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Sample records for active site cys

  1. The role of short-range Cys171-Cys178 disulfide bond in maintaining cutinase active site integrity: A molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Matak, Mehdi Youssefi; Moghaddam, Majid Erfani

    2009-12-11

    Understanding structural determinants in enzyme active site integrity can provide a good knowledge to design efficient novel catalytic machineries. Fusarium solani pisi cutinase with classic triad Ser-His-Asp is a promising enzyme to scrutinize these structural determinants. We performed two MD simulations: one, with the native structure, and the other with the broken Cys171-Cys178 disulfide bond. This disulfide bond stabilizes a turn in active site on which catalytic Asp175 is located. Functionally important H-bonds and atomic fluctuations in catalytic pocket have been changed. We proposed that this disulfide bond within active site can be considered as an important determinant of cutinase active site structural integrity.

  2. Involvement of the Cys-Tyr cofactor on iron binding in the active site of human cysteine dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Arjune, Sita; Schwarz, Guenter; Belaidi, Abdel A

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur metabolism has gained increasing medical interest over the last years. In particular, cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been recognized as a potential marker in oncology due to its altered gene expression in various cancer types. Human CDO is a non-heme iron-dependent enzyme, which catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid, which is further metabolized to taurine or pyruvate and sulfate. Several studies have reported a unique post-translational modification of human CDO consisting of a cross-link between cysteine 93 and tyrosine 157 (Cys-Tyr), which increases catalytic efficiency in a substrate-dependent manner. However, the reaction mechanism by which the Cys-Tyr cofactor increases catalytic efficiency remains unclear. In this study, steady-state kinetics were determined for wild type CDO and two different variants being either impaired or saturated with the Cys-Tyr cofactor. Cofactor formation in CDO resulted in an approximately fivefold increase in k cat and tenfold increase in k cat/K m over the cofactor-free CDO variant. Furthermore, iron titration experiments revealed an 18-fold decrease in K d of iron upon cross-link formation. This finding suggests a structural role of the Cys-Tyr cofactor in coordinating the ferrous iron in the active site of CDO in accordance with the previously postulated reaction mechanism of human CDO. Finally, we identified product-based inhibition and α-ketoglutarate and glutarate as CDO inhibitors using a simplified well plate-based activity assay. This assay can be used for high-throughput identification of additional inhibitors, which may contribute to understand the functional importance of CDO in sulfur amino acid metabolism and related diseases.

  3. Mutagenesis of Zinc Ligand Residue Cys221 Reveals Plasticity in the IMP-1 Metallo-β-Lactamase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Lori B.; Shanker, Sreejesh; Mikulski, Rose; Brown, Nicholas G.; Phillips, Kevin J.; Lykissa, Ernest; Venkataram Prasad, B. V.

    2012-01-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases catalyze the hydrolysis of a broad range of β-lactam antibiotics and are a concern for the spread of drug resistance. To analyze the determinants of enzyme structure and function, the sequence requirements for the subclass B1 IMP-1 β-lactamase zinc binding residue Cys221 were tested by saturation mutagenesis and evaluated for protein expression, as well as hydrolysis of β-lactam substrates. The results indicated that most substitutions at position 221 destabilized the enzyme. Only the enzymes containing C221D and C221G substitutions were expressed well in Escherichia coli and exhibited catalytic activity toward β-lactam antibiotics. Despite the lack of a metal-chelating group at position 221, the C221G enzyme exhibited high levels of catalytic activity in the presence of exogenous zinc. Molecular modeling suggests the glycine substitution is unique among substitutions in that the complete removal of the cysteine side chain allows space for a water molecule to replace the thiol and coordinate zinc at the Zn2 zinc binding site to restore function. Multiple methods were used to estimate the C221G Zn2 binding constant to be 17 to 43 μM. Studies of enzyme function in vivo in E. coli grown on minimal medium showed that both IMP-1 and the C221G mutant exhibited compromised activity when zinc availability was low. Finally, substitutions at residue 121, which is the IMP-1 equivalent of the subclass B3 zinc-chelating position, failed to rescue C221G function, suggesting the coordination schemes of subclasses B1 and B3 are not interchangeable. PMID:22908171

  4. The role of conserved Cys residues in Brassica rapa auxin amidohydrolase: Cys139 is crucial for the enzyme activity and Cys320 regulates enzyme stability.

    PubMed

    Smolko, Ana; Šupljika, Filip; Martinčić, Jelena; Jajčanin-Jozić, Nina; Grabar-Branilović, Marina; Tomić, Sanja; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Piantanida, Ivo; Salopek-Sondi, Branka

    2016-04-01

    Brassica rapa auxin amidohydrolase (BrILL2) participates in the homeostasis of the plant hormones auxins by hydrolyzing the amino acid conjugates of auxins, thereby releasing the free active form of hormones. Herein, the potential role of the two conserved Cys residues of BrILL2 (at sequence positions 139 and 320) has been investigated by using interdisciplinary approaches and methods of molecular biology, biochemistry, biophysics and molecular modelling. The obtained results show that both Cys residues participate in the regulation of enzyme activity. Cys320 located in the satellite domain of the enzyme is mainly responsible for protein stability and regulation of enzyme activity through polymer formation, as has been revealed by enzyme kinetics and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of the BrILL2 wild type and mutants C320S and C139S. Cys139 positioned in the active site of the catalytic domain is involved in the coordination of one Mn(2+) ion of the bimetal center and is crucial for the enzymatic activity. Although the point mutation Cys139 to Ser causes the loss of enzyme activity, it does not affect the metal binding to the BrILL2 enzyme, as has been shown by isothermal titration calorimetry, circular dichroism spectropolarimetry and differential scanning calorimetry data. MD simulations (200 ns) revealed a different active site architecture of the BrILL2C139S mutant in comparison to the wild type enzyme. Additional possible reasons for the inactivity of the BrILL2C139S mutant have been discussed based on MD simulations and MM-PBSA free energy calculations of BrILL2 enzyme complexes (wt and C139S mutant) with IPA-Ala as a substrate.

  5. The role of conserved Cys residues in Brassica rapa auxin amidohydrolase: Cys139 is crucial for the enzyme activity and Cys320 regulates enzyme stability.

    PubMed

    Smolko, Ana; Šupljika, Filip; Martinčić, Jelena; Jajčanin-Jozić, Nina; Grabar-Branilović, Marina; Tomić, Sanja; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Piantanida, Ivo; Salopek-Sondi, Branka

    2016-04-01

    Brassica rapa auxin amidohydrolase (BrILL2) participates in the homeostasis of the plant hormones auxins by hydrolyzing the amino acid conjugates of auxins, thereby releasing the free active form of hormones. Herein, the potential role of the two conserved Cys residues of BrILL2 (at sequence positions 139 and 320) has been investigated by using interdisciplinary approaches and methods of molecular biology, biochemistry, biophysics and molecular modelling. The obtained results show that both Cys residues participate in the regulation of enzyme activity. Cys320 located in the satellite domain of the enzyme is mainly responsible for protein stability and regulation of enzyme activity through polymer formation, as has been revealed by enzyme kinetics and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of the BrILL2 wild type and mutants C320S and C139S. Cys139 positioned in the active site of the catalytic domain is involved in the coordination of one Mn(2+) ion of the bimetal center and is crucial for the enzymatic activity. Although the point mutation Cys139 to Ser causes the loss of enzyme activity, it does not affect the metal binding to the BrILL2 enzyme, as has been shown by isothermal titration calorimetry, circular dichroism spectropolarimetry and differential scanning calorimetry data. MD simulations (200 ns) revealed a different active site architecture of the BrILL2C139S mutant in comparison to the wild type enzyme. Additional possible reasons for the inactivity of the BrILL2C139S mutant have been discussed based on MD simulations and MM-PBSA free energy calculations of BrILL2 enzyme complexes (wt and C139S mutant) with IPA-Ala as a substrate. PMID:26959939

  6. Site-directed mutagenesis substituting cysteine for serine in 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx A) of Arabidopsis thaliana effectively improves its peroxidase and chaperone functions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Mi; Lee, Seung Sik; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Jung, Hyun Suk; Cao, Guang Ping; Lee, Yuno; Singh, Sudhir; Hong, Sung Hyun; Lee, Keun Woo; Lee, Sang Yeol; Cho, Jae-Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx) A protein of Arabidopsis thaliana performs the dual functions of a peroxidase and a molecular chaperone depending on its conformation and the metabolic conditions. However, the precise mechanism responsible for the functional switching of 2-Cys Prx A is poorly known. This study examines various serine-to-cysteine substitutions on α-helix regions of 2-Cys Prx A in Arabidopsis mutants and the effects they have on the dual function of the protein. Methods Various mutants of 2-Cys Prx A were generated by replacing serine (Ser) with cysteine (Cys) at different locations by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutants were then over-expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein was further analysed by size exclusion chromatography, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and image analysis. Peroxidase activity, molecular chaperone activity and hydrophobicity of the proteins were also determined. Molecular modelling analysis was performed in order to demonstrate the relationship between mutation positions and switching of 2-Cys Prx A activity. Key Results Replacement of Ser150 with Cys150 led to a marked increase in holdase chaperone and peroxidase activities of 2-Cys Prx A, which was associated with a change in the structure of an important domain of the protein. Molecular modelling demonstrated the relationship between mutation positions and the switching of 2-Cys Prx A activity. Examination of the α2 helix, dimer–dimer interface and C-term loop indicated that the peroxidase function is associated with a fully folded α2 helix and easy formation of a stable reduced decamer, while a more flexible C-term loop makes the chaperone function less likely. Conclusions Substitution of Cys for Ser at amino acid location 150 of the α-helix of 2-Cys Prx A regulates/enhances the dual enzymatic functions of the 2-Cys Prx A protein. If confirmed in planta, this

  7. A Redox 2-Cys Mechanism Regulates the Catalytic Activity of Divergent Cyclophilins1[W

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Bruna Medéia; Sforça, Mauricio Luis; Ambrosio, Andre Luis Berteli; Domingues, Mariane Noronha; Brasil de Souza, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalvez; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Perez, Carlos Alberto; Whittaker, Sara Britt-Marie; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Matos; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The citrus (Citrus sinensis) cyclophilin CsCyp is a target of the Xanthomonas citri transcription activator-like effector PthA, required to elicit cankers on citrus. CsCyp binds the citrus thioredoxin CsTdx and the carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II and is a divergent cyclophilin that carries the additional loop KSGKPLH, invariable cysteine (Cys) residues Cys-40 and Cys-168, and the conserved glutamate (Glu) Glu-83. Despite the suggested roles in ATP and metal binding, the functions of these unique structural elements remain unknown. Here, we show that the conserved Cys residues form a disulfide bond that inactivates the enzyme, whereas Glu-83, which belongs to the catalytic loop and is also critical for enzyme activity, is anchored to the divergent loop to maintain the active site open. In addition, we demonstrate that Cys-40 and Cys-168 are required for the interaction with CsTdx and that CsCyp binds the citrus carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II YSPSAP repeat. Our data support a model where formation of the Cys-40-Cys-168 disulfide bond induces a conformational change that disrupts the interaction of the divergent and catalytic loops, via Glu-83, causing the active site to close. This suggests a new type of allosteric regulation in divergent cyclophilins, involving disulfide bond formation and a loop-displacement mechanism. PMID:23709667

  8. Site-Selective Glycosylation of Hemoglobin on Cys β93

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yalong; Bhatt, Veer S.; Sun, Guoyong; Wang, Peng G.; Palmer, Andre F.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a novel glycosylated hemoglobin (Hb) with high oxygen affinity as a potential Hb-based oxygen carrier. Site-selective glycosylation of bovine Hb was achieved by conjugating a lactose derivative to Cys 93 on the β subunit of Hb. LC-MS analysis indicates that the reaction was quantitative, with no unmodified Hb present in the reaction product. The glycosylation site was identified by chymotrypsin digestion of the glycosylated bovine Hb followed with LC-MS/MS and from the X-ray crystal structure of the glycosylated Hb. The chemical conjugation of the lactose derivative at Cys β93 yields an oxygen carrier with a high oxygen affinity (P50 of 4.94 mmHg) and low cooperativity coefficient (n) of 1.20. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AFFFF) coupled with multi-angle static light scattering (MASLS) was used to measure the absolute molecular weight of the glycosylated Hb. AFFFF-MASLS analysis indicates that glycosylation of Hb significantly altered the α2β2-αβ equilibrium compared to native Hb. Subsequent X-ray analysis of the glycosylated Hb crystal showed that the covalently linked lactose derivative is sandwiched between the β1 and α2 (and hence by symmetry the β2 and α1) subunits of the tetramer, and the interaction between the saccharide and amino acid residues located at the interface is apparently stabilized by hydrogen bonding interactions. The resultant structural analysis of the glycosylated Hb helps to explain the shift in the α2β2-αβ equilibrium in terms of the hydrogen bonding interactions at the β1α2/β2α1 interface. Taken together, all of these results indicate that it is feasible to site-specifically glycosylate Hb. This work has great potential in developing an oxygen carrier with defined chemistry that can target oxygen delivery to low pO2 tissues and organs. PMID:18925771

  9. Free-thiol Cys331 exposed during activation process is critical for native tetramer structure of cathepsin C (dipeptidyl peptidase I)

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Martin; Baudyš, Miroslav; Voburka, Zdeněk; Kluh, Ivan; Vondrášek, Jiří; Mareš, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The mature bovine cathepsin C (CC) molecule is composed of four identical monomers, each proteolytically processed into three chains. Five intrachain disulfides and three nonpaired cysteine residues per monomer were identified. Beside catalytic Cys234 in the active site, free-thiol Cys331 and Cys424 were characterized. Cys424 can be classified as inaccessible buried residue. Selective modification of Cys331 results in dissociation of native CC tetramer into dimers. The 3D homology-based model of the CC catalytic core suggests that Cys331 becomes exposed as the activation peptide is removed during procathepsin C activation. The model further shows that exposed Cys331 is surrounded by a surface hydrophobic cluster, unique to CC, forming a dimer–dimer interaction interface. Substrate/inhibitor recognition of the active site in the CC dimer differs significantly from that in the native tetramer. Taken together, a mechanism is proposed that assumes that the CC tetramer formation results in a site-specific occlusion of endopeptidase-like active site cleft of each CC monomeric unit. Thus, tetramerization provides for the structural basis of the dipeptidyl peptidase activity of CC through a substrate access-limiting mechanism different from those found in homologous monomeric exopeptidases cathepsin H and B. In conclusion, the mechanism of tetramer formation as well as specific posttranslational processing segregates CC in the family of papain proteases. PMID:11910036

  10. Overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxins: balancing toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Puerto-Galán, Leonor; Pérez-Ruiz, Juan M.; Ferrández, Julia; Cano, Beatriz; Naranjo, Belén; Nájera, Victoria A.; González, Maricruz; Lindahl, Anna M.; Cejudo, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthesis, the primary source of biomass and oxygen into the biosphere, involves the transport of electrons in the presence of oxygen and, therefore, chloroplasts constitute an important source of reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide. If accumulated at high level, hydrogen peroxide may exert a toxic effect; however, it is as well an important second messenger. In order to balance the toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide its level has to be tightly controlled. To this end, chloroplasts are equipped with different antioxidant systems such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs), thiol-based peroxidases able to reduce hydrogen and organic peroxides. At high peroxide concentrations the peroxidase function of 2-Cys Prxs may become inactivated through a process of overoxidation. This inactivation has been proposed to explain the signaling function of hydrogen peroxide in eukaryotes, whereas in prokaryotes, the 2-Cys Prxs of which were considered to be insensitive to overoxidation, the signaling activity of hydrogen peroxide is less relevant. Here we discuss the current knowledge about the mechanisms controlling 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in chloroplasts, organelles with an important signaling function in plants. Given the prokaryotic origin of chloroplasts, we discuss the occurrence of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in cyanobacteria with the aim of identifying similarities between chloroplasts and their ancestors regarding their response to hydrogen peroxide. PMID:23967002

  11. Overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxins: balancing toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Puerto-Galán, Leonor; Pérez-Ruiz, Juan M; Ferrández, Julia; Cano, Beatriz; Naranjo, Belén; Nájera, Victoria A; González, Maricruz; Lindahl, Anna M; Cejudo, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthesis, the primary source of biomass and oxygen into the biosphere, involves the transport of electrons in the presence of oxygen and, therefore, chloroplasts constitute an important source of reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide. If accumulated at high level, hydrogen peroxide may exert a toxic effect; however, it is as well an important second messenger. In order to balance the toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide its level has to be tightly controlled. To this end, chloroplasts are equipped with different antioxidant systems such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs), thiol-based peroxidases able to reduce hydrogen and organic peroxides. At high peroxide concentrations the peroxidase function of 2-Cys Prxs may become inactivated through a process of overoxidation. This inactivation has been proposed to explain the signaling function of hydrogen peroxide in eukaryotes, whereas in prokaryotes, the 2-Cys Prxs of which were considered to be insensitive to overoxidation, the signaling activity of hydrogen peroxide is less relevant. Here we discuss the current knowledge about the mechanisms controlling 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in chloroplasts, organelles with an important signaling function in plants. Given the prokaryotic origin of chloroplasts, we discuss the occurrence of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in cyanobacteria with the aim of identifying similarities between chloroplasts and their ancestors regarding their response to hydrogen peroxide.

  12. Redox activity and multiple copper(I) coordination of 2His-2Cys oligopeptide.

    PubMed

    Choi, DongWon; Alshahrani, Aisha A; Vytla, Yashodharani; Deeconda, Manogna; Serna, Victor J; Saenz, Robert F; Angel, Laurence A

    2015-02-01

    Copper binding motifs with their molecular mechanisms of selective copper(I) recognition are essential molecules for acquiring copper ions, trafficking copper to specific locations and controlling the potentially damaging redox activities of copper in biochemical processes. The redox activity and multiple Cu(I) binding of an analog methanobactin peptide-2 (amb2) with the sequence acetyl-His1-Cys2-Tyr3-Pro4-His5-Cys6 was investigated using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and UV-Vis spectrophotometry analyses. The Cu(II) titration of amb2 showed oxidation of amb2 via the formation of intra- and intermolecular Cys-Cys disulfide bridges and the multiple Cu(I) coordination by unoxidized amb2 or the partially oxidized dimer and trimer of amb2. The principal product of these reactions was [amb2 + 3Cu(I)](+) which probably coordinates the three Cu(I) ions via two bridging thiolate groups of Cys2 and Cys6 and the δN6 of the imidazole groups of His6, as determined by geometry optimized structures at the B3LYP/LanL2DZ level of theory. The products observed by IM-MS showed direct correlation to spectral changes associated with disulfide bond formation in the UV-Vis spectrophotometric study. The results show that IM-MS analysis is a powerful technique for unambiguously determining the major ion species produced during the redox and metal binding chemistry of oligopeptides.

  13. Mechanisms of mitochondrial holocytochrome c synthase and the key roles played by cysteines and histidine of the heme attachment site, Cys-XX-Cys-His.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Shalon E; San Francisco, Brian; Mendez, Deanna L; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S; Rodgers, Kenton R; Bretsnyder, Eric C; Kranz, Robert G

    2014-10-17

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c assembly requires the covalent attachment of heme by thioether bonds between heme vinyl groups and a conserved CXXCH motif of cytochrome c/c1. The enzyme holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS) binds heme and apocytochrome c substrate to catalyze this attachment, subsequently releasing holocytochrome c for proper folding to its native structure. We address mechanisms of assembly using a functional Escherichia coli recombinant system expressing human HCCS. Human cytochrome c variants with individual cysteine, histidine, double cysteine, and triple cysteine/histidine substitutions (of CXXCH) were co-purified with HCCS. Single and double mutants form a complex with HCCS but not the triple mutant. Resonance Raman and UV-visible spectroscopy support the proposal that heme puckering induced by both thioether bonds facilitate release of holocytochrome c from the complex. His-19 (of CXXCH) supplies the second axial ligand to heme in the complex, the first axial ligand was previously shown to be from HCCS residue His-154. Substitutions of His-19 in cytochrome c to seven other residues (Gly, Ala, Met, Arg, Lys, Cys, and Tyr) were used with various approaches to establish other roles played by His-19. Three roles for His-19 in HCCS-mediated assembly are suggested: (i) to provide the second axial ligand to the heme iron in preparation for covalent attachment; (ii) to spatially position the two cysteinyl sulfurs adjacent to the two heme vinyl groups for thioether formation; and (iii) to aid in release of the holocytochrome c from the HCCS active site. Only H19M is able to carry out these three roles, albeit at lower efficiencies than the natural His-19.

  14. Redox activity and multiple copper(I) coordination of 2His-2Cys oligopeptide.

    PubMed

    Choi, DongWon; Alshahrani, Aisha A; Vytla, Yashodharani; Deeconda, Manogna; Serna, Victor J; Saenz, Robert F; Angel, Laurence A

    2015-02-01

    Copper binding motifs with their molecular mechanisms of selective copper(I) recognition are essential molecules for acquiring copper ions, trafficking copper to specific locations and controlling the potentially damaging redox activities of copper in biochemical processes. The redox activity and multiple Cu(I) binding of an analog methanobactin peptide-2 (amb2) with the sequence acetyl-His1-Cys2-Tyr3-Pro4-His5-Cys6 was investigated using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and UV-Vis spectrophotometry analyses. The Cu(II) titration of amb2 showed oxidation of amb2 via the formation of intra- and intermolecular Cys-Cys disulfide bridges and the multiple Cu(I) coordination by unoxidized amb2 or the partially oxidized dimer and trimer of amb2. The principal product of these reactions was [amb2 + 3Cu(I)](+) which probably coordinates the three Cu(I) ions via two bridging thiolate groups of Cys2 and Cys6 and the δN6 of the imidazole groups of His6, as determined by geometry optimized structures at the B3LYP/LanL2DZ level of theory. The products observed by IM-MS showed direct correlation to spectral changes associated with disulfide bond formation in the UV-Vis spectrophotometric study. The results show that IM-MS analysis is a powerful technique for unambiguously determining the major ion species produced during the redox and metal binding chemistry of oligopeptides. PMID:25800013

  15. A heparin binding site Arg79Cys missense mutation in the SERPINC1 gene in a Korean patient with hereditary antithrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jong-Ha; Maeng, Ho-Young; Kim, Hee-Jin; Lee, Kyung-A; Choi, Jong-Rak; Song, Jaewoo

    2011-01-01

    We describe a case of heparin binding site Arg79Cys mutation in the gene encoding antithrombin, SERPINC1, in a Korean patient with hereditary antithrombin (AT) deficiency. The patient was a 34-year-old Korean man who presented with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in his right leg without precipitating factors. On outpatient evaluation, coagulation tests without anticoagulation revealed a decreased AT III activity level at 48%, but normal AT III antigen level at 103%, indicating type II AT deficiency. Family studies revealed that his father (62 years of age) had decreased AT activity (48%) but had normal AT antigen levels (116%), indicating that the proband had a paternally inherited type II AT deficiency. Direct sequencing of the SERPINC1 gene in the patient and his father revealed a heterozygotic missense mutation, a cytosine to thymine substitution at nucleotide position 235 in exon 2 of the SERPINC1 gene (p.Arg79Cys). To our knowledge, this is the first report of Arg79Cys heterozygote mutation in family members with venous thromboembolism.

  16. Nematode cys-loop GABA receptors: biological function, pharmacology and sites of action for anthelmintics.

    PubMed

    Accardi, Michael V; Beech, Robin N; Forrester, Sean G

    2012-06-01

    Parasitic nematode infection of humans and livestock is a major problem globally. Attempts to control nematode populations have led to the development of several classes of anthelmintic, which target cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels. Unlike the vertebrate nervous system, the nematode nervous system possesses a large and diversified array of ligand-gated chloride channels that comprise key components of the inhibitory neurotransmission system. In particular, cys-loop GABA receptors have evolved to play many fundamental roles in nematode behaviour such as locomotion. Analysis of the genomes of several free-living and parasitic nematodes suggests that there are several groups of cys-loop GABA receptor subunits that, for the most part, are conserved among nematodes. Despite many similarities with vertebrate cys-loop GABA receptors, those in nematodes are quite distinct in sequence similarity, subunit composition and biological function. With rising anthelmintic resistance in many nematode populations worldwide, GABA receptors should become an area of increased scientific investigation in the development of the next generation of anthelmintics. PMID:22430311

  17. Nematode cys-loop GABA receptors: biological function, pharmacology and sites of action for anthelmintics.

    PubMed

    Accardi, Michael V; Beech, Robin N; Forrester, Sean G

    2012-06-01

    Parasitic nematode infection of humans and livestock is a major problem globally. Attempts to control nematode populations have led to the development of several classes of anthelmintic, which target cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels. Unlike the vertebrate nervous system, the nematode nervous system possesses a large and diversified array of ligand-gated chloride channels that comprise key components of the inhibitory neurotransmission system. In particular, cys-loop GABA receptors have evolved to play many fundamental roles in nematode behaviour such as locomotion. Analysis of the genomes of several free-living and parasitic nematodes suggests that there are several groups of cys-loop GABA receptor subunits that, for the most part, are conserved among nematodes. Despite many similarities with vertebrate cys-loop GABA receptors, those in nematodes are quite distinct in sequence similarity, subunit composition and biological function. With rising anthelmintic resistance in many nematode populations worldwide, GABA receptors should become an area of increased scientific investigation in the development of the next generation of anthelmintics.

  18. The nucleotide mapping of DNA double-strand breaks at the CYS3 initiation site of meiotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    de Massy, B; Rocco, V; Nicolas, A

    1995-01-01

    Initiation of meiotic recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs by localized DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at several locations in the genome, corresponding to hot spots for meiotic gene conversion and crossing over. The meiotic DSBs occur in regions of chromatin that are hypersensitive to nucleases. To gain insight into the molecular mechanism involved in the formation of these DSBs, we have determined their positions at the nucleotide level at the CYS3 hot spot of gene conversion on chromosome I. We found four major new features of these DSBs: (i) sites of DSBs are multiple with varying intensities and spacing within the promoter region of the CYS3 gene; (ii) no consensus sequence can be found at these sites, indicating that the activity involved in DSB formation has little or no sequence specificity; (iii) the breaks are generated by blunt cleavages; and (iv) the 5' ends are modified in rad50S mutant strains, where the processing of these ends is known to be prevented. We present a model for the initiation of meiotic recombination taking into account the implications of these results. Images PMID:7556102

  19. Asymmetric processing of mutant factor X Arg386Cys reveals differences between intrinsic and extrinsic pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Baroni, M; Pavani, G; Pinotti, M; Branchini, A; Bernardi, F; Camire, R M

    2015-10-01

    Alterations in coagulation factor X (FX) activation, mediated by the extrinsic VIIa/tissue factor (FVIIa/TF) or the intrinsic factor IXa/factor VIIIa (FIXa/FVIIIa) complexes, can result in hemorrhagic/prothrombotic tendencies. However, the molecular determinants involved in substrate recognition by these enzymes are poorly defined. Here, we investigated the role of arginine 386 (chymotrypsin numbering c202), a surface-exposed residue on the FX catalytic domain. The naturally occurring FX386Cys mutant and FX386Ala variant were characterized. Despite the unpaired cysteine, recombinant (r)FX386Cys was efficiently secreted (88.6±21.3% of rFXwt) and possessed normal clearance in mice. rFX386Cys was also normally activated by FVIIa/TF and displayed intact amidolytic activity. In contrast, rFX386Cys activation by the FIXa/FVIIIa complex was 4.5-fold reduced, which was driven by a decrease in the kcat (1.6∗10(-4) s(-1) vs 5.8∗10(-4) s(-1), rFXwt). The virtually unaltered Km (70.6 nM vs 55.6nM, rFXwt) suggested no major alterations in the FX substrate exosite. Functional assays in plasma supplemented with rFX386Cys indicated a remarkable reduction in the thrombin generation rate and thus in coagulation efficiency. Consistently, the rFX386Ala variant displayed similar biochemical features suggesting that global changes at position 386 impact the intrinsic pathway activation. These data indicate that the FXArg386 is involved in FIXa/FVIIIa-mediated FX activation and help in elucidating the bleeding tendency associated with the FX386Cys in a rare FX deficiency case. Taking advantage of the unpaired cysteine, the rFX386Cys mutant may be efficiently targeted by thiol-specific ligands and represent a valuable tool to study FX structure-function relationships both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26012870

  20. Increasing the hydrolysis constant of the reactive site upon introduction of an engineered Cys¹⁴-Cys³⁹ bond into the ovomucoid third domain from silver pheasant.

    PubMed

    Hemmi, Hikaru; Kumazaki, Takashi; Kojima, Shuichi; Yoshida, Takuya; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Yokosawa, Hideyoshi; Miura, Kin-Ichiro; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2011-08-01

    P14C/N39C is the disulfide variant of the ovomucoid third domain from silver pheasant (OMSVP3) introducing an engineered Cys¹⁴-Cys³⁹ bond near the reactive site on the basis of the sequence homology between OMSVP3 and ascidian trypsin inhibitor. This variant exhibits a narrower inhibitory specificity. We have examined the effects of introducing a Cys¹⁴-Cys³⁹ bond into the flexible N-terminal loop of OMSVP3 on the thermodynamics of the reactive site peptide bond hydrolysis, as well as the thermal stability of reactive site intact inhibitors. P14C/N39C can be selectively cleaved by Streptomyces griseus protease B at the reactive site of OMSVP3 to form a reactive site modified inhibitor. The conversion rate of intact to modified P14C/N39C is much faster than that for wild type under any pH condition. The pH-independent hydrolysis constant (K(hyd) °) is estimated to be approximately 5.5 for P14C/N39C, which is higher than the value of 1.6 for natural OMSVP3. The reactive site modified form of P14C/N39C is thermodynamically more stable than the intact one. Thermal denaturation experiments using intact inhibitors show that the temperature at the midpoint of unfolding at pH 2.0 is 59 °C for P14C/N39C and 58 °C for wild type. There have been no examples, except P14C/N39C, where introducing an engineered disulfide causes a significant increase in K(hyd) °, but has no effect on the thermal stability. The site-specific disulfide introduction into the flexible N-terminal loop of natural Kazal-type inhibitors would be useful to further characterize the thermodynamics of the reactive site peptide bond hydrolysis.

  1. Specific affinity-labeling of the nociceptin ORL1 receptor using a thiol-activated Cys(Npys)-containing peptide ligand.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Ayami; Nishimura, Hirokazu; Matsuyama, Yutaka; Liu, Xiaohui; Costa, Tommaso; Shimohigashi, Yasuyuki

    2016-11-01

    We previously showed that an antagonist-based peptide ligand, H-Cys(Npys)-Arg-Tyr-Tyr-Arg- Ile-Lys-NH2 , captures the free thiol groups in the ligand-binding site of the nociceptin receptor ORL1. However, the exact receptor sites of this thiol-disulfide exchange reaction have not been uncovered, although such identification would help to clarify the ligand recognition site. Since the Cys→Ala substitution prevents the reaction, we performed the so-called Ala scanning for all the Cys residues in the transmembrane (TM) domains of the ORL1 receptor. Seven different mutant receptors were soundly expressed in the COS-7 cells and examined for their specific affinity labeling by a competitive binding assay using nociceptin and [(3) H]nociceptin. The results of in vitro Ala scanning analyses revealed that the labeled residues were Cys59 in TM1, Cys215 and Cys231 in TM5, and Cys310 in TM7. The present study has provided a novel method of Cys(Npys)-affinity labeling for identification of the ligand-binding sites in the ORL1 receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 460-469, 2016.

  2. Spatial relationship between the nucleotide-binding site, Lys-61 and Cys-374 in actin and a conformational change induced by myosin subfragment-1 binding.

    PubMed

    Miki, M; dos Remedios, C G; Barden, J A

    1987-10-15

    The spatial relationship between Lys-61, the nucleotide binding site and Cys-374 was studied. Lys-61 was labelled with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate as a resonance energy acceptor, the nucleotide-binding site was labelled with the fluorescent ATP analogues epsilon ATP or formycin-A 5'-triphosphate (FTP) and Cys-374 was labelled with 5-(2-[(iodoacetyl)amino]ethyl)aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (1,5-IAEDANS) as a resonance energy donor. The distances between the nucleotide binding site and Lys-61 or between Lys-61 and Cys-374 were calculated to be 3.5 +/- 0.3 nm and 4.60 +/- 0.03 nm, respectively. (The assumption has been made in calculating these distances that the energy donor and acceptor rotate rapidly relative to the fluorescence lifetime.) On the other hand, when doubly-labelled actin with 1,5-IAEDANS at Cys-374 and FITC at Lys-61 was polymerized in the presence of a twofold molar excess of phalloidin [Miki, M. (1987) Eur. J. Biochem. 164, 229-235], the fluorescence of 1,5-IAEDANS bound to actin was quenched significantly. This could be attributed to inter-monomer energy transfer. The inter-monomer distance between FITC attached to Lys-61 in a monomer and 1,5-IAEDANS attached to Cys-374 in its nearest-neighbour monomer in an F-actin filament was calculated to be 3.34 +/- 0.06 nm, assuming that the likely change in the intra-monomer distance does not change during polymerization by more than 0.4 nm. One possible spatial relationship between Lys-61, Cys-374 and the nucleotide binding site in an F-actin filament is proposed. The effect of myosin subfragment-1 (S1) binding on the energy transfer efficiency was studied. The fluorescence intensity of AEDANS-FITC-actin decreased by 30% upon interaction with S1. The fluorescence intensity of AEDANS-FITC-actin polymer in the presence of phalloidin increased by 21% upon interaction with S1. The addition of ATP led to the fluorescence intensity returning to the initial level. Assuming that the change of fluorescence

  3. ATP-dependent modulation and autophosphorylation of rapeseed 2-Cys peroxiredoxin.

    PubMed

    Aran, Martin; Caporaletti, Daniel; Senn, Alejandro M; Tellez de Iñon, María T; Girotti, María R; Llera, Andrea S; Wolosiuk, Ricardo A

    2008-04-01

    2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prx) are ubiquitous thiol-containing peroxidases that have been implicated in antioxidant defense and signal transduction. Although their biochemical features have been extensively studied, little is known about the mechanisms that link the redox activity and non-redox processes. Here we report that the concerted action of a nucleoside triphosphate and Mg(2+) on rapeseed 2-Cys Prx reversibly impairs the peroxidase activity and promotes the formation of high molecular mass species. Using protein intrinsic fluorescence in the analysis of site-directed mutants, we demonstrate that ATP quenches the emission intensity of Trp179, a residue close to the conserved Cys175. More importantly, we found that ATP facilitates the autophosphorylation of 2-Cys Prx when the protein is successively reduced with thiol-bearing compounds and oxidized with hydroperoxides or quinones. MS analyses reveal that 2-Cys Prx incorporates the phosphoryl group into the Cys175 residue yielding the sulfinic-phosphoryl [Prx-(Cys175)-SO(2)PO(3)(2-)] and the sulfonic-phosphoryl [Prx-(Cys175)-SO(3)PO(3)(2-)] anhydrides. Hence, the functional coupling between ATP and 2-Cys Prx gives novel insights into not only the removal of reactive oxygen species, but also mechanisms that link the energy status of the cell and the oxidation of cysteine residues.

  4. Allosteric binding site in a Cys-loop receptor ligand-binding domain unveiled in the crystal structure of ELIC in complex with chlorpromazine

    PubMed Central

    Nys, Mieke; Wijckmans, Eveline; Farinha, Ana; Yoluk, Özge; Andersson, Magnus; Brams, Marijke; Spurny, Radovan; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Lindahl, Erik; Ulens, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels or Cys-loop receptors are responsible for fast inhibitory or excitatory synaptic transmission. The antipsychotic compound chlorpromazine is a widely used tool to probe the ion channel pore of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, which is a prototypical Cys-loop receptor. In this study, we determine the molecular determinants of chlorpromazine binding in the Erwinia ligand-gated ion channel (ELIC). We report the X-ray crystal structures of ELIC in complex with chlorpromazine or its brominated derivative bromopromazine. Unexpectedly, we do not find a chlorpromazine molecule in the channel pore of ELIC, but behind the β8–β9 loop in the extracellular ligand-binding domain. The β8–β9 loop is localized downstream from the neurotransmitter binding site and plays an important role in coupling of ligand binding to channel opening. In combination with electrophysiological recordings from ELIC cysteine mutants and a thiol-reactive derivative of chlorpromazine, we demonstrate that chlorpromazine binding at the β8–β9 loop is responsible for receptor inhibition. We further use molecular-dynamics simulations to support the X-ray data and mutagenesis experiments. Together, these data unveil an allosteric binding site in the extracellular ligand-binding domain of ELIC. Our results extend on previous observations and further substantiate our understanding of a multisite model for allosteric modulation of Cys-loop receptors. PMID:27791038

  5. 6-Shogaol has anti-amyloidogenic activity and ameliorates Alzheimer's disease via CysLT1R-mediated inhibition of cathepsin B.

    PubMed

    Na, Ji-Young; Song, Kibbeum; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Sokho; Kwon, Jungkee

    2016-08-12

    Although 6-shogaol, a constituent of ginger, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects on neuronal cells, the effects of 6-shogaol on Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not yet been investigated. Here we aimed to determine whether 6-shogaol exerts neuroprotective effects against AD. Specifically, we investigated the effects of 6-shogaol on the cysteinyl leukotriene 1 receptor (CysLT1R), a major factor in AD pathogenesis. Moreover, we clarified the relationship between CysLT1R and cathepsin B, a cysteine protease. We used in vitro and in vivo models to determine whether 6-shogaol inhibits CysLT1R/cathepsin B in an amyloid-beta (Aβ; 1-42)-induced model of neurotoxicity. We first confirmed that CysLT1R and cathepsin B are upregulated by Aβ (1-42) and that CysLT1R activation induces cathepsin B. In contrast, we found that 6-shogaol-mediated inhibition of CysLT1R downregulates cathepsin B in both in vitro and in vivo models. Furthermore, we found that 6-shogaol-mediated inhibition of CysLT1R/cathepsin B reduces Aβ deposition in the brain and ameliorates behavioral deficits in APPSw/PS1-dE9 Tg mice. Our results indicate that 6-shogaol is a CysLT1R/cathepsin B inhibitor and is a novel potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases, including AD. PMID:27286707

  6. Association of the hOGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Coppedè, Fabio; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Lo Gerfo, Annalisa; Carlesi, Cecilia; Piazza, Selina; Rocchi, Anna; Petrozzi, Lucia; Nesti, Claudia; Micheli, Dario; Bacci, Andrea; Migliore, Lucia; Murri, Luigi; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2007-06-13

    Amyotropic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal and progressive neurodegenerative disease causing the loss of motoneurons of the brain and the spinal cord. The etiology of ALS is still uncertain, but males are at increased risk for the disease than females. Several studies have suggested that motoneurons in ALS might be subjected to the double insult of increased DNA oxidative damage and deficiencies in DNA repair systems. Particularly, increased levels of 8-oxoguanine and impairments of the DNA base excision repair system have been observed in neurons of ALS patients. There is evidence that the Ser326Cys polymorphism of the human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) gene is associated with a reduced DNA repair activity. To evaluate the role of the hOGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism in sporadic ALS (sALS), we screened 136 patients and 129 matched controls. In the total population, we observed association between both the Cys326 allele (p=0.02) and the combined Ser326Cys+Cys326Cys genotype (OR=1.65, 95% CI=1.06-2.88) and increased risk of disease. After stratification by gender, the Cys326 allele (p=0.01), both the Ser326Cys genotype (OR=2.14, 95% CI=1.09-4.19) and the combined Ser326Cys+Cys326Cys genotype (OR=2.15, 95% CI=1.16-4.01) were associated with sALS risk only in males. No significant association between the Ser326Cys polymorphism and disease phenotype, including age and site of onset and disease progression, was observed. Present results suggest a possible involvement of the hOGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism in sALS pathogenesis. PMID:17531381

  7. The activity of TcCYS4 modified by variations in pH and temperature can affect symptoms of witches' broom disease of cocoa, caused by the fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Ana Camila Oliveira; Souza, Cristiane Ferreira; Monzani, Paulo Sérgio; Garcia, Wanius; de Almeida, Alex Alan Furtado; Costa, Marcio Gilberto Cardoso; Pirovani, Carlos Priminho

    2015-01-01

    The phytocystatins regulate various physiological processes in plants, including responses to biotic and abiotic stresses, mainly because they act as inhibitors of cysteine proteases. In this study, we have analyzed four cystatins from Theobroma cacao L. previously identified in ESTs libraries of the interaction with the fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa and named TcCYS1, TcCYS2, TcCYS3 and TcCYS4. The recombinant cystatins were purified and subjected to the heat treatment, at different temperatures, and their thermostabilities were monitored using their ability to inhibit papain protease. TcCYS1 was sensitive to temperatures above 50°C, while TcCYS2, TcCYS3, and TcCYS4 were thermostable. TcCYS4 presented a decrease of inhibitory activity when it was treated at temperatures between 60 and 70°C, with the greater decrease occurring at 65°C. Analyses by native gel electrophoresis and size-exclusion chromatography showed that TcCYS4 forms oligomers at temperatures between 60 and 70°C, condition where reduction of inhibitory activity was observed. TcCYS4 oligomers remain stable for up to 20 days after heat treatment and are undone after treatment at 80°C. TcCYS4 presented approximately 90% of inhibitory activity at pH values between 5 and 9. This protein treated at temperatures above 45°C and pH 5 presented reduced inhibitory activity against papain, suggesting that the pH 5 enhances the formation of TcCYS4 oligomers. A variation in the titratable acidity was observed in tissues of T. cacao during the symptoms of witches' broom disease. Our findings suggest that the oligomerization of TcCYS4, favored by variations in pH, is an endergonic process. We speculate that this process can be involved in the development of the symptoms of witches' broom disease in cocoa.

  8. Cys-Gly specific dipeptidase Dug1p from S. cerevisiae binds promiscuously to di-, tri-, and tetra-peptides: Peptide-protein interaction, homology modeling, and activity studies reveal a latent promiscuity in substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Hardeep; Datt, Manish; Ekka, Mary Krishna; Mittal, Monica; Singh, Appu Kumar; Kumaran, Sangaralingam

    2011-02-01

    Dug1p is a recently identified novel dipeptidase and plays an important role in glutathione (GSH) degradation. To understand the mechanism of its substrate recognition and specificity towards Cys-Gly dipeptides, we characterized the solution properties of Dug1p and studied the thermodynamics of Dug1p-peptide interactions. In addition, we used homology modeling and ligand docking approaches to get structural insights into Dug1p-peptide interaction. Dug1p exists as dimer and the stoichiometry of peptide-Dug1p complex is 2:1 indicating each monomer in the dimer binds to one peptide. Thermodynamic studies indicate that the free energy change for Dug1p-peptide complex formation is similar (▵G(bind) ∼ -7.0 kcal/mol) for a variety of peptides of different composition and length (22 peptides). Three-dimensional model of Dug1p is constructed and docking of peptides to the modeled structure suggests that hydrogen bonding to active site residues (E172, E171, and D137) lock the N-terminal of the peptide into the binding site. Dug1p recognizes peptides in a metal independent manner and peptide binding is not sensitive to salts (dlogK/dlog[salt] ∼ 0) over a range of [NaCl] (0.02-0.5 M), [ZnCl(2)], and [MnCl(2)] (0-0.5 mM). Our results indicate that promiscuity in peptide binding results from the locking of peptide N-terminus into the active site. These observations were supported by our competitive inhibition activity assays. Dug1p activity towards Cys-Gly peptide is significantly reduced (∼ 70%) in the presence of Glu-Cys-Gly. Therefore, Dug1p can recognize a variety of oligopeptides, but has evolved with post-binding screening potential to hydrolyze Cys-Gly peptides selectively.

  9. Recognition of a common rDNA target site in archaea and eukarya by analogous LAGLIDADG and His-Cys box homing endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Norimichi; Nomura, Yayoi; Sussman, Django; Klein, Daniel; Stoddard, Barry L

    2008-12-01

    The presence of a homing endonuclease gene (HEG) within a microbial intron or intein empowers the entire element with the ability to invade genomic targets. The persistence of a homing endonuclease lineage depends in part on conservation of its DNA target site. One such rDNA sequence has been invaded both in archaea and in eukarya, by LAGLIDADG and His-Cys box homing endonucleases, respectively. The bases encoded by this target include a universally conserved ribosomal structure, termed helix 69 (H69) in the large ribosomal subunit. This region forms the 'B2a' intersubunit bridge to the small ribosomal subunit, contacts bound tRNA in the A- and P-sites, and acts as a trigger for ribosome disassembly through its interactions with ribosome recycling factor. We have determined the DNA-bound structure and specificity profile of an archaeal LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease (I-Vdi141I) that recognizes this target site, and compared its specificity with the analogous eukaryal His-Cys box endonuclease I-PpoI. These homodimeric endonuclease scaffolds have arrived at similar specificity profiles across their common biological target and analogous solutions to the problem of accommodating conserved asymmetries within the DNA sequence, but with differences at individual base pairs that are fine-tuned to the sequence conservation of archaeal versus eukaryal ribosomes. PMID:18984620

  10. Natural Killer cell-dependent and non-dependent anti-viral activity of 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin against HIV

    PubMed Central

    Asmal, Mohammed; Letvin, Norman L.; Geiben-Lynn, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    2-cys peroxiredoxins (Prx), a group of anti-oxidative enzyme proteins, act directly on virally-infected cells to inhibit HIV-1 replication, and indirectly through destruction of HIV infected cells by stimulation of Natural Killer (NK) cell-mediated immune responses. We assayed for antibody-dependent NK cell mediated viral inhibition (ADCVI) using plasma from SIV-infected rhesus macaques. We found that Prx-1 strongly increased ADCVI in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting augmentation of NK cell killing. We also investigated the effect of Prx-1 on NK cell-independent HIV-1 and HIV-2 inhibition. We found that primary HIV isolates were potently inhibited at nM concentrations, regardless of viral clade, receptor usage or anti-retroviral drug resistance. During NK cell independent inhibition, we found that Prx-1 reversed the HIV-1 induced gene expression of Heat shock protein 90 kDa alpha (cystolic), class A member 2, (HSP90), a protein of the stress pathway. Prx-1 highly activated Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2B (CDKN2B), a gene of the TGF-β pathway, and Baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 2 (Birc-2), an anti-apoptotic gene of the NF-κB pathway. We identified gene-expression networks highly dependent on the NFκB and ERK1/2 pathways. Our findings demonstrate that Prx-1 inhibits HIV replication through NK cell-dependent and NK cell-independent mechanisms. PMID:24244928

  11. Improvement of chaperone activity of 2-Cys peroxiredoxin using electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung Hyun; An, Byung Chull; Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, Jae Taek; Cho, Jae-Hyun; Jung, Hyun Suk; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2012-08-01

    The peroxiredoxin protein expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaPrx) is a typical 2-cysteine peroxiredoxin that has dual functions as both a thioredoxin-dependent peroxidase and molecular chaperone. As the function of PaPrx is regulated by its structural status, in the present study, we examined the effects of electron beam radiation on the structural modifications of PaPrx, as well as changes to PaPrx peroxidase and chaperone functions. It was found that the chaperone activity of PaPrx was increased approximately 3- to 4-fold at 2 kGy when compared to non-irradiated PaPrx, while its peroxidase activity decreased. This corresponded to a shift from the low molecular weight PaPrx species that acts as a peroxidase to the high molecular weight complex that functions as a chaperone, as detected using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We also investigated the influence of the electron beam on physical protein properties such as hydrophobicity and secondary structure. The exposure of the PaPrx hydrophobic domains in response to irradiation reached a peak at 2 kGy and then decreased in a dose-dependent manner at higher doses. In addition, the exposure of β-sheet and random coil elements on the surface of PaPrx was significantly increased following irradiation with an electron beam, whereas exposure of α-helix and turn elements was decreased. These results suggest that irradiated PaPrx may be a potential candidate for use in bio-engineering systems and various industrial applications, due to its enhanced chaperone activity.

  12. The desensitization gate of inhibitory Cys-loop receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielen, Marc; Thomas, Philip; Smart, Trevor G.

    2015-04-01

    Cys-loop neurotransmitter-gated ion channels are vital for communication throughout the nervous system. Following activation, these receptors enter into a desensitized state in which the ion channel shuts even though the neurotransmitter molecules remain bound. To date, the molecular determinants underlying this most fundamental property of Cys-loop receptors have remained elusive. Here we present a generic mechanism for the desensitization of Cys-loop GABAA (GABAARs) and glycine receptors (GlyRs), which both mediate fast inhibitory synaptic transmission. Desensitization is regulated by interactions between the second and third transmembrane segments, which affect the ion channel lumen near its intracellular end. The GABAAR and GlyR pore blocker picrotoxin prevented desensitization, consistent with its deep channel-binding site overlapping a physical desensitization gate.

  13. The desensitization gate of inhibitory Cys-loop receptors.

    PubMed

    Gielen, Marc; Thomas, Philip; Smart, Trevor G

    2015-01-01

    Cys-loop neurotransmitter-gated ion channels are vital for communication throughout the nervous system. Following activation, these receptors enter into a desensitized state in which the ion channel shuts even though the neurotransmitter molecules remain bound. To date, the molecular determinants underlying this most fundamental property of Cys-loop receptors have remained elusive. Here we present a generic mechanism for the desensitization of Cys-loop GABAA (GABAARs) and glycine receptors (GlyRs), which both mediate fast inhibitory synaptic transmission. Desensitization is regulated by interactions between the second and third transmembrane segments, which affect the ion channel lumen near its intracellular end. The GABAAR and GlyR pore blocker picrotoxin prevented desensitization, consistent with its deep channel-binding site overlapping a physical desensitization gate. PMID:25891813

  14. Construction of a family of Cys2His2 zinc binding sites in the hydrophobic core of thioredoxin by structure-based design.

    PubMed

    Wisz, M S; Garrett, C Z; Hellinga, H W

    1998-06-01

    A semi-automated, rational design strategy has been used to introduce a family of seven single, mononuclear Cys2His2 zinc sites at various locations in the hydrophobic core of Escherichia colithioredoxin, a protein that is normally devoid of metal centers. The electronic absorption spectra of the CoII complexes show that five of these designed proteins bind metal with the intended tetrahedral geometry. The designed sites differ in their metal-binding constants and effects on protein stability. Since these designs are constructed within the same host protein framework, comparison of their behavior allows a qualitative evaluation of dominant factors that contribute to metal-binding and metal-mediated protein stabilization. Metal-binding constants are dominated by steric interactions between the buried, designed coordination sphere and the surrounding protein matrix. Metal-mediated stability is the consequence of differential binding to the native and unfolded states. Increased interactions with the unfolded state decrease the stabilizing effect of metal binding. The affinity for the unfolded state is dependent on the placement of the primary coordination sphere residues within the linear protein sequence. These results indicate that a protein fold can have a remarkably broad potential for accommodating metal-mediated cross-links and suggest strategies for engineering protein stability by constructing metal sites that maximize metal binding to the native state and minimize binding to the unfolded state.

  15. The Activity of TcCYS4 Modified by Variations in pH and Temperature Can Affect Symptoms of Witches’ Broom Disease of Cocoa, Caused by the Fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Ana Camila Oliveira; Souza, Cristiane Ferreira; Monzani, Paulo Sérgio; Garcia, Wanius; de Almeida, Alex Alan Furtado; Costa, Marcio Gilberto Cardoso; Pirovani, Carlos Priminho

    2015-01-01

    The phytocystatins regulate various physiological processes in plants, including responses to biotic and abiotic stresses, mainly because they act as inhibitors of cysteine proteases. In this study, we have analyzed four cystatins from Theobroma cacao L. previously identified in ESTs libraries of the interaction with the fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa and named TcCYS1, TcCYS2, TcCYS3 and TcCYS4. The recombinant cystatins were purified and subjected to the heat treatment, at different temperatures, and their thermostabilities were monitored using their ability to inhibit papain protease. TcCYS1 was sensitive to temperatures above 50°C, while TcCYS2, TcCYS3, and TcCYS4 were thermostable. TcCYS4 presented a decrease of inhibitory activity when it was treated at temperatures between 60 and 70°C, with the greater decrease occurring at 65°C. Analyses by native gel electrophoresis and size-exclusion chromatography showed that TcCYS4 forms oligomers at temperatures between 60 and 70°C, condition where reduction of inhibitory activity was observed. TcCYS4 oligomers remain stable for up to 20 days after heat treatment and are undone after treatment at 80°C. TcCYS4 presented approximately 90% of inhibitory activity at pH values between 5 and 9. This protein treated at temperatures above 45°C and pH 5 presented reduced inhibitory activity against papain, suggesting that the pH 5 enhances the formation of TcCYS4 oligomers. A variation in the titratable acidity was observed in tissues of T. cacao during the symptoms of witches’ broom disease. Our findings suggest that the oligomerization of TcCYS4, favored by variations in pH, is an endergonic process. We speculate that this process can be involved in the development of the symptoms of witches’ broom disease in cocoa. PMID:25830226

  16. Activation of superoxide formation and lysozyme release in human neutrophils by the synthetic lipopeptide Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4. Involvement of guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins and synergism with chemotactic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, R; Schultz, G; Richter-Freund, M; Metzger, J; Wiesmüller, K H; Jung, G; Bessler, W G; Hauschildt, S

    1990-01-01

    Upon exposure to the bacterial chemotactic peptide fMet-Leu-Phe, human neutrophils release lysozyme and generate superoxide anions (O2.-). The synthetic lipoamino acid N-palmitoyl-S-[2,3-bis(palmitoyloxy)-(2RS)-propyl]-(R)-cysteine (Pam3Cys), which is derived from the N-terminus of bacterial lipoprotein, when attached to Ser-(Lys)4 [giving Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4], activated O2.- formation and lysozyme release in human neutrophils with an effectiveness amounting to about 15% of that of fMet-Leu-Phe. Palmitic acid, muramyl dipeptide, lipopolysaccharide and the lipopeptides Pam3Cys-Ala-Gly, Pam3Cys-Ser-Gly, Pam3Cys-Ser, Pam3Cys-OMe and Pam3Cys-OH did not activate O2.- formation. Pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins) and functionally uncouples formyl peptide receptors from G-proteins, prevented activation of O2.- formation by fMet-Leu-Phe and inhibited Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4-induced O2.- formation by 85%. Lipopeptide-induced exocytosis was pertussis-toxin-insensitive. O2.- formation induced by Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 and fMet-Leu-Phe was enhanced by cytochalasin B, by a phorbol ester and by a diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor. Addition of activators of adenylate cyclase and removal of extracellular Ca2+ inhibited O2.- formation by fMet-Leu-Phe and Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 to different extents. Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 synergistically enhanced fMet-Leu-Phe-induced O2.- formation and primed neutrophils to respond to the chemotactic peptide at non-stimulatory concentrations. Our data suggest the following. (1) Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 activates neutrophils through G-proteins, involving pertussis-toxin-sensitive and -insensitive processes. (2) The signal transduction pathways activated by fMet-Leu-Phe and Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 are similar but not identical. (3) In inflammatory processes, bacterial lipoproteins and chemotactic peptides may interact synergistically to activate O2.- formation, leading to enhanced bactericidal activity. PMID:2160237

  17. Support for a three-dimensional structure predicting a Cys-Glu-Lys catalytic triad for Pseudomonas aeruginosa amidase comes from site-directed mutagenesis and mutations altering substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Novo, Carlos; Farnaud, Sebastien; Tata, Renée; Clemente, Alda; Brown, Paul R

    2002-08-01

    The aliphatic amidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa belongs to the nitrilase superfamily, and Cys(166) is the nucleophile of the catalytic mechanism. A model of amidase was built by comparative modelling using the crystal structure of the worm nitrilase-fragile histidine triad fusion protein (NitFhit; Protein Data Bank accession number 1EMS) as a template. The amidase model predicted a catalytic triad (Cys-Glu-Lys) situated at the bottom of a pocket and identical with the presumptive catalytic triad of NitFhit. Three-dimensional models for other amidases belonging to the nitrilase superfamily also predicted Cys-Glu-Lys catalytic triads. Support for the structure for the P. aeruginosa amidase came from site-direct mutagenesis and from the locations of amino acid residues that altered substrate specificity or binding when mutated. PMID:11955282

  18. Support for a three-dimensional structure predicting a Cys-Glu-Lys catalytic triad for Pseudomonas aeruginosa amidase comes from site-directed mutagenesis and mutations altering substrate specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Novo, Carlos; Farnaud, Sebastien; Tata, Renée; Clemente, Alda; Brown, Paul R

    2002-01-01

    The aliphatic amidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa belongs to the nitrilase superfamily, and Cys(166) is the nucleophile of the catalytic mechanism. A model of amidase was built by comparative modelling using the crystal structure of the worm nitrilase-fragile histidine triad fusion protein (NitFhit; Protein Data Bank accession number 1EMS) as a template. The amidase model predicted a catalytic triad (Cys-Glu-Lys) situated at the bottom of a pocket and identical with the presumptive catalytic triad of NitFhit. Three-dimensional models for other amidases belonging to the nitrilase superfamily also predicted Cys-Glu-Lys catalytic triads. Support for the structure for the P. aeruginosa amidase came from site-direct mutagenesis and from the locations of amino acid residues that altered substrate specificity or binding when mutated. PMID:11955282

  19. Catalytic Thr or Ser Residue Modulates Structural Switches in 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin by Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Tairum, Carlos A.; Santos, Melina Cardoso; Breyer, Carlos A.; Geyer, R. Ryan; Nieves, Cecilia J.; Portillo-Ledesma, Stephanie; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Toledo, José Carlos; Toyama, Marcos H.; Augusto, Ohara; Netto, Luis E. S.; de Oliveira, Marcos A.

    2016-01-01

    Typical 2-Cys Peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs) reduce hydroperoxides with extraordinary rates due to an active site composed of a catalytic triad, containing a peroxidatic cysteine (CP), an Arg, and a Thr (or Ser). 2-Cys Prx are involved in processes such as cancer; neurodegeneration and host-pathogen interactions. During catalysis, 2-Cys Prxs switch between decamers and dimers. Analysis of 2-Cys Prx structures in the fully folded (but not locally unfolded) form revealed a highly conserved, non-conventional hydrogen bond (CH-π) between the catalytic triad Thr of a dimer with an aromatic residue of an adjacent dimer. In contrast, structures of 2-Cys Prxs with a Ser in place of the Thr do not display this CH-π bond. Chromatographic and structural data indicate that the Thr (but not Ser) destabilizes the decamer structure in the oxidized state probably through steric hindrance. As a general trend, mutations in a yeast 2-Cys Prx (Tsa1) favoring the dimeric state also displayed a decreased catalytic activity. Remarkably, yeast naturally contains Thr-Ser variants (Tsa1 and Tsa2, respectively) with distinct oligomeric stabilities in their disulfide states. PMID:27629822

  20. Catalytic Thr or Ser Residue Modulates Structural Switches in 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin by Distinct Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tairum, Carlos A; Santos, Melina Cardoso; Breyer, Carlos A; Geyer, R Ryan; Nieves, Cecilia J; Portillo-Ledesma, Stephanie; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Toledo, José Carlos; Toyama, Marcos H; Augusto, Ohara; Netto, Luis E S; de Oliveira, Marcos A

    2016-09-15

    Typical 2-Cys Peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs) reduce hydroperoxides with extraordinary rates due to an active site composed of a catalytic triad, containing a peroxidatic cysteine (CP), an Arg, and a Thr (or Ser). 2-Cys Prx are involved in processes such as cancer; neurodegeneration and host-pathogen interactions. During catalysis, 2-Cys Prxs switch between decamers and dimers. Analysis of 2-Cys Prx structures in the fully folded (but not locally unfolded) form revealed a highly conserved, non-conventional hydrogen bond (CH-π) between the catalytic triad Thr of a dimer with an aromatic residue of an adjacent dimer. In contrast, structures of 2-Cys Prxs with a Ser in place of the Thr do not display this CH-π bond. Chromatographic and structural data indicate that the Thr (but not Ser) destabilizes the decamer structure in the oxidized state probably through steric hindrance. As a general trend, mutations in a yeast 2-Cys Prx (Tsa1) favoring the dimeric state also displayed a decreased catalytic activity. Remarkably, yeast naturally contains Thr-Ser variants (Tsa1 and Tsa2, respectively) with distinct oligomeric stabilities in their disulfide states.

  1. Catalytic Thr or Ser Residue Modulates Structural Switches in 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin by Distinct Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tairum, Carlos A; Santos, Melina Cardoso; Breyer, Carlos A; Geyer, R Ryan; Nieves, Cecilia J; Portillo-Ledesma, Stephanie; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Toledo, José Carlos; Toyama, Marcos H; Augusto, Ohara; Netto, Luis E S; de Oliveira, Marcos A

    2016-01-01

    Typical 2-Cys Peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs) reduce hydroperoxides with extraordinary rates due to an active site composed of a catalytic triad, containing a peroxidatic cysteine (CP), an Arg, and a Thr (or Ser). 2-Cys Prx are involved in processes such as cancer; neurodegeneration and host-pathogen interactions. During catalysis, 2-Cys Prxs switch between decamers and dimers. Analysis of 2-Cys Prx structures in the fully folded (but not locally unfolded) form revealed a highly conserved, non-conventional hydrogen bond (CH-π) between the catalytic triad Thr of a dimer with an aromatic residue of an adjacent dimer. In contrast, structures of 2-Cys Prxs with a Ser in place of the Thr do not display this CH-π bond. Chromatographic and structural data indicate that the Thr (but not Ser) destabilizes the decamer structure in the oxidized state probably through steric hindrance. As a general trend, mutations in a yeast 2-Cys Prx (Tsa1) favoring the dimeric state also displayed a decreased catalytic activity. Remarkably, yeast naturally contains Thr-Ser variants (Tsa1 and Tsa2, respectively) with distinct oligomeric stabilities in their disulfide states. PMID:27629822

  2. Chemical modification studies on arginine kinase: essential cysteine and arginine residues at the active site.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen-Jing; Li, Miao; Wang, Xiao-Yun

    2007-12-01

    Chemical modification was used to elucidate the essential amino acids in the catalytic activity of arginine kinase (AK) from Migratoria manilensis. Among six cysteine (Cys) residues only one Cys residue was determined to be essential in the active site by Tsou's method. Furthermore, the AK modified by DTNB can be fully reactivated by dithiothreitol (DTT) in a monophasic kinetic course. At the same time, this reactivation can be slowed down in the presence of ATP, suggesting that the essential Cys is located near the ATP binding site. The ionizing groups at the AK active site were studied and the standard dissociation enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ) was 12.38kcal/mol, showing that the dissociation group may be the guanidino of arginine (Arg). Using the specific chemical modifier phenylglyoxal (PG) demonstrated that only one Arg, located near the ATP binding site, is essential for the activity of AK. PMID:17765964

  3. Anisotropic Covalency Contributions to Superexchange Pathways in Type One Copper Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Type one (T1) Cu sites deliver electrons to catalytic Cu active sites: the mononuclear type two (T2) Cu site in nitrite reductases (NiRs) and the trinuclear Cu cluster in the multicopper oxidases (MCOs). The T1 Cu and the remote catalytic sites are connected via a Cys-His intramolecular electron-transfer (ET) bridge, which contains two potential ET pathways: P1 through the protein backbone and P2 through the H-bond between the Cys and the His. The high covalency of the T1 Cu–S(Cys) bond is shown here to activate the T1 Cu site for hole superexchange via occupied valence orbitals of the bridge. This covalency-activated electronic coupling (HDA) facilitates long-range ET through both pathways. These pathways can be selectively activated depending on the geometric and electronic structure of the T1 Cu site and thus the anisotropic covalency of the T1 Cu–S(Cys) bond. In NiRs, blue (π-type) T1 sites utilize P1 and green (σ-type) T1 sites utilize P2, with P2 being more efficient. Comparing the MCOs to NiRs, the second-sphere environment changes the conformation of the Cys-His pathway, which selectively activates HDA for superexchange by blue π sites for efficient turnover in catalysis. These studies show that a given protein bridge, here Cys-His, provides different superexchange pathways and electronic couplings depending on the anisotropic covalencies of the donor and acceptor metal sites. PMID:25310460

  4. Modification of Cys-837 identifies an actin-binding site in the beta-propeller protein scruin.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, S; Footer, M; Matsudaira, P

    1997-01-01

    In the acrosomal process of Limulus sperm, the beta-propeller protein scruin cross-links actin into a crystalline bundle. To confirm that scruin has the topology of a beta-propeller protein and to understand how scruin binds actin, we compared the solvent accessibility of cysteine residues in scruin and the acrosomal process by chemical modification with (1,5-IAEDANS). In soluble scruin, the two most reactive cysteines of soluble scruin are C837 and C900, whereas C146, C333, and C683 are moderately reactive. This pattern of reactivity is consistent with the topology of a typical beta-propeller protein; all of the reactive cysteines map to putative loops and turns whereas the unreactive cysteines lie within the predicted interior of the protein. The chemical reactivities of cysteine in the acrosomal process implicate C837 at an actin-binding site. In contrast to soluble scruin, in the acrosomal process, C837 is completely unreactive while the other cysteines become less reactive. Binding studies of chemically modified scruin correlate the extent of modification at C837 with the extent of inhibition of actin binding. Furthermore, peptides corresponding to residues flanking C837 bind actin and narrow a possible actin-binding region to a KQK sequence. On the basis of these studies, our results suggest that an actin-binding site lies in the C-terminal domain of scruin and involves a putative loop defined by C837. Images PMID:9188095

  5. Site-directed mutagenesis and high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of the active site of porphobilinogen deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.I.; Roessner, C.A.; Stolowich, N.J.; Karuso, P.; Williams, H.J.; Grant, S.K.; Gonzalez, M.D.; Hoshino, T. )

    1988-10-18

    The active site of porphobilinogen (PBG){sup 1} deaminase from Escherichia coli has been found to contain an unusual dipyrromethane derived from four molecules of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) covalently linked to Cys-242, one of the two cysteine residues conserved in E. coli and human deaminase. By use of a hemA{sup {minus}} strain of E. coli the enzyme was enriched from (5-{sup 13}C)ALA and examined by {sup 1}H-detected multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy, which revealed all of the salient features of a dipyrromethane composed of two PBG units linked heat to tail and terminating in a CH{sub 2}-S bond to a cysteine residue. Site-specific mutagenesis of Cys-99 and Cys-242, respectively, has shown that substitution of Ser for Cys-99 does not affect the enzymatic activity, whereas substitution of Ser for Cys-242 removes essentially all of the catalytic activity as measured by the conversion of the substrate PBG to uro'gen I. The NMR spectrum of the covalent complex of deaminase with the suicide inhibitor 2-bromo-(2,11-{sup 13}C{sub 2})PBG reveals that the aminomethyl terminus of the inhibitor reacts with the enzyme's cofactor at the {alpha}-free pyrrole. NMR spectroscopy of the ES{sub 2} complex confirmed a PBG-derived head-to-tail dipyrromethane attached to the {alpha}-free pyrrole position of the enzyme. A mechanistic rationale for deaminase is presented.

