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Sample records for active site conformations

  1. Substrate conformational transitions in the active site of chorismate mutase: their role in the catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Cui, Q; Lipscomb, W N; Karplus, M

    2001-07-31

    Chorismate mutase acts at the first branch-point of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis and catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to prephenate. The results of molecular dynamics simulations of the substrate in solution and in the active site of chorismate mutase are reported. Two nonreactive conformers of chorismate are found to be more stable than the reactive pseudodiaxial chair conformer in solution. It is shown by QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations, which take into account the motions of the enzyme, that when these inactive conformers are bound to the active site, they are rapidly converted to the reactive chair conformer. This result suggests that one contribution of the enzyme is to bind the more prevalent nonreactive conformers and transform them into the active form in a step before the chemical reaction. The motion of the reactive chair conformer in the active site calculated by using the QM/MM potential generates transient structures that are closer to the transition state than is the stable CHAIR conformer.

  2. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  3. Protein Conformational Landscapes and Catalysis. Influence of Active Site Conformations in the Reaction Catalyzed by L-Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Świderek, Katarzyna; Tuñón, Iñaki; Martí, Sergio; Moliner, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade L-Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) has become an extremely useful marker in both clinical diagnosis and in monitoring the course of many human diseases. It has been assumed from the 80s that the full catalytic process of LDH starts with the binding of the cofactor and the substrate followed by the enclosure of the active site by a mobile loop of the protein before the reaction to take place. In this paper we show that the chemical step of the LDH catalyzed reaction can proceed within the open loop conformation, and the different reactivity of the different protein conformations would be in agreement with the broad range of rate constants measured in single molecule spectrometry studies. Starting from a recently solved X-ray diffraction structure that presented an open loop conformation in two of the four chains of the tetramer, QM/MM free energy surfaces have been obtained at different levels of theory. Depending on the level of theory used to describe the electronic structure, the free energy barrier for the transformation of pyruvate into lactate with the open conformation of the protein varies between 12.9 and 16.3 kcal/mol, after quantizing the vibrations and adding the contributions of recrossing and tunneling effects. These values are very close to the experimentally deduced one (14.2 kcal·mol−1) and ~2 kcal·mol−1 smaller than the ones obtained with the closed loop conformer. Calculation of primary KIEs and IR spectra in both protein conformations are also consistent with our hypothesis and in agreement with experimental data. Our calculations suggest that the closure of the active site is mainly required for the inverse process; the oxidation of lactate to pyruvate. According to this hypothesis H4 type LDH enzyme molecules, where it has been propose that lactate is transformed into pyruvate, should have a better ability to close the mobile loop than the M4 type LDH molecules. PMID:25705562

  4. Enzymatic Detoxication, Conformational Selection, and the Role of Molten Globule Active Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Honaker, Matthew T.; Acchione, Mauro; Zhang, Wei; Mannervik, Bengt; Atkins, William M.

    2013-01-01

    The role of conformational ensembles in enzymatic reactions remains unclear. Discussion concerning “induced fit” versus “conformational selection” has, however, ignored detoxication enzymes, which exhibit catalytic promiscuity. These enzymes dominate drug metabolism and determine drug-drug interactions. The detoxication enzyme glutathione transferase A1–1 (GSTA1–1), exploits a molten globule-like active site to achieve remarkable catalytic promiscuity wherein the substrate-free conformational ensemble is broad with barrierless transitions between states. A quantitative index of catalytic promiscuity is used to compare engineered variants of GSTA1–1 and the catalytic promiscuity correlates strongly with characteristics of the thermodynamic partition function, for the substrate-free enzymes. Access to chemically disparate transition states is encoded by the substrate-free conformational ensemble. Pre-steady state catalytic data confirm an extension of the conformational selection model, wherein different substrates select different starting conformations. The kinetic liability of the conformational breadth is minimized by a smooth landscape. We propose that “local” molten globule behavior optimizes detoxication enzymes. PMID:23649628

  5. Threshold occupancy and specific cation binding modes in the hammerhead ribozyme active site are required for active conformation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Giambaşu, George M.; Sosa, Carlos P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.; York, Darrin M.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between formation of active in-line attack conformations and monovalent (Na+) and divalent (Mg2+) metal ion binding in the hammerhead ribozyme has been explored with molecular dynamics simulations. To stabilize repulsions between negatively charged groups, different requirements of threshold occupancy of metal ions were observed in the reactant and activated precursor states both in the presence or absence of a Mg2+ in the active site. Specific bridging coordination patterns of the ions are correlated with the formation of active in-line attack conformations and can be accommodated in both cases. Furthermore, simulation results suggest that the hammerhead ribozyme folds to form an electronegative recruiting pocket that attracts high local concentrations of positive charge. The present simulations help to reconcile experiments that probe the metal ion sensitivity of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis and support the supposition that Mg2+, in addition to stabilizing active conformations, plays a specific chemical role in catalysis. PMID:19265710

  6. The histamine H1-receptor antagonist binding site. Part I: Active conformation of cyproheptadine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Drooge, Marc J.; Donné-op den Kelder, Gabriëlle M.; Timmerman, Hendrik

    1991-08-01

    The active conformation of several histamine H1-antagonists is investigated. As a template molecule we used the antagonist cyproheptadine, which consists of a piperidylene ring connected to a tricyclic system. The piperidylene moiety is shown to be flexible. The global minimum is a chair conformation but, additionally, a second chair and various boat conformations have to be considered, as their energies are less than 5 kcal/mol above the energy of the global minimum. Two semi-rigid histamine H1-antagonists, phenindamine and triprolidine, were fitted onto the various conformations of cyproheptadine in order to derive the pharmacologically active conformation of cyproheptadine. At the same time, the active conformation of both phenindamine and triprolidine was derived. It is demonstrated that, within the receptor-bound conformation of cyproheptadine, the piperidylene ring most probably exists in a boat form.

  7. Structural role of the active-site metal in the conformation of Trypanosoma brucei phosphoglycerate mutase.

    PubMed

    Mercaldi, Gustavo F; Pereira, Humberto M; Cordeiro, Artur T; Michels, Paul A M; Thiemann, Otavio H

    2012-06-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutases (PGAMs) participate in both the glycolytic and the gluconeogenic pathways in reversible isomerization of 3-phosphoglycerate and 2-phosphoglycerate. PGAMs are members of two distinct protein families: enzymes that are dependent on or independent of the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate cofactor. We determined the X-ray structure of the monomeric Trypanosoma brucei independent PGAM (TbiPGAM) in its apoenzyme form, and confirmed this observation by small angle X-ray scattering data. Comparing the TbiPGAM structure with the Leishmania mexicana independent PGAM structure, previously reported with a phosphoglycerate molecule bound to the active site, revealed the domain movement resulting from active site occupation. The structure reported here shows the interaction between Asp319 and the metal bound to the active site, and its contribution to the domain movement. Substitution of the metal-binding residue Asp319 by Ala resulted in complete loss of independent PGAM activity, and showed for the first time its involvement in the enzyme's function. As TbiPGAM is an attractive molecular target for drug development, the apoenzyme conformation described here provides opportunities for its use in structure-based drug design approaches. Database Structural data for the Trypanosoma brucei 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-independent phosphoglycerate mutase (iPGAM) has been deposited with the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) Protein Data Bank under code 3NVL.

  8. The effect of methyl-donated hydrogen bonding on active site conformations of hyaluronate lyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migues, Angela N.; Vergenz, Robert A.; Moore, Kevin B.

    2010-03-01

    Geometric evidence shows a val-A252 methyl-donated (MD) hydrogen bond (HB) in hyaluronate lyase (Streptococcus pneumoniae) interacts with nearby NH--O and OH--O HBs, distorting active-site helical structure. Results for model fragment A248-254 are based on experimental heavy atom positions with ab initio hydrogen atoms. The MDHB, with (H-O distance, donor-H-O angle) = (2.3å; 174^o), exhibits more favorable geometry than thr-A253 OH--O HB (1.8å; 170^o) to the same ala-249 C=O. Consequently, thr-253 N-H--O interaction is forced closer to lys-250 C=O than ala-249 C=O(2.6 versus 2.7å). A novel method has been developed to quantify the effects of atomic diplacements on motions of neighboring helices. A coordinate system was established to track the movement of specific residues and to ascertain the effect of such motions on active site conformations.

  9. Active site conformational changes of prostasin provide a new mechanism of protease regulation by divalent cations

    SciTech Connect

    Spraggon, Glen; Hornsby, Michael; Shipway, Aaron; Tully, David C.; Bursulaya, Badry; Danahay, Henry; Harris, Jennifer L.; Lesley, Scott A.

    2010-01-12

    Prostasin or human channel-activating protease 1 has been reported to play a critical role in the regulation of extracellular sodium ion transport via its activation of the epithelial cell sodium channel. Here, the structure of the extracellular portion of the membrane associated serine protease has been solved to high resolution in complex with a nonselective d-FFR chloromethyl ketone inhibitor, in an apo form, in a form where the apo crystal has been soaked with the covalent inhibitor camostat and in complex with the protein inhibitor aprotinin. It was also crystallized in the presence of the divalent cation Ca{sup +2}. Comparison of the structures with each other and with other members of the trypsin-like serine protease family reveals unique structural features of prostasin and a large degree of conformational variation within specificity determining loops. Of particular interest is the S1 subsite loop which opens and closes in response to basic residues or divalent ions, directly binding Ca{sup +2} cations. This induced fit active site provides a new possible mode of regulation of trypsin-like proteases adapted in particular to extracellular regions with variable ionic concentrations such as the outer membrane layer of the epithelial cell.

  10. Conformational Change in the Active Site of Streptococcal Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase Through Site-Directed Mutagenesis at Asp-115.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Yusuke; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (UGL) degrades unsaturated disaccharides generated from mammalian extracellular matrices, glycosaminoglycans, by polysaccharide lyases. Two Asp residues, Asp-115 and Asp-175 of Streptococcus agalactiae UGL (SagUGL), are completely conserved in other bacterial UGLs, one of which (Asp-175 of SagUGL) acts as a general acid and base catalyst. The other Asp (Asp-115 of SagUGL) also affects the enzyme activity, although its role in the enzyme reaction has not been well understood. Here, we show substitution of Asp-115 in SagUGL with Asn caused a conformational change in the active site. Tertiary structures of SagUGL mutants D115N and D115N/K370S with negligible enzyme activity were determined at 2.00 and 1.79 Å resolution, respectively, by X-ray crystallography. The side chain of Asn-115 is drastically shifted in both mutants owing to the interaction with several residues, including Asp-175, by formation of hydrogen bonds. This interaction between Asn-115 and Asp-175 probably prevents the mutants from triggering the enzyme reaction using Asp-175 as an acid catalyst.

  11. Fragment-based identification of determinants of conformational and spectroscopic change at the ricin active site

    SciTech Connect

    Carra,J.; McHugh, C.; Mulligan, S.; Machiesky, L.; Soares, A.; Millard, C.

    2007-01-01

    We found that amide ligands can bind weakly but specifically to the ricin active site, producing significant shifts in positions of the critical active site residues Arg180 and Tyr80. These results indicate that fragment-based drug discovery methods are capable of identifying minimal bonding determinants of active-site side-chain rearrangements and the mechanistic origins of spectroscopic shifts. Our results suggest that tryptophan fluorescence provides a sensitive probe for the geometric relationship of arginine-tryptophan pairs, which often have significant roles in protein function. Using the unusual characteristics of the RTA system, we measured the still controversial thermodynamic changes of site-specific urea binding to a protein, results that are relevant to understanding the physical mechanisms of protein denaturation.

  12. Dimethyl sulfoxide induced structural transformations and non-monotonic concentration dependence of conformational fluctuation around active site of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Roy, Susmita; Jana, Biman; Bagchi, Biman

    2012-03-21

    Experimental studies have observed significant changes in both structure and function of lysozyme (and other proteins) on addition of a small amount of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in aqueous solution. Our atomistic molecular dynamic simulations of lysozyme in water-DMSO reveal the following sequence of changes on increasing DMSO concentration. (i) At the initial stage (around 5% DMSO concentration) protein's conformational flexibility gets markedly suppressed. From study of radial distribution functions, we attribute this to the preferential solvation of exposed protein hydrophobic residues by the methyl groups of DMSO. (ii) In the next stage (10-15% DMSO concentration range), lysozome partially unfolds accompanied by an increase both in fluctuation and in exposed protein surface area. (iii) Between 15-20% concentration ranges, both conformational fluctuation and solvent accessible protein surface area suddenly decrease again indicating the formation of an intermediate collapse state. These results are in good agreement with near-UV circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence studies. We explain this apparently surprising behavior in terms of a structural transformation which involves clustering among the methyl groups of DMSO. (iv) Beyond 20% concentration of DMSO, the protein starts its final sojourn towards the unfolding state with further increase in conformational fluctuation and loss in native contacts. Most importantly, analysis of contact map and fluctuation near the active site reveal that both partial unfolding and conformational fluctuations are centered mostly on the hydrophobic core of active site of lysozyme. Our results could offer a general explanation and universal picture of the anomalous behavior of protein structure-function observed in the presence of cosolvents (DMSO, ethanol, tertiary butyl alcohol, dioxane) at their low concentrations.

  13. Conformational transition of the lid helix covering the protease active site is essential for the ATP-dependent protease activity of FtsH.

    PubMed

    Suno, Ryoji; Shimoyama, Masakazu; Abe, Akiko; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Shimodate, Natsuka; Watanabe, Yo-hei; Akiyama, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Masasuke

    2012-09-21

    When bound to ADP, ATP-dependent protease FtsH subunits adopt either an "open" or "closed" conformation. In the open state, the protease catalytic site is located in a narrow space covered by a lidlike helix. This space disappears in the closed form because the lid helix bends at Gly448. Here, we replaced Gly448 with various residues that stabilize helices. Most mutants retained low ATPase activity and bound to the substrate protein, but lost protease activity. However, a mutant proline substitution lost both activities. Our study shows that the conformational transition of the lid helix is essential for the function of FtsH.

  14. Conformational plasticity surrounding the active site of NADH oxidase from Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Miletti, Teresa; Di Trani, Justin; Jr Levros, Louis-Charles; Mittermaier, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Biotechnological applications of enzymes can involve the use of these molecules under nonphysiological conditions. Thus, it is of interest to understand how environmental variables affect protein structure and dynamics and how this ultimately modulates enzyme function. NADH oxidase (NOX) from Thermus thermophilus exemplifies how enzyme activity can be tuned by reaction conditions, such as temperature, cofactor substitution, and the addition of cosolutes. This enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of reduced NAD(P)H to NAD(P)+ with the concurrent reduction of O2 to H2O2, with relevance to biosensing applications. It is thermophilic, with an optimum temperature of approximately 65°C and sevenfold lower activity at 25°C. Moderate concentrations (≈1M) of urea and other chaotropes increase NOX activity by up to a factor of 2.5 at room temperature. Furthermore, it is a flavoprotein that accepts either FMN or the much larger FAD as cofactor. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titration and 15N spin relaxation experiments together with isothermal titration calorimetry to study how NOX structure and dynamics are affected by changes in temperature, the addition of urea and the substitution of the FMN cofactor with FAD. The majority of signals from NOX are quite insensitive to changes in temperature, cosolute addition, and cofactor substitution. However, a small cluster of residues surrounding the active site shows significant changes. These residues are implicated in coupling changes in the solution conditions of the enzyme to changes in catalytic activity. PMID:25970557

  15. Magnesium-Dependent Active-Site Conformational Selection in the Diels-Alderase Ribozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Berezniak, Tomasz; Zahran, Mai; Imhof, Petra; Jaeschke, Andres; Smith, Jeremy C

    2010-10-01

    The Diels-Alderase ribozyme, an in vitro-evolved ribonucleic acid enzyme, accelerates the formation of carbon-carbon bonds between an anthracene diene and a maleimide dienophile in a [4 + 2] cycloaddition, a reaction with broad application in organic chemistry. Here, the Diels-Alderase ribozyme is examined via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in both crystalline and aqueous solution environments. The simulations indicate that the catalytic pocket is highly dynamic. At low Mg(2+) ion concentrations, inactive states with the catalytic pocket closed dominate. Stabilization of the enzymatically active, open state of the catalytic pocket requires a high concentration of Mg(2+) ions (e.g., 54 mM), with cations binding to specific phosphate sites on the backbone of the residues bridging the opposite strands of the pocket. The free energy profile for pocket opening at high Mg(2+) cation concentration exhibits a double minimum, with a barrier to opening of approximately 5.5 kJ/mol and the closed state approximately 3 kJ/mol lower than the open state. Selection of the open state on substrate binding leads to the catalytic activity of the ribozyme. The simulation results explain structurally the experimental observation that full catalytic activity depends on the Mg(2+) ion concentration

  16. The Crystal Structure of a Cardiovirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Reveals an Unusual Conformation of the Polymerase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Vives-Adrian, Laia; Lujan, Celia; Oliva, Baldo; van der Linden, Lonneke; Selisko, Barbara; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is a member of the Cardiovirus genus within the large Picornaviridae family, which includes a number of important human and animal pathogens. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) 3Dpol is a key enzyme for viral genome replication. In this study, we report the X-ray structures of two different crystal forms of the EMCV RdRp determined at 2.8- and 2.15-Å resolution. The in vitro elongation and VPg uridylylation activities of the purified enzyme have also been demonstrated. Although the overall structure of EMCV 3Dpol is shown to be similar to that of the known RdRps of other members of the Picornaviridae family, structural comparisons show a large reorganization of the active-site cavity in one of the crystal forms. The rearrangement affects mainly motif A, where the conserved residue Asp240, involved in ribonucleoside triphosphate (rNTP) selection, and its neighbor residue, Phe239, move about 10 Å from their expected positions within the ribose binding pocket toward the entrance of the rNTP tunnel. This altered conformation of motif A is stabilized by a cation-π interaction established between the aromatic ring of Phe239 and the side chain of Lys56 within the finger domain. Other contacts, involving Phe239 and different residues of motif F, are also observed. The movement of motif A is connected with important conformational changes in the finger region flanked by residues 54 to 63, harboring Lys56, and in the polymerase N terminus. The structures determined in this work provide essential information for studies on the cardiovirus RNA replication process and may have important implications for the development of new antivirals targeting the altered conformation of motif A. IMPORTANCE The Picornaviridae family is one of the largest virus families known, including many important human and animal pathogens. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) 3Dpol is a key enzyme for picornavirus genome replication and a validated

  17. Understanding the conformational flexibility and electrostatic properties of curcumin in the active site of rhAChE via molecular docking, molecular dynamics, and charge density analysis.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Kandasamy; Kalaiarasi, Chinnasamy; Kumaradhas, Poomani

    2017-01-04

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an important enzyme responsible for Alzheimer's disease, as per report, keto-enol form of curcumin inhibits this enzyme. The present study aims to understand the binding mechanism of keto-enol curcumin with the recombinant human Acetylcholinesterase (rhAChE) from its conformational flexibility, intermolecular interactions, charge density distribution, and the electrostatic properties at the active site of rhAChE. To accomplish this, a molecular docking analysis of curcumin with the rhAChE was performed, which gives the structure and conformation of curcumin in the active site of rhAChE. Further, the charge density distribution and the electrostatic properties of curcumin molecule (lifted from the active site of rhAChE) were determined from the high level density functional theory (DFT) calculations coupled with the charge density analysis. On the other hand, the curcumin molecule was optimized (gas phase) using DFT method and further, the structure and charge density analysis were also carried out. On comparing the conformation, charge density distribution and the electrostatic potential of the active site form of curcumin with the corresponding gas phase form reveals that the above said properties are significantly altered when curcumin is present in the active site of rhAChE. The conformational stability and the interaction of curcumin in the active site are also studied using molecular dynamics simulation, which shows a large variation in the conformational geometry of curcumin as well as the intermolecular interactions.

  18. Conformational transition of FGFR kinase activation revealed by site-specific unnatural amino acid reporter and single molecule FRET

    PubMed Central

    Perdios, Louis; Lowe, Alan R.; Saladino, Giorgio; Bunney, Tom D.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.; Chin, Jason W.; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Tate, Edward W.; Katan, Matilda

    2017-01-01

    Protein kinases share significant structural similarity; however, structural features alone are insufficient to explain their diverse functions. Thus, bridging the gap between static structure and function requires a more detailed understanding of their dynamic properties. For example, kinase activation may occur via a switch-like mechanism or by shifting a dynamic equilibrium between inactive and active states. Here, we utilize a combination of FRET and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to probe the activation mechanism of the kinase domain of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR). Using genetically-encoded, site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids in regions essential for activation, followed by specific labeling with fluorescent moieties, we generated a novel class of FRET-based reporter to monitor conformational differences corresponding to states sampled by non phosphorylated/inactive and phosphorylated/active forms of the kinase. Single molecule FRET analysis in vitro, combined with MD simulations, shows that for FGFR kinase, there are populations of inactive and active states separated by a high free energy barrier resulting in switch-like activation. Compared to recent studies, these findings support diversity in features of kinases that impact on their activation mechanisms. The properties of these FRET-based constructs will also allow further studies of kinase dynamics as well as applications in vivo. PMID:28045057

  19. Conformational transition of FGFR kinase activation revealed by site-specific unnatural amino acid reporter and single molecule FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdios, Louis; Lowe, Alan R.; Saladino, Giorgio; Bunney, Tom D.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.; Chin, Jason W.; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Tate, Edward W.; Katan, Matilda

    2017-01-01

    Protein kinases share significant structural similarity; however, structural features alone are insufficient to explain their diverse functions. Thus, bridging the gap between static structure and function requires a more detailed understanding of their dynamic properties. For example, kinase activation may occur via a switch-like mechanism or by shifting a dynamic equilibrium between inactive and active states. Here, we utilize a combination of FRET and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to probe the activation mechanism of the kinase domain of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR). Using genetically-encoded, site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids in regions essential for activation, followed by specific labeling with fluorescent moieties, we generated a novel class of FRET-based reporter to monitor conformational differences corresponding to states sampled by non phosphorylated/inactive and phosphorylated/active forms of the kinase. Single molecule FRET analysis in vitro, combined with MD simulations, shows that for FGFR kinase, there are populations of inactive and active states separated by a high free energy barrier resulting in switch-like activation. Compared to recent studies, these findings support diversity in features of kinases that impact on their activation mechanisms. The properties of these FRET-based constructs will also allow further studies of kinase dynamics as well as applications in vivo.

  20. Influence of Active Site Conformations on the Hydride Transfer step of the Thymidylate Synthase Reaction Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Świderek, Katarzyna; Kohen, Amnon; Moliner, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    The hydride transfer from C6 of tetrahydrofolate to the reaction’s exocyclic methylene-dUMP intermediate is the rate limiting step in thymidylate synthase (TSase) catalysis. This step has been studied by means of QM/MM Molecular Dynamics simulations to generate the corresponding free energy surfaces. The use of two different initial X-ray structures has allowed exploring different conformational spaces and exploring the existence of chemical paths with not only different reactivities, but also different reaction mechanisms. The results confirm that this chemical conversion takes place preferentially via a concerted mechanism where the hydride transfer is conjugated to thiol-elimination from the product. The findings also confirm the labile character of the substrate-enzyme covalent bond established between the C6 of the nucleotide substrate and a conserved cysteine residue. The calculations also reproduce and rationalize a normal H/T 2° kinetic isotope effect measured for that step. From a computational point of view, the results demonstrate that the use of an incomplete number of coordinates to describe the real reaction coordinate can render biased results. PMID:25868526

  1. Detection of local polarity and conformational changes at the active site of rabbit muscle creatine kinase with a new arginine-specific fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujuan; Wang, Xiaochun; Shi, Wen; Wang, Ke; Ma, Huimin

    2008-02-01

    A new polarity-sensitive fluorescent probe, 3-(4-chloro-6-p-glyoxal-phenoxy-1,3,5-triazinylamino)-7-(dimethylamino)-2-methylphenazine (CGTDP), is synthesized for selective labeling of active-site arginine residues. The probe comprises a neutral red moiety as a polarity-sensitive fluorophore and a phenylglyoxal unit as an arginine-specific labeling group. The probe exhibits a sensitive response of shift of fluorescence maximum emission wavelength to solvent polarity only instead of pH or temperature, which leads to the use of the probe in detecting the local polarity and conformational changes of the active site of rabbit muscle creatine kinase (CK) denatured by pH or temperature. The polarity of the active site domain has been first found to correspond to a dielectric constant of about 44, and the conformational change of the active site directly revealed by CGTDP occurs far before that of CK as a whole disclosed by the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence during acid or thermal denaturation. The present strategy may provide a useful method to detect the local polarity and conformational changes of the active sites of many enzymes that employ arginine residues as anion recognition sites under different denaturation conditions.

  2. On the role of the conformational flexibility of the active-site lid on the allosteric kinetics of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Jaimes, Ismael; Sosa-Peinado, Alejandro; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Horjales, Eduardo; Calcagno, Mario L

    2002-05-24

    The active site of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from Escherichia coli (GlcN6P deaminase, EC 3.5.99.6) has a complex lid formed by two antiparallel beta-strands connected by a helix-loop segment (158-187). This motif contains Arg172, which is a residue involved in binding the substrate in the active-site, and three residues that are part of the allosteric site, Arg158, Lys160 and Thr161. This dual binding role of the motif forming the lid suggests that it plays a key role in the functional coupling between active and allosteric sites. Previous crystallographic work showed that the temperature coefficients of the active-site lid are very large when the enzyme is in its T allosteric state. These coefficients decrease in the R state, thus suggesting that this motif changes its conformational flexibility as a consequence of the allosteric transition. In order to explore the possible connection between the conformational flexibility of the lid and the function of the deaminase, we constructed the site-directed mutant Phe174-Ala. Phe174 is located at the C-end of the lid helix and its side-chain establishes hydrophobic interactions with the remainder of the enzyme. The crystallographic structure of the T state of Phe174-Ala deaminase, determined at 2.02 A resolution, shows no density for the segment 162-181, which is part of the active-site lid (PDB 1JT9). This mutant form of the enzyme is essentially inactive in the absence of the allosteric activator, N-acetylglucosamine-6-P although it recovers its activity up to the wild-type level in the presence of this ligand. Spectrometric and binding studies show that inactivity is due to the inability of the active-site to bind ligands when the allosteric site is empty. These data indicate that the conformational flexibility of the active-site lid critically alters the binding properties of the active site, and that the occupation of the allosteric site restores the lid conformational flexibility to a functional state.

  3. Local conformations and competitive binding affinities of single- and double-stranded primer-template DNA at the polymerization and editing active sites of DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Datta, Kausiki; Johnson, Neil P; LiCata, Vince J; von Hippel, Peter H

    2009-06-19

    In addition to their capacity for template-directed 5' --> 3' DNA synthesis at the polymerase (pol) site, DNA polymerases have a separate 3' --> 5' exonuclease (exo) editing activity that is involved in assuring the fidelity of DNA replication. Upon misincorporation of an incorrect nucleotide residue, the 3' terminus of the primer strand at the primer-template (P/T) junction is preferentially transferred to the exo site, where the faulty residue is excised, allowing the shortened primer to rebind to the template strand at the pol site and incorporate the correct dNTP. Here we describe the conformational changes that occur in the primer strand as it shuttles between the pol and exo sites of replication-competent Klenow and Klentaq DNA polymerase complexes in solution and use these conformational changes to measure the equilibrium distribution of the primer between these sites for P/T DNA constructs carrying both matched and mismatched primer termini. To this end, we have measured the fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra at wavelengths of >300 nm for conformational probes comprising pairs of 2-aminopurine bases site-specifically replacing adenine bases at various positions in the primer strand of P/T DNA constructs bound to DNA polymerases. Control experiments that compare primer conformations with available x-ray structures confirm the validity of this approach. These distributions and the conformational changes in the P/T DNA that occur during template-directed DNA synthesis in solution illuminate some of the mechanisms used by DNA polymerases to assure the fidelity of DNA synthesis.

  4. Conformational Lability in Serine Protease Active Sites: Structures of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activator (HGFA) Alone and with the Inhibitory Domain from HGFA Inhibitor-1B

    SciTech Connect

    Shia, Steven; Stamos, Jennifer; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Fan, Bin; Wu, Judy; Corpuz, Raquel T.; Santell, Lydia; Lazarus, Robert A.; Eigenbrot, Charles

    2010-07-20

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) is a serine protease that converts hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) into its active form. When activated HGF binds its cognate receptor Met, cellular signals lead to cell growth, differentiation, and migration, activities which promote tissue regeneration in liver, kidney and skin. Intervention in the conversion of HGF to its active form has the potential to provide therapeutic benefit where HGF/Met activity is associated with tumorigenesis. To help identify ways to moderate HGF/Met effects, we have determined the molecular structure of the protease domain of HGFA. The structure we determined, at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, with no pseudo-substrate or inhibitor bound is characterized by an unconventional conformation of key residues in the enzyme active site. In order to find whether this apparently non-enzymatically competent arrangement would persist in the presence of a strongly-interacting inhibitor, we also have determined, at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution, the X-ray structure of HGFA complexed with the first Kunitz domain (KD1) from the physiological inhibitor hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor 1B (HAI-1B). In this complex we observe a rearranged substrate binding cleft that closely mirrors the cleft of other serine proteases, suggesting an extreme conformational dynamism. We also characterize the inhibition of 16 serine proteases by KD1, finding that the previously reported enzyme specificity of the intact extracellular region of HAI-1B resides in KD1 alone. We find that HGFA, matriptase, hepsin, plasma kallikrein and trypsin are potently inhibited, and use the complex structure to rationalize the structural basis of these results.

  5. Ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester binding orients the misaligned active site of the ubiquitin hydrolase UCHL1 into productive conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreaux, David A.; Maiti, Tushar K.; Davies, Christopher W.; Das, Chittaranjan

    2010-07-06

    Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) is a Parkinson disease-associated, putative cysteine protease found abundantly and selectively expressed in neurons. The crystal structure of apo UCHL1 showed that the active-site residues are not aligned in a canonical form, with the nucleophilic cysteine being 7.7 {angstrom} from the general base histidine, an arrangement consistent with an inactive form of the enzyme. Here we report the crystal structures of the wild type and two Parkinson disease-associated variants of the enzyme, S18Y and I93M, bound to a ubiquitin-based suicide substrate, ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester. These structures reveal that ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester binds primarily at two sites on the enzyme, with its carboxy terminus at the active site and with its amino-terminal {beta}-hairpin at the distal site - a surface-exposed hydrophobic crevice 17 {angstrom} away from the active site. Binding at the distal site initiates a cascade of side-chain movements in the enzyme that starts at a highly conserved, surface-exposed phenylalanine and is relayed to the active site resulting in the reorientation and proximal placement of the general base within 4 {angstrom} of the catalytic cysteine, an arrangement found in productive cysteine proteases. Mutation of the distal-site, surface-exposed phenylalanine to alanine reduces ubiquitin binding and severely impairs the catalytic activity of the enzyme. These results suggest that the activity of UCHL1 may be regulated by its own substrate.

  6. The structures of RNase A complexed with 3'-CMP and d(CpA): active site conformation and conserved water molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Zegers, I.; Maes, D.; Dao-Thi, M. H.; Poortmans, F.; Palmer, R.; Wyns, L.

    1994-01-01

    The interactions of RNase A with cytidine 3'-monophosphate (3'-CMP) and deoxycytidyl-3',5'-deoxyadenosine (d(CpA)) were analyzed by X-ray crystallography. The 3'-CMP complex and the native structure were determined from trigonal crystals, and the d(CpA) complex from monoclinic crystals. The differences between the overall structures are concentrated in loop regions and are relatively small. The protein-inhibitor contacts are interpreted in terms of the catalytic mechanism. The general base His 12 interacts with the 2' oxygen, as does the electrostatic catalyst Lys 41. The general acid His 119 has 2 conformations (A and B) in the native structure and is found in, respectively, the A and the B conformation in the d(CpA) and the 3'-CMP complex. From the present structures and from a comparison with RNase T1, we propose that His 119 is active in the A conformation. The structure of the d(CpA) complex permits a detailed analysis of the downstream binding site, which includes His 119 and Asn 71. The comparison of the present RNase A structures with an inhibitor complex of RNase T1 shows that there are important similarities in the active sites of these 2 enzymes, despite the absence of any sequence homology. The water molecules were analyzed in order to identify conserved water sites. Seventeen water sites were found to be conserved in RNase A structures from 5 different space groups. It is proposed that 7 of those water molecules play a role in the binding of the N-terminal helix to the rest of the protein and in the stabilization of the active site. PMID:7756988

  7. Conformational Flexibility of a Short Loop near the Active Site of the SARS-3CLpro is Essential to Maintain Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunmei; Teng, Xin; Qi, Yifei; Tang, Bo; Shi, Hailing; Ma, Xiaomin; Lai, Luhua

    2016-01-01

    The SARS 3C-like proteinase (SARS-3CLpro), which is the main proteinase of the SARS coronavirus, is essential to the virus life cycle. This enzyme has been shown to be active as a dimer in which only one protomer is active. However, it remains unknown how the dimer structure maintains an active monomer conformation. It has been observed that the Ser139-Leu141 loop forms a short 310-helix that disrupts the catalytic machinery in the inactive monomer structure. We have tried to disrupt this helical conformation by mutating L141 to T in the stable inactive monomer G11A/R298A/Q299A. The resulting tetra-mutant G11A/L141T/R298A/Q299A is indeed enzymatically active as a monomer. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the L141T mutation disrupts the 310-helix and helps to stabilize the active conformation. The coil-310-helix conformational transition of the Ser139-Leu141 loop serves as an enzyme activity switch. Our study therefore indicates that the dimer structure can stabilize the active conformation but is not a required structure in the evolution of the active enzyme, which can also arise through simple mutations. PMID:26879383

  8. Conformational Flexibility of a Short Loop near the Active Site of the SARS-3CLpro is Essential to Maintain Catalytic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunmei; Teng, Xin; Qi, Yifei; Tang, Bo; Shi, Hailing; Ma, Xiaomin; Lai, Luhua

    2016-02-01

    The SARS 3C-like proteinase (SARS-3CLpro), which is the main proteinase of the SARS coronavirus, is essential to the virus life cycle. This enzyme has been shown to be active as a dimer in which only one protomer is active. However, it remains unknown how the dimer structure maintains an active monomer conformation. It has been observed that the Ser139-Leu141 loop forms a short 310-helix that disrupts the catalytic machinery in the inactive monomer structure. We have tried to disrupt this helical conformation by mutating L141 to T in the stable inactive monomer G11A/R298A/Q299A. The resulting tetra-mutant G11A/L141T/R298A/Q299A is indeed enzymatically active as a monomer. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the L141T mutation disrupts the 310-helix and helps to stabilize the active conformation. The coil-310-helix conformational transition of the Ser139-Leu141 loop serves as an enzyme activity switch. Our study therefore indicates that the dimer structure can stabilize the active conformation but is not a required structure in the evolution of the active enzyme, which can also arise through simple mutations.

  9. Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase in complex with the feedback inhibitor CoA reveals only one active-site conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Wubben, T.; Mesecar, A.D.

    2014-10-02

    Phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase (PPAT) catalyzes the penultimate step in the coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway, reversibly transferring an adenylyl group from ATP to 4'-phosphopantetheine to form dephosphocoenzyme A (dPCoA). To complement recent biochemical and structural studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPAT (MtPPAT) and to provide further insight into the feedback regulation of MtPPAT by CoA, the X-ray crystal structure of the MtPPAT enzyme in complex with CoA was determined to 2.11 {angstrom} resolution. Unlike previous X-ray crystal structures of PPAT-CoA complexes from other bacteria, which showed two distinct CoA conformations bound to the active site, only one conformation of CoA is observed in the MtPPAT-CoA complex.

  10. Short-time dynamics of pH-dependent conformation and substrate binding in the active site of beta-glucosidases: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Flannelly, David F; Aoki, Thalia G; Aristilde, Ludmilla

    2015-09-01

    The complete degradation of cellulose to glucose is essential to carbon turnover in terrestrial ecosystems and to engineered biofuel production. A rate-limiting step in this pathway is catalyzed by beta-glucosidase (BG) enzymes, which convert cellulobiose into two glucose molecules. The activity of these enzymes has been shown to vary with solution pH. However, it is not well understood how pH influences the enzyme conformation required for catalytic action on the substrate. A structural understanding of this pH effect is important for predicting shifts in BG activity in bioreactors and environmental matrices, in addition to informing targeted protein engineering. Here we applied molecular dynamics simulations to explore conformational and substrate binding dynamics in two well-characterized BGs of bacterial (Clostridium cellulovorans) and fungal (Trichoderma reesei) origins as a function of pH. The enzymes were simulated in an explicit solvated environment, with NaCl as electrolytes, at their prominent ionization states obtained at pH 5, 6, 7, and 7.5. Our findings indicated that pH-dependent changes in the ionization states of non-catalytic residues localized outside of the immediate active site led to pH-dependent disruption of the active site conformation. This disruption interferes with favorable H-bonding interactions with catalytic residues required to initiate catalysis on the substrate. We also identified specific non-catalytic residues that are involved in stabilizing the substrate at the optimal pH for enzyme activity. The simulations further revealed the dynamics of water-bridging interactions both outside and inside the substrate binding cleft during structural changes in the enzyme-substrate complex. These findings provide new structural insights into the pH-dependent substrate binding specificity in BGs.

  11. Mapping intermolecular interactions and active site conformations: from human MMP-1 crystal structure to molecular dynamics free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Nash, Anthony; Birch, Helen L; de Leeuw, Nora H

    2017-02-01

    The zinc-dependent Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) found within the extracellular matrix (ECM) of vertebrates are linked to pathological processes such as arthritis, skin ulceration and cancer. Although a general backbone proteolytic mechanism is understood, crystallographic data continue to suggest an active site that is too narrow to encompass the respective substrate. We present a fully parameterised Molecular Dynamics (MD) study of the structural properties of an MMP-1-collagen crystallographic structure (Protein Data Bank - 4AUO), followed by an exploration of the free energy surface of a collagen polypeptide chain entering the active site, using a combined meta-dynamics and umbrella sampling (MDUS) approach. We conclude that the interactions between MMP-1 and the collagen substrate are in good agreement with a number of experimental studies. As such, our unrestrained MD simulations and our MDUS results, which indicate an energetic barrier for a local uncoiling and insertion event, can inform future investigations of the collagen-peptide non-bonded association steps with the active site prior to proteolytic mechanisms. The elucidation of such free energy barriers provides a better understanding of the role of the enzyme in the ECM and is important in the design of future MMP inhibitors.

  12. Tryptophanase from Proteus vulgaris: the conformational rearrangement in the active site, induced by the mutation of Tyrosine 72 to phenylalanine, and its mechanistic consequences.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Vitalia V; Zakomirdina, Ludmila N; Dementieva, Irene S; Phillips, Robert S; Gollnick, Paul D; Demidkina, Tatyana V; Faleev, Nicolai G

    2006-04-01

    Tyr72 is located at the active site of tryptophanase (Trpase) from Proteus vulgaris. For the wild-type Trpase Tyr72 might be considered as the general acid catalyst at the stage of elimination of the leaving groups. The replacement of Tyr72 by Phe leads to a decrease in activity for L-tryptophan by 50,000-fold and to a considerable rearrangement of the active site of Trpase. This rearrangement leads to an increase of room around the alpha-C atom of any bound amino acid, such that covalent binding of alpha-methyl-substituted amino acids becomes possible (which cannot be realized in wild-type Trpase). The changes in reactivities of S-alkyl-L-cysteines provide evidence for an increase of congestion in the proximity of their side groups in the mutant enzyme as compared to wild-type enzyme. The observed alteration of catalytic properties in a large degree originates from a conformational change in the active site. The Y72F Trpase retains significant activity for L-serine, which allowed us to conclude that in the mutant enzyme, some functional group is present which fulfills the role of the general acid catalyst in reactions associated with elimination of small leaving groups.

  13. Conformational activation of ADAMTS13.

    PubMed

    South, Kieron; Luken, Brenda M; Crawley, James T B; Phillips, Rebecca; Thomas, Mari; Collins, Richard F; Deforche, Louis; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen; Lane, David A

    2014-12-30

    A disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs 13 (ADAMTS13) is a metalloprotease that regulates von Willebrand factor (VWF) function. ADAMTS13-mediated proteolysis is determined by conformational changes in VWF, but also may depend on its own conformational activation. Kinetic analysis of WT ADAMTS13 revealed ∼ 2.5-fold reduced activity compared with ADAMTS13 lacking its C-terminal tail (MDTCS) or its CUB1-2 domains (WTΔCUB1-2), suggesting that the CUB domains naturally limit ADAMTS13 function. Consistent with this suggestion, WT ADAMTS13 activity was enhanced ∼ 2.5-fold by preincubation with either an anti-CUB mAb (20E9) or VWF D4CK (the natural binding partner for the CUB domains). Furthermore, the isolated CUB1-2 domains not only bound MDTCS, but also inhibited activity by up to 2.5-fold. Interestingly, a gain-of-function (GoF) ADAMTS13 spacer domain variant (R568K/F592Y/R660K/Y661F/Y665F) was ∼ 2.5-fold more active than WT ADAMTS13, but could not be further activated by 20E9 mAb or VWF D4CK and was unable to bind or to be inhibited by the CUB1-2 domains, suggesting that the inhibitory effects of the CUB domains involve an interaction with the spacer domain that is disrupted in GoF ADAMTS13. Electron microscopy demonstrated a "closed" conformation of WT ADAMTS13 and suggested a more "open" conformation for GoF ADAMTS13. The cryptic spacer domain epitope revealed by conformational unfolding also represents the core antigenic target for autoantibodies in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. We propose that ADAMTS13 circulates in a closed conformation, which is maintained by a CUB-spacer domain binding interaction. ADAMTS13 becomes conformationally activated on demand through interaction of its C-terminal CUB domains with VWF, making it susceptible to immune recognition.

  14. Differential furanose selection in the active sites of archaeal DNA polymerases probed by fixed-conformation nucleotide analogues

    PubMed Central

    Ketkar, Amit; Zafar, Maroof K.; Banerjee, Surajit; Marquez, Victor E.; Egli, Martin; Eoff, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    DNA polymerases select for the incorporation of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) using amino acid side-chains that act as a “steric-gate” to bar improper incorporation of rNTPs. An additional factor in the selection of nucleotide substrates resides in the preferred geometry for the furanose moiety of the incoming nucleotide triphosphate. We have probed the role of sugar geometry during nucleotide selection by model DNA polymerases from Sulfolobus solfataricus using fixed conformation nucleotide analogues. North-methanocarba-dATP (N-MC-dATP) locks the central ring into a RNA-type (C2′-exo, North) conformation near a C3′-endo pucker and South-methanocarba-dATP (S-MC-dATP) locks the central ring system into a (C3′-exo, South) conformation near a C2′-endo pucker. Dpo4 preferentially inserts N-MC-dATP and in the crystal structure of Dpo4 in complex with N-MC-dAMP, the nucleotide analogue superimposes almost perfectly with Dpo4 bound to unmodified dATP. Biochemical assays indicate that the S. solfataricus B-family DNA polymerase Dpo1 can insert and extend from both N-MC-dATP and S-MC-dATP. In this respect, Dpo1 is unexpectedly more tolerant of substrate conformation than Dpo4. The crystal structure of Dpo4 bound to S-MC-dADP shows that poor incorporation of the Southern pucker by the Y-family polymerase results from a hydrogen bond between the 3′-OH group of the nucleotide analogue and the OH group of the steric gate residue, Tyr12, shifting the S-MC-dADP molecule away from the dNTP binding pocket and distorting the base pair at the primer-template junction. These results provide insights into substrate specificity of DNA polymerases, as well as molecular mechanisms that act as a barrier against insertion of rNTPs. PMID:23050956

  15. Conformational Change Observed in the Active Site of Class C β-Lactamase MOX-1 upon Binding to Aztreonam.

    PubMed

    Oguri, Takuma; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko

    2015-08-01

    We solved the crystal structure of the class C β-lactamase MOX-1 complexed with the inhibitor aztreonam at 1.9Å resolution. The main-chain oxygen of Ser315 interacts with the amide nitrogen of aztreonam. Surprisingly, compared to that in the structure of free MOX-1, this main-chain carboxyl changes its position significantly upon binding to aztreonam. This result indicates that the interaction between MOX-1 and β-lactams can be accompanied by conformational changes in the B3 β-strand main chain.

  16. Connecting Active-Site Loop Conformations and Catalysis in Triosephosphate Isomerase: Insights from a Rare Variation at Residue 96 in the Plasmodial Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Pareek, Vidhi; Samanta, Moumita; Joshi, Niranjan V; Balaram, Hemalatha; Murthy, Mathur R N; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2016-04-01

    Despite extensive research into triosephosphate isomerases (TIMs), there exists a gap in understanding of the remarkable conjunction between catalytic loop-6 (residues 166-176) movement and the conformational flip of Glu165 (catalytic base) upon substrate binding that primes the active site for efficient catalysis. The overwhelming occurrence of serine at position 96 (98% of the 6277 unique TIM sequences), spatially proximal to E165 and the loop-6 residues, raises questions about its role in catalysis. Notably, Plasmodium falciparum TIM has an extremely rare residue--phenylalanine--at this position whereas, curiously, the mutant F96S was catalytically defective. We have obtained insights into the influence of residue 96 on the loop-6 conformational flip and E165 positioning by combining kinetic and structural studies on the PfTIM F96 mutants F96Y, F96A, F96S/S73A, and F96S/L167V with sequence conservation analysis and comparative analysis of the available apo and holo structures of the enzyme from diverse organisms.

  17. Three-dimensional structure of endo-1,4-beta-xylanase II from Trichoderma reesei: two conformational states in the active site.

    PubMed Central

    Törrönen, A; Harkki, A; Rouvinen, J

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of endo-1,4-beta-xylanase II (XYNII) from Trichoderma reesei has been determined by X-ray diffraction techniques and refined to a conventional R-factor of 18.3% at 1.8 A resolution. The 190 amino acid length protein was found to exist as a single domain where the main chain folds to form two mostly antiparallel beta-sheets, which are packed against each other in parallel. The beta-sheet structure is twisted, forming a large cleft on one side of the molecule. The structure of XYNII resembles that of Bacillus 1,3-1,4-beta-glucanase. The cleft is an obvious suggestion for an active site, which has putative binding sites for at least four xylose residues. The catalytic residues are apparently the two glutamic acid residues (Glu86 and Glu177) in the middle of the cleft. One structure was determined at pH 5.0, corresponding to the pH optimum of XYNII. The second structure was determined at pH 6.5, where enzyme activity is reduced considerably. A clear structural change was observed, especially in the position of the side chain of Glu177. The observed conformational change is probably important for the mechanism of catalysis in XYNII. Images PMID:8013449

  18. SLITHER: a web server for generating contiguous conformations of substrate molecules entering into deep active sites of proteins or migrating through channels in membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Po-Hsien; Kuo, Kuei-Ling; Chu, Pei-Ying; Liu, Eric M; Lin, Jung-Hsin

    2009-07-01

    Many proteins use a long channel to guide the substrate or ligand molecules into the well-defined active sites for catalytic reactions or for switching molecular states. In addition, substrates of membrane transporters can migrate to another side of cellular compartment by means of certain selective mechanisms. SLITHER (http://bioinfo.mc.ntu.edu.tw/slither/or http://slither.rcas.sinica.edu.tw/) is a web server that can generate contiguous conformations of a molecule along a curved tunnel inside a protein, and the binding free energy profile along the predicted channel pathway. SLITHER adopts an iterative docking scheme, which combines with a puddle-skimming procedure, i.e. repeatedly elevating the potential energies of the identified global minima, thereby determines the contiguous binding modes of substrates inside the protein. In contrast to some programs that are widely used to determine the geometric dimensions in the ion channels, SLITHER can be applied to predict whether a substrate molecule can crawl through an inner channel or a half-channel of proteins across surmountable energy barriers. Besides, SLITHER also provides the list of the pore-facing residues, which can be directly compared with many genetic diseases. Finally, the adjacent binding poses determined by SLITHER can also be used for fragment-based drug design.

  19. Conformational flexibility related to enzyme activity: evidence for a dynamic active-site gatekeeper function of Tyr215 in Aerococcus viridans lactate oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Stoisser, Thomas; Brunsteiner, Michael; Wilson, David K.; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    L-Lactate oxidase (LOX) belongs to a large family of flavoenzymes that catalyze oxidation of α-hydroxy acids. How in these enzymes the protein structure controls reactivity presents an important but elusive problem. LOX contains a prominent tyrosine in the substrate binding pocket (Tyr215 in Aerococcus viridans LOX) that is partially responsible for securing a flexible loop which sequesters the active site. To characterize the role of Tyr215, effects of substitutions of the tyrosine (Y215F, Y215H) were analyzed kinetically, crystallographically and by molecular dynamics simulations. Enzyme variants showed slowed flavin reduction and oxidation by up to 33-fold. Pyruvate release was also decelerated and in Y215F, it was the slowest step overall. A 2.6-Å crystal structure of Y215F in complex with pyruvate shows the hydrogen bond between the phenolic hydroxyl and the keto oxygen in pyruvate is replaced with a potentially stronger hydrophobic interaction between the phenylalanine and the methyl group of pyruvate. Residues 200 through 215 or 216 appear to be disordered in two of the eight monomers in the asymmetric unit suggesting that they function as a lid controlling substrate entry and product exit from the active site. Substitutions of Tyr215 can thus lead to a kinetic bottleneck in product release. PMID:27302031

  20. The anti/syn conformation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine is modulated by Bacillus subtilis PolX active site residues His255 and Asn263. Efficient processing of damaged 3'-ends.

    PubMed

    Zafra, Olga; Pérez de Ayala, Lucía; de Vega, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8oxodG) is a major lesion resulting from oxidative stress and found in both DNA and dNTP pools. Such a lesion is usually removed from DNA by the Base Excision Repair (BER), a universally conserved DNA repair pathway. 8oxodG usually adopts the favored and promutagenic syn-conformation at the active site of DNA polymerases, allowing the base to hydrogen bonding with adenine during DNA synthesis. Here, we study the structural determinants that affect the glycosidic torsion-angle of 8oxodGTP at the catalytic active site of the family X DNA polymerase from Bacillus subtilis (PolXBs). We show that, unlike most DNA polymerases, PolXBs exhibits a similar efficiency to stabilize the anti and syn conformation of 8oxodGTP at the catalytic site. Kinetic analyses indicate that at least two conserved residues of the nucleotide binding pocket play opposite roles in the anti/syn conformation selectivity, Asn263 and His255 that favor incorporation of 8oxodGMP opposite dA and dC, respectively. In addition, the presence in PolXBs of Mn(2+)-dependent 3'-phosphatase and 3'-phosphodiesterase activities is also shown. Those activities rely on the catalytic center of the C-terminal Polymerase and Histidinol Phosphatase (PHP) domain of PolXBs and, together with its 3'-5' exonuclease activity allows the enzyme to resume gap-filling after processing of damaged 3' termini.

  1. Glu311 and Arg337 Stabilize a Closed Active-site Conformation and Provide a Critical Catalytic Base and Countercation for Green Bioluminescence in Beetle Luciferases.

    PubMed

    Viviani, V R; Simões, A; Bevilaqua, V R; Gabriel, G V M; Arnoldi, F G C; Hirano, T

    2016-08-30

    Beetle luciferases elicit the emission of different bioluminescence colors from green to red. Whereas firefly luciferases emit yellow-green light and are pH-sensitive, undergoing a typical red-shift at acidic pH and higher temperatures and in the presence of divalent heavy metals, click beetle and railroadworm luciferases emit a wider range of colors from green to red but are pH-independent. Despite many decades of study, the structural determinants and mechanisms of bioluminescence colors and pH sensitivity remain enigmatic. Here, through modeling studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and spectral and kinetic studies using recombinant luciferases from the three main families of bioluminescent beetles that emit different colors of light (Macrolampis sp2 firefly, Phrixotrix hirtus railroadworm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans click beetle), we investigated the role of E311 and R337 in bioluminescence color determination. All mutations of these residues in firefly luciferase produced red mutants, indicating that the preservation of opposite charges and the lengths of the side chains of E311 and R337 are essential for keeping a salt bridge that stabilizes a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission. Kinetic studies indicate that residue R337 is important for binding luciferin and creating a positively charged environment around excited oxyluciferin phenolate. In Pyrearinus green-emitting luciferase, the R334A mutation causes a 27 nm red-shift, whereas in Phrixotrix red-emitting luciferase, the L334R mutation causes a blue-shift that is no longer affected by guanidine. These results provide compelling evidence that the presence of arginine at position 334 is essential for blue-shifting the emission spectra of most beetle luciferases. Therefore, residues E311 and R337 play both structural and catalytic roles in bioluminescence color determination, by stabilizing a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission, and also

  2. Conformational changes associated with the binding of zinc acetate at the putative active site of XcTcmJ, a cupin from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, Herbert L.; Kozbial, Piotr; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Carlton, Dennis; Caruthers, Jonathan; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Grant, Joanna C.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Tien, Henry J.; Trout, Christina V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Xu, Qingping; Zubieta, Chloe; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    In the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, the product of the tcmJ gene, XcTcmJ, encodes a protein belonging to the RmlC family of cupins. XcTcmJ was crystallized in a monoclinic space group (C2) in the presence of zinc acetate and the structure was determined to 1.6 Å resolution. Previously, the apo structure has been reported in the absence of any bound metal ion [Chin et al. (2006 ▶), Proteins, 65, 1046–1050]. The most significant difference between the apo structure and the structure of XcTcmJ described here is a reorganization of the binding site for zinc acetate, which was most likely acquired from the crystallization solution. This site is located in the conserved metal ion-binding domain at the putative active site of XcTcmJ. In addition, an acetate was also bound within coordination distance of the zinc. In order to accommodate this binding, rearrangement of a conserved histidine ligand is required as well as several nearby residues within and around the putative active site. These observations indicate that binding of zinc serves a functional role in this cupin protein. PMID:20944231

  3. Conformational changes associated with the binding of zinc acetate at the putative active site of XcTcmJ, a cupin from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Herbert L; Kozbial, Piotr; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S Sri; Miller, Mitchell D; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Carlton, Dennis; Caruthers, Jonathan; Chiu, Hsiu Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K; Grant, Joanna C; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T; Murphy, Kevin D; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L; Tien, Henry J; Trout, Christina V; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Xu, Qingping; Zubieta, Chloe; Hodgson, Keith O; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc André; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A

    2010-10-01

    In the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, the product of the tcmJ gene, XcTcmJ, encodes a protein belonging to the RmlC family of cupins. XcTcmJ was crystallized in a monoclinic space group (C2) in the presence of zinc acetate and the structure was determined to 1.6 Å resolution. Previously, the apo structure has been reported in the absence of any bound metal ion [Chin et al. (2006), Proteins, 65, 1046-1050]. The most significant difference between the apo structure and the structure of XcTcmJ described here is a reorganization of the binding site for zinc acetate, which was most likely acquired from the crystallization solution. This site is located in the conserved metal ion-binding domain at the putative active site of XcTcmJ. In addition, an acetate was also bound within coordination distance of the zinc. In order to accommodate this binding, rearrangement of a conserved histidine ligand is required as well as several nearby residues within and around the putative active site. These observations indicate that binding of zinc serves a functional role in this cupin protein.

  4. Active conformation of an insect neuropeptide family.

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, R J; Roberts, V A; Dyson, H J; Holman, G M; Tainer, J A

    1991-01-01

    To understand the structural and chemical basis for insect neuropeptide activity, we have designed, synthesized, and determined the conformation of a biologically active cyclic analog of the pyrokinins, an insect neuropeptide family that mediates myotropic (visceral muscle contractile) activity. Members of this insect neuropeptide family share the common C-terminal pentapeptide sequence Phe-Xaa-Pro-Arg-Leu-NH2 (Xaa = Ser, Thr, or Val). Circular dichroic, nuclear magnetic resonance, and molecular dynamics analyses of the conformationally restricted cyclic pyrokinin analog cyclo(-Asn-Thr-Ser-Phe-Thr-Pro-Arg-Leu-) indicated the presence of a beta-turn in the active core region encompassing residues Thr-Pro-Arg-Leu. The rigid cyclic analog retains biological activity, suggesting that its C-terminal beta-turn is the active pyrokinin conformation recognized by the myotropic receptor. As individual pyrokinins and pyrokinin-like neuropeptides demonstrate both oviduct-contractile and pheromone-biosynthesis activities in various insects, the biologically active beta-turn structure reported here holds broad significance for many biological processes. Images PMID:2034692

  5. Crystal structure of D-psicose 3-epimerase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and its complex with true substrate D-fructose: a pivotal role of metal in catalysis, an active site for the non-phosphorylated substrate, and its conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangsoo; Kim, Hye-Jung; Oh, Deok-Kun; Cha, Sun-Shin; Rhee, Sangkee

    2006-09-01

    D-psicose, a rare sugar produced by the enzymatic reaction of D-tagatose 3-epimerase (DTEase), has been used extensively for the bioproduction of various rare carbohydrates. Recently characterized D-psicose 3-epimerase (DPEase) from Agrobacterium tumefaciens was found to belong to the DTEase family and to catalyze the interconversion of D-fructose and D-psicose by epimerizing the C-3 position, with marked efficiency for D-psicose. The crystal structures of DPEase and its complex with the true substrate D-fructose were determined; DPEase is a tetramer and each monomer belongs to a TIM-barrel fold. The active site in each subunit is distinct from that of other TIM-barrel enzymes, which use phosphorylated ligands as the substrate. It contains a metal ion with octahedral coordination to two water molecules and four residues that are absolutely conserved across the DTEase family. Upon binding of D-fructose, the substrate displaces water molecules in the active site, with a conformation mimicking the intermediate cis-enediolate. Subsequently, Trp112 and Pro113 in the beta4-alpha4 loop undergo significant structural changes, sealing off the active site. Structural evidence and site-directed mutagenesis of the putative catalytic residues suggest that the metal ion plays a pivotal role in catalysis by anchoring the bound D-fructose, and Glu150 and Glu244 carry out an epimerization reaction at the C-3 position.

  6. Morpheus: a conformation-activity relationships and receptor modeling package.

    PubMed

    Andrews, P R; Quint, G; Winkler, D A; Richardson, D; Sadek, M; Spurling, T H

    1989-09-01

    Our molecular modeling software package, MORPHEUS, allows the study of the interactions between biologically active molecules and their receptors. The package is capable of exploring the multidimensional conformational space accessible to each molecule of the data set under study. By specifying distance constraints or hypothetical receptor binding points, the package is able to filter the biologically accessible conformations of each active compound and deduce a three-dimensional model of the binding sites consistent with the properties of the agonists (or antagonists) under scrutiny. The electrostatic potentials in the environment of a putative binding site can also be investigated using the MORPHEUS package. The molecular modeling module CRYS-X, which is written in FORTRAN 77 for IBM PC machines, is capable of building, displaying and manipulating molecules.

  7. Mechanism of Conversion of Light into Chemical Energy in Bacteriorhodopsin: Identification of Charge Movements and Coupling to Active Site Conformational Changes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-30

    aspartic acid in bacteriorhodopsin using two very different methods. The aspartic acid sites are of interest because FTIR spectroscopy and site...bacteria. This labels all the aspartic acid sidechains of the protein. Our work on optimization of this method will be discussed below. The second method...uses in vitro semisynthesis of parts of the bacteriorhodopsin protein to label only single aspartic acid sites. This work is in collaboration with Prof

  8. Conformation-activity relationships of opiate analgesics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jennifer; Andrews, Peter

    1987-04-01

    Extensive conformational calculations were performed on the potent opiate analgesics etorphine, PET, R30490 and etonitazene to determine all of their many low-energy conformations. The results were used to characterize four possible models for binding of a simple pharmacophore, comprising two phenyl rings plus a protonated nitrogen, to opiate analgesic receptors. These four models may define the necessary three-dimensional features leading to particular opiate actions. The model favoured for μ receptor activity can accommodate a protonated nitrogen, an aromatic ring (which may be substituted with an electronegative group) and a second lipophilic group. These structural features must be presented in a precise three-dimensional arrangement. It appears likely that a hydrophilic substituent in a certain region of the analgesic pharmacophore may also interact with the receptor as a secondary binding group.

  9. Direct Raman measurement of an elevated base pKa in the active site of a small ribozyme in a precatalytic conformation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Man; Spitale, Robert C; Volpini, Rosaria; Krucinska, Jolanta; Cristalli, Gloria; Carey, Paul R; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2009-09-16

    Catalytic RNA molecules can achieve rate acceleration by shifting base pK(a) values toward neutrality. Prior evidence has suggested that base A38 of the hairpin ribozyme plays an important role in phosphoryl transfer, possibly functioning as a general acid, or by orienting a specific water molecule for proton transfer. To address the role of A38, we used Raman spectroscopy to measure directly the pK(a) of the N1-imino moiety in the context of hairpin ribozyme crystals representative of a "precatalytic" conformation. The results revealed that the pK(a) of A38 is shifted to 5.46 +/- 0.05 relative to 3.68 +/- 0.06 derived from a reference solution of the nucleotide AMP. The elevated pK(a) correlates well with the first titration point of the macroscopic pH-rate profile of the hairpin ribozyme in solution and strongly supports A38 as a general acid catalyst in bond scission. The results confirm that A38 is protonated before the transition state, which would promote phosphorane development. Overall, the results establish a cogent structure-function paradigm that expands our understanding of how RNA structure can enhance nucleobase reactivity to catalyze biological reactions.

  10. Protein Conformational Changes Are Detected and Resolved Site Specifically by Second-Harmonic Generation.

    PubMed

    Moree, Ben; Connell, Katelyn; Mortensen, Richard B; Liu, C Tony; Benkovic, Stephen J; Salafsky, Joshua

    2015-08-18

    We present here a straightforward, broadly applicable technique for real-time detection and measurement of protein conformational changes in solution. This method is based on tethering proteins labeled with a second-harmonic generation (SHG) active dye to supported lipid bilayers. We demonstrate our method by measuring the conformational changes that occur upon ligand binding with three well-characterized proteins labeled at lysine residues: calmodulin (CaM), maltose-binding protein (MBP), and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). We also create a single-site cysteine mutant of DHFR engineered within the Met20 catalytic loop region and study the protein's structural motion at this site. Using published x-ray crystal structures, we show that the changes in the SHG signals upon ligand binding are the result of structural motions that occur at the labeled sites between the apo and ligand-bound forms of the proteins, which are easily distinguished from each other. In addition, we demonstrate that different magnitudes of the SHG signal changes are due to different and specific ligand-induced conformational changes. Taken together, these data illustrate the potential of the SHG approach for detecting and measuring protein conformational changes for a wide range of biological applications.

