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Sample records for active site cysteines

  1. Chemical modification studies on arginine kinase: essential cysteine and arginine residues at the active site.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen-Jing; Li, Miao; Wang, Xiao-Yun

    2007-12-01

    Chemical modification was used to elucidate the essential amino acids in the catalytic activity of arginine kinase (AK) from Migratoria manilensis. Among six cysteine (Cys) residues only one Cys residue was determined to be essential in the active site by Tsou's method. Furthermore, the AK modified by DTNB can be fully reactivated by dithiothreitol (DTT) in a monophasic kinetic course. At the same time, this reactivation can be slowed down in the presence of ATP, suggesting that the essential Cys is located near the ATP binding site. The ionizing groups at the AK active site were studied and the standard dissociation enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ) was 12.38kcal/mol, showing that the dissociation group may be the guanidino of arginine (Arg). Using the specific chemical modifier phenylglyoxal (PG) demonstrated that only one Arg, located near the ATP binding site, is essential for the activity of AK. PMID:17765964

  2. Role of a cysteine residue in the active site of ERK and the MAPKK family

    SciTech Connect

    Ohori, Makoto; Kinoshita, Takayoshi; Yoshimura, Seiji; Warizaya, Masaichi; Nakajima, Hidenori . E-mail: hidenori.nakajima@jp.astellas.com; Miyake, Hiroshi

    2007-02-16

    Kinases of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, including extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), represent likely targets for pharmacological intervention in proliferative diseases. Here, we report that FR148083 inhibits ERK2 enzyme activity and TGF{beta}-induced AP-1-dependent luciferase expression with respective IC{sub 50} values of 0.08 and 0.05 {mu}M. FR265083 (1'-2' dihydro form) and FR263574 (1'-2' and 7'-8' tetrahydro form) exhibited 5.5-fold less and no activity, respectively, indicating that both the {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated ketone and the conformation of the lactone ring contribute to this inhibitory activity. The X-ray crystal structure of the ERK2/FR148083 complex revealed that the compound binds to the ATP binding site of ERK2, involving a covalent bond to S{gamma} of ERK2 Cys166, hydrogen bonds with the backbone NH of Met108, N{zeta} of Lys114, backbone C=O of Ser153, N{delta}2 of Asn154, and hydrophobic interactions with the side chains of Ile31, Val39, Ala52, and Leu156. The covalent bond motif in the ERK2/FR148083 complex assures that the inhibitor has high activity for ERK2 and no activity for other MAPKs such as JNK1 and p38MAPK{alpha}/{beta}/{gamma}/{delta} which have leucine residues at the site corresponding to Cys166 in ERK2. On the other hand, MEK1 and MKK7, kinases of the MAPKK family which also can be inhibited by FR148083, contain a cysteine residue corresponding to Cys166 of ERK2. The covalent binding to the common cysteine residue in the ATP-binding site is therefore likely to play a crucial role in the inhibitory activity for these MAP kinases. These findings on the molecular recognition mechanisms of FR148083 for kinases with Cys166 should provide a novel strategy for the pharmacological intervention of MAPK cascades.

  3. Cysteine-S-conjugate beta-lyase activity and pyridoxal phosphate binding site of onion alliin lyase.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, N; Shimomura, N; Iseki, J; Honma, M; Chiba, S; Tahara, S; Mizutani, J

    1997-08-01

    Purification of onion alliin lyase gave two fractions by cation exchange chromatography. Both fractions showed the comparable high catalytic activity of cysteine-S-conjugate beta-lyase with that of alliin lyase using S-(2-chloro-6-nitrophenyl)-L-cysteine and alliin, S-allyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide as substrates. All the active substrates tested with onion alliin lyase were also active to the cysteine-S-conjugate beta-lyase of Mucor javanicus, but the catalytic activity of the Mucor enzyme was lower for all the substrates. The pyridoxal phosphate binding site of the onion alliin lyase was identified as Lys 285 in the amino acid sequence deduced from cDNA which has been reported. This lysine was conserved in all the sequences from the alliin lyase cDNAs, while similarity was not found between the sequences around pyridoxal phosphate binding sites of both the onion alliin lyase and the Mucor cysteine-S-conjugate beta-lyase. PMID:9301115

  4. Chemical modification of a xylanase from a thermotolerant Streptomyces. Evidence for essential tryptophan and cysteine residues at the active site.