  6. A peroxiredoxin cDNA from Taiwanofungus camphorata: role of Cys31 in dimerization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Yu; Chen, Yu-Ting; Wen, Lisa; Sheu, Dey-Chyi; Lin, Chi-Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) play important roles in antioxidant defense and redox signaling pathways. A Prx isozyme cDNA (TcPrx2, 745 bp, EF552425) was cloned from Taiwanofungus camphorata and its recombinant protein was overexpressed. The purified protein was shown to exist predominantly as a dimer by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrolysis in the absence of a reducing agent. The protein in its dimeric form showed no detectable Prx activity. However, the protein showed increased Prx activity with increasing dithiothreitol concentration which correlates with dissociation of the dimer into monomer. The TcPrx2 contains two Cys residues. The Cys(60) located in the conserved active site is the putative active peroxidatic Cys. The role of Cys(31) was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis. The C31S mutant (C(31) → S(31)) exists predominantly as a monomer with noticeable Prx activity. The Prx activity of the mutant was higher than that of the corresponding wild-type protein by nearly twofold at 12 μg/mL. The substrate preference of the mutant was H2O2 > cumene peroxide > t-butyl peroxide. The Michaelis constant (K M) value for H2O2 of the mutant was 0.11 mM. The mutant enzyme was active under a broad pH range from 6 to 10. The results suggest a role of Cys(31) in dimerization of the TcPrx2, a role which, at least in part, may be involved in determining the activity of Prx. The C(31) residue does not function as a resolving Cys and therefore the TcPrx2 must follow the reaction mechanism of 1-Cys Prx. This TcPrx2 represents a new isoform of Prx family. PMID:24194195

  7. Molecular Cloning of cpcU and Heterodimeric Bilin Lyase Activity Analysis of CpcU and CpcS for Attachment of Phycocyanobilin to Cys-82 on the β-Subunit of Phycocyanin in Arthrospira platensis FACHB314.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fei; Zang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Xuecheng; Zhang, Ran; Huang, Xiaoyun; Hou, Lulu; Jiang, Minjie; Liu, Chang; Pang, Chunhong

    2016-01-01

    A new bilin lyase gene cpcU was cloned from Arthrospira platensis FACHB314 to study the assembly of the phycocyanin β-Subunit. Two recombinant plasmids, one contained the phycocyanobilin (PCB) producing genes (hoxI and pcyA), while the other contained the gene of the β-Subunit of phycobiliprotein (cpcB) and the lyase gene (cpcU, cpcS, or cpcU/S) were constructed and separately transferred into Escherichia coli in order to test the activities of relevant lyases for catalyzing PCB addition to CpcB during synthesizing fluorescent β-PC of A. platensis FACHB314. The fluorescence intensity examination showed that Cys-82 maybe the active site for the β-Subunit binding to PCBs and the attachment could be carried out by CpcU, CpcS, or co-expressed cpcU/S in A. platensis FACHB314. PMID:26999083

  8. Site-specific PEGylation of hemoglobin at Cys-93(beta): correlation between the colligative properties of the PEGylated protein and the length of the conjugated PEG chain.

    PubMed

    Manjula, B N; Tsai, A; Upadhya, R; Perumalsamy, K; Smith, P K; Malavalli, A; Vandegriff, K; Winslow, R M; Intaglietta, M; Prabhakaran, M; Friedman, J M; Acharya, A S

    2003-01-01

    Increasing the molecular size of acellular hemoglobin (Hb) has been proposed as an approach to reduce its undesirable vasoactive properties. The finding that bovine Hb surface decorated with about 10 copies of PEG5K per tetramer is vasoactive provides support for this concept. The PEGylated bovine Hb has a strikingly larger molecular radius than HbA (1). The colligative properties of the PEGylated bovine Hb are distinct from those of HbA and even polymerized Hb, suggesting a role for the colligative properties of PEGylated Hb in neutralizing the vasoactivity of acellular Hb. To correlate the colligative properties of surface-decorated Hb with the mass of the PEG attached and also its vasoactivity, we have developed a new maleimide-based protocol for the site-specific conjugation of PEG to Hb, taking advantage of the unusually high reactivity of Cys-93(beta) of oxy HbA and the high reactivity of the maleimide to protein thiols. PEG chains of 5, 10, and 20 kDa have been functionalized at one of their hydroxyl groups with a maleidophenyl moiety through a carbamate linkage and used to conjugate the PEG chains at the beta-93 Cys of HbA to generate PEGylated Hbs carrying two copies of PEG (of varying chain length) per tetramer. Homogeneous preparations of (SP-PEG5K)(2)-HbA, (SP-PEG10K)(2)-HbA, and (SP-PEG20K)(2)-HbA have been isolated by ion exchange chromatography. The oxygen affinity of Hb is increased slightly on PEGylation, but the length of the PEG-chain had very little additional influence on the O(2) affinity. Both the hydrodynamic volume and the molecular radius of the Hb increased on surface decoration with PEG and exhibited a linear correlation with the mass of the PEG chain attached. On the other hand, both the viscosity and the colloidal osmotic pressure (COP) of the PEGylated Hbs exhibited an exponential increase with the increase in PEG chain length. In contrast to the molecular volume, viscosity, and COP, the vasoactivity of the PEGylated Hbs was not a

  9. A Homozygous [Cys25]PTH(1-84) Mutation That Impairs PTH/PTHrP Receptor Activation Defines a Novel Form of Hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sihoon; Mannstadt, Michael; Guo, Jun; Kim, Seul Min; Yi, Hyon-Seung; Khatri, Ashok; Dean, Thomas; Okazaki, Makoto; Gardella, Thomas J; Jüppner, Harald

    2015-10-01

    Hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia are encountered in idiopathic hypoparathyroidism (IHP) and pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP1B). In contrast to PHP1B, which is caused by resistance toward parathyroid hormone (PTH), the genetic defects leading to IHP impair production of this important regulator of mineral ion homeostasis. So far, only five PTH mutations were shown to cause IHP, each of which is located in the hormone's pre-pro leader segment and thus impair hormone secretion. In three siblings affected by IHP, we now identified a homozygous arginine-to-cysteine mutation at position 25 (R25C) of the mature PTH(1-84) polypeptide; heterozygous family members are healthy. Depending on the assay used for evaluating these patients, plasma PTH levels were either low or profoundly elevated, thus leading to ambiguities regarding the underlying diagnosis, namely IHP or PHP1B. Consistent with increased PTH levels, recombinant [Cys25]PTH(1-84) and wild-type PTH(1-84) were secreted equally well by transfected COS-7 cells. However, synthetic [Cys25]PTH(1-34) was found to have a lower binding affinity for the PTH receptor type-1 (PTH1R) than PTH(1-34) and consequently a lower efficiency for stimulating cAMP formation in cells expressing this receptor. Consistent with these in vitro findings, long-term infusion of [Cys25]PTH(1-34) resulted only in minimal calcemic and phosphaturic responses, despite readily detectable levels of [Cys25]PTH(1-34) in plasma. The mineral ion abnormalities observed in the three IHP patients are thus most likely caused by the inherited homozygous missense PTH mutation, which reduces bioactivity of the secreted hormone. Based on these findings, screening for PTH(1-84) mutations should be considered when clinical and laboratory findings are consistent with PHP1B, but GNAS methylation changes have been excluded. Differentiating between IHP and PHP1B has considerable implications for genetic counseling, therapy, and long-term outcome because

  10. The functional role of Cys3-Cys4 loop in hydrophobin HGFI.

    PubMed

    Niu, Baolong; Gong, Yanbo; Gao, Xianghua; Xu, Haijin; Qiao, Mingqiang; Li, Wenfeng

    2014-11-01

    Hydrophobins are a large group of low-molecular weight proteins. These proteins are highly surface-active and can form amphipathic membranes by self-assembling at hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces. Based on physical properties and hydropathy profiles, hydrophobins are divided into two classes. Upon the analysis of amino acid sequences and higher structures, some models suggest that the Cys3-Cys4 loop regions in class I and II hydrophobins can exhibit remarkable difference in their alignment and conformation, and have a critical role in the rodlets structure formation. To examine the requirement for the Cys3-Cys4 loop in class I hydrophobins, we used protein fusion technology to obtain a mutant protein HGFI-AR by replacing the amino acids between Cys3 and Cys4 of the class I hydrophobin HGFI from Grifola frondosa with those ones between Cys3 and Cys4 of the class II hydrophobin HFBI from Trichoderma reesei. The gene of the mutant protein HGFI-AR was successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris. Water contact angle (WCA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements demonstrated that the purified HGFI-AR could form amphipathic membranes by self-assembling at mica and hydrophobic polystyrene surfaces. This property enabled them to alter the surface wettabilities of polystyrene and mica and change the elemental composition of siliconized glass. In comparison to recombinant class I hydrophobin HGFI (rHGFI), the membranes formed on hydrophobic surfaces by HGFI-AR were not robust enough to resist 1 % hot SDS washing. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements indicated that unlike rHGFI, no rodlet structure was observed on the mutant protein HGFI-AR coated mica surface. In addition, when compared to rHGFI, no secondary structural change was detected by Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy after HGFI-AR self-assembled at the water-air interface. HGFI-AR could not either be deemed responsible for the fluorescence intensity increase of Thioflavin T (THT) and the

  11. Development of a three-dimensional CysLT1 (LTD4) antagonist model with an incorporated amino acid residue from the receptor.

    PubMed

    Zwaagstra, M E; Schoenmakers, S H; Nederkoorn, P H; Gelens, E; Timmerman, H; Zhang, M Q

    1998-04-23

    This paper describes the molecular modeling of leukotriene CysLT1 (or LTD4) receptor antagonists. Several different structural classes of CysLT1 antagonists were superimposed onto the new and highly rigid CysLT1 antagonist 8-carboxy-3'-[2-(2-quinolinyl)ethenyl]flavone (1, VUF 5017) to generate a common pharmacophoric arrangement. On the basis of known structure-activity relationships of CysLT1 antagonists, the quinoline nitrogen (or a bioisosteric equivalent thereof) and an acidic function were taken as the matching points. In order to optimize the fitting of acidic moieties of all antagonists, an arginine residue from the receptor was proposed as the interaction site for the acidic moieties. Incorporation of this amino acid residue into the model revealed additional interactions between the guanidine group and the nitrogen atoms of quinoline-containing CysLT1 antagonists. In some cases, the arginine may even interact with pi-clouds of phenyl residues of CysLT1 antagonists. The alignment of Montelukast (MK-476) suggests the presence of an additional pocket in the binding site for CysLT1 antagonists. The derived model should be useful for a better understanding of the molecular recognition of the leukotriene CysLT1 receptor.

  12. Engineering of 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin for Enhanced Stress-Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    An, Byung Chull; Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, Jae Taek; Hong, Sung Hyun; Wi, Seung Gon; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2011-01-01

    A typical 2-cysteine peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx)-like protein (PpPrx) that alternatively acts as a peroxidase or a molecular chaperone in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 was previously characterized. The dual functions of PpPrx are regulated by the existence of an additional Cys112 between the active Cys51 and Cys171 residues. In the present study, additional Cys residues (Cys31, Cys112, and Cys192) were added to PpPrx variants to improve their enzymatic function. The optimal position of the additional Cys residues for the dual functionality was assessed. The peroxidase activities of the S31C and Y192C mutants were increased 3- to 4-fold compared to the wild-type, while the chaperone activity was maintained at > 66% of PpPrx. To investigate whether optimization of the dual functions could enhance stress-tolerance in vivo, a complementation study was performed. The S31C and Y192C mutants showed a much greater tolerance than other variants under a complex condition of heat and oxidative stresses. The optimized dual functions of PpPrx could be adapted for use in bioengineering systems and industries, such as to develop organisms that are more resistant to extreme environments. PMID:21773675

  13. Energy-transfer measurements of the Cys35-Cys84 distance in bovine cardiac troponin C.

    PubMed

    Liou, Y M; Fuchs, F

    1993-09-01

    Bovine cardiac troponin C (cTnC) has cysteine residues located in the non-functional Ca(2+)-binding loop I (Cys-35) and at the N-terminal end of the central helix (Cys-84) near site II, the regulatory Ca(2+)-binding site. Recently, we reported that the excimer fluorescence resulting from the dimerization of adjacent pyrene groups attached to the two Cys residues is reduced by Ca2+ binding to site II (Liou, Y.-M. and Fuchs, F. (1992) Biophys. J. 61, 892-901). This result would suggest that Ca2+ binding causes a separation of the two Cys residues, a conclusion at variance with predictions from molecular modeling studies (Herzberg, O., Moult, J. and James, M.N.G. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 2638-2644). Alternatively, the reduction in excimer fluorescence could be accounted for by an immobilization of the pyrene attached to Cys-84 by a Ca(2+)-induced hydrophobic pocket. To arrive at a more definitive interpretation of these experiments, we carried out steady-state fluorescence resonance energy-transfer measurements of the Cys35-Cys84 distance. We used three different donor-acceptor pairs: 2-(4'-(iodoacetamido)anilino) naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid (IAANS) and 4-dimethylamino-phenylazophenyl-4-maleimide (DABMI), IAANS and N-(4-(dimethyl-amino)-3,5-dinitrophenyl) maleimide (DDPM), and 5-((((2-iodoacetyl)amino)ethyl)amino)naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS) and DDPM. At pCa 8.0, the distances were 23.8, 21.0, and 22.0 A with the donor-acceptor pairs, IAANS-DABMI, IAANS-DDPM and IAEDAN-DDPM, respectively. At pCa 4.0, the distances were 25.8, 24.1 and 21.2 A. The distances at pCa 8 and pCa 4.0 were not significantly altered when labeled cTnC was complexed with cardiac troponin I (cTnI). Thus, Ca2+ has little, if any, effect on the Cys35-Cys84 distance. These results are consistent with a model in which Ca2+ binding induces a separation of helices B and C from helix D, without any relative movement of the two N-terminal Ca(2+)-binding domains.

  14. Role of Cys-1327 and Cys-1337 in redox sensitivity and allosteric monitoring in human carbamoyl phosphate synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hart, Emily J; Powers-Lee, Susan G

    2009-02-27

    Human carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (hCPS) has evolved critical features that allow it to remove excess and potentially neurotoxic ammonia via the urea cycle, including use of only free ammonia as a nitrogen donor, a K(m) for ammonia 100-fold lower than for CPSs that also use glutamine as a nitrogen donor, and required allosteric activation by N-acetylglutamate (AGA), a sensor of excess amino acids. The recent availability of a Schizosaccharomyces pombe expression system for hCPS allowed us to utilize protein engineering approaches to elucidate the distinctive hCPS properties. Although the site of AGA interaction is not defined, it is known that the binding of AGA to CPS leads to a conformational change in which a pair of cysteine side chains become proximate and can then be selectively induced to undergo disulfide bonding. We analyzed the response of hCPS cysteine mutants to thiol-specific reagents and identified Cys-1327 and Cys-1337 as the AGA-responsive proximate cysteines. Possibly two of the features unique to urea-specific CPSs, relative to other CPSs (the conserved Cys-1327/Cys-1337 pair and the occurrence at very high concentrations in the liver mitochondrial matrix) co-evolved to provide buffering against reactive oxygen species. Reciprocal mutation analysis of Escherichia coli CPS (eCPS), creating P909C and G919C and establishing the ability of these engineered cysteine residues to share a disulfide bond, indicated an eCPS conformational change at least partly similar to the hCPS conformational change induced by AGA. These findings strongly suggested an alternative eCPS conformation relative to the single crystal conformation thus far identified. PMID:19106093

  15. Overexpression and activities of 1-Cys peroxiredoxin from Pseudomonas fluorescens GcM5-1A carried by pine wood nematode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guohua; Feng, Kai; Guo, Daosen; Li, Ronggui

    2015-09-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are enzymatic antioxidants widely distributed in biological kingdoms, which constitute a family of heme-free peroxidases that reduce alkyl hydroperoxides and hydrogen peroxide. In this paper, an open reading frame (ORF) of 639 bp, which encoded a protein of 213 amino acid residues, was cloned from Pseudomonas fluorescens GcM5-1A carried by pine wood nematode. Amino acid sequence alignment showed that the encoded protein shared 99, 97, and 97 % identity with the thiol-specific antioxidant protein LsfA of P. fluorescens Q2-87, the peroxiredoxin of Pseudomonas sp. GM17 and 1-Cys peroxiredoxin of P. fluorescens Pf 0-1, respectively. The ORF was cloned into expressing vector pET-15b and introduced into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Overexpression of a 27-kDa protein was achieved by IPTG induction. The recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography on a Ni(2+) matrix column. Non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis indicated that part of the recombinant appeared in dimer form. Bioassay results showed that purified recombinant protein had both peroxidase and thioredoxin activity. Furthermore, E. coli expressing the ORF showed tolerance to hydrogen peroxide stress, which indicated that the gene might help P. fluorescens GcM5-1A resist hydrogen peroxide generated by host pines after pine wood nematode associated with this bacterium infected pine trees.

  16. Substance P primes lipoteichoic acid- and Pam3CysSerLys4-mediated activation of human mast cells by up-regulating Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Tancowny, Brian P; Karpov, Victor; Schleimer, Robert P; Kulka, Marianna

    2010-10-01

    Substance P (SP) is a neuropeptide with neuroimmunoregulatory activity that may play a role in susceptibility to infection. Human mast cells, which are important in innate immune responses, were analysed for their responses to pathogen-associated molecules via Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the presence of SP. Human cultured mast cells (LAD2) were activated by SP and TLR ligands including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Pam3CysSerLys4 (Pam3CSK4) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and mast cell leukotriene and chemokine production was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and gene expression by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Mast cell degranulation was determined using a β-hexosaminidase (β-hex) assay. SP treatment of LAD2 up-regulated mRNA for TLR2, TLR4, TLR8 and TLR9 while anti-immunoglobulin E (IgE) stimulation up-regulated expression of TLR4 only. Flow cytometry and western blot confirmed up-regulation of TLR2 and TLR8. Pretreatment of LAD2 with SP followed by stimulation with Pam3CSK4 or LTA increased production of leukotriene C4 (LTC(4) ) and interleukin (IL)-8 compared with treatment with Pam3CSK4 or LTA alone (>2-fold; P<0·01). SP alone activated 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) nuclear translocation but also augmented Pam3CSK4 and LTA-mediated 5-LO translocation. Pam3CSK4, LPS and LTA did not induce LAD2 degranulation. SP primed LTA and Pam3CSK4-mediated activation of JNK, p38 and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and activated the nuclear translocation of c-Jun, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) and cyclic-AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) transcription factors. Pretreatment with SP followed by LTA stimulation synergistically induced production of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8)/IL-8, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)/monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-6 protein. SP primes TLR2-mediated activation of human mast cells by up-regulating TLR expression and

  17. Active Site Characterization of Proteases Sequences from Different Species of Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Morya, V K; Yadav, Virendra K; Yadav, Sangeeta; Yadav, Dinesh

    2016-09-01

    A total of 129 proteases sequences comprising 43 serine proteases, 36 aspartic proteases, 24 cysteine protease, 21 metalloproteases, and 05 neutral proteases from different Aspergillus species were analyzed for the catalytically active site residues using MEROPS database and various bioinformatics tools. Different proteases have predominance of variable active site residues. In case of 24 cysteine proteases of Aspergilli, the predominant active site residues observed were Gln193, Cys199, His364, Asn384 while for 43 serine proteases, the active site residues namely Asp164, His193, Asn284, Ser349 and Asp325, His357, Asn454, Ser519 were frequently observed. The analysis of 21 metalloproteases of Aspergilli revealed Glu298 and Glu388, Tyr476 as predominant active site residues. In general, Aspergilli species-specific active site residues were observed for different types of protease sequences analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis of these 129 proteases sequences revealed 14 different clans representing different types of proteases with diverse active site residues.

  18. The role of amino acid residues in the active site of L-methionine γ-lyase from Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Mitsuki; Kudou, Daizou; Murano, Shouko; Shiba, Tomoo; Sato, Dan; Tamura, Takashi; Harada, Shigeharu; Inagaki, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Cys116, Lys240*, and Asp241* (asterisks indicate residues from the second subunit of the active dimer) at the active site of L-methionine γ-lyase of Pseudomonas putida (MGL_Pp) are highly conserved among heterologous MGLs. In a previous study, we found that substitution of Cys116 for His led to a drastic increase in activity toward L-cysteine and a decrease in that toward L-methionine. In this study, we examined some properties of the C116H mutant by kinetic analysis and 3D structural analysis. We assumed that substitution of Cys116 for His broke the original hydrogen-bond network and that this induced a significant effect of Tyr114 as a general acid catalyst, possibly due to the narrow space in the active site. The C116H mutant acquired a novel β-elimination activity and lead a drastic conformation change in the histidine residue at position 116 by binding the substrate, suggesting that this His residue affects the reaction specificity of C116H. Furthermore, we suggest that Lys240* is important for substrate recognition and structural stability and that Asp241* is also involved in substrate specificity in the elimination reaction. Based on this, we suggest that the hydrogen-bond network among Cys116, Lys240*, and Asp241* contributes to substrate specificity that is, to L-methionine recognition at the active site in MGL_Pp.

  19. Impact of the iron-sulfur cluster proximal to the active site on the catalytic function of an O2-tolerant NAD(+)-reducing [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Karstens, Katja; Wahlefeld, Stefan; Horch, Marius; Grunzel, Miriam; Lauterbach, Lars; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver

    2015-01-20

    The soluble NAD(+)-reducing hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha H16 belongs to the O2-tolerant subtype of pyridine nucleotide-dependent [NiFe]-hydrogenases. To identify molecular determinants for the O2 tolerance of this enzyme, we introduced single amino acids exchanges in the SH small hydrogenase subunit. The resulting mutant strains and proteins were investigated with respect to their physiological, biochemical, and spectroscopic properties. Replacement of the four invariant conserved cysteine residues, Cys41, Cys44, Cys113, and Cys179, led to unstable protein, strongly supporting their involvement in the coordination of the iron-sulfur cluster proximal to the catalytic [NiFe] center. The Cys41Ser exchange, however, resulted in an SH variant that displayed up to 10% of wild-type activity, suggesting that the coordinating role of Cys41 might be partly substituted by the nearby Cys39 residue, which is present only in O2-tolerant pyridine nucleotide-dependent [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Indeed, SH variants carrying glycine, alanine, or serine in place of Cys39 showed increased O2 sensitivity compared to that of the wild-type enzyme. Substitution of further amino acids typical for O2-tolerant SH representatives did not greatly affect the H2-oxidizing activity in the presence of O2. Remarkably, all mutant enzymes investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy did not reveal significant spectral changes in relation to wild-type SH, showing that the proximal iron-sulfur cluster does not contribute to the wild-type spectrum. Interestingly, exchange of Trp42 by serine resulted in a completely redox-inactive [NiFe] site, as revealed by infrared spectroscopy and H2/D(+) exchange experiments. The possible role of this residue in electron and/or proton transfer is discussed.

  20. Proton uptake and pKa changes in the uncoupled Asn139Cys variant of cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ann-Louise; Carlsson, Jens; Högbom, Martin; Hosler, Jonathan P; Gennis, Robert B; Brzezinski, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CytcO) is a membrane-bound enzyme that links electron transfer from cytochrome c to O(2) to proton pumping across the membrane. Protons are transferred through specific pathways that connect the protein surface with the catalytic site as well as the proton input with the proton output sides. Results from earlier studies have shown that one site within the so-called D proton pathway, Asn139, located ~10 Å from the protein surface, is particularly sensitive to mutations that uncouple the O(2) reduction reaction from the proton pumping activity. For example, none of the Asn139Asp (charged) or Asn139Thr (neutral) mutant CytcOs pump protons, although the proton-uptake rates are unaffected. Here, we have investigated the Asn139Cys and Asn139Cys/Asp132Asn mutant CytcOs. In contrast to other structural variants investigated to date, the Cys side chain may be either neutral or negatively charged in the experimentally accessible pH range. The data show that the Asn139Cys and Asn139Asp mutations result in the same changes of the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters associated with the proton transfer. The similarity is not due to introduction of charge at position 139, but rather introduction of a protonatable group that modulates the proton connectivity around this position. These results illuminate the mechanism by which CytcO couples electron transfer to proton pumping.

  1. Actin Cys374 as a nucleophilic target of alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Dalle-Donne, Isabella; Carini, Marina; Vistoli, Giulio; Gamberoni, Luca; Giustarini, Daniela; Colombo, Roberto; Maffei Facino, Roberto; Rossi, Ranieri; Milzani, Aldo; Aldini, Giancarlo

    2007-03-01

    We have recently shown that actin can be modified by the Michael addition of 4-hydroxynonenal to Cys374. Here, we have exposed purified actin at increasing acrolein concentrations and have identified the sites of acrolein addition using LC-ESI-MS/MS. Acrolein reacted with Cys374, His87, His173, and, minimally, His40. Cys374 adduction by both 4-hydroxynonenal and acrolein negligibly affected the polymerization of aldehyde-modified (carbonylated) actin, as shown by fluorescence measurements. Differently, acrolein binding at histidine residues, when Cys374 was completely saturated, inhibited polymerization in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular modeling analyses indicated that structural distortions of the ATP-binding site, induced by four acrolein-Michael adducts, could explain the changes in the polymerization process. Aldehyde binding to Cys374 does not alter significantly actin polymerization because this residue is located in a very flexible region, whose covalent modifications do not alter the protein folding. These data demonstrate that Cys374 represents the primary target site of alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde addition to actin in vitro. As Cys374 is a preferential target for various oxidative/nitrosative modifications, and actin is one of the main carbonylated proteins in vivo, these findings also suggest that the highly reactive Cys374 could serve as a carbonyl scavenger of reactive alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes and other electrophilic lipids.

  2. Zinc cysteine active sites of metalloproteins: a density functional theory and x-ray absorption fine structure study.

    PubMed

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Farooqi, Mohammed Junaid; Garza, Emily Sofia; Bunker, Grant

    2008-03-21

    Density functional theory (DFT) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy are complementary tools for the biophysical study of active sites in metalloproteins. DFT is used to compute XAFS multiple scattering Debye Waller factors, which are then employed in genetic algorithm-based fitting process to obtain a global fit to the XAFS in the space of fitting parameters. Zn-Cys sites, which serve important functions as transcriptional switches in Zn finger proteins and matrix metalloproteinases, previously have proven intractable by this method; here these limitations are removed. In this work we evaluate optimal DFT nonlocal functionals and basis sets for determining optimal geometries and vibrational densities of states of mixed ligation Zn(His)(4-n)(Cys)(n) sites. Theoretical results are compared to experimental XAFS measurements and Raman spectra from the literature and tabulated for use.

  3. Discrimination of differentially inhibited cysteine proteases by activity-based profiling using cystatin variants with tailored specificities.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Frank; Rhéaume, Ann-Julie; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Vorster, Juan; Michaud, Dominique

    2012-12-01

    Recent research has shown the possibility of tailoring the inhibitory specificity of plant cystatins toward cysteine (Cys) proteases by single mutations at positively selected amino acid sites. Here we devised a cystatin activity-based profiling approach to assess the impact of such mutations at the proteome scale using single variants of tomato cystatin SlCYS8 and digestive Cys proteases of the herbivorous insect, Colorado potato beetle, as a model. Biotinylated forms of SlCYS8 and SlCYS8 variants were used to capture susceptible Cys proteases in insect midgut protein extracts by biotin immobilization on avidin-embedded beads. A quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis of the captured proteins was performed to compare the inhibitory profile of different SlCYS8 variants. The approach confirmed the relevance of phylogenetic inferences categorizing the insect digestive Cys proteases into six functionally distinct families. It also revealed significant variation in protease family profiles captured with N-terminal variants of SlCYS8, in line with in silico structural models for Cys protease-SlCYS8 interactions suggesting a functional role for the N-terminal region. Our data confirm overall the usefulness of cystatin activity-based protease profiling for the monitoring of Cys protease-inhibitor interactions in complex biological systems. They also illustrate the potential of biotinylated cystatins to identify recombinant cystatin candidates for the inactivation of specific Cys protease targets. PMID:23082957

  4. Discrimination of differentially inhibited cysteine proteases by activity-based profiling using cystatin variants with tailored specificities.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Frank; Rhéaume, Ann-Julie; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Vorster, Juan; Michaud, Dominique

    2012-12-01

    Recent research has shown the possibility of tailoring the inhibitory specificity of plant cystatins toward cysteine (Cys) proteases by single mutations at positively selected amino acid sites. Here we devised a cystatin activity-based profiling approach to assess the impact of such mutations at the proteome scale using single variants of tomato cystatin SlCYS8 and digestive Cys proteases of the herbivorous insect, Colorado potato beetle, as a model. Biotinylated forms of SlCYS8 and SlCYS8 variants were used to capture susceptible Cys proteases in insect midgut protein extracts by biotin immobilization on avidin-embedded beads. A quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis of the captured proteins was performed to compare the inhibitory profile of different SlCYS8 variants. The approach confirmed the relevance of phylogenetic inferences categorizing the insect digestive Cys proteases into six functionally distinct families. It also revealed significant variation in protease family profiles captured with N-terminal variants of SlCYS8, in line with in silico structural models for Cys protease-SlCYS8 interactions suggesting a functional role for the N-terminal region. Our data confirm overall the usefulness of cystatin activity-based protease profiling for the monitoring of Cys protease-inhibitor interactions in complex biological systems. They also illustrate the potential of biotinylated cystatins to identify recombinant cystatin candidates for the inactivation of specific Cys protease targets.

  5. Structure-Function Relationship of the Chloroplastic Glutaredoxin S12 with an Atypical WCSYS Active Site*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Couturier, Jeremy; Koh, Cha San; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Winger, Alison M.; Gualberto, Jose Manuel; Corbier, Catherine; Decottignies, Paulette; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Didierjean, Claude; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Glutaredoxins (Grxs) are efficient catalysts for the reduction of mixed disulfides in glutathionylated proteins, using glutathione or thioredoxin reductases for their regeneration. Using GFP fusion, we have shown that poplar GrxS12, which possesses a monothiol 28WCSYS32 active site, is localized in chloroplasts. In the presence of reduced glutathione, the recombinant protein is able to reduce in vitro substrates, such as hydroxyethyldisulfide and dehydroascorbate, and to regenerate the glutathionylated glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Although the protein possesses two conserved cysteines, it is functioning through a monothiol mechanism, the conserved C terminus cysteine (Cys87) being dispensable, since the C87S variant is fully active in all activity assays. Biochemical and crystallographic studies revealed that Cys87 exhibits a certain reactivity, since its pKa is around 5.6. Coupled with thiol titration, fluorescence, and mass spectrometry analyses, the resolution of poplar GrxS12 x-ray crystal structure shows that the only oxidation state is a glutathionylated derivative of the active site cysteine (Cys29) and that the enzyme does not form inter- or intramolecular disulfides. Contrary to some plant Grxs, GrxS12 does not incorporate an iron-sulfur cluster in its wild-type form, but when the active site is mutated into YCSYS, it binds a [2Fe-2S] cluster, indicating that the single Trp residue prevents this incorporation. PMID:19158074

  6. The atypical N-glycosylation motif, Asn-Cys-Cys, in human GPR109A is required for normal cell surface expression and intracellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Daisuke; Imura, Yuki; Ishii, Satoshi; Shimizu, Takao; Nakamura, Motonao

    2015-01-01

    Asparagine-linked glycosylation (N-glycosylation) is necessary for the proper folding of secreted and membrane proteins, including GPCRs. Thus, many GPCRs possess the N-glycosylation motif Asn-X-Ser/Thr at their N-termini and/or extracellular loops. We found that human GPR109A (hGPR109A) has an N-glycosylation site at Asn17 in the N-terminal atypical motif, Asn17-Cys18-Cys19. Why does hGPR109A require the atypical motif, rather than the typical sequence? Here we show that Asn17-Cys18-Cys19 sequence of hGPR109A possesses 2 biologic roles. First, Asn17-X-Cys19 contributed to hGPR109A N-glycosylation by acting as an atypical motif. This modification is required for the normal surface expression of hGPR109A, as evidenced by the reduced surface expression of the nonglycosylated mutants, hGPR109A/N17A, and the finding that hGPR109A/C19S and hGPR109A/C19T, which are N-glycosylated at Asn17, exhibited expression similar to the wild-type receptor. Second, the X-Cys18-Cys19 dicysteine is indispensable for hGPR109A function. Substitution of Cys18 or Cys19 residue to Ala impaired Gi-mediated signaling via hGPR109A. We propose the disulfide bond formations of these residues with other Cys existed in the extracellular loops for the proper folding. Together, these results suggest that the atypical motif Asn17-Cys18-Cys19 is crucial for the normal surface trafficking and function of hGPR109A.—Yasuda, D., Imura, Y., Ishii, S., Shimizu, T., and Nakamura, M. The atypical N-glycosylation motif, Asn-Cys-Cys, in human GPR109A is required for normal cell surface expression and intracellular signaling. PMID:25690651

  7. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  8. The structure of reduced tryparedoxin peroxidase reveals a decamer and insight into reactivity of 2Cys-peroxiredoxins.

    PubMed

    Alphey, M S; Bond, C S; Tetaud, E; Fairlamb, A H; Hunter, W N

    2000-07-21

    Tryparedoxin peroxidase (TryP) is a recently discovered 2Cys-peroxiredoxin involved in defence against oxidative stress in parasitic trypanosomatids. The crystal structure of recombinant Crithidia fasciculata TryP, in the reduced state, has been determined using multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion methods applied to a selenomethionyl derivative. The model comprises a decamer with 52 symmetry, ten chloride ions with 23 water molecules and has been refined, using data to 3.2 A resolution (1 A=0.1 nm), to an R-factor and R(free) of 27.3 and 28.6 %, respectively. Secondary structure topology places TryP along with tryparedoxin and glutathione peroxidase in a distinct subgroup of the thioredoxin super-family. The molecular details at the active site support ideas about the enzyme mechanism and comparisons with an oxidised 2Cys-peroxiredoxin reveal structural alterations induced by the change in oxidation state. These include a difference in quaternary structure from dimer (oxidised form) to decamer (reduced form). The 2Cys-peroxiredoxin assembly may prevent indiscriminate oligomerisation, localise ten peroxidase active sites and contribute to both the specificity of reduction by the redox partner tryparedoxin and attraction of peroxides into the active site.

  9. Role of a cysteine residue in the active site of ERK and the MAPKK family

    SciTech Connect

    Ohori, Makoto; Kinoshita, Takayoshi; Yoshimura, Seiji; Warizaya, Masaichi; Nakajima, Hidenori . E-mail: hidenori.nakajima@jp.astellas.com; Miyake, Hiroshi

    2007-02-16

    Kinases of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, including extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), represent likely targets for pharmacological intervention in proliferative diseases. Here, we report that FR148083 inhibits ERK2 enzyme activity and TGF{beta}-induced AP-1-dependent luciferase expression with respective IC{sub 50} values of 0.08 and 0.05 {mu}M. FR265083 (1'-2' dihydro form) and FR263574 (1'-2' and 7'-8' tetrahydro form) exhibited 5.5-fold less and no activity, respectively, indicating that both the {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated ketone and the conformation of the lactone ring contribute to this inhibitory activity. The X-ray crystal structure of the ERK2/FR148083 complex revealed that the compound binds to the ATP binding site of ERK2, involving a covalent bond to S{gamma} of ERK2 Cys166, hydrogen bonds with the backbone NH of Met108, N{zeta} of Lys114, backbone C=O of Ser153, N{delta}2 of Asn154, and hydrophobic interactions with the side chains of Ile31, Val39, Ala52, and Leu156. The covalent bond motif in the ERK2/FR148083 complex assures that the inhibitor has high activity for ERK2 and no activity for other MAPKs such as JNK1 and p38MAPK{alpha}/{beta}/{gamma}/{delta} which have leucine residues at the site corresponding to Cys166 in ERK2. On the other hand, MEK1 and MKK7, kinases of the MAPKK family which also can be inhibited by FR148083, contain a cysteine residue corresponding to Cys166 of ERK2. The covalent binding to the common cysteine residue in the ATP-binding site is therefore likely to play a crucial role in the inhibitory activity for these MAP kinases. These findings on the molecular recognition mechanisms of FR148083 for kinases with Cys166 should provide a novel strategy for the pharmacological intervention of MAPK cascades.

  10. Positive selection of digestive Cys proteases in herbivorous Coleoptera.

    PubMed

    Vorster, Juan; Rasoolizadeh, Asieh; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Cloutier, Conrad; Sainsbury, Frank; Michaud, Dominique

    2015-10-01

    Positive selection is thought to contribute to the functional diversification of insect-inducible protease inhibitors in plants in response to selective pressures exerted by the digestive proteases of their herbivorous enemies. Here we assessed whether a reciprocal evolutionary process takes place on the insect side, and whether ingestion of a positively selected plant inhibitor may translate into a measurable rebalancing of midgut proteases in vivo. Midgut Cys proteases of herbivorous Coleoptera, including the major pest Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), were first compared using a codon-based evolutionary model to look for the occurrence of hypervariable, positively selected amino acid sites among the tested sequences. Hypervariable sites were found, distributed within -or close to- amino acid regions interacting with Cys-type inhibitors of the plant cystatin protein family. A close examination of L. decemlineata sequences indicated a link between their assignment to protease functional families and amino acid identity at positively selected sites. A function-diversifying role for positive selection was further suggested empirically by in vitro protease assays and a shotgun proteomic analysis of L. decemlineata Cys proteases showing a differential rebalancing of protease functional family complements in larvae fed single variants of a model cystatin mutated at positively selected amino acid sites. These data confirm overall the occurrence of hypervariable, positively selected amino acid sites in herbivorous Coleoptera digestive Cys proteases. They also support the idea of an adaptive role for positive selection, useful to generate functionally diverse proteases in insect herbivores ingesting functionally diverse, rapidly evolving dietary cystatins. PMID:26264818

  11. Protective role of Cys-178 against the inactivation and oligomerization of human insulin-degrading enzyme by oxidation and nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Ralat, Luis A; Ren, Min; Schilling, Alexander B; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-12-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a 110-kDa metalloendopeptidase, hydrolyzes several physiologically relevant peptides, including insulin and amyloid-beta (Abeta). Human IDE has 13 cysteines and is inhibited by hydrogen peroxide and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), donors of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, respectively. Here, we report that the oxidative burst of BV-2 microglial cells leads to oxidation or nitrosylation of secreted IDE, leading to the reduced activity. Hydrogen peroxide and GSNO treatment of IDE reduces the V(max) for Abeta degradation, increases IDE oligomerization, and decreases IDE thermostability. Additionally, this inhibitory response of IDE is substrate-dependent, biphasic for Abeta degradation but monophasic for a shorter bradykinin-mimetic substrate. Our mutational analysis of IDE and peptide mass fingerprinting of GSNO-treated IDE using Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer reveal a surprising interplay of Cys-178 with Cys-110 and Cys-819 for catalytic activity and with Cys-789 and Cys-966 for oligomerization. Cys-110 is near the zinc-binding catalytic center and is normally buried. The oxidation and nitrosylation of Cys-819 allow Cys-110 to be oxidized or nitrosylated, leading to complete inactivation of IDE. Cys-789 is spatially adjacent to Cys-966, and their nitrosylation and oxidation together trigger the oligomerization and inhibition of IDE. Interestingly, the Cys-178 modification buffers the inhibition caused by Cys-819 modification and prevents the oxidation or nitrosylation of Cys-110. The Cys-178 modification can also prevent the oligomerization-mediated inhibition. Thus, IDE can be intricately regulated by reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. The structure of IDE reveals the molecular basis for the long distance interactions of these cysteines and how they regulate IDE function.

  12. Characterization of plant sulfiredoxin and role of sulphinic form of 2-Cys peroxiredoxin

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Baena, Iván; Barranco-Medina, Sergio; Lázaro-Payo, Alfonso; López-Jaramillo, Francisco Javier; Sevilla, Francisca; Lázaro, Juan-José

    2010-01-01

    The antioxidant function of 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx) involves the oxidation of its conserved peroxidatic cysteine to sulphenic acid that is recycled by a reductor agent. In conditions of oxidative stress, the peroxidatic cysteine can be overoxidized to sulphinic acid inactivating the Prx. An enzyme recently discovered, named sulfiredoxin (Srx), reduces the sulphinic 2-Cys Prx (Prx-SO2H). To explore the physiological functions of Srx in plants we have cloned, expressed and purified to homogeneity a Srx from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtSrx), as well as five variants by site-directed mutagenesis on amino acids involved in its activity. The activity of sulfiredoxin, determined by a new method, is dependent on the concentration of the sulphinic form of Prx and the conserved Srx is capable of regenerating the functionality of both pea and Arabidopsis Prx-SO2H. Molecular modelling of AtSrx and the facts that the R28Q variant shows a partial inactivation, that the activity of the E76A variant is equivalent to that of the native enzyme and that the double mutation R28Q/E76A abolishes the enzymatic activity suggests that the pair His100-Glu76 may be involved in the activation of C72 in the absence of R28. The knock-out mutant plants without Srx or 2-Cys Prx exhibited phenotypical differences under growth conditions of 16 h light, probably due to the signalling role of the sulphinic form of Prx. These mutants showed more susceptibility to oxidative stress than wild-type plants. This work presents the first systematic biochemical characterization of the Srx/Prx system from plants and contributes to a better understanding of its physiological function. PMID:20176891

  13. Crystallographic analysis of a subcomplex of the transsulfursome with tRNA for Cys-tRNA(Cys) synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meirong; Nakazawa, Yuto; Kubo, Yume; Asano, Nozomi; Kato, Koji; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2016-07-01

    In most organisms, Cys-tRNA(Cys) is directly synthesized by cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase (CysRS). Many methanogenic archaea, however, use a two-step, indirect pathway to synthesize Cys-tRNA(Cys) owing to a lack of CysRS and cysteine-biosynthesis systems. This reaction is catalyzed by O-phosphoseryl-tRNA synthetase (SepRS), Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase (SepCysS) and SepRS/SepCysS pathway enhancer (SepCysE) as the transsulfursome, in which SepCysE connects both SepRS and SepCysS. On the transsulfursome, SepRS first ligates an O-phosphoserine to tRNA(Cys), and the mischarged intermediate Sep-tRNA(Cys) is then transferred to SepCysS, where it is further modified to Cys-tRNA(Cys). In this study, a subcomplex of the transsulfursome with tRNA(Cys) (SepCysS-SepCysE-tRNA(Cys)), which is involved in the second reaction step of the indirect pathway, was constructed and then crystallized. The crystals diffracted X-rays to a resolution of 2.6 Å and belonged to space group P6522, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 107.2, c = 551.1 Å. The structure determined by molecular replacement showed that the complex consists of a SepCysS dimer, a SepCysE dimer and one tRNA(Cys) in the asymmetric unit. PMID:27380375

  14. Fluorescence energy transfer between Cys-10 residues in F-actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Miki, M; Barden, J A; Hambly, B D; dos Remedios, C G

    1986-05-01

    Fluorescence energy transfer was measured between Cys-10 residues in an F-actin filament using 5-[2-((iodoacetyl)amino)-ethyl]aminonaphthalene-1-sulphonic acid (1,5-IAEDANS) as a fluorescence energy donor and 4-dimethylaminophenylazophenyl-4'-maleimide (DABMI) as the acceptor. Both labels were covalently attached to Cys-10 residues in an F-actin filament. Taking the helical structure of the F-actin filament into consideration, the radial coordinate of Cys-10 was calculated to be 23 A. This corresponds to a distance between adjacent sites along the long pitch helix of 56.1 A and along the genetic helix of 53.3 A.

  15. Intrastrand cross-linked actin between Gln-41 and Cys-374. I. Mapping of sites cross-linked in F-actin by N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl) putrescine.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, G; Mák, M; Kim, E; Elzinga, M; Muhlrad, A; Reisler, E

    1998-12-22

    A new heterobifunctional photo-cross-linking reagent, N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl)-putrescine (ANP), was synthesized and covalently bound to Gln-41 of rabbit skeletal muscle actin by a bacterial transglutaminase-mediated reaction. Up to 1.0 mol of the reagent was incorporated per mole of G-actin; at least 90% of it was bound to Gln-41 while a minor fraction (about 8%) was attached to Gln-59. The labeled G-actin was polymerized, and the resulting F-actin was intermolecularly cross-linked by irradiation with UV light. The labeled and cross-linked peptides were isolated from either a complete or limited tryptic digest of cross-linked actin. In the limited digest the tryptic cleavage was restricted to arginine by succinylation of the lysyl residues. N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry indicated that the cross-linked peptides contained residues 40-50 (or 40-62 in the arginine limited digest) and residues 373-375, and that the actual cross-linking took place between Gln-41 and Cys-374. This latter finding was also supported by the inhibition of Cys-374 labeling with a fluorescent probe in the cross-linked actin. The dynamic length of ANP, between 11.1 and 12.5 A, constrains to that range the distance between the gamma-carboxyl group of Gln-41 in one monomer and the sulfur atom of Cys-374 in an adjacent monomer. This is consistent with the distances between these two residues on adjacent monomers of the same strand in the long-pitch helix in the structural models of F-actin [Holmes, K. C., Popp, D., Gebhard, W., and Kabsch, W. (1990) Nature 347, 44-49 and Lorenz, M., Popp, D., and Holmes, K. C. (1993) J. Mol. Biol. 234, 826-836]. The effect of cross-linking on the function of actin is described in the companion papers. PMID:9922144

  16. A theoretical study of the active sites of papain and S195C rat trypsin: implications for the low reactivity of mutant serine proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    The serine and cysteine proteinases represent two important classes of enzymes that use a catalytic triad to hydrolyze peptides and esters. The active site of the serine proteinases consists of three key residues, Asp...His...Ser. The hydroxyl group of serine functions as a nucleophile and the imidazole ring of histidine functions as a general acid/general base during catalysis. Similarly, the active site of the cysteine proteinases also involves three key residues: Asn, His, and Cys. The active site of the cysteine proteinases is generally believed to exist as a zwitterion (Asn...His+...Cys-) with the thiolate anion of the cysteine functioning as a nucleophile during the initial stages of catalysis. Curiously, the mutant serine proteinases, thiol subtilisin and thiol trypsin, which have the hybrid Asp...His...Cys triad, are almost catalytically inert. In this study, ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations have been performed on the active sites of papain and the mutant serine proteinase S195C rat trypsin. These calculations predict that the active site of papain exists predominately as a zwitterion (Cys-...His+...Asn). However, similar calculations on S195C rat trypsin demonstrate that the thiol mutant is unable to form a reactive thiolate anion prior to catalysis. Furthermore, structural comparisons between native papain and S195C rat trypsin have demonstrated that the spatial juxtapositions of the triad residues have been inverted in the serine and cysteine proteinases and, on this basis, I argue that it is impossible to convert a serine proteinase to a cysteine proteinase by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:8819168

  17. Using catalytic atom maps to predict the catalytic functions present in enzyme active sites.

    PubMed

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R; Houk, K N

    2012-09-18

    Catalytic atom maps (CAMs) are minimal models of enzyme active sites. The structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were examined to determine if proteins with CAM-like geometries in their active sites all share the same catalytic function. We combined the CAM-based search protocol with a filter based on the weighted contact number (WCN) of the catalytic residues, a measure of the "crowdedness" of the microenvironment around a protein residue. Using this technique, a CAM based on the Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad of trypsin was able to correctly identify catalytic triads in other enzymes within 0.5 Å rmsd of the CAM with 96% accuracy. A CAM based on the Cys-Arg-(Asp/Glu) active site residues from the tyrosine phosphatase active site achieved 89% accuracy in identifying this type of catalytic functionality. Both of these CAMs were able to identify active sites across different fold types. Finally, the PDB was searched to locate proteins with catalytic functionality similar to that present in the active site of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase), whose mechanism is not known with certainty. A CAM, based on the conserved Lys-Asp-Lys-Asp tetrad in the ODCase active site, was used to search the PDB for enzymes with similar active sites. The ODCase active site has a geometry similar to that of Schiff base-forming Class I aldolases, with lowest aldolase rmsd to the ODCase CAM at 0.48 Å. The similarity between this CAM and the aldolase active site suggests that ODCase has the correct catalytic functionality present in its active site for the generation of a nucleophilic lysine. PMID:22909276

  18. Using Catalytic Atom Maps to Predict the Catalytic Functions Present in Enzyme Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R.; Houk, K. N.

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic Atom Maps (CAMs) are minimal models of enzyme active sites. The structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were examined to determine if proteins with CAM-like geometries in their active sites all share the same catalytic function. We combined the CAM-based search protocol with a filter based on the weighted contact number (WCN) of the catalytic residues, a measure of the “crowdedness” of the microenvironment around a protein residue. Using this technique, a CAM based on the Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad of trypsin was able to correctly identify catalytic triads in other enzymes within 0.5 Å RMSD of the Catalytic Atom Map with 96% accuracy. A CAM based on the Cys-Arg-(Asp/Glu) active site residues from the tyrosine phosphatase active site achieved 89% accuracy in identifying this type of catalytic functionality. Both of these Catalytic Atom Maps were able to identify active sites across different fold types. Finally, the PDB was searched to locate proteins with catalytic functionality similar to that present in the active site of orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase), whose mechanism is not known with certainty. A CAM, based on the conserved Lys-Asp-Lys-Asp tetrad in the ODCase active site, was used to search the PDB for enzymes with similar active sites. The ODCase active site has a geometry similar to that of Schiff base-forming Class I aldolases, with lowest aldolase RMSD to the ODCase CAM at 0.48 Å. The similarity between this CAM and the aldolase active site suggests that ODCase has the correct catalytic functionality present in its active site for the generation of a nucleophilic lysine. PMID:22909276

  19. Activation of human 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptors via an allosteric transmembrane site.

    PubMed

    Lansdell, Stuart J; Sathyaprakash, Chaitra; Doward, Anne; Millar, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    In common with other members of the Cys-loop family of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptors (5-HT3Rs) are activated by the binding of a neurotransmitter to an extracellular orthosteric site, located at the interface of two adjacent receptor subunits. In addition, a variety of compounds have been identified that modulate agonist-evoked responses of 5-HT3Rs, and other Cys-loop receptors, by binding to distinct allosteric sites. In this study, we examined the pharmacological effects of a group of monoterpene compounds on recombinant 5-HT3Rs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Two phenolic monoterpenes (carvacrol and thymol) display allosteric agonist activity on human homomeric 5-HT3ARs (64 ± 7% and 80 ± 4% of the maximum response evoked by the endogenous orthosteric agonist 5-HT, respectively). In addition, at lower concentrations, where agonist effects are less apparent, carvacrol and thymol act as potentiators of responses evoked by submaximal concentrations of 5-HT. By contrast, carvacrol and thymol have no agonist or potentiating activity on the closely related mouse 5-HT3ARs. Using subunit chimeras containing regions of the human and mouse 5-HT3A subunits, and by use of site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified transmembrane amino acids that either abolish the agonist activity of carvacrol and thymol on human 5-HT3ARs or are able to confer this property on mouse 5-HT3ARs. By contrast, these mutations have no significant effect on orthosteric activation of 5-HT3ARs by 5-HT. We conclude that 5-HT3ARs can be activated by the binding of ligands to an allosteric transmembrane site, a conclusion that is supported by computer docking studies. PMID:25338672

  20. [Litter decomposition and lignocellulose enzyme activities of Actinothuidium hookeri and Cys- topteris montana in alpine timberline ecotone of western Sichuan, China].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-mei; He, Run-lian; Deng, Chang-chun; Yang, Wan-qin; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Lin; Liu, Yang

    2015-11-01

    The mass loss and lignocellulose enzyme activities of Actinothuidium hookeri residues and Cystopteris montana leaf litter in coniferous forest and timberline of western Sichuan, China were investigated. The results showed that both the mass loss rates of A. hookeri and C. Montana in timberline were higher than those in coniferous forest, while enzyme activities in timberline were lower than those in coniferous forest which was contrast with the hypothesis. The mass loss of two ground covers had significant differences in different seasons. The mass loss rate of A. hookeri in snow-covered season accounted for 69.8% and 83.0% of the whole year' s in timberline and coniferous forest, while that of C. montana in the growing season accounted for 82.6% and 83.4% of the whole year' s in timberline and coniferous forest, respectively. C. montana leaf litter decayed faster in the growing season, which was consistent with its higher cellulase activity in the growing season. The result illustrated that the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose might be the main driving force for the early stage of litter decomposition. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that environmental factors and initial litter quality could explain 45.8%-85.1% variation of enzyme activity. The enzyme activities of A. hookeri and C. montana in the process of decomposition were mainly affected by the freeze-thaw cycle in snow-covered season. PMID:26915177

  1. Metavanadate at the active site of the phosphatase VHZ.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav I; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Hengge, Alvan C

    2012-09-01

    Vanadate is a potent modulator of a number of biological processes and has been shown by crystal structures and NMR spectroscopy to interact with numerous enzymes. Although these effects often occur under conditions where oligomeric forms dominate, the crystal structures and NMR data suggest that the inhibitory form is usually monomeric orthovanadate, a particularly good inhibitor of phosphatases because of its ability to form stable trigonal-bipyramidal complexes. We performed a computational analysis of a 1.14 Å structure of the phosphatase VHZ in complex with an unusual metavanadate species and compared it with two classical trigonal-bipyramidal vanadate-phosphatase complexes. The results support extensive delocalized bonding to the apical ligands in the classical structures. In contrast, in the VHZ metavanadate complex, the central, planar VO(3)(-) moiety has only one apical ligand, the nucleophilic Cys95, and a gap in electron density between V and S. A computational analysis showed that the V-S interaction is primarily ionic. A mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of metavanadate in the active site from a dimeric vanadate species that previous crystallographic evidence has shown to be able to bind to the active sites of phosphatases related to VHZ. Together, the results show that the interaction of vanadate with biological systems is not solely reliant upon the prior formation of a particular inhibitory form in solution. The catalytic properties of an enzyme may act upon the oligomeric forms primarily present in solution to generate species such as the metavanadate ion observed in the VHZ structure. PMID:22876963

  2. Simultaneous Enrichment of Cysteine-containing Peptides and Phosphopeptides Using a Cysteine-specific Phosphonate Adaptable Tag (CysPAT) in Combination with titanium dioxide (TiO2) Chromatography*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Honggang; Haar Petersen, Martin; Ibañez-Vea, Maria; Lassen, Pernille S.; Larsen, Martin R.; Palmisano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine is a rare and conserved amino acid involved in most cellular functions. The thiol group of cysteine can be subjected to diverse oxidative modifications that regulate many physio-pathological states. In the present work, a Cysteine-specific Phosphonate Adaptable Tag (CysPAT) was synthesized to selectively label cysteine-containing peptides (Cys peptides) followed by their enrichment with titanium dioxide (TiO2) and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. The CysPAT strategy was developed using a synthetic peptide, a standard protein and subsequently the strategy was applied to protein lysates from Hela cells, achieving high specificity and enrichment efficiency. In particular, for Cys proteome analysis, the method led to the identification of 7509 unique Cys peptides from 500 μg of HeLa cell lysate starting material. Furthermore, the method was developed to simultaneously enrich Cys peptides and phosphorylated peptides. This strategy was applied to SILAC labeled Hela cells subjected to 5 min epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation. In total, 10440 unique reversibly modified Cys peptides (3855 proteins) and 7339 unique phosphopeptides (2234 proteins) were simultaneously identified from 250 μg starting material. Significant regulation was observed in both phosphorylation and reversible Cys modification of proteins involved in EGFR signaling. Our data indicates that EGF stimulation can activate the well-known phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream signaling molecules, such as mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK1 and MAPK3), however, it also leads to substantial modulation of reversible cysteine modifications in numerous proteins. Several protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) showed a reduction of the catalytic Cys site in the conserved putative phosphatase HC(X)5R motif indicating an activation and subsequent de-phosphorylation of proteins involved in the EGF signaling pathway. Overall, the CysPAT strategy is a straight forward, easy and promising

  3. Mechanistic pathways of mercury removal from the organomercurial lyase active site.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pedro J; Rodrigues, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial populations present in Hg-rich environments have evolved biological mechanisms to detoxify methylmercury and other organometallic mercury compounds. The most common resistance mechanism relies on the H(+)-assisted cleavage of the Hg-C bond of methylmercury by the organomercurial lyase MerB. Although the initial reaction steps which lead to the loss of methane from methylmercury have already been studied experimentally and computationally, the reaction steps leading to the removal of Hg(2+) from MerB and regeneration of the active site for a new round of catalysis have not yet been elucidated. In this paper, we have studied the final steps of the reaction catalyzed by MerB through quantum chemical computations at the combined MP2/CBS//B3PW91/6-31G(d) level of theory. While conceptually simple, these reaction steps occur in a complex potential energy surface where several distinct pathways are accessible and may operate concurrently. The only pathway which clearly emerges as forbidden in our analysis is the one arising from the sequential addition of two thiolates to the metal atom, due to the accumulation of negative charges in the active site. The addition of two thiols, in contrast, leads to two feasible mechanistic possibilities. The most straightforward pathway proceeds through proton transfer from the attacking thiol to Cys159 , leading to its removal from the mercury coordination sphere, followed by a slower attack of a second thiol, which removes Cys96. The other pathway involves Asp99 in an accessory role similar to the one observed earlier for the initial stages of the reaction and affords a lower activation enthalpy, around 14 kcal mol(-1), determined solely by the cysteine removal step rather than by the thiol ligation step. Addition of one thiolate to the intermediates arising from either thiol attack occurs without a barrier and produces an intermediate bound to one active site cysteine and from which Hg(SCH3)2 may be removed only after

  4. Mechanistic pathways of mercury removal from the organomercurial lyase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial populations present in Hg-rich environments have evolved biological mechanisms to detoxify methylmercury and other organometallic mercury compounds. The most common resistance mechanism relies on the H+-assisted cleavage of the Hg–C bond of methylmercury by the organomercurial lyase MerB. Although the initial reaction steps which lead to the loss of methane from methylmercury have already been studied experimentally and computationally, the reaction steps leading to the removal of Hg2+ from MerB and regeneration of the active site for a new round of catalysis have not yet been elucidated. In this paper, we have studied the final steps of the reaction catalyzed by MerB through quantum chemical computations at the combined MP2/CBS//B3PW91/6-31G(d) level of theory. While conceptually simple, these reaction steps occur in a complex potential energy surface where several distinct pathways are accessible and may operate concurrently. The only pathway which clearly emerges as forbidden in our analysis is the one arising from the sequential addition of two thiolates to the metal atom, due to the accumulation of negative charges in the active site. The addition of two thiols, in contrast, leads to two feasible mechanistic possibilities. The most straightforward pathway proceeds through proton transfer from the attacking thiol to Cys159 , leading to its removal from the mercury coordination sphere, followed by a slower attack of a second thiol, which removes Cys96. The other pathway involves Asp99 in an accessory role similar to the one observed earlier for the initial stages of the reaction and affords a lower activation enthalpy, around 14 kcal mol−1, determined solely by the cysteine removal step rather than by the thiol ligation step. Addition of one thiolate to the intermediates arising from either thiol attack occurs without a barrier and produces an intermediate bound to one active site cysteine and from which Hg(SCH3)2 may be removed only after

  5. Identification of the reactive cysteine residue (Cys227) in human carbonyl reductase.

    PubMed

    Tinguely, J N; Wermuth, B

    1999-02-01

    Carbonyl reductase is highly susceptible to inactivation by organomercurials suggesting the presence of a reactive cysteine residue in, or close to, the active site. This residue is also close to a site which binds glutathione. Structurally, carbonyl reductase belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family and contains five cysteine residues, none of which is conserved within the family. In order to identify the reactive residue and investigate its possible role in glutathione binding, alanine was substituted for each cysteine residue of human carbonyl reductase by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Four of the five mutants (C26A, C122A C150A and C226A) exhibited wild-type-like enzyme activity, although K(m) values of C226A for three structurally different substrates were increased threefold to 10-fold. The fifth mutant, C227A, showed a 10-15-fold decrease in kcat and a threefold to 40-fold increase in K(m), resulting in a 30-500-fold drop in kcat/K(m). NaCl (300 mM) increased the activity of C227A 16-fold, whereas the activity of the wild-type enzyme was only doubled. Substitution of serine rather than alanine for Cys227 similarly affected the kinetic constants with the exception that NaCl did not activate the enzyme. Both C227A and C227S mutants were insensitive to inactivation by 4-hydroxymercuribenzoate. Unlike the parent carbonyl compounds, the glutathione adducts of menadione and prostaglandin A1 were better substrates for the C227A and C227S mutants than the wild-type enzyme. Conversely, the binding of free glutathione to both mutants was reduced. Our findings indicate that Cys227 is the reactive residue and suggest that it is involved in the binding of both substrate and glutathione. PMID:10091578

  6. Identification of Cys255 in HIF-1α as a novel site for development of covalent inhibitors of HIF-1α/ARNT PasB domain protein-protein interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, Rosa; Love, Robert; Nilsson, Carol L; Bergqvist, Simon; Nowlin, Dawn; Yan, Jiangli; Liu, Kevin K.-C.; Zhu, Jing; Chen, Ping; Deng, Ya-Li; Dyson, H Jane; Greig, Michael J; Brooun, Alexei

    2012-11-09

    The heterodimer HIF-1α (hypoxia inducible factor)/HIF-β (also known as ARNT-aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator) is a key mediator of cellular response to hypoxia. The interaction between these monomer units can be modified by the action of small molecules in the binding interface between their C-terminal heterodimerization (PasB) domains. Taking advantage of the presence of several cysteine residues located in the allosteric cavity of HIF-1α PasB domain, we applied a cysteine-based reactomics “hotspot identification” strategy to locate regions of HIF-1α PasB domain critical for its interaction with ARNT. COMPOUND 5 was identified using a mass spectrometry-based primary screening strategy and was shown to react specifically with Cys255 of the HIF-1α PasB domain. Biophysical characterization of the interaction between PasB domains of HIF-1α and ARNT revealed that covalent binding of COMPOUND 5 to Cys255 reduced binding affinity between HIF-1α and ARNT PasB domains approximately 10-fold. Detailed NMR structural analysis of HIF-1α-PasB-COMPOUND 5 conjugate showed significant local conformation changes in the HIF-1α associated with key residues involved in the HIF-1α/ARNT PasB domain interaction as revealed by the crystal structure of the HIF-1α/ARNT PasB heterodimer. Our screening strategy could be applied to other targets to identify pockets surrounding reactive cysteines suitable for development of small molecule modulators of protein function.

  7. Active site studies of Escherichia coli 2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate aldolase

    SciTech Connect

    Vlahos, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    The data presented delineate the complete amino acid sequence of E. coli KHG aldolase and also identify Lys-133, Glu-45, and Arg-49 as aminoacyl residues required for catalytic activity. Incubation of E. coli KHG aldolase with (/sup 14/C)pyruvate in the presence of NaCNBH/sub 3/ results in the incorporation of one mol of /sup 14/C per mol of enzyme subunit. Digestion of this enzyme-adduct with trypsin, followed by purification of the peptides, allowed for the isolation of a unique radioactive peptide. Its amino acid sequence showed that the pyruvate-binding (i.e., Schiff-base forming) lysine residue is located at position 133 in the intact enzyme. E. coli KHG aldolase activity is lost when the enzyme is reacted with bromopyruvate; saturation kinetics are observed. The substrates, pyruvate and KHG, protect the enzyme from inactivation. Both facts suggest that the reagent is active-site specific. Incubation of the aldolase with (3-/sup 14/C)bromopyruvate is associated with a concomitant loss of enzymatic activity and esterification of Glu-45; if the enzyme is denatured in the presence of excess bromopyruvate, Cys-159 and Cys-180 are also alkylated. Blocking the active-site lysine residue with pyruvate prevents Glu-45 from being esterified but does not eliminate alkylation of these two cysteine residues. Woodward's Reagent K was also found to inactivate the aldolase under conditions that are usually specific for carboxyl group modification. This aldolase is also inactivated by 1,2-cyclohexanedione. Loss of enzymatic activity occurs concomitantly with modification of one arginine residue per enzyme subunit. Treatment of the aldolase with the arginine-specific reagent, 4-(oxyacetyl)phenoxyacetic acid, followed by digestion with trypsin allowed for the isolation of a unique peptide and the identification of Arg-49 as the specific residue involved.