  11. Protein Conformational Changes Are Detected and Resolved Site Specifically by Second-Harmonic Generation

    PubMed Central

    Moree, Ben; Connell, Katelyn; Mortensen, Richard B.; Liu, C. Tony; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Salafsky, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    We present here a straightforward, broadly applicable technique for real-time detection and measurement of protein conformational changes in solution. This method is based on tethering proteins labeled with a second-harmonic generation (SHG) active dye to supported lipid bilayers. We demonstrate our method by measuring the conformational changes that occur upon ligand binding with three well-characterized proteins labeled at lysine residues: calmodulin (CaM), maltose-binding protein (MBP), and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). We also create a single-site cysteine mutant of DHFR engineered within the Met20 catalytic loop region and study the protein’s structural motion at this site. Using published x-ray crystal structures, we show that the changes in the SHG signals upon ligand binding are the result of structural motions that occur at the labeled sites between the apo and ligand-bound forms of the proteins, which are easily distinguished from each other. In addition, we demonstrate that different magnitudes of the SHG signal changes are due to different and specific ligand-induced conformational changes. Taken together, these data illustrate the potential of the SHG approach for detecting and measuring protein conformational changes for a wide range of biological applications. PMID:26287632

  12. Ligand Binding at the α4-α4 Agonist-Binding Site of the α4β2 nAChR Triggers Receptor Activation through a Pre-Activated Conformational State

    PubMed Central

    Indurthi, Dinesh C.; Lewis, Trevor M.; Ahring, Philip K.; Balle, Thomas; Chebib, Mary; Absalom, Nathan L.

    2016-01-01

    The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is the most abundant subtype in the brain and exists in two functional stoichiometries: (α4)3(β2)2 and (α4)2(β2)3. A distinct feature of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor is the biphasic activation response to the endogenous agonist acetylcholine, where it is activated with high potency and low efficacy when two α4-β2 binding sites are occupied and with low potency/high efficacy when a third α4-α4 binding site is occupied. Further, exogenous ligands can bind to the third α4-α4 binding site and potentiate the activation of the receptor by ACh that is bound at the two α4-β2 sites. We propose that perturbations of the recently described pre-activation step when a third binding site is occupied are a key driver of these distinct activation properties. To investigate this, we used a combination of simple linear kinetic models and voltage clamp electrophysiology to determine whether transitions into the pre-activated state were increased when three binding sites were occupied. We separated the binding at the two different sites with ligands selective for the α4-β2 site (Sazetidine-A and TC-2559) and the α4-α4 site (NS9283) and identified that when a third binding site was occupied, changes in the concentration-response curves were best explained by an increase in transitions into a pre-activated state. We propose that perturbations of transitions into a pre-activated state are essential to explain the activation properties of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor by acetylcholine and other ligands. Considering the widespread clinical use of benzodiazepines, this discovery of a conserved mechanism that benzodiazepines and ACh potentiate receptor activation via a third binding site can be exploited to develop therapeutics with similar properties at other cys-loop receptors. PMID:27552221

  13. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  14. Conformational changes in tertiary structure near the ligand binding site of an integrin I domain

    PubMed Central

    Oxvig, Claus; Lu, Chafen; Springer, Timothy A.

    1999-01-01

    For efficient ligand binding, integrins must be activated. Specifically, a conformational change has been proposed in a ligand binding domain present within some integrins, the inserted (I) domain [Lee, J., Bankston, L., Arnaout, M. & Liddington, R. C. (1995) Structure (London) 3, 1333–1340]. This proposal remains controversial, however, despite extensive crystal structure studies on the I domain [Lee, J., Bankston, L., Arnaout, M. & Liddington, R. C. (1995) Structure (London) 3, 1333–1340; Liddington, R. & Bankston, L. (1998) Structure (London) 6, 937–938; Qu, A. & Leahy, D. J. (1996) Structure (London) 4, 931–942; and Baldwin, E. T., Sarver, R. W., Bryant, G. L., Jr., Curry, K. A., Fairbanks, M. B., Finzel, B. C., Garlick, R. L., Heinrikson, R. L., Horton, N. C. & Kelly, L. L. (1998) Structure (London) 6, 923–935]. By defining the residues present in the epitope of a mAb against the human Mac-1 integrin (αMβ2, CD11b/CD18) that binds only the active receptor, we provide biochemical evidence that the I domain itself undergoes a conformational change with activation. This mAb, CBRM1/5, binds the I domain very close to the ligand binding site in a region that is widely exposed regardless of activation as judged by reactivity with other antibodies. The conformation of the epitope differs in two crystal forms of the I domain, previously suggested to represent active and inactive receptor. Our data suggests that conformational differences in the I domain are physiologically relevant and not merely a consequence of different crystal lattice interactions. We also demonstrate that the transition between the two conformational states depends on species-specific residues at the bottom of the I domain, which are proposed to be in an interface with another integrin domain, and that this transition correlates with functional activity. PMID:10051621

  15. List 9 - Active CERCLIS Sites:

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The List 9 displays the sequence of activities undertaken at active CERCLIS sites. An active site is one at which site assessment, removal, remedial, enforcement, cost recovery, or oversight activities are being planned or conducted.

  16. Mutations in exons 10 and 11 of human glucokinase result in conformational variations in the active site of the structure contributing to poor substrate binding - explains hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Yellapu, Nandakumar; Mahto, Manoj Kumar; Valasani, Koteswara Rao; Sarma, P V G K; Matcha, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the glucokinase (GK) gene play a critical role in the establishment of type 2 diabetes. In our earlier study, R308K mutation in GK in a clinically proven type 2 diabetic patient showed, structural and functional variations that contributed immensely to the hyperglycemic condition. In the extension of this work, a cohort of 30 patients with established type 2 diabetic condition were chosen and the exons 10 and 11 of GK were PCR-amplified and sequenced. The sequence alignment showed A379S, D400Y, E300A, E395A, E395G, H380N, I348N, L301M, M298I, M381G, M402R, R308K, R394P, R397S, and S398R mutations in 12 different patients. The structural analysis of these mutated GKs, showed a variable number of β-α-β units, hairpins, β-bulges, strands, helices, helix-helix interactions, β-turns, and γ-turns along with the RMSD variations when compared to wild-type GK. Molecular modeling studies revealed that the substrate showed variable binding orientations and could not fit into the active site of these mutated structures; moreover, it was expelled out of the conformations. Therefore, these structural variations in GK due to mutations could be one of the strongest reasons for the hyperglycemic levels in these type 2 diabetic patients.

  17. Probing Conformational Changes and Interfacial Recognition Site of Lipases With Surfactants and Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Diaz, E; Amara, S; Roussel, A; Longhi, S; Cambillau, C; Carrière, F

    2017-01-01

    Structural studies on lipases by X-ray crystallography have revealed conformational changes occurring in the presence of surfactants/inhibitors and the pivotal role played by a molecular "lid" of variable size and structure depending on the enzyme. Besides controlling the access to the enzyme active site, the lid is involved in lipase activation, formation of the interfacial recognition site (IRS), and substrate docking within the active site. The combined use of surfactants and inhibitors has been critical for a better understanding of lipase structure-function relationships. An overview of crystal structures of lipases in complex with surfactants and inhibitors reveals common structural features and shows how surfactants monomers interact with the lid in its open conformation. The location of surfactants, inhibitors, and hydrophobic residues exposed upon lid opening provides insights into the IRS of lipases. The mechanism by which surfactants promote the lid opening can be further investigated in solution by site-directed spin labeling of lipase coupled to electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. These experimental approaches are illustrated here by results obtained with mammalian digestive lipases, fungal lipases, and cutinases.

  18. Engineering a hyper-catalytic enzyme by photo-activated conformation modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Pratul K

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme engineering for improved catalysis has wide implications. We describe a novel chemical modification of Candida antarctica lipase B that allows modulation of the enzyme conformation to promote catalysis. Computational modeling was used to identify dynamical enzyme regions that impact the catalytic mechanism. Surface loop regions located distal to active site but showing dynamical coupling to the reaction were connected by a chemical bridge between Lys136 and Pro192, containing a derivative of azobenzene. The conformational modulation of the enzyme was achieved using two sources of light that alternated the azobenzene moiety in cis and trans conformations. Computational model predicted that mechanical energy from the conformational fluctuations facilitate the reaction in the active-site. The results were consistent with predictions as the activity of the engineered enzyme was found to be enhanced with photoactivation. Preliminary estimations indicate that the engineered enzyme achieved 8-52 fold better catalytic activity than the unmodulated enzyme.

  19. [Structural regularities in activated cleavage sites of thrombin receptors].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlik, I V; Verevka, S V

    1999-01-01

    Comparison of thrombin receptors activation splitting sites sequences testifies to their similarity both in activation splitting sites of protein precursors and protein proteinase inhibitors reactive sites. In all these sites corresponded to effectory sites P2'-positions are placed by hydrophobic amino-acids only. The regularity defined conforms with previous thesis about the role of effectory S2'-site in regulation of the processes mediated by serine proteinases.

  20. Identifying and quantitating conformational exchange in membrane proteins using site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Cafiso, David S

    2014-10-21

    Protein structures are not static but sample different conformations over a range of amplitudes and time scales. These fluctuations may involve relatively small changes in bond angles or quite large rearrangements in secondary structure and tertiary fold. The equilibrium between discrete structural substates on the microsecond to millisecond time scale is sometimes termed conformational exchange. Protein dynamics and conformational exchange are believed to provide the basis for many important activities, such as protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, enzymatic activity and protein allostery; however, for many proteins, the dynamics and conformational exchange that lead to function are poorly defined. Spectroscopic methods, such as NMR, are among the most important methods to explore protein dynamics and conformational exchange; however, they are difficult to implement in some systems and with some types of exchange events. Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) is an EPR based approach that is particularly well-suited to high molecular-weight systems such as membrane proteins. Because of the relatively fast time scale for EPR spectroscopy, it is an excellent method to examine exchange. Conformations that are in exchange are captured as distinct populations in the EPR spectrum, and this feature when combined with the use of methods that can shift the free energy of conformational substates allows one to identify regions of proteins that are in dynamic exchange. In addition, modern pulse EPR methods have the ability to examine conformational heterogeneity, resolve discrete protein states, and identify the substates in exchange. Protein crystallography has provided high-resolution models for a number of membrane proteins; but because of conformational exchange, these models do not always reflect the structures that are present when the protein is in a native bilayer environment. In the case of the Escherichia coli vitamin B12 transporter, BtuB, the energy

  1. Identifying and Quantitating Conformational Exchange in Membrane Proteins Using Site-Directed Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Protein structures are not static but sample different conformations over a range of amplitudes and time scales. These fluctuations may involve relatively small changes in bond angles or quite large rearrangements in secondary structure and tertiary fold. The equilibrium between discrete structural substates on the microsecond to millisecond time scale is sometimes termed conformational exchange. Protein dynamics and conformational exchange are believed to provide the basis for many important activities, such as protein–protein and protein–ligand interactions, enzymatic activity and protein allostery; however, for many proteins, the dynamics and conformational exchange that lead to function are poorly defined. Spectroscopic methods, such as NMR, are among the most important methods to explore protein dynamics and conformational exchange; however, they are difficult to implement in some systems and with some types of exchange events. Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) is an EPR based approach that is particularly well-suited to high molecular-weight systems such as membrane proteins. Because of the relatively fast time scale for EPR spectroscopy, it is an excellent method to examine exchange. Conformations that are in exchange are captured as distinct populations in the EPR spectrum, and this feature when combined with the use of methods that can shift the free energy of conformational substates allows one to identify regions of proteins that are in dynamic exchange. In addition, modern pulse EPR methods have the ability to examine conformational heterogeneity, resolve discrete protein states, and identify the substates in exchange. Protein crystallography has provided high-resolution models for a number of membrane proteins; but because of conformational exchange, these models do not always reflect the structures that are present when the protein is in a native bilayer environment. In the case of the Escherichia coli vitamin B12 transporter, Btu

  2. Conformity assessment for seismic monitoring and reservoir simulation at the Ketzin pilot site - how much conformity can be reached?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüth, Stefan; Ivanova, Alexandra; Kempka, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The EU CCS Directive defines three high-level criteria which have to be fulfilled by a site operator in the post closure phase of a storage site before liability can be transferred to the public after site closure. One of these high-level requirements is "Demonstrating conformity between observed and simulated plume behaviour". The observed plume behaviour is derived from geophysical and/or geochemical monitoring. Repeated 3D seismic observations have proven to provide the most comprehensive image of a CO2 plume in various projects such as Sleipner, Weyburn, or Ketzin. The simulated plume behaviour is derived from reservoir simulation using a model calibrated with monitoring results. Plume observations using any monitoring method are always affected by limited resolution and detection ability, and reservoir simulations will only be able to provide an approximated representation of the occurring reservoir processes. Therefore, full conformity between observed and simulated plume behaviour is difficult to achieve, if it is at all. It is therefore of crucial importance for each storage site to understand to what degree conformity can be achieved under realistic conditions, comprising noise affected monitoring data and reservoir models based on geological uncertainties. We applied performance criteria (plume footprint area, lateral migration distance, plume volume, and similarity index) for a comparison between monitoring results (4D seismic measurements) and reservoir simulations, considering a range of seismic amplitude values as noise threshold and a range of minimum thickness of the simulated CO2 plume. Relating the performance criteria to the noise and thickness threshold values allows assessing the quality of conformance between simulated and observed behaviour of a CO2 plume. The Ketzin site is provided with a comprehensive monitoring data set and a history-matched reservoir model. Considering the relatively high noise level, which is inherent for land

  3. New binding site conformations of the dengue virus NS3 protease accessed by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Hugo; Bastos, Izabela M D; Ribeiro, Bergmann M; Maigret, Bernard; Santana, Jaime M

    2013-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by four distinct serotypes of the dengue virus (DENV1-4), and is estimated to affect over 500 million people every year. Presently, there are no vaccines or antiviral treatments for this disease. Among the possible targets to fight dengue fever is the viral NS3 protease (NS3PRO), which is in part responsible for viral processing and replication. It is now widely recognized that virtual screening campaigns should consider the flexibility of target protein by using multiple active conformational states. The flexibility of the DENV NS3PRO could explain the relatively low success of previous virtual screening studies. In this first work, we explore the DENV NS3PRO conformational states obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to take into account protease flexibility during the virtual screening/docking process. To do so, we built a full NS3PRO model by multiple template homology modeling. The model comprised the NS2B cofactor (essential to the NS3PRO activation), a glycine flexible link and the proteolytic domain. MD simulations had the purpose to sample, as closely as possible, the ligand binding site conformational landscape prior to inhibitor binding. The obtained conformational MD sample was clustered into four families that, together with principal component analysis of the trajectory, demonstrated protein flexibility. These results allowed the description of multiple binding modes for the Bz-Nle-Lys-Arg-Arg-H inhibitor, as verified by binding plots and pair interaction analysis. This study allowed us to tackle protein flexibility in our virtual screening campaign against the dengue virus NS3 protease.

  4. β-Glucans: Relationships between Modification, Conformation and Functional Activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Sheng, Xiaojing; Shi, Aimin; Hu, Hui; Yang, Ying; Liu, Li; Fei, Ling; Liu, Hongzhi

    2017-02-09

    β-glucan is a type of polysaccharide which widely exists in bacteria, fungi, algae, and plants, and has been well known for its biological activities such as enhancing immunity, antitumor, antibacterial, antiviral, and wound healing activities. The conformation of β-glucan plays a crucial role on its biological activities. Therefore, β-glucans obtained from different sources, while sharing the same basic structures, often show different bioactivities. The basic structure and inter-molecular forces of polysaccharides can be changed by modification, which leads to the conformational transformation in solution that can directly affect bioactivity. In this review, we will first determine different ways to modify β-glucan molecules including physical methods, chemical methods, and biological methods, and then reveal the relationship of the flexible helix form of the molecule chain and the helix conformation to their bioactivities. Last, we summarize the scientific challenges to modifying β-glucan's conformation and functional activity, and discuss its potential future development.

  5. Protein Conformational Gating of Enzymatic Activity in Xanthine Oxidoreductase

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Eger, Bryan T.; Okamoto, Ken; Nishino, Takeshi; Pai, Emil F.

    2012-05-24

    In mammals, xanthine oxidoreductase can exist as xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and xanthine oxidase (XO). The two enzymes possess common redox active cofactors, which form an electron transfer (ET) pathway terminated by a flavin cofactor. In spite of identical protein primary structures, the redox potential difference between XDH and XO for the flavin semiquinone/hydroquinone pair (E{sub sq/hq}) is {approx}170 mV, a striking difference. The former greatly prefers NAD{sup +} as ultimate substrate for ET from the iron-sulfur cluster FeS-II via flavin while the latter only accepts dioxygen. In XDH (without NAD{sup +}), however, the redox potential of the electron donor FeS-II is 180 mV higher than that for the acceptor flavin, yielding an energetically uphill ET. On the basis of new 1.65, 2.3, 1.9, and 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures for XDH, XO, the NAD{sup +}- and NADH-complexed XDH, E{sub sq/hq} were calculated to better understand how the enzyme activates an ET from FeS-II to flavin. The majority of the E{sub sq/hq} difference between XDH and XO originates from a conformational change in the loop at positions 423-433 near the flavin binding site, causing the differences in stability of the semiquinone state. There was no large conformational change observed in response to NAD{sup +} binding at XDH. Instead, the positive charge of the NAD{sup +} ring, deprotonation of Asp429, and capping of the bulk surface of the flavin by the NAD{sup +} molecule all contribute to altering E{sub sq/hq} upon NAD{sup +} binding to XDH.

  6. Two Na+ Sites Control Conformational Change in a Neurotransmitter Transporter Homolog.

    PubMed

    Tavoulari, Sotiria; Margheritis, Eleonora; Nagarajan, Anu; DeWitt, David C; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Rosado, Edwin; Ravera, Silvia; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Forrest, Lucy R; Rudnick, Gary

    2016-01-15

    In LeuT, a prokaryotic homolog of neurotransmitter transporters, Na(+) stabilizes outward-open conformational states. We examined how each of the two LeuT Na(+) binding sites contributes to Na(+)-dependent closure of the cytoplasmic pathway using biochemical and biophysical assays of conformation. Mutating either of two residues that contribute to the Na2 site completely prevented cytoplasmic closure in response to Na(+), suggesting that Na2 is essential for this conformational change, whereas Na1 mutants retained Na(+) responsiveness. However, mutation of Na1 residues also influenced the Na(+)-dependent conformational change in ways that varied depending on the position mutated. Computational analyses suggest those mutants influence the ability of Na1 binding to hydrate the substrate pathway and perturb an interaction network leading to the extracellular gate. Overall, the results demonstrate that occupation of Na2 stabilizes outward-facing conformations presumably through a direct interaction between Na(+) and transmembrane helices 1 and 8, whereas Na(+) binding at Na1 influences conformational change through a network of intermediary interactions. The results also provide evidence that N-terminal release and helix motions represent distinct steps in cytoplasmic pathway opening.

  7. Two Na+ Sites Control Conformational Change in a Neurotransmitter Transporter Homolog*

    PubMed Central

    Tavoulari, Sotiria; Margheritis, Eleonora; Nagarajan, Anu; DeWitt, David C.; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Rosado, Edwin; Ravera, Silvia; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Forrest, Lucy R.; Rudnick, Gary

    2016-01-01

    In LeuT, a prokaryotic homolog of neurotransmitter transporters, Na+ stabilizes outward-open conformational states. We examined how each of the two LeuT Na+ binding sites contributes to Na+-dependent closure of the cytoplasmic pathway using biochemical and biophysical assays of conformation. Mutating either of two residues that contribute to the Na2 site completely prevented cytoplasmic closure in response to Na+, suggesting that Na2 is essential for this conformational change, whereas Na1 mutants retained Na+ responsiveness. However, mutation of Na1 residues also influenced the Na+-dependent conformational change in ways that varied depending on the position mutated. Computational analyses suggest those mutants influence the ability of Na1 binding to hydrate the substrate pathway and perturb an interaction network leading to the extracellular gate. Overall, the results demonstrate that occupation of Na2 stabilizes outward-facing conformations presumably through a direct interaction between Na+ and transmembrane helices 1 and 8, whereas Na+ binding at Na1 influences conformational change through a network of intermediary interactions. The results also provide evidence that N-terminal release and helix motions represent distinct steps in cytoplasmic pathway opening. PMID:26582198

  8. Exploring the Role of Conformational Heterogeneity in cis-Autoproteolytic Activation of ThnT

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, there have been major achievements in understanding the relationship between enzyme catalysis and protein structural plasticity. In autoprocessing systems, however, there is a sparsity of direct evidence of the role of conformational dynamics, which are complicated by their intrinsic chemical reactivity. ThnT is an autoproteolytically activated enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of the β-lactam antibiotic thienamycin. Conservative mutation of ThnT results in multiple conformational states that can be observed via X-ray crystallography, establishing ThnT as a representative and revealing system for studing how conformational dynamics control autoactivation at a molecular level. Removal of the nucleophile by mutation to Ala disrupts the population of a reactive state and causes widespread structural changes from a conformation that promotes autoproteolysis to one associated with substrate catalysis. Finer probing of the active site polysterism was achieved by EtHg derivatization of the nucleophile, which indicates the active site and a neighboring loop have coupled dynamics. Disruption of these interactions by mutagenesis precludes the ability to observe a reactive state through X-ray crystallography, and application of this insight to other autoproteolytically activated enzymes offers an explanation for the widespread crystallization of inactive states. We suggest that the N → O(S) acyl shift in cis-autoproteolysis might occur through a si-face attack, thereby unifying the fundamental chemistry of these enzymes through a common mechanism. PMID:24933323

  9. Investigation on the low energy conformational surface of tabun to probe the role of its different conformers on biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukku, Yuliya; Michalkova, Andrea; Majumdar, D.; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2006-05-01

    Conformational studies have been carried out on the two different enantiomers of tabun at the density functional and second order Møller-Plesset perturbation levels of theory to generate low energy potential energy surfaces in the gas phase as well as in aqueous environment. The structures of the low energy conformers together with their molecular electrostatic potential surfaces have been compared with those of the non-aged acetylcholinesterase-tabun complex to locate the active conformer of this molecule.

  10. Calcium binding to the low affinity sites in troponin C induces conformational changes in the high affinity domain. A possible route of information transfer in activation of muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Grabarek, Z; Leavis, P C; Gergely, J

    1986-01-15

    Residues 89-100 of troponin C (C89-100) and 96-116 of troponin I (I96-116) interact with each other in the troponin complex (Dalgarno, D.C., Grand, R.J.A., Levine, B.A. Moir, A., J.G., Scott, G.M.M., and Perry, S.V. (1982) FEBS Lett. 150, 54-58) and are necessary for the Ca2+ sensitivity of actomyosin ATPase (Syska, H., Wilkinson, J.M., Grand, R.J.A., and Perry, S.V. (1976) Biochem. J. 153, 375-387 and Grabarek, Z., Drabikowski, W., Leavis, P.C., Rosenfeld, S.S., and Gergely, J. (1981) J. Biol. Chem. 256, 13121-13127). We have studied Ca2+-induced changes in the region C89-100 by monitoring the fluorescence of troponin C (TnC) labeled at Cys-98 with 5-(iodoacetamidoethyl)aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid. Equilibrium titration of the labeled TnC with Ca2+ indicates that the probe is sensitive to binding to both classes of sites in free TnC as well as in its complex with TnI. When Mg2 X TnC is mixed with Ca2+ in a stopped flow apparatus, there is a rapid fluorescence increase related to Ca2+ binding to the unoccupied sites I and II followed by a slower increase (k = 9.9 s-1) that represents Mg2+-Ca2+ exchange at sites III and IV. In the TnC X TnI complex, the fast phase is much larger and the Mg2+-Ca2+ exchange at sites III and IV results in a small decrease rather than an increase in the fluorescence of the probe. The possibility is discussed that the fast change in the environment of Cys-98 upon Ca2+ binding to sites I and II may be instrumental in triggering activation of the thin filament by facilitating a contact between C89-100 and I96-116.

  11. Human insulin analogues modified at the B26 site reveal a hormone conformation that is undetected in the receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Žáková, Lenka; Kletvíková, Emília; Lepšík, Martin; Collinsová, Michaela; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Jiráček, Jiří; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.

    2014-10-01

    [AsnB26]- and [GlyB26]-insulin mutants attain a B26-turn like fold without assistance of chemical modifications. Their structures match the insulin receptor interface and expand the spectrum of insulin conformations. The structural characterization of the insulin–insulin receptor (IR) interaction still lacks the conformation of the crucial B21–B30 insulin region, which must be different from that in its storage forms to ensure effective receptor binding. Here, it is shown that insulin analogues modified by natural amino acids at the TyrB26 site can represent an active form of this hormone. In particular, [AsnB26]-insulin and [GlyB26]-insulin attain a B26-turn-like conformation that differs from that in all known structures of the native hormone. It also matches the receptor interface, avoiding substantial steric clashes. This indicates that insulin may attain a B26-turn-like conformation upon IR binding. Moreover, there is an unexpected, but significant, binding specificity of the AsnB26 mutant for predominantly the metabolic B isoform of the receptor. As it is correlated with the B26 bend of the B-chain of the hormone, the structures of AsnB26 analogues may provide the first structural insight into the structural origins of differential insulin signalling through insulin receptor A and B isoforms.

  12. Conformational equilibria and intrinsic affinities define integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Su, Yang; Xia, Wei; Qin, Yan; Humphries, Martin J; Vestweber, Dietmar; Cabañas, Carlos; Lu, Chafen; Springer, Timothy A

    2017-03-01

    We show that the three conformational states of integrin α5β1 have discrete free energies and define activation by measuring intrinsic affinities for ligand of each state and the equilibria linking them. The 5,000-fold higher affinity of the extended-open state than the bent-closed and extended-closed states demonstrates profound regulation of affinity. Free energy requirements for activation are defined with protein fragments and intact α5β1 On the surface of K562 cells, α5β1 is 99.8% bent-closed. Stabilization of the bent conformation by integrin transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains must be overcome by cellular energy input to stabilize extension. Following extension, headpiece opening is energetically favored. N-glycans and leg domains in each subunit that connect the ligand-binding head to the membrane repel or crowd one another and regulate conformational equilibria in favor of headpiece opening. The results suggest new principles for regulating signaling in the large class of receptors built from extracellular domains in tandem with single-span transmembrane domains.

  13. Influence of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide on the activity and conformation of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yitong; Ming, Zhu; Cao, Yuye; Feng, Shicheng; Yang, Hua; Chen, Lingyun; Yang, Sheng-Tao

    2017-03-08

    The dramatically different bio-effects of graphene and graphene oxide (GO) have been widely observed in diverse biological systems, which determine the applications and toxicity of graphene materials. To elucidate the mechanism at molecular level, it is urgent to investigate the enzyme-graphene interaction and its consequences. In this study, we comparatively studied the influence of GO and reduced GO (RGO) on the activity and conformation of lysozyme to provide better understandings of their different bio-effects. Both GO and RGO adsorbed large quantities of lysozyme after incubation. GO inhibited lysozyme activity seriously, while RGO nearly had no influence on the enzyme activity. The different inhibitions of enzyme activity could be explained by the lysozyme conformational changes, where GO induced more changes to the protein conformation according to UV-vis absorbance, far-UV circular dichroism spectra, intrinsic fluorescence quenching, and infrared spectra. Based on the spectroscopic changes of lysozyme, GO induced the loss of secondary structure and exposed the active site of lysozyme more to the aqueous environment. In addition, neither GO nor RGO induced the fibrillation of lysozyme after 12d incubation. The results collectively indicated that the oxidation degree significantly impacted the enzyme-graphene interaction. The implications to the designs of enzyme-graphene system for bio-related applications and the toxicological effects of graphene materials are discussed.

  14. The R163K Mutant of Human Thymidylate Synthase Is Stabilized in an Active Conformation: Structural Asymmetry and Reactivity of Cysteine 195

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Lydia M.; Lovelace, Leslie L.; Lebioda, Lukasz

    2008-06-16

    Loop 181-197 of human thymidylate synthase (hTS) populates two conformational states. In the first state, Cys195, a residue crucial for catalytic activity, is in the active site (active conformer); in the other conformation, it is about 10 {angstrom} away, outside the active site (inactive conformer). We have designed and expressed an hTS variant, R163K, in which the inactive conformation is destabilized. The activity of this mutant is 33% higher than that of wt hTS, suggesting that at least one-third of hTS populates the inactive conformer. Crystal structures of R163K in two different crystal forms, with six and two subunits per asymmetric part of the unit cells, have been determined. All subunits of this mutant are in the active conformation while wt hTS crystallizes as the inactive conformer in similar mother liquors. The structures show differences in the environment of catalytic Cys195, which correlate with Cys195 thiol reactivity, as judged by its oxidation state. Calculations show that the molecular electrostatic potential at Cys195 differs between the subunits of the dimer. One of the dimers is asymmetric with a phosphate ion bound in only one of the subunits. In the absence of the phosphate ion, that is in the inhibitor-free enzyme, the tip of loop 47-53 is about 11 {angstrom} away from the active site.

  15. Human insulin analogues modified at the B26 site reveal a hormone conformation that is undetected in the receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Žáková, Lenka; Kletvíková, Emília; Lepšík, Martin; Collinsová, Michaela; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Jiráček, Jiří; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.

    2014-01-01

    The structural characterization of the insulin–insulin receptor (IR) interaction still lacks the conformation of the crucial B21–B30 insulin region, which must be different from that in its storage forms to ensure effective receptor binding. Here, it is shown that insulin analogues modified by natural amino acids at the TyrB26 site can represent an active form of this hormone. In particular, [AsnB26]-insulin and [GlyB26]-insulin attain a B26-turn-like conformation that differs from that in all known structures of the native hormone. It also matches the receptor interface, avoiding substantial steric clashes. This indicates that insulin may attain a B26-turn-like conformation upon IR binding. Moreover, there is an unexpected, but significant, binding specificity of the AsnB26 mutant for predominantly the metabolic B isoform of the receptor. As it is correlated with the B26 bend of the B-chain of the hormone, the structures of AsnB26 analogues may provide the first structural insight into the structural origins of differential insulin signalling through insulin receptor A and B isoforms. PMID:25286859

  16. 8-Oxoguanine Affects DNA Backbone Conformation in the EcoRI Recognition Site and Inhibits Its Cleavage by the Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Kiryutin, Alexey S.; Kasymov, Rustem D.; Petrova, Darya V.; Endutkin, Anton V.; Popov, Alexander V.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Fedechkin, Stanislav O.; Brockerman, Jacob A.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Smirnov, Serge L.

    2016-01-01

    8-oxoguanine is one of the most abundant and impactful oxidative DNA lesions. However, the reasons underlying its effects, especially those not directly explained by the altered base pairing ability, are poorly understood. We report the effect of the lesion on the action of EcoRI, a widely used restriction endonuclease. Introduction of 8-oxoguanine inside, or adjacent to, the GAATTC recognition site embedded within the Drew—Dickerson dodecamer sequence notably reduced the EcoRI activity. Solution NMR revealed that 8-oxoguanine in the DNA duplex causes substantial alterations in the sugar—phosphate backbone conformation, inducing a BI→BII transition. Moreover, molecular dynamics of the complex suggested that 8-oxoguanine, although does not disrupt the sequence-specific contacts formed by the enzyme with DNA, shifts the distribution of BI/BII backbone conformers. Based on our data, we propose that the disruption of enzymatic cleavage can be linked with the altered backbone conformation and dynamics in the free oxidized DNA substrate and, possibly, at the protein—DNA interface. PMID:27749894

  17. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Two conformational states in the crystal structure of the Homo sapiens cytoplasmic ribosomal decoding A site.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Jiro; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Westhof, Eric

    2006-01-01

    The decoding A site of the small ribosomal subunit is an RNA molecular switch, which monitors codon-anticodon interactions to guarantee translation fidelity. We have solved the crystal structure of an RNA fragment containing two Homo sapiens cytoplasmic A sites. Each of the two A sites presents a different conformational state. In one state, adenines A1492 and A1493 are fully bulged-out with C1409 forming a wobble-like pair to A1491. In the second state, adenines A1492 and A1493 form non-Watson-Crick pairs with C1409 and G1408, respectively while A1491 bulges out. The first state of the eukaryotic A site is, thus, basically the same as in the bacterial A site with bulging A1492 and A1493. It is the state used for recognition of the codon/anticodon complex. On the contrary, the second state of the H.sapiens cytoplasmic A site is drastically different from any of those observed for the bacterial A site without bulging A1492 and A1493.

  19. A Two-Metal-Ion-Mediated Conformational Switching Pathway for HDV Ribozyme Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Radak, Brian K.; Harris, Michael E.; York, Darrin M.

    2016-01-01

    RNA enzymes serve as a potentially powerful platform from which to design catalysts and engineer new biotechnology. A fundamental understanding of these systems provides insight to guide design. The hepatitis delta virus ribozyme (HDVr) is a small, self-cleaving RNA motif widely distributed in nature, that has served as a paradigm for understanding basic principles of RNA catalysis. Nevertheless, questions remain regarding the precise roles of divalent metal ions and key nucleotides in catalysis. In an effort to establish a reaction mechanism model consistent with available experimental data, we utilize molecular dynamics simulations to explore different conformations and metal ion binding modes along the HDVr reaction path. Building upon recent crystallographic data, our results provide a dynamic model of the HDVr reaction mechanism involving a conformational switch between multiple non-canonical G25:U20 base pair conformations in the active site. These local nucleobase dynamics play an important role in catalysis by modulating the metal binding environments of two Mg2+ ions that support catalysis at different steps of the reaction pathway. The first ion plays a structural role by inducing a base pair flip necessary to obtain the catalytic fold in which C75 moves towards to the scissile phosphate in the active site. Ejection of this ion then permits a second ion to bind elsewhere in the active site and facilitate nucleophile activation. The simulations collectively describe a mechanistic scenario that is consistent with currently available experimental data from crystallography, phosphorothioate substitutions, and chemical probing studies. Avenues for further experimental verification are suggested. PMID:27774349

  20. A Coevolutionary Residue Network at the Site of a Functionally Important Conformational Change in a Phosphohexomutase Enzyme Family

    PubMed Central

    Furdui, Cristina; Beamer, Lesa J.

    2012-01-01

    Coevolution analyses identify residues that co-vary with each other during evolution, revealing sequence relationships unobservable from traditional multiple sequence alignments. Here we describe a coevolutionary analysis of phosphomannomutase/phosphoglucomutase (PMM/PGM), a widespread and diverse enzyme family involved in carbohydrate biosynthesis. Mutual information and graph theory were utilized to identify a network of highly connected residues with high significance. An examination of the most tightly connected regions of the coevolutionary network reveals that most of the involved residues are localized near an interdomain interface of this enzyme, known to be the site of a functionally important conformational change. The roles of four interface residues found in this network were examined via site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic characterization. For three of these residues, mutation to alanine reduces enzyme specificity to ∼10% or less of wild-type, while the other has ∼45% activity of wild-type enzyme. An additional mutant of an interface residue that is not densely connected in the coevolutionary network was also characterized, and shows no change in activity relative to wild-type enzyme. The results of these studies are interpreted in the context of structural and functional data on PMM/PGM. Together, they demonstrate that a network of coevolving residues links the highly conserved active site with the interdomain conformational change necessary for the multi-step catalytic reaction. This work adds to our understanding of the functional roles of coevolving residue networks, and has implications for the definition of catalytically important residues. PMID:22685552

  1. Examining the conformational dynamics of membrane proteins in situ with site-directed fluorescence labeling.

    PubMed

    Richards, Ryan; Dempski, Robert E

    2011-05-29

    Two electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology (TEVC) is a powerful tool to investigate the mechanism of ion transport1 for a wide variety of membrane proteins including ion channels, ion pumps, and transporters. Recent developments have combined site-specific fluorophore labeling alongside TEVC to concurrently examine the conformational dynamics at specific residues and function of these proteins on the surface of single cells. We will describe a method to study the conformational dynamics of membrane proteins by simultaneously monitoring fluorescence and current changes using voltage-clamp fluorometry. This approach can be used to examine the molecular motion of membrane proteins site-specifically following cysteine replacement and site-directed fluorophore labeling. Furthermore, this method provides an approach to determine distance constraints between specific residues. This is achieved by selectively attaching donor and acceptor fluorophores to two mutated cysteine residues of interest. In brief, these experiments are performed following functional expression of the desired protein on the surface of Xenopus leavis oocytes. The large surface area of these oocytes enables facile functional measurements and a robust fluorescence signal. It is also possible to readily change the extracellular conditions such as pH, ligand or cations/anions, which can provide further information on the mechanism of membrane proteins. Finally, recent developments have also enabled the manipulation of select internal ions following co-expression with a second protein. Our protocol is described in multiple parts. First, cysteine scanning mutagenesis proceeded by fluorophore labeling is completed at residues located at the interface of the transmembrane and extracellular domains. Subsequent experiments are designed to identify residues which demonstrate large changes in fluorescence intensity (<5%) upon a conformational change of the protein. Second, these changes in fluorescence

  2. A conformational change in the peripheral anionic site of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase induced by a bis-imidazolium oxime.

    PubMed

    Legler, Patricia M; Soojhawon, Iswarduth; Millard, Charles B

    2015-09-01

    As part of ongoing efforts to design improved nerve agent antidotes, two X-ray crystal structures of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase (TcAChE) bound to the bis-pyridinium oxime, Ortho-7, or its experimental bis-imidazolium analogue, 2BIM-7, were determined. Bis-oximes contain two oxime groups connected by a hydrophobic linker. One oxime group of Ortho-7 binds at the entrance to the active-site gorge near Trp279, and the second binds at the bottom near Trp84 and Phe330. In the Ortho-7-TcAChE complex the oxime at the bottom of the gorge was directed towards the nucleophilic Ser200. In contrast, the oxime group of 2BIM-7 was rotated away from Ser200 and the oxime at the entrance induced a significant conformational change in the peripheral anionic site (PAS) residue Trp279. The conformational change alters the surface of the PAS and positions the imidazolium oxime of 2BIM-7 further from Ser200. The relatively weaker binding and poorer reactivation of VX-inhibited, tabun-inhibited or sarin-inhibited human acetylcholinesterase by 2BIM-7 compared with Ortho-7 may in part be owing to the unproductively bound states caught in crystallo. Overall, the reactivation efficiency of 2BIM-7 was comparable to that of 2-pyridine aldoxime methyl chloride (2-PAM), but unlike 2-PAM the bis-imidazolium oxime lacks a fixed charge, which may affect its membrane permeability.

  3. Cyclic AMP Analog Blocks Kinase Activation by Stabilizing Inactive Conformation: Conformational Selection Highlights a New Concept in Allosteric Inhibitor Design*

    PubMed Central

    Badireddy, Suguna; Yunfeng, Gao; Ritchie, Mark; Akamine, Pearl; Wu, Jian; Kim, Choel W.; Taylor, Susan S.; Qingsong, Lin; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Anand, Ganesh S.

    2011-01-01

    The regulatory (R) subunit of protein kinase A serves to modulate the activity of protein kinase A in a cAMP-dependent manner and exists in two distinct and structurally dissimilar, end point cAMP-bound “B” and C-subunit-bound “H”-conformations. Here we report mechanistic details of cAMP action as yet unknown through a unique approach combining x-ray crystallography with structural proteomics approaches, amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange and ion mobility mass spectrometry, applied to the study of a stereospecific cAMP phosphorothioate analog and antagonist((Rp)-cAMPS). X-ray crystallography shows cAMP-bound R-subunit in the B form but surprisingly the antagonist Rp-cAMPS-bound R-subunit crystallized in the H conformation, which was previously assumed to be induced only by C-subunit-binding. Apo R-subunit crystallized in the B form as well but amide exchange mass spectrometry showed large differences between apo, agonist and antagonist-bound states of the R-subunit. Further ion mobility reveals the apo R-subunit as an ensemble of multiple conformations with collisional cross-sectional areas spanning both the agonist and antagonist-bound states. Thus contrary to earlier studies that explained the basis for cAMP action through “induced fit” alone, we report evidence for conformational selection, where the ligand-free apo form of the R-subunit exists as an ensemble of both B and H conformations. Although cAMP preferentially binds the B conformation, Rp-cAMPS interestingly binds the H conformation. This reveals the unique importance of the equatorial oxygen of the cyclic phosphate in mediating conformational transitions from H to B forms highlighting a novel approach for rational structure-based drug design. Ideal inhibitors such as Rp-cAMPS are those that preferentially “select” inactive conformations of target proteins by satisfying all “binding” constraints alone without inducing conformational changes necessary for activation. PMID:21081668

  4. Conformation and activity of recombinant human fibroblast interferon-beta.

    PubMed

    Boublik, M; Moschera, J A; Wei, C; Kung, H F

    1990-04-01

    Conformation of highly purified recombinant human fibroblast interferon-beta (rHuIFN-beta) was correlated with its biological activity. The extent of ordered secondary structure was determined by circular dichroic (CD) spectroscopy in various buffer conditions to establish conditions of protein stability and its potential for helix formation. The highest "helicity" (about 50 +/- 5% of alpha-helices) and the highest antiviral activities (4-10 x 10(7) units/mg) were found in 50% ethylene glycol, 1 M NaCl and 0.05 M Na3PO4, pH 7.2 (Buffer I); 80 mM citric acid, 20 mM Na2HPO4, pH 2.9 (Buffer II); and 25 mM NH4OAc, 125 mM NaCl, pH 5.1 (Buffer III). Both helicity and antiviral activity of the IFN-beta decrease in parallel with denaturation by urea, heat, and/or by repeated cycles of freezing and thawing. Low pH (pH 2.9 Buffer II) exhibits a distinct stabilizing effect on the structure and antiviral activity of IFN-beta against heat denaturation.

  5. Long-Range Inhibitor-Induced Conformational Regulation of Human IRE1α Endoribonuclease Activity.

    PubMed

    Concha, Nestor O; Smallwood, Angela; Bonnette, William; Totoritis, Rachel; Zhang, Guofeng; Federowicz, Kelly; Yang, Jingsong; Qi, Hongwei; Chen, Stephanie; Campobasso, Nino; Choudhry, Anthony E; Shuster, Leanna E; Evans, Karen A; Ralph, Jeff; Sweitzer, Sharon; Heerding, Dirk A; Buser, Carolyn A; Su, Dai-Shi; DeYoung, M Phillip

    2015-12-01

    Activation of the inositol-requiring enzyme-1 alpha (IRE1α) protein caused by endoplasmic reticulum stress results in the homodimerization of the N-terminal endoplasmic reticulum luminal domains, autophosphorylation of the cytoplasmic kinase domains, and conformational changes to the cytoplasmic endoribonuclease (RNase) domains, which render them functional and can lead to the splicing of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP 1) mRNA. Herein, we report the first crystal structures of the cytoplasmic portion of a human phosphorylated IRE1α dimer in complex with (R)-2-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)-N-(4-methylbenzyl)-2,7-diazaspiro(4.5)decane-7-carboxamide, a novel, IRE1α-selective kinase inhibitor, and staurosporine, a broad spectrum kinase inhibitor. (R)-2-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)-N-(4-methylbenzyl)-2,7-diazaspiro(4.5)decane-7-carboxamide inhibits both the kinase and RNase activities of IRE1α. The inhibitor interacts with the catalytic residues Lys599 and Glu612 and displaces the kinase activation loop to the DFG-out conformation. Inactivation of IRE1α RNase activity appears to be caused by a conformational change, whereby the αC helix is displaced, resulting in the rearrangement of the kinase domain-dimer interface and a rotation of the RNase domains away from each other. In contrast, staurosporine binds at the ATP-binding site of IRE1α, resulting in a dimer consistent with RNase active yeast Ire1 dimers. Activation of IRE1α RNase activity appears to be promoted by a network of hydrogen bond interactions between highly conserved residues across the RNase dimer interface that place key catalytic residues poised for reaction. These data implicate that the intermolecular interactions between conserved residues in the RNase domain are required for activity, and that the disruption of these interactions can be achieved pharmacologically by small molecule kinase domain inhibitors.

  6. Conformation-selective ATP-competitive inhibitors control regulatory interactions and noncatalytic functions of mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Hari, Sanjay B; Merritt, Ethan A; Maly, Dustin J

    2014-05-22

    Most potent protein kinase inhibitors act by competing with ATP to block the phosphotransferase activity of their targets. However, emerging evidence demonstrates that ATP-competitive inhibitors can affect kinase interactions and functions in ways beyond blocking catalytic activity. Here, we show that stabilizing alternative ATP-binding site conformations of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p38α and Erk2 with ATP-competitive inhibitors differentially, and in some cases divergently, modulates the abilities of these kinases to interact with upstream activators and deactivating phosphatases. Conformation-selective ligands are also able to modulate Erk2's ability to allosterically activate the MAPK phosphatase DUSP6, highlighting how ATP-competitive ligands can control noncatalytic kinase functions. Overall, these studies underscore the relationship between the ATP-binding and regulatory sites of MAPKs and provide insight into how ATP-competitive ligands can be designed to confer graded control over protein kinase function.

  7. Does ecosystem sensitivity to precipitation at the site-level conform to regional-scale predictions?.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Kevin R; Blair, John M; Smith, Melinda D; Knapp, Alan K

    2016-03-01

    Central to understanding global C cycle dynamics is the functional relationship between precipitation and net primary production (NPP). At large spatial (regional) scales, the responsiveness of aboveground NPP (ANPP) to interannual variation in annual precipitation (AP; ANPPsens) is inversely related to site-level ANPP, coinciding with turnover of plant communities along precipitation gradients. Within ecosystems experiencing chronic alterations in water availability, plant community change will also occur with unknown consequences for ANPPsens. To examine the role plant community shifts may play in determining alterations in site-level ANPPPsens, we experimentally increased precipitation by approximately 35% for two decades in a native Central U.S. grassland. Consistent with regional models, ANPPsens decreased initially as water availability and ANPP increased. However, ANPPsens shifted back to ambient levels when mesic species increased in abundance in the plant community. Similarly, in grassland sites with distinct mesic and xeric plant communities and corresponding 50% differences in ANPP, ANPPsens did not differ over almost three decades. We conclude that responses in ANPPsens to chronic alterations in water availability within an ecosystem may not conform to regional AP-ANPP patterns, despite expected changes in ANPP and plant communities. The result is unanticipated functional resistance to climate change at the site scale.

  8. Solute Probes of Conformational Changes in Open Complex Formation by E. coli RNA Polymerase at the λPR Promoter: Evidence for Unmasking of the Active Site in the Isomerization Step and for Large-Scale Coupled Folding in the Subsequent Conversion to RPo†

    PubMed Central

    Kontur, Wayne S.; Saecker, Ruth M.; Davis, Caroline A.; Capp, Michael W.; Record, M. Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Transcription initiation is a multi-step process involving a series of requisite conformational changes in RNA polymerase (R) and promoter DNA (P) that create the open complex (RPo). Here we use the small solutes urea and glycine betaine (GB) to probe the extent and type of surface area changes in the formation of RPo between Eσ70 RNA polymerase and λPR promoter DNA. Effects of urea quantitatively reflect changes in amide surface and are particularly well suited to detect coupled protein folding events. GB provides a qualitative probe for the exposure or burial of anionic surface. Kinetics of formation and dissociation of RPo reveal strikingly large effects of the solutes on the final steps of RPo formation: urea dramatically increases the dissociation rate constant kd, whereas GB decreases the rate of dissociation. Formation of the first kinetically significant intermediate I1 is disfavored in urea, and moderately favored by GB. GB slows the rate-determining step that converts I1 to the second kinetically significant intermediate I2; urea has no effect on this step. The most direct interpretation of these data is that recognition of promoter DNA in I1 involves only limited conformational changes. Notably the data support the following hypotheses: 1) the negatively charged N-terminal domain of σ70 remains bound in the “jaws” of polymerase in I1; 2) the subsequent rate-determining isomerization step involves ejecting this domain from the jaws, thereby unmasking the active site; and 3) final conversion to RPo involves coupled folding of the mobile downstream clamp of polymerase. PMID:16475805

  9. Active site-specific reconstituted copper(II) horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase: a biological model for type 1 Cu2+ and its changes upon ligand binding and conformational transitions.

    PubMed

    Maret, W; Dietrich, H; Ruf, H H; Zeppezauer, M

    1980-06-01

    Insertion of Cu2+ ions into horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase depleted of its catalytic Zn2+ ions creates an artificial blue copper center similar to that of plastocyanin and similar copper proteins. The esr spectrum of a frozen solution and the optical spectra at 296 and 77 K are reported, together with the corresponding data for binary and ternary complexes with NAD+ and pyrazole. The binary complex of the cupric enzyme with pyrazole establishes a novel type of copper proteins having the optical characteristics of Type 1 and the esr parameters of Type 2 Cu2+. Ternary complex formation with NAD+ converts the Cu2+ ion to a Type 1 center. By an intramolecular redox reaction the cuprous enzyme is formed from the cupric enzyme. Whereas the activity of the cupric alcohol dehydrogenase is difficult to assess (0.5%-1% that of the native enzyme), the cuprous enzyme is distinctly active (8% of the native enzyme). The implications of these findings are discussed in view of the coordination of the metal in native copper proteins.

  10. Coenzyme A Binding to the Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase (3)-IIIb Increases Conformational Sampling of Antibiotic Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaohu; Norris, Adrianne; Baudry, Jerome Y; Serpersu, Engin H

    2011-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy experiments and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to describe the dynamic properties of the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase (3)-IIIb (AAC) in its apo and coenzyme A (CoASH) bound forms. The {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H HSQC spectra indicate a partial structural change and coupling of the CoASH binding site with another region in the protein upon the CoASH titration into the apo enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate a significant structural and dynamic variation of the long loop in the antibiotic binding domain in the form of a relatively slow (250 ns), concerted opening motion in the CoASH enzyme complex and that binding of the CoASH increases the structural flexibility of the loop, leading to an interchange between several similar equally populated conformations.

  11. Probing the promiscuous active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase using synthetic substrates, homology modeling, and active site modification.

    PubMed

    Daniellou, Richard; Zheng, Hongyan; Langill, David M; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2007-06-26

    The active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase (IDH, EC 1.1.1.18) from Bacillus subtilis recognizes a variety of mono- and disaccharides, as well as 1l-4-O-substituted inositol derivatives. It catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the axial alcohol of these substrates with comparable kinetic constants. We have found that 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol does not act as a substrate for IDH, in contrast to structurally similar compounds such as those bearing substituted benzyl substituents in the same position. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol and 4-O-(2-naphthyl)methyl-myo-inositol, which is a substrate for IDH, shows a distinct difference in the preferred conformation of the aryl substituent. Conformational analysis of known substrates of IDH suggests that this conformational difference may account for the difference in reactivity of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol in the presence of IDH. A sequence alignment of IDH with the homologous glucose-fructose oxidoreductase allowed the construction of an homology model of inositol dehydrogenase, to which NADH and 4-O-benzyl-scyllo-inosose were docked and the active site energy minimized. The active site model is consistent with all experimental results and suggests that a conserved tyrosine-glycine-tyrosine motif forms the hydrophobic pocket adjoining the site of inositol recognition. Y233F and Y235F retain activity, while Y233R and Y235R do not. A histidine-aspartate pair, H176 and D172, are proposed to act as a dyad in which H176 is the active site acid/base. The enzyme is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate, and the mutants H176A and D172N show a marked loss of activity. Kinetic isotope effect experiments with D172N indicate that chemistry is rate-determining for this mutant.

  12. Allosteric regulation of SecA: magnesium-mediated control of conformation and activity.

    PubMed

    Gold, Vicki A M; Robson, Alice; Clarke, Anthony R; Collinson, Ian

    2007-06-15

    In bacteria, the SecA protein associates with a ubiquitous protein channel SecYEG where it drives the post-translational secretion of pre-proteins across the plasma membrane. The high-resolution structures of both proteins have been determined in their resting states; however, the mechanism that couples ATP hydrolysis to active transport of substrate proteins through the membrane is not well understood. An analysis of the steady-state ATPase activity of the enzyme reveals that there is an allosteric binding site for magnesium distinct from that associated with hydrolysis of ATP. We have demonstrated that this regulation involves a large conformational change to the SecA dimer, which exerts a strong influence on the turnover and affinity for ATP, as well as the affinity for ADP. The strong inhibitory influence of magnesium on the ATPase activity can be countered by cardiolipin and conditions that promote protein translocation.

  13. A conformational change within the WAVE2 complex regulates its degradation following cellular activation

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Noah; Biber, Guy; Fried, Sophia; Reicher, Barak; Levy, Omer; Sabag, Batel; Noy, Elad; Barda-Saad, Mira

    2017-01-01

    WASp family Verprolin-homologous protein-2 (WAVE2), a member of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) family of actin nucleation promoting factors, is a central regulator of actin cytoskeleton polymerization and dynamics. Multiple signaling pathways operate via WAVE2 to promote the actin-nucleating activity of the actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex. WAVE2 exists as a part of a pentameric protein complex known as the WAVE regulatory complex (WRC), which is unstable in the absence of its individual proteins. While the involvement of WAVE2 in actin polymerization has been well documented, its negative regulation mechanism is poorly characterized to date. Here, we demonstrate that WAVE2 undergoes ubiquitylation in a T-cell activation dependent manner, followed by proteasomal degradation. The WAVE2 ubiquitylation site was mapped to lysine 45, located at the N-terminus where WAVE2 binds to the WRC. Using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), we reveal that the autoinhibitory conformation of the WRC maintains the stability of WAVE2 in resting cells; the release of autoinhibition following T-cell activation facilitates the exposure of WAVE2 to ubiquitylation, leading to its degradation. The dynamic conformational structures of WAVE2 during cellular activation dictate its degradation. PMID:28332566

  14. Structures of glycosylated mammalian glutaminyl cyclases reveal conformational variability near the active center.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Carrillo, David; Koch, Birgit; Parthier, Christoph; Wermann, Michael; Dambe, Tresfore; Buchholz, Mirko; Ludwig, Hans-Henning; Heiser, Ulrich; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Stubbs, Milton T; Schilling, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-07-19

    Formation of N-terminal pyroglutamate (pGlu or pE) from glutaminyl or glutamyl precursors is catalyzed by glutaminyl cyclases (QC). As the formation of pGlu-amyloid has been linked with Alzheimer's disease, inhibitors of QCs are currently the subject of intense development. Here, we report three crystal structures of N-glycosylated mammalian QC from humans (hQC) and mice (mQC). Whereas the overall structures of the enzymes are similar to those reported previously, two surface loops in the neighborhood of the active center exhibit conformational variability. Furthermore, two conserved cysteine residues form a disulfide bond at the base of the active center that was not present in previous reports of hQC structure. Site-directed mutagenesis suggests a structure-stabilizing role of the disulfide bond. At the entrance to the active center, the conserved tryptophan residue, W(207), which displayed multiple orientations in previous structure, shows a single conformation in both glycosylated human and murine QCs. Although mutagenesis of W(207) into leucine or glutamine altered substrate conversion significantly, the binding constants of inhibitors such as the highly potent PQ50 (PBD150) were minimally affected. The crystal structure of PQ50 bound to the active center of murine QC reveals principal binding determinants provided by the catalytic zinc ion and a hydrophobic funnel. This study presents a first comparison of two mammalian QCs containing typical, conserved post-translational modifications.

  15. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  16. Quantitative determination of site-specific conformational distributions in an unfolded protein by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Havlin, Robert H; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2009-10-02

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are used to investigate the structure of the 35-residue villin headpiece subdomain (HP35) in folded, partially denatured, and fully denatured states. Experiments are carried out in frozen glycerol/water solutions, with chemical denaturation by guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl). Without GdnHCl, two-dimensional solid-state (13)C NMR spectra of samples prepared with uniform (13)C labeling of selected residues show relatively sharp cross-peaks at chemical shifts that are consistent with the known three-helix bundle structure of folded HP35. At high GdnHCl concentrations, most cross-peaks broaden and shift, qualitatively indicating disruption of the folded structure and development of static conformational disorder in the frozen denatured state. Conformational distributions at one residue in each helical segment are probed quantitatively with three solid-state NMR techniques that provide independent constraints on backbone varphi and psi torsion angles in samples with sequential pairs of carbonyl (13)C labels. Without GdnHCl, the combined data are well fit by alpha-helical conformations. At [GdnHCl]=4.5 M, corresponding to the approximate denaturation midpoint, the combined data are well fit by a combination of alpha-helical and partially extended conformations at each site, but with a site-dependent population ratio. At [GdnHCl]=7.0 M, corresponding to the fully denatured state, the combined data are well fit by a combination of partially extended and polyproline II conformations, again with a site-dependent population ratio. Two entirely different models for conformational distributions lead to nearly the same best-fit distributions, demonstrating the robustness of these conclusions. This work represents the first quantitative investigation of site-specific conformational distributions in partially folded and unfolded states of a protein by solid-state NMR.

  17. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  18. Conformational and activity changes during guanidine denaturation of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Xie, G F; Tsou, C L

    1987-01-05

    Changes in intrinsic protein fluorescence of lobster muscle D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate: NAD+ oxidoreductase (phosphorylating), EC 1.2.1.12) have been compared with inactivation of the enzyme during denaturation in guanidine solutions. The holoenzyme is completely inactivated at guanidine concentrations less than 0.5 M and this is accompanied by a red shift of the emission maximum at 335 nm and a marked decrease in intensity of the intrinsic fluorescence. At 0.5 M guanidine, the inactivation is a slow process, with a first-order rate constant of 2.4 X 10(-3) s-1. A further red shift in the emission maximum and a decrease in intensity occur at guanidine concentrations higher than 1.5 M. The emission peak at 410 nm of the fluorescent NAD derivative introduced at the active site of this enzyme (Tsou, C.L. et al. (1983) Biochem. Soc. Trans. 11, 425-429) shows both a red shift and a marked decrease in intensity at the same guanidine concentration required to bring about the inactivation and the initial changes in the intrinsic fluorescence of the holoenzyme. It appears that treatment by low guanidine concentrations leads to both complete inactivation and perturbation of the active site conformation and that a tryptophan residue is situated at or near the active site.

  19. Structural Differences between Active Forms of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Revealed by Conformationally Sensitive Ligands*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shih-Hon; Gorlatova, Natalia V.; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Schwartz, Bradford S.

    2008-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) in which the reactive center loop (RCL) spontaneously inserts into a central β-sheet, β-sheet A, resulting in inactive inhibitor. Available x-ray crystallographic studies of PAI-1 in an active conformation relied on the use of stabilizing mutations. Recently it has become evident that these structural models do not adequately explain the behavior of wild-type PAI-1 (wtPAI-1) in solution. To probe the structure of native wtPAI-1, we used three conformationally sensitive ligands: the physiologic cofactor, vitronectin; a monoclonal antibody, 33B8, that binds preferentially to RCL-inserted forms of PAI-1; and RCL-mimicking peptides that insert into β-sheet A. From patterns of interaction with wtPAI-1 and the stable mutant, 14-1B, we propose a model of the native conformation of wtPAI-1 in which the bottom of the central sheet is closed, whereas the top of the β-sheet A is open to allow partial insertion of the RCL. Because the incorporation of RCL-mimicking peptides into wtPAI-1 is accelerated by vitronectin, we further propose that vitronectin alters the conformation of the RCL to allow increased accessibility to β-sheet A, yielding a structural hypothesis that is contradictory to the current structural model of PAI-1 in solution and its interaction with vitronectin. PMID:18436534

  20. Characterization of the conformational alterations, reduced anticoagulant activity, and enhanced antiangiogenic activity of prelatent antithrombin.

    PubMed

    Richard, Benjamin; Swanson, Richard; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Ramirez, Ben; Izaguirre, Gonzalo; Gettins, Peter G W; Olson, Steven T

    2008-05-23

    A conformationally altered prelatent form of antithrombin that possesses both anticoagulant and antiangiogenic activities is produced during the conversion of native to latent antithrombin (Larsson, H., Akerud, P., Nordling, K., Raub-Segall, E., Claesson-Welsh, L., and Björk, I. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 11996-12002). Here, we show that the previously characterized prelatent antithrombin is a mixture of native antithrombin and a modified, true prelatent antithrombin that are resolvable by heparin-agarose chromatography. Kinetic analyses revealed that prelatent antithrombin is an intermediate in the conversion of native to latent antithrombin whose formation is favored by stabilizing anions of the Hofmeister series. Purified prelatent antithrombin had reduced anticoagulant function compared with native antithrombin, due to a reduced heparin affinity and consequent impaired ability of heparin to either bridge prelatent antithrombin and coagulation proteases in a ternary complex or to induce full conformational activation of the serpin. Significantly, prelatent antithrombin possessed an antiangiogenic activity more potent than that of latent antithrombin, based on the relative abilities of the two forms to inhibit endothelial cell growth. The prelatent form was conformationally altered from native antithrombin as judged from an attenuation of tryptophan fluorescence changes following heparin activation and a reduced thermal stability. The alterations are consistent with the limited structural changes involving strand 1C observed in a prelatent form of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (Dupont, D. M., Blouse, G. E., Hansen, M., Mathiasen, L., Kjelgaard, S., Jensen, J. K., Christensen, A., Gils, A., Declerck, P. J., Andreasen, P. A., and Wind, T. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 36071-36081), since the (1)H NMR spectrum, electrophoretic mobility, and proteolytic susceptibility of prelatent antithrombin most resemble those of native rather than those of latent antithrombin

  1. Purified human SUV3p exhibits multiple-substrate unwinding activity upon conformational change.

    PubMed

    Shu, Zhanyong; Vijayakumar, Sangeetha; Chen, Chi-Fen; Chen, Phang-Lang; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2004-04-27

    Suv3 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been classified as a mitochondrial RNA helicase. However, the helicase domain in both yeast and human SUV3 varies considerably from the typical RNA helicase motifs. To investigate its enzymatic activities, a homogeneously purified preparation of SUV3 is required. Expression of a processed form of human SUV3 carrying an N-terminal deletion of 46 amino acids (SUV3DeltaN46) in a yeast suv3 null mutant, which otherwise fails to grow in a nonfermentable carbon source and forms petite colonies in glucose medium, rescues the null phenotype. Through a five-step chromatographic procedure, an 83 kDa SUV3DeltaN46 protein (SUV3-83) and a partially degraded 70 kDa product (SUV3-70) containing amino acids 68-685 were purified to homogeneity. Single- or double-stranded DNA and RNA stimulated ATPase activity of both proteins. SUV3-70, which retains core catalytic domains, can bind and unwind multiple duplex substrates of RNA and DNA with a 5'-3' directionality over a wide range of pH, while SUV3-83 has helicase activity at only acidic pH. ATP, but not nonhydrolyzable ATP, is essential for the unwinding activity, suggesting the requirement of the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. Consistent with this notion, suv3 mutants containing alanine (A) or arginine (R) substitutions at the conserved lysine residue in the ATP binding site (K213) lost ATPase activity and also failed to unwind the substrates. Importantly, circular dichroism (CD) spectral analysis showed that SUV3-83, at pH 5.0, adopts a conformation similar to that of SUV3-70, suggesting a conformational change in SUV3-83 is required for its helicase activity. The physiological relevance of the multiple-substrate helicase activity of human SUV3 is discussed.

  2. The HHM Motif at the CuH-site of Peptidylglycine Monooxygenase is a pH-Dependent Conformational Switch†

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Chelsey D.; Mayfield, Mary; Blackburn, Ninian J.