    PubMed

    Keskar, S S; Srinivasan, M C; Deshpande, V V

    1989-07-01

    Extracellular xylanase produced in submerged culture by a thermotolerant Streptomyces T7 growing at 37-50 degrees C was purified to homogeneity by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration on Sephadex G-50. The purified enzyme has an Mr of 20,463 and a pI of 7.8. The pH and temperature optima for the activity were 4.5-5.5 and 60 degrees C respectively. The enzyme retained 100% of its original activity on incubation at pH 5.0 for 6 days at 50 degrees C and for 11 days at 37 degrees C. The Km and Vmax. values, as determined with soluble larch-wood xylan, were 10 mg/ml and 7.6 x 10(3) mumol/min per mg of enzyme respectively. The xylanase was devoid of cellulase activity. It was completely inhibited by Hg2+ (2 x 10(-6) M). The enzyme degraded xylan, producing xylobiose, xylo-oligosaccharides and a small amount of xylose as end products, indicating that it is an endoxylanase. Chemical modification of xylanase with N-bromosuccinimide, 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl bromide and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate (PHMB) revealed that 1 mol each of tryptophan and cysteine per mol of enzyme were essential for the activity. Xylan completely protected the enzyme from inactivation by the above reagents, suggesting the presence of tryptophan and cysteine at the substrate-binding site. Inactivation of xylanase by PHMB could be restored by cysteine.

  5. Characterization and sequencing of an active-site cysteine-containing peptide from the xylanase of a thermotolerant Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Keskar, S S; Rao, M B; Deshpande, V V

    1992-02-01

    The kinetics of chemical modification of the xylanase from a thermotolerant Streptomyces T7 indicated the involvement of 1 mol of cysteine residue/mol of enzyme [Keskar, Srinivasan & Deshpande (1989) Biochem. J. 261, 49-55]. The chromophoric reagent N-(2,4-dinitroanilino)maleimide (DAM) reacts covalently with thiol groups of xylanase with complete inactivation. Protection against inactivation was provided by the substrate (xylan). The purified xylanase that had been modified with DAM was digested with pepsin and the peptides were purified by gel filtration followed by peptide mapping. The active-site peptide was distinguished from the other thiol-containing peptides by comparison of the peptides generated by labelling the enzyme in the presence and in the absence of the substrate. The peptide mapping of the modified enzyme in the absence of xylan showed three yellow peptides, whereas in the presence of xylan only two yellow peptides were detected. The active-site peptide protected by the substrate failed to form the complex with DAM. The modified active-site peptide was isolated and sequenced. Gas-phase sequencing provided the following sequence: Ser-Val-Ile-Met-Xaa-Ile-Asp-His-Ile-Arg-Phe. This is the first report on the isolation and sequencing of the active-site peptide from a xylanase. The comparison of reactive cysteine-containing peptide sequence with the catalytic regions of other glucanases revealed the presence of a conserved aspartic acid residue.

  6. Involvement of the Cys-Tyr cofactor on iron binding in the active site of human cysteine dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Arjune, Sita; Schwarz, Guenter; Belaidi, Abdel A

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur metabolism has gained increasing medical interest over the last years. In particular, cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been recognized as a potential marker in oncology due to its altered gene expression in various cancer types. Human CDO is a non-heme iron-dependent enzyme, which catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid, which is further metabolized to taurine or pyruvate and sulfate. Several studies have reported a unique post-translational modification of human CDO consisting of a cross-link between cysteine 93 and tyrosine 157 (Cys-Tyr), which increases catalytic efficiency in a substrate-dependent manner. However, the reaction mechanism by which the Cys-Tyr cofactor increases catalytic efficiency remains unclear. In this study, steady-state kinetics were determined for wild type CDO and two different variants being either impaired or saturated with the Cys-Tyr cofactor. Cofactor formation in CDO resulted in an approximately fivefold increase in k cat and tenfold increase in k cat/K m over the cofactor-free CDO variant. Furthermore, iron titration experiments revealed an 18-fold decrease in K d of iron upon cross-link formation. This finding suggests a structural role of the Cys-Tyr cofactor in coordinating the ferrous iron in the active site of CDO in accordance with the previously postulated reaction mechanism of human CDO. Finally, we identified product-based inhibition and α-ketoglutarate and glutarate as CDO inhibitors using a simplified well plate-based activity assay. This assay can be used for high-throughput identification of additional inhibitors, which may contribute to understand the functional importance of CDO in sulfur amino acid metabolism and related diseases.

