter packing material on which biofilm was grown to assist with buffering of the...efficiencies were attributed to the thickness of the biofilm on the GAC. GAC was also used in a separate vessel to dampen the fluctuations of the

  14. Impact of structured personal on-site patient education on low posaconazole plasma concentrations in patients with haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hoenigl, Martin; Duettmann, Wiebke; Raggam, Reinhard B; Huber-Krassnitzer, Bianca; Theiler, Georg; Seeber, Katharina; Prueller, Florian; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines; Prattes, Jürgen; Wagner, Jasmin; Wölfler, Albert; Krause, Robert

    2014-08-01

    Low posaconazole plasma concentrations (PPCs) are associated with breakthrough invasive mould infections among patients with haematological malignancies. This study evaluated the influence of structured personal on-site patient education on low PPCs. The study was conducted from July 2012 to May 2013 at the Division of Hematology, Medical University Hospital of Graz (Graz, Austria). PPCs were measured in all patients with haematological malignancies receiving the drug prophylactically. Concentrations above the target of 0.5 mg/L were defined as satisfactory and those below this concentration as low. In patients with low PPCs, structured personal on-site education regarding the intake of posaconazole (e.g. intake with fatty/acid food, prevention of nausea and vomiting) was performed. In total, 258 steady-state PPCs were measured in 65 patients [median PPC 0.59 mg/L, interquartile range 0.25-0.92 mg/L; 141/258 (54.7%) satisfactory]. Diarrhoea was the strongest predictor of low PPCs in the multivariate analysis. Initial steady-state PPCs were sufficient in 29 patients and low in 36 patients. Of the 36 patients with low initial steady-state PPCs, 8 were either discharged or antifungal therapy was modified before a follow-up PPC was obtained; in the remaining 28 patients, personal on-site education was performed. In 12/28 patients (43%) the personal on-site education led to sufficient levels, whilst in 16 (57%) PPCs stayed below the target, although increasing from <0.2 mg/L to >0.3 mg/L in 6 of these patients. In conclusion, personal education appears to be a promising tool to increase low PPCs.

  15. Active and passive cooling for concentrating photovoltaic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Edenburn, M.W.

    1980-01-01

    The optimization, based on minimum energy cost, of active and passive cooling designs for point-focus Fresnel lens photovoltaic arrays and line-focus, parabolic-trough photovoltaic arrays are discussed, and the two types of cooling are compared. Passive cooling is more cost effective than active for Fresnel lens arrays while the reverse is true for parabolic trough arrays. The analysis produced several other conclusions of interest which are also discussed.

  16. Characterization of Active Site Residues of Nitroalkane Oxidase†

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Michael P.; Fenny, Nana S.; Ali, Shah R.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of primary and secondary nitrolkanes to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones plus nitrite. The structure of the enzyme shows that Serl71 forms a hydrogen bond to the flavin N5, suggesting that it plays a role in catalysis. Cys397 and Tyr398 were previously identified by chemical modification as potential active site residues. To more directly probe the roles of these residues, the S171A, S171V, S171T, C397S, and Y398F enzymes have been characterized with nitroethane as substrate. The C397S and Y398 enzymes were less stable than the wild-type enzyme, and the C397S enzyme routinely contained a substoichiometric amount of FAD. Analysis of the steady-state kinetic parameters for the mutant enzymes, including deuterium isotope effects, establishes that all of the mutations result in decreases in the rate constants for removal of the substrate proton by ~5-fold and decreases in the rate constant for product release of ~2-fold. Only the S171V and S171T mutations alter the rate constant for flavin oxidation. These results establish that these residues are not involved in catalysis, but rather are required for maintaining the protein structure. PMID:20056514

  17. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  18. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems.

  19. Musk Kinase Activity is Modulated By A Serine Phosphorylation Site in The Kinase Loop.

    PubMed

    Camurdanoglu, B Z; Hrovat, C; Dürnberger, G; Madalinski, M; Mechtler, K; Herbst, R

    2016-09-26

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) forms when a motor neuron contacts a muscle fibre. A reciprocal exchange of signals initiates a cascade of signalling events that result in pre- and postsynaptic differentiation. At the centre of these signalling events stands muscle specific kinase (MuSK). MuSK activation, kinase activity and subsequent downstream signalling are crucial for NMJ formation as well as maintenance. Therefore MuSK kinase activity is tightly regulated to ensure proper NMJ development. We have identified a novel serine phosphorylation site at position 751 in MuSK that is increasingly phosphorylated upon agrin stimulation. S751 is also phosphorylated in muscle tissue and its phosphorylation depends on MuSK kinase activity. A phosphomimetic mutant of S751 increases MuSK kinase activity in response to non-saturating agrin concentrations . In addition, basal MuSK and AChR phosphorylation as well as AChR cluster size are increased. We believe that the phosphorylation of S751 provides a novel mechanism to relief the autoinhibition of the MuSK activation loop. Such a lower autoinhibition could foster or stabilize MuSK kinase activation, especially during stages when no or low level of agrin are present. Phosphorylation of S751 might therefore represent a novel mechanism to modulate MuSK kinase activity during prepatterning or NMJ maintenance.

  20. Uranium concentrations and 234U/238U activity ratios in fault-associated groundwater as possible earthquake precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkel, R. C.

    In order to assess the utility of uranium isotopes as fluid phase earthquake precursors, uranium concentrations and 234U/238U activity ratios have been monitored on a monthly or bimonthly basis in water from 24 wells and springs associated with Southern California fault zones. Uranium concentrations vary from 0.002 ppb at Indian Canyon Springs on the San Jacinto fault to 8.3 ppb at Lake Hughes well on the San Andreas fault in the Palmdale area. 234U/238U activity ratios vary from 0.88 at Agua Caliente Springs on the Elsinore fault to 5.4 at Niland Slab well on the San Andreas fault in the Imperial Valley. There was one large earthquake in the study area during 1979, the 15 October 1979 M=6.6 Imperial Valley earthquake. Correlated with this event, uranium concentrations varied by a factor of more than 60 and activity ratios by a factor of 3 at the Niland Slab site, about 70 km from the epicenter. At the other sites monitored, uranium concentrations varied in time, but with no apparent pattern, while uranium activity ratios remained essentially constant throughout the monitoring period.

  1. Histochemical modification of the active site of succinate dehydrogenase with N-acetylimidazole.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Y; Shono, M

    1986-04-01

    The kinetics of acetylation of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase [EC 1.3.99.1] in the two fibre types (A and C) of rat gastrocnemius with N-acetylimidazole was studied by a newly modified histochemical technique. Acetylimidazole partially inactivated the enzyme, but subsequent deacetylation with hydroxylamine restored the enzyme activity completely. Inactivation of the enzyme by acetylimidazole was prevented by malonate, which is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme. The value of the inhibition constant (Ki = 34 microM) for malonate, obtained from the dependence of the pseudo-first order rate constant of acetylation of the enzyme with acetylimidazole on the malonate concentration, was in good agreement with the Ki value (33 microM) obtained by a different method, the dependence of the initial velocity of succinate oxidation by the dehydrogenase on the substrate concentration in the presence of malonate. These findings suggest that a tyrosyl residue is located in the malonate binding site (the active site) of succinate dehydrogenase in the gastrocnemius and plays a role in substrate binding, but is not a catalytic group.

  2. Factors affecting 210Po and 210Pb activity concentrations in mussels and implications for environmental bio-monitoring programmes.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fernando P; Oliveira, João M; Alberto, G

    2011-02-01

    The activity of (210)Po and (210)Pb was determined in mussels of the same size (3.5-4.0 cm shell length) sampled monthly over a 17-month period at the Atlantic coast of Portugal. Average radionuclide concentration values in mussels were 759±277 Bq kg(-1) for (210)Po (range 460-1470 Bq kg(-1) dry weight), and 45±19 Bq kg(-1) for (210)Pb (range 23-96 Bq kg(-1) dry weight). Environmental parameters and mussel biometric parameters were monitored during the same period. Although there was no seasonal variation of radionuclide concentrations in sea water during the study period, the concentration of radionuclide activity in mussels varied seasonally displaying peaks of high concentrations in winter and low concentrations in summer. Analysis of radionuclide data in relation to the physiological Condition Index of mussels revealed that (210)Po and (210)Pb activities in the mussel (average activity per individual) remained nearly constant during the investigation period, while mussel body weight fluctuated due to fat storage/expenditure in the soft tissues. Similar variation of radionuclide concentrations was observed in mussels transplanted from the sea coast into the Tejo Estuary. However, under estuarine environmental conditions and with higher food availability throughout the year, transplanted mussel Condition Index was higher than in coastal mussels and average radionuclide concentrations were 210±75 Bq kg(-1) (dry weight) for (210)Po and 10±4 Bq kg(-1) (dry weight) for (210)Pb, therefore lower than in coastal mussels with similar shell length. It is concluded that the apparent seasonal fluctuation and inter-site difference of radionuclide concentrations were mostly caused by mussel body weight fluctuation and not by radionuclide body burden fluctuation. This interpretation can be extended to the apparent seasonal fluctuation in concentrations of lipophilic and lipophobic contaminants in mussels, and provides an explanation for occasional high concentrations of

  3. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  4. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  5. Phase I and II liver enzyme activities in juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) collected from three sites in the Kissimmee-Everglades drainage, Florida (USA).

    PubMed

    Gunderson, M P; Oberdörster, E; Guillette, L J

    2004-10-01

    We examined CYP1A (measured using hepatic EROD and MROD activities) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities in juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) collected from three sites with varying contamination in the Kissimmee-Everglades drainage in south Florida. We hypothesized that contaminants present in areas with intermediate or higher contaminant concentrations would alter hepatic enzyme activities in juvenile alligators from those sites when compared to hepatic enzyme activity in animals from the area with the least contamination. EROD activity was found to be higher in animals from the site with lower reported levels of contamination relative to those from the site with the highest reported contamination suggesting an inhibition of CYP1A expression or activity. No differences among animals from the three sites were observed for hepatic MROD and GST activities. A significant negative relationship between EROD, MROD, and GST activities and body size was exhibited in alligators from the site with the lowest contamination. No relationship between body size and hepatic enzyme activity was found in animals from the sites with intermediate and higher contamination, suggesting that contaminants present at these sites act to alter this relationship. No correlation was observed in this study between plasma steroid concentrations (estradiol-17 beta or testosterone) and hepatic EROD, MROD, or GST activities.

  6. Active and passive cooling for concentrating photovoltaic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Edenburn, M.W.

    1981-10-01

    Optimization, based on minimum energy cost, of active and passive cooling designs for point-focus Fresnel lens photovoltaic arrays and line-focus, parabolic-trough photovoltaic arrays is discussed, and the two types of cooling are compared. Passive cooling is more cost-effective for Fresnel lens arrays while the reverse is true for parabolic-trough arrays.

  7. Extracellular matrix-specific focal adhesions in vascular smooth muscle produce mechanically active adhesion sites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhe; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Hill, Michael A.; Meininger, Gerald A.

    2008-01-01

    Integrin-mediated mechanotransduction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays an important role in the physiological control of tissue blood flow and vascular resistance. To test whether force applied to specific extracellular matrix (ECM)-integrin interactions could induce myogenic-like mechanical activity at focal adhesion sites, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to apply controlled forces to specific ECM adhesion sites on arteriolar VSMCs. The tip of AFM probes were fused with a borosilicate bead (2∼5 μm) coated with fibronectin (FN), collagen type I (CNI), laminin (LN), or vitronectin (VN). ECM-coated beads induced clustering of α5- and β3-integrins and actin filaments at sites of bead-cell contact indicative of focal adhesion formation. Step increases of an upward (z-axis) pulling force (800∼1,600 pN) applied to the bead-cell contact site for FN-specific focal adhesions induced a myogenic-like, force-generating response from the VSMC, resulting in a counteracting downward pull by the cell. This micromechanical event was blocked by cytochalasin D but was enhanced by jasplakinolide. Function-blocking antibodies to α5β1- and αvβ3-integrins also blocked the micromechanical cell event in a concentration-dependent manner. Similar pulling experiments with CNI, VN, or LN failed to induce myogenic-like micromechanical events. Collectively, these results demonstrate that mechanical force applied to integrin-FN adhesion sites induces an actin-dependent, myogenic-like, micromechanical event. Focal adhesions formed by different ECM proteins exhibit different mechanical characteristics, and FN appears of particular relevance in its ability to strongly attach to VSMCs and to induce myogenic-like, force-generating reactions from sites of focal adhesion in response to externally applied forces. PMID:18495809

  8. Investigation of the relationship between atmospheric mercury and concentrations of key greenhouse gases at a mountainous monitoring site.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Pandey, Sudhir Kumar; Brown, Richard J C; Sheu, Guey Rong; Jeon, Eui-Chan; Jung, Kweon; Kang, Chang-Hee

    2015-03-01

    The concentration of total gaseous mercury (TGM) was monitored, together with some key greenhouse gases (GHGs: carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and water (H2O) vapor) at hourly intervals at a mountainous monitoring site close to the highly industrialized city of Seoul, Korea. Correlations between the concentrations of Hg and those of the greenhouse gases were examined to assess their source characteristics and responses to changes in meteorological conditions. The mean Hg levels in this study (3.58 ± 2.13 ng m(-3)) were considerably lower (by, e.g., 24.3%) than those measured previously in other comparable sites during 1999-2006 (4.73 ± 1.34 ng m(-3)). Accordingly, such a reduction in Hg levels suggests the effectiveness of the regulatory measures enforced over the years. The mean Hg level observed in this study is also lower (by approximately 5%) than those in other Asian locations. In contrast, the mean concentrations of the two most important GHGs (CO2 and CH4) were moderately higher than those of other locations across the world (by approximately 4-9%). The results of our analysis indicate that the behavior of Hg is strongly correlated with water vapor and CH4 in terms of their source characteristics, despite notable differences in their diurnal patterns.

  9. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  10. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  11. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  12. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  13. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  14. Robotics and Automation Activities at the Savannah River Site: A Site Report for SUBWOG 39F

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.

    1995-09-28

    The Savannah River Site has successfully used robots, teleoperators, and remote video to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, improve worker safety, and improve the quality of operations. Previous reports have described the use of mobile teleoperators in coping with a high level liquid waste spill, the removal of highly contaminated equipment, and the inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. This report will cover recent applications at the Savannah River, as well as systems which SRS has delivered to other DOE site customers.

  15. Russian Activities in Space Photovoltaic Power Modules with Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, Vyacheslav M.; Rumyantsev, Valeri D.

    2004-01-01

    Space concentrator modules with point-and line-focus Fresnel lenses and with reflective parabolic troughs have been developed recently at Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute. PV receivers for these modules are based: on the single junction LPE and MOCVD AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells characterized by AM0 efficiencies of 23.5 - 24% at 20 - 50 suns and 24 - 24.75 at 50 - 200 suns; on the mechanically stacked tandem AlGaAs/GaAs-GaSb cells with efficiency of 27 - 28 at 20 - 100 suns. MOCVD AlGaAs/GaAs cells with internal Bragg reflector have shown a higher radiation resistance as compared to a traditional structure. Monolithic two-terminal tandems AlGaAs (top)-GaAs (bottom) for space application and GaSb (top) - InGaAsSb (bottom) for TRV application are under development as well.

  16. GAS HYDRATES AT TWO SITES OF AN ACTIVE CONTINENTAL MARGIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart on the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m.

  17. Concentration, origin and health hazard from fine particle-bound PAH at three characteristic sites in Southern Poland.

    PubMed

    Rogula-Kozłowska, Wioletta; Kozielska, Barbara; Klejnowski, Krzysztof

    2013-09-01

    Suspended particles with the aerodynamic diameters not greater than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) and 1 μm (PM1, sub-fraction of PM2.5) were sampled at three sites: an urban background site, rural background site, and urban traffic site in southern Poland. In total, there were 240 samples taken within 02.08.2009-27.12.2010. Fifteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were determined in each dust fraction. The averages of the concentration of total PAH (ΣPAH) and of particular PAH, as well as the share of carcinogenic PAH in total PAH (ΣPAHcarc/ΣPAH), carcinogenic equivalent, mutagenic equivalent, and TCDD-toxic equivalent appeared high compared to other areas in the world. Their high values express the significance of health hazard from PM and PM-bound PAH in southern Poland. The diagnostic ratios suggest that PM-bound PAH originate from municipal (PM1-2.5) and vehicular (PM1) combustion.

  18. Online Measurement of Exhaled NO Concentration and Its Production Sites by Fast Non-equilibrium Dilution Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Liying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Zhenxin; Liu, Jiwei; Li, Haiyang

    2016-03-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide (NO) is one of the most promising breath markers for respiratory diseases. Its profile for exhalation and the respiratory NO production sites can provide useful information for medical disease diagnosis and therapeutic procedures. However, the high-level moisture in exhaled gas always leads to the poor selectivity and sensitivity for ion spectrometric techniques. Herein, a method based on fast non-equilibrium dilution ion mobility spectrometry (NED-IMS) was firstly proposed to directly monitor the exhaled NO profile on line. The moisture interference was eliminated by turbulently diluting the original moisture to 21% of the original with the drift gas and dilution gas. Weak enhancement was observed for humid NO response and its limit of detection at 100% relative humidity was down to 0.58 ppb. The NO concentrations at multiple exhalation flow rates were measured, while its respiratory production sites were determined by using two-compartment model (2CM) and Högman and Meriläinen algorithm (HMA). Last but not the least, the NO production sites were analyzed hourly to tentatively investigate the daily physiological process of NO. The results demonstrated the capacity of NED-IMS in the real-time analysis of exhaled NO and its production sites for clinical diagnosis and assessment.

  19. Online Measurement of Exhaled NO Concentration and Its Production Sites by Fast Non-equilibrium Dilution Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Liying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Zhenxin; Liu, Jiwei; Li, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide (NO) is one of the most promising breath markers for respiratory diseases. Its profile for exhalation and the respiratory NO production sites can provide useful information for medical disease diagnosis and therapeutic procedures. However, the high-level moisture in exhaled gas always leads to the poor selectivity and sensitivity for ion spectrometric techniques. Herein, a method based on fast non-equilibrium dilution ion mobility spectrometry (NED-IMS) was firstly proposed to directly monitor the exhaled NO profile on line. The moisture interference was eliminated by turbulently diluting the original moisture to 21% of the original with the drift gas and dilution gas. Weak enhancement was observed for humid NO response and its limit of detection at 100% relative humidity was down to 0.58 ppb. The NO concentrations at multiple exhalation flow rates were measured, while its respiratory production sites were determined by using two-compartment model (2CM) and Högman and Meriläinen algorithm (HMA). Last but not the least, the NO production sites were analyzed hourly to tentatively investigate the daily physiological process of NO. The results demonstrated the capacity of NED-IMS in the real-time analysis of exhaled NO and its production sites for clinical diagnosis and assessment. PMID:26975333

  20. Lidar research activities and observations at NARL site, Gadanki, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellapragada, Bhavani Kumar

    2016-05-01

    The National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), a unit of Department of Space (DOS), located at Gadanki village (13.5°N, 79.2°E, 370 m AMSL) in India, is involved in the development of lidar remote sensing technologies for atmospheric research. Several advanced lidar technologies employing micropulse, polarization, Raman and scanning have been developed at this site and demonstrated for atmospheric studies during the period between 2008 and 2015. The technology of micropulse lidar, operates at 532 nm wavelength, was successfully transferred to an industry and the commercial version has been identified for Indian Lidar network (I-LINK) programme. Under this lidar network activity, several lidar units were installed at different locations in India to study tropospheric aerosols and clouds. The polarization sensitive lidar technology was realized using a set of mini photomultiplier tube (PMT) units and has the capability to operate during day and night without a pause. The lidar technology uses a compact flashlamp pumped Qswitched laser and employs biaxial configuration between the transmitter and receiver units. The lidar technology has been utilized for understanding the polarization characteristics of boundary layer aerosols during the mixed layer development. The demonstrated Raman lidar technology, uses the third harmonic wavelength of Nd:YAG laser, provides the altitude profiles of aerosol backscattering, extinction and water vapor covering the boundary layer range and allows operation during nocturnal periods. The Raman lidar derived height profiles of aerosol backscattering and extinction coefficient, lidar ratio, and watervapor mixing ratio inform the tropical boundary layer aerosol characteristics. The scanning lidar technology uses a near infrared laser wavelength for probing the lower atmosphere and has been utilized for high resolution cloud profiling during convective periods. The lidar technology is also used for rain rate measurement during

  1. Dynamically achieved active site precision in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes' enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme-substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C-H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed.

  2. Measurements of Atmospheric Ice Nuclei Concentrations at Two Canadian Sites: Downtown Toronto and Whistler, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Leaitch, W. R.; Evans, G. J.; MacDonald, A.; Abbatt, J.

    2010-12-01

    The subset of atmospheric aerosol particles termed ice nuclei (IN) facilitate heterogeneous ice formation by lowering the energy barrier to ice formation, thus allowing ice clouds to form at temperatures above the homogeneous freezing threshold. Though ice plays a major role in initiating precipitation globally, the composition and distribution of IN in the atmosphere remains poorly understood. In order to investigate potential anthropogenic contributions to atmospheric ice nucleation, we measured IN concentrations on a major road in Toronto, ON, using the University of Toronto Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (UT-CFDC). The majority of measurements were conducted close to 95% relative humidity (RH) with respect to water, but full RH scans to conditions above supersaturation with respect to liquid water were also performed. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol size (APS, SMPS) and chemical composition (Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer, ATOFMS) allow us to investigate the relationship of IN to varying aerosol types. The number of IN observed was highly variable, ranging from 0-87/L. These urban data will be contrasted with similar data obtained in the coniferous forest of Whistler Mountain, BC. An intense biogenic secondary aerosol event observed at Whistler is used to estimate an upper limit for IN from organic aerosol formed from monoterpene oxidation.

  3. Seasonal Variations in CO2 Efflux, Vadose Zone Gas Concentrations, and Natural Attenuation Rates at a Crude Oil Spill Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trost, J.; Sihota, N.; Delin, G. N.; Warren, E.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate estimates of hydrocarbon source zone natural attenuation (SZNA) rates are important for managing contaminated sites but are difficult to measure. Moreover, SZNA rates may vary seasonally in response to climatic conditions. Previous research at a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota, USA showed that SZNA rates in the summer can be estimated by subtracting background soil CO2 efflux from the total soil CO2 efflux above the contaminated source. In this study, seasonal variations in surficial CO2 efflux were evaluated with measurements of gas concentrations (including 14CO2), temperature, and volumetric water content in the vadose zone at the site during a 2-year period. Soil CO2 effluxes in the source zone were consistently greater than background CO2 effluxes, and the magnitude and areal extent of the increased efflux varied seasonally. In the source zone, the 14CO2 and the CO2 efflux data showed a larger proportion of soil CO2 was derived from SZNA in fall and winter (October - February) compared to the summer (June - August). Surficial CO2 effluxes and vadose zone CO2 and CH4 concentrations in the source (2 - 7 meters below land surface) were positively correlated with soil temperature, indicating seasonal variability in SZNA rates. However, peak surficial CO2 effluxes did not correspond with periods of highest CO2 or CH4 concentrations at the 2 - 7 meter depth, demonstrating the effects of physical attributes (such as soil depth, frost, and volumetric water content) on gas transport. Overall, results showed that SZNA rates, background soil respiration rates, and gas transport varied seasonally, and that biological and physical factors are important to consider for accurately estimating SZNA rates.

  4. Prediction of suspended-sediment concentrations at selected sites in the Fountain Creek watershed, Colorado, 2008-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stogner, Robert W.; Nelson, Jonathan M.; McDonald, Richard R.; Kinzel, Paul J.; Mau, David P.

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Pikes Peak Area Council of Governments, Colorado Water Conservation Board, Colorado Springs City Engineering, and the Lower Arkansas Valley Water Conservancy District, began a small-scale pilot study to evaluate the effectiveness of the use of a computational model of streamflow and suspended-sediment transport for predicting suspended-sediment concentrations and loads in the Fountain Creek watershed in Colorado. Increased erosion and sedimentation damage have been identified by the Fountain Creek Watershed Plan as key problems within the watershed. A recommendation in the Fountain Creek Watershed plan for management of the basin is to establish measurable criteria to determine if progress in reducing erosion and sedimentation damage is being made. The major objective of this study was to test a computational method to predict local suspended-sediment loads at two sites with different geomorphic characteristics in order to evaluate the feasibility of using such an approach to predict local suspended-sediment loads throughout the entire watershed. Detailed topographic surveys, particle-size data, and suspended-sediment samples were collected at two gaged sites: Monument Creek above Woodmen Road at Colorado Springs, Colorado (USGS gage 07103970), and Sand Creek above mouth at Colorado Springs, Colorado (USGS gage 07105600). These data were used to construct three-dimensional computational models of relatively short channel reaches at each site. The streamflow component of these models predicted a spatially distributed field of water-surface elevation, water velocity, and bed shear stress for a range of stream discharges. Using the model predictions, along with measured particle sizes, the sediment-transport component of the model predicted the suspended-sediment concentration throughout the reach of interest. These computed concentrations were used with predicted flow patterns and channel morphology to

  5. Active-site zinc ligands and activated H2O of zinc enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Vallee, B L; Auld, D S

    1990-01-01

    The x-ray crystallographic structures of 12 zinc enzymes have been chosen as standards of reference to identify the ligands to the catalytic and structural zinc atoms of other members of their respective enzyme families. Universally, H2O is a ligand and critical component of the catalytically active zinc sites. In addition, three protein side chains bind to the catalytic zinc atom, whereas four protein ligands bind to the structural zinc atom. The geometry and coordination number of zinc can vary greatly to accommodate particular ligands. Zinc forms complexes with nitrogen and oxygen just as readily as with sulfur, and this is reflected in catalytic zinc sites having a binding frequency of His much greater than Glu greater than Asp = Cys, three of which bind to the metal atom. The systematic spacing between the ligands is striking. For all catalytic zinc sites except the coenzyme-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase, the first two ligands are separated by a "short-spacer" consisting of 1 to 3 amino acids. These ligands are separated from the third ligand by a "long spacer" of approximately 20 to approximately 120 amino acids. The spacer enables formation of a primary bidentate zinc complex, whereas the long spacer contributes flexibility to the coordination sphere, which can poise the zinc for catalysis as well as bring other catalytic and substrate binding groups into apposition with the active site. The H2O is activated by ionization, polarization, or poised for displacement. Collectively, the data imply that the preferred mechanistic pathway for activating the water--e.g., zinc hydroxide or Lewis acid catalysis--will be determined by the identity of the other three ligands and their spacing. Images PMID:2104979

  6. Forskolin- and dihydroalprenolol (DHA) binding sites and adenylate cyclase activity in heart of rats fed diets containing different oils

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, S.Q.; Ren, Y.F.; Alam, B.S.