  8. Unusual Extra Space at the Active Site and High Activity for Acetylated Hydroxyproline of Prolyl Aminopeptidase from Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Ito, Kiyoshi; Sakata, Makoto; Xu, Yue; Nakashima, Kanako; Matsubara, Futoshi; Hatakeyama, Susumi; Yoshimoto, Tadashi

    2006-01-01

    The prolyl aminopeptidase complexes of Ala-TBODA [2-alanyl-5-tert-butyl-(1, 3, 4)-oxadiazole] and Sar-TBODA [2-sarcosyl-5-tert-butyl-(1, 3, 4)-oxadiazole] were analyzed by X-ray crystallography at 2.4 Å resolution. Frames of alanine and sarcosine residues were well superimposed on each other in the pyrrolidine ring of proline residue, suggesting that Ala and Sar are recognized as parts of this ring of proline residue by the presence of a hydrophobic proline pocket at the active site. Interestingly, there was an unusual extra space at the bottom of the hydrophobic pocket where proline residue is fixed in the prolyl aminopeptidase. Moreover, 4-acetyloxyproline-βNA (4-acetyloxyproline β-naphthylamide) was a better substrate than Pro-βNA. Computer docking simulation well supports the idea that the 4-acetyloxyl group of the substrate fitted into that space. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of Phe139, Tyr149, Tyr150, Phe236, and Cys271, consisting of the hydrophobic pocket, revealed that all of these five residues are involved significantly in the formation of the hydrophobic proline pocket for the substrate. Tyr149 and Cys271 may be important for the extra space and may orient the acetyl derivative of hydroxyproline to a preferable position for hydrolysis. These findings imply that the efficient degradation of collagen fragment may be achieved through an acetylation process by the bacteria. PMID:16452443

  9. Functional analysis of recombinant 2-Cys peroxiredoxin from the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis.

    PubMed

    Kusakisako, K; Masatani, T; Miyata, T; Galay, R L; Maeda, H; Talactac, M R; Tsuji, N; Mochizuki, M; Fujisaki, K; Tanaka, T

    2016-02-01

    Ticks are obligate haematophagous arthropods that feed on vertebrate blood containing high levels of iron. The host-derived iron reacts to oxygen in the tick's body, and then high levels of reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), may be generated. High levels of H(2)O(2) cause oxidative stress to aerobic organisms. Therefore, antioxidant responses are necessary to control H(2)O(2). We focused on peroxiredoxins (Prxs), H(2)O(2) -scavenging enzymes. The sequence of Haemaphysalis longicornis 2-Cys Prx (HlPrx2) was identified from fat body cDNA libraries of this tick and recombinant HlPrx2 was then prepared using Escherichia coli. By comparison with the 2-Cys Prxs of other organisms, we found two conserved cysteines in HlPrx2, Cys51 and Cys172. We examined the antioxidant activity of HlPrx2 and mutant proteins produced by a single base substitution, converting one or both of these cysteines into serines. The assays revealed that proteins containing Cys51 showed antioxidant activity when H(2)O(2) was removed. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and size-exclusion chromatography demonstrated that only the wild-type HlPrx2 formed homodimers and that all of the proteins that we made had a high molecular weight peak. These results indicate that both Cys51 and Cys172 are essential for the dimerization of HlPrx2, whereas only the Cys51 residue is necessary for antioxidant activity. PMID:26471013

  10. Cloning and characterization of a novel nuclease from shrimp hepatopancreas, and prediction of its active site.

    PubMed

    Wang, W Y; Liaw, S H; Liao, T H

    2000-03-15

    Approximately 95% of the amino acid sequence of a shrimp (Penaeus japonicus) nuclease was derived from protease-digested peptides. A 1461-base cDNA for the nuclease was amplified and sequenced with degenerate primers based on the amino acid sequence and then specific primers by 3' and 5' RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends). It contains an open reading frame encoding a putative 21-residue signal peptide and a 381-residue mature protein. The N-terminus of the enzyme is pyroglutamate, deduced from composition and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight MS analyses, and confirmed by a glutamine residue in the cDNA sequence. The enzyme has 11 Cys residues, forming five intramolecular disulphides. The eleventh Cys residue was linked to a thiol compound with an estimated molecular mass of between 500 and 700 Da. A sequence similarity search revealed no homologous proteins but residues 205-255 shared a conserved active-site motif within a distinct group of nucleases. His(211) in this conserved motif was shown to be very important in catalysis by site-specific modification with (14)C-labelled iodoacetate. The shrimp nuclease, previously designated DNase I, does indeed possess a low level of hydrolytic activity towards RNA in the presence of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+). The conservation of functionally important residues during distant evolution might imply that the catalytic mechanisms are similar in these nucleases, which should be classified in one subfamily. Finally, an active-site structure for shrimp nuclease was proposed on the basis of published structural data and the results of mutational and biochemical analyses of Serratia nuclease.

  11. Geometrical analysis of Cys-Cys bridges in proteins and their prediction from incomplete structural information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldblum, A.; Rein, R.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of C-alpha atom positions from cysteines involved in disulphide bridges in protein crystals shows that their geometric characteristics are unique with respect to other Cys-Cys, non-bridging pairs. They may be used for predicting disulphide connections in incompletely determined protein structures, such as low resolution crystallography or theoretical folding experiments. The basic unit for analysis and prediction is the 3 x 3 distance matrix for Cx positions of residues (i - 1), Cys(i), (i +1) with (j - 1), Cys(j), (j + 1). In each of its columns, row and diagonal vector--outer distances are larger than the central distance. This analysis is compared with some analytical models.

  12. Reduction of Urease Activity by Interaction with the Flap Covering the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Macomber, Lee; Minkara, Mona S.; Hausinger, Robert P.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing appreciation for the human microbiome coupled with the global rise of antibiotic resistant organisms, it is imperative that new methods be developed to specifically target pathogens. To that end, a novel computational approach was devised to identify compounds that reduce the activity of urease, a medically important enzyme of Helicobacter pylori, Proteus mirabilis, and many other microorganisms. Urease contains a flexible loop that covers its active site; Glide was used to identify small molecules predicted to lock this loop in an open conformation. These compounds were screened against the model urease from Klebsiella aerogenes and the natural products epigallocatechin and quercetin were shown to inhibit at low and high micromolar concentrations, respectively. These molecules exhibit a strong time-dependent inactivation of urease that was not due to their oxygen sensitivity. Rather, these compounds appear to inactivate urease by reacting with a specific Cys residue located on the flexible loop. Substitution of this cysteine by alanine in the C319A variant increased the urease resistance to both epigallocatechin and quercetin, as predicted by the computational studies. Protein dynamics are integral to the function of many enzymes; thus, identification of compounds that lock an enzyme into a single conformation presents a useful approach to define potential inhibitors. PMID:25594724

  13. The role of the Cys-X-X-X-Cys motif on the kinetics of cupric ion loading to the Streptomyces lividans Sco protein.

    PubMed

    Blundell, Katie L I M; Wilson, Michael T; Vijgenboom, Erik; Worrall, Jonathan A R

    2013-08-01

    The mechanisms and spectroscopic properties generated by intermediate states upon cupric ion binding to flexible peptide motifs in proteins are of considerable interest. One such motif is the Cys-X-X-X-Cys motif characteristic to members of the Sco family of proteins. In the antibiotic producing bacterium, Streptomyces lividans, a role for its Sco protein (Sco(Sl)) as a cupric metallochaperone to the extracytoplasmic CuA domain of cytochrome c oxidase has been revealed. Stopped-flow kinetic studies have revealed a mechanism of cupric ion capture by Sco(Sl), which passes through a monothiolate intermediate, with distinct spectral features. In the present study we have used two site directed mutants of Sco(Sl), C86A and C90A, to determine which Cys in the CXXXC motif acts as the capture ligand. Comparison of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters obtained from cupric ion binding to the C86A and C90A mutants clearly indicate that Cys86 is the capture ligand and this finding can be reconciled with structural data. At subsaturating levels of cupric ions both mutants bind copper rapidly, but the absorbance properties are distinctly different from wild type Sco(Sl). This is most extreme for the C86A mutant where the Cys90 thiolate bond is considered to be weaker than the Cys86 thiolate bond in the C90A mutant. We put forward an explanation for this behaviour whereby we propose that the cupric ion is moving to a second site with no thiolate coordination.

  14. Catalysis: Elusive active site in focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labinger, Jay A.

    2016-08-01

    The identification of the active site of an iron-containing catalyst raises hopes of designing practically useful catalysts for the room-temperature conversion of methane to methanol, a potential fuel for vehicles. See Letter p.317

  15. Sulfur K-edge XAS and DFT calculations on nitrile hydratase: geometric and electronic structure of the non-heme iron active site.

    PubMed

    Dey, Abhishek; Chow, Marina; Taniguchi, Kayoko; Lugo-Mas, Priscilla; Davin, Steven; Maeda, Mizuo; Kovacs, Julie A; Odaka, Masafumi; Hodgson, Keith O; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I

    2006-01-18

    The geometric and electronic structure of the active site of the non-heme iron enzyme nitrile hydratase (NHase) is studied using sulfur K-edge XAS and DFT calculations. Using thiolate (RS(-))-, sulfenate (RSO(-))-, and sulfinate (RSO(2)(-))-ligated model complexes to provide benchmark spectral parameters, the results show that the S K-edge XAS is sensitive to the oxidation state of S-containing ligands and that the spectrum of the RSO(-) species changes upon protonation as the S-O bond is elongated (by approximately 0.1 A). These signature features are used to identify the three cysteine residues coordinated to the low-spin Fe(III) in the active site of NHase as CysS(-), CysSOH, and CysSO(2)(-) both in the NO-bound inactive form and in the photolyzed active form. These results are correlated to geometry-optimized DFT calculations. The pre-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectrum is sensitive to the Z(eff) of the Fe and reveals that the Fe in [FeNO](6) NHase species has a Z(eff) very similar to that of its photolyzed Fe(III) counterpart. DFT calculations reveal that this results from the strong pi back-bonding into the pi antibonding orbital of NO, which shifts significant charge from the formally t(2)(6) low-spin metal to the coordinated NO. PMID:16402841

  16. Identification of essential active-site residues in ornithine decarboxylase of Nicotiana glutinosa decarboxylating both L-ornithine and L-lysine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y S; Cho, Y D

    2001-12-15

    The cDNA encoding ornithine decarboxylase (ODC; EC 4.1.1.17), a key enzyme in putrescine and polyamine biosynthesis, has been cloned from Nicotiana glutinosa (GenBank AF 323910), and was expressed in Escherichia coli. The amino acid sequence of N. glutinosa ODC showed 90% identity with Datura stramonium ODC, and 44% identity with human ODC. N. glutinosa ODC did not possess the PEST sequence [a sequence rich in proline (P), glutamic acid (E), serine (S) and threonine (T) residues] found in mammalian ODCs, which are thought to be involved in rapid degradation of the protein. The purified ODC was a homodimeric protein, having a native M(r) of 92000. Kinetic studies of ODC showed that N. glutinosa ODC decarboxylated both l-ornithine and l-lysine with K(m) values of 562 microM and 1592 microM at different optimal pH values of 8.0 and 6.8 respectively. ODC activity was completely and irreversibly inhibited by alpha-difluoromethylornithine (K(i) 1.15 microM), showing a competitive inhibition pattern. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed on ODC to introduce mutations at conserved lysine (Lys(95)) and cysteine (Cys(96), Cys(338) and Cys(377)) residues, chosen by examination of the conserved sequence, which were proven by chemical modification to be involved in enzymic activity. Except for Cys(96), each mutation caused a substantial loss in enzyme activity. Most notably, Lys(95) increased the K(m) for l-ornithine by 16-fold and for l-lysine by 3-fold, with 100-fold and 2.8-fold decreases in the k(cat) for ODC and lysine decarboxylase (LDC) activity respectively. The Cys(377)-->Ala mutant possessed a k(cat) that was lowered by 23-fold, and the K(m) value was decreased by 1.4-fold for l-ornithine. The three-dimensional model of ODC protein constructed on the basis of the crystal structure of Trypanosoma brucei, mouse and human ODCs localized the four residues in the active-site cleft. This is the first work carried out on active-site residues of plant ODC, where ODC and LDC

  17. Stimulation and oxidative catalytic inactivation of thermolysin by copper.Cys-Gly-His-Lys.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Nikhil H; Bradford, Seth; Cowan, J A

    2007-09-01

    [Cu(2+).Cys-Gly-His-Lys] stimulates thermolysin (TLN) activity at low concentration (below 10 microM) and inhibits the enzyme at higher concentration, with binding affinities of 2.0 and 4.9 microM, respectively. The metal-free Cys-Gly-His-Lys peptide also stimulates TLN activity, with an apparent binding affinity of 2.2 microM. Coordination of copper through deprotonated imine nitrogens, the histidyl nitrogen, and the free N-terminal amino group is consistent with the characteristic absorption spectrum of a Cu(2+)-amino-terminal copper and nickel binding motif (lambda (max) approximately 525 nm). The lack of thiol coordination is suggested by both the absence of a thiol to Cu(2+) charge transfer band and electrochemical studies, since the electrode potential (vs. Ag/AgCl) 0.84 V (DeltaE = 92 mV) for the Cu(3+/2+) redox couple obtained for [Cu(2+).Cys-Gly-His-Lys] was found to be in close agreement with that of a related complex [Cu(2+).Lys-Gly-His-Lys](+) (0.84 V, DeltaE = 114 mV). The N-terminal cysteine appears to be available as a zinc-anchoring residue and plays a critical functional role since the [Cu(2+).Lys-Gly-His-Lys](+) homologue exhibits neither stimulation nor inhibition of TLN. Under oxidizing conditions (ascorbate/O(2)) the catalyst is shown to mediate the complete irreversible inactivation of TLN at concentrations where enzyme activity would otherwise be stimulated. The observed rate constant for inactivation of TLN activity was determined as k (obs) = 7.7 x 10(-2) min(-1), yielding a second-order rate constant of (7.7 +/- 0.9) x 10(4) M(-1) min(-1). Copper peptide mediated generation of reactive oxygen species that subsequently modify active-site residues is the most likely pathway for inactivation of TLN rather than cleavage of the peptide backbone. PMID:17618468

  18. Targeting of histone acetyltransferase p300 by cyclopentenone prostaglandin Δ(12)-PGJ(2) through covalent binding to Cys(1438).

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Kodihalli C; Narayan, Vivek; Lushington, Gerald H; Peterson, Blake R; Prabhu, K Sandeep

    2012-02-20

    Inhibitors of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are perceived to treat diseases like cancer, neurodegeneration, and AIDS. On the basis of previous studies, we hypothesized that Cys(1438) in the substrate binding site could be targeted by Δ(12)-prostaglandin J(2) (Δ(12)-PGJ(2)), a cyclopentenone prostaglandin (CyPG) derived from PGD(2). We demonstrate here the ability of CyPGs to inhibit p300 HAT-dependent acetylation of histone H3. A cell-based assay system clearly showed that the α,β-unsaturation in the cyclopentenone ring of Δ(12)-PGJ(2) was crucial for the inhibitory activity, while the 9,10-dihydro-15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-PGJ(2), which lacks the electrophilic carbon (at carbon 9), was ineffective. Molecular docking studies suggested that Δ(12)-PGJ(2) places the electrophilic carbon in the cyclopentenone ring well within the vicinity of Cys(1438) of p300 to form a covalent Michael adduct. Site-directed mutagenesis of the p300 HAT domain, peptide competition assay involving p300 wild type and mutant peptides, followed by mass spectrometric analysis confirmed the covalent interaction of Δ(12)-PGJ(2) with Cys(1438). Using biotinylated derivatives of Δ(12)-PGJ(2) and 9,10-dihydro-15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-PGJ(2), we demonstrate the covalent interaction of Δ(12)-PGJ(2) with the p300 HAT domain, but not the latter. In agreement with the in vitro filter binding assay, CyPGs were also found to inhibit H3 histone acetylation in cell-based assays. In addition, Δ(12)-PGJ(2) also inhibited the acetylation of the HIV-1 Tat by recombinant p300 in in vitro assays. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that Δ(12)-PGJ(2) inhibits p300 through Michael addition, where α,β-unsaturated carbonyl function is absolutely required for the inhibitory activity.

  19. Coevolution of the Ile1,016 and Cys1,534 Mutations in the Voltage Gated Sodium Channel Gene of Aedes aegypti in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Maloof, Farah Z.; Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla; Elizondo-Quiroga, Armando E.; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul; Black IV, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Worldwide the mosquito Aedes aegypti (L.) is the principal urban vector of dengue viruses. Currently 2.5 billion people are at risk for infection and reduction of Ae. aegypti populations is the most effective means to reduce the risk of transmission. Pyrethroids are used extensively for adult mosquito control, especially during dengue outbreaks. Pyrethroids promote activation and prolong the activation of the voltage gated sodium channel protein (VGSC) by interacting with two distinct pyrethroid receptor sites [1], formed by the interfaces of the transmembrane helix subunit 6 (S6) of domains II and III. Mutations of S6 in domains II and III synergize so that double mutants have higher pyrethroid resistance than mutants in either domain alone. Computer models predict an allosteric interaction between mutations in the two domains. In Ae. aegypti, a Ile1,016 mutation in the S6 of domain II was discovered in 2006 and found to be associated with pyrethroid resistance in field populations in Mexico. In 2010 a second mutation, Cys1,534 in the S6 of domain III was discovered and also found to be associated with pyrethroid resistance and correlated with the frequency of Ile1,016. Methodology/Principal Findings A linkage disequilibrium analysis was performed on Ile1,016 and Cys1,534 in Ae. aegypti collected in Mexico from 2000–2012 to test for statistical associations between S6 in domains II and III in natural populations. We estimated the frequency of the four dilocus haplotypes in 1,016 and 1,534: Val1,016/Phe1,534 (susceptible), Val1,016/Cys1,534, Ile1,016/Phe1,534, and Ile1,016/Cys1,534 (resistant). The susceptible Val1,016/Phe1,534 haplotype went from near fixation to extinction and the resistant Ile1,016/Cys1,534 haplotype increased in all collections from a frequency close to zero to frequencies ranging from 0.5–0.9. The Val1,016/Cys1,534 haplotype increased in all collections until 2008 after which it began to decline as Ile1,016/Cys1,534 increased

  20. The contribution of NADPH thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) and sulfiredoxin to 2-Cys peroxiredoxin overoxidation in Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Puerto-Galán, Leonor; Pérez-Ruiz, Juan M; Guinea, Manuel; Cejudo, Francisco Javier

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a harmful by-product of photosynthesis, which also has important signalling activity. Therefore, the level of hydrogen peroxide needs to be tightly controlled. Chloroplasts harbour different antioxidant systems including enzymes such as the 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs). Under oxidizing conditions, 2-Cys Prxs are susceptible to inactivation by overoxidation of their peroxidatic cysteine, which is enzymatically reverted by sulfiredoxin (Srx). In chloroplasts, the redox status of 2-Cys Prxs is highly dependent on NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) and Srx; however, the relationship of these activities in determining the level of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation is unknown. Here we have addressed this question by a combination of genetic and biochemical approaches. An Arabidopsis thaliana double knockout mutant lacking NTRC and Srx shows a phenotype similar to the ntrc mutant, while the srx mutant resembles wild-type plants. The deficiency of NTRC causes reduced overoxidation of 2-Cys Prxs, whereas the deficiency of Srx has the opposite effect. Moreover, in vitro analyses show that the disulfide bond linking the resolving and peroxidatic cysteines protects the latter from overoxidation, thus explaining the dominant role of NTRC on the level of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in vivo. The overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys Prxs shows no circadian oscillation, in agreement with the fact that neither the NTRC nor the SRX genes show circadian regulation of expression. Additionally, the low level of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in the ntrc mutant is light dependent, suggesting that the redox status of 2-Cys Prxs in chloroplasts depends on light rather than the circadian clock.

  1. The contribution of NADPH thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) and sulfiredoxin to 2-Cys peroxiredoxin overoxidation in Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Puerto-Galán, Leonor; Pérez-Ruiz, Juan M.; Guinea, Manuel; Cejudo, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a harmful by-product of photosynthesis, which also has important signalling activity. Therefore, the level of hydrogen peroxide needs to be tightly controlled. Chloroplasts harbour different antioxidant systems including enzymes such as the 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs). Under oxidizing conditions, 2-Cys Prxs are susceptible to inactivation by overoxidation of their peroxidatic cysteine, which is enzymatically reverted by sulfiredoxin (Srx). In chloroplasts, the redox status of 2-Cys Prxs is highly dependent on NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) and Srx; however, the relationship of these activities in determining the level of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation is unknown. Here we have addressed this question by a combination of genetic and biochemical approaches. An Arabidopsis thaliana double knockout mutant lacking NTRC and Srx shows a phenotype similar to the ntrc mutant, while the srx mutant resembles wild-type plants. The deficiency of NTRC causes reduced overoxidation of 2-Cys Prxs, whereas the deficiency of Srx has the opposite effect. Moreover, in vitro analyses show that the disulfide bond linking the resolving and peroxidatic cysteines protects the latter from overoxidation, thus explaining the dominant role of NTRC on the level of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in vivo. The overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys Prxs shows no circadian oscillation, in agreement with the fact that neither the NTRC nor the SRX genes show circadian regulation of expression. Additionally, the low level of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in the ntrc mutant is light dependent, suggesting that the redox status of 2-Cys Prxs in chloroplasts depends on light rather than the circadian clock. PMID:25560178

  2. The contribution of NADPH thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) and sulfiredoxin to 2-Cys peroxiredoxin overoxidation in Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Puerto-Galán, Leonor; Pérez-Ruiz, Juan M; Guinea, Manuel; Cejudo, Francisco Javier

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a harmful by-product of photosynthesis, which also has important signalling activity. Therefore, the level of hydrogen peroxide needs to be tightly controlled. Chloroplasts harbour different antioxidant systems including enzymes such as the 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs). Under oxidizing conditions, 2-Cys Prxs are susceptible to inactivation by overoxidation of their peroxidatic cysteine, which is enzymatically reverted by sulfiredoxin (Srx). In chloroplasts, the redox status of 2-Cys Prxs is highly dependent on NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) and Srx; however, the relationship of these activities in determining the level of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation is unknown. Here we have addressed this question by a combination of genetic and biochemical approaches. An Arabidopsis thaliana double knockout mutant lacking NTRC and Srx shows a phenotype similar to the ntrc mutant, while the srx mutant resembles wild-type plants. The deficiency of NTRC causes reduced overoxidation of 2-Cys Prxs, whereas the deficiency of Srx has the opposite effect. Moreover, in vitro analyses show that the disulfide bond linking the resolving and peroxidatic cysteines protects the latter from overoxidation, thus explaining the dominant role of NTRC on the level of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in vivo. The overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys Prxs shows no circadian oscillation, in agreement with the fact that neither the NTRC nor the SRX genes show circadian regulation of expression. Additionally, the low level of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in the ntrc mutant is light dependent, suggesting that the redox status of 2-Cys Prxs in chloroplasts depends on light rather than the circadian clock. PMID:25560178

  3. Low dielectric response in enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Edward L.; Krishtalik, Lev I.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of charge transfer depend crucially on the dielectric reorganization of the medium. In enzymatic reactions that involve charge transfer, atomic dielectric response of the active site and of its surroundings determines the efficiency of the protein as a catalyst. We report direct spectroscopic measurements of the reorganization energy associated with the dielectric response in the active site of α-chymotrypsin. A chromophoric inhibitor of the enzyme is used as a spectroscopic probe. We find that water strongly affects the dielectric reorganization in the active site of the enzyme in solution. The reorganization energy of the protein matrix in the vicinity of the active site is similar to that of low-polarity solvents. Surprisingly, water exhibits an anomalously high dielectric response that cannot be described in terms of the dielectric continuum theory. As a result, sequestering the active site from the aqueous environment inside low-dielectric enzyme body dramatically reduces the dielectric reorganization. This reduction is particularly important for controlling the rate of enzymatic reactions. PMID:10681440

  4. Dual Role of a Biosynthetic Enzyme, CysK, in Contact Dependent Growth Inhibition in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kaundal, Soni; Uttam, Manju; Thakur, Krishan Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Contact dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is the phenomenon where CDI+ bacterial strain (inhibitor) inhibits the growth of CDI−strain (target) by direct cell to cell contact. CDI is mediated by cdiBAI gene cluster where CdiB facilitates the export of CdiA, an exotoxin, on the cell surface and CdiI acts as an immunity protein to protect CDI+ cells from autoinhibition. CdiA-CT, the C-terminal region of the toxin CdiA, from uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain 536 (UPEC536) is a latent tRNase that requires binding of a biosynthetic enzyme CysK (O-acetylserine sulfyhydrylase) for activation in the target cells. CdiA-CT can also interact simultaneously with CysK and immunity protein, CdiI, to form a ternary complex in UPEC536. But the role of CysK in the ternary complex is not clear. We studied the hydrodynamic, thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of binary and ternary complexes using AUC, ITC and SPR respectively, to investigate the role of CysK in UPEC536. We report that CdiA-CT binds CdiI and CysK with nanomolar range affinity. We further report that binding of CysK to CdiA-CT improves its affinity towards CdiI by ~40 fold resulting in the formation of a more stable complex with over ~130 fold decrease in dissociation rate. Thermal melting experiments also suggest the role of CysK in stabilizing CdiA-CT/CdiI complex as Tm of the binary complex shifts ~10°C upon binding CysK. Hence, CysK acts a modulator of CdiA-CT/CdiI interactions by stabilizing CdiA-CT/CdiI complex and may play a crucial role in preventing autoinhibition in UPEC536. This study reports a new moonlighting function of a biosynthetic enzyme, CysK, as a modulator of toxin/immunity interactions in UPEC536 inhibitor cells. PMID:27458806

  5. Bromopyruvate, an active site-directed inactivator of E. coli 2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate(KHG) aldolase, modifies glutamic acid residue-45

    SciTech Connect

    Vlahos, C.J.; Dekker, E.E.

    1987-05-01

    E. coli KHG-aldolase (2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate in equilibrium pyruvate + glyoxylate), a novel trimeric Class I aldolase, requires one active-site lysine residue (Lys 133)/subunit for Schiff-base formation as well as one arginine residue (Arg 49)/subunit for catalytic activity. The substrate analog, 3-bromopyruvate (BRPY), causes a time- and concentration-dependent loss of KHG-aldolase activity. This inactivation is regarded as active site-directed since: (a) BRPY modification results in complete loss of enzymatic activity; (b) saturation kinetics are exhibited, suggesting that a reversible complex is formed between the aldolase and BRPY prior to the rate-limiting inactivation step; (c) over 90% of the initial aldolase activity is protected by either substrate, pyruvate or KHG; (d) 1.1 mol of /sup 14/C-BRPY is bound/enzyme subunit. Peptide isolation and sequencing show that the incorporated radioactivity is associated with residue Glu-45. Denaturation of the enzyme with guanidine x HCl following treatment with excess /sup 14/C-BRPY allows for the incorporation of carbon-14 at Cys-159 and Cys-180 as well. The presence of pyruvate protects Glu-45 from being esterified but does not prevent the alkylation of the two cysteine residues. These results suggest that Glu-45 is essential for the catalytic activity of E. coli KHG-aldolase, most likely functioning as the active-site amphoteric proton donor/acceptor moiety that is involved in the overall mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by this enzyme.

  6. Activatable fluorescent cys-diabody conjugated with indocyanine green derivative: consideration of fluorescent catabolite kinetics on molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Sano, Kohei; Nakajima, Takahito; Ali, Towhid; Bartlett, Derek W; Wu, Anna M; Kim, Insook; Paik, Chang H; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2013-10-01

    Antibody fragments including diabodies have more desirable pharmacokinetic characteristics than whole antibodies. An activatable optical imaging probe based on a cys-diabody targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen conjugated with the near-infrared fluorophore, indocyanine green (ICG), was designed such that it can only be activated when bound to the tumor, leading to high signal-to-background ratios. We employed short polyethylene glycol (PEG) linkers between the ICG and the reactive functional group (Sulfo-OSu group), resulting in covalent conjugation of ICG to the cys-diabody, which led to lower dissociation of ICG from cys-diabody early after injection, reducing hepatic uptake. However, unexpectedly, high and long-term fluorescence was observed in the kidneys, liver, and blood pool more than 1 h after injection of the cys-diabody PEG-ICG conjugate. A biodistribution study using I125-labeled cys-diabody-ICG showed immediate uptake in the kidneys followed by a rapid decrease, while gastric activity increased due to released radioiodine during rapid cys-diabody-ICG catabolism in the kidneys. To avoid this catabolic pathway, it would be preferable to use antibody fragments large enough not to be filtered through glomerulus or to conjugate the fragments with fluorescent dyes that are readily excreted into urine when cleaved from the cys-diabody to achieve high tumor-specific detection.

  7. Activatable fluorescent cys-diabody conjugated with indocyanine green derivative: consideration of fluorescent catabolite kinetics on molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Kohei; Nakajima, Takahito; Ali, Towhid; Bartlett, Derek W.; Wu, Anna M.; Kim, Insook; Paik, Chang H.; Choyke, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Antibody fragments including diabodies have more desirable pharmacokinetic characteristics than whole antibodies. An activatable optical imaging probe based on a cys-diabody targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen conjugated with the near-infrared fluorophore, indocyanine green (ICG), was designed such that it can only be activated when bound to the tumor, leading to high signal-to-background ratios. We employed short polyethylene glycol (PEG) linkers between the ICG and the reactive functional group (Sulfo-OSu group), resulting in covalent conjugation of ICG to the cys-diabody, which led to lower dissociation of ICG from cys-diabody early after injection, reducing hepatic uptake. However, unexpectedly, high and long-term fluorescence was observed in the kidneys, liver, and blood pool more than 1 h after injection of the cys-diabody PEG-ICG conjugate. A biodistribution study using I125-labeled cys-diabody-ICG showed immediate uptake in the kidneys followed by a rapid decrease, while gastric activity increased due to released radioiodine during rapid cys-diabody-ICG catabolism in the kidneys. To avoid this catabolic pathway, it would be preferable to use antibody fragments large enough not to be filtered through glomerulus or to conjugate the fragments with fluorescent dyes that are readily excreted into urine when cleaved from the cys-diabody to achieve high tumor-specific detection. PMID:23752742

  8. Role of cysteine residues in ribonuclease H from Escherichia coli. Site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification.

    PubMed Central

    Kanaya, S; Kimura, S; Katsuda, C; Ikehara, M

    1990-01-01

    The role of the three cysteine residues at positions 13, 63 and 133 in Escherichia coli RNAase H, an enzyme that is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide [Berkower, Leis & Hurwitz (1973) J. Biol. Chem. 248, 5914-5921], was examined by using both site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification. Novel aspects that were found are as follows. First, none of the cysteine residues is required for activity. Secondly, chemical modification of either Cys-13 or Cys-133 with thiol-blocking reagents inactivates the enzyme, but that of Cys-63 does not. Thus the sensitivity of E. coli RNAase H to N-ethylmaleimide arises not from blocking of the thiol group but from steric hindrance by the modifying group incorporated at either Cys-13 or Cys-133. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2171503

  9. Tricyclic Covalent Inhibitors Selectively Target Jak3 through an Active Site Thiol*

    PubMed Central

    Goedken, Eric R.; Argiriadi, Maria A.; Banach, David L.; Fiamengo, Bryan A.; Foley, Sage E.; Frank, Kristine E.; George, Jonathan S.; Harris, Christopher M.; Hobson, Adrian D.; Ihle, David C.; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J.; Michalak, Mark E.; Murdock, Sara E.; Tomlinson, Medha J.; Voss, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. We have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nm) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. These results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:25552479

  10. Biogenesis of phycobiliproteins: II. CpcS-I and CpcU comprise the heterodimeric bilin lyase that attaches phycocyanobilin to CYS-82 OF beta-phycocyanin and CYS-81 of allophycocyanin subunits in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002.

    PubMed

    Saunée, Nicolle A; Williams, Shervonda R; Bryant, Donald A; Schluchter, Wendy M

    2008-03-21

    The Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 genome encodes three genes, denoted cpcS-I, cpcU, cpcV, with sequence similarity to cpeS. CpcS-I copurified with His(6)-tagged (HT) CpcU as a heterodimer, CpcSU. When CpcSU was assayed for bilin lyase activity in vitro with phycocyanobilin (PCB) and apophycocyanin, the reaction product had an absorbance maximum of 622 nm and was highly fluorescent (lambda(max) = 643 nm). In control reactions with PCB and apophycocyanin, the products had absorption maxima at 635 nm and very low fluorescence yields, indicating they contained the more oxidized mesobiliverdin (Arciero, D. M., Bryant, D. A., and Glazer, A. N. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 18343-18349). Tryptic peptide mapping showed that the CpcSU-dependent reaction product had one major PCB-containing peptide that contained the PCB binding site Cys-82. The CpcSU lyase was also tested with recombinant apoHT-allophycocyanin (aporHT-AP) and PCB in vitro. AporHT-AP formed an ApcA/ApcB heterodimer with an apparent mass of approximately 27 kDa. When aporHT-AP was incubated with PCB and CpcSU, the product had an absorbance maximum of 614 nm and a fluorescence emission maximum at 636 nm, the expected maxima for monomeric holo-AP. When no enzyme or CpcS-I or CpcU was added alone, the products had absorbance maxima between 645 and 647 nm and were not fluorescent. When these reaction products were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and zinc-enhanced fluorescence emission, only the reaction products from CpcSU had PCB attached to both AP subunits. Therefore, CpcSU is the bilin lyase-responsible for attachment of PCB to Cys-82 of CpcB and Cys-81 of ApcA and ApcB.

  11. ERK/Egr-1 signaling pathway is involved in CysLT2 receptor-mediated IL-8 production in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kana; Fang, Sanhua; Cai, Beilei; Huang, Xueqin; Zhang, Xiayan; Lu, Yunbi; Zhang, Weiping; Wei, Erqing

    2014-07-01

    The CysLT2 receptor is involved in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury, differentiation of colorectal cancers, bleomycin-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. However, the signal transduction of cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 2 (CysLT2) in inflammatory responses remains to be clarified. In HEK293 cells stably expressing hCysLT1, hCysLT2 and rGPR17, we determined the signaling pathways for interleukin-8 (IL-8) production after CysLT2 receptor activation. HEK293 cells were stably transfected with the recombinant plasmids of pcDNA3.1(+)-hCysLT1, pcDNA3.1(+)-hCysLT2 and pcDNA3.1-rGPR17. Leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and LTD4 were used as the agonists to induce IL-8 production and the related changes in signal molecules. We found that LTC4 and LTD4 significantly induced IL-8 promoter activation in the HEK293 cells stably expressing hCysLT2, but not in those expressing hCysLT1 and rGPR17. In hCysLT2-HEK293 cells, LTC4 induced elevation of intracellular calcium, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and Egr-1 expression, and stimulated IL-8 expression and release. These responses were blocked by the selective CysLT2 receptor antagonist HAMI3379. The ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 inhibited Egr-1 and IL-8 expression as well as IL-8 release, but the JNK and p38 inhibitors did not have the inhibitory effects. Down-regulation of Egr-1 by RNA interference with its siRNA inhibited the LTC4-induced IL-8 expression and release. In conclusion, these findings indicate the ERK-Egr-1 pathway of CysLT2 receptors mediates IL-8 production induced by the pro-inflammatory mediators LTC4 and LTD4.

  12. Cys-loop ligand-gated chloride channels in dorsal unpaired median neurons of Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Daniel; Derst, Christian; Rigo, Jean-Michel; Van Kerkhove, Emmy

    2010-05-01

    In insects, inhibitory neurotransmission is generally associated with members of the cys-loop ligand-gated anion channels, such as the glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl), the GABA-gated chloride channels (GABACl), and the histamine-gated chloride channels (HisCl). These ionotropic receptors are considered established target sites for the development of insecticides, and therefore it is necessary to obtain a better insight in their distribution, structure, and functional properties. Here, by combining electrophysiology and molecular biology techniques, we identified and characterized GluCl, GABACl, and HisCl in dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons of Locust migratoria. In whole cell patch-clamp recordings, application of glutamate, GABA, or histamine induced rapidly activating ionic currents. GluCls were sensitive to ibotenic acid and blocked by picrotoxin and fipronil. The pharmacological profile of the L. migratoria GABACl fitted neither the vertebrate GABA(A) nor GABA(C) receptor and was similar to the properties of the cloned Drosophila melanogaster GABA receptor subunit (Rdl). The expression of Rdl-like subunit-containing GABA receptors was shown at the molecular level using RT-PCR. Sequencing analysis indicated that the orthologous GABACl of D. melanogaster CG10357-A is expressed in DUM neurons of L. migratoria. Histamine-induced currents exhibited a fast onset and desensitized completely on continuous application of histamine. In conclusion, within the DUM neurons of L. migratoria, we identified three different cys-loop ligand-gated anion channels that use GABA, glutamate, or histamine as their neurotransmitter. PMID:20200125

  13. Direct targeted glycation of the free sulfhydryl group of cysteine residue (Cys-34) of BSA. Mapping of the glycation sites of the anti-tumor Thomsen-Friedenreich neoglycoconjugate vaccine prepared by Michael addition reaction.

    PubMed

    Demian, Wael L L; Kottari, Naresh; Shiao, Tze Chieh; Randell, Edward; Roy, René; Banoub, Joseph H

    2014-12-01

    We present in this manuscript the characterization of the exact glycation sites of the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen-BSA vaccine (TF antigen:BSA) prepared using a Michael addition reaction between the saccharide antigen as an electrophilic acceptor and the nucleophilic thiol and L-Lysine ε-amino groups of BSA using different ligation conditions. Matrix laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of the neoglycoconjugates prepared with TF antigen:protein ratios of 2:1 and 8:1, allowed to observe, respectively, the protonated molecules for each neoglycoconjugates: [M + H](+) at m/z 67,599 and 70,905. The measurements of these molecular weights allowed us to confirm exactly the carbohydrate:protein ratios of these two synthetic vaccines. These were found to be closely formed by a TF antigen:BSA ratios of 2:1 and 8:1, respectively. Trypsin digestion and liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry allowed us to identify the series of released glycopeptide and peptide fragments. De novo sequencing affected by low-energy collision dissociation tandem mass spectrometry was then employed to unravel the precise glycation sites of these neoglycoconjugate vaccines. Finally, we identified, respectively, three diagnostic and characteristic glycated peptides for the synthetic glycoconjugate possessing a TF antigen:BSA ratio 2:1, whereas we have identified for the synthetic glycoconjugate having a TF:BSA ratio 8:1 a series of 14 glycated peptides. The net increase in the occupancy sites of these neoglycoconjugates was caused by the large number of glycoforms produced during the chemical ligation of the synthetic carbohydrate antigen onto the protein carrier.

  14. Direct targeted glycation of the free sulfhydryl group of cysteine residue (Cys-34) of BSA. Mapping of the glycation sites of the anti-tumor Thomsen-Friedenreich neoglycoconjugate vaccine prepared by Michael addition reaction.

    PubMed

    Demian, Wael L L; Kottari, Naresh; Shiao, Tze Chieh; Randell, Edward; Roy, René; Banoub, Joseph H

    2014-12-01

    We present in this manuscript the characterization of the exact glycation sites of the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen-BSA vaccine (TF antigen:BSA) prepared using a Michael addition reaction between the saccharide antigen as an electrophilic acceptor and the nucleophilic thiol and L-Lysine ε-amino groups of BSA using different ligation conditions. Matrix laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of the neoglycoconjugates prepared with TF antigen:protein ratios of 2:1 and 8:1, allowed to observe, respectively, the protonated molecules for each neoglycoconjugates: [M + H](+) at m/z 67,599 and 70,905. The measurements of these molecular weights allowed us to confirm exactly the carbohydrate:protein ratios of these two synthetic vaccines. These were found to be closely formed by a TF antigen:BSA ratios of 2:1 and 8:1, respectively. Trypsin digestion and liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry allowed us to identify the series of released glycopeptide and peptide fragments. De novo sequencing affected by low-energy collision dissociation tandem mass spectrometry was then employed to unravel the precise glycation sites of these neoglycoconjugate vaccines. Finally, we identified, respectively, three diagnostic and characteristic glycated peptides for the synthetic glycoconjugate possessing a TF antigen:BSA ratio 2:1, whereas we have identified for the synthetic glycoconjugate having a TF:BSA ratio 8:1 a series of 14 glycated peptides. The net increase in the occupancy sites of these neoglycoconjugates was caused by the large number of glycoforms produced during the chemical ligation of the synthetic carbohydrate antigen onto the protein carrier. PMID:25476939

  15. Multiple redox and non-redox interactions define 2-Cys peroxiredoxin as a regulatory hub in the chloroplast.

    PubMed

    Muthuramalingam, Meenakumari; Seidel, Thorsten; Laxa, Miriam; Nunes de Miranda, Susana M; Gärtner, Florian; Ströher, Elke; Kandlbinder, Andrea; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2009-11-01

    In plants, the highly abundant 2-cysteine peroxiredoxin (2-CysPrx) is associated with the chloroplast and involved in protecting photosynthesis. This work addresses the multiple interactions of the 2-CysPrx in the chloroplast, which depend on its redox state. Transcript co-regulation analysis showed a strong linkage to the peptidyl-prolyl-cis/trans isomerase Cyclophilin 20-3 (Cyp20-3) and other components of the photosynthetic apparatus. Co-expression in protoplasts and quantification of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency in vivo confirmed protein interactions of 2-CysPrx with Cyp20-3 as well as NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC), while thioredoxin x (Trx-x) did not form complexes that could enable FRET. Likewise, changes in FRET of fluorescently labeled 2-CysPrx in vitro and in vivo proved redox dependent dynamics of 2-CysPrx. Addition of Cyp20-3 to an in vitro peroxidase assay with 2-CysPrx had no significant effect on peroxide reduction. Also, in the presence of NTRC, addition of Cyp20-3 did not further enhance peroxide reduction. In addition, 2-CysPrx functioned as chaperone and inhibited aggregation of citrate synthase during heat treatment. This activity was partly inhibited by Cyp20-3. As a new interaction partner of decameric 2-CysPrx, photosystem II could be identified after chloroplast fractionation and in pull-down assays after reconstitution. In summary, the data indicate a dynamic function of plant 2-CysPrx as redox sensor, chaperone, and regulator in the chloroplast with diverse functions beyond its role as thiol peroxidase.

  16. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Action levels

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, J.S.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1991-10-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide for early leak detection and to monitor performance of the active low-level waste disposal facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and the transuranic waste storage areas in SWSA 5 North. Early leak detection is accomplished by sampling runoff, groundwater, and perched water in burial trenches. Sample results are compared to action levels that represent background contamination by naturally occurring and fallout-derived radionuclides. 15 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Intramembrane Proton Binding Site Linked to Activation of Bacterial Pentameric Ion Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Long; Cheng, Xiaolin; Sine, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Prokaryotic orthologs of eukaryotic Cys-loop receptor channels recently emerged as structural and mechanistic surrogates to investigate this superfamily of intercellular signaling proteins. Here, we examine proton activation of the prokaryotic ortholog GLIC using patch clamp electrophysiology, mutagenesis, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Whole-cell current recordings from human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing GLIC show half-maximal activation at pH 6, close to the pKa of histidine, implicating the three native His residues in proton sensing linked to activation. The mutation H235F abolishes proton activation, H277Y is without effect, and all nine mutations of His-127 prevent expression on the cell surface. In the GLIC crystal structure, His-235 on transmembrane (TM) α-helix 2, hydrogen bonds to the main chain carbonyl oxygen of Ile-259 on TM α-helix 3. MD simulations show that when His-235 is protonated, the hydrogen bond persists, and the channel remains in the open conformation, whereas when His-235 is deprotonated, the hydrogen bond dissociates, and the channel closes. Mutations of the proximal Tyr-263, which also links TM α-helices 2 and 3 via a hydrogen bond, alter proton sensitivity over a 1.5 pH unit range. MD simulations show that mutations of Tyr-263 alter the hydrogen bonding capacity of His-235. The overall findings show that His-235 in the TM region of GLIC is a novel proton binding site linked to channel activation. PMID:22084238

  18. l-Cys/CSE/H2S pathway modulates mouse uterus motility and sildenafil effect.

    PubMed

    Mitidieri, Emma; Tramontano, Teresa; Donnarumma, Erminia; Brancaleone, Vincenzo; Cirino, Giuseppe; d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Sorrentino, Raffaella

    2016-09-01

    Sildenafil, a selective phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, commonly used in the oral treatment for erectile dysfunction, relaxes smooth muscle of human bladder through the activation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) signaling. H2S is an endogenous gaseous transmitter with myorelaxant properties predominantly formed from l-cysteine (l-Cys) by cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). Sildenafil also relaxes rat and human myometrium during preterm labor but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In the present study we investigated the possible involvement of H2S as a mediator of sildenafil-induced effect in uterine mouse contractility. We firstly demonstrated that both enzymes, CBS and CSE were expressed, and able to convert l-Cys into H2S in mouse uterus. Thereafter, sildenafil significantly increased H2S production in mouse uterus and this effect was abrogated by CBS or CSE inhibition. In parallel, l-Cys, sodium hydrogen sulfide or sildenafil but not d-Cys reduced spontaneous uterus contractility in a functional study. The blockage of CBS and CSE reduced this latter effect even if a major role for CSE than CBS was observed. This data was strongly confirmed by using CSE(-/-) mice. Indeed, the increase in H2S production mediated by l-Cys or by sildenafil was not found in CSE(-/-) mice. Besides, the effect of H2S or sildenafil on spontaneous contractility was reduced in CSE(-/-) mice. A decisive proof for the involvement of H2S signaling in sildenafil effect in mice uterus was given by the measurement of cGMP. Sildenafil increased cGMP level that was significantly reduced by CSE inhibition. In conclusion, l-Cys/CSE/H2S signaling modulates the mouse uterus motility and the sildenafil effect. Therefore the study may open different therapeutical approaches for the management of the uterus abnormal contractility disorders.

  19. l-Cys/CSE/H2S pathway modulates mouse uterus motility and sildenafil effect.

    PubMed

    Mitidieri, Emma; Tramontano, Teresa; Donnarumma, Erminia; Brancaleone, Vincenzo; Cirino, Giuseppe; d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Sorrentino, Raffaella

    2016-09-01

    Sildenafil, a selective phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, commonly used in the oral treatment for erectile dysfunction, relaxes smooth muscle of human bladder through the activation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) signaling. H2S is an endogenous gaseous transmitter with myorelaxant properties predominantly formed from l-cysteine (l-Cys) by cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). Sildenafil also relaxes rat and human myometrium during preterm labor but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In the present study we investigated the possible involvement of H2S as a mediator of sildenafil-induced effect in uterine mouse contractility. We firstly demonstrated that both enzymes, CBS and CSE were expressed, and able to convert l-Cys into H2S in mouse uterus. Thereafter, sildenafil significantly increased H2S production in mouse uterus and this effect was abrogated by CBS or CSE inhibition. In parallel, l-Cys, sodium hydrogen sulfide or sildenafil but not d-Cys reduced spontaneous uterus contractility in a functional study. The blockage of CBS and CSE reduced this latter effect even if a major role for CSE than CBS was observed. This data was strongly confirmed by using CSE(-/-) mice. Indeed, the increase in H2S production mediated by l-Cys or by sildenafil was not found in CSE(-/-) mice. Besides, the effect of H2S or sildenafil on spontaneous contractility was reduced in CSE(-/-) mice. A decisive proof for the involvement of H2S signaling in sildenafil effect in mice uterus was given by the measurement of cGMP. Sildenafil increased cGMP level that was significantly reduced by CSE inhibition. In conclusion, l-Cys/CSE/H2S signaling modulates the mouse uterus motility and the sildenafil effect. Therefore the study may open different therapeutical approaches for the management of the uterus abnormal contractility disorders. PMID:27326921

  20. Characterization of active sites in zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, J.; Bug, A.; Nicol, J.M.

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Atomic-level details of the interaction of adsorbed molecules with active sites in catalysts are urgently needed to facilitate development of more effective and/or environmentally benign catalysts. To this end the authors have carried out neutron scattering studies combined with theoretical calculations of the dynamics of small molecules inside the cavities of zeolite catalysts. The authors have developed the use of H{sub 2} as a probe of adsorption sites by observing the hindered rotations of the adsorbed H{sub 2} molecule, and they were able to show that an area near the four-rings is the most likely adsorption site for H{sub 2} in zeolite A while adsorption of H{sub 2} near cations located on six-ring sites decreases in strength as Ni {approximately} Co > Ca > Zn {approximately} Na. Vibrational and rotational motions of ethylene and cyclopropane adsorption complexes were used as a measure for zeolite-adsorbate interactions. Preliminary studies of the binding of water, ammonia, and methylamines were carried out in a number of related guest-host materials.

  1. Active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Stringer, C.D.; Milanez, S.; Lee, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Previous affinity labeling studies and comparative sequence analyses have identified two different lysines at the active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and have suggested their essentiality to function. The essential lysines occupy positions 166 and 329 in the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and positions 175 and 334 in the spinach enzyme. Based on the pH-dependencies of inactivations of the two enzymes by trinitrobenzene sulfonate, Lys-166 (R. rubrum enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 7.9 and Lys-334 (spinach enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 9.0. These low pK/sub a/ values as well as the enhanced nucleophilicities of the lysyl residues argue that both are important to catalysis rather than to substrate binding. Lys-166 may correspond to the essential base that initiates catalysis and that displays a pK/sub a/ of 7.5 in the pH-curve for V/sub max//K/sub m/. Cross-linking experiments with 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonate stilbene demonstrate that the two active-site lysines are within 12 A. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  3. SufE D74R Substitution Alters Active Site Loop Dynamics To Further Enhance SufE Interaction with the SufS Cysteine Desulfurase

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yuyuan; Kim, Dokyong; Dong, Guangchao; Busenlehner, Laura S.; Frantom, Patrick A.; Outten, F. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Many essential metalloproteins require iron–sulfur (Fe–S) cluster cofactors for their function. In vivo persulfide formation from L-cysteine is a key step in the biogenesis of Fe–S clusters in most organisms. In Escherichia coli, the SufS cysteine desulfurase mobilizes persulfide from L-cysteine via a PLP-dependent ping-pong reaction. SufS requires the SufE partner protein to transfer the persulfide to the SufB Fe–S cluster scaffold. Without SufE, the SufS enzyme fails to efficiently turn over and remains locked in the persulfide-bound state. Coordinated protein–protein interactions mediate sulfur transfer from SufS to SufE. Multiple studies have suggested that SufE must undergo a conformational change to extend its active site Cys loop during sulfur transfer from SufS. To test this putative model, we mutated SufE Asp74 to Arg (D74R) to increase the dynamics of the SufE Cys51 loop. Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) analysis of SufE D74R revealed an increase in solvent accessibility and dynamics in the loop containing the active site Cys51 used to accept persulfide from SufS. Our results indicate that the mutant protein has a stronger binding affinity for SufS than that of wild-type SufE. In addition, SufE D74R can still enhance SufS desulfurase activity and did not show saturation at higher SufE D74R concentrations, unlike wild-type SufE. These results show that dynamic changes may shift SufE to a sulfur-acceptor state that interacts more strongly with SufS. PMID:26171726

  4. Sulfur K-Edge XAS and DFT Calculations on NitrileHydratase: Geometric and Electronic Structure of the Non-heme Iron Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Abhishek; Chow, Marina; Taniguchi, Kayoko; Lugo-Mas, Priscilla; Davin, Steven; Maeda, Mizuo; Kovacs, Julie A.; Odaka, Masafumi; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-09-28

    The geometric and electronic structure of the active site of the non-heme iron enzyme nitrile hydratase (NHase) is studied using sulfur K-edge XAS and DFT calculations. Using thiolate (RS{sup -})-, sulfenate (RSO{sup -})-, and sulfinate (RSO{sub 2}{sup -})-ligated model complexes to provide benchmark spectral parameters, the results show that the S K-edge XAS is sensitive to the oxidation state of S-containing ligands and that the spectrum of the RSO- species changes upon protonation as the S-O bond is elongated (by {approx}0.1 {angstrom}). These signature features are used to identify the three cysteine residues coordinated to the low-spin Fe{sup III} in the active site of NHase as CysS{sup -}, CysSOH, and CysSO{sub 2}{sup -} both in the NO-bound inactive form and in the photolyzed active form. These results are correlated to geometry-optimized DFT calculations. The pre-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectrum is sensitive to the Z{sub eff} of the Fe and reveals that the Fe in [FeNO]{sup 6} NHase species has a Z{sub eff} very similar to that of its photolyzed Fe{sup III} counterpart. DFT calculations reveal that this results from the strong {pi} back-bonding into the {pi}* antibonding orbital of NO, which shifts significant charge from the formally t{sub 2}{sup 6} low-spin metal to the coordinated NO.

  5. SufE D74R Substitution Alters Active Site Loop Dynamics To Further Enhance SufE Interaction with the SufS Cysteine Desulfurase.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yuyuan; Kim, Dokyong; Dong, Guangchao; Busenlehner, Laura S; Frantom, Patrick A; Outten, F Wayne

    2015-08-11

    Many essential metalloproteins require iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster cofactors for their function. In vivo persulfide formation from l-cysteine is a key step in the biogenesis of Fe-S clusters in most organisms. In Escherichia coli, the SufS cysteine desulfurase mobilizes persulfide from l-cysteine via a PLP-dependent ping-pong reaction. SufS requires the SufE partner protein to transfer the persulfide to the SufB Fe-S cluster scaffold. Without SufE, the SufS enzyme fails to efficiently turn over and remains locked in the persulfide-bound state. Coordinated protein-protein interactions mediate sulfur transfer from SufS to SufE. Multiple studies have suggested that SufE must undergo a conformational change to extend its active site Cys loop during sulfur transfer from SufS. To test this putative model, we mutated SufE Asp74 to Arg (D74R) to increase the dynamics of the SufE Cys51 loop. Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) analysis of SufE D74R revealed an increase in solvent accessibility and dynamics in the loop containing the active site Cys51 used to accept persulfide from SufS. Our results indicate that the mutant protein has a stronger binding affinity for SufS than that of wild-type SufE. In addition, SufE D74R can still enhance SufS desulfurase activity and did not show saturation at higher SufE D74R concentrations, unlike wild-type SufE. These results show that dynamic changes may shift SufE to a sulfur-acceptor state that interacts more strongly with SufS.

  6. Non-reductive modulation of chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase by 2-Cys peroxiredoxin.

    PubMed

    Caporaletti, Daniel; D'Alessio, Ana C; Rodriguez-Suarez, Roberto J; Senn, Alejandro M; Duek, Paula D; Wolosiuk, Ricardo A

    2007-04-13

    2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx) is a large group of proteins that participate in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and photosynthesis. In the prevailing view, this ubiquitous peroxidase poises the concentration of H2O2 and, in so doing, regulates signal transduction pathways or protects macromolecules against oxidative damage. Here, we describe the first purification of 2-Cys Prx from higher plants and subsequently we show that the native and the recombinant forms of rapeseed leaves stimulate the activity of chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (CFBPase), a key enzyme of the photosynthetic CO2 assimilation. The absence of reductants, the strict requirement of both fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and Ca2+, and the response of single mutants C174S and C179S CFBPase bring forward clear differences with the well-known stimulation mediated by reduced thioredoxin via the regulatory 170's loop of CFBPase. Taken together, these findings provide an unprecedented insight into chloroplast enzyme regulation wherein both 2-Cys Prx and the 170's loop of CFBPase exhibit novel functions.

  7. Non-reductive modulation of chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase by 2-Cys peroxiredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaletti, Daniel; D'Alessio, Ana C.; Rodriguez-Suarez, Roberto J.; Senn, Alejandro M.; Duek, Paula D.; Wolosiuk, Ricardo A. . E-mail: rwolosiuk@leloir.org.ar

    2007-04-13

    2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx) is a large group of proteins that participate in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and photosynthesis. In the prevailing view, this ubiquitous peroxidase poises the concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and, in so doing, regulates signal transduction pathways or protects macromolecules against oxidative damage. Here, we describe First purification of 2-Cys Prx from higher plants and subsequently we show that the native and the recombinant forms of rapeseed leaves stimulate the activity of chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (CFBPase), a key enzyme of the photosynthetic CO{sub 2} assimilation. The absence of reductants, the strict requirement of both fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and Ca{sup 2+}, and the response of single mutants C174S and C179S CFBPase bring forward clear differences with the well-known stimulation mediated by reduced thioredoxin via the regulatory 170's loop of CFBPase. Taken together, these findings provide an unprecedented insight into chloroplast enzyme regulation wherein both 2-Cys Prx and the 170's loop of CFBPase exhibit novel functions.

  8. Oxidation and S-nitrosylation of cysteines in human cytosolic and mitochondrial glutaredoxins: effects on structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Hashemy, Seyed Isaac; Johansson, Catrine; Berndt, Carsten; Lillig, Christopher Horst; Holmgren, Arne

    2007-05-11

    Glutathione (GSH) is the major intracellular thiol present in 1-10-mm concentrations in human cells. However, the redox potential of the 2GSH/GSSG (glutathione disulfide) couple in cells varies in association with proliferation, differentiation, or apoptosis from -260 mV to -200 or -170 mV. Hydrogen peroxide is transiently produced as second messenger in receptor-mediated growth factor signaling. To understand oxidation mechanisms by GSSG or nitric oxide-related nitrosylation we studied effects on glutaredoxins (Grx), which catalyze GSH-dependent thiol-disulfide redox reactions, particularly reversible glutathionylation of protein sulfhydryl groups. Human Grx1 and Grx2 contain Cys-Pro-Tyr-Cys and Cys-Ser-Tyr-Cys active sites and have three and two additional structural Cys residues, respectively. We analyzed the redox state and disulfide pairing of Cys residues upon GSSG oxidation and S-nitrosylation. Cytosolic/nuclear Grx1 was partly inactivated by both S-nitrosylation and oxidation. Inhibition by nitrosylation was reversible under anaerobic conditions; aerobically it was stronger and irreversible, indicating inactivation by nitration. Oxidation of Grx1 induced a complex pattern of disulfide-bonded dimers and oligomers formed between Cys-8 and either Cys-79 or Cys-83. In addition, an intramolecular disulfide between Cys-79 and Cys-83 was identified, predicted to have a profound effect on the three-dimensional structure. In contrast, mitochondrial Grx2 retains activity upon oxidation, did not form disulfide-bonded dimers or oligomers, and could not be S-nitrosylated. The dimeric iron sulfur cluster-coordinating inactive form of Grx2 dissociated upon nitrosylation, leading to activation of the protein. The striking differences between Grx1 and Grx2 reflect their diverse regulatory functions in vivo and also adaptation to different subcellular localization.

  9. Characterization of the cysK2-ctl1-cysE2 gene cluster involved in sulfur metabolism in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Bogicevic, Biljana; Irmler, Stefan; Portmann, Reto; Meile, Leo; Berthoud, Hélène

    2012-01-16

    The up- and downstream regions of ctl1 and ctl2 that encode a cystathionine lyase were analyzed in various Lactobacillus casei strains. ctl1 and ctl2 were found to be part of a gene cluster encoding two other open reading frames. One of the two open reading frames precedes ctl1 and encodes a putative cysteine synthase. The other open reading frame lies downstream of ctl1 and encodes a putative serine acetyltransferase. The gene cluster is not present in the publicly available genome sequences of L. casei ATCC 334, BL23 and Zhang. Apparently, the gene cluster was acquired by a horizontal gene transfer event and can also be found in other lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. RT-PCR was used to analyze the expression of the gene cluster. Additionally, an mass spectrometry-based selected reaction monitoring method was developed for quantifying Ctl1 in a cell-free extract of lactic acid bacteria. The gene cluster cysK2-ctl1-cysE2 was expressed as single transcript, and expression was down-regulated by cysteine. In addition, cystathionine lyase activity present in cell-free extracts disappeared when L. casei was grown in the presence of cysteine. Whereas the transcript and the gene product of ctl1 protein were found in all studied ctl1(+)L. casei strains, only the transcript but not the protein or cystathionine lyase activity was detected in L. helveticus FAM2888, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus ATCC 11842 and S. thermophilus FAM17014, which actually possess a homolog of the cysK2-ctl1-cysE2 gene cluster.

  10. Characterization of the cysK2-ctl1-cysE2 gene cluster involved in sulfur metabolism in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Bogicevic, Biljana; Irmler, Stefan; Portmann, Reto; Meile, Leo; Berthoud, Hélène

    2012-01-16

    The up- and downstream regions of ctl1 and ctl2 that encode a cystathionine lyase were analyzed in various Lactobacillus casei strains. ctl1 and ctl2 were found to be part of a gene cluster encoding two other open reading frames. One of the two open reading frames precedes ctl1 and encodes a putative cysteine synthase. The other open reading frame lies downstream of ctl1 and encodes a putative serine acetyltransferase. The gene cluster is not present in the publicly available genome sequences of L. casei ATCC 334, BL23 and Zhang. Apparently, the gene cluster was acquired by a horizontal gene transfer event and can also be found in other lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. RT-PCR was used to analyze the expression of the gene cluster. Additionally, an mass spectrometry-based selected reaction monitoring method was developed for quantifying Ctl1 in a cell-free extract of lactic acid bacteria. The gene cluster cysK2-ctl1-cysE2 was expressed as single transcript, and expression was down-regulated by cysteine. In addition, cystathionine lyase activity present in cell-free extracts disappeared when L. casei was grown in the presence of cysteine. Whereas the transcript and the gene product of ctl1 protein were found in all studied ctl1(+)L. casei strains, only the transcript but not the protein or cystathionine lyase activity was detected in L. helveticus FAM2888, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus ATCC 11842 and S. thermophilus FAM17014, which actually possess a homolog of the cysK2-ctl1-cysE2 gene cluster. PMID:21745695

  11. The catalytic domain CysPc of the DEK1 calpain is functionally conserved in land plants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhe; Demko, Viktor; Wilson, Robert C; Johnson, Kenneth A; Ahmad, Rafi; Perroud, Pierre-François; Quatrano, Ralph; Zhao, Sen; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Otegui, Marisa S; Olsen, Odd-Arne; Johansen, Wenche

    2013-09-01

    DEK1, the single calpain of land plants, is a member of the ancient membrane bound TML-CysPc-C2L calpain family that dates back 1.5 billion years. Here we show that the CysPc-C2L domains of land plant calpains form a separate sub-clade in the DEK1 clade of the phylogenetic tree of plants. The charophycean alga Mesostigma viride DEK1-like gene is clearly divergent from those in land plants, suggesting that a major evolutionary shift in DEK1 occurred during the transition to land plants. Based on genetic complementation of the Arabidopsis thaliana dek1-3 mutant using CysPc-C2L domains of various origins, we show that these two domains have been functionally conserved within land plants for at least 450 million years. This conclusion is based on the observation that the CysPc-C2L domains of DEK1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens complements the A. thaliana dek1-3 mutant phenotype. In contrast, neither the CysPc-C2L domains from M. viride nor chimeric animal-plant calpains complement this mutant. Co-evolution analysis identified differences in the interactions between the CysPc-C2L residues of DEK1 and classical calpains, supporting the view that the two enzymes are regulated by fundamentally different mechanisms. Using the A. thaliana dek1-3 complementation assay, we show that four conserved amino acid residues of two Ca²⁺-binding sites in the CysPc domain of classical calpains are conserved in land plants and functionally essential in A. thaliana DEK1. PMID:23663131

  12. The catalytic domain CysPc of the DEK1 calpain is functionally conserved in land plants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhe; Demko, Viktor; Wilson, Robert C; Johnson, Kenneth A; Ahmad, Rafi; Perroud, Pierre-François; Quatrano, Ralph; Zhao, Sen; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Otegui, Marisa S; Olsen, Odd-Arne; Johansen, Wenche

    2013-09-01

    DEK1, the single calpain of land plants, is a member of the ancient membrane bound TML-CysPc-C2L calpain family that dates back 1.5 billion years. Here we show that the CysPc-C2L domains of land plant calpains form a separate sub-clade in the DEK1 clade of the phylogenetic tree of plants. The charophycean alga Mesostigma viride DEK1-like gene is clearly divergent from those in land plants, suggesting that a major evolutionary shift in DEK1 occurred during the transition to land plants. Based on genetic complementation of the Arabidopsis thaliana dek1-3 mutant using CysPc-C2L domains of various origins, we show that these two domains have been functionally conserved within land plants for at least 450 million years. This conclusion is based on the observation that the CysPc-C2L domains of DEK1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens complements the A. thaliana dek1-3 mutant phenotype. In contrast, neither the CysPc-C2L domains from M. viride nor chimeric animal-plant calpains complement this mutant. Co-evolution analysis identified differences in the interactions between the CysPc-C2L residues of DEK1 and classical calpains, supporting the view that the two enzymes are regulated by fundamentally different mechanisms. Using the A. thaliana dek1-3 complementation assay, we show that four conserved amino acid residues of two Ca²⁺-binding sites in the CysPc domain of classical calpains are conserved in land plants and functionally essential in A. thaliana DEK1.