    2013-01-01

    Peptidylglycine monooxygenase is a copper-containing enzyme which catalyzes the amidation of neuropeptide hormones, the first step of which is the conversion of a glycine-extended pro-peptide to its α-hydroxyglcine intermediate. The enzyme contains two mononuclear Cu centers termed CuM (ligated to imidazole nitrogens of H242, H244 and the thioether S of M314) and CuH (ligated to imidazole nitrogens of H107, H108 and H172) with a Cu-Cu separation of 11 Å. During catalysis, the M site binds oxygen and substrate and the H site donates the second electron required for hydroxylation. The WT enzyme shows maximum catalytic activity at pH 5.8, and undergoes loss of activity at lower pHs due to a protonation event with a pKA of 4.6. Low pH also causes a unique structural transition in which a new S ligand coordinates to copper with an identical pKA, manifest by a large increase in Cu-S intensity in the XAS. In previous work (Bauman, A. T., Broers, B. A., Kline, C. D., and Blackburn, N. J. (2011) Biochemistry 50, 10819–10828) we tentitively assigned the new Cu-S interaction to binding of M109 to the H-site (part of an HHM conserved motif common to all but one member of the family). Here we follow up on these findings via studies on the catalytic activity, pH-activity profiles, and spectroscopic (EPR, XAS and FTIR) properties of a number of H-site variants, including H107A, H108A, H172A and M109I. Our results establish that M109 is indeed the coordinating ligand, and confirm the prediction that the low pH structural transition with associated loss of activity is abrogated when the M109 thioether is absent. The histidine mutants show more complex behavior, but the almost complete lack of activity in all three variants coupled with only minor differences in their spectroscopic properties suggests that unique structural elements at H are critical for functionality. The data suggest a more general utility for the HHM motif as a copper- and pH-dependent conformational switch

  3. The Redox State Regulates the Conformation of Rv2466c to Activate the Antitubercular Prodrug TP053*

    PubMed Central

    Albesa-Jové, David; Comino, Natalia; Tersa, Montse; Mohorko, Elisabeth; Urresti, Saioa; Dainese, Elisa; Chiarelli, Laurent R.; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Manganelli, Riccardo; Makarov, Vadim; Riccardi, Giovanna; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Glockshuber, Rudi; Guerin, Marcelo E.

    2015-01-01

    Rv2466c is a key oxidoreductase that mediates the reductive activation of TP053, a thienopyrimidine derivative that kills replicating and non-replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but whose mode of action remains enigmatic. Rv2466c is a homodimer in which each subunit displays a modular architecture comprising a canonical thioredoxin-fold with a Cys19-Pro20-Trp21-Cys22 motif, and an insertion consisting of a four α-helical bundle and a short α-helical hairpin. Strong evidence is provided for dramatic conformational changes during the Rv2466c redox cycle, which are essential for TP053 activity. Strikingly, a new crystal structure of the reduced form of Rv2466c revealed the binding of a C-terminal extension in α-helical conformation to a pocket next to the active site cysteine pair at the interface between the thioredoxin domain and the helical insertion domain. The ab initio low-resolution envelopes obtained from small angle x-ray scattering showed that the fully reduced form of Rv2466c adopts a “closed” compact conformation in solution, similar to that observed in the crystal structure. In contrast, the oxidized form of Rv2466c displays an “open” conformation, where tertiary structural changes in the α-helical subdomain suffice to account for the observed conformational transitions. Altogether our structural, biochemical, and biophysical data strongly support a model in which the formation of the catalytic disulfide bond upon TP053 reduction triggers local structural changes that open the substrate binding site of Rv2466c allowing the release of the activated, reduced form of TP053. Our studies suggest that similar structural changes might have a functional role in other members of the thioredoxin-fold superfamily. PMID:26546681

  4. Lectin site ligation of CR3 induces conformational changes and signaling.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Xian M; Heflin, Katie E; Lavigne, Liz M; Yu, Kebing; Kim, Minsoo; Salomon, Arthur R; Reichner, Jonathan S

    2012-01-27

    Neutrophils provide an innate immune response to tissues infected with fungal pathogens such as Candida albicans. This response is tightly regulated in part through the interaction of integrins with extracellular matrix ligands that are distributed within infected tissues. The β(2) integrin, CR3 (CD11b/CD18), is unique among integrins in containing a lectin-like domain that binds the fungal pathogen-associated molecular pattern β-glucan and serves as the dominant receptor for recognition of fungal pathogens by human granulocytes. β-Glucan, when isolated in soluble form, has been shown to be a safe and effective immune potentiator when administered therapeutically. Currently a pharmaceutical grade preparation of β-glucan is in several clinical trials with an anti-cancer indication. CR3 binding of extracellular matrix, carbohydrate, or both ligands simultaneously differentially regulates neutrophil function through a mechanism not clearly understood. Using FRET reporters, we interrogated the effects of soluble β-glucan on intracellular and extracellular CR3 structure. Although the canonical CR3 ligand fibrinogen induced full activation, β-glucan alone or in conjunction with fibrinogen stabilized an intermediate conformation with moderate headpiece extension and full cytoplasmic tail separation. A set of phosphopeptides differentially regulated by β-glucan in a CR3-dependent manner were identified using functional proteomics and found to be enriched for signaling molecules and proteins involved in transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing, and alternative splicing. These data confirm that CR3 is a signaling pattern recognition receptor for β-glucan and represent the first direct evidence of soluble β-glucan binding and affecting a signaling-competent intermediate CR3 conformation on living cells.

  5. Characterizing Solution Surface Loop Conformational Flexibility of the GM2 Activator Protein

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    GM2AP has a β-cup topology with numerous X-ray structures showing multiple conformations for some of the surface loops, revealing conformational flexibility that may be related to function, where function is defined as either membrane binding associated with ligand binding and extraction or interaction with other proteins. Here, site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamic (MD) simulations are used to characterize the mobility and conformational flexibility of various structural regions of GM2AP. A series of 10 single cysteine amino acid substitutions were generated, and the constructs were chemically modified with the methanethiosulfonate spin label. Continuous wave (CW) EPR line shapes were obtained and subsequently simulated using the microscopic order macroscopic disorder (MOMD) program. Line shapes for sites that have multiple conformations in the X-ray structures required two spectral components, whereas spectra of the remaining sites were adequately fit with single-component parameters. For spin labeled sites L126C and I66C, spectra were acquired as a function of temperature, and simulations provided for the determination of thermodynamic parameters associated with conformational change. Binding to GM2 ligand did not alter the conformational flexibility of the loops, as evaluated by EPR and NMR spectroscopies. These results confirm that the conformational flexibility observed in the surface loops of GM2AP crystals is present in solution and that the exchange is slow on the EPR time scale (>ns). Furthermore, MD simulation results are presented and agree well with the conformational heterogeneity revealed by SDSL. PMID:25127419

  6. Effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate on the conformation and activity of bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqing; Zhang, Hongmei; Kang, Yijun; Cao, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is among the most prominent contaminates in human serum and has been reported to possess potential toxicity to the human body. In this study, the effects of PFOS on the conformation and activity of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated in vitro. The results indicated that the binding interaction of PFOS with BSA destroyed the tertiary and secondary structures of protein with the loss of α-helix structure and the increasing of hydrophobic microenvironment of the Trp or Tyr residues. During the thermal denaturation protein, PFOS increases the protein stability of BSA. The proportion of α-helix decreased on increasing the PFOS concentration and the microenvironment of the Trp or Tyr residues becomes more hydrophobic. The results from molecular modeling indicated that BSA had not only one possible binding site to bind with PFOS by the polar interaction, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic forces. In addition, the BSA relative activities were decreased with the increase of PFOS concentration. Such loss of BSA activity in the presence of PFOS indicated that one of the binding sites in BSA is located in subdomain IIIA, which is in good agreement with the fluorescence spectroscopic experiments and molecular modeling results. This study offers a comprehensive picture of the interactions of PFOS with serum albumin and provides insights into the toxicological effect of perfluoroalkylated substances.

  7. Theory of site-specific DNA-protein interactions in the presence of conformational fluctuations of DNA binding domains.

    PubMed

    Murugan, R

    2010-07-21

    We develop a theory that explains how the thermally driven conformational fluctuations in the DNA binding domains (DBDs) of the DNA binding proteins (DBPs) are effectively coupled to the one-dimensional searching dynamics of DBPs for their cognate sites on DNA. We show that the rate gammaopt, associated with the flipping of conformational states of DBDs beyond which the maximum search efficiency of DBPs is achieved, varies with the one-dimensional sliding length L as gammaopt proportional, L(-2) and with the number of roadblock protein molecules present on the same DNA m as gammaopt proportional, m2. The required free energy barrier ERTO associated with this flipping transition seems to be varying with L as ERTO proportional, variant ln L2. When the barrier height associated with the conformational flipping of DBDs is comparable with that of the thermal free energy, then the possible value of L under in vivo conditions seems to be L

  8. Detection of Ligand‐induced Conformational Changes in the Activation Loop of Aurora‐A Kinase by PELDOR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Selena G.; Grazia Concilio, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The structure of protein kinases has been extensively studied by protein crystallography. Conformational movement of the kinase activation loop is thought to be crucial for regulation of activity; however, in many cases the position of the activation loop in solution is unknown. Protein kinases are an important class of therapeutic target and kinase inhibitors are classified by their effect on the activation loop. Here, we report the use of pulsed electron double resonance (PELDOR) and site‐directed spin labeling to monitor conformational changes through the insertion of MTSL [S‐(1‐oxyl‐2,2,5,5‐tetramethyl‐2,5‐dihydro‐1 H‐pyrrol‐3‐yl)methyl methanesulfonothioate] on the dynamic activation loop and a stable site on the outer surface of the enzyme. The action of different ligands such as microtubule‐associated protein (TPX2) and inhibitors could be discriminated as well as their ability to lock the activation loop in a fixed conformation. This study provides evidence for structural adaptations that could be used for drug design and a methodological approach that has potential to characterize inhibitors in development. PMID:28032021

  9. Extended Synaptotagmin Interaction with the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Depends on Receptor Conformation, Not Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Michel G; Herdman, Chelsea; Guillou, François; Mishra, Prakash K; Baril, Joëlle; Bellenfant, Sabrina; Moss, Tom

    2015-06-26

    We previously demonstrated that ESyt2 interacts specifically with the activated FGF receptor and is required for a rapid phase of receptor internalization and for functional signaling via the ERK pathway in early Xenopus embryos. ESyt2 is one of the three-member family of Extended Synaptotagmins that were recently shown to be implicated in the formation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane (PM) junctions and in the Ca(2+) dependent regulation of these junctions. Here we show that ESyt2 is directed to the ER by its putative transmembrane domain, that the ESyts hetero- and homodimerize, and that ESyt2 homodimerization in vivo requires a TM adjacent sequence but not the SMP domain. ESyt2 and ESyt3, but not ESyt1, selectively interact in vivo with activated FGFR1. In the case of ESyt2, this interaction requires a short TM adjacent sequence and is independent of receptor autophosphorylation, but dependent on receptor conformation. The data show that ESyt2 recognizes a site in the upper kinase lobe of FGFR1 that is revealed by displacement of the kinase domain activation loop during receptor activation.

  10. Synthesis, conformation, and dopaminergic activity of 5,6-ethano-bridged derivatives of selective dopaminergic 3-benzazepines.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, J; Oh, H J; DeBrosse, C W; Eggleston, D S; Wise, M; Flaim, K E; Gessner, G W; Sawyer, J L; Kaiser, C

    1987-08-01

    To probe the suggestion that D-1 (DA1) dopamine receptors might possess an accessory pi-binding site in a location complementary to a suitably oriented aromatic ring (i.e., in an axial orientation approximately orthogonal to the catechol nucleus) in agonists such as 2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepine-7,8-diol (1) and 3',4'-dihydroxynomifensine (2) that are selective for this subtype, cis- and trans-2,3,4,8,9,9a-hexahydro-4-phenyl-1H-indeno[1,7-cd]azepine-6,7-diol were prepared. These compounds are 5,6-ethano-bridged derivatives of the D-1 selective dopamine receptor agonist 1. Introduction of the bridge reduces the conformational mobility of the parent molecule. Comprehensive conformational analyses by molecular mechanical methods indicated that both the cis and trans isomers could attain a conformation that places the phenyl substituent in an axial orientation. X-ray analysis of the trans isomer showed an axial disposition of the phenyl ring; however, NMR studies suggest that this conformation is fixed in the trans isomer, but not in the cis. The dopamine receptor binding affinity and intrinsic activity of the cis isomer were considerably greater than those of its trans counterpart; the cis isomer also demonstrated a high degree of selectivity for the D-1 subtypes. One possible explanation of these results, suggested by the molecular modeling studies, is that both the axial orientation of the phenyl postulated to be required for binding to the receptor and a putatively requisite location of the nitrogen in approximately the plane of the catechol ring can be attained only by the cis isomer in which the tetrahydroazepine ring is in a twist conformation. Conversely, these results might simply suggest a preference of the D-1 receptors for benzazepine agonists having the phenyl group in an equatorial orientation. Still another possibility is that the D-1 receptor binding site is in a sterically hindered area accessible only to compounds that are relatively

  11. The noncompetitive inhibitor WW781 senses changes in erythrocyte anion exchanger (AE1) transport site conformation and substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Knauf, P A; Raha, N M; Spinelli, L J

    2000-02-01

    WW781 binds reversibly to red blood cell AE1 and inhibits anion exchange by a two-step mechanism, in which an initial complex (complex 1) is rapidly formed, and then there is a slower equilibration to form a second complex (complex 2) with a lower free energy. According to the ping-pong kinetic model, AE1 can exist in forms with the anion transport site facing either inward or outward, and the transition between these forms is greatly facilitated by binding of a transportable substrate such as Cl(-). Both the rapid initial binding of WW781 and the formation of complex 2 are strongly affected by the conformation of AE1, such that the forms with the transport site facing outward have higher affinity than those with the transport site facing inward. In addition, binding of Cl(-) seems to raise the free energy of complex 2 relative to complex 1, thereby reducing the equilibrium binding affinity, but Cl(-) does not compete directly with WW781. The WW781 binding site, therefore, reveals a part of the AE1 structure that is sensitive to Cl(-) binding and to transport site orientation, in addition to the disulfonic stilbene binding site. The relationship of the inhibitory potency of WW781 under different conditions to the affinities for the different forms of AE1 provides information on the possible asymmetric distributions of unloaded and Cl(-)-loaded transport sites that are consistent with the ping-pong model, and supports the conclusion from flux and nuclear magnetic resonance data that both the unloaded and Cl(-)-loaded sites are very asymmetrically distributed, with far more sites facing the cytoplasm than the outside medium. This asymmetry, together with the ability of WW781 to recruit toward the forms with outward-facing sites, implies that WW781 may be useful for changing the conformation of AE1 in studies of structure-function relationships.

  12. Novel monoclonal antibodies recognizing the active conformation of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Ise, Nobuyuki; Omi, Kazuya; Miwa, Kyoko; Honda, Hideo; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Goishi, Katsutoshi

    2010-04-09

    The precise regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is crucial for its function in cellular growth control. Although many antibodies against EGFR have been developed and used to analyze its regulation and function, it is not yet easy to analyze activated EGFR specifically. Activated EGFR has been mainly detected by its phosphorylation state using anti-phospho-EGFR and anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. In the present study, we have established novel monoclonal antibodies which recognize the activated EGFR independently of its phosphorylation. Our antibodies detected active state of EGFR in immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence, by recognizing the epitopes which are exposed through the conformational change induced by ligand-binding. Furthermore, we found that our antibodies preferentially detected the conformation of constitutively active EGFR mutants found in lung cancer cell lines. These results indicate that our antibodies may become novel research and diagnostic tools for detecting and analyzing the conformation of active EGFR in various cells and tissues.

  13. Dynamic protein conformations preferentially drive energy transfer along the active chain of the photosystem II reaction centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Houdao; Yue, Alexander; Yan, Yijing; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-06-01

    One longstanding puzzle concerning photosystem II, a core component of photosynthesis, is that only one of the two symmetric branches in its reaction centre is active in electron transfer. To investigate the effect of the photosystem II environment on the preferential selection of the energy transfer pathway (a prerequisite for electron transfer), we have constructed an exciton model via extensive molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a recent X-ray structure. Our results suggest that it is essential to take into account an ensemble of protein conformations to accurately compute the site energies. We identify the cofactor CLA606 of active chain as the most probable site for the energy excitation. We further pinpoint a number of charged protein residues that collectively lower the CLA606 site energy. Our work provides insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms of the core machinery of the green-plant photosynthesis.

  14. Dynamic protein conformations preferentially drive energy transfer along the active chain of the photosystem II reaction centre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Houdao; Yue, Alexander; Yan, YiJing; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-06-23

    One longstanding puzzle concerning photosystem II, a core component of photosynthesis, is that only one of the two symmetric branches in its reaction centre is active in electron transfer. To investigate the effect of the photosystem II environment on the preferential selection of the energy transfer pathway (a prerequisite for electron transfer), we have constructed an exciton model via extensive molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a recent X-ray structure. Our results suggest that it is essential to take into account an ensemble of protein conformations to accurately compute the site energies. We identify the cofactor CLA606 of active chain as the most probable site for the energy excitation. We further pinpoint a number of charged protein residues that collectively lower the CLA606 site energy. Our work provides insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms of the core machinery of the green-plant photosynthesis.

  15. Dynamic protein conformations preferentially drive energy transfer along the active chain of the photosystem II reaction centre

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Houdao; Yue, Alexander; Yan, YiJing; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-01-01

    One longstanding puzzle concerning photosystem II, a core component of photosynthesis, is that only one of the two symmetric branches in its reaction centre is active in electron transfer. To investigate the effect of the photosystem II environment on the preferential selection of the energy transfer pathway (a prerequisite for electron transfer), we have constructed an exciton model via extensive molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a recent X-ray structure. Our results suggest that it is essential to take into account an ensemble of protein conformations to accurately compute the site energies. We identify the cofactor CLA606 of active chain as the most probable site for the energy excitation. We further pinpoint a number of charged protein residues that collectively lower the CLA606 site energy. Our work provides insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms of the core machinery of the green-plant photosynthesis. PMID:24954746

  16. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  17. An active site water network in the plasminogen activator pla from Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-07-14

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 A. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  18. Mutations inducing an active-site aperture in Rhizobium sp. sucrose isomerase confer hydrolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Alexandra; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Robert, Xavier; Rhimi, Moez; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Aghajari, Nushin

    2013-02-01

    Sucrose isomerase is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of sucrose isomers of high biotechnological and pharmaceutical interest. Owing to the complexity of the chemical synthesis of these isomers, isomaltulose and trehalulose, enzymatic conversion remains the preferred method for obtaining these products. Depending on the microbial source, the ratio of the sucrose-isomer products varies significantly. In studies aimed at understanding and explaining the underlying molecular mechanisms of these reactions, mutations obtained using a random-mutagenesis approach displayed a major hydrolytic activity. Two of these variants, R284C and F164L, of sucrose isomerase from Rhizobium sp. were therefore crystallized and their crystal structures were determined. The three-dimensional structures of these mutants allowed the identification of the molecular determinants that favour hydrolytic activity compared with transferase activity. Substantial conformational changes resulting in an active-site opening were observed, as were changes in the pattern of water molecules bordering the active-site region.

  19. Autophosphorylation Activity of a Soluble Hexameric Histidine Kinase Correlates with the Shift in Protein Conformational Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Wojnowska, Marta; Yan, Jun; Sivalingam, Ganesh N.; Cryar, Adam; Gor, Jayesh; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Djordjevic, Snezana

    2013-01-01

    Summary In a commonly accepted model, in response to stimuli, bacterial histidine kinases undergo a conformational transition between an active and inactive form. Structural information on histidine kinases is limited. By using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), we demonstrate an exchange between two conformational populations of histidine kinase ExsG that are linked to different levels of kinase activity. ExsG is an atypical signaling protein that incorporates an uncommon histidine kinase catalytic core at the C terminus preceded by an N-terminal “receiver domain” that is normally associated with the response regulator proteins in two-component signal transduction systems. IM-MS analysis and enzymatic assays indicate that phosphorylation of the ExsG receiver domain stabilizes the “compact” form of the protein and inhibits kinase core activity; in contrast, nucleotide binding required for kinase activity is associated with the more open conformation of ExsG. PMID:24210218

  20. Recent Progress in Understanding the Conformational Mechanism of Heterotrimeric G Protein Activation

    PubMed Central

    Duc, Nguyen Minh; Kim, Hee Ryung; Chung, Ka Young

    2017-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are key intracellular coordinators that receive signals from cells through activation of cognate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The details of their atomic interactions and structural mechanisms have been described by many biochemical and biophysical studies. Specifically, a framework for understanding conformational changes in the receptor upon ligand binding and associated G protein activation was provided by description of the crystal structure of the β2-adrenoceptor-Gs complex in 2011. This review focused on recent findings in the conformational dynamics of G proteins and GPCRs during activation processes. PMID:28035078

  1. Modulation of a pre-existing conformational equilibrium tunes adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ådén, Jörgen; Verma, Abhinav; Schug, Alexander; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2012-10-10

    Structural plasticity is often required for distinct microscopic steps during enzymatic reaction cycles. Adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli (AK(eco)) populates two major conformations in solution; the open (inactive) and closed (active) state, and the overall turnover rate is inversely proportional to the lifetime of the active conformation. Therefore, structural plasticity is intimately coupled to enzymatic turnover in AK(eco). Here, we probe the open to closed conformational equilibrium in the absence of bound substrate with NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. The conformational equilibrium in absence of substrate and, in turn, the turnover number can be modulated with mutational- and osmolyte-driven perturbations. Removal of one hydrogen bond between the ATP and AMP binding subdomains results in a population shift toward the open conformation and a resulting increase of k(cat). Addition of the osmolyte TMAO to AK(eco) results in population shift toward the closed conformation and a significant reduction of k(cat). The Michaelis constants (K(M)) scale with the change in k(cat), which follows from the influence of the population of the closed conformation for substrate binding affinity. Hence, k(cat) and K(M) are mutually dependent, and in the case of AK(eco), any perturbation that modulates k(cat) is mirrored with a proportional response in K(M). Thus, our results demonstrate that the equilibrium constant of a pre-existing conformational equilibrium directly affects enzymatic catalysis. From an evolutionary perspective, our findings suggest that, for AK(eco), there exists ample flexibility to obtain a specificity constant (k(cat)/K(M)) that commensurate with the exerted cellular selective pressure.

  2. The conformation of acetylcholine at its target site in the membrane-embedded nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, P. T. F.; Verhoeven, A.; Miller, K. W.; Meier, B. H.; Watts, A.

    2007-01-01

    The conformation of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine bound to the fully functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptor embedded in its native membrane environment has been characterized by using frequency-selective recoupling solid-state NMR. Six dipolar couplings among five resolved 13C-labeled atoms of acetylcholine were measured. Bound acetylcholine adopts a bent conformation characterized with a quaternary ammonium-to-carbonyl distance of 5.1 Å. In this conformation, and with its orientation constrained to that previously determined by us, the acetylcholine could be docked satisfactorily in the agonist pocket of the agonist-bound, but not the agonist-free, crystal structure of a soluble acetylcholine-binding protein from Lymnaea stagnali. The quaternary ammonium group of the acetylcholine was determined to be within 3.9 Å of five aromatic residues and its acetyl group close to residues C187/188 of the principle and residue L112 of the complementary subunit. The observed >CO chemical shift is consistent with H bonding to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor residues γY116 and δT119 that are homologous to L112 in the soluble acetylcholine-binding protein. PMID:17989232

  3. Conformational Adaptation of Asian Macaque TRIMCyp Directs Lineage Specific Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Hué, Stéphane; Rose, Nicola J.; Marzetta, Flavia; James, Leo C.; Towers, Greg J.

    2010-01-01

    TRIMCyps are anti-retroviral proteins that have arisen independently in New World and Old World primates. All TRIMCyps comprise a CypA domain fused to the tripartite domains of TRIM5α but they have distinct lentiviral specificities, conferring HIV-1 restriction in New World owl monkeys and HIV-2 restriction in Old World rhesus macaques. Here we provide evidence that Asian macaque TRIMCyps have acquired changes that switch restriction specificity between different lentiviral lineages, resulting in species-specific alleles that target different viruses. Structural, thermodynamic and viral restriction analysis suggests that a single mutation in the Cyp domain, R69H, occurred early in macaque TRIMCyp evolution, expanding restriction specificity to the lentiviral lineages found in African green monkeys, sooty mangabeys and chimpanzees. Subsequent mutations have enhanced restriction to particular viruses but at the cost of broad specificity. We reveal how specificity is altered by a scaffold mutation, E143K, that modifies surface electrostatics and propagates conformational changes into the active site. Our results suggest that lentiviruses may have been important pathogens in Asian macaques despite the fact that there are no reported lentiviral infections in current macaque populations. PMID:20808866

  4. Halting of Caspase Activity Protects Tau from MC1-Conformational Change and Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Mead, Emma; Kestoras, Dimitra; Gibson, Yolanda; Hamilton, Lucy; Goodson, Ross; Jones, Sophie; Eversden, Sarah; Davies, Peter; O'Neill, Michael; Hutton, Michael; Szekeres, Philip; Wolak, Joanna

    2016-10-18

    Intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies in which tau, a microtubule-associated protein, loses its ability to stabilize microtubules. Several post-translational modifications including phosphorylation and truncation increase tau's propensity to aggregate thus forming NFTs; however, the mechanisms underlying tau conformational change and aggregation still remain to be defined. Caspase activation and subsequent proteolytic cleavage of tau is thought to be a potential trigger of this disease-related pathological conformation. The aim of this work was to investigate the link between caspase activation and a disease-related conformational change of tau in a neuroblastoma cell-based model of spontaneous tau aggregation. We demonstrated that caspase induction initiates proteolytic cleavage of tau and generation of conformationally altered and aggregated tau recognized by the MC1 conformational antibody. Most importantly, these events were shown to be attenuated with caspase inhibitors. This implies that therapeutics aimed at inhibiting caspase-mediated tau cleavage may prove beneficial in slowing cleavage and aggregation, thus potentially halting tau pathology and disease progression.

  5. Halting of Caspase Activity Protects Tau from MC1-Conformational Change and Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Emma; Kestoras, Dimitra; Gibson, Yolanda; Hamilton, Lucy; Goodson, Ross; Jones, Sophie; Eversden, Sarah; Davies, Peter; O’Neill, Michael; Hutton, Michael; Szekeres, Philip; Wolak, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies in which tau, a microtubule-associated protein, loses its ability to stabilize microtubules. Several post-translational modifications including phosphorylation and truncation increase tau’s propensity to aggregate thus forming NFTs; however, the mechanisms underlying tau conformational change and aggregation still remain to be defined. Caspase activation and subsequent proteolytic cleavage of tau is thought to be a potential trigger of this disease-related pathological conformation. The aim of this work was to investigate the link between caspase activation and a disease-related conformational change of tau in a neuroblastoma cell-based model of spontaneous tau aggregation. We demonstrated that caspase induction initiates proteolytic cleavage of tau and generation of conformationally altered and aggregated tau recognized by the MC1 conformational antibody. Most importantly, these events were shown to be attenuated with caspase inhibitors. This implies that therapeutics aimed at inhibiting caspase-mediated tau cleavage may prove beneficial in slowing cleavage and aggregation, thus potentially halting tau pathology and disease progression. PMID:27589517

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation and conformational analysis of some catalytically active peptides.

    PubMed

    Honarparvar, Bahareh; Skelton, Adam A

    2015-04-01

    The design of stable and inexpensive artificial enzymes with potent catalytic activity is a growing field in peptide science. The first step in this design process is to understand the key factors that can affect the conformational preference of an enzyme and correlate them with its catalytic activity. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water of two catalytically active peptides (peptide 1: Fmoc-Phe1-Phe2-His-CONH2; peptide 2: Fmoc-Phe1-Phe2-Arg-CONH2) were performed at temperatures of 300, 400, and 500 K. Conformational analysis of these peptides using Ramachandran plots identified the secondary structures of the amino acid residues involved (Phe1, Phe2, His, Arg) and confirmed their conformational flexibility in solution. Furthermore, Ramachandran maps revealed the intrinsic preference of the constituent residues of these compounds for a helical conformation. Long-range interaction distances and radius of gyration (R g) values obtained during 20 ns MD simulations confirmed their tendency to form folded conformations. Results showed a decrease in side-chain (Phe1, Phe2, His ring, and Arg) contacts as the temperature was raised from 300 to 400 K and then to 500 K. Finally, the radial distribution functions (RDF) of the water molecules around the nitrogen atoms in the catalytically active His and Arg residues of peptide 1 and peptide 2 revealed that the strongest water-peptide interaction occurred with the arginine nitrogen atoms in peptide 2. Our results highlight differences in the secondary structures of the two peptides that can be explained by the different arrangement of water molecules around the nitrogen atoms of Arg in peptide 2 as compared to the arrangement of water molecules around the nitrogen atoms of His in peptide 1. The results of this work thus provide detailed insight into peptide conformations which can be exploited in the future design of peptide analogs.

  7. The effect of citric acid on the activity, thermodynamics and conformation of mushroom polyphenoloxidase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zou, Li-qiang; Liu, Jun-ping; Zhang, Zhao-qin; Liu, Cheng-mei; Liang, Rui-hong

    2013-09-01

    Few reports have focused on the effect of citric acid on thermodynamics and conformation of polyphenoloxidase (PPO). In this study, variations on activity, thermodynamics and conformation of mushroom PPO induced by citric acid (1-60mM) and relationships among these were investigated. It showed that with the increasing concentration of citric acid, the activity of PPO decreased gradually to an inactivity condition; inactivation rate constant (k) of PPO increased and the activation energy (Ea) as well as thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) decreased, which indicated that the thermosensitivity, stability and number of non-covalent bonds of PPO decreased. The conformation was gradually unfolded, which was reflected in the decrease of α-helix contents, increase of β-sheet and exposure of aromatic amino acid residuals. Moreover, two linear relationships of relative activities, enthalpies (ΔH) against α-helix contents were obtained. It indicated that changes of activity and thermodynamics might correlate to the unfolding of conformation.

  8. The uncoupled ATPase activity of the ABC transporter BtuC2D2 leads to a hysteretic conformational change, conformational memory, and improved activity

    PubMed Central

    Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; I. Gilson, Amy; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABC transporters comprise a large and ubiquitous family of proteins. From bacteria to man they translocate solutes at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Unlike other enzymes that use ATP as an energy source, ABC transporters are notorious for having high levels of basal ATPase activity: they hydrolyze ATP also in the absence of their substrate. It is unknown what are the effects of such prolonged and constant activity on the stability and function of ABC transporters or any other enzyme. Here we report that prolonged ATP hydrolysis is beneficial to the ABC transporter BtuC2D2. Using ATPase assays, surface plasmon resonance interaction experiments, and transport assays we observe that the constantly active transporter remains stable and functional for much longer than the idle one. Remarkably, during extended activity the transporter undergoes a slow conformational change (hysteresis) and gradually attains a hyperactive state in which it is more active than it was to begin with. This phenomenon is different from stabilization of enzymes by ligand binding: the hyperactive state is only reached through ATP hydrolysis, and not ATP binding. BtuC2D2 displays a strong conformational memory for this excited state, and takes hours to return to its basal state after catalysis terminates. PMID:26905293

  9. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  10. Conformational Response of 30S-bound IF3 to A-Site Binders Streptomycin and Kanamycin

    PubMed Central

    Chulluncuy, Roberto; Espiche, Carlos; Nakamoto, Jose Alberto; Fabbretti, Attilio; Milón, Pohl

    2016-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used to treat infectious diseases. Among them, streptomycin and kanamycin (and derivatives) are of importance to battle multidrug-resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Both drugs bind the small ribosomal subunit (30S) and inhibit protein synthesis. Genetic, structural, and biochemical studies indicate that local and long-range conformational rearrangements of the 30S subunit account for this inhibition. Here, we use intramolecular FRET between the C- and N-terminus domains of the flexible IF3 to monitor real-time perturbations of their binding sites on the 30S platform. Steady and pre-steady state binding experiments show that both aminoglycosides bring IF3 domains apart, promoting an elongated state of the factor. Binding of Initiation Factor IF1 triggers closure of IF3 bound to the 30S complex, while both aminoglycosides revert the IF1-dependent conformation. Our results uncover dynamic perturbations across the 30S subunit, from the A-site to the platform, and suggest that both aminoglycosides could interfere with prokaryotic translation initiation by modulating the interaction between IF3 domains with the 30S platform. PMID:27983590

  11. Conformational Response of 30S-bound IF3 to A-Site Binders Streptomycin and Kanamycin.

    PubMed

    Chulluncuy, Roberto; Espiche, Carlos; Nakamoto, Jose Alberto; Fabbretti, Attilio; Milón, Pohl

    2016-12-13

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used to treat infectious diseases. Among them, streptomycin and kanamycin (and derivatives) are of importance to battle multidrug-resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Both drugs bind the small ribosomal subunit (30S) and inhibit protein synthesis. Genetic, structural, and biochemical studies indicate that local and long-range conformational rearrangements of the 30S subunit account for this inhibition. Here, we use intramolecular FRET between the C- and N-terminus domains of the flexible IF3 to monitor real-time perturbations of their binding sites on the 30S platform. Steady and pre-steady state binding experiments show that both aminoglycosides bring IF3 domains apart, promoting an elongated state of the factor. Binding of Initiation Factor IF1 triggers closure of IF3 bound to the 30S complex, while both aminoglycosides revert the IF1-dependent conformation. Our results uncover dynamic perturbations across the 30S subunit, from the A-site to the platform, and suggest that both aminoglycosides could interfere with prokaryotic translation initiation by modulating the interaction between IF3 domains with the 30S platform.

  12. Crystallographic snapshot of the Escherichia coli EnvZ histidine kinase in an active conformation.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Hedda U; Coles, Murray; Lupas, Andrei N; Hartmann, Marcus D

    2014-06-01

    Sensor histidine kinases are important sensors of the extracellular environment and relay signals via conformational changes that trigger autophosphorylation of the kinase and subsequent phosphorylation of a response regulator. The exact mechanism and the regulation of this protein family are a matter of ongoing investigation. Here we present a crystal structure of a functional chimeric protein encompassing the entire catalytic part of the Escherichia coli EnvZ histidine kinase, fused to the HAMP domain of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus Af1503 receptor. The construct is thus equivalent to the full cytosolic part of EnvZ. The structure shows a putatively active conformation of the catalytic domain and gives insight into how this conformation could be brought about in response to sensory input. Our analysis suggests a sequential flip-flop autokinase mechanism.

  13. Conformational study of chiral penicillamine ligand on optically active silver nanoclusters with IR and VCD spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Hiroshi; Nishida, Naoki; Kimura, Keisaku

    2010-02-01

    The conformation of chiral D-/ L-penicillamine ( D-/ L-Pen) adsorbed on optically active silver nanoclusters with a mean core diameter of about 1.1 nm was investigated by infrared (IR) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy. IR spectra of the D-/ L-Pen-protected nanoclusters in D 2O/CD 3OD solution are essentially identical, but the VCD exhibits a mirror image relationship indicating that these species have enantiomeric relationship. The experimental IR and VCD spectra are compared with the calculated ones for different model conformers at the DFT/B3PW91 level. The analysis in the spectral region of ν asym(COO -) and δ sym(NH 2) modes reveals significant shortcomings when comparing with vacuum calculations. We then take a bulk solvent effect into account in the theoretical calculations to obtain better agreement, resulting in the establishment of a preferential conformation of chiral penicillamine on the silver nanocluster surface.

  14. Rounding up active cis-elements in the triple C corral: combining conservation, cleavage and conformation capture for the analysis of regulatory gene domains.

    PubMed

    McBride, David J; Kleinjan, Dirk A

    2004-11-01

    Identification and functional analysis of potential cis-regulatory elements is a laborious process that often depends on removing putative elements from their natural context to study their activity. While such methods provide valuable information about the isolated element, they disregard the potential role of an element's interaction(s) with other regulatory sequences and the three-dimensional structure of an active gene locus. Here, two novel methods are discussed--chromosome conformation capture (3C) and RNA-TRAP--that can be used to detect interactions between distal regulatory sites and which thus indicate the chromosomal conformation that is adopted by a gene locus in various states of transcriptional activity. Combined with comparative genomics and traditional DNase I hypersensitive site mapping, these methods form a powerful approach for the study of the mechanisms of long-range transcriptional regulation.

  15. How different are structurally flexible and rigid binding sites? Sequence and structural features discriminating proteins that do and do not undergo conformational change upon ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Gunasekaran, Kannan; Nussinov, Ruth

    2007-01-05

    Proteins are dynamic molecules and often undergo conformational change upon ligand binding. It is widely accepted that flexible loop regions have a critical functional role in enzymes. Lack of consideration of binding site flexibility has led to failures in predicting protein functions and in successfully docking ligands with protein receptors. Here we address the question: which sequence and structural features distinguish the structurally flexible and rigid binding sites? We analyze high-resolution crystal structures of ligand bound (holo) and free (apo) forms of 41 proteins where no conformational change takes place upon ligand binding, 35 examples with moderate conformational change, and 22 cases where a large conformational change has been observed. We find that the number of residue-residue contacts observed per-residue (contact density) does not distinguish flexible and rigid binding sites, suggesting a role for specific interactions and amino acids in modulating the conformational changes. Examination of hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions reveals that cases that do not undergo conformational change have high polar interactions constituting the binding pockets. Intriguingly, the large, aromatic amino acid tryptophan has a high propensity to occur at the binding sites of examples where a large conformational change has been noted. Further, in large conformational change examples, hydrophobic-hydrophobic, aromatic-aromatic, and hydrophobic-polar residue pair interactions are dominant. Further analysis of the Ramachandran dihedral angles (phi, psi) reveals that the residues adopting disallowed conformations are found in both rigid and flexible cases. More importantly, the binding site residues adopting disallowed conformations clustered narrowly into two specific regions of the L-Ala Ramachandran map. Examination of the dihedral angles changes upon ligand binding shows that the magnitude of phi, psi changes are in general minimal, although some large

  16. Conformational variability of the glycine receptor M2 domain in response to activation by different agonists.

    PubMed

    Pless, Stephan A; Dibas, Mohammed I; Lester, Henry A; Lynch, Joseph W

    2007-12-07

    Models describing the structural changes mediating Cys loop receptor activation generally give little attention to the possibility that different agonists may promote activation via distinct M2 pore-lining domain structural rearrangements. We investigated this question by comparing the effects of different ligands on the conformation of the external portion of the homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor M2 domain. Conformational flexibility was assessed by tethering a rhodamine fluorophore to cysteines introduced at the 19' or 22' positions and monitoring fluorescence and current changes during channel activation. During glycine activation, fluorescence of the label attached to R19'C increased by approximately 20%, and the emission peak shifted to lower wavelengths, consistent with a more hydrophobic fluorophore environment. In contrast, ivermectin activated the receptors without producing a fluorescence change. Although taurine and beta-alanine were weak partial agonists at the alpha1R19'C glycine receptor, they induced large fluorescence changes. Propofol, which drastically enhanced these currents, did not induce a glycine-like blue shift in the spectral emission peak. The inhibitors strychnine and picrotoxin elicited fluorescence and current changes as expected for a competitive antagonist and an open channel blocker, respectively. Glycine and taurine (or beta-alanine) also produced an increase and a decrease, respectively, in the fluorescence of a label attached to the nearby L22'C residue. Thus, results from two separate labeled residues support the conclusion that the glycine receptor M2 domain responds with distinct conformational changes to activation by different agonists.

  17. Structures of native and complexed complement factor D: implications of the atypical His57 conformation and self-inhibitory loop in the regulation of specific serine protease activity.

    PubMed

    Jing, H; Babu, Y S; Moore, D; Kilpatrick, J M; Liu, X Y; Volanakis, J E; Narayana, S V

    1998-10-09

    Factor D is a serine protease essential for the activation of the alternative pathway of complement. The structures of native factor D and a complex formed with isatoic anhydride inhibitor were determined at resolution of 2.3 and 1.5 A, respectively, in an isomorphous monoclinic crystal form containing one molecule per asymmetric unit. The native structure was compared with structures determined previously in a triclinic cell containing two molecules with different active site conformations. The current structure shows greater similarity with molecule B in the triclinic cell, suggesting that this may be the dominant factor D conformation in solution. The major conformational differences with molecule A in the triclinic cell are located in four regions, three of which are close to the active site and include some of the residues shown to be critical for factor D catalytic activity. The conformational flexibility associated with these regions is proposed to provide a structural basis for the previously proposed substrate-induced reversible conformational changes in factor D. The high-resolution structure of the factor D/isatoic anhydride complex reveals the binding mode of the mechanism-based inhibitor. The higher specificity towards factor D over trypsin and thrombin is based on hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitor benzyl ring and the aliphatic side-chain of Arg218 that is salt bridged with Asp189 at the bottom of the primary specificity (S1) pocket. Comparison of factor D structural variants with other serine protease structures revealed the presence of a unique "self-inhibitory loop". This loop (214-218) dictates the resting-state conformation of factor D by (1) preventing His57 from adopting active tautomer conformation, (2) preventing the P1 to P3 residues of the substrate from forming anti-parallel beta-sheets with the non-specific substrate binding loop, and (3) blocking the accessibility of Asp189 to the positive1y charged P1 residue of the

  18. Exploiting conformational dynamics in drug discovery: design of C-terminal inhibitors of Hsp90 with improved activities

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Elisabetta; Zhao, Huiping; Blagg, Brian S.J.; Colombo, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    The interaction that occurs between molecules is a dynamic process that impacts both structural and conformational properties of the ligand and the ligand binding site. Herein, we investigate the dynamic cross-talk between a protein and the ligand as a source for new opportunities in ligand design. Analysis of the formation/disappearance of protein pockets produced in response to a first-generation inhibitor assisted in the identification of functional groups that could be introduced onto scaffolds to facilitate optimal binding, which allowed for increased binding with previously uncharacterized regions. MD simulations were used to elucidate primary changes that occur in the Hsp90 C-terminal binding pocket in the presence of first-generation ligands. This data was then used to design ligands that adapt to these receptor conformations, which provides access to an energy landscape that is not visible in a static model. The newly synthesized compounds demonstrated anti-proliferative activity at ~150 nanomolar concentration. The method identified herein may be used to design chemical probes that provide additional information on structural variations of Hsp90 C-terminal binding site. PMID:24397468

  19. Non-enzymatic Glycation of Almond Cystatin Leads to Conformational Changes and Altered Activity.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Azad A; Sohail, Aamir; Bhat, Sheraz A; Rehman, Md T; Bano, Bilqees

    2015-01-01

    The non-enzymatic reaction between proteins and reducing sugars, known as glycation, leads to the formation of inter and intramolecular cross-links of proteins. Stable end products called as advanced Maillard products or advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have received tremendous attention since last decades. It was suggested that the formation of AGEs not only modify the conformation of proteins but also induces altered biological activity. In this study, cystatin purified from almond was incubated with three different sugars namely D-ribose, fructose and lactose to monitor the glycation process. Structural changes induced in cystatin on glycation were studied using UV-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, CD and FTIR techniques. Glycated cystatin was found to migrate slower on electrophoresis as compared to control cystatin. Biological activity data of glycated cystatin showed that D-ribose was most effective in inducing conformational changes with maximum altered activity.

  20. Evidence for segmental mobility in the active site of pepsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, J.; Strop, P.; Senn, H.; Foundling, S.; Kostka, V.

    1986-05-01

    The low hydrolytic activity (k/sub cat/ < 0.001 s/sup -1/) of chicken pepsin (CP) towards tri- and tetrapeptides is enhanced at least 100 times by modification of its single sulfhydryl group of Cys-115, with little effect on K/sub m/-values. Modification thus simulates the effect of secondary substrate binding on pepsin catalysis. The rate of Cys-115 modification is substantially decreased in the presence of some competitive inhibitors, suggesting its active site location. Experiments with CP alkylated at Cys-115 with Acrylodan as a fluorescent probe or with N-iodoacetyl-(4-fluoro)-aniline as a /sup 19/F-nmr probe suggest conformation change around Cys-115 to occur on substrate or substrate analog binding. The difference /sup 1/H-nmr spectra (500 MHz) of unmodified free and inhibitor-complexed CP reveal chemical shifts almost exclusively in the aromatic region. The effects of Cu/sup + +/ on /sup 19/F- and /sup 1/H-nmr spectra have been studied. Examination of a computer graphics model of CP based on E. parasitica pepsin-inhibitor complex X-ray coordinates suggests that Cys-115 is located near the S/sub 3//S/sub 5/ binding site. The results are interpreted in favor of segmental mobility of this region important for pepsin substrate binding and catalysis.

  1. Small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering reveal conformational changes in rhodopsin activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Utsab R.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Perera, Suchitrhanga M. C. D.; Chawla, Udeep; Struts, Andrey V.; Graziono, Vito; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Heller, William T.; Qian, Shuo; Brown, Michael F.; Chu, Xiang-Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Understanding G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation plays a crucial role in the development of novel improved molecular drugs. During photo-activation, the retinal chromophore of the visual GPCR rhodopsin isomerizes from 11-cis to all-trans conformation, yielding an equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. The principal goals of this work are to address whether the activation of rhodopsin leads to a single state or a conformational ensemble, and how protein organizational structure changes with detergent environment in solution. We use both small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques to answer the above questions. For the first time we observe the change in protein conformational ensemble upon photo-activation by SANS with contrast variation, which enables the separate study of the protein structure within the detergent assembly. In addition, SAXS study of protein structure within detergent assembly suggests that the detergent molecules form a belt of monolayer (micelle) around protein with different geometrical shapes to keep the protein in folded state.

  2. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-06

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions.

  3. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C.; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F.; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W.; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa. Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  4. Corrosion Research And Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  5. Corrosion Research and Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  6. Cd-substituted horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase: catalytic site metal coordination geometry and protein conformation.

    PubMed

    Hemmingsen, L; Bauer, R; Bjerrum, M J; Zeppezauer, M; Adolph, H W; Formicka, G; Cedergren-Zeppezauer, E

    1995-05-30

    The coordination geometry of the catalytic site in Cd-substituted horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH) has been investigated as a function of pH using the method of perturbed angular correlation of gamma-rays (PAC). LADH in solution fully loaded with cadmium, including radioactive 111mCd in the catalytic site [Cd2(111mCd)Cd2LADH], was studied over the pH range 7.9-11.5. Analysis of the PAC spectra showed the ionization of a group with pKa of 11. This pKa value is about 2 pH units higher than that of native zinc-containing LADH. A pKa of 9.6 was found for the binary complex of Cd2(111mCd)Cd2LADH with NAD+. This value is also about 2 pH units higher than that of the binary complex of native zinc-containing enzyme and NAD+. No pH dependency was detected for the binary complex of Cd2(111mCd)Cd2LADH with NADH within the pH range measured (pH 8.3-11.5). Assuming that metal-coordinated water is the ionizing group [Kvassman, J., & Pettersson, G. (1979) Eur. J. Biochem. 100, 115-123], we conclude that the larger ionic radius of Cd(II) relative to Zn(II) in the catalytic site causes the elevated pKa values of metal-bound water. Interpretation of nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) parameters derived from PAC spectra is based on the use of the angular overlap model, using the coordinates for the catalytic zinc site from the 1.8 A resolution crystal structure of the ternary complex between LADH, NADH, and dimethyl sulfoxide as a model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Structure of the Catalytic Domain of EZH2 Reveals Conformational Plasticity in Cofactor and Substrate Binding Sites and Explains Oncogenic Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Dong, Aiping; Li, Fengling; He, Hao; Senisterra, Guillermo; Seitova, Alma; Duan, Shili; Brown, Peter J.; Vedadi, Masoud; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Schapira, Matthieu

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is an important regulator of cellular differentiation and cell type identity. Overexpression or activating mutations of EZH2, the catalytic component of the PRC2 complex, are linked to hyper-trimethylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3) in many cancers. Potent EZH2 inhibitors that reduce levels of H3K27me3 kill mutant lymphoma cells and are efficacious in a mouse xenograft model of malignant rhabdoid tumors. Unlike most SET domain methyltransferases, EZH2 requires PRC2 components, SUZ12 and EED, for activity, but the mechanism by which catalysis is promoted in the PRC2 complex is unknown. We solved the 2.0 Å crystal structure of the EZH2 methyltransferase domain revealing that most of the canonical structural features of SET domain methyltransferase structures are conserved. The site of methyl transfer is in a catalytically competent state, and the structure clarifies the structural mechanism underlying oncogenic hyper-trimethylation of H3K27 in tumors harboring mutations at Y641 or A677. On the other hand, the I-SET and post-SET domains occupy atypical positions relative to the core SET domain resulting in incomplete formation of the cofactor binding site and occlusion of the substrate binding groove. A novel CXC domain N-terminal to the SET domain may contribute to the apparent inactive conformation. We propose that protein interactions within the PRC2 complex modulate the trajectory of the post-SET and I-SET domains of EZH2 in favor of a catalytically competent conformation. PMID:24367611

  8. Conformational basis for substrate recognition and regulation of catalytic activity in Staphylococcus aureus nucleoside di-phosphate kinase.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sandeep Kumar; Rajasree, Kalagiri; Gopal, B

    2011-10-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDK) are characterized by high catalytic turnover rates and diverse substrate specificity. These features make this enzyme an effective activator of a pro-drug-an application that has been actively pursued for a variety of therapeutic strategies. The catalytic mechanism of this enzyme is governed by a conserved histidine that coordinates a magnesium ion at the active site. Despite substantial structural and biochemical information on NDK, the mechanistic feature of the phospho-transfer that leads to auto-phosphorylation remains unclear. While the role of the histidine residue is well documented, the other active site residues, in particular the conserved serine remains poorly characterized. Studies on some homologues suggest no role for the serine residue at the active site, while others suggest a crucial role for this serine in the regulation and quaternary association of this enzyme in some species. Here we report the biochemical features of the Staphylococcus aureus NDK and the mutant enzymes. We also describe the crystal structures of the apo-NDK, as a transition state mimic with vanadate and in complex with different nucleotide substrates. These structures formed the basis for molecular dynamics simulations to understand the broad substrate specificity of this enzyme and the role of active site residues in the phospho-transfer mechanism and oligomerization. Put together, these data suggest that concerted changes in the conformation of specific residues facilitate the stabilization of nucleotide complexes thereby enabling the steps involved in the ping-pong reaction mechanism without large changes to the overall structure of this enzyme.

  9. Structure- and conformation-activity studies of nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor dimeric ligands

    PubMed Central

    Pacifico, Salvatore; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Brancaccio, Diego; Novellino, Ettore; Marzola, Erika; Ferrari, Federica; Cerlesi, Maria Camilla; Trapella, Claudio; Preti, Delia; Salvadori, Severo; Calò, Girolamo; Guerrini, Remo

    2017-01-01

    The peptide nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) and the N/OFQ receptor (NOP) constitute a neuropeptidergic system that modulates various biological functions and is currently targeted for the generation of innovative drugs. In the present study dimeric NOP receptor ligands with spacers of different lengths were generated using both peptide and non-peptide pharmacophores. The novel compounds (12 peptide and 7 nonpeptide ligands) were pharmacologically investigated in a calcium mobilization assay and in the mouse vas deferens bioassay. Both structure- and conformation-activity studies were performed. Results demonstrated that dimerization did not modify the pharmacological activity of both peptide and non-peptide pharmacophores. Moreover, when dimeric compounds were obtained with low potency peptide pharmacophores, dimerization recovered ligand potency. This effect depends on the doubling of the C-terminal address sequence rather than the presence of an additional N-terminal message sequence or modifications of peptide conformation. PMID:28383520

  10. Trehalose induces functionally active conformation in the intrinsically disordered N-terminal domain of glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shagufta H; Jasuja, Ravi; Kumar, Raj

    2016-08-05

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a classic member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and plays pivotal roles in human physiology at the level of gene regulation. Various constellations of cellular cofactors are required to associate with GR to activate/repress genes. The effects of specific ligands on the AF2 structure and consequent preferential binding of co-activators or co-repressors have helped our understanding of the mechanisms involved. But the data so far fall short of fully explaining GR actions. We believe that this is because work so far has largely avoided detailed examination of the contributions of AF1 to overall GR actions. It has been shown that the GR containing only the N-terminal domain (NTD) and the DNA-binding domain (GR500) is constitutively quite active in stimulating transcription from simple promoters. However, we are only beginning to understand structure and functions of GR500 in spite of the fact that AF1 located within the NTD serves as major transactivation domain for GR. Lack of this information has hampered our complete understanding of how GR regulates its target gene(s). The major obstacle in determining GR500 structure has been due to its intrinsically disordered NTD conformation, frequently found in transcription factors. In this study, we tested whether a naturally occurring osmolyte, trehalose, can promote functionally ordered conformation in GR500. Our data show that in the presence of trehalose, GR500 is capable of formation of a native-like functionally folded conformation.

  11. A neglected modulator of insulin-degrading enzyme activity and conformation: The pH.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Giuseppe; Satriano, Cristina; Milardi, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a ubiquitously expressed zinc metalloprotease, has multiple activities in addition to insulin degradation and its malfunction is believed to connect type 2 diabetes with Alzheimer's disease. IDE has been found in many different cellular compartments, where it may experience significant physio-pathological pH variations. However, the exact role of pH variations on the interplay between enzyme conformations, stability, oligomerization state and catalysis is not understood. Here, we use ESI mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy, surface plasmon resonance and circular dichroism to investigate the structure-activity relationship of IDE at different pH values. We show that acidic pH affects the ability of the enzyme to bind the substrate and decrease the stability of the protein by inducing an α-helical bundle conformation with a concomitant dissociation of multi-subunit IDE assemblies into monomeric units and loss of activity. These effects suggest a major role played by electrostatic forces in regulating multi-subunit enzyme assembly and function. Our results clearly indicate a pH dependent coupling among enzyme conformation, assembly and stability and suggest that cellular acidosis can have a large effect on IDE oligomerization state, inducing an enzyme inactivation and an altered insulin degradation that could have an impact on insulin signaling.

  12. Synthesis, conformational analysis, and biological activity of C-thioribonucleosides related to tiazofurin.

    PubMed

    Franchetti, P; Marchetti, S; Cappellacci, L; Jayaram, H N; Yalowitz, J A; Goldstein, B M; Barascut, J L; Dukhan, D; Imbach, J L; Grifantini, M

    2000-04-06

    The syntheses of furanthiofurin [5beta-D-(4'-thioribofuranosyl)furan-3-carboxamide, 1] and thiophenthiofurin [5beta-D-(4'-thioribofuranosyl)thiophene-3-carboxamide, 2], two C-thioribonucleoside analogues of tiazofurin, are described. Direct trifluoroacetic acid-catalyzed C-glycosylation of ethyl furan-3-carboxylate with 1-O-acetyl-2,3,5-tri-O-benzyl-4-thio-D-ribofuranose gave 2- and 5-glycosylated regioisomers, as a mixture of alpha and beta anomers. Ethyl 5-(2,3,5-tri-O-benzyl)-beta-D-(4'-thioribofuranosyl)furan-3-carboxylate (6beta) was debenzylated and then converted into the corresponding amide (furanthiofurin) by reaction with ammonium hydroxide. A similar C-glycosylation of ethyl thiophene-3-carboxylate with 1,2,3,5-tetra-O-acetyl-4-thio-D-ribofuranose catalyzed by stannic chloride afforded an anomeric mixture of 2- and 5-glycosylated regioisomers. Deacetylation of ethyl 5-(2,3,5-tri-O-acetyl)-beta-D-(4'-thioribofuranosyl)thiophene-3-carboxylate (13beta) with methanolic ammonia and treatment of the ethyl ester with ammonium hydroxide gave thiophenthiofurin. The glycosylation site and anomeric configuration were established by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Thiophenthiofurin was found to be cytotoxic in vitro toward human myelogenous leukemia K562, albeit 39-fold less than thiophenfurin, while furanthiofurin proved to be inactive. K562 cells incubated with thiophenthiofurin resulted in inhibition of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and an increase in IMP pools with a concurrent decrease in GTP levels. From computational studies it was deduced that, among the C-nucleoside analogues of tiazofurin, activity requires an electrophilic sulfur adjacent to the C-glycosidic bond and an energetically favorable conformer around chi = 0 degrees. Among these, the more constrained (least flexible) compounds (tiazofurin and thiophenfurin) are more active than the less constrained thiophenthiofurin. Those compounds which contain a nucleophilic oxygen in place of the

  13. Conformational changes in the metal-binding sites of cardiac troponin C induced by calcium binding

    SciTech Connect

    Krudy, G.A.; Brito, R.M.M.; Putkey, J.A.; Rosevear, P.R. )

    1992-02-18

    Isotope labeling of recombinant normal cardiac troponin C (cTnC3) with {sup 15}N-enriched amino acids and multidimensional NMR were used to assign the downfield-shifted amide protons of Gly residues at position 6 in Ca{sup 2+}-binding loops II, III, and IV, as well a tightly hydrogen-bonded amides within the short antiparallel {beta}-sheets between pairs of Ca{sup 2+}-binding loops. The amide protons of Gly70, Gly110, and Gly146 were found to be shifted significantly downfield from the remaining amide proton resonances in Ca{sup 2+}-saturated cTnC3. No downfield-shifted Gly resonance was observed from the naturally inactive site I. Comparison of downfield-shifted amide protons in the Ca{sup 2+}-saturated forms of cTnC3 and CBM-IIA, a mutant having Asp65 replaced by Ala, demonstrated the Gly70 is hydrogen bonded to the carboxylate side chain of Asp65. Thus, the hydrogen bond between Gly and Asp in positions 6 and 1, respectively, of the Ca{sup 2+}-binding loop appears crucial for maintaining the integrity of the helix-loop-helix Ca{sup 2+}-binding sites. The amide protons of Ile112 and Ile148 in the C-terminal domain and Ile36 in the N-terminal domain {beta}-sheets exhibit chemical shifts consistent with hydrogen-bond formation between the pair of Ca{sup 2+}-binding loops in each domain of Ca{sup 2+}-saturated cTnC3. In the absence of Ca{sup 2+}, no strong hydrogen bonds were detected between the {beta}-strands in the N-terminal domain of cTnC3. Thus, Ca{sup 2+} binding at site II results in a tightening of the Ca{sup 2+}-binding loop and formation of one strong hydrogen bond between {beta}-strands in the N-terminal domain. These changes may initiate movement of helices in the N-terminal domain responsible for the interaction of TnC with troponin I.

  14. Involved-Site Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Versus 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Early Stage Supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ciammella, Patrizia; Piva, Cristina; Ragona, Riccardo; Botto, Barbara; Gavarotti, Paolo; Merli, Francesco; Vitolo, Umberto; Iotti, Cinzia; Ricardi, Umberto

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows for margin reduction and highly conformal dose distribution, with consistent advantages in sparing of normal tissues. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare involved-site IG-IMRT with involved-site 3D conformal RT (3D-CRT) in the treatment of early stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) involving the mediastinum, with efficacy and toxicity as primary clinical endpoints. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 90 stage IIA HL patients treated with either involved-site 3D-CRT or IG-IMRT between 2005 and 2012 in 2 different institutions. Inclusion criteria were favorable or unfavorable disease (according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria), complete response after 3 to 4 cycles of an adriamycin- bleomycin-vinblastine-dacarbazine (ABVD) regimen plus 30 Gy as total radiation dose. Exclusion criteria were chemotherapy other than ABVD, partial response after ABVD, total radiation dose other than 30 Gy. Clinical endpoints were relapse-free survival (RFS) and acute toxicity. Results: Forty-nine patients were treated with 3D-CRT (54.4%) and 41 with IG-IMRT (45.6%). Median follow-up time was 54.2 months for 3D-CRT and 24.1 months for IG-IMRT. No differences in RFS were observed between the 2 groups, with 1 relapse each. Three-year RFS was 98.7% for 3D-CRT and 100% for IG-IMRT. Grade 2 toxicity events, mainly mucositis, were recorded in 32.7% of 3D-CRT patients (16 of 49) and in 9.8% of IG-IMRT patients (4 of 41). IG-IMRT was significantly associated with a lower incidence of grade 2 acute toxicity (P=.043). Conclusions: RFS rates at 3 years were extremely high in both groups, albeit the median follow-up time is different. Acute tolerance profiles were better for IG-IMRT than for 3D-CRT. Our preliminary results support the clinical safety and efficacy of advanced RT planning and delivery techniques in patients affected with early stage HL, achieving complete

  15. Conformational changes accompany activation of reovirus RNA-dependent RNA transcription

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Israel I.; Weiner, Scott G.; She, Yi-Min; Yeager, Mark; Coombs, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    Many critical biologic processes involve dynamic interactions between proteins and nucleic acids. Such dynamic processes are often difficult to delineate by conventional static methods. For example, while a variety of nucleic acid polymerase structures have been determined at atomic resolution, the details of how some multi-protein transcriptase complexes actively produce mRNA, as well as conformational changes associated with activation of such complexes, remain poorly understood. The mammalian reovirus innermost capsid (core) manifests all enzymatic activities necessary to produce mRNA from each of the 10 encased double-stranded RNA genes. We used rapid freezing and electron cryo-microscopy to trap and visualize transcriptionally active reovirus core particles and compared them to inactive core images. Rod-like density centered within actively transcribing core spike channels was attributed to exiting nascent mRNA. Comparative radial density plots of active and inactive core particles identified several structural changes in both internal and external regions of the icosahedral core capsid. Inactive and transcriptionally active cores were partially digested with trypsin and identities of initial tryptic peptides determined by mass spectrometry. Differentially-digested peptides, which also suggest transcription-associated conformational changes, were placed within the known 3-dimensional structures of major core proteins. PMID:18321727

  16. The pepsin residue glycine-76 contributes to active-site loop flexibility and participates in catalysis.

    PubMed Central

    Okoniewska, M; Tanaka, T; Yada, R Y

    2000-01-01

    Glycine residues are known to contribute to conformational flexibility of polypeptide chains, and have been found to contribute to flexibility of some loops associated with enzymic catalysis. A comparison of porcine pepsin in zymogen, mature and inhibited forms revealed that a loop (a flap), consisting of residues 71--80, located near the active site changed its position upon substrate binding. The loop residue, glycine-76, has been implicated in the catalytic process and thought to participate in a hydrogen-bond network aligning the substrate. This study investigated the role of glycine-76 using site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutants, G76A, G76V and G76S, were constructed to increase conformational restriction of a polypeptide chain. In addition, the serine mutant introduced a hydrogen-bonding potential at position 76 similar to that observed in human renin. All the mutants, regardless of amino acid size and polarity, had lower catalytic efficiency and activated more slowly than the wild-type enzyme. The slower activation process was associated directly with altered proteolytic activity. Consequently, it was proposed that a proteolytic cleavage represents a limiting step of the activation process. Lower catalytic efficiency of the mutants was explained as a decrease in the flap flexibility and, therefore, a different pattern of hydrogen bonds responsible for substrate alignment and flap conformation. The results demonstrated that flap flexibility is essential for efficient catalytic and activation processes. PMID:10861225

  17. Control of the active site structure of giant bilayer hemoglobin from the Annelid Eisenia foetida using hierarchic assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Girasole, Marco; Arcovito, Alessandro; Marconi, Augusta; Davoli, Camilla; Congiu-Castellano, Agostina; Bellelli, Andrea; Amiconi, Gino

    2005-12-05

    The active site structure of the oxygenated derivative of the main subassemblies (whole protein, dodecamers, and trimers) of the giant haemoglobin from Eisenia foetida has been characterized by x-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The data revealed a remarkable effect of the hierarchic assemblies on the active site of the subunit. Specifically, the whole protein has the same site structure of the dodecamer, while a sharp conformational transition occurs when the dodecamer is disassembled into trimers (and monomers) revealing that constraints due to the protein matrix determine the active site geometry and, consequently, the protein function in these large complexes.

  18. Immobilization of enzymes using non-ionic colloidal liquid aphrons (CLAs): Activity kinetics, conformation, and energetics.