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if dietary lipids can induce changes in the adenylate cyclase system in rat heart. Three groups of male young Sprague-Dawley rats were fed for 6 weeks diets containing 10% corn oil (I), 8% coconut oil + 2% corn oil (II) or 10% menhaden oil (III). Adenylate cyclase activity (basal, fluoride-, isoproterenol-, and forskolin-stimulated) was higher in heart homogenates of rats in group III than in the other two groups. Concentration of the (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding sites in the cardiac membranes were significantly higher in rats fed menhaden oil. The values (pmol/mg protein) were 4.8 +/- 0.2 (I), 4.5 +/- 0.7 (II) and 8.4 +/- 0.5 (III). There was no significant difference in the affinity of the forskolin binding sites among the 3 dietary groups. When measured at different concentrations of forskolin, the adenylate cyclase activity in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil was higher than in the other 2 groups. Concentrations of the (/sup 3/H)DHA binding sites were slightly higher but their affinity was lower in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil. The results suggest that diets containing fish oil increase the concentration of the forskolin binding sites and may also affect the characteristics of the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor in rat heart.

  7. Relationships between environmental organochlorine contaminant residues, plasma corticosterone concentrations, and intermediary metabolic enzyme activities in Great Lakes herring gull embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzen, A; Moon, T W; Kennedy, S W; Glen, G A

    1999-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to survey and detect differences in plasma corticosterone concentrations and intermediary metabolic enzyme activities in herring gull (Larus argentatus) embryos environmentally exposed to organochlorine contaminants in ovo. Unincubated fertile herring gull eggs were collected from an Atlantic coast control site and various Great Lakes sites in 1997 and artificially incubated in the laboratory. Liver and/or kidney tissues from approximately half of the late-stage embryos were analyzed for the activities of various intermediary metabolic enzymes known to be regulated, at least in part, by corticosteroids. Basal plasma corticosterone concentrations were determined for the remaining embryos. Yolk sacs were collected from each embryo and a subset was analyzed for organochlorine contaminants. Regression analysis of individual yolk sac organochlorine residue concentrations, or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TEQs), with individual basal plasma corticosterone concentrations indicated statistically significant inverse relationships for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs), total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), non-ortho PCBs, and TEQs. Similarly, inverse relationships were observed for the activities of two intermediary metabolic enzymes (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and malic enzyme) when regressed against PCDDs/PCDFs. Overall, these data suggest that current levels of organochlorine contamination may be affecting the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and associated intermediary metabolic pathways in environmentally exposed herring gull embryos in the Great Lakes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10064546

  8. Calculating Capstone depleted uranium aerosol concentrations from beta activity measurements.

    PubMed

    Szrom, Frances; Falo, Gerald A; Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Whicker, Jeffrey J; Alberth, David P

    2009-03-01

    Beta activity measurements were used as surrogate measurements of uranium mass in aerosol samples collected during the field testing phase of the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. These aerosol samples generated by the perforation of armored combat vehicles were used to characterize the DU source term for the subsequent Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) of Capstone aerosols. Establishing a calibration curve between beta activity measurements and uranium mass measurements is straightforward if the uranium isotopes are in equilibrium with their immediate short-lived, beta-emitting progeny. For DU samples collected during the Capstone study, it was determined that the equilibrium between the uranium isotopes and their immediate short-lived, beta-emitting progeny had been disrupted when penetrators had perforated target vehicles. Adjustments were made to account for the disrupted equilibrium and for wall losses in the aerosol samplers. Values for the equilibrium fraction ranged from 0.16 to 1, and the wall loss correction factors ranged from 1 to 1.92. This paper describes the process used and adjustments necessary to calculate uranium mass from proportional counting measurements.

  9. Migration of concentrated radionuclide solutions in water-saturated soil investigation of a hypothetical high activity waste solution discharge accident

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarzer, K.; Katscher, W.; Thelen, J.

    1983-01-01

    For the case of postulated leakage from a tank containing a high activity nuclear waste solution, as planned for the German reprocessing plant at Gorleben, the migration of radionuclides in the groundwater current has been examined. As the nuclide migration velocity is strongly influenced by sorption processes, which for a given soil are concentration dependent, adsorption and desorption coefficients for strontium, cesium, ruthenium, and cerium were measured over a wide concentration range in sandy subsoil taken from the Gorleben site. Using the results from the adsorption experiments and neglecting the fact that the sorption coefficients in the case of desorption turn out to be significantly higher, migration velocities and concentration profiles for strontium, cesium, ruthenium, and cerium were calculated with the MOFIS code. The results show significant delay and concentration decrease of the radionuclides with strontium being the ''critical'' element.

  10. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  11. Exposure of commuters to carbon monoxide in Mexico City II. Comparison of in-vehicle and fixed-site concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Bremauntz, A A; Ashmore, M R

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare measurements of carbon monoxide taken concurrently inside vehicles and at fixed-site monitoring stations (FSMs), in order to assess if the FSM stations can be used to estimate commuters' exposure to this pollutant. During the study period ambient CO concentrations were very high. Five selected stations reported concentrations in excess of the Mexican (13 ppm) and United States (9 ppm) 8-hour standards for CO. Since, for all modes of transportation, the in-vehicle concentrations were always larger than the concurrent ambient concentrations, the differences between them were always positive and the ratios were always greater than one. Average, in-vehicle/ambient ratios for each mode of transportation were: automobile, 5.2; minivan, 5.2; minibus, 4.3; bus, 3.1; trolleybus 3.0; and metro, 2.2. A series of simple regression models with a moderate predictive power (R2 = 0.47 to 0.71) were developed for metro, bus, minibus, and automobile commuters. The models include the FSM measurements and also, depending on the mode of transportation, other variables, such as vehicular speed, the route of travel, and the wind speed. In the future, the models should be validated in two ways to determine their predictive power. First, they should be verified against additional samples taken under similar conditions; and second, their applications under different conditions should be explored through sampling during a different season of the year or on other commuting routes.

  12. Ambient Airborne Solids Concentrations Including Volcanic Ash at Hanford, Washington Sampling Sites Subsequent to the Mount St. Helens Eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1982-12-20

    A major eruption of Mount St. Helens occurred on May 18, 1980. Subsequently, airborne solid concentrations were measured as a function of time at two sites within the southern edge of the fallout plume about 211 km east of Mount St. Helens. This ash was a source for investigating area-wide resuspension. Rain had a variable effect on decreasing airborne concentrations from resuspension. From 0.5 to 1.5 cm of rain were required to significantly reduce airborne solid concentrations through July. For a more aged resuspension source in September, a rain of 2.0 cm had a negligible effect. A monthly average threshold-wind speed for resuspension was defined as 3.6 m/s. For monthly-average wind speeds less than the threshold wind speed, monthly-average airborne concentrations tended to decrease with time. A decrease was recorded between September and October. For this 4-month time period, the half-life was on the order of 50 days, corresponding to a weathering rate of 5.1 year/sup -1/.

  13. Short-term 222Rn activity concentration changes in underground spaces with limited air exchange with the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fijałkowska-Lichwa, L.; Przylibski, T. A.

    2011-04-01

    The authors investigated short-time changes in 222Rn activity concentration occurring yearly in two underground tourist facilities with limited air exchange with the atmosphere. One of them is Niedźwiedzia (Bear) Cave in Kletno, Poland - a natural space equipped with locks ensuring isolation from the atmosphere. The other site is Fluorite Adit in Kletno, a section of a disused uranium mine. This adit is equipped with a mechanical ventilation system, operated periodically outside the opening times (at night). Both sites are situated within the same metamorphic rock complex, at similar altitudes, about 2 km apart. The measurements conducted revealed spring and autumn occurrence of convective air movements. In Bear Cave, this process causes a reduction in 222Rn activity concentration in the daytime, i.e. when tourists, guides and other staff are present in the cave. From the point of view of radiation protection, this is the best situation. For the rest of the year, daily concentrations of 222Rn activity in the cave are very stable. In Fluorite Adit, on the other hand, significant variations in daily 222Rn activity concentrations are recorded almost all year round. These changes are determined by the periods of activity and inactivity of mechanical ventilation. Unfortunately this is inactive in the daytime, which results in the highest values of 222Rn activity concentration at the times when tourists and staff are present in the adit. Slightly lower concentrations of radon in Fluorite Adit are recorded in the winter season, when convective air movements carry a substantial amount of radon out into the atmosphere. The incorrect usage of mechanical ventilation in Fluorite Adit results in the most unfavourable conditions in terms of radiation protection. The staff working in that facility are exposed practically throughout the year to the highest 222Rn activity concentrations, both at work (in the adit) and at home (outside their working hours). Therefore, not very well

  14. The yeast regulator of transcription protein Rtr1 lacks an active site and phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kehui; Manley, James L; Tong, Liang

    2012-07-10

    The activity of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is controlled in part by the phosphorylation state of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Recent reports have suggested that yeast regulator of transcription protein, Rtr1, and its human homologue RPAP2, possess Pol II CTD Ser5 phosphatase activity. Here we report the crystal structure of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1, which reveals a new type of zinc finger protein and does not have any close structural homologues. Importantly, the structure does not show evidence of an active site, and extensive experiments to demonstrate its CTD phosphatase activity have been unsuccessful, suggesting that Rtr1 has a non-catalytic role in CTD dephosphorylation.

  15. Endocrine disrupting activities of surface water associated with a West Virginia oil and gas industry wastewater disposal site.

    PubMed

    Kassotis, Christopher D; Iwanowicz, Luke R; Akob, Denise M; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M; Mumford, Adam C; Orem, William H; Nagel, Susan C

    2016-07-01

    Currently, >95% of end disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater from unconventional oil and gas operations in the US occurs via injection wells. Key data gaps exist in understanding the potential impact of underground injection on surface water quality and environmental health. The goal of this study was to assess endocrine disrupting activity in surface water at a West Virginia injection well disposal site. Water samples were collected from a background site in the area and upstream, on, and downstream of the disposal facility. Samples were solid-phase extracted, and extracts assessed for agonist and antagonist hormonal activities for five hormone receptors in mammalian and yeast reporter gene assays. Compared to reference water extracts upstream and distal to the disposal well, samples collected adjacent and downstream exhibited considerably higher antagonist activity for the estrogen, androgen, progesterone, glucocorticoid and thyroid hormone receptors. In contrast, low levels of agonist activity were measured in upstream/distal sites, and were inhibited or absent at downstream sites with significant antagonism. Concurrent analyses by partner laboratories (published separately) describe the analytical and geochemical profiling of the water; elevated conductivity as well as high sodium, chloride, strontium, and barium concentrations indicate impacts due to handling of unconventional oil and gas wastewater. Notably, antagonist activities in downstream samples were at equivalent authentic standard concentrations known to disrupt reproduction and/or development in aquatic animals. Given the widespread use of injection wells for end-disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater, these data raise concerns for human and animal health nearby.

  16. Endocrine disrupting activities of surface water associated with a West Virginia oil and gas industry wastewater disposal site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Akob, Denise M.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Mumford, Adam; Orem, William H.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, >95% of end disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater from unconventional oil and gas operations in the US occurs via injection wells. Key data gaps exist in understanding the potential impact of underground injection on surface water quality and environmental health. The goal of this study was to assess endocrine disrupting activity in surface water at a West Virginia injection well disposal site. Water samples were collected from a background site in the area and upstream, on, and downstream of the disposal facility. Samples were solid-phase extracted, and extracts assessed for agonist and antagonist hormonal activities for five hormone receptors in mammalian and yeast reporter gene assays. Compared to reference water extracts upstream and distal to the disposal well, samples collected adjacent and downstream exhibited considerably higher antagonist activity for the estrogen, androgen, progesterone, glucocorticoid and thyroid hormone receptors. In contrast, low levels of agonist activity were measured in upstream/distal sites, and were inhibited or absent at downstream sites with significant antagonism. Concurrent analyses by partner laboratories (published separately) describe the analytical and geochemical profiling of the water; elevated conductivity as well as high sodium, chloride, strontium, and barium concentrations indicate impacts due to handling of unconventional oil and gas wastewater. Notably, antagonist activities in downstream samples were at equivalent authentic standard concentrations known to disrupt reproduction and/or development in aquatic animals. Given the widespread use of injection wells for end-disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater, these data raise concerns for human and animal health nearby.

  17. Comparison of PM10 concentrations and metal content in three different sites of the Venice Lagoon: an analysis of possible aerosol sources.

    PubMed

    Contini, Daniele; Belosi, Franco; Gambaro, Andrea; Cesari, Daniela; Stortini, Angela Maria; Bove, Maria Chiara

    2012-01-01

    The Venice Lagoon is exposed to atmospheric pollutants from industrial activities, thermoelectric power plants, petrochemical plants, incinerator, domestic heating, ship traffic, glass factories and vehicular emissions on the mainland. In 2005, construction began on the mobile dams (MOSE), one dam for each channel connecting the lagoon to the Adriatic Sea as a barrier against high tide. These construction works could represent an additional source of pollutants. PM10 samples were taken on random days between 2007 and 2010 at three different sites: Punta Sabbioni, Chioggia and Malamocco, located near the respective dam construction worksites. Chemical analyses of V, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Cd, Sb, Tl and Pb in PM10 samples were performed by Inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) and results were used to identify the main aerosol sources. The correlation of measured data with meteorology, and source apportionment, failed to highlight a contribution specifically associated to the emissions of the MOSE construction works. The comparison of the measurements at the three sites showed a substantial homogeneity of metal concentrations in the area. Source apportionment with principal component analysis (PCA) and positive matrix factorization (PMF) showed that a four principal factors model could describe the sources of metals in PM10. Three of them were assigned to specific sources in the area and one was characterised as a source of mixed origin (anthropogenic and crustal). A specific anthropogenic source of PM10 rich in Ni and Cr, active at the Chioggia site, was also identified.

  18. Risks to children from exposure to lead in air during remedial or removal activities at Superfund sites: a case study of the RSR lead smelter Superfund site.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Ghassan A; Diamond, Gary L

    2003-01-01

    Superfund sites that are contaminated with lead and undergoing remedial action generate lead-enriched dust that can be released into the air. Activities that can emit lead-enriched dust include demolition of lead smelter buildings, stacks, and baghouses; on-site traffic of heavy construction vehicles; and excavation of soil. Typically, air monitoring stations are placed around the perimeter of a site of an ongoing remediation to monitor air lead concentrations that might result from site emissions. The National Ambient Air Quality (NAAQ) standard, established in 1978 to be a quarterly average of 1.5 microg/m(3), is often used as a trigger level for corrective action to reduce emissions. This study explored modeling approaches for assessing potential risks to children from air lead emissions from the RSR Superfund site in West Dallas, TX, during demolition and removal of a smelter facility. The EPA Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) model and the International Commission of Radiologic Protection (ICRP) lead model were used to simulate blood lead concentrations in children, based on monitored air lead concentrations. Although air lead concentrations at monitoring stations located in the downwind community intermittently exceeded the NAAQ standard, both models indicated that exposures to children in the community areas did not pose a significant long-term or acute risk. Long-term risk was defined as greater than 5% probability of a child having a long-term blood lead concentration that exceeded 10 microg/dl, which is the CDC and the EPA blood lead concern level. Short-term or acute risk was defined as greater than 5% probability of a child having a blood lead concentration on any given day that exceeded 20 microg/dl, which is the CDC trigger level for medical evaluation (this is not intended to imply that 20 microg/dl is a threshold for health effects in children exposed acutely to airborne lead). The estimated potential long-term and short-term exposures

  19. Contamination of mercury during the wintering period influences concentrations at breeding sites in two migratory piscivorous birds.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Raphael A; Baird, Christopher J; King, Laura E; Kyser, T Kurt; Friesen, Vicki L; Campbell, Linda M

    2014-12-02

    Many aquatic fish-eating birds migrate long distances and are exposed to different mercury concentrations ([Hg]) during their annual cycle. Here we examined the importance of migration on [Hg] in two colonial migratory fish-eating bird species. We determined temporal trends of [Hg] and stable isotopes of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) during the annual cycle in Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) and Caspian Terns (Hydroprogne caspia) breeding in Lake Ontario by a repeated sampling of breast feathers and blood from recaptured individuals. We found an effect of previous winter [Hg], species, sex, and location to explain variations of Hg at breeding sites. This suggests Hg carryover from winter to summer periods and that variations of [Hg] in the summer are partially explained by [Hg] in the winter. Carryover of Hg among seasons and slow changes in [Hg] over time were found especially for individuals in high winter exposure groups, suggesting a slow depuration rate and a fast uptake rate for both species. In contrast, stable isotope values rapidly switched to reach equilibrium at a similar midpoint regardless of winter habitat or diet suggesting minimal carryover of isotopic signatures. The potential of Hg carryover from wintering sites indicates that Hg concentrations in birds at a given time may be influenced by previous exposure from distant locations.

  20. Evolution in the concentration of activities in lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Harry J.

    2016-03-01

    From a perusal of the proceedings of the SPIE Advanced Lithography Symposium, the progression of new concepts in lithographic technology can be seen. A new idea first appears in a few papers, and over time, there is an increase in the number of papers on the same topic. Eventually the method becomes commonplace, and the number of papers on the topic declines, as the idea becomes part of our industry's working knowledge. For example, one or two papers on resolution enhancement techniques (RETs) appeared in the proceedings of the Optical Microlithography Conference in 1989 and 1990. By 1994, the total number of papers had increased to 35. Early lithographers focused on practical issues, such as adhesion promotion and resist edge bead. The introduction of simulation software brought on the next era of lithography. This was followed by a period of time in which RETs were developed and brought to maturity. The introduction of optical proximity corrections (OPC) initiated the next major era of lithography. The traditional path for scaling by using shorter wavelengths, decreasing k1 and increasing numerical aperture has given way to the current era of optical multiple patterning and lithography-design co-optimization. There has been sufficient activity in EUV lithography R and D to justify a separate EUV Lithography Conference as part of the annual Advanced Lithography Symposium. Each era builds on the cumulative knowledge gained previously. Over time, there have been parallel developments in optics, exposure tools, resist, metrology and mask technology, many of which were associated with changes in the wavelength of light used for leading-edge lithography.

  1. Use of Temperature and Surface Gas Flux as Novel Measures of Microbial Activity at a Crude Oil Spill Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekins, B. A.; Warren, E.; Sihota, N. J.; Hostettler, F. D.

    2012-12-01

    Degradation of crude oil in the subsurface has been studied for over 30 years at a spill site located near Bemidji, Minnesota, USA. The well-characterized site is being used to experiment with the use of surface gas flux and temperature measurements as novel methods for quantifying microbial activity. In the largest subsurface oil body, a 2-m-thick smear zone spans the water table 6-8 m below the surface. Methane produced from degradation of the oil diffuses upward and mixes with oxygen from the surface supporting aerobic methanotrophy at 2-4 m depth. The methane oxidation produces CO2 and heat at rates which are hypothetically proportional to other measures of subsurface microbial activity. To test this hypothesis, vertical profiles of temperature and microbial populations, surface CO2 flux, and oil degradation state were measured at three sites in the oil body and one background site. Temperature increases in the oil zone near the water table were 1-4°C above the background site. The site with the highest temperature increase at the water table also had the highest concentrations of gene copy numbers for methanogens (mcrA) and methanotrophs (pmoA) along with the most degraded oil. Surface CO2 flux over the oil sites averaged more than twice that at the background site but was not consistently highest over the site with the highest activity by other measures. One possible explanation for this discrepancy is variation in the effective diffusion coefficient of the vadose zone between the methanotrophic zone and the surface. At the level of the methanotrophic zone, temperatures were elevated 2-6°C over the background values but again the site with greatest average annual temperature increase was not at the most active site. This may be due to enhanced recharge at the most active site, which lies at the center of a local topographic depression where focused recharge occurs. Overall, the temperature and flux data showed significant increases at the oil sites compared

  2. A Comparison Study of Volatile Organic Compound Species and Concentrations in Snow Samples From Rural Sites in South-Western Quebec and at Alert, Nunavut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, R.; Kos, G.; Ariya, P. A.

    2006-12-01

    An intercomparison study was undertaken to evaluate volatile organic compound (VOC) species and concentrations in snow from different environments. Samples were collected in semi-urban/rural environments in Montreal, south-western Quebec, approximately 50 and 150 km east and north of Montreal, Quebec. Samples were also collected in the High Arctic near Alert, Nunavut. Analysis was carried out using pre- concentration with solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) and subsequent analyses using gas chromatography systems fitted with mass spectrometric (GC/MS) and flame ionisation detectors (GC/FID). Headspace and liquid phase of the snow samples were analysed. Bacterial and fungal species were isolated from sampled snow and their ice nucleation ability was assessed. Results demonstrate how VOC species and concentrations vary with the degree of anthropogenic activity and how long-range transport causes anthropogenic compounds to get deposited in the snow pack of remote areas. It is also shown, that snow provides a reservoir of various photo-labile compounds, and serves as an active site for microbiological processes. Atmospheric implications of the results will be discussed.

  3. Temporal variations in gaseous elemental mercury concentrations at a contaminated site: Main factors affecting nocturnal maxima in daily cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esbrí, José M.; Martínez-Coronado, Alba; Higueras, Pablo L.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury is considered to be a global pollutant and it has been globally transported as gaseous elemental mercury (GEM). International networks for the continuous monitoring of mercury, all of which are based on background sites, study the dispersion pattern of this metal and trends in its evolution in time and space. However, information about seasonal and daily cycling of polluted sites is scarce. The aim of the work described here was to cover this gap in knowledge. For this purpose, continuous (GEM) measurements were carried out in Almadén town from November 2011 to September 2013. Meteorological data were also collected during this time. GEM data show an average concentration during the sampling period (2011-2013) of 27.4 ng m-3, with a range of 0.8-686.9 ng m-3. The results highlighted seasonal and daily cycles of GEM in Almadén town, with seasonally higher levels in summer (686.9 ng m-3) and significantly daily higher levels during the night. A multiple linear regression model has established wind speed as the best GEM predictor in all seasons during the night, while the best predictor in winter is relative humidity, temperature in spring, solar radiation in summer and wind speed in autumn during the day. These results provide evidence that, in mining polluted sites like Almadén, photochemical reactions have a negligible impact on GEM levels during the daytime and that meteorological parameters are more relevant. Further studies on diurnal GEM cycling in polluted sites must be carried out to obtain a realistic local risk assessment, taking into account night GEM levels and their importance in each case study.

  4. Conformational plasticity surrounding the active site of NADH oxidase from Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Miletti, Teresa; Di Trani, Justin; Jr Levros, Louis-Charles; Mittermaier, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Biotechnological applications of enzymes can involve the use of these molecules under nonphysiological conditions. Thus, it is of interest to understand how environmental variables affect protein structure and dynamics and how this ultimately modulates enzyme function. NADH oxidase (NOX) from Thermus thermophilus exemplifies how enzyme activity can be tuned by reaction conditions, such as temperature, cofactor substitution, and the addition of cosolutes. This enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of reduced NAD(P)H to NAD(P)+ with the concurrent reduction of O2 to H2O2, with relevance to biosensing applications. It is thermophilic, with an optimum temperature of approximately 65°C and sevenfold lower activity at 25°C. Moderate concentrations (≈1M) of urea and other chaotropes increase NOX activity by up to a factor of 2.5 at room temperature. Furthermore, it is a flavoprotein that accepts either FMN or the much larger FAD as cofactor. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titration and 15N spin relaxation experiments together with isothermal titration calorimetry to study how NOX structure and dynamics are affected by changes in temperature, the addition of urea and the substitution of the FMN cofactor with FAD. The majority of signals from NOX are quite insensitive to changes in temperature, cosolute addition, and cofactor substitution. However, a small cluster of residues surrounding the active site shows significant changes. These residues are implicated in coupling changes in the solution conditions of the enzyme to changes in catalytic activity. PMID:25970557

  5. Daily and seasonal variations in radon activity concentration in the soil air.

    PubMed

    Műllerová, Monika; Holý, Karol; Bulko, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Radon activity concentration in the soil air in the area of Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics (FMPI) in Bratislava, Slovak Republic, has been continuously monitored since 1994. Long-term measurements at a depth of 0.8 m and short-term measurements at a depth of 0.4 m show a high variability in radon activity concentrations in the soil. The analysis of the data confirms that regular daily changes in radon activity concentration in the soil air depend on the daily changes in atmospheric pressure. It was also found that the typical annual courses of the radon activity concentration in the soil air (with summer minima and winter maxima) were disturbed by mild winter and heavy summer precipitation. Influence of precipitation on the increase in the radon activity concentration in the soil air was observed at a depth of 0.4 m and subsequently at a depth of 0.8 m.

  6. Nuclear Site Security in the Event of Terrorist Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M.L.; Sims, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper, presented as a poster, identifies why ballistic protection should now be considered at nuclear sites to counter terrorist threats. A proven and flexible form of multi purpose protection is described in detail with identification of trial results that show its suitability for this role. (authors)

  7. Does canopy mean N concentration explain differences in light use efficiency in 14 eddy-covariance sites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltoniemi, Mikko; Pulkkinen, Minna; Kolari, Pasi; Mäkelä, Annikki

    2010-05-01

    Production efficiency models aim at explaining variation of vegetation productivity with climatic input and information on vegetation cover often obtained from satellite observations. It has been acknowledged that different plant species differ in their potential to assimilate carbon dioxide per unit of PAR (i.e light use efficiency, LUE). Subsequently, some LUE-based models apply different LUE-coefficients for different plant functional types. Leaf N concentrations differ between plant species, and related differences in light saturated photosynthesis rate (A_max) have been detected. How much these differences affect the ecosystem production or LUE is more obscure. Canopies acclimate to prevailing environmental conditions, which causes variation e.g. in the proportion of leaves exposed to direct sunlight, leaf morphology, structure,orientation, and vertical N distibution. Furthermore, a fair proportion of photosynthesis occurs during cloudy days, in which case high A_max is unessential, and number of these days differs by location. We studied if canopy mean N concentration could explain differences in LUE derived for 14 forest sites using eddy-covariance measurements. The largest actual LUE was estimated for each site directly as an upper percentile of the ratio of Gross Primary Production (GPP) to absorbed PAR. Potential LUE for each site, on the other hand, was estimated by parameterising a LUE-based production efficiency model (Prelued), which accounts for daily changes in weather (temperature, VPD, PAR). In this model structure, the LUE-parameter for each site, can be interpreted as the potential LUE under optimal environmental conditions, i.e when the environment is not limiting production at all. Averages of the largest actual LUE and potential LUE were higher in deciduous sites than in conifer sites. Canopy mean N correlated weakly with both the largest actual and potential LUE, and the correlation was also significant in conifer subset in the former case

  8. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  9. Revealing the nature of the active site on the carbon catalyst for C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, XiaoYing; Li, Bo; Su, Dangsheng

    2014-09-28

    A reactivity descriptor for the C-H bond activation on the nanostructured carbon catalyst is proposed. Furthermore the calculations reveal that the single ketone group can be an active site in ODH reaction.