  13. Heparanase Activates Antithrombin through the Binding to Its Heparin Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Águila, Sonia; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that participates in morphogenesis, tissue repair, heparan sulphates turnover and immune response processes. It is over-expressed in tumor cells favoring the metastasis as it penetrates the endothelial layer that lines blood vessels and facilitates the metastasis by degradation of heparan sulphate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix. Heparanase may also affect the hemostatic system in a non-enzymatic manner, up-regulating the expression of tissue factor, which is the initiator of blood coagulation, and dissociating tissue factor pathway inhibitor on the cell surface membrane of endothelial and tumor cells, thus resulting in a procoagulant state. Trying to check the effect of heparanase on heparin, a highly sulphated glycosaminoglycan, when it activates antithrombin, our results demonstrated that heparanase, but not proheparanase, interacted directly with antithrombin in a non-covalent manner. This interaction resulted in the activation of antithrombin, which is the most important endogenous anticoagulant. This activation mainly accelerated FXa inhibition, supporting an allosteric activation effect. Heparanase bound to the heparin binding site of antithrombin as the activation of Pro41Leu, Arg47Cys, Lys114Ala and Lys125Alaantithrombin mutants was impaired when it was compared to wild type antithrombin. Intrinsic fluorescence analysis showed that heparanase induced an activating conformational change in antithrombin similar to that induced by heparin and with a KD of 18.81 pM. In conclusion, under physiological pH and low levels of tissue factor, heparanase may exert a non-enzymatic function interacting and activating the inhibitory function of antithrombin. PMID:27322195

  14. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of a new bilin lyase: the cpcT gene encoding a bilin lyase responsible for attachment of phycocyanobilin to Cys-153 on the β-subunit of phycocyanin in Arthrospira platensis FACHB314.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ran; Feng, Xiao-Ting; Wu, Fei; Ding, Yan; Zang, Xiao-Nan; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Yuan, Ding-Yang; Zhao, Bing-Ran

    2014-07-10

    To study the assembly of phycocyanin β subunit, the gene cpcT was first cloned from Arthrospira platensis FACHB314. To explore the function of cpcT, the DNA of phycocyanin β subunit and cpcT were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 with the plasmid pET-hox1-pcyA, which contained the genes hemeoxygenase 1 (Hox1) and ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PcyA) needed to produce phycocyanobilin. The transformed strains showed specific phycocyanin fluorescence, and the fluorescence intensity was stronger than the strains with only phycocyanin β subunit, indicating that CpcT can promote the assembly of phycocyanin to generate fluorescence. To study the possible binding sites of apo-phycocyanin and phycocyanobilin, the Cys-82 and Cys-153 of the β subunit were individually mutated, giving two kinds of mutants. The results show that Cys-153 maybe the active site for β subunit binding to phycocyanobilins, which is catalyzed by CpcT in A. platensis FACHB314. PMID:24768724

  15. Expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic studies of different redox states of the active site of thioredoxin 1 from the whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Acevedo, Adam A.; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D.; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a 12 kDa cellular redox protein that belongs to a family of small redox proteins which undergo reversible oxidation to produce a cystine disulfide bond through the transfer of reducing equivalents from the catalytic site cysteine residues (Cys32 and Cys35) to a disulfide substrate. In this study, crystals of thioredoxin 1 from the Pacific whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (LvTrx) were successfully obtained. One data set was collected from each of four crystals at 100 K and the three-dimensional structures of the catalytic cysteines in different redox states were determined: reduced and oxidized forms at 2.00 Å resolution using data collected at a synchrotron-radiation source and two partially reduced structures at 1.54 and 1.88 Å resolution using data collected using an in-house source. All of the crystals belonged to space group P3212, with unit-cell parameters a = 57.5 (4), b = 57.5 (4), c = 118.1 (8) Å. The asymmetric unit contains two subunits of LvTrx, with a Matthews coefficient (V M) of 2.31 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 46%. Initial phases were determined by molecular replacement using the crystallographic model of Trx from Drosophila melanogaster as a template. In the present work, LvTrx was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Structural analysis of the different redox states at the Trx active site highlights its reactivity and corroborates the existence of a dimer in the crystal. In the crystallographic structures the dimer is stabilized by several interactions, including a disulfide bridge between Cys73 of each LvTrx monomer, a hydrogen bond between the side chain of Asp60 of each monomer and several hydrophobic interactions, with a noncrystallographic twofold axis. PMID:23695560

  16. Control of active sites in flocculation: Concept of equivalent active sites''

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Flocculation and dispersion of solids are strong functions of the amount and conformation of the adsorbed polymer. Regions of dispersion and flocculation of solids with particular polymer molecules may be deduced from saturation adsorption data. The concept of equivalent active sites'' is proposed to explain flocculation and dispersion behavior irrespective of the amount or conformation of the adsorbed polymer. The concept has been further extended to study the selective flocculation process.

  17. Small molecule binding sites on the Ras:SOS complex can be exploited for inhibition of Ras activation.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jon J G; Anderson, Malcolm; Blades, Kevin; Brassington, Claire; Breeze, Alexander L; Chresta, Christine; Embrey, Kevin; Fairley, Gary; Faulder, Paul; Finlay, M Raymond V; Kettle, Jason G; Nowak, Thorsten; Overman, Ross; Patel, S Joe; Perkins, Paula; Spadola, Loredana; Tart, Jonathan; Tucker, Julie A; Wrigley, Gail

    2015-03-12

    Constitutively active mutant KRas displays a reduced rate of GTP hydrolysis via both intrinsic and GTPase-activating protein-catalyzed mechanisms, resulting in the perpetual activation of Ras pathways. We describe a fragment screening campaign using X-ray crystallography that led to the discovery of three fragment binding sites on the Ras:SOS complex. The identification of tool compounds binding at each of these sites allowed exploration of two new approaches to Ras pathway inhibition by stabilizing or covalently modifying the Ras:SOS complex to prevent the reloading of Ras with GTP. Initially, we identified ligands that bound reversibly to the Ras:SOS complex in two distinct sites, but these compounds were not sufficiently potent inhibitors to validate our stabilization hypothesis. We conclude by demonstrating that covalent modification of Cys118 on Ras leads to a novel mechanism of inhibition of the SOS-mediated interaction between Ras and Raf and is effective at inhibiting the exchange of labeled GDP in both mutant (G12C and G12V) and wild type Ras.

  18. A 1-Cys Peroxiredoxin from a Thermophilic Archaeon Moonlights as a Molecular Chaperone to Protect Protein and DNA against Stress-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Bang Phuong; Kwak, Jae Myeong; Xuan, Yuan Hu; Cheong, Gang-Won

    2015-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) act against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), organic peroxides, and peroxynitrite. Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1, an anaerobic archaeon, contains many antioxidant proteins, including three Prxs (Tk0537, Tk0815, and Tk1055). Only Tk0537 has been found to be induced in response to heat, osmotic, and oxidative stress. Tk0537 was found to belong to a 1-Cys Prx6 subfamily based on sequence analysis and was named 1-Cys TkPrx. Using gel filtration chromatography, electron microscopy, and blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we observed that 1-Cys TkPrx exhibits oligomeric forms with reduced peroxide reductase activity as well as decameric and dodecameric forms that can act as molecular chaperones by protecting both proteins and DNA from oxidative stress. Mutational analysis showed that a cysteine residue at the N-terminus (Cys46) was responsible for the peroxide reductase activity, and cysteine residues at the C-terminus (Cys205 and Cys211) were important for oligomerization. Based on our results, we propose that interconversion between different oligomers is important for regulating the different functions of 1-Cys TkPrx. PMID:25933432

  19. An additional cysteine in a typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin of Pseudomonas promotes functional switching between peroxidase and molecular chaperone.

    PubMed

    An, Byung Chull; Lee, Seung Sik; Jung, Hyun Suk; Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Yuno; Lee, Keun Woo; Lee, Sang Yeol; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2015-09-14

    Peroxiredoxins (Prx) have received considerable attention during recent years. This study demonstrates that two typical Pseudomonas-derived 2-Cys Prx proteins, PpPrx and PaPrx can alternatively function as a peroxidase and chaperone. The amino acid sequences of these two Prx proteins exhibit 93% homology, but PpPrx possesses an additional cysteine residue, Cys112, instead of the alanine found in PaPrx. PpPrx predominates with a high molecular weight (HMW) complex and chaperone activity, whereas PaPrx has mainly low molecular weight (LMW) structures and peroxidase activity. Mass spectrometry and structural analyses showed the involvement of Cys112 in the formation of an inter-disulfide bond, the instability of LMW structures, the formation of HMW complexes, and increased hydrophobicity leading to functional switching of Prx proteins between peroxidase and chaperone. PMID:26278368

  20. Opioid profiles of Cys2-containing enkephalin analogues.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, Nevena; Milanov, Peter; Vezenkov, Lubomir; Pajpanova, Tamara; Naydenova, Emilia

    2004-09-13

    To elucidate the structural features determining delta-opioid receptor properties of enkephalin analogues containing Cys(O2NH2) in position 2, a series of Cys2-containing derivatives were synthesized and tested for their effectiveness in depressing electrically evoked contractions of the mouse vas deferens (predominantly enkephalin-selective delta-opioid receptors) and the guinea-pig ileum (mu- and kappa-opioid receptors). The peptidase resistance of the compounds was also tested. The ratio IC50 in the guinea-pig ileum/IC50 in the mouse vas deferens, indicating selectivity for delta-opioid receptors, was high for Cys(O2NH2)2-containing analogues and especially for [Cys(O2NH2)2, Leu5]enkephalin, which was about seven times more selective than delta-opioid receptor selective ligand cyclic [D-Pen2, D-Pen5]enkephalin (DPDPE). The dissociation constant (KA) and relative efficacy (e(rel)) of the compounds in the mouse-isolated vas deferens were determined using explicit formulae derived by fitting of the data points with two-parametric hyperbolic function. The obtained values for KA and e(rel) suggest that: (i) incorporation of Cys(O2NH2)2 in the molecule of [Leu5]enkephalin highly increases the efficacy and does not change significantly the affinity of the respective analogues to delta-opioid receptors; [Cys(O2NH2)2, Leu5]enkephalin has higher affinity than DPDPE, but is less resistant to enzyme degradation; the effect of this modification on the efficacy is decreased when methionine is in position 5; (ii) D-configuration of Cys(O2NH2)2-containing analogues increases their peptidase resistance, but reduces efficacy and affinity of the peptides towards delta-opioid receptors; (iii) the substitution of Cys(O2NH2) with Hcy(O2NH2) reduces the efficacy, affinity and potency of the respective analogues and maintains their sensitivity to endogenous peptidases; (iv) the substitution of the sulfonamide group with benzyl group in the molecule of Cys in position 2 decreases their

  1. X-ray structure at 1.75 resolution of a norovirus 3C protease linked to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Jon; Coates, Leighton; Hussey, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses are recognized universally as the most important cause of human epidemic non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a 3C cysteine protease that cleaves a 200kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional proteins. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the Southampton norovirus 3C protease (SV3CP) bound to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor (MAPI) which has been refined at 1.75 resolution, following initial MAD phasing with a selenomethionine derivative. The inhibitor, acetyl-Glu-Phe-Gln-Leu-Gln-X, based on a 3C protease cleavage recognition sequences in the 200kDa polyprotein substrate, reacts covalently through its propenylethylester group (X) with the active site nucleophile, Cys 139. The 3C protease-inhibitor structure permits, for the first time, the identification of substrate recognition and binding groups and provides important new information for the development of antiviral prophylactics.

  2. Role of Cysteine Residues in the Structure, Stability, and Alkane Producing Activity of Cyanobacterial Aldehyde Deformylating Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yuuki; Yasugi, Fumitaka; Arai, Munehito

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (AD) is a key enzyme for alkane biosynthesis in cyanobacteria, and it can be used as a catalyst for alkane production in vitro and in vivo. However, three free Cys residues in AD may impair its catalytic activity by undesired disulfide bond formation and oxidation. To develop Cys-deficient mutants of AD, we examined the roles of the Cys residues in the structure, stability, and alkane producing activity of AD from Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 by systematic Cys-to-Ala/Ser mutagenesis. The C71A/S mutations reduced the hydrocarbon producing activity of AD and facilitated the formation of a dimer, indicating that the conserved Cys71, which is located in close proximity to the substrate-binding site, plays crucial roles in maintaining the activity, structure, and stability of AD. On the other hand, mutations at Cys107 and Cys117 did not affect the hydrocarbon producing activity of AD. Therefore, we propose that the C107A/C117A double mutant is preferable to wild type AD for alkane production and that the double mutant may be used as a pseudo-wild type protein for further improvement of the alkane producing activity of AD. PMID:25837679

  3. Role of cysteine residues in the structure, stability, and alkane producing activity of cyanobacterial aldehyde deformylating oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuuki; Yasugi, Fumitaka; Arai, Munehito

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (AD) is a key enzyme for alkane biosynthesis in cyanobacteria, and it can be used as a catalyst for alkane production in vitro and in vivo. However, three free Cys residues in AD may impair its catalytic activity by undesired disulfide bond formation and oxidation. To develop Cys-deficient mutants of AD, we examined the roles of the Cys residues in the structure, stability, and alkane producing activity of AD from Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 by systematic Cys-to-Ala/Ser mutagenesis. The C71A/S mutations reduced the hydrocarbon producing activity of AD and facilitated the formation of a dimer, indicating that the conserved Cys71, which is located in close proximity to the substrate-binding site, plays crucial roles in maintaining the activity, structure, and stability of AD. On the other hand, mutations at Cys107 and Cys117 did not affect the hydrocarbon producing activity of AD. Therefore, we propose that the C107A/C117A double mutant is preferable to wild type AD for alkane production and that the double mutant may be used as a pseudo-wild type protein for further improvement of the alkane producing activity of AD.

  4. Ligand-dependent dynamics of the active-site lid in bacterial dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Masooma; Richter, Christine; Chisty, Liisa T; Kirkpatrick, John; Blackledge, Martin; Webb, Martin R; Driscoll, Paul C

    2014-02-18

    The dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) enzyme family has been the subject of substantial investigation as a potential therapeutic target for the regulation of vascular tension. DDAH enzymes catalyze the conversion of asymmetric N(η),N(η)-dimethylarginine (ADMA) to l-citrulline. Here the influence of substrate and product binding on the dynamic flexibility of DDAH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PaDDAH) has been assessed. A combination of heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy, static and time-resolved fluorescence measurements, and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations was employed. A monodisperse monomeric variant of the wild-type enzyme binds the reaction product l-citrulline with a low millimolar dissociation constant. A second variant, engineered to be catalytically inactive by substitution of the nucleophilic Cys249 residue with serine, can still convert the substrate ADMA to products very slowly. This PaDDAH variant also binds l-citrulline, but with a low micromolar dissociation constant. NMR and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the active site "lid", formed by residues Gly17-Asp27, exhibits a high degree of internal motion on the picosecond-to-nanosecond time scale. This suggests that the lid is open in the apo state and allows substrate access to the active site that is otherwise buried. l-Citrulline binding to both protein variants is accompanied by an ordering of the lid. Modification of PaDDAH with a coumarin fluorescence reporter allowed measurement of the kinetic mechanism of the PaDDAH reaction. A combination of NMR and kinetic data shows that the catalytic turnover of the enzyme is not limited by release of the l-citrulline product. The potential to develop the coumarin-PaDDAH adduct as an l-citrulline sensor is discussed. PMID:24484052

  5. Distinct expression patterns of two Arabidopsis phytocystatin genes, AtCYS1 and AtCYS2, during development and abiotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung Eun; Hong, Joon Ki; Lim, Chan Ju; Chen, Huan; Je, Jihyun; Yang, Kyung Ae; Kim, Dool Yi; Choi, Young Ju; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2010-01-01

    The phytocystatins of plants are members of the cystatin superfamily of proteins, which are potent inhibitors of cysteine proteases. The Arabidopsis genome encodes seven phytocystatin isoforms (AtCYSs) in two distantly related AtCYS gene clusters. We selected AtCYS1 and AtCYS2 as representatives for each cluster and then generated transgenic plants expressing the GUS reporter gene under the control of each gene promoter. These plants were used to examine AtCYS expression at various stages of plant development and in response to abiotic stresses. Histochemical analysis of AtCYS1 promoter- and AtCYS2 promoter-GUS transgenic plants revealed that these genes have similar but distinct spatial and temporal expression patterns during normal development. In particular, AtCYS1 was preferentially expressed in the vascular tissue of all organs, whereas AtCYS2 was expressed in trichomes and guard cells in young leaves, caps of roots, and in connecting regions of the immature anthers and filaments and the style and stigma in flowers. In addition, each AtCYS gene has a unique expression profile during abiotic stresses. High temperature and wounding stress enhanced the expression of both AtCYS1 and AtCYS2, but the temporal and spatial patterns of induction differed. From these data, we propose that these two AtCYS genes play important, but distinct, roles in plant development and stress responses. PMID:20526604

  6. Dissecting the active site of a photoreceptor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Wouter; Hara, Miwa; Ren, Jie; Moghadam, Farzaneh; Xie, Aihua; Kumauchi, Masato

    While enzymes are quite large molecules, functionally important chemical events are often limited to a small region of the protein: the active site. The physical and chemical properties of residues at such active sites are often strongly altered compared to the same groups dissolved in water. Understanding such effects is important for unraveling the mechanisms underlying protein function and for protein engineering, but has proven challenging. Here we report on our ongoing efforts on using photoactive yellow protein (PYP), a bacterial photoreceptor, as a model system for such effects. We will report on the following questions: How many residues affect active site properties? Are these residues in direct physical contact with the active site? Can functionally important residues be recognized in the crystal structure of a protein? What structural resolution is needed to understand active sites? What spectroscopic techniques are most informative? Which weak interactions dominate active site properties?

  7. Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase in adipocyte is Cys-specific and affected by obesity.

    PubMed

    Alponti, Rafaela Fadoni; Viana, Luciana Godoy; Yamanouye, Norma; Silveira, Paulo Flavio

    2015-08-01

    Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP, EC 3.4.11.3) in adipocytes is well known to traffic between high (HDM) and low (LDM) density microsomal fractions toward the plasma membrane (MF) under stimulation by insulin. However, its catalytic preference for aminoacyl substrates with N-terminal Leu or Cys is controversial. Furthermore, possible changes in its traffic under metabolic challenges are unknown. The present study investigated the catalytic activity attributable to EC 3.4.11.3 in HDM, LDM and MF from isolated adipocytes of healthy (C), food deprived (FD) and monosodium glutamate (MSG) obese rats on aminoacyl substrates with N-terminal Cys or Leu, in absence or presence of insulin. Efficacy and reproducibility of subcellular adipocyte fractionation procedure were demonstrated. Comparison among HDM vs LDM vs MF intragroup revealed that hydrolytic activity trafficking from LDM to MF under influence of insulin in C, MSG and FD is only on N-terminal Cys. In MSG the same pattern of anterograde traffic and aminoacyl preference occurred independently of insulin stimulation. The pathophysiological significance of IRAP in adipocytes seems to be linked to comprehensive energy metabolism related roles of endogenous substrates with N-terminal cysteine pair such as vasopressin and oxytocin.

  8. Cloning and functional characterization of a typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin from southern bluefin tuna (Thunnus maccoyii).

    PubMed

    Sutton, Drew L; Loo, Grace H; Menz, R Ian; Schuller, Kathryn A

    2010-06-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs, EC: 1.11.1.15) are cysteine-dependent peroxidases proposed to function as antioxidant enzymes and also in H2O2-mediated cell signaling. They have been well characterized in yeast, mammals, protists and bacteria but not yet in fish. Here we describe the cloning and functional characterization of a Prx 2 cDNA from southern bluefin tuna (SBT, Thunnus maccoyii), an important aquaculture species in South Australia. The SBT Prx sequence was closely related (76-92% identical) to Prx 1 and 2 sequences from other fish and mammals and phylogenetic analyses showed that it was most likely a Prx 2. The deduced amino acid sequence contained the peroxidatic and resolving Cys residues characteristic of typical 2-Cys Prx proteins from all kingdoms of life. It also contained the GGLG motif associated with the sensitivity of eukaryotic typical 2-Cys Prx proteins to overoxidation and consequent inactivation by H2O2. When the SBT Prx 2 was expressed in E. coli, it showed thioredoxin (Trx)-dependent peroxidase activity with H2O2, cumene hydroperoxide (CuOOH) and t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-bOOH). The SBT Prx displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with Trx but sigmoidal kinetics with H2O2 and CuOOH. The K(m)(Trx) was 12 microM and the S(0.5) values for H2O2 and CuOOH were 29 and 25 microM, respectively. At mM concentrations of H2O2, SBT Prx progressively lost its peroxidase activity as has been observed for other eukaryotic typical 2-Cys Prx proteins. The native SBT Prx enzyme existed as a mixture of dimers, tetramers, decamers and a higher order aggregate.

  9. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program --now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human Exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines be opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  10. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program -- now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history. The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines the opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  11. Activation of Inhibitors by Sortase Triggers Irreversible Modification of the Active Site*S

    PubMed Central

    Maresso, Anthony W.; Wu, Ruiying; Kern, Justin W.; Zhang, Rongguang; Janik, Dorota; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Schneewind, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Sortases anchor surface proteins to the cell wall of Gram-positive pathogens through recognition of specific motif sequences. Loss of sortase leads to large reductions in virulence, which identifies sortase as a target for the development of antibacterials. By screening 135,625 small molecules for inhibition, we report here that aryl (β-amino)ethyl ketones inhibit sortase enzymes from staphylococci and bacilli. Inhibition of sortases occurs through an irreversible, covalent modification of their active site cysteine. Sortases specifically activate this class of molecules via β-elimination, generating a reactive olefin intermediate that covalently modifies the cysteine thiol. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of Bacillus anthracis sortase B with and without inhibitor provides insights into the mechanism of inhibition and reveals binding pockets that can be exploited for drug discovery. PMID:17545669

  12. The bifunctional active site of s-adenosylmethionine synthetase. Roles of the active site aspartates.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J C; Markham, G D

    1999-11-12

    S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzes the biosynthesis of AdoMet in a unique enzymatic reaction. Initially the sulfur of methionine displaces the intact tripolyphosphate chain (PPP(i)) from ATP, and subsequently PPP(i) is hydrolyzed to PP(i) and P(i) before product release. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli AdoMet synthetase shows that the active site contains four aspartate residues. Aspartate residues Asp-16* and Asp-271 individually provide the sole protein ligand to one of the two required Mg(2+) ions (* denotes a residue from a second subunit); aspartates Asp-118 and Asp-238* are proposed to interact with methionine. Each aspartate has been changed to an uncharged asparagine, and the metal binding residues were also changed to alanine, to assess the roles of charge and ligation ability on catalytic efficiency. The resultant enzyme variants all structurally resemble the wild type enzyme as indicated by circular dichroism spectra and are tetramers. However, all have k(cat) reductions of approximately 10(3)-fold in AdoMet synthesis, whereas the MgATP and methionine K(m) values change by less than 3- and 8-fold, respectively. In the partial reaction of PPP(i) hydrolysis, mutants of the Mg(2+) binding residues have >700-fold reduced catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)), whereas the D118N and D238*N mutants are impaired less than 35-fold. The catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by Mg(2+) site mutants is improved by AdoMet, like the wild type enzyme. In contrast AdoMet reduces the catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by the D118N and D238*N mutants, indicating that the events involved in AdoMet activation are hindered in these methionyl binding site mutants. Ca(2+) uniquely activates the D271A mutant enzyme to 15% of the level of Mg(2+), in contrast to the approximately 1% Ca(2+) activation of the wild type enzyme. This indicates that the Asp-271 side chain size is a discriminator between the activating ability of Ca(2+) and the

  13. Transient Transcriptional Regulation of the CYS-C1 Gene and Cyanide Accumulation upon Pathogen Infection in the Plant Immune Response1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    García, Irene; Rosas, Tábata; Bejarano, Eduardo R.; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C.

    2013-01-01

    Cyanide is produced concomitantly with ethylene biosynthesis. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) detoxifies cyanide primarily through the enzyme β-cyanoalanine synthase, mainly by the mitochondrial CYS-C1. CYS-C1 loss of function is not toxic for the plant and leads to an increased level of cyanide in cys-c1 mutants as well as a root hairless phenotype. The classification of genes differentially expressed in cys-c1 and wild-type plants reveals that the high endogenous cyanide content of the cys-c1 mutant is correlated with the biotic stress response. Cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated during compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions. In addition, cys-c1 plants present an increased susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea and an increased tolerance to the biotrophic Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 bacterium and Beet curly top virus. The cys-c1 mutation produces a reduction in respiration rate in leaves, an accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and an induction of the alternative oxidase AOX1a and pathogenesis-related PR1 expression. We hypothesize that cyanide, which is transiently accumulated during avirulent bacterial infection and constitutively accumulated in the cys-c1 mutant, uncouples the respiratory electron chain dependent on the cytochrome c oxidase, and this uncoupling induces the alternative oxidase activity and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which act by stimulating the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system. PMID:23784464

  14. Transient transcriptional regulation of the CYS-C1 gene and cyanide accumulation upon pathogen infection in the plant immune response.

    PubMed

    García, Irene; Rosas, Tábata; Bejarano, Eduardo R; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2013-08-01

    Cyanide is produced concomitantly with ethylene biosynthesis. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) detoxifies cyanide primarily through the enzyme β-cyanoalanine synthase, mainly by the mitochondrial CYS-C1. CYS-C1 loss of function is not toxic for the plant and leads to an increased level of cyanide in cys-c1 mutants as well as a root hairless phenotype. The classification of genes differentially expressed in cys-c1 and wild-type plants reveals that the high endogenous cyanide content of the cys-c1 mutant is correlated with the biotic stress response. Cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated during compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions. In addition, cys-c1 plants present an increased susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea and an increased tolerance to the biotrophic Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 bacterium and Beet curly top virus. The cys-c1 mutation produces a reduction in respiration rate in leaves, an accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and an induction of the alternative oxidase AOX1a and pathogenesis-related PR1 expression. We hypothesize that cyanide, which is transiently accumulated during avirulent bacterial infection and constitutively accumulated in the cys-c1 mutant, uncouples the respiratory electron chain dependent on the cytochrome c oxidase, and this uncoupling induces the alternative oxidase activity and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which act by stimulating the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system. PMID:23784464

  15. Active site cysteine-null glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) rescues nitric oxide-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takeya; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Nakatsuji, Masatoshi; Itakura, Masanori; Kaneshige, Akihiro; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Inui, Takashi; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2016-02-29

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a homotetrameric enzyme involved in a key step of glycolysis, also has a role in mediating cell death under nitrosative stress. Our previous reports suggest that nitric oxide-induced intramolecular disulfide-bonding GAPDH aggregation, which occurs through oxidation of the active site cysteine (Cys-152), participates in a mechanism to account for nitric oxide-induced death signaling in some neurodegenerative/neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we demonstrate a rescue strategy for nitric oxide-induced cell death accompanied by GAPDH aggregation in a mutant with a substitution of Cys-152 to alanine (C152A-GAPDH). Pre-incubation of purified wild-type GAPDH with C152A-GAPDH under exposure to nitric oxide inhibited wild-type GAPDH aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro. Several lines of structural analysis revealed that C152A-GAPDH extensively interfered with nitric oxide-induced GAPDH-amyloidogenesis. Overexpression of doxycycline-inducible C152A-GAPDH in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma significantly rescued nitric oxide-induced death, concomitant with the decreased formation of GAPDH aggregates. Further, both co-immunoprecipitation assays and simulation models revealed a heterotetramer composed of one dimer each of wild-type GAPDH and C152A-GAPDH. These results suggest that the C152A-GAPDH mutant acts as a dominant-negative molecule against GAPDH aggregation via the formation of this GAPDH heterotetramer. This study may contribute to a new therapeutic approach utilizing C152A-GAPDH against brain damage in nitrosative stress-related disorders.

  16. In vivo parameters influencing 2-Cys Prx oligomerization: The role of enzyme sulfinylation.

    PubMed

    Noichri, Y; Palais, G; Ruby, V; D'Autreaux, B; Delaunay-Moisan, A; Nyström, T; Molin, M; Toledano, M B

    2015-12-01

    2-Cys Prxs are H2O2-specific antioxidants that become inactivated by enzyme hyperoxidation at elevated H2O2 levels. Although hyperoxidation restricts the antioxidant physiological role of these enzymes, it also allows the enzyme to become an efficient chaperone holdase. The critical molecular event allowing the peroxidase to chaperone switch is thought to be the enzyme assembly into high molecular weight (HMW) structures brought about by enzyme hyperoxidation. How hyperoxidation promotes HMW assembly is not well understood and Prx mutants allowing disentangling its peroxidase and chaperone functions are lacking. To begin addressing the link between enzyme hyperoxidation and HMW structures formation, we have evaluated the in vivo 2-Cys Prxs quaternary structure changes induced by H2O2 by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) on crude lysates, using wild type (Wt) untagged and Myc-tagged S. cerevisiae 2-Cys Prx Tsa1 and derivative Tsa1 mutants or genetic conditions known to inactivate peroxidase or chaperone activity or altering the enzyme sensitivity to hyperoxidation. Our data confirm the strict causative link between H2O2-induced hyperoxidation and HMW formation/stabilization, also raising the question of whether CP hyperoxidation triggers the assembly of HMW structures by the stacking of decamers, which is the prevalent view of the literature, or rather, the stabilization of preassembled stacked decamers.

  17. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Microbial 2-Cys Peroxiredoxins: Insights into Their Complex Physiological Roles

    PubMed Central

    Toledano, Michel B.; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    The peroxiredoxins (Prxs) constitute a very large and highly conserved family of thiol-based peroxidases that has been discovered only very recently. We consider here these enzymes through the angle of their discovery, and of some features of their molecular and physiological functions, focusing on complex phenotypes of the gene mutations of the 2-Cys Prxs subtype in yeast. As scavengers of the low levels of H2O2 and as H2O2 receptors and transducers, 2-Cys Prxs have been highly instrumental to understand the biological impact of H2O2, and in particular its signaling function. 2-Cys Prxs can also become potent chaperone holdases, and unveiling the in vivo relevance of this function, which is still not established, should further increase our knowledge of the biological impact and toxicity of H2O2. The diverse molecular functions of 2-Cys Prx explain the often-hard task of relating them to peroxiredoxin genes phenotypes, which underscores the pleiotropic physiological role of these enzymes and complex biologic impact of H2O2. PMID:26813659

  19. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  20. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  1. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  2. How pH modulates the dimer-decamer interconversion of 2-Cys peroxiredoxins from the Prx1 subfamily.

    PubMed

    Morais, Mariana A B; Giuseppe, Priscila O; Souza, Tatiana A C B; Alegria, Thiago G P; Oliveira, Marcos A; Netto, Luis E S; Murakami, Mario T

    2015-03-27

    2-Cys peroxiredoxins belonging to the Prx1 subfamily are Cys-based peroxidases that control the intracellular levels of H2O2 and seem to assume a chaperone function under oxidative stress conditions. The regulation of their peroxidase activity as well as the observed functional switch from peroxidase to chaperone involves changes in their quaternary structure. Multiple factors can modulate the oligomeric transitions of 2-Cys peroxiredoxins such as redox state, post-translational modifications, and pH. However, the molecular basis for the pH influence on the oligomeric state of these enzymes is still elusive. Herein, we solved the crystal structure of a typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin from Leishmania in the dimeric (pH 8.5) and decameric (pH 4.4) forms, showing that conformational changes in the catalytic loop are associated with the pH-induced decamerization. Mutagenesis and biophysical studies revealed that a highly conserved histidine (His(113)) functions as a pH sensor that, at acidic conditions, becomes protonated and forms an electrostatic pair with Asp(76) from the catalytic loop, triggering the decamerization. In these 2-Cys peroxiredoxins, decamer formation is important for the catalytic efficiency and has been associated with an enhanced sensitivity to oxidative inactivation by overoxidation of the peroxidatic cysteine. In eukaryotic cells, exposure to high levels of H2O2 can trigger intracellular pH variations, suggesting that pH changes might act cooperatively with H2O2 and other oligomerization-modulator factors to regulate the structure and function of typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins in response to oxidative stress.

  3. How pH modulates the dimer-decamer interconversion of 2-Cys peroxiredoxins from the Prx1 subfamily.

    PubMed

    Morais, Mariana A B; Giuseppe, Priscila O; Souza, Tatiana A C B; Alegria, Thiago G P; Oliveira, Marcos A; Netto, Luis E S; Murakami, Mario T

    2015-03-27

    2-Cys peroxiredoxins belonging to the Prx1 subfamily are Cys-based peroxidases that control the intracellular levels of H2O2 and seem to assume a chaperone function under oxidative stress conditions. The regulation of their peroxidase activity as well as the observed functional switch from peroxidase to chaperone involves changes in their quaternary structure. Multiple factors can modulate the oligomeric transitions of 2-Cys peroxiredoxins such as redox state, post-translational modifications, and pH. However, the molecular basis for the pH influence on the oligomeric state of these enzymes is still elusive. Herein, we solved the crystal structure of a typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin from Leishmania in the dimeric (pH 8.5) and decameric (pH 4.4) forms, showing that conformational changes in the catalytic loop are associated with the pH-induced decamerization. Mutagenesis and biophysical studies revealed that a highly conserved histidine (His(113)) functions as a pH sensor that, at acidic conditions, becomes protonated and forms an electrostatic pair with Asp(76) from the catalytic loop, triggering the decamerization. In these 2-Cys peroxiredoxins, decamer formation is important for the catalytic efficiency and has been associated with an enhanced sensitivity to oxidative inactivation by overoxidation of the peroxidatic cysteine. In eukaryotic cells, exposure to high levels of H2O2 can trigger intracellular pH variations, suggesting that pH changes might act cooperatively with H2O2 and other oligomerization-modulator factors to regulate the structure and function of typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins in response to oxidative stress. PMID:25666622

  4. How pH Modulates the Dimer-Decamer Interconversion of 2-Cys Peroxiredoxins from the Prx1 Subfamily*

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Mariana A. B.; Giuseppe, Priscila O.; Souza, Tatiana A. C. B.; Alegria, Thiago G. P.; Oliveira, Marcos A.; Netto, Luis E. S.; Murakami, Mario T.

    2015-01-01

    2-Cys peroxiredoxins belonging to the Prx1 subfamily are Cys-based peroxidases that control the intracellular levels of H2O2 and seem to assume a chaperone function under oxidative stress conditions. The regulation of their peroxidase activity as well as the observed functional switch from peroxidase to chaperone involves changes in their quaternary structure. Multiple factors can modulate the oligomeric transitions of 2-Cys peroxiredoxins such as redox state, post-translational modifications, and pH. However, the molecular basis for the pH influence on the oligomeric state of these enzymes is still elusive. Herein, we solved the crystal structure of a typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin from Leishmania in the dimeric (pH 8.5) and decameric (pH 4.4) forms, showing that conformational changes in the catalytic loop are associated with the pH-induced decamerization. Mutagenesis and biophysical studies revealed that a highly conserved histidine (His113) functions as a pH sensor that, at acidic conditions, becomes protonated and forms an electrostatic pair with Asp76 from the catalytic loop, triggering the decamerization. In these 2-Cys peroxiredoxins, decamer formation is important for the catalytic efficiency and has been associated with an enhanced sensitivity to oxidative inactivation by overoxidation of the peroxidatic cysteine. In eukaryotic cells, exposure to high levels of H2O2 can trigger intracellular pH variations, suggesting that pH changes might act cooperatively with H2O2 and other oligomerization-modulator factors to regulate the structure and function of typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins in response to oxidative stress. PMID:25666622

  5. Mutations of fumarase that distinguish between the active site and a nearby dicarboxylic acid binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, T.; Lees, M.; Banaszak, L.

    1997-01-01

    Two mutant forms of fumarase C from E. coli have been made using PCR and recombinant DNA. The recombinant form of the protein included a histidine arm on the C-terminal facilitating purification. Based on earlier studies, two different carboxylic acid binding sites, labeled A- and B-, were observed in crystal structures of the wild type and inhibited forms of the enzyme. A histidine at each of the sites was mutated to an asparagine. H188N at the A-site resulted in a large decrease in specific activity, while the H129N mutation at the B-site had essentially no effect. From the results, we conclude that the A-site is indeed the active site, and a dual role for H188 as a potential catalytic base is proposed. Crystal structures of the two mutant proteins produced some unexpected results. Both mutations reduced the affinity for the carboxylic acids at their respective sites. The H129N mutant should be particularly useful in future kinetic studies because it sterically blocks the B-site with the carboxyamide of asparagine assuming the position of the ligand's carboxylate. In the H188N mutation at the active site, the new asparagine side chain still interacts with an active site water that appears to have moved slightly as a result of the mutation. PMID:9098893

  6. Crystal structures of clinically relevant Lys103Asn/Tyr181Cys double mutant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in complexes with ATP and non-nucleoside inhibitor HBY 097.

    PubMed

    Das, Kalyan; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Clark, Arthur D; Boyer, Paul L; Hughes, Stephen H; Arnold, Eddy

    2007-01-01

    Lys103Asn and Tyr181Cys are the two mutations frequently observed in patients exposed to various non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drugs (NNRTIs). Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) strains containing both reverse transcriptase (RT) mutations are resistant to all of the approved NNRTI drugs. We have determined crystal structures of Lys103Asn/Tyr181Cys mutant HIV-1 RT with and without a bound non-nucleoside inhibitor (HBY 097, (S)-4-isopropoxycarbonyl-6-methoxy-3-(methylthio-methyl)-3,4-dihydroquinoxalin-2(1H)-thione) at 3.0 A and 2.5 A resolution, respectively. The structure of the double mutant RT/HBY 097 complex shows a rearrangement of the isopropoxycarbonyl group of HBY 097 compared to its binding with wild-type RT. HBY 097 makes a hydrogen bond with the thiol group of Cys181 that helps the drug retain potency against the Tyr181Cys mutation. The structure of the unliganded double mutant HIV-1 RT showed that Lys103Asn mutation facilitates coordination of a sodium ion with Lys101 O, Asn103 N and O(delta1), Tyr188 O(eta), and two water molecules. The formation of the binding pocket requires the removal of the sodium ion. Although the RT alone and the RT/HBY 097 complex were crystallized in the presence of ATP, only the RT has an ATP coordinated with two Mn(2+) at the polymerase active site. The metal coordination mimics a reaction intermediate state in which complete octahedral coordination was observed for both metal ions. Asp186 coordinates at an axial position whereas the carboxylates of Asp110 and Asp185 are in the planes of coordination of both metal ions. The structures provide evidence that NNRTIs restrict the flexibility of the YMDD loop and prevent the catalytic aspartate residues from adopting their metal-binding conformations.

  7. Ionizable Side Chains at Catalytic Active Sites of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic active sites of enzymes of known structure can be well defined by a modern program of computational geometry. The CASTp program was used to define and measure the volume of the catalytic active sites of 573 enzymes in the Catalytic Site Atlas database. The active sites are identified as catalytic because the amino acids they contain are known to participate in the chemical reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Acid and base side chains are reliable markers of catalytic active sites. The catalytic active sites have 4 acid and 5 base side chains, in an average volume of 1072 Å3. The number density of acid side chains is 8.3 M (in chemical units); the number density of basic side chains is 10.6 M. The catalytic active site of these enzymes is an unusual electrostatic and steric environment in which side chains and reactants are crowded together in a mixture more like an ionic liquid than an ideal infinitely dilute solution. The electrostatics and crowding of reactants and side chains seems likely to be important for catalytic function. In three types of analogous ion channels, simulation of crowded charges accounts for the main properties of selectivity measured in a wide range of solutions and concentrations. It seems wise to use mathematics designed to study interacting complex fluids when making models of the catalytic active sites of enzymes. PMID:22484856

  8. Structural definition of the active site and catalytic mechanism of 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone 4-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, D.-I.; Zheng, Y.-J.; Viitanen, P.V.; Jordan, D.B.

    2010-03-08

    X-ray crystal structures of L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase from Magnaporthe grisea are reported for the E-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, E-{sub 4}{sup 2-}-Mg{sup 2+}, E-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}-Mn{sup 2+}, E-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}-Mn{sup 2+}-glycerol, and E-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}-Zn{sup 2+} complexes with resolutions that extend to 1.55, 0.98, 1.60, 1.16, and 1.00 {angstrom}, respectively. Active-site residues of the homodimer are fully defined. The structures were used to model the substrate ribulose 5-phosphate in the active site with the phosphate group anchored at the sulfate site and the placement of the ribulose group guided by the glycerol site. The model includes two Mg{sup 2+} cations that bind to the oxygen substituents of the C2, C3, C4, and phosphate groups of the substrate, the side chains of Glu37 and His153, and water molecules. The position of the metal cofactors and the substrate's phosphate group are further stabilized by an extensive hydrogen-bond and salt-bridge network. On the basis of their proximity to the substrate's reaction participants, the imidazole of an Asp99-His136 dyad from one subunit, the side chains of the Asp41, Cys66, and Glu174 residues from the other subunit, and Mg{sup 2+}-activated water molecules are proposed to serve specific roles in the catalytic cycle as general acid-base functionalities. The model suggests that during the 1,2-shift step of the reaction, the substrate's C3 and C4 hydroxyl groups are cis to each other. A cis transition state is calculated to have an activation barrier that is 2 kcal/mol greater than that of the trans transition state in the absence of the enzyme.

  9. Expression of salt-induced 2-Cys peroxiredoxin from Oryza sativa increases stress tolerance and fermentation capacity in genetically engineered yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Sup; Kim, Young-Saeng; Yoon, Ho-Sung

    2013-04-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs), also termed thioredoxin peroxidases (TPXs), are a family of thiol-specific antioxidant enzymes that are critically involved in cell defense and protect cells from oxidative damage. In this study, a putative chloroplastic 2-Cys thioredoxin peroxidase (OsTPX) was identified by proteome analysis from leaf tissue samples of rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings exposed to 0.1 M NaCl for 3 days. To investigate the relationship between the OsTPX gene and the stress response, OsTPX was cloned into the yeast expression vector p426GPD under the control of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1) promoter, and the construct was transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. OsTPX expression was confirmed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses. OsTPX contained two highly conserved cysteine residues (Cys114 and Cys236) and an active site region (FTFVCPT), and it is structurally very similar to human 2-Cys Prx. Heterologous OsTPX expression increased the ability of the transgenic yeast cells to adapt and recover from reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative stresses, such as a reduction of cellular hydroperoxide levels in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and menadione, by improving redox homeostasis. OsTPX expression also conferred enhanced tolerance to tert-butylhydroperoxide, heat shock, and high ethanol concentrations. Furthermore, high OsTPX expression improved the fermentation capacity of the yeast during glucose-based batch fermentation at a high temperature (40 °C) and at the general cultivation temperature (30 °C). The alcohol yield in OsTPX-expressing transgenic yeast increased by approximately 29 % (0.14 g g(-1)) and 21 % (0.12 g g(-1)) during fermentation at 40 and 30 °C, respectively, compared to the wild-type yeast. Accordingly, OsTPX-expressing transgenic yeast showed prolonged cell survival during the environmental stresses produced during fermentation. These

  10. Dipeptide-based models of nickel superoxide dismutase: solvent effects highlight a critical role to Ni-S bonding and active site stabilization.

    PubMed

    Gale, Eric M; Cowart, Darin M; Scott, Robert A; Harrop, Todd C

    2011-10-17

    Nickel superoxide dismutase (Ni-SOD) catalyzes the disproportionation of the superoxide radical to O(2) and H(2)O(2) utilizing the Ni(III/II) redox couple. The Ni center in Ni-SOD resides in an unusual coordination environment that is distinct from other SODs. In the reduced state (Ni-SOD(red)), Ni(II) is ligated to a primary amine-N from His1, anionic carboxamido-N/thiolato-S from Cys2, and a second thiolato-S from Cys6 to complete a NiN(2)S(2) square-planar coordination motif. Utilizing the dipeptide N(2)S(2-) ligand, H(2)N-Gly-l-Cys-OMe (GC-OMeH(2)), an accurate model of the structural and electronic contributions provided by His1 and Cys2 in Ni-SOD(red), we constructed the dinuclear sulfur-bridged metallosynthon, [Ni(2)(GC-OMe)(2)] (1). From 1 we prepared the following monomeric Ni(II)-N(2)S(2) complexes: K[Ni(GC-OMe)(SC(6)H(4)-p-Cl)] (2), K[Ni(GC-OMe)(S(t)Bu)] (3), K[Ni(GC-OMe)(SC(6)H(4)-p-OMe)] (4), and K[Ni(GC-OMe)(SNAc)] (5). The design strategy in utilizing GC-OMe(2-) is analogous to one which we reported before (see Inorg. Chem. 2009, 48, 5620 and Inorg. Chem. 2010, 49, 7080) where Ni-SOD(red) active site mimics can be assembled at will with electronically variant RS(-) ligands. Discussed herein is our initial account pertaining to the aqueous behavior of isolable, small-molecule Ni-SOD model complexes (non-maquette based). Spectroscopic (FTIR, UV-vis, ESI-MS, XAS) and electrochemical (CV) measurements suggest that 2-5 successfully simulate many of the electronic features of Ni-SOD(red). Furthermore, the aqueous studies reveal a dynamic behavior with regard to RS(-) lability and bridging interactions, suggesting a stabilizing role brought about by the protein architecture.

  11. Modular organization and identification of a mononuclear iron-binding site within the NifU protein.

    PubMed

    Agar, J N; Yuvaniyama, P; Jack, R F; Cash, V L; Smith, A D; Dean, D R; Johnson, M K

    2000-04-01

    The NifS and NifU nitrogen fixation-specific gene products are required for the full activation of both the Fe-protein and MoFe-protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Because the two nitrogenase component proteins both require the assembly of [Fe-S]-containing clusters for their activation, it has been suggested that NifS and NifU could have complementary functions in the mobilization of sulfur and iron necessary for nitrogenase-specific [Fe-S] cluster assembly. The NifS protein has been shown to have cysteine desulfurase activity and can be used to supply sulfide for the in vitro catalytic formation of [Fe-S] clusters. The NifU protein was previously purified and shown to be a homodimer with a [2Fe-2S] cluster in each subunit. In the present work, primary sequence comparisons, amino acid substitution experiments, and optical and resonance Raman spectroscopic characterization of recombinantly produced NifU and NifU fragments are used to show that NifU has a modular structure. One module is contained in approximately the N-terminal third of NifU and is shown to provide a labile rubredoxin-like ferric-binding site. Cysteine residues Cys35, Cys62, and Cys106 are necessary for binding iron in the rubredoxin-like mode and visible extinction coefficients indicate that up to one ferric ion can be bound per NifU monomer. The second module is contained in approximately the C-terminal half of NifU and provides the [2Fe-2S] cluster-binding site. Cysteine residues Cys137, Cys139, Cys172, and Cys175 provide ligands to the [2Fe-2S] cluster. The cysteines involved in ligating the mononuclear Fe in the rubredoxin-like site and those that provide the [2Fe-2S] cluster ligands are all required for the full physiological function of NifU. The only two other cysteines contained within NifU, Cys272 and Cys275, are not necessary for iron binding at either site, nor are they required for the full physiological function of NifU. The results provide the basis for a model where

  12. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli heat shock protein YedU reveals three potential catalytic active sites

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yonghong; Liu, Deqian; Kaluarachchi, Warna D.; Bellamy, Henry D.; White, Mark A.; Fox, Robert O.

    2003-01-01

    The mRNA of Escherichia coli yedU gene is induced 31-fold upon heat shock. The 31-kD YedU protein, also calls Hsp31, is highly conserved in several human pathogens and has chaperone activity. We solved the crystal structure of YedU at 2.2 Å resolution. YedU monomer has an α/β/α sandwich domain and a small α/β domain. YedU is a dimer in solution, and its crystal structure indicates that a significant amount of surface area is buried upon dimerization. There is an extended hydrophobic patch that crosses the dimer interface on the surface of the protein. This hydrophobic patch is likely the substrate-binding site responsible for the chaperone activity. The structure also reveals a potential protease-like catalytic triad composed of Cys184, His185, and Asp213, although no enzymatic activity could be identified. YedU coordinates a metal ion using His85, His122, and Glu90. This 2-His-1-carboxylate motif is present in carboxypeptidase A (a zinc enzyme), and a number of dioxygenases and hydroxylases that utilize iron as a cofactor, suggesting another potential function for YedU. PMID:14500888

  13. How does the protein environment optimize the thermodynamics of thiol sulfenylation? Insights from model systems to QM/MM calculations on human 2-Cys peroxiredoxin.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Julianna; van Bergen, Laura; De Proft, Frank; Roos, Goedele

    2015-01-01

    Protein thiol/sulfenic acid oxidation potentials provide a tool to select specific oxidation agents, but are experimentally difficult to obtain. Here, insights into the thiol sulfenylation thermodynamics are obtained from model calculations on small systems and from a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) analysis on human 2-Cys peroxiredoxin thioredoxin peroxidase B (Tpx-B). To study thiol sulfenylation in Tpx-B, our recently developed computational method to determine reduction potentials relatively compared to a reference system and based on reaction energies reduction potential from electronic energies is updated. Tpx-B forms a sulfenic acid (R-SO(-)) on one of its active site cysteines during reactive oxygen scavenging. The observed effect of the conserved active site residues is consistent with the observed hydrogen bond interactions in the QM/MM optimized Tpx-B structures and with free energy calculations on small model systems. The ligand effect could be linked to the complexation energies of ligand L with CH3S(-) and CH3SO(-). Compared to QM only calculations on Tpx-B's active site, the QM/MM calculations give an improved understanding of sulfenylation thermodynamics by showing that other residues from the protein environment other than the active site residues can play an important role.

  14. Profiling Cys34 Adducts of Human Serum Albumin by Fixed-Step Selected Reaction Monitoring*

    PubMed Central

    Li, He; Grigoryan, Hasmik; Funk, William E.; Lu, Sixin Samantha; Rose, Sherri; Williams, Evan R.; Rappaport, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    A method is described for profiling putative adducts (or other unknown covalent modifications) at the Cys34 locus of human serum albumin (HSA), which represents the preferred reaction site for small electrophilic species in human serum. By comparing profiles of putative HSA-Cys34 adducts across populations of interest it is theoretically possible to explore environmental causes of degenerative diseases and cancer caused by both exogenous and endogenous chemicals. We report a novel application of selected-reaction-monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry, termed fixed-step SRM (FS-SRM), that allows detection of essentially all HSA-Cys34 modifications over a specified range of mass increases (added masses). After tryptic digestion, HSA-Cys34 adducts are contained in the third largest peptide (T3), which contains 21 amino acids and an average mass of 2433.87 Da. The FS-SRM method does not require that exact masses of T3 adducts be known in advance but rather uses a theoretical list of T3-adduct m/z values separated by a fixed increment of 1.5. In terms of added masses, each triply charged parent ion represents a bin of ±2.3 Da between 9.1 Da and 351.1 Da. Synthetic T3 adducts were used to optimize FS-SRM and to establish screening rules based upon selected b- and y-series fragment ions. An isotopically labeled T3 adduct is added to protein digests to facilitate quantification of putative adducts. We used FS-SRM to generate putative adduct profiles from six archived specimens of HSA that had been pooled by gender, race, and smoking status. An average of 66 putative adduct hits (out of a possible 77) were detected in these samples. Putative adducts covered a wide range of concentrations, were most abundant in the mass range below 100 Da, and were more abundant in smokers than in nonsmokers. With minor modifications, the FS-SRM methodology can be applied to other nucleophilic sites and proteins. PMID:21193536

  15. Active site - a site of binding of affinity inhibitors in baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Svyato, I.E.; Sklyankina, V.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-03-20

    The interaction of the enzyme-substrate complex with methyl phosphate, O-phosphoethanolamine, O-phosphopropanolamine, N-acetylphosphoserine, and phosphoglyolic acid, as well as pyrophosphatase, modified by monoesters of phosphoric acid, with pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate, was investigated. It was shown that the enzyme containing the substrate in the active site does not react with monophosphates, but modified pyrophosphatase entirely retains the ability to bind polyanions to the regulatory site. It is concluded that the inactivation of baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase by monoesters of phosphoric acid, which are affinity inhibitors of it, is the result of modification of the active site of the enzyme.

  16. A novel approach to predict active sites of enzyme molecules.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kuo-Chen; Cai, Yu-dong

    2004-04-01

    Enzymes are critical in many cellular signaling cascades. With many enzyme structures being solved, there is an increasing need to develop an automated method for identifying their active sites. However, given the atomic coordinates of an enzyme molecule, how can we predict its active site? This is a vitally important problem because the core of an enzyme molecule is its active site from the viewpoints of both pure scientific research and industrial application. In this article, a topological entity was introduced to characterize the enzymatic active site. Based on such a concept, the covariant discriminant algorithm was formulated for identifying the active site. As a paradigm, the serine hydrolase family was demonstrated. The overall success rate by jackknife test for a data set of 88 enzyme molecules was 99.92%, and that for a data set of 50 independent enzyme molecules was 99.91%. Meanwhile, it was shown through an example that the prediction algorithm can also be used to find any typographic error of a PDB file in annotating the constituent amino acids of catalytic triad and to suggest a possible correction. The very high success rates are due to the introduction of a covariance matrix in the prediction algorithm that makes allowance for taking into account the coupling effects among the key constituent atoms of active site. It is anticipated that the novel approach is quite promising and may become a useful high throughput tool in enzymology, proteomics, and structural bioinformatics. PMID:14997541

  17. Growth exponents in surface models with non-active sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Figueiredo, W.; Aarão Reis, F. D. A.

    2006-11-01

    In this work, we studied the role played by the inactive sites present on the substrate of a growing surface. In our model, one particle sticks at the surface if the site where it falls is an active site. However, we allow the deposited particle to diffuse along the surface in accordance with some mechanism previously defined. Using Monte Carlo simulations, and some analytical results, we have investigated the model in (1+1) and (2+1) dimensions considering different relaxation mechanisms. We show that the consideration of non-active sites is a crucial point in the model. In fact, we have seen that the saturation regime is not observed for any value of the density of inactive sites. Besides, the growth exponent β turns to be one, at long times, whatever the mechanism of diffusion we consider in one and two dimensions.

  18. A small ribozyme with dual-site kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Elisa; Maxwell, Adam W.R.; Burke, Donald H.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoryl transfer onto backbone hydroxyls is a recognized catalytic activity of nucleic acids. We find that kinase ribozyme K28 possesses an unusually complex active site that promotes (thio)phosphorylation of two residues widely separated in primary sequence. After allowing the ribozyme to radiolabel itself by phosphoryl transfer from [γ-32P]GTP, DNAzyme-mediated cleavage yielded two radiolabeled cleavage fragments, indicating phosphorylation sites within each of the two cleavage fragments. These sites were mapped by alkaline digestion and primer extension pausing. Enzymatic digestion and mutational analysis identified nucleotides important for activity and established the active structure as being a constrained pseudoknot with unusual connectivity that may juxtapose the two reactive sites. Nuclease sensitivities for nucleotides near the pseudoknot core were altered in the presence of GTPγS, indicating donor-induced folding. The 5′ target site was more strongly favored in full-length ribozyme K28 (128 nt) than in truncated RNAs (58 nt). Electrophoretic mobilities of self-thiophosphorylated products on organomercurial gels are distinct from the 5′ mono-thiophosphorylated product produced by reaction with polynucleotide kinase, potentially indicating simultaneous labeling of both sites within individual RNA strands. Our evidence supports a single, compact structure with local dynamics, rather than global rearrangement, as being responsible for dual-site phosphorylation. PMID:22618879

  19. Low micromolar zinc accelerates the fibrillization of human tau via bridging of Cys-291 and Cys-322.

    PubMed

    Mo, Zhong-Ying; Zhu, Ying-Zhu; Zhu, Hai-Li; Fan, Jun-Bao; Chen, Jie; Liang, Yi

    2009-12-11

    A hallmark of a group of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease is the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, which are principally composed of bundles of filaments formed by microtubule-associated protein Tau. Clarifying how natively unstructured Tau protein forms abnormal aggregates is of central importance for elucidating the etiology of these diseases. There is considerable evidence showing that zinc, as an essential element that is highly concentrated in brain, is linked to the development or progression of these diseases. Herein, by using recombinant human Tau fragment Tau(244-372) and its mutants, we have investigated the effect of zinc on the aggregation of Tau. Low micromolar concentrations of Zn(2+) dramatically accelerate fibril formation of wild-type Tau(244-372) under reducing conditions, compared with no Zn(2+). Higher concentrations of Zn(2+), however, induce wild-type Tau(244-372) to form granular aggregates in reducing conditions. Moreover, these non-fibrillar aggregates assemble into mature Tau filaments when Zn(2+) has been chelated by EDTA. Unlike wild-type Tau(244-372), low micromolar concentrations of Zn(2+) have no obvious effects on fibrillization kinetics of single mutants C291A and C322A and double mutant C291A/C322A under reducing conditions. The results from isothermal titration calorimetry show that one Zn(2+) binds to one Tau molecule via tetrahedral coordination to Cys-291 and Cys-322 as well as two histidines, with moderate, micromolar affinity. Our data demonstrate that low micromolar zinc accelerates the fibrillization of human Tau protein via bridging Cys-291 and Cys-322 in physiological reducing conditions, providing clues to understanding the relationship between zinc dyshomeostasis and the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Activity assays of mammalian thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase: fluorescent disulfide substrates, mechanisms, and use with tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Montano, Sergio J; Lu, Jun; Gustafsson, Tomas N; Holmgren, Arne

    2014-03-15

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a protein disulfide reductase that, together with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), controls oxidative stress or redox signaling via thiol redox control. Human cytosolic Trx1 has Cys32 and Cys35 as the active site and three additional cysteine residues (Cys62, Cys69, and Cys73), which by oxidation generates inactive Cys62 to Cys69 two-disulfide Trx. This, combined with TrxR with a broad substrate specificity, complicates assays of mammalian Trx and TrxR. We sought to understand the autoregulation of Trx and TrxR and to generate new methods for quantification of Trx and TrxR. We optimized the synthesis of two fluorescent substrates, di-eosin-glutathione disulfide (Di-E-GSSG) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled insulin (FiTC-insulin), which displayed higher fluorescence on disulfide reduction. Di-E-GSSG showed a very large increase in fluorescence quantum yield but had a relatively low affinity for Trx and was also a weak direct substrate for TrxR, in contrast to GSSG. FiTC-insulin was used to develop highly sensitive assays for TrxR and Trx. Reproducible conditions were developed for reactivation of modified Trx, commonly present in frozen or oxidized samples. Trx in cell extracts and tissue samples, including plasma and serum, were subsequently analyzed, showing highly reproducible results and allowing measurement of trace amounts of Trx.

  1. Architecture and active site of particulate methane monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Culpepper, Megen A.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria, organisms that live on methane gas as their sole carbon source. Understanding pMMO function has important implications for bioremediation applications and for the development of new, environmentally friendly catalysts for the direct conversion of methane to methanol. Crystal structures of pMMOs from three different methanotrophs reveal a trimeric architecture, consisting of three copies each of the pmoB, pmoA, and pmoC subunits. There are three distinct metal centers in each protomer of the trimer, mononuclear and dinuclear copper sites in the periplasmic regions of pmoB and a mononuclear site within the membrane that can be occupied by copper or zinc. Various models for the pMMO active site have been proposed within these structural constraints, including dicopper, tricopper, and diiron centers. Biochemical and spectroscopic data on pMMO and recombinant soluble fragments, denoted spmoB proteins, indicate that the active site involves copper and is located at the site of the dicopper center in the pmoB subunit. Initial spectroscopic evidence for O2 binding at this site has been obtained. Despite these findings, questions remain about the active site identity and nuclearity and will be the focus of future studies. PMID:22725967

  2. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  3. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  4. A Trp474Cys mutation in the alpha-subunit of beta-hexosaminidase causes a subacute encephalopathic form of G{sub M2} gangliosidosis, type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Petroulakis, E.; Cao, Z.; Salo, T.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in the HEXA gene that encodes the {alpha}-subunit of the heterodimeric lysosomal enzyme {beta}-hexosaminidase A, or Hex A ({alpha}{beta}), cause G{sub M2} gangliosidosis, type 1. The infantile form (Tay-Sachs disease) results when there is no residual Hex A activity, while less severe and more variable clinical phenotypes result when residual Hex A activity is present. A non-Jewish male who presented with an acute psychotic episode at age 16 was diagnosed with a subacute encephalopathic form of G{sub M2} gangliosidosis. At age 19, chronic psychosis with intermittent acute exacerbations remains the most disabling symptom in this patient and his affected brother although both exhibit some ataxia and moderately severe dysarthria. We have found a 4 bp insertion (+TATC 1278) associated with infantile Tay-Sachs disease on one allele; no previously identified mutation was found on the second allele. SSCP analysis detected a shift in exon 13 and sequencing revealed a G1422C mutation in the second allele that results in a Trp474Cys substitution. The presence of the mutation was confirmed by the loss of HaeIII and ScrFI sites in exon 13 PCR products from the subjects and their father. The mutation was introduced into the {alpha}-subunit cDNA and Hex S ({alpha}{alpha}) and Hex A ({alpha}{beta}) were transiently expressed in monkey COS-7 cells. The Trp474Cys mutant protein had approximately 5% and 12% of wild-type Hex S and Hex A activity, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed a small amount of residual mature {alpha}-subunit and a normal level of precursor protein. We conclude that the Trp474Cys mutation is the cause of the Hex A deficiency associated with a subacute (juvenile-onset) phenotype in this patient. Like other mutations in exon 13 of HEXA, it appears to affect intracellular processing. Studies of the defect in intracellular processing are in progress.

  5. Multiple Transport-Active Binding Sites Are Available for a Single Substrate on Human P-Glycoprotein (ABCB1)

    PubMed Central

    Chufan, Eduardo E.; Kapoor, Khyati; Sim, Hong-May; Singh, Satyakam; Talele, Tanaji T.; Durell, Stewart R.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2013-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1) is an ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter that is associated with the development of multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Pgp transports a variety of chemically dissimilar amphipathic compounds using the energy from ATP hydrolysis. In the present study, to elucidate the binding sites on Pgp for substrates and modulators, we employed site-directed mutagenesis, cell- and membrane-based assays, molecular modeling and docking. We generated single, double and triple mutants with substitutions of the Y307, F343, Q725, F728, F978 and V982 residues at the proposed drug-binding site with cys in a cysless Pgp, and expressed them in insect and mammalian cells using a baculovirus expression system. All the mutant proteins were expressed at the cell surface to the same extent as the cysless wild-type Pgp. With substitution of three residues of the pocket (Y307, Q725 and V982) with cysteine in a cysless Pgp, QZ59S-SSS, cyclosporine A, tariquidar, valinomycin and FSBA lose the ability to inhibit the labeling of Pgp with a transport substrate, [125I]-Iodoarylazidoprazosin, indicating these drugs cannot bind at their primary binding sites. However, the drugs can modulate the ATP hydrolysis of the mutant Pgps, demonstrating that they bind at secondary sites. In addition, the transport of six fluorescent substrates in HeLa cells expressing triple mutant (Y307C/Q725C/V982C) Pgp is also not significantly altered, showing that substrates bound at secondary sites are still transported. The homology modeling of human Pgp and substrate and modulator docking studies support the biochemical and transport data. In aggregate, our results demonstrate that a large flexible pocket in the Pgp transmembrane domains is able to bind chemically diverse compounds. When residues of the primary drug-binding site are mutated, substrates and modulators bind to secondary sites on the transporter and more than one transport-active binding site is available for each substrate

  6. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  7. Repair of oxidative DNA damage is delayed in the Ser326Cys polymorphic variant of the base excision repair protein OGG1.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, Rachael M; Hodges, Nikolas J

    2012-07-01

    Gene-environment interactions influence an individual's risk of disease development. A common human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1) variant, Cys326-hOGG1, has been associated with increased cancer risk. Evidence suggests that this is due to reduced repair ability, particularly under oxidising conditions but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Oxidising conditions may arise due to internal cellular processes, such as inflammation or external chemical or radiation exposure. To investigate wild-type and variant OGG1 regulation and activity under oxidising conditions, we generated mOgg1 (-/-) null mouse embryonic fibroblasts cells stably expressing Ser326- and Cys326-hOGG1 and measured activity, gene expression, protein expression and localisation following treatment with the glutathione-depleting compound L-buthionine-S-sulfoximine (BSO). Assessment of OGG1 activity using a 7,8-dihydro-8-oxodeoxyguanine (8-oxo dG) containing molecular beacon demonstrated that the activity of both Ser326- and Cys326-hOGG1 was increased following oxidative treatment but with different kinetics. Peak activity of Ser326-hOGG1 occurred 12 h prior to that of Cys326-hOGG1. In both variants, the increased activity was not associated with any gene expression or protein increase or change in protein localisation. These findings suggest that up-regulation of OGG1 activity in response to BSO-induced oxidative stress is via post-transcriptional regulation and provide further evidence for impaired Cys326-hOGG1 repair ability under conditions of oxidative stress. This may have important implications for increased mutation frequency resulting from increased oxidative stress in individuals homozygous for the Cys326 hOGG1 allele.