    PubMed

    Ward, Keeran; Xi, Jingshu; Stuckey, David C

    2016-05-01

    This study seeks to examine the ability of non-ionic/non-polar Colloidial Liquid Aphrons (CLAs) to preserve enzyme functionality upon immobilization and release. CLAs consisting of micron-sized oil droplets surrounded by a thin aqueous layer stabilized by a mixture of surfactants, were formulated by direct addition (pre-manufacture addition) using 1% Tween 80/mineral oil and 1% Tween 20 and the enzymes lipase, aprotinin and α-chymotrypsin. The results of activity assays for both lipase and α-chymotrypsin showed that kinetic activity increased upon immobilization by factors of 7 and 5.5, respectively, while aprotinin retained approximately 85% of its native activity. The conformation of the enzymes released through desorption showed no significant alterations compared to their native state. Changes in pH and temperature showed that optimum conditions did not change after immobilization, while analysis of activation energy for the immobilized enzyme showed an increase in activity at higher temperatures. Furthermore, the effect of bound water within the aphron structure allowed for some degree of enzyme hydration, and this hydration was needed for an active conformation with results showing a decrease in ΔH* for the immobilized system compared to its native counterpart.

  19. Conformal optical elements for correcting wavefront distortions in YAG : Nd{sup 3+} active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Korolkov, V P; Nasyrov, R K; Poleshchuk, A G; Arapov, Yu D; Ivanov, A F

    2013-02-28

    Correction of the wavefront is studied for the light beam passing wide-aperture YAG : Nd3+ single-crystal rods, which are used as active elements in high-power solid-state lasers. A nonideal character of the crystal structure is responsible for the deformation of the wavefront of passing radiation. By using the halftone technology we have developed conformal aberration correctors capable of compensating rod nonuniformities and reducing the laser radiation divergence by an order of magnitude. The results obtained make it possible to employ optically nonuniform active elements in laser constructions. (laser optics 2012)

  20. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  1. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  2. Magnesium impacts myosin V motor activity by altering key conformational changes in the mechanochemical cycle.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Darshan V; Muretta, Joseph M; Swenson, Anja M; Thomas, David D; Yengo, Christopher M

    2013-07-09

    We investigated how magnesium (Mg) impacts key conformational changes during the ADP binding/release steps in myosin V and how these alterations impact the actomyosin mechanochemical cycle. The conformation of the nucleotide binding pocket was examined with our established FRET system in which myosin V labeled with FlAsH in the upper 50 kDa domain participates in energy transfer with mant labeled nucleotides. We examined the maximum actin-activated ATPase activity of MV FlAsH at a range of free Mg concentrations (0.1-9 mM) and found that the highest activity occurs at low Mg (0.1-0.3 mM), while there is a 50-60% reduction in activity at high Mg (3-9 mM). The motor activity examined with the in vitro motility assay followed a similar Mg-dependence, and the trend was similar with dimeric myosin V. Transient kinetic FRET studies of mantdADP binding/release from actomyosin V FlAsH demonstrate that the transition between the weak and strong actomyosin.ADP states is coupled to movement of the upper 50 kDa domain and is dependent on Mg with the strong state stabilized by Mg. We find that the kinetics of the upper 50 kDa conformational change monitored by FRET correlates well with the ATPase and motility results over a wide range of Mg concentrations. Our results suggest the conformation of the upper 50 kDa domain is highly dynamic in the Mg free actomyosin.ADP state, which is in agreement with ADP binding being entropy driven in the absence of Mg. Overall, our results demonstrate that Mg is a key factor in coupling the nucleotide- and actin-binding regions. In addition, Mg concentrations in the physiological range can alter the structural transition that limits ADP dissociation from actomyosin V, which explains the impact of Mg on actin-activated ATPase activity and in vitro motility.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of Zika virus NS3 helicase: Insights into RNA binding site activity.

    PubMed

    Mottin, Melina; Braga, Rodolpho C; da Silva, Roosevelt A; Silva, Joao H Martins da; Perryman, Alexander L; Ekins, Sean; Andrade, Carolina Horta

    2017-03-21

    America is still suffering with the outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection. Congenital ZIKV syndrome has already caused a public health emergency of international concern. However, there are still no vaccines to prevent or drugs to treat the infection caused by ZIKV. The ZIKV NS3 helicase (NS3h) protein is a promising target for drug discovery due to its essential role in viral genome replication. NS3h unwinds the viral RNA to enable the replication of the viral genome by the NS5 protein. NS3h contains two important binding sites: the NTPase binding site and the RNA binding site. Here, we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the molecular behavior of ZIKV NS3h in the presence and absence of ssRNA and the potential implications for NS3h activity and inhibition. Although there is conformational variability and poor electron densities of the RNA binding loop in various apo flaviviruses NS3h crystallographic structures, the MD trajectories of NS3h-ssRNA demonstrated that the RNA binding loop becomes more stable when NS3h is occupied by RNA. Our results suggest that the presence of RNA generates important interactions with the RNA binding loop, and these interactions stabilize the loop sufficiently that it remains in a closed conformation. This closed conformation likely keeps the ssRNA bound to the protein for a sufficient duration to enable the unwinding/replication activities of NS3h to occur. In addition, conformational changes of this RNA binding loop can change the nature and location of the optimal ligand binding site, according to ligand binding site prediction results. These are important findings to help guide the design and discovery of new inhibitors of NS3h as promising compounds to treat the ZIKV infection.

  4. Quillaja Saponin Variants with Central Glycosidic Linkage Modifications Exhibit Distinct Conformations and Adjuvant Activities

    PubMed Central

    Walkowicz, William E.; Fernández-Tejada, Alberto; George, Constantine; Corzana, Francisco; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Gin, David Y.

    2016-01-01

    Immunological adjuvants such as the saponin natural product QS-21 help stimulate the immune response to co-administered antigens and have become increasingly important in the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. However, clinical use of QS21 is encumbered by chemical instability, dose-limiting toxicity, and low-yielding purification from the natural source. Previous studies of structure–activity relationships in the four structural domains of QS-21 have led to simplified, chemically stable variants that retain potent adjuvant activity and low toxicity in mouse vaccination models. However, modification of the central glycosyl ester linkage has not yet been explored. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, immunologic evaluation, and molecular dynamics analysis of a series of novel QS-21 variants with different linker lengths, stereochemistry, and flexibility to investigate the role of this linkage in saponin adjuvant activity and conformation. Despite relatively conservative structural modifications, these variants exhibit striking differences in in vivo adjuvant activity that correlate with specific conformational preferences. These results highlight the junction of the triterpene and linear oligosaccharide domains as playing a critical role in the immunoadjuvant activity of the Quillaja saponins and also suggest a mechanism of action involving interaction with a discrete macromolecular target, in contrast to the non-specific mechanisms of emulsion-based adjuvants. PMID:27014435

  5. Activation of the p75 neurotrophin receptor through conformational rearrangement of disulphide-linked receptor dimers

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Marçal; Charalampopoulos, Ioannis; Kenchappa, Rajappa S.; Simi, Anastasia; Karaca, Esra; Reversi, Alessandra; Choi, Soyoung; Bothwell, Mark; Mingarro, Ismael; Friedman, Wilma J.; Schiavo, Giampietro; Bastiaens, Philippe I. H.; Verveer, Peter J.; Carter, Bruce D.; Ibáñez, Carlos F.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Ligand-mediated dimerization has emerged as a universal mechanism of growth factor receptor activation. Recent structural studies have shown that neurotrophins interact with dimers of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), but the actual mechanism of receptor activation has remained elusive. Here we show that p75NTR forms disulphide-linked dimers independently of neurotrophin binding through the highly conserved Cys257 in its transmembrane domain. Mutation of Cys257 abolished neurotrophin-dependent receptor activity but did not affect downstream signaling by the p75NTR/NgR/Lingo-1 complex in response to MAG, indicating the existence of distinct, ligand-specific activation mechanisms for p75NTR. FRET experiments revealed a close association of p75NTR intracellular domains that was transiently disrupted by conformational changes induced upon NGF binding. Although mutation of Cys257 did not alter the oligomeric state of p75NTR, the mutant receptor was no longer able to propagate conformational changes to the cytoplasmic domain upon ligand binding. We propose that neurotrophins activate p75NTR by a novel mechanism involving rearrangement of disulphide-linked receptor subunits. PMID:19376068

  6. Conformational properties of pyrethroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullaley, Anne; Taylor, Robin

    1994-04-01

    X-ray database searches and theoretical potential-energy calculations indicate that the acid moieties of pyrethroid cyclopropanecarboxylate esters adopt a well-defined, relatively inflexible conformation. In contrast, the alcohol moieties can exist in many low-energy geometries. One of the least conformationally flexible pyrethroid alcohols is 4-phenylindan-2-ol. The approximate overall conformation adopted at the biological binding site by insecticidal esters of this alcohol can be deduced with reasonable confidence by molecular modelling. Graphics superposition of a variety of pyrethroid acids suggests the existence of a large but rather narrow pocket at the binding site, in which substituents at the 3-position of the cyclopropane ring can be accommodated. This pocket is asymmetric with respect to the plane of the cyclopropane ring, extending further on the side remote from the ester group. The effects of α-substitution on the insecticidal activity of pyrethroid esters may be due to the influence of substituents on the preferred conformations of the molecules. This hypothesis rationalises the paradoxical dependence on absolute stereochemistry of the activities of various allylbenzyl and cinnamyl alcohol derivatives.

  7. Dynamics of the Active Sites of Dimeric Seryl tRNA Synthetase from Methanopyrus kandleri.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Saheb; Nandi, Nilashis

    2015-08-27

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) carry out the first step of protein biosynthesis. Several aaRSs are multimeric, and coordination between the dynamics of active sites present in each monomer is a prerequisite for the fast and accurate aminoacylation. However, important lacunae of understanding exist concerning the conformational dynamics of multimeric aaRSs. Questions remained unanswered pertaining to the dynamics of the active site. Little is known concerning the conformational dynamics of the active sites in response to the substrate binding, reorganization of the catalytic residues around reactants, time-dependent changes at the reaction center, which are essential for facilitating the nucleophilic attack, and interactions at the interface of neighboring monomers. In the present work, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of dimeric (mk)SerRS from Methanopyrus kandleri bound with tRNA using an explicit solvent system. Two dimeric states of seryl tRNA synthetase (open, substrate bound, and adenylate bound) and two monomeric states (open and substrate bound) are simulated with bound tRNA. The aim is to understand the conformational dynamics of (mk)SerRS during its reaction cycle. While the present results provide a clear dynamical perspective of the active sites of (mk)SerRS, they corroborate with the results from the time-averaged experimental data such as crystallographic and mutation analysis of methanogenic SerRS from M. kandleri and M. barkeri. It is observed from the present simulation that the motif 2 loop gates the active site and its Glu351 and Arg360 stabilizes ATP in a bent state favorable for nucleophilic attack. The flexibility of the walls of the active site gradually reduces near reaction center, which is a more organized region compared to the lid region. The motif 2 loop anchors Ser and ATP using Arg349 in a hydrogen bonded geometry crucial for nucleophilic attack and favorably influences the electrostatic potential at the

  8. Synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups on the hydrolysis of cellulose over activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, Guo Shiou; Sievers, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    The chemical oxidation of activated carbon by H2 O2 and H2 SO4 is investigated, structural and chemical modifications are characterized, and the materials are used as catalysts for the hydrolysis of cellulose. Treatment with H2 O2 enlarges the pore size and imparts functional groups such as phenols, lactones, and carboxylic acids. H2 SO4 treatment targets the edges of carbon sheets primarily, and this effect is more pronounced with a higher temperature. Adsorption isotherms demonstrate that the adsorption of oligomers on functionalized carbon is dominated by van der Waals forces. The materials treated chemically are active for the hydrolysis of cellulose despite the relative weakness of most of their acid sites. It is proposed that a synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups enhances the activity by inducing a conformational change in the glucan chains if they are adsorbed at defect sites. This activates the glycosidic bonds for hydrolysis by in-plane functional groups.

  9. Denaturation studies of active-site labeled papain using electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Z A; Butterfiel, D A

    1991-01-01

    A spin-labeled p-chloromercuribenzoate (SL-PMB) and a fluorescence probe, 6-acryloyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Acrylodan), both of which bind to the single SH group located in the active site of papain, were used to investigate the interaction of papain (EC 3.4.22.2) with two protein denaturants. It was found that the active site of papain was highly stable in urea solution, but underwent a large conformational change in guanidine hydrochloride solution. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence results were in agreement and both paralleled enzymatic activity of papain with respect to both the variation in pH and denaturation. These results strongly suggest that SL-PMB and Acrylodan labels can be used to characterize the physical state of the active site of the enzyme. PMID:1657229

  10. Conformational entropic maps of functional coupling domains in GPCR activation: A case study with beta2 adrenergic receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fan; Abrol, Ravinder; Goddard, William, III; Dougherty, Dennis

    2014-03-01

    Entropic effect in GPCR activation is poorly understood. Based on the recent solved structures, researchers in the GPCR structural biology field have proposed several ``local activating switches'' that consisted of a few number of conserved residues, but have long ignored the collective dynamical effect (conformational entropy) of a domain comprised of an ensemble of residues. A new paradigm has been proposed recently that a GPCR can be viewed as a composition of several functional coupling domains, each of which undergoes order-to-disorder or disorder-to-order transitions upon activation. Here we identified and studied these functional coupling domains by comparing the local entropy changes of each residue between the inactive and active states of the β2 adrenergic receptor from computational simulation. We found that agonist and G-protein binding increases the heterogeneity of the entropy distribution in the receptor. This new activation paradigm and computational entropy analysis scheme provides novel ways to design functionally modified mutant and identify new allosteric sites for GPCRs. The authors thank NIH and Sanofi for funding this project.

  11. Mutation in the SH1 helix reduces the activation energy of the ATP-induced conformational transition of myosin.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Sosuke; Chaen, Shigeru

    2007-05-25

    The SH1 helix is a joint that links the converter subdomain to the rest of the myosin motor domain. Recently, we showed that a mutation within the SH1 helix in Dictyostelium myosin II (R689H) reduced the elasticity and thermal stability of the protein. To reveal the involvement of the SH1 helix in ATP-dependent conformational changes of the motor domain, we have investigated the effects of the R689H mutation on the conformational changes of the converter, using a GFP-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer method. Although the mutation does not seem to strongly affect conformations, we found that it significantly reduced the activation energy required for the ATP-induced conformational transition corresponding to the recovery stroke. Given the effects of the mutation on the mechanical properties of myosin, we propose that the SH1 helix plays an important role in the mechanochemical energy conversion underlying the conformational change of the myosin motor domain.

  12. Conformational changes in the P site and mRNA entry channel evoked by AUG recognition in yeast translation preinitiation complexes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Saini, Adesh K.; Shin, Byung-Sik; Nanda, Jagpreet; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2015-01-01

    The translation preinitiation complex (PIC) is thought to assume an open conformation when scanning the mRNA leader, with AUG recognition evoking a closed conformation and more stable P site interaction of Met-tRNAi; however, physical evidence is lacking that AUG recognition constrains interaction of mRNA with the 40S binding cleft. We compared patterns of hydroxyl radical cleavage of rRNA by Fe(II)-BABE tethered to unique sites in eIF1A in yeast PICs reconstituted with mRNA harboring an AUG or near-cognate (AUC) start codon. rRNA residues in the P site display reduced cleavage in AUG versus AUC PICs; and enhanced cleavage in the AUC complexes was diminished by mutations of scanning enhancer elements of eIF1A that increase near-cognate recognition in vivo. This suggests that accessibility of these rRNA residues is reduced by accommodation of Met-tRNAi in the P site (PIN state) and by their interactions with the anticodon stem of Met-tRNAi. Our cleavage data also provide evidence that AUG recognition evokes dissociation of eIF1 from its 40S binding site, ejection of the eIF1A-CTT from the P-site and rearrangement to a closed conformation of the entry channel with reduced mobility of mRNA. PMID:25670678

  13. Hemagglutinating activity and conformation of a lactose-binding lectin from mushroom Agrocybe cylindracea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Zhao, Xi; Xu, Xiao-Chao; Li, Ling-Rui; Liu, Yan-Hong; Zhong, Shao-Dong; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2008-03-01

    A lactose-binding lectin (Agrocybe cylindracea Lectin, ACL) purified from fruiting bodies of the mushroom A. cylindracea was investigated to determine the hemagglutinating activity and conformation changes after chemical modification, removal of metal ion and treatment at different temperatures and pH. ACL agglutinated both rabbit and human erythrocytes and its hemagglutinating activity could be inhibited by lactose. This lectin was stable in the pH range of 6-9 and temperature up to 60 degrees C. Fluorescence quenching and modification of tryptophan residues indicated that there were about two tryptophan residues in ACL molecule and one of them might be located on the surface, while the other was buried in the hydrophobic shallow groove near the surface. Chemical modification of serine/threonine and histidine showed that the partial necessity of these residues for the hemagglutinating activity of ACL. However, modifications of arginine, tyrosine and cysteine residues had no effect on its agglutinating activity.

  14. Mechanical Activation of a Multimeric Adhesive Protein Through Domain Conformational Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijeratne, Sithara S.; Botello, Eric; Yeh, Hui-Chun; Zhou, Zhou; Bergeron, Angela L.; Frey, Eric W.; Patel, Jay M.; Nolasco, Leticia; Turner, Nancy A.; Moake, Joel L.; Dong, Jing-fei; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2013-03-01

    The mechanical force-induced activation of the adhesive protein von Willebrand factor (VWF), which experiences high hydrodynamic forces, is essential in initiating platelet adhesion. The importance of the mechanical force-induced functional change is manifested in the multimeric VWF’s crucial role in blood coagulation, when high fluid shear stress activates plasma VWF (PVWF) multimers to bind platelets. Here, we showed that a pathological level of high shear stress exposure of PVWF multimers results in domain conformational changes, and the subsequent shifts in the unfolding force allow us to use force as a marker to track the dynamic states of the multimeric VWF. We found that shear-activated PVWF multimers are more resistant to mechanical unfolding than nonsheared PVWF multimers, as indicated in the higher peak unfolding force. These results provide insight into the mechanism of shear-induced activation of PVWF multimers.

  15. L1198F Mutation Resensitizes Crizotinib to ALK by Altering the Conformation of Inhibitor and ATP Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Sun, Rong; Wu, Yuehong; Song, Mingzhu; Li, Jia; Yang, Qianye; Chen, Xiaoyi; Bao, Jinku; Zhao, Qi

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment with small molecule inhibitors is greatly challenged by acquired resistance. A recent study reported the newest generation inhibitor resistant mutation L1198F led to the resensitization to crizotinib, which is the first Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drug for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC. It is of great importance to understand how this extremely rare event occurred for the purpose of overcoming the acquired resistance of such inhibitors. In this study, we exploited molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to dissect the molecular mechanisms. Our MD results revealed that L1198F mutation of ALK resulted in the conformational change at the inhibitor site and altered the binding affinity of ALK to crizotinib and lorlatinib. L1198F mutation also affected the autoactivation of ALK as supported by the identification of His1124 and Tyr1278 as critical amino acids involved in ATP binding and phosphorylation. Our findings are valuable for designing more specific and potent inhibitors for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC and other types of cancer. PMID:28245558

  16. Hunting the human DPP III active conformation: combined thermodynamic and QM/MM calculations.

    PubMed

    Tomić, Antonija; Tomić, Sanja

    2014-11-07

    Multiple choices of the protein active conformations in flexible metalloenzymes complicate study of their catalytic mechanism. We used three different conformations of human dipeptidyl-peptidase III (DPP III) to investigate the influence of the protein environment on ligand binding and the Zn(2+) coordination. MD simulations followed by calculations of binding free energy components accomplished for a series of DPP III substrates, both synthetic and natural, revealed that binding of the β-strand shaped substrate to the five-stranded β-core of the compact DPP III form (in antiparallel fashion) is the preferred binding mode, in agreement with the experimentally determined structure of the DPP III inactive mutant-tynorphin complex (Bezerra et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2012, 109, 6525). Previously it was proposed that the catalytic mechanism of DPP III is similar to that of thermolysin, which assumes exchange of five and four coordinated Zn(2+), and activation of Zn-bound water by a nearby Glu. Our QM/MM calculations, performed for a total of 18 protein structures with different zinc ion environments, revealed that the 5-coordinated metal ion is more favourable than the 6-coordinated one in only the most compact DPP III form. Besides, in this structure E451 is H-bonded to the metal ion coordinating water. Also, our study revealed two constraints for the broad substrate specificity of DPP III. One is the possibility of the substrate adopting the β-strand shape and the other is its charged N-terminus. Altogether, we assume that the human DPP III active conformation would be the most compact form, similar to the "closed X-ray" DPP III structure.

  17. Automated docking of {alpha}-(1,4)- and {alpha}-(1,6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides in the glucoamylase active site

    SciTech Connect

    Countinho, P.M.; Reilly, P.J.; Dowd, M.K.

    1998-06-01

    Low-energy conformers of five {alpha}-(1,4)- and {alpha}-(1,6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides were flexibly docked into the glucoamylase active site using AutoDock 2.2. To ensure that all significant conformational space was searched, the starting trisaccharide conformers for docking were all possible combinations of the corresponding disaccharide low-energy conformers. All docked trisaccharides occupied subsites {minus}1 and +1 in very similar modes to those of corresponding nonreducing-end disaccharides. For linear substrates, full binding at subsite +2 occurred only when the substrate reducing end was {alpha}-(1,4)-linked, with hydrogen-bonding with the hydroxy-methyl group being the only polar interaction there. Given the absence of other important interactions at this subsite, multiple substrate conformations are allowed. For the one docked branched substrate, steric hindrance in the {alpha}-(1,6)-glycosidic oxygen suggests that the active-site residues have to change position for hydrolysis to occur. Subsite +1 of the glucoamylase active site allows flexibility in binding but, at least in Aspergillus glucoamylases, subsite +2 selectively binds substrates {alpha}-(1,4)-linked between subsites +1 and +2. Enzyme engineering to limit substrate flexibility at subsite +2 could improve glucoamylase industrial properties.

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ski7 Is a GTP-Binding Protein Adopting the Characteristic Conformation of Active Translational GTPases.

    PubMed

    Kowalinski, Eva; Schuller, Anthony; Green, Rachel; Conti, Elena

    2015-07-07

    Ski7 is a cofactor of the cytoplasmic exosome in budding yeast, functioning in both mRNA turnover and non-stop decay (NSD), a surveillance pathway that degrades faulty mRNAs lacking a stop codon. The C-terminal region of Ski7 (Ski7C) shares overall sequence similarity with the translational GTPase (trGTPase) Hbs1, but whether Ski7 has retained the properties of a trGTPase is unclear. Here, we report the high-resolution structures of Ski7C bound to either intact guanosine triphosphate (GTP) or guanosine diphosphate-Pi. The individual domains of Ski7C adopt the conformation characteristic of active trGTPases. Furthermore, the nucleotide-binding site of Ski7C shares similar features compared with active trGTPases, notably the presence of a characteristic monovalent cation. However, a suboptimal polar residue at the putative catalytic site and an unusual polar residue that interacts with the γ-phosphate of GTP distinguish Ski7 from other trGTPases, suggesting it might function rather as a GTP-binding protein than as a GTP-hydrolyzing enzyme.

  19. Recent advances in the investigation of the bioactive conformation of peptides active at the micro-opioid receptor. conformational analysis of endomorphins.

    PubMed

    Gentilucci, Luca; Tolomelli, Alessandra

    2004-01-01

    Despite of the recent advances in the structural investigation of complex molecules, the comprehension of the 3D features responsible for the interaction between opioid peptides and micro-opioid receptors still remains an elusive task. This has to be attributed to the intrinsic nature of opioid peptides, which can assume a number of different conformations of similar energy, and to the flexibility of the receptorial cavity, which can modify its inner shape to host different ligands. Due to this inherent mobility of the ligand-receptor system, massive efforts devoted to the definition of a rigid bioactive conformation to be used as a template for the design of new pharmacologically active compounds might be overstressed. The future goal might be the design of peptide or nonpeptide ligands capable of maximizing specific hydrophobic interactions. This review covers the recent opinions emerged on the nature of the ligand-receptor interaction, and the development of suitable models for the determination of the bioactive conformation of peptide ligands active towards micro-opioid receptors.

  20. Influence of conformationally restricted pyrimidines on the activity of 10-23 DNAzymes.

    PubMed

    Robaldo, Laura; Izzo, Franco; Dellafiore, María; Proietti, Cecilia; Elizalde, Patricia V; Montserrat, Javier M; Iribarren, Adolfo M

    2012-04-15

    The catalytic core of a 10-23 DNAzyme was modified introducing conformationally restricted nucleosides such as (2'R)-, (2'S)-2'-deoxy-2'-C-methyluridine, (2'R)-, (2'S)-2'-deoxy-2'-C-methylcytidine, 2,2'-anhydrouridine and LNA-C, in one, two or three positions. Catalytic activities under pseudo first order conditions were compared at different Mg(2+) concentrations using a short RNA substrate. At low Mg(2+) concentrations, triple modified DNAzymes with similar kinetic performance to that displayed by the non-modified control were identified. In the search for a partial explanation of the obtained results, in silico studies were carried out in order to explore the conformational behavior of 2'-deoxy-2'-C-methylpyrimidines in the context of a loop structure, suggesting that at least partial flexibility is needed for the maintenance of activity. Finally, the modified 2'-C-methyl DNAzyme activity was tested assessing the inhibition of Stat3 expression and the decrease in cell proliferation using the human breast cancer cell line T47D.

  1. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates a major conformational rearrangement in the activation of rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Quintana, D; Francesch, A; Garriga, P; de Lera, A R; Padrós, E; Manyosa, J

    1995-01-01

    The study of the structural differences between rhodopsin and its active form (metarhodopsin II) has been carried out by means of deconvolution analysis of infrared spectra. Deconvolution techniques allow the direct identification of the spectral changes that have occurred, which results in a significantly different view of the conformational changes occurring after activation of the receptor as compared with previous difference spectroscopy analysis. Thus, a number of changes in the bands assigned to solvent-exposed domains of the receptor are detected, indicating significant decreases in extended (beta) sequences and in reverse turns, and increases in irregular/aperiodic sequences and in helices with a non-alpha geometry, whereas there is no decrease in alpha-helices. In addition to secondary structure conversions, qualitative alterations within a given secondary structure type are detected. These are seen to occur in both reverse turns and helices. The nature of this spectral change is of great importance, since a clear alteration in the helices bundle core is detected. All these changes indicate that the rhodopsin --> metarhodopsin II transition involves not a minor but a major conformational rearrangement, reconciling the infrared data with the energetics of the activation process. PMID:8519961

  2. OSI Conformance Testing for Bibliographic Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbez, Gilbert; Swain, Leigh

    1990-01-01

    Describes the development of Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) conformance testing sites, conformance testing tools, and conformance testing services. Discusses related topics such as interoperability testing, arbitration testing, and international harmonization of conformance testing. A glossary is included. (24 references) (SD)

  3. The Activation of c-Src Tyrosine Kinase: Conformational Transition Pathway and Free Energy Landscape.

    PubMed

    Fajer, Mikolai; Meng, Yilin; Roux, Benoît

    2016-10-28

    Tyrosine kinases are important cellular signaling allosteric enzymes that regulate cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and migration. Their activity must be tightly controlled, and malfunction can lead to a variety of diseases, particularly cancer. The nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Src, a prototypical model system and a representative member of the Src-family, functions as complex multidomain allosteric molecular switches comprising SH2 and SH3 domains modulating the activity of the catalytic domain. The broad picture of self-inhibition of c-Src via the SH2 and SH3 regulatory domains is well characterized from a structural point of view, but a detailed molecular mechanism understanding is nonetheless still lacking. Here, we use advanced computational methods based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent to advance our understanding of kinase activation. To elucidate the mechanism of regulation and self-inhibition, we have computed the pathway and the free energy landscapes for the "inactive-to-active" conformational transition of c-Src for different configurations of the SH2 and SH3 domains. Using the isolated c-Src catalytic domain as a baseline for comparison, it is observed that the SH2 and SH3 domains, depending upon their bound orientation, promote either the inactive or active state of the catalytic domain. The regulatory structural information from the SH2-SH3 tandem is allosterically transmitted via the N-terminal linker of the catalytic domain. Analysis of the conformational transition pathways also illustrates the importance of the conserved tryptophan 260 in activating c-Src, and reveals a series of concerted events during the activation process.

  4. tBid Undergoes Multiple Conformational Changes at the Membrane Required for Bax Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Shamas-Din, Aisha; Bindner, Scott; Zhu, Weijia; Zaltsman, Yehudit; Campbell, Clinton; Gross, Atan; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David W.; Fradin, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Bid is a Bcl-2 family protein that promotes apoptosis by activating Bax and eliciting mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP). Full-length Bid is cleaved in response to apoptotic stimuli into two fragments, p7 and tBid (p15), that are held together by strong hydrophobic interactions until the complex binds to membranes. The detailed mechanism(s) of fragment separation including tBid binding to membranes and release of the p7 fragment to the cytoplasm remain unclear. Using liposomes or isolated mitochondria with fluorescently labeled proteins at physiological concentrations as in vitro models, we report that the two components of the complex quickly separate upon interaction with a membrane. Once tBid binds to the membrane, it undergoes slow structural rearrangements that result in an equilibrium between two major tBid conformations on the membrane. The conformational change of tBid is a prerequisite for interaction with Bax and is, therefore, a novel step that can be modulated to promote or inhibit MOMP. Using automated high-throughput image analysis in cells, we show that down-regulation of Mtch2 causes a significant delay between tBid and Bax relocalization in cells. We propose that by promoting insertion of tBid via a conformational change at the mitochondrial outer membrane, Mtch2 accelerates tBid-mediated Bax activation and MOMP. Thus the interaction of Mtch2 and tBid is a potential target for therapeutic control of Bid initiated cell death. PMID:23744079

  5. The conformational state of polyphenol oxidase from field bean (Dolichos lablab) upon SDS and acid-pH activation.

    PubMed

    Kanade, Santosh R; Paul, Beena; Rao, A G Appu; Gowda, Lalitha R

    2006-05-01

    Field bean (Dolichos lablab) contains a single isoform of PPO (polyphenol oxidase)--a type III copper protein that catalyses the o-hydroxylation of monophenols and oxidation of o-diphenols using molecular oxygen--and is a homotetramer with a molecular mass of 120 kDa. The enzyme is activated manyfold either in the presence of the anionic detergent SDS below its critical micellar concentration or on exposure to acid-pH. The enhancement of kcat upon activation is accompanied by a marked shift in the pH optimum for the oxidation of t-butyl catechol from 4.5 to 6.0, an increased sensitivity to tropolone, altered susceptibility to proteolytic degradation and decreased thermostability. The Stokes radius of the native enzyme is found to increase from 49.1+/-2 to 75.9+/-0.6 A (1 A=0.1 nm). The activation by SDS and acid-pH results in a localized conformational change that is anchored around the catalytic site of PPO that alters the microenvironment of an essential glutamic residue. Chemical modification of field bean and sweet potato PPO with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodi-imide followed by kinetic analysis leads to the conclusion that both the enzymes possess a core carboxylate essential to activity. This enhanced catalytic efficiency of PPO, considered as an inducible defence oxidative enzyme, is vital to the physiological defence strategy adapted by plants to insect herbivory and pathogen attack.

  6. Conformational change results in loss of enzymatic activity of jack bean urease on its interaction with silver nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Ponnuvel, Shobana; Subramanian, Balakumar; Ponnuraj, Karthe

    2015-10-01

    Urease is an enzyme produced by microbes such as bacteria, yeast and fungi. Plants also produce this enzyme. Urease action splits urea into ammonia and carbamate. This action is having important implications in agro-chemical, medicinal and environment. Therefore there is always a constant search for new and novel compounds which could inhibit this enzyme. Here we have studied the interaction of jack bean urease (JBU) with silver nanoparticle to analyze the influence of the resultant protein corona formation on the catalytic property of JBU. Several techniques like UV-Vis, gel shift assay and CD spectroscopy have been used to characterize this interaction. Urease activity assay suggests that the protein corona formation inhibits the enzymatic action of JBU. The loss of enzymatic action could be either due to the nanoparticle blocking the active site of JBU or a conformational change in the protein. The CD spectra of JBU-AgNP complexes clearly revealed significant changes in the secondary structural composition of the JBU and this could be the reason for the loss of enzymatic activity of JBU. This study revealed an interesting observation, where the interaction of AgNP with JBU resulted destabilization of hexameric nature of JBU which is otherwise highly stable. The results of the present study could be useful in the development of nanoparticle based material for inhibiting the ureolytic activity of ureases in different fields.

  7. Effects of chemical modification on the conformation and biological activity of peanut agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Nonnenmacher, D; Brossmer, R

    1981-03-27

    The effect of chemical modifications on the biological properties of peanut agglutinin was investigated. The free amino groups were modified with succinic anhydride and 1-isothiocyanato-4-benzenesulfonic acid. Though the extent of modification was 95 and 85%, respectively, these derivatives did not lose their sugar binding capacity. The agglutinating activity with neuraminidase-treated human erythrocytes and various tumor cells was reduced. The mitogenic activity tested with neuraminidase-treated human lymphocytes was also diminished The tyrosine residues were modified with tetranitromethane and further with 4-aminophenyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside and the negatively charged 2-(4-amino-benzyl)-alpha-D-neuraminic acid. The extent of modification was 30, 28 and 6%, respectively. The agglutinating and mitogenic activities were in this case not severely changed. The influence of all these modifications on the conformation was investigated by means of CD studies in the far and near ultraviolet regions.

  8. Regioselective sulfation of Artemisia sphaerocephala polysaccharide: Solution conformation and antioxidant activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junlong; Yang, Wen; Tang, YinYing; Xu, Qing; Huang, Shengli; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ji; Lei, Ziqiang

    2016-01-20

    Regioselective modification is an effective approach to synthesize polysaccharides with different structure features and improved properties. In this study, regioselective sulfation of Artemisia sphaerocephala polysaccharide (SRSASP) was prepared by using triphenylchloromethane (TrCl) as protecting precursor. The decrease in fractal dimension (df) values (1.56-2.04) of SRSASP was observed in size-exclusion chromatography combined with multi angle laser light scattering (SEC-MALLS) analysis. Compared to sample substituted at C-6, SRSASP showed a more expanded conformation of random coil, which was attributed to the breakup of hydrogen bonds and elastic contributions. Circular dichroism (CD), methylene blue (MB) and congo red (CR) spectrophotometric method and atomic force microscopy (AFM) results confirmed the conformational transition and stiffness of the chains after sulfation. SRSASP exhibited enhanced antioxidant activities in the DPPH, superoxide and hydroxyl radical scavenging assay. Sulfation at C-2 or C-3 was favorable for the chelation which might prevent the generation of hydroxyl radicals. It concluded that the degree of substitution and substitution position were the factors influencing biological activities of sulfated polysaccharides.

  9. Conformational analysis of a quinolonic ribonucleoside with anti-HSV-1 activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane D.; Velloso, Marcia Helena R.; Leal, Kátia Z.; Azeredo, Rodrigo B. de V.; Sugiura, Makiko; Albuquerque, Magaly G.; Santos, Fernanda da C.; Souza, Maria Cecília B. V. de; Cunha, Anna Claudia; Seidl, Peter R.; Alencastro, Ricardo B. de; Ferreira, Vitor F.

    2011-01-01

    The infections caused by the Herpes Simplex Virus are one of the most common sources of diseases in adults and several natural nucleoside analogues are currently used in the treatment of these infections. In vitro tests of a series of quinolonic ribonucleosides derivatives synthesized by part of our group indicated that some of them have antiviral activity against HSV-1. The conformational analysis of bioactive compounds is extremely important in order to better understand their chemical structures and biological activity. In this work, we have carried out a nuclear relaxation NMR study of 6-Me ribonucleoside derivative in order to determine if the syn or anti conformation is preferential. The NMR analysis permits the determination of inter-atomic distances by using techniques which are based on nuclear relaxation and related phenomena. Those techniques are non-selective longitudinal or spin-lattice relaxation rates and NULL pulse sequence, which allow the determination of distances between pairs of hydrogen atoms. The results of NMR studies were compared with those obtained by molecular modeling.

  10. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-04

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases.

  11. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases. PMID:22020126

  12. SU-C-BRE-01: 3D Conformal Micro Irradiation Results of Four Treatment Sites for Preclinical Small Animal and Clinical Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Price, S; Yaddanapudi, S; Rangaraj, D; Izaguirre, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Small animal irradiation can provide preclinical insights necessary for clinical advancement. In order to provide clinically relevant data, these small animal irradiations must be designed such that the treatment methods and results are comparable to clinical protocols, regardless of variations in treatment size and modality. Methods: Small animal treatments for four treatment sites (brain, liver, lung and spine) were investigated, accounting for change in treatment energy and target size. Up to five orthovoltage (300kVp) beams were used in the preclinical treatments, using circular, square, and conformal tungsten apertures, based on the treatment site. Treatments were delivered using the image guided micro irradiator (microIGRT). The plans were delivered to a mouse sized phantom and dose measurements in axial and coronal planes were performed using radiochromic film. The results of the clinical and preclinical protocols were characterized in terms of conformality number, CTV coverage, dose nonuniformity ratio, and organ at risk sparing. Results: Preclinical small animal treatment conformality was within 1–16% of clinical results for all treatment sites. The volume of the CTV receiving 100% of the prescription dose was typically within 10% of clinical values. The dose non-uniformity was consistently higher for preclinical treatments compared to clinical treatments, indicating hot spots in the target. The ratios of the mean dose in the target to the mean dose in an organ at risk were comparable if not better for preclinical versus clinical treatments. Finally, QUANTEC dose constraints were applied and the recommended morbidity limits were satisfied in each small animal treatment site. Conclusion: We have shown that for four treatment sites, preclinical 3D conformal small animal treatments can be clinically comparable if clinical protocols are followed. Using clinical protocols as the standard, preclinical irradiation methods can be altered and iteratively

  13. Wobble Pairs of the HDV Ribozyme Play Specific Roles in Stabilization of Active Site Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sripathi, Kamali N.; Banáš, Pavel; Reblova, Kamila; Šponer, Jiři; Otyepka, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is the only known human pathogen whose genome contains a catalytic RNA motif (ribozyme). The overall architecture of the HDV ribozyme is that of a double-nested pseudoknot, with two GU pairs flanking the active site. Although extensive studies have shown that mutation of either wobble results in decreased catalytic activity, little work has focused on linking these mutations to specific structural effects on catalytic fitness. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations based on an activated structure to probe the active site dynamics as a result of wobble pair mutations. In both wild-type and mutant ribozymes, the in-line fitness of the active site (as a measure of catalytic proficiency) strongly depends on the presence of a C75(N3H3+)N1(O5′) hydrogen bond, which positions C75 as the general acid for the reaction. Our mutational analyses show that each GU wobble supports catalytically fit conformations in distinct ways; the reverse G25U20 wobble promotes high in-line fitness, high occupancy of the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) general-acid hydrogen bond and stabilization of the G1U37 wobble, while the G1U37 wobble acts more locally by stabilizing high in-line fitness and the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) hydrogen bond. We also find that stable type I A-minor and P1.1 hydrogen bonding above and below the active site, respectively, prevent local structural disorder from spreading and disrupting global conformation. Taken together, our results define specific, often redundant architectural roles for several structural motifs of the HDV ribozyme active site, expanding the known roles of these motifs within all HDV-like ribozymes and other structured RNAs. PMID:25631765

  14. Conformation and hydrogen ion titration of proteins: a continuum electrostatic model with conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    You, T J; Bashford, D

    1995-11-01

    A new method for including local conformational flexibility in calculations of the hydrogen ion titration of proteins using macroscopic electrostatic models is presented. Intrinsic pKa values and electrostatic interactions between titrating sites are calculated from an ensemble of conformers in which the positions of titrating side chains are systematically varied. The method is applied to the Asp, Glu, and Tyr residues of hen lysozyme. The effects of different minimization and/or sampling protocols for both single-conformer and multi-conformer calculations are studied. For single-conformer calculations it is found that the results are sensitive to the choice of all-hydrogen versus polar-hydrogen-only atomic models and to the minimization protocol chosen. The best overall agreement of single-conformer calculations with experiment is obtained with an all-hydrogen model and either a two-step minimization process or minimization using a high dielectric constant. Multi-conformational calculations give significantly improved agreement with experiment, slightly smaller shifts between model compound pKa values and calculated intrinsic pKa values, and reduced sensitivity of the intrinsic pKa calculations to the initial details of the structure compared to single-conformer calculations. The extent of these improvements depends on the type of minimization used during the generation of conformers, with more extensive minimization giving greater improvements. The ordering of the titrations of the active-site residues, Glu-35 and Asp-52, is particularly sensitive to the minimization and sampling protocols used. The balance of strong site-site interactions in the active site suggests a need for including site-site conformational correlations.

  15. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine.

    PubMed

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-11-13

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO(2). We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O(2) and CO(2) bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO(2) defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg(2+) surrounded by three H(2)O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming.

  16. The membrane protein Pannexin1 forms two open channel conformations depending on the mode of activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junjie; Ambrosi, Cinzia; Qiu, Feng; Jackson, David G.; Sosinsky, Gina; Dahl, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) participates in several signaling events that involve ATP release, including the innate immune response, ciliary beat in airway epithelia and oxygen supply in the vasculature. The view that Panx1 forms a large ATP-release channel has been challenged by the association of a low conductance, small anion-selective channel with the presence of Panx1. We showed that Panx1 membrane channels can function in two distinct modes with different conductances and permeabilities when heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. When stimulated by potassium ions (K+), Panx1 formed a high conductance channel of ~500 pS that was permeable to ATP. Various physiological stimuli can induce this ATP-permeable conformation of the channel in several cell types. In contrast, the channel had a low conductance (~50 pS) with no detectable ATP permeability when activated by voltage in the absence of K+. The two channel states were associated with different reactivities of the terminal cysteine of Panx1 to thiol reagents, suggesting different conformations. Single particle electron microscopic analysis revealed that K+ stimulated the formation of channels with a larger pore diameter than those formed in the absence of K+. These data suggest that different stimuli lead to distinct channel structures with distinct biophysical properties. PMID:25056878

  17. Interactions of a designed peptide with lipopolysaccharide: Bound conformation and anti-endotoxic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bhunia, Anirban; Chua, Geok Lin; Domadia, Prerna N.; Warshakoon, Hemamali; Cromer, Jens R.; David, Sunil A.; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2008-05-09

    Designed peptides that would selectively interact with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or endotoxin and fold into specific conformations could serve as important scaffolds toward the development of antisepsis compounds. Here, we describe solution structure of a designed amphipathic peptide, H{sub 2}N-YVKLWRMIKFIR-CONH{sub 2} (YW12D) in complex with endotoxin as determined by transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy. The conformation of the isolated peptide is highly flexible, but undergoes a dramatic structural stabilization in the presence of LPS. Structure calculations reveal that the peptide presents two amphipathic surfaces in its bound state to LPS whereby each surface is characterized by two positive charges and a number of aromatic and/or aliphatic residues. ITC data suggests that peptide interacts with two molecules of lipid A. In activity assays, YW12D exhibits neutralization of LPS toxicity with very little hemolysis of red blood cells. Structural and functional properties of YW12D would be applicable in designing low molecular weight non-toxic antisepsis molecules.

  18. New model of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator proposes active channel-like conformation.

    PubMed

    Dalton, James; Kalid, Ori; Schushan, Maya; Ben-Tal, Nir; Villà-Freixa, Jordi

    2012-07-23

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an unusual ABC transporter, functioning as a chloride channel critical for fluid homeostasis in multiple organs. Disruption of CFTR function is associated with cystic fibrosis making it an attractive therapeutic target. In addition, CFTR blockers are being developed as potential antidiarrheals. CFTR drug discovery is hampered by the lack of high resolution structural data, and considerable efforts have been invested in modeling the channel structure. Although previously published CFTR models that have been made publicly available mostly agree with experimental data relating to the overall structure, they present the channel in an outward-facing conformation that does not agree with expected properties of a "channel-like" structure. Here, we make available a model of CFTR in such a "channel-like" conformation, derived by a unique modeling approach combining restrained homology modeling and ROSETTA refinement. In contrast to others, the present model is in agreement with expected channel properties such as pore shape, dimensions, solvent accessibility, and experimentally derived distances. We have used the model to explore the interaction of open channel blockers within the pore, revealing a common binding mode and ionic interaction with K95, in agreement with experimental data. The binding-site was further validated using a virtual screening enrichment experiment, suggesting the model might be suitable for drug discovery. In addition, we subjected the model to a molecular dynamics simulation, revealing previously unaddressed salt-bridge interactions that may be important for structure stability and pore-lining residues that may take part in Cl(-) conductance.

  19. A Model for the Conformational Activation of the Structurally Quiescent Metalloprotease ADAMTS13 by Von Willebrand Factor.

    PubMed

    South, Kieron; Freitas, Marta O; Lane, David A

    2017-02-16

    Blood loss is prevented by the multi-domain glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF), which binds exposed collagen at damaged vessels and captures platelets. VWF is regulated by the metalloprotease ADAMTS13, which, in turn, is conformationally activated by VWF. To delineate the structural requirements for VWF-mediated conformational activation of ADAMTS13, we performed binding and functional studies with a panel of truncated ADAMTS13 variants. We demonstrate that both the isolated CUB1 and CUB2 domains in ADAMTS13 bind to the spacer domain exosite of a truncated ADAMTS13 variant, MDTCS (KD of 135 ± 10.1 nM and 86.9 ± 9.0 nM, respectively). However, only the CUB1 domain inhibited proteolytic activity of MDTCS. Moreover, ADAMTS13∆CUB2, unlike ADAMTS13∆CUB1-2, exhibited activity similar to wild-type ADAMTS13 and could be activated by VWF D4-CK. The CUB2 domain is therefore not essential for maintaining the inactive conformation of ADAMTS13. Both CUB domains could bind to the VWF D4-CK domain fragment (KD of 53.7± 2.1 nM and 84.3 ± 2.0 nM, respectively). However, deletion of both CUB domains did not prevent VWF D4-CK binding, suggesting that competition for CUB-domain binding to the spacer domain is not the dominant mechanism behind the conformational activation. ADAMTS13∆TSP8-CUB2 could no longer bind to VWF D4-CK, and deletion of TSP8 abrogated ADAMTS13 conformational activation. These findings support an ADAMTS13-activation model in which VWF D4-CK engages the TSP8-CUB2 domains, inducing the conformational change that disrupts the CUB1-spacer domain interaction and thereby activates ADAMTS13.

  20. Conformational Changes in Orotidine 5’-Monophosphate Decarboxylase: A Structure-Based Explanation for How the 5’-Phosphate Group Activates the Enzyme†

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Bijoy J.; Wood, McKay; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Goryanova, Bogdana; Amyes, Tina L.; Richard, John P.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The binding of a ligand to orotidine 5’-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) is accompanied by a conformational change from an open, inactive conformation (Eo) to a closed, active conformation (Ec). As the substrate traverses the reaction coordinate to form the stabilized vinyl carbanion/carbene intermediate, interactions are enforced that destabilize the carboxylate group of the substrate as well as stabilize the intermediate (in the Ec•S‡ complex). Focusing on the OMPDC from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, the “remote” 5’-phosphate group of the substrate activates the enzyme 2.4 × 108-fold; the activation is equivalently described by an intrinsic binding energy (IBE) of 11.4 kcal/mol. We studied residues in the activation that 1) directly contact the 5’-phosphate group; 2) participate in a hydrophobic cluster near the base of the active site loop that sequesters the bound substrate from solvent; and 3) form hydrogen-bonding interactions across the interface between the “mobile” and “fixed” half-barrel domains of the (β/α8-barrel structure. Our data support a model in which the IBE provided by the 5’-phosphate group is used to enable interactions both near the N-terminus of the active site loop and across the domain interface that stabilize both the Ec•S and Ec•S‡ complexes relative to the Eo•S complex. The conclusion that the IBE of the 5’-phosphate group provides stabilization of both the Ec•S and Ec•S‡ complexes, not just the Ec•S‡ complex, is central to understanding the structural origins of enzymatic catalysis as well as the requirements for the de novo design of enzymes that catalyze novel reactions. PMID:23030629

  1. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, D.T.; Robinson, H.; Kim, S.-K.; Reddy, P. T.

    2011-01-21

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV)-two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  2. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    D Gallagher; S Kim; H Robinson; P Reddy

    2011-12-31

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV) - two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  3. Effects of Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) Treatment on Enhancing Activity and Conformation of α-Amylase.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mei-ling; Fang, Ting; Du, Mu-ying; Zhang, Fu-sheng

    2016-04-01

    To explore an efficient, safe, and speedy application of pulsed electric field (PEF) technology for enzymatic modification, effects of PEF treatment on the enzymatic activity, property and kinetic parameters of α-amylase were investigated. Conformational transitions were also studied with the aid of circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectra. The maximum enzymatic activity of α-amylase was obtained under 15 kV/cm electric field intensity and 100 mL/min flow velocity PEF treatment, in which the enzymatic activity increased by 22.13 ± 1.14% compared with control. The activation effect could last for 18 h at 4 °C. PEF treatment could widen the range of optimum temperature for α-amylase, however, it barely exerted any effect on the optimum pH. On the other hand, α-amylase treated by PEF showed an increase of Vmax, t1/2 and ΔG, whereas a decrease of Km and k were observed. Furthermore, it can be observed from fluorescence and CD spectra that PEF treatment had increased the number of amino acid residues, especially that of tryptophan, on α-amylase surface with enhanced α-helices by 34.76% and decreased random coil by 12.04% on α-amylase when compared with that of untreated. These changes in structure had positive effect on enhancing α-amylase activity and property.

  4. Effect of ultrasound on the activity and conformation of α-amylase, papain and pepsin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Long; Zeng, Wei-Cai; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Liao, Xue-Pin; Shi, Bi

    2014-05-01

    The effect of ultrasound on the activity of α-amylase, papain and pepsin was investigated and the mechanism of the effect was explored by determining their conformational changes. With the irradiation of power ultrasound, the activity of α-amylase and papain was inhibited, while the activity of pepsin was activated. According to the analysis of circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy, the πo → π(∗) amide transitions and secondary structural components, especially β-sheet, of these three enzymes were significantly influenced by ultrasound. The tryptophan fluorescence intensity of the three enzymes was also observed to be affected by sonication. Furthermore, it was found that the pepsin molecule might gradually be resistant to prolonged ultrasonic treatment and recover from the ultrasound-induced damage to its original structure. The results suggested that the activity of α-amylase, papain and pepsin could be modified by ultrasonic treatment mainly due to the variation of their secondary and tertiary structures.

  5. Conformational Dynamics in DNA Replication Selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brieba, Luis G.

    2007-11-01

    Replicative DNA polymerases are remarkable molecular machines that carry out DNA synthesis accordingly to the Watson and Crick rules (Guanine pairs with Cytosine and Adenine with Thymidine) with high specificity or fidelity. The biochemical mechanism that dictates polymerase fidelity has its fundaments in the tight active site of replicative polymerases and the shape and size of the Watson-Crick base pairs. Pre-steady state kinetic analysis have shown that during polymerase nucleotide addition, the chemical reaction is not the rate limiting step and it was postulated that DNA polymerases suffer a conformational change from an "open" to a "closed" conformation before chemistry which is also the step responsible for their high fidelity. Crystal structures of replicative DNA polymerases demonstrated that the fingers subdomain suffers a large conformational change during catalysis and that this conformational transition aligns the polymerase active site in a proper conformation for catalysis. Recent studies using single molecule techniques and Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer analysis also shown that at least in the case of T7 DNA polymerase, the closure of the fingers subdomain is in part the rate limiting step associated with the high fidelity of DNA polymerases, although the overall fidelity of the reaction maybe involves an assemble of chemical steps and several conformational changes. Our current knowledge indicates that the mechanisms of enzyme specificity in DNA replication involve several energy landscapes that maybe correlated with conformational changes and active site assemblies.

  6. Carbon nanotube active-matrix backplanes for conformal electronics and sensors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshitake; Takei, Kuniharu; Gillies, Andrew G; Fearing, Ronald S; Javey, Ali

    2011-12-14

    In this paper, we report a promising approach for fabricating large-scale flexible and stretchable electronics using a semiconductor-enriched carbon nanotube solution. Uniform semiconducting nanotube networks with superb electrical properties (mobility of ∼20 cm2 V(-1) s(-1) and ION/IOFF of ∼10(4)) are obtained on polyimide substrates. The substrate is made stretchable by laser cutting a honeycomb mesh structure, which combined with nanotube-network transistors enables highly robust conformal electronic devices with minimal device-to-device stochastic variations. The utility of this device concept is demonstrated by fabricating an active-matrix backplane (12×8 pixels, physical size of 6×4 cm2) for pressure mapping using a pressure sensitive rubber as the sensor element.

  7. HTS-compatible FRET-based conformational sensors clarify membrane receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Scholler, Pauline; Moreno-Delgado, David; Lecat-Guillet, Nathalie; Doumazane, Etienne; Monnier, Carine; Charrier-Savournin, Fabienne; Fabre, Ludovic; Chouvet, Cédric; Soldevila, Stéphanie; Lamarque, Laurent; Donsimoni, Geoffrey; Roux, Thomas; Zwier, Jurriaan M; Trinquet, Eric; Rondard, Philippe; Pin, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-30

    Cell surface receptors represent a vast majority of drug targets. Efforts have been conducted to develop biosensors reporting their conformational changes in live cells for pharmacological and functional studies. Although Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) appears to be an ideal approach, its use is limited by the low signal-to-noise ratio. Here we report a toolbox composed of a combination of labeling technologies, specific fluorophores compatible with time-resolved FRET and a novel method to quantify signals. This approach enables the development of receptor biosensors with a large signal-to-noise ratio. We illustrate the usefulness of this toolbox through the development of biosensors for various G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases. These receptors include mGlu, GABAB, LH, PTH, EGF and insulin receptors among others. These biosensors can be used for high-throughput studies and also revealed new information on the activation process of these receptors in their cellular environment.

  8. Conformational study reveals amino acid residues essential for hemagglutinating and anti-proliferative activities of Clematis montana lectin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bangmin; Zhang, Bin; Qi, Wei; Zhu, Yanan; Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Nan; Sun, Rong; Bao, Jinku; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-11-01

    Clematis montana lectin (CML), a novel mannose-binding lectin purified from C. montana Buch.-Ham stem (Ranunculaceae), has been proved to have hemagglutinating activity in rabbit erythrocytes and apoptosis-inducing activity in tumor cells. However, the biochemical properties of CML have not revealed and its structural information still needs to be elucidated. In this study, it was found that CML possessed quite good thermostability and alkaline resistance, and its hemagglutinating activity was bivalent metal cation dependent. In addition, hemagglutination test and fluorescence spectroscopy proved that GuHCl, urea, and sodium dodecyl sulfate could change the conformation of CML and further caused the loss of hemagglutination activity. Moreover, the changes of fluorescence spectrum indicated that the tryptophan (Trp) microenvironment conversion might be related to the conformation and bioactivities of CML. In addition, it was also found that Trp residues, arginine (Arg) residues, and sulfhydryl were important for the hemagglutinating activity of CML, but only Trp was proved to be crucial for the CML conformation. Furthermore, the Trp, Arg, and sulfhydryl-modified CML exhibited 97.17%, 76.99%, and 49.64% loss of its anti-proliferative activity, respectively, which was consistent with the alterations of its hemagglutinating activity. Given these findings, Trp residues on the surface of CML are essential for the active center to form substrate-accessible conformation and suitable environment for carbohydrate binding.

  9. Differential Assembly of Catalytic Interactions within the Conserved Active Sites of Two Ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Molecular recognition is central to biology and a critical aspect of RNA function. Yet structured RNAs typically lack the preorganization needed for strong binding and precise positioning. A striking example is the group I ribozyme from Tetrahymena, which binds its guanosine substrate (G) orders of magnitude slower than diffusion. Binding of G is also thermodynamically coupled to binding of the oligonucleotide substrate (S) and further work has shown that the transition from E•G to E•S•G accompanies a conformational change that allows G to make the active site interactions required for catalysis. The group I ribozyme from Azoarcus has a similarly slow association rate but lacks the coupled binding observed for the Tetrahymena ribozyme. Here we test, using G analogs and metal ion rescue experiments, whether this absence of coupling arises from a higher degree of preorganization within the Azoarcus active site. Our results suggest that the Azoarcus ribozyme forms cognate catalytic metal ion interactions with G in the E•G complex, interactions that are absent in the Tetrahymena E•G complex. Thus, RNAs that share highly similar active site architectures and catalyze the same reactions can differ in the assembly of transition state interactions. More generally, an ability to readily access distinct local conformational states may have facilitated the evolutionary exploration needed to attain RNA machines that carry out complex, multi-step processes. PMID:27501145

  10. Dynamically achieved active site precision in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes' enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme-substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C-H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed.

  11. Effect of prolonged exposure to organic solvents on the active site environment of subtilisin Carlsberg.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Vibha; Delgado, Yamixa; Fasoli, Ezio; Ferrer, Amaris; Griebenow, Kai; Secundo, Francesco; Barletta, Gabriel L

    2010-06-01

    The potential of enzyme catalysis as a tool for organic synthesis is nowadays indisputable, as is the fact that organic solvents affect an enzyme's activity, selectivity and stability. Moreover, it was recently realized that an enzyme's initial activity is substantially decreased after prolonged exposure to organic media, an effect that further hampers their potential as catalysts for organic synthesis. Regrettably, the mechanistic reasons for these effects are still debatable. In the present study we have made an attempt to explain the reasons behind the partial loss of enzyme activity on prolonged exposure to organic solvents. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies of the serine protease subtilisin Carlsberg chemically modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG-SC) and inhibited with a Dancyl fluorophore, and dissolved in two organic solvents (acetonitrile and 1,4-dioxane) indicate that when the enzyme is initially introduced into these solvents, the active site environment is similar to that in water; however prolonged exposure to the organic medium causes this environment to resemble that of the solvent in which the enzyme is dissolved. Furthermore, kinetic studies show a reduction on both V(max) and K(M) as a result of prolonged exposure to the solvents. One interpretation of these results is that during this prolonged exposure to organic solvents the active-site fluorescent label inhibitor adopts a different binding conformation. Extrapolating this to an enzymatic reaction we argue that substrates bind in a less catalytically favorable conformation after the enzyme has been exposed to organic media for several hours.

  12. Design, synthesis, and antibacterial activities of conformationally constrained kanamycin A derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenxuan; Chen, Ying; Liang, Qingzhao; Li, Hui; Jin, Hongwei; Zhang, Liangren; Meng, Xiangbao; Li, Zhongjun

    2013-01-18

    A series of conformationally constrained kanamycin A derivatives with a 2'-hydroxyl group in ring I and a 5-hydroxyl group in ring II tethered by carbon chains were designed and synthesized. Pivotal 5,2'-hydroxyl groups were exposed, and the kanamycin A intermediate was synthesized from 5, 2', 4″, 6″-di-O-benzylidene-protected tetraazidokanamycin A. Cyclic kanamycin A derivatives with intramolecular 8-, 9-, 10-, and 11-membered ethers were then prepared by cesium carbonate mediated Williamson ether synthesis or a ring-closing metathesis reaction. The kanamycin A derivatives were assayed against both susceptible and resistant bacterial strains. Although no derivative showed better antibacterial activities than kanamycin A, the antibacterial activities of these cyclic kanamycin A derivatives indeed varied with the length of the bridge. Moreover, different variations of activities were observed between the susceptible and resistant bacterial strains. More tightly constrained derivative 2 with a one-carbon bridge showed better activity than the others against susceptible strains, but it was much less effective for resistant bacterial strains than derivative 3 with a two-carbon bridge and derivative 6 with an unsaturated four-carbon bridge.

  13. The protein conformation of Cd-substituted horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase and its metal-site coordination geometry in binary and ternary inhibitor complexes.

    PubMed

    Hemmingsen, L; Bauer, R; Bjerrum, M J; Adolph, H W; Zeppezauer, M; Cedergren-Zeppezauer, E

    1996-10-15

    The coordination geometry of the metal at the active site in Cd-substituted horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH) has been investigated for the binary complexes of LADH with imidazole, isobutyramide, decanoic acid and Cl-, and for the ternary complexes of LADH with NADH and imidazole, NADH and isobutyramide, NAD+ and decanoic acid and NAD+ and Cl-, by using the method of perturbed angular correlation of gamma-rays (PAC). The spectral results are consistent with a flexible structure around the metal for the binary complexes with inhibitors. For ternary complexes, however, a rigid structure is observed. An exception is the ternary complex between LADH, NADH and imidazole, in which the metal site is still flexible. Comparing with available structures determined by X-ray crystallography, we found a correlation between open structures and flexible metal sites, and between closed structures and rigid metal sites. This indicates that the PAC technique can be applied to distinguish the two conformations in solution. The spectral parameters, omega(o) and eta, of the experiments, except for the complexes with imidazole, fall into two groups: one with low omega(o) and one with high omega(o) (eta is relatively constant in all experiments). In this work it is clarified that the low omega(o) values are connected with the presence of a negatively charged solvent ligand. Using an angular-overlap approach to interpret the results, the low omega(o) values are found to be compatible with a coordination geometry where the S-Cd-S (Cys174 and Cys46 coordinate to the metal) angle is about 110 degrees as suggested in [Hemmingsen, L., Bauer, R., Danielsen, E., Bjerrum. M. J., Zeppezauer, M., Adolph, H. W., Formicka, G. & Cedergren-Zeppezauer, E. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 7145-7153], whereas high omega(o) values are compatible with an S-Cd-S angle of 130 degrees. The presence of a negatively charged metal ligand, therefore, might trigger the movement of the sulfur of Cys174. As it is

  14. Molecular dynamics explorations of active site structure in designed and evolved enzymes.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Sílvia; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Noey, Elizabeth L; Houk, K N

    2015-04-21

    This Account describes the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reveal how mutations alter the structure and organization of enzyme active sites. As proposed by Pauling about 70 years ago and elaborated by many others since then, biocatalysis is efficient when functional groups in the active site of an enzyme are in optimal positions for transition state stabilization. Changes in mechanism and covalent interactions are often critical parts of enzyme catalysis. We describe our explorations of the dynamical preorganization of active sites using MD, studying the fluctuations between active and inactive conformations normally concealed to static crystallography. MD shows how the various arrangements of active site residues influence the free energy of the transition state and relates the populations of the catalytic conformational ensemble to the enzyme activity. This Account is organized around three case studies from our laboratory. We first describe the importance of dynamics in evaluating a series of computationally designed and experimentally evolved enzymes for the Kemp elimination, a popular subject in the enzyme design field. We find that the dynamics of the active site is influenced not only by the original sequence design and subsequent mutations but also by the nature of the ligand present in the active site. In the second example, we show how microsecond MD has been used to uncover the role of remote mutations in the active site dynamics and catalysis of a transesterase, LovD. This enzyme was evolved by Tang at UCLA and Codexis, Inc., and is a useful commercial catalyst for the production of the drug simvastatin. X-ray analysis of inactive and active mutants did not reveal differences in the active sites, but relatively long time scale MD in solution showed that the active site of the wild-type enzyme preorganizes only upon binding of the acyl carrier protein (ACP) that delivers the natural acyl group to the active site. In the absence of bound ACP

  15. Substrate shuttling between active sites of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase is not required to generate coproporphyrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, John D.; Warby, Christy A.; Whitby, Frank G.; Kushner, James P.; Hill, Christopher P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase (URO-D; EC 4.1.1.37), the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is required for the production of heme, vitamin B12, siroheme, and chlorophyll precursors. URO-D catalyzes the sequential decarboxylation of the four acetate side chains on the pyrrole groups of uroporphyrinogen to produce coproporphyrinogen. URO-D is a stable homodimer with the active site clefts of the two subunits adjacent to each other. It has been hypothesized that the two catalytic centers interact functionally, perhaps by shuttling of reaction intermediates between subunits. We tested this hypothesis by construction of a single chain protein (scURO-D) in which the two subunits were connected by a flexible linker. The crystal structure of this protein was shown to be superimposible with wild-type activity and have comparable catalytic activity. Mutations that impaired one or the other of the two active sites of scURO-D resulted in approximately half of wild-type activity. The distribution of reaction intermediates was the same for mutant and wild-type sequences, and was unaltered in a competition experiment using the I and III isomer substrates. These observations indicate that communication between active sites is not required for enzyme function, and suggest that the dimeric structure of URO-D is required to achieve conformational stability and create a large active site cleft. PMID:19362562

  16. Substrate Shuttling Between Active Sites of Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase in Not Required to Generate Coproporphyrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.; Warby, C; Whitby, F; Kushner, J; Hill, C

    2009-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D; EC 4.1.1.37), the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is required for the production of heme, vitamin B12, siroheme, and chlorophyll precursors. URO-D catalyzes the sequential decarboxylation of four acetate side chains in the pyrrole groups of uroporphyrinogen to produce coproporphyrinogen. URO-D is a stable homodimer, with the active-site clefts of the two subunits adjacent to each other. It has been hypothesized that the two catalytic centers interact functionally, perhaps by shuttling of reaction intermediates between subunits. We tested this hypothesis by construction of a single-chain protein (single-chain URO-D) in which the two subunits were connected by a flexible linker. The crystal structure of this protein was shown to be superimposable with wild-type activity and to have comparable catalytic activity. Mutations that impaired one or the other of the two active sites of single-chain URO-D resulted in approximately half of wild-type activity. The distributions of reaction intermediates were the same for mutant and wild-type sequences and were unaltered in a competition experiment using I and III isomer substrates. These observations indicate that communication between active sites is not required for enzyme function and suggest that the dimeric structure of URO-D is required to achieve conformational stability and to create a large active-site cleft.