  10. Cellular Active N-Hydroxyurea FEN1 Inhibitors Block Substrate Entry to the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Exell, Jack C.; Thompson, Mark J.; Finger, L. David; Shaw, Steven J.; Debreczeni, Judit; Ward, Thomas A.; McWhirter, Claire; Siöberg, Catrine L. B.; Martinez Molina, Daniel; Mark Abbott, W.; Jones, Clifford D.; Nissink, J. Willem M.; Durant, Stephen T.; Grasby, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    The structure-specific nuclease human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) plays a key role in DNA replication and repair and may be of interest as an oncology target. We present the first crystal structure of inhibitor-bound hFEN1 and show a cyclic N-hydroxyurea bound in the active site coordinated to two magnesium ions. Three such compounds had similar IC50 values but differed subtly in mode of action. One had comparable affinity for protein and protein–substrate complex and prevented reaction by binding to active site catalytic metal ions, blocking the unpairing of substrate DNA necessary for reaction. Other compounds were more competitive with substrate. Cellular thermal shift data showed engagement of both inhibitor types with hFEN1 in cells with activation of the DNA damage response evident upon treatment. However, cellular EC50s were significantly higher than in vitro inhibition constants and the implications of this for exploitation of hFEN1 as a drug target are discussed. PMID:27526030

  11. Active Layer and Moisture Measurements for Intensive Site 0 and 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-04-17

    These are measurements of Active Layer Thickness collected along several lines beginning in September, 2011 to the present. The data were collected at several time periods along the Site0 L2 Line, the Site1 AB Line, and an ERT Monitoring Line near Area A in Site1.

  12. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  13. Elevated blood active ghrelin and normal total ghrelin and obestatin concentrations in uterine leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Markowska, A; Ziolkowska, A; Nowinka, K; Malendowicz, L K

    2009-01-01

    Ghrelin and obestatin originate from the same peptide precursor, preproghrelin. Both peptides are secreted in the blood. We investigated serum active and total ghrelin and obestatin concentrations in women with uterine myomatosis. Serum concentrations of active ghrelin in uterine leiomyoma were significantly higher compared to women in the control group (86 +/- 3 vs 56 +/- 9 pg/ml, respectively; p < 0.02). On the other hand, serum concentrations of total ghrelin and obestatin in uterine leiomyoma did not differ from those in the control group. In the control group the ratio of active to total ghrelin concentrations amounted to 0.62, while in women with uterine myoma it was 0.95, pointing to a prevalence of the active form of ghrelin in women with uterine myoma. Also the ratio of active ghrelin concentration to obestatin concentration was higher in the latter group while the ratio of total circulating ghrelin to obestatin concentrations was similar in the two groups. The data may suggest a role of active ghrelin in the development of a myoma. Moreover, the results indicate that increased blood ratios of active to total ghrelin and to obestatin concentrations are not specific for cachexia.

  14. Are nest sites actively chosen? Testing a common assumption for three non-resource limited birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, A. E.; Elliot, S. L.; Hart, A. G.

    2009-09-01

    Many widely-accepted ecological concepts are simplified assumptions about complex situations that remain largely untested. One example is the assumption that nest-building species choose nest sites actively when they are not resource limited. This assumption has seen little direct empirical testing: most studies on nest-site selection simply assume that sites are chosen actively (and seek explanations for such behaviour) without considering that sites may be selected randomly. We used 15 years of data from a nestbox scheme in the UK to test the assumption of active nest-site choice in three cavity-nesting bird species that differ in breeding and migratory strategy: blue tit ( Cyanistes caeruleus), great tit ( Parus major) and pied flycatcher ( Ficedula hypoleuca). Nest-site selection was non-random (implying active nest-site choice) for blue and great tits, but not for pied flycatchers. We also considered the relative importance of year-specific and site-specific factors in determining occupation of nest sites. Site-specific factors were more important than year-specific factors for the tit species, while the reverse was true for pied flycatchers. Our results show that nest-site selection, in birds at least, is not always the result of active choice, such that choice should not be assumed automatically in studies of nesting behaviour. We use this example to highlight the need to test key ecological assumptions empirically, and the importance of doing so across taxa rather than for single "model" species.

  15. Mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 MSK1 regulates glucocorticoid response element promoter activity in a glucocorticoid concentration-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Beck, Ilse M; Clarisse, Dorien; Bougarne, Nadia; Okret, Sam; Haegeman, Guy; De Bosscher, Karolien

    2013-09-05

    The glucocorticoid receptor is a nuclear receptor, and can be activated by glucocorticoid ligands. Mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase (MSK1), when activated by p38 and ERK mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), plays a major role in chromatin relaxation via phosphorylation of histone H3 S10. The glucocorticoid receptor can target MSK1 as part of its anti-inflammatory mechanism. Here, we studied the converse mechanism, i.e. the impact of MSK1 on glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transactivation. Upstream MSK1-activating kinases concentration-dependently enhanced glucocorticoid response element (GRE)-regulated promoter activity. Correspondingly, MSK1 inhibition, via H89, or combined p38 and ERK MAPK inhibition, via SB203580 and U0126, diminished maximally stimulated GRE-regulated promoter activity using high concentrations of glucocorticoids. Concomitantly, the combination of these agents does not seem to alter site-specific phosphorylations of murine glucocorticoid receptor S212 or S220. Paradoxically, we reveal that a sub-maximally activated GRE-mediated promoter activity, by using lower concentrations of glucocorticoids, is consistently enhanced by H89 or a combination of SB203580 and U0126, irrespective of the GRE promoter context. Furthermore, we show that the glucocorticoid-induced nucleocytoplasmic translocation of MSK1 occurs in a glucocorticoid concentration-dependent manner. The observed glucocorticoid concentration-dependent effect of MSK1 or MAPK inhibition on glucocorticoid receptor transactivation warrants further research into the applicability of combined glucocorticoid and kinase inhibitor strategies for anti-inflammatory purposes.

  16. Hourly elemental concentrations in PM2.5 aerosols sampled simultaneously at urban background and road site during SAPUSS - diurnal variations and PMF receptor modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Querol, X.; Amato, F.; Karanasiou, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.

    2013-04-01

    monitoring sites at similar concentrations regardless their different ventilation conditions; (2) by contrast, local industrial aerosol plumes associated with shipping oil combustion and smelters activities have a higher impact on the more ventilated UB site; (3) a unique source of Pb-Cl (associated with combustion emissions) is found to be the major (82%) source of fine Cl in the urban agglomerate; (4) the mean diurnal variation of PM2.5 primary traffic non-exhaust brake dust (Fe-Cu) suggests that this source is mainly emitted and not resuspended, whereas PM2.5 urban dust (Ca) is found mainly resuspended by both traffic vortex and sea breeze; (5) urban dust (Ca) is found the aerosol source most affected by land wetness, reduced by a factor of eight during rainy days and suggesting that wet roads may be a solution for reducing urban dust concentrations.

  17. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  18. Structural characterization of single nucleotide variants at ligand binding sites and enzyme active sites of human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazunori D.; Nishi, Hafumi; Nakata, Junichi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Functional sites on proteins play an important role in various molecular interactions and reactions between proteins and other molecules. Thus, mutations in functional sites can severely affect the overall phenotype. Progress of genome sequencing projects has yielded a wealth of information on single nucleotide variants (SNVs), especially those with less than 1% minor allele frequency (rare variants). To understand the functional influence of genetic variants at a protein level, we investigated the relationship between SNVs and protein functional sites in terms of minor allele frequency and the structural position of variants. As a result, we observed that SNVs were less abundant at ligand binding sites, which is consistent with a previous study on SNVs and protein interaction sites. Additionally, we found that non-rare variants tended to be located slightly apart from enzyme active sites. Examination of non-rare variants revealed that most of the mutations resulted in moderate changes of the physico-chemical properties of amino acids, suggesting the existence of functional constraints. In conclusion, this study shows that the mapping of genetic variants on protein structures could be a powerful approach to evaluate the functional impact of rare genetic variations. PMID:27924270

  19. Using the Novel Method of Nonthermal Plasma To Add Cl Active Sites on Activated Carbon for Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bi; Zeng, Xiaobo; Xu, Ping; Chen, Juan; Xu, Yang; Luo, Guangqian; Xu, Minghou; Yao, Hong

    2016-11-01

    A new method using nonthermal plasma to add Cl active sites on activated carbon was proposed to improve the efficiency of activated carbon (AC) for removal of mercury from flue gas. The experiments were conducted via a lab-scale dielectric barrier discharge nonthermal plasma system and a vertical adsorption reactor. The results showed that the nonthermal plasma treatment with a small amount of Cl2 successfully added Cl active sites on AC and greatly increased the mercury removal efficiency of AC by chemisorption in a very short treatment time. The increase in Cl2 concentration for AC treatment promoted the efficiency of AC. The capacity of mercury adsorption positively correlated with the content of Cl2 for AC treatment, which depends on the number of Cl active sites on activated carbon. The treated AC maintained a high mercury removal efficiency within a temperature range of 30-210 °C. SO2 and H2O in flue gas inhibited the removal of mercury by AC, while HCl had a promotional effect. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated the chemisorption of mercury was attributed to the C-Cl groups generated on AC surfaces during Cl2 nonthermal plasma treatment. The C-Cl groups as active sites had strong adsorption energy for mercury, which converted elemental mercury to HgCl2.

  20. Lamellipodial actin mechanically links myosin activity with adhesion site formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannone, Gregory; Dubin-Thaler, Benjamin; Rossier, Olivier; Cai, Yunfei; Chaga, Oleg; Jiang, Guoying; Beaver, William; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Freund, Yoav; Borisy, Gary; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell motility proceeds by cycles of edge protrusion, adhesion and retraction. Whether these functions are coordinated by biochemical or biomechanical processes is unknown. We find that myosin II pulls the rear of the lamellipodial actin network, causing upward bending, edge retraction and initiation of new adhesion sites. The network then separates from the edge and condenses over the myosin. Protrusion resumes as lamellipodial actin regenerates from the front and extends rearward until it reaches newly assembled myosin, initiating the next cycle. Upward bending, observed by evanescence and electron microscopy, results in ruffle formation when adhesion strength is low. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy shows that the regenerating lamellipodium forms a cohesive, separable layer of actin above the lamellum. Thus, actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process. PMID:17289574

  1. High-accuracy measurements of N2O concentration and site-specific nitrogen isotopes in small or high concentration samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, M. R.; Arata, C.; Huang, K.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) gas is among the major contributors to global warming and ozone depletion in stratosphere. Quantitative estimate of N­2O production in various pathways and N­2O fluxes across different reservoirs is the key to understanding the role of N­2O in the global change. To achieve this goal, accurate and concurrent measurement of both N2O concentration ([N2O]) and its site-specific isotopic composition (SP-δ15N), namely δ15Nα and δ15Nβ, is desired. Recent developments in Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) have enabled high precision measurements of [N2O] and SP-δ15N of a continuous gas flow. However, many N­­2O samples are discrete with limited volume (< 500 ml), and/or high [N2O] (> 2 ppm), and are not suitable for direct measurements by CRDS. Here we present results of a Small Sample Isotope Module 2 (SSIM2) which is coupled to and automatically coordinated with a Picarro isotopic N2O CRDS analyzer to handle and measure high concentration and/or small volume samples. The SSIM2 requires 20 ml of sample per analysis, and transfers the sample to the CRDS for high precision measurement. When the sample injection is < 20 ml, a zero gas is optionally filled to make up the volume. We used the SSIM2 to dilute high [N2O] samples and < 20 ml samples, and tested the effect of dilution on the measured SP-δ15N. In addition, we employed and tested a newly developed double injection method for samples adequate for two 20 ml injections. After the SSIM2 and the CRDS cavity was primed with the first injection, the second injection, which has negligible dilution of the sample, can be accurately measured for both [N2O] and SP-δ15N. Results of these experiments indicate that the precision of SSIM2-CRDS is similar to that of the continuous measurements using the CRDS alone, and that dilution has minimal effect on SP-δ15N, as along as the [N2O] is > 300 ppb after dilution. Overall, the precision of SP-δ15N measured using the SSIM2 is < 0.5 ‰.

  2. Autologous keratinocyte suspension in platelet concentrate accelerates and enhances wound healing – a prospective randomized clinical trial on skin graft donor sites: platelet concentrate and keratinocytes on donor sites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Wound healing involves complex mechanisms, which, if properly chaperoned, can enhance patient recovery. The abilities of platelets and keratinocytes may be harnessed in order to stimulate wound healing through the formation of platelet clots, the release of several growth factors and cytokines, and cell proliferation. The aim of the study was to test whether autologous keratinocyte suspensions in platelet concentrate would improve wound healing. The study was conducted at the Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland in 45 patients, randomized to three different topical treatment groups: standard treatment serving as control, autologous platelet concentrate (PC) and keratinocytes suspended in autologous platelet concentrate (PC + K). Split thickness skin graft donor sites were chosen on the anterolateral thighs of patients undergoing plastic surgery for a variety of defects. Wound healing was assessed by the duration and quality of the healing process. Pain intensity was evaluated at day five. Results Healing time was reduced from 13.9 ± 0.5 days (mean ± SEM) in the control group to 7.2 ± 0.2 days in the PC group (P < 0.01). An addition of keratinocytes in suspension further reduced the healing time to 5.7 ± 0.2 days. Pain was reduced in both the PC and PC + K groups. Data showed a statistically detectable advantage of using PC + K over PC alone (P < 0.01). Conclusion The results demonstrate the positive contribution of autologous platelets combined with keratinocytes in stimulating wound healing and reducing pain. This strikingly simple approach could have a significant impact on patient care, especially critically burned victims for whom time is of the essence. Clinical trial registry information Protocol Record Identification Number: 132/03 Registry URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov PMID:23570605

  3. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions.

  4. Active-Site Hydration and Water Diffusion in Cytochrome P450cam: A Highly Dynamic Process

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome Y

    2011-01-01

    Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (300 ns) are performed on both the apo- (i.e., camphor-free) and camphor-bound cytochrome P450cam (CYP101). Water diffusion into and out of the protein active site is observed without biased sampling methods. During the course of the molecular dynamics simulation, an average of 6.4 water molecules is observed in the camphor-binding site of the apo form, compared to zero water molecules in the binding site of the substrate-bound form, in agreement with the number of water molecules observed in crystal structures of the same species. However, as many as 12 water molecules can be present at a given time in the camphor-binding region of the active site in the case of apo-P450cam, revealing a highly dynamic process for hydration of the protein active site, with water molecules exchanging rapidly with the bulk solvent. Water molecules are also found to exchange locations frequently inside the active site, preferentially clustering in regions surrounding the water molecules observed in the crystal structure. Potential-of-mean-force calculations identify thermodynamically favored trans-protein pathways for the diffusion of water molecules between the protein active site and the bulk solvent. Binding of camphor in the active site modifies the free-energy landscape of P450cam channels toward favoring the diffusion of water molecules out of the protein active site.

  5. Temporal relationships between heavy-metal concentrations in water and food crops at a Zambian urban agriculture site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Jennifer A.; Malamud, Bruce D.; Chishala, Benson H.; Kapungwe, Evaristo; Volk, John; Harpp, Karen S.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, for a suite of 17 elements, we examine the temporal relationships between heavy-metal concentrations in water and food crops, and between different elements, at Chunga, Zambia, August 2004 to July 2005. In many locations in the developing world, the water source used for urban agriculture is often wastewater from industrial sources, and is potentially contaminated with heavy metals. In Zambia, the location of this study, the wastewater source for irrigation use in some urban areas has been called 'a sink for sewage, mining and industrial effluents' all of which potentially contain heavy metals. We present field research results examining relationships between heavy-metal concentrations in both the water and the foodcrops from an urban agriculture location in northwest Lusaka (Chunga), the capital of Zambia. Monthly monitoring of water and food crops irrigated by the water was carried out at the study site, August 2004 to July 2005, for n = 39 water samples and n = 17 food crop samples. Heavy-metal concentrations were examined for Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd, Ba, Hg, Tl, Pb, U (17 elements) using ICP-MS. We find that both water and food-crop samples have peak concentrations for many elements in the wet season (October to February). When examining temporal relationships, we find some positive and negative statistically significant correlations between elements for both [water]:[food crop] and [food crop]:[food crop]. For the concentrations of [water]:[food crop] we find particularly strong positive correlations for V:Se and (V, Cr, Co, Zn, Cd, Hg, Pb, U):Tl; strong negative correlations are observed for V:Zn, Ni:Cu, Cd:Cu. For [food crop]:[food crop] particularly strong positive relationships are observed for Al:V, Al:Cr, Cr:V, and Cd:U. Theoretically, concentrations of heavy-metals in plant samples normally should reflect the heavy-metal contamination in the water used to irrigate the plants throughout the growth cycle (typically six

  6. PM10 Concentration levels at an urban and background site in Cyprus: The impact of urban sources and dust storms

    PubMed Central

    Achilleos, Souzana; Evans, John S.; Yiallouros, Panayiotis K.; Kleanthous, Savvas; Schwartz, Joel; Koutrakis, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Air quality in Cyprus is influenced by both local and transported pollution including desert dust storms. We examined PM10 concentration data collected in Nicosia (urban representative) from April 1, 1993 through December 11, 2008, and Ayia Marina (rural background representative) from January 1, 1999 through December 31, 2008. Measurements were conducted using a Tapered Element Oscillating Micro-balance (TEOM). PM10 concentrations, meteorological records and satellite data were used to identify dust storm days. We investigated long term trends using a Generalized Additive Model (GAM) after controlling for day of week, month, temperature, wind speed, and relative humidity. In Nicosia, annual PM10 concentrations ranged from 50.4 to 63.8 μg/m3 and exceeded the EU annual standard limit enacted in 2005 of 40 μg/m3 every year. A large, statistically significant impact of urban sources (defined as the difference between urban and background levels) was seen in Nicosia over the period 2000–2008, and was highest during traffic hours, weekdays, cold months, and low wind conditions. Our estimate of the mean (standard error) contribution of urban sources to the daily ambient PM10 was 24.0 (0.4) μg/m3. The study of yearly trends showed that PM10 levels in Nicosia decreased from 59.4 μg/m3 in 1993 to 49.0 μg/m3 in 2008, probably in part as a result of traffic emission control policies in Cyprus. In Ayia Marina, annual concentrations ranged from 27.3 to 35.6 μg/m3, and no obvious time trends were observed. The levels measured at the Cyprus background site are comparable to background concentrations reported in other Eastern Mediterranean countries. Average daily PM10 concentrations during desert dust storms were around 100 μg/m3 since 2000 and much higher in earlier years. Despite the large impact of dust storms and their increasing frequency over time, dust storms were responsible for a small fraction of the exceedances of the daily PM10 limit. PMID:25562931

  7. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine.

    PubMed

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-11-13

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO(2). We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O(2) and CO(2) bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO(2) defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg(2+) surrounded by three H(2)O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming.

  8. Evaluation of immunoassay for determination of pesticide concentrations at a large-scale ground-water contamination site

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrowski, T.R.; Thurman, E.M.; Mohrman, G.B.

    1996-10-01

    Pesticide concentrations in ground water at a 25 square mile site in the west-central United States were determined using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for trazine herbicides and cyclodiene insecticides. A high degree of correlation was seen between results from GC/MS and ELISA methods for the triazine herbicides; the correlation of methods for the cyclodiene insecticide analyses is in progress. Samples for GC/MS analysis were prepared using solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedures. GC/MS detection was performed in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. However, the extent of contamination in several samples made GC/MC analysis difficult due to baseline disturbances and the co-elution of peaks. In contrast, the analysis of the same samples by ELISA yielded definitive, easily obtained results in a minimum amount of time. Although ELISA was used on this site primarily as a screening technique, the comparison of GC/MS and ELISA suggests that ELISA is a powerful and selective tool for analyses in complex ground-water matrices.

  9. Enhanced concentrations of citric acid in spring aerosols collected at the Gosan background site in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jinsang; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2011-09-01

    In order to investigate water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in the aerosol samples under the Asian continent outflow, total suspended particle (TSP) samples ( n = 32) were collected at the Gosan site in Jeju Island over 2-5 days integration during 23 March-1 June 2007 and 16-24 April 2008. The samples were analyzed for water-soluble dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, and α-dicarbonyls using a capillary gas chromatography technique. We found elevated concentrations of atmospheric citric acid (range: 20-320 ng m -3) in the TSP samples during mid- to late April of 2007 and 2008. To specify the sources of citric acid, dicarboxylic acids and related compounds were measured in the pollen sample collected at the Gosan site (Pollen_Gosan), authentic pollen samples from Japanese cedar ( Cryptomeria) (Pollen_cedar) and Japanese cypress ( Chamaecyparis obtusa) (Pollen_cypress), and tangerine fruit produced from Jeju Island. Citric acid (2790 ng in unit mg of pollen mass) was found as most abundant species in the Pollen_Gosan, followed by oxalic acid (2390 ng mg -1). Although citric acid was not detected in the Pollen_cedar and Pollen_cypress as major species, it was found as a dominant species in the tangerine juice while malic acid was detected as major species in the tangerine peel, followed by oxalic and citric acids. Since Japanese cedar trees are planted around tangerine farms to prevent strong winds from the Pacific Ocean, citric acid that may be directly emitted from tangerine is likely adsorbed on pollens emitted from Japanese cedar and then transported to the Gosan site. Much lower malic/citric acid ratios obtained under cloudy condition than clear condition suggest that malic acid may rapidly decompose to lower molecular weight compounds such as oxalic and malonic acids (

  10. Effect of the active-ion concentration on the lasing dynamics of holmium fibre lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Sholokhov, E M; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2010-12-09

    The lasing dynamics of fibre lasers with a core based on quartz glass doped with holmium ions to concentrations in the range of 10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} is investigated. It is shown that fibre lasers with a high concentration of active holmium ions generate pulses, but a decrease in the holmium concentration changes the lasing from pulsed to cw regime. At the same time, a decrease in the active-ion concentration and the corresponding increase in the fibre length in the cavity reduce the lasing efficiency. (lasers)

  11. Effects of eccentric and concentric resistance training on skeletal muscle substrates, enzyme activities and capillary supply.

    PubMed

    Tesch, P A; Thorsson, A; Colliander, E B

    1990-12-01

    This study compared the skeletal muscle metabolic adaptations in response to combined eccentric and concentric or concentric resistance training regimens. Twenty-six physically active males were assigned to either the combined eccentric and concentric group (n = 10), the concentric group (n = 10) or the control group (n = 6). The combined eccentric and concentric and the concentric groups performed four to five sets of maximal, voluntary bilateral quadriceps muscle actions at 1.05 rad s-1 using a speed-controlled dynamometer three times per week for 12 weeks. The concentric group performed 12 concentric actions per set, whereas the combined eccentric and concentric group performed six coupled eccentric and concentric actions per set. Bilateral percutaneous muscle biopsies were obtained from m. vastus lateralis at rest pre- and post-training. Tissue samples were analysed for contents of adenosine triphosphate, creatine phosphate and creatine and for enzyme activities of citrate synthase, lactate dehydrogenase, myokinase, phosphofructokinase, hexokinase and Mg2(+)-ATPase using fluorometric techniques. Histochemical staining procedures were employed to determine capillary supply. The overall increase (P less than 0.05) in muscle strength was greater (P less than 0.05) for the combined eccentric and concentric group than for the concentric group. Enzyme or substrate contents and capillary supply were unaltered after either type of training. It is suggested that substantial increases in muscle strength may occur in response to resistance training without enhancing or compromising metabolic function of skeletal muscle.

  12. Silver-Coated Nylon Dressing Plus Active DC Microcurrent for Healing of Autogenous Skin Donor Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Silver-Coated Nylon Dressing Plus Active DC Microcurrent for Healing of Autogenous Skin Donor Sites Edward W. Malin, MD, Chaya M. Galin, BSN, RN... microcurrent in comparison to silver-coated dressing with sham microcurrent on wound-closure time for autogenous skin donor sites. Methods: Four...hundred five patients were screened for treatment of their donor sites using a silver-coated nylon dressing with either sham or active microcurrent

  13. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth’s crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts. Here we investigated in closer detail the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. Finally, we give a potential explanation of this effect, finding alkali-metal ions having different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar surfaces. PMID:25584435

  14. 76 FR 30696 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... eligible active uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of the Energy... requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs of...

  15. 76 FR 24871 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... from eligible active uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of...). Title X requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs...

  16. Comparison of activity concentration of 238U, 232Th and 40K in different Layers of subsurface Structures in Dei-Dei and Kubwa, Abuja, northcentral Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Omeje; Wagiran, Husin; Ibrahim, Noorddin; Lee, Siak Kuan; Sabri, Soheil

    2013-10-01

    The study of activity concentration of 232Th, 238U and 40K of rock samples from site one (S1L1-S1L11, 70 m) and site two (S2L1-S2L9, 60 m) boreholes in Dei-Dei and Kubwa was presented and the first time in the region to be compared. Activity concentrations were analysed using a high resolution co-axial HPGe gamma ray spectrometer system. The activity concentration ranges in site one borehole were from 45±1 to 98±6 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, from 18±2 to 37±4 Bq kg-1 for 238U and from 254 ±32 Bq kg-1 to 1195 ±151 Bq kg-1 for 40K. The activity concentration ranges in site two borehole were from 32±3 to 84±7 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, from 15±2 to 52±5 Bq kg-1 for 238U and from 119±15 to 705±94 for 40K Bq kg-1. Significantly higher concentration of 232Th and 238U occurs in samples collected from S1L7, S1L11 and S2L1 layers. These zones experienced granitic intrusions produced by denudation and tectonism. 40K in rock samples of S1L4 and S2L4 activity concentrations is close; it could be that biotite granitic intrusion that is inferred as the formation in that layer reflects the same activity of potassium in rock's radioactivity measurement. The area requires further investigation of soil geochemistry and activity concentration of radionuclides in groundwater.