  8. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  9. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined. PMID:27243042

  10. Studies on the active site of pig plasma amine oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Collison, D; Knowles, P F; Mabbs, F E; Rius, F X; Singh, I; Dooley, D M; Cote, C E; McGuirl, M

    1989-01-01

    Amine oxidase from pig plasma (PPAO) has two bound Cu2+ ions and at least one pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) moiety as cofactors. It is shown that recovery of activity by copper-depleted PPAO is linear with respect to added Cu2+ ions. Recovery of e.s.r. and optical spectral characteristics of active-site copper parallel the recovery of catalytic activity. These results are consistent with both Cu2+ ions contributing to catalysis. Further e.s.r. studies indicate that the two copper sites in PPAO, unlike those in amine oxidases from other sources, are chemically distinct. These comparative studies establish that non-identity of the Cu2+ ions in PPAO is not a requirement for amine oxidase activity. It is shown through the use of a new assay procedure that there are two molecules of PQQ bound per molecule of protein in PPAO; only the more reactive of these PQQ moieties is required for activity. PMID:2559715

  11. Aβ-affected pathogenic induction of S-nitrosylation of OGT and identification of Cys-NO linkage triplet.

    PubMed

    Ryu, In-Hyun; Lee, Ki-Young; Do, Su-Il

    2016-05-01

    Mechanistic link of protein hypo-O-GlcNAcylation to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains unclear. Here, we found that S-nitrosylation of O-linked N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (SNO-OGT) was induced by β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) exposure to SK-N-MC and SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells. Subsequently, Aβ-induced SNO-OGT led to protein hypo-O-GlcNAcylation globally including tau hypo-O-GlcNAcylation. Our results support that underlying mechanism for induction of SNO-OGT comprises the concerted action of Aβ-triggered Ca2+ entry into cells and nNOS-catalyzed NO production. Intriguingly, OGT was found to be associated with nNOS and its association was enhanced during Aβ treatment. In parallel with SNO-OGT-mediated tau hypo-O-GlcNAcylation, Aβ led to SNO-Akt-mediated GSK3β activation for tau phosphorylation, suggesting that tau hyperphosphorylation is established by synergistic connection between SNO-OGT and GSK3β activation. We also observed that Aβ-neurotoxicity including both reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cell death was amplified with DON treatment, whereas it was restored by PUGNAc treatment, GlcNH2 treatment or OGT overexpression. Early time-course Aβ-monitoring assay revealed that premaintained hyper-O-GlcNAcylation inside cells blocked not only Aβ-triggered Ca2+ entry into cells but also induction of SNO-OGT and SNO-Akt. Together, these findings suggest that induction of SNO-OGT by Aβ exposure is a pathogenic mechanism to cause cellular hypo-O-GlcNAcylation by which Aβ neurotoxicity is executed, and conversely, hyper-O-GlcNAcylation within cells can defend against Aβ neurotoxicity. Furthermore, our Cys mapping demonstrates that cysteine-nitric oxide (Cys-NO) linkages in SNO-OGT occur at triple Cys845, Cys921, and Cys965 residues in C-terminal catalytic domain (C-CAT), suggesting that Cys-NO linkage triplet in SNO-OGT is associated with null OGT activity. PMID:26854602

  12. Computer simulation of the active site of human serum cholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Kefang Jiao; Song Li; Zhengzheng Lu

    1996-12-31

    The first 3D-structure of acetylchelinesterase from Torpedo California electric organ (T.AChE) was published by JL. Sussman in 1991. We have simulated 3D-structure of human serum cholinesterase (H.BuChE) and the active site of H.BuChE. It is discovered by experiment that the residue of H.BuChE is still active site after a part of H.BuChE is cut. For example, the part of 21KD + 20KD is active site of H.BuChE. The 20KD as it is. Studies on these peptides by Hemelogy indicate that two active peptides have same negative electrostatic potential maps diagram. These negative electrostatic areas attached by acetyl choline with positive electrostatic potency. We predict that 147...236 peptide of AChE could be active site because it was as 20KD as with negative electrostatic potential maps. We look forward to proving from other ones.

  13. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  14. Multi-site Phosphorylation Regulates Bim Stability and Apoptotic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Anette; Barrett, Tamera; Flavell, Richard A.; Davis, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim is established to be an important mediator of signaling pathways that induce cell death. Multi-site phosphorylation of Bim by several members of the MAP kinase group is implicated as a regulatory mechanism that controls the apoptotic activity of Bim. To test the role of Bim phosphorylation in vivo, we constructed mice with a series of mutant alleles that express phosphorylation-defective Bim proteins. We show that mutation of the phosphorylation site Thr-112 causes decreased binding of Bim to the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 and can increase cell survival. In contrast, mutation of the phosphorylation sites Ser-55, Ser-65, and Ser-73 can cause increased apoptosis because of reduced proteasomal degradation of Bim. Together, these data indicate that phosphorylation can regulate Bim by multiple mechanisms and that the phosphorylation of Bim on different sites can contribute to the sensitivity of cellular apoptotic responses. PMID:18498746

  15. Water in the Active Site of Ketosteroid Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Hanoian, Philip; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to investigate the structural and dynamical properties of water in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) to provide insight into the role of these water molecules in the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. This reaction is thought to proceed via a dienolate intermediate that is stabilized by hydrogen bonding with residues Tyr16 and Asp103. A comparative study was performed for the wild-type (WT) KSI and the Y16F, Y16S, and Y16F/Y32F/Y57F (FFF) mutants. These systems were studied with three different bound ligands: equilenin, which is an intermediate analog, and the intermediate states of two steroid substrates. Several distinct water occupation sites were identified in the active site of KSI for the WT and mutant systems. Three additional sites were identified in the Y16S mutant that were not occupied in WT KSI or the other mutants studied. The number of water molecules directly hydrogen bonded to the ligand oxygen was approximately two waters in the Y16S mutant, one water in the Y16F and FFF mutants, and intermittent hydrogen bonding of one water molecule in WT KSI. The molecular dynamics trajectories of the Y16F and FFF mutants reproduced the small conformational changes of residue 16 observed in the crystal structures of these two mutants. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations of 1H NMR chemical shifts of the protons in the active site hydrogen-bonding network suggest that the presence of water in the active site does not prevent the formation of short hydrogen bonds with far-downfield chemical shifts. The molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the active site water molecules exchange much more frequently for WT KSI and the FFF mutant than for the Y16F and Y16S mutants. This difference is most likely due to the hydrogen-bonding interaction between Tyr57 and an active site water molecule that is persistent in the Y16F and Y16S mutants but absent in the FFF mutant and significantly less

  16. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  17. Functional and Biochemical Characterization of Alvinella pompejana Cys-Loop Receptor Homologues

    PubMed Central

    Debaveye, Sarah; Brams, Marijke; Pardon, Els; Willegems, Katrien; Bertrand, Daniel; Steyaert, Jan; Efremov, Rouslan; Ulens, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Cys-loop receptors are membrane spanning ligand-gated ion channels involved in fast excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Three-dimensional structures of these ion channels, determined by X-ray crystallography or electron microscopy, have revealed valuable information regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying ligand recognition, channel gating and ion conductance. To extend and validate the current insights, we here present promising candidates for further structural studies. We report the biochemical and functional characterization of Cys-loop receptor homologues identified in the proteome of Alvinella pompejana, an extremophilic, polychaete annelid found in hydrothermal vents at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. Seven homologues were selected, named Alpo1-7. Five of them, Alpo2-6, were unidentified prior to this study. Two-electrode voltage clamp experiments revealed that wild type Alpo5 and Alpo6, both sharing remarkably high sequence identity with human glycine receptor α subunits, are anion-selective channels that can be activated by glycine, GABA and taurine. Furthermore, upon expression in insect cells fluorescence size-exclusion chromatography experiments indicated that four homologues, Alpo1, Alpo4, Alpo6 and Alpo7, can be extracted out of the membrane by a wide variety of detergents while maintaining their oligomeric state. Finally, large-scale purification efforts of Alpo1, Alpo4 and Alpo6 resulted in milligram amounts of biochemically stable and monodisperse protein. Overall, our results establish the evolutionary conservation of glycine receptors in annelids and pave the way for future structural studies. PMID:26999666

  18. Functional and Biochemical Characterization of Alvinella pompejana Cys-Loop Receptor Homologues.

    PubMed

    Wijckmans, Eveline; Nys, Mieke; Debaveye, Sarah; Brams, Marijke; Pardon, Els; Willegems, Katrien; Bertrand, Daniel; Steyaert, Jan; Efremov, Rouslan; Ulens, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Cys-loop receptors are membrane spanning ligand-gated ion channels involved in fast excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Three-dimensional structures of these ion channels, determined by X-ray crystallography or electron microscopy, have revealed valuable information regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying ligand recognition, channel gating and ion conductance. To extend and validate the current insights, we here present promising candidates for further structural studies. We report the biochemical and functional characterization of Cys-loop receptor homologues identified in the proteome of Alvinella pompejana, an extremophilic, polychaete annelid found in hydrothermal vents at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. Seven homologues were selected, named Alpo1-7. Five of them, Alpo2-6, were unidentified prior to this study. Two-electrode voltage clamp experiments revealed that wild type Alpo5 and Alpo6, both sharing remarkably high sequence identity with human glycine receptor α subunits, are anion-selective channels that can be activated by glycine, GABA and taurine. Furthermore, upon expression in insect cells fluorescence size-exclusion chromatography experiments indicated that four homologues, Alpo1, Alpo4, Alpo6 and Alpo7, can be extracted out of the membrane by a wide variety of detergents while maintaining their oligomeric state. Finally, large-scale purification efforts of Alpo1, Alpo4 and Alpo6 resulted in milligram amounts of biochemically stable and monodisperse protein. Overall, our results establish the evolutionary conservation of glycine receptors in annelids and pave the way for future structural studies. PMID:26999666

  19. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  20. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  1. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  2. Conformational Transitions in Human AP Endonuclease 1 and Its Active Site Mutant during Abasic Site Repair†

    PubMed Central

    Kanazhevskaya, Lyubov Yu.; Koval, Vladimir V.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Strauss, Phyllis R.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2010-01-01

    AP endonuclease 1 (APE 1) is a crucial enzyme of the base excision repair pathway (BER) in human cells. APE1 recognizes apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and makes a nick in the phosphodiester backbone 5′ to them. The conformational dynamics and presteady-state kinetics of wild-type APE1 and its active site mutant, Y171F-P173L-N174K, have been studied. To observe conformational transitions occurring in the APE1 molecule during the catalytic cycle, we detected intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the enzyme under single turnover conditions. DNA duplexes containing a natural AP site, its tetrahydrofuran analogue, or a 2′-deoxyguanosine residue in the same position were used as specific substrates or ligands. The stopped-flow experiments have revealed high flexibility of the APE1 molecule and the complexity of the catalytic process. The fluorescent traces indicate that wild-type APE1 undergoes at least four conformational transitions during the processing of abasic sites in DNA. In contrast, nonspecific interactions of APE1 with undamaged DNA can be described by a two-step kinetic scheme. Rate and equilibrium constants were extracted from the stopped-flow and fluorescence titration data for all substrates, ligands, and products. A replacement of three residues at the enzymatic active site including the replacement of tyrosine 171 with phenylalanine in the enzyme active site resulted in a 2 × 104-fold decrease in the reaction rate and reduced binding affinity. Our data indicate the important role of conformational changes in APE1 for substrate recognition and catalysis. PMID:20575528

  3. [Cys(O2NH2)2]enkephalin analogues and dalargin: selectivity for delta-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N; Bocheva, A; Dimitrov, E; Ivancheva, C; Radomirov, R

    1996-05-23

    To investigate the structure-activity relationships for potent and selective action of enkephalins at the delta-opioid receptors, two newly synthesized analogues, [Cys(O2NH2)2,Leu5]enkephalin and [Cys(O2NH2)2, Met5] enkephalin and the hexapeptide [D-Ala2,Leu5]enkephalyl-Arg (dalargin) were tested and compared with [Leu5]enkephalin and [Met5]enkephalin, for their effectiveness to inhibit electrically evoked contractions of the mouse vas deferens (predominantly enkephalin-selective delta-opioid receptors) and the guinea pig ileum (mu- and kappa-opioid receptors). The mouse vas deferens assays included evaluation of the effects of opioid agonists on the first, purinergic, and the second, adrenergic, components of electrically evoked biphasic responses (10 Hz and 20 Hz) and on ATP- or noradrenaline-evoked, tetrodotoxin-resistant responses. The opioids tested inhibited in a similar manner: (i) the purinergic and the adrenergic components of the electrically evoked contractions; and (ii) the ATP- and noradrenaline-induced postjunctional responses of the mouse vas deferens. Extremely low IC50 values (of 2-5 orders) were found for [Cys(O2NH2)2,Leu5] enkephalin, whose relative potency was between 239 and 1316 times higher than that of [Leu5]enkephalin. The order of potency for the other peptides in this tissue was: [Cys(O2NH2)2,Met5]enkephalin > [Leu5]enkephalin > dalargin > [Met5]enkephalin. The highest IC50 values in the guinea pig ileum assays, indicating the lowest affinity for mu-/kappa-opioid receptors, were obtained for the cysteine sulfonamide analogues, while dalargin showed a potency four times higher than that of [Met5]enkephalin. The order of potency in this tissue was: dalargin > [Met5]enkephalin > [Leu5]enkephalin > [Cys(O2NH2)2,Met5]enkephalin > [Cys(O2NH2)2,Leu5]enkephalin. The ratio, IC50 in guinea pig ileum: IC50 in mouse vas deferens, indicating selectivity of the respective peptide for delta-opioid receptors, was extremely high for [Cys(O2NH2)2,Leu5

  4. N-methyl-D-aspartate recognition site ligands modulate activity at the coupled glycine recognition site.

    PubMed

    Hood, W F; Compton, R P; Monahan, J B

    1990-03-01

    In synaptic plasma membranes from rat forebrain, the potencies of glycine recognition site agonists and antagonists for modulating [3H]1-[1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl]piperidine ([3H]TCP) binding and for displacing strychnine-insensitive [3H]glycine binding are altered in the presence of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) recognition site ligands. The NMDA competitive antagonist, cis-4-phosphonomethyl-2-piperidine carboxylate (CGS 19755), reduces [3H]glycine binding, and the reduction can be fully reversed by the NMDA recognition site agonist, L-glutamate. Scatchard analysis of [3H]glycine binding shows that in the presence of CGS 19755 there is no change in Bmax (8.81 vs. 8.79 pmol/mg of protein), but rather a decrease in the affinity of glycine (KD of 0.202 microM vs. 0.129 microM). Similar decreases in affinity are observed for the glycine site agonists, D-serine and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate, in the presence of CGS 19755. In contrast, the affinity of glycine antagonists, 1-hydroxy-3-amino-2-pyrrolidone and 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylate, at this [3H]glycine recognition site increases in the presence of CGS 19755. The functional consequence of this change in affinity was addressed using the modulation of [3H]TCP binding. In the presence of L-glutamate, the potency of glycine agonists for the stimulation of [3H]TCP binding increases, whereas the potency of glycine antagonists decreases. These data are consistent with NMDA recognition site ligands, through their interactions at the NMDA recognition site, modulating activity at the associated glycine recognition site.

  5. Active site remodeling accompanies thioester bond formation in the SUMO E1

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Shaun K.; Capili, Allan D.; Lu, Xuequan; Tan, Derek S.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    E1 enzymes activate ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like (Ubl) proteins in two steps by carboxy-terminal adenylation and thioester bond formation to a conserved catalytic cysteine in the E1 Cys domain. The structural basis for these intermediates remains unknown. Here we report crystal structures for human SUMO E1 in complex with SUMO adenylate and tetrahedral intermediate analogs at 2.45 Å and 2.6 Å, respectively. These structures show that side chain contacts to ATP·Mg are released after adenylation to facilitate a 130 degree rotation of the Cys domain during thioester bond formation that is accompanied by remodeling of key structural elements including the helix that contains the E1 catalytic cysteine, the cross-over and re-entry loops, and refolding of two helices that are required for adenylation. These changes displace side chains required for adenylation with side chains required for thioester bond formation. Mutational and biochemical analyses suggest these mechanisms are conserved in other E1s. PMID:20164921

  6. Active site remodelling accompanies thioester bond formation in the SUMO E1

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Shaun K.; Capili, Allan D.; Lu, Xuequan; Tan, Derek S.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2010-03-30

    E1 enzymes activate ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like (Ubl) proteins in two steps by carboxy-terminal adenylation and thioester bond formation to a conserved catalytic cysteine in the E1 Cys domain. The structural basis for these intermediates remains unknown. Here we report crystal structures for human SUMO E1 in complex with SUMO adenylate and tetrahedral intermediate analogues at 2.45 and 2.6 {angstrom}, respectively. These structures show that side chain contacts to ATP-Mg are released after adenylation to facilitate a 130 degree rotation of the Cys domain during thioester bond formation that is accompanied by remodelling of key structural elements including the helix that contains the E1 catalytic cysteine, the crossover and re-entry loops, and refolding of two helices that are required for adenylation. These changes displace side chains required for adenylation with side chains required for thioester bond formation. Mutational and biochemical analyses indicate these mechanisms are conserved in other E1s.

  7. Effects of Toll-like receptor 2 agonist Pam(3)CysSK(4) on inflammation and brain damage in experimental pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sellner, Johann; Grandgirard, Denis; Gianinazzi, Christian; Landmann, Regine M; Leib, Stephen L

    2009-01-01

    TLR2 signaling participates in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal meningitis. In infant rats, the TLR2 agonist Pam(3)CysSK(4) was applied intracisternally (0.5 microg in 10 microl saline) alone or after induction of pneumococcal meningitis to investigate the effect of TLR2 activation on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammation and hippocampal apoptosis. A dose effect of Pam(3)CysSK(4) on apoptosis was investigated by intracisternal application of 0.5 microg in 10 microl saline and 40 microg in 20 microl saline. Pam(3)CysSK(4) neither induced apoptosis in sham-operated mice nor aggravated apoptosis in acute infection. However, Pam(3)CysSK(4) induced pleocytosis, TNF-alpha and MMP-9 in CSF in sham-infection but not during acute meningitis. We conclude that TLR2 signaling triggered by Pam(3)CysSK(4) at a dosage capable to induce a neuroinflammatory response does not induce hippocampal apoptosis in the infant rat model of experimental pneumococcal meningitis.

  8. Control of active sites in selective flocculation: I -- Mathematical model

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M.; Prakash, T.S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Heteroflocculation has been determined to be another major reason for loss in selectivity for flocculation process. In a mathematical model developed earlier, conditions for controlling heteroflocculation were discussed. Blocking active sites to control selective adsorption of a flocculant oil a desirable solid surface is discussed. It has been demonstrated that the lower molecular weight fraction of a flocculant which is incapable of flocculating the particles is an efficient site blocking agent. The major application of selective flocculation has been in mineral processing but many potential uses exist in biological and other colloidal systems. These include purification of ceramic powders, separating hazardous solids from chemical waste, and removal of deleterious components from paper pulp.

  9. Ligand Binding at the α4-α4 Agonist-Binding Site of the α4β2 nAChR Triggers Receptor Activation through a Pre-Activated Conformational State

    PubMed Central

    Indurthi, Dinesh C.; Lewis, Trevor M.; Ahring, Philip K.; Balle, Thomas; Chebib, Mary; Absalom, Nathan L.

    2016-01-01

    The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is the most abundant subtype in the brain and exists in two functional stoichiometries: (α4)3(β2)2 and (α4)2(β2)3. A distinct feature of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor is the biphasic activation response to the endogenous agonist acetylcholine, where it is activated with high potency and low efficacy when two α4-β2 binding sites are occupied and with low potency/high efficacy when a third α4-α4 binding site is occupied. Further, exogenous ligands can bind to the third α4-α4 binding site and potentiate the activation of the receptor by ACh that is bound at the two α4-β2 sites. We propose that perturbations of the recently described pre-activation step when a third binding site is occupied are a key driver of these distinct activation properties. To investigate this, we used a combination of simple linear kinetic models and voltage clamp electrophysiology to determine whether transitions into the pre-activated state were increased when three binding sites were occupied. We separated the binding at the two different sites with ligands selective for the α4-β2 site (Sazetidine-A and TC-2559) and the α4-α4 site (NS9283) and identified that when a third binding site was occupied, changes in the concentration-response curves were best explained by an increase in transitions into a pre-activated state. We propose that perturbations of transitions into a pre-activated state are essential to explain the activation properties of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor by acetylcholine and other ligands. Considering the widespread clinical use of benzodiazepines, this discovery of a conserved mechanism that benzodiazepines and ACh potentiate receptor activation via a third binding site can be exploited to develop therapeutics with similar properties at other cys-loop receptors. PMID:27552221

  10. The site of activation of factor X by cancer procoagulant.

    PubMed

    Gordon, S G; Mourad, A M

    1991-12-01

    Cancer procoagulant (CP) is a cysteine proteinase found in a variety of malignant cells and tissues and in human amnion-chorion tissue. It initiates coagulation by activating factor X. However, the amino acid sequence of the substrate protein that determines the cleavage site of cysteine proteinases is different from that of the serine proteinases that normally activate factor X, such as factor IXa, VIIa and Russell's Viper Venom (RVV). Therefore, it was of interest to determine the site of cleavage of human factor X by CP. Purified CP was incubated with purified factor X and the reaction mixture was electrophoresed on a 10% Tris-tricine SDS-PAGE gel. The proteins were electroeluted on to a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane, and stained with Coomassie blue. The heavy chain of activated factor X was cut out of the PVDF membrane and sequenced with an Applied Biosystems 477A with on-line HPLC. The primary cleavage sequence was Asp-Ala-Ala-Asp-Leu-Asp-Pro-; two other secondary sequences Ser-Ile-Thr-Trp-Lys-Pro- and Glu-Asn-Pro-Phe-Asp-Leu were found. The penultimate amino acid on the carbonyl side of the hydrolysed amide bond plays a critical role for the recognition of the cleavage site of cysteine proteinases. These data indicate that the penultimate amino acid for the primary cleavage site of factor X by CP is proline-20 and for the secondary sites, proline-13 and proline-28. This is in contrast to arginine-52 that determines the specificity of the cleavage by normal serine proteinase activation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Active-Site-Accessible, Porphyrinic Metal;#8722;Organic Framework Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Omar K.; Shultz, Abraham M.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2012-02-06

    On account of their structural similarity to cofactors found in many metallo-enzymes, metalloporphyrins are obvious potential building blocks for catalytically active, metal-organic framework (MOF) materials. While numerous porphyrin-based MOFs have already been described, versions featuring highly accessible active sites and permanent microporosity are remarkably scarce. Indeed, of the more than 70 previously reported porphyrinic MOFs, only one has been shown to be both permanently microporous and contain internally accessible active sites for chemical catalysis. Attempts to generalize the design approach used in this single successful case have failed. Reported here, however, is the synthesis of an extended family of MOFs that directly incorporate a variety of metalloporphyrins (specifically Al{sup 3+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Pd{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 3+}, and Fe{sup 3+} complexes). These robust porphyrinic materials (RPMs) feature large channels and readily accessible active sites. As an illustrative example, one of the manganese-containing RPMs is shown to be catalytically competent for the oxidation of alkenes and alkanes.

  12. Functional constituents of the active site of human neutrophil collagenase.

    PubMed

    Mookhtiar, K A; Wang, F; Van Wart, H E

    1986-05-01

    A series of chemical modification reactions has been carried out to identify functional constituents of the active site of human neutrophil collagenase. The enzyme is reversibly inhibited by the transition metal chelating agent 1,10-phenanthroline, and inhibition is fully reversed by zinc. Removal of weakly bound metal ions by gel filtration inactivates collagenase, and activity is fully restored on immediate readdition of calcium. The enzyme is unaffected by reagents that modify serine, cysteine, and arginine residues. However, reaction with the carboxyl reagents cyclohexylmorpholinocarbodiimide and Woodward's Reagent K lowers the activity of the enzyme substantially. Acetylimidazole inactivates the enzyme, but activity is completely restored on addition of hydroxylamine. The enzyme is also inactivated by tetranitromethane, indicating that it contains an essential tyrosine residue. Acylation of collagenase with diethyl pyrocarbonate, diketene, acetic anhydride, or trinitrobenzenesulfonate inactivates the enzyme, and activity is not restored on addition of hydroxylamine, indicating the presence of an essential lysine residue.

  13. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  14. Structure and receptor-binding activity of insulin from a holostean fish, the bowfin (Amia calva).

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, J M; Youson, J H; Whittaker, J

    1991-01-01

    The holostean fishes are the extant representatives of the primitive ray-finned fishes from which the present-day teleosts may have evolved. The primary structure of insulin from a holostean fish, the bowfin (Amia calva), was established as: A-chain: Gly-Ile-Val-Glu-Gln-Cys-Cys-Leu-Lys-Pro-Cys-Thr-Ile-Tyr-Glu-Met-Glu- Lys-Tyr-Cys-Asn B-chain: Ala-Ala-Ser-Gln-His-Leu-Cys-Gly-Ser-His-Leu-Val-Glu-Ala-Leu-Phe-Leu- Val-Cys-Gly-Glu-Ser-Gly-Phe-Phe-Tyr-Asn-Pro-Asn-Lys-Ser This amino acid sequence contains several substitutions (methionine at A16, phenylalanine at B16 and serine at B22) at sites that have been strongly conserved in other vertebrate species and that may be expected to influence biological activity. Consistent with this prediction, bowfin insulin was approx. 14-fold less potent than pig insulin in inhibiting the binding of [125I-Tyr-A14](human insulin) to transfected mouse NIH 3T3 cells expressing the human insulin receptor. PMID:2039477

  15. Genome-wide analysis of the Zn(II)2Cys6 zinc cluster-encoding gene family in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins with a Zn(II)2Cys6 domain, Cys-X2-Cys-X6-Cys-X5-12-Cys-X2-Cys-X6-9-Cys (hereafter, referred to as the C6 domain), form a subclass of zinc finger proteins found exclusively in fungi and yeast. Genome sequence databases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans have provided an overvie...

  16. Identification of the amine-polyamine-choline transporter superfamily 'consensus amphipathic region' as the target for inactivation of the Escherichia coli GABA transporter GabP by thiol modification reagents. Role of Cys-300 in restoring thiol sensitivity to Gabp lacking Cys.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, L A; King, S C

    1999-01-01

    The Escherichia coli gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter GabP (gab permease) contains a functionally significant cysteine residue (Cys-300) within its consensus amphipathic region (CAR), a putative channel-forming structure that extends out of transmembrane helix 8 and into the adjoining cytoplasmic loop 8-9 of transporters from the amine-polyamine-choline (APC) superfamily. Here we show that of the five cysteine residues (positions 158, 251, 291, 300 and 443) in the E. coli GabP, Cys-300 is the one that renders the transport activity sensitive to inhibition by thiol modification reagents: whereas substituting Ala for Cys-300 mimics the inhibitory effect of thiol modification, substituting Ala at position 158, 251, 291 or 443 preserves robust transport activity and confers no resistance to thiol inactivation; and whereas the robustly active Cys-300 single-Cys mutant is fully sensitive to thiol modification, other single-Cys mutants (Cys at 158, 251, 291 or 443) exhibit kinetically compromised transport activities that resist further chemical inactivation by thiol reagents. The present study reveals additionally that Cys-300 exhibits (1) sensitivity to hydrophobic thiol reagents, (2) general resistance to bulky (fluorescein 5-maleimide) and/or charged ¿2-sulphonatoethyl methanethiosulphonate or [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] methanethiosulphonate¿ thiol reagents and (3) a peculiar sensitivity to p-chloromercuribenzenesulphonate (PCMBS). The accessibility of PCMBS to Cys-300 (located midway through the lipid bilayer) might be related to the structural similarity that it shares with guvacine (1, 2,3,6-tetrahydro-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid), a transported GabP substrate. These structural requirements for thiol sensitivity provide the first chemical evidence consistent with channel-like access to the polar surface of the CAR, a physical configuration that might provide a basis for understanding how this region impacts the function of APC transporters generally [Closs

  17. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  18. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  19. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Hicks, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from April 1991 through September 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations (SWO) and the Environmental Sciences Division, both of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level (radioactive) waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. A new set of action levels was developed on the basis of a statistical analysis of background contamination. These new action levels have been used to evaluate results in this report. Results of ASEMP monitoring continue to demonstrate that no LLW (except [sup 3]H) is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II, which began in early FY 1991, was >90% complete at the end of September 1991. Results of sampling of groundwater and surface waters is presented.

  20. Inhibition and active-site modelling of prolidase.

    PubMed

    King, G F; Crossley, M J; Kuchel, P W

    1989-03-15

    Consideration of the active-site model of prolidase led us to examine azetidine, pyrrolidine and piperidine substrate analogs as potential in vivo inhibitors of the enzyme. One of these, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-proline, was shown to be a potent competitive inhibitor of porcine kidney prolidase (Ki = 90 microM); its rapid protein-mediated permeation of human and sheep erythrocytes suggests that it may be effective in vivo. The higher homolog, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-pipecolic acid, was also a potent inhibitor of the enzyme while the antihypertensive drugs, captopril and enalaprilat, were shown to have mild and no inhibitory effects, respectively. Analysis of inhibitor action and consideration of X-ray crystallographic data of relevant Mn2+ complexes allowed the active-site model of prolidase to be further refined; a new model is presented in which the substrate acts as a bidentate ligand towards the active-site manganous ion. Various aspects of the new model help to explain why Mn2+ has been 'chosen' by the enzyme in preference to other biologically available metal ions. PMID:2924773

  1. No association of dopamine D2 receptor molecular variant Cys311 and schizophrenia in Chinese patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chia-Hsiang Chen; Shih-Hsiang Chien; Hai-Gwo Hwu

    1996-07-26

    A serine-to-cysteine mutation of dopamine D2 receptor at codon 311 (Cys311) was found to have higher frequency in schizophrenic patients than in normal controls in Japanese by Arinami et al. The Cys311 allele was found to be associated with patients with younger age-of-onset, positive family history, and more positive symptoms. To investigate the possible involvement of Cys311 in schizophrenia in the Chinese population, 114 unrelated Taiwanese Chinese schizophrenic patients with positive family history and 88 normal controls were genotyped for Cys311. Four patients and 5 normal controls were heterozygotes of Ser311/Cys311; no homozygotes of Cys311 were identified in either group. The allele frequencies of Cys311 in Chinese schizophrenic patients and normal controls were 2% and 3%, respectively. No significant difference was detected between the two groups. Our results do not support the argument that the Cys311 allele of DRD2 poses a genetic risk for certain types of schizophrenia in Chinese populations. 18 refs.

  2. The Structures of the C185S and C185A Mutants of Sulfite Oxidase Reveal Rearrangement of the Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, James A.; Wilson, Heather L.; Pushie, M. Jake; Kisker, Caroline; George, Graham N.; Rajagopalan, K.V.

    2010-11-03

    Sulfite oxidase (SO) catalyzes the physiologically critical conversion of sulfite to sulfate. Enzymatic activity is dependent on the presence of the metal molybdenum complexed with a pyranopterin-dithiolene cofactor termed molybdopterin. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of SOs from a variety of sources has identified a single conserved Cys residue essential for catalytic activity. The crystal structure of chicken liver sulfite oxidase indicated that this residue, Cys185 in chicken SO, coordinates the Mo atom in the active site. To improve our understanding of the role of this residue in the catalytic mechanism of sulfite oxidase, serine and alanine variants at position 185 of recombinant chicken SO were generated. Spectroscopic and kinetic studies indicate that neither variant is capable of sulfite oxidation. The crystal structure of the C185S variant was determined to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution and to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution in the presence of sulfite, and the C185A variant to 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. The structures of the C185S and C185A variants revealed that neither the Ser or Ala side chains appeared to closely interact with the Mo atom and that a third oxo group replaced the usual cysteine sulfur ligand at the Mo center, confirming earlier extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) work on the human C207S mutant. An unexpected result was that in the C185S variant, in the absence of sulfite, the active site residue Tyr322 became disordered as did the loop region flanking it. In the C185S variant crystallized in the presence of sulfite, the Tyr322 residue relocalized to the active site. The C185A variant structure also indicated the presence of a third oxygen ligand; however, Tyr322 remained in the active site. EXAFS studies of the Mo coordination environment indicate the Mo atom is in the oxidized Mo{sup VI} state in both the C185S and C185A variants of chicken SO and show the expected trioxodithiolene active site. Density

  3. Druggability analysis and classification of protein tyrosine phosphatase active sites

    PubMed Central

    Ghattas, Mohammad A; Raslan, Noor; Sadeq, Asil; Al Sorkhy, Mohammad; Atatreh, Noor

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many diseases. The fact that no PTP inhibitors have reached the market so far has raised many questions about their druggability. In this study, the active sites of 17 PTPs were characterized and assessed for its ability to bind drug-like molecules. Consequently, PTPs were classified according to their druggability scores into four main categories. Only four members showed intermediate to very druggable pocket; interestingly, the rest of them exhibited poor druggability. Particularly focusing on PTP1B, we also demonstrated the influence of several factors on the druggability of PTP active site. For instance, the open conformation showed better druggability than the closed conformation, while the tight-bound water molecules appeared to have minimal effect on the PTP1B druggability. Finally, the allosteric site of PTP1B was found to exhibit superior druggability compared to the catalytic pocket. This analysis can prove useful in the discovery of new PTP inhibitors by assisting researchers in predicting hit rates from high throughput or virtual screening and saving unnecessary cost, time, and efforts via prioritizing PTP targets according to their predicted druggability. PMID:27757011

  4. Translational Control of Host Gene Expression by a Cys-Motif Protein Encoded in a Bracovirus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunseong; Kim, Yonggyun

    2016-01-01

    Translational control is a strategy that various viruses use to manipulate their hosts to suppress acute antiviral response. Polydnaviruses, a group of insect double-stranded DNA viruses symbiotic to some endoparasitoid wasps, are divided into two genera: ichnovirus (IV) and bracovirus (BV). In IV, some Cys-motif genes are known as host translation-inhibitory factors (HTIF). The genome of endoparasitoid wasp Cotesia plutellae contains a Cys-motif gene (Cp-TSP13) homologous to an HTIF known as teratocyte-secretory protein 14 (TSP14) of Microplitis croceipes. Cp-TSP13 consists of 129 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 13.987 kDa and pI value of 7.928. Genomic DNA region encoding its open reading frame has three introns. Cp-TSP13 possesses six conserved cysteine residues as other Cys-motif genes functioning as HTIF. Cp-TSP13 was expressed in Plutella xylostella larvae parasitized by C. plutellae. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) was purified and injected into non-parasitized P. xylostella that expressed Cp-TSP13. Cp-TSP13 was cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector and used to infect Sf9 cells to transiently express Cp-TSP13. The synthesized Cp-TSP13 protein was detected in culture broth. An overlaying experiment showed that the purified Cp-TSP13 entered hemocytes. It was localized in the cytosol. Recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly inhibited protein synthesis of secretory proteins when it was added to in vitro cultured fat body. In addition, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 directly inhibited the translation of fat body mRNAs in in vitro translation assay using rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Moreover, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly suppressed cellular immune responses by inhibiting hemocyte-spreading behavior. It also exhibited significant insecticidal activities by both injection and feeding routes. These results indicate that Cp-TSP13 is a viral HTIF. PMID:27598941

  5. Translational Control of Host Gene Expression by a Cys-Motif Protein Encoded in a Bracovirus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunseong; Kim, Yonggyun

    2016-01-01

    Translational control is a strategy that various viruses use to manipulate their hosts to suppress acute antiviral response. Polydnaviruses, a group of insect double-stranded DNA viruses symbiotic to some endoparasitoid wasps, are divided into two genera: ichnovirus (IV) and bracovirus (BV). In IV, some Cys-motif genes are known as host translation-inhibitory factors (HTIF). The genome of endoparasitoid wasp Cotesia plutellae contains a Cys-motif gene (Cp-TSP13) homologous to an HTIF known as teratocyte-secretory protein 14 (TSP14) of Microplitis croceipes. Cp-TSP13 consists of 129 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 13.987 kDa and pI value of 7.928. Genomic DNA region encoding its open reading frame has three introns. Cp-TSP13 possesses six conserved cysteine residues as other Cys-motif genes functioning as HTIF. Cp-TSP13 was expressed in Plutella xylostella larvae parasitized by C. plutellae. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) was purified and injected into non-parasitized P. xylostella that expressed Cp-TSP13. Cp-TSP13 was cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector and used to infect Sf9 cells to transiently express Cp-TSP13. The synthesized Cp-TSP13 protein was detected in culture broth. An overlaying experiment showed that the purified Cp-TSP13 entered hemocytes. It was localized in the cytosol. Recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly inhibited protein synthesis of secretory proteins when it was added to in vitro cultured fat body. In addition, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 directly inhibited the translation of fat body mRNAs in in vitro translation assay using rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Moreover, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly suppressed cellular immune responses by inhibiting hemocyte-spreading behavior. It also exhibited significant insecticidal activities by both injection and feeding routes. These results indicate that Cp-TSP13 is a viral HTIF. PMID:27598941

  6. Structure of a (Cys3His) zinc ribbon, a ubiquitous motif in archaeal and eucaryal transcription.

    PubMed

    Chen, H T; Legault, P; Glushka, J; Omichinski, J G; Scott, R A

    2000-09-01

    Transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) is an essential component in the formation of the transcription initiation complex in eucaryal and archaeal transcription. TFIIB interacts with a promoter complex containing the TATA-binding protein (TBP) to facilitate interaction with RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) and the associated transcription factor IIF (TFIIF). TFIIB contains a zinc-binding motif near the N-terminus that is directly involved in the interaction with RNA pol II/TFIIF and plays a crucial role in selecting the transcription initiation site. The solution structure of the N-terminal residues 2-59 of human TFIIB was determined by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. The structure consists of a nearly tetrahedral Zn(Cys)3(His)1 site confined by type I and "rubredoxin" turns, three antiparallel beta-strands, and disordered loops. The structure is similar to the reported zinc-ribbon motifs in several transcription-related proteins from archaea and eucarya, including Pyrococcus furiosus transcription factor B (PfTFB), human and yeast transcription factor IIS (TFIIS), and Thermococcus celer RNA polymerase II subunit M (TcRPOM). The zinc-ribbon structure of TFIIB, in conjunction with the biochemical analyses, suggests that residues on the beta-sheet are involved in the interaction with RNA pol II/TFIIF, while the zinc-binding site may increase the stability of the beta-sheet. PMID:11045620

  7. Structure of a (Cys3His) zinc ribbon, a ubiquitous motif in archaeal and eucaryal transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H. T.; Legault, P.; Glushka, J.; Omichinski, J. G.; Scott, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) is an essential component in the formation of the transcription initiation complex in eucaryal and archaeal transcription. TFIIB interacts with a promoter complex containing the TATA-binding protein (TBP) to facilitate interaction with RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) and the associated transcription factor IIF (TFIIF). TFIIB contains a zinc-binding motif near the N-terminus that is directly involved in the interaction with RNA pol II/TFIIF and plays a crucial role in selecting the transcription initiation site. The solution structure of the N-terminal residues 2-59 of human TFIIB was determined by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. The structure consists of a nearly tetrahedral Zn(Cys)3(His)1 site confined by type I and "rubredoxin" turns, three antiparallel beta-strands, and disordered loops. The structure is similar to the reported zinc-ribbon motifs in several transcription-related proteins from archaea and eucarya, including Pyrococcus furiosus transcription factor B (PfTFB), human and yeast transcription factor IIS (TFIIS), and Thermococcus celer RNA polymerase II subunit M (TcRPOM). The zinc-ribbon structure of TFIIB, in conjunction with the biochemical analyses, suggests that residues on the beta-sheet are involved in the interaction with RNA pol II/TFIIF, while the zinc-binding site may increase the stability of the beta-sheet. PMID:11045620

  8. Modeling the Active Sites in Metalloenzymes 5. The Heterolytic Bond Cleavage of H2 in the [NiFe] Hydrogenase of DesulfoWibrio gigas by a Nucleophilic Addition Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Shuqiang; Hall, Michael B.

    2001-11-19

    The H2 activation catalyzed by an Fe(II)-Ni(III) model of the [NiFe] hydrogenase of DesulfoVibrio gigas has been investigated by density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) calculations on the neutral and anionic active site complexes, [(CO)(CN)2Fe(Mu-SH)2Ni(SH)(SH2)]0 and [(CO)(CN)2Fe(Mu-SH)2Ni(SH)2]-. The results suggest that the reaction proceeds by a nucleophilic addition mechanism that cleaves the H-H bond heterolytically. The terminal cysteine residue Cys530 in the [NiFe] hydrogenase active site of the D. gigas enzyme plays a crucial role in the catalytic process by accepting the proton. The active site is constructed to provide access by this cysteine residue, and this role explains the change in activity observed when this cysteine is replaced by a selenocysteine. Furthermore, the optimized geometry of the transition state in the model bears a striking resemblance to the geometry of the active site as determined by X-ray crystallography.

  9. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  10. A Minimal Cysteine Motif Required to Activate the SKOR K+ Channel of Arabidopsis by the Reactive Oxygen Species H2O2*

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Mata, Carlos; Wang, Jianwen; Gajdanowicz, Pawel; Gonzalez, Wendy; Hills, Adrian; Donald, Naomi; Riedelsberger, Janin; Amtmann, Anna; Dreyer, Ingo; Blatt, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are essential for development and stress signaling in plants. They contribute to plant defense against pathogens, regulate stomatal transpiration, and influence nutrient uptake and partitioning. Although both Ca2+ and K+ channels of plants are known to be affected, virtually nothing is known of the targets for ROS at a molecular level. Here we report that a single cysteine (Cys) residue within the Kv-like SKOR K+ channel of Arabidopsis thaliana is essential for channel sensitivity to the ROS H2O2. We show that H2O2 rapidly enhanced current amplitude and activation kinetics of heterologously expressed SKOR, and the effects were reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT). Both H2O2 and DTT were active at the outer face of the membrane and current enhancement was strongly dependent on membrane depolarization, consistent with a H2O2-sensitive site on the SKOR protein that is exposed to the outside when the channel is in the open conformation. Cys substitutions identified a single residue, Cys168 located within the S3 α-helix of the voltage sensor complex, to be essential for sensitivity to H2O2. The same Cys residue was a primary determinant for current block by covalent Cys S-methioylation with aqueous methanethiosulfonates. These, and additional data identify Cys168 as a critical target for H2O2, and implicate ROS-mediated control of the K+ channel in regulating mineral nutrient partitioning within the plant. PMID:20605786

  11. Enhancement of the Chaperone Activity of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Resulting from a Point-Specific Mutation Confers Heat Tolerance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Taek; Lee, Seung Sik; Mondal, Suvendu; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kim, Siu; Lee, Keun Woo; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Cho, Jae-Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2016-01-01

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaAhpC) is a member of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. Here, we examined the peroxidase and molecular chaperone functions of PaAhpC using a site-directed mutagenesis approach by substitution of Ser and Thr residues with Cys at positions 78 and 105 located between two catalytic cysteines. Substitution of Ser with Cys at position 78 enhanced the chaperone activity of the mutant (S78C-PaAhpC) by approximately 9-fold compared with that of the wild-type protein (WT-PaAhpC). This increased activity may have been associated with the proportionate increase in the high-molecular-weight (HMW) fraction and enhanced hydrophobicity of S78C-PaAhpC. Homology modeling revealed that mutation of Ser78 to Cys78 resulted in a more compact decameric structure than that observed in WT-PaAhpC and decreased the atomic distance between the two neighboring sulfur atoms of Cys78 in the dimer-dimer interface of S78C-PaAhpC, which could be responsible for the enhanced hydrophobic interaction at the dimer-dimer interface. Furthermore, complementation assays showed that S78C-PaAhpC exhibited greatly improved the heat tolerance, resulting in enhanced survival under thermal stress. Thus, addition of Cys at position 78 in PaAhpC modulated the functional shifting of this protein from a peroxidase to a chaperone. PMID:27457208

  12. Enhancement of the Chaperone Activity of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Resulting from a Point-Specific Mutation Confers Heat Tolerance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Taek; Lee, Seung Sik; Mondal, Suvendu; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kim, Siu; Lee, Keun Woo; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Cho, Jae-Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2016-08-31

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaAhpC) is a member of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. Here, we examined the peroxidase and molecular chaperone functions of PaAhpC using a site-directed mutagenesis approach by substitution of Ser and Thr residues with Cys at positions 78 and 105 located between two catalytic cysteines. Substitution of Ser with Cys at position 78 enhanced the chaperone activity of the mutant (S78C-PaAhpC) by approximately 9-fold compared with that of the wild-type protein (WT-PaAhpC). This increased activity may have been associated with the proportionate increase in the high-molecular-weight (HMW) fraction and enhanced hydrophobicity of S78C-PaAhpC. Homology modeling revealed that mutation of Ser(78) to Cys(78) resulted in a more compact decameric structure than that observed in WT-PaAhpC and decreased the atomic distance between the two neighboring sulfur atoms of Cys(78) in the dimer-dimer interface of S78C-PaAhpC, which could be responsible for the enhanced hydrophobic interaction at the dimer-dimer interface. Furthermore, complementation assays showed that S78C-PaAhpC exhibited greatly improved the heat tolerance, resulting in enhanced survival under thermal stress. Thus, addition of Cys at position 78 in PaAhpC modulated the functional shifting of this protein from a peroxidase to a chaperone. PMID:27457208

  13. The single Cys2-His2 zinc finger domain of the GAGA protein flanked by basic residues is sufficient for high-affinity specific DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Pedone, P V; Ghirlando, R; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M; Felsenfeld, G; Omichinski, J G

    1996-04-01

    Specific DNA binding to the core consensus site GAGAGAG has been shown with an 82-residue peptide (residues 310-391) taken from the Drosophila transcription factor GAGA. Using a series of deletion mutants, it was demonstrated that the minimal domain required for specific binding (residues 310-372) includes a single zinc finger of the Cys2-His2 family and a stretch of basic amino acids located on the N-terminal end of the zinc finger. In gel retardation assays, the specific binding seen with either the peptide or the whole protein is zinc dependent and corresponds to a dissociation constant of approximately 5 x 10(-9) M for the purified peptide. It has previously been thought that a single zinc finger of the Cys2-His2 family is incapable of specific, high-affinity binding to DNA. The combination of an N-terminal basic region with a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger in the GAGA protein can thus be viewed as a novel DNA binding domain. This raises the possibility that other proteins carrying only one Cys2-His2 finger are also capable of high-affinity specific binding to DNA. PMID:8610125

  14. Protein chaperones Q8ZP25_SALTY from Salmonella typhimurium and HYAE_ECOLI from Escherichia coli exhibit thioredoxin-like structures despite lack of canonical thioredoxin active site sequence motif.

    PubMed

    Parish, David; Benach, Jordi; Liu, Goahua; Singarapu, Kiran Kumar; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas; Su, Min; Bansal, Sonal; Prestegard, James H; Hunt, John; Montelione, Gaetano T; Szyperski, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    The structure of the 142-residue protein Q8ZP25_SALTY encoded in the genome of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 was determined independently by NMR and X-ray crystallography, and the structure of the 140-residue protein HYAE_ECOLI encoded in the genome of Escherichia coli was determined by NMR. The two proteins belong to Pfam (Finn et al. 34:D247-D251, 2006) PF07449, which currently comprises 50 members, and belongs itself to the 'thioredoxin-like clan'. However, protein HYAE_ECOLI and the other proteins of Pfam PF07449 do not contain the canonical Cys-X-X-Cys active site sequence motif of thioredoxin. Protein HYAE_ECOLI was previously classified as a [NiFe] hydrogenase-1 specific chaperone interacting with the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) signal peptide. The structures presented here exhibit the expected thioredoxin-like fold and support the view that members of Pfam family PF07449 specifically interact with Tat signal peptides. PMID:19039680

  15. Protein Chaperones Q8ZP25_SALTY from Salmonella Typhimurium and HYAE_ECOLI from Escherichia coli Exhibit Thioredoxin-like Structures Despite Lack of Canonical Thioredoxin Active Site Sequence Motif

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, D.; Benach, J; Liu, G; Singarapu, K; Xiao, R; Acton, T; Hunt, J; Montelione, G; Szyperski, T; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    The structure of the 142-residue protein Q8ZP25 SALTY encoded in the genome of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 was determined independently by NMR and X-ray crystallography, and the structure of the 140-residue protein HYAE ECOLI encoded in the genome of Escherichia coli was determined by NMR. The two proteins belong to Pfam (Finn et al. 34:D247-D251, 2006) PF07449, which currently comprises 50 members, and belongs itself to the 'thioredoxin-like clan'. However, protein HYAE ECOLI and the other proteins of Pfam PF07449 do not contain the canonical Cys-X-X-Cys active site sequence motif of thioredoxin. Protein HYAE ECOLI was previously classified as a (NiFe) hydrogenase-1 specific chaperone interacting with the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) signal peptide. The structures presented here exhibit the expected thioredoxin-like fold and support the view that members of Pfam family PF07449 specifically interact with Tat signal peptides.

  16. Electrostatic fields in the active sites of lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Sun, D P; Liao, D I; Remington, S J

    1989-07-01

    Considerable experimental evidence is in support of several aspects of the mechanism that has been proposed for the catalytic activity of lysozyme. However, the enzymatically catalyzed hydrolysis of polysaccharides proceeds over 5 orders of magnitude faster than that of model compounds that mimic the configuration of the substrate in the active site of the enzyme. Although several possible explanations for this rate enhancement have been discussed elsewhere, a definitive mechanism has not emerged. Here we report striking results obtained by classical electrodynamics, which suggest that bond breakage and the consequent separation of charge in lysozyme is promoted by a large electrostatic field across the active site cleft, produced in part by a very asymmetric distribution of charged residues on the enzyme surface. Lysozymes unrelated in amino acid sequence have similar distributions of charged residues and electric fields. The results reported here suggest that the electrostatic component of the rate enhancement is greater than 9 kcal.mol-1. Thus, electrostatic interactions may play a more important role in the enzymatic mechanism than has generally been appreciated.

  17. Histidine at the active site of Neurospora tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Pfiffner, E; Lerch, K

    1981-10-13

    The involvement of histidyl residues as potential ligands to the binuclear active-site copper of Neurospora tyrosinase was explored by dye-sensitized photooxidation. The enzymatic activity of the holoenzyme was shown to be unaffected by exposure to light in the presence of methylene blue; however, irradiation of the apoenzyme under the same conditions led to a progressive loss of its ability to be reactivated with Cu2+. This photoinactivation was paralleled by a decrease in the histidine content whereas the number of histidyl residues in the holoenzyme remained constant. Copper measurements of photooxidized, reconstituted apoenzyme demonstrated the loss of binding of one copper atom per mole of enzyme as a consequence of photosensitized oxidation of three out of nine histidine residues. Their sequence positions were determined by a comparison of the relative yields of the histidine containing peptides of photooxidized holo- and apotyrosinases. The data obtained show the preferential modification of histidyl residues 188, 193, and 289 and suggest that they constitute metal ligands to one of the two active-site copper atoms. Substitution of copper by cobalt was found to afford complete protection of the histidyl residues from being modified by dye-sensitized photooxidation. PMID:6458322

  18. Site-specific modification of rabbit muscle creatine kinase with sulfhydryl-specific fluorescence probe by use of hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N; Tonai, T; Kunugi, S

    1997-05-23

    We investigated the effect of pressure on the reactivity of cysteine residues of rabbit muscle creatine kinase (CK). Performing the fluorescent modification under high pressure, a unique sulfhydryl group (Cys-253) of CK was labeled, in addition to Cys-282, which is known as a single reactive sulfhydryl under ambient conditions. CK is composed of two identical subunits, containing four cysteine residues in each subunit. Cys-282 plays an important role in enzymatic activity. In the pressure range from 0.1 MPa to 300 MPa, only one sulfhydryl group for each subunit of CK reacted with the reagents. However, at 400 MPa 2 sulfhydryl groups were modified. The 2-nitro-5-thiocyanobenzoic acid (NTCB) cleavage method revealed that both Cys-282 and Cys-253 were modified at 400 MPa. The chemical modification of Cys-282 induced a loss of enzymatic activity. By taking advantage of the modification under high pressure, selective modification of Cys-253 with 5-[N-(iodoacetamidoethyl)amino]-naphthalene-1-sulfonate (IAEDANS) was performed. A reversible blocking of Cys-282 at atmospheric pressure was followed by the reaction of Cys-253 with the fluorescent probe at 400 MPa. After the decompression, Cys-282 was unblocked, and obtained Cys-253-modified CK retained up to 64% of the catalytic activity of the intact CK. The fluorescent properties of IAEDANS covalently bound at Cys-253 were not significantly different from those of IAEDANS covalently bound at Cys-282.

  19. Trichodiene synthase. Identification of active site residues by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Cane, D E; Shim, J H; Xue, Q; Fitzsimons, B C; Hohn, T M

    1995-02-28

    Derivatization of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-treated trichodiene synthase with [methyl-14C]methyl methanethiosulfonate and analysis of the derived tryptic peptides suggested the presence of two cysteine residues at the active site. The corresponding C146A and C190A mutants were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The C190A mutant displayed partial but significantly reduced activity, with a reduction in kcat/Km of 3000 compared to the wild-type trichodiene synthase, while the C146A mutant was essentially inactive. A hybrid trichodiene synthase, constructed from amino acids 1-309 of the Fusarium sporotrichioides enzyme and amino acids 310-383 of the Gibberella pulicaris cyclase, had steady state kinetic parameters nearly identical to those of the wild-type F. sporotrichioides enzyme. From this parent hybrid, a series of mutants was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis in which the amino acids in the base-rich region, 302-306 (DRRYR), were systematically modified. Three of these mutants were overexpressed and purified to homogeneity. The importance of Arg304 for catalysis was established by the observation that the R304K mutant showed a more than 25-fold increase in Km, as well as a 200-fold reduction in kcat. In addition, analysis of the incubation products of the R304K mutant by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) indicated that farnesyl diphosphate was converted not only to trichodiene but to at least two additional C15H24 hydrocarbons, mle 204. Replacement of the Tyr305 residue of trichodiene synthase with Phe had little effect on kcat, while increasing the Km by a factor of ca. 7-8.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7873527

  20. The copper active site of CBM33 polysaccharide oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Hemsworth, Glyn R; Taylor, Edward J; Kim, Robbert Q; Gregory, Rebecca C; Lewis, Sally J; Turkenburg, Johan P; Parkin, Alison; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2013-04-24

    The capacity of metal-dependent fungal and bacterial polysaccharide oxygenases, termed GH61 and CBM33, respectively, to potentiate the enzymatic degradation of cellulose opens new possibilities for the conversion of recalcitrant biomass to biofuels. GH61s have already been shown to be unique metalloenzymes containing an active site with a mononuclear copper ion coordinated by two histidines, one of which is an unusual τ-N-methylated N-terminal histidine. We now report the structural and spectroscopic characterization of the corresponding copper CBM33 enzymes. CBM33 binds copper with high affinity at a mononuclear site, significantly stabilizing the enzyme. X-band EPR spectroscopy of Cu(II)-CBM33 shows a mononuclear type 2 copper site with the copper ion in a distorted axial coordination sphere, into which azide will coordinate as evidenced by the concomitant formation of a new absorption band in the UV/vis spectrum at 390 nm. The enzyme's three-dimensional structure contains copper, which has been photoreduced to Cu(I) by the incident X-rays, confirmed by X-ray absorption/fluorescence studies of both aqueous solution and intact crystals of Cu-CBM33. The single copper(I) ion is ligated in a T-shaped configuration by three nitrogen atoms from two histidine side chains and the amino terminus, similar to the endogenous copper coordination geometry found in fungal GH61. PMID:23540833

  1. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors via their allosteric binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, J; Bacáková, L; Lisá, V; el-Fakahany, E E; Tucek, S

    1996-01-01

    Ligands that bind to the allosteric-binding sites on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors alter the conformation of the classical-binding sites of these receptors and either diminish or increase their affinity for muscarinic agonists and classical antagonists. It is not known whether the resulting conformational change also affects the interaction between the receptors and the G proteins. We have now found that the muscarinic receptor allosteric modulators alcuronium, gallamine, and strychnine (acting in the absence of an agonist) alter the synthesis of cAMP in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the M2 or the M4 subtype of muscarinic receptors in the same direction as the agonist carbachol. In addition, most of their effects on the production of inositol phosphates in CHO cells expressing the M1 or the M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes are also similar to (although much weaker than) those of carbachol. The agonist-like effects of the allosteric modulators are not observed in CHO cells that have not been transfected with the gene for any of the subtypes of muscarinic receptors. The effects of alcuronium on the formation of cAMP and inositol phosphates are not prevented by the classical muscarinic antagonist quinuclidinyl benzilate. These observations demonstrate for the first time that the G protein-mediated functional responses of muscarinic receptors can be evoked not only from their classical, but also from their allosteric, binding sites. This represents a new mechanism of receptor activation. PMID:8710935

  2. Radiation inactivation study of aminopeptidase: probing the active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamadar, V. K.; Jamdar, S. N.; Mohan, Hari; Dandekar, S. P.; Harikumar, P.

    2004-04-01

    Ionizing radiation inactivated purified chicken intestinal aminopeptidase in media saturated with gases in the order N 2O>N 2>air. The D 37 values in the above conditions were 281, 210 and 198 Gy, respectively. OH radical scavengers such as t-butanol and isopropanol effectively nullified the radiation-induced damage in N 2O. The radicals (SCN) 2•-, Br 2•- and I 2•- inactivated the enzyme, pointing to the involvement of aromatic amino acids and cysteine in its catalytic activity. The enzyme exhibited fluorescence emission at 340 nm which is characteristic of tryptophan. The radiation-induced loss of activity was accompanied by a decrease in the fluorescence of the enzyme suggesting a predominant influence on tryptophan residues. The enzyme inhibition was associated with a marked increase in the Km and a decrease in the Vmax and kcat values, suggesting an irreversible alteration in the catalytic site. The above observations were confirmed by pulse radiolysis studies.

  3. Mimicking enzymatic active sites on surfaces for energy conversion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gutzler, Rico; Stepanow, Sebastian; Grumelli, Doris; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Kern, Klaus

    2015-07-21

    Metal-organic supramolecular chemistry on surfaces has matured to a point where its underlying growth mechanisms are well understood and structures of defined coordination environments of metal atoms can be synthesized in a controlled and reproducible procedure. With surface-confined molecular self-assembly, scientists have a tool box at hand which can be used to prepare structures with desired properties, as for example a defined oxidation number and spin state of the transition metal atoms within the organic matrix. From a structural point of view, these coordination sites in the supramolecular structure resemble the catalytically active sites of metallo-enzymes, both characterized by metal centers coordinated to organic ligands. Several chemical reactions take place at these embedded metal ions in enzymes and the question arises whether these reactions also take place using metal-organic networks as catalysts. Mimicking the active site of metal atoms and organic ligands of enzymes in artificial systems is the key to understanding the selectivity and efficiency of enzymatic reactions. Their catalytic activity depends on various parameters including the charge and spin configuration in the metal ion, but also on the organic environment, which can stabilize intermediate reaction products, inhibits catalytic deactivation, and serves mostly as a transport channel for the reactants and products and therefore ensures the selectivity of the enzyme. Charge and spin on the transition metal in enzymes depend on the one hand on the specific metal element, and on the other hand on its organic coordination environment. These two parameters can carefully be adjusted in surface confined metal-organic networks, which can be synthesized by virtue of combinatorial mixing of building synthons. Different organic ligands with varying functional groups can be combined with several transition metals and spontaneously assemble into ordered networks. The catalytically active metal

  4. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-06-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work.

  5. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  6. Spectroscopic Definition of the Ferroxidase Site in M Ferritin: Comparison of Binuclear Substrate vs. Cofactor Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jennifer K.; Liu, Xiaofeng S.; Tosha, Takehiko; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2008-01-01

    Maxi ferritins, 24 subunit protein nanocages, are essential in humans, plants, bacteria, and other animals for the concentration and storage of iron as hydrated ferric oxide, while minimizing free radical generation or use by pathogens. Formation of the precursors to these ferric oxides is catalyzed at a non-heme biferrous substrate site, which has some parallels with the cofactor sites in other biferrous enzymes. A combination of circular dichroism (CD), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH MCD) has been used to probe Fe(II) binding to the substrate active site in frog M ferritin. These data determined that the active site within each subunit consists of two inequivalent five-coordinate (5C) ferrous centers that are weakly anti-ferromagnetically coupled, consistent with a μ-1,3 carboxylate bridge. The active site ligand set is unusual and likely includes a terminal water bound to each Fe(II) center. The Fe(II) ions bind to the active sites in a concerted manner, and cooperativity among the sites in each subunit is observed, potentially providing a mechanism for the control of ferritin iron loading. Differences in geometric and electronic structure – including a weak ligand field, availability of two water ligands at the biferrous substrate site, and the single carboxylate bridge in ferritin – coincide with the divergent reaction pathways observed between this substrate site and the previously studied cofactor active sites. PMID:18576633

  7. An active-site lysine in avian liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase

    SciTech Connect

    Guidinger, P.F.; Nowak, T. )

    1991-09-10

    The participation of lysine in the catalysis by avian liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was studied by chemical modification and by a characterization of the modified enzyme. The rate of inactivation by 2,4-pentanedione is pseudo-first-order and linearly dependent on reagent concentration with a second-order rate constant of 0.36 {plus minus} 0.025 M{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}. Inactivation by pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate of the reversible reaction catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase follows bimolecular kinetics with a second-order rate constant of 7,700 {plus minus} 860 m{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}. Treatment of the enzyme or one lysine residue modified concomitant with 100% loss in activity. A stoichiometry of 1:1 is observed when either the reversible or the irreversible reactions catalyzed by the enzyme are monitored. A study of k{sub obs} vs pH suggests this active-site lysine has a pK{sub a} of 8.1 and a pH-independent rate constant of inactivation of 47,700 m{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}. Proton relaxation rate measurements suggest that pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate modification alters binding of the phosphate-containing substrates. {sup 31}P NMR relaxation rate measurements show altered binding of the substrates in the ternary enzyme {center dot}Mn{sup 2+}{center dot}substrate complex. Circular dichroism studies show little change in secondary structure of pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate modified phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. These results indicate that avian liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase has one reactive lysine at the active site and it is involved in the binding and activation of the phosphate-containing substrates.

  8. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth.

  9. Eel calcitonin binding site distribution and antinociceptive activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Guidobono, F.; Netti, C.; Sibilia, V.; Villa, I.; Zamboni, A.; Pecile, A.

    1986-03-01

    The distribution of binding site for (/sup 125/I)-eel-calcitonin (ECT) to rat central nervous system, studied by an autoradiographic technique, showed concentrations of binding in the diencephalon, the brain stem and the spinal cord. Large accumulations of grains were seen in the hypothalamus, the amygdala, in the fasciculus medialis prosencephali, in the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, in the ventrolateral part of the periventricular gray matter, in the lemniscus medialis and in the raphe nuclei. The density of grains in the reticular formation and in the nucleus tractus spinalis nervi trigemini was more moderate. In the spinal cord, grains were scattered throughout the dorsal horns. Binding of the ligand was displaced equally by cold ECT and by salmon CT(sCT), indicating that both peptides bind to the same receptors. Human CT was much weaker than sCT in displacing (/sup 125/I)-ECT binding. The administration of ECT into the brain ventricles of rats dose-dependently induced a significant and long-lasting enhancement of hot-plate latencies comparable with that obtained with sCT. The antinociceptive activity induced by ECT is compatible with the topographical distribution of binding sites for the peptide and is a further indication that fish CTs are active in the mammalian brain.

  10. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  11. The interaction of DNA with multi-Cys2His2 zinc finger proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Heermann, Dieter W.

    2015-02-01

    The multi-Cys2His2 (mC2H2) zinc finger protein, like CTCF, plays a central role in the three-dimensional organization of chromatin and gene regulation. The interaction between DNA and mC2H2 zinc finger proteins becomes crucial to better understand how CTCF dynamically shapes the chromatin structure. Here, we study a coarse-grained model of the mC2H2 zinc finger proteins in complexes with DNA, and in particular, we study how a mC2H2 zinc finger protein binds to and searches for its target DNA loci. On the basis of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we present several interesting kinetic conformational properties of the proteins, such as the rotation-coupled sliding, the asymmetrical roles of different zinc fingers and the partial binding partial dangling mode. In addition, two kinds of studied mC2H2 zinc finger proteins, of CG-rich and AT-rich binding motif each, were able to recognize their target sites and slide away from their non-target sites, which shows a proper sequence specificity in our model and the derived force field for mC2H2-DNA interaction. A further application to CTCF shows that the protein binds to a specific DNA duplex only with its central zinc fingers. The zinc finger domains of CTCF asymmetrically bend the DNA, but do not form a DNA loop alone in our simulations.

  12. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  13. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  14. A Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA binding protein regulates the sirodesmin PL biosynthetic gene cluster in Leptosphaeria maculans

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ellen M.; Gardiner, Donald M.; Keller, Nancy P.; Howlett, Barbara J.

    2008-01-01

    A gene, sirZ, encoding a Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA binding protein is present in a cluster of genes responsible for the biosynthesis of the epipolythiodioxopiperazine (ETP) toxin, sirodesmin PL in the ascomycete plant pathogen, Leptosphaeria maculans. RNA-mediated silencing of sirZ gives rise to transformants that produce only residual amounts of sirodesmin PL and display a decrease in the transcription of several sirodesmin PL biosynthetic genes. This indicates that SirZ is a major regulator of this gene cluster. Proteins similar to SirZ are encoded in the gliotoxin biosynthetic gene cluster of Aspergillus fumigatus (gliZ) and in an ETP-like cluster in Penicillium lilacinoechinulatum (PlgliZ). Despite its high level of sequence similarity to gliZ, PlgliZ is unable to complement the gliotoxin-deficiency of a mutant of gliZ in A. fumigatus. Putative binding sites for these regulatory proteins in the promoters of genes in these clusters were predicted using bioinformatic analysis. These sites are similar to those commonly bound by other proteins with Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA binding domains. PMID:18023597

  15. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  16. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  17. Dopamine DRD2/Cys311 is not associated with chronic schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, F.; Hoyne, J.; Cai, Xingang

    1996-09-20

    A mutation in the DRD2 receptor gene has been reported in association with schizophrenia in Japanese and Caucasian populations. The variation, Ser to Cys at codon 311, occurs in the third intracellular loop of the receptor and is therefore putatively functional. We report the results of screening US Caucasian schizophrenic and nonschizophrenic populations. We detected the occurrence of the DRD2 Cys311 variant in both schizophrenics and controls. Our data demonstrates no significant difference between the frequency of Cys311 in Caucasian schizophrenic and non-schizophrenic populations, indicating no association with schizophrenia. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Functional insight into Maelstrom in the germline piRNA pathway: a unique domain homologous to the DnaQ-H 3'-5' exonuclease, its lineage-specific expansion/loss and evolutionarily active site switch.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dapeng; Xiong, Huiling; Shan, Jufang; Xia, Xuhua; Trudeau, Vance L

    2008-01-01

    Maelstrom (MAEL) plays a crucial role in a recently-discovered piRNA pathway; however its specific function remains unknown. Here a novel MAEL-specific domain characterized by a set of conserved residues (Glu-His-His-Cys-His-Cys, EHHCHC) was identified in a broad range of species including vertebrates, sea squirts, insects, nematodes, and protists. It exhibits ancient lineage-specific expansions in several species, however, appears to be lost in all examined teleost fish species. Functional involvement of MAEL domains in DNA- and RNA-related processes was further revealed by its association with HMG, SR-25-like and HDAC_interact domains. A distant similarity to the DnaQ-H 3'-5' exonuclease family with the RNase H fold was discovered based on the evidence that all MAEL domains adopt the canonical RNase H fold; and several protist MAEL domains contain the conserved 3'-5' exonuclease active site residues (Asp-Glu-Asp-His-Asp, DEDHD). This evolutionary link together with structural examinations leads to a hypothesis that MAEL domains may have a potential nuclease activity or RNA-binding ability that may be implicated in piRNA biogenesis. The observed transition of two sets of characteristic residues between the ancestral DnaQ-H and the descendent MAEL domains may suggest a new mode for protein function evolution called "active site switch", in which the protist MAEL homologues are the likely evolutionary intermediates due to harboring the specific characteristics of both 3'-5' exonuclease and MAEL domains.