  7. Active site mapping, biochemical properties and subcellular localization of rhodesain, the major cysteine protease of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, C R; Hansell, E; Lucas, K D; Brinen, L S; Alvarez Hernandez, A; Cheng, J; Gwaltney, S L; Roush, W R; Stierhof, Y D; Bogyo, M; Steverding, D; McKerrow, J H

    2001-11-01

    Cysteine protease activity of African trypanosome parasites is a target for new chemotherapy using synthetic protease inhibitors. To support this effort and further characterize the enzyme, we expressed and purified rhodesain, the target protease of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (MVAT4 strain), in reagent quantities from Pichia pastoris. Rhodesain was secreted as an active, mature protease. Site-directed mutagenesis of a cryptic glycosylation motif not previously identified allowed production of rhodesain suitable for crystallization. An invariable ER(A/V)FNAA motif in the pro-peptide sequence of rhodesain was identified as being unique to the genus Trypanosoma. Antibodies to rhodesain localized the protease in the lysosome and identified a 40-kDa protein in long slender forms of T. b. rhodesiense and all life-cycle stages of T. b. brucei. With the latter parasite, protease expression was five times greater in short stumpy trypanosomes than in the other stages. Radiolabeled active site-directed inhibitors identified brucipain as the major cysteine protease in T. b. brucei. Peptidomimetic vinyl sulfone and epoxide inhibitors designed to interact with the S2, S1 and S' subsites of the active site cleft revealed differences between rhodesain and the related trypanosome protease cruzain. Using fluorogenic dipeptidyl substrates, rhodesain and cruzain had acid pH optima, but unlike some mammalian cathepsins retained significant activity and stability up to pH 8.0, consistent with a possible extracellular function. S2 subsite mapping of rhodesain and cruzain with fluorogenic peptidyl substrates demonstrates that the presence of alanine rather than glutamate at S2 prevents rhodesain from cleaving substrates in which P2 is arginine. PMID:11704274

  8. Chemical modification of chalcone isomerase by mercurials and tetrathionate. Evidence for a single cysteine residue in the active site

    SciTech Connect

    Bednar, R.A.; Fried, W.B.; Lock, Y.W.; Pramanik, B. )

    1989-08-25

    Chalcone isomerase from soybean is inactivated by stoichiometric amounts of p-mercuribenzoate or HgCl{sub 2}. Spectral titration of the enzyme with p-mercuribenzoate indicates that a single thiol group is modified. Treatment of modified enzyme with KCN or thiols results in a complete restoration of enzyme activity demonstrating that the inactivation is not due to irreversible protein denaturation. A product of the enzymatic reaction, naringenin, provides complete kinetic protection against inactivation by both mercurials. The binding constant (33 microM) for naringenin determined from the concentration dependence of the protection agrees with the inhibition constant (34 microM) for naringenin as a competitive inhibitor of the catalytic reaction. This agreement demonstrates that the observed kinetic protection results from the specific binding of naringenin to the active site. Incubation of native chalcone isomerase with sodium tetrathionate (0.1 M) results in a slow time-dependent loss of enzymatic activity. The inactivation of chalcone isomerase by tetrathionate and N-ethylmaleimide becomes very rapid in the presence of 6 M urea, indicating that the native tertiary structure is responsible for the low reactivity of the enzymatic thiol. The stoichiometric modification of reduced and denatured chalcone isomerase by ({sup 3}H) N-ethylmaleimide indicates that the enzyme contains only a single cysteine residue and does not contain any disulfides. The evidence presented suggests that the only half-cystine residue in chalcone isomerase is located in the active site and thereby provides the first clue to the location of the active site in chalcone isomerase.

  9. Probes of the Catalytic Site of Cysteine Dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Chai,S.; Bruyere, J.; Maroney, M.

    2006-01-01

    The first major step of cysteine catabolism, the oxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid, is catalyzed by cysteine dioxygenase (CDO). In the present work, we utilize recombinant rat liver CDO and cysteine derivatives to elucidate structural parameters involved in substrate recognition and x-ray absorption spectroscopy to probe the interaction of the active site iron center with cysteine. Kinetic studies using cysteine structural analogs show that most are inhibitors and that a terminal functional group bearing a negative charge (e.g. a carboxylate) is required for binding. The substrate-binding site has no stringent restrictions with respect to the size of the amino acid. Lack of the amino or carboxyl groups at the a-carbon does not prevent the molecules from interacting with the active site. In fact, cysteamine is shown to be a potent activator of the enzyme without being a substrate. CDO was also rendered inactive upon complexation with the metal-binding inhibitors azide and cyanide. Unlike many non-heme iron dioxygenases that employ a-keto acids as cofactors, CDO was shown to be the only dioxygenase known to be inhibited by {alpha}-ketoglutarate.