  17. Site-specific microbial communities in three PCB-impacted sediments are associated with different in situ dechlorinating activities.

    PubMed

    Kjellerup, Birthe V; Sun, Xueli; Ghosh, Upal; May, Harold D; Sowers, Kevin R

    2008-05-01

    Competitive PCR and denaturing HPLC analyses together with an assay detecting potential polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) dechlorinating activities were combined with physical-chemical site characterizations to identify factors affecting the reductive dechlorination of PCBs in the three historically impacted sediments: Grasse and Buffalo Rivers, NY and Anacostia River, DC. In Grasse River sediment an in situ enriched population of Dehalococcoides phylotypes was abundant in high numbers together with a relatively high dechlorination activity and a high concentration of congeners containing unflanked chlorine substitutions. In contrast microbial communities in Anacostia and Buffalo Rivers sediments consisted of similar total numbers of putative dechlorinating bacteria, but the populations consisted of more diverse putative dechlorinating phylotypes and were associated with lower dechlorination activities and higher concentrations of flanked congeners. Differences observed in the PCB dechlorination activity were not influenced by the chemical PCB availability in spiked sediment or physical sediment characteristics, but were consistent with the concentration of PCBs and total organic carbon in the native sediment. Application of molecular methods for selective detection of indigenous microbial dechlorinating communities combined with assessment of the dechlorinating activity and analysis of the in situ congener profiles provided a comprehensive approach for characterization and identification of sites that are amenable to bioremediation, which is essential for the development of in situ treatment strategies.

  18. A model of the rabies virus glycoprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Rustici, M; Bracci, L; Lozzi, L; Neri, P; Santucci, A; Soldani, P; Spreafico, A; Niccolai, N

    1993-06-01

    The glycoprotein from the neurotropic rabies virus shows a significant homology with the alpha neurotoxin that binds to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The crystal structure of the alpha neurotoxins suggests that the Arg 37 guanidinium group and the Asp 31 side-chain carboxylate of the erabutoxin have stereochemical features resembling those of acetylcholine. Conformational studies on the Asn194-Ser195-Arg196-Gly197 tetrapeptide, an essential part of the binding site of the rabies virus glycoprotein, indicate that the side chains of Asn and Arg could also mimic the acetylcholine structure. This observation is consistent with the recently proposed mechanism of the viral infection.

  19. Tissue Mercury Concentrations and Survival of Tree Swallow Embryos, Nestlings and Young Adult Females on a Contaminated Site.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Capwell E; Cristol, Daniel A

    2015-10-01

    Tree swallows nesting on mercury-contaminated sites along the South River in Virginia, USA were monitored for reproductive success. The bodies of nestlings found deceased in their nest boxes were collected, along with blood and feather samples from the adult parents and surviving siblings. We also measured hatching and fledging success of the clutches and the annual recapture rate of adults. We found that the body feathers of deceased nestlings contained significantly higher concentrations of mercury (12.89 ± 8.42 μg/g, n = 15) than those of nestlings that survived to fledge (7.41 ± 4.79 μg/g, n = 15). However, mothers of more successful clutches (>75 % hatching) did not differ in mercury concentrations from females with less successful clutches (<50 % hatching). Additionally, adult females breeding for the first time that returned to breed the following year did not differ in blood mercury from females of the same age that bred once but never returned. Our results suggest that mercury had its greatest effect on these songbirds during the nestling stage, whereas for embryos or first-time breeding females, other factors likely played larger roles in mortality.

  20. Atmospheric mercury concentrations observed at ground-based monitoring sites globally distributed in the framework of the GMOS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprovieri, Francesca; Pirrone, Nicola; Bencardino, Mariantonia; D'Amore, Francesco; Carbone, Francesco; Cinnirella, Sergio; Mannarino, Valentino; Landis, Matthew; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Weigelt, Andreas; Brunke, Ernst-Günther; Labuschagne, Casper; Martin, Lynwill; Munthe, John; Wängberg, Ingvar; Artaxo, Paulo; Morais, Fernando; Barbosa, Henrique de Melo Jorge; Brito, Joel; Cairns, Warren; Barbante, Carlo; Diéguez, María del Carmen; Garcia, Patricia Elizabeth; Dommergue, Aurélien; Angot, Helene; Magand, Olivier; Skov, Henrik; Horvat, Milena; Kotnik, Jože; Read, Katie Alana; Mendes Neves, Luis; Gawlik, Bernd Manfred; Sena, Fabrizio; Mashyanov, Nikolay; Obolkin, Vladimir; Wip, Dennis; Feng, Xin Bin; Zhang, Hui; Fu, Xuewu; Ramachandran, Ramesh; Cossa, Daniel; Knoery, Joël; Marusczak, Nicolas; Nerentorp, Michelle; Norstrom, Claus

    2016-09-01

    Long-term monitoring of data of ambient mercury (Hg) on a global scale to assess its emission, transport, atmospheric chemistry, and deposition processes is vital to understanding the impact of Hg pollution on the environment. The Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project was funded by the European Commission (http://www.gmos.eu) and started in November 2010 with the overall goal to develop a coordinated global observing system to monitor Hg on a global scale, including a large network of ground-based monitoring stations, ad hoc periodic oceanographic cruises and measurement flights in the lower and upper troposphere as well as in the lower stratosphere. To date, more than 40 ground-based monitoring sites constitute the global network covering many regions where little to no observational data were available before GMOS. This work presents atmospheric Hg concentrations recorded worldwide in the framework of the GMOS project (2010-2015), analyzing Hg measurement results in terms of temporal trends, seasonality and comparability within the network. Major findings highlighted in this paper include a clear gradient of Hg concentrations between the Northern and Southern hemispheres, confirming that the gradient observed is mostly driven by local and regional sources, which can be anthropogenic, natural or a combination of both.

  1. What controls the oxidative ratio of UK peats? A multi-site study of elemental CHNO concentrations in peat cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, Gareth; Worrall, Fred; Masiello, Carrie

    2013-04-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) is the amount of CO2 sequestered in the terrestrial biosphere for each mol of O2 produced. The OR governs the effectiveness of a terrestrial biome to mitigate the impact of anthropogenic CO2 emissions and it has been used to calculate the balance of terrestrial and oceanic carbon sinks across the globe. However, few studies have investigated the controls of the variability in OR. What factors affect OR - climate? Soil type? Vegetation type? N deposition? Land use? Land use change? Small shifts in OR could have important implications in the global partitioning of CO2 between the atmosphere, biosphere, and oceans. This study looks at peat soils from a series of sites representing a climatic transect across the UK. Duplicate peat cores were taken, along with samples of above-ground vegetation and litter, from sites in northern Scotland (Forsinard), southern Scotland (Auchencorth), northern England (Moor House; Thorne Moor) through the Welsh borders (Whixhall Moss) and Somerset levels (Westhay Moor) to Dartmoor and Bodmin Moor in the south west of England. Sub-samples of the cores were analysed for their CHNO concentrations using a Costech ECS 4010 Elemental combustion system. Using the method of Masiello et al. (2008), OR values could be calculated from these elemental concentrations. Results show that OR values of UK peats varied between 0.82 and 1.27 with a median value of 1.08 which is within the range of world soils. There were significant differences in OR of the peat between sites with the data falling into two broad groupings - Group 1: Forsinard, Auchencorth, Dartmoor and Bodmin Moor; Group 2: Moor House, Thorne Moor, Westhay Moor, Whixhall Moss. Whilst there were significant changes (p < 0.05) in elemental ratios with increasing peat depth (increasing C:N ratio and decreasing O:C ratio) there was no significant difference overall in OR with depth. This paper will explore some of the possible controlling factors on these ratios. Local

  2. Variability of atmospheric krypton-85 activity concentrations observed close to the ITCZ in the southern hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Bollhöfer, A; Schlosser, C; Ross, J O; Sartorius, H; Schmid, S

    2014-01-01

    Krypton-85 activity concentrations in surface air have been measured at Darwin, which is located in northern Australia and is influenced by seasonal monsoonal activity. Measurements between August 2007 and May 2010 covered three wet seasons. The mean activity concentration of krypton-85 measured during this period was 1.31±0.02Bqm(-3). A linear model fitted to the average monthly data, using month and monsoon as predictors, shows that krypton-85 activity concentration measured during the sampling period has declined by 0.01Bqm(-3) per year. Although there is no statistically significant difference in mean activity concentration of krypton-85 between wet and dry season, the model implies that activity concentration is higher by about 0.015Bqm(-3) during months influenced by the monsoon when a north westerly flow prevails. Backward dispersion runs using the Lagrangian particle dispersion model Hysplit4 highlight possible source regions during an active monsoon located deep in the northern hemisphere, and include reprocessing facilities in Japan and India. However, the contribution of these facilities to krypton-85 activity concentrations in Darwin would be less than 0.003Bqm(-3).

  3. Soil-gas radon concentration monitoring in an active granite quarry from Central Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Luís.; Barbosa, Susana; Pereira, Alcides; Aumento, Fabrizio

    2010-05-01

    This study was carried out in an active quarry located nearby the town of Nelas (Central Portugal), with the primary objective of assessing the effect of regular explosions on soil-gas radon concentrations. Here, a late-orogenic Hercynian porphyritic biotite granite occurs and is exploited for the production of high quality aggregates for different building purposes. This granite is part of the Beiras batholiths, being a geochemically moderately evolved rock, slightly peraluminous, and widely known by the frequent occurrence of associated uranium mineralizations. In fact, more than 4000t of U3O8 was produced from 60 mines of the Beiras region in the last century, over a wide area of more than 10.000 km2, and thousands of anomalies related with the local accumulation of uranium in fault filling materials, metasedimentary enclaves and doleritic veins were recognized during prospecting works. The heterogeneity of uranium distribution in this rock is reflected at the test site; indeed, a gamma ray survey shows that some of the faults that occur in the quarry are slightly mineralized. A total of 7 radon monitoring stations were implemented in the quarry, at a typical depth comprised between 1 and 2 meters, in holes drilled for the purpose. Aware RM-70 pancake GM detectors were used, sensitive to alpha, beta and gamma/X-rays above 10 keV, connected to palmtop computers for data registration (1 minute interval) and power supplied by batteries. Monitoring was carried out during 6 months, in Spring/Summer conditions and the exact time of each explosion was registered manually. Several problems of data loss and power supply affected the stations during the experiment, leading to discontinuities in the records. Still the available data showed important differences in the soil-gas radon concentrations between stations, which can be explained by the heterogeneity of uranium distribution in the rock and increased local permeability. Furthermore, all stations showed a clear daily

  4. Propofol and remifentanil effect-site concentrations estimated by pharmacokinetic simulation and bispectral index monitoring during craniotomy with intraoperative awakening for brain tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Francisco; Beiras, Aldara

    2007-07-01

    Different anesthetic techniques have been suggested for craniotomy with intraoperative awakening. We describe an asleep-awake-asleep technique with propofol and remifentanil infusions, with pharmacokinetic simulation to predict the effect-site concentrations and to modulate the infusion rates of both drugs, and bispectral index (BIS) monitoring. Five critical moments were defined: first loss of consciousness (LOC1), first recovery of consciousness (ROC1), final of neurologic testing (NT), second loss of consciousness (LOC2), and second recovery of consciousness (ROC2). At LOC1, predicted effect-site concentrations of propofol and remifentanil were, respectively, 3.6+/-1.2 microg/mL and 2.4+/-0.4 etag/mL. At ROC1, predicted effect-site concentrations of propofol and remifentanil were, respectively, 2.1+/-0.3 microg/mL and 1.8+/-0.3 etag/mL. At NT, predicted effect-site concentrations of propofol and remifentanil were, respectively, 0.9+/-0.3 microg/mL and 1.8+/-0.2 etag/mL. At LOC2, predicted effect-site concentrations of propofol and remifentanil were, respectively, 2.1+/-0.2 microg/mL and 2.5+/-0.2 etag/mL. At ROC2, predicted effect-site concentrations of propofol and remifentanil were, respectively, 1.2+/-0.5 microg/mL and 1.4+/-0.2 etag/mL (data are mean+/-SE). A significative correlation was found between BIS and predicted effect-site concentrations of propofol (r=0.547, P<0.001) and remifentanil (r=0.533, P<0.001). Multiple regression analysis between BIS and propofol and remifentanil predicted effect-site concentrations at the different critical steps of the procedure was done and found also significative (r=0.7341, P<0.001).

  5. Active Site Hydrophobicity and the Convergent Evolution of Paraoxonase Activity in Structurally Divergent Enzymes: The Case of Serum Paraoxonase 1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a native lactonase capable of promiscuously hydrolyzing a broad range of substrates, including organophosphates, esters, and carbonates. Structurally, PON1 is a six-bladed β-propeller with a flexible loop (residues 70–81) covering the active site. This loop contains a functionally critical Tyr at position 71. We have performed detailed experimental and computational analyses of the role of selected Y71 variants in the active site stability and catalytic activity in order to probe the role of Y71 in PON1’s lactonase and organophosphatase activities. We demonstrate that the impact of Y71 substitutions on PON1’s lactonase activity is minimal, whereas the kcat for the paraoxonase activity is negatively perturbed by up to 100-fold, suggesting greater mutational robustness of the native activity. Additionally, while these substitutions modulate PON1’s active site shape, volume, and loop flexibility, their largest effect is in altering the solvent accessibility of the active site by expanding the active site volume, allowing additional water molecules to enter. This effect is markedly more pronounced in the organophosphatase activity than the lactonase activity. Finally, a detailed comparison of PON1 to other organophosphatases demonstrates that either a similar “gating loop” or a highly buried solvent-excluding active site is a common feature of these enzymes. We therefore posit that modulating the active site hydrophobicity is a key element in facilitating the evolution of organophosphatase activity. This provides a concrete feature that can be utilized in the rational design of next-generation organophosphate hydrolases that are capable of selecting a specific reaction from a pool of viable substrates. PMID:28026940

  6. Soil concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and trace metals from an electronic waste dump site in the Greater Accra Region, Ghana: Implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Akortia, Eric; Olukunle, Olubiyi I; Daso, Adegbenro P; Okonkwo, Jonathan O

    2017-03-01

    Unregulated electronic waste (e-waste) recycling operations have become a significant environmental issue as well as human health risk in developing countries across the world. The present study evaluated the extent of pollution in Agbogbloshie e-waste recycling site in Accra, Ghana. The concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and some selected trace metals were determined using gas chromatography electron impact ionization mass spectrometry and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry, respectively. The concentrations of ∑ PBDEs ranged from 15.6 to 96.8ngg(-1) dry weight, with an overall mean of 54.8ngg(-1)dw. BDE-28 was the dominant congener followed by BDE-209 and BDE-47. The order of mean concentrations of the abundant trace metals was Fe>Cu>Pb≫Mn, with a mean range of .531-289mgkg(-1). Geoaccumulation index suggested that the surface soils deteriorated from moderate to high metal pollution, particularly for Cu, Pb and Fe. Of the trace metals analysed, Fe exhibited the highest concentration ranging from 3.97 to 918mgkg(-1). Correlation and principal component analyses suggested possible interactions between PBDEs and the trace metals analysed, while source assessment suggested that PBDEs and trace metals were mostly derived from inputs from the e-waste recycling activities. Average daily dose (ADD) was estimated using concentrations corresponding to 5th percentile, median and 95th percentile. Hazard quotients of 380 and 862 were obtained for adults and children respectively, for Cu and Pb which is a cause for concern especially for local children.

  7. Passive sampling to measure baseline dissolved persistent organic pollutant concentrations in the water column of the Palos Verdes Shelf Superfund site.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Loretta A; Lao, Wenjian; Maruya, Keith A; White, Carmen; Burgess, Robert M

    2012-11-06

    Passive sampling was used to deduce water concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the vicinity of a marine Superfund site on the Palos Verdes Shelf, California, USA. Precalibrated solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers and polyethylene (PE) strips that were preloaded with performance reference compounds (PRCs) were codeployed for 32 d along an 11-station gradient at bottom, surface, and midwater depths. Retrieved samplers were analyzed for DDT congeners and their breakdown products (DDE, DDD, DDMU, and DDNU) and 43 PCB congeners using GC-EI- and NCI-MS. PRCs were used to calculate compound-specific fractional equilibration achieved in situ for the PE samplers, using both an exponential approach to equilibrium (EAE) and numerical integration of Fickian diffusion (NI) models. The highest observed concentrations were for p,p'-DDE, with 2200 and 990 pg/L deduced from PE and SPME, respectively. The difference in these estimates could be largely attributed to uncertainty in equilibrium partition coefficients, unaccounted for disequilibrium between samplers and water, or different time scales over which the samplers average. The concordance between PE and SPME estimated concentrations for DDE was high (R(2) = 0.95). PCBs were only detected in PE samplers, due to their much larger size. Near-bottom waters adjacent to and down current from sediments with the highest bulk concentrations exhibited aqueous concentrations of DDTs and PCBs that exceeded Ambient Water Quality Criteria (AWQC) for human and aquatic health, indicating the need for future monitoring to determine the effectiveness of remedial activities taken to reduce adverse effects of contaminated surface sediments.

  8. Proteome-wide analysis of nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations in active sites of human proteins.

    PubMed

    Dingerdissen, Hayley; Motwani, Mona; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2013-03-01

    An enzyme's active site is essential to normal protein activity such that any disruptions at this site may lead to dysfunction and disease. Nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations (nsSNVs), which alter the amino acid sequence, are one type of disruption that can alter the active site. When this occurs, it is assumed that enzyme activity will vary because of the criticality of the site to normal protein function. We integrate nsSNV data and active site annotations from curated resources to identify all active-site-impacting nsSNVs in the human genome and search for all pathways observed to be associated with this data set to assess the likely consequences. We find that there are 934 unique nsSNVs that occur at the active sites of 559 proteins. Analysis of the nsSNV data shows an over-representation of arginine and an under-representation of cysteine, phenylalanine and tyrosine when comparing the list of nsSNV-impacted active site residues with the list of all possible proteomic active site residues, implying a potential bias for or against variation of these residues at the active site. Clustering analysis shows an abundance of hydrolases and transferases. Pathway and functional analysis shows several pathways over- or under-represented in the data set, with the most significantly affected pathways involved in carbohydrate metabolism. We provide a table of 32 variation-substrate/product pairs that can be used in targeted metabolomics experiments to assay the effects of specific variations. In addition, we report the significant prevalence of aspartic acid to histidine variation in eight proteins associated with nine diseases including glycogen storage diseases, lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital syndrome, Parkinson's disease and several cancers.

  9. Radionuclide activities and metal concentrations in sediments of the Sebou Estuary, NW Morocco, following a flooding event.

    PubMed

    Laissaoui, A; Mas, J L; Hurtado, S; Ziad, N; Villa, M; Benmansour, M

    2013-06-01

    This study presents metal concentrations (Fe, Mg, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Sr and V) and radionuclide activities ((40)K, (137)Cs, (210)Pb, (226)Ra, (228)Ac, (234)Th and (212)Pb) in surface deposits and a sediment core from the Sebou Estuary, Northwest Morocco. Samples were collected in April 2009, about 2 months after a flooding event, and analysed using a well-type coaxial gamma-ray detector and inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry. Activities of radionuclides and concentrations of almost all elements in surface samples displayed only moderate spatial variation, suggesting homogenous deposition of eroded local soil in response to intense precipitation. Excess (210)Pb displayed relatively constant activity throughout the sediment core, preventing dating and precluding determination of the historical accumulation rates of pollutants at the core site. Some elements showed non-systematic trends with depth and displayed local maxima and minima. Other elements presented relatively systematic concentration trends or relatively constant levels with discrete maxima and/or minima. Except for Mn, Sr and Cr, all metal concentrations in sediment were below levels typical of polluted systems, suggesting little human impact or losses of metals from sediment particles.

  10. Assessment of activation products in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.

    1996-07-01

    This document assesses the impact of radioactive activation products released from SRS facilities since the first reactor became operational late in 1953. The isotopes reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS: {sup 32}P, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 60}C, and {sup 65}Zn. Release pathways, emission control features, and annual releases to the aqueous and atmospheric environments are discussed. No single incident has resulted in a major acute release of activation products to the environment. The releases were the result of normal operations of the reactors and separations facilities. Releases declined over the years as better controls were established and production was reduced. The overall radiological impact of SRS activation product atmospheric releases from 1954 through 1994 on the offsite maximally exposed individual can be characterized by a total dose of 0.76 mrem. During the same period, such an individual received a total dose of 14,400 mrem from non-SRS sources of ionizing radiation present in the environment. SRS activation product aqueous releases between 1954 and 1994 resulted in a total dose of 54 mrem to the offsite maximally exposed individual. The impact of SRS activation product releases on offsite populations also has been evaluated.

  11. Antimicrobial activity and phenolic content of natural site and micropropagated Limonium avei (De Not.) Brullo & Erben plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Nostro, Antonia; Filocamo, Angela; Giovannini, Annalisa; Catania, Stefania; Costa, Chiara; Marino, Andreana; Bisignano, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    This study reported the antimicrobial activity and phenolic content of natural site and micropropagated Limonium avei (De Not.) Brullo & Erben inflorescences. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of ethanolic extracts were determined according to the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Individual phenolic acids and flavonoids were detected by a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-DAD) method. The samples showed a comparable antimicrobial activity, although the natural site extract possessed the lower MIC values. The best activity was detected against Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin resistant strains (MIC and MBC values ranging from 7.81 to 62.50 µg mL(-1) and from 500 to 2000 µg mL(-1) respectively). In contrast, a low activity was found on Gram-negative bacteria and Candida albicans. The HPLC-DAD analysis revealed ten phenolic acids and four flavonoids with a major amount of m-coumaric acid, naringin and quercetin in the natural site extract.

  12. All the catalytic active sites of MoS2 for hydrogen evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Du; Qiao, Qiao; ...

    2016-11-29

    MoS2 presents a promising low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), but the understanding about its active sites has remained limited. Here we present an unambiguous study of the catalytic activities of all possible reaction sites of MoS2, including edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries. We demonstrate that, in addition to the well-known catalytically active edge sites, sulfur vacancies provide another major active site for the HER, while the catalytic activity of grain boundaries is much weaker. Here, the intrinsic turnover frequencies (Tafel slopes) of the edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries are estimated to be 7.5more » s–1 (65–75 mV/dec), 3.2 s–1 (65–85 mV/dec), and 0.1 s–1 (120–160 mV/dec), respectively. We also demonstrate that the catalytic activity of sulfur vacancies strongly depends on the density of the vacancies and the local crystalline structure in proximity to the vacancies. Unlike edge sites, whose catalytic activity linearly depends on the length, sulfur vacancies show optimal catalytic activities when the vacancy density is in the range of 7–10%, and the number of sulfur vacancies in high crystalline quality MoS2 is higher than that in low crystalline quality MoS2, which may be related with the proximity of different local crystalline structures to the vacancies.« less

  13. Microbial community changes along the active seepage site of one cold seep in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huiluo; Zhang, Weipeng; Wang, Yong; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The active seepage of the marine cold seeps could be a critical process for the exchange of energy between the submerged geosphere and the sea floor environment through organic-rich fluids, potentially even affecting surrounding microbial habitats. However, few studies have investigated the associated microbial community changes. In the present study, 16S rRNA genes were pyrosequenced to decipher changes in the microbial communities from the Thuwal seepage point in the Red Sea to nearby marine sediments in the brine pool, normal marine sediments and water, and benthic microbial mats. An unexpected number of reads from unclassified groups were detected in these habitats; however, the ecological functions of these groups remain unresolved. Furthermore, ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community structures were investigated using the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene. Analysis of amoA showed that planktonic marine habitats, including seeps and marine water, hosted archaeal ammonia oxidizers that differed from those in microbial mats and marine sediments, suggesting modifications of the ammonia oxidizing archaeal (AOA) communities along the environmental gradient from active seepage sites to peripheral areas. Changes in the microbial community structure of AOA in different habitats (water vs. sediment) potentially correlated with changes in salinity and oxygen concentrations. Overall, the present results revealed for the first time unanticipated novel microbial groups and changes in the ammonia-oxidizing archaea in response to environmental gradients near the active seepages of a cold seep. PMID:26284035

  14. Microbial community changes along the active seepage site of one cold seep in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huiluo; Zhang, Weipeng; Wang, Yong; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The active seepage of the marine cold seeps could be a critical process for the exchange of energy between the submerged geosphere and the sea floor environment through organic-rich fluids, potentially even affecting surrounding microbial habitats. However, few studies have investigated the associated microbial community changes. In the present study, 16S rRNA genes were pyrosequenced to decipher changes in the microbial communities from the Thuwal seepage point in the Red Sea to nearby marine sediments in the brine pool, normal marine sediments and water, and benthic microbial mats. An unexpected number of reads from unclassified groups were detected in these habitats; however, the ecological functions of these groups remain unresolved. Furthermore, ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community structures were investigated using the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene. Analysis of amoA showed that planktonic marine habitats, including seeps and marine water, hosted archaeal ammonia oxidizers that differed from those in microbial mats and marine sediments, suggesting modifications of the ammonia oxidizing archaeal (AOA) communities along the environmental gradient from active seepage sites to peripheral areas. Changes in the microbial community structure of AOA in different habitats (water vs. sediment) potentially correlated with changes in salinity and oxygen concentrations. Overall, the present results revealed for the first time unanticipated novel microbial groups and changes in the ammonia-oxidizing archaea in response to environmental gradients near the active seepages of a cold seep.

  15. Active site conformational changes of prostasin provide a new mechanism of protease regulation by divalent cations

    SciTech Connect

    Spraggon, Glen; Hornsby, Michael; Shipway, Aaron; Tully, David C.; Bursulaya, Badry; Danahay, Henry; Harris, Jennifer L.; Lesley, Scott A.

    2010-01-12

    Prostasin or human channel-activating protease 1 has been reported to play a critical role in the regulation of extracellular sodium ion transport via its activation of the epithelial cell sodium channel. Here, the structure of the extracellular portion of the membrane associated serine protease has been solved to high resolution in complex with a nonselective d-FFR chloromethyl ketone inhibitor, in an apo form, in a form where the apo crystal has been soaked with the covalent inhibitor camostat and in complex with the protein inhibitor aprotinin. It was also crystallized in the presence of the divalent cation Ca{sup +2}. Comparison of the structures with each other and with other members of the trypsin-like serine protease family reveals unique structural features of prostasin and a large degree of conformational variation within specificity determining loops. Of particular interest is the S1 subsite loop which opens and closes in response to basic residues or divalent ions, directly binding Ca{sup +2} cations. This induced fit active site provides a new possible mode of regulation of trypsin-like proteases adapted in particular to extracellular regions with variable ionic concentrations such as the outer membrane layer of the epithelial cell.