  17. Site-directed spin labeling reveals a conformational switch in the phosphorylation domain of smooth muscle myosin.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Wendy D; Blakely, Sarah E; Nesmelov, Yuri E; Thomas, David D

    2005-03-15

    We have used site-directed spin labeling and EPR spectroscopy to detect structural changes within the regulatory light chain (RLC) of smooth muscle myosin upon phosphorylation. Smooth muscle contraction is activated by phosphorylation of S19 on RLC, but the structural basis of this process is unknown. There is no crystal structure containing a phosphorylated RLC, and there is no crystal structure for the N-terminal region of any RLC. Therefore, we have prepared single-Cys mutations throughout RLC, exchanged each mutant onto smooth muscle heavy meromyosin, verified normal regulatory function, and used EPR to determine dynamics and solvent accessibility at each site. A survey of spin-label sites throughout the RLC revealed that only the N-terminal region (first 24 aa) shows a significant change in dynamics upon phosphorylation, with most of the first 17 residues showing an increase in rotational amplitude. Therefore, we focused on this N-terminal region. Additional structural information was obtained from the pattern of oxygen accessibility along the sequence. In the absence of phosphorylation, little or no periodicity was observed, suggesting a lack of secondary structural order in this region. However, phosphorylation induced a strong helical pattern (3.6-residue periodicity) in the first 17 residues, while increasing accessibility throughout the first 24 residues. We have identified a domain within RLC, the N-terminal phosphorylation domain, in which phosphorylation increases helical order, internal dynamics, and accessibility. These results support a model in which this disorder-to-order transition within the phosphorylation domain results in decreased head-head interactions, activating myosin in smooth muscle.

  18. Interaction of aspartic acid-104 and proline-287 with the active site of m-calpain.

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, J S; Elce, J S

    1996-01-01

    In an ongoing study of the mechanisms of calpain catalysis and Ca(2+)-induced activation, the effects of Asp-104-->Ser and Pro-287-->Ser large subunit mutations on m-calpain activity, the pH-activity profile, Ca(2+)-sensitivity, and autolysis were measured. The importance of these positions was suggested by sequence comparisons between the calpain and papain families of cysteine proteinases. Asp-104 is adjacent to the active-site Cys-105, and Pro-287 is adjacent to the active-site Asn-286 and probably to the active-site His-262; both Asp-104 and Pro-287 are absolutely conserved in the known calpains, but are replaced by highly conserved serine residues in the papains. The single mutants had approx. 10-15% of wild-type activity, due mainly to a decrease in kcat, since Km was only slightly increased. The Pro-287-->Ser mutation appeared to cause a local perturbation of the catalytic Cys-105/His-262 catalytic ion pair, reducing its efficiency without major effect on the conformation and stability of the enzyme. The Asp-104-->Ser mutation caused a marked narrowing of the pH-activity curve, a 9-fold increase in Ca2+ requirement, and an acceleration of autolysis, when compared with the wild-type enzyme. The results indicated that Asp-104 alters the nature of its interaction with the catalytic ion pair during Ca(2+)-induced conformational change in calpain. This interaction may be direct or indirect, but is important in activation of the enzyme. PMID:8912692

  19. U2AF65 adapts to diverse pre-mRNA splice sites through conformational selection of specific and promiscuous RNA recognition motifs

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Jermaine L.; Agrawal, Anant A.; Gupta, Ankit; Green, Michael R.; Kielkopf, Clara L.

    2013-01-01

    Degenerate splice site sequences mark the intron boundaries of pre-mRNA transcripts in multicellular eukaryotes. The essential pre-mRNA splicing factor U2AF65 is faced with the paradoxical tasks of accurately targeting polypyrimidine (Py) tracts preceding 3′ splice sites while adapting to both cytidine and uridine nucleotides with nearly equivalent frequencies. To understand how U2AF65 recognizes degenerate Py tracts, we determined six crystal structures of human U2AF65 bound to cytidine-containing Py tracts. As deoxy-ribose backbones were required for co-crystallization with these Py tracts, we also determined two baseline structures of U2AF65 bound to the deoxy-uridine counterparts and compared the original, RNA-bound structure. Local structural changes suggest that the N-terminal RNA recognition motif 1 (RRM1) is more promiscuous for cytosine-containing Py tracts than the C-terminal RRM2. These structural differences between the RRMs were reinforced by the specificities of wild-type and site-directed mutant U2AF65 for region-dependent cytosine- and uracil-containing RNA sites. Small-angle X-ray scattering analyses further demonstrated that Py tract variations select distinct inter-RRM spacings from a pre-existing ensemble of U2AF65 conformations. Our results highlight both local and global conformational selection as a means for universal 3′ splice site recognition by U2AF65. PMID:23376934

  20. Conformational flexibility of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, Claudio; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2016-05-01

    L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, better known as aspartame, is not only one of the most used artificial sweeteners, but also a very interesting molecule with respect to the correlation between molecular structure and taste. The extreme conformational flexibility of this dipeptide posed a huge difficulty when researchers tried to use it as a lead compound to design new sweeteners. In particular, it was difficult to take advantage of its molecular model as a mold to infer the shape of the, then unknown, active site of the sweet taste receptor. Here, we follow the story of the 3D structural aspects of aspartame from early conformational studies to recent docking into homology models of the receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 376-384, 2016.

  1. A model of the rabies virus glycoprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Rustici, M; Bracci, L; Lozzi, L; Neri, P; Santucci, A; Soldani, P; Spreafico, A; Niccolai, N

    1993-06-01

    The glycoprotein from the neurotropic rabies virus shows a significant homology with the alpha neurotoxin that binds to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The crystal structure of the alpha neurotoxins suggests that the Arg 37 guanidinium group and the Asp 31 side-chain carboxylate of the erabutoxin have stereochemical features resembling those of acetylcholine. Conformational studies on the Asn194-Ser195-Arg196-Gly197 tetrapeptide, an essential part of the binding site of the rabies virus glycoprotein, indicate that the side chains of Asn and Arg could also mimic the acetylcholine structure. This observation is consistent with the recently proposed mechanism of the viral infection.

  2. Structure and Reactivity of the Phosphotriesterase Active Site

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    characterize different catalytic conformations for chorismate mutase . Preliminary evidence for water binding in phosphotriesterase suggests that activity in...MD/QM study of the chorismate mutase catalyzed Claisen rearrangement reaction. 2001.subm. J.Phys.Chem.B 22.Day, P.N.J., J.H.; Gordon,M.S.; Webb,S.P...Claisen rearrangement of an unusual substrate in chorismate mutase . 2001.subm. J.Phys.Chem.B 38.Stevens, W.J., Basch,H., Krauss,M., Compact effective

  3. Unmasking tandem site interaction in human acetylcholinesterase. Substrate activation with a cationic acetanilide substrate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joseph L; Cusack, Bernadette; Davies, Matthew P; Fauq, Abdul; Rosenberry, Terrone L

    2003-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) contains a narrow and deep active site gorge with two sites of ligand binding, an acylation site (or A-site) at the base of the gorge, and a peripheral site (or P-site) near the gorge entrance. The P-site contributes to catalytic efficiency by transiently binding substrates on their way to the acylation site, where a short-lived acyl enzyme intermediate is produced. A conformational interaction between the A- and P-sites has recently been found to modulate ligand affinities. We now demonstrate that this interaction is of functional importance by showing that the acetylation rate constant of a substrate bound to the A-site is increased by a factor a when a second molecule of substrate binds to the P-site. This demonstration became feasible through the introduction of a new acetanilide substrate analogue of acetylcholine, 3-(acetamido)-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium (ATMA), for which a = 4. This substrate has a low acetylation rate constant and equilibrates with the catalytic site, allowing a tractable algebraic solution to the rate equation for substrate hydrolysis. ATMA affinities for the A- and P-sites deduced from the kinetic analysis were confirmed by fluorescence titration with thioflavin T as a reporter ligand. Values of a >1 give rise to a hydrolysis profile called substrate activation, and the AChE site-specific mutant W86F, and to a lesser extent wild-type human AChE itself, showed substrate activation with acetylthiocholine as the substrate. Substrate activation was incorporated into a previous catalytic scheme for AChE in which a bound P-site ligand can also block product dissociation from the A-site, and two additional features of the AChE catalytic pathway were revealed. First, the ability of a bound P-site ligand to increase the substrate acetylation rate constant varied with the structure of the ligand: thioflavin T accelerated ATMA acetylation by a factor a(2) of 1.3, while propidium failed to accelerate. Second, catalytic rate

  4. Modulation of arginine decarboxylase activity from Mycobacterium smegmatis. Evidence for pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-mediated conformational changes in the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Balasundaram, D; Tyagi, A K

    1989-08-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (arginine carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.19) from Mycobacterium smegmatis, TMC 1546 has been purified to homogeneity. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 232 kDa and a subunit mass of 58.9 kDa. The enzyme from mycobacteria is totally dependent on pyridoxal 5'-phosphate for its activity at its optimal pH and, unlike that from Escherichia coli, Mg2+ does not play an active role in the enzyme conformation. The enzyme is specific for arginine (Km = 1.6 mM). The holoenzyme is completely resolved in dialysis against hydroxylamine. Reconstitution of the apoenzyme with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate shows sigmoidal binding characteristics at pH 8.4 with a Hill coefficient of 2.77, whereas at pH 6.2 the binding is hyperbolic in nature. The kinetics of reconstitution at pH 8.4 are apparently sigmoidal, indicating the occurrence of two binding types of differing strengths. A low-affinity (Kd = 22.5 microM) binding to apoenzyme at high pyridoxal 5'-phosphate concentrations and a high-affinity (Kd = 3.0 microM) binding to apoenzyme at high pyridoxal 5'-phosphate concentrations. The restoration of full activity occurred in parallel with the tight binding (high affinity) of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate to the apoenzyme. Along with these characteristics, spectral analyses of holoenzyme and apoenzyme at pH 8.4 and pH 6.2 indicate a pH-dependent modulation of coenzyme function. Based on the pH-dependent changes in the polarity of the active-site environment, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate forms different Schiff-base tautomers at pH 8.4 and pH 6.2 with absorption maxima at 415 nm and 333 nm, respectively. These separate forms of Schiff-base confer different catalytic efficiencies to the enzyme.

  5. Evidence That GH115 α-Glucuronidase Activity, Which Is Required to Degrade Plant Biomass, Is Dependent on Conformational Flexibility*

    PubMed Central

    Rogowski, Artur; Baslé, Arnaud; Farinas, Cristiane S.; Solovyova, Alexandra; Mortimer, Jennifer C.; Dupree, Paul; Gilbert, Harry J.; Bolam, David N.

    2014-01-01

    The microbial degradation of the plant cell wall is an important biological process that is highly relevant to environmentally significant industries such as the bioenergy and biorefining sectors. A major component of the wall is glucuronoxylan, a β1,4-linked xylose polysaccharide that is decorated with α-linked glucuronic and/or methylglucuronic acid (GlcA/MeGlcA). Recently three members of a glycoside hydrolase family, GH115, were shown to hydrolyze MeGlcA side chains from the internal regions of xylan, an activity that has not previously been described. Here we show that a dominant member of the human microbiota, Bacteroides ovatus, contains a GH115 enzyme, BoAgu115A, which displays glucuronoxylan α-(4-O-methyl)-glucuronidase activity. The enzyme is significantly more active against substrates in which the xylose decorated with GlcA/MeGlcA is flanked by one or more xylose residues. The crystal structure of BoAgu115A revealed a four-domain protein in which the active site, comprising a pocket that abuts a cleft-like structure, is housed in the second domain that adopts a TIM barrel-fold. The third domain, a five-helical bundle, and the C-terminal β-sandwich domain make inter-chain contacts leading to protein dimerization. Informed by the structure of the enzyme in complex with GlcA in its open ring form, in conjunction with mutagenesis studies, the potential substrate binding and catalytically significant amino acids were identified. Based on the catalytic importance of residues located on a highly flexible loop, the enzyme is required to undergo a substantial conformational change to form a productive Michaelis complex with glucuronoxylan. PMID:24214982

  6. Key Role of Active-Site Water Molecules in Bacteriorhodopsin Proton-Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, A.N.; Baudry, Jerome Y; Suhai, Sandor; Fischer, S.; Smith, Jeremy C

    2008-10-01

    The functional mechanism of the light-driven proton pump protein bacteriorhodopsin depends on the location of water molecules in the active site at various stages of the photocycle and on their roles in the proton-transfer steps. Here, free energy computations indicate that electrostatic interactions favor the presence of a cytoplasmic-side water molecule hydrogen bonding to the retinal Schiff base in the state preceding proton transfer from the retinal Schiff base to Asp85. However, the nonequilibrium nature of the pumping process means that the probability of occupancy of a water molecule in a given site depends both on the free energies of insertion of the water molecule in this and other sites during the preceding photocycle steps and on the kinetic accessibility of these sites on the time scale of the reaction steps. The presence of the cytoplasmic-side water molecule has a dramatic effect on the mechanism of proton transfer: the proton is channeled on the Thr89 side of the retinal, whereas the transfer on the Asp212 side is hindered. Reaction-path simulations and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the presence of the cytoplasmic-side water molecule permits a low-energy bacteriorhodopsin conformer in which the water molecule bridges the twisted retinal Schiff base and the proton acceptor Asp85. From this low-energy conformer, proton transfer occurs via a concerted mechanism in which the water molecule participates as an intermediate proton carrier.

  7. Molecular mimicry of substrate oxygen atoms by water molecules in the beta-amylase active site.

    PubMed

    Pujadas, G; Palau, J

    2001-08-01

    Soybean beta-amylase (EC 3.2.1.2) has been crystallized both free and complexed with a variety of ligands. Four water molecules in the free-enzyme catalytic cleft form a multihydrogen-bond network with eight strategic residues involved in enzyme-ligand hydrogen bonds. We show here that the positions of these four water molecules are coincident with the positions of four potential oxygen atoms of the ligands within the complex. Some of these waters are displaced from the active site when the ligands bind to the enzyme. How many are displaced depends on the shape of the ligand. This means that when one of the four positions is not occupied by a ligand oxygen atom, the corresponding water remains. We studied the functional/structural role of these four waters and conclude that their presence means that the conformation of the eight side chains is fixed in all situations (free or complexed enzyme) and preserved from unwanted or forbidden conformational changes that could hamper the catalytic mechanism. The water structure at the active pocket of beta-amylase is therefore essential for providing the ligand recognition process with plasticity. It does not affect the protein active-site geometry and preserves the overall hydrogen-bonding network, irrespective of which ligand is bound to the enzyme. We also investigated whether other enzymes showed a similar role for water. Finally, we discuss the potential use of these results for predicting whether water molecules can mimic ligand atoms in the active center.

  8. Crystal structure of Plasmodium vivax FK506-binding protein 25 reveals conformational changes responsible for its noncanonical activity.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Sreekanth; Austin, David; Harikishore, Amaravadhi; Nguyen, Quoc Toan; Baek, Kwanghee; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2014-07-01

    The malarial parasites currently remain one of the most dreadful parasites, which show increasing trend of drug resistance to the currently available antimalarial drugs. Thus, the need to identify and characterize new protein targets in these parasites can aid to design novel therapeutic strategies to combat malaria. Recently, the conserved FK506-binding protein family members with molecular weight of 35 kDa from Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax (referred to as PfFKBP35 and PvFKBP35, respectively) were identified for drug targeting. Further data mining revealed a 25-kDa FKBP (FKBP25) family member present in the parasites. FKBP25 belongs to a unique class of FKBP, because it is a nuclear FKBP with multiple protein-binding partners. Apart from immune regulation, it is also known for its chaperoning role in various cellular processes such as transcription regulation and trafficking. Here, we present the biochemical characterization and 1.9-Å crystal structure of an N-terminal truncated FKBP25 from P. vivax (PvFKBP25(72-209)). The protein reveals the noncanonical nature with unique structural changes observed in the loops flanking the active site, concealing the binding pocket. Further, a potential calmodulin-binding domain, which is absent in human FKBP25, is observed in this protein. Although the functional implication of Plasmodium FKBP25 in malaria still remains elusive, we speculate that the notable conformational changes in its structure might serve as an overture in understanding its molecular mechanism.

  9. Improving the neutral phytase activity from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Wang, Zupeng; Yan, Xiuhua

    2015-03-01

    Neutral phytase is used as a feed additive for degradation of anti-nutritional phytate in aquatic feed industry. Site-directed mutagenesis of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 phytase was performed with an aim to increase its activity. Mutation residues were chosen based on multiple sequence alignments and structure analysis of neutral phytsaes from different microorganisms. The mutation sites on surface (D148E, S197E and N156E) and around the active site (D52E) of phytase were selected. Analysis of the phytase variants showed that the specific activities of mutants D148E and S197E remarkably increased by about 35 and 13% over a temperature range of 40-75 °C at pH 7.0, respectively. The k cat of mutants D148E and S197E were 1.50 and 1.25 times than that of the wild-type phytase, respectively. Both D148E and S197E showed much higher thermostability than that of the wild-type phytase. However, mutants N156E and D52E led to significant loss of specific activity of the enzyme. Structural analysis revealed that these mutations may affect conformation of the active site of phytase. The present mutant phytases D148E and S197E with increased activities and thermostabilities have application potential as additives in aquaculture feed.

  10. Probing the active site of a diels-alderase ribozyme by photoaffinity cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Wombacher, Richard; Jäschke, Andres

    2008-07-09

    The active site of a Diels-Alderase ribozyme is located in solution by photoaffinity cross-linking using a productlike azidobenzyl probe. Two key nucleotides are identified that contact the Diels-Alder product in a conformation-dependent fashion. The design of such probes does not require knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the ribozyme, and the technique yields both static and dynamic structural information. This work establishes photoaffinity cross-linking as an empirical approach that is applied here for the first time to an artificial ribozyme.

  11. Active conformation of the erythropoietin receptor: random and cysteine-scanning mutagenesis of the extracellular juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaohui; Gross, Alec W; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-03-17

    In the absence of erythropoietin (Epo) cell surface Epo receptors (EpoR) are dimeric; dimerization is mediated mainly by the transmembrane domain. Binding of Epo changes the orientation of the two receptor subunits. This conformational change is transmitted through the juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase and induction of proliferation and survival signals. To define the active EpoR conformation(s) we screened libraries of EpoRs with random mutations in the transmembrane domain and identified several point mutations that activate the EpoR in the absence of ligand, including changes of either of the first two transmembrane domain residues (Leu(226) and Ile(227)) to cysteine. Following this discovery, we performed cysteine-scanning mutagenesis in the EpoR juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains. Many mutants formed disulfide-linked receptor dimers, but only EpoR dimers linked by cysteines at positions 223, 226, or 227 activated EpoR signal transduction pathways and supported proliferation of Ba/F3 cells in the absence of cytokines. These data suggest that activation of dimeric EpoR by Epo binding is achieved by reorienting the EpoR transmembrane and the connected cytosolic domains and that certain disulfide-bonded dimers represent the activated dimeric conformation of the EpoR, constitutively activating downstream signaling. Based on our data and the previously determined structure of Epo bound to a dimer of the EpoR extracellular domain, we present a model of the active and inactive conformations of the Epo receptor.

  12. Neural signatures of social conformity: A coordinate-based activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of functional brain imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiyan; Luo, Yi; Feng, Chunliang

    2016-12-01

    People often align their behaviors with group opinions, known as social conformity. Many neuroscience studies have explored the neuropsychological mechanisms underlying social conformity. Here we employed a coordinate-based meta-analysis on neuroimaging studies of social conformity with the purpose to reveal the convergence of the underlying neural architecture. We identified a convergence of reported activation foci in regions associated with normative decision-making, including ventral striatum (VS), dorsal posterior medial frontal cortex (dorsal pMFC), and anterior insula (AI). Specifically, consistent deactivation of VS and activation of dorsal pMFC and AI are identified when people's responses deviate from group opinions. In addition, the deviation-related responses in dorsal pMFC predict people's conforming behavioral adjustments. These are consistent with current models that disagreement with others might evoke "error" signals, cognitive imbalance, and/or aversive feelings, which are plausibly detected in these brain regions as control signals to facilitate subsequent conforming behaviors. Finally, group opinions result in altered neural correlates of valuation, manifested as stronger responses of VS to stimuli endorsed than disliked by others.

  13. A conformational analysis of mouse Nalp3 domain structures by molecular dynamics simulations, and binding site analysis.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Bikash R; Maharana, Jitendra; Bhoi, Gopal K; Lenka, Santosh K; Patra, Mahesh C; Dikhit, Manas R; Dubey, Praveen K; Pradhan, Sukanta K; Behera, Bijay K

    2014-05-01

    Scrutinizing various nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) genes in higher eukaryotes is very important for understanding the intriguing mechanism of the host defense against pathogens. The nucleotide-binding domain (NACHT), leucine-rich repeat (LRR), and pyrin domains (PYD)-containing protein 3 (Nalp3), is an intracellular innate immune receptor and is associated with several immune system related disorders. Despite Nalp3's protective role during a pathogenic invasion, the molecular features and structural organization of this crucial protein is poorly understood. Using comparative modeling and molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the structural architecture of Nalp3 domains, and characterized the dynamic and energetic parameters of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding in NACHT, and pathogen-derived ligands muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and imidazoquinoline with LRR domains. The results suggested that walker A, B and extended walker B motifs were the key ATP binding regions in NACHT that mediate self-oligomerization. The analysis of the binding sites of MDP and imidazoquinoline revealed LRR 7-9 to be the most energetically favored site for imidazoquinoline interaction. However, the binding free energy calculations using the Molecular Mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM/PBSA) method indicated that MDP is incompatible for activating the Nalp3 molecule in its monomeric form, and suggest its complex interaction with NOD2 or other NLRs accounts for MDP recognition. The high binding affinity of ATP with NACHT was correlated to the experimental data for human NLRs. Our binding site prediction for imidazoquinoline in LRR warrants further investigation via in vivo models. This is the first study that provides ligand recognition in mouse Nalp3 and its spatial structural arrangements.

  14. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  15. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  16. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  17. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  18. Receptor site topographies for phencyclidine-like and sigma drugs: predictions from quantitative conformational, electrostatic potential, and radioreceptor analyses.

    PubMed

    Manallack, D T; Wong, M G; Costa, M; Andrews, P R; Beart, P M

    1988-12-01

    Computer-assisted molecular modelling techniques and electrostatic analyses of a wide range of phenycyclidine (PCP) and sigma ligands, in conjunction with radioreceptor studies, were used to determine the topographies of the PCP and sigma receptors. The PCP receptor model was defined using key molecules from the arylcyclohexylamine, benzomorphan, bridged benz[f]isoquinoline, and dibenzocycloalkenimine drug classes. Hypothetical receptor points (R1, R2) were constructed onto the aromatic ring of each compound to represent hydrophobic interactions with the receptor, along with an additional receptor point (R3) representing a hydrogen bond between the nitrogen atom and the receptor. The superimposition of these key molecules gave the coordinates of the receptor points and nitrogen defining the primary PCP pharmacophore as follows: R1 (0.00, 3.50, 0.00), R2 (0.00, -3.50, 0.00), R3 (6.66, -1.13, 0.00), and N (3.90, -1.46, -0.32). Additional analyses were used to describe secondary binding sites for an additional hydrogen bonding site and two lipophilic clefts. Similarly, the sigma receptor model was constructed from ligands of the benzomorphan, octahydrobenzo[f]quinoline, phenylpiperidine, and diphenylguanidine drug classes. Coordinates for the primary sigma pharmacophore are as follows: R1 (0.00, 3.50, 0.00), R2 (0.00, -3.50, 0.00), R3 (6.09, 2.09, 0.00), and N (4.9, -0.12, -1.25). Secondary binding sites for sigma ligands were proposed for the interaction of aromatic ring substituents and large N-substituted lipophilic groups with the receptor. The sigma receptor model differs from the PCP model in the position of nitrogen atom, direction of the nitrogen lone pair vector, and secondary sigma binding sites. This study has thus demonstrated that the differing quantitative structure-activity relationships of PCP and sigma ligands allow the definition of discrete receptors. These models may be used in conjunction with rational drug design techniques to design novel PCP

  19. Site-specific excision repair of 1-nitrosopyrene-induced DNA adducts at the nucleotide level in the HPRT gene of human fibroblasts: effect of adduct conformation on the pattern of site-specific repair.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, D; Maher, V M; McCormick, J J

    1996-01-01

    Studies showing that different types of DNA adducts are repaired in human cells at different rates suggest that DNA adduct conformation is the major determinant of the rate of nucleotide excision repair. However, recent studies of repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers or benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE)-induced adducts at the nucleotide level in DNA of normal human fibroblasts indicate that the rate of repair of the same adduct at different nucleotide positions can vary up to 10-fold, suggesting an important role for local DNA conformation. To see if site-specific DNA repair is a common phenomenon for bulky DNA adducts, we determined the rate of repair of 1-nitrosopyrene (1-NOP)-induced adducts in exon 3 of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene at the nucleotide level using ligation-mediated PCR. To distinguish between the contributions of adduct conformation and local DNA conformation to the rate of repair, we compared the results obtained with 1-NOP with those we obtained previously using BPDE. The principal DNA adduct formed by either agent involves guanine. We found that rates of repair of 1-NOP-induced adducts also varied significantly at the nucleotide level, but the pattern of site-specific repair differed from that of BPDE-induced adducts at the same guanine positions in the same region of DNA. The average rate of excision repair of 1-NOP adducts in exon 3 was two to three times faster than that of BPDE adducts, but at particular nucleotides the rate was slower or faster than that of BPDE adducts or, in some cases, equal to that of BPDE adducts. These results indicate that the contribution of the local DNA conformation to the rate of repair at a particular nucleotide position depends upon the specific DNA adduct involved. However, the data also indicate that the conformation of the DNA adduct is not the only factor contributing to the rate of repair at different nucleotide positions. Instead, the rate of repair at a particular nucleotide

  20. Controlled Orientation of Active Sites in a Nanostructured Multienzyme Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Yang, Byungseop; Jung, Younghan; Cha, Jaehyun; Cho, Jinhwan; Choi, Eun-Sil; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-01-01

    Multistep cascade reactions in nature maximize reaction efficiency by co-assembling related enzymes. Such organization facilitates the processing of intermediates by downstream enzymes. Previously, the studies on multienzyme nanocomplexes assembled on DNA scaffolds demonstrated that closer interenzyme distance enhances the overall reaction efficiency. However, it remains unknown how the active site orientation controlled at nanoscale can have an effect on multienzyme reaction. Here, we show that controlled alignment of active sites promotes the multienzyme reaction efficiency. By genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and two compatible bioorthogonal chemistries, we conjugated mannitol dehydrogenase to formate dehydrogenase with the defined active site arrangement with the residue-level accuracy. The study revealed that the multienzyme complex with the active sites directed towards each other exhibits four-fold higher relative efficiency enhancement in the cascade reaction and produces 60% more D-mannitol than the other complex with active sites directed away from each other. PMID:28004799

  1. Conformation-dependent QSAR approach for the prediction of inhibitory activity of bromodomain modulators.

    PubMed

    García-Jacas, C R; Martinez-Mayorga, K; Marrero-Ponce, Y; Medina-Franco, J L

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic drug discovery is a promising research field with growing interest in the scientific community, as evidenced by the number of publications and the large amount of structure-epigenetic activity information currently available in the public domain. Computational methods are valuable tools to analyse and understand the activity of large compound collections from their structural information. In this manuscript, QSAR models to predict the inhibitory activity of a diverse and heterogeneous set of 88 organic molecules against the bromodomains BRD2, BRD3 and BRD4 are presented. A conformation-dependent representation of the chemical structures was established using the RDKit software and a training and test set division was performed. Several two-linear and three-linear QuBiLS-MIDAS molecular descriptors ( www.tomocomd.com ) were computed to extract the geometric structural features of the compounds studied. QuBiLS-MIDAS-based features sets, to be used in the modelling, were selected using dimensionality reduction strategies. The multiple linear regression procedure coupled with a genetic algorithm were employed to build the predictive models. Regression models containing between 6 to 9 variables were developed and assessed according to several internal and external validation methods. Analyses of outlier compounds and the applicability domain for each model were performed. As a result, the models against BRD2 and BRD3 with 8 variables and the model with 9 variables against BRD4 were those with the best overall performance according to the criteria accounted for. The results obtained suggest that the models proposed will be a good tool for studying the inhibitory activities of drug candidates against the bromodomains considered during epigenetic drug discovery.

  2. A Novel Site of Action for α-SNAP in the SNARE Conformational Cycle Controlling Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Barszczewski, Marcin; Chua, John J.; Stein, Alexander; Winter, Ulrike; Heintzmann, Rainer; Zilly, Felipe E.; Fasshauer, Dirk; Lang, Thorsten

    2008-01-01

    Regulated exocytosis in neurons and neuroendocrine cells requires the formation of a stable soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex consisting of synaptobrevin-2/vesicle-associated membrane protein 2, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25), and syntaxin 1. This complex is subsequently disassembled by the concerted action of α-SNAP and the ATPases associated with different cellular activities-ATPase N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF). We report that NSF inhibition causes accumulation of α-SNAP in clusters on plasma membranes. Clustering is mediated by the binding of α-SNAP to uncomplexed syntaxin, because cleavage of syntaxin with botulinum neurotoxin C1 or competition by using antibodies against syntaxin SNARE motif abolishes clustering. Binding of α-SNAP potently inhibits Ca2+-dependent exocytosis of secretory granules and SNARE-mediated liposome fusion. Membrane clustering and inhibition of both exocytosis and liposome fusion are counteracted by NSF but not when an α-SNAP mutant defective in NSF activation is used. We conclude that α-SNAP inhibits exocytosis by binding to the syntaxin SNARE motif and in turn prevents SNARE assembly, revealing an unexpected site of action for α-SNAP in the SNARE cycle that drives exocytotic membrane fusion. PMID:18094056

  3. A novel site of action for alpha-SNAP in the SNARE conformational cycle controlling membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Barszczewski, Marcin; Chua, John J; Stein, Alexander; Winter, Ulrike; Heintzmann, Rainer; Zilly, Felipe E; Fasshauer, Dirk; Lang, Thorsten; Jahn, Reinhard

    2008-03-01

    Regulated exocytosis in neurons and neuroendocrine cells requires the formation of a stable soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex consisting of synaptobrevin-2/vesicle-associated membrane protein 2, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25), and syntaxin 1. This complex is subsequently disassembled by the concerted action of alpha-SNAP and the ATPases associated with different cellular activities-ATPase N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF). We report that NSF inhibition causes accumulation of alpha-SNAP in clusters on plasma membranes. Clustering is mediated by the binding of alpha-SNAP to uncomplexed syntaxin, because cleavage of syntaxin with botulinum neurotoxin C1 or competition by using antibodies against syntaxin SNARE motif abolishes clustering. Binding of alpha-SNAP potently inhibits Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis of secretory granules and SNARE-mediated liposome fusion. Membrane clustering and inhibition of both exocytosis and liposome fusion are counteracted by NSF but not when an alpha-SNAP mutant defective in NSF activation is used. We conclude that alpha-SNAP inhibits exocytosis by binding to the syntaxin SNARE motif and in turn prevents SNARE assembly, revealing an unexpected site of action for alpha-SNAP in the SNARE cycle that drives exocytotic membrane fusion.

  4. Mapping the Free Energy Landscape of PKA Inhibition and Activation: A Double-Conformational Selection Model for the Tandem cAMP-Binding Domains of PKA RIα.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Madoka; McNicholl, Eric Tyler; Ramkissoon, Avinash; Moleschi, Kody; Taylor, Susan S; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Protein Kinase A (PKA) is the major receptor for the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) secondary messenger in eukaryotes. cAMP binds to two tandem cAMP-binding domains (CBD-A and -B) within the regulatory subunit of PKA (R), unleashing the activity of the catalytic subunit (C). While CBD-A in RIα is required for PKA inhibition and activation, CBD-B functions as a "gatekeeper" domain that modulates the control exerted by CBD-A. Preliminary evidence suggests that CBD-B dynamics are critical for its gatekeeper function. To test this hypothesis, here we investigate by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) the two-domain construct RIα (91-379) in its apo, cAMP2, and C-bound forms. Our comparative NMR analyses lead to a double conformational selection model in which each apo CBD dynamically samples both active and inactive states independently of the adjacent CBD within a nearly degenerate free energy landscape. Such degeneracy is critical to explain the sensitivity of CBD-B to weak interactions with C and its high affinity for cAMP. Binding of cAMP eliminates this degeneracy, as it selectively stabilizes the active conformation within each CBD and inter-CBD contacts, which require both cAMP and W260. The latter is contributed by CBD-B and mediates capping of the cAMP bound to CBD-A. The inter-CBD interface is dispensable for intra-CBD conformational selection, but is indispensable for full activation of PKA as it occludes C-subunit recognition sites within CBD-A. In addition, the two structurally homologous cAMP-bound CBDs exhibit marked differences in their residual dynamics profiles, supporting the notion that conservation of structure does not necessarily imply conservation of dynamics.

  5. Conformation of epicinchonine and cinchonine in view of their antimalarial activity: x-ray and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Kowalik, J T; Lipińska, T; Oleksyn, B J; Sliwiński, J

    1999-01-01

    X-ray structure analysis was carried out for a single crystal of 9-epi-10,11-dihydrocinchonine in the form of free base obtained by stereoselective interconversion of cinchonine via 9-O-tosylcinchonine. An intramolecular hydrogen bond was found between the carbinol hydroxyl group, -O12-H12, and the quinuclidine nitrogen atom, N1, with the parameters: O12...N1=2.688(3)A, O12-H12=0.84(4)A, N1...H12=2.11(4)A and O12-H12...N1=126(3) degrees. Theoretical calculations for isolated molecules of epicinchonine and cinchonine with the use of AM1 semiempirical method and comparative studies of the crystal structures have shown that the conformation of the alkaloid molecules with respect to the C8-C9 bond depends on the absolute configuration at C9. The conformation with respect to the C9-C16 bond depends on the protonation of N1 for threo but not for erythro alkaloids. It was established that the ability to form inter- or intramolecular hydrogen bonds is determined by the energetically preferred conformations of erythro and threo alkaloids, respectively. In most cases the conformations preferred for erythro alkaloids are energetically forbidden for their threo epimers and vice versa. The differences in conformation and capability to form intramolecular hydrogen bonds may explain why their antimalarial activities are incomparable.

  6. Conformable actively multiplexed high-density surface electrode array for brain interfacing

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan

    2015-01-13

    Provided are methods and devices for interfacing with brain tissue, specifically for monitoring and/or actuation of spatio-temporal electrical waveforms. The device is conformable having a high electrode density and high spatial and temporal resolution. A conformable substrate supports a conformable electronic circuit and a barrier layer. Electrodes are positioned to provide electrical contact with a brain tissue. A controller monitors or actuates the electrodes, thereby interfacing with the brain tissue. In an aspect, methods are provided to monitor or actuate spatio-temporal electrical waveform over large brain surface areas by any of the devices disclosed herein.

  7. An active site rearrangement within the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme releases nonproductive interactions and allows formation of catalytic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Raghuvir N.; Van Schie, Sabine N.S.; Giambaşu, George; Dai, Qing; Yesselman, Joseph D.; York, Darrin; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Biological catalysis hinges on the precise structural integrity of an active site that binds and transforms its substrates and meeting this requirement presents a unique challenge for RNA enzymes. Functional RNAs, including ribozymes, fold into their active conformations within rugged energy landscapes that often contain misfolded conformers. Here we uncover and characterize one such “off-pathway” species within an active site after overall folding of the ribozyme is complete. The Tetrahymena group I ribozyme (E) catalyzes cleavage of an oligonucleotide substrate (S) by an exogenous guanosine (G) cofactor. We tested whether specific catalytic interactions with G are present in the preceding E•S•G and E•G ground-state complexes. We monitored interactions with G via the effects of 2′- and 3′-deoxy (–H) and −amino (–NH2) substitutions on G binding. These and prior results reveal that G is bound in an inactive configuration within E•G, with the nucleophilic 3′-OH making a nonproductive interaction with an active site metal ion termed MA and with the adjacent 2′-OH making no interaction. Upon S binding, a rearrangement occurs that allows both –OH groups to contact a different active site metal ion, termed MC, to make what are likely to be their catalytic interactions. The reactive phosphoryl group on S promotes this change, presumably by repositioning the metal ions with respect to G. This conformational transition demonstrates local rearrangements within an otherwise folded RNA, underscoring RNA's difficulty in specifying a unique conformation and highlighting Nature's potential to use local transitions of RNA in complex function. PMID:26567314

  8. Perspective: On the active site model in computational catalyst screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Karsten; Plaisance, Craig P.; Oberhofer, Harald; Andersen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    First-principles screening approaches exploiting energy trends in surface adsorption represent an unparalleled success story in recent computational catalysis research. Here we argue that our still limited understanding of the structure of active sites is one of the major bottlenecks towards an ever extended and reliable use of such computational screening for catalyst discovery. For low-index transition metal surfaces, the prevalently chosen high-symmetry (terrace and step) sites offered by the nominal bulk-truncated crystal lattice might be justified. For more complex surfaces and composite catalyst materials, computational screening studies will need to actively embrace a considerable uncertainty with respect to what truly are the active sites. By systematically exploring the space of possible active site motifs, such studies might eventually contribute towards a targeted design of optimized sites in future catalysts.

  9. Diffusional correlations among multiple active sites in a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-04-07

    Simulations of the enzymatic dynamics of a model enzyme containing multiple substrate binding sites indicate the existence of diffusional correlations in the chemical reactivity of the active sites. A coarse-grain, particle-based, mesoscopic description of the system, comprising the enzyme, the substrate, the product and solvent, is constructed to study these effects. The reactive and non-reactive dynamics is followed using a hybrid scheme that combines molecular dynamics for the enzyme, substrate and product molecules with multiparticle collision dynamics for the solvent. It is found that the reactivity of an individual active site in the multiple-active-site enzyme is reduced substantially, and this effect is analyzed and attributed to diffusive competition for the substrate among the different active sites in the enzyme.

  10. The cytosolic DNA sensor cGAS forms an oligomeric complex with DNA and undergoes switch-like conformational changes in the activation loop.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Wu, Jiaxi; Du, Fenghe; Xu, Hui; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Zhe; Brautigam, Chad A; Zhang, Xuewu; Chen, Zhijian J

    2014-02-13

    The presence of DNA in the cytoplasm is a danger signal that triggers immune and inflammatory responses. Cytosolic DNA binds to and activates cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS), which produces the second messenger cGAMP. cGAMP binds to the adaptor protein STING and activates a signaling cascade that leads to the production of type I interferons and other cytokines. Here, we report the crystal structures of human cGAS in its apo form, representing its autoinhibited conformation as well as in its cGAMP- and sulfate-bound forms. These structures reveal switch-like conformational changes of an activation loop that result in the rearrangement of the catalytic site. The structure of DNA-bound cGAS reveals a complex composed of dimeric cGAS bound to two molecules of DNA. Functional analyses of cGAS mutants demonstrate that both the protein-protein interface and the two DNA binding surfaces are critical for cGAS activation. These results provide insights into the mechanism of DNA sensing by cGAS.

  11. Conformational flexibility of a scorpion toxin active on mammals and insects: a circular dichroism study.

    PubMed

    Loret, E P; Sampieri, F; Roussel, A; Granier, C; Rochat, H

    1990-01-01

    Three scorpion toxins have been analyzed by circular dichroism in water and in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) solutions. These toxins were chosen because they are representative of three kinds of pharmacological activities: (1) toxin AaH IT2, an antiinsect toxin purified from the venom of Androctonus australis Hector, which is able to bind to insect nervous system preparation, (2) toxin Css II, from the venom of Centruroides suffusus suffusus, which is a beta-type antimammal toxin capable of binding to mammal nervous system preparation, and (3) the toxin Ts VII from the venom of Tityus serrulatus, which is able to bind to both types of nervous systems. In order to minimize bias, CD data were analyzed by a predictive algorithm to assess secondary structure content. Among the three molecules, Ts VII presented the most unordered secondary structure in water, but it gained in ordered forms when solubilized in TFE. These results indicated that the Ts VII backbone is the most flexible, which might result in a more pronounced tendency for this toxin molecule to undergo conformational changes. This is consistent with the fact that it competes with both antiinsect and beta-type antimammal toxins for the binding to the sodium channel.

  12. Protein domains and conformational changes in the activation of RepA, a DNA replication initiator.

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, R; Andreu, J M; Díaz-Orejas, R

    1998-01-01

    RepA is the DNA replication initiator protein of the Pseudomonas plasmid pPS10. RepA has a dual function: as a dimer, it binds to an inversely-repeated sequence acting as a repressor of its own synthesis; as a monomer, RepA binds to four directly-repeated sequences to constitute a specialized nucleoprotein complex responsible for the initiation of DNA replication. We have previously shown that a Leucine Zipper-like motif (LZ) at the N-terminus of RepA is responsible for protein dimerization. In this paper we characterize the existence in RepA of two protein globular domains C-terminal to the LZ. We propose that dissociation of RepA dimers into monomers results in a conformational change from a compact arrangement of both domains, competent for binding to the operator, to an extended species that is suited for iteron binding. This model establishes the structural basis for the activation of DNA replication initiators in plasmids from Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:9687517

  13. A Conserved Surface Loop in Type I Dehydroquinate Dehydratases Positions an Active Site Arginine and Functions in Substrate Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Peterson, Scott N.; Caffrey, Michael; Anderson, Wayne F.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-04-18

    Dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD) catalyzes the third step in the biosynthetic shikimate pathway. We present three crystal structures of the Salmonella enterica type I DHQD that address the functionality of a surface loop that is observed to close over the active site following substrate binding. Two wild-type structures with differing loop conformations and kinetic and structural studies of a mutant provide evidence of both direct and indirect mechanisms of involvement of the loop in substrate binding. In addition to allowing amino acid side chains to establish a direct interaction with the substrate, closure of the loop necessitates a conformational change of a key active site arginine, which in turn positions the substrate productively. The absence of DHQD in humans and its essentiality in many pathogenic bacteria make the enzyme a target for the development of nontoxic antimicrobials. The structures and ligand binding insights presented here may inform the design of novel type I DHQD inhibiting molecules.

  14. Modulation of constitutive activity and signaling bias of the ghrelin receptor by conformational constraint in the second extracellular loop.

    PubMed

    Mokrosiński, Jacek; Frimurer, Thomas M; Sivertsen, Bjørn; Schwartz, Thue W; Holst, Birgitte

    2012-09-28

    Based on a rare, natural Glu for Ala-204(C+6) variant located six residues after the conserved Cys residue in extracellular loop 2b (ECL2b) associated with selective elimination of the high constitutive signaling of the ghrelin receptor, this loop was subjected to a detailed structure functional analysis. Introduction of Glu in different positions demonstrated that although the constitutive signaling was partly reduced when introduced in position 205(C+7) it was only totally eliminated in position 204(C+6). No charge-charge interaction partner could be identified for the Glu(C+6) variant despite mutational analysis of a number of potential partners in the extracellular loops and outer parts of the transmembrane segments. Systematic probing of position 204(C+6) with amino acid residues of different physicochemical properties indicated that a positively charged Lys surprisingly provided phenotypes similar to those of the negatively charged Glu residue. Computational chemistry analysis indicated that the propensity for the C-terminal segment of extracellular loop 2b to form an extended α-helix was increased from 15% in the wild type to 89 and 82% by introduction in position 204(C+6) of a Glu or a Lys residue, respectively. Moreover, the constitutive activity of the receptor was inhibited by Zn(2+) binding in an engineered metal ion site, stabilizing an α-helical conformation of this loop segment. It is concluded that the high constitutive activity of the ghrelin receptor is dependent upon flexibility in the C-terminal segment of extracellular loop 2 and that mutations or ligand binding that constrains this segment and thereby conceivably the movements of transmembrane domain V relative to transmembrane domain III inhibits the high constitutive signaling.

  15. Robotics at Savannah River site: activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.S.

    1984-09-01

    The objectives of the Robotics Technology Group at the Savannah River Laboratory are to employ modern industrial robots and to develop unique automation and robotic systems to enhance process operations at the Savannah River site (SRP and SRL). The incentives are to improve safety, reduce personnel radiation exposure, improve product quality and productivity, and to reduce operating costs. During the past year robotic systems have been installed to fill chemical dilution vials in a SRP laboratory at 772-F and remove radioactive waste materials in the SRL Californium Production Facility at 773-A. A robotic system to lubricate an extrusion press has been developed and demonstrated in the SRL robotics laboratory and is scheduled for installation at the 321-M fuel fabrication area. A mobile robot was employed by SRP for a radiation monitoring task at a waste tank top in H-Area. Several other robots are installed in the SRL robotics laboratories and application development programs are underway. The status of these applications is presented in this report.

  16. Structural role of a conserved active site cis proline in the Thermotoga maritima acetyl esterase from the carbohydrate esterase family 7.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mrityunjay K; Manoj, Narayanan

    2017-04-01

    A conserved cis proline residue located in the active site of Thermotoga maritima acetyl esterase (TmAcE) from the carbohydrate esterase family 7 (CE7) has been substituted by alanine. The residue was known to play a crucial role in determining the catalytic properties of the enzyme. To elucidate the structural role of the residue, the crystal structure of the Pro228Ala variant (TmAcEP228A ) was determined at 2.1 Å resolution. The replacement does not affect the overall secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures and moderately decreases the thermal stability. However, the wild type cis conformation of the 227-228 peptide bond adopts a trans conformation in the variant. Other conformational changes in the tertiary structure are restricted to residues 222-226, preceding this peptide bond and are located away from the active site. Overall, the results suggest that the conserved proline residue is responsible for the cis conformation of the peptide and shapes the geometry of the active site. Elimination of the pyrrolidine ring results in the loss of van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions with both the alcohol and acyl moeities of the ester substrate, leading to significant impairment of the activity and perturbation of substrate specificity. Furthermore, a cis-to-trans conformational change arising out of residue changes at this position may be associated with the evolution of divergent activity, specificity, and stability properties of members constituting the CE7 family. Proteins 2017; 85:694-708. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Conformational analysis of the 5' leader and the gag initiation site of Mo-MuLV RNA and allosteric transitions induced by dimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Mougel, M; Tounekti, N; Darlix, J L; Paoletti, J; Ehresmann, B; Ehresmann, C

    1993-01-01

    Dimerization of genomic RNA is a key step in the retroviral life cycle and has been postulated to be involved in the regulation of translation, encapsidation and reverse transcription. Here, we have derived a secondary structure model of nucleotides upstream from psi and of the gag initiation region of Mo-MuLV RNA in monomeric and dimeric forms, using chemical probing, sequence comparison and computer prediction. The 5' domain is extensively base-paired and interactions take place between U5 and 5' leader sequences. The U5-PBS subdomain can fold in two mutually exclusive conformations: a very stable and extended helical structure (E form) in which 17 of the 18 nucleotides of the PBS are paired, or an irregular three-branch structure (B form) in which 10 nucleotides of the PBS are paired. The dimeric RNA adopts the B conformation. The monomeric RNA can switch from the E to the B conformation by a thermal treatment. If the E to B transition is associated to dimerization, it may facilitate annealing of the primer tRNAPro to the PBS by lowering the free energy required for melting the PBS. Furthermore, dimerization induces allosteric rearrangements around the SD site and the gag initiation region. Images PMID:8233816

  18. Regulation of nuclear pore complex conformation by IP(3) receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Moore-Nichols, David; Arnott, Anne; Dunn, Robert C

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, both the molecular architecture and functional dynamics of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) have been revealed with increasing detail. These large, supramolecular assemblages of proteins form channels that span the nuclear envelope of cells, acting as crucial regulators of nuclear import and export. From the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear envelope, nuclear pore complexes exhibit an eightfold symmetric ring structure encompassing a central lumen. The lumen often appears occupied by an additional structure alternatively referred to as the central granule, nuclear transport complex, or nuclear plug. Previous studies have suggested that the central granule may play a role in mediating calcium-dependent regulation of diffusion across the nuclear envelope for intermediate sized molecules (10-40 kDa). Using atomic force microscopy to measure the surface topography of chemically fixed Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclear envelopes, we present measurements of the relative position of the central granule within the NPC lumen under a variety of conditions known to modify nuclear Ca(2+) stores. These measurements reveal a large, approximately 9-nm displacement of the central granule toward the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear envelope under calcium depleting conditions. Additionally, activation of nuclear inositol triphosphate (IP(3)) receptors by the specific agonist, adenophostin A, results in a concentration-dependent displacement of central granule position with an EC(50) of ~1.2 nM. The displacement of the central granule within the NPC is observed on both the cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic faces of the nuclear envelope. The displacement is blocked upon treatment with xestospongin C, a specific inhibitor of IP(3) receptor activation. These results extend previous models of NPC conformational dynamics linking central granule position to depletion of IP(3) sensitive nuclear envelope calcium stores. PMID:12202368

  19. Structure, conformation and biological activity of a novel lipodepsipeptide from Pseudomonas corrugata: cormycin A1

    PubMed Central

    Scaloni, Andrea; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Amodeo, Pietro; Mannina, Luisa; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Segre, Anna Laura; Cruciani, Oscar; Lodovichetti, Francesca; Greco, Maria Luigia; Fiore, Alberto; Gallo, Monica; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Coraiola, Manuela; Menestrina, Gianfranco; Graniti, Antonio; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2004-01-01

    Cationic lipodepsipeptides from Pseudomonas spp. have been characterized for their structural and antimicrobial properties. In the present study, the structure of a novel lipodepsipeptide, cormycin A, produced in culture by the tomato pathogen Pseudomonas corrugata was elucidated by combined protein chemistry, mass spectrometry and two-dimensional NMR procedures. Its peptide moiety corresponds to L-Ser-D-Orn-L-Asn-D-Hse-L-His-L-aThr-Z-Dhb-L-Asp(3-OH)-L-Thr(4-Cl) [where Orn represents ornithine, Hse is homoserine, aThr is allo-threonine, Z-Dhb is 2,3-dehydro-2-aminobutanoic acid, Asp(3-OH) is 3-hydroxyaspartic acid and Thr(4-Cl) is 4-chlorothreonine], with the terminal carboxy group closing a macrocyclic ring with the hydroxy group of the N-terminal serine residue. This is, in turn, N-acylated by 3,4-dihydroxy-esadecanoate. In aqueous solution, cormycin A showed a rather compact structure, being derived from an inward orientation of some amino acid side chains and from the ‘hairpin-bent’ conformation of the lipid, due to inter-residue interactions involving its terminal part. Cormycin was significantly more active than the other lipodepsipeptides from Pseudomonas spp., as demonstrated by phytotoxicity and antibiosis assays, as well as by red-blood-cell lysis. Differences in biological activity were putatively ascribed to its weak positive net charge at neutral pH. Planar lipid membrane experiments showed step-like current transitions, suggesting that cormycin is able to form pores. This ability was strongly influenced by the phospholipid composition of the membrane and, in particular, by the presence of sterols. All of these findings suggest that cormycin derivatives could find promising applications, either as antifungal compounds for topical use or as post-harvest biocontrol agents. PMID:15196052

  20. Long-distance proton transfer with a break in the bacteriorhodopsin active site.

    PubMed

    Phatak, Prasad; Frähmcke, Jan S; Wanko, Marius; Hoffmann, Michael; Strodel, Paul; Smith, Jeremy C; Suhai, Sándor; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Elstner, Marcus

    2009-05-27

    Bacteriorhodopsin is a proton-pumping membrane protein found in the plasma membrane of the archaeon Halobacterium salinarium. Light-induced isomerization of the retinal chromophore from all-trans to 13-cis leads to a sequence of five conformation-coupled proton transfer steps and the net transport of one proton from the cytoplasmic to the extracellular side of the membrane. The mechanism of the long-distance proton transfer from the primary acceptor Asp85 to the extracellular proton release group during the O --> bR is poorly understood. Experiments suggest that this long-distance transfer could involve a transient state [O] in which the proton resides on the intermediate carrier Asp212. To assess whether the transient protonation of Asp212 participates in the deprotonation of Asp85, we performed hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics proton transfer calculations using different protein structures and with different retinal geometries and active site water molecules. The structural models were assessed by computing UV-vis excitation energies and C=O vibrational frequencies. The results indicate that a transient [O] conformer with protonated Asp212 could indeed be sampled during the long-distance proton transfer to the proton release group. Our calculations suggest that, in the starting proton transfer state O, the retinal is strongly twisted and at least three water molecules are present in the active site.

  1. Automated docking of maltose, 2-deoxymaltose, and maltotetraose into the soybean beta-amylase active site.

    PubMed

    Laederach, A; Dowd, M K; Coutinho, P M; Reilly, P J

    1999-11-01

    In this study, products and substrates were docked into the active site of beta-amylase using the simulated annealing algorithm AutoDock. Lowest-energy conformers reproduced known crystallographic atom positions within 0.4 to 0.8 A rmsd. Docking studies were carried out with both open and closed configurations of the beta-amylase mobile flap, a loop comprising residues 96 to 103. Ligands with two rings docked within the cleft near the active site when the flap was open, but those with four rings did not. The flap must be closed for alpha-maltotetraose to adopt a conformation allowing it to dock near the crystallographically determined subsites. The closed flap is necessary for productive but not for nonproductive binding, and therefore it plays a essential role in catalysis. The gain in total binding energy upon closing of the flap for alpha-maltose docked to subsites -2, -1 and +1, +2 is about 22 kcal/mol, indicating more favorable interactions are possible with the flap closed. Larger intermolecular interaction energies are observed for two alpha-maltose molecules docked to subsites -2, -1 and +1, +2 than for one alpha-maltotetraose molecule docked from subsites -2 to +2, suggesting that it is only upon cleavage of the alpha-1,4 linkage that optimal closed-flap binding can occur with the crytallographically determined enzyme structure.

  2. Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: why selenoproteins?

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Johansson, Linda; Bauer, Holger; Arscott, L David; Rauch, Susanne; Ballou, David P; Williams, Charles H; Schirmer, R Heiner; Arnér, Elias S J

    2003-10-28

    Selenium, an essential trace element for mammals, is incorporated into a selected class of selenoproteins as selenocysteine. All known isoenzymes of mammalian thioredoxin (Trx) reductases (TrxRs) employ selenium in the C-terminal redox center -Gly-Cys-Sec-Gly-COOH for reduction of Trx and other substrates, whereas the corresponding sequence in Drosophila melanogaster TrxR is -Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser-COOH. Surprisingly, the catalytic competence of these orthologous enzymes is similar, whereas direct Sec-to-Cys substitution of mammalian TrxR, or other selenoenzymes, yields almost inactive enzyme. TrxRs are therefore ideal for studying the biology of selenocysteine by comparative enzymology. Here we show that the serine residues flanking the C-terminal Cys residues of Drosophila TrxRs are responsible for activating the cysteines to match the catalytic efficiency of a selenocysteine-cysteine pair as in mammalian TrxR, obviating the need for selenium. This finding suggests that the occurrence of selenoenzymes, which implies that the organism is selenium-dependent, is not necessarily associated with improved enzyme efficiency. Our data suggest that the selective advantage of selenoenzymes is a broader range of substrates and a broader range of microenvironmental conditions in which enzyme activity is possible.

  3. Stabilizing effects of G protein on the active conformation of adenosine A1 receptor differ depending on G protein type.

    PubMed

    Tateyama, Michihiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2016-10-05

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) trigger various cellular and physiological responses upon the ligand binding. The ligand binding induces conformational change in GPCRs which allows G protein to interact with the receptor. The interaction of G protein also affects the active conformation of GPCRs. In this study, we have investigated the effects of Gαi1, Gαo and chimeric Gαqi5 on the active conformation of the adenosine A1 receptor, as each Gα showed difference in the interaction with adenosine A1 receptor. The conformational changes in the adenosine A1 receptor were detected as the agonist-induced decreases in efficiency of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescent proteins (FPs) fused at the two intracellular domains of the adenosine A1 receptor. Amplitudes of the agonist-induced FRET decreases were subtle when the FP-tagged adenosine A1 receptor was expressed alone, whereas they were significantly enhanced when co-expressed with Gαi1Gβ1Gγ22 (Gi1) or Gαqi5Gβ1Gγ22 (Gqi5) but not with GαοGβ1Gγ22 (Go). The enhancement of the agonist-induced FRET decrease in the presence of Gqi5 was significantly larger than that of Gi1. Furthermore, the FRET recovery upon the agonist removal in the presence of Gqi5 was significantly slower than that of Gi1. From these results it was revealed that the agonist-bound active conformation of adenosine A1 receptor is unstable without the binding of G protein and that the stabilizing effects of G protein differ depending on the types of G protein.

  4. Catalytic roles of flexible regions at the active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco)

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Harpel, M.R.; Chen, Yuh-Ru; Larson, E.M.; Larimer, F.W.

    1995-12-31

    Chemical and mutagenesis studies of Rubisco have identified Lys329 and Glu48 as active-site residues that are located in distinct, interacting domains from adjacent subunits. Crystallographic analyses have shown that Lys329 is the apical residue in a 12-residue flexible loop (loop 6) of the {Beta},{alpha}-barrel domain of the active site and that Glu48 resides at the end of helix B of the N-terminal domain of the active site. When phosphorylated ligands are bound by the enzyme, loop 6 adopts a closed conformation and, in concert with repositioning of helix B, thereby occludes the active site from the external environment. In this closed conformation, the {gamma}-carboxylate of Glu48 and the {epsilon}-amino group of Lys329 engage in intersubunit electrostatic interaction. By use of appropriate site-directed mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum Rubisco, we are addressing several issues: the catalytic roles of Lys329 and Glu48, the functional significance of the intersubunit salt bridge comprised of these two residues, and the roles of loop 6 and helix B in stabilizing labile reaction intermediates. Characterization of novel products derived from misprocessing of D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) by the mutant proteins have illuminated the structure of the key intermediate in the normal oxygenase pathway.

  5. Structural Characterization of Mutations at the Oxygen Activation Site in Monomeric Sarcosine Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Schuman Jorns, Marilyn; Chen, Zhi-wei; Mathews, F. Scott

    2010-04-30

    Oxygen reduction and sarcosine oxidation in monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) occur at separate sites above the si- and re-faces, respectively, of the flavin ring. Mutagenesis studies implicate Lys265 as the oxygen activation site. Substitution of Lys265 with a neutral (Met, Gln, or Ala) or basic (Arg) residue results in an {approx}10{sup 4}- or 250-fold decrease, respectively, in the reaction rate. The overall structure of MSOX and residue conformation in the sarcosine binding cavity are unaffected by replacement of Lys265 with Met or Arg. The side chain of Met265 exhibits the same configuration in each molecule of Lys265Met crystals and is nearly congruent with Lys265 in wild-type MSOX. The side chain of Arg265 is, however, dramatically shifted (4-5 {angstrom}) compared with Lys265, points in the opposite direction, and exhibits significant conformational variability between molecules of the same crystal. The major species in solutions of Lys265Arg is likely to contain a 'flipped-out' Arg265 and exhibit negligible oxygen activation, similar to Lys265Met. The 400-fold higher oxygen reactivity observed with Lys265Arg is attributed to a minor (<1%) 'flipped-in' Arg265 conformer whose oxygen reactivity is similar to that of wild-type MSOX. A structural water (WAT1), found above the si-face of the flavin ring in all previously determined MSOX structures, is part of an apparent proton relay system that extends from FAD N(5) to bulk solvent. WAT1 is strikingly absent in Lys265Met and Lys265Arg, a feature that may account for the apparent kinetic stabilization of a reductive half-reaction intermediate that is detectable with the mutants but not wild-type MSOX.

  6. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macro­globulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group. PMID:26143919

  7. Mutational analysis of the lac regulatory region: second-site changes that activate mutant promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Rothmel, R K; LeClerc, J E

    1989-01-01

    Second-site mutations that restored activity to severe lacP1 down-promoter mutants were isolated. This was accomplished by using a bacteriophage f1 vector containing a fusion of the mutant E. coli lac promoters with the structural gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), so that a system was provided for selecting phage revertants (or pseudorevertants) that conferred resistance of phage-infected cells to chloramphenicol. Among the second-site changes that relieved defects in mutant lac promoters, the only one that restored lacP1 activity was a T----G substitution at position -14, a weakly conserved site in E. coli promoters. Three other sequence changes, G----A at -2, A----T at +1, and C----A at +10, activated nascent promoters in the lac regulatory region. The nascent promoters conformed to the consensus rule, that activity is gained by sequence changes toward homology with consensus sequences at the -35 and -10 regions of the promoter. However, the relative activities of some promoters cannot be explained solely by consideration of their conserved sequence elements. Images PMID:2660105

  8. Protein conformational populations and functionally relevant substates.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Savol, Andrej; Burger, Virginia; Chennubhotla, Chakra S; Agarwal, Pratul K

    2014-01-21

    it to attain the transition state, therefore promoting the reaction mechanism. In the long term, this emerging view of proteins with conformational substates has broad implications for improving our understanding of enzymes, enzyme engineering, and better drug design. Researchers have already used photoactivation to modulate protein conformations as a strategy to develop a hypercatalytic enzyme. In addition, the alteration of the conformational substates through binding of ligands at locations other than the active site provides the basis for the design of new medicines through allosteric modulation.