  10. Evidence for proximal cysteine and lysine residues at or near the active site of arginine kinase of Stichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qin; Chen, Baoyu; Wang, Xicheng

    2004-12-01

    Inactivation of arginine kinase (AK) of Stichopus japonicus by o-phthalaldehyde (OPTA) was investigated. The modified enzyme showed an absorption peak at 337 nm and a fluorescent emission peak at 410 nm, which are characteristic of an isoindole derivative formed by OPTA binding to a thiol and an amine group in proximity within the enzyme. Loss of enzymatic activity was concomitant with an increase in fluorescence intensity at 410 nm. Stoichiometry studies by Tsou's method showed that among the cysteine residues available for OPTA modification in the enzyme, only one was essential for the enzyme activity. This cysteine residue is located in a highly hydrophobic environment, presumably near ATP and ADP binding region. This conclusion was verified by 5,5 -dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) modification. In addition, these results were supported by means of electrophoresis and ultraviolet, fluorescence, circular dichroism spectroscopy and fast performance liquid chromatography. Sequence comparison suggested that this essential cysteine residue maybe the conservative Cys274. PMID:15627388

  11. Single Residue Mutation in Active Site of Serine Acetyltransferase Isoform 3 from Entamoeba histolytica Assists in Partial Regaining of Feedback Inhibition by Cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sudhir; Mazumder, Mohit; Dharavath, Sudhaker; Gourinath, S.

    2013-01-01

    The cysteine biosynthetic pathway is essential for survival of the protist pathogen Entamoeba histolytica, and functions by producing cysteine for countering oxidative attack during infection in human hosts. Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS) are involved in cysteine biosynthesis and are present in three isoforms each. While EhSAT1 and EhSAT2 are feedback inhibited by end product cysteine, EhSAT3 is nearly insensitive to such inhibition. The active site residues of EhSAT1 and of EhSAT3 are identical except for position 208, which is a histidine residue in EhSAT1 and a serine residue in EhSAT3. A combination of comparative modeling, multiple molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculation studies showed a difference in binding energies of native EhSAT3 and of a S208H-EhSAT3 mutant for cysteine. Mutants have also been generated in vitro, replacing serine with histidine at position 208 in EhSAT3 and replacing histidine 208 with serine in EhSAT1. These mutants showed decreased affinity for substrate serine, as indicated by Km, compared to the native enzymes. Inhibition kinetics in the presence of physiological concentrations of serine show that IC50 of EhSAT1 increases by about 18 folds from 9.59 µM for native to 169.88 µM for H208S-EhSAT1 mutant. Similar measurements with EhSAT3 confirm it to be insensitive to cysteine inhibition while its mutant (S208H-EhSAT3) shows a gain of cysteine inhibition by 36% and the IC50 of 3.5 mM. Histidine 208 appears to be one of the important residues that distinguish the serine substrate from the cysteine inhibitor. PMID:23437075

  12. Thiol-beta-lactamase: replacement of the active-site serine of RTEM beta-lactamase by a cysteine residue.

    PubMed

    Sigal, I S; Harwood, B G; Arentzen, R

    1982-12-01

    We describe a procedure by which the codon (AGC) for the active-site serine-70 of pBR322 beta-lactamase (penicillinase, penicillin amido-beta-lactamhydrolase, EC 3.5.2.6) is altered to that for cysteine (TGC). The pertinent nucleotide bases, A-G-C-A, positions 410-413, of pBR322 are excised by treating a limited HgiAI digest of pBR322 with the 3' leads to 5' exonuclease of T4 DNA polymerase. The new sequence, T-G-C-A, is inserted in two steps. First, the Kpn I molecular linker d(T-G-G-T-A-C-C-A) is ligated into the gap described above. The internal sequence G-T-A-C is then excised enzymatically with Kpn I and T4 DNA polymerase and the molecule is recircularized. This mutant gene, which codes for a thiol-beta-lactamase, confers on Escherichia coli K-12 hosts an ampicillin resistance that is reduced compared with that given by pBR322 yet is greater than that of E. coli lacking any intact beta-lactamase gene. Cell-free extracts of E. coli strains hosting the thiol-beta-lactamase gene possess a p-chloromercuribenzoate-sensitive beta-lactamase activity.