  16. Investigating the effect of electro-active ion concentration on spectral induced polarization signatures arising from biomineralization pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L. D.; Williams, K. H.; Hubbard, S. S.; Wu, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Spectral induced polarization (SIP) is a proven geophysical method for detecting biomineral formation with promising applications for monitoring biogeochemical products during microbial induced sequestration of heavy metals and radionuclides in soils. SIP has been used to monitor the evolution of bioremediation-induced end-products at the uranium-contaminated U.S. Department of Energy Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Colorado. Although a significant SIP response was detected, the quantitative interpretation is non-trivial as the polarization of metallic minerals depends both on the mineral surface properties and the electrolyte chemistry. In previous experiments SIP mechanisms were studied under complex environments and individual source mechanisms could not be evaluated. Here we examine the role of electrolyte chemistry by comparing the effect of redox active / inactive ions on metallic polarization. In these abiotic experiments magnetite was used as a proxy biomineral and dispersed within columns packed with sand. Parallel columns were saturated with solutions of different concentrations of active (Fe2+) and inactive (Ca2+) ions (0.01mM-10mM) and SIP measurements made (0.1-1000 Hz). Experimental results show small, but detectable, differences in the effect of active ion and inactive ion concentration on the SIP response. To better characterize the effect of electro-active ions on metallic minerals we used a Cole - Cole type relaxation model, to describe the SIP responses. In order to better resolve the relaxation model parameters, we followed a two-step approach whereby we started with a Bayesian based inversion to resolve for the initial parameter estimates, and subsequently used these estimates as a starting model for a deterministic solution. Our results suggest that changes in the active ion concentration, in the presence of magnetite, alone are unlikely to fully explain recent SIP monitoring data from the Rifle site.

  17. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  18. [The effectiveness of ultralow doses and concentrations of biologically active compounds].

    PubMed

    Ashmarin, I P; Lelekova, T V; Sanzhieva, L Ts

    1992-01-01

    Numerous data of literature are analysed on the biological activity of ultra-low (10(-12)-10(-19) M) concentrations and corresponding doses of same bioregulators. Our own data are presented on the modulation of lymphatic vessel contractility by peptides (thyroliberin, defensin, and tuftsin) in concentrations ranging from 10(-13) to 10(-16) M. Hypothetic mechanisms of these phenomena are discussed.

  19. Marine Biology Field Trip Sites. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  20. Seasonal and spatial variations of 210Po and 210Pb activity concentrations in Mytilus galloprovincialis from Croatian coast of the Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Rožmarić, Martina; Rogić, Matea; Benedik, Ljudmila; Štrok, Marko; Barišić, Delko

    2013-11-01

    Results of 2 years monitoring of (210)Po and (210)Pb activity concentrations in soft tissue of the species Mytilus galloprovincialis from Croatian part of the Adriatic coast are presented. The samples were collected at thirteen coastal stations (some of which are also a part of the Mediterranean Mussel Watch Project) in spring and autumn of 2010 and 2011. The collected mussels were ranging between 4 cm and 6 cm in shell length. After sample pre-treatment lead and polonium were radiochemically separated on Sr resin. (210)Po was determined by alpha-particle spectrometry and (210)Pb was determined, via (210)Bi, by a low-level gas proportional counter. The results of (210)Po activity concentrations were found to vary between (104±11) and (1421±81) Bq kg(-1) dry weight while (210)Pb activity concentrations were much lower and in range (8.2±5.3)-(94.1±29.8) Bq kg(-1) dry weight. Higher (210)Po and (210)Pb activity concentrations were determined in spring period. The inter-site differences seen in their activity concentrations can be due to natural background levels of sites. The (210)Po/(210)Pb activity concentration ratios in all cases exceeded unity for all mussel samples and ranged between 4.0 and 47.9.

  1. An active site mutation increases the polymerase activity of the guinea pig-lethal Marburg virus.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Alexander; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Becker, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) causes severe, often fatal, disease in humans and transient illness in rodents. Sequential passaging of MARV in guinea pigs resulted in selection of a lethal virus containing 4 aa changes. A D184N mutation in VP40 (VP40D184N), which leads to a species-specific gain of viral fitness, and three mutations in the active site of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase L, which were investigated in the present study for functional significance in human and guinea pig cells. The transcription/replication activity of L mutants was strongly enhanced by a substitution at position 741 (S741C), and inhibited by other substitutions (D758A and A759D) in both species. The polymerase activity of L carrying the S741C substitution was eightfold higher in guinea pig cells than in human cells upon co-expression with VP40D184N, suggesting that the additive effect of the two mutations provides MARV a replicative advantage in the new host.

  2. Altered Biomarkers of Mucosal Immunity and Reduced Vaginal Lactobacillus Concentrations in Sexually Active Female Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Rebecca Pellett; Carpenter, Colleen; Fiedler, Tina; Kalyoussef, Sabah; McAndrew, Thomas C.; Viswanathan, Shankar; Kim, Mimi; Keller, Marla J.; Fredricks, David N.; Herold, Betsy C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Genital secretions collected from adult women exhibit in vitro activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Escherichia coli (E. coli), but prior studies have not investigated this endogenous antimicrobial activity or its mediators in adolescent females. Methodology/Principal Findings Anti-HSV and anti-E.coli activity were quantified from cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) specimens collected from 20 sexually active adolescent females (15–18 years). Soluble immune mediators that may influence this activity were measured in CVL, and concentrations of Lactobacillus jensenii and crispatus were quantified by PCR from vaginal swabs. Results for adolescents were compared to those obtained from 54 healthy, premenopausal adult women. Relative to specimens collected from adults, CVL collected from adolescent subjects had significantly reduced activity against E. coli and diminished concentrations of protein, IgG, and IgA but significantly increased anti-HSV activity and concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-6 and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Vaginal swabs collected from adolescent subjects had comparable concentrations of L. crispatus but significantly reduced concentrations of L. jensenii, relative to adult swabs. Conclusions/Significance Biomarkers of genital mucosal innate immunity may differ substantially between sexually active adolescents and adult women. These findings warrant further study and may have significant implications for prevention of sexually transmitted infections in adolescent females. PMID:22808157

  3. Encroachment of Human Activity on Sea Turtle Nesting Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziskin, D.; Aubrecht, C.; Elvidge, C.; Tuttle, B.; Baugh, K.; Ghosh, T.

    2008-12-01

    The encroachment of anthropogenic lighting on sea turtle nesting sites poses a serious threat to the survival of these animals [Nicholas, 2001]. This danger is quantified by combining two established data sets. The first is the Nighttime Lights data produced by the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center [Elvidge et al., 1997]. The second is the Marine Turtle Database produced by the World Conservation Monitoring Centre (WCMC). The technique used to quantify the threat of encroachment is an adaptation of the method described in Aubrecht et al. [2008], which analyzes the stress on coral reef systems by proximity to nighttime lights near the shore. Nighttime lights near beaches have both a direct impact on turtle reproductive success since they disorient hatchlings when they mistake land-based lights for the sky-lit surf [Lorne and Salmon, 2007] and the lights are also a proxy for other anthropogenic threats. The identification of turtle nesting sites with high rates of encroachment will hopefully steer conservation efforts to mitigate their effects [Witherington, 1999]. Aubrecht, C, CD Elvidge, T Longcore, C Rich, J Safran, A Strong, M Eakin, KE Baugh, BT Tuttle, AT Howard, EH Erwin, 2008, A global inventory of coral reef stressors based on satellite observed nighttime lights, Geocarto International, London, England: Taylor and Francis. In press. Elvidge, CD, KE Baugh, EA Kihn, HW Kroehl, ER Davis, 1997, Mapping City Lights with Nighttime Data from the DMSP Operational Linescan System, Photogrammatic Engineering and Remote Sensing, 63:6, pp. 727-734. Lorne, JK, M Salmon, 2007, Effects of exposure to artificial lighting on orientation of hatchling sea turtles on the beach and in the ocean, Endangered Species Research, Vol. 3: 23-30. Nicholas, M, 2001, Light Pollution and Marine Turtle Hatchlings: The Straw that Breaks the Camel's Back?, George Wright Forum, 18:4, p77-82. Witherington, BE, 1999, Reducing Threats To Nesting Habitat, Research and Management Techniques for

  4. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  5. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  6. Barium ions selectively activate BK channels via the Ca2+-bowl site.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Zeng, Xu-Hui; Lingle, Christopher J

    2012-07-10

    Activation of Ca(2+)-dependent BK channels is increased via binding of micromolar Ca(2+) to two distinct high-affinity sites per BK α-subunit. One site, termed the Ca(2+) bowl, is embedded within the second RCK domain (RCK2; regulator of conductance for potassium) of each α-subunit, while oxygen-containing residues in the first RCK domain (RCK1) have been linked to a separate Ca(2+) ligation site. Although both sites are activated by Ca(2+) and Sr(2+), Cd(2+) selectively favors activation via the RCK1 site. Divalent cations of larger ionic radius than Sr(2+) are thought to be ineffective at activating BK channels. Here we show that Ba(2+), better known as a blocker of K(+) channels, activates BK channels and that this effect arises exclusively from binding at the Ca(2+)-bowl site. Compared with previous estimates for Ca(2+) bowl-mediated activation by Ca(2+), the affinity of Ba(2+) to the Ca(2+) bowl is reduced about fivefold, and coupling of binding to activation is reduced from ∼3.6 for Ca(2+) to about ∼2.8 for Ba(2+). These results support the idea that ionic radius is an important determinant of selectivity differences among different divalent cations observed for each Ca(2+)-binding site.

  7. Activation of brown adipose tissue mitochondrial GDP binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Swick, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    The primary function of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is heat production. This ability is attributed to the existence of a unique inner mitochondrial membrane protein termed the uncoupling protein or thermogenin. This protein is permeable to H+ and thus allows respiration (and therefore thermogenesis) to proceed at a rapid rate, independent of ADP phosphorylation. Proton conductance can be inhibited by the binding of purine nucleotides to the uncoupling protein. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-GDP to BAT mitochondria is frequently used as a measure of BAT thermogenic activity. Rats fed a diet that was low but adequate in protein exhibited a decrease in feed efficiency. In addition, BAT thermogenesis was activated as indicated by an elevation in the level of GDP binding to BAT mitochondria. This phenomena occurred in older rats and persisted over time.

  8. Structure and Reactivity of the Phosphotriesterase Active Site

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    characterize different catalytic conformations for chorismate mutase . Preliminary evidence for water binding in phosphotriesterase suggests that activity in...MD/QM study of the chorismate mutase catalyzed Claisen rearrangement reaction. 2001.subm. J.Phys.Chem.B 22.Day, P.N.J., J.H.; Gordon,M.S.; Webb,S.P...Claisen rearrangement of an unusual substrate in chorismate mutase . 2001.subm. J.Phys.Chem.B 38.Stevens, W.J., Basch,H., Krauss,M., Compact effective

  9. Active urea transport by the skin of Bufo viridis: Amiloride- and phloretin-sensitive transport sites

    SciTech Connect

    Rapoport, J.; Abuful, A.; Chaimovitz, C.; Noeh, Z.; Hays, R.M. Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY )

    1988-09-01

    Urea is actively transported inwardly (J{sub i}) across the skin of the green toad Bufo viridis. J{sub i} is markedly enhanced in toads adapted to hypertonic saline. The authors studied urea transport across the skin of Bufo viridis under a variety of experimental conditions, including treatment with amiloride and phloretin, agents that inhibit urea permeability in the bladder of Bufo marinus. Amiloride (10{sup {minus}4} M) significantly inhibited J{sub i} in both adapted and unadapted animals and was unaffected by removal of sodium from the external medium. Phloretin (10{sup {minus}4} M) significantly inhibited J{sub i} in adapted animals by 23-46%; there was also a reduction in J{sub i} in unadapted toads at 10{sup {minus}4} and 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M phloretin. A dose-response study revealed that the concentration of phloretin causing half-maximal inhibition (K{sub {1/2}}) was 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M for adapted animals. J{sub i} was unaffected by the substitution of sucrose for Ringer solution or by ouabain. They conclude (1) the process of adaptation appears to involve an increase in the number of amiloride- and phloretin-inhibitable urea transport sites in the skin, with a possible increase in the affinity of the sites for phloretin; (2) the adapted skin resembles the Bufo marinus urinary bladder with respect to amiloride and phloretin-inhibitable sites; (3) they confirm earlier observations that J{sub i} is independent of sodium transport.

  10. Photocatalytic Properties of TiO2: Evidence of the Key Role of Surface Active Sites in Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bak, Tadeusz; Li, Wenxian; Nowotny, Janusz; Atanacio, Armand J; Davis, Joel

    2015-09-10

    Photocatalytic activity of oxide semiconductors is commonly considered in terms of the effect of the band gap on the light-induced performance. The present work considers a combined effect of several key performance-related properties (KPPs) on photocatalytic activity of TiO2 (rutile), including the chemical potential of electrons (Fermi level), the concentration of surface active sites, and charge transport, in addition to the band gap. The KPPs have been modified using defect engineering. This approach led to imposition of different defect disorders and the associated KPPs, which are defect-related. This work shows, for the first time, a competitive influence of different KPPs on photocatalytic activity that was tested using oxidation of methylene blue (MB). It is shown that the increase of oxygen activity in the TiO2 lattice from 10(-12) Pa to 10(5) Pa results in (i) increase in the band gap from 2.42 to 2.91 eV (direct transitions) or 2.88 to 3 eV (indirect transitions), (ii) increase in the population of surface active sites, (iii) decrease of the Fermi level, and (iv) decrease of the charge transport. It is shown that the observed changes in the photocatalytic activity are determined by two dominant KPPs: the concentration of active surface sites and the Fermi level, while the band gap and charge transport have a minor effect on the photocatalytic performance. The effect of the defect-related properties on photoreactivity of TiO2 with water is considered in terms of a theoretical model offering molecular-level insight into the process.

  11. On the calculation of activity concentrations and nuclide ratios from measurements of atmospheric radioactivity.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, A; Ringbom, A

    2014-09-01

    Motivated by the need for consistent use of concepts central to the reporting of results from measurements of atmospheric radioactivity, we discuss some properties of the methods commonly used. Different expressions for decay correction of the activity concentration for parent-daughter decay pairs are presented, and it is suggested that this correction should be performed assuming parent-daughter ingrowth in the sample during the entire measurement process. We note that, as has already been suggested by others, activities rather than activity concentrations should be used when nuclide ratios are calculated. In addition, expressions that can be used to transform activity concentrations to activity ratios are presented. Finally we note that statistical uncertainties for nuclide ratios can be properly calculated using the exact solution to the problem of confidence intervals for a ratio of two jointly normally distributed variables, the so-called Fieller׳s theorem.

  12. Active site proton delivery and the lyase activity of human CYP17A1

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Yogan; Gregory, Michael C.; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2014-01-03

    equivalents and protons are funneled into non-productive pathways. This is similar to previous work with other P450 catalyzed hydroxylation. However, catalysis of carbon–carbon bond scission by the T306A mutant was largely unimpeded by disruption of the CYP17A1 acid-alcohol pair. The unique response of CYP17A1 lyase activity to mutation of Thr306 is consistent with a reactive intermediate formed independently of proton delivery in the active site, and supports involvement of a nucleophilic peroxo-anion rather than the traditional Compound I in catalysis.

  13. Pathways of H2 toward the Active Site of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Vitor H.; Baptista, António M.; Soares, Cláudio M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2), but little is known about the diffusion of H2 toward the active site. Here we analyze pathways for H2 permeation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent. Various MD simulation replicates were done, to improve the sampling of the system states. H2 easily permeates hydrogenase in every simulation and it moves preferentially in channels. All H2 molecules that reach the active site made their approach from the side of the Ni ion. H2 is able to reach distances of <4 Å from the active site, although after 6 Å permeation is difficult. In this region we mutated Val-67 into alanine and perform new MD simulations. These simulations show an increase of H2 inside the protein and at lower distances from the active site. This valine can be a control point in the H2 access to the active center. PMID:16731562

  14. Evaluation of metal concentration and antioxidant activity of three edible mushrooms from Mugla, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sarikurkcu, Cengiz; Tepe, Bektas; Semiz, Deniz Karsli; Solak, M Halil

    2010-05-01

    This study is designed for the determination of metal concentrations, antioxidant activity potentials and total phenolics of Amanita caesarea, Clitocybe geotropa and Leucoagaricus pudicus. Concentrations of four heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni) and five minor elements (Zn, Fe, Mn, Cu, Co) are determined. In the case of A. caesarea, Cr and Ni concentrations are found in a high level. Concentrations of the metals are found to be within safe limits for C. geotropa. In beta-carotene/linoleic acid test, L. pudicus showed the highest activity potential. In DPPH system, A. caesarea showed 79.4% scavenging ability. Additionally, reducing power and chelating capacity of the mushrooms increased with concentration. The strongest super-oxide anion scavenger was A. caesarea. In the case of total phenolics, L. pudicus found to have the highest content.

  15. Maintenance of plastid RNA editing activities independently of their target sites.

    PubMed

    Tillich, Michael; Poltnigg, Peter; Kushnir, Sergei; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian

    2006-03-01

    RNA editing in plant organelles is mediated by site-specific, nuclear-encoded factors. Previous data suggested that the maintenance of these factors depends on the presence of their rapidly evolving cognate sites. The surprising ability of allotetraploid Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) to edit a foreign site in the chloroplast ndhA messenger RNA was thought to be inherited from its diploid male ancestor, Nicotiana tomentosiformis. Here, we show that the same ndhA editing activity is also present in Nicotiana sylvestris, which is the female diploid progenitor of tobacco and which lacks the ndhA site. Hence, heterologous editing is not simply a result of tobacco's allopolyploid genome organization. Analyses of other editing sites after sexual or somatic transfer between land plants showed that heterologous editing occurs at a surprisingly high frequency. This suggests that the corresponding editing activities are conserved despite the absence of their target sites, potentially because they serve other functions in the plant cell.

  16. A Processive Carbohydrate Polymerase That Mediates Bifunctional Catalysis Using a Single Active Site

    PubMed Central

    May, John F.; Levengood, Matthew R.; Splain, Rebecca A.; Brown, Christopher D.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    Even in the absence of a template, glycosyltransferases can catalyze the synthesis of carbohydrate polymers of specific sequence. The paradigm has been that one enzyme catalyzes the formation of one type of glycosidic linkage, yet certain glycosyltransferases generate polysaccharide sequences composed of two distinct linkage types. In principle, bifunctional glycosyltransferases can possess separate active sites for each catalytic activity or one active site with dual activities. We encountered the fundamental question of one or two distinct active sites in our investigation of the galactosyltransferase GlfT2. GlfT2 catalyzes the formation of mycobacterial galactan, a critical cell-wall polymer composed of galactofuranose residues connected with alternating, regioisomeric linkages. We found that GlfT2 mediates galactan polymerization using only one active site that manifests dual regioselectivity. Structural modeling of the bifunctional glycosyltransferases hyaluronan synthase and cellulose synthase suggests that these enzymes also generate multiple glycosidic linkages using a single active site. These results highlight the versatility of glycosyltransferases for generating polysaccharides of specific sequence. We postulate that a hallmark of processive elongation of a carbohydrate polymer by a bifunctional enzyme is that one active site can give rise to two separate types of glycosidic bonds. PMID:22217153

  17. Nature of Catalytic Active Sites Present on the Surface of Advanced Bulk Tantalum Mixed Oxide Photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Phivilay, Somphonh; Puretzky, Alexander A; Domen, Kazunari Domen; Wachs, Israel

    2013-01-01

    The most active photocatalyst system for water splitting under UV irradiation (270 nm) is the promoted 0.2%NiO/NaTaO3:2%La photocatalyst with optimized photonic efficiency (P.E.) of 56%, but fundamental issues about the nature of the surface catalytic active sites and their involvement in the photocatalytic process still need to be clarified. This is the first study to apply cutting edge surface spectroscopic analyses to determine the surface nature of tantalum mixed oxide photocatalysts. Surface analysis with HR-XPS (1-3nm) and HS-LEIS (0.3nm) spectroscopy indicates that the NiO and La2O3 promoters are concentrated in the surface region of the bulk NaTaO3 phase. The La2O3 is concentrated on the NaTaO3 outermost surface layers while NiO is distributed throughout the NaTaO3 surface region (1-3nm). Raman and UV-vis spectroscopy revealed that the bulk molecular and electronic structures, respectively, of NaTaO3 were not modified by the addition of the La2O3 and NiO promoters, with La2O3 resulting in a slightly more ordered structure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy reveals that the addition of La2O3 and NiO produces a greater number of electron traps resulting in the suppression of the recombination of excited electrons/holes. In contrast to earlier reports, the La2O3 is only a textural promoter (increasing the BET surface area ~7x by stabilizing smaller NaTaO3 particles), but causes a ~3x decrease in the specific photocatalytic TORs ( mol H2/m2/h) rate because surface La2O3 blocks exposed catalytic active NaTaO3 sites. The NiO promoter was found to be a potent electronic promoter that enhances the NaTaO3 surface normalized TORs by a factor of ~10-50 and TOF by a factor of ~10. The level of NiO promotion is the same in the absence and presence of La2O3 demonstrating that there is no promotional synergistic interaction between the NiO and La2O3 promoters. This study demonstrates the important contributions of the photocatalyst surface properties to the fundamental

  18. Comparison of Active Drug Concentrations in the Pulmonary Epithelial Lining Fluid and Interstitial Fluid of Calves Injected with Enrofloxacin, Florfenicol, Ceftiofur, or Tulathromycin.

    PubMed

    Foster, Derek M; Martin, Luke G; Papich, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is the most common reason for parenteral antimicrobial administration to beef cattle in the United States. Yet there is little information describing the antimicrobial concentrations at the site of action. The objective of this study was to compare the active drug concentrations in the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid and interstitial fluid of four antimicrobials commonly used in cattle. After injection, plasma, interstitial fluid, and pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentrations and protein binding were measured to determine the plasma pharmacokinetics of each drug. A cross-over design with six calves per drug was used. Following sample collection and drug analysis, pharmacokinetic calculations were performed. For enrofloxacin and metabolite ciprofloxacin, the interstitial fluid concentration was 52% and 78% of the plasma concentration, while pulmonary fluid concentrations was 24% and 40% of the plasma concentration, respectively. The pulmonary concentrations (enrofloxacin + ciprofloxacin combined) exceeded the MIC90 of 0.06 μg/mL at 48 hours after administration. For florfenicol, the interstitial fluid concentration was almost 98% of the plasma concentration, and the pulmonary concentrations were over 200% of the plasma concentrations, exceeding the breakpoint (≤ 2 μg/mL), and the MIC90 for Mannheimia haemolytica (1.0 μg/mL) for the duration of the study. For ceftiofur, penetration to the interstitial fluid was only 5% of the plasma concentration. Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentration represented 40% of the plasma concentration. Airway concentrations exceeded the MIC breakpoint for susceptible respiratory pathogens (≤ 2 μg/mL) for a short time at 48 hours after administration. The plasma and interstitial fluid concentrations of tulathromcyin were lower than the concentrations in pulmonary fluid throughout the study. The bronchial concentrations were higher than the plasma or interstitial concentrations, with over 900

  19. Comparison of Active Drug Concentrations in the Pulmonary Epithelial Lining Fluid and Interstitial Fluid of Calves Injected with Enrofloxacin, Florfenicol, Ceftiofur, or Tulathromycin

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Derek M.; Martin, Luke G.; Papich, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is the most common reason for parenteral antimicrobial administration to beef cattle in the United States. Yet there is little information describing the antimicrobial concentrations at the site of action. The objective of this study was to compare the active drug concentrations in the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid and interstitial fluid of four antimicrobials commonly used in cattle. After injection, plasma, interstitial fluid, and pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentrations and protein binding were measured to determine the plasma pharmacokinetics of each drug. A cross-over design with six calves per drug was used. Following sample collection and drug analysis, pharmacokinetic calculations were performed. For enrofloxacin and metabolite ciprofloxacin, the interstitial fluid concentration was 52% and 78% of the plasma concentration, while pulmonary fluid concentrations was 24% and 40% of the plasma concentration, respectively. The pulmonary concentrations (enrofloxacin + ciprofloxacin combined) exceeded the MIC90 of 0.06 μg/mL at 48 hours after administration. For florfenicol, the interstitial fluid concentration was almost 98% of the plasma concentration, and the pulmonary concentrations were over 200% of the plasma concentrations, exceeding the breakpoint (≤ 2 μg/mL), and the MIC90 for Mannheimia haemolytica (1.0 μg/mL) for the duration of the study. For ceftiofur, penetration to the interstitial fluid was only 5% of the plasma concentration. Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid concentration represented 40% of the plasma concentration. Airway concentrations exceeded the MIC breakpoint for susceptible respiratory pathogens (≤ 2 μg/mL) for a short time at 48 hours after administration. The plasma and interstitial fluid concentrations of tulathromcyin were lower than the concentrations in pulmonary fluid throughout the study. The bronchial concentrations were higher than the plasma or interstitial concentrations, with over 900

  20. Sublethal Effects of Imidacloprid on Honey Bee Colony Growth and Activity at Three Sites in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Meikle, William G; Adamczyk, John J; Weiss, Milagra; Gregorc, Ales; Johnson, Don R; Stewart, Scott D; Zawislak, Jon; Carroll, Mark J; Lorenz, Gus M

    2016-01-01

    Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoid pesticide heavily used by the agricultural industry and shown to have negative impacts on honey bees above certain concentrations. We evaluated the effects of different imidacloprid concentrations in sugar syrup using cage and field studies, and across different environments. Honey bee colonies fed sublethal concentrations of imidicloprid (0, 5, 20 and 100 ppb) over 6 weeks in field trials at a desert site (Arizona), a site near intensive agriculture (Arkansas) and a site with little nearby agriculture but abundant natural forage (Mississippi) were monitored with respect to colony metrics, such as adult bee and brood population sizes, as well as pesticide residues. Hive weight and internal hive temperature were monitored continuously over two trials in Arizona. Colonies fed 100 ppb imidacloprid in Arizona had significantly lower adult bee populations, brood surface areas and average frame weights, and reduced temperature control, compared to colonies in one or more of the other treatment groups, and consumption rates of those colonies were lower compared to other colonies in Arizona and Arkansas, although no differences in capped brood or average frame weight were observed among treatments in Arkansas. At the Mississippi site, also rich in alternative forage, colonies fed 5 ppb imidacloprid had less capped brood than control colonies, but contamination of control colonies was detected. In contrast, significantly higher daily hive weight variability among colonies fed 5 ppb imidacloprid in Arizona suggested greater foraging activity during a nectar flow post treatment, than any other treatment group. Imidacloprid concentrations in stored honey corresponded well with the respective syrup concentrations fed to the colonies and remained stable within the hive for at least 7 months after the end of treatment.