  9. Community Update on Site Activities, July 19, 2013

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In an effort to engage and inform community members interested in the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site cleanup, EPA will be issuing periodic topic-based fact sheets that will provide background information and updates about ongoing activities.

  10. Discovery and Characterization of a Cell-Permeable, Small-Molecule c-Abl Kinase Activator that Binds to the Myristoyl Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jingsong; Campobasso, Nino; Biju, Mangatt P.; Fisher, Kelly; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Cottom, Josh; Galbraith, Sarah; Ho, Thau; Zhang, Hong; Hong, Xuan; Ward, Paris; Hofmann, Glenn; Siegfried, Brett; Zappacosta, Francesca; Washio, Yoshiaki; Cao, Ping; Qu, Junya; Bertrand, Sophie; Wang, Da-Yuan; Head, Martha S.; Li, Hu; Moores, Sheri; Lai, Zhihong; Johanson, Kyung; Burton, George; Erickson-Miller, Connie; Simpson, Graham; Tummino, Peter; Copeland, Robert A.; Oliff, Allen

    2014-10-02

    c-Abl kinase activity is regulated by a unique mechanism involving the formation of an autoinhibited conformation in which the N-terminal myristoyl group binds intramolecularly to the myristoyl binding site on the kinase domain and induces the bending of the {alpha}I helix that creates a docking surface for the SH2 domain. Here, we report a small-molecule c-Abl activator, DPH, that displays potent enzymatic and cellular activity in stimulating c-Abl activation. Structural analyses indicate that DPH binds to the myristoyl binding site and prevents the formation of the bent conformation of the {alpha}I helix through steric hindrance, a mode of action distinct from the previously identified allosteric c-Abl inhibitor, GNF-2, that also binds to the myristoyl binding site. DPH represents the first cell-permeable, small-molecule tool compound for c-Abl activation.

  11. Activity and conformation of lysozyme in molecular solvents, protic ionic liquids (PILs) and salt-water systems.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, Emmy C; Separovic, Frances; Drummond, Calum J; Greaves, Tamar L

    2016-09-21

    Improving protein stabilisation is important for the further development of many applications in the pharmaceutical, specialty chemical, consumer product and agricultural sectors. However, protein stabilization is highly dependent on the solvent environment and, hence, it is very complex to tailor protein-solvent combinations for stable protein maintenance. Understanding solvent features that govern protein stabilization will enable selection or design of suitable media with favourable solution environments to retain protein native conformation. In this work the structural conformation and activity of lysozyme in 29 solvent systems were investigated to determine the role of various solvent features on the stability of the enzyme. The solvent systems consisted of 19 low molecular weight polar solvents and 4 protic ionic liquids (PILs), both at different water content levels, and 6 aqueous salt solutions. Small angle X-ray scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy were used to investigate the tertiary and secondary structure of lysozyme along with the corresponding activity in various solvation systems. At low non-aqueous solvent concentrations (high water content), the presence of solvents and salts generally maintained lysozyme in its native structure and enhanced its activity. Due to the presence of a net surface charge on lysozyme, electrostatic interactions in PIL-water systems and salt solutions enhanced lysozyme activity more than the specific hydrogen-bond interactions present in non-ionic molecular solvents. At higher solvent concentrations (lower water content), solvents with a propensity to exhibit the solvophobic effect, analogous to the hydrophobic effect in water, retained lysozyme native conformation and activity. This solvophobic effect was observed particularly for solvents which contained hydroxyl moieties. Preferential solvophobic effects along with bulky chemical structures were postulated to result in less

  12. Large loop conformation sampling using the activation relaxation technique, ART-nouveau method.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2012-07-01

    We present an adaptation of the ART-nouveau energy surface sampling method to the problem of loop structure prediction. This method, previously used to study protein folding pathways and peptide aggregation, is well suited to the problem of sampling the conformation space of large loops by targeting probable folding pathways instead of sampling exhaustively that space. The number of sampled conformations needed by ART nouveau to find the global energy minimum for a loop was found to scale linearly with the sequence length of the loop for loops between 8 and about 20 amino acids. Considering the linear scaling dependence of the computation cost on the loop sequence length for sampling new conformations, we estimate the total computational cost of sampling larger loops to scale quadratically compared to the exponential scaling of exhaustive search methods.

  13. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    SciTech Connect

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  14. Effects of protein flexibility and active site water molecules on the prediction of sites of metabolism for cytochrome P450 2C19 substrates.

    PubMed

    Li, Junhao; Cai, Jinya; Su, Haixia; Du, Hanwen; Zhang, Juan; Ding, Shihui; Liu, Guixia; Tang, Yun; Li, Weihua

    2016-03-01

    Structure-based prediction of sites of metabolism (SOMs) mediated by cytochrome P450s (CYPs) is of great interest in drug discovery and development. However, protein flexibility and active site water molecules remain a challenge for accurate SOM prediction. CYP2C19 is one of the major drug-metabolizing enzymes and has attracted considerable attention because of its polymorphism and capability of metabolizing ∼7% clinically used drugs. In this study, we systematically evaluated the effects of protein flexibility and active site water molecules on SOM prediction for CYP2C19 substrates. Multiple conformational sampling techniques including GOLD flexible residues sampling, molecular dynamics (MD) and tCONCOORD side-chain sampling were adopted for assessing the influence of protein flexibility on SOM prediction. The prediction accuracy could be significantly improved when protein flexibility was considered using the tCONCOORD sampling method, which indicated that the side-chain conformation was important for accurate prediction. However, the inclusion of the crystallographic or MD-derived water molecule(s) does not necessarily improve the prediction accuracy. Finally, a combination of docking results with SMARTCyp was found to be able to increase the SOM prediction accuracy.

  15. Structure-based drug design: exploring the proper filling of apolar pockets at enzyme active sites.

    PubMed

    Zürcher, Martina; Diederich, François

    2008-06-20

    The proper filling of apolar pockets at enzyme active sites is central for increasing binding activity and selectivity of hits and leads in medicinal chemistry. In our structure-based design approach toward the generation of potent enzyme inhibitors, we encountered a variety of challenges in gaining suitable binding affinity from the occupation of such pockets. We summarize them here for the first time. A fluorine scan of tricyclic thrombin inhibitors led to the discovery of favorable orthogonal dipolar C-F...CO interactions. Efficient cation-pi interactions were established in the S4 pocket of factor Xa, another serine protease from the blood coagulation cascade. Changing from mono- to bisubstrate inhibitors of catechol O-methyltransferase, a target in the L-Dopa-based treatment of Parkinson's disease, enabled the full exploitation of a previously unexplored hydrophobic pocket. Conformational preorganization of a pocket at an enzyme active site is crucial for harvesting binding affinity. This is demonstrated for two enzymes from the nonmevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis, IspE and IspF, which are pursued as antimalarial targets. Disrupting crystallographically defined water networks on the way into a pocket might cost all of the binding free enthalpy gained from its occupation, as revealed in studies with tRNA-guanine transglycosylase, a target against shigellosis. Investigations of the active site of plasmepsin II, another antimalarial target, showed that principles for proper apolar cavity filling, originally developed for synthetic host-guest systems, are also applicable to enzyme environments.

  16. Conformal Nets II: Conformal Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Arthur; Douglas, Christopher L.; Henriques, André

    2017-03-01

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  17. The ion-induced folding of the hammerhead ribozyme: core sequence changes that perturb folding into the active conformation.

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, G S; Murchie, A I; Lilley, D M

    1996-01-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme undergoes an ion-dependent folding process into the active conformation. We find that the folding can be blocked at specific stages by changes of sequence or functionality within the core. In the the absence of added metal ions, the global structure of the hammerhead is extended, with a large angle subtended between stems I and II. No core sequence changes appear to alter this geometry, consistent with an unstructured core under these conditions. Upon addition of low concentrations of magnesium ions, the hammerhead folds by an association of stems II and III, to include a large angle between them. This stage is inhibited or altered by mutations within the oligopurine sequence lying between stems II and III, and folding is completely prevented by an A14G mutation. Further increase in magnesium ion concentration brings about a second stage of folding in the natural sequence hammerhead, involving a reorientation of stem I, which rotates around into the same direction of stem II. Because this transition occurs over the same range of magnesium ion concentration over which the hammerhead ribozyme becomes active, it is likely that the final conformation is most closely related to the active form of the structure. Magnesium ion-dependent folding into this conformation is prevented by changes at G5, notably removal of the 2'-hydroxyl group and replacement of the base by cytidine. The ability to dissect the folding process by means of sequence changes suggests that two separate ion-dependent stages are involved in the folding of the hammerhead ribozyme into the active conformation. PMID:8752086

  18. A unique geometry of the active site of angiotensin-converting enzyme consistent with structure-activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Dorica; Naylor, Christopher B.; Motoc, Ioan; Marshall, Garland R.

    1987-04-01

    Previous structure-activity studies of captopril and related active angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have led to the conclusion that the basic structural requirements for inhibition of ACE involve (a) a terminal carboxyl group; (b) an amido carbonyl group; and (c) different types of effective zinc (Zn) ligand functional groups. Such structural requirements common to a set of compounds acting at the same receptor have been used to define a pharmacophoric pattern of atoms or groups of atoms mutually oriented in space that is necessary for ACE inhibition from a stereochemical point of view. A unique pharmacophore model (within the resolution of approximately 0.15 Å) was observed using a method for systematic search of the conformational hyperspace available to the 28 structurally different molecules under study. The method does not assume a common molecular framework, and, therefore, allows comparison of different compounds that is independent of their absolute orientation. Consequently, by placing the carboxyl binding group, the binding site for amido carbonyl, and the Zn atom site in positions determined by ideal binding geometry with the inhibitors' functional groups, it was possible to clearly specify a geometry for the active site of ACE.

  19. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2008-08-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes.

  20. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  1. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide.

  2. Relief of autoinhibition by conformational switch explains enzyme activation by a catalytically dead paralog

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Oleg A; Kinch, Lisa; Ariagno, Carson; Deng, Xiaoyi; Zhong, Shihua; Grishin, Nick; Tomchick, Diana R; Chen, Zhe; Phillips, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    Catalytically inactive enzyme paralogs occur in many genomes. Some regulate their active counterparts but the structural principles of this regulation remain largely unknown. We report X-ray structures of Trypanosoma brucei S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase alone and in functional complex with its catalytically dead paralogous partner, prozyme. We show monomeric TbAdoMetDC is inactive because of autoinhibition by its N-terminal sequence. Heterodimerization with prozyme displaces this sequence from the active site through a complex mechanism involving a cis-to-trans proline isomerization, reorganization of a β-sheet, and insertion of the N-terminal α-helix into the heterodimer interface, leading to enzyme activation. We propose that the evolution of this intricate regulatory mechanism was facilitated by the acquisition of the dimerization domain, a single step that can in principle account for the divergence of regulatory schemes in the AdoMetDC enzyme family. These studies elucidate an allosteric mechanism in an enzyme and a plausible scheme by which such complex cooperativity evolved. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20198.001 PMID:27977001

  3. Relief of autoinhibition by conformational switch explains enzyme activation by a catalytically dead paralog

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, Oleg A.; Kinch, Lisa; Ariagno, Carson; Deng, Xiaoyi; Zhong, Shihua; Grishin, Nick; Tomchick, Diana R.; Chen, Zhe; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2016-12-15

    Catalytically inactive enzyme paralogs occur in many genomes. Some regulate their active counterparts but the structural principles of this regulation remain largely unknown. We report X-ray structures ofTrypanosoma brucei S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase alone and in functional complex with its catalytically dead paralogous partner, prozyme. We show monomericTbAdoMetDC is inactive because of autoinhibition by its N-terminal sequence. Heterodimerization with prozyme displaces this sequence from the active site through a complex mechanism involving acis-to-transproline isomerization, reorganization of a β-sheet, and insertion of the N-terminal α-helix into the heterodimer interface, leading to enzyme activation. We propose that the evolution of this intricate regulatory mechanism was facilitated by the acquisition of the dimerization domain, a single step that can in principle account for the divergence of regulatory schemes in the AdoMetDC enzyme family. These studies elucidate an allosteric mechanism in an enzyme and a plausible scheme by which such complex cooperativity evolved.

  4. The closed/open model for lipase activation. Addressing intermediate active forms of fungal enzymes by trapping of conformers in water-restricted environments.

    PubMed

    González-Navarro, H; Bañó, M C; Abad, C

    2001-03-13

    The behavior of prototypic fungal lipases in a water-restricted environment has been investigated by exploiting the reported experimental strategy that allows the trapping (freeze-drying) of the enzyme in the conformation present in aqueous solution and to subsequently assay it in nonaqueous media [Mingarro, I., Abad, C., and Braco, L. (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 92, 3308-3312]. We now report, using simple esterification as well as acidolysis (triglycerides as substrates) as nonaqueous model reactions, that the presence of a detergent (n-octyl-beta-glucopyranoside) in the freeze-drying buffer, at concentrations below the critical micellar concentration, generates different catalytically active (kinetically trapped) conformational states of the enzyme. These activated forms exquisitely discriminate between short- and long-chain fatty acids, suggesting that they can be correlated with intermediate conformations of the protein sufficiently open to permit the access of relatively small but not large substrates. Additional data obtained from aqueous solution activity measurements in the presence of detergent revealed that the fungal lipase retains an active conformation induced by high detergent concentration (30 mM) for a long period of time, a 'memory effect', which is stabilized in the absence of a well-defined interface by few detergent molecules. Together these results provide support to a model of lipase action involving several equilibrium states (closed, intermediate, and open), which can be modulated by the composition of the microenvironment, i.e., by the detergent concentration.

  5. Malonate in the nucleotide-binding site traps human AKAP18γ/δ in a novel conformational state.

    PubMed

    Bjerregaard-Andersen, Kaare; Østensen, Ellen; Scott, John D; Taskén, Kjetil; Morth, Jens Preben

    2016-08-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are a family of proteins that provide spatiotemporal resolution of protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation. In the myocardium, PKA and AKAP18γ/δ are found in complex with sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 2 (SERCA2) and phospholamban (PLB). This macromolecular complex provides a means by which anchored PKA can dynamically regulate cytoplasmic Ca(2+) release and re-uptake. For this reason, AKAP18γ/δ presents an interesting drug target with therapeutic potential in cardiovascular disease. The crystal structure of the central domain of human AKAP18γ has been determined at the atomic resolution of 1.25 Å. This first structure of human AKAP18γ is trapped in a novel conformation by a malonate molecule bridging the important R-loop with the 2H phosphoesterase motif. Although the physiological substrate of AKAP18γ is currently unknown, a potential proton wire deep in the central binding crevice has been indentified, leading to bulk solvent below the R-loop. Malonate complexed with AKAP18γ at atomic resolution provides an excellent starting point for structure-guided drug design.

  6. Altered binding of thioflavin t to the peripheral anionic site of acetylcholinesterase after phosphorylation of the active site by chlorpyrifos oxon or dichlorvos

    SciTech Connect

    Sultatos, L.G. Kaushik, R.

    2008-08-01

    The peripheral anionic site of acetylcholinesterase, when occupied by a ligand, is known to modulate reaction rates at the active site of this important enzyme. The current report utilized the peripheral anionic site specific fluorogenic probe thioflavin t to determine if the organophosphates chlorpyrifos oxon and dichlorvos bind to the peripheral anionic site of human recombinant acetylcholinesterase, since certain organophosphates display concentration-dependent kinetics when inhibiting this enzyme. Incubation of 3 nM acetylcholinesterase active sites with 50 nM or 2000 nM inhibitor altered both the B{sub max} and K{sub d} for thioflavin t binding to the peripheral anionic site. However, these changes resulted from phosphorylation of Ser203 since increasing either inhibitor from 50 nM to 2000 nM did not alter further thioflavin t binding kinetics. Moreover, the organophosphate-induced decrease in B{sub max} did not represent an actual reduction in binding sites, but instead likely resulted from conformational interactions between the acylation and peripheral anionic sites that led to a decrease in the rigidity of bound thioflavin t. A drop in fluorescence quantum yield, leading to an apparent decrease in B{sub max}, would accompany the decreased rigidity of bound thioflavin t molecules. The organophosphate-induced alterations in K{sub d} represented changes in binding affinity of thioflavin t, with diethylphosphorylation of Ser203 increasing K{sub d}, and dimethylphosphorylation of Ser203 decreasing K{sub d}. These results indicate that chlorpyrifos oxon and dichlorvos do not bind directly to the peripheral anionic site of acetylcholinesterase, but can affect binding to that site through phosphorylation of Ser203.

  7. Effects of the transport site conformation on the binding of external NAP-taurine to the human erythrocyte anion exchange system: evidence for intrinsic asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Knauf, P.A.; Law, F.Y.; Tarshis, T.; Furuya, W.

    1984-05-01

    External N-(4-azido (NAP-taurine) inhibits human red cell chloride exchange by binding to a site that is distinct from the chloride transport site. Increases in the intracellular chloride concentration (at constant external chloride) cause an increase in the inhibitory potency of external NAP-taurine. This effect is not due to the changes in pH or membrane potential that usually accompany a chloride gradient, since even when these changes are reversed or eliminated the inhibitory potency remains high. According to the ping-pong model for anion exchange, such transmembrane effects of intracellular chloride on external NAP-taurine can be explained if NAP-taurine only binds to its site when the transport site is in the outward-facing (E/sub o/ or ECl/sub o/) form. Since NAP-taurine prevents the conformational change from ECl/sub o/ to ECl/sub i/, it must lock the system in the outward-facing form. NAP-taurine can therefore be used just like the competitive inhibitor H/sub 2/DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyano-1,2-diphenylethane-2,2'-disulfonic acid) to monitor the fraction of transport sites that face outward. A quantitative analysis of the effects of chloride gradients on the inhibitory potency of NAP-taurine and H/sub 2/DIDS reveals that the transport system is intrinsically asymmetric, such that when Cl/sub i/ = Cl/sub o/, most of the unloaded transport sites face the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. 30 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Exploring functionally related enzymes using radially distributed properties of active sites around the reacting points of bound ligands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Structural genomics approaches, particularly those solving the 3D structures of many proteins with unknown functions, have increased the desire for structure-based function predictions. However, prediction of enzyme function is difficult because one member of a superfamily may catalyze a different reaction than other members, whereas members of different superfamilies can catalyze the same reaction. In addition, conformational changes, mutations or the absence of a particular catalytic residue can prevent inference of the mechanism by which catalytic residues stabilize and promote the elementary reaction. A major hurdle for alignment-based methods for prediction of function is the absence (despite its importance) of a measure of similarity of the physicochemical properties of catalytic sites. To solve this problem, the physicochemical features radially distributed around catalytic sites should be considered in addition to structural and sequence similarities. Results We showed that radial distribution functions (RDFs), which are associated with the local structural and physicochemical properties of catalytic active sites, are capable of clustering oxidoreductases and transferases by function. The catalytic sites of these enzymes were also characterized using the RDFs. The RDFs provided a measure of the similarity among the catalytic sites, detecting conformational changes caused by mutation of catalytic residues. Furthermore, the RDFs reinforced the classification of enzyme functions based on conventional sequence and structural alignments. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the application of RDFs provides advantages in the functional classification of enzymes by providing information about catalytic sites. PMID:22536854

  9. Quantitative Conformationally Sampled Pharmacophore (CSP) for δ Opioid Ligands: Reevaluation of hydrophobic moieties essential for biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Denzil; Coop, Andrew; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated several therapeutic applications for δ opioid agonists and antagonists. To exploit the therapeutic potential of δ opioids developing a structural basis for the activity of ligands at the δ opioid receptor is essential. The conformationally sampled pharmacophore (CSP) method (Bernard et al., JACS, 125: 3103–3107, 2003) is extended here to obtain quantitative models of δ opioid ligand efficacy and affinity. Quantification is performed via overlap integrals of the conformational space sampled by ligands with respect to a reference compound. Iterative refinement of the CSP model identified hydrophobic groups other than the traditional phenylalanine residues as important for efficacy and affinity in DSLET and ICI 174,864. The obtained models for a structurally diverse set of peptidic and non-peptidic δ opioid ligands offer good predictions with R2 values > 0.9 and the predicted efficacy for a set of test compounds was consistent with the experimental value. PMID:17367120

  10. Structure analysis reveals the flexibility of the ADAMTS-5 active site

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, Huey-Sheng; Tomasselli, Alfredo G.; Mathis, Karl J.; Schnute, Mark E.; Woodard, Scott S.; Caspers, Nicole; Williams, Jennifer M.; Kiefer, James R.; Munie, Grace; Wittwer, Arthur; Malfait, Anne-Marie; Tortorella, Micky D.

    2012-03-02

    A ((1S,2R)-2-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl) succinamide derivative (here referred to as Compound 12) shows significant activity toward many matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-2, MMP-8, MMP-9, and MMP-13. Modeling studies had predicted that this compound would not bind to ADAMTS-5 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-5) due to its shallow S1' pocket. However, inhibition analysis revealed it to be a nanomolar inhibitor of both ADAMTS-4 and -5. The observed inconsistency was explained by analysis of crystallographic structures, which showed that Compound 12 in complex with the catalytic domain of ADAMTS-5 (cataTS5) exhibits an unusual conformation in the S1' pocket of the protein. This first demonstration that cataTS5 can undergo an induced conformational change in its active site pocket by a molecule like Compound 12 should enable the design of new aggrecanase inhibitors with better potency and selectivity profiles.

  11. Histone Deacetylase Activity Represses Gamma Interferon-Inducible HLA-DR Gene Expression following the Establishment of a DNase I-Hypersensitive Chromatin Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Aaron; Zhang, Hongquan; Yang, Wen-Ming; Seto, Edward; Blanck, George

    2001-01-01

    Expression of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) is required for gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-inducible major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression and transcriptionally productive HLA-DRA promoter occupancy in several human tumor cell lines. Treatment of these Rb-defective tumor cell lines with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors rescued IFN-γ-inducible HLA-DRA and -DRB mRNA and cell surface protein expression, demonstrating repression of these genes by endogenous cellular HDAC activity. Additionally, Rb-defective, transcriptionally incompetent tumor cells retained the HLA-DRA promoter DNase I-hypersensitive site. Thus, HDAC-mediated repression of the HLA-DRA promoter occurs following the establishment of an apparent nucleosome-free promoter region and before transcriptionally productive occupancy of the promoter by the required transactivators. Repression of HLA-DRA promoter activation by HDAC activity likely involves a YY1 binding element located in the first exon of the HLA-DRA gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments localized YY1 to the HLA-DRA gene in Rb-defective tumor cells. Additionally, mutation of the YY1 binding site prevented repression of the promoter by HDAC1 and partially prevented activation of the promoter by trichostatin A. Mutation of the octamer element also significantly reduced the ability of HDAC1 to confer repression of inducible HLA-DRA promoter activation. Treatment of Rb-defective tumor cells with HDAC inhibitors greatly reduced the DNA binding activity of Oct-1, a repressor of inducible HLA-DRA promoter activation. These findings represent the first evidence that HDAC activity can repress IFN-γ-inducible HLA class II gene expression and also demonstrate that HDAC activity can contribute to promoter repression following the establishment of a DNase I-hypersensitive chromatin conformation. PMID:11533238

  12. Promoter-proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Pia K.; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites on transcription requires promoter proximity, as demonstrated using artificial constructs and supported by a genome-wide data set. Importantly, transcription down-regulation can be recapitulated in a gene context devoid of splice sites by placing a functional bona fide pA site/transcription terminator within ∼500 base pairs of the promoter. In contrast, promoter-proximal positioning of a pA site-independent histone gene terminator supports high transcription levels. We propose that optimal communication between a pA site-dependent gene terminator and its promoter critically depends on gene length and that short RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels. PMID:23028143

  13. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  14. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  15. Active and regulatory sites of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Pesi, Rossana; Allegrini, Simone; Careddu, Maria Giovanna; Filoni, Daniela Nicole; Camici, Marcella; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2010-12-01

    Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II), which acts preferentially on 6-hydroxypurine nucleotides, is essential for the survival of several cell types. cN-II catalyses both the hydrolysis of nucleotides and transfer of their phosphate moiety to a nucleoside acceptor through formation of a covalent phospho-intermediate. Both activities are regulated by a number of phosphorylated compounds, such as diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap₄A), ADP, ATP, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) and phosphate. On the basis of a partial crystal structure of cN-II, we mutated two residues located in the active site, Y55 and T56. We ascertained that the ability to catalyse the transfer of phosphate depends on the presence of a bulky residue in the active site very close to the aspartate residue that forms the covalent phospho-intermediate. The molecular model indicates two possible sites at which adenylic compounds may interact. We mutated three residues that mediate interaction in the first activation site (R144, N154, I152) and three in the second (F127, M436 and H428), and found that Ap₄A and ADP interact with the same site, but the sites for ATP and BPG remain uncertain. The structural model indicates that cN-II is a homotetrameric protein that results from interaction through a specific interface B of two identical dimers that have arisen from interaction of two identical subunits through interface A. Point mutations in the two interfaces and gel-filtration experiments indicated that the dimer is the smallest active oligomerization state. Finally, gel-filtration and light-scattering experiments demonstrated that the native enzyme exists as a tetramer, and no further oligomerization is required for enzyme activation.

  16. Prediction and conformation by synthesis of two antigenic sites in human haemoglobin by extrapolation from the known antigenic structure of sperm-whale myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Kazim, A L; Atassi, M Z

    1977-10-01

    The complete antigenic structure of sperm-whale myoglobin was previously determined in our laboratory. By structural analogy with myoglobin, two regions in human haemoglobin were predicted to comprise antigenic sites. One region was on the alpha-chain [alpha-(15-23)] and the other on the beta-chain [beta-(16-23)]. These two regions were synthesized, purified and characterized, and their immunochemistry was studied. Each peptide was able specifically to bind considerable amounts of haemoglobin antibodies. In a set of homologous proteins, barring any drastic conformational or electrostatic inductive effects exerted by the substitutions, and allowing for obstruction due to subunit interaction, the determination of the antigenic structure of one protein may serve as a useful starting model for the others.

  17. Structure-activity study on the Phe side chain arrangement of endomorphins using conformationally constrained analogues.

    PubMed

    Tömböly, Csaba; Kövér, Katalin E; Péter, Antal; Tourwé, Dirk; Biyashev, Dauren; Benyhe, Sándor; Borsodi, Anna; Al-Khrasani, Mahmoud; Rónai, András Z; Tóth, Géza

    2004-01-29

    Endomorphins-1 and -2 were substituted with all the beta-MePhe stereoisomers in their Phe residues to generate a conformationally constrained peptide set. This series of molecules was subjected to biological assays, and for beta-MePhe(4)-endomorphins-2, a conformational analysis was performed. Incorporation of (2S,3S)-beta-MePhe(4) resulted in the most potent analogues of both endomorphins with enhanced enzymatic stability. Their micro opioid affinities were 4-times higher than the parent peptides, they stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding, and they were found to be full agonists. NMR experiments revealed that C-terminal (2S,3S)-beta-MePhe in endomorphin-2 strongly favored the gauche (-) spatial orientation which implies the presence of the chi(1) = -60 degrees rotamer of Phe(4) in the binding conformer of endomorphins. Our results emphasize that the appropriate orientation of the C-terminal aromatic side chain of endomorphins is substantial for binding to the micro opioid receptor.

  18. A NMR and MD study of the active site of factor Xa by selective inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, B. T.; Fraternali, F.; Do, Q. T.; Atkinson, R. A.; Palmas, P.; Sklenar, V.; Wildgoose, P.; Strop, P.; Saudek, V.

    1998-02-01

    The structure of two selective inhibitors obtained by the screening of a vast combinatorial library, Ac-Tyr-Ile-Arg-Ile-NH2 and Ac-(4-amino-Phe)-(Cyc.-Gly)-NH2, in the active site of the blood clotting enzyme factor Xa was determined using transferred NOE NMR and simulated annealing (SA) under NMR constraints. The refined structures of the inhibitors were docked in the active site and SA was performed inside the enzyme which has been kept as a rigid charged template. The final structures were optimised by molecular dynamics simulation of the complexes in water. The inhibitors assume a compact, very well defined conformation embedded in the binding site without blocking the catalysis. The model allows to explain the mode of action, affinity and specificity. L'étude structurale d'inhibiteurs du facteur Xa, une enzyme de coagulation, obtenus par chimie combinatoire : Ac-Tyr-Ile-Arg-Ile-NH2, Ac-(4-amino-Phe)-(Cyc.-Gly)-NH2, a été réalisée par RMN NOE de transfert et modélisation moléculaire. Les structures ont été calculées sous contraintes RMN : géométrie de distance, recuit simulé et minimisation, affinées par une recherche conformationnelle et recuit de l'inhibiteur placé dans le site actif et optimisées par simulation de dynamique moléculaire du complexe dans l'eau. L'inhibiteur présente une structure compacte positionnée dans le site d'interaction hors d'accès du site catalytique. Ce modèle permet d'expliquer le mode d'action, l'affinité et la spécificité des peptides.

  19. Conformational changes in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase mutants: effect of mutations either at Ca(2+)-binding site II or at tryptophan 552 in the cytosolic domain.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Guillaume; Jaxel, Christine; Picard, Martin; le Maire, Marc; Champeil, Philippe; Falson, Pierre

    2006-04-25

    By analyzing, after expression in yeast and purification, the intrinsic fluorescence properties of point mutants of rabbit Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA1a) with alterations to amino acid residues in Ca(2+)-binding site I (E(771)), site II (E(309)), in both sites (D(800)), or in the nucleotide-binding domain (W(552)), we were able to follow the conformational changes associated with various steps in the ATPase catalytic cycle. Whereas Ca(2+) binding to purified wild-type (WT) ATPase in the absence of ATP leads to the rise in Trp fluorescence expected for the so-called E2 --> E1Ca(2) transition, the Ca(2+)-induced fluorescence rise is dramatically reduced for the E(309)Q mutant. As this purified E(309)Q mutant retains the ability to bind Ca(2+) at site I (but not at site II), we tentatively conclude that the protein reorganization induced by Ca(2+) binding at site II makes the major contribution to the overall Trp fluorescence changes observed upon Ca(2+) binding to both sites. Judging from the fluorescence response of W(552)F, similar to that of WT, these changes appear to be primarily due to membranous tryptophans, not to W(552). The same holds for the fluorescence rise observed upon phosphorylation from P(i) (the so-called E2 --> E2P transition). As for WT ATPase, Mg(2+) binding in the absence of Ca(2+) affects the fluorescence of the E(309)Q mutant, suggesting that this Mg(2+)-dependent fluorescence rise does not reflect binding of Mg(2+) to Ca(2+) sites; instead, Mg(2+) probably binds close to the catalytic site, or perhaps near transmembrane span M3, at a location recently revealed by Fe(2+)-catalyzed oxidative cleavage. Mutation of W(552) hardly affects ATP-induced fluorescence changes in the absence of Ca(2+), which are therefore mostly due to membranous Trp residues, demonstrating long-range communication between the nucleotide-binding domain and the membranous domain.

  20. Pose prediction accuracy in docking studies and enrichment of actives in the active site of GSK-3beta.

    PubMed

    Gadakar, Pravin Kumar; Phukan, Samiron; Dattatreya, Prasanna; Balaji, V N

    2007-01-01

    We present molecular docking studies on the inhibitors of GSK-3beta kinase in the enzyme binding sites of the X-ray complexes (1H8F, 1PYX, 1O9U, 1Q4L, 1Q5K, and 1UV5) using the Schrödinger docking tool Glide. Cognate and cross-docking studies using standard precision (SP) and extraprecision (XP) algorithms have been carried out. Cognate docking studies demonstrate that docked poses similar to X-ray poses (root-mean-square deviations of less than 2 A) are found within the top four ranks of the GlideScore and E-model scores. However, cross-docking studies typically produce poses that are significantly deviated from X-ray poses in all but a couple of cases, implying potential for induced fit effects in ligand binding. In this light, we have also carried out induced fit docking studies in the active sites of 1O9U, 1Q4L, and 1Q5K. Specifically, conformational changes have been effected in the active sites of these three protein structures to dock noncognate ligands. Thus, for example, the active site of 1O9U has been induced to fit the ligands of 1Q4L, 1Q5K, and 1UV5. These studies produce ligand docked poses which have significantly lower root-mean-square deviations relative to their X-ray crystallographic poses, when compared to the corresponding values from the cross-docking studies. Furthermore, we have used an ensemble of the induced fit models and X-ray structures to enhance the retrieval of active GSK-3beta inhibitors seeded in a decoy database, normally used in Glide validation studies. Thus, our studies provide valuable insights into computational strategies useful for the identification of potential GSK-3beta inhibitors.

  1. BAX Activation is Initiated at a Novel Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Suzuki, Motoshi; Davis, Marguerite L.; Pitter, Kenneth; Bird, Gregory H.; Katz, Samuel G.; Tu, Ho-Chou; Kim, Hyungjin; Cheng, Emily H.-Y.; Tjandra, Nico; Walensky, Loren D.

    2008-01-01

    BAX is a pro-apoptotic protein of the BCL-2 family stationed in the cytosol until activated by a diversity of stress stimuli to induce cell death. Anti-apoptotic proteins such as BCL-2 counteract BAX-mediated cell death. Although an interaction site that confers survival functionality has been defined for anti-apoptotic proteins, an activation site has not been identified for BAX, rendering its explicit trigger mechanism unknown. We previously developed Stabilized Alpha-Helix of BCL-2 domains (SAHBs) that directly initiate BAX-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis. Here we demonstrate by NMR analysis that BIM SAHB binds BAX at an interaction site that is distinct from the canonical binding groove characterized for anti-apoptotic proteins. The specificity of the BIM SAHB-BAX interaction is highlighted by point mutagenesis that abrogates functional activity, confirming that BAX activation is initiated at this novel structural location. Thus, we have now defined a BAX interaction site for direct activation, establishing a new target for therapeutic modulation of apoptosis. PMID:18948948

  2. Synthesis and appetite suppressant activity of 1-aryloxy-2-substituted aminomethyltetrahydronaphthalenes as conformationally rigid analogues of fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Kalpana; Srivastava, Shipra; Shankar, Girija; Nath, Chandishwar

    2006-04-15

    Several 1-aryloxy-2-substituted aminomethyltetrahydronaphthalenes (7-21) as conformationally rigid analogues of fluoxetine were synthesized and evaluated for their anorexigenic and antidepressant activities. For SAR studies the related acyclic analogues (22-27) were also prepared. Out of the 21 synthesized compounds, 10 compounds (9, 10, 11, 15, 16, 18, 21, 22, 23 and 27) exhibited significant anorexigenic activity (at 75 micromol/kg). Interestingly, all the compounds (7-20, 22-26) were devoid of antidepressant effect, except for compounds 21 and 27 in which the antidepressant activity was retained. Compound 16 emerged as the most active compound of the series with better anorexigenic activity (97.92%) compared to fluoxetine (76.25%) and even with a clinically used drug sibutramine, thus providing a new structural lead for appetite suppressants.

  3. Dynamic active-site protection by the M. tuberculosis protein tyrosine phosphatase PtpB lid domain.

    PubMed

    Flynn, E Megan; Hanson, Jeffrey A; Alber, Tom; Yang, Haw

    2010-04-07

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein tyrosine phosphatase PtpB shows resistance to the oxidative conditions that prevail within an infected host macrophage, but the mechanism of this molecular adaptation is unknown. Crystal structures of PtpB revealed previously that a closed, two-helix lid covers the active site. By measuring single-molecule Forster-type resonance energy transfer to probe the dynamics of two helices that constitute the lid, we obtained direct evidence for large, spontaneous opening transitions of PtpB with the closed form of both helices favored approximately 3:1. Despite similar populations of conformers, the two helices move asynchronously as demonstrated by different opening and closing rates under our experimental conditions. Assuming that lid closure excludes oxidant, the rates of opening and closing quantitatively accounted for the slow observed rate of oxidative inactivation. Increasing solvent viscosity using glycerol but not PEG8000 resulted in higher rates of oxidative inactivation due to an increase in the population of open conformers. These results establish that the rapid conformational gating of the PtpB lid constitutes a reversible physical blockade that transiently masks the active site and retards oxidative inactivation.

  4. Involvement of novel autophosphorylation sites in ATM activation.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Graham, Mark E; Peng, Cheng; Chen, Philip; Robinson, Phillip J; Lavin, Martin F

    2006-08-09

    ATM kinase plays a central role in signaling DNA double-strand breaks to cell cycle checkpoints and to the DNA repair machinery. Although the exact mechanism of ATM activation remains unknown, efficient activation requires the Mre11 complex, autophosphorylation on S1981 and the involvement of protein phosphatases and acetylases. We report here the identification of several additional phosphorylation sites on ATM in response to DNA damage, including autophosphorylation on pS367 and pS1893. ATM autophosphorylates all these sites in vitro in response to DNA damage. Antibodies against phosphoserine 1893 revealed rapid and persistent phosphorylation at this site after in vivo activation of ATM kinase by ionizing radiation, paralleling that observed for S1981 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation was dependent on functional ATM and on the Mre11 complex. All three autophosphorylation sites are physiologically important parts of the DNA damage response, as phosphorylation site mutants (S367A, S1893A and S1981A) were each defective in ATM signaling in vivo and each failed to correct radiosensitivity, genome instability and cell cycle checkpoint defects in ataxia-telangiectasia cells. We conclude that there are at least three functionally important radiation-induced autophosphorylation events in ATM.

  5. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Membrane-Bound STIM1 to Investigate Conformational Changes during STIM1 Activation upon Calcium Release.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sreya; Karolak, Aleksandra; Debant, Marjolaine; Buscaglia, Paul; Renaudineau, Yves; Mignen, Olivier; Guida, Wayne C; Brooks, Wesley H

    2017-02-27

    Calcium is involved in important intracellular processes, such as intracellular signaling from cell membrane receptors to the nucleus. Typically, calcium levels are kept at less than 100 nM in the nucleus and cytosol, but some calcium is stored in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for rapid release to activate intracellular calcium-dependent functions. Stromal interacting molecule 1 (STIM1) plays a critical role in early sensing of changes in the ER's calcium level, especially when there is a sudden release of stored calcium from the ER. Inactive STIM1, which has a bound calcium ion, is activated upon ion release. Following activation of STIM1, there is STIM1-assisted initiation of extracellular calcium entry through channels in the cell membrane. This extracellular calcium entering the cell then amplifies intracellular calcium-dependent actions. At the end of the process, ER levels of stored calcium are reestablished. The main focus of this work was to study the conformational changes accompanying homo- or heterodimerization of STIM1. For this purpose, the ER luminal portion of STIM1 (residues 58-236), which includes the sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain plus the calcium-binding EF-hand domains 1 and 2 attached to the STIM1 transmembrane region (TM), was modeled and embedded in a virtual membrane. Next, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the conformational changes that take place during STIM1 activation and subsequent protein-protein interactions. Indeed, the simulations revealed exposure of residues in the EF-hand domains, which may be important for dimerization steps. Altogether, understanding conformational changes in STIM1 can help in drug discovery when targeting this key protein in intracellular calcium functions.

  7. Identification of an activation site in Bak and mitochondrial Bax triggered by antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Sweta; Anwari, Khatira; Alsop, Amber E.; Yuen, Wai Shan; Huang, David C. S.; Carroll, John; Smith, Nicholas A.; Smith, Brian J.; Dewson, Grant; Kluck, Ruth M.

    2016-01-01

    During apoptosis, Bak and Bax are activated by BH3-only proteins binding to the α2–α5 hydrophobic groove; Bax is also activated via a rear pocket. Here we report that antibodies can directly activate Bak and mitochondrial Bax by binding to the α1–α2 loop. A monoclonal antibody (clone 7D10) binds close to α1 in non-activated Bak to induce conformational change, oligomerization, and cytochrome c release. Anti-FLAG antibodies also activate Bak containing a FLAG epitope close to α1. An antibody (clone 3C10) to the Bax α1–α2 loop activates mitochondrial Bax, but blocks translocation of cytosolic Bax. Tethers within Bak show that 7D10 binding directly extricates α1; a structural model of the 7D10 Fab bound to Bak reveals the formation of a cavity under α1. Our identification of the α1–α2 loop as an activation site in Bak paves the way to develop intrabodies or small molecules that directly and selectively regulate these proteins. PMID:27217060

  8. Are conformational changes, induced by osmotic pressure variations, the underlying mechanism of controlling the adhesive activity of mussel adhesive proteins?

    PubMed

    van der Leeden, Mieke C

    2005-11-22

    The mussel adhesive protein Mefp-1, under physiological conditions, presumably has a self-avoiding random walk conformation with helix-like or turned deca-peptide segments. Such a conformation may coil up under osmotic pressure induced by surrounding macromolecules. As a consequence, the orientation of the 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine groups (dopa), essential for the adhesive strength as well as the cohesive strength in Mefp-1, will be altered. Changing the concentration of the protein itself or of different-type surrounding macromolecules may therefore be a tool to control the protein's adhesive activity. The effect of osmotic pressure on the conformation and dopa reactivity of Mefp-1 is studied by the addition of (poly)ethylene oxide (PEO) as a model macromolecule (Mw = 100 kD). From UV-spectroscopy measurements, it can be concluded that dopa reactivity in Mefp-1 changes with increasing PEO concentration. Fitting of the measured absorbance intensity data of the oxidation product dopaquinone versus time with a kinetic model points to the decreased accessibility of dopa groups in the Mefp-1 structure, a faster oxidation, and diminished cross linking under the influence of increasing PEO concentration up to 2.4 g/L, corresponding to an osmotic pressure of approximately 73 Pa. At higher PEO concentrations, the accessibility of the dopa groups for oxidation as well as cross-link formation decreases until about 20% of the dopa groups are oxidized at a PEO concentration of 3.8 g/L, corresponding to an osmotic pressure of approximately 113 Pa. FTIR measurements on the basis of amide I shifts qualitatively point to a transition to a more continuously turned structure of Mefp-1 in the presence of PEO. Therefore, it seems that conformational changes caused by variations of osmotic pressure determine the extent of steric hindrance of the dopa groups and hence the adhesive reactivity of Mefp-1.

  9. Catalytic-site conformational equilibrium in nerve-agent adducts of acetylcholinesterase: possible implications for the HI-6 antidote substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Artursson, Elisabet; Andersson, Per Ola; Akfur, Christine; Linusson, Anna; Börjegren, Susanne; Ekström, Fredrik

    2013-05-01

    Nerve agents such as tabun, cyclosarin and Russian VX inhibit the essential enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by organophosphorylating the catalytic serine residue. Nucleophiles, such as oximes, are used as antidotes as they can reactivate and restore the function of the inhibited enzyme. The oxime HI-6 shows a notably low activity on tabun adducts but can effectively reactivate adducts of cyclosarin and Russian VX. To examine the structural basis for the pronounced substrate specificity of HI-6, we determined the binary crystal structures of Mus musculus AChE (mAChE) conjugated by cyclosarin and Russian VX and found a conformational mobility of the side chains of Phe338 and His447. The interaction between HI-6 and tabun-adducts of AChE were subsequently investigated using a combination of time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. Our findings show that HI-6 binds to tabun inhibited Homo sapiens AChE (hAChE) with an IC50 value of 300μM and suggest that the reactive nucleophilic moiety of HI-6 is excluded from the phosphorus atom of tabun. We propose that a conformational mobility of the side-chains of Phe338 and His447 is a common feature in nerve-agent adducts of AChE. We also suggest that the conformational mobility allow HI-6 to reactivate conjugates of cyclosarin and Russian VX while a reduced mobility in tabun conjugated AChE results in steric hindrance that prevents efficient reactivation.

  10. Small angle neutron scattering reveals pH-dependent conformational changes in Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I: implications for enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; O'Neill, Hugh M; McGaughey, Joseph; Urban, Volker S; Rempe, Caroline S; Petridis, Loukas; Smith, Jeremy C; Evans, Barbara R; Heller, William T

    2011-09-16

    Cellobiohydrolase I (Cel7A) of the fungus Trichoderma reesei (now classified as an anamorph of Hypocrea jecorina) hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose to soluble sugars, making it of key interest for producing fermentable sugars from biomass for biofuel production. The activity of the enzyme is pH-dependent, with its highest activity occurring at pH 4-5. To probe the response of the solution structure of Cel7A to changes in pH, we measured small angle neutron scattering of it in a series of solutions having pH values of 7.0, 6.0, 5.3, and 4.2. As the pH decreases from 7.0 to 5.3, the enzyme structure remains well defined, possessing a spatial differentiation between the cellulose binding domain and the catalytic core that only changes subtly. At pH 4.2, the solution conformation of the enzyme changes to a structure that is intermediate between a properly folded enzyme and a denatured, unfolded state, yet the secondary structure of the enzyme is essentially unaltered. The results indicate that at the pH of optimal activity, the catalytic core of the enzyme adopts a structure in which the compact packing typical of a fully folded polypeptide chain is disrupted and suggest that the increased range of structures afforded by this disordered state plays an important role in the increased activity of Cel7A through conformational selection.

  11. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  12. Spectroscopic studies of the active site of galactose oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, P.F.; Brown, R.D. III; Koenig, S.H.

    1995-07-19

    X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopy have been used to probe the copper site structure in galactose oxidase at pH 4.5 and 7.0. the results suggest that there are no major differences in the structure of the tetragonal Cu(II) site at these pH values. Analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicates that four N,O scatterers are present at approximately 2 {Angstrom}; these are presumably the equatorial ligands. In addition, the EXAFS data establish that oxidative activation to produce the active-site tyrosine radical does not cause major changes in the copper coordination environment. Therefore results obtained on the one-electron reduced enzyme, containing Cu(II) but not the tyrosine radical, probably also apply to the catalytically active Cu(II)/tyrosine radical state. Solvent water exchange, inhibitor binding, and substrate binding have been probed via nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) measurements. The NMRD profile of galactose oxidase is quantitatively consistent with the rapid exchange of a single, equatorial water ligand with a Cu(II)-O separation of about 2.4 {Angstrom}. Azide and cyanide displace this coordinated water. The binding of azide and the substrate dihydroxyacetone produce very similar effects on the NMRD profile of galactose oxidase, indicating that substrates also bind to the active site Cu(II) in an equatorial position.

  13. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  14. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  15. Discovery of antiglioma activity of biaryl 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline derivatives and conformationally flexible analogues.

    PubMed

    Mohler, Michael L; Kang, Gyong-Suk; Hong, Seoung-Soo; Patil, Renukadevi; Kirichenko, Oleg V; Li, Wei; Rakov, Igor M; Geisert, Eldon E; Miller, Duane D

    2006-09-21

    Cultured rat astrocytes and C6 rat glioma were used as a differential screen for a variety of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (THI) derivatives. Compound 1 [1-(biphenyl-4-ylmethyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-6,7-diol hydrochloride] selectively blocked the growth of C6 glioma leaving normal astrocytes relatively unaffected. The potential for clinical utility of 1 was further substantiated in human gliomas and other tumor cell lines. Preliminary SAR of this activity was characterized by synthesis and testing of several THI and conformationally flexible variants.

  16. Lipid Tail Protrusion in Simulations Predicts Fusogenic Activity of Influenza Fusion Peptide Mutants and Conformational Models

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Per; Kasson, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Fusion peptides from influenza hemagglutinin act on membranes to promote membrane fusion, but the mechanism by which they do so remains unknown. Recent theoretical work has suggested that contact of protruding lipid tails may be an important feature of the transition state for membrane fusion. If this is so, then influenza fusion peptides would be expected to promote tail protrusion in proportion to the ability of the corresponding full-length hemagglutinin to drive lipid mixing in fusion assays. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of influenza fusion peptides in lipid bilayers, comparing the X-31 influenza strain against a series of N-terminal mutants. As hypothesized, the probability of lipid tail protrusion correlates well with the lipid mixing rate induced by each mutant. This supports the conclusion that tail protrusion is important to the transition state for fusion. Furthermore, it suggests that tail protrusion can be used to examine how fusion peptides might interact with membranes to promote fusion. Previous models for native influenza fusion peptide structure in membranes include a kinked helix, a straight helix, and a helical hairpin. Our simulations visit each of these conformations. Thus, the free energy differences between each are likely low enough that specifics of the membrane environment and peptide construct may be sufficient to modulate the equilibrium between them. However, the kinked helix promotes lipid tail protrusion in our simulations much more strongly than the other two structures. We therefore predict that the kinked helix is the most fusogenic of these three conformations. PMID:23505359

  17. The active site structure and mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Arginine specific reagents showed irreversible inhibition of avian liver mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Potent protection against modification was elicited by CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} in the presence of other substrates. Labeling of enzyme with (7-{sup 14}C) phenylglyoxal showed that 1 or 2 arginines are involved in CO{sub 2} binding and activation. Peptide map studies showed this active site arginine residues is located at position 289. Histidine specific reagents showed pseudo first order inhibition of avian mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity. The best protection against modification was elicited by IDP or IDP and Mn{sup +2}. One histidine residue is at or near the phosphoenolpyruvate binding site as demonstrated in the increased absorbance at 240 nm and proton relaxation rate studies. Circular dichroism studies reveal that enzyme structure was perturbed by diethylpyrocarbonate modification. Metal binding studies suggest that this enzyme has only one metal binding site. The putative binding sites from several GTP and phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes are observed in P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase from different species.

  18. Voltage-sensor conformation shapes the intra-membrane drug binding site that determines gambierol affinity in Kv channels.

    PubMed

    Kopljar, Ivan; Grottesi, Alessandro; de Block, Tessa; Rainier, Jon D; Tytgat, Jan; Labro, Alain J; Snyders, Dirk J

    2016-08-01

    Marine ladder-shaped polyether toxins are implicated in neurological symptoms of fish-borne food poisonings. The toxin gambierol, produced by the marine dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus, belongs to the group of ladder-shaped polyether toxins and inhibits Kv3.1 channels with nanomolar affinity through a mechanism of gating modification. Binding determinants for gambierol localize at the lipid-exposed interface of the pore forming S5 and S6 segments, suggesting that gambierol binds outside of the permeation pathway. To explore a possible involvement of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD), we made different chimeric channels between Kv3.1 and Kv2.1, exchanging distinct parts of the gating machinery. Our results showed that neither the electro-mechanical coupling nor the S1-S3a region of the VSD affect gambierol sensitivity. In contrast, the S3b-S4 part of the VSD (paddle motif) decreased gambierol sensitivity in Kv3.1 more than 100-fold. Structure determination by homology modeling indicated that the position of the S3b-S4 paddle and its primary structure defines the shape and∖or the accessibility of the binding site for gambierol, explaining the observed differences in gambierol affinity between the channel chimeras. Furthermore, these findings explain the observed difference in gambierol affinity for the closed and open channel configurations of Kv3.1, opening new possibilities for exploring the VSDs as selectivity determinants in drug design.

  19. Template Based Design of Anti-Metastatic Drugs from the Active Conformation of Laminin Peptide 11

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    sequence is an enterokinase site. We abandoned this site -97A kDa when we could not achieve cleavage efficiencies greater than -66.0 kDa 50%. The...too many extra residues. Therefore we eventually utilized a modification of this A B C D vector, pET-15b which does not contain an enterokinase Fiuure

  20. Reprogramming the Chemodiversity of Terpenoid Cyclization by Remolding the Active Site Contour of epi-Isozizaene Synthase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The class I terpenoid cyclase epi-isozizaene synthase (EIZS) utilizes the universal achiral isoprenoid substrate, farnesyl diphosphate, to generate epi-isozizaene as the predominant sesquiterpene cyclization product and at least five minor sesquiterpene products, making EIZS an ideal platform for the exploration of fidelity and promiscuity in a terpenoid cyclization reaction. The hydrophobic active site contour of EIZS serves as a template that enforces a single substrate conformation, and chaperones subsequently formed carbocation intermediates through a well-defined mechanistic sequence. Here, we have used the crystal structure of EIZS as a guide to systematically remold the hydrophobic active site contour in a library of 26 site-specific mutants. Remolded cyclization templates reprogram the reaction cascade not only by reproportioning products generated by the wild-type enzyme but also by generating completely new products of diverse structure. Specifically, we have tripled the overall number of characterized products generated by EIZS. Moreover, we have converted EIZS into six different sesquiterpene synthases: F96A EIZS is an (E)-β-farnesene synthase, F96W EIZS is a zizaene synthase, F95H EIZS is a β-curcumene synthase, F95M EIZS is a β-acoradiene synthase, F198L EIZS is a β-cedrene synthase, and F96V EIZS and W203F EIZS are (Z)-γ-bisabolene synthases. Active site aromatic residues appear to be hot spots for reprogramming the cyclization cascade by manipulating the stability and conformation of critical carbocation intermediates. A majority of mutant enzymes exhibit only relatively modest 2–100-fold losses of catalytic activity, suggesting that residues responsible for triggering substrate ionization readily tolerate mutations deeper in the active site cavity. PMID:24517311

  1. Conformational studies of a peptide corresponding to a region of the C-terminus of ribonuclease A: implications as a potential chain-folding initiation site.

    PubMed

    Beals, J M; Haas, E; Krausz, S; Scheraga, H A

    1991-08-06

    Conformational properties of the OT-16 peptide, the C-terminal 20 amino acids of RNase A, were examined by nonradiative energy transfer. A modified OT-16 peptide was prepared by solid-phase synthesis with the inclusion of diaminobutyric acid (DABA) at the C-terminus. The OT-16-DABA peptide was labeled with a fluorescent 1,5-dimethylaminonaphthalene sulfonyl (dansyl, DNS) acceptor at the N-terminal amine and a fluorescent naphthoxyacetic acid (NAA) donor at the gamma-amine of the DABA located at the C-terminus of the peptide by using an orthogonal protection scheme. Energy transfer was monitored in DNS-OT-16-DABA-NAA by using both fluorescence intensity (sensitized emission) and lifetime (donor quenching) experiments. The lifetime data indicate that the peptide system is a dynamic, flexible one. A detailed analysis, based on a dynamic model that includes a skewed Gaussian function to model the equilibrium distribution of interprobe distances and a mutual diffusion coefficient between the two probes to model conformational dynamics in the peptide [Beechem & Haas (1989) Biophys. J. 55, 1225.], identified the existence of a partially ordered structure (relatively narrow distribution of interprobe distances) at temperatures greater than or equal to 20 degrees C in the absence of denaturant. The width and the position of the average of the distributions decrease with increasing temperature, in this range; this suggests that the structure is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. In addition, the peptide undergoes cold denaturation at around 1.5 degrees C as indicated by broadening of the distance distribution. The addition of 6 M guanidine hydrochloride (Gdn-HCl) also broadens the distance distribution significantly, presumably by eliminating the hydrophobic interactions and unfolding the peptide. The results of the analysis of the distance distribution demonstrate that (1) nonradiative energy transfer can be used to study the conformational dynamics of peptides on the

  2. Identification of a hexapeptide that mimics a conformation-dependent binding site of acetylcholine receptor by use of a phage-epitope library.

    PubMed Central

    Balass, M; Heldman, Y; Cabilly, S; Givol, D; Katchalski-Katzir, E; Fuchs, S

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) 5.5 is directed against the ligand-binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The epitope for this antibody is conformation-dependent, and the antibody does not react with synthetic peptides derived from the receptor sequence. We have identified a ligand peptide that mimics this conformation-dependent epitope from a phage-epitope library composed of filamentous phage displaying random hexapeptides. Among 38 positive phage clones, individually selected from the library, 34 positive clones carried the sequence Asp-Leu-Val-Trp-Leu-Leu (DLVWLL), 1 positive clone had the sequence Asp-Ile-Val-Trp-Leu-Leu (DIVWLL), and 3 positive clones expressed the sequence Leu-Ile-Glu-Trp-Leu-Leu (LIEWLL), none of which are significantly homologous with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit sequence. All of these phages bind specifically to mAb 5.5. The synthetic peptide DLVWLL inhibits binding of mAb 5.5 to the related peptide-presenting phage and to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in a concentration-dependent manner; the IC50 value is of the order of 10(-4) M. Bioactivity of the peptide "mimotope" DLVWLL was demonstrated in vivo in hatched chickens by inhibition of the mAb 5.5 effect by the peptide. The neuromuscular block and myasthenia gravis-like symptoms that are induced in chicken by passive transfer of mAb 5.5 were specifically abolished by DLVWLL. This study shows the potential of a random peptide phage-epitope library for selecting a mimotope for an antibody that recognizes a folded form of the protein, where peptides from the linear amino acid sequence of the protein are not applicable. Images Fig. 5 PMID:7504273

  3. Structure-function relationships and conformational properties of alpha-MSH(6-13) analogues with candidacidal activity.

    PubMed

    Carotenuto, Alfonso; Saviello, Maria Rosaria; Auriemma, Luigia; Campiglia, Pietro; Catania, Anna; Novellino, Ettore; Grieco, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) is an endogenous linear tridecapeptide with potent anti-inflammatory effects. We firstly demonstrated that alpha-MSH and its C-terminal sequence Lys-Pro-Val [alpha-MSH(11-13)] have antimicrobial effects against two major and representative pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Successively, in an attempt to improve the candidacidal activity of alpha-MSH and to better understand the peptide structure-antifungal activity relations, we have recently designed and synthesized novel peptide analogues. We focused on the sequence alpha-MSH(6-13), which contains the invariant melanocortin core sequence His-Phe-Arg-Trp (6-9) and also contains the sequence Lys-Pro-Val (11-13) important for antimicrobial activity. In that structure-activity study, we discovered several compounds that have greater candidacidal activity than alpha-MSH, among which the peptide [d-Nal-7,Phe-12]-alpha-MSH(6-13) was the most potent. Here, we report a detailed conformational analysis by spectroscopic and computational methods of three peptides, alpha-MSH(6-13) (1), [d-Nal-7,Phe-12]-alpha-MSH(6-13) (2) and [d-Nal-7,Asp-12]-alpha-MSH(6-13) (3). Peptides were chosen on the basis of their candidacidal activities and were studied in membrane mimetic environment (SDS micelles). Different turn structures were observed for the three peptides and a conformation-activity model was developed based on these results. This study offers a structural basis for the design of novel peptide and non-peptide analogues to be used as new antimicrobial agents.

  4. Transportation Conformity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This section provides information on: current laws, regulations and guidance, policy and technical guidance, project-level conformity, general information, contacts and training, adequacy review of SIP submissions

  5. Inactivation during denaturation of ribonuclease A by guanidinium chloride is accompanied by unfolding at the active site.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H J; Tsou, C L

    1995-01-01

    Inactivation of pancreatic RNAase A occurs in guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) at low concentrations before the unfolding of the molecule as a whole can be detected [Liu and Tsou (1987) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 916, 455-464]. We have now shown that the rate of digestion of the RNAase molecule by either trypsin or proteinase K increases significantly at low concentrations of GdmCl where the enzyme is largely inactivated, but fluorescence and absorption measurements reveal no conformational changes. N-Terminal sequence analysis of the peptide fragments generated shows that proteolysis occurs primarily at or near the active site. The decrease in activity of RNAase at low concentrations of GdmCl is therefore due to partial unfolding of the molecule, particularly at the active site and not to an inhibition by the denaturant. Images Figure 4 PMID:7832749

  6. Self-objectification, feminist activism and conformity to feminine norms among female vegetarians, semi-vegetarians, and non-vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Britney G; Khan, Aliya; Edner, Benjamin; Rosén, Lee A

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has suggested that vegetarians may be at an increased risk for developing disordered eating or body image issues when compared to non-vegetarians. However, the results of such studies are mixed, and no research has explored potential connections between vegetarianism and self-objectification. In the current study, the authors examine factors that predicted body surveillance, body shame, and appearance control beliefs; three aspects of self-objectification. Surveys were completed by 386 women from the United States who were categorized as vegetarian, semi-vegetarian, or non-vegetarian. The three groups differed regarding dietary motivations, levels of feminist activism, and body shame, but did not differ on their conformity to feminine norms. While conformity to feminine norms predicted body surveillance and body shame levels among all three groups of women, feminist activism predicted appearance control beliefs among non-vegetarians only. These findings suggest that it is important for researchers and clinicians to distinguish among these three groups when examining the relationship between vegetarianism and self-objectification.

  7. Protein Conformation Ensembles Monitored by HDX Reveal a Structural Rationale for Abscisic Acid Signaling Protein Affinities and Activities

    PubMed Central

    West, Graham M.; Pascal, Bruce D.; Ng, Ley-Moy; Soon, Fen-Fen; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric; Chalmers, Michael J.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Plants regulate growth and respond to environmental stress through abscisic acid (ABA) regulated pathways, and as such these pathways are of primary interest for biological and agricultural research. The ABA response is first perceived by the PYR/PYL/RCAR class of START protein receptors. These ABA activated receptors disrupt phosphatase inhibition of Snf1-related kinases (SnRKs) enabling kinase signaling. Here, insights into the structural mechanism of proteins in the ABA signaling pathway (the ABA receptor PYL2, HAB1 phosphatase, and two kinases, SnRK2.3 and 2.6) are discerned through hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry. HDX on the phosphatase in the presence of binding partners provides evidence for receptor-specific conformations involving the Trp385 ‘lock’ that is necessary for signaling. Furthermore, kinase activity is linked to a more stable closed conformation. These solution-based studies complement the static crystal structures and provide a more detailed understanding of the ABA signaling pathway. PMID:23290725

  8. Engineering a minimal G protein to facilitate crystallisation of G protein-coupled receptors in their active conformation

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Byron; Tate, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) modulate cytoplasmic signalling in response to extracellular stimuli, and are important therapeutic targets in a wide range of diseases. Structure determination of GPCRs in all activation states is important to elucidate the precise mechanism of signal transduction and to facilitate optimal drug design. However, due to their inherent instability, crystallisation of GPCRs in complex with cytoplasmic signalling proteins, such as heterotrimeric G proteins and β-arrestins, has proved challenging. Here, we describe the design of a minimal G protein, mini-Gs, which is composed solely of the GTPase domain from the adenylate cyclase stimulating G protein Gs. Mini-Gs is a small, soluble protein, which efficiently couples GPCRs in the absence of Gβγ subunits. We engineered mini-Gs, using rational design mutagenesis, to form a stable complex with detergent-solubilised β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR). Mini G proteins induce similar pharmacological and structural changes in GPCRs as heterotrimeric G proteins, but eliminate many of the problems associated with crystallisation of these complexes, specifically their large size, conformational dynamics and instability in detergent. They are therefore novel tools, which will facilitate the biochemical and structural characterisation of GPCRs in their active conformation. PMID:27672048

  9. Effect of ultrasound combined with malic acid on the activity and conformation of mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) polyphenoloxidase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Liu, Wei; Xiong, Zhiqiang; Zou, Liqiang; Liu, Junping; Zhong, Junzhen; Chen, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Polyphenoloxidase (PPO) plays an important role in the browning of vegetables, fruits and edible fungi. The effects of ultrasound, malic acid, and their combination on the activity and conformation of mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) PPO were studied. The activity of PPO decreased gradually with the increasing of malic acid concentrations (5-60mM). Neither medium concentrations (10, 20, 30mM) malic acid nor individual ultrasound (25kHz, 55.48W/cm(2)) treatment could remarkably inactivate PPO. However, the inactivation during their combination was more significant than the sum of ultrasound inactivation and malic acid inactivation. The inactivation kinetics of PPO followed a first-order kinetics under the combination of ultrasound and malic acid. The conformation of combination treated PPO was changed, which was reflected in the decrease of α-helix, increase of β-sheet contents and disruption of the tertiary structure. Results of molecular microstructure showed that ultrasound broke large molecular groups of PPO into small ones. Moreover, combined treatment disrupted the microstructure of PPO and molecules were connected together.