  19. Active site loop conformation regulates promiscuous activity in a lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a "hot spot" in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity.

  20. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  1. Dalargin and [Cys-(O2NH2)]2 analogues of enkephalins and their selectivity for mu opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N; Ivancheva, C; Dimitrov, E; Bocheva, A; Radomirov, R

    1995-07-01

    1. Effects of the enkephalins Met-enk (M) and Leu-enk (L), of two newly synthesized analogues--[Cys-(O2NH2)]2-Met-enk (CM) and [Cys-(O2NH2)]2-Leu-enk (CL)--and of a hexapeptide--D-Ala2-Leu5-Arg6 (Dalargin; DL) on the spontaneous and electrically stimulated activity were examined with respect to their selectivity for the mu opioid receptors in the longitudinal layer of guinea pig ileum. 2. M and CM exerted relaxing and contractile effects on the spontaneous contractile activity while L, CL and DL produced only relaxation. The order of potency towards the relaxatory phase was DL > M > CM > L > CL and towards the contractile phase CM > M. 3. The effects of enkephalins on the spontaneous activity were naloxone and TTX sensitive except for the contractile phase of M and CM which persisted in the presence of TTX. NO was not involved in the neurotransmission of the relaxatory responses, while the blockade of alpha and beta adrenoceptors showed the participation of adrenergic mechanisms. Relaxation and contraction induced by enkephalins could not be directly attributed to cholinergic neurotransmission. 4. The naloxone-sensitive and concentration-dependent inhibitory effects of enkephalins and their analogues on the electrically stimulated cholinergic contractions were established. The order of the relative potency of opioids was: DL-3.8; M-1.0; L-0.4; CM-0.01; CL-0.005. 5. These data indicated that the D-Ala2 substitution and lengthening of the peptide chain by Arg6 in the molecule of L increased the potency at the mu opiate receptors, while the substitution in position 2 with Cys-(O2NH2) in the molecule of M and L yielded a less potent and selective mu agonists.

  2. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site.

    PubMed

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called 'catalytic residues' are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. PMID:25902402

  3. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site.

    PubMed

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called 'catalytic residues' are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes.

  4. Reactivity of Cys4 zinc finger domains with gold(III) complexes: insights into the formation of "gold fingers".

    PubMed

    Jacques, Aurélie; Lebrun, Colette; Casini, Angela; Kieffer, Isabelle; Proux, Olivier; Latour, Jean-Marc; Sénèque, Olivier

    2015-04-20

    Gold(I) complexes such as auranofin or aurothiomalate have been used as therapeutic agents for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis for several decades. Several gold(I) and gold(III) complexes have also shown in vitro anticancer properties against human cancer cell lines, including cell lines resistant to cisplatin. Because of the thiophilicity of gold, cysteine-containing proteins appear as likely targets for gold complexes. Among them, zinc finger proteins have attracted attention and, recently, gold(I) and gold(III) complexes have been shown to inhibit poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1), which is an essential protein involved in DNA repair and in cancer resistance to chemotherapies. In this Article, we characterize the reactivity of the gold(III) complex [Au(III)(terpy)Cl]Cl2 (Auterpy) with a model of Zn(Cys)4 "zinc ribbon" zinc finger by a combination of absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism, mass spectrometry, high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We show that the Zn(Cys)4 site of Zn·LZR is rapidly oxidized by Auterpy to form a disulfide bond. The Zn(2+) ion is released, and the two remaining cysteines coordinate the Au(+) ion that is produced during the redox reaction. Subsequent oxidation of these cysteines can take place in conditions of excess gold(III) complex. In the presence of excess free thiols mimicking the presence of glutathione in cells, mixing of the zinc finger model and gold(III) complex yields a different product: complex (Au(I))2·LZR with two Au(+) ions bound to cysteines is formed. Thus, on the basis of detailed speciation and kinetic measurements, we demonstrate herein that the destruction of Zn(Cys)4 zinc fingers by gold(III) complexes to achieve the formation of "gold fingers" is worth consideration, either directly or mediated by reducing agents.

  5. Two Pairs of Conserved Cysteines Are Required for the Oxidative Activity of Ero1p in Protein Disulfide Bond Formation in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Frand, Alison R.; Kaiser, Chris A.

    2000-01-01

    In the major pathway for protein disulfide-bond formation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), oxidizing equivalents flow from the conserved ER-membrane protein Ero1p to secretory proteins via protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). Herein, a mutational analysis of the yeast ERO1 gene identifies two pairs of conserved cysteines likely to form redox-active disulfide bonds in Ero1p. Cys100, Cys105, Cys352, and Cys355 of Ero1p are important for oxidative protein folding and for cell viability, whereas Cys90, Cys208, and Cys349 are dispensable for these functions. Substitution of Cys100 with alanine impedes the capture of Ero1p-Pdi1p mixed-disulfide complexes from yeast, and also blocks oxidation of Pdi1p in vivo. Cys352 and Cys355 are required to maintain the fully oxidized redox state of Ero1p, and also play an auxiliary role in thiol–disulfide exchange with Pdi1p. These results suggest a model for the function of Ero1p wherein Cys100 and Cys105 form a redox-active disulfide bond that engages directly in thiol–disulfide exchange with ER oxidoreductases. The Cys352–Cys355 disulfide could then serve to reoxidize the Cys100–Cys105 cysteine pair, possibly through an intramolecular thiol–disulfide exchange reaction. PMID:10982384

  6. The alpha-galactosidase A p.Arg118Cys variant does not cause a Fabry disease phenotype: data from individual patients and family studies

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Susana; Ortiz, Alberto; Germain, Dominique P.; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Gomes, António Caldeira; Camprecios, Marta; Fenollar-Cortés, Maria; Gallegos-Villalobos, Ángel; Garcia, Diego; García-Robles, José Antonio; Egido, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Rivas, Eduardo; Herrero, José Antonio; Mas, Sebastián; Oancea, Raluca; Péres, Paloma; Salazar-Martín, Luis Manuel; Solera-Garcia, Jesús; Alves, Helena; Garman, Scott C.; Oliveira, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lysosomal α-galactosidase A (α-Gal) is the enzyme deficient in Fabry disease (FD), an X-linked glycosphingolipidosis caused by pathogenic mutations affecting the GLA gene. The early-onset, multi-systemic FD classical phenotype is associated with absent or severe enzyme deficiency, as measured by in vitro assays, but patients with higher levels of residual α-Gal activity may have later-onset, more organ-restricted clinical presentations. A change in the codon 118 of the wild-type α-Gal sequence, replacing basic arginine by a potentially sulfhydryl-binding cysteine residue – GLA p.(Arg118Cys) –, has been recurrently described in large FD screening studies of high-risk patients. Although the Cys118 allele is associated with high residual α-Gal activity in vitro, it has been classified as a pathogenic mutation, mainly on the basis of theoretical arguments about the chemistry of the cysteine residue. However its pathogenicity has never been convincingly demonstrated by pathology criteria. We reviewed the clinical, biochemical and histopathology data obtained from 22 individuals of Portuguese and Spanish ancestry carrying the Cys118 allele, including 3 homozygous females. Cases were identified either on the differential diagnosis of possible FD manifestations and on case-finding studies (n=11; 4 males), or on unbiased cascade screening of probands’ close relatives (n=11; 3 males). Overall, those data strongly suggest that the GLA p.(Arg118Cys) variant does not segregate with FD clinical phenotypes in a Mendelian fashion, but might be a modulator of the multifactorial risk of cerebrovascular disease, since the allelic frequency in stroke patients was 0.0087 (p=0.0185 vs the general population). The Cys118 allelic frequency in healthy Portuguese adults (n=696) has been estimated as 0.001, therefore not qualifying for “rare” condition. PMID:25468652

  7. Metals in the active site of native protein phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Heroes, Ewald; Rip, Jens; Beullens, Monique; Van Meervelt, Luc; De Gendt, Stefan; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a major protein Ser/Thr phosphatase in eukaryotic cells. Its activity depends on two metal ions in the catalytic site, which were identified as manganese in the bacterially expressed phosphatase. However, the identity of the metal ions in native PP1 is unknown. In this study, total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to detect iron and zinc in PP1 that was purified from rabbit skeletal muscle. Metal exchange experiments confirmed that the distinct substrate specificity of recombinant and native PP1 is determined by the nature of their associated metals. We also found that the iron level associated with native PP1 is decreased by incubation with inhibitor-2, consistent with a function of inhibitor-2 as a PP1 chaperone. PMID:25890482

  8. The role of the Cys2-Cys7 disulfide bridge in the early steps of Islet amyloid polypeptide aggregation: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milardi, Danilo; Pappalardo, Matteo; Pannuzzo, Martina; Grasso, Domenico M.; Rosa, Carmelo La

    2008-10-01

    Aggregation of Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is believed to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Type II Diabetes Mellitus. In an attempt to gain details on the early events of this process, here we performed MD simulations of the spontaneous assembly of three replicas of human IAPP. Systems containing the Cys2-Cys7 disulfide bridge exhibited a greater stability and a decreased tendency to evolve into β-sheet rich structures if compared to the disulfide-depleted variants. Conversely, the stability of assemblies constituted by the rat isoforms was shown to be independent from the presence of the disulfide bridge.

  9. Zymogen Activation and Subcellular Activity of Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme 1/Site 1 Protease*

    PubMed Central

    da Palma, Joel Ramos; Burri, Dominique Julien; Oppliger, Joël; Salamina, Marco; Cendron, Laura; de Laureto, Patrizia Polverino; Seidah, Nabil Georges; Kunz, Stefan; Pasquato, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin isozyme 1 (SKI-1)/site 1 protease (S1P) plays crucial roles in cellular homeostatic functions and is hijacked by pathogenic viruses for the processing of their envelope glycoproteins. Zymogen activation of SKI-1/S1P involves sequential autocatalytic processing of its N-terminal prodomain at sites B′/B followed by the herein newly identified C′/C sites. We found that SKI-1/S1P autoprocessing results in intermediates whose catalytic domain remains associated with prodomain fragments of different lengths. In contrast to other zymogen proprotein convertases, all incompletely matured intermediates of SKI-1/S1P showed full catalytic activity toward cellular substrates, whereas optimal cleavage of viral glycoproteins depended on B′/B processing. Incompletely matured forms of SKI-1/S1P further process cellular and viral substrates in distinct subcellular compartments. Using a cell-based sensor for SKI-1/S1P activity, we found that 9 amino acid residues at the cleavage site (P1–P8) and P1′ are necessary and sufficient to define the subcellular location of processing and to determine to what extent processing of a substrate depends on SKI-1/S1P maturation. In sum, our study reveals novel and unexpected features of SKI-1/S1P zymogen activation and subcellular specificity of activity toward cellular and pathogen-derived substrates. PMID:25378398

  10. Crystal structures of 8-Cl and 9-Cl TIBO complexed with wild-type HIV-1 RT and 8-Cl TIBO complexed with the Tyr181Cys HIV-1 RT drug-resistant mutant.

    PubMed

    Das, K; Ding, J; Hsiou, Y; Clark, A D; Moereels, H; Koymans, L; Andries, K; Pauwels, R; Janssen, P A; Boyer, P L; Clark, P; Smith, R H; Kroeger Smith, M B; Michejda, C J; Hughes, S H; Arnold, E

    1996-12-20

    would affect the relative positions of the primer terminus and the polymerase active site. This could explain biochemical data showing that NNRTI binding to HIV-1 RT reduces efficiency of the chemical step of DNA polymerization, but does not prevent binding of either dNTPs or DNA. When the structure of the Tyr181Cys mutant HIV-1 RT in complex with 8-Cl TIBO is compared with the corresponding structure containing wild-type HIV-1 RT, the overall conformations of Tyr181Cys and wild-type HIV-1 RT and of the 8-Cl TIBO inhibitors are very similar. Some positional changes in the polypeptide backbone of the beta6-beta10-beta9 sheet containing residue 181 are observed when the Tyr181Cys and wild-type complexes are compared, particularlty near residue Val179 of beta9. In the p51 subunit, the Cys181 side-chain is oriented in a similar direction to the Tyr181 side-chain in the wild-type complex. However, the electron density corresponding to the sulfur of the Cys181 side-chain in the p66 subunit is very weak, indicating that the thiol group is disordered, presumably because there is no significant interaction with either 8-Cl TIBO or nearby amino acid residues. In the mutant complex, there are slight rearrangements of the side-chains of other amino acid residues in the NNIBP and of the flexible dimethylallyl group of 8-Cl TIBO; these conformational changes could potentially compensate for the interactions that were lost when the relatively large tyrosine at position 181 was replaced by a less bulky cysteine residue. In the corresponding wild-type complex, Tyr181 iin the p66 subunit has significant interactions with the bound inhibitor and the position of the Tyr181 side-chain is well defined in both subunits. Apparently the Tyr181 --> Cys mutation eliminates favorable contacts of the aromatic ring of the tyrosine and the bou

  11. Expression of 6-Cys Gene Superfamily Defines Babesia bovis Sexual Stage Development within Rhipicephalus microplus

    PubMed Central

    Alzan, Heba F.; Herndon, David R.; Ueti, Massaro W.; Scoles, Glen A.; Kappmeyer, Lowell S.; Suarez, Carlos E.

    2016-01-01

    Babesia bovis, an intra-erythrocytic tick-borne apicomplexan protozoan, is one of the causative agents of bovine babesiosis. Its life cycle includes sexual reproduction within cattle fever ticks, Rhipicephalus spp. Six B. bovis 6-Cys gene superfamily members were previously identified (A, B, C, D, E, F) where their orthologues in Plasmodium parasite have been shown to encode for proteins required for the development of sexual stages. The current study identified four additional 6-Cys genes (G, H, I, J) in the B. bovis genome. These four genes are described in the context of the complete ten 6-Cys gene superfamily. The proteins expressed by this gene family are predicted to be secreted or surface membrane directed. Genetic analysis comparing the 6-Cys superfamily among five distinct B. bovis strains shows limited sequence variation. Additionally, A, B, E, H, I and J genes were transcribed in B. bovis infected tick midgut while genes A, B and E were also transcribed in the subsequent B. bovis kinete stage. Transcription of gene C was found exclusively in the kinete. In contrast, transcription of genes D, F and G in either B. bovis infected midguts or kinetes was not detected. None of the 6-Cys transcripts were detected in B. bovis blood stages. Subsequent protein analysis of 6-Cys A and B is concordant with their transcript profile. The collective data indicate as in Plasmodium parasite, certain B. bovis 6-Cys family members are uniquely expressed during sexual stages and therefore, they are likely required for parasite reproduction. Within B. bovis specifically, proteins encoded by 6-Cys genes A and B are markers for sexual stages and candidate antigens for developing novel vaccines able to interfere with the development of B. bovis within the tick vector. PMID:27668751

  12. Site-specific PEGylation of lidamycin and its antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Shang, Boyang; Hu, Lei; Shao, Rongguang; Zhen, Yongsu

    2015-05-01

    In this study, N-terminal site-specific mono-PEGylation of the recombinant lidamycin apoprotein (rLDP) of lidamycin (LDM) was prepared using a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) derivative (M w 20 kDa) through a reactive terminal aldehyde group under weak acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The biochemical properties of mPEG-rLDP-AE, an enediyne-integrated conjugate, were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of mPEG-rLDP-AE was evaluated by MTT assays and in xenograft model. The results indicated that mPEG-rLDP-AE showed significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. After PEGylation, mPEG-rLDP still retained the binding capability to the enediyne AE and presented the physicochemical characteristics similar to that of native LDP. It is of interest that the PEGylation did not diminish the antitumor efficacy of LDM, implying the possibility that this derivative may function as a payload to deliver novel tumor-targeted drugs. PMID:26579455

  13. Active site mutants of Escherichia coli dethiobiotin synthetase: effects of mutations on enzyme catalytic and structural properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, G; Sandalova, T; Lohman, K; Lindqvist, Y; Rendina, A R

    1997-04-22

    41A, S41C, K37Q, and K37L, showed that the crystals were essentially isomorphous to that of the wild-type DTBS. The models of these mutant enzymes were well refined (1.9 -2.6 A) and showed good similarity to the wild-type enzyme (rmsd of C alpha atoms: 0.16-0.24 A). The crystal structure of S41C complexed with DAPA, Mn2+/Mg2+, and AMPPCP revealed a localized conformational change (rotations of side chains of Cys41 and Thr11) which can account for the changes in the kinetic parameters observed for S41C. The crystal structures of the Lys37 mutant enzymes showed that the positive charge of the side chain of Lys37 is indispensable. Mutations of Lys37 to either glutamine or leucine resulted in a shift of the metal ion (up to 0.5 A) together with side chains of other active site residues which could disrupt the subtle balance between the positive and negative charges in the active site. The conformational change of the phosphate binding loop (Gly8-X-X-X-X-X-Gly14-Lys15-Thr16) upon nucleotide binding observed previously [Huang, W., Jia, J., Gibson, K. J., Taylor, W. S., Rendina, A. R., Schneider, G., & Lindqvist, Y. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 10985] appears to be important to attain the proper active site scaffold. PMID:9125495

  14. Hybrid [FeFe]-hydrogenases with modified active sites show remarkable residual enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Siebel, Judith F; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Weber, Katharina; Rumpel, Sigrun; Reijerse, Edward; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-02-24

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are to date the only enzymes for which it has been demonstrated that the native inorganic binuclear cofactor of the active site Fe2(adt)(CO)3(CN)2 (adt = azadithiolate = [S-CH2-NH-CH2-S](2-)) can be synthesized on the laboratory bench and subsequently inserted into the unmaturated enzyme to yield fully functional holo-enzyme (Berggren, G. et al. (2013) Nature 499, 66-70; Esselborn, J. et al. (2013) Nat. Chem. Biol. 9, 607-610). In the current study, we exploit this procedure to introduce non-native cofactors into the enzyme. Mimics of the binuclear subcluster with a modified bridging dithiolate ligand (thiodithiolate, N-methylazadithiolate, dimethyl-azadithiolate) and three variants containing only one CN(-) ligand were inserted into the active site of the enzyme. We investigated the activity of these variants for hydrogen oxidation as well as proton reduction and their structural accommodation within the active site was analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Interestingly, the monocyanide variant with the azadithiolate bridge showed ∼50% of the native enzyme activity. This would suggest that the CN(-) ligands are not essential for catalytic activity, but rather serve to anchor the binuclear subsite inside the protein pocket through hydrogen bonding. The inserted artificial cofactors with a propanedithiolate and an N-methylazadithiolate bridge as well as their monocyanide variants also showed residual activity. However, these activities were less than 1% of the native enzyme. Our findings indicate that even small changes in the dithiolate bridge of the binuclear subsite lead to a rather strong decrease of the catalytic activity. We conclude that both the Brønsted base function and the conformational flexibility of the native azadithiolate amine moiety are essential for the high catalytic activity of the native enzyme. PMID:25633077

  15. Enrichment by organomercurial agarose and identification of cys-containing peptides from yeast cell lysates.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Mark J

    2008-05-01

    Dynamic range and the presence of highly abundant proteins limit the number of proteins that may be identified within a complex mixture. Cysteine (Cys) has unique chemical reactivity that may be exploited for chemical tagging/capture with biotin/avidin reagents or affinity chromatography allowing specific isolation and subsequent identification of peptide sequences by mass spectrometry. Organomercurial agarose (Hg-beads) specifically captures Cys-containing peptides and proteins from cell lysates. Tryptic peptides from yeast lysates containing Cys were captured and eluted from Hg-beads after incubation with TCEP and trypsin. From two 1 h nano 1-D LC DDA/MS of the eluate >700 proteins were identified with an estimated false positive rate of approximately 1%. Few peptides were identified with high confidence without Cys within their sequence after capture, and extensive washing, indicating little nonspecific binding. The number of fragmentation spectra was increased using automated 2-D nano-LC/MS and allowed identification of 1496 proteins with an estimated false positive rate of 1.1%. Approximately 4% of the proteins identified were from peptides that did not contain Cys, and these were biased toward higher abundance proteins. Comparison of the 1496 proteins to those reported previously showed that >25% were from yeast proteins not previously observed. Most proteins were identified from a single peptide, and sequence coverage was sacrificed by focusing only on identifying Cys-containing peptides, but large numbers of proteins were rapidly identified by eliminating many of the peptides from the higher abundance proteins.

  16. Hemoglobin βCys93 is essential for cardiovascular function and integrated response to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongli; Hess, Douglas T; Qian, Zhaoxia; Hausladen, Alfred; Fonseca, Fabio; Chaube, Ruchi; Reynolds, James D; Stamler, Jonathan S

    2015-05-19

    Oxygen delivery by Hb is essential for vertebrate life. Three amino acids in Hb are strictly conserved in all mammals and birds, but only two of those, a His and a Phe that stabilize the heme moiety, are needed to carry O2. The third conserved residue is a Cys within the β-chain (βCys93) that has been assigned a role in S-nitrosothiol (SNO)-based hypoxic vasodilation by RBCs. Under this model, the delivery of SNO-based NO bioactivity by Hb redefines the respiratory cycle as a triune system (NO/O2/CO2). However, the physiological ramifications of RBC-mediated vasodilation are unknown, and the apparently essential nature of βCys93 remains unclear. Here we report that mice with a βCys93Ala mutation are deficient in hypoxic vasodilation that governs blood flow autoregulation, the classic physiological mechanism that controls tissue oxygenation but whose molecular basis has been a longstanding mystery. Peripheral blood flow and tissue oxygenation are decreased at baseline in mutant animals and decline excessively during hypoxia. In addition, βCys93Ala mutation results in myocardial ischemia under basal normoxic conditions and in acute cardiac decompensation and enhanced mortality during transient hypoxia. Fetal viability is diminished also. Thus, βCys93-derived SNO bioactivity is essential for tissue oxygenation by RBCs within the respiratory cycle that is required for both normal cardiovascular function and circulatory adaptation to hypoxia.

  17. Importance of thioredoxin in the proteolysis of an immunoglobulin G as antigen by lysosomal Cys-proteases

    PubMed Central

    KERBLAT, I; DROUET, C; CHESNE, S; MARCHE, P N

    1999-01-01

    For disulphide-bonded antigens, reduction has been postulated to be a prerequisite for proteolytic antigen processing, with subsequent production of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II binding fragments. The murine monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) CE25/B7 was used as a multimeric antigen in a human model. Native IgG is highly resistant to proteolysis and has been previously found to be partially reduced at early steps of cell processing to become a suitable substrate for endopeptidases. The role of the oxidoreductase thioredoxin (Trx) was assessed in the reduction of the IgG by cleavage of H–L and H–H disulphide bonds. Recombinant human Trx (rTrx) has been assayed in a proteolytic in vitro system on IgG using endosomal and lysosomal subcellular fractions from B lymphoblastoid cells. rTrx is required in a dose-dependent manner for development of efficient proteolysis, catalysed by thiol-dependent Cys-proteases, such as cathepsin B. We demonstrated that cathepsin B activity was stimulated by the addition of rTrx. Thus, we propose that Trx-dependent IgG proteolysis occurred, on the one hand by means of the unfolding of the IgG after disulphide reduction, becoming a substrate of lysosomal proteases, and on the other hand by Cys-proteases such as cathepsin B that are fully active upon the regeneration of their activity by hydrogen donors. PMID:10447715

  18. Modulating the Copper-Sulfur Interaction in Type 1 Blue Copper Azurin by Replacing Cys112 with Nonproteinogenic Homocysteine

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Kevin M; Yu, Yang; Blackburn, Ninian; Lu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The Cu-SCys interaction is known to play a dominant role in defining the type 1 (T1) blue copper center with respect to both its electronic structure and electron transfer function. Despite this importance, its role has yet to be probed by mutagenesis studies without dramatic change of its T1 copper character. We herein report replacement of the conserved Cys112 in azurin with the nonproteinogenic amino acid homocysteine. Based on electronic absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance, and extended x-ray absorption fine structural spectroscopic studies, this variant displays typical type 1 copper site features. Surprisingly, instead of increasing the strength of the Cu-sulfur interaction by the introduction of the extra methylene group, the Cys112Hcy azurin showed a decrease in the covalent interaction between SHcy and Cu(II) when compared with the WT SCys-Cu(II) interaction. This is likely due to geometric adjustment of the center that resulted in the copper ion moving out of the trigonal plane defined by two histidines and one Hcy and closer to Met121. These structural changes resulted in an increase of reduction potential by 35 mV, consistent with lower Cu-S covalency. These results suggest that the Cu-SCys interaction is close to being optimal in native blue copper protein. It also demonstrates the power of using nonproteinogenic amino acids in addressing important issues in bioinorganic chemistry. PMID:24707355

  19. FacB, the Aspergillus nidulans activator of acetate utilization genes, binds dissimilar DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Todd, R B; Andrianopoulos, A; Davis, M A; Hynes, M J

    1998-01-01

    The facB gene is required for acetate induction of acetamidase (amdS) and the acetate utilization enzymes acetyl-CoA synthase (facA), isocitrate lyase (acuD) and malate synthase (acuE) in Aspergillus nidulans. The facB gene encodes a transcriptional activator with a GAL4-type Zn(II)2Cys6 zinc binuclear cluster DNA-binding domain which is shown to be required for DNA binding. In vitro DNA-binding sites for FacB in the 5' regions of the amdS, facA, acuD and acuE genes have been identified. Mutations in amdS FacB DNA-binding sites affected expression of an amdS-lacZ reporter in vivo and altered the affinity of in vitro DNA binding. This study shows that the FacB Zn(II)2Cys6 cluster binds to dissimilar sites which show similarity in form but not sequence with DNA-binding sites of other Zn(II)2Cys6 proteins. Sequences with homology to FacB sites are found in the 5' regions of genes regulated by the closely related yeast Zn(II)2Cys6 protein CAT8. PMID:9524126

  20. Role of cysteine-58 and cysteine-95 residues in the thiol di-sulfide oxidoreductase activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Nikhil; Hoti, S L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) is the first human cytokine reported and was thought to have a central role in the regulation of inflammatory responses. Homologs of this molecule have been reported in bacteria, invertebrates and plants. Apart from cytokine activity, it also has two catalytic activities viz., tautomerase and di-sulfide oxidoreductase, which appear to be involved in immunological functions. The CXXC catalytic site is responsible for di-sulfide oxidoreductase activity of MIF. We have recently reported thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti (Wba-MIF-2), although it lacks the CXXC motif. We hypothesized that three conserved cysteine residues might be involved in the formation of di-sulfide oxidoreductase catalytic site. Homology modeling of Wba-MIF-2 showed that among the three cysteine residues, Cys58 and Cys95 residues came in close proximity (3.23Å) in the tertiary structure with pKa value 9, indicating that these residues might play a role in the di-sulfide oxidoreductase catalytic activity. We carried out site directed mutagenesis of these residues (Cys58Ser & Cys95Ser) and expressed mutant proteins in Escherichia coli. The mutant proteins did not show any oxidoreductase activity in the insulin reduction assay, thus indicating that these two cysteine residues are vital for the catalytic activity of Wba-MIF-2. PMID:26432350

  1. Effects of site-directed mutagenesis in the N-terminal domain of thermolysin on its stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Yuichi; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi; Inouye, Kuniyo

    2013-01-01

    The thermolysin variant G8C/N60C/S65P in which the triple mutation in the N-terminal domain, Gly8→Cys/Asn60→Cys/Ser65→Pro, is undertaken increases stability [Yasukawa, K. and Inouye, K. (2007) Improving the activity and stability of thermolysin by site-directed mutagenesis. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1774, 1281–1288] and its mechanism is examined in this study. The apparent denaturing temperatures based on ellipticity at 222 nm of the wild-type thermolysin (WT), G8C/N60C, S65P and G8C/N60C/S65P were 85, >95, 88 and >95°C, respectively. The first-order rate constants, kobs, of the thermal inactivation of WT and variants at 10 mM CaCl2 increased with increasing thermal treatment temperatures (70–95°C), and those at 80°C decreased with increasing CaCl2 concentrations (1–100 mM). The kobs values were in the order of WT > S65P > G8C/N60C≒G8C/N60C/S65P at all temperatures and CaCl2 concentrations. These results indicate that the mutational combination, Gly8→Cys/Asn60→Cys and Ser65→Pro, increases stability only as high as Gly8→Cys/Asn60→Cys does. Assuming that irreversible inactivation of thermolysin occurs only in the absence of calcium ions, the dissociation constants, Kd, to the calcium ions of WT, G8C/N60C, S65P and G8C/N60C/S65P were 47, 8.9, 17 and 7.2 mM, respectively, suggesting that Gly8→Cys/Asn60→Cys and Ser65→Pro stabilize thermolysin by improving its affinity to calcium ions, most probably the one at the Ca2+-binding site III in the N-terminal domain. PMID:23087322

  2. Evaluation of acid-labile S-protecting groups to prevent Cys racemization in Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hibino, Hajime; Miki, Yasuyoshi; Nishiuchi, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Phosphonium and uronium salt-based reagents enable efficient and effective coupling reactions and are indispensable in peptide chemistry, especially in machine-assisted SPPS. However, after the activating and coupling steps with these reagents in the presence of tertiary amines, Fmoc derivatives of Cys are known to be considerably racemized during their incorporation. To avoid this side reaction, a coupling method mediated by phosphonium/uronium reagents with a weaker base, such as 2,4,6-trimethylpyridine, than the ordinarily used DIEA or that by carbodiimide has been recommended. However, these methods are appreciably inferior to the standard protocol applied for SPPS, that is, a 1 min preactivation procedure of coupling with phosphonium or uronium reagents/DIEA in DMF, in terms of coupling efficiency, and also the former method cannot reduce racemization of Cys(Trt) to an acceptable level (<1.0%) even when the preactivation procedure is omitted. Here, the 4,4′-dimethoxydiphenylmethyl and 4-methoxybenzyloxymethyl groups were demonstrated to be acid-labile S-protecting groups that can suppress racemization of Cys to an acceptable level (<1.0%) when the respective Fmoc derivatives are incorporated via the standard SPPS protocol of phosphonium or uronium reagents with the aid of DIEA in DMF. Furthermore, these protecting groups significantly reduced the rate of racemization compared to the Trt group even in the case of microwave-assisted SPPS performed at a high temperature. © 2013 The Authors. European Peptide Society published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24357151

  3. Hb Sallanches [alpha104(G11)Cys-->Tyr, TGC-->TAC (alpha2)]: an unstable hemoglobin variant found in an Indian child.

    PubMed

    Dash, Sumitra; Harano, Keiko; Menon, Santosh

    2006-01-01

    We report the fourth observation of Hb Sallanches [alpha104(G11)Cys-->Tyr, TGC-->TAC (alpha2)], an unstable alpha chain variant of intermediate severity in the homozygous state. Heterozygosity occasionally produces mild hypochromia and microcytosis in some patients. A balanced beta/alpha ratio, found in previously reported cases, points to unstable alphabeta dimers formed as a result of the Cys-->Tyr substitution at the alpha1beta1 contact site in this hemoglobin (Hb) variant. Our patient, and the previous two of the three cases reported in patients of Pakistani origin, points to a common population stock, separated by the mass population migration which occurred during the partition of Pakistan and India in 1947. PMID:16840231

  4. Accurate Detection of Adenylation Domain Functions in Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases by an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay System Using Active Site-directed Probes for Adenylation Domains.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Miyamoto, Kengo; Konno, Sho; Kasai, Shota; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2015-12-18

    A significant gap exists between protein engineering and enzymes used for the biosynthesis of natural products, largely because there is a paucity of strategies that rapidly detect active-site phenotypes of the enzymes with desired activities. Herein, we describe a proof-of-concept study of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system for the adenylation (A) domains in nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) using a combination of active site-directed probes coupled to a 5'-O-N-(aminoacyl)sulfamoyladenosine scaffold with a biotin functionality that immobilizes probe molecules onto a streptavidin-coated solid support. The recombinant NRPSs have a C-terminal His-tag motif that is targeted by an anti-6×His mouse antibody as the primary antibody and a horseradish peroxidase-linked goat antimouse antibody as the secondary antibody. These probes can selectively capture the cognate A domains by ligand-directed targeting. In addition, the ELISA technique detected A domains in the crude cell-free homogenates from the Escherichia coli expression systems. When coupled with a chromogenic substrate, the antibody-based ELISA technique can visualize probe-protein binding interactions, which provides accurate readouts of the A-domain functions in NRPS enzymes. To assess the ELISA-based engineering of the A domains of NRPSs, we reprogramed 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB)-activating enzyme EntE toward salicylic acid (Sal)-activating enzymes and investigated a correlation between binding properties for probe molecules and enzyme catalysts. We generated a mutant of EntE that displayed negligible loss in the kcat/Km value with the noncognate substrate Sal and a corresponding 48-fold decrease in the kcat/Km value with the cognate substrate DHB. The resulting 26-fold switch in substrate specificity was achieved by the replacement of a Ser residue in the active site of EntE with a Cys toward the nonribosomal codes of Sal-activating enzymes. Bringing a laboratory ELISA technique

  5. Palmate-like pentafoliata1 encodes a novel Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger transcription factor essential for compound leaf morphogenesis in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    As the primary site for photosynthetic carbon fixation and the interface between plants and the environment, plant leaves play a key role in plant growth, biomass production and survival, and global carbon and oxygen cycles. Leaves can be simple with a single blade or compound with multiple units of blades known as leaflets. In a palmate-type compound leaf, leaflets are clustered at the tip of the leaf. In a pinnate-type compound leaf, on the other hand, leaflets are placed on a rachis in distance from each other. Higher orders of complexities such as bipinnate compound leaves of the “sensitive” plant, Mimosa pudica, also occur in nature. However, how different leaf morphologies are determined is still poorly understood. Medicago truncatula is a model legume closely related to alfalfa and soybean with trifoliate compound leaves. Recently, we have shown that Palmate-like Pentafoliata1 (PALM1) encodes a putative Cys(2) His(2) zinc finger transcription factor essential for compound leaf morphogenesis in M. truncatula. Here, we present our phylogenetic relationship analysis of PALM1 homologs from different species and demonstrate that PALM1 has transcriptional activity in the transactivation assay in yeast. PMID:20724826

  6. Interaction of three-finger proteins from snake venoms and from mammalian brain with the cys-loop receptors and their models.

    PubMed

    Faure, G; Shelukhina, I V; Porowinska, D; Shulepko, M A; Lyukmanova, E N; Dolgikh, D A; Spirova, E N; Kasheverov, I E; Utkin, Yu N; Corringer, J-P; Tsetlin, V I

    2016-05-01

    With the use of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) it was shown that ws-Lynx1, a water-soluble analog of the three-finger membrane-bound protein Lynx1, that modulates the activity of brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), interacts with the acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP) with high affinity, K D = 62 nM. This result agrees with the earlier demonstrated competition of ws-Lynx1 with radioiodinated α-bungarotoxin for binding to AChBP. For the first time it was shown that ws-Lynx1 binds to GLIC, prokaryotic Cys-loop receptor (K D = 1.3 μM). On the contrary, SPR revealed that α-cobratoxin, a three-finger protein from cobra venom, does not bind to GLIC. Obtained results indicate that SPR is a promising method for analysis of topography of ws-Lynx1 binding sites using its mutants and those of AChBP and GLIC. PMID:27417718

  7. The Disulfide Bond Cys255-Cys279 in the Immunoglobulin-Like Domain of Anthrax Toxin Receptor 2 Is Required for Membrane Insertion of Anthrax Protective Antigen Pore

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Kyle; Altiyev, Agamyrat; Puschhof, Jens; Sauter, Roland; Arigi, Emma; Ruiz, Blanca; Peng, Xiuli; Almeida, Igor; Sherman, Michael; Xiao, Chuan; Sun, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax toxin receptors act as molecular clamps or switches that control anthrax toxin entry, pH-dependent pore formation, and translocation of enzymatic moieties across the endosomal membranes. We previously reported that reduction of the disulfide bonds in the immunoglobulin-like (Ig) domain of the anthrax toxin receptor 2 (ANTXR2) inhibited the function of the protective antigen (PA) pore. In the present study, the disulfide linkage in the Ig domain was identified as Cys255-Cys279 and Cys230-Cys315. Specific disulfide bond deletion mutants were achieved by replacing Cys residues with Ala residues. Deletion of the disulfide bond C255-C279, but not C230-C315, inhibited the PA pore-induced release of the fluorescence dyes from the liposomes, suggesting that C255-C279 is essential for PA pore function. Furthermore, we found that deletion of C255-C279 did not affect PA prepore-to-pore conversion, but inhibited PA pore membrane insertion by trapping the PA membrane-inserting loops in proteinaceous hydrophobic pockets. Fluorescence spectra of Trp59, a residue adjacent to the PA-binding motif in von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domain of ANTXR2, showed that deletion of C255-C279 resulted in a significant conformational change on the receptor ectodomain. The disulfide deletion-induced conformational change on the VWA domain was further confirmed by single-particle 3D reconstruction of the negatively stained PA-receptor heptameric complexes. Together, the biochemical and structural data obtained in this study provides a mechanistic insight into the role of the receptor disulfide bond C255-C279 in anthrax toxin action. Manipulation of the redox states of the receptor, specifically targeting to C255-C279, may become a novel strategy to treat anthrax. PMID:26107617

  8. Characterization of the active site of chloroperoxidase using physical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    Chloroperoxidase (CPO) and Cytochrome P-450, two very different hemeproteins, have been shown to have similar active sites by several techniques. Recent work has demonstrated thiolate ligation from a cysteine residue to the iron in P-450. A major portion of this research has been devoted to obtaining direct evidence that CPO also has a thiolate 5th ligand from a cysteine residue. This information will provide the framework for a detailed analysis of the structure-function relationships between peroxidases, catalase and cytochrome P-450 hemeproteins. To determine whether the 5th ligand is a cysteine, methionine or a unique amino acid, specific isotope enrichment experiments were used. Preliminary /sup 1/H-NMR studies show that the carbon monoxide-CPO complex has a peak in the upfield region corresponding to alpha-protons of a thiolate amino acid. C. fumago was grown on 95% D/sub 2/O media with a small amount of /sup 1/H-cysteine added. Under these conditions C. fumago slows down the biosynthesis of cysteine by at least 50% and utilizes the exogenous cysteine in the media. GC-MS was able to show that the methylene protons next to the sulfur atom in cysteine are 80-90% protonated while these positions in methionine are approximately 73% deuterated. Comparison of the /sup 1/H-NMR spectra of CO-CPO and CO-CPO indicate the presence of a cysteine ligand in chloroperoxidase.

  9. N6-Methyldeoxyadenosine Marks Active Transcription Start Sites in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Deng, Xin; Yu, Miao; Han, Dali; Hao, Ziyang; Liu, Jianzhao; Lu, Xingyu; Dore, Louis C; Weng, Xiaocheng; Ji, Quanjiang; Mets, Laurens; He, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY N6-methyldeoxyadenosine (6mA or m6A) is a DNA modification preserved in prokaryotes to eukaryotes. It is widespread in bacteria, and functions in DNA mismatch repair, chromosome segregation, and virulence regulation. In contrast, the distribution and function of 6mA in eukaryotes have been unclear. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the 6mA landscape in the genome of Chlamydomonas using new sequencing approaches. We identified the 6mA modification in 84% of genes in Chlamydomonas. We found that 6mA mainly locates at ApT dinucleotides around transcription start sites (TSS) with a bimodal distribution, and appears to mark active genes. A periodic pattern of 6mA deposition was also observed at base resolution, which is associated with nucleosome distribution near the TSS, suggesting a possible role in nucleosome positioning. The new genome-wide mapping of 6mA and its unique distribution in the Chlamydomonas genome suggest potential regulatory roles of 6mA in gene expression in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:25936837

  10. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  11. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems. PMID:25727891

  12. A proposed definition of the 'activity' of surface sites on lactose carriers for dry powder inhalation.

    PubMed

    Grasmeijer, Floris; Frijlink, Henderik W; de Boer, Anne H

    2014-06-01

    A new definition of the activity of surface sites on lactose carriers for dry powder inhalation is proposed which relates to drug detachment during dispersion. The new definition is expected to improve the understanding of 'carrier surface site activity', which stimulates the unambiguous communication about this subject and may aid in the rational design and interpretation of future formulation studies. In contrast to the currently prevailing view on carrier surface site activity, it follows from the newly proposed definition that carrier surface site activity depends on more variables than just the physicochemical properties of the carrier surface. Because the term 'active sites' is ambiguous, it is recommended to use the term 'highly active sites' instead to denote carrier surface sites with a relatively high activity. PMID:24613490

  13. Expression of a soluble form of iodotyrosine deiodinase for active site characterization by engineering the native membrane protein from Mus musculus

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, Jennifer M.; McTamney, Patrick M.; Rokita, Steven E.

    2012-06-27

    Reductive deiodination is critical for thyroid function and represents an unusual exception to the more common oxidative and hydrolytic mechanisms of dehalogenation in mammals. Studies on the reductive processes have been limited by a lack of convenient methods for heterologous expression of the appropriate proteins in large scale. The enzyme responsible for iodide salvage in the thyroid, iodotyrosine deodinase, is now readily generated after engineering its gene from Mus musculus. High expression of a truncated derivative lacking the membrane domain at its N-terminal was observed in Sf9 cells, whereas expression in Pichia pastoris remained low despite codon optimization. Ultimately, the desired expression in Escherichia coli was achieved after replacing the two conserved Cys residues of the deiodinase with Ala and fusing the resulting protein to thioredoxin. This final construct provided abundant enzyme for crystallography and mutagenesis. Utility of the E. coli system was demonstrated by examining a set of active site residues critical for binding to the zwitterionic portion of substrate.

  14. Dynamic HypA zinc site is essential for acid viability and proper urease maturation in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ryan C.; Hu, Heidi Q.; Merrell, D. Scott; Maroney, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori requires urease activity in order to survive in the acid environment of the human stomach. Urease is regulated in part by nickelation, a process that requires the HypA protein, which is a putative nickel metallochaperone that is generally associated with hydrogenase maturation. However, in H. pylori, HypA plays a dual role. In addition to an N-terminal nickel binding site, HypA proteins also contain a structural zinc site that is coordinated by two rigorously conserved CXXC sequences, which in H. pylori are flanked by His residues. These structural Zn sites are known to be dynamic, converting from Zn(Cys)4 centers at pH 7.2 to Zn(Cys)2(His)2 centers at pH 6.3 in the presence of Ni(II) ions. In this study, mutant strains of H. pylori that express zinc site variants of the HypA protein are used to show that the structural changes in the zinc site are important for the acid viability of the bacterium, and that a reduction in acid viability in these variants can be traced in large measure to deficient urease activity. This in turn leads to a model that connects the Zn(Cys)4 coordination to urease maturation. PMID:25608738

  15. The Association between OGG1 Ser326Cys Polymorphism and Lung Cancer Susceptibility: A Meta-Analysis of 27 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li-Jun; Jin, Zhen-Xiao; Zhao, Yu-Hong; Yi, Ding-Hua; Chen, Wen-Sheng; Yu, Shi-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have investigated association of OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism with lung cancer susceptibility; however, the findings are inconsistent. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis based on 27 publications encompass 9663 cases and 11348 controls to comprehensively evaluate such associations. Methods We searched publications from MEDLINE and EMBASE which were assessing the associations between OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism and lung cancer risk. We calculated pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) by using either fixed-effects or random-effects model. We used genotype based mRNA expression data from HapMap for SNP rs1052133 in normal cell lines among 270 subjects with four different ethnicities. Results The results showed that individuals carrying the Cys/Cys genotype did not have significantly increased risk for lung cancer (OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 0.98–1.36) when compared with the Ser/Ser genotype; similarly, no significant association was found in recessive, dominant or heterozygous co-dominant model (Ser/Cys vs. Cys/Cys). However, markedly increased risks were found in relatively large sample size (Ser/Ser vs. Cys/Cys: OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.13–1.48, and recessive model: OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.07–1.32). As to histological types, we found the Cys/Cys was associated with adenocarcinoma risk (Ser/Ser vs. Cys/Cys: OR = 1.32, 95% CI = 1.12–1.56; Ser/Cys vs. Cys/Cys: OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.04–1.37, and recessive model OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.08–1.40). No significant difference of OGG1 mRNA expression was found among genotypes between different ethnicities. Conclusions Despite some limitations, this meta-analysis established solid statistical evidence for an association between the OGG1 Cys/Cys genotype and lung cancer risk, particularly for studies with large sample size and adenocarcinoma, but this association warrants additional validation in larger and well designed studies. PMID

  16. Relationship between hOGG1 Ser326Cys gene polymorphism and coronary artery lesions in patients with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Meng-Hong; Qi, Hong-Mei; Wu, Mei-Hua; Ge, Yu-Zhi; Li, Hua-Tai

    2015-01-01

    To study the relationship between human 8-oxoguanine glycosylase (hOGG1) Ser326Cys gene polymorphism and coronary artery lesions in patients with diabetes mellitus, we analyzed 323 patients with diabetic mellitus, who underwent coronary angiography. Using PCR-RFLP, these patients were grouped into three genotypes: Cys/Cys (n=85), Ser/Ser (n=121), and Ser/Cys (n=117). Several clinical data, including history of diseases and biochemical indices were recorded. hOGG1 mRNA expression and 8-hydroxy deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were measured by RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. The quantities and severity of coronary artery with lesions were analyzed from coronary angiography. The Gensini and SYNTAX scores were detected by the unitary criteria. The 8-OHdG levels showed statistical difference among the three genotypes (F=21.56, P<0.05). Also, 8-OHdG in Cys/Cys genotype was higher than Ser/Ser and Ser/Cys genotype (q=2.32, q=3.12, P<0.05). In terms of the expression of hOGGl mRNA, the measure of hOGGl/β-actin showed significant difference among the three groups (F=12.56, P<0.05). On comparing two groups, hOGGl/β-actin in Cys/Cys genotype was higher thanSer/Ser and Ser/Cys genotypes (q=2.32, q=3.12, P<0.05). Percentage of 3-vessel lesions was high in Cys/Cys genotype and percentage of 1-vessel lesions was low in Ser/Cys genotype. Gensini and SYNTAX scores and ratio of complex lesions were significantly higher in the Cys/Cys genotype than the other two genotypes (FGensini=47.16, FSYNTAX=55.12; P<0.05). hOGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism showed correlation with coronary artery lesions in patients with diabetes mellitus, and Cys/Cys genotype may have more impact on the severity of lesions. PMID:26770476

  17. The crystal structure of the C45S mutant of annelid Arenicola marina peroxiredoxin 6 supports its assignment to the mechanistically typical 2-Cys subfamily without any formation of toroid-shaped decamers

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Aude; Loumaye, Eléonore; Clippe, André; Rees, Jean-François; Knoops, Bernard; Declercq, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    The peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) define a superfamily of thiol-dependent peroxidases able to reduce hydrogen peroxide, alkyl hydroperoxides, and peroxynitrite. Besides their cytoprotective antioxidant function, PRDXs have been implicated in redox signaling and chaperone activity, the latter depending on the formation of decameric high-molecular-weight structures. PRDXs have been mechanistically divided into three major subfamilies, namely typical 2-Cys, atypical 2-Cys, and 1-Cys PRDXs, based on the number and position of cysteines involved in the catalysis. We report the structure of the C45S mutant of annelid worm Arenicola marina PRDX6 in three different crystal forms determined at 1.6, 2.0, and 2.4 Å resolution. Although A. marina PRDX6 was cloned during the search of annelid homologs of mammalian 1-Cys PRDX6s, the crystal structures support its assignment to the mechanistically typical 2-Cys PRDX subfamily. The protein is composed of two distinct domains: a C-terminal domain and an N-terminal domain exhibiting a thioredoxin fold. The subunits are associated in dimers compatible with the formation of intersubunit disulfide bonds between the peroxidatic and the resolving cysteine residues in the wild-type enzyme. The packing of two crystal forms is very similar, with pairs of dimers associated as tetramers. The toroid-shaped decamers formed by dimer association and observed in most typical 2-Cys PRDXs is not present. Thus, A. marina PRDX6 presents structural features of typical 2-Cys PRDXs without any formation of toroid-shaped decamers, suggesting that it should function more like a cytoprotective antioxidant enzyme or a modulator of peroxide-dependent cell signaling rather than a molecular chaperone. PMID:18359859

  18. Further Characterization of Cys-Type and Ser-Type Anaerobic Sulfatase Maturating Enzymes Suggests a Commonality in Mechanism of Catalysis†

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Tyler L.; Ahlum, Jessica H.; Qin, Rosie M.; Lanz, Nicholas D.; Radle, Matthew I.; Krebs, Carsten; Booker, Squire J.

    2013-01-01

    The anaerobic sulfatase maturating enzyme from Clostridium perfringens (anSMEcpe) catalyzes the two-electron oxidation of a cysteinyl residue on a cognate protein to a formyglycyl residue (FGly) using a mechanism that involves organic radicals. The FGly residue plays a unique role as a cofactor in a class of enzymes termed arylsulfatases, which catalyze the hydrolysis of various organosulfate monoesters. anSMEcpe has been shown to be a member of the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) family of enzymes, [4Fe–4S] cluster–requiring proteins that use a 5’-deoxyadenosyl 5’-radical (5’-dA•) generated from a reductive cleavage of SAM to initiate radical-based catalysis. Herein, we show that anSMEcpe contains in addition to the [4Fe–4S] cluster harbored by all radical SAM (RS) enzymes, two additional [4Fe–4S] clusters, similar to the radical SAM protein AtsB, which catalyzes the two-electron oxidation of a seryl residue to a FGly residue. We show by size-exclusion chromatography that both AtsB and anSMEcpe are monomeric proteins, and site-directed mutagenesis studies on AtsB reveal that individual Cys→Ala substitutions at seven conserved positions result in insoluble protein, consistent with those residues acting as ligands to the two additional [4Fe–4S] clusters. Ala substitutions at an additional conserved Cys residue (C291 in AtsB; C276 in anSMEcpe) afford proteins that display intermediate behavior. These proteins exhibit reduced solubility and drastically reduced activity, behavior that is conspicuously similar to that of a critical Cys residue in BtrN, another radical SAM dehydrogenase [Grove, T. L., et al (2010) Biochemistry, 49, 3783–3785]. We also show that wild-type anSMEcpe acts on peptides containing other oxidizeable amino acids at the target position. Moreover, we show that the enzyme will convert threonyl peptides to the corresponding ketone product, and also allo-threonyl peptides, but with a significantly reduced efficiency

  19. Effect of amino acid substitutions in a potential metal-binding site of AnfA on expression from the anfH promoter in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Premakumar, R; Loveless, T M; Bishop, P E

    1994-10-01

    AnfA, an activator required for transcription of the structural genes encoding nitrogenase 3 (anfHDGK) in Azotobacter vinelandii, has a potential metal-binding site [(S19)H(C21)FTGE(C26)R] in its N terminus. Growth studies and expression of an anfH-lacZ fusion in mutants containing amino acid substitutions in this site indicate that Ser-19 is not required for AnfA activity whereas Cys-21 and Cys-26 are required. Residual expression of the anfH-lacZ fusion in AnfA- mutants was found to be due to activation by VnfA, the activator required for expression of genes encoding nitrogenase 2.

  20. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  1. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  2. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  3. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  4. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  5. Mitochondrial 1-Cys-peroxiredoxin/thioredoxin system protects manganese-containing superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) against inactivation by peroxynitrite in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pedrajas, José R; Carreras, Alfonso; Valderrama, Raquel; Barroso, Juan B

    2010-11-01

    Peroxynitrite is a reactive nitrogen species that can mediate protein tyrosine nitration, inactivating many proteins. We show that yeast mitochondrial peroxiredoxin (Prx1p), which belongs to the group 1-Cys-Prx, has thioredoxin-dependent peroxynitrite reductase activity. This activity was characterised in vitro with the recombinant mitochondrial Prx1p, the thioredoxin reductase Trr2p and the thioredoxin Trx3p, using a generator of peroxynitrite (SIN-1). Purified mitochondria from wild-type and null Prx1p or Trx3p yeast strains, exposed to SIN-1, showed a differential inactivation of manganese-containing superoxide dismutase activity. The above yeast strains were exposed to SIN-1 and examined under confocal microscopy. Prx1p or Trx3p-null cells showed a greater accumulation of peroxynitrite than wild-type ones. Our results indicate that this 1-Cys-Prx is a peroxynitrite reductase activity that uses reducing equivalents from NADPH through the mitochondrial thioredoxin system. Therefore, mitochondrial 1-Cys-peroxiredoxin/thioredoxin system constitutes an essential antioxidant defence against oxidative and nitrosative stress in yeast mitochondria.

  6. GAS HYDRATES AT TWO SITES OF AN ACTIVE CONTINENTAL MARGIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart on the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m.

  7. Control of active sites in selective flocculation: III -- Mechanism of site blocking

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    It has been shown in Parts I and II of this paper that heteroflocculation can be controlled by poisoning the sites for flocculant adsorption using a site blocking agent (SBA). An efficient SBA was determined to be the lower molecular weight fraction of the flocculant. In this paper, the underlying mechanism of SBA action is described. Also, the mathematical model detailed in Part I is used to determine the effect of different SBAs on apatite-dolomite separation efficiency. It has been demonstrated that the depression in flocculation is directly related to the site blocking parameter ([bar [Phi

  8. Dynamically achieved active site precision in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes' enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme-substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C-H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed.

  9. Expression, purification and characterization of an atypical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin from the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Lu, Z

    2015-04-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) play important roles in protecting organisms against damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we cloned a cDNA of Bombyx mori peroxiredoxin 5 (BmPrx5), which contained a 565-bp open reading frame for a 188-residue protein. Sequence analysis indicated that BmPrx5 belongs to the atypical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. Recombinant BmPrx5 purified from Escherichia coli showed antioxidant activity that removes H2 O2 and protects DNA from oxidative damage. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the level of BmPrx5 mRNA in haemocytes increased early and decreased by 24 h after injection of H2 O2 whereas, in the fat body, the transcript level decreased at 6 h and increased at 12 h. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus infection resulted in higher levels of H2 O2 in the haemolymph and of BmPrx5 mRNA in haemocytes at 8 h postinfection. These data suggest that BmPrx5 acts as an antioxidant enzyme to protect the silkworm from oxidative damage induced by bacterial infection. Further study is needed to elucidate the exact role of BmPrx5 in the silkworm immune system.

  10. Cys34-PEGylated Human Serum Albumin for Drug Binding and Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mehtala, Jonathan G.; Kulczar, Chris; Lavan, Monika; Knipp, Gregory; Wei, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivatives were conjugated onto the Cys-34 residue of human serum albumin (HSA) to determine their effects on the solubilization, permeation, and cytotoxic activity of hydrophobic drugs such as paclitaxel (PTX). PEG(C34)HSA conjugates were prepared on a multigram scale by treating native HSA (n-HSA) with 5- or 20-kDa mPEG-maleimide, resulting in up to 77% conversion of the mono-PEGylated adduct. Nanoparticle tracking analysis of PEG(C34)HSA formulations in phosphate buffer revealed an increase in nanosized aggregates relative to n-HSA, both in the absence and presence of PTX. Cell viability studies conducted with MCF-7 breast cancer cells indicated that PTX cytotoxicity was enhanced by PEG(C34)HSA when mixed at 10:1 mole ratios, up to a two-fold increase in potency relative to n-HSA. The PEG(C34)HSA conjugates were also evaluated as PTX carriers across monolayers of HUVEC and hCMEC/D3 cells, and found to have nearly identical permeation profiles as n-HSA. PMID:25918947

  11. Expression, purification and characterization of an atypical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin from the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Lu, Z

    2015-04-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) play important roles in protecting organisms against damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we cloned a cDNA of Bombyx mori peroxiredoxin 5 (BmPrx5), which contained a 565-bp open reading frame for a 188-residue protein. Sequence analysis indicated that BmPrx5 belongs to the atypical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. Recombinant BmPrx5 purified from Escherichia coli showed antioxidant activity that removes H2 O2 and protects DNA from oxidative damage. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the level of BmPrx5 mRNA in haemocytes increased early and decreased by 24 h after injection of H2 O2 whereas, in the fat body, the transcript level decreased at 6 h and increased at 12 h. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus infection resulted in higher levels of H2 O2 in the haemolymph and of BmPrx5 mRNA in haemocytes at 8 h postinfection. These data suggest that BmPrx5 acts as an antioxidant enzyme to protect the silkworm from oxidative damage induced by bacterial infection. Further study is needed to elucidate the exact role of BmPrx5 in the silkworm immune system. PMID:25512182

  12. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  13. Correlation of loss of activity of human aldehyde dehydrogenase with reaction of bromoacetophenone with glutamic acid-268 and cysteine-302 residues. Partial-sites reactivity of aldehyde dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Abriola, D P; MacKerell, A D; Pietruszko, R

    1990-01-01

    Bromoacetophenone (2-bromo-1-phenylethanone) has been characterized as an affinity reagent for human aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.3) [MacKerell, MacWright & Pietruszko (1986) Biochemistry 25, 5182-5189], and has been shown to react specifically with the Glu-268 residue [Abriola, Fields, Stein, MacKerell & Pietruszko (1987) Biochemistry 26, 5679-5684] with an apparent inactivation stoichiometry of two molecules of bromoacetophenone per molecule of enzyme. The specificity of bromoacetophenone for reaction with Glu-268, however, is not absolute, owing to the extreme reactivity of this reagent. When bromo[14C]acetophenone was used to label the human cytoplasmic E1 isoenzyme radioactively and tryptic fragmentation was carried out, peptides besides that containing Glu-268 were found to have reacted with reagent. These peptides were purified by h.p.l.c. and analysed by sequencing and scintillation counting to quantify radioactive label in the material from each cycle of sequencing. Reaction of bromoacetophenone with the aldehyde dehydrogenase molecule during enzyme activity loss occurs with two residues, Glu-268 and Cys-302. The activity loss, however, appears to be proportional to incorporation of label at Glu-268. The large part of incorporation of label at Cys-302 occurs after the activity loss is essentially complete. With both Glu-268 and Cys-302, however, the incorporation of label stops after one molecule of bromoacetophenone has reacted with each residue. Reaction with other residues continues after activity loss is complete. PMID:1968743

  14. Monoclonal antibody against the active site of caeruloplasmin and the ELISA system detecting active caeruloplasmin.

    PubMed

    Hiyamuta, S; Ito, K

    1994-04-01

    Serum caeruloplasmin deficiency is a characteristic biochemical abnormality found in patients with Wilson's disease, but the mechanism of this disease is unknown. Although the phenylenediamine oxidase activity of serum caeruloplasmin is markedly low in patients with Wilson's disease, mRNA of caeruloplasmin exists to some extent. To investigate the deficiency of caeruloplasmin oxidase activity in Wilson's disease, we generated 14 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and selected ID1, which had the strongest reactivity, and ID2, which had neutralizing ability. We also established a system to measure active caeruloplasmin specifically using these MAbs. These MAbs and the system will be useful tools in analyzing the active site of caeruloplasmin in patients with Wilson's disease.

  15. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (P<0.01), cleaved caspase 3, and the caspase-cleaved product of cytokeratin 18. Decreased levels of VEGF (P<0.01) and reduced vessel size (P<0.05) were also observed, the latter only in the ZM198,615-pretreatment group. Furthermore, we performed a series of in vitro studies using the colon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  16. Challenging a paradigm: theoretical calculations of the protonation state of the Cys25-His159 catalytic diad in free papain.

    PubMed

    Shokhen, Michael; Khazanov, Netaly; Albeck, Amnon

    2009-12-01

    A central mechanistic paradigm of cysteine proteases is that the His-Cys catalytic diad forms an ion-pair NH(+)/S(-) already in the catalytically active free enzyme. Most molecular modeling studies of cysteine proteases refer to this paradigm as their starting point. Nevertheless, several recent kinetics and X-ray crystallography studies of viral and bacterial cysteine proteases depart from the ion-pair mechanism, suggesting general base catalysis. We challenge the postulate of the ion-pair formation in free papain. Applying our QM/SCRF(VS) molecular modeling approach, we analyzed all protonation states of the catalytic diad in free papain and its SMe derivative, comparing the predicted and experimental pK(a) data. We conclude that the His-Cys catalytic diad in free papain is fully protonated, NH(+)/SH. The experimental pK(a) = 8.62 of His159 imidazole in free papain, obtained by NMR-controlled titration and originally interpreted as the NH(+)/S(-) <==> N/S(-) NH(+)/S(-) <==> N/S(-) equilibrium, is now assigned to the NH(+)/SH <==> N/SH NH(+)/SH <==> N/SH equilibrium.

  17. Multimodal approach to explore the pathogenicity of BARD1, ARG 658 CYS, and ILE 738 VAL mutants.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Rajan Kumar; Vikrant; Siddiqui, Quadir M; Thapa, Pankaj S; Raikundalia, Sweta; Gadewal, Nikhil; Kumar, Nachimuthu Senthil; Hosur, M V; Varma, Ashok K

    2016-07-01

    BARD1-BRCA1 complex plays an important role in DNA damage repair, apoptosis, chromatin remodeling, and other important processes required for cell survival. BRCA1 and BARD1 heterodimer possess E3 ligase activity and is involved in genome maintenance, by functioning in surveillance for DNA damage, thereby regulating multiple pathways including tumor suppression. BRCT domains are evolutionary conserved domains present in different proteins such as BRCA1, BARD1, XRCC, and MDC1 regulating damage response and cell-cycle control through protein-protein interactions. Nonetheless, the role of BARD1BRCT in the recruitment of DNA repair mechanism and structural integrity with BRCA1 complex is still implicit. To explicate the role of BARD1BRCT in the DNA repair mechanism, in silico, in vitro, and biophysical approach were applied to characterize BARD1 BRCT wild-type and Arg658Cys and Ile738Val mutants. However, no drastic secondary and tertiary structural changes in the mutant proteins were observed. Thermal and chemical denaturation studies revealed that mutants Arg658Cys and Ile738Val have a decrease in Tm and ∆G than the wild type. In silico studies of BARD1 BRCT (568-777) and mutant protein indicate loss in structural compactness on the Ile738Val mutant. Comparative studies of wild-type and mutants will thus be helpful in understanding the basic role of BARD1BRCT in DNA damage repair.

  18. A hereditary bleeding disorder resulting from a premature stop codon in thrombomodulin (p.Cys537Stop).

    PubMed

    Langdown, Jonathan; Luddington, Roger J; Huntington, James A; Baglin, Trevor P

    2014-09-18

    In this study, we describe a novel thrombomodulin (TM) mutation (c.1611C>A) that codes for a change from cysteine 537 to a premature stop codon (p.Cys537Stop). Three members of a family with a history of posttraumatic bleeding were identified to be heterozygous for this TM mutation. All coagulation screening tests, coagulation factor assays, and platelet function test results were within normal limits. However, the endogenous thrombin potential was markedly reduced at low-tissue factor concentration, and failure to correct with normal plasma indicated the presence of a coagulation inhibitor. Plasma TM levels were highly elevated (433-845 ng/ml, normal range 2-8 ng/ml, equating to 5 to 10 nM), and the addition of exogenous protein C further decreased thrombin generation. The mutation, p.Cys537Stop, results in a truncation within the carboxyl-terminal transmembrane helix. We predict that as a consequence of the truncation, the variant TM is shed from the endothelial surface into the blood plasma. This would promote systemic protein C activation and early cessation of thrombin generation within a developing hemostatic clot, thereby explaining the phenotype of posttraumatic bleeding observed within this family. PMID:25049278

  19. The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN protein is able to specifically bind DNA through its single Cys2-His2 zinc finger motif.

    PubMed

    Dathan, Nina; Zaccaro, Laura; Esposito, Sabrina; Isernia, Carla; Omichinski, James G; Riccio, Andrea; Pedone, Carlo; Di Blasio, Benedetto; Fattorusso, Roberto; Pedone, Paolo V

    2002-11-15

    The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN (SUP) gene has been shown to be important in maintaining the boundary between stamens and carpels, and is presumed to act by regulating cell proliferation. In this work, we show that the SUP protein, which contains a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger domain including the QALGGH sequence, highly conserved in the plant zinc finger proteins, binds DNA. Using a series of deletion mutants, it was determined that the minimal domain required for specific DNA binding (residues 15-78) includes the single zinc finger and two basic regions located on either side of this motif. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions in the zinc finger or in the basic regions, including a mutation that knocks out the function of the SUP protein in vivo (glycine 63 to aspartate), have been found to abolish the activity of the SUP DNA-binding domain. These results strongly suggest that the SUP protein functions in vivo by acting as a DNA-binding protein, likely involved in transcriptional regulation. The association of both an N-terminal and a C-terminal basic region with a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger represents a novel DNA-binding motif suggesting that the mechanism of DNA recognition adopted by the SUP protein is different from that described so far in other zinc finger proteins. PMID:12433998

  20. Robotics and Automation Activities at the Savannah River Site: A Site Report for SUBWOG 39F

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.