  1. Sublethal Effects of Imidacloprid on Honey Bee Colony Growth and Activity at Three Sites in the U.S.

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, John J.; Weiss, Milagra; Gregorc, Ales; Johnson, Don R.; Stewart, Scott D.; Zawislak, Jon; Carroll, Mark J.; Lorenz, Gus M.

    2016-01-01

    Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoid pesticide heavily used by the agricultural industry and shown to have negative impacts on honey bees above certain concentrations. We evaluated the effects of different imidacloprid concentrations in sugar syrup using cage and field studies, and across different environments. Honey bee colonies fed sublethal concentrations of imidicloprid (0, 5, 20 and 100 ppb) over 6 weeks in field trials at a desert site (Arizona), a site near intensive agriculture (Arkansas) and a site with little nearby agriculture but abundant natural forage (Mississippi) were monitored with respect to colony metrics, such as adult bee and brood population sizes, as well as pesticide residues. Hive weight and internal hive temperature were monitored continuously over two trials in Arizona. Colonies fed 100 ppb imidacloprid in Arizona had significantly lower adult bee populations, brood surface areas and average frame weights, and reduced temperature control, compared to colonies in one or more of the other treatment groups, and consumption rates of those colonies were lower compared to other colonies in Arizona and Arkansas, although no differences in capped brood or average frame weight were observed among treatments in Arkansas. At the Mississippi site, also rich in alternative forage, colonies fed 5 ppb imidacloprid had less capped brood than control colonies, but contamination of control colonies was detected. In contrast, significantly higher daily hive weight variability among colonies fed 5 ppb imidacloprid in Arizona suggested greater foraging activity during a nectar flow post treatment, than any other treatment group. Imidacloprid concentrations in stored honey corresponded well with the respective syrup concentrations fed to the colonies and remained stable within the hive for at least 7 months after the end of treatment. PMID:28030617

  2. Zinc and iron concentration and SOD activity in human semen and seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Marzec-Wróblewska, Urszula; Kamiński, Piotr; Lakota, Paweł; Szymański, Marek; Wasilow, Karolina; Ludwikowski, Grzegorz; Kuligowska-Prusińska, Magdalena; Odrowąż-Sypniewska, Grażyna; Stuczyński, Tomasz; Michałkiewicz, Jacek

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to measure zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) concentration in human semen and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in seminal plasma and correlate the results with sperm quality. Semen samples were obtained from men (N = 168) undergoing routine infertility evaluation. The study design included two groups based on the ejaculate parameters. Group I (n = 39) consisted of males with normal ejaculate (normozoospermia), and group II (n = 129) consisted of males with pathological spermiogram. Seminal Zn and Fe were measured in 162 samples (group I, n = 38; group II, n = 124) and SOD activity in 149 samples (group I, n = 37; group II, n = 112). Correlations were found between SOD activity and Fe and Zn concentration, and between Fe and Zn concentration. SOD activity was negatively associated with volume of semen and positively associated with rapid progressive motility, nonprogressive motility, and concentration. Negative correlation was stated between Fe concentration and normal morphology. Mean SOD activity in seminal plasma of semen from men of group I was higher than in seminal plasma of semen from men of group II. Fe concentration was higher in teratozoospermic males than in males with normal morphology of spermatozoa in group II. Our results suggest that Fe may influence spermatozoa morphology.

  3. Ambient concentration and dry deposition of major inorganic nitrogen species at two urban sites in Sichuan Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanbo; Yang, Fumo; Shi, Guangming; Tian, Mi; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Liuyi; Fu, Chuan

    2016-12-01

    To assess pollution levels of major inorganic nitrogen species and their atmospheric deposition input to sensitive ecosystems in Sichuan Basin, southwest China, ambient concentrations of oxidized (NOy ∼ NO2, HNO3, NO3(-)) and reduced (NHx = NH3, NH4(+)) nitrogen species were collected at two urban sites during four one-month periods, each in a different season from July 2014 to April 2015. Estimated annual mean concentration of NOy was 20.3 and 13.5 μg N m(-3) in Chengdu and Wanzhou, respectively, and NHx was 16.9 and 13.6 μg N m(-3), respectively. Back trajectory cluster analysis indicated that high levels of NOy and NHx in Chengdu were mainly caused by local emissions while those in Wanzhou were caused by both the local emissions and long-range transport of pollutants. On annual basis, NO2 contributed the most to NOy, followed by NO3(-) and HNO3, accounting for 87.5%, 10.5% and 2.0%, respectively, of NOy in Chengdu, and 91.4%, 6.9% and 1.7%, respectively, in Wanzhou. NH3 was the predominant contributor to NHx, contributing 65.6% and 72.2% in Chengdu and Wanzhou, respectively. Dry deposition fluxes were estimated using the inferential method with measured ambient concentrations and modelled dry deposition velocities. The total inorganic nitrogen dry deposition flux was estimated to be 21.4 and 8.5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), with 44.3% and 41.4% from NOy in Chengdu and Wanzhou, respectively. NO2 and NH3 each contributed about 80% of NOy and NHx dry deposition, respectively. Wet deposition was only collected in Wanzhou, where the annual wet deposition of NO3(-) and NH4(+) was 4.5 and 15.7 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), respectively. The total wet plus dry deposition was 28.7 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) in Wanzhou with 72.2% from reduced nitrogen. Therefore, controlling NH3 emissions from agricultural, traffic, waste containers and sewage system sources would be effective to reduce the total nitrogen deposition in the Sichuan Basin area.

  4. The concentration of stress at the rotator cuff tendon-to-bone attachment site is conserved across species.

    PubMed

    Saadat, Fatemeh; Deymier, Alix C; Birman, Victor; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Genin, Guy M

    2016-09-01

    The tendon-to-bone attachment site integrates two distinct tissues via a gradual transition in composition, mechanical properties, and structure. Outcomes of surgical repair are poor, in part because surgical repair does not recreate the natural attachment, and in part because the mechanical features that are most critical to mechanical and physiological functions have not been identified. We employed allometric analysis to resolve a paradox about how the architecture of the rotator cuff contributes to load transfer: whereas published data suggest that the mean muscle stresses expected at the tendon-to-bone attachment are conserved across species, data also show that the relative dimensions of key anatomical features vary dramatically, suggesting that the amplification of stresses at the interface between tendon and bone should also vary widely. However, a mechanical model that enabled a sensitivity analysis revealed that the degree of stress concentration was in fact highly conserved across species: the factors that most affected stress amplification were most highly conserved across species, while those that had a lower effect showed broad variation across a range of relative insensitivity. Results highlight how micromechanical factors can influence structure-function relationships and cross-species scaling over several orders of magnitude in animal size, and provide guidance on physiological features to emphasize in surgical and tissue engineered repair of the rotator cuff.

  5. Immunological and physiological effects of chronic exposure of Peromyscus leucopus to Aroclor 1254 at a concentration similar to that found at contaminated sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Segre, M.; Arena, S.M.; Greeley, E.H.; Melancon, M.J.; Graham, D.A.; French, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental contaminants known to cause adverse health effects to biological systems. Limited data are available on their effects on the immune system of wildlife species. Previously, we found that 4 and 6-week-old white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) born from dams injected with a single dose (300 mg/kg) of Aroclor 1254, had altered immunological, hematological, and biochemical responses. Here, we examined the effect of transplacental lactational and postnatal exposure to Aroclor 1254, at a concentration similar to that found at contaminated sites, on various physiological parameters of 22-week-old white-footed mice. Liver weight and liver somatic index of PCB treated animals were significantly higher, the combined weights of the adrenal glands were significantly lower and EROD and BROD enzyme activity was significantly higher compared to control values. The number of thymocytes of the treated mice was significantly lower than that of the controls; however, thymocytes of treated mice had a higher proliferative response to the mitogen Con A. These alterations were correlated with the PCBs body burdens. Some toxic effects of chronic exposure to PCBs, at levels comparable to exposure found in contaminated sites in the USA, are still evident in adult P. leucopus.

  6. First measurements of (236)U concentrations and (236)U/(239)Pu isotopic ratios in a Southern Hemisphere soil far from nuclear test or reactor sites.

    PubMed

    Srncik, M; Tims, S G; De Cesare, M; Fifield, L K

    2014-06-01

    The variation of the (236)U and (239)Pu concentrations as a function of depth has been studied in a soil profile at a site in the Southern Hemisphere well removed from nuclear weapon test sites. Total inventories of (236)U and (239)Pu as well as the (236)U/(239)Pu isotopic ratio were derived. For this investigation a soil core from an undisturbed forest area in the Herbert River catchment (17°30' - 19°S) which is located in north-eastern Queensland (Australia) was chosen. The chemical separation of U and Pu was carried out with a double column which has the advantage of the extraction of both elements from a relatively large soil sample (∼20 g) within a day. The samples were measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry using the 14UD pelletron accelerator at the Australian National University. The highest atom concentrations of both (236)U and (239)Pu were found at a depth of 2-3 cm. The (236)U/(239)Pu isotopic ratio in fallout at this site, as deduced from the ratio of the (236)U and (239)Pu inventories, is 0.085 ± 0.003 which is clearly lower than the Northern Hemisphere value of ∼0.2. The (236)U inventory of (8.4 ± 0.3) × 10(11) at/m(2) was more than an order of magnitude lower than values reported for the Northern Hemisphere. The (239)Pu activity concentrations are in excellent agreement with a previous study and the (239+240)Pu inventory was (13.85 ± 0.29) Bq/m(2). The weighted mean (240)Pu/(239)Pu isotopic ratio of 0.142 ± 0.005 is slightly lower than the value for global fallout, but our results are consistent with the average ratio of 0.173 ± 0.027 for the southern equatorial region (0-30°S).

  7. Operational strategy for soil concentration predictions of strontium/yttrium-90 and cesium-137 in surface soil at the West Valley Demonstration Project site

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, J.A.

    1995-06-05

    There are difficulties associated with the assessment of the interpretation of field measurements, determination of guideline protocols and control and disposal of low level radioactive contaminated soil in the environmental health physics field. Questions are raised among scientists and in public forums concerning the necessity and high costs of large area soil remediation versus the risks of low-dose radiation health effects. As a result, accurate soil activity assessments become imperative in decontamination situations. The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), a US Department of Energy facility located in West Valley, New York is managed and operated by West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc. (WVNS). WVNS has identified contaminated on-site soil areas with a mixed variety of radionuclides (primarily fission product). Through the use of data obtained from a previous project performed during the summer of 1994 entitled ``Field Survey Correlation and Instrumentation Response for an In Situ Soil Measurement Program`` (Myers), the WVDP offers a unique research opportunity to investigate the possibility of soil concentration predictions based on exposure or count rate responses returned from a survey detector probe. In this study, correlations are developed between laboratory measured soil beta activity and survey probe response for the purposes of determining the optimal detector for field use and using these correlations to establish predictability of soil activity levels.

  8. Estimating Groundwater Concentrations from Mass Releases to the Aquifer at Integrated Disposal Facility and Tank Farm Locations Within the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, Marcel P.; Freeman, Eugene J.

    2005-06-09

    This report summarizes groundwater-related numerical calculations that will support groundwater flow and transport analyses associated with the scheduled 2005 performance assessment of the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site. The report also provides potential supporting information to other ongoing Hanford Site risk analyses associated with the closure of single-shell tank farms and related actions. The IDF 2005 performance assessment analysis is using well intercept factors (WIFs), as outlined in the 2001 performance assessment of the IDF. The flow and transport analyses applied to these calculations use both a site-wide regional-scale model and a local-scale model of the area near the IDF. The regional-scale model is used to evaluate flow conditions, groundwater transport, and impacts from the IDF in the central part of the Hanford Site, at the core zone boundary around the 200 East and 200 West Areas, and along the Columbia River. The local-scale model is used to evaluate impacts from transport of contaminants to a hypothetical well 100 m downgradient from the IDF boundaries. Analyses similar to the regional-scale analysis of IDF releases are also provided at individual tank farm areas as additional information. To gain insight on how the WIF approach compares with other approaches for estimating groundwater concentrations from mass releases to the unconfined aquifer, groundwater concentrations were estimated with the WIF approach for two hypothetical release scenarios and compared with similar results using a calculational approach (the convolution approach). One release scenario evaluated with both approaches (WIF and convolution) involved a long-term source release from immobilized low-activity waste glass containing 25,550 Ci of technetium-99 near the IDF; another involved a hypothetical shorter-term release of {approx}0.7 Ci of technetium over 600 years from the S-SX tank farm area. In addition, direct simulation results for both release

  9. Quantum mechanics study of the hydroxyethylamines-BACE-1 active site interaction energies.

    PubMed

    Gueto-Tettay, Carlos; Drosos, Juan Carlos; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo

    2011-06-01

    The identification of BACE-1, a key enzyme in the production of Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, generated by the proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein, was a major advance in the field of Alzheimer's disease as this pathology is characterized by the presence of extracellular senile plaques, mainly comprised of Aβ peptides. Hydroxyethylamines have demonstrated a remarkable potential, like candidate drugs, for this disease using BACE-1 as target. Density Functional Theory calculations were employed to estimate interaction energies for the complexes formed between the hydroxyethylamine derivated inhibitors and 24 residues in the BACE-1 active site. The collected data offered not only a general but a particular quantitative description that gives a deep insight of the interactions in the active site, showing at the same time how ligand structural variations affect them. Polar interactions are the major energetic contributors for complex stabilization and those ones with charged aspartate residues are highlighted, as they contribute over 90% of the total attractive interaction energy. Ligand-ARG296 residue interaction reports the most repulsive value and decreasing of the magnitude of this repulsion can be a key feature for the design of novel and more potent BACE-1 inhibitors. Also it was explained why sultam derivated BACE-1 inhibitors are better ones than lactam based. Hydrophobic interactions concentrated at S1 zone and other relevant repulsions and attractions were also evaluated. The comparison of two different theory levels (X3LYP and M062X) allowed to confirm the relevance of the detected interactions as each theory level has its own strength to depict the forces involved, as is the case of M062X which is better describing the hydrophobic interactions. Those facts were also evaluated and confirmed by comparing the quantitative trend, of selected ligand-residue interactions, with MP2 theory level as reference standard method for electrostatic plus

  10. Quantum mechanics study of the hydroxyethylamines-BACE-1 active site interaction energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueto-Tettay, Carlos; Drosos, Juan Carlos; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo

    2011-06-01

    The identification of BACE-1, a key enzyme in the production of Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, generated by the proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein, was a major advance in the field of Alzheimer's disease as this pathology is characterized by the presence of extracellular senile plaques, mainly comprised of Aβ peptides. Hydroxyethylamines have demonstrated a remarkable potential, like candidate drugs, for this disease using BACE-1 as target. Density Functional Theory calculations were employed to estimate interaction energies for the complexes formed between the hydroxyethylamine derivated inhibitors and 24 residues in the BACE-1 active site. The collected data offered not only a general but a particular quantitative description that gives a deep insight of the interactions in the active site, showing at the same time how ligand structural variations affect them. Polar interactions are the major energetic contributors for complex stabilization and those ones with charged aspartate residues are highlighted, as they contribute over 90% of the total attractive interaction energy. Ligand-ARG296 residue interaction reports the most repulsive value and decreasing of the magnitude of this repulsion can be a key feature for the design of novel and more potent BACE-1 inhibitors. Also it was explained why sultam derivated BACE-1 inhibitors are better ones than lactam based. Hydrophobic interactions concentrated at S1 zone and other relevant repulsions and attractions were also evaluated. The comparison of two different theory levels (X3LYP and M062X) allowed to confirm the relevance of the detected interactions as each theory level has its own strength to depict the forces involved, as is the case of M062X which is better describing the hydrophobic interactions. Those facts were also evaluated and confirmed by comparing the quantitative trend, of selected ligand-residue interactions, with MP2 theory level as reference standard method for electrostatic plus

  11. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Kenny, Paul J.; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets. PMID:25869137

  12. Target selectivity of vertebrate notch proteins. Collaboration between discrete domains and CSL-binding site architecture determines activation probability.

    PubMed

    Ong, Chin-Tong; Cheng, Hui-Teng; Chang, Li-Wei; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Stormo, Gary D; Kopan, Raphael

    2006-02-24

    All four mammalian Notch proteins interact with a single DNA-binding protein (RBP-jkappa), yet they are not equivalent in activating target genes. Parallel assays of three Notch-responsive promoters in several cell lines revealed that relative activation strength is dependent on protein module and promoter context more than the cellular context. Each Notch protein reads binding site orientation and distribution on the promoter differently; Notch1 performs extremely well on paired sites, and Notch3 prefers single sites in conjunction with a proximal zinc finger transcription factor. Although head-head sites can elicit a Notch response on their own, use of CBS (CSL binding site) in tail-tail orientation is context-dependent. Bias for specific DNA elements is achieved by interplay between the N-terminal RAM (RBP-jkappa-associated molecule/ankyrin region), which interprets CBS proximity and orientation, and the C-terminal transactivation domain that interacts specifically with the transcription machinery or nearby factors. To confirm the prediction that modular design underscores the evolution of functional divergence between Notch proteins, we generated a synthetic Notch protein (Notch1 ankyrin with Notch3 transactivation domain) that displayed superior signaling strength on the hes5 promoter. Consistent with the prediction that "preferred" targets (Hes1) should respond faster and at lower Notch concentration than other targets, we showed that Hes5-GFP was extinguished fast and recovered slowly, whereas Hes1-GFP was inhibited late and recovered quickly after a pulse of DAPT in metanephroi cultures.

  13. Deep Sequencing of Random Mutant Libraries Reveals the Active Site of the Narrow Specificity CphA Metallo-β-Lactamase is Fragile to Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhizeng; Mehta, Shrenik C.; Adamski, Carolyn J.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    CphA is a Zn2+-dependent metallo-β-lactamase that efficiently hydrolyzes only carbapenem antibiotics. To understand the sequence requirements for CphA function, single codon random mutant libraries were constructed for residues in and near the active site and mutants were selected for E. coli growth on increasing concentrations of imipenem, a carbapenem antibiotic. At high concentrations of imipenem that select for phenotypically wild-type mutants, the active-site residues exhibit stringent sequence requirements in that nearly all residues in positions that contact zinc, the substrate, or the catalytic water do not tolerate amino acid substitutions. In addition, at high imipenem concentrations a number of residues that do not directly contact zinc or substrate are also essential and do not tolerate substitutions. Biochemical analysis confirmed that amino acid substitutions at essential positions decreased the stability or catalytic activity of the CphA enzyme. Therefore, the CphA active - site is fragile to substitutions, suggesting active-site residues are optimized for imipenem hydrolysis. These results also suggest that resistance to inhibitors targeted to the CphA active site would be slow to develop because of the strong sequence constraints on function. PMID:27616327

  14. Influence of Concentration and Activation on Hydrogen Peroxide Diffusion through Dental Tissues In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Carlos R. G.; Souza, Cristiane S.; Borges, Alessandra B.; Huhtala, Maria Filomena R. L.; Caneppele, Taciana M. F.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of physical and chemical activation on the diffusion time of different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching agents through enamel and dentin. One hundred and twenty bovine cylindrical specimens were divided into six groups (n = 20): 20% HP; 20% HP with light activation; 20% HP with manganese gluconate; 35% HP; 35% HP with light activation; and 35% HP with manganese gluconate. The specimens were fixed over transparent epoxy wells with internal cavities to simulate a pulpal chamber. This chamber was filled with an enzymatic reagent to simulate pulpal fluid. The bleaching gels were applied on enamel surface and the image of the pulpal fluid was captured by a video camera to monitor the time of peroxide penetration in each specimen. ANOVA analysis showed that concentration and type of activation of bleaching gel significantly influenced the diffusion time of HP (P < 0.05). 35% HP showed the lowest diffusion times compared to the groups with 20% HP gel. The light activation of HP decreased significantly the diffusion time compared to chemical activation. The highest diffusion time was obtained with 20% HP chemically activated. The diffusion time of HP was dependent on activation and concentration of HP. The higher concentration of HP diffused through dental tissues more quickly. PMID:24163616

  15. A Comparison of Barley Malt Amylolytic Enzyme Activities and Malt Sugar Concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that barley malt alpha-amylase activity would correlate better with malt sugar concentrations than the activities of beta-amylase, or limit dextrinase. Seeds of four two-row and four six-row North American elite barley cultivars were steeped and germin...

  16. A Comparison of Barley Malt Amylolytic Enzyme Activities and Malt Sugar Concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that barley malt alpha-amylase activity would correlate better with malt sugar concentrations than the activities of beta-amylase, or limit dextrinase. Seeds of four two-row and four six-row North American elite barley cultivars were steeped and germi...

  17. Site-specific characterization of Castromil Brownfield area related to gold mining activities.

    PubMed

    Ferreira da Silva, Eduardo; Serrano Pinto, Luís; Patinha, Carla; Cardoso Fonseca, Edmundo

    2004-03-01

    Castromil is one of the gold mining areas in Portugal that has been abandoned since 1940. This area, which was first mined in Roman times, is located within a Hercynian granite body near the contact with Silurian metasediments. Gold is essentially disseminated along veins in the silicified granite, running NW-SE, related with a shear zone and frequently associated with sulphides (arsenopyrite and basically pyrite). In paragenetic terms, three stages of mineralization are considered: ferro-arseniferous (quartz + arsenopyrite I + pyrite I + pyrrhotite + bismuth), zinciferous (sphalerite + chalcopyrite), and remobilization (arsenopyrite II + galena + gold). Due to the lack of laws and environmental education, Castromil is today a gold mining heritage site where we can detect the consequences of an incautious exploration (tailings, wells and adits located in the old explored zone) and where a residential area is located. In order to characterize the actual state of the old mining area the trace metal contamination of soils and waters by mining activities was investigated. In the studied area 106 soil samples, 15 waters and 20 plants were sampled and analysed. The soil samples were analysed for 32 elements by ICP-AES. Waters were analysed by ionic chromatography and ICP-MS for major and trace elements. Plants were analysed for As, Fe and Pb by AAS. The results are discussed taking into account the risk-based standards for soils and groundwater's (target and intervention values) proposed by Swartjes (1999). The results show elevated concentration of As and Pb which were found in soils collected from agricultural areas. Foodstuff plants species collected in the Castromil agricultural area show high concentrations of As in the leaves (cabbage and lettuce) and in the tubers (potatoes). Groundwaters in the mining area contain high concentrations of As that exceeds the intervention values. The area must to be subject to a remediation process, considering the actual risks to

  18. Concentration evolution of pharmaceutically active compounds in raw urban and industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Muñoz, Dolores; Martín, Julia; Santos, Juan Luis; Aparicio, Irene; Alonso, Esteban

    2014-09-01

    The distribution of pharmaceutically active compounds in the environment has been reported in several works in which wastewater treatment plants have been identified as the main source of these compounds to the environment. The concentrations of these compounds in influent wastewater can vary widely not only during the day but also along the year, because of the seasonal-consumption patterns of some pharmaceuticals. However, only few studies have attempted to assess the hourly variability of the concentrations of pharmaceutically active compounds in wastewater. In this work, the distribution and seasonal and hourly variability of twenty-one pharmaceuticals, belonging to seven therapeutic groups, have been investigated in urban and industrial wastewater. The highest concentrations of pharmaceutically active compounds, except salicylic acid, were found in urban wastewater, especially in the case of anti-inflammatory drugs and caffeine. The highest concentrations of salicylic acid were measured in industrial wastewater, reaching concentration levels up to 3295μgL(-)(1). The studied pharmaceutically active compounds showed different distribution patterns during winter and summer periods. Temporal variability of pharmaceutically active compounds during a 24-h period showed a distribution in concordance with their consumption and excretion patterns, in the case of urban wastewater, and with the schedule of industrial activities, in the case of industrial wastewater.

  19. Labeling of human clots in vitro with an active-site mutant of t-PA

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, E.T.; Mack, D.L.; Monge, J.C.; Billadello, J.J.; Sobel, B.E. )

    1990-02-01

    Prompt detection of acute thrombosis and its response to treatment with thrombolytic agents generally require angiography. Scintigraphic approaches with labeled antibodies to or components of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems have been disappointing because of prolonged circulating half-lives of tracers and relatively slow or limited binding to thrombi. Accordingly, we developed and characterized a thrombolytically inactive, active-site mutant (Ser-478----Thr) of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) designed to detect thrombi in vivo. Binding of iodine-125-({sup 125}I) labeled Ser----Thr t-PA to thrombi in vitro was time- and concentration-dependent, and specific judging from inhibition by pre-incubation with anti-t-PA IgG. Clearance of 125I-labeled mutant t-PA in rabbits was rapid and biexponential (alpha t1/2 = 1.9 +/- 0.4 min, beta t1/2 = 39.8 +/- 11.2 min). Thus, the amidolytically inactive mutant of t-PA designed binds rapidly and specifically to human thrombi in vitro and is cleared rapidly from the circulation in vivo--properties rendering it attractive as a potentially useful clot imaging agent.

  20. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  1. 75 FR 71677 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of the Energy Policy Act of... requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs of...

  2. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...). (e) For all asbestos-containing waste material received, the owner or operator of the active waste... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an...