  10. Engineering a minimal G protein to facilitate crystallisation of G protein-coupled receptors in their active conformation.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Byron; Tate, Christopher G

    2016-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) modulate cytoplasmic signalling in response to extracellular stimuli, and are important therapeutic targets in a wide range of diseases. Structure determination of GPCRs in all activation states is important to elucidate the precise mechanism of signal transduction and to facilitate optimal drug design. However, due to their inherent instability, crystallisation of GPCRs in complex with cytoplasmic signalling proteins, such as heterotrimeric G proteins and β-arrestins, has proved challenging. Here, we describe the design of a minimal G protein, mini-Gs, which is composed solely of the GTPase domain from the adenylate cyclase stimulating G protein Gs Mini-Gs is a small, soluble protein, which efficiently couples GPCRs in the absence of Gβγ subunits. We engineered mini-Gs, using rational design mutagenesis, to form a stable complex with detergent-solubilised β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR). Mini G proteins induce similar pharmacological and structural changes in GPCRs as heterotrimeric G proteins, but eliminate many of the problems associated with crystallisation of these complexes, specifically their large size, conformational dynamics and instability in detergent. They are therefore novel tools, which will facilitate the biochemical and structural characterisation of GPCRs in their active conformation.

  11. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Silicate Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts [1-3]. Nevertheless, among those structures K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. In this study, the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars were investigated in closer details. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. We give a potential explanation of the increased ice nucleation activity of K-feldspar. The ice nucleating sites are very much dependent on the alkali ion present by altering the water structure and the feldspar surface. The higher activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to the presence of potassium ions on the surface and surface bilayer. The alkali-ions have different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar. Chaotropic behavior of Calcium and Sodium ions are lowering the ice nucleation potential of the other feldspars, while kosmotropic Potassium has a neutral or even positive effect. Furthermore we investigated the influence of milling onto the ice nucleation of quartz particles. The ice nucleation activity can be increased by mechanical milling, by introducing more molecular, nucleation active defects to the particle surface. This effect is larger than expected by plane surface increase. [1] Atkinson et al. The Importance of Feldspar for Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust in Mixed-Phase Clouds. Nature 2013, 498, 355-358. [2] Yakobi-Hancock et al.. Feldspar Minerals as Efficient Deposition Ice Nuclei. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2013, 13, 11175-11185. [3] Zolles et al. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015 accepted.

  12. Minimized natural versions of fungal ribotoxins show improved active site plasticity.

    PubMed

    Maestro-López, Moisés; Olombrada, Miriam; García-Ortega, Lucía; Serrano-González, Daniel; Lacadena, Javier; Oñaderra, Mercedes; Gavilanes, José G; Martínez-Del-Pozo, Álvaro

    2017-04-01

    Fungal ribotoxins are highly specific extracellular RNases which cleave a single phosphodiester bond at the ribosomal sarcin-ricin loop, inhibiting protein biosynthesis by interfering with elongation factors. Most ribotoxins show high degree of conservation, with similar sizes and amino acid sequence identities above 85%. Only two exceptions are known: hirsutellin A and anisoplin, produced by the entomopathogenic fungi Hirsutella thompsonii and Metarhizium anisopliae, respectively. Both proteins are similar but smaller than the other known ribotoxins (130 vs 150 amino acids), displaying only about 25% sequence identity with them. They can be considered minimized natural versions of their larger counterparts, best represented by α-sarcin. The conserved α-sarcin active site residue Tyr48 has been replaced by the geometrically equivalent Asp, present in the minimized ribotoxins, to produce and characterize the corresponding mutant. As a control, the inverse anisoplin mutant (D43Y) has been also studied. The results show how the smaller versions of ribotoxins represent an optimum compromise among conformational freedom, stability, specificity, and active-site plasticity which allow these toxic proteins to accommodate the characteristic abilities of ribotoxins into a shorter amino acid sequence and more stable structure of intermediate size between that of other nontoxic fungal RNases and previously known larger ribotoxins.

  13. Multiple, Ligand-Dependent Routes from the Active Site of Cytochrome P450 2C9

    SciTech Connect

    Cojocaru, Vlad; Winn, Peter J.; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-02-13

    The active site of liver-specific, drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenases is deeply buried in the protein and is connected to the protein surface through multiple tunnels, many of which were found open in different CYP crystal structures. It has been shown that different tunnels could serve as ligand passage routes in different CYPs. However, it is not understood whether one CYP uses multiple routes for substrate access and product release and whether these routes depend on ligand properties. From 300 ns of molecular dynamics simulations of CYP2C9, the second most abundant CYP in the human liver we found four main ligand exit routes, the occurrence of each depending on the ligand type and the conformation of the F-G loop, which is likely to be affected by the CYP-membrane interaction. A non-helical F-G loop favored exit towards the putative membrane-embedded region. Important protein features that direct ligand exit include aromatic residues that divide the active site and whose motions control access to two pathways. The ligands interacted with positively charged residues on the protein surface through hydrogen bonds that appear to select for acidic substrates. The observation of multiple, ligand-dependent routes in a CYP aids understanding of how CYP mutations affect drug metabolism and provides new possibilities for CYP inhibition.

  14. Similarities in the HIV-1 and ASV Integrease Active Site Upon Metal Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Lins, Roberto D.; Straatsma, TP; Briggs, J. M.

    2000-04-05

    The HIV-1 integrase, which is essential for viral replication, catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA into the host chromosome thereby recruiting host cell machinery into making viral proteins. It represents the third main HIV enzyme target for inhibitor design, the first two being the reverse transcriptase and the protease. We report here a fully hydrated 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation performed using parallel NWChem3.2.1 with the AMBER95 force field. The HIV-1 integrase catalytic domain previously determined by crystallography (1B9D) and modeling including two Mg2+ ions placed into the active site based on an alignment against an ASV integrase structure containing two divalent metals (1VSH), was used as the starting structure. The simulation reveals a high degree of flexibility in the region of residues 140-149 even in the presence of a second divalent metal ion and a dramatic conformational change of the side chain of E152 when the second metal ion is present. This study shows similarities in the behavior of the catalytic residues in the HIV-1 and ASV integrases upon metal binding. The present simulation also provides support to the hypothesis that the second metal ion is likely to be carried into the HIV-1 integrase active site by the substrate, a strand of DNA.

  15. Face the Edges: Catalytic Active Sites of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Edges are special sites in nanomaterials. The atoms residing on the edges have different environments compared to those in other parts of a nanomaterial and, therefore, they may have different properties. Here, recent progress in nanomaterial fields is summarized from the viewpoint of the edges. Typically, edge sites in MoS2 or metals, other than surface atoms, can perform as active centers for catalytic reactions, so the method to enhance performance lies in the optimization of the edge structures. The edges of multicomponent interfaces present even more possibilities to enhance the activities of nanomaterials. Nanoframes and ultrathin nanowires have similarities to conventional edges of nanoparticles, the application of which as catalysts can help to reduce the use of costly materials. Looking beyond this, the edge structures of graphene are also essential for their properties. In short, the edge structure can influence many properties of materials. PMID:27980960

  16. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  17. The HIV-1 p6/EIAV p9 docking site in Alix is autoinhibited as revealed by a conformation-sensitive anti-Alix monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xi; Pan, Shujuan; Sun, Le; Corvera, Joe; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Kuang, Jian

    2008-09-01

    Alix [ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene 2)-interacting protein X], a component of the endosomal sorting machinery, contains a three-dimensional docking site for HIV-1 p6(Gag) or EIAV (equine infectious anaemia virus) p9(Gag), and binding of the viral protein to this docking site allows the virus to hijack the host endosomal sorting machinery for budding from the plasma membrane. In the present study, we identified a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes the docking site for p6(Gag)/p9(Gag) and we used this antibody to probe the accessibility of the docking site in Alix. Our results show that the docking site is not available in cytosolic or recombinant Alix under native conditions and becomes available upon addition of the detergent Nonidet P40 or SDS. In HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cell lysates, an active p6(Gag)/p9(Gag) docking site is specifically available in Alix from the membrane fraction. The findings of the present study demonstrate that formation or exposure of the p6(Gag)/p9(Gag) docking site in Alix is a regulated event and that Alix association with the membrane may play a positive role in this process.

  18. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  19. Nest predation increases with parental activity: separating nest site and parental activity effects.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T E; Scott, J; Menge, C

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection. PMID:11413645

  20. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  1. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  2. [Mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2012-04-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent for inhibiting arginine-auxotrophic tumors (such as melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas) in phase III clinical trials. In this work, we studied the molecular mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutation sites, A128, H404 and 1410, were introduced into wild-type ADI gene by QuikChange site-directed mutagenesis method, and four ADI mutants M1 (A128T), M2 (H404R), M3 (I410L), and M4 (A128T, H404R) were obtained. The ADI mutants were individually expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the enzymatic properties of the purified mutant proteins were determined. The results show that both A128T and H404R had enhanced optimum pH, higher activity and stability of ADI under physiological condition (pH 7.4), as well as reduced K(m) value. This study provides an insight into the molecular mechanism of the ADI activity, and also the experimental evidence for the rational protein evolution in the future.

  3. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J.; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  4. Mutations at Arg220 and Thr237 in PER-2 β-lactamase: impact on conformation, activity and susceptibility to inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Melina; Curto, Lucrecia; Brunetti, Florencia; Sauvage, Eric; Galleni, Moreno; Power, Pablo; Gutkind, Gabriel

    2017-03-20

    PER-2 accounts for up to 10% of oxyimino-cephalosporin resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli in Argentina, and hydrolyzes both cefotaxime and ceftazidime with high catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km). Through crystallographic analyses, we recently proposed the existence of a hydrogen-bond network connecting Ser70-Gln69-oxyanion water-Thr237-Arg220 that might be important for the activity and inhibition of the enzyme. Mutations at Arg244 in most class A β-lactamases (as TEM and SHV) reduce susceptibility to mechanism-based inactivators, and Arg220 in PER β-lactamases is equivalent to Arg244. Alterations in the hydrogen bond network of the active site in PER-2, through modifications in key residues such as Arg220 and (to a much lesser extent) Thr237, dramatically impact the overall susceptibility to inactivation, with up to ∼300 and 500-fold reduction in the kinact/KI values for clavulanic acid and tazobactam, respectively. Hydrolysis on cephalosporins and aztreonam was also affected although in different extents compared to wild-type PER-2; for cefepime, only Arg220Gly mutation resulted in a strong reduction in the catalytic efficiency. Mutations at Arg220 entail modifications in the catalytic activity of PER-2, and probably local perturbations in the protein, but not global conformational changes. Therefore, the apparent structural stability of the mutants suggests that these enzymes could be possibly selected in vivo.

  5. Replacement of wybutine by hydrazines and its effect on the active conformation of yeast tRNAPhe.

    PubMed Central

    Schleich, H G; Wintermeyer, W; Zachau, H G

    1978-01-01

    The highly modified base wybutine (YWye) next to the anticodon of yeast tRNAPhe has been replaced by different hydrazine derivatives. The effect of the replacement on the activity of the tRNA has been studied in the heterologous aminoacylation with synthetase from E. coli and in the poly(U) directed binding to ribosomes from both yeast and E. coli. It was found that starting from tRNA-PheYWye the activity increased with increasing size, aromaticity, and stacking tendency of the substituent replacing YWye. It is concluded that YWye by the size of its aromatic system and by its stacking properties is particularly well suited for stabilizing the native conformation of tRNAPhe. PMID:351568

  6. Comparative study of two box H/ACA ribonucleoprotein pseudouridine-synthases: relation between conformational dynamics of the guide RNA, enzyme assembly and activity.

    PubMed

    Fourmann, Jean-Baptiste; Tillault, Anne-Sophie; Blaud, Magali; Leclerc, Fabrice; Branlant, Christiane; Charpentier, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Multiple RNA-guided pseudouridine synthases, H/ACA ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) which contain a guide RNA and four proteins, catalyze site-specific post-transcriptional isomerization of uridines into pseudouridines in substrate RNAs. In archaeal particles, the guide small RNA (sRNA) is anchored by the pseudouridine synthase aCBF5 and the ribosomal protein L7Ae. Protein aNOP10 interacts with both aCBF5 and L7Ae. The fourth protein, aGAR1, interacts with aCBF5 and enhances catalytic efficiency. Here, we compared the features of two H/ACA sRNAs, Pab21 and Pab91, from Pyrococcus abyssi. We found that aCBF5 binds much more weakly to Pab91 than to Pab21. Surprisingly, the Pab91 sRNP exhibits a higher catalytic efficiency than the Pab21 sRNP. We thus investigated the molecular basis of the differential efficiencies observed for the assembly and catalytic activity of the two enzymes. For this, we compared profiles of the extent of lead-induced cleavages in these sRNAs during a stepwise reconstitution of the sRNPs, and analyzed the impact of the absence of the aNOP10-L7Ae interaction. Such probing experiments indicated that the sRNAs undergo a series of conformational changes upon RNP assembly. These changes were also evaluated directly by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, a tool highly adapted to analyzing RNA conformational dynamics. In addition, our results reveal that the conformation of helix P1 formed at the base of the H/ACA sRNAs is optimized in Pab21 for efficient aCBF5 binding and RNP assembly. Moreover, P1 swapping improved the assembly of the Pab91 sRNP. Nonetheless, efficient aCBF5 binding probably also relies on the pseudouridylation pocket which is not optimized for high activity in the case of Pab21.

  7. Conformable, flexible, large-area networks of pressure and thermal sensors with organic transistor active matrixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Someya, Takao; Kato, Yusaku; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Iba, Shingo; Noguchi, Yoshiaki; Murase, Yousuke; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Takayasu

    2005-08-01

    Skin-like sensitivity, or the capability to recognize tactile information, will be an essential feature of future generations of robots, enabling them to operate in unstructured environments. Recently developed large-area pressure sensors made with organic transistors have been proposed for electronic artificial skin (E-skin) applications. These sensors are bendable down to a 2-mm radius, a size that is sufficiently small for the fabrication of human-sized robot fingers. Natural human skin, however, is far more complex than the transistor-based imitations demonstrated so far. It performs other functions, including thermal sensing. Furthermore, without conformability, the application of E-skin on three-dimensional surfaces is impossible. In this work, we have successfully developed conformable, flexible, large-area networks of thermal and pressure sensors based on an organic semiconductor. A plastic film with organic transistor-based electronic circuits is processed to form a net-shaped structure, which allows the E-skin films to be extended by 25%. The net-shaped pressure sensor matrix was attached to the surface of an egg, and pressure images were successfully obtained in this configuration. Then, a similar network of thermal sensors was developed with organic semiconductors. Next, the possible implementation of both pressure and thermal sensors on the surfaces is presented, and, by means of laminated sensor networks, the distributions of pressure and temperature are simultaneously obtained. Author contributions: T. Someya designed research; T. Someya, Y.K., T. Sekitani, S.I., Y.N., Y.M., H.K., and T. Sakurai performed research; and T. Someya wrote the paper.This paper was submitted directly (Track II) to the PNAS office.Freely available online through the PNAS open access option.Abbreviations: E-skin, electronic artificial skin; IDS, source-drain current; PTCDI, 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-diimide; parylene, polychloro-para-xylylene; CuPc, copper

  8. MSK1 activity is controlled by multiple phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    McCOY, Claire E.; Campbell, David G.; Deak, Maria; Bloomberg, Graham B.; Arthur, J. Simon C.

    2004-01-01

    MSK1 (mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase) is a kinase activated in cells downstream of both the ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades. In the present study, we show that, in addition to being phosphorylated on Thr-581 and Ser-360 by ERK1/2 or p38, MSK1 can autophosphorylate on at least six sites: Ser-212, Ser-376, Ser-381, Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758. Of these sites, the N-terminal T-loop residue Ser-212 and the ‘hydrophobic motif’ Ser-376 are phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain of MSK1, and their phosphorylation is essential for the catalytic activity of the N-terminal kinase domain of MSK1 and therefore for the phosphorylation of MSK1 substrates in vitro. Ser-381 is also phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain, and mutation of Ser-381 decreases MSK1 activity, probably through the inhibition of Ser-376 phosphorylation. Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758 are phosphorylated by the N-terminal kinase domain; however, their function is not known. The activation of MSK1 in cells therefore requires the activation of the ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK cascades and does not appear to require additional signalling inputs. This is in contrast with the closely related RSK (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase) proteins, whose activity requires phosphorylation by PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1) in addition to phosphorylation by ERK1/2. PMID:15568999

  9. An important base triple anchors the substrate helix recognition surface within the Tetrahymena ribozyme active site.

    PubMed

    Szewczak, A A; Ortoleva-Donnelly, L; Zivarts, M V; Oyelere, A K; Kazantsev, A V; Strobel, S A

    1999-09-28

    Key to understanding the structural biology of catalytic RNA is determining the underlying networks of interactions that stabilize RNA folding, substrate binding, and catalysis. Here we demonstrate the existence and functional importance of a Hoogsteen base triple (U300.A97-U277), which anchors the substrate helix recognition surface within the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme active site. Nucleotide analog interference suppression analysis of the interacting functional groups shows that the U300.A97-U277 triple forms part of a network of hydrogen bonds that connect the P3 helix, the J8/7 strand, and the P1 substrate helix. Product binding and substrate cleavage kinetics experiments performed on mutant ribozymes that lack this base triple (C A-U, U G-C) or replace it with the isomorphous C(+).G-C triple show that the A97 Hoogsteen triple contributes to the stabilization of both substrate helix docking and the conformation of the ribozyme's active site. The U300. A97-U277 base triple is not formed in the recently reported crystallographic model of a portion of the group I intron, despite the presence of J8/7 and P3 in the RNA construct [Golden, B. L., Gooding, A. R., Podell, E. R. & Cech, T. R. (1998) Science 282, 259-264]. This, along with other biochemical evidence, suggests that the active site in the crystallized form of the ribozyme is not fully preorganized and that substantial rearrangement may be required for substrate helix docking and catalysis.

  10. pH-Dependent Conformational Changes in the HCV NS3 Protein Modulate Its ATPase and Helicase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Gustavo Tavares; da Costa, Emmerson Corrêa Brasil; Capaccia, Anne Miranda; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects 170 to 200 million people worldwide and is, therefore, a major health problem. The lack of efficient treatments that specifically target the viral proteins or RNA and its high chronicity rate make hepatitis C the cause of many deaths and hepatic transplants annually. The NS3 protein is considered an important target for the development of anti-HCV drugs because it is composed of two domains (a serine protease in the N-terminal portion and an RNA helicase/NTPase in the C-terminal portion), which are essential for viral replication and proliferation. We expressed and purified both the NS3 helicase domain (NS3hel) and the full-length NS3 protein (NS3FL) and characterized pH-dependent structural changes associated with the increase in their ATPase and helicase activities at acidic pH. Using intrinsic fluorescence experiments, we have observed that NS3hel was less stable at pH 6.4 than at pH 7.2. Moreover, binding curves using an extrinsic fluorescent probe (bis-ANS) and ATPase assays performed under different pH conditions demonstrated that the hydrophobic clefts of NS3 are significantly more exposed to the aqueous medium at acidic pH. Using fluorescence spectroscopy and anisotropy assays, we have also observed more protein interaction with DNA upon pH acidification, which suggests that the hydrophobic clefts exposure on NS3 might be related to a loss of stability that could lead it to adopt a more open conformation. This conformational change at acidic pH would stimulate both its ATPase and helicase activities, as well as its ability to bind DNA. Taken together, our results indicate that the NS3 protein adopts a more open conformation due to acidification from pH 7.2 to 6.4, resulting in a more active form at a pH that is found near Golgi-derived membranes. This increased activity could better allow NS3 to carry out its functions during HCV replication. PMID:25551442

  11. Direct electrical control of IgG conformation and functional activity at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, Paola; Caiazzo, Marialuisa; Alessandrini, Andrea; Eggenhöffner, Roberto; Vassalli, Massimo; Facci, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    We have devised a supramolecular edifice involving His-tagged protein A and antibodies to yield surface immobilized, uniformly oriented, IgG-type, antibody layers with Fab fragments exposed off an electrode surface. We demonstrate here that we can affect the conformation of IgGs, likely pushing/pulling electrostatically Fab fragments towards/from the electrode surface. A potential difference between electrode and solution acts on IgGs’ charged aminoacids modulating the accessibility of the specific recognition regions of Fab fragments by antigens in solution. Consequently, antibody-antigen affinity is affected by the sign of the applied potential: a positive potential enables an effective capture of antigens; a negative one pulls the fragments towards the electrode, where steric hindrance caused by neighboring molecules largely hampers the capture of antigens. Different experimental techniques (electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, fluorescence confocal microscopy and electrochemical atomic force spectroscopy) were used to evaluate binding kinetics, surface coverage, effect of the applied electric field on IgGs, and role of charged residues on the phenomenon described. These findings expand the concept of electrical control of biological reactions and can be used to gate electrically specific recognition reactions with impact in biosensors, bioactuators, smart biodevices, nanomedicine, and fundamental studies related to chemical reaction kinetics.

  12. Direct electrical control of IgG conformation and functional activity at surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ghisellini, Paola; Caiazzo, Marialuisa; Alessandrini, Andrea; Eggenhöffner, Roberto; Vassalli, Massimo; Facci, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We have devised a supramolecular edifice involving His-tagged protein A and antibodies to yield surface immobilized, uniformly oriented, IgG-type, antibody layers with Fab fragments exposed off an electrode surface. We demonstrate here that we can affect the conformation of IgGs, likely pushing/pulling electrostatically Fab fragments towards/from the electrode surface. A potential difference between electrode and solution acts on IgGs’ charged aminoacids modulating the accessibility of the specific recognition regions of Fab fragments by antigens in solution. Consequently, antibody-antigen affinity is affected by the sign of the applied potential: a positive potential enables an effective capture of antigens; a negative one pulls the fragments towards the electrode, where steric hindrance caused by neighboring molecules largely hampers the capture of antigens. Different experimental techniques (electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, fluorescence confocal microscopy and electrochemical atomic force spectroscopy) were used to evaluate binding kinetics, surface coverage, effect of the applied electric field on IgGs, and role of charged residues on the phenomenon described. These findings expand the concept of electrical control of biological reactions and can be used to gate electrically specific recognition reactions with impact in biosensors, bioactuators, smart biodevices, nanomedicine, and fundamental studies related to chemical reaction kinetics. PMID:27883075

  13. Conformation-Specific Infrared and Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of α-METHYLBENZYL Radical: Probing the State-Dependent Effects of Methyl Rocking against a Radical Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, Nathanael M.; Mehta, Deepali N.; Zwier, Timothy S.; Reilly, Neil J.; Kokkin, Damian L.; McCarthy, Michael C.

    2012-06-01

    Combustion processes involve a myriad of complex reaction pathways which connect smaller precursors to larger polyaromatic hydrocarbons, many of which are still unknown. In particular, benzyl-type radicals play an important role in combustible fuels due to their intrinsic resonance stabilization and consequent increase in relative concentration. Here, we present a study of the vibronic spectroscopy of α-Methylbenzyl radical (α-MeBz), in which the orientation of the methyl group adjacent to the radical site responds to the electronic interaction extending from the conjugated π-system. Probing the isolated radical, produced in an electrical discharge under jet-cooled conditions, the two-color resonant two-photon ionization, fluorescence excitation, and dispersed fluorescence spectra were obtained in order to determine the ground and excited state barriers to internal rotation and the angular change associated with electronic excitation. Resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy (RIDIRS) has also been implemented to elucidate the infrared signatures in the alkyl and aromatic CH stretch regions in order to probe in a complementary way the state-dependent conformational preferences of α-MeBz. We will show that the D0- and D1-RIDIR spectra report sensitively on the strong coupling between the CH stretch vibrations and the C_α-C_β torsional geometry. Furthermore, photoionization efficiency scans were carried out to reveal the adiabatic ionization threshold of α-MeBz and the quantized levels present in the radical cation state.

  14. Probing the interaction induced conformation transitions in acid phosphatase with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: Relation to inhibition and bio-activity of Chlorella vulgaris acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Farooq; Zhou, Xing; Yao, Hongzhou; Zhou, Ying; Xu, Chao

    2016-09-01

    The present study explored the interaction and kinetics of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) with acid phosphatase (ACP) by utilizing diverse range of spectroscopic techniques. The results corroborate, the CoFe2O4 NPs cause fluorescence quenching in ACP by static quenching mechanism. The negative values of van't Hoff thermodynamic expressions (ΔH=-0.3293Jmol(-1)K(-1) and ΔG=-3.960kJmol(-1)K(-1)) corroborate the spontaneity and exothermic nature of static quenching. The positive value of ΔS (13.2893Jmol(-1)K(-1)) corroborate that major contributors of higher and stronger binding affinity among CoFe2O4 NPs with ACP were electrostatic. In addition, FTIR, UV-CD, UV-vis spectroscopy and three dimensional fluorescence (3D) techniques confirmed that CoFe2O4 NPs binding induces microenvironment perturbations leading to secondary and tertiary conformation changes in ACP to a great extent. Furthermore, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) affirmed the comparatively significant changes in microenvironment around tryptophan (Trp) residue by CoFe2O4 NPs. The effect of CoFe2O4 NPs on the activation kinetics of ACP was further examined in Chlorella vulgaris. Apparent Michaelis constant (Km) values of 0.57 and 26.5mM with activation energy values of 0.538 and 3.428kJmol(-1) were determined without and with 200μM CoFe2O4 NPs. Apparent Vmax value of -7Umml(-1) corroborate that enzyme active sites were completely captured by the NPs leaving no space for the substrate. The results confirmed that CoFe2O4 NPs ceased the activity by unfolding of ACP enzyme. This suggests CoFe2O4 NPs perturbed the enzyme activity by transitions in conformation and hence the metabolic activity of ACP. This study provides the pavement for novel and simple approach of using sensitive biomarkers for sensing NPs in environment.

  15. Relating conformation to function in integrin α5β1.

    PubMed

    Su, Yang; Xia, Wei; Li, Jing; Walz, Thomas; Humphries, Martin J; Vestweber, Dietmar; Cabañas, Carlos; Lu, Chafen; Springer, Timothy A

    2016-07-05

    Whether β1 integrin ectodomains visit conformational states similarly to β2 and β3 integrins has not been characterized. Furthermore, despite a wealth of activating and inhibitory antibodies to β1 integrins, the conformational states that these antibodies stabilize, and the relation of these conformations to function, remain incompletely characterized. Using negative-stain electron microscopy, we show that the integrin α5β1 ectodomain adopts extended-closed and extended-open conformations as well as a bent conformation. Antibodies SNAKA51, 8E3, N29, and 9EG7 bind to different domains in the α5 or β1 legs, activate, and stabilize extended ectodomain conformations. Antibodies 12G10 and HUTS-4 bind to the β1 βI domain and hybrid domains, respectively, activate, and stabilize the open headpiece conformation. Antibody TS2/16 binds a similar epitope as 12G10, activates, and appears to stabilize an open βI domain conformation without requiring extension or hybrid domain swing-out. mAb13 and SG/19 bind to the βI domain and βI-hybrid domain interface, respectively, inhibit, and stabilize the closed conformation of the headpiece. The effects of the antibodies on cell adhesion to fibronectin substrates suggest that the extended-open conformation of α5β1 is adhesive and that the extended-closed and bent-closed conformations are nonadhesive. The functional effects and binding sites of antibodies and fibronectin were consistent with their ability in binding to α5β1 on cell surfaces to cross-enhance or inhibit one another by competitive or noncompetitive (allosteric) mechanisms.

  16. Euphorbia dendroides Latex as a Source of Jatrophane Esters: Isolation, Structural Analysis, Conformational Study, and Anti-CHIKV Activity.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Mélissa; Nothias, Louis-Félix; Nedev, Hirsto; Gallard, Jean-François; Leyssen, Pieter; Retailleau, Pascal; Costa, Jean; Roussi, Fanny; Iorga, Bogdan I; Paolini, Julien; Litaudon, Marc

    2016-11-23

    An efficient process was used to isolate six new jatrophane esters, euphodendroidins J (3), K (5), L (6), M, (8), N (10), and O (11), along with seven known diterpenoid esters, namely, euphodendroidins A (4), B (9), E (1), and F (2), jatrophane ester (7), and 3α-hydroxyterracinolides G and B (12 and 13), and terracinolides J and C (14 and 15) from the latex of Euphorbia dendroides. Their 2D structures and relative configurations were established by extensive NMR spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configurations of compounds 1, 11, and 15 were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. Euphodendroidin F (2) was obtained in 18% yield from the diterpenoid ester-enriched extract after two consecutive flash chromatography steps, making it an interesting starting material for chemical synthesis. Euphodendroidins K and L (5 and 6) showed an unprecedented NMR spectroscopic behavior, which was investigated by variable-temperature NMR experiments and molecular modeling. The structure-conformation relationships study of compounds 1, 5, and 6, using DFT-NMR calculations, indicated the prominent role of the acylation pattern in governing the conformational behavior of these jatrophane esters. The antiviral activity of compounds 1-15 was evaluated against Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) replication.

  17. Structural Study of a Flexible Active Site Loop in Human Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase and Its Functional Implications.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Lucía; Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Roitberg, Adrián; Estrin, Darío A; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Marti, Marcelo A; Capece, Luciana

    2016-05-17

    Human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase catalyzes the oxidative cleavage of tryptophan to N-formyl kynurenine, the initial and rate-limiting step in the kynurenine pathway. Additionally, this enzyme has been identified as a possible target for cancer therapy. A 20-amino acid protein segment (the JK loop), which connects the J and K helices, was not resolved in the reported hIDO crystal structure. Previous studies have shown that this loop undergoes structural rearrangement upon substrate binding. In this work, we apply a combination of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations and site-directed mutagenesis experiments to characterize the structure and dynamics of this protein region. Our simulations show that the JK loop can be divided into two regions: the first region (JK loop(C)) displays specific and well-defined conformations and is within hydrogen bonding distance of the substrate, while the second region (JK loop(N)) is highly disordered and exposed to the solvent. The peculiar flexible nature of JK loop(N) suggests that it may function as a target for post-translational modifications and/or a mediator for protein-protein interactions. In contrast, hydrogen bonding interactions are observed between the substrate and Thr379 in the highly conserved "GTGG" motif of JK loop(C), thereby anchoring JK loop(C) in a closed conformation, which secures the appropriate substrate binding mode for catalysis. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirm the key role of this residue, highlighting the importance of the JK loop(C) conformation in regulating the enzymatic activity. Furthermore, the existence of the partially and totally open conformations in the substrate-free form suggests a role of JK loop(C) in controlling substrate and product dynamics.

  18. The oxidation state of active site thiols determines activity of saccharopine dehydrogenase at low pH.

    PubMed

    Bobyk, Kostyantyn D; Kim, Sang Gon; Kumar, Vidya Prasanna; Kim, Sung-Kun; West, Ann H; Cook, Paul F

    2011-09-15

    Saccharopine dehydrogenase catalyzes the NAD-dependent conversion of saccharopine to generate L-lysine and α-ketoglutarate. A disulfide bond between cysteine 205 and cysteine 249, in the vicinity of the dinucleotide-binding site, is observed in structures of the apoenzyme, while a dithiol is observed in a structure with AMP bound, suggesting preferential binding of the dinucleotide to reduced enzyme. Mutation of C205 to S gave increased values of V/E(t) and V/KE(t) at pH 7 compared to wild type. Primary deuterium and solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effects suggest the catalytic pathway, which includes the hydride transfer and hydrolysis steps, contributes more to rate limitation in C205S, but the rates of the two steps relative to one another remain the same. There is a large increase in the rate constants V₁/E(t) and V₁/K(NAD)Et at pH values below 7 compared to WT. Data indicate the low pH increase in activity results from a decreased sensitivity of the C205S mutant enzyme to the protonation state of an enzyme group with a pK(a) of about 7, likely responsible for a pH-dependent conformational change. Reduction of WT and C205S mutant enzymes with TCEP gives equal activities at pH 6, consistent with the increased activity observed for the C205S mutant enzyme.

  19. Synthesis, absolute configuration and conformation of optically active 1,2-homoheptafulvalene.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shunji; Kurita, Mitsuhiro; Kikuchi, Sigeru; Asao, Toyonobu; Ito, Yoshitora; Oda, Masaji; Sotokawa, Hideo; Tajiri, Akio; Morita, Noboru

    2003-02-07

    An optically active 1,2-homoheptafulvalene was successfully synthesized and subjected to spectroscopic investigation. The cycloaddition of the optically active hydrocarbon with tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) and 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione(PTAD) gave a [4 + 2] cycloadduct and a mixture of [8 + 2] cycloadducts, respectively, which are both optically active.

  20. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  1. Structure of Arabidopsis thaliana 5-methylthioribose kinase reveals a more occluded active site than its bacterial homolog

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Shao-Yang; Cornell, Kenneth A; Howell, P Lynne

    2007-01-01

    Background Metabolic variations exist between the methionine salvage pathway of humans and a number of plants and microbial pathogens. 5-Methylthioribose (MTR) kinase is a key enzyme required for methionine salvage in plants and many bacteria. The absence of a mammalian homolog suggests that MTR kinase is a good target for the design of specific herbicides or antibiotics. Results The structure of Arabidopsis thaliana MTR kinase co-crystallized with ATPγS and MTR has been determined at 1.9 Å resolution. The structure is similar to B. subtilis MTR kinase and has the same protein kinase fold observed in other evolutionarily related protein kinase-like phosphotransferases. The active site is comparable between the two enzymes with the DXE-motif coordinating the nucleotide-Mg, the D238 of the HGD catalytic loop polarizing the MTR O1 oxygen, and the RR-motif interacting with the substrate MTR. Unlike its bacterial homolog, however, the Gly-rich loop (G-loop) of A. thaliana MTR kinase has an extended conformation, which shields most of the active site from solvent, a feature that resembles eukaryotic protein kinases more than the bacterial enzyme. The G- and W-loops of A. thaliana and B. subtilis MTR kinase adopt different conformations despite high sequence similarity. The ATPγS analog was hydrolyzed during the co-crystallization procedure, resulting in ADP in the active site. This suggests that the A. thaliana enzyme, like its bacterial homolog, may have significant ATPase activity in the absence of MTR. Conclusion The structure of A. thaliana MTR kinase provides a template for structure-based design of agrochemicals, particularly herbicides whose effectiveness could be regulated by nutrient levels. Features of the MTR binding site offer an opportunity for a simple organic salt of an MTR analog to specifically inhibit MTR kinase. PMID:17961230

  2. Structure of Arabidopsis thaliana 5-methylthioribose Kinase Reveals a More Occluded Active Site Than its Bacterial Homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Ku,S.; Cornell, K.; Howell, P.

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic variations exist between the methionine salvage pathway of humans and a number of plants and microbial pathogens. 5-Methylthioribose (MTR) kinase is a key enzyme required for methionine salvage in plants and many bacteria. The absence of a mammalian homolog suggests that MTR kinase is a good target for the design of specific herbicides or antibiotics. The structure of Arabidopsis thaliana MTR kinase co-crystallized with ATP?S and MTR has been determined at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The structure is similar to B. subtilis MTR kinase and has the same protein kinase fold observed in other evolutionarily related protein kinase-like phosphotransferases. The active site is comparable between the two enzymes with the DXE-motif coordinating the nucleotide-Mg, the D238 of the HGD catalytic loop polarizing the MTR O1 oxygen, and the RR-motif interacting with the substrate MTR. Unlike its bacterial homolog, however, the Gly-rich loop (G-loop) of A. thaliana MTR kinase has an extended conformation, which shields most of the active site from solvent, a feature that resembles eukaryotic protein kinases more than the bacterial enzyme. The G- and W-loops of A. thaliana and B. subtilis MTR kinase adopt different conformations despite high sequence similarity. The ATP?S analog was hydrolyzed during the co-crystallization procedure, resulting in ADP in the active site. This suggests that the A. thaliana enzyme, like its bacterial homolog, may have significant ATPase activity in the absence of MTR. The structure of A. thaliana MTR kinase provides a template for structure-based design of agrochemicals, particularly herbicides whose effectiveness could be regulated by nutrient levels. Features of the MTR binding site offer an opportunity for a simple organic salt of an MTR analog to specifically inhibit MTR kinase.

  3. Vitamin K epoxide reductase: homology, active site and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P

    2004-06-01

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) recycles reduced vitamin K, which is used subsequently as a co-factor in the gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid residues in blood coagulation enzymes. VKORC1, a subunit of the VKOR complex, has recently been shown to possess this activity. Here, we show that VKORC1 is a member of a large family of predicted enzymes that are present in vertebrates, Drosophila, plants, bacteria and archaea. Four cysteine residues and one residue, which is either serine or threonine, are identified as likely active-site residues. In some plant and bacterial homologues the VKORC1 homologous domain is fused with domains of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. These might reduce disulfide bonds of VKORC1-like enzymes as a prerequisite for their catalytic activities.

  4. NMR structure of the noncytotoxic α-sarcin mutant Δ(7-22): The importance of the native conformation of peripheral loops for activity

    PubMed Central

    García-Mayoral, Ma Flor; García-Ortega, Lucia; Lillo, Ma Pilar; Santoro, Jorge; Martínez Del Pozo, Álvaro; Gavilanes, José G.; Rico, Manuel; Bruix, Marta

    2004-01-01

    The deletion mutant Δ(7-22) of α-sarcin, unlike its wild-type protein counterpart, lacks the specific ability to degrade rRNA in intact ribosomes and exhibits an increased unspecific ribonuclease activity and decreased interaction with lipid vesicles. In trying to shed light on these differences, we report here on the three-dimensional structure of the Δ(7-22) α-sarcin mutant using NMR methods. We also evaluated its dynamic properties on the basis of theoretical models and measured its correlation time (6.2 nsec) by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. The global fold characteristic of ribotoxins is preserved in the mutant. The most significant differences with respect to the α-sarcin structure are concentrated in (1) loop 2, (2) loop 3, which adopts a new orientation, and (3) loop 5, which shows multiple conformations and an altered dynamics. The interactions between loop 5 and the N-terminal hairpin are lost in the mutant, producing increased solvent accessibility of the active-site residues. The degree of solvent exposure of the catalytic His 137 is similar to that shown by His 92 in RNase T1. Additionally, the calculated order parameters of residues belonging to loop 5 in the mutant correspond to an internal dynamic behavior more similar to RNase T1 than α-sarcin. On the other hand, changes in the relative orientation of loop 3 move the lysine-rich region 111–114, crucial for substrate recognition, away from the active site. All of the structural and dynamic data presented here reveal that the mutant is a hybrid of ribotoxins and noncytotoxic ribonucleases, consistent with its biological properties. PMID:15044731

  5. Correlation of Conformational Changes and Protein Degradation with Loss of Lysozyme Activity Due to Chlorine Dioxide Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Beng Guat; Branning, Sharon Alyssa

    2016-12-13

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a potent oxidizing agent used for the treatment of drinking water and decontamination of facilities and equipment. The purpose of this research is to elucidate the manner in which ClO2 destroys proteins by studying the effects of ClO2 on lysozyme. The degree of enzyme activity lost can be correlated to the treatment time and levels of the ClO2 used. Lysozyme activity was drastically reduced to 45.3% of original enzyme activity when exposed to 4.3 mM ClO2 in the sample after 3 h. Almost all activities were lost in 3 h after exposure to higher ClO2 concentrations of up to 16.8 and 21.9 mM. Changes in protein conformation and amount as a result of ClO2 treatment were determined using the Raman spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis. Raman shifts and the alteration of spectral features observed in the ClO2-treated lysozyme samples are associated with loss of the α-helix secondary structure, tertiary structure, and disulfide bond. Progressive degradation of the denatured lysozyme by increasing levels of chlorine dioxide was also observed in gel electrophoresis. Hence, ClO2 can effectively cause protein denaturation and degradation resulting in loss of enzyme activity.

  6. A spectroscopic investigation on the interaction of a magnetic ferrofluid with a model plasma protein: effect on the conformation and activity of the protein.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bijan Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Kaustav; Bose, Subhrangsu; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2012-11-28

    The understanding of the interaction of nanomaterials with relevant biological targets e.g., proteins is of paramount importance in biological and pharmaceutical fields of research. In a biological fluid, proteins can associate with nanomaterials which can subsequently exert a significant impact on the conformation and functionality of the protein. Here we report the binding interaction of a model plasma protein Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) with a magnetic nanoparticle of mixed spinel origin (Ni(0.5)Zn(0.5)Fe(2)O(4), abbreviated as NZFO from now and onwards). The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS and ΔG) for the protein-nanoparticle binding interaction have been evaluated from the van't Hoff equation to unveil that the binding interaction is enthalpically as well as entropically driven (ΔH < 0 and ΔS > 0), with an overall favorable Gibbs free energy change (ΔG < 0). Also the thermodynamic parameters delineate the predominant role of electrostatic interaction in the BSA-NZFO binding process. The results of temperature dependent fluorescence quenching and time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements indicate a static quenching mechanism in the present case. Steady-state absorption, synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques have been employed to unveil the conformational changes in BSA induced by the binding of NZFO. Disruption of the native conformation of the protein upon binding with NZFO is reflected through a reduced functionality (in terms of esterase activity) of the protein-NZFO conjugate system in comparison to the native protein. Based on the experimental findings the probable binding location of NZFO is argued to be the hydrophilic domain IB. This seems physically realizable since domain I of BSA is characterized by a net negative charge and hence can serve as a favorable binding site for NZFO carrying a positive surface charge. The key role of electrostatic forces in the BSA

  7. General Conformity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The General Conformity requirements ensure that the actions taken by federal agencies in nonattainment and maintenance areas do not interfere with a state’s plans to meet national standards for air quality.

  8. Conformal Infinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauendiener, Jörg

    2004-12-01

    The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, "conformal infinity" is related to almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved from physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory of gravitation, and how it lends itself very naturally to the solution of radiation problems in numerical relativity. The fundamental concept of null-infinity is introduced. Friedrich's regular conformal field equations are presented and various initial value problems for them are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the conformal field equations provide a very powerful method within numerical relativity to study global problems such as gravitational wave propagation and detection.

  9. The role of active site tyrosine 58 in Citrobacter freundii methionine γ-lyase.

    PubMed

    Anufrieva, Natalya V; Faleev, Nicolai G; Morozova, Elena A; Bazhulina, Natalia P; Revtovich, Svetlana V; Timofeev, Vladimir P; Tkachev, Yaroslav V; Nikulin, Alexei D; Demidkina, Tatyana V

    2015-09-01

    In the spatial structure of methionine γ-lyase (MGL, EC 4.4.1.11) from Citrobacter freundii, Tyr58 is located at H-bonding distance to the oxygen atom of the phosphate "handle" of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP). It was replaced for phenylalanine by site-directed mutagenesis. The X-ray structure of the mutant enzyme was determined at 1.96Å resolution. Comparison of spatial structures and absorption spectra of wild-type and mutant holoenzymes demonstrated that the replacement did not result in essential changes of the conformation of the active site Tyr58Phe MGL. The Kd value of PLP for Tyr58Phe MGL proved to be comparable to the Kd value for the wild-type enzyme. The replacement led to a decrease of catalytic efficiencies in both γ- and β-elimination reactions of about two orders of magnitude as compared to those for the wild-type enzyme. The rates of exchange of C-α- and C-β- protons of inhibitors in D2O catalyzed by the mutant form are comparable with those for the wild-type enzyme. Spectral data on the complexes of the mutant form with the substrates and inhibitors showed that the replacement led to a change of rate the limiting step of the physiological reaction. The results allowed us to conclude that Tyr58 is involved in an optimal positioning of the active site Lys210 at some stages of γ- and β-elimination reactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications.

  10. A divalent cation stabilizes the active conformation of the B. subtilis RNase P x pre-tRNA complex: a role for an inner-sphere metal ion in RNase P.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, John; Koutmou, Kristin S; Rueda, David; Koutmos, Markos; Walter, Nils G; Fierke, Carol A

    2010-07-02

    Metal ions interact with RNA to enhance folding, stabilize structure, and, in some cases, facilitate catalysis. Assigning functional roles to specifically bound metal ions presents a major challenge in analyzing the catalytic mechanisms of ribozymes. Bacillus subtilis ribonuclease P (RNase P), composed of a catalytically active RNA subunit (PRNA) and a small protein subunit (P protein), catalyzes the 5'-end maturation of precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs). Inner-sphere coordination of divalent metal ions to PRNA is essential for catalytic activity but not for the formation of the RNase P x pre-tRNA (enzyme-substrate, ES) complex. Previous studies have demonstrated that this ES complex undergoes an essential conformational change (to the ES* conformer) before the cleavage step. Here, we show that the ES* conformer is stabilized by a high-affinity divalent cation capable of inner-sphere coordination, such as Ca(II) or Mg(II). Additionally, a second, lower-affinity Mg(II) activates cleavage catalyzed by RNase P. Structural changes that occur upon binding Ca(II) to the ES complex were determined by time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer measurements of the distances between donor-acceptor fluorophores introduced at specific locations on the P protein and pre-tRNA 5' leader. These data demonstrate that the 5' leader of pre-tRNA moves 4 to 6 A closer to the PRNA x P protein interface during the ES-to-ES* transition and suggest that the metal-dependent conformational change reorganizes the bound substrate in the active site to form a catalytically competent ES* complex.

  11. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  12. Temperature-induced conformational change at the catalytic site of Sulfolobus solfataricus alcohol dehydrogenase highlighted by Asn249Tyr substitution. A hydrogen/deuterium exchange, kinetic, and fluorescence quenching study.

    PubMed

    Secundo, Francesco; Russo, Consiglia; Giordano, Antonietta; Carrea, Giacomo; Rossi, Mosè; Raia, Carlo A

    2005-08-23

    A combination of hydrogen/deuterium exchange, fluorescence quenching, and kinetic studies was used to acquire experimental evidence for the crystallographically hypothesized increase in local flexibility which occurs in thermophilic NAD(+)-dependent Sulfolobus solfataricus alcohol dehydrogenase (SsADH) upon substitution Asn249Tyr. The substitution, located at the adenine-binding site, proved to decrease the affinity for both coenzyme and substrate, rendering the mutant enzyme 6-fold more active when compared to the wild-type enzyme [Esposito et al. (2003) FEBS Lett. 539, 14-18]. The amide H/D exchange data show that the wild-type and mutant enzymes have similar global flexibility at 22 and 60 degrees C. However, the temperature dependence of the Stern-Volmer constant determined by acrylamide quenching shows that the increase in temperature affects the local flexibility differently, since the K(SV) increment is significantly higher for the wild-type than for the mutant enzyme over the range 18-45 degrees C. Interestingly, the corresponding van't Hoff plot (log K(SV) vs 1/T) proves nonlinear for the apo and holo wild-type and apo mutant enzymes, with a break at approximately 45 degrees C in all three cases due to a conformational change affecting the tryptophan microenvironment experienced by the quencher molecules. The Arrhenius and van't Hoff plots derived from the k(cat) and K(M) thermodependence measured with cyclohexanol and NAD(+) at different temperatures display an abrupt change of slope at 45-50 degrees C. This proves more pronounced in the case of the mutant enzyme compared to the wild-type enzyme due to a conformational change in the structure rather than to an overlapping of two or more rate-limiting reaction steps with different temperature dependencies of their rate constants. Three-dimensional analysis indicates that the observed conformational change induced by temperature is associated with the flexible loops directly involved in the substrate and

  13. Crystal structure of a member of a novel family of dioxygenases (PF10014) reveals a conserved cupin fold and active site

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Grant, Joanna; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Farr, Carol L.; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Lesley, Scott A.; Godzik, Adam; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    PF10014 is a novel family of 2-oxyglutarate-Fe2+-dependent dioxygenases that are involved in biosynthesis of antibiotics and regulation of biofilm formation, likely by catalyzing hydroxylation of free amino acids or other related ligands. The crystal structure of a PF10014 member from Methylibium petroleiphilum at 1.9 Å resolution shows strong structural similarity to cupin dioxygenases in overall fold and active site, despite very remote homology. However, one of the β-strands of the cupin catalytic core is replaced by a loop that displays conformational isomerism that likely regulates the active site. PMID:23852666

  14. Crystal structure of a member of a novel family of dioxygenases (PF10014) reveals a conserved cupin fold and active site.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingping; Grant, Joanna; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Farr, Carol L; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W; Miller, Mitchell D; Lesley, Scott A; Godzik, Adam; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M; Wilson, Ian A

    2014-01-01

    PF10014 is a novel family of 2-oxyglutarate-Fe(2+) -dependent dioxygenases that are involved in biosynthesis of antibiotics and regulation of biofilm formation, likely by catalyzing hydroxylation of free amino acids or other related ligands. The crystal structure of a PF10014 member from Methylibium petroleiphilum at 1.9 Å resolution shows strong structural similarity to cupin dioxygenases in overall fold and active site, despite very remote homology. However, one of the β-strands of the cupin catalytic core is replaced by a loop that displays conformational isomerism that likely regulates the active site.

  15. Heparanase Activates Antithrombin through the Binding to Its Heparin Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Águila, Sonia; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that participates in morphogenesis, tissue repair, heparan sulphates turnover and immune response processes. It is over-expressed in tumor cells favoring the metastasis as it penetrates the endothelial layer that lines blood vessels and facilitates the metastasis by degradation of heparan sulphate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix. Heparanase may also affect the hemostatic system in a non-enzymatic manner, up-regulating the expression of tissue factor, which is the initiator of blood coagulation, and dissociating tissue factor pathway inhibitor on the cell surface membrane of endothelial and tumor cells, thus resulting in a procoagulant state. Trying to check the effect of heparanase on heparin, a highly sulphated glycosaminoglycan, when it activates antithrombin, our results demonstrated that heparanase, but not proheparanase, interacted directly with antithrombin in a non-covalent manner. This interaction resulted in the activation of antithrombin, which is the most important endogenous anticoagulant. This activation mainly accelerated FXa inhibition, supporting an allosteric activation effect. Heparanase bound to the heparin binding site of antithrombin as the activation of Pro41Leu, Arg47Cys, Lys114Ala and Lys125Alaantithrombin mutants was impaired when it was compared to wild type antithrombin. Intrinsic fluorescence analysis showed that heparanase induced an activating conformational change in antithrombin similar to that induced by heparin and with a KD of 18.81 pM. In conclusion, under physiological pH and low levels of tissue factor, heparanase may exert a non-enzymatic function interacting and activating the inhibitory function of antithrombin. PMID:27322195

  16. Molecular dynamics studies unravel role of conserved residues responsible for movement of ions into active site of DHBPS

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Ranajit Nivrutti; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Singh, Balvinder

    2017-01-01

    3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase (DHBPS) catalyzes the conversion of D-ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru5P) to L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate in the presence of Mg2+. Although crystal structures of DHBPS in complex with Ru5P and non-catalytic metal ions have been reported, structure with Ru5P along with Mg2+ is still elusive. Therefore, mechanistic role played by Mg2+ in the structure of DHBPS is poorly understood. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations of DHBPS-Ru5P complex along with Mg2+ have shown entry of Mg2+ from bulk solvent into active site. Presence of Mg2+ in active site has constrained conformations of Ru5P and has reduced flexibility of loop-2. Formation of hydrogen bonds among Thr-108 and residues - Gly-109, Val-110, Ser-111, and Asp-114 are found to be critical for entry of Mg2+ into active site. Subsequent in silico mutations of residues, Thr-108 and Asp-114 have substantiated the importance of these interactions. Loop-4 of one monomer is being proposed to act as a “lid” covering the active site of other monomer. Further, the conserved nature of residues taking part in the transfer of Mg2+ suggests the same mechanism being present in DHBPS of other microorganisms. Thus, this study provides insights into the functioning of DHBPS that can be used for the designing of inhibitors. PMID:28079168

  17. Molecular dynamics studies unravel role of conserved residues responsible for movement of ions into active site of DHBPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Ranajit Nivrutti; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Singh, Balvinder

    2017-01-01

    3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase (DHBPS) catalyzes the conversion of D-ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru5P) to L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate in the presence of Mg2+. Although crystal structures of DHBPS in complex with Ru5P and non-catalytic metal ions have been reported, structure with Ru5P along with Mg2+ is still elusive. Therefore, mechanistic role played by Mg2+ in the structure of DHBPS is poorly understood. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations of DHBPS-Ru5P complex along with Mg2+ have shown entry of Mg2+ from bulk solvent into active site. Presence of Mg2+ in active site has constrained conformations of Ru5P and has reduced flexibility of loop-2. Formation of hydrogen bonds among Thr-108 and residues - Gly-109, Val-110, Ser-111, and Asp-114 are found to be critical for entry of Mg2+ into active site. Subsequent in silico mutations of residues, Thr-108 and Asp-114 have substantiated the importance of these interactions. Loop-4 of one monomer is being proposed to act as a “lid” covering the active site of other monomer. Further, the conserved nature of residues taking part in the transfer of Mg2+ suggests the same mechanism being present in DHBPS of other microorganisms. Thus, this study provides insights into the functioning of DHBPS that can be used for the designing of inhibitors.

  18. Role of a cysteine residue in the active site of ERK and the MAPKK family

    SciTech Connect

    Ohori, Makoto; Kinoshita, Takayoshi; Yoshimura, Seiji; Warizaya, Masaichi; Nakajima, Hidenori . E-mail: hidenori.nakajima@jp.astellas.com; Miyake, Hiroshi

    2007-02-16

    Kinases of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, including extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), represent likely targets for pharmacological intervention in proliferative diseases. Here, we report that FR148083 inhibits ERK2 enzyme activity and TGF{beta}-induced AP-1-dependent luciferase expression with respective IC{sub 50} values of 0.08 and 0.05 {mu}M. FR265083 (1'-2' dihydro form) and FR263574 (1'-2' and 7'-8' tetrahydro form) exhibited 5.5-fold less and no activity, respectively, indicating that both the {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated ketone and the conformation of the lactone ring contribute to this inhibitory activity. The X-ray crystal structure of the ERK2/FR148083 complex revealed that the compound binds to the ATP binding site of ERK2, involving a covalent bond to S{gamma} of ERK2 Cys166, hydrogen bonds with the backbone NH of Met108, N{zeta} of Lys114, backbone C=O of Ser153, N{delta}2 of Asn154, and hydrophobic interactions with the side chains of Ile31, Val39, Ala52, and Leu156. The covalent bond motif in the ERK2/FR148083 complex assures that the inhibitor has high activity for ERK2 and no activity for other MAPKs such as JNK1 and p38MAPK{alpha}/{beta}/{gamma}/{delta} which have leucine residues at the site corresponding to Cys166 in ERK2. On the other hand, MEK1 and MKK7, kinases of the MAPKK family which also can be inhibited by FR148083, contain a cysteine residue corresponding to Cys166 of ERK2. The covalent binding to the common cysteine residue in the ATP-binding site is therefore likely to play a crucial role in the inhibitory activity for these MAP kinases. These findings on the molecular recognition mechanisms of FR148083 for kinases with Cys166 should provide a novel strategy for the pharmacological intervention of MAPK cascades.

  19. QM/MM modelling of ketosteroid isomerase reactivity indicates that active site closure is integral to catalysis.

    PubMed

    van der Kamp, Marc W; Chaudret, Robin; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2013-07-01

    Ketosteroid isomerase (Δ⁵-3-keto steroid isomerase or steroid Δ-isomerase) is a highly efficient enzyme at the centre of current debates on enzyme catalysis. We have modelled the reaction mechanism of the isomerization of 3-oxo-Δ⁵-steroids into their Δ⁴-conjugated isomers using high-level combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods, and semi-empirical QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations. Energy profiles were obtained at various levels of QM theory (AM1, B3LYP and SCS-MP2). The high-level QM/MM profile is consistent with experimental data. QM/MM dynamics simulations indicate that active site closure and desolvation of the catalytic Asp38 occur before or during formation of dienolate intermediates. These changes have a significant effect on the reaction barrier. A low barrier to reaction is found only when the active site is closed, poising it for catalysis. This conformational change is thus integral to the whole process. The effects on the barrier are apparently largely due to changes in solvation. The combination of high-level QM/MM energy profiles and QM/MM dynamics simulation shows that the reaction involves active site closure, desolvation of the catalytic base, efficient isomerization and re-opening of the active site. These changes highlight the transition between the ligand binding/releasing form and the catalytic form of the enzyme. The results demonstrate that electrostatic interactions (as a consequence of pre-organization of the active site) are crucial for stabilization during the chemical reaction step, but closure of the active site is essential for efficient catalysis to occur.

  20. Target-classification approach applied to active UXO sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Shamatava, Irma; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study is designed to illustrate the discrimination performance at two UXO active sites (Oklahoma's Fort Sill and the Massachusetts Military Reservation) of a set of advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) inversion/discrimination models which include the orthonormalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS), joint diagonalization (JD), and differential evolution (DE) approaches and whose power and flexibility greatly exceed those of the simple dipole model. The Fort Sill site is highly contaminated by a mix of the following types of munitions: 37-mm target practice tracers, 60-mm illumination mortars, 75-mm and 4.5'' projectiles, 3.5'', 2.36'', and LAAW rockets, antitank mine fuzes with and without hex nuts, practice MK2 and M67 grenades, 2.5'' ballistic windshields, M2A1-mines with/without bases, M19-14 time fuzes, and 40-mm practice grenades with/without cartridges. The site at the MMR site contains targets of yet different sizes. In this work we apply our models to EMI data collected using the MetalMapper (MM) and 2 × 2 TEMTADS sensors. The data for each anomaly are inverted to extract estimates of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters associated with each buried target. (The latter include the total volume magnetic source or NVMS, which relates to size, shape, and material properties; the former includes location, depth, and orientation). The estimated intrinsic parameters are then used for classification performed via library matching and the use of statistical classification algorithms; this process yielded prioritized dig-lists that were submitted to the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) for independent scoring. The models' classification performance is illustrated and assessed based on these independent evaluations.

  1. Automated docking of alpha-(1-->4)- and alpha-(1-->6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides and maltopentaose into the soybean beta-amylase active site.

    PubMed

    Rockey, W M; Laederach, A; Reilly, P J

    2000-08-01

    The Lamarckian genetic algorithm of AutoDock 3.0 was used to dock alpha-maltotriose, methyl alpha-panoside, methyl alpha-isopanoside, methyl alpha-isomaltotrioside, methyl alpha-(6(1)-alpha-glucopyranosyl)-maltoside, and alpha-maltopentaose into the closed and, except for alpha-maltopentaose, into the open conformation of the soybean beta-amylase active site. In the closed conformation, the hinged flap at the mouth of the active site closes over the substrate. The nonreducing end of alpha-maltotriose docks preferentially to subsites -2 or +1, the latter yielding nonproductive binding. Some ligands dock into less optimal conformations with the nonreducing end at subsite -1. The reducing-end glucosyl residue of nonproductively-bound alpha-maltotriose is close to residue Gln194, which likely contributes to binding to subsite +3. In the open conformation, the substrate hydrogen-bonds with several residues of the open flap. When the flap closes, the substrate productively docks if the nonreducing end is near subsites -2 or -1. Trisaccharides with alpha-(1-->6) bonds do not successfully dock except for methyl alpha-isopanoside, whose first and second glucosyl rings dock exceptionally well into subsites -2 and -1. The alpha-(1-->6) bond between the second and third glucosyl units causes the latter to be improperly positioned into subsite +1; the fact that isopanose is not a substrate of beta-amylase indicates that binding to this subsite is critical for hydrolysis.

  2. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Altering Pollen Soluble Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Deborah J; Haque, Tamanna; Tudor, Richard L; Barron, Yoshimi; Zampronio, Cleidiane G; Cotton, Nicholas P J; de Graaf, Barend H J; White, Scott A; Cooper, Helen J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Harper, Jeffery F; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2017-03-01

    Protein phosphorylation regulates numerous cellular processes. Identifying the substrates and protein kinases involved is vital to understand how these important posttranslational modifications modulate biological function in eukaryotic cells. Pyrophosphatases catalyze the hydrolysis of inorganic phosphate (PPi) to inorganic phosphate Pi, driving biosynthetic reactions; they are essential for low cytosolic inorganic phosphate. It was suggested recently that posttranslational regulation of Family I soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (sPPases) may affect their activity. We previously demonstrated that two pollen-expressed sPPases, Pr-p26.1a and Pr-p26.1b, from the flowering plant Papaver rhoeas were inhibited by phosphorylation. Despite the potential significance, there is a paucity of data on sPPase phosphorylation and regulation. Here, we used liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry to map phosphorylation sites to the otherwise divergent amino-terminal extensions on these pollen sPPases. Despite the absence of reports in the literature on mapping phosphorylation sites on sPPases, a database survey of various proteomes identified a number of examples, suggesting that phosphorylation may be a more widely used mechanism to regulate these enzymes. Phosphomimetic mutants of Pr-p26.1a/b significantly and differentially reduced PPase activities by up to 2.5-fold at pH 6.8 and 52% in the presence of Ca(2+) and hydrogen peroxide over unmodified proteins. This indicates that phosphoregulation of key sites can inhibit the catalytic responsiveness of these proteins in concert with key intracellular events. As sPPases are essential for many metabolic pathways in eukaryotic cells, our findings identify the phosphorylation of sPPases as a potential master regulatory mechanism that could be used to attenuate metabolism.

  3. First Principles Computational Study of the Active Site of Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Ivaylo; Klien, Micheal

    2004-01-14

    Ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to investigate the structural features of the active site of the binuclear enzyme rat liver arginase. Special emphasis was placed on the crucial role of the second shell ligand interactions. These interactions were systematically studied by performing calculations on models of varying size. It was determined that a water molecule, and not hydroxide, is the bridging exogenous ligand. The carboxylate ligands facilitate the close approach of the Mn (II) ions by attenuating the metal-metal electrostatic repulsion. Of the two metals, MnA was shown to carry a larger positive charge. Analysis of the electronic properties of the active site revealed that orbitals involving the terminal Asp234 residue, as well as the flexible -1,1 bridging Asp232, lie at high energies, suggesting weaker coordination. This is reflected in certain structural variability present in our models and is also consistent with recent experimental findings. Finally, implications of our findings for the biological function of the enzyme are delineated.