    1995-09-28

    The Savannah River Site has successfully used robots, teleoperators, and remote video to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, improve worker safety, and improve the quality of operations. Previous reports have described the use of mobile teleoperators in coping with a high level liquid waste spill, the removal of highly contaminated equipment, and the inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. This report will cover recent applications at the Savannah River, as well as systems which SRS has delivered to other DOE site customers.

  1. Control of active sites in selective flocculation: II -- Role of site blocking agents

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Control of heteroflocculation using a lower molecular weight fraction of the flocculant as a site blocking agent is demonstrated in the apatite-dolomite-polyethylene oxide system. The most effective SBA (site blocking agent) was determined to be the highest molecular weight fraction of the flocculant itself which was not capable of flocculating any of the components of the mixture. In the presence of the SBA, flocculant adsorption decreased significantly on apatite particles, thereby inhibiting coflocculation.

  2. Association of OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism and pancreatic cancer susceptibility: evidence from a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yulan; Chen, Xu; Li, Taijie; Li, Meng; Liang, Hongjie

    2014-03-01

    The 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) gene has been considered to be associated with cancer susceptibility. The OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism has been reported to be associated with pancreatic cancer (PC), but the published studies have yielded inconsistent results. For better understanding of the effect of OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism on PC susceptibility, a meta-analysis was performed. All eligible studies were identified through a search of PubMed, Excerpta Medica Database (Embase), Elsevier Science Direct, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database before May 2013. The association between the OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism and PC risk was conducted by odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of five case-control studies with 1,690 cases and 3,650 controls were eventually collected. Overall, we found that OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism was not associated with PC susceptibility (Cys/Cys vs. Ser/Ser: OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.80-1.14; Cys/Cys vs. Ser/Ser + Ser/Cys: OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.78-1.14; Cys/Cys + Ser/Cys vs. Ser/Ser (OR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.89-1.12)). In the subgroup analysis based on ethnicity, source of control, sample size, and genotyping method, no significant association was found in any genetic models. This meta-analysis suggests that the OGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism may not associated with PC susceptibility. Considering the limited sample size and ethnicity included in the meta-analysis, further larger scaled and well-designed studies are needed to confirm our results.

  3. Reactive sulfhydryl groups of sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase. II. Site of labeling with iodoacetamide and its fluorescent derivative.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, T; Kawakita, M

    1987-02-01

    Iodoacetamide (IAA) and its fluorescent derivative, 5-(2-iodoacetamidoethyl) amino-naphthalene-1-sulfonate (IAEDANS) specifically bind to a site on the C-terminal half of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase. The location of this specific binding site was identified. SR membranes were treated with 150 microM [14C]IAA at pH 7.0 and 30 degrees C. One mole of IAA per mole of ATPase was bound in 6 h without affecting the Ca2+-transport activity. [14C]IAA-labeled SR membranes were cleaved with BrCN, and 14C-labeled peptide fragments were separated by Sephadex LH-60 chromatography and then digested further with trypsin. A radioactive peptide (Ala-Cys 674-Cys-Phe-Ala-Arg) was purified by Sephadex LH-20 chromatography and C18 reversed phase HPLC (Cys denotes the [14C]IAA-binding site). IAEDANS-labeling was carried out by reacting SR membranes with 50 microM IAEDANS for 5 h, at pH 7.0 and 30 degrees C. A fluorescent peptide was successfully purified by the same procedures as for the IAA-labeled peptide, and the amino acid sequence analysis of this peptide revealed that the IAEDANS labeling site was identical with the IAA binding site.

  4. Lack of association between dopamine D2 receptor gene Cys311 variant and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihisa; Fukushima, Noboru; Takahashi, Makoto; Kameda, Kensuke; Ihda, Shin

    1996-04-09

    Itokawa et al. reported identifying one missense nucleotide mutation from C to G resulting in a substitution of serine with cysteine at codon 311 in the third intracellular loop of the dopamine D2 receptor in schizophrenics. Arinami et al. reported finding a positive association between the Cys311 variant and schizophrenia. In response to the report by Arinami et al. we examined 106 unrelated Japanese schizophrenics and 106 normal controls to determine if there is any association of the Cys311 variant with schizophrenia. However, we found no statistically significant differences in allelic frequencies of Cys311 between schizophrenia and normal controls. The present results as well as those of all previous studies except for that of Arinami et al. indicated that an association between the dopamine D2 receptor gene and schizophrenia is unlikely to exist. 24 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Mutation at a Strictly Conserved, Active Site Tyrosine in the Copper Amine Oxidase Leads to Uncontrolled Oxygenase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhi-wei; Datta, Saumen; DuBois, Jennifer L.; Klinman, Judith P.; Mathews, F. Scott

    2010-09-07

    The copper amine oxidases carry out two copper-dependent processes: production of their own redox-active cofactor (2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine quinone, TPQ) and the subsequent oxidative deamination of substrate amines. Because the same active site pocket must facilitate both reactions, individual active site residues may serve multiple roles. We have examined the roles of a strictly conserved active site tyrosine Y305 in the copper amine oxidase from Hansenula polymorpha kinetically, spetroscopically (Dubois and Klinman (2006) Biochemistry 45, 3178), and, in the present work, structurally. While the Y305A enzyme is almost identical to the wild type, a novel, highly oxygenated species replaces TPQ in the Y305F active sites. This new structure not only provides the first direct detection of peroxy intermediates in cofactor biogenesis but also indicates the critical control of oxidation chemistry that can be conferred by a single active site residue.

  6. Interaction of haptoglobin with hemoglobin octamers based on the mutation αAsn78Cys or βGly83Cys

    PubMed Central

    Brillet, Thomas; Marden, Michael C.; Yeh, Joanne I.; Shen, Tong-Jian; Ho, Nancy T.; Kettering, Regina; Du, Shoucheng; Vasseur, Corinne; Domingues-Hamdi, Elisa; Ho, Chien; Baudin-Creuza, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Octameric hemoglobins have been developed by the introduction of surface cysteines in either the alpha or beta chain. Originally designed as a blood substitute, we report here the structure and ligand binding function; in addition the interaction with haptoglobin was studied. The recombinant Hbs (rHbs) with mutations alpha Asn78Cys or beta Gly83Cys spontaneously form octamers under conditions where the cysteines are oxidized. Oxygen binding curves and CO kinetic studies indicate a correct allosteric transition of the tetramers within the octamer. Crystallographic studies of the two rHbs show two disulfide bonds per octamer. Reducing agents may provoke dissociation to tetramers, but the octamers are stable when mixed with fresh human plasma, indicating that the reduction by plasma is slower than the oxidation by the dissolved oxygen, consistent with an enhanced stability. The octameric rHbs were also mixed with a solution of haptoglobin (Hp), which binds the dimers of Hb: there was little interaction for incubation times of 15 min; however, on longer timescales a complex was formed. Dynamic light scattering was used to follow the interaction of Hp with the alpha Asn78Cys octamer during 24 hours; a transition from a simple complex of 15 nm to a final size of 60 nm was observed. The results indicate a specific orientation of the αβ dimers may be of importance for the binding to haptoglobin. PMID:23847747

  7. Sample multiplexing with cysteine-selective approaches: cysDML and cPILOT.

    PubMed

    Gu, Liqing; Evans, Adam R; Robinson, Renã A S

    2015-04-01

    Cysteine-selective proteomics approaches simplify complex protein mixtures and improve the chance of detecting low abundant proteins. It is possible that cysteinyl-peptide/protein enrichment methods could be coupled to isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging methods for quantitative proteomics analyses in as few as two or up to 10 samples, respectively. Here we present two novel cysteine-selective proteomics approaches: cysteine-selective dimethyl labeling (cysDML) and cysteine-selective combined precursor isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging (cPILOT). CysDML is a duplex precursor quantification technique that couples cysteinyl-peptide enrichment with on-resin stable-isotope dimethyl labeling. Cysteine-selective cPILOT is a novel 12-plex workflow based on cysteinyl-peptide enrichment, on-resin stable-isotope dimethyl labeling, and iodoTMT tagging on cysteine residues. To demonstrate the broad applicability of the approaches, we applied cysDML and cPILOT methods to liver tissues from an Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model and wild-type (WT) controls. From the cysDML experiments, an average of 850 proteins were identified and 594 were quantified, whereas from the cPILOT experiment, 330 and 151 proteins were identified and quantified, respectively. Overall, 2259 unique total proteins were detected from both cysDML and cPILOT experiments. There is tremendous overlap in the proteins identified and quantified between both experiments, and many proteins have AD/WT fold-change values that are within ~20% error. A total of 65 statistically significant proteins are differentially expressed in the liver proteome of AD mice relative to WT. The performance of cysDML and cPILOT are demonstrated and advantages and limitations of using multiple duplex experiments versus a single 12-plex experiment are highlighted.

  8. Sample Multiplexing with Cysteine-Selective Approaches: cysDML and cPILOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Liqing; Evans, Adam R.; Robinson, Renã A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Cysteine-selective proteomics approaches simplify complex protein mixtures and improve the chance of detecting low abundant proteins. It is possible that cysteinyl-peptide/protein enrichment methods could be coupled to isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging methods for quantitative proteomics analyses in as few as two or up to 10 samples, respectively. Here we present two novel cysteine-selective proteomics approaches: cysteine-selective dimethyl labeling (cysDML) and cysteine-selective combined precursor isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging (cPILOT). CysDML is a duplex precursor quantification technique that couples cysteinyl-peptide enrichment with on-resin stable-isotope dimethyl labeling. Cysteine-selective cPILOT is a novel 12-plex workflow based on cysteinyl-peptide enrichment, on-resin stable-isotope dimethyl labeling, and iodoTMT tagging on cysteine residues. To demonstrate the broad applicability of the approaches, we applied cysDML and cPILOT methods to liver tissues from an Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model and wild-type (WT) controls. From the cysDML experiments, an average of 850 proteins were identified and 594 were quantified, whereas from the cPILOT experiment, 330 and 151 proteins were identified and quantified, respectively. Overall, 2259 unique total proteins were detected from both cysDML and cPILOT experiments. There is tremendous overlap in the proteins identified and quantified between both experiments, and many proteins have AD/WT fold-change values that are within ~20% error. A total of 65 statistically significant proteins are differentially expressed in the liver proteome of AD mice relative to WT. The performance of cysDML and cPILOT are demonstrated and advantages and limitations of using multiple duplex experiments versus a single 12-plex experiment are highlighted.

  9. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  10. Vasohibins: new transglutaminase-like cysteine proteases possessing a non-canonical Cys-His-Ser catalytic triad

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Ponting, Chris P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Vasohibin-1 and Vasohibin-2 regulate angiogenesis, tumour growth and metastasis. Their molecular functions, however, were previously unknown, in large part owing to their perceived lack of homology to proteins of known structure and function. To identify their functional amino acids and domains, their molecular activity and their evolutionary history, we undertook an in-depth analysis of Vasohibin sequences. We find that Vasohibin proteins are previously undetected members of the transglutaminase-like cysteine protease superfamily, and all possess a non-canonical Cys-His-Ser catalytic triad. We further propose a calcium-dependent activation mechanism for Vasohibin proteins. These findings can now be used to design constructs for protein structure determination and to develop enzyme inhibitors as angiogenic regulators to treat metastasis and tumour growth. Contact: luis.sanchezpulido@dpag.ox.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26794318

  11. An ionizable active-site tryptophan imparts catalase activity to a peroxidase core.

    PubMed

    Loewen, Peter C; Carpena, Xavi; Vidossich, Pietro; Fita, Ignacio; Rovira, Carme

    2014-05-21

    Catalase peroxidases (KatG's) are bifunctional heme proteins that can disproportionate hydrogen peroxide (catalatic reaction) despite their structural dissimilarity with monofunctional catalases. Using X-ray crystallography and QM/MM calculations, we demonstrate that the catalatic reaction of KatG's involves deprotonation of the active-site Trp, which plays a role similar to that of the distal His in monofunctional catalases. The interaction of a nearby mobile arginine with the distal Met-Tyr-Trp essential adduct (in/out) acts as an electronic switch, triggering deprotonation of the adduct Trp.

  12. Inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by a reactive metabolite of acetaminophen and mass spectral characterization of an arylated active site peptide.

    PubMed

    Dietze, E C; Schäfer, A; Omichinski, J G; Nelson, S D

    1997-10-01

    Acetaminophen (4'-hydroxyacetanilide, APAP) is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug that can cause hepatic necrosis under some circumstances via cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation to a reactive metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). Although the mechanism of hepatocellular injury caused by APAP is not fully understood, it is known that NAPQI forms covalent adducts with several hepatocellular proteins. Reported here is the identification of one of these proteins as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [GAPDH, D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate: NAD+ oxidoreductase (phosphorylating), EC 1.2.1.12]. Two hours after the administration of hepatotoxic doses of [14C]APAP to mice, at a time prior to overt cell damage, hepatocellular GAPDH activity was significantly decreased concurrent with the formation of a 14C-labeled GAPDH adduct. A nonhepatotoxic regioisomer of APAP, 3'-hydroxyacetanilide (AMAP), was found to decrease GAPDH activity to a lesser extent than APAP, and radiolabel from [14C]AMAP bound to a lesser extent to GAPDH at a time when its overall binding to hepatocellular proteins was almost equivalent to that of APAP. In order to determine the nature of the covalent adduct between GAPDH and APAP, its major reactive and toxic metabolite, NAPQI, was incubated with purified porcine muscle GAPDH. Microsequencing analysis and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) with collision-induced dissociation (CID) were used to characterize one of the adducts as APAP bound to the cysteinyl sulfhydryl group of Cys-149 in the active site peptide of GAPDH. PMID:9348431

  13. Nuclear Site Security in the Event of Terrorist Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M.L.; Sims, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper, presented as a poster, identifies why ballistic protection should now be considered at nuclear sites to counter terrorist threats. A proven and flexible form of multi purpose protection is described in detail with identification of trial results that show its suitability for this role. (authors)

  14. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  15. Active Layer and Moisture Measurements for Intensive Site 0 and 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-04-17

    These are measurements of Active Layer Thickness collected along several lines beginning in September, 2011 to the present. The data were collected at several time periods along the Site0 L2 Line, the Site1 AB Line, and an ERT Monitoring Line near Area A in Site1.

  16. Evidence for proximal cysteine and lysine residues at or near the active site of arginine kinase of Stichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qin; Chen, Baoyu; Wang, Xicheng

    2004-12-01

    Inactivation of arginine kinase (AK) of Stichopus japonicus by o-phthalaldehyde (OPTA) was investigated. The modified enzyme showed an absorption peak at 337 nm and a fluorescent emission peak at 410 nm, which are characteristic of an isoindole derivative formed by OPTA binding to a thiol and an amine group in proximity within the enzyme. Loss of enzymatic activity was concomitant with an increase in fluorescence intensity at 410 nm. Stoichiometry studies by Tsou's method showed that among the cysteine residues available for OPTA modification in the enzyme, only one was essential for the enzyme activity. This cysteine residue is located in a highly hydrophobic environment, presumably near ATP and ADP binding region. This conclusion was verified by 5,5 -dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) modification. In addition, these results were supported by means of electrophoresis and ultraviolet, fluorescence, circular dichroism spectroscopy and fast performance liquid chromatography. Sequence comparison suggested that this essential cysteine residue maybe the conservative Cys274. PMID:15627388

  17. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine

    PubMed Central

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO2. We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O2 and CO2 bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO2 defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg2+ surrounded by three H2O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming. PMID:23112176

  18. Active-Site Hydration and Water Diffusion in Cytochrome P450cam: A Highly Dynamic Process

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome Y

    2011-01-01

    Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (300 ns) are performed on both the apo- (i.e., camphor-free) and camphor-bound cytochrome P450cam (CYP101). Water diffusion into and out of the protein active site is observed without biased sampling methods. During the course of the molecular dynamics simulation, an average of 6.4 water molecules is observed in the camphor-binding site of the apo form, compared to zero water molecules in the binding site of the substrate-bound form, in agreement with the number of water molecules observed in crystal structures of the same species. However, as many as 12 water molecules can be present at a given time in the camphor-binding region of the active site in the case of apo-P450cam, revealing a highly dynamic process for hydration of the protein active site, with water molecules exchanging rapidly with the bulk solvent. Water molecules are also found to exchange locations frequently inside the active site, preferentially clustering in regions surrounding the water molecules observed in the crystal structure. Potential-of-mean-force calculations identify thermodynamically favored trans-protein pathways for the diffusion of water molecules between the protein active site and the bulk solvent. Binding of camphor in the active site modifies the free-energy landscape of P450cam channels toward favoring the diffusion of water molecules out of the protein active site.

  19. Parameterization of an Active Thermal Erosion Site, Caribou Creek, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busey, R.; Bolton, W. R.; Cherry, J. E.; Hinzman, L. D.

    2012-12-01

    Thermokarst features are thought to be an important mechanism for landscape change in permafrost-dominated cold regions, but few such features have been incorporated into full featured landscape models. The root of this shortcoming is that historic observations are not detailed enough to parameterize a model, and the models typically do not include the relevant processes for thermal erosion. A new, dynamic thermokarst feature has been identified at the Caribou-Poker Creek Research Watershed (CPCRW) in the boreal forest of Interior Alaska. Located adjacent to a traditional use trail, this feature terminates directly in Caribou Creek. Erosion within the feature is driven predominantly by fluvial interflow. CPCRW is a Long-Term Ecological Research site underlain by varying degrees of relatively warm, discontinuous permafrost. This poster will describe the suite of measurements that have been undertaken to parameterize the ERODE model for this site, including thorough surveys, time lapse- and aerial photography, and 3-D structure from motion algorithms.

  20. Genetic diversity and natural selection of three blood-stage 6-Cys proteins in Plasmodium vivax populations from the China-Myanmar endemic border.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Ma, An; Chen, Shen-Bo; Yang, Ying-Chao; Chen, Jun-Hu; Yin, Ming-Bo

    2014-12-01

    Pv12, Pv38 and Pv41, the three 6-Cys family proteins which are expressed in the blood-stage of vivax malaria, might be involved in merozoite invasion activity and thus be potential vaccine candidate antigens of Plasmodium vivax. However, little information is available concerning the genetic diversity and natural selection of these three proteins. In the present study, we analyzed the amino acid sequences of P. vivax blood-stage 6-Cys family proteins in comparison with the homologue proteins of Plasmodium cynomolgi strain B using bioinformatic methods. We also investigated genetic polymorphisms and natural selection of these three genes in P. vivax populations from the China-Myanmar endemic border. The three P. vivax blood-stage 6-Cys proteins were shown to possess a signal peptide at the N-terminus, containing two s48/45 domains, and Pv12 and Pv38 have a GPI-anchor motif at the C-terminus. Then, 22, 21 and 29 haplotypes of pv12, pv38 and pv41 were identified out of 45, 38 and 40 isolates, respectively. The dN/dS values for Domain II of pv38 and pv41 were 3.33880 and 5.99829, respectively, suggesting positive balancing selection for these regions. Meanwhile, the C-terminus of pv41 showed high nucleotide diversity, and Tajima's D test suggested that this fragment could be under positive balancing selection. Overall, our results have significant implications, providing a genetic basis for blood-stage malaria vaccine development based on these three 6-Cys proteins.

  1. Reversal in Cognition Impairments, Cholinergic Dysfunction, and Cerebral Oxidative Stress Through the Modulation of Ryanodine Receptors (RyRs) and Cysteinyl Leukotriene-1 (CysLT1) Receptors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prabhat; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) is a general pathophysiological condition occurring in vascular dementia (VaD) associated with negative impact on cognitive functions. Ryanodine as well as cysteinyl leukotriene-1 receptors (RyRs and CysLT1Rs) are extensively present in the central nervous system, where they participate in regulation of cognition, motivation, inflammation and neurodegeneration. The purpose of this study is to examine the role of ruthenium red; a selective RyR blocker as well as montelukast; a specific CysLT1 antagonist in CCH induced VaD in mice. Two vessel occlusion (2VO) or permanent ligation of bilateral common carotid arteries technique was used to induce CCH in mice. Animals with bilateral carotid arteries occlusion have revealed impaired learning and memory (Morris water maze), cholinergic dysfunction (increased acetylcholinesterase activity) as well as increased brain oxidative stress (reduction in brain superoxide dismutase, glutathione and catalase with an increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance level), with increased brain infarct size (2,3,5-triphenylterazolium chloride staining). While, administration of ruthenium red and montelukast considerably attenuated CCH induced cognitive impairments, cholinergic dysfunction, brain oxidative stress as well as brain damage. The results suggest that bilateral carotid arteries occlusion induced CCH has brought out VaD, which was attenuated by treatment with ruthenium red and montelukast. Therefore, modulation of RyRs as well as CysLT1 receptors may provide help in conditions involving CCH such as cognitive impairment and VaD. PMID:26500103

  2. TcCYS4, a cystatin from cocoa, reduces necrosis triggered by MpNEP2 in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Santana, L S; Costa, M G C; Pirovani, N M; Almeida, A F; Alvim, F C; Pirovani, C P

    2014-09-26

    In Brazil, most cocoa bean production occurs in Southern Bahia. Witches' broom disease arrived in this area in 1989 and has since caused heavy losses in production. The disease is caused by the basidiomycete fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa, a hemibiotrophic fungus that produces the necrosis and ethylene-inducting protein (MpNEP2) during infection; this protein can activate cysteine proteases and induce programmed cell death. Cysteine proteases can be modulated by cystatin. In this study, we overexpressed TcCYS4, a cocoa cystatin, in tobacco plants and evaluated the effect on MpNEP2 in model plants. Tccys4 cDNA was cloned into the pCAMBIA 1390 vector and inserted into the tobacco plants via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Transgene expression was analyzed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis. Transcript and protein levels in Tcccys4:tobacco lines were 8.9- and 1.5-fold higher than in wild-type plants (wt). Tcccys4:tobacco lines showed no change in growth compared to wt plants. CO2 net assimilation (A) increased in Tcccys4:tobacco lines compared to wt plants. Only one line showed statistically significant stomatal conductance (gs) and transpiration rate (E) changes. MpNEP2 was infiltered into the foliar mesophyll of Tcccys4:tobacco lines and wt plants, and necrotic lesions were attenuated in lines highly expressing Tccys4. Our results suggest that cocoa cystatin TcCYS4 affects MpNEP2 activity related to the progression of programmed cell death in tobacco plants. This may occur through the action of cystatin to inhibit cysteine proteases activated by MpNEP2 in plant tissues. Further studies are necessary to examine cystatin in the Theobroma cacao-M. perniciosa pathosystem.

  3. Blogs and Social Network Sites as Activity Systems: Exploring Adult Informal Learning Process through Activity Theory Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heo, Gyeong Mi; Lee, Romee

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses an Activity Theory framework to explore adult user activities and informal learning processes as reflected in their blogs and social network sites (SNS). Using the assumption that a web-based space is an activity system in which learning occurs, typical features of the components were investigated and each activity system then…

  4. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  5. Active Site Structure and Peroxidase Activity of Oxidatively Modified Cytochrome c Species in Complexes with Cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Capdevila, Daiana A; Oviedo Rouco, Santiago; Tomasina, Florencia; Tortora, Verónica; Demicheli, Verónica; Radi, Rafael; Murgida, Daniel H

    2015-12-29

    We report a resonance Raman and UV-vis characterization of the active site structure of oxidatively modified forms of cytochrome c (Cyt-c) free in solution and in complexes with cardiolipin (CL). The studied post-translational modifications of Cyt-c include methionine sulfoxidation and tyrosine nitration, which lead to altered heme axial ligation and increased peroxidase activity with respect to those of the wild-type protein. In spite of the structural and activity differences between the protein variants free in solution, binding to CL liposomes induces in all cases the formation of a spectroscopically identical bis-His axial coordination conformer that more efficiently promotes lipid peroxidation. The spectroscopic results indicate that the bis-His form is in equilibrium with small amounts of high-spin species, thus suggesting a labile distal His ligand as the basis for the CL-induced increase in enzymatic activity observed for all protein variants. For Cyt-c nitrated at Tyr74 and sulfoxidized at Met80, the measured apparent binding affinities for CL are ∼4 times larger than for wild-type Cyt-c. On the basis of these results, we propose that these post-translational modifications may amplify the pro-apoptotic signal of Cyt-c under oxidative stress conditions at CL concentrations lower than for the unmodified protein.

  6. Identification of ice nucleation active sites on feldspar dust particles.

    PubMed

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-03-19

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts. Here we investigated in closer detail the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. Finally, we give a potential explanation of this effect, finding alkali-metal ions having different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar surfaces. PMID:25584435

  7. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth’s crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts. Here we investigated in closer detail the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. Finally, we give a potential explanation of this effect, finding alkali-metal ions having different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar surfaces. PMID:25584435

  8. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions. PMID:25999343

  9. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions.

  10. Active site densities, oxygen activation and adsorbed reactive oxygen in alcohol activation on npAu catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Cun; Friend, C M; Fushimi, Rebecca; Madix, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    The activation of molecular O2 as well as the reactivity of adsorbed oxygen species is of central importance in aerobic selective oxidation chemistry on Au-based catalysts. Herein, we address the issue of O2 activation on unsupported nanoporous gold (npAu) catalysts by applying a transient pressure technique, a temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor, to measure the saturation coverage of atomic oxygen, its collisional dissociation probability, the activation barrier for O2 dissociation, and the facility with which adsorbed O species activate methanol, the initial step in the catalytic cycle of esterification. The results from these experiments indicate that molecular O2 dissociation is associated with surface silver, that the density of reactive sites is quite low, that adsorbed oxygen atoms do not spill over from the sites of activation onto the surrounding surface, and that methanol reacts quite facilely with the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In addition, the O species from O2 dissociation exhibits reactivity for the selective oxidation of methanol but not for CO. The TAP experiments also revealed that the surface of the npAu catalyst is saturated with adsorbed O under steady state reaction conditions, at least for the pulse reaction. PMID:27376884

  11. Expression of 6-Cys gene superfamily defines babesia bovis sexual stage development within rhipicephalus microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Babesia bovis, an intra-erythrocytic tick-borne apicomplexan protozoan, is one of the agents of bovine babesiosis. Its life cycle includes sexual reproduction within cattle fever ticks, Rhipicephalus spp. Six B. bovis 6-Cys gene superfamily members were previously identified (A, B, C, D, E, F) and t...

  12. Thioredoxin Activates MKK4-NFκB Pathway in a Redox-dependent Manner to Control Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Gene Expression in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kundumani-Sridharan, Venkatesh; Subramani, Jaganathan; Das, Kumuda C

    2015-07-10

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MKK4) is activated via phosphorylation of Ser-257 and Thr-261 by upstream MAP3Ks and activates JNK and p38 MAPKs in response to cellular stress. We show that thioredoxin (Trx), a cellular redox protein, activates MKK4 via Cys-246 and Cys-266 residues as mutation of these residues renders MKK4 insensitive to phosphorylation by MAP3Ks, TNFα, or Trx. MKK4 is activated in vitro by reduced Trx but not oxidized Trx in the absence of an upstream kinase, suggesting that autophosphorylation of this protein occurs due to reduction of Cys-246 and Cys-266 by Trx. Additionally, mutation of Cys-246 and Cys-266 resulted in loss of kinase activity suggesting that the redox state of Cys-246 and Cys-266 is a critical determinant of MKK4 activation. Trx induces manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) gene transcription by activating MKK4 via redox control of Cys-246 and Cys-266, as mutation of these residues abrogates MKK4 activation and MnSOD expression. We further show that MKK4 activates NFκB for its binding to the MnSOD promoter, which leads to AP-1 dissociation followed by MnSOD transcription. Taken together, our studies show that the redox status of Cys-246 and Cys-266 in MKK4 controls its activities independent of MAP3K, demonstrating integration of the endothelial redox environment to MAPK signaling.

  13. Photonic Activation of Plasminogen Induced by Low Dose UVB

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Manuel; Snabe, Torben; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Petersen, Steffen Bjørn; Campos, Sara R. R.; Baptista, António M.; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Activation of plasminogen to its active form plasmin is essential for several key mechanisms, including the dissolution of blood clots. Activation occurs naturally via enzymatic proteolysis. We report that activation can be achieved with 280 nm light. A 2.6 fold increase in proteolytic activity was observed after 10 min illumination of human plasminogen. Irradiance levels used are in the same order of magnitude of the UVB solar irradiance. Activation is correlated with light induced disruption of disulphide bridges upon UVB excitation of the aromatic residues and with the formation of photochemical products, e.g. dityrosine and N-formylkynurenine. Most of the protein fold is maintained after 10 min illumination since no major changes are observed in the near-UV CD spectrum. Far-UV CD shows loss of secondary structure after illumination (33.4% signal loss at 206 nm). Thermal unfolding CD studies show that plasminogen retains a native like cooperative transition at ~70 ºC after UV-illumination. We propose that UVB activation of plasminogen occurs upon photo-cleavage of a functional allosteric disulphide bond, Cys737-Cys765, located in the catalytic domain and in van der Waals contact with Trp761 (4.3 Å). Such proximity makes its disruption very likely, which may occur upon electron transfer from excited Trp761. Reduction of Cys737-Cys765 will result in likely conformational changes in the catalytic site. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that reduction of Cys737-Cys765 in plasminogen leads to an increase of the fluctuations of loop 760–765, the S1-entrance frame located close to the active site. These fluctuations affect the range of solvent exposure of the catalytic triad, particularly of Asp646 and Ser74, which acquire an exposure profile similar to the values in plasmin. The presented photonic mechanism of plasminogen activation has the potential to be used in clinical applications, possibly together with other enzymatic treatments for the elimination of

  14. Possible active site of the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin.

    PubMed

    Slootstra, J W; De Geus, P; Haas, H; Verrips, C T; Meloen, R H

    1995-10-01

    Epitopes on thaumatin and monellin were studied using the PEPSCAN-technology. The antibodies used were raised against thaumatin. Only antibodies that, in an ELISA, both recognized thaumatin and monellin were used in the PEPSCAN-analyses. On thaumatin two major overlapping epitopes were identified. On monellin no epitopes could be identified. The identified epitope region on thaumatin shares structural features with various peptide and protein sweeteners. It contains an aspartame-like site which is formed by Asp21 and Phe80, tips of the two extruding loops KGDAALDAGGR19-29 and CKRFGRPP77-84, which are spatially positioned next to each other. Furthermore, sub-sequences of the KGDAALDAGGR19-29 loop are similar to peptide-sweeteners such as L-Asp-D-Ala-L-Ala-methyl ester and L-Asp-D-Ala-Gly-methyl ester. Since the aspartame-like Asp21-Phe80 site and the peptide-sweetener-like sequences are also not present in non-sweet thaumatin-like proteins it is postulated that the KGDAALDAGGR19-29- and CKRFGRPP77-84 loop contain important sweet-taste determinants. This region has previously not been implicated as a sweet-taste determinant of thaumatin.

  15. Assessment of activation products in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.

    1996-07-01

    This document assesses the impact of radioactive activation products released from SRS facilities since the first reactor became operational late in 1953. The isotopes reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS: {sup 32}P, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 60}C, and {sup 65}Zn. Release pathways, emission control features, and annual releases to the aqueous and atmospheric environments are discussed. No single incident has resulted in a major acute release of activation products to the environment. The releases were the result of normal operations of the reactors and separations facilities. Releases declined over the years as better controls were established and production was reduced. The overall radiological impact of SRS activation product atmospheric releases from 1954 through 1994 on the offsite maximally exposed individual can be characterized by a total dose of 0.76 mrem. During the same period, such an individual received a total dose of 14,400 mrem from non-SRS sources of ionizing radiation present in the environment. SRS activation product aqueous releases between 1954 and 1994 resulted in a total dose of 54 mrem to the offsite maximally exposed individual. The impact of SRS activation product releases on offsite populations also has been evaluated.

  16. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  17. Characterization of an Active Thermal Erosion Site, Caribou Creek, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busey, R.; Bolton, W. R.; Cherry, J. E.; Hinzman, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this project is to estimate volume loss of soil over time from this site, provide parameterizations on erodibility of ice rich permafrost and serve as a baseline for future landscape evolution simulations. Located in the zone of discontinuous permafrost, the interior region of Alaska (USA) is home to a large quantity of warm, unstable permafrost that is both high in ice content and has soil temperatures near the freezing point. Much of this permafrost maintains a frozen state despite the general warming air temperature trend in the region due to the presence of a thick insulating organic mat and a dense root network in the upper sub-surface of the soil column. At a rapidly evolving thermo-erosion site, located within the Caribou-Poker Creeks Research Watershed (part of the Bonanza Creek LTER) near Chatanika, Alaska (N65.140, W147.570), the protective organic layer and associated plants were disturbed by an adjacent traditional use trail and the shifting of a groundwater spring. These triggers have led to rapid geomorphological change on the landscape as the soil thaws and sediment is transported into the creek at the valley bottom. Since 2006 (approximately the time of initiation), the thermal erosion has grown to 170 meters length, 3 meters max depth, and 15 meters maximum width. This research combines several data sets: DGPS survey, imagery from an extremely low altitude pole-based remote sensing (3 to 5 meters above ground level), and imagery from an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) at about 60m altitude.

  18. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  19. Active Site Metal Occupancy and Cyclic Di-GMP Phosphodiesterase Activity of Thermotoga maritima HD-GYP.

    PubMed

    Miner, Kyle D; Kurtz, Donald M

    2016-02-16

    HD-GYPs make up a subclass of the metal-dependent HD phosphohydrolase superfamily and catalyze conversion of cyclic di(3',5')-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) to 5'-phosphoguanylyl-(3'→5')-guanosine (pGpG) and GMP. Until now, the only reported crystal structure of an HD-GYP that also exhibits c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity contains a His/carboxylate ligated triiron active site. However, other structural and phylogenetic correlations indicate that some HD-GYPs contain dimetal active sites. Here we provide evidence that an HD-GYP c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase, TM0186, from Thermotoga maritima can accommodate both di- and trimetal active sites. We show that an as-isolated iron-containing TM0186 has an oxo/carboxylato-bridged diferric site, and that the reduced (diferrous) form is necessary and sufficient to catalyze conversion of c-di-GMP to pGpG, but that conversion of pGpG to GMP requires more than two metals per active site. Similar c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activities were obtained with divalent iron or manganese. On the basis of activity correlations with several putative metal ligand residue variants and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that TM0186 can accommodate both di- and trimetal active sites. Our results also suggest that a Glu residue conserved in a subset of HD-GYPs is required for formation of the trimetal site and can also serve as a labile ligand to the dimetal site. Given the anaerobic growth requirement of T. maritima, we suggest that this HD-GYP can function in vivo with either divalent iron or manganese occupying di- and trimetal sites.

  20. A rapid and direct method for the determination of active site accessibility in proteins based on ESI-MS and active site titrations.

    PubMed

    O'Farrell, Norah; Kreiner, Michaela; Moore, Barry D; Parker, Marie-Claire

    2006-11-01

    We have developed an electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) technique that can be applied to rapidly determine the number of intact active sites in proteins. The methodology relies on inhibiting the protein with an active-site irreversible inhibitor and then using ESI-MS to determine the extent of inhibition. We have applied this methodology to a test system: a serine protease, subtilisin Carlsberg, and monitored the extent of inhibition by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), an irreversible serine hydrolase inhibitor as a function of the changes in immobilisation and hydration conditions. Two types of enzyme preparation were investigated, lyophilised enzymes and protein-coated microcrystals (PCMC).

  1. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins' active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  2. Marine Biology Field Trip Sites. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  3. Endolysosomes Are the Principal Intracellular Sites of Acid Hydrolase Activity.

    PubMed

    Bright, Nicholas A; Davis, Luther J; Luzio, J Paul

    2016-09-12

    The endocytic delivery of macromolecules from the mammalian cell surface for degradation by lysosomal acid hydrolases requires traffic through early endosomes to late endosomes followed by transient (kissing) or complete fusions between late endosomes and lysosomes. Transient or complete fusion results in the formation of endolysosomes, which are hybrid organelles from which lysosomes are re-formed. We have used synthetic membrane-permeable cathepsin substrates, which liberate fluorescent reporters upon proteolytic cleavage, as well as acid phosphatase cytochemistry to identify which endocytic compartments are acid hydrolase active. We found that endolysosomes are the principal organelles in which acid hydrolase substrates are cleaved. Endolysosomes also accumulated acidotropic probes and could be distinguished from terminal storage lysosomes, which were acid hydrolase inactive and did not accumulate acidotropic probes. Using live-cell microscopy, we have demonstrated that fusion events, which form endolysosomes, precede the onset of acid hydrolase activity. By means of sucrose and invertase uptake experiments, we have also shown that acid-hydrolase-active endolysosomes and acid-hydrolase-inactive, terminal storage lysosomes exist in dynamic equilibrium. We conclude that the terminal endocytic compartment is composed of acid-hydrolase-active, acidic endolysosomes and acid hydrolase-inactive, non-acidic, terminal storage lysosomes, which are linked and function in a lysosome regeneration cycle. PMID:27498570

  4. Outside-binding site mutations modify the active site's shapes in neuraminidase from influenza A H1N1.

    PubMed

    Tolentino-Lopez, Luis; Segura-Cabrera, Aldo; Reyes-Loyola, Paola; Zimic, Mirko; Quiliano, Miguel; Briz, Veronica; Muñoz-Fernández, Angeles; Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario; Ilizaliturri-Flores, Ian; Correa-Basurto, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The recent occurrence of 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic as well as others has raised concern of a far more dangerous outcome should this virus becomes resistant to current drug therapies. The number of clinical cases that are resistant to oseltamivir (Tamiflu®) is larger than the limited number of neuraminidase (NA) mutations (H275Y, N295S, and I223R) that have been identified at the active site and that are associated to oseltamivir resistance. In this study, we have performed a comparative analysis between a set of NAs that have the most representative mutations located outside the active site. The recently crystallized NA-oseltamivir complex (PDB ID: 3NSS) was used as a wild-type structure. After selecting the target NA sequences, their three-dimensional (3D) structure was built using 3NSS as a template by homology modeling. The 3D NA models were refined by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The refined models were used to perform a docking study, using oseltamivir as a ligand. Furthermore, the docking results were refined by free-energy analysis using the MM-PBSA method. The analysis of the MD simulation results showed that the NA models reached convergence during the first 10 ns. Visual inspection and structural measures showed that the mutated NA active sites show structural variations. The docking and MM-PBSA results from the complexes showed different binding modes and free energy values. These results suggest that distant mutations located outside the active site of NA affect its structure and could be considered to be a new source of resistance to oseltamivir, which agrees with reports in the clinical literature.

  5. Active site proton delivery and the lyase activity of human CYP17A1

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Yogan; Gregory, Michael C.; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2014-01-03

    equivalents and protons are funneled into non-productive pathways. This is similar to previous work with other P450 catalyzed hydroxylation. However, catalysis of carbon–carbon bond scission by the T306A mutant was largely unimpeded by disruption of the CYP17A1 acid-alcohol pair. The unique response of CYP17A1 lyase activity to mutation of Thr306 is consistent with a reactive intermediate formed independently of proton delivery in the active site, and supports involvement of a nucleophilic peroxo-anion rather than the traditional Compound I in catalysis.

  6. Autocatalytic activity and substrate specificity of the pestivirus N-terminal protease N{sup pro}

    SciTech Connect

    Gottipati, Keerthi; Acholi, Sudheer; Ruggli, Nicolas; Choi, Kyung H.

    2014-03-15

    Pestivirus N{sup pro} is the first protein translated in the viral polypeptide, and cleaves itself off co-translationally generating the N-terminus of the core protein. Once released, N{sup pro} blocks the host's interferon response by inducing degradation of interferon regulatory factor-3. N{sup pro'}s intracellular autocatalytic activity and lack of trans-activity have hampered in vitro cleavage studies to establish its substrate specificity and the roles of individual residues. We constructed N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins that carry the authentic cleavage site and determined the autoproteolytic activities of N{sup pro} proteins containing substitutions at the predicted catalytic sites Glu22 and Cys69, at Arg100 that forms a salt bridge with Glu22, and at the cleavage site Cys168. Contrary to previous reports, we show that N{sup pro'}s catalytic activity does not involve Glu22, which may instead be involved in protein stability. Furthermore, N{sup pro} does not have specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site even though this residue is conserved throughout the pestivirus genus. - Highlights: • N{sup pro'}s autoproteolysis is studied using N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins. • N-terminal 17 amino acids are dispensable without loss of protease activity. • The putative catalytic residue Glu22 is not involved in protease catalysis. • No specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site despite evolutionary conservation. • N{sup pro} prefers small amino acids with non-branched beta carbons at the P1 position.

  7. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  8. Encroachment of Human Activity on Sea Turtle Nesting Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziskin, D.; Aubrecht, C.; Elvidge, C.; Tuttle, B.; Baugh, K.; Ghosh, T.

    2008-12-01

    The encroachment of anthropogenic lighting on sea turtle nesting sites poses a serious threat to the survival of these animals [Nicholas, 2001]. This danger is quantified by combining two established data sets. The first is the Nighttime Lights data produced by the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center [Elvidge et al., 1997]. The second is the Marine Turtle Database produced by the World Conservation Monitoring Centre (WCMC). The technique used to quantify the threat of encroachment is an adaptation of the method described in Aubrecht et al. [2008], which analyzes the stress on coral reef systems by proximity to nighttime lights near the shore. Nighttime lights near beaches have both a direct impact on turtle reproductive success since they disorient hatchlings when they mistake land-based lights for the sky-lit surf [Lorne and Salmon, 2007] and the lights are also a proxy for other anthropogenic threats. The identification of turtle nesting sites with high rates of encroachment will hopefully steer conservation efforts to mitigate their effects [Witherington, 1999]. Aubrecht, C, CD Elvidge, T Longcore, C Rich, J Safran, A Strong, M Eakin, KE Baugh, BT Tuttle, AT Howard, EH Erwin, 2008, A global inventory of coral reef stressors based on satellite observed nighttime lights, Geocarto International, London, England: Taylor and Francis. In press. Elvidge, CD, KE Baugh, EA Kihn, HW Kroehl, ER Davis, 1997, Mapping City Lights with Nighttime Data from the DMSP Operational Linescan System, Photogrammatic Engineering and Remote Sensing, 63:6, pp. 727-734. Lorne, JK, M Salmon, 2007, Effects of exposure to artificial lighting on orientation of hatchling sea turtles on the beach and in the ocean, Endangered Species Research, Vol. 3: 23-30. Nicholas, M, 2001, Light Pollution and Marine Turtle Hatchlings: The Straw that Breaks the Camel's Back?, George Wright Forum, 18:4, p77-82. Witherington, BE, 1999, Reducing Threats To Nesting Habitat, Research and Management Techniques for

  9. Use of chemical modifications and site-directed mutagenesis to probe the functional role of thiol groups on the. gamma. subunit of Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pradier, L.; Yee, A.S.; McNamee, M.G. )

    1989-08-08

    Alkylation of Torpedo californica purified nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) with N-phenylmaleimide (NPM) under nonreducing conditions led to ion flux inhibition without affecting ligand binding properties. The {gamma} subunit was shown to be preferentially labeled by ({sup 3}H)NPM with partial labeling of the {alpha} subunit at higher NPM concentrations. Alkylation occurs at cysteine residues as confirmed by amino acid analysis. Cyanogen bromide peptide mapping of the {gamma} subunit indicates that at least two residues corresponding to Cys-416, -420, or -451 are labeled. Residues 416 and 420 are part of the proposed amphipathic helix, and the functional role of these two cysteines is further investigated by site-directed mutagenesis of T. californica AChR cDNAs and expression of the mutants in Xenopus laevis oocytes following injection of SP6 transcripts. Several features of SP6 transcripts are shown to be important for efficient translation in vivo. Mutations Cys {yields} Ser{gamma}416,420 and Cys {yields} Phe{gamma}416 did not perturb either the receptor functional properties or its expression levels. The double mutant Cys {yields} Phe{gamma}416,420 displayed a 30% decrease of normalized AChR activity. The relatively small effect of large steric mutations in the amphipathic helix argues against its presence in the tightly packed transmembrane domain of the protein.

  10. Dipicrylamine Modulates GABAρ1 Receptors through Interactions with Residues in the TM4 and Cys-Loop Domains.

    PubMed

    Limon, Agenor; Estrada-Mondragón, Argel; Ruiz, Jorge M Reyes; Miledi, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    Dipicrylamine (DPA) is a commonly used acceptor agent in Förster resonance energy transfer experiments that allows the study of high-frequency neuronal activity in the optical monitoring of voltage in living cells. However, DPA potently antagonizes GABAA receptors that contain α1 and β2 subunits by a mechanism which is not clearly understood. In this work, we aimed to determine whether DPA modulation is a general phenomenon of Cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs), and whether this modulation depends on particular amino acid residues. For this, we studied the effects of DPA on human homomeric GABAρ1, α7 nicotinic, and 5-HT3A serotonin receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results indicate that DPA is an allosteric modulator of GABAρ1 receptors with an IC50 of 1.6 µM, an enhancer of α7 nicotinic receptors at relatively high concentrations of DPA, and has little, if any, effect on 5-HT3A receptors. DPA antagonism of GABAρ1 was strongly enhanced by preincubation, was slightly voltage-dependent, and its washout was accelerated by bovine serum albumin. These results indicate that DPA modulation is not a general phenomenon of LGICs, and structural differences between receptors may account for disparities in DPA effects. In silico modeling of DPA docking to GABAρ1, α7 nicotinic, and 5-HT3A receptors suggests that a hydrophobic pocket within the Cys-loop and the M4 segment in GABAρ1, located at the extracellular/membrane interface, facilitates the interaction with DPA that leads to inhibition of the receptor. Functional examinations of mutant receptors support the involvement of the M4 segment in the allosteric modulation of GABAρ1 by DPA. PMID:26869399

  11. The influence of Ser-154, Cys-113, and the phosphorylated threonine residue on the catalytic reaction mechanism of Pin1.

    PubMed

    Vöhringer-Martinez, Esteban; Verstraelen, Toon; Ayers, Paul W

    2014-08-21

    Pin1 is an enzyme that specifically catalyzes the cis-trans isomerization of proline amide bonds in peptides that contain a phosphorylated threonine or serine residue in the position preceding proline. In the cell, the isomerization reaction is associated with cellular signaling and has been related to diseases such as Alzheimer and cancer. The catalytic mechanism by which Pin1 accelerates the isomerization reaction, however, is still unknown. In this study, we use molecular dynamics simulation in combination with the QM/MM methodology to disclose the influence of the residues Ser-154 and Cys-113 in the enzyme and the phosphorylated threonine residue in the peptide on the reaction mechanism. To account for the correct electrostatic interaction between the three residues and the reactive center, we derive atomic charges that account for the varying electrostatic field in the catalytic cavity. Different methods based on reproducing the molecular electrostatic potential or an atoms in molecules approach were investigated. Finally, the reaction mechanism is analyzed with the mean reaction force and the influence of the three residues is disclosed. Our results show that Pin1 specifically catalyzes the isomerization of the trans conformer in a jump-rope type of motion, as suggested by us and confirmed experimentally by others. This is accomplished by anchoring the threonine phosphate residue on one end of the peptide through electrostatic interactions with the basic triad of the enzyme and at the other end through specific enzyme-peptide hydrogen bonds. Cys-113 reduces the structural contribution to the activation free energy through the stabilization of the cis conformer, and Ser-154 in combination with Gln-131 assist in the isomerization reaction of the trans isomer. PMID:25059768

  12. Site-directed mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB reveals amino acid residues important for mercury methylation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven D; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M; Elias, Dwayne A; Hurt, Richard A; Brown, Steven D; Podar, Mircea; Wall, Judy D

    2015-05-01

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential for mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative "cap helix" region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. This study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin.

  13. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Hurt, Richard A.; Brown, Steven D.; Podar, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential for mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. This study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin. PMID:25724962

  14. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Hurt, Richard A.; Brown, Steven D.; Podar, Mircea; Wall, Judy D.

    2015-02-27

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential formore » mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. Ultimately, this study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin.« less

  15. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Hurt, Richard A.; Brown, Steven D.; Podar, Mircea; Wall, Judy D.

    2015-02-27

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential for mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. Ultimately, this study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin.

  16. Mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by acetoacetate decarboxylase. Importance of lysine 116 in determining the pKa of active-site lysine 115.

    PubMed

    Highbarger, L A; Gerlt, J A; Kenyon, G L

    1996-01-01

    Acetoacetate decarboxylase from Clostridium acetobutylicum (AAD) catalyzes the decarboxylation of acetoacetate via a Schiff base intermediate [Hamilton, G. A., & Westheimer, F. H. (1959) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 81, 6332; Fridovich, I., & Westheimer F. H. (1962) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 84, 3208]. The pKa of the active-site lysine (Lys 115) is 6.0, 4.5 pKa units less than the pKa of lysine in solution [Kokesh, F. C., & Westheimer, F. H. (1971) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 93, 7270; Frey, P. A., Kokesh, F. C., & Westheimer, F. H. (1971) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 93, 7266; Schmidt, D. E., Jr., & Westheimer, F. H. (1971) Biochemistry 10, 1249]. Westheimer and co-workers hypothesized that the pKa of Lys 115 is decreased by its spatial proximity to the epsilon-ammonium group of Lys 116. We have investigated this proposal by studying site-directed mutants of Lys 115 and Lys 116. Two substitutions for Lys 115 (K115C and K115Q) were both catalytically inactive at pH 5.95, the pH optimum of wild type AAD, demonstrating the importance of this residue in catalysis. Activity could be restored to K115C by aminoethylation with 2-bromoethyl-ammonium bromide (2-BEAB). Substitutions for Lys 116 (K116C, K116N, and K116R) had reduced but significant activities at pH 5.95. The effects of Lys 116 on the pKa of Lys 115 in the mutant AADs were evaluated following imine formation with 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde and reduction with NaBH4. Whereas the pKa of Lys 115 in K116R is similar to that observed for wild type AAD, the pKaS of Lys 115 in K116C and K116N were elevated to > 9.2. Alkylation of Cys 116 in K116C with 2-BEAB resulted in both significant activation and restoration of the pKa of Lys 115 to 5.9. These data support Westheimer's hypothesis that the pKa of the Schiff base-forming Lys 115 is decreased by its spatial proximity to the epsilon-ammonium group of Lys 116. PMID:8555196

  17. Femtomolar Zn(II) affinity in a peptide-based ligand designed to model thiolate-rich metalloprotein active sites.

    PubMed

    Petros, Amy K; Reddi, Amit R; Kennedy, Michelle L; Hyslop, Alison G; Gibney, Brian R

    2006-12-11

    Metal-ligand interactions are critical components of metalloprotein assembly, folding, stability, electrochemistry, and catalytic function. Research over the past 3 decades on the interaction of metals with peptide and protein ligands has progressed from the characterization of amino acid-metal and polypeptide-metal complexes to the design of folded protein scaffolds containing multiple metal cofactors. De novo metalloprotein design has emerged as a valuable tool both for the modular synthesis of these complex metalloproteins and for revealing the fundamental tenets of metalloprotein structure-function relationships. Our research has focused on using the coordination chemistry of de novo designed metalloproteins to probe the interactions of metal cofactors with protein ligands relevant to biological phenomena. Herein, we present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of Fe(II), Co(II), Zn(II), and[4Fe-4S]2(+/+) binding to IGA, a 16 amino acid peptide ligand containing four cysteine residues, H2N-KLCEGG-CIGCGAC-GGW-CONH2. These studies were conducted to delineate the inherent metal-ion preferences of this unfolded tetrathiolate peptide ligand as well as to evaluate the role of the solution pH on metal-peptide complex speciation. The [4Fe-4S]2(+/+)-IGA complex is both an excellent peptide-based synthetic analogue for natural ferredoxins and is flexible enough to accommodate mononuclear metal-ion binding. Incorporation of a single ferrous ion provides the FeII-IGA complex, a spectroscopic model of a reduced rubredoxin active site that possesses limited stability in aqueous buffers. As expected based on the Irving-Williams series and hard-soft acid-base theory, the Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes of IGA are significantly more stable than the Fe(II) complex. Direct proton competition experiments, coupled with determinations of the conditional dissociation constants over a range of pH values, fully define the thermodynamic stabilities and speciation of each MII-IGA complex. The

  18. Spectroscopic definition of the copper active sites in mordenite: selective methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Vanelderen, Pieter; Snyder, Benjamin E R; Tsai, Ming-Li; Hadt, Ryan G; Vancauwenbergh, Julie; Coussens, Olivier; Schoonheydt, Robert A; Sels, Bert F; Solomon, Edward I

    2015-05-20

    Two distinct [Cu-O-Cu](2+) sites with methane monooxygenase activity are identified in the zeolite Cu-MOR, emphasizing that this Cu-O-Cu active site geometry, having a ∠Cu-O-Cu ∼140°, is particularly formed and stabilized in zeolite topologies. Whereas in ZSM-5 a similar [Cu-O-Cu](2+) active site is located in the intersection of the two 10 membered rings, Cu-MOR provides two distinct local structures, situated in the 8 membered ring windows of the side pockets. Despite their structural similarity, as ascertained by electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy, the two Cu-O-Cu active sites in Cu-MOR clearly show different kinetic behaviors in selective methane oxidation. This difference in reactivity is too large to be ascribed to subtle differences in the ground states of the Cu-O-Cu sites, indicating the zeolite lattice tunes their reactivity through second-sphere effects. The MOR lattice is therefore functionally analogous to the active site pocket of a metalloenzyme, demonstrating that both the active site and its framework environment contribute to and direct reactivity in transition metal ion-zeolites.

  19. School Pharmacist/School Environmental Hygienic Activities at School Site.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Akiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The "School Health and Safety Act" was enforced in April 2009 in Japan, and "school environmental health standards" were established by the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. In Article 24 of the Enforcement Regulations, the duties of the school pharmacist have been clarified; school pharmacists have charged with promoting health activities in schools and carrying out complete and regular checks based on the "school environmental health standards" in order to protect the health of students and staff. In supported of this, the school pharmacist group of Japan Pharmaceutical Association has created and distributed digital video discs (DVDs) on "check methods of school environmental health standards" as support material. We use the DVD to ensure the basic issues that school pharmacists deal with, such as objectives, criteria, and methods for each item to be checked, advice, and post-measures. We conduct various workshops and classes, and set up Q&A committees so that inquiries from members are answered with the help of such activities. In addition, school pharmacists try to improve the knowledge of the school staff on environmental hygiene during their in-service training. They also conduct "drug abuse prevention classes" at school and seek to improve knowledge and recognition of drugs, including "dangerous drugs". PMID:27252053

  20. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Kenny, Paul J; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-05-29

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets.

  1. Avian retroviral RNA encapsidation: reexamination of functional 5' RNA sequences and the role of nucleocapsid Cys-His motifs.

    PubMed Central

    Aronoff, R; Hajjar, A M; Linial, M L

    1993-01-01

    RNA packaging signals (psi) from the 5' ends of murine and avian retroviral genomes have previously been shown to direct encapsidation of heterologous mRNA into the retroviral virion. The avian 5' packaging region has now been further characterized, and we have defined a 270-nucleotide sequence, A psi, which is sufficient to direct packaging of heterologous RNA. Identification of the A psi sequence suggests that several retroviral cis-acting sequences contained in psi+ (the primer binding site, the putative dimer linkage sequence, and the splice donor site) are dispensable for specific RNA encapsidation. Subgenomic env mRNA is not efficiently encapsidated into particles, even though the A psi sequence is present in this RNA. In contrast, spliced heterologous psi-containing RNA is packaged into virions as efficiently as unspliced species; thus splicing per se is not responsible for the failure of env mRNA to be encapsidated. We also found that an avian retroviral mutant deleted for both nucleocapsid Cys-His boxes retains the capacity to encapsidate RNA containing psi sequences, although this RNA is unstable and is thus difficult to detect in mature particles. Electron microscopy reveals that virions produced by this mutant lack a condensed core, which may allow the RNA to be accessible to nucleases. Images PMID:8380070

  2. Impact of cysteine variants on the structure, activity, and stability of recombinant human α-galactosidase A.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Huawei; Honey, Denise M; Kingsbury, Jonathan S; Park, Anna; Boudanova, Ekaterina; Wei, Ronnie R; Pan, Clark Q; Edmunds, Tim

    2015-09-01

    Recombinant human α-galactosidase A (rhαGal) is a homodimeric glycoprotein deficient in Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disorder. In this study, each cysteine residue in rhαGal was replaced with serine to understand the role each cysteine plays in the enzyme structure, function, and stability. Conditioned media from transfected HEK293 cells were assayed for rhαGal expression and enzymatic activity. Activity was only detected in the wild type control and in mutants substituting the free cysteine residues (C90S, C174S, and the C90S/C174S). Cysteine-to-serine substitutions at the other sites lead to the loss of expression and/or activity, consistent with their involvement in the disulfide bonds found in the crystal structure. Purification and further characterization confirmed that the C90S, C174S, and the C90S/C174S mutants are enzymatically active, structurally intact and thermodynamically stable as measured by circular dichroism and thermal denaturation. The purified inactive C142S mutant appeared to have lost part of its alpha-helix secondary structure and had a lower apparent melting temperature. Saturation mutagenesis study on Cys90 and Cys174 resulted in partial loss of activity for Cys174 mutants but multiple mutants at Cys90 with up to 87% higher enzymatic activity (C90T) compared to wild type, suggesting that the two free cysteines play differential roles and that the activity of the enzyme can be modulated by side chain interactions of the free Cys residues. These results enhanced our understanding of rhαGal structure and function, particularly the critical roles that cysteines play in structure, stability, and enzymatic activity.

  3. Isolated metal active site concentration and stability control catalytic CO2 reduction selectivity.

    PubMed

    Matsubu, John C; Yang, Vanessa N; Christopher, Phillip

    2015-03-01

    CO2 reduction by H2 on heterogeneous catalysts is an important class of reactions that has been studied for decades. However, atomic scale details of structure-function relationships are still poorly understood. Particularly, it has been suggested that metal particle size plays a unique role in controlling the stability of CO2 hydrogenation catalysts and the distribution of active sites, which dictates reactivity and selectivity. These studies often have not considered the possible role of isolated metal active sites in the observed dependences. Here, we utilize probe molecule diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) with known site-specific extinction coefficients to quantify the fraction of Rh sites residing as atomically dispersed isolated sites (Rhiso), as well as Rh sites on the surface of Rh nanoparticles (RhNP) for a series of TiO2 supported Rh catalysts. Strong correlations were observed between the catalytic reverse water gas shift turn over frequency (TOF) and the fraction of Rhiso sites and between catalytic methanation TOF and the fraction of RhNP sites. Furthermore, it was observed that reaction condition-induced disintegration of Rh nanoparticles, forming Rhiso active sites, controls the changing reactivity with time on stream. This work demonstrates that isolated atoms and nanoparticles of the same metal on the same support can exhibit uniquely different catalytic selectivity in competing parallel reaction pathways and that disintegration of nanoparticles under reaction conditions can play a significant role in controlling stability.

  4. Isolated metal active site concentration and stability control catalytic CO2 reduction selectivity.

    PubMed

    Matsubu, John C; Yang, Vanessa N; Christopher, Phillip

    2015-03-01

    CO2 reduction by H2 on heterogeneous catalysts is an important class of reactions that has been studied for decades. However, atomic scale details of structure-function relationships are still poorly understood. Particularly, it has been suggested that metal particle size plays a unique role in controlling the stability of CO2 hydrogenation catalysts and the distribution of active sites, which dictates reactivity and selectivity. These studies often have not considered the possible role of isolated metal active sites in the observed dependences. Here, we utilize probe molecule diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) with known site-specific extinction coefficients to quantify the fraction of Rh sites residing as atomically dispersed isolated sites (Rhiso), as well as Rh sites on the surface of Rh nanoparticles (RhNP) for a series of TiO2 supported Rh catalysts. Strong correlations were observed between the catalytic reverse water gas shift turn over frequency (TOF) and the fraction of Rhiso sites and between catalytic methanation TOF and the fraction of RhNP sites. Furthermore, it was observed that reaction condition-induced disintegration of Rh nanoparticles, forming Rhiso active sites, controls the changing reactivity with time on stream. This work demonstrates that isolated atoms and nanoparticles of the same metal on the same support can exhibit uniquely different catalytic selectivity in competing parallel reaction pathways and that disintegration of nanoparticles under reaction conditions can play a significant role in controlling stability. PMID:25671686

  5. Site specific rationale for technical impracticability of active groundwater restoration at a former manufactured gas plant site

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, C.M.; Walden, R.H.; MacFarlane, I.D.

    1995-12-31

    The National Contingency Plan (40 CFR Part 300 ) requires that remedial strategies must, at minimum, protect human health and the environment and meet applicable and relevant or appropriate requirements (ARARs). Where groundwater is impacted, maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) and maximum contaminant level goals (MCLGs) set under the Safe Drinking Water Act are often used as ARARs, whether or not the aquifer is a reasonably anticipated future source of drinking water. The US Environmental Protection Agency now recognizes the difficulty of groundwater restoration at sites where dense nonaqueous phase liquids are present, particularly in certain complex hydrogeological settings (EPA 1993). However, demonstration of impracticability generally does not occur until active remediation (e.g., pump and treat) has been shown to be ineffective. A case study of a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) is used to demonstrate how physical and chemical properties of the aquifer and coal tar, the major waste product from MGP sites, influence the feasibility of active restoration. Field characterization investigations, laboratory studies, and groundwater modeling are integrated into a demonstration following EPA guidelines. Laboratory studies included microbiological characterization and natural biodegradation and suggest that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at this site. This work will be useful as EPA continues to develop presumptive remedies for cleanup under Superfund.

  6. The calculation of surface orbital energies for specific types of active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.; Cole, F.

    1992-11-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p, and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on dispersed metal catalysts. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  7. The calculation of surface orbital energies for specific types of active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.; Cole, F.

    1992-01-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p, and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on dispersed metal catalysts. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  8. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  9. Activity of site-specific endonucleases on complexes of plasmid DNA with multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, V. P.; Krylova, H. V.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Veligura, A. A.; Shulitsky, B. G.; Asayonok, A. A.; Vaskovtsev, E. V.

    2016-08-01

    We have synthesized and investigated structural and functional properties of plasmid DNA complexes with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for detection of changes in structural state of the plasmid DNA at its recognition by site-specific endonuclease. It has been also established that the site-specific endonuclease is functionally active on the surface of MWCNTs.

  10. 77 FR 5560 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... project proposals on those leases) in identified Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) on the OCS offshore New Jersey... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the... site assessment plans (SAPs) on those leases. BOEM may issue one or more commercial wind energy...

  11. The balance of flexibility and rigidity in the active site residues of hen egg white lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jian-Xun; Jiang, Fan

    2011-05-01

    The crystallographic temperature factors (B factor) of individual atoms contain important information about the thermal motion of the atoms in a macromolecule. Previously the theory of flexibility of active site has been established based on the observation that the enzyme activity is sensitive to low concentration denaturing agents. It has been found that the loss of enzyme activity occurs well before the disruption of the three-dimensional structural scaffold of the enzyme. To test the theory of conformational flexibility of enzyme active site, crystal structures were perturbed by soaking in low concentration guanidine hydrochloride solutions. It was found that many lysozyme crystals tested could still diffract until the concentration of guanidine hydrochloride reached 3 M. It was also found that the B factors averaged over individually collected data sets were more accurate. Thus it suggested that accurate measurement of crystal temperature factors could be achieved for medium-high or even medium resolution crystals by averaging over multiple data sets. Furthermore, we found that the correctly predicted active sites included not only the more flexible residues, but also some more rigid residues. Both the flexible and the rigid residues in the active site played an important role in forming the active site residue network, covering the majority of the substrate binding residues. Therefore, this experimental prediction method may be useful for characterizing the binding site and the function of a protein, such as drug targeting.

  12. 1993 annual report of hazardous waste activities for the Oak Ridge K-25 site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report is a detailed listing of all of the Hazardous Waste activities occurring at Martin Marietta`s K-25 site. Contained herein are hazardous waste notification forms, waste stream reports, generator fee forms and various TSDR reports.

  13. Probing impact of active site residue mutations on stability and activity of Neisseria polysaccharea amylosucrase.

    PubMed

    Daudé, David; Topham, Christopher M; Remaud-Siméon, Magali; André, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    The amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea is a transglucosidase from the GH13 family of glycoside-hydrolases that naturally catalyzes the synthesis of α-glucans from the widely available donor sucrose. Interestingly, natural molecular evolution has modeled a dense hydrogen bond network at subsite -1 responsible for the specific recognition of sucrose and conversely, it has loosened interactions at the subsite +1 creating a highly promiscuous subsite +1. The residues forming these subsites are considered to be likely involved in the activity as well as the overall stability of the enzyme. To assess their role, a structure-based approach was followed to reshape the subsite -1. A strategy based on stability change predictions, using the FoldX algorithm, was considered to identify the best candidates for site-directed mutagenesis and guide the construction of a small targeted library. A miniaturized purification protocol was developed and both mutant stability and substrate promiscuity were explored. A range of 8 °C between extreme melting temperature values was observed and some variants were able to synthesize series of oligosaccharides with distributions differing from that of the parental enzyme. The crucial role of subsite -1 was thus highlighted and the biocatalysts generated can now be considered as starting points for further engineering purposes.