  3. Unmasking tandem site interaction in human acetylcholinesterase. Substrate activation with a cationic acetanilide substrate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joseph L; Cusack, Bernadette; Davies, Matthew P; Fauq, Abdul; Rosenberry, Terrone L

    2003-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) contains a narrow and deep active site gorge with two sites of ligand binding, an acylation site (or A-site) at the base of the gorge, and a peripheral site (or P-site) near the gorge entrance. The P-site contributes to catalytic efficiency by transiently binding substrates on their way to the acylation site, where a short-lived acyl enzyme intermediate is produced. A conformational interaction between the A- and P-sites has recently been found to modulate ligand affinities. We now demonstrate that this interaction is of functional importance by showing that the acetylation rate constant of a substrate bound to the A-site is increased by a factor a when a second molecule of substrate binds to the P-site. This demonstration became feasible through the introduction of a new acetanilide substrate analogue of acetylcholine, 3-(acetamido)-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium (ATMA), for which a = 4. This substrate has a low acetylation rate constant and equilibrates with the catalytic site, allowing a tractable algebraic solution to the rate equation for substrate hydrolysis. ATMA affinities for the A- and P-sites deduced from the kinetic analysis were confirmed by fluorescence titration with thioflavin T as a reporter ligand. Values of a >1 give rise to a hydrolysis profile called substrate activation, and the AChE site-specific mutant W86F, and to a lesser extent wild-type human AChE itself, showed substrate activation with acetylthiocholine as the substrate. Substrate activation was incorporated into a previous catalytic scheme for AChE in which a bound P-site ligand can also block product dissociation from the A-site, and two additional features of the AChE catalytic pathway were revealed. First, the ability of a bound P-site ligand to increase the substrate acetylation rate constant varied with the structure of the ligand: thioflavin T accelerated ATMA acetylation by a factor a(2) of 1.3, while propidium failed to accelerate. Second, catalytic rate

  4. Monocopper active site for partial methane oxidation in Cu-exchanged 8MR zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Ambarish R.; Zhao, Zhi -Jian; Siahrostami, Samira; Nørskov, Jens K.; Studt, Felix

    2016-08-17

    Direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen is experiencing renewed interest owing to the availability of new natural gas resources. Copper-exchanged zeolites such as mordenite and ZSM-5 have shown encouraging results, and di- and tri-copper species have been suggested as active sites. Recently, small eight-membered ring (8MR) zeolites including SSZ-13, -16, and -39 have been shown to be active for methane oxidation, but the active sites and reaction mechanisms in these 8MR zeolites are not known. In this work, we use density functional theory (DFT) calculations to systematically evaluate monocopper species as active sites for the partial methane oxidation reaction in Cu-exchanged SSZ-13. On the basis of kinetic and thermodynamic arguments, we suggest that [CuIIOH]+ species in the 8MR are responsible for the experimentally observed activity. Furthermore, our results successfully explain the available spectroscopic data and experimental observations including (i) the necessity of water for methanol extraction and (ii) the effect of Si/Al ratio on the catalyst activity. Monocopper species have not yet been suggested as an active site for the partial methane oxidation reaction, and our results suggest that [CuIIOH]+ active site may provide complementary routes for methane activation in zeolites in addition to the known [Cu–O–Cu]2+ and Cu3O3 motifs.

  5. Monocopper active site for partial methane oxidation in Cu-exchanged 8MR zeolites

    DOE PAGES

    Kulkarni, Ambarish R.; Zhao, Zhi -Jian; Siahrostami, Samira; ...

    2016-08-17

    Direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen is experiencing renewed interest owing to the availability of new natural gas resources. Copper-exchanged zeolites such as mordenite and ZSM-5 have shown encouraging results, and di- and tri-copper species have been suggested as active sites. Recently, small eight-membered ring (8MR) zeolites including SSZ-13, -16, and -39 have been shown to be active for methane oxidation, but the active sites and reaction mechanisms in these 8MR zeolites are not known. In this work, we use density functional theory (DFT) calculations to systematically evaluate monocopper species as active sites for the partial methane oxidationmore » reaction in Cu-exchanged SSZ-13. On the basis of kinetic and thermodynamic arguments, we suggest that [CuIIOH]+ species in the 8MR are responsible for the experimentally observed activity. Furthermore, our results successfully explain the available spectroscopic data and experimental observations including (i) the necessity of water for methanol extraction and (ii) the effect of Si/Al ratio on the catalyst activity. Monocopper species have not yet been suggested as an active site for the partial methane oxidation reaction, and our results suggest that [CuIIOH]+ active site may provide complementary routes for methane activation in zeolites in addition to the known [Cu–O–Cu]2+ and Cu3O3 motifs.« less

  6. Pesticide distributions in surface water: The distribution of pesticide concentrations at two study sites points to herbicides that may affect management of public water supplies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamer, J.K.; Wieczorek, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    Distributions of concentrations of 46 pesticides were documented from May 1992 through March 1994 for Maple Creek near Nickerson, Neb., and Platte River at Louisville, Neb. As their source of public water supplies, Lincoln and the western part of Omaha withdraw groundwater from the adjacent alluvium near the Platte River site, which is hydraulically connected to the Platte River. Organonitrogen herbicides dominated the pesticide distributions at each site. Variations in the distributions of pesticides at the two sites partly reflect differences in land use and land management practices. Diazinon, an insecticide used in urban areas, was commonly detected at the Platte River site but not at the Maple Creek site. Of the 46 pesticides analyzed at the Platte River site, the herbicides atrazine and alachlor were more likely to exceed their respective maximum contaminant levels of 3.0 and 2.0 pg/L; cyanazine was more likely to exceed the health advisory level of 1.0 ??g/L.

  7. 1993 annual report of hazardous waste activities for the Oak Ridge K-25 site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report is a detailed listing of all of the Hazardous Waste activities occurring at Martin Marietta`s K-25 site. Contained herein are hazardous waste notification forms, waste stream reports, generator fee forms and various TSDR reports.

  8. The surface chemistry of heterogeneous catalysis: mechanisms, selectivity, and active sites.

    PubMed

    Zaera, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    The role of chemical kinetics in defining the requirements for the active sites of heterogeneous catalysts is discussed. A personal view is presented, with specific examples from our laboratory to illustrate the role of the chemical composition, structure, and electronic properties of specific surface sites in determining reaction activity and selectivity. Manipulation of catalytic behavior via the addition of chemical modifiers and by tuning of the reaction conditions is also introduced.

  9. Characterization of concentration gradients of a morphogenetically active retinoid in the chick limb bud

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    It has long been suggested that the generation of biological patterns depends in part on gradients of diffusible substances. In an attempt to bridge the gap between this largely theoretical concept and experimental embryology, we have examined the physiology of diffusion gradients in an actual embryonic field. In particular, we have generated in the chick wing bud concentration gradients of the morphogenetically active retinoid TTNPB, (E)-4-[2-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro- 5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthalenyl)-1-prope nyl] benzoic acid, a synthetic vitamin A compound. Upon local application of TTNPB the normal 234 digit pattern is duplicated in a way that correlates with the geometry of the underlying TTNPB gradient; low doses of TTNPB lead to a shallow gradient and an additional digit 2, whereas higher doses result in a steep, far-reaching gradient and patterns with additional digits 3 and 4. The experimentally measured TTNPB distribution along the anteroposterior axis, can be modeled by a local source and a dispersed sink. This model correctly predicts the site of specification of digit 2, and provides an empirical estimate of the diffusion coefficient (D) of retinoids in embryonic limb tissue. The numerical value of approximately 10(-7) cm2s-1 for D suggests that retinoids are not freely diffusible in the limb rudiment, but interact with the previously identified cellular retinoic acid binding protein. In addition, D affords an estimate of the time required to establish a diffusion gradient as 3 to 4 h. This time span is in a range compatible with the time scale of pattern specification in developing vertebrate limbs. Our studies support the view that diffusion of morphogenetic substances is a plausible mechanism of pattern formation in secondary embryonic fields. PMID:3667700

  10. Nuclear waste: Status of DOE`s nuclear waste site characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    1987-12-31

    Three potential nuclear waste repository sites have been selected to carry out characterization activities-the detailed geological testing to determine the suitability of each site as a repository. The sites are Hanford in south-central Washington State, Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada, and Deaf Smith in the Texas Panhandle. Two key issues affecting the total program are the estimations of the site characterization completion data and costs and DOE`s relationship with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission which has been limited and its relations with affected states and Indian tribes which continue to be difficult.

  11. Concentrations of organic contaminants in mollusks and sediments at NOAA National Status and Trend sites in the coastal and estuarine United States.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, T P

    1991-01-01

    Mean concentrations of PAHs, PCBs, and DDT in mollusks and sediments at sites in the National Status and Trends Program (NST) are distributed in log-normal fashion. The dry weight-based chlorinated organic concentrations in mollusks generally exceed those in nearby sediments by an order of magnitude. PAHs are found at similar concentrations in sediments and mollusks. Highest concentrations of PCBs and DDT in mollusks are in the ranges of 1000 to 4000 ng/g (dry) and 400 to 1000 ng/g (dry), respectively. The highest PAH concentrations in sediments are in the 10,000 to 50,000 ng/g (dry) range. While higher concentrations of contaminants can be found by sampling localized hot spots, the NST data represent the distribution of concentrations over general areas of the coastal United States.

  12. New Isotopic Constraints on the Sources of Methane at Sites of Active Continental Serpentinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. T.; Gruen, D.; Morrill, P. L.; Rietze, A.; Nealson, K. H.; Kubo, M. D.; Cardace, D.; Schrenk, M. O.; Hoehler, T. M.; McCollom, T. M.; Etiope, G.; Hosgormez, H.; Schoell, M.; Ono, S.

    2014-12-01

    At continental sites of serpentinization, high concentrations of reduced gases (e.g., H2, CH4) are frequently found in association with highly-alkaline groundwater. Identification of the process(es) responsible for the generation of methane—as well as the source(s) of C & H—in these environments has been challenging. The difficulty is due to both the wide range of processes (microbial, thermal, abiotic) that could be involved, and the limited number of parameters that are accessible to currently-available analytical technologies (e.g., δ13C, δD). The recent development of a new technique based on tunable infrared laser spectroscopy [1] has enabled the fully-resolved quantification of four isotopologues of methane: 12CH4, 13CH4, 12CH3D, and 13CH3D, a doubly-substituted ("clumped") isotopologue. We used this technique to measure 13CH3D in gases sampled from continental sites of serpentinization, in order to provide independent constraints on C-H bond-forming processes involved in the generation of the methane found in these systems. Our study sites are hosted in ultramafic units that are presently undergoing serpentinization. These include The Cedars peridotite body (Calif., USA) [2], the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (Calif., USA) [3], and the Chimaera seep (Tekirova Ophiolite, Turkey) [4]. Preliminary measurements indicate that Δ13CH3D (the deviation of the abundance of 13CH3D from the stochastic distribution) in methane sampled from these sites spans nearly the entire range of thermodynamically-predicted values, from >+5‰ (13CH3D-based apparent equilibrium temperature < 45 °C) to ~0‰ (Tapparent → ∞). The new 13CH3D data is complemented by conventional geochemical analyses (e.g., dissolved ions/organics, δ13C, δD) on samples collected during the same field campaigns. Our study demonstrates that the measurement of 13CH3D provides a new dimension of isotopic constraints for unraveling the complex processes controlling the distribution

  13. Synergic Effect of Active Sites in Zinc-Modified ZSM-5 Zeolites as Revealed by High-Field Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guodong; Wang, Qiang; Xu, Jun; Trébosc, Julien; Lafon, Olivier; Wang, Chao; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Deng, Feng

    2016-12-19

    Understanding the nature of active sites in metal-supported catalysts is of great importance towards establishing their structure-property relationships. The outstanding catalytic performance of metal-supported catalysts is frequently ascribed to the synergic effect of different active sites, which is however not well spectroscopically characterized. Herein, we report the direct detection of surface Zn species and (1) H-(67) Zn internuclear interaction between Zn(2+) ions and Brønsted acid sites on Zn-modified ZSM-5 zeolites by high-field solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The observed promotion of C-H bond activation of methane is rationalized by the enhanced Brønsted acidity generated by synergic effects arising from the spatial proximity/interaction between Zn(2+) ions and Brønsted acidic protons. The concentration of synergic active sites is determined by (1) H-(67) Zn double-resonance solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

  14. Contraceptive steroid concentrations in women with early active schistosomiasis: lack of effect of antischistosomal drugs.

    PubMed

    el-Raghy, I; Back, D J; Osman, F; Orme, M L; Fathalla, M

    1986-04-01

    Plasma concentrations of the oral contraceptive steroids (OCS) ethinyloestradiol (EE2) and levonorgestrel (LNG) have been determined in women with early active schistosomiasis and compared to those obtained in healthy volunteers. Steroid concentrations following a single dose of Ovral (500 micrograms LNG, 50 micrograms EE2) or during a multiple dose regimen were unaffected by the disease. There was no significant effect of the antischistosomal drugs praziquantel (40 mg X kg-1) or metrifonate (10 mg X kg-1 X 3 at 2-week intervals) on plasma steroid concentrations. In regular users of OCS, significantly higher concentrations of LNG were observed than in women who received only a single dose. We conclude that there is no pharmacokinetic reason for withholding OCS from patients with early active schistosomiasis who are also receiving either praziquantel or metrifonate.

  15. Number and locations of agonist binding sites required to activate homomeric Cys-loop receptors.

    PubMed

    Rayes, Diego; De Rosa, María José; Sine, Steven M; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2009-05-06

    Homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors contain five identical agonist binding sites, each formed at a subunit interface. To determine the number and locations of binding sites required to generate a stable active state, we constructed a receptor subunit with a mutation that disables the agonist binding site and a reporter mutation that alters unitary conductance and coexpressed mutant and nonmutant subunits. Although receptors with a range of different subunit compositions are produced, patch-clamp recordings reveal that the amplitude of each single-channel opening event reports the number and, for certain subunit combinations, the locations of subunits with intact binding sites. We find that receptors with three binding sites at nonconsecutive subunit interfaces exhibit maximal mean channel open time, receptors with binding sites at three consecutive or two nonconsecutive interfaces exhibit intermediate open time, and receptors with binding sites at two consecutive or one interface exhibit brief open time. Macroscopic recordings after rapid application of agonist reveal that channel activation slows and the extent of desensitization decreases as the number of binding sites per receptor decreases. The overall results provide a framework for defining mechanisms of activation and drug modulation for homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors.

  16. Concentration of mercury species in relationship to other site-specific factors in the surface waters of northern Wisconsin lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Watras, C.J.; Morrison, K.A.; Host, J.S.

    1995-05-01

    To investigate relationships between mercury speciation and site-specific factors in temperate freshwaters, we measured the concentration of seven Hg species along with 18 environmental variables in the surface waters of 23 northern Wisconsin lakes during spring and fall. The lakes spanned relatively wide gradients in Hg(0.15-4.8 ng liter {sup -1}) and methylmercury (MeHg: 0.04-2.2 ng liter{sup -1}). Over the range of measured variables, Hg and MeHg were most strongly correlated with each other (r{sup 2} = 0.83-0.88) and with dissolved organic C (DOC) (r{sup 2} = 0.64-0.92). Multiple regression models containing DOC and a (DOC x pH) interaction term accounted for 85-90% of the variability in Hg and MeHg between lakes. Observed differences between lakes reflected internal cycling processes and external transport pathways. Internally, high DOC and low pH favored Hg methylation and retention over Hg evasion across the air-water interface. Externally, watershed mapping suggested that the cotransport of DOC, Hg, and MeHg from riparian wetland was also a potentially important process. Observed seasonal differences indicated a 30% increase in MeHg across lakes during summer due to internal or external processes. The effects of DOC, seston-water partition coefficients tended to decrease, indicating disproportionately more Hg in the dissovled phase. These observations are consistent with previous data on bioaccumulation factors for zooplankton and fish. 43 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. An indole-containing dauer pheromone component with unusual dauer inhibitory activity at higher concentrations.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Rebecca A; Ragains, Justin R; Clardy, Jon

    2009-07-16

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, the dauer pheromone, which consists of a number of derivatives of the 3,6-dideoxysugar ascarylose, is the primary cue for entry into the stress-resistant, "nonaging" dauer larval stage. Here, using activity-guided fractionation and NMR-based structure elucidation, a structurally novel, indole-3-carboxyl-modified ascaroside is identified that promotes dauer formation at low nanomolar concentrations but inhibits dauer formation at higher concentrations.

  18. Blood selenium concentrations and enzyme activities related to glutathione metabolism in wild emperor geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian; Hoffman, David J.; Schmutz, Joel A.

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, we collected blood samples from 63 emperor geese (Chen canagica) on their breeding grounds on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) in western Alaska, USA. We studied the relationship between selenium concentrations in whole blood and the activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in plasma. Experimental studies have shown that plasma activities of these enzymes are useful biomarkers of selenium-induced oxidative stress, but little information is available on their relationship to selenium in the blood of wild birds. Adult female emperor geese incubating their eggs in mid-June had a higher mean concentration of selenium in their blood and a greater activity of glutathione peroxidase in their plasma than adult geese or goslings that were sampled during the adult flight feathermolting period in late July and early August. Glutathione peroxidase activity was positively correlated with the concentration of selenium in the blood of emperor geese, and the rate of increase relative to selenium was greater in goslings than in adults. The activity of glutathione reductase was greatest in the plasma of goslings and was greater in molting adults than incubating females but was not significantly correlated with selenium in the blood of adults or goslings. Incubating female emperor geese had high selenium concentrations in their blood, accompanied by increased glutathione peroxidase activity consistent with early oxidative stress. These findings indicate that further study of the effects of selenium exposure, particularly on reproductive success, is warranted in this species.

  19. Inhibitory effect of high concentrations of ferric ions on the activity of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Yoshishige; Inoue, Chihiro; Suto, Koichi; Chida, Tadashi

    2003-01-01

    The influence of high concentrations of ferric ions on the biochemical activity of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was studied using intact cells. The specific oxidation rate of ferrous ions decreased with increasing ferric ion concentration. Lineweaver-Burk plots revealed typical competitive inhibition kinetics, because the slopes varied with the ferric ion concentration. A linear relationship between the slope and the square of the ferric ion concentration revealed that the iron-oxidizing enzyme system of A. ferrooxidans was competitively inhibited by about two molecules of ferric ion. The kinetic equation based on this inhibition model agreed with the experimental observation at a high ferric ion concentration where the bacterium is usually exposed in bioleaching and biooxidation plants.

  20. Increased concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Alpine streams during annual snowmelt: investigating effects of sampling method, site characteristics, and meteorology.

    PubMed

    Shahpoury, Pourya; Hageman, Kimberly J; Matthaei, Christoph D; Alumbaugh, Robert E; Cook, Michelle E

    2014-10-07

    Silicone passive samplers and macroinvertebrates were used to measure time-integrated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in alpine streams during annual snowmelt. The three sampling sites were located near a main highway in Arthur's Pass National Park in the Southern Alps of New Zealand. A similar set of PAH congeners, composed of 2-4 rings, were found in silicone passive samplers and macroinvertebrates. The background PAH concentrations were similar at all sites, implying that proximity to the highway did not affect concentrations. In passive samplers, an increase of PAH concentrations by up to seven times was observed during snowmelt. In macroinvertebrates, the concentration changes were moderate; however, macroinvertebrate sampling did not occur during the main pulse observed in the passive samplers. The extent of vegetation in the catchment appeared to affect the concentration patterns seen at the different stream sites. A strong correlation was found between PAH concentrations in passive samplers and the amount of rainfall in the study area, indicating that the washout of contaminants from snowpack by rainfall was an important process.

  1. Intramuscular pressure and torque during isometric, concentric and eccentric muscular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Styf, J.; Ballard, R.; Aratow, M.; Crenshaw, A.; Watenpaugh, D.; Hargens, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    Intramuscular pressures, electromyography (EMG) and torque generation during isometric, concentric and eccentric maximal isokinetic muscle activity were recorded in 10 healthy volunteers. Pressure and EMG activity were continuously and simultaneously measured side by side in the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles. Ankle joint torque and position were monitored continuously by an isokinetic dynamometer during plantar flexion and dorsiflexion of the foot. The increased force generation during eccentric muscular activity, compared with other muscular activity, was not accompanied by higher intramuscular pressure. Thus, this study demonstrated that eccentric muscular activity generated higher torque values for each increment of intramuscular pressure. Intramuscular pressures during antagonistic co-activation were significantly higher in the tibilis anterior muscle (42-46% of maximal agonistic activity) compared with the soleus muscle (12-29% of maximal agonistic activity) and was largely due to active recruitment of muscle fibers. In summary, eccentric muscular activity creates higher torque values with no additional increase of the intramuscular pressure compared with concentric and isometric muscular activity.

  2. Determination of thorium concentrations and activity ratios in silicate rocks by alpha spectrometry.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, R N; Marques, L S; Nicolai, S H A; Ribeiro, F B

    2004-01-01

    A detailed radiochemical procedure for alpha spectrometry measurements of thorium concentrations and of 230Th/232Th activity ratios in silicates is presented. The Th behaviour, during each step of the chemical process, was investigated by using a 234Th tracer, which is a gamma-ray emitter. The described chemical processing provides relatively high thorium yields, which varied between 56% and 88%, in the analysis of GB-1 (granite) and BB-1 (basalt) Brazilian geological standards. Also, the application of the established radiochemical method allowed a determination of both Th concentrations and activity ratios with high reproducibility, on the order of 2%. The estimation of the concentration result accuracy is also about 2%, which was calculated by using published data obtained from neutron activation analysis as reference values.

  3. Comparison of Lower Limb Muscle Activity during Eccentric and Concentric Exercises in Runners with Achilles Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jaeho

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to identify changes in muscle activation by comparing muscle activities of the affected side (AS) and non-affected side (NAS) during eccentric and concentric exercises in runners with unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. [Subjects] The study included 18 participants consisting of men and women with chronic Achilles tendinopathy in a single leg who had more than 1 year of running experience. [Methods] All subjects performed concentric and eccentric exercise with the Achilles tendon moving from full plantar flexion to full dorsiflexion for 8 seconds, and electromyography data was obtained. [Results] All muscles examined showed a significant increase in %maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) with concentric exercise compared with eccentric exercise. Compared with the NAS, the AS showed significant increases in %MVC of the rectus femoris, tibialis anterior, and lateral gastrocnemius. All interaction effects of exercise methods and injuries showed statistically significant changes. [Conclusion] Runners with Achilles tendinopathy show increases in medial gastrocnemius activity when performing eccentric exercise. PMID:25276014

  4. Sedimentology models from activity concentration measurements: application to the "Bay of Cadiz" Natural Park (SW Spain).

    PubMed

    Ligero, R A; Vidal, J; Meléndez, M J; Hamani, M; Casas-Ruiz, M

    2009-03-01

    A previous study on seabed sediments of the Bay of Cadiz (SW of Spain) enabled us to identify several relations between sedimentological variables and activity concentrations of environmental radionuclides such as (137)Cs, (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K. In this paper the study has been extended to a large neighbouring inter-tidal area in order to establish if the above mentioned models can be generalized. As a result we have determined that the measured activity concentrations are closely to the values predicted by the theoretical models (correlation coefficient range=0.85-0.93). Furthermore, the proposal model for granulometric facies as a function of activity concentrations of the abovementioned radionuclides provides for the sediments distribution a representation which agrees with the values of the tidal energy distribution obtained using numeric models calibrated with experimental data from current meters and water level recorders.

  5. Vertical distribution of (137)Cs activity concentration in marine sediments at Amvrakikos Gulf, western of Greece.

    PubMed

    Tsabaris, C; Patiris, D L; Fillis-Tsirakis, E; Kapsimalis, V; Pilakouta, M; Pappa, F K; Vlastou, R

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present work is the study of (137)Cs migration in sediment column taking into account the sedimentation rate in the Amvrakikos Gulf, at the western part of Greece. Marine core sediments were collected and the measurements were performed using the high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry method. The vertical distribution of (137)Cs activity concentration, as part of anthropogenic marine radioactivity, provided averaged sedimentation rate by identifying the depths of activity concentrations due to the Chernobyl accident and the nuclear tests signals. Furthermore, (137)Cs measurements were reproduced using the proposed one-dimensional diffusion-advection model which provides mainly as an output, the sedimentation rate and the average diffusivity of (137)Cs in the sediment column. The proposed model estimates the temporal variation of (137)Cs activity concentration from 1987 (one year after the Chernobyl accident) till today (2014).

  6. PCB concentrations and activity of sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus vary by sex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Binder, Thomas R.; Rediske, Richard R.; O'Keefe, James P.

    2013-01-01

    We determined the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations of 40 male and 40 female adult sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus captured in the Cheboygan River, a tributary to Lake Huron, during May 2011. In addition, we performed a laboratory experiment using passive integrated transponder tags to determine whether male adult sea lampreys were more active than female adult sea lampreys. Sex had a significant effect on PCB concentration, and PCB concentration at a given level of sea lamprey condition was approximately 25 % greater in males than in females. Adjusting for the difference in condition between the sexes, males averaged a 17 % greater PCB concentration compared with females. Results from the laboratory experiment indicated that males were significantly more active than females. The observed sex difference in PCB concentrations was not due to female sea lampreys releasing eggs at spawning because the sea lamprey is semelparous, and we caught the sea lampreys before spawning. Rather, we attributed the sex difference in PCB concentrations to a greater rate of energy expenditure in males compared with females. We proposed that this greater rate of energy expenditure was likely due to greater activity. Our laboratory experiment results supported this hypothesis. A greater resting metabolic rate may also have contributed to a greater rate of energy expenditure. Our findings should eventually be applicable toward improving control of sea lamprey, a pest responsible for considerable damage to fisheries in lakes where it is not native.