  4. Kinetics of Hydrogen Atom Abstraction from Substrate by an Active Site Thiyl Radical in Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides in all organisms. Active E. coli class Ia RNR is an α2β2 complex that undergoes reversible, long-range proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) over a pathway of redox active amino acids (β-Y122 → [β-W48] → β-Y356 → α-Y731 → α-Y730 → α-C439) that spans ∼35 Å. To unmask PCET kinetics from rate-limiting conformational changes, we prepared a photochemical RNR containing a [ReI] photooxidant site-specifically incorporated at position 355 ([Re]-β2), adjacent to PCET pathway residue Y356 in β. [Re]-β2 was further modified by replacing Y356 with 2,3,5-trifluorotyrosine to enable photochemical generation and spectroscopic observation of chemically competent tyrosyl radical(s). Using transient absorption spectroscopy, we compare the kinetics of Y· decay in the presence of substrate and wt-α2, Y731F-α2 ,or C439S-α2, as well as with 3′-[2H]-substrate and wt-α2. We find that only in the presence of wt-α2 and the unlabeled substrate do we observe an enhanced rate of radical decay indicative of forward radical propagation. This observation reveals that cleavage of the 3′-C–H bond of substrate by the transiently formed C439· thiyl radical is rate-limiting in forward PCET through α and has allowed calculation of a lower bound for the rate constant associated with this step of (1.4 ± 0.4) × 104 s–1. Prompting radical propagation with light has enabled observation of PCET events heretofore inaccessible, revealing active site chemistry at the heart of RNR catalysis. PMID:25353063

  5. Perspective: pre-chemistry conformational changes in DNA polymerase mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Karunesh; Beard, William A.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2012-01-01

    In recent papers, there has been a lively exchange concerning theories for enzyme catalysis, especially the role of protein dynamics/pre-chemistry conformational changes in the catalytic cycle of enzymes. Of particular interest is the notion that substrate-induced conformational changes that assemble the polymerase active site prior to chemistry are required for DNA synthesis and impact fidelity (i.e., substrate specificity). High-resolution crystal structures of DNA polymerase β representing intermediates of substrate complexes prior to the chemical step are available. These structures indicate that conformational adjustments in both the protein and substrates must occur to achieve the requisite geometry of the reactive participants for catalysis. We discuss computational and kinetic methods to examine possible conformational change pathways that lead from the observed crystal structure intermediates to the final structures poised for chemistry. The results, as well as kinetic data from site-directed mutagenesis studies, are consistent with models requiring pre-chemistry conformational adjustments in order to achieve high fidelity DNA synthesis. Thus, substrate-induced conformational changes that assemble the polymerase active site prior to chemistry contribute to DNA synthesis even when they do not represent actual rate-determining steps for chemistry. PMID:23459563

  6. The surfactant-induced conformational and activity alterations in Rhizopus niveus lipase.

    PubMed

    Alam, Parvez; Rabbani, Gulam; Badr, Gamal; Badr, Badr Mohamed; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we have reported the effect of nonionic, anionic, cationic, and zwitterionic detergents on the enzymatic activity and structural stability of Rhizopus niveus lipase. Secondary structural changes were monitored by Far-UV CD which shows that surfactant induces helicity in the Rhizopus niveus lipase protein which was maximum in case of CTAB followed by SDS, CHAPS, and Brij-35. Similarly, tertiary structural changes were monitored by tryptophan fluorescence. We also carried out enzyme kinetics assays which showed that activity was enhanced by 1.5- and 1.1-fold in the presence of CHAPS and Brij-35, respectively. Furthermore, there was a decline in activity by 20 and 30 % in case of SDS and CTAB, respectively. These studies may be helpful in understanding detergent-lipase interaction in greater detail as lipases are used in many industrial processes.

  7. C-H Activation on Co,O Sites: Isolated Surface Sites versus Molecular Analogs.

    PubMed

    Estes, Deven P; Siddiqi, Georges; Allouche, Florian; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Safonova, Olga V; Trigub, Alexander L; Koptyug, Igor V; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-11-16

    The activation and conversion of hydrocarbons is one of the most important challenges in chemistry. Transition-metal ions (V, Cr, Fe, Co, etc.) isolated on silica surfaces are known to catalyze such processes. The mechanisms of these processes are currently unknown but are thought to involve C-H activation as the rate-determining step. Here, we synthesize well-defined Co(II) ions on a silica surface using a metal siloxide precursor followed by thermal treatment under vacuum at 500 °C. We show that these isolated Co(II) sites are catalysts for a number of hydrocarbon conversion reactions, such as the dehydrogenation of propane, the hydrogenation of propene, and the trimerization of terminal alkynes. We then investigate the mechanisms of these processes using kinetics, kinetic isotope effects, isotopic labeling experiments, parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) NMR, and comparison with a molecular analog. The data are consistent with all of these reactions occurring by a common mechanism, involving heterolytic C-H or H-H activation via a 1,2 addition across a Co-O bond.

  8. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  9. Protein Conformational Populations and Functionally Relevant Sub-states

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Pratul K; Burger, Virginia; Savol, Andrej; Ramanathan, Arvind; Chennubhotla, Chakra

    2013-01-01

    it to attain the transition state, therefore promoting the reaction mechanism. In the long term, this emerging view of proteins with conformational substates has broad implications for improving our understanding of enzymes, enzyme engineering, and better drug design. Researchers have already used photoactivation to modulate protein conformations as a strategy to develop a hypercatalytic enzyme. In addition, the alteration of the conformational substates through binding of ligands at locations other than the active site provides the basis for the design of new medicines through allosteric modulation.

  10. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  11. Conformational changes in a hyperthermostable glycoside hydrolase: enzymatic activity is a consequence of the loop dynamics and protonation balance.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Leandro C; da Silva, Viviam M; Colussi, Francieli; Cabral, Aline D; de Oliveira Neto, Mario; Squina, Fabio M; Garcia, Wanius

    2015-01-01

    Endo-β-1, 4-mannanase from Thermotoga petrophila (TpMan) is a modular hyperthermostable enzyme involved in the degradation of mannan-containing polysaccharides. The degradation of these polysaccharides represents a key step for several industrial applications. Here, as part of a continuing investigation of TpMan, the region corresponding to the GH5 domain (TpManGH5) was characterized as a function of pH and temperature. The results indicated that the enzymatic activity of the TpManGH5 is pH-dependent, with its optimum activity occurring at pH 6. At pH 8, the studies demonstrated that TpManGH5 is a molecule with a nearly spherical tightly packed core displaying negligible flexibility in solution, and with size and shape very similar to crystal structure. However, TpManGH5 experiences an increase in radius of gyration in acidic conditions suggesting expansion of the molecule. Furthermore, at acidic pH values, TpManGH5 showed a less globular shape, probably due to a loop region slightly more expanded and flexible in solution (residues Y88 to A105). In addition, molecular dynamics simulations indicated that conformational changes caused by pH variation did not change the core of the TpManGH5, which means that only the above mentioned loop region presents high degree of fluctuations. The results also suggested that conformational changes of the loop region may facilitate polysaccharide and enzyme interaction. Finally, at pH 6 the results indicated that TpManGH5 is slightly more flexible at 65°C when compared to the same enzyme at 20°C. The biophysical characterization presented here is well correlated with the enzymatic activity and provide new insight into the structural basis for the temperature and pH-dependent activity of the TpManGH5. Also, the data suggest a loop region that provides a starting point for a rational design of biotechnological desired features.

  12. Conformational Changes in a Hyperthermostable Glycoside Hydrolase: Enzymatic Activity Is a Consequence of the Loop Dynamics and Protonation Balance

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Leandro C.; da Silva, Viviam M.; Colussi, Francieli; Cabral, Aline D.; de Oliveira Neto, Mario; Squina, Fabio M.; Garcia, Wanius

    2015-01-01

    Endo-β-1, 4-mannanase from Thermotoga petrophila (TpMan) is a modular hyperthermostable enzyme involved in the degradation of mannan-containing polysaccharides. The degradation of these polysaccharides represents a key step for several industrial applications. Here, as part of a continuing investigation of TpMan, the region corresponding to the GH5 domain (TpManGH5) was characterized as a function of pH and temperature. The results indicated that the enzymatic activity of the TpManGH5 is pH-dependent, with its optimum activity occurring at pH 6. At pH 8, the studies demonstrated that TpManGH5 is a molecule with a nearly spherical tightly packed core displaying negligible flexibility in solution, and with size and shape very similar to crystal structure. However, TpManGH5 experiences an increase in radius of gyration in acidic conditions suggesting expansion of the molecule. Furthermore, at acidic pH values, TpManGH5 showed a less globular shape, probably due to a loop region slightly more expanded and flexible in solution (residues Y88 to A105). In addition, molecular dynamics simulations indicated that conformational changes caused by pH variation did not change the core of the TpManGH5, which means that only the above mentioned loop region presents high degree of fluctuations. The results also suggested that conformational changes of the loop region may facilitate polysaccharide and enzyme interaction. Finally, at pH 6 the results indicated that TpManGH5 is slightly more flexible at 65°C when compared to the same enzyme at 20°C. The biophysical characterization presented here is well correlated with the enzymatic activity and provide new insight into the structural basis for the temperature and pH-dependent activity of the TpManGH5. Also, the data suggest a loop region that provides a starting point for a rational design of biotechnological desired features. PMID:25723179

  13. Detailed conformation dynamics and activation process of wild type c-Abl and T315I mutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Jun; Zhao, Wen-Hua; Liu, Qian

    2014-10-01

    Bcr-Abl is an important target for therapy against chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). The synergistic effect between myristyl pocket and the ATP pocket has been found. But its detailed information based on molecular level still has not been achieved. In this study, conventional molecular dynamics (CMD) and target molecular dynamics (TMD) simulations were performed to explore the effect of T315I mutation on dynamics and activation process of Abl containing the N-terminal cap (Ncap). The CMD simulation results reveal the increasing flexibility of ATP pocket in kinase domain (KD) after T315I mutation which confirms the disability of ATP-pocket inhibitors to the Abl-T315I mutant. On the contrary, the T315I mutation decreased the flexibility of remote helix αI which suggests the synergistic effect between them. The mobility of farther regions containing Ncap, SH3, SH2 and SH2-KD linker were not affected by T315I mutation. The TMD simulation results show that the activation process of wild type Abl and Abl-T315I mutant experienced global conformation change. Their differences were elucidated by the activation motion of subsegments including A-loop, P-loop and Ncap. Besides, the T315I mutation caused decreasing energy barrier and increasing intermediate number in activation process, which results easier activation process. The TMD and CMD results indicate that a drug targeting only the ATP pocket is not enough to inhibit the Abl-T315I mutant. An effective way to inhibit the abnormal activity of Abl-T315I mutant is to combine the ATP-pocket inhibitors with inhibitors binding at non-ATP pockets mainly related to Ncap, SH2-KD linker and myristyl pocket.

  14. Substrate behavior of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is not associated with a lack of insertion of the reactive site loop.

    PubMed

    Gils, A; Knockaert, I; Declerck, P J

    1996-06-11

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a unique member of the serpin superfamily. In the present study, we have evaluated the effect of substitution, with a proline, at positions P5, P7, P14, P15, or P16, on the conformational flexibility and functional properties of PAI-1. These mutants (PAI-1-P5, IIe-->Pro at P5; PAI-1-P7, Ala-->Pro at P7; PAI-1-P14, Thr-->Pro at P14; PAI-1-P15, Gly-->Pro at P15; PAI-1-P16, Ser-->Pro at P16) were purified and fully characterized. WtPAI-1 had a specific activity of 68 +/- 10% (mean +/- SD, n = 6) whereas PAI-1-P5, PAI-1-P7, and PAI-1-P16 had specific activities of 34 +/- 9.3%, 42 +/- 10%, and 36 +/- 11%, respectively. PAI-1-P14 and PAI-1-P15 did not exhibit significant inhibitory activity. Conformational analysis revealed that wtPAI-1 preparations contained 12 +/- 2.0% substrate, whereas PAI-1-P5, PAI-1-P7, and PAI-1-P16 were characterized with a significantly (p < 0.001) increased substrate behavior (i.e., 43 +/- 6.1%, 42 +/- 1.5% and 22 +/- 1.7%, respectively). The inactive variants PAI-1-P14 and PAI-1-P15 behaved exclusively as substrates toward various serine proteinases. Heat denaturation studies revealed that cleavage of any noninhibitory substrate form of PAI-1 resulted in an insertion of the NH2-terminal side of the reactive site loop. Incubation with plasmin showed the presence of a unique plasmin cleavage site (Lys191-Ser192) exclusively present in all latent forms studied. We conclude that (a) the entire P5 to P16 region in PAI-1 plays an important role in the functional and conformational properties of PAI-1; (b) the substrate behavior of serpins is not associated with a lack of insertion of the reactive site loop; (c) the identification of a plasmin cleavage site in latent PAI-1 may provide new insights in the mechanisms for the inactivation of storage pools of PAI-1.

  15. Binding of 3,4,5,6-Tetrahydroxyazepanes to the Acid-[beta]-glucosidase Active Site: Implications for Pharmacological Chaperone Design for Gaucher Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Orwig, Susan D.; Tan, Yun Lei; Grimster, Neil P.; Yu, Zhanqian; Powers, Evan T.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Lieberman, Raquel L.

    2013-03-07

    Pharmacologic chaperoning is a therapeutic strategy being developed to improve the cellular folding and trafficking defects associated with Gaucher disease, a lysosomal storage disorder caused by point mutations in the gene encoding acid-{beta}-glucosidase (GCase). In this approach, small molecules bind to and stabilize mutant folded or nearly folded GCase in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), increasing the concentration of folded, functional GCase trafficked to the lysosome where the mutant enzyme can hydrolyze the accumulated substrate. To date, the pharmacologic chaperone (PC) candidates that have been investigated largely have been active site-directed inhibitors of GCase, usually containing five- or six-membered rings, such as modified azasugars. Here we show that a seven-membered, nitrogen-containing heterocycle (3,4,5,6-tetrahydroxyazepane) scaffold is also promising for generating PCs for GCase. Crystal structures reveal that the core azepane stabilizes GCase in a variation of its proposed active conformation, whereas binding of an analogue with an N-linked hydroxyethyl tail stabilizes GCase in a conformation in which the active site is covered, also utilizing a loop conformation not seen previously. Although both compounds preferentially stabilize GCase to thermal denaturation at pH 7.4, reflective of the pH in the ER, only the core azepane, which is a mid-micromolar competitive inhibitor, elicits a modest increase in enzyme activity for the neuronopathic G202R and the non-neuronopathic N370S mutant GCase in an intact cell assay. Our results emphasize the importance of the conformational variability of the GCase active site in the design of competitive inhibitors as PCs for Gaucher disease.

  16. Solution conformation of a peptide fragment representing a proposed RNA-binding site of a viral coat protein studied by two-dimensional NMR

    SciTech Connect

    van der Graaf, M.; van Mierlo, C.P.M.; Hemminga, M.A. )

    1991-06-11

    The first 25 amino acids of the coat protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus are essential for binding the encapsidated RNA. Although an {alpha}-helical conformation has been predicted for this highly positively charged N-terminal region. No experimental evidence for this conformation has been presented so far. In this study, two-dimensional proton NMR experiments were performed on a chemically synthesized pentacosapeptide containing the first 25 amino acids of this coat protein. All resonances could be assigned by a combined use of two-dimensional correlated spectroscopy and nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy carried out at four different temperatures. Various NMR parameters indicate the presence of a conformational ensemble consisting of helical structures rapidly converting into more extended states. Differences in chemical shifts and nuclear Overhauser effects indicate that lowering the temperature induces a shift of the dynamic equilibrium toward more helical structures. At 10{degrees}C, a perceptible fraction of the conformational ensemble consists of structures with an {alpha}-helical conformation between residues 9 and 17, likely starting with a turnlike structure around Thr9 and Arg10. Both the conformation and the position of this helical region agree well with the secondary structure predictions mentioned above.

  17. Conformational studies of peptides corresponding to the coeliac-activating regions of wheat alpha-gliadin.

    PubMed Central

    Tatham, A S; Marsh, M N; Wieser, H; Shewry, P R

    1990-01-01

    The structures of four peptides corresponding to parts of the coeliac-activating protein A-gliadin were studied by structure prediction and c.d. spectroscopy. Three of the peptides corresponded to parts of the coeliac-activating N-terminal region (residues 3-55, 3-19 and 39-45) and contained two tetrapeptide motifs common to all coeliac-active regions (Pro-Ser-Gln-Gln and Gln-Gln-Gln-Pro). The Pro-Ser-Gln-Gln sequence was also present in the fourth peptide, on the basis of the C-terminal part of the molecule (211-217). These studies showed that beta-reverse turns were the predominant structural feature in all peptides and were predominantly of type I/III in two of the N-terminal peptides and type II in the C-terminal peptide. These turns form when the peptide is dissolved in solvents of low dielectric constant (trifluoroethanol) and high dielectric constant (water and iso-osmotic saline), although their presence in the N-terminal peptides may be masked in the latter solvents due to equilibrium with a poly-L-proline II structure favoured at lower temperatures. PMID:2400392

  18. Characterization of the active site of ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munshi, C; Thiel, D J; Mathews, I I; Aarhus, R; Walseth, T F; Lee, H C

    1999-10-22

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase synthesizes two Ca(2+) messengers by cyclizing NAD to produce cyclic ADP-ribose and exchanging nicotinic acid with the nicotinamide group of NADP to produce nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Recombinant Aplysia cyclase was expressed in yeast and co-crystallized with a substrate, nicotinamide. x-ray crystallography showed that the nicotinamide was bound in a pocket formed in part by a conserved segment and was near the central cleft of the cyclase. Glu(98), Asn(107) and Trp(140) were within 3.5 A of the bound nicotinamide and appeared to coordinate it. Substituting Glu(98) with either Gln, Gly, Leu, or Asn reduced the cyclase activity by 16-222-fold, depending on the substitution. The mutant N107G exhibited only a 2-fold decrease in activity, while the activity of W140G was essentially eliminated. The base exchange activity of all mutants followed a similar pattern of reduction, suggesting that both reactions occur at the same active site. In addition to NAD, the wild-type cyclase also cyclizes nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide to cyclic GDP-ribose. All mutant enzymes had at least half of the GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity of the wild type, some even 2-3-fold higher, indicating that the three coordinating amino acids are responsible for positioning of the substrate but not absolutely critical for catalysis. To search for the catalytic residues, other amino acids in the binding pocket were mutagenized. E179G was totally devoid of GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity, and both its ADP-ribosyl cyclase and the base exchange activities were reduced by 10,000- and 18,000-fold, respectively. Substituting Glu(179) with either Asn, Leu, Asp, or Gln produced similar inactive enzymes, and so was the conversion of Trp(77) to Gly. However, both E179G and the double mutant E179G/W77G retained NAD-binding ability as shown by photoaffinity labeling with [(32)P]8-azido-NAD. These results indicate that both Glu(179) and Trp(77) are crucial for catalysis and

  19. The C-terminal region of the motor protein MCAK controls its structure and activity through a conformational switch.

    PubMed

    Talapatra, Sandeep K; Harker, Bethany; Welburn, Julie P I

    2015-04-27

    The precise regulation of microtubule dynamics is essential during cell division. The kinesin-13 motor protein MCAK is a potent microtubule depolymerase. The divergent non-motor regions flanking the ATPase domain are critical in regulating its targeting and activity. However, the molecular basis for the function of the non-motor regions within the context of full-length MCAK is unknown. Here, we determine the structure of MCAK motor domain bound to its regulatory C-terminus. Our analysis reveals that the MCAK C-terminus binds to two motor domains in solution and is displaced allosterically upon microtubule binding, which allows its robust accumulation at microtubule ends. These results demonstrate that MCAK undergoes long-range conformational changes involving its C-terminus during the soluble to microtubule-bound transition and that the C-terminus-motor interaction represents a structural intermediate in the MCAK catalytic cycle. Together, our work reveals intrinsic molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of kinesin-13 activity.

  20. Role of Methoxypolyethylene Glycol on the Hydration, Activity, Conformation and Dynamic Properties of a Lipase in a Dry Film

    PubMed Central

    Secundo, Francesco; Barletta, Gabriel; Mazzola, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    A combined approach based on the use of ATR-FT/IR and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy allowed to shed light on the effects of the additive methoxypolyethylene glycol (MePEG) on the hydration, conformation and dynamic properties of lipase from Burkholderia cepacia dehydrated to form a film. Spectroscopic data show that the additive has little effect on the structure of the protein; however, H/D exchange kinetic and fluorescence anisotropy suggest a more flexible enzyme molecule when in the presence of MePEG. By infrared spectroscopy, we estimated that, after conditioning the films at water activity of 1, the water content in the lipase dehydrated with MePEG is 5.4-and 4.7-fold higher than in the absence of the additive and the additive alone, respectively. Additionally, our infrared data suggest that MePEG acts by hindering intermolecular protein–protein interactions and contributing to increase the accessibility and flexibility of the lipase in the dehydrated solid film. These factors also explain the enhancement of the enzyme catalytic activity (i.e., up to 3.7-fold in neat organic solvent) when in the presence of MePEG. The method and results presented might better address the use of additives for the preparation of enzymes employed in non-aqueous media or of proteins used in a dry form in different fields of biotechnology. PMID:18727030

  1. Correlation of moth sex pheromone activities with molecular characteristics involved in conformers of bombykol and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, T

    1975-09-01

    Molecular characteristics of bombykol and its 11 derivatives, which reveal significant correlations with biological activities for single sex pheromone receptor cells of four moth species, Bombyx mori, Aglia tau, Endromis versicolora, and Deilephila euphorbiae, were examined on the assumption of the "bifunctional unit model." Probabilities of bifunctional unit formations of those 12 compounds were assessed with frequency distribution patterns of distances between the proton acceptor, the proton donor, and the methyl group involved in a total of 1,200 conformers. A highly significant correlation exists between biological activity for each species and the probability of a particular bifunctional unit formation: a proton acceptor (A)--a methyl group (Me) unit (A--Me distances: about 6 A) for Deilephila (r = 0.94); a proton acceptor (A)--a proton donor (D)(A--D: about 11 A) for Aglia (r = 0.83); two antagonistic proton donor--methyl units (D--Me: about 14 and 5 A for favorable and adverse unit, respectively) for Bombyx (r = 0.94) and Endromis (r = 0.92).

  2. Conformational Restriction Leading to a Selective CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor Agonist Orally Active Against Colitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The CB2 cannabinoid receptor has been implicated in the regulation of intestinal inflammation. Following on from the promising activity of a series of 4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide, we developed constrained analogues based on a 2H-pyrazolo[4,3-c]quinolin-3(5H)-one scaffold, with improved affinity for the hCB2 receptor and had very high selectivity over the hCB1 receptor. Importantly, the lead of this series (26, hCB2: Ki = 0.39 nM, hCB1: Ki > 3000 nM) was found to protect mice against experimental colitis after oral administration. PMID:25699149

  3. Structures of Cas9 endonucleases reveal RNA-mediated conformational activation.

    PubMed

    Jinek, Martin; Jiang, Fuguo; Taylor, David W; Sternberg, Samuel H; Kaya, Emine; Ma, Enbo; Anders, Carolin; Hauer, Michael; Zhou, Kaihong; Lin, Steven; Kaplan, Matias; Iavarone, Anthony T; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Nogales, Eva; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-03-14

    Type II CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems use an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease, Cas9, to generate double-strand breaks in invasive DNA during an adaptive bacterial immune response. Cas9 has been harnessed as a powerful tool for genome editing and gene regulation in many eukaryotic organisms. We report 2.6 and 2.2 angstrom resolution crystal structures of two major Cas9 enzyme subtypes, revealing the structural core shared by all Cas9 family members. The architectures of Cas9 enzymes define nucleic acid binding clefts, and single-particle electron microscopy reconstructions show that the two structural lobes harboring these clefts undergo guide RNA-induced reorientation to form a central channel where DNA substrates are bound. The observation that extensive structural rearrangements occur before target DNA duplex binding implicates guide RNA loading as a key step in Cas9 activation.

  4. A single active catalytic site is sufficient to promote transport in P-glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Bársony, Orsolya; Szalóki, Gábor; Türk, Dóra; Tarapcsák, Szabolcs; Gutay-Tóth, Zsuzsanna; Bacsó, Zsolt; Holb, Imre J.; Székvölgyi, Lóránt; Szabó, Gábor; Csanády, László; Szakács, Gergely; Goda, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is an ABC transporter responsible for the ATP-dependent efflux of chemotherapeutic compounds from multidrug resistant cancer cells. Better understanding of the molecular mechanism of Pgp-mediated transport could promote rational drug design to circumvent multidrug resistance. By measuring drug binding affinity and reactivity to a conformation-sensitive antibody we show here that nucleotide binding drives Pgp from a high to a low substrate-affinity state and this switch coincides with the flip from the inward- to the outward-facing conformation. Furthermore, the outward-facing conformation survives ATP hydrolysis: the post-hydrolytic complex is stabilized by vanadate, and the slow recovery from this state requires two functional catalytic sites. The catalytically inactive double Walker A mutant is stabilized in a high substrate affinity inward-open conformation, but mutants with one intact catalytic center preserve their ability to hydrolyze ATP and to promote drug transport, suggesting that the two catalytic sites are randomly recruited for ATP hydrolysis. PMID:27117502

  5. The structure of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate isomerase from Burkholderia pseudomallei reveals a zinc binding site at the heart of the active site.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Nicholas J

    2010-07-16

    Heptoses are found in the surface polysaccharides of most bacteria, contributing to structures that are essential for virulence and antibiotic resistance. Consequently, the biosynthetic enzymes for these sugars are attractive targets for novel antibiotics. The best characterized biosynthetic enzyme is GmhA, which catalyzes the conversion of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate into D-glycero-D-manno-heptopyranose-7-phosphate, the first step in the biosynthesis of heptose. Here, the structure of GmhA from Burkholderia pseudomallei is reported. This enzyme contains a zinc ion at the heart of its active site: this ion stabilizes the active, closed form of the enzyme and presents coordinating side chains as a potential acid and base to drive catalysis. A complex with the product demonstrates that the enzyme retains activity in the crystal and thus suggests that the closed conformation is catalytically relevant and is an excellent target for the development of therapeutics. A revised mechanism for the action of GmhA is postulated on the basis of this structure and the activity of B. pseudomallei GmhA mutants.

  6. Structure, chain conformation, and immunomodulatory activity of the polysaccharide purified from Bacillus Calmette Guerin formulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Hong; Yu, Juping; Liu, Yameng; Lu, Weisheng; Chai, Yin; Liu, Chao; Pan, Chun; Yao, Wenbing; Gao, Xiangdong

    2016-10-05

    A polysaccharide, coded as BDP, purified from the injection powder of Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) polysaccharide and nucleic acid, was composed mainly of α-D-(1→4)-linked glucan with (1→6)-linked branches and trace amounts of fucose and mannose from the results of FT-IR, HPAEC-PAD and NMR spectrum. The Mw, Mn, Mz, and [Formula: see text] were determined to be 1.320×10(5)g/mol, 1.012×10(5)g/mol, 2.139×10(5)g/mol, and 21.8±3.2%nm by using HPSEC-MALLS, respectively. The ν value from [Formula: see text] was calculated to be 0.52±0.01, which firstly clarified that BDP existed as random coils in 0.9% NaCl aqueous solution. AFM and SEM combined with Congo-red test also revealed that the polysaccharide was irregular globular like or curly structure. Furthermore, in vitro tests on RAW264.7 murine macrophages cells revealed that BDP exhibited significant immunomodulatory activity.

  7. Novel mechanisms for superoxide-scavenging activity of human manganese superoxide dismutase determined by the K68 key acetylation site.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiaqi; Cheng, Kuoyuan; Zhang, Bo; Xu, Huan; Cao, Yuanzhao; Guo, Fei; Feng, Xudong; Xia, Qing

    2015-08-01

    Superoxide is the primary reactive oxygen species generated in the mitochondria. Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) is the major enzymatic superoxide scavenger present in the mitochondrial matrix and one of the most crucial reactive oxygen species-scavenging enzymes in the cell. SOD2 is activated by sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) through NAD(+)-dependent deacetylation. However, the exact acetylation sites of SOD2 are ambiguous and the mechanisms underlying the deacetylation-mediated SOD2 activation largely remain unknown. We are the first to characterize SOD2 mutants of the acetylation sites by investigating the relative enzymatic activity, structures, and electrostatic potential of SOD2 in this study. These SOD2 mutations affected the superoxide-scavenging activity in vitro and in HEK293T cells. The lysine 68 (K68) site is the most important acetylation site contributing to SOD2 activation and plays a role in cell survival after paraquat treatment. The molecular basis underlying the regulation of SOD2 activity by K68 was investigated in detail. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that K68 mutations induced a conformational shift of residues located in the active center of SOD2 and altered the charge distribution on the SOD2 surface. Thus, the entry of the superoxide anion into the coordinated core of SOD2 was inhibited. Our results provide a novel mechanistic insight, whereby SOD2 acetylation affects the structure and charge distribution of SOD2, its tetramerization, and p53-SOD2 interactions of SOD2 in the mitochondria, which may play a role in nuclear-mitochondrial communication during aging.

  8. Slingshot-Cofilin activation mediates mitochondrial and synaptic dysfunction via Aβ ligation to β1-integrin conformers

    PubMed Central

    Woo, J A; Zhao, X; Khan, H; Penn, C; Wang, X; Joly-Amado, A; Weeber, E; Morgan, D; Kang, D E

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of amyloid-β protein (Aβ) is an early event associated with synaptic and mitochondrial damage in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies have implicated the filamentous actin (F-actin) severing protein, Cofilin, in synaptic remodeling, mitochondrial dysfunction, and AD pathogenesis. However, whether Cofilin is an essential component of the AD pathogenic process and how Aβ impinges its signals to Cofilin from the neuronal surface are unknown. In this study, we found that Aβ42 oligomers (Aβ42O, amyloid-β protein 1–42 oligomers) bind with high affinity to low or intermediate activation conformers of β1-integrin, resulting in the loss of surface β1-integrin and activation of Cofilin via Slingshot homology-1 (SSH1) activation. Specifically, conditional loss of β1-integrin prevented Aβ42O-induced Cofilin activation, and allosteric modulation or activation of β1-integrin significantly reduced Aβ42O binding to neurons while blocking Aβ42O-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial dysfunction, depletion of F-actin/focal Vinculin, and apoptosis. Cofilin, in turn, was required for Aβ42O-induced loss of cell surface β1-integrin, disruption of F-actin/focal Talin–Vinculin, and depletion of F-actin-associated postsynaptic proteins. SSH1 reduction, which mitigated Cofilin activation, prevented Aβ42O-induced mitochondrial Cofilin translocation and apoptosis, while AD brain mitochondria contained significantly increased activated/oxidized Cofilin. In mechanistic support in vivo, AD mouse model (APP (amyloid precursor protein)/PS1) brains contained increased SSH1/Cofilin and decreased SSH1/14-3-3 complexes, indicative of SSH1–Cofilin activation via release of SSH1 from 14-3-3. Finally, genetic reduction in Cofilin rescued APP/Aβ-induced synaptic protein loss and gliosis in vivo as well as deficits in long-term potentiation (LTP) and contextual memory in APP/PS1 mice. These novel findings therefore implicate the essential

  9. The transient catalytically competent coenzyme allocation into the active site of Anabaena ferredoxin NADP+ -reductase.

    PubMed

    Peregrina, José Ramón; Lans, Isaías; Medina, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) catalyses the electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP(+) via its flavin FAD cofactor. A molecular dynamics theoretical approach is applied here to visualise the transient catalytically competent interaction of Anabaena FNR with its coenzyme, NADP(+). The particular role of some of the residues identified as key in binding and accommodating the 2'P-AMP moiety of the coenzyme is confirmed in molecular terms. Simulations also indicate that the architecture of the active site precisely contributes to the orientation of the N5 of the FAD isoalloxazine ring and the C4 of the coenzyme nicotinamide ring in the conformation of the catalytically competent hydride transfer complex and, therefore, contributes to the efficiency of the process. In particular, the side chain of the C-terminal Y303 in Anabaena FNR appears key to providing the optimum geometry by reducing the stacking probability between the isoalloxazine and nicotinamide rings, thus providing the required co-linearity and distance among the N5 of the flavin cofactor, the C4 of the coenzyme nicotinamide and the hydride that has to be transferred between them. All these factors are highly related to the reaction efficiency, mechanism and reversibility of the process.

  10. The ClpP N-Terminus Coordinates Substrate Access with Protease Active Site Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, L.; Bohon, J; Chance, M; Licht, S

    2008-01-01

    Energy-dependent protein degradation machines, such as the Escherichia coli protease ClpAP, require regulated interactions between the ATPase component (ClpA) and the protease component (ClpP) for function. Recent studies indicate that the ClpP N-terminus is essential in these interactions, yet the dynamics of this region remain unclear. Here, we use synchrotron hydroxyl radical footprinting and kinetic studies to characterize functionally important conformational changes of the ClpP N-terminus. Footprinting experiments show that the ClpP N-terminus becomes more solvent-exposed upon interaction with ClpA. In the absence of ClpA, deletion of the ClpP N-terminus increases the initial degradation rate of large peptide substrates 5-15-fold. Unlike ClpAP, ClpP?N exhibits a distinct slow phase of product formation that is eliminated by the addition of hydroxylamine, suggesting that truncation of the N-terminus leads to stabilization of the acyl-enzyme intermediate. These results indicate that (1) the ClpP N-terminus acts as a 'gate' controlling substrate access to the active sites, (2) binding of ClpA opens this 'gate', allowing substrate entry and formation of the acyl-enzyme intermediate, and (3) closing of the N-terminal 'gate' stimulates acyl-enzyme hydrolysis.

  11. QM/MM calculations of kinetic isotope effects in the chorismate mutase active site.

    PubMed

    Martí, Sergio; Moliner, Vincent; Tuñón, Iñaki; Williams, Ian H

    2003-02-07

    Kinetic isotope effects have been computed for the Claisen rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate in aqueous solution and in the active site of chorismate mutase from B. subtilus. These included primary 13C and 18O and secondary 3H effects for substitutions at the bond-making and bond-breaking positions. The initial structures of the putative stationary points on the potential energy surface, required for the calculations of isotope effects using the CAMVIB/CAMISO programs, have been selected from hybrid QM/MM molecular dynamical simulations using the DYNAMO program. Refinement of the reactant complex and transition-state structures has been carried out by means of AM1/CHARMM24/TIP3P calculations using the GRACE program, with full gradient relaxation of the position of > 5200 atoms for the enzymic simulations, and with a box containing 711 water molecules for the corresponding reaction in aqueous solution. Comparison of these results, and of gas phase calculations, with experimental data has shown that the chemical rearrangement is largely rate-determining for the enzyme mechanism. Inclusion of the chorismate conformational pre-equilibrium step in the modelled kinetic scheme leads to better agreement between recent experimental data and theoretical predictions. These results provide new information on an important enzymatic transformation, and the key factors responsible for the kinetics of its molecular mechanism are clarified. Treatment of the enzyme and/or solvent environment by means of a large and flexible model is absolutely essential for prediction of kinetic isotope effects.

  12. Site-specific PEGylation of lidamycin and its antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Shang, Boyang; Hu, Lei; Shao, Rongguang; Zhen, Yongsu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, N-terminal site-specific mono-PEGylation of the recombinant lidamycin apoprotein (rLDP) of lidamycin (LDM) was prepared using a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) derivative (Mw 20 kDa) through a reactive terminal aldehyde group under weak acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The biochemical properties of mPEG-rLDP-AE, an enediyne-integrated conjugate, were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of mPEG-rLDP-AE was evaluated by MTT assays and in xenograft model. The results indicated that mPEG-rLDP-AE showed significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. After PEGylation, mPEG-rLDP still retained the binding capability to the enediyne AE and presented the physicochemical characteristics similar to that of native LDP. It is of interest that the PEGylation did not diminish the antitumor efficacy of LDM, implying the possibility that this derivative may function as a payload to deliver novel tumor-targeted drugs. PMID:26579455

  13. Regulatory role of the second gelsolin-like domain of Caenorhabditis elegans gelsolin-like protein 1 (GSNL-1) in its calcium-dependent conformation and actin-regulatory activities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongmei; Ono, Shoichiro

    2013-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans gelsolin-like protein-1 (GSNL-1) is an unconventional member of the gelsolin family of actin-regulatory proteins. Unlike typical gelsolin-related proteins with three or six G domains, GSNL-1 has four gelsolin-like (G) domains (G1–G4) and exhibits calcium-dependent actin filament severing and capping activities. The first G domain (G1) of GSNL-1 is necessary for its actin-regulatory activities. However, how other domains in GSNL-1 participate in regulation of its functions is not understood. Here, we report biochemical evidence that the second G domain (G2) of GSNL-1 has a regulatory role in its calcium-dependent conformation and actin-regulatory activities. Comparison of the sequences of gelsolin-related proteins from various species indicates that sequences of G2 are highly conserved. Among the conserved residues in G2, we focused on D162 of GSNL-1, since equivalent residues in gelsolin and severin are part of the calcium-binding sites and is a pathogenic mutation site in human gelsolin causing familial amyloidosis, Finnish-type. The D162N mutation does not alter the inactive and fully calcium-activated states of GSNL-1 for actin filament severing (at 20 nM GSNL-1) and capping activities (at 50 nM GSNL-1). However, under these conditions, the mutant shows reduced calcium sensitivity for activation. By contrast, the D162N mutation strongly enhances susceptibility of GSNL-1 to chymotrypsin digestion only at high calcium concentrations but not at low calcium concentrations. The mutation also reduces affinity of GSNL-1 with actin monomers. These results suggest that G2 of GSNL-1 functions as a regulatory domain for its calcium-dependent actin-regulatory activities by mediating conformational changes of the GSNL-1 molecule. PMID:23475707

  14. Allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a using Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside and its combination.

    PubMed

    Rani, Nidhi; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; P T V, Lakshmi; Arunachalam, Annamalai

    2016-08-01

    Recent crystallographic study revealed the involvement of allosteric site in active site inhibition of penicillin binding protein (PBP2a), where one molecule of Ceftaroline (Cef) binds to the allosteric site of PBP2a and paved way for the other molecule (Cef) to bind at the active site. Though Cef has the potency to inhibit the PBP2a, its adverse side effects are of major concern. Previous studies have reported the antibacterial property of Quercetin derivatives, a group of natural compounds. Hence, the present study aims to evaluate the effect of Quercetin 3-o-rutinoside (Rut) in allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a. The molecular docking studies between allosteric site and ligands (Rut, Que, and Cef) revealed a better binding efficiency (G-score) of Rut (-7.790318) and Cef (-6.194946) with respect to Que (-5.079284). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies showed significant changes at the active site in the presence of ligands (Rut and Cef) at allosteric site. Four different combinations of Rut and Cef were docked and their G-scores ranged between -6.320 and -8.623. MD studies revealed the stability of the key residue (Ser403) with Rut being at both sites, compared to other complexes. Morphological analysis through electron microscopy confirmed that combination of Rut and Cefixime was able to disturb the bacterial cell membrane in a similar fashion to that of Rut and Cefixime alone. The results of this study indicate that the affinity of Rut at both sites were equally good, with further validations Rut could be considered as an alternative for inhibiting MRSA growth.

  15. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site

    PubMed Central

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called ‘catalytic residues’ are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06181.001 PMID:25902402

  16. A split active site couples cap recognition by Dcp2 to activation

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N.; Jones, Brittnee N.; Hernandez, Gail A.; Gross, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Decapping by Dcp2 is an essential step in 5′-3′ mRNA decay. In yeast, decapping requires an open-to-closed transition in Dcp2, though the link between closure and catalysis remains elusive. Here we show using NMR that cap binds conserved residues on both the catalytic and regulatory domains of Dcp2. Lesions in the cap-binding site on the regulatory domain reduce the catalytic step two orders of magnitude and block formation of the closed state whereas Dcp1 enhances the catalytic step by a factor of ten and promotes closure. We conclude that closure occurs during the rate-limiting catalytic step of decapping, juxtaposing the cap-binding region of each domain to form a composite active site. This work suggests a model for regulation of decapping, where coactivators trigger decapping by stabilizing a labile composite active site. PMID:20711189

  17. Composite active site of chondroitin lyase ABC accepting both epimers of uronic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Shaya, D.; Hahn, Bum-Soo; Bjerkan, Tonje Marita; Kim, Wan Seok; Park, Nam Young; Sim, Joon-Soo; Kim, Yeong-Shik; Cygler, M.

    2008-03-19

    Enzymes have evolved as catalysts with high degrees of stereospecificity. When both enantiomers are biologically important, enzymes with two different folds usually catalyze reactions with the individual enantiomers. In rare cases a single enzyme can process both enantiomers efficiently, but no molecular basis for such catalysis has been established. The family of bacterial chondroitin lyases ABC comprises such enzymes. They can degrade both chondroitin sulfate (CS) and dermatan sulfate (DS) glycosaminoglycans at the nonreducing end of either glucuronic acid (CS) or its epimer iduronic acid (DS) by a {beta}-elimination mechanism, which commences with the removal of the C-5 proton from the uronic acid. Two other structural folds evolved to perform these reactions in an epimer-specific fashion: ({alpha}/{alpha}){sub 5} for CS (chondroitin lyases AC) and {beta}-helix for DS (chondroitin lyases B); their catalytic mechanisms have been established at the molecular level. The structure of chondroitinase ABC from Proteus vulgaris showed surprising similarity to chondroitinase AC, including the presence of a Tyr-His-Glu-Arg catalytic tetrad, which provided a possible mechanism for CS degradation but not for DS degradation. We determined the structure of a distantly related Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron chondroitinase ABC to identify additional structurally conserved residues potentially involved in catalysis. We found a conserved cluster located {approx}12 {angstrom} from the catalytic tetrad. We demonstrate that a histidine in this cluster is essential for catalysis of DS but not CS. The enzyme utilizes a single substrate-binding site while having two partially overlapping active sites catalyzing the respective reactions. The spatial separation of the two sets of residues suggests a substrate-induced conformational change that brings all catalytically essential residues close together.

  18. Mass Spectrometry Reveals Differences in Stability and Subunit Interactions between Activated and Nonactivated Conformers of the (αβγδ)4 Phosphorylase Kinase Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Laura A.; Nadeau, Owen W.; Carlson, Gerald M.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylase kinase (PhK), a 1.3 MDa enzyme complex that regulates glycogenolysis, is composed of four copies each of four distinct subunits (α, β, γ, and δ). The catalytic protein kinase subunit within this complex is γ, and its activity is regulated by the three remaining subunits, which are targeted by allosteric activators from neuronal, metabolic, and hormonal signaling pathways. The regulation of activity of the PhK complex from skeletal muscle has been studied extensively; however, considerably less is known about the interactions among its subunits, particularly within the non-activated versus activated forms of the complex. Here, nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry and partial denaturation were used to disrupt PhK, and subunit dissociation patterns of non-activated and phospho-activated (autophosphorylation) conformers were compared. In so doing, we have established a network of subunit contacts that complements and extends prior evidence of subunit interactions obtained from chemical crosslinking, and these subunit interactions have been modeled for both conformers within the context of a known three-dimensional structure of PhK solved by cryoelectron microscopy. Our analyses show that the network of contacts among subunits differs significantly between the nonactivated and phospho-activated conformers of PhK, with the latter revealing new interprotomeric contact patterns for the β subunit, the predominant subunit responsible for PhK's activation by phosphorylation. Partial disruption of the phosphorylated conformer yields several novel subcomplexes containing multiple β subunits, arguing for their self-association within the activated complex. Evidence for the theoretical αβγδ protomeric subcomplex, which has been sought but not previously observed, was also derived from the phospho-activated complex. In addition to changes in subunit interaction patterns upon phospho-activation, mass spectrometry revealed a large change in the overall

  19. Conformational analysis for some nonclassical antagonists of histamine H3 receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borota, Ana; Mracec, Maria; Rad, Ramona; Ostopovici, Liliana; Mracec, Mircea

    A conformational search in vacuum for a series of 1,3-substituted pyrrolidine derivatives has been performed using the AMBER, AM1, PM3, and MNDO methods. Conformational analysis of the pyrrolidine ligands suggests that these compounds could have many conformers that populate the low-energy minima on the potential energy surface (PES). The conformational space occupied by the ligands is large and, in vacuum, the rotation barriers of different flexible bonds have energies between 0.5 and thousands of kcal/mol. By optimization, most conformers have energy barriers of 0-5 kcal/mol; thus, they could interconvert easily to obtain better interactions in the receptor active site. Optimized conformers having energy barriers of >5 kcal/mol display bad geometries with very large bond lengths and deformed rings. Shapes and heights of rotation barriers obtained through COSMO-AM1 single-point calculations in water are similar to those obtained from single-point calculations in vacuum. However, in water the energy barriers are lower, allowing most conformers to convert in other low-energy conformers. The best conformers in vacuum and in water are different: the gas phase best conformer has a helical shape, while the best conformer in water has an extended shape.

  20. A Unique Sugar-binding Site Mediates the Distinct Anti-influenza Activity of Pig Surfactant Protein D*

    PubMed Central

    van Eijk, Martin; Rynkiewicz, Michael J.; White, Mitchell R.; Hartshorn, Kevan L.; Zou, Xueqing; Schulten, Klaus; Luo, Dong; Crouch, Erika C.; Cafarella, Tanya R.; Head, James F.; Haagsman, Henk P.; Seaton, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    Pigs can act as intermediate hosts by which reassorted influenza A virus (IAV) strains can be transmitted to humans and cause pandemic influenza outbreaks. The innate host defense component surfactant protein D (SP-D) interacts with glycans on the hemagglutinin of IAV and contributes to protection against IAV infection in mammals. This study shows that a recombinant trimeric neck lectin fragment derived from porcine SP-D (pSP-D) exhibits profound inhibitory activity against IAV, in contrast to comparable fragments derived from human SP-D. Crystallographic analysis of the pSP-D fragment complexed with a viral sugar component shows that a unique tripeptide loop alters the lectin site conformation of pSP-D. Molecular dynamics simulations highlight the role of this flexible loop, which adopts a more stable conformation upon sugar binding and may facilitate binding to viral glycans through contact with distal portions of the branched mannoside. The combined data demonstrate that porcine-specific structural features of SP-D contribute significantly to its distinct anti-IAV activity. These findings could help explain why pigs serve as important reservoirs for newly emerging pathogenic IAV strains. PMID:22685299

  1. Probing the conformational changes and peroxidase-like activity of cytochrome c upon interaction with iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jafari Azad, Vida; Kasravi, Shahab; Alizadeh Zeinabad, Hojjat; Memar Bashi Aval, Mehri; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Rahimi, Arash; Falahati, Mojtaba

    2016-09-15

    Herein, the interaction of iron nanoparticle (Fe-NP) with cytochrome c (Cyt c) was investigated, and a range of techniques such as dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential measurements, static and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, near and far circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy were used to analyze the interaction between Cyt c and Fe-NP. DLS and zeta potential measurements showed that the values of hydrodynamic radius and charge distribution of Fe-NP are 83.95 ± 3.7 nm and 4.5 ± .8 mV, respectively. The fluorescence spectroscopy results demonstrated that the binding of Fe-NP with Cyt c is mediated by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. Also Fe-NP induced conformational changes in Cyt c and reduced the melting temperature value of Cyt c from 79.18 to 71.33°C. CD experiments of interaction between Fe-NP and Cyt c revealed that the secondary structure of Cyt c with the dominant α-helix structures remained unchanged whereas the tertiary structure and heme position of Cyt c are subjected to remarkable changes. Absorption spectroscopy at 695 nm revealed that Fe-NP considerably disrupt the Fe…S(Met80) bond. In addition, the UV-vis experiment showed the peroxidase-like activity of Cyt c upon interaction with Fe-NP. Hence, the data indicate the Fe-NP results in unfolding of Cyt c and subsequent peroxidase-like activity of denatured species. It was concluded that a comprehensive study of the interaction of Fe-NP with biological system is a crucial step for their potential application as intracellular delivery carriers and medicinal agents.

  2. Characterization of Active Site Residues of Nitroalkane Oxidase†

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Michael P.; Fenny, Nana S.; Ali, Shah R.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of primary and secondary nitrolkanes to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones plus nitrite. The structure of the enzyme shows that Serl71 forms a hydrogen bond to the flavin N5, suggesting that it plays a role in catalysis. Cys397 and Tyr398 were previously identified by chemical modification as potential active site residues. To more directly probe the roles of these residues, the S171A, S171V, S171T, C397S, and Y398F enzymes have been characterized with nitroethane as substrate. The C397S and Y398 enzymes were less stable than the wild-type enzyme, and the C397S enzyme routinely contained a substoichiometric amount of FAD. Analysis of the steady-state kinetic parameters for the mutant enzymes, including deuterium isotope effects, establishes that all of the mutations result in decreases in the rate constants for removal of the substrate proton by ~5-fold and decreases in the rate constant for product release of ~2-fold. Only the S171V and S171T mutations alter the rate constant for flavin oxidation. These results establish that these residues are not involved in catalysis, but rather are required for maintaining the protein structure. PMID:20056514

  3. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  4. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems.

  5. Computational Design of Experiment Unveils the Conformational Reaction Coordinate of GH125 α-Mannosidases.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Gil, Santiago; Males, Alexandra; Fernandes, Pearl Z; Williams, Spencer J; Davies, Gideon J; Rovira, Carme

    2017-01-25

    Conformational analysis of enzyme-catalyzed mannoside hydrolysis has revealed two predominant conformational itineraries through B2,5 or (3)H4 transition-state (TS) conformations. A prominent unassigned catalytic itinerary is that of exo-1,6-α-mannosidases belonging to CAZy family 125. A published complex of Clostridium perfringens GH125 enzyme with a nonhydrolyzable 1,6-α-thiomannoside substrate mimic bound across the active site revealed an undistorted (4)C1 conformation and provided no insight into the catalytic pathway of this enzyme. We show through a purely computational approach (QM/MM metadynamics) that sulfur-for-oxygen substitution in the glycosidic linkage fundamentally alters the energetically accessible conformational space of a thiomannoside when bound within the GH125 active site. Modeling of the conformational free energy landscape (FEL) of a thioglycoside strongly favors a mechanistically uninformative (4)C1 conformation within the GH125 enzyme active site, but the FEL of corresponding O-glycoside substrate reveals a preference for a Michaelis complex in an (O)S2 conformation (consistent with catalysis through a B2,5 TS). This prediction was tested experimentally by determination of the 3D X-ray structure of the pseudo-Michaelis complex of an inactive (D220N) variant of C. perfringens GH125 enzyme in complex with 1,6-α-mannobiose. This complex revealed unambiguous distortion of the -1 subsite mannoside to an (O)S2 conformation, matching that predicted by theory and supporting an (O)S2 → B2,5 → (1)S5 conformational itinerary for GH125 α-mannosidases. This work highlights the power of the QM/MM approach and identified shortcomings in the use of nonhydrolyzable substrate analogues for conformational analysis of enzyme-bound species.

  6. An Allosteric Cross-Talk Between the Activation Loop and the ATP Binding Site Regulates the Activation of Src Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Pucheta-Martínez, Encarna; Saladino, Giorgio; Morando, Maria Agnese; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge; Lelli, Moreno; Sutto, Ludovico; D’Amelio, Nicola; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the activation loop is a fundamental step in the activation of most protein kinases. In the case of the Src tyrosine kinase, a prototypical kinase due to its role in cancer and its historic importance, phosphorylation of tyrosine 416 in the activation loop is known to rigidify the structure and contribute to the switch from the inactive to a fully active form. However, whether or not phosphorylation is able per-se to induce a fully active conformation, that efficiently binds ATP and phosphorylates the substrate, is less clear. Here we employ a combination of solution NMR and enhanced-sampling molecular dynamics simulations to fully map the effects of phosphorylation and ATP/ADP cofactor loading on the conformational landscape of Src tyrosine kinase. We find that both phosphorylation and cofactor binding are needed to induce a fully active conformation. What is more, we find a complex interplay between the A-loop and the hinge motion where the phosphorylation of the activation-loop has a significant allosteric effect on the dynamics of the C-lobe. PMID:27063862

  7. An Allosteric Cross-Talk Between the Activation Loop and the ATP Binding Site Regulates the Activation of Src Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucheta-Martínez, Encarna; Saladino, Giorgio; Morando, Maria Agnese; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge; Lelli, Moreno; Sutto, Ludovico; D’Amelio, Nicola; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorylation of the activation loop is a fundamental step in the activation of most protein kinases. In the case of the Src tyrosine kinase, a prototypical kinase due to its role in cancer and its historic importance, phosphorylation of tyrosine 416 in the activation loop is known to rigidify the structure and contribute to the switch from the inactive to a fully active form. However, whether or not phosphorylation is able per-se to induce a fully active conformation, that efficiently binds ATP and phosphorylates the substrate, is less clear. Here we employ a combination of solution NMR and enhanced-sampling molecular dynamics simulations to fully map the effects of phosphorylation and ATP/ADP cofactor loading on the conformational landscape of Src tyrosine kinase. We find that both phosphorylation and cofactor binding are needed to induce a fully active conformation. What is more, we find a complex interplay between the A-loop and the hinge motion where the phosphorylation of the activation-loop has a significant allosteric effect on the dynamics of the C-lobe.

  8. Zeta Inhibitory Peptide Disrupts Electrostatic Interactions That Maintain Atypical Protein Kinase C in Its Active Conformation on the Scaffold p62.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Chun Lisa; Xie, Lei; Dore, Kim; Xie, Li; Del Rio, Jason C; King, Charles C; Martinez-Ariza, Guillermo; Hulme, Christopher; Malinow, Roberto; Bourne, Philip E; Newton, Alexandra C

    2015-09-04

    Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) enzymes signal on protein scaffolds, yet how they are maintained in an active conformation on scaffolds is unclear. A myristoylated peptide based on the autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate fragment of the atypical PKCζ, zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP), has been extensively used to inhibit aPKC activity; however, we have previously shown that ZIP does not inhibit the catalytic activity of aPKC isozymes in cells (Wu-Zhang, A. X., Schramm, C. L., Nabavi, S., Malinow, R., and Newton, A. C. (2012) J. Biol. Chem. 287, 12879-12885). Here we sought to identify a bona fide target of ZIP and, in so doing, unveiled a novel mechanism by which aPKCs are maintained in an active conformation on a protein scaffold. Specifically, we used protein-protein interaction network analysis, structural modeling, and protein-protein docking to predict that ZIP binds an acidic surface on the Phox and Bem1 (PB1) domain of p62, an interaction validated by peptide array analysis. Using a genetically encoded reporter for PKC activity fused to the p62 scaffold, we show that ZIP inhibits the activity of wild-type aPKC, but not a construct lacking the pseudosubstrate. These data support a model in which the pseudosubstrate of aPKCs is tethered to the acidic surface on p62, locking aPKC in an open, signaling-competent conformation. ZIP competes for binding to the acidic surface, resulting in displacement of the pseudosubstrate of aPKC and re-engagement in the substrate-binding cavity. This study not only identifies a cellular target for ZIP, but also unveils a novel mechanism by which scaffolded aPKC is maintained in an active conformation.

  9. Finding a Needle in the Haystack: Computational Modeling of Mg2+ Binding in the Active Site of Protein Farnesyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yue; Chakravorty, Dhruva K.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Studies aimed at elucidating the unknown Mg2+ binding site in protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) are reported. FTase catalyzes the transfer of a farnesyl group to a conserved cysteine residue (Cys1p) on a target protein, an important step for proteins in the signal transduction pathways (e.g. Ras). Mg2+ ions accelerate the protein farnesylation reaction by up to 700-fold. The exact function of Mg2+ in catalysis and the structural characteristics of its binding remain unresolved to date. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations addressing the role of magnesium ions in FTase are presented, and relevant octahedral binding motifs for Mg2+ in wild type (WT) FTase and Dβ352A mutant are explored. Our simulations suggest that the addition of Mg2+ ions causes a conformational changes to occur in the FTase active site, breaking interactions known to keep FPP in its inactive conformation. Two relevant Mg2+ ion binding motifs were determined in WT FTase. In the first binding motif, WT1, the Mg2+ ion is coordinated to D352β, zinc-bound D297β, two water molecules, and one oxygen atoms from the α- and β-phosphates of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP). The second binding motif, WT2, is identical with the exception of the zinc-bound D297β being replaced by a water molecule in the Mg2+ coordination complex. In the Dβ352A mutant Mg2+ binding motif, D297β, three water molecules and one oxygen atom from the α- and β-phosphates of FPP complete the octahedral coordination sphere of Mg2+. Simulations of WT FTase, in which Mg2+ was replaced by water in the active site, re-created the salt bridges and hydrogen bonding patterns around FPP, validating these simulations. In all Mg2+ binding motifs, a key hydrogen bond was identified between a magnesium bound water and Cys1p, bridging the two metallic binding sites, and thereby, reducing the equilibrium distance between the reacting atoms of FPP Cys1p. The free energy profiles calculated for these systems provide a qualitative understanding of

  10. The crystal structure of the Rv0301-Rv0300 VapBC-3 toxin-antitoxin complex from M. tuberculosis reveals a Mg2+ ion in the active site and a putative RNA-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Andrew B; Miallau, Linda; Sawaya, Michael R; Habel, Jeff; Cascio, Duilio; Eisenberg, David

    2013-01-10

    VapBC pairs account for 45 out of 88 identified toxin-antitoxin (TA) pairs in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv genome. A working model suggests that under times of stress, antitoxin molecules are degraded, releasing the toxins to slow the metabolism of the cell, which in the case of VapC toxins is via their RNase activity. Otherwise the TA pairs remain bound to their promoters, autoinhibiting transcription. The crystal structure of Rv0301-Rv0300, an Mtb VapBC TA complex determined at 1.49 Å resolution, suggests a mechanism for these three functions: RNase activity, its inhibition by antitoxin, and its ability to bind promoter DNA. The Rv0301 toxin consists of a core of five parallel beta strands flanked by alpha helices. Three proximal aspartates coordinate a Mg2+ ion forming the putative RNase active site. The Rv0300 antitoxin monomer is extended in structure, consisting of an N-terminal beta strand followed by four helices. The last two helices wrap around the toxin and terminate near the putative RNase active site, but with different conformations. In one conformation, the C-terminal arginine interferes with Mg2+ ion coordination, suggesting a mechanism by which the antitoxin can inhibit toxin activity. At the N-terminus of the antitoxin, two pairs of Ribbon-Helix-Helix (RHH) motifs are related by crystallographic twofold symmetry. The resulting hetero-octameric complex is similar to the FitAB system, but the two RHH motifs are about 30 Å closer together in the Rv0301-Rv0300 complex, suggesting either a different span of the DNA recognition sequence or a conformational change.

  11. Coupling of conformational transitions in the N-terminal domain of the 51-kDa FK506-binding protein (FKBP51) near its site of interaction with the steroid receptor proteins

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, David M.; Mustafi, Sourajit M.; Brecher, Matthew; Zhang, Jing; Heroux, Annie; Li, Hongmin; Hernandez, Griselda

    2015-05-07

    Interchanging Leu-119 for Pro-119 at the tip of the β45 loop in the first FK506 binding domain (FK1) of the FKBP51 and FKBP52 proteins, respectively, has been reported to largely reverse the inhibitory (FKBP51) or stimulatory (FKBP52) effects of these co-chaperones on the transcriptional activity of glucocorticoid and androgen receptor-protein complexes. Previous NMR relaxation studies have identified exchange line broadening, indicative of submillisecond conformational motion, throughout the β45 loop in the FK1 domain of FKBP51, which are suppressed by the FKBP52-like L119P substitution. This substitution also attenuates exchange line broadening in the underlying β2 and β3a strands that is centered near a bifurcated main chain hydrogen bond interaction between these two strands. The present study demonstrates that these exchange line broadening effects arise from two distinct coupled conformational transitions, and the transition within the β2 and β3a strands samples a transient conformation that resembles the crystal structures of the selectively inhibited FK1 domain of FKBP51 recently reported. Although the crystal structures for their series of inhibitors were interpreted as evidence for an induced fit mechanism of association, the presence of a similar conformation being significantly populated in the unliganded FKBP51 domain is more consistent with a conformational selection binding process. As a result, the contrastingly reduced conformational plasticity of the corresponding FK1 domain of FKBP52 is consistent with the current model in which FKBP51 binds to both the apo- and hormone-bound forms of the steroid receptor to modulate its affinity for ligand, whereas FKBP52 binds selectively to the latter state.

  12. Coupling of conformational transitions in the N-terminal domain of the 51-kDa FK506-binding protein (FKBP51) near its site of interaction with the steroid receptor proteins

    DOE PAGES

    LeMaster, David M.; Mustafi, Sourajit M.; Brecher, Matthew; ...

    2015-05-07

    Interchanging Leu-119 for Pro-119 at the tip of the β4-β5 loop in the first FK506 binding domain (FK1) of the FKBP51 and FKBP52 proteins, respectively, has been reported to largely reverse the inhibitory (FKBP51) or stimulatory (FKBP52) effects of these co-chaperones on the transcriptional activity of glucocorticoid and androgen receptor-protein complexes. Previous NMR relaxation studies have identified exchange line broadening, indicative of submillisecond conformational motion, throughout the β4-β5 loop in the FK1 domain of FKBP51, which are suppressed by the FKBP52-like L119P substitution. This substitution also attenuates exchange line broadening in the underlying β2 and β3a strands that is centeredmore » near a bifurcated main chain hydrogen bond interaction between these two strands. The present study demonstrates that these exchange line broadening effects arise from two distinct coupled conformational transitions, and the transition within the β2 and β3a strands samples a transient conformation that resembles the crystal structures of the selectively inhibited FK1 domain of FKBP51 recently reported. Although the crystal structures for their series of inhibitors were interpreted as evidence for an induced fit mechanism of association, the presence of a similar conformation being significantly populated in the unliganded FKBP51 domain is more consistent with a conformational selection binding process. As a result, the contrastingly reduced conformational plasticity of the corresponding FK1 domain of FKBP52 is consistent with the current model in which FKBP51 binds to both the apo- and hormone-bound forms of the steroid receptor to modulate its affinity for ligand, whereas FKBP52 binds selectively to the latter state.« less

  13. Crystal Structures and Functional Characterization of Wild Type and Active Sites Mutants of CYP101D1

    PubMed Central

    Batabyal, Dipanwita; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Although CYP101D1 and P450cam catayze the same reaction at a similar rate and share strikingly similar active site architectures, there are significance functional differences. CYP101D1 thus provides an opportunity to probe what structural and functional features must be shared and what can differ yet maintain high catalytic efficiency. Crystal structures of the cyanide complex of wild type CYP101D1 and it active site mutants, D259N and T260A, have been solved. The conformational changes in CYP101D1 upon cyanide binding are very similar to P450cam indicating a similar mechanism for proton delivery during oxygen activation using solvent assisted proton transfer. The D259N-CN− complex shows a perturbed solvent structure compared to wild type which is similar to what was observed in the oxy-complex of the corresonding D251N mutant in P450cam. As in P450cam the T260A mutant is highly uncoupled while the D259N gives barely detectable activity. Despite these similarities, CYP101D1 is able to use the P450cam redox partners while P450cam cannot use the CYP101D1 redox partners. Thus the strict requirement of P450cam for its own redox partner is relaxed in CYP101D1. Differences in the local environment of the essential Asp (Asp259 in CYP101D1) provides a strucutral basis for understanding these functional differences. PMID:24261604

  14. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  15. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  16. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  17. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  18. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  19. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  20. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  1. Robotics and Automation Activities at the Savannah River Site: A Site Report for SUBWOG 39F

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.

    1995-09-28

    The Savannah River Site has successfully used robots, teleoperators, and remote video to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, improve worker safety, and improve the quality of operations. Previous reports have described the use of mobile teleoperators in coping with a high level liquid waste spill, the removal of highly contaminated equipment, and the inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. This report will cover recent applications at the Savannah River, as well as systems which SRS has delivered to other DOE site customers.

  2. GAS HYDRATES AT TWO SITES OF AN ACTIVE CONTINENTAL MARGIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart on the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m.

  3. The Role of the β5-α11 Loop in the Active-Site Dynamics of Acylated Penicillin-Binding Protein A from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fedarovich, Alena; Nicholas, Robert A.; Davies, Christopher

    2013-04-22

    Penicillin-binding protein A (PBPA) is a class B penicillin-binding protein that is important for cell division in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We have determined a second crystal structure of PBPA in apo form and compared it with an earlier structure of apoenzyme. Significant structural differences in the active site region are apparent, including increased ordering of a β-hairpin loop and a shift of the SxN active site motif such that it now occupies a position that