  14. 'Unconventional' coordination chemistry by metal chelating fragments in a metalloprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Martin, David P; Blachly, Patrick G; Marts, Amy R; Woodruff, Tessa M; de Oliveira, César A F; McCammon, J Andrew; Tierney, David L; Cohen, Seth M

    2014-04-01

    The binding of three closely related chelators: 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-thione (allothiomaltol, ATM), 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-thione (thiomaltol, TM), and 3-hydroxy-4H-pyran-4-thione (thiopyromeconic acid, TPMA) to the active site of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) has been investigated. Two of these ligands display a monodentate mode of coordination to the active site Zn(2+) ion in hCAII that is not recapitulated in model complexes of the enzyme active site. This unprecedented binding mode in the hCAII-thiomaltol complex has been characterized by both X-ray crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy. In addition, the steric restrictions of the active site force the ligands into a 'flattened' mode of coordination compared with inorganic model complexes. This change in geometry has been shown by density functional computations to significantly decrease the strength of the metal-ligand binding. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the mode of binding by small metal-binding groups can be significantly influenced by the protein active site. Diminishing the strength of the metal-ligand bond results in unconventional modes of metal coordination not found in typical coordination compounds or even carefully engineered active site models, and understanding these effects is critical to the rational design of inhibitors that target clinically relevant metalloproteins.

  15. Nuclear waste: Status of DOE`s nuclear waste site characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    1987-12-31

    Three potential nuclear waste repository sites have been selected to carry out characterization activities-the detailed geological testing to determine the suitability of each site as a repository. The sites are Hanford in south-central Washington State, Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada, and Deaf Smith in the Texas Panhandle. Two key issues affecting the total program are the estimations of the site characterization completion data and costs and DOE`s relationship with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission which has been limited and its relations with affected states and Indian tribes which continue to be difficult.

  16. XAFS Study of the Photo-Active Site of Mo/MCM-41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Daisuke; Ichikuni, Nobuyuki; Shimazu, Shogo

    2007-02-01

    An Mo/MCM-41 catalyst was prepared and used for study of propene and 1-butene photo-metathesis reactions. XAFS analysis revealed that hydrogen reduction leads to a decreased role for the Mo=O site. The Mo-O site plays an important role for the olefin photo-metathesis reaction on the H2 reduced Mo/MCM-41. From EXAFS analysis, the active site of photo-metathesis reaction is the Mo=O part for oxidized Mo/MCM-41, whereas it is the Mo-O site for reduced Mo/MCM-41.

  17. The Three Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigen 85 Isoforms Have Unique Substrates and Activities Determined by Non-active Site Regions*

    PubMed Central

    Backus, Keriann M.; Dolan, Michael A.; Barry, Conor S.; Joe, Maju; McPhie, Peter; Boshoff, Helena I. M.; Lowary, Todd L.; Davis, Benjamin G.; Barry, Clifton E.

    2014-01-01

    The three isoforms of antigen 85 (A, B, and C) are the most abundant secreted mycobacterial proteins and catalyze transesterification reactions that synthesize mycolated arabinogalactan, trehalose monomycolate (TMM), and trehalose dimycolate (TDM), important constituents of the outermost layer of the cellular envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These three enzymes are nearly identical at the active site and have therefore been postulated to exist to evade host immunity. Distal to the active site is a second putative carbohydrate-binding site of lower homology. Mutagenesis of the three isoforms at this second site affected both substrate selectivity and overall catalytic activity in vitro. Using synthetic and natural substrates, we show that these three enzymes exhibit unique selectivity; antigen 85A more efficiently mycolates TMM to form TDM, whereas C (and to a lesser extent B) has a higher rate of activity using free trehalose to form TMM. This difference in substrate selectivity extends to the hexasaccharide fragment of cell wall arabinan. Mutation of secondary site residues from the most active isoform (C) into those present in A or B partially interconverts this substrate selectivity. These experiments in combination with molecular dynamics simulations reveal that differences in the N-terminal helix α9, the adjacent Pro216–Phe228 loop, and helix α5 are the likely cause of changes in activity and substrate selectivity. These differences explain the existence of three isoforms and will allow for future work in developing inhibitors. PMID:25028517

  18. Transcriptional activation through ETS domain binding sites in the cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV gene

    SciTech Connect

    Virbasius, J.V.; Scarpulla, R.C. )

    1991-11-01

    A mutational analysis of the rat cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (RCO4) promoter region revealed the presence of a major control element consisting of a tandemly repeated pair of binding sites for a nuclear factor from HeLa cells. This factor was designated NRF-2 (nuclear respiratory factor 2) because a functional recognition site was also found in the human ATP synthase {beta}-subunit gene. Deletion or site-directed point mutations of the NRF-2 binding sites in the RCO4 promoter resulted in substantial loss of transcriptional activity, and synthetic oligomers of the NRF-2 binding sites from both genes stimulated a heterologous promoter when cloned in cis. NRF-2 binding a transcriptional activation required a purine-rich core sequence, GGAA. This motif is characteristic of the recognition site for a family of activators referred to as ETS domain proteins because of the similarity within their DNA-binding domains to the ets-1 proto-oncogene product. NRF-2 recognized an authentic Ets-1 site within the Moloney murine sarcoma virus long terminal repeat, and this site was able to compete for NRF-2 binding to the RCO4 promoter sequence. However, in contrast to Ets-1, which appears to be exclusive to lymphoid tissues, NRF-2 has the broad tissue distribution expected of a regulator of respiratory chain expression.

  19. Quantitative, directional measurement of electric field heterogeneity in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase.

    PubMed

    Fafarman, Aaron T; Sigala, Paul A; Schwans, Jason P; Fenn, Timothy D; Herschlag, Daniel; Boxer, Steven G

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the electrostatic forces and features within highly heterogeneous, anisotropic, and chemically complex enzyme active sites and their connection to biological catalysis remains a longstanding challenge, in part due to the paucity of incisive experimental probes of electrostatic properties within proteins. To quantitatively assess the landscape of electrostatic fields at discrete locations and orientations within an enzyme active site, we have incorporated site-specific thiocyanate vibrational probes into multiple positions within bacterial ketosteroid isomerase. A battery of X-ray crystallographic, vibrational Stark spectroscopy, and NMR studies revealed electrostatic field heterogeneity of 8 MV/cm between active site probe locations and widely differing sensitivities of discrete probes to common electrostatic perturbations from mutation, ligand binding, and pH changes. Electrostatic calculations based on active site ionization states assigned by literature precedent and computational pK(a) prediction were unable to quantitatively account for the observed vibrational band shifts. However, electrostatic models of the D40N mutant gave qualitative agreement with the observed vibrational effects when an unusual ionization of an active site tyrosine with a pK(a) near 7 was included. UV-absorbance and (13)C NMR experiments confirmed the presence of a tyrosinate in the active site, in agreement with electrostatic models. This work provides the most direct measure of the heterogeneous and anisotropic nature of the electrostatic environment within an enzyme active site, and these measurements provide incisive benchmarks for further developing accurate computational models and a foundation for future tests of electrostatics in enzymatic catalysis.

  20. Molecular dynamics explorations of active site structure in designed and evolved enzymes.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Sílvia; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Noey, Elizabeth L; Houk, K N

    2015-04-21

    This Account describes the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reveal how mutations alter the structure and organization of enzyme active sites. As proposed by Pauling about 70 years ago and elaborated by many others since then, biocatalysis is efficient when functional groups in the active site of an enzyme are in optimal positions for transition state stabilization. Changes in mechanism and covalent interactions are often critical parts of enzyme catalysis. We describe our explorations of the dynamical preorganization of active sites using MD, studying the fluctuations between active and inactive conformations normally concealed to static crystallography. MD shows how the various arrangements of active site residues influence the free energy of the transition state and relates the populations of the catalytic conformational ensemble to the enzyme activity. This Account is organized around three case studies from our laboratory. We first describe the importance of dynamics in evaluating a series of computationally designed and experimentally evolved enzymes for the Kemp elimination, a popular subject in the enzyme design field. We find that the dynamics of the active site is influenced not only by the original sequence design and subsequent mutations but also by the nature of the ligand present in the active site. In the second example, we show how microsecond MD has been used to uncover the role of remote mutations in the active site dynamics and catalysis of a transesterase, LovD. This enzyme was evolved by Tang at UCLA and Codexis, Inc., and is a useful commercial catalyst for the production of the drug simvastatin. X-ray analysis of inactive and active mutants did not reveal differences in the active sites, but relatively long time scale MD in solution showed that the active site of the wild-type enzyme preorganizes only upon binding of the acyl carrier protein (ACP) that delivers the natural acyl group to the active site. In the absence of bound ACP

  1. Sequences flanking the core-binding site modulate glucocorticoid receptor structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Schöne, Stefanie; Jurk, Marcel; Helabad, Mahdi Bagherpoor; Dror, Iris; Lebars, Isabelle; Kieffer, Bruno; Imhof, Petra; Rohs, Remo; Vingron, Martin; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H

    2016-09-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds as a homodimer to genomic response elements, which have particular sequence and shape characteristics. Here we show that the nucleotides directly flanking the core-binding site, differ depending on the strength of GR-dependent activation of nearby genes. Our study indicates that these flanking nucleotides change the three-dimensional structure of the DNA-binding site, the DNA-binding domain of GR and the quaternary structure of the dimeric complex. Functional studies in a defined genomic context show that sequence-induced changes in GR activity cannot be explained by differences in GR occupancy. Rather, mutating the dimerization interface mitigates DNA-induced changes in both activity and structure, arguing for a role of DNA-induced structural changes in modulating GR activity. Together, our study shows that DNA sequence identity of genomic binding sites modulates GR activity downstream of binding, which may play a role in achieving regulatory specificity towards individual target genes.

  2. Correlated structural kinetics and retarded solvent dynamics at the metalloprotease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Moran; Born, Benjamin; Heyden, Matthias; Tworowski, Dmitry; Fields, Gregg B.; Sagi, Irit; Havenith, Martina

    2011-09-18

    Solvent dynamics can play a major role in enzyme activity, but obtaining an accurate, quantitative picture of solvent activity during catalysis is quite challenging. Here, we combine terahertz spectroscopy and X-ray absorption analyses to measure changes in the coupled water-protein motions during peptide hydrolysis by a zinc-dependent human metalloprotease. These changes were tightly correlated with rearrangements at the active site during the formation of productive enzyme-substrate intermediates and were different from those in an enzyme–inhibitor complex. Molecular dynamics simulations showed a steep gradient of fast-to-slow coupled protein-water motions around the protein, active site and substrate. Our results show that water retardation occurs before formation of the functional Michaelis complex. We propose that the observed gradient of coupled protein-water motions may assist enzyme-substrate interactions through water-polarizing mechanisms that are remotely mediated by the catalytic metal ion and the enzyme active site.

  3. An overlapping kinase and phosphatase docking site regulates activity of the retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Hirschi, Alexander; Cecchini, Matthew; Steinhardt, Rachel C; Schamber, Michael R; Dick, Frederick A; Rubin, Seth M

    2010-09-01

    The phosphorylation state and corresponding activity of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) are modulated by a balance of kinase and phosphatase activities. Here we characterize the association of Rb with the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c). A crystal structure identifies an enzyme docking site in the Rb C-terminal domain that is required for efficient PP1c activity toward Rb. The phosphatase docking site overlaps with the known docking site for cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk), and PP1 competition with Cdk-cyclins for Rb binding is sufficient to retain Rb activity and block cell-cycle advancement. These results provide the first detailed molecular insights into Rb activation and establish a novel mechanism for Rb regulation in which kinase and phosphatase compete for substrate docking. PMID:20694007

  4. Structure of C42D Azotobacter vinelandii FdI. A Cys-X-X-Asp-X-X-Cys motif ligates an air-stable [4Fe-4S]2+/+ cluster.

    PubMed

    Jung, Y S; Bonagura, C A; Tilley, G J; Gao-Sheridan, H S; Armstrong, F A; Stout, C D; Burgess, B K

    2000-11-24

    All naturally occurring ferredoxins that have Cys-X-X-Asp-X-X-Cys motifs contain [4Fe-4S](2+/+) clusters that can be easily and reversibly converted to [3Fe-4S](+/0) clusters. In contrast, ferredoxins with unmodified Cys-X-X-Cys-X-X-Cys motifs assemble [4Fe-4S](2+/+) clusters that cannot be easily interconverted with [3Fe-4S](+/0) clusters. In this study we changed the central cysteine of the Cys(39)-X-X-Cys(42)-X-X-Cys(45) of Azotobacter vinelandii FdI, which coordinates its [4Fe-4S](2+/+) cluster, into an aspartate. UV-visible, EPR, and CD spectroscopies, metal analysis, and x-ray crystallography show that, like native FdI, aerobically purified C42D FdI is a seven-iron protein retaining its [4Fe-4S](2+/+) cluster with monodentate aspartate ligation to one iron. Unlike known clusters of this type the reduced [4Fe-4S](+) cluster of C42D FdI exhibits only an S = 1/2 EPR with no higher spin signals detected. The cluster shows only a minor change in reduction potential relative to the native protein. All attempts to convert the cluster to a 3Fe cluster using conventional methods of oxygen or ferricyanide oxidation or thiol exchange were not successful. The cluster conversion was ultimately accomplished using a new electrochemical method. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction and the lack of Gly residues adjacent to the Asp ligand explain the remarkable stability of this cluster.

  5. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  6. The metal binding site of the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease. A spectroscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Urbani, A; Bazzo, R; Nardi, M C; Cicero, D O; De Francesco, R; Steinkühler, C; Barbato, G

    1998-07-24

    The NS3 region of the hepatitis C virus encodes for a serine protease activity, which is necessary for the processing of the nonstructural region of the viral polyprotein. The minimal domain with proteolytic activity resides in the N terminus, where a structural tetradentate zinc binding site is located. The ligands being been identified by x-ray crystallography as being three cysteines (Cys97, Cys99, and Cys145) and one histidine residue (His149), which is postulated to coordinate the metal through a water molecule. In this article, we present an analysis of the role of metal coordination with respect to enzyme activity and folding. Using NMR spectroscopy, the resonances of His149 were assigned based on their isotropic shift in a Co(II)-substituted protein. Data obtained with 15N-labeled NS3 protease were compatible with the involvement of the delta-N of His149 in metal coordination. pH titration experiments showed that the cooperative association of at least two protons is required in the protonation process of His149. Changes in the NMR signals of this residue between pH 7 and 5 are interpreted as evidence for a structural change at the metal binding site, which switches from a "closed" to an "open" conformation. Site-directed mutagenesis of His149 has shown the importance of this residue in the metal incorporation pathway and for achieving an active fold. The metal coordination of the protease was also investigated by circular dichroism and electronic absorption spectroscopies using a Co(II)-substituted enzyme. We show evidence for rearrangements of the metal coordination geometry induced by complex formation with an NS4A peptide cofactor. No such changes were observed upon binding to a substrate peptide. Also, CN- and N3- induced Co(II) ligand field perturbations, which went along with an 1.5-fold enhancement of protease activity.

  7. Part I. Cobalt thiolate complexes modeling the active site of cobalt nitrile hydratase. Part II. Formation of inorganic nanoparticles on protein scaffolding in Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Irene Yuk Man

    Part I. A series of novel cobalt dithiolate complexes with mixed imine/amine ligand systems is presented here as electronic and structural models for the active site in the bacterial enzyme class, nitrile hydratase (NHase). Pentadentate cobalt(II) complexes with S2N 3 ligand environments are first studied as precursors to the more relevant cobalt(III) complexes. Adjustment of the backbone length by removal of a methylene group increases the reactivity of the system; whereas reduction of the two backbone imine bonds to allow free rotation about those bonds may decrease reactivity. Reactivity change due to the replacement of the backbone amine proton with a more sterically challenging methyl group is not yet clear. Upon oxidation, the monocationic pentadentate cobalt(III) complex, 1b, shows promising reactivity similar to that of NHase. The metal's open coordination site allows reversible binding of the endogenous, monoanionic ligands, N 3- and NCS-. Oxygenation of the thiolate sulfur atoms by exposure to O2 and H2O 2 produces sulfenate and sulfinate ligands in complex 8, which resembles the crystal structure of "deactivated" Fe NHase. However, its lack of reactivity argues against the oxygenated enzyme structure as the active form. Six-coordinate cobalt(III) complexes with S2N4 amine/amine ligand systems are also presented as analogues of previously reported iron(III) compounds, which mimic the spectroscopic properties of Fe NHase. The cobalt complexes do not seem to similarly model Co NHase. However, the S = 0 cobalt(III) center can be spectroscopically silent and difficult to detect, making comparison with synthetic models using common techniques hard. Part II. Dodecameric Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase mutant, E165C, stacks along its six-fold axis to produce tubular nanostructures in the presence of some divalent metal ions, as does the wild type enzyme. The centrally located, engineered Cys-165 residues appear to bind to various species and may serve as

  8. Mitochondrial phosphate transport. N-ethylmaleimide insensitivity correlates with absence of beef heart-like Cys42 from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphate transport protein.

    PubMed

    Guérin, B; Bukusoglu, C; Rakotomanana, F; Wohlrab, H

    1990-11-15

    The mitochondrial phosphate transport protein (PTP) has been purified in a reconstitutively active form from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida parapsilosis. ADP/ATP carriers that copurify have been identified. The PTP from S. cerevisiae migrates as a single band (35 kDa) in sodium dodecyl sulfate gels with the same mobility as the N-ethylmaleimide-alkylated beef heart PTP. It does not cross-react with anti-sera against beef heart PTP. The CNBr peptide maps of the yeast and beef proteins are very different. The rate of unidirectional phosphate uptake into reconstituted proteoliposomes is stimulated about 2.5-fold to a Vmax of 170 mumol of phosphate min-1 (mg PTP)-1 (22 degrees C) by increasing the pHi of the proteoliposomes from 6.8 (same as pHe) to 8.0. The Km for Pi of this reconstituted activity is 2.2 mM. The transport is sensitive to mersalyl (50% inhibition at 60 microM) and insensitive to N-ethylmaleimide. We have purified peptides matching the highly conserved motif Pro-X-(Asp/glu)-X-X-(Lys/Arg)-X-(Arg/lys) (X is an unspecified amino acid) of the triplicate gene structure sequence of the beef heart PTP. The N-ethylmaleimide-reactive Cys42 of the beef heart protein, located between the two basic amino acids of this motif (Lys41-Cys42-Arg43), is replaced with a Thr in the yeast protein. This substitution most likely is responsible for the lack of N-ethylmaleimide sensitivity of the yeast protein and mersalyl thus reacts with another cysteine to inhibit the transport. Finally it is concluded that Cys42 has no essential role in the catalysis of inorganic phosphate transport by the mitochondrial phosphate transport protein.

  9. The Cys4 zinc finger of bacteriophage T7 primase in sequence-specific single-stranded DNA recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kusakabe, Takahiro; Hine, Anna V.; Hyberts, Sven G.; Richardson, Charles C.

    1999-01-01

    Bacteriophage T7 DNA primase recognizes 5′-GTC-3′ in single-stranded DNA. The primase contains a single Cys4 zinc-binding motif that is essential for recognition. Biochemical and mutagenic analyses suggest that the Cys4 motif contacts cytosine of 5′-GTC-3′ and may also contribute to thymine recognition. Residues His33 and Asp31 are critical for these interactions. Biochemical analysis also reveals that T7 primase selectively binds CTP in the absence of DNA. We propose that bound CTP selects the remaining base G, of 5′-GTC-3′, by base pairing. Our deduced mechanism for recognition of ssDNA by Cys4 motifs bears little resemblance to the recognition of trinucleotides of double-stranded DNA by Cys2His2 zinc fingers. PMID:10200256

  10. Molecular recognition in the interaction of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxin with NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) and thioredoxin x.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Bayard, Pilar; Ojeda, Valle; Hervás, Manuel; Cejudo, Francisco J; Navarro, José A; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Pérez-Ruiz, Juan M

    2014-11-28

    In addition to the standard NADPH thioredoxin reductases (NTRs), plants hold a plastidic NTR (NTRC), with a thioredoxin module fused at the C-terminus. NTRC is an efficient reductant of 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs). The interaction of NTRC and chloroplastic thioredoxin x with 2-Cys Prxs has been confirmed in vivo, by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays, and in vitro, by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments. In comparison with thioredoxin x, NTRC interacts with 2-Cys Prx with higher affinity, both the thioredoxin and NTR domains of NTRC contributing significantly to this interaction, as demonstrated by using the NTR and thioredoxin modules of the enzyme expressed separately. The presence of the thioredoxin domain seems to prevent the interaction of NTRC with thioredoxin x.

  11. Molecular recognition in the interaction of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxin with NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) and thioredoxin x.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Bayard, Pilar; Ojeda, Valle; Hervás, Manuel; Cejudo, Francisco J; Navarro, José A; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Pérez-Ruiz, Juan M

    2014-11-28

    In addition to the standard NADPH thioredoxin reductases (NTRs), plants hold a plastidic NTR (NTRC), with a thioredoxin module fused at the C-terminus. NTRC is an efficient reductant of 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs). The interaction of NTRC and chloroplastic thioredoxin x with 2-Cys Prxs has been confirmed in vivo, by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays, and in vitro, by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments. In comparison with thioredoxin x, NTRC interacts with 2-Cys Prx with higher affinity, both the thioredoxin and NTR domains of NTRC contributing significantly to this interaction, as demonstrated by using the NTR and thioredoxin modules of the enzyme expressed separately. The presence of the thioredoxin domain seems to prevent the interaction of NTRC with thioredoxin x. PMID:25448674

  12. Enhanced Enzyme Kinetic Stability by Increasing Rigidity within the Active Site*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan; An, Jiao; Yang, Guangyu; Wu, Geng; Zhang, Yong; Cui, Li; Feng, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme stability is an important issue for protein engineers. Understanding how rigidity in the active site affects protein kinetic stability will provide new insight into enzyme stabilization. In this study, we demonstrated enhanced kinetic stability of Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB) by mutating the structurally flexible residues within the active site. Six residues within 10 Å of the catalytic Ser105 residue with a high B factor were selected for iterative saturation mutagenesis. After screening 2200 colonies, we obtained the D223G/L278M mutant, which exhibited a 13-fold increase in half-life at 48 °C and a 12 °C higher T5015, the temperature at which enzyme activity is reduced to 50% after a 15-min heat treatment. Further characterization showed that global unfolding resistance against both thermal and chemical denaturation also improved. Analysis of the crystal structures of wild-type CalB and the D223G/L278M mutant revealed that the latter formed an extra main chain hydrogen bond network with seven structurally coupled residues within the flexible α10 helix that are primarily involved in forming the active site. Further investigation of the relative B factor profile and molecular dynamics simulation confirmed that the enhanced rigidity decreased fluctuation of the active site residues at high temperature. These results indicate that enhancing the rigidity of the flexible segment within the active site may provide an efficient method for improving enzyme kinetic stability. PMID:24448805

  13. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  14. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  15. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (20″×14″) upright format signs specified in 29 CFR 1910.145(d)(4) and this paragraph; and (iii... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an...

  16. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (20″×14″) upright format signs specified in 29 CFR 1910.145(d)(4) and this paragraph; and (iii... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an...

  17. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (20″×14″) upright format signs specified in 29 CFR 1910.145(d)(4) and this paragraph; and (iii... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an...

  18. 77 FR 39508 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... specific project proposals on those leases) in an identified Wind Energy Area (WEA) on the OCS offshore... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the... Activities on the Atlantic OCS Offshore RI and MA'' to: Program Manager, Office of Renewable Energy...

  19. Effects of resource activities upon repository siting and waste containment with reference to bedded salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, J.; Rowe, J.

    1980-02-01

    The primary consideration for the suitability of a nuclear waste repository site is the overall ability of the repository to safely contain radioactive waste. This report is a discussion of the past, present, and future effects of resource activities on waste containment. Past and present resource activities which provide release pathways (i.e., leaky boreholes, adjacent mines) will receive initial evaluation during the early stages of any repository site study. However, other resource activities which may have subtle effects on containment (e.g., long-term pumping causing increased groundwater gradients, invasion of saline water causing lower retardation) and all potential future resource activities must also be considered during the site evaluation process. Resource activities will affect both the siting and the designing of repositories. Ideally, sites should be located in areas of low resource activity and low potential for future activity, and repository design should seek to eliminate or minimize the adverse effects of any resource activity. Buffer zones should be created to provide areas in which resource activities that might adversely affect containment can be restricted or curtailed. This could mean removing large areas of land from resource development. The impact of these frozen assets should be assessed in terms of their economic value and of their effect upon resource reserves. This step could require a major effort in data acquisition and analysis followed by extensive numerical modeling of regional fluid flow and mass transport. Numerical models should be used to assess the effects of resource activity upon containment and should include the cumulative effects of different resource activities. Analysis by other methods is probably not possible except for relatively simple cases.

  20. CysK2 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is an O-Phospho-l-Serine-Dependent S-Sulfocysteine Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Eva Maria; Böth, Dominic; Lössl, Philip; Vilaplana, Francisco; Schnell, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is dependent on cysteine biosynthesis, and reduced sulfur compounds such as mycothiol synthesized from cysteine serve in first-line defense mechanisms against oxidative stress imposed by macrophages. Two biosynthetic routes to l-cysteine, each with its own specific cysteine synthase (CysK1 and CysM), have been described in M. tuberculosis, but the function of a third putative sulfhydrylase in this pathogen, CysK2, has remained elusive. We present biochemical and biophysical evidence that CysK2 is an S-sulfocysteine synthase, utilizing O-phosphoserine (OPS) and thiosulfate as substrates. The enzyme uses a mechanism via a central aminoacrylate intermediate that is similar to that of other members of this pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme family. The apparent second-order rate of the first half-reaction with OPS was determined as kmax/Ks = (3.97 × 103) ± 619 M−1 s−1, which compares well to the OPS-specific mycobacterial cysteine synthase CysM with a kmax/Ks of (1.34 × 103) ± 48.2. Notably, CysK2 does not utilize thiocarboxylated CysO as a sulfur donor but accepts thiosulfate and sulfide as donor substrates. The specificity constant kcat/Km for thiosulfate is 40-fold higher than for sulfide, suggesting an annotation as S-sulfocysteine synthase. Mycobacterial CysK2 thus provides a third metabolic route to cysteine, either directly using sulfide as donor or indirectly via S-sulfocysteine. Hypothetically, S-sulfocysteine could also act as a signaling molecule triggering additional responses in redox defense in the pathogen upon exposure to reactive oxygen species during dormancy. PMID:25022854

  1. Computational approaches to the determination of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C R A; French, S A; Sokol, A A; Thomas, J M

    2005-04-15

    We apply quantum chemical methods to the study of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in mesoporous silica and metal oxide catalysts. Our approach is based on the use of both molecular cluster and embedded cluster (QM/MM) techniques, where the active site and molecular complex are described using density functional theory (DFT) and the embedding matrix simulated by shell model potentials. We consider three case studies: alkene epoxidation over the microporous TS-1 catalyst; methanol synthesis on ZnO and Cu/ZnO and C-H bond activation over Li-doped MgO.

  2. Computational approaches to the determination of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C R A; French, S A; Sokol, A A; Thomas, J M

    2005-04-15

    We apply quantum chemical methods to the study of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in mesoporous silica and metal oxide catalysts. Our approach is based on the use of both molecular cluster and embedded cluster (QM/MM) techniques, where the active site and molecular complex are described using density functional theory (DFT) and the embedding matrix simulated by shell model potentials. We consider three case studies: alkene epoxidation over the microporous TS-1 catalyst; methanol synthesis on ZnO and Cu/ZnO and C-H bond activation over Li-doped MgO. PMID:15901543

  3. Rapid binding of a cationic active site inhibitor to wild type and mutant mouse acetylcholinesterase: Brownian dynamics simulation including diffusion in the active site gorge.

    PubMed

    Tara, S; Elcock, A H; Kirchhoff, P D; Briggs, J M; Radic, Z; Taylor, P; McCammon, J A

    1998-12-01

    It is known that anionic surface residues play a role in the long-range electrostatic attraction between acetylcholinesterase and cationic ligands. In our current investigation, we show that anionic residues also play an important role in the behavior of the ligand within the active site gorge of acetylcholinesterase. Negatively charged residues near the gorge opening not only attract positively charged ligands from solution to the enzyme, but can also restrict the motion of the ligand once it is inside of the gorge. We use Brownian dynamics techniques to calculate the rate constant kon, for wild type and mutant acetylcholinesterase with a positively charged ligand. These calculations are performed by allowing the ligand to diffuse within the active site gorge. This is an extension of previously reported work in which a ligand was allowed to diffuse only to the enzyme surface. By setting the reaction criteria for the ligand closer to the active site, better agreement with experimental data is obtained. Although a number of residues influence the movement of the ligand within the gorge, Asp74 is shown to play a particularly important role in this function. Asp74 traps the ligand within the gorge, and in this way helps to ensure a reaction.

  4. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Cyanide (CN) is a well-studied toxic principle, known to inhibit heme-enzymes. • Inhibition is supposed to result from CN binding at the active site as a ligand. • Diverse heme enzymes’ CN inhibition profiles challenge prevailing mechanism. • Poor binding efficiency of CN at low enzyme concentrations and ligand pressures. • CN-based diffusible radicals cause ‘non-productive electron transfers’ (inhibition). - Abstract: The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins’ active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  5. Denaturation studies of active-site labeled papain using electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Z A; Butterfiel, D A

    1991-01-01

    A spin-labeled p-chloromercuribenzoate (SL-PMB) and a fluorescence probe, 6-acryloyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Acrylodan), both of which bind to the single SH group located in the active site of papain, were used to investigate the interaction of papain (EC 3.4.22.2) with two protein denaturants. It was found that the active site of papain was highly stable in urea solution, but underwent a large conformational change in guanidine hydrochloride solution. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence results were in agreement and both paralleled enzymatic activity of papain with respect to both the variation in pH and denaturation. These results strongly suggest that SL-PMB and Acrylodan labels can be used to characterize the physical state of the active site of the enzyme. PMID:1657229

  6. Catalysis-dependent selenium incorporation and migration in the nitrogenase active site iron-molybdenum cofactor

    PubMed Central

    Spatzal, Thomas; Perez, Kathryn A; Howard, James B; Rees, Douglas C

    2015-01-01

    Dinitrogen reduction in the biological nitrogen cycle is catalyzed by nitrogenase, a two-component metalloenzyme. Understanding of the transformation of the inert resting state of the active site FeMo-cofactor into an activated state capable of reducing dinitrogen remains elusive. Here we report the catalysis dependent, site-selective incorporation of selenium into the FeMo-cofactor from selenocyanate as a newly identified substrate and inhibitor. The 1.60 Å resolution structure reveals selenium occupying the S2B site of FeMo-cofactor in the Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe-protein, a position that was recently identified as the CO-binding site. The Se2B-labeled enzyme retains substrate reduction activity and marks the starting point for a crystallographic pulse-chase experiment of the active site during turnover. Through a series of crystal structures obtained at resolutions of 1.32–1.66 Å, including the CO-inhibited form of Av1-Se2B, the exchangeability of all three belt-sulfur sites is demonstrated, providing direct insights into unforeseen rearrangements of the metal center during catalysis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11620.001 PMID:26673079

  7. Catalysis-dependent selenium incorporation and migration in the nitrogenase active site iron-molybdenum cofactor.

    PubMed

    Spatzal, Thomas; Perez, Kathryn A; Howard, James B; Rees, Douglas C

    2015-12-16

    Dinitrogen reduction in the biological nitrogen cycle is catalyzed by nitrogenase, a two-component metalloenzyme. Understanding of the transformation of the inert resting state of the active site FeMo-cofactor into an activated state capable of reducing dinitrogen remains elusive. Here we report the catalysis dependent, site-selective incorporation of selenium into the FeMo-cofactor from selenocyanate as a newly identified substrate and inhibitor. The 1.60 Å resolution structure reveals selenium occupying the S2B site of FeMo-cofactor in the Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe-protein, a position that was recently identified as the CO-binding site. The Se2B-labeled enzyme retains substrate reduction activity and marks the starting point for a crystallographic pulse-chase experiment of the active site during turnover. Through a series of crystal structures obtained at resolutions of 1.32-1.66 Å, including the CO-inhibited form of Av1-Se2B, the exchangeability of all three belt-sulfur sites is demonstrated, providing direct insights into unforeseen rearrangements of the metal center during catalysis.

  8. Molybdenum cofactor properties and [Fe-S] cluster coordination in Escherichia coli nitrate reductase A: investigation by site-directed mutagenesis of the conserved his-50 residue in the NarG subunit.

    PubMed

    Magalon, A; Asso, M; Guigliarelli, B; Rothery, R A; Bertrand, P; Giordano, G; Blasco, F

    1998-05-19

    Most of the molybdoenzymes contain, in the amino-terminal region of their catalytic subunits, a conserved Cys group that in some cases binds an [Fe-S] cluster. In dissimilatory nitrate reductases, the first Cys residue of this motif is replaced by a conserved His residue. Site-directed mutagenesis of this residue (His-50) was performed on the NarG subunit from Escherichia coli nitrate reductase A. The results obtained by EPR spectroscopy enable us to exclude the implication of this residue in [Fe-S] binding. Additionally, we showed that the His-50 residue does not coordinate the molybdenum atom, but its substitution by Cys or Ser introduces a perturbation of the hydrogen bonding network around the molybdenum cofactor. From potentiometric studies, it is proposed that the high-pH and the low-pH forms of the Mo(V) are both involved during the redox turnover of the enzyme. Perturbation of the Mo(V) pKV value might be responsible for the low activity reported in the His-50-Cys mutant enzyme. A catalytic model is proposed in which the protonation/deprotonation of the Mo(V) species is an essential step. Thus, one of the two protons involved in the catalytic cycle could be the one coupled to the molybdenum atom in the dissimilatory nitrate reductase of E. coli. PMID:9585550

  9. [Computational analysis of a cys-loop ligand gated ion channel from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii].

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Plants possess several neurotransmitters with well-known physiological roles. Currently only receptors for glutamate were reported to be found in plants, while receptors for acetylcholine, serotonin and GABA have not yet been reported. In animals, these neurotransmitters act via one class of ligand binding ion channels called Cys-loop receptors which play a major role in fast synaptic transmission. They show the presence of two domains namely Neurotransmitter-gated ion-channel ligand-binding domain (Pfam: PF02931) and Neurotransmitter-gated transmembrane domain (Pfam: PF02932). Cys-loop receptors are also known in prokaryotes. No cys-loop receptor has been characterized from plants yet. In this study, the Ensembl plants database was searched for proteins with these two domains in the sequenced plant genomes, what resulted in only one protein (LIC1) from the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. BLAST and profile HMM searches against the pdb structure database showed that this protein is related to animal and prokaryotic cys-loop receptors, although the cysteine residues characteristic of the cys-loop are absent. Physico-chemical and sequence analysis indicate that LIC1 is an anionic receptor. A model of this protein was generated using homology modeling based on a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of Torpedo marmorata. The characteristic extracellular domain (ECD) and transmembrane domain (TMD) are well structured but the intercellular region is poorly formed. This is the first report on a detailed characterization of a cys-loop receptor from the plant kingdom. PMID:26510602

  10. Redox regulation of methionine aminopeptidase 2 activity.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Joyce; Wong, Jason W H; Hogg, Philip J

    2014-05-23

    Protein translation is initiated with methionine in eukaryotes, and the majority of proteins have their N-terminal methionine removed by methionine aminopeptidases (MetAP1 and MetAP2) prior to action. Methionine removal can be important for protein function, localization, or stability. No mechanism of regulation of MetAP activity has been identified. MetAP2, but not MetAP1, contains a single Cys(228)-Cys(448) disulfide bond that has an -RHStaple configuration and links two β-loop structures, which are hallmarks of allosteric disulfide bonds. From analysis of crystal structures and using mass spectrometry and activity assays, we found that the disulfide bond exists in oxidized and reduced states in the recombinant enzyme. The disulfide has a standard redox potential of -261 mV and is efficiently reduced by the protein reductant, thioredoxin, with a rate constant of 16,180 m(-1) s(-1). The MetAP2 disulfide bond also exists in oxidized and reduced states in glioblastoma tumor cells, and stressing the cells by oxygen or glucose deprivation results in more oxidized enzyme. The Cys(228)-Cys(448) disulfide is at the rim of the active site and is only three residues distant from the catalytic His(231), which suggested that cleavage of the bond would influence substrate hydrolysis. Indeed, oxidized and reduced isoforms have different catalytic efficiencies for hydrolysis of MetAP2 peptide substrates. These findings indicate that MetAP2 is post-translationally regulated by an allosteric disulfide bond, which controls substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency.

  11. Identification of a 2-cys peroxiredoxin as a tetramethyl benzidine-hydrogen peroxide stained protein from the thylakoids of the extreme halophyte Arthrocnemum macrostachyum L.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Andrea; Antonacci, Alessia; Marsano, Francesco; Redondo-Gomez, Susana; Figueroa Clemente, Enrique Manuel; Andreucci, Flora; Barbato, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    Tetramethylbenzidine-H(2)O(2) staining of SDS-polyacrylamide gel is a widely used method for the specific detection of proteins with heme-dependent peroxidase activity. When this method was used with thylakoids from the halophytic plant Arthrocnemum macrostachyum, besides the cytochrome f and cytochrome b6 proteins usually found in higher plants and cyanobacteria, at least four additional bands were detected. One of them, a 46-kDa protein, was shown to be an extrinsic protein, and identified by mass spectrometry and immunoblotting as a 2-cys peroxiredoxin. Peroxidase activity was insensitive to oxidizing agents such as trans-4,4-diydroxy-1,2-dithiane or hydrogen peroxide, but was inhibited by treatment of thylakoids with reducing agents such as dithiothreitol or mercaptoethanol. By immunoblotting, it was shown that loss of peroxidase activity was paralleled by disappearance of the 46-kDa band, which was converted to a 23-kDa immunoreactive form. A dimer/monomer relationship between the two proteins is suggested, with the dimeric form likely being a heme-binding protein. This possibility was further supported by anionic exchange chromatography and de novo sequencing of tryptic fragments of the protein and sequence comparison, as most of the residues previously implicated in heme binding in 2-cys peroxiredoxin from Rattus norvegicus were conserved in A. macrostachyum. The amount of this protein was modulated by environmental conditions, and increased when salt concentration in the growth medium was higher or lower than the optimal one. PMID:22683464

  12. Substrate Shuttling Between Active Sites of Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase in Not Required to Generate Coproporphyrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.; Warby, C; Whitby, F; Kushner, J; Hill, C

    2009-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D; EC 4.1.1.37), the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is required for the production of heme, vitamin B12, siroheme, and chlorophyll precursors. URO-D catalyzes the sequential decarboxylation of four acetate side chains in the pyrrole groups of uroporphyrinogen to produce coproporphyrinogen. URO-D is a stable homodimer, with the active-site clefts of the two subunits adjacent to each other. It has been hypothesized that the two catalytic centers interact functionally, perhaps by shuttling of reaction intermediates between subunits. We tested this hypothesis by construction of a single-chain protein (single-chain URO-D) in which the two subunits were connected by a flexible linker. The crystal structure of this protein was shown to be superimposable with wild-type activity and to have comparable catalytic activity. Mutations that impaired one or the other of the two active sites of single-chain URO-D resulted in approximately half of wild-type activity. The distributions of reaction intermediates were the same for mutant and wild-type sequences and were unaltered in a competition experiment using I and III isomer substrates. These observations indicate that communication between active sites is not required for enzyme function and suggest that the dimeric structure of URO-D is required to achieve conformational stability and to create a large active-site cleft.

  13. Crystal structure of an avian influenza polymerase PA[subscript N] reveals an endonuclease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Puwei; Bartlam, Mark; Lou, Zhiyong; Chen, Shoudeng; Zhou, Jie; He, Xiaojing; Lv, Zongyang; Ge, Ruowen; Li, Xuemei; Deng, Tao; Fodor, Ervin; Rao, Zihe; Liu, Yingfang

    2009-11-10

    The heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase, containing the PA, PB1 and PB2 proteins, catalyses viral RNA replication and transcription in the nucleus of infected cells. PB1 holds the polymerase active site and reportedly harbours endonuclease activity, whereas PB2 is responsible for cap binding. The PA amino terminus is understood to be the major functional part of the PA protein and has been implicated in several roles, including endonuclease and protease activities as well as viral RNA/complementary RNA promoter binding. Here we report the 2.2 angstrom (A) crystal structure of the N-terminal 197 residues of PA, termed PA(N), from an avian influenza H5N1 virus. The PA(N) structure has an alpha/beta architecture and reveals a bound magnesium ion coordinated by a motif similar to the (P)DX(N)(D/E)XK motif characteristic of many endonucleases. Structural comparisons and mutagenesis analysis of the motif identified in PA(N) provide further evidence that PA(N) holds an endonuclease active site. Furthermore, functional analysis with in vivo ribonucleoprotein reconstitution and direct in vitro endonuclease assays strongly suggest that PA(N) holds the endonuclease active site and has critical roles in endonuclease activity of the influenza virus polymerase, rather than PB1. The high conservation of this endonuclease active site among influenza strains indicates that PA(N) is an important target for the design of new anti-influenza therapeutics.

  14. Molecular cloning and analysis of the regulation of cys-14/sup +/, a structural gene of the sulfur regulatory circuit of Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Ketter, J.S.; Marzluf, G.A.

    1988-04-01

    The cys-14/sup +/ gene encodes sulfate permease II, which is primarily expressed in mycelia. cys-14/sup +/ is one of a set of sulfur-related structural genes under the control of cys-3/sup +/ and scon/sup +/, the regulatory genes of the sulfur control circuit. The authors cloned cys-14/sup +/ from a cosmid library of Neurospora crassa DNA. A restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showed that this clone maps to the region of chromosome IV corresponding to the cys-14/sup +/ locus. Northern blot analyses were used to examine the regulated expression of the cys-14/sup +/ gene. In the wild type, a 3-kilobase cysc-14/sup +/ transcript was highly expressed under sulfur-derepressing conditions but completely absent during sulfur repression. A cys-3 mutant, which cannot synthesize any of the sulfur-controlled enzymes, including sulfate permease II, did not possess any cys-14/sup +/ transcript under wither condition. A cys-3 temperature-sensitive revertant completely lacked any cys-14/sup +/ mRNA at the conditional temperature but expressed the cys-14/sup +/ transcript upon derepression at the permissive temperature. Mutation of a second sulfur regulatory gene, scon/sup c/, causes the expression of sulfur-related enzymes in a constitutive fashion; the scon/sup c/ mutant showed a corresponding constitutive expression of cys-14/sup +/ mRNA, such that it was present even in cells subjected to sulfur repression conditions. These results show that the cys-14/sup +/ gene is regulated through the modulation of message content by the cys-3/sup +/ and scon/sup c/ control genes in response to the sulfur levels of the cells.

  15. Evaluation of physical activity web sites for use of behavior change theories.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Amol; Patrick, Kevin; Sallis, James F; Calfas, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) Web sites were assessed for their use of behavior change theories, including constructs of the health belief model, Transtheoretical Model, social cognitive theory, and the theory of reasoned action and planned behavior. An evaluation template for assessing PA Web sites was developed, and content validity and interrater reliability were demonstrated. Two independent raters evaluated 24 PA Web sites. Web sites varied widely in application of theory-based constructs, ranging from 5 to 48 on a 100-point scale. The most common intervention strategies were general information, social support, and realistic goal areas. Coverage of theory-based strategies was low, varying from 26% for social cognitive theory to 39% for health belief model. Overall, PA Web sites provided little assessment, feedback, or individually tailored assistance for users. They were unable to substantially tailor the on-line experience for users at different stages of change or different demographic characteristics.

  16. Spectroscopic and Computational Characterization of the NO Adduct of Substrate-Bound Fe(II) Cysteine Dioxygenase: Insights into the Mechanism of O2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Blaesi, Elizabeth J.; Gardner, Jessica D.; Fox, Brian G.; Brunold, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) is a mononuclear non-heme iron(II)-dependent enzyme critical for maintaining appropriate cysteine (Cys) and taurine levels in eukaryotic systems. Since CDO possesses both an unusual 3-His facial ligation sphere to the iron center and a rare Cys-Tyr crosslink near the active site, the mechanism by which it converts Cys and molecular oxygen to cysteine sulfinic acid is of broad interest. However, as of yet direct experimental support for any of the proposed mechanisms is still lacking. In this study, we have used NO as a substrate analogue for O2 to prepare a species that mimics the geometric and electronic structures of an early reaction intermediate. The resultant unusual S=1/2 {FeNO}7 species was characterized by magnetic circular dichroism, electron paramagnetic resonance, and electronic absorption spectroscopies, as well as computational methods including density functional theory and semi-empirical calculations. The NO adducts of Cys- and selenocysteine (Sec)-bound Fe(II)CDO exhibit virtually identical electronic properties; yet, CDO is unable to oxidize Sec. To explore the differences in reactivity between Cys- and Sec-bound CDO, the geometries and energies of viable O2-bound intermediates were evaluated computationally, and it was found that a low-energy quintet-spin intermediate on the Cys reaction pathway adopts a different geometry for the Sec-bound adduct. The absence of a low-energy O2 adduct for Sec-bound CDO is consistent with our experimental data and may explain why Sec does not act as a substrate for CDO. PMID:23906193

  17. Conformational Change in the Active Site of Streptococcal Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase Through Site-Directed Mutagenesis at Asp-115.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Yusuke; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (UGL) degrades unsaturated disaccharides generated from mammalian extracellular matrices, glycosaminoglycans, by polysaccharide lyases. Two Asp residues, Asp-115 and Asp-175 of Streptococcus agalactiae UGL (SagUGL), are completely conserved in other bacterial UGLs, one of which (Asp-175 of SagUGL) acts as a general acid and base catalyst. The other Asp (Asp-115 of SagUGL) also affects the enzyme activity, although its role in the enzyme reaction has not been well understood. Here, we show substitution of Asp-115 in SagUGL with Asn caused a conformational change in the active site. Tertiary structures of SagUGL mutants D115N and D115N/K370S with negligible enzyme activity were determined at 2.00 and 1.79 Å resolution, respectively, by X-ray crystallography. The side chain of Asn-115 is drastically shifted in both mutants owing to the interaction with several residues, including Asp-175, by formation of hydrogen bonds. This interaction between Asn-115 and Asp-175 probably prevents the mutants from triggering the enzyme reaction using Asp-175 as an acid catalyst.

  18. Counting Active Sites on Titanium Oxide-Silica Catalysts for Hydrogen Peroxide Activation through In Situ Poisoning with Phenylphosphonic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, Todd R.; Boston, Andrew M.; Thompson, Anthony B.; Gray, Kimberly A.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2015-06-04

    Quantifying specific active sites in supported catalysts improves our understanding and assists in rational design. Supported oxides can undergo significant structural changes as surface densities increase from site-isolated cations to monolayers and crystallites, which changes the number of kinetically relevant sites. Herein, TiOx domains are titrated on TiOx–SiO2 selectively with phenylphosphonic acid (PPA). An ex situ method quantifies all fluid-accessible TiOx, whereas an in situ titration during cis-cyclooctene epoxidation provides previously unavailable values for the number of tetrahedral Ti sites on which H2O2 activation occurs. We use this method to determine the active site densities of 22 different catalysts with different synthesis methods, loadings, and characteristic spectra and find a single intrinsic turnover frequency for cis-cyclooctene epoxidation of (40±7) h-1. This simple method gives molecular-level insight into catalyst structure that is otherwise hidden when bulk techniques are used.

  19. Active site of tripeptidyl peptidase II from human erythrocytes is of the subtilisin type.

    PubMed Central

    Tomkinson, B; Wernstedt, C; Hellman, U; Zetterqvist, O

    1987-01-01

    The present report presents evidence that the amino acid sequence around the serine of the active site of human tripeptidyl peptidase II is of the subtilisin type. The enzyme from human erythrocytes was covalently labeled at its active site with [3H]diisopropyl fluorophosphate, and the protein was subsequently reduced, alkylated, and digested with trypsin. The labeled tryptic peptides were purified by gel filtration and repeated reversed-phase HPLC, and their amino-terminal sequences were determined. Residue 9 contained the radioactive label and was, therefore, considered to be the active serine residue. The primary structure of the part of the active site (residues 1-10) containing this residue was concluded to be Xaa-Thr-Gln-Leu-Met-Asx-Gly-Thr-Ser-Met. This amino acid sequence is homologous to the sequence surrounding the active serine of the microbial peptidases subtilisin and thermitase. These data demonstrate that human tripeptidyl peptidase II represents a potentially distinct class of human peptidases and raise the question of an evolutionary relationship between the active site of a mammalian peptidase and that of the subtilisin family of serine peptidases. PMID:3313395

  20. Evolution of anatase surface active sites probed by in situ sum-frequency phonon spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Chen, Shiyou; Li, Yadong; Gao, Yi; Yang, Deheng; Shen, Yuen Ron; Liu, Wei-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Surface active sites of crystals often govern their relevant surface chemistry, yet to monitor them in situ in real atmosphere remains a challenge. Using surface-specific sum-frequency spectroscopy, we identified the surface phonon mode associated with the active sites of undercoordinated titanium ions and conjoint oxygen vacancies, and used it to monitor them on anatase (TiO2) (101) under ambient conditions. In conjunction with theory, we determined related surface structure around the active sites and tracked the evolution of oxygen vacancies under ultraviolet irradiation. We further found that unlike in vacuum, the surface oxygen vacancies, which dominate the surface reactivity, are strongly regulated by ambient gas molecules, including methanol and water, as well as weakly associated species, such as nitrogen and hydrogen. The result revealed a rich interplay between prevailing ambient species and surface reactivity, which can be omnipresent in environmental and catalytic applications of titanium dioxides. PMID:27704049

  1. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Michael K; Mehta, Angad P; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H; Begley, Tadhg P; Ealick, Steven E

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  2. Solvent Tuning of Electrochemical Potentials in the Active Sites of HiPIP Versus Ferredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, A.; Francis, E.J.; Adams, M.W.W.; Babini, E.; Takahashi, Y.; Fukuyama, K.; Hodgson, K.O.; Hedman, B.; Solomon, E.I.; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept. /Georgia U. /Bologna U. /Osaka U. /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-29

    A persistent puzzle in the field of biological electron transfer is the conserved iron-sulfur cluster motif in both high potential iron-sulfur protein (HiPIP) and ferredoxin (Fd) active sites. Despite this structural similarity, HiPIPs react oxidatively at physiological potentials, whereas Fds are reduced. Sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy uncovers the substantial influence of hydration on this variation in reactivity. Fe-S covalency is much lower in natively hydrated Fd active sites than in HiPIPs but increases upon water removal; similarly, HiPIP covalency decreases when unfolding exposes an otherwise hydrophobically shielded active site to water. Studies on model compounds and accompanying density functional theory calculations support a correlation of Fe-S covalency with ease of oxidation and therefore suggest that hydration accounts for most of the difference between Fd and HiPIP reduction potentials.

  3. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  4. Wasp recruitment to the T cell:APC contact site occurs independently of Cdc42 activation.

    PubMed

    Cannon, J L; Labno, C M; Bosco, G; Seth, A; McGavin, M H; Siminovitch, K A; Rosen, M K; Burkhardt, J K

    2001-08-01

    Cdc42 and WASP are critical regulators of actin polymerization whose function during T cell signaling is poorly understood. Using a novel reagent that specifically detects Cdc42-GTP in fixed cells, we found that activated Cdc42 localizes to the T cell:APC contact site in an antigen-dependent manner. TCR signaling alone was sufficient to induce localization of Cdc42-GTP, and functional Lck and Zap-70 kinases were required. WASP also localized to the T cell:APC contact site in an antigen-dependent manner. Surprisingly, WASP localization was independent of the Cdc42 binding domain but required the proline-rich domain. Our results indicate that localized WASP activation requires the integration of multiple signals: WASP is recruited via interaction with SH3 domain-containing proteins and is activated by Cdc42-GTP concentrated at the same site. PMID:11520460

  5. Mutations Closer to the Active Site Improve the Promiscuous Aldolase Activity of 4-Oxalocrotonate Tautomerase More Effectively than Distant Mutations.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mehran; van der Meer, Jan-Ytzen; Geertsema, Edzard M; Poddar, Harshwardhan; Baas, Bert-Jan; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2016-07-01

    The enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), which catalyzes enol-keto tautomerization as part of a degradative pathway for aromatic hydrocarbons, promiscuously catalyzes various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. These include the aldol condensation of acetaldehyde with benzaldehyde to yield cinnamaldehyde. Here, we demonstrate that 4-OT can be engineered into a more efficient aldolase for this condensation reaction, with a >5000-fold improvement in catalytic efficiency (kcat /Km ) and a >10(7) -fold change in reaction specificity, by exploring small libraries in which only "hotspots" are varied. The hotspots were identified by systematic mutagenesis (covering each residue), followed by a screen for single mutations that give a strong improvement in the desired aldolase activity. All beneficial mutations were near the active site of 4-OT, thus underpinning the notion that new catalytic activities of a promiscuous enzyme are more effectively enhanced by mutations close to the active site. PMID:27238293

  6. Testing the applicability of rapid on-site enzymatic activity detection for surface water monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Philipp; Vogl, Wolfgang; Juri, Koschelnik; Markus, Epp; Maximilian, Lackner; Markus, Oismüller; Monika, Kumpan; Peter, Strauss; Regina, Sommer; Gabriela, Ryzinska-Paier; Farnleitner Andreas, H.; Matthias, Zessner

    2015-04-01

    On-site detection of enzymatic activities has been suggested as a rapid surrogate for microbiological pollution monitoring of water resources (e.g. using glucuronidases, galactosidases, esterases). Due to the possible short measuring intervals enzymatic methods have high potential as near-real time water quality monitoring tools. This presentation describes results from a long termed field test. For twelve months, two ColiMinder devices (Vienna Water Monitoring, Austria) for on-site determination of enzymatic activity were tested for stream water monitoring at the experimental catchment HOAL (Hydrological Open Air Laboratory, Center for Water Resource Systems, Vienna University of Technology). The devices were overall able to follow and reflect the diverse hydrological and microbiological conditions of the monitored stream during the test period. Continuous data in high temporal resolution captured the course of enzymatic activity in stream water during diverse rainfall events. The method also proofed sensitive enough to determine diurnal fluctuations of enzymatic activity in stream water during dry periods. The method was able to capture a seasonal trend of enzymatic activity in stream water that matches the results gained from Colilert18 analysis for E. coli and coliform bacteria of monthly grab samples. Furthermore the comparison of ColiMinder data with measurements gained at the same test site with devices using the same method but having different construction design (BACTcontrol, microLAN) showed consistent measuring results. Comparative analysis showed significant differences between measured enzymatic activity (modified fishman units and pmol/min/100ml) and cultivation based analyses (most probable number, colony forming unit). Methods of enzymatic activity measures are capable to detect ideally the enzymatic activity caused by all active target bacteria members, including VBNC (viable but nonculturable) while cultivation based methods cannot detect VBNC

  7. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzner, R.E.; Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  8. Identification of the reactive cysteinyl residue and ATP binding site in Bacillus cereus glutamine synthetase by chemical modification.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Y; Itoh, M; Tanaka, E; Kimura, K

    1990-02-01

    Bacillus cereus glutamine synthetase was modified by reaction with a fluorescent SH reagent, N-[[(iodoacetyl)amino]ethyl]-5-naphthylamine-1-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS), or an ATP analog, 5'-p-fluorosulfonylbenzoyladenosine (FSBA). The locations of the specific binding sites of these reagents were identified. IAEDANS inactivated Mg2(+)-dependent activity and activated Mn2(+)-dependent activity. FSBA inactivated only Mn2(+)-dependent activity. Mg2+ plus Mn2(+)-dependent activity was inactivated by IAEDANS or FSBA. Amino acid sequence analysis of the single AEDANS-labeled proteolytic fragment showed the cysteinyl residue at position 306 to be the site of modification. Cys 306 is one of three cysteines that are unique to Bacillus glutamine synthetase. The result suggested that the cysteine has a role in the active site of the enzyme. We also report that the amino acid residue modified by FSBA was the lysyl residue at position 43.

  9. The active site of low-temperature methane hydroxylation in iron-containing zeolites.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Benjamin E R; Vanelderen, Pieter; Bols, Max L; Hallaert, Simon D; Böttger, Lars H; Ungur, Liviu; Pierloot, Kristine; Schoonheydt, Robert A; Sels, Bert F; Solomon, Edward I

    2016-08-18

    An efficient catalytic process for converting methane into methanol could have far-reaching economic implications. Iron-containing zeolites (microporous aluminosilicate minerals) are noteworthy in this regard, having an outstanding ability to hydroxylate methane rapidly at room temperature to form methanol. Reactivity occurs at an extra-lattice active site called α-Fe(ii), which is activated by nitrous oxide to form the reactive intermediate α-O; however, despite nearly three decades of research, the nature of the active site and the factors determining its exceptional reactivity are unclear. The main difficulty is that the reactive species-α-Fe(ii) and α-O-are challenging to probe spectroscopically: data from bulk techniques such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility are complicated by contributions from inactive 'spectator' iron. Here we show that a site-selective spectroscopic method regularly used in bioinorganic chemistry can overcome this problem. Magnetic circular dichroism reveals α-Fe(ii) to be a mononuclear, high-spin, square planar Fe(ii) site, while the reactive intermediate, α-O, is a mononuclear, high-spin Fe(iv)=O species, whose exceptional reactivity derives from a constrained coordination geometry enforced by the zeolite lattice. These findings illustrate the value of our approach to exploring active sites in heterogeneous systems. The results also suggest that using matrix constraints to activate metal sites for function-producing what is known in the context of metalloenzymes as an 'entatic' state-might be a useful way to tune the activity of heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:27535535

  10. The active site of low-temperature methane hydroxylation in iron-containing zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Benjamin E. R.; Vanelderen, Pieter; Bols, Max L.; Hallaert, Simon D.; Böttger, Lars H.; Ungur, Liviu; Pierloot, Kristine; Schoonheydt, Robert A.; Sels, Bert F.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2016-08-01

    An efficient catalytic process for converting methane into methanol could have far-reaching economic implications. Iron-containing zeolites (microporous aluminosilicate minerals) are noteworthy in this regard, having an outstanding ability to hydroxylate methane rapidly at room temperature to form methanol. Reactivity occurs at an extra-lattice active site called α-Fe(II), which is activated by nitrous oxide to form the reactive intermediate α-O; however, despite nearly three decades of research, the nature of the active site and the factors determining its exceptional reactivity are unclear. The main difficulty is that the reactive species—α-Fe(II) and α-O—are challenging to probe spectroscopically: data from bulk techniques such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility are complicated by contributions from inactive ‘spectator’ iron. Here we show that a site-selective spectroscopic method regularly used in bioinorganic chemistry can overcome this problem. Magnetic circular dichroism reveals α-Fe(II) to be a mononuclear, high-spin, square planar Fe(II) site, while the reactive intermediate, α-O, is a mononuclear, high-spin Fe(IV)=O species, whose exceptional reactivity derives from a constrained coordination geometry enforced by the zeolite lattice. These findings illustrate the value of our approach to exploring active sites in heterogeneous systems. The results also suggest that using matrix constraints to activate metal sites for function—producing what is known in the context of metalloenzymes as an ‘entatic’ state—might be a useful way to tune the activity of heterogeneous catalysts.

  11. A Tale of Two Isomerases: Compact versus Extended Active Sites in Ketosteroid Isomerase and Phosphoglucose Isomerase

    SciTech Connect

    Somarowthu, Srinivas; Brodkin, Heather R.; D’Aquino, J. Alejandro; Ringe, Dagmar; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Beuning, Penny J.

    2012-07-11

    Understanding the catalytic efficiency and specificity of enzymes is a fundamental question of major practical and conceptual importance in biochemistry. Although progress in biochemical and structural studies has enriched our knowledge of enzymes, the role in enzyme catalysis of residues that are not nearest neighbors of the reacting substrate molecule is largely unexplored experimentally. Here computational active site predictors, THEMATICS and POOL, were employed to identify functionally important residues that are not in direct contact with the reacting substrate molecule. These predictions then guided experiments to explore the active sites of two isomerases, Pseudomonas putida ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) and human phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), as prototypes for very different types of predicted active sites. Both KSI and PGI are members of EC 5.3 and catalyze similar reactions, but they represent significantly different degrees of remote residue participation, as predicted by THEMATICS and POOL. For KSI, a compact active site of mostly first-shell residues is predicted, but for PGI, an extended active site in which residues in the first, second, and third layers around the reacting substrate are predicted. Predicted residues that have not been previously tested experimentally were investigated by site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic analysis. In human PGI, single-point mutations of the predicted second- and third-shell residues K362, H100, E495, D511, H396, and Q388 show significant decreases in catalytic activity relative to that of the wild type. The results of these experiments demonstrate that, as predicted, remote residues are very important in PGI catalysis but make only small contributions to catalysis in KSI.

  12. SABER: A computational method for identifying active sites for new reactions

    PubMed Central

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R; Houk, K N

    2012-01-01

    A software suite, SABER (Selection of Active/Binding sites for Enzyme Redesign), has been developed for the analysis of atomic geometries in protein structures, using a geometric hashing algorithm (Barker and Thornton, Bioinformatics 2003;19:1644–1649). SABER is used to explore the Protein Data Bank (PDB) to locate proteins with a specific 3D arrangement of catalytic groups to identify active sites that might be redesigned to catalyze new reactions. As a proof-of-principle test, SABER was used to identify enzymes that have the same catalytic group arrangement present in o-succinyl benzoate synthase (OSBS). Among the highest-scoring scaffolds identified by the SABER search for enzymes with the same catalytic group arrangement as OSBS were l-Ala d/l-Glu epimerase (AEE) and muconate lactonizing enzyme II (MLE), both of which have been redesigned to become effective OSBS catalysts, demonstrated by experiments. Next, we used SABER to search for naturally existing active sites in the PDB with catalytic groups similar to those present in the designed Kemp elimination enzyme KE07. From over 2000 geometric matches to the KE07 active site, SABER identified 23 matches that corresponded to residues from known active sites. The best of these matches, with a 0.28 Å catalytic atom RMSD to KE07, was then redesigned to be compatible with the Kemp elimination using RosettaDesign. We also used SABER to search for potential Kemp eliminases using a theozyme predicted to provide a greater rate acceleration than the active site of KE07, and used Rosetta to create a design based on the proteins identified. PMID:22492397

  13. SABER: a computational method for identifying active sites for new reactions.

    PubMed

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R; Houk, K N

    2012-05-01

    A software suite, SABER (Selection of Active/Binding sites for Enzyme Redesign), has been developed for the analysis of atomic geometries in protein structures, using a geometric hashing algorithm (Barker and Thornton, Bioinformatics 2003;19:1644-1649). SABER is used to explore the Protein Data Bank (PDB) to locate proteins with a specific 3D arrangement of catalytic groups to identify active sites that might be redesigned to catalyze new reactions. As a proof-of-principle test, SABER was used to identify enzymes that have the same catalytic group arrangement present in o-succinyl benzoate synthase (OSBS). Among the highest-scoring scaffolds identified by the SABER search for enzymes with the same catalytic group arrangement as OSBS were L-Ala D/L-Glu epimerase (AEE) and muconate lactonizing enzyme II (MLE), both of which have been redesigned to become effective OSBS catalysts, demonstrated by experiments. Next, we used SABER to search for naturally existing active sites in the PDB with catalytic groups similar to those present in the designed Kemp elimination enzyme KE07. From over 2000 geometric matches to the KE07 active site, SABER identified 23 matches that corresponded to residues from known active sites. The best of these matches, with a 0.28 Å catalytic atom RMSD to KE07, was then redesigned to be compatible with the Kemp elimination using RosettaDesign. We also used SABER to search for potential Kemp eliminases using a theozyme predicted to provide a greater rate acceleration than the active site of KE07, and used Rosetta to create a design based on the proteins identified. PMID:22492397

  14. Preliminary examination of the impacts of repository site characterization activities and facility construction and operation activities on Hanford air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Glantz, C.S.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1986-04-01

    Air quality impacts that would result from site characterization activities and from the construction and operation of a high-level nuclear wste repository at Hanford are estimated using two simple atmospheric dispersion models, HANCHI and CHISHORT. Model results indicate that pollutant concentrations would not exceed ambient air quality standards at any point outside the Hanford fenceline or at any publicly accessible location within the Hanford Site. The increase in pollutant concentrations in nearby communities due to site activities would be minimal. HANCHI and CHISHORT are documented in the appendices of this document. Further study of the repository's impact on air quality will be conducted when more detailed project plans and work schedules are available.

  15. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-12-15

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser(696) and Ser(698) in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser(886) and/or Ser(893) in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser(717) in the JM, and at Ser(733), Thr(752), Ser(783), Ser(864), Ser(911), Ser(958) and Thr(998) in the kinase domain. The LC-ESI-MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr(890), Ser(893) and Thr(894)) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr(890), Ser(893), Thr(894) and Thr(899), differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response.

  16. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-01-01

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser696 and Ser698 in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser886 and/or Ser893 in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser717 in the JM, and at Ser733, Thr752, Ser783, Ser864, Ser911, Ser958 and Thr998 in the kinase domain. The LC–ESI–MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr890, Ser893 and Thr894) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr890, Ser893, Thr894 and Thr899, differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response. PMID:26472115

  17. Tentative Identification of the Second Substrate Binding Site in Arabidopsis Phytochelatin Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Ju-Chen; Yang, Chien-Chih; Sui, Yu-Ting; Lin, Shin-Yu; Juang, Rong-Huay

    2013-01-01

    Phytochelatin synthase (PCS) uses the substrates glutathione (GSH, γGlu-Cys-Gly) and a cadmium (Cd)-bound GSH (Cd∙GS2) to produce the shortest phytochelatin product (PC2, (γGlu-Cys)2-Gly) through a ping-pong mechanism. The binding of the 2 substrates to the active site, particularly the second substrate binding site, is not well-understood. In this study, we generated a structural model of the catalytic domain of Arabidopsis AtPCS1 (residues 12–218) by using the crystal structure of the γGlu-Cys acyl-enzyme complex of the PCS of the cyanobacterium Nostoc (NsPCS) as a template. The modeled AtPCS1 revealed a cavity in