  7. Molecular dynamics explorations of active site structure in designed and evolved enzymes.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Sílvia; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Noey, Elizabeth L; Houk, K N

    2015-04-21

    This Account describes the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reveal how mutations alter the structure and organization of enzyme active sites. As proposed by Pauling about 70 years ago and elaborated by many others since then, biocatalysis is efficient when functional groups in the active site of an enzyme are in optimal positions for transition state stabilization. Changes in mechanism and covalent interactions are often critical parts of enzyme catalysis. We describe our explorations of the dynamical preorganization of active sites using MD, studying the fluctuations between active and inactive conformations normally concealed to static crystallography. MD shows how the various arrangements of active site residues influence the free energy of the transition state and relates the populations of the catalytic conformational ensemble to the enzyme activity. This Account is organized around three case studies from our laboratory. We first describe the importance of dynamics in evaluating a series of computationally designed and experimentally evolved enzymes for the Kemp elimination, a popular subject in the enzyme design field. We find that the dynamics of the active site is influenced not only by the original sequence design and subsequent mutations but also by the nature of the ligand present in the active site. In the second example, we show how microsecond MD has been used to uncover the role of remote mutations in the active site dynamics and catalysis of a transesterase, LovD. This enzyme was evolved by Tang at UCLA and Codexis, Inc., and is a useful commercial catalyst for the production of the drug simvastatin. X-ray analysis of inactive and active mutants did not reveal differences in the active sites, but relatively long time scale MD in solution showed that the active site of the wild-type enzyme preorganizes only upon binding of the acyl carrier protein (ACP) that delivers the natural acyl group to the active site. In the absence of bound ACP

  8. Ligand-binding specificity and promiscuity of the main lignocellulolytic enzyme families as revealed by active-site architecture analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Li; Liu, Shijia; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Lushan

    2016-01-01

    Biomass can be converted into sugars by a series of lignocellulolytic enzymes, which belong to the glycoside hydrolase (GH) families summarized in CAZy databases. Here, using a structural bioinformatics method, we analyzed the active site architecture of the main lignocellulolytic enzyme families. The aromatic amino acids Trp/Tyr and polar amino acids Glu/Asp/Asn/Gln/Arg occurred at higher frequencies in the active site architecture than in the whole enzyme structure. And the number of potential subsites was significantly different among different families. In the cellulase and xylanase families, the conserved amino acids in the active site architecture were mostly found at the −2 to +1 subsites, while in β-glucosidase they were mainly concentrated at the −1 subsite. Families with more conserved binding amino acid residues displayed strong selectivity for their ligands, while those with fewer conserved binding amino acid residues often exhibited promiscuity when recognizing ligands. Enzymes with different activities also tended to bind different hydroxyl oxygen atoms on the ligand. These results may help us to better understand the common and unique structural bases of enzyme-ligand recognition from different families and provide a theoretical basis for the functional evolution and rational design of major lignocellulolytic enzymes. PMID:27009476

  9. Correlated structural kinetics and retarded solvent dynamics at the metalloprotease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Moran; Born, Benjamin; Heyden, Matthias; Tworowski, Dmitry; Fields, Gregg B.; Sagi, Irit; Havenith, Martina

    2011-09-18

    Solvent dynamics can play a major role in enzyme activity, but obtaining an accurate, quantitative picture of solvent activity during catalysis is quite challenging. Here, we combine terahertz spectroscopy and X-ray absorption analyses to measure changes in the coupled water-protein motions during peptide hydrolysis by a zinc-dependent human metalloprotease. These changes were tightly correlated with rearrangements at the active site during the formation of productive enzyme-substrate intermediates and were different from those in an enzyme–inhibitor complex. Molecular dynamics simulations showed a steep gradient of fast-to-slow coupled protein-water motions around the protein, active site and substrate. Our results show that water retardation occurs before formation of the functional Michaelis complex. We propose that the observed gradient of coupled protein-water motions may assist enzyme-substrate interactions through water-polarizing mechanisms that are remotely mediated by the catalytic metal ion and the enzyme active site.

  10. Influence of microwave irradiation on boron concentrate activation with an emphasis on surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Qiaoyi; Liu, Yajing; Xue, Xiangxin; Duan, Peining

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we employed microwave irradiation for activating boron concentrate, an abundant but low-grade boron mineral resource in China. The boron concentrate was pretreated by microwave irradiation based on TG-DTG-DSC analysis, and the influence of each parameter on processing efficiency was characterized using chemical analysis, XRD, SEM, FTIR and particle distribution analysis. Subsequently, the surface properties of boron concentrate and the mechanism of microwave irradiation was analyzed. Our results indicate that microwave irradiation decreased the processing temperature and shortened the roasting time by accelerating dehydroxylation and oxidation reactions in the boron concentrate, reducing the particle diameter and damaging the microstructure of the minerals, and it increased the B2O3 activity of boron from 64.68% to 86.73%, greater than the optimal conventional treatment. Compared with the simple thermal field, microwave roasting obviously increased ability of the boron concentrate to absorb OH- in the leachant and promoted boron leaching by expanding the contact area of the mineral exposed to leachant, boosting the amount of Mg2+ and Fe3+ on mineral surfaces, and increasing the hydrophilicity of the boron concentrate respectively. It enhanced the γSVLW and γSV- of boron concentrate from 29.15 mJ/m2 and 5.07 mJ/m2 to 37.07 mJ/m2 and 12.41 mJ/m2.

  11. Two interacting binding sites for quinacrine derivatives in the active site of trypanothione reductase – a template for drug design

    PubMed Central

    Saravanamuthu, Ahilan; Vickers, Tim J.; Bond, Charles S.; Peterson, Mark R.; Hunter, William N.; Fairlamb, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Trypanothione reductase is a key enzyme in the trypanothione-based redox metabolism of pathogenic trypanosomes. Since this system is absent in humans, being replaced with glutathione and glutathione reductase, it offers a target for selective inhibition. The rational design of potent inhibitors requires accurate structures of enzyme-inhibitor complexes, but this is lacking for trypanothione reductase. We therefore used quinacrine mustard, an alkylating derivative of the competitive inhibitor quinacrine, to probe the active site of this dimeric flavoprotein. Quinacrine mustard irreversibly inactivates Trypanosoma cruzi trypanothione reductase, but not human glutathione reductase, in a time-dependent manner with a stoichiometry of two inhibitors bound per monomer. The rate of inactivation is dependent upon the oxidation state of trypanothione reductase, with the NADPH-reduced form being inactivated significantly faster than the oxidised form. Inactivation is slowed by clomipramine and a melarsen oxide-trypanothione adduct (both are competitive inhibitors) but accelerated by quinacrine. The structure of the trypanothione reductase-quinacrine mustard adduct was determined to 2.7 Å, revealing two molecules of inhibitor bound in the trypanothione-binding site. The acridine moieties interact with each other through π-stacking effects, and one acridine interacts in a similar fashion with a tryptophan residue. These interactions provide a molecular explanation for the differing effects of clomipramine and quinacrine on inactivation by quinacrine mustard. Synergism with quinacrine occurs as a result of these planar acridines being able to stack together in the active site cleft, thereby gaining an increased number of binding interactions, whereas antagonism occurs with non-planar molecules, such as clomipramine, where stacking is not possible. PMID:15102853

  12. The three Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85 isoforms have unique substrates and activities determined by non-active site regions.

    PubMed

    Backus, Keriann M; Dolan, Michael A; Barry, Conor S; Joe, Maju; McPhie, Peter; Boshoff, Helena I M; Lowary, Todd L; Davis, Benjamin G; Barry, Clifton E

    2014-09-05

    The three isoforms of antigen 85 (A, B, and C) are the most abundant secreted mycobacterial proteins and catalyze transesterification reactions that synthesize mycolated arabinogalactan, trehalose monomycolate (TMM), and trehalose dimycolate (TDM), important constituents of the outermost layer of the cellular envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These three enzymes are nearly identical at the active site and have therefore been postulated to exist to evade host immunity. Distal to the active site is a second putative carbohydrate-binding site of lower homology. Mutagenesis of the three isoforms at this second site affected both substrate selectivity and overall catalytic activity in vitro. Using synthetic and natural substrates, we show that these three enzymes exhibit unique selectivity; antigen 85A more efficiently mycolates TMM to form TDM, whereas C (and to a lesser extent B) has a higher rate of activity using free trehalose to form TMM. This difference in substrate selectivity extends to the hexasaccharide fragment of cell wall arabinan. Mutation of secondary site residues from the most active isoform (C) into those present in A or B partially interconverts this substrate selectivity. These experiments in combination with molecular dynamics simulations reveal that differences in the N-terminal helix α9, the adjacent Pro(216)-Phe(228) loop, and helix α5 are the likely cause of changes in activity and substrate selectivity. These differences explain the existence of three isoforms and will allow for future work in developing inhibitors.

  13. Regression models for estimating salinity and selenium concentrations at selected sites in the Upper Colorado River Basin, Colorado, 2009-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Linard, Joshua I.; Schaffrath, Keelin R.

    2014-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of salinity and selenium in the tributaries and main-stem reaches of the Colorado River are a water-quality concern and have been the focus of remediation efforts for many years. Land-management practices with the objective of limiting the amount of salt and selenium that reaches the stream have focused on improving the methods by which irrigation water is conveyed and distributed. Federal land managers implement improvements in accordance with the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Act of 1974, which directs Federal land managers to enhance and protect the quality of water available in the Colorado River. In an effort to assist in evaluating and mitigating the detrimental effects of salinity and selenium, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, the Colorado River Water Resources District, and the Bureau of Land Management, analyzed salinity and selenium data collected at sites to develop regression models. The study area and sites are on the Colorado River or in one of three small basins in Western Colorado: the White River Basin, the Lower Gunnison River Basin, and the Dolores River Basin. By using data collected from water years 2009 through 2011, regression models able to estimate concentrations were developed for salinity at six sites and selenium at six sites. At a minimum, data from discrete measurement of salinity or selenium concentration, streamflow, and specific conductance at each of the sites were needed for model development. Comparison of the Adjusted R2 and standard error statistics of the two salinity models developed at each site indicated the models using specific conductance as the explanatory variable performed better than those using streamflow. The addition of multiple explanatory variables improved the ability to estimate selenium concentration at several sites compared with use of solely streamflow or specific conductance. The error associated with the log-transformed salinity

  14. Fragment-based identification of determinants of conformational and spectroscopic change at the ricin active site

    SciTech Connect

    Carra,J.; McHugh, C.; Mulligan, S.; Machiesky, L.; Soares, A.; Millard, C.

    2007-01-01

    We found that amide ligands can bind weakly but specifically to the ricin active site, producing significant shifts in positions of the critical active site residues Arg180 and Tyr80. These results indicate that fragment-based drug discovery methods are capable of identifying minimal bonding determinants of active-site side-chain rearrangements and the mechanistic origins of spectroscopic shifts. Our results suggest that tryptophan fluorescence provides a sensitive probe for the geometric relationship of arginine-tryptophan pairs, which often have significant roles in protein function. Using the unusual characteristics of the RTA system, we measured the still controversial thermodynamic changes of site-specific urea binding to a protein, results that are relevant to understanding the physical mechanisms of protein denaturation.

  15. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  16. All the catalytic active sites of MoS2 for hydrogen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Du; Qiao, Qiao; Yu, Yifei; Peterson, David; Zafar, Abdullah; Kumar, Raj; Curtarolo, Stefano; Hunte, Frank; Shannon, Steve; Zhu, Yimei; Yang, Weitao; Cao, Linyou

    2016-11-29

    MoS2 presents a promising low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), but the understanding about its active sites has remained limited. Here we present an unambiguous study of the catalytic activities of all possible reaction sites of MoS2, including edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries. We demonstrate that, in addition to the well-known catalytically active edge sites, sulfur vacancies provide another major active site for the HER, while the catalytic activity of grain boundaries is much weaker. Here, the intrinsic turnover frequencies (Tafel slopes) of the edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries are estimated to be 7.5 s–1 (65–75 mV/dec), 3.2 s–1 (65–85 mV/dec), and 0.1 s–1 (120–160 mV/dec), respectively. We also demonstrate that the catalytic activity of sulfur vacancies strongly depends on the density of the vacancies and the local crystalline structure in proximity to the vacancies. Unlike edge sites, whose catalytic activity linearly depends on the length, sulfur vacancies show optimal catalytic activities when the vacancy density is in the range of 7–10%, and the number of sulfur vacancies in high crystalline quality MoS2 is higher than that in low crystalline quality MoS2, which may be related with the proximity of different local crystalline structures to the vacancies.

  17. Environmental Controls on the Activity of Aquifer Microbial Communities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Konopka, Allan; Plymale, Andrew E.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Lin, Xueju; McKinley, James P.

    2013-11-06

    Aquifer microbes in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA are periodically exposed to U(VI) concentrations that can range up to 10 μM in small sediment fractures. Assays of 35 H-leucine incorporation indicated that both sediment-associated and planktonic microbes were metabolically active, and that organic C was growth-limiting in the sediments. Although bacteria suspended in native groundwater retained high activity when exposed to 100 μM U(VI), they were inhibited by U(VI) < 1 μM in synthetic groundwater that lacked added bicarbonate. Chemical speciation modeling suggested that positively-charged species and particularly (UO2)3(OH)5+ rose in concentration as more U(VI) was added to synthetic groundwater, but that carbonate complexes dominated U(VI) speciation in natural groundwater. U toxicity was relieved when increasing amounts of bicarbonate were added to synthetic groundwater containing 4.5 μM U(VI). Pertechnetate, an oxyanion that is another contaminant of concern at the Hanford Site, was not toxic to groundwater microbes at concentrations up to 125 μM.

  18. Comparability of suspended-sediment concentration and total suspended-solids data for two sites on the L'Anguille River, Arkansas, 2001 to 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, Joel M.; Evans, Dennis A.; Green, W. Reed

    2005-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration and total suspended solids data collected with automatic pumping samplers at the L'Anguille River near Colt and the L'Anguille River at Palestine, Arkansas, August 2001 to October 2003 were compared using ordinary least squares regression analyses to determine the relation between the two datasets for each of the two sites. The purpose of this report is to describe the suspended-sediment concentration and total suspended-solids data and examine the comparability of the two datasets for each site. Suspended-sediment concentration and total suspended solids data for the L'Anguille River varied spatially and temporally from August 2001 to October 2003. The site at the L'Anguille River at Palestine represents a larger portion of the L'Anguille River Basin than the site near Colt, and generally had higher median suspended-sediment concentration and total suspended solids and greater ranges in values. The differences between suspended-sediment concentration and total suspended solids data for the L'Anguille River near Colt appeared inversely related to streamflow and not related to time. The relation between suspended-sediment concentration and total suspended solids at the L'Anguille River at Palestine was more variable than at Colt and did not appear to have a relation with flow or time. The relation between suspended-sediment concentration and total suspended solids for the L'Anguille River near Colt shows that total suspended solids increased proportionally as suspended-sediment concentration increased. However, the relation between suspended-sediment concentration and total suspended solids for the L'Anguille River at Palestine showed total suspended solids increased less proportionally as suspended-sediment concentration increased compared to the L'Anguille River near Colt. Differences between the two analytical methods may partially explain differences between the suspended-sediment concentration and total suspended solids data at

  19. Effects of Active Recovery on Lactate Concentration, Heart Rate and RPE in Climbing

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Nick; Bird, Ellis L.; Coleman, Ian; Hodgson, Chris

    2006-01-01

    The performance advantage of active rather than passive recovery during subsequent trials for repeated high intensity short-term exercise is well documented. Research findings suggest that shorter periods of active recovery, than traditionally employed, can be prescribed and still retain performance benefits over passive recoveries in successive exercise trials. The aim of this study was to examine the benefits of a short duration active recovery for repeat climbing trials. Ten recreational climbers volunteered for the study. In this randomly assigned crossover study each climber completed five two-minute climbing trails before a two minute active or passive recovery. This was followed by a one and a half minute passive refocusing period for all climbers before the subsequent climbing trial. Heart rate was monitored continuously, RPE immediately post climbing and fingertip capillary blood samples collected during each refocusing phase. There was a non-significant difference between active and passive recoveries for heart rate during climbing. After the active phase climbers had higher heart rates than when following the passive recovery protocol, however, by the end of the refocusing phase the active recovery protocol led to lower heart rates than for the entirely passive recovery. There was a significant difference between active and passive recovery conditions in lactate concentration (F(1,9) = 18.79, p = 0.002) and RPE (F(1,9) = 6.51, p = 0.031). Lactate concentration and RPE were lower across all five climbing trials for the active recovery protocol. After active recovery climbers started the next trial with a lower arterial lactate concentration than for a passive recovery and indicated lower RPE scores at the end of each climb. The refocusing period following active recovery allowed climbers heart rates to return to a lower level at the start of the next climb than for the passive recovery condition. Key Points The three and half minute recovery strategy

  20. Planktonic food web structure at a coastal time-series site: II. Spatiotemporal variability of microbial trophic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, Paige E.; Campbell, Victoria; Gellene, Alyssa G.; Hu, Sarah K.; Caron, David A.

    2017-03-01

    The grazing activities of phagotrophic protists on various microbial assemblages play key roles in determining the amount of carbon available for higher trophic levels and for export out of the photic zone. However, comparisons of the proportion of carbon consumed from the phytoplankton (cyanobacteria+photosynthetic eukaryotes) and heterotrophic bacteria (bacteria+archaea, excluding cyanobacteria) are rare. In this study, microbial community composition, phytoplankton growth and mortality rates (total chlorophyll a, Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus, and photosynthetic picoeukaryotes), and bacterial mortality rates were measured seasonally from 2012 to 2014 in the surface waters of three environmentally distinct sites in the San Pedro Channel, off the coast of southern CA, USA. Higher nutrient concentrations at the nearshore site supported community standing stocks that were 1.3-4.5x those found offshore, yet average growth and grazing rates of the phytoplankton and bacterial assemblages were generally similar between sites and across seasons. Thus, the amount of carbon consumed by the grazer assemblage was largely dictated by prey standing stocks. Heterotrophic bacteria constituted an important source of carbon for microbial consumers, particularly at the two offshore sites where bacterial carbon consumed was roughly equivalent to the amount of phytoplankton carbon consumed. Carbon removal by grazers at the nearshore station was predominantly from the diatoms, which were the primary component of the photosynthetic community at that site. This study highlights the significant contribution of protistan-bacterial trophic interactions to planktonic food webs and provides unique community composition and turnover data to inform biogeochemical models.

  1. Probing cathepsin K activity with a selective substrate spanning its active site.

    PubMed Central

    Lecaille, Fabien; Weidauer, Enrico; Juliano, Maria A; Brömme, Dieter; Lalmanach, Gilles

    2003-01-01

    The limited availability of highly selective cathepsin substrates seriously impairs studies designed to monitor individual cathepsin activities in biological samples. Among mammalian cysteine proteases, cathepsin K has a unique preference for a proline residue at P2, the primary determinant of its substrate specificity. Interestingly, congopain from Trypanosoma congolense also accommodates a proline residue in its S2 subsite. Analysis of a congopain model showed that amino acids forming its S2 subsite are identical with those of cathepsin K, except Leu67 which is replaced by a tyrosine residue in cathepsin K. Furthermore, amino acid residues of the congopain S2' binding pocket, which accepts a proline residue, are strictly identical with those of cathepsin K. Abz-HPGGPQ-EDN2ph [where Abz represents o-aminobenzoic acid and EDN2ph (=EDDnp) represents N -(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-ethylenediamine], a substrate initially developed for trypanosomal enzymes, was efficiently cleaved at the Gly-Gly bond by cathepsin K (kcat/ K(m)=426000 M(-1) x s(-1)). On the other hand, Abz-HPGGPQ-EDN2ph was resistant to hydrolysis by cathepsins B, F, H, L, S and V (20 nM enzyme concentration) and the Y67L (Tyr67-->Leu)/L205A cathepsin K mutant (20 nM), but still acted as a competitive inhibitor. Taken together, the selectivity of Abz-HPGGPQ-EDN2ph to cathepsin K primarily depends on the S2 and S2' subsite specificities of cathepsin K and the ionization state of histidine at P3. Whereas Abz-HPGGPQ-EDN2ph was hydrolysed by wild-type mouse fibroblast lysates, its hydrolysis was completely abolished in the cathepsin K-deficient samples, indicating that Abz-HPGGPQ-EDN2ph can be used to monitor selectively cathepsin K activity in physiological fluids and cell lysates. PMID:12837132

  2. The thrombin receptor extracellular domain contains sites crucial for peptide ligand-induced activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bahou, W F; Coller, B S; Potter, C L; Norton, K J; Kutok, J L; Goligorsky, M S

    1993-01-01

    A thrombin receptor (TR) demonstrating a unique activation mechanism has recently been isolated from a megakaryocytic (Dami) cell line. To further study determinants of peptide ligand-mediated activation phenomenon, we have isolated, cloned, and stably expressed the identical receptor from a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) library. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing a functional TR (CHO-TR), platelets, and HUVECs were then used to specifically characterize alpha-thrombin- and peptide ligand-induced activation responses using two different antibodies: anti-TR34-52 directed against a 20-amino acid peptide spanning the thrombin cleavage site, and anti-TR1-160 generated against the NH2-terminal 160 amino acids of the TR expressed as a chimeric protein in Escherichia coli. Activation-dependent responses to both alpha-thrombin (10 nM) and peptide ligand (20 microM) were studied using fura 2-loaded cells and microspectrofluorimetry. Whereas preincubation of CHO-TR with anti-TR34-52 abolished only alpha-thrombin-induced [Ca2+]i transients, preincubation with anti-TR1-160 abrogated both alpha-thrombin- and peptide ligand-induced responses. This latter inhibitory effect was dose dependent and similar for both agonists, with an EC50 of approximately 90 micrograms/ml. Anti-TR1-160 similarly abolished peptide ligand-induced [Ca2+]i transients in platelets and HUVECs, whereas qualitatively different responses characterized by delayed but sustained elevations in [Ca2+]i transients were evident using alpha-thrombin. Platelet aggregation to low concentrations of both ligands was nearly abolished by anti-TR1-160, although some shape change remained; anti-TR34-52 only inhibited alpha-thrombin-induced aggregation. These data establish that a critical recognition sequence for peptide ligand-mediated receptor activation is contained on the NH2-terminal portion of the receptor, upstream from the first transmembrane domain. Furthermore, alpha

  3. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  4. Active and diverse rainwater bacteria collected at an inland site in spring and summer 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Byung Cheol; Jang, Gwang Il

    2014-09-01

    Rainwater is an important natural resource and utilized for various beneficial purposes. However, information on prokaryotes in rainwater is limited. Rainwater samples were collected during three heavy rain events at a suburban site in Seoul in April, May, and July 2011. The highest bacterial abundance (BA) in rainwater was observed in April when airborne bacteria had also been abundant the day before rainwater collection. ATP content in bacterial fraction of the rainwater suggested that the rainwater bacteria were metabolically active. Bacterial community compositions (BCCs) of rainwater samples, analyzed by using 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing, differed considerably among the three rain events. Rainwater bacteria showed potentials of fast growth and drastic shift after incubation in BCCs from fresh rainwater at broad taxonomic levels and the dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) level. Presumable marine bacterial OTUs which formed a robust clade with marine bacteria Lacinutrix spp. were at high concentrations in rainwater in April, likely reflecting origin from saline environments. Most of the Flavobacteria sequences unusually high in April rainwater seemed to have marine origins. Further, spore-forming euryhaline marine Firmicutes were isolated from rainwater samples, suggesting possible dispersal of some marine bacteria via rain. A potential human pathogen and Escherichia coli-like sequences were detected in rainwater samples, calling for the need for assessment of health risks of collected rainwater.

  5. Antioxidant activities of polysaccharides obtained from Chlorella pyrenoidosa via different ethanol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Xuan; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Xiao, Zheng; Huang, Yi-Fan; Liu, Bin

    2016-10-01

    An ultrasonic-assisted extraction of Chlorella pyrenoidosa polysaccharides (CPP) was carried out using different concentrations of ethanol for precipitation, and named as CPP60, CPP70 and CPP85, respectively. The monosaccharide composition of each polysaccharide (CPP) was determined using gas chromatography (GC) and the antioxidant activity of each was investigated via the reducing power and scavenging activity of hydroxyl radicals, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals and superoxide anion radicals, respectively. All of the polysaccharides examined possessed antioxidant activity in vitro. CPP70 exhibited stronger scavenging activity against superoxide, DPPH and hydroxyl radicals, when compared with CPP60 and CPP85. This suggests that polysaccharides from C. pyrenoidosa precipitated by a final ethanol concentration of 70%, have the potential to be developed as natural antioxidants for use in food and pharmaceuticals.

  6. Detecting kinase activities from single cell lysate using concentration-enhanced mobility shift assay.

    PubMed

    Cheow, Lih Feng; Sarkar, Aniruddh; Kolitz, Sarah; Lauffenburger, Douglas; Han, Jongyoon

    2014-08-05

    Electrokinetic preconcentration coupled with mobility shift assays can give rise to very high detection sensitivities. We describe a microfluidic device that utilizes this principle to detect cellular kinase activities by simultaneously concentrating and separating substrate peptides with different phosphorylation states. This platform is capable of reliably measuring kinase activities of single adherent cells cultured in nanoliter volume microwells. We also describe a novel method utilizing spacer peptides that significantly increase separation resolution while maintaining high concentration factors in this device. Thus, multiplexed kinase measurements can be implemented with single cell sensitivity. Multiple kinase activity profiling from single cell lysate could potentially allow us to study heterogeneous activation of signaling pathways that can lead to multiple cell fates.

  7. Evaluation of Polyethylene Passive Samplers to Estimate Deep Water PCB Concentrations at the Palos Verdes Shelf Superfund Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Palos Verdes Superfund site is located in over 50 meters of water on the continental shelf and slope off the coast of southern California (USA). The site includes 27 km2 of seabed contaminated over several decades by municipal treatment plant effluent discharged via outfall ...

  8. [[superscript 3]H]-Flunitrazepam-Labeled Benzodiazepine Binding Sites in the Hippocampal Formation in Autism: A Multiple Concentration Autoradiographic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guptill, Jeffrey T.; Booker, Anne B.; Gibbs, Terrell T.; Kemper, Thomas L.; Bauman, Margaret L.; Blatt, Gene J.

    2007-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the GABAergic system in cerebellar and limbic structures is affected in autism. We extended our previous study that found reduced [[superscript 3]H] flunitrazepam-labeled benzodiazepine sites in the autistic hippocampus to determine whether this reduction was due to a decrease in binding site number (B [subscript…

  9. Synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups on the hydrolysis of cellulose over activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, Guo Shiou; Sievers, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    The chemical oxidation of activated carbon by H2 O2 and H2 SO4 is investigated, structural and chemical modifications are characterized, and the materials are used as catalysts for the hydrolysis of cellulose. Treatment with H2 O2 enlarges the pore size and imparts functional groups such as phenols, lactones, and carboxylic acids. H2 SO4 treatment targets the edges of carbon sheets primarily, and this effect is more pronounced with a higher temperature. Adsorption isotherms demonstrate that the adsorption of oligomers on functionalized carbon is dominated by van der Waals forces. The materials treated chemically are active for the hydrolysis of cellulose despite the relative weakness of most of their acid sites. It is proposed that a synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups enhances the activity by inducing a conformational change in the glucan chains if they are adsorbed at defect sites. This activates the glycosidic bonds for hydrolysis by in-plane functional groups.

  10. Denaturation studies of active-site labeled papain using electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Z A; Butterfiel, D A

    1991-01-01

    A spin-labeled p-chloromercuribenzoate (SL-PMB) and a fluorescence probe, 6-acryloyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Acrylodan), both of which bind to the single SH group located in the active site of papain, were used to investigate the interaction of papain (EC 3.4.22.2) with two protein denaturants. It was found that the active site of papain was highly stable in urea solution, but underwent a large conformational change in guanidine hydrochloride solution. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence results were in agreement and both paralleled enzymatic activity of papain with respect to both the variation in pH and denaturation. These results strongly suggest that SL-PMB and Acrylodan labels can be used to characterize the physical state of the active site of the enzyme. PMID:1657229