  13. The Crystal Structure of Thermotoga maritima Class III Ribonucleotide Reductase Lacks a Radical Cysteine Pre-Positioned in the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Aurelius, Oskar; Johansson, Renzo; Bågenholm, Viktoria; Lundin, Daniel; Tholander, Fredrik; Balhuizen, Alexander; Beck, Tobias; Sahlin, Margareta; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Mulliez, Etienne; Logan, Derek T.

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, the building blocks for DNA synthesis, and are found in all but a few organisms. RNRs use radical chemistry to catalyze the reduction reaction. Despite RNR having evolved several mechanisms for generation of different kinds of essential radicals across a large evolutionary time frame, this initial radical is normally always channelled to a strictly conserved cysteine residue directly adjacent to the substrate for initiation of substrate reduction, and this cysteine has been found in the structures of all RNRs solved to date. We present the crystal structure of an anaerobic RNR from the extreme thermophile Thermotoga maritima (tmNrdD), alone and in several complexes, including with the allosteric effector dATP and its cognate substrate CTP. In the crystal structure of the enzyme as purified, tmNrdD lacks a cysteine for radical transfer to the substrate pre-positioned in the active site. Nevertheless activity assays using anaerobic cell extracts from T. maritima demonstrate that the class III RNR is enzymatically active. Other genetic and microbiological evidence is summarized indicating that the enzyme is important for T. maritima. Mutation of either of two cysteine residues in a disordered loop far from the active site results in inactive enzyme. We discuss the possible mechanisms for radical initiation of substrate reduction given the collected evidence from the crystal structure, our activity assays and other published work. Taken together, the results suggest either that initiation of substrate reduction may involve unprecedented conformational changes in the enzyme to bring one of these cysteine residues to the expected position, or that alternative routes for initiation of the RNR reduction reaction may exist. Finally, we present a phylogenetic analysis showing that the structure of tmNrdD is representative of a new RNR subclass IIIh, present in all Thermotoga

  14. Salvage of the thiamin pyrimidine moiety by plant TenA proteins lacking an active-site cysteine.

    PubMed

    Zallot, Rémi; Yazdani, Mohammad; Goyer, Aymeric; Ziemak, Michael J; Guan, Jiahn-Chou; McCarty, Donald R; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Gerdes, Svetlana; Garrett, Timothy J; Benach, Jordi; Hunt, John F; Shintani, David K; Hanson, Andrew D

    2014-10-01

    The TenA protein family occurs in prokaryotes, plants and fungi; it has two subfamilies, one (TenA_C) having an active-site cysteine, the other (TenA_E) not. TenA_C proteins participate in thiamin salvage by hydrolysing the thiamin breakdown product amino-HMP (4-amino-5-aminomethyl-2-methylpyrimidine) to HMP (4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine); the function of TenA_E proteins is unknown. Comparative analysis of prokaryote and plant genomes predicted that (i) TenA_E has a salvage role similar to, but not identical with, that of TenA_C and (ii) that TenA_E and TenA_C also have non-salvage roles since they occur in organisms that cannot make thiamin. Recombinant Arabidopsis and maize TenA_E proteins (At3g16990, GRMZM2G080501) hydrolysed amino-HMP to HMP and, far more actively, hydrolysed the N-formyl derivative of amino-HMP to amino-HMP. Ablating the At3g16990 gene in a line with a null mutation in the HMP biosynthesis gene ThiC prevented its rescue by amino-HMP. Ablating At3g16990 in the wild-type increased sensitivity to paraquat-induced oxidative stress; HMP overcame this increased sensitivity. Furthermore, the expression of TenA_E and ThiC genes in Arabidopsis and maize was inversely correlated. These results indicate that TenA_E proteins mediate amidohydrolase and aminohydrolase steps in the salvage of thiamin breakdown products. As such products can be toxic, TenA_E proteins may also pre-empt toxicity.

  15. Active site cysteine-null glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) rescues nitric oxide-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takeya; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Nakatsuji, Masatoshi; Itakura, Masanori; Kaneshige, Akihiro; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Inui, Takashi; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2016-02-29

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a homotetrameric enzyme involved in a key step of glycolysis, also has a role in mediating cell death under nitrosative stress. Our previous reports suggest that nitric oxide-induced intramolecular disulfide-bonding GAPDH aggregation, which occurs through oxidation of the active site cysteine (Cys-152), participates in a mechanism to account for nitric oxide-induced death signaling in some neurodegenerative/neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we demonstrate a rescue strategy for nitric oxide-induced cell death accompanied by GAPDH aggregation in a mutant with a substitution of Cys-152 to alanine (C152A-GAPDH). Pre-incubation of purified wild-type GAPDH with C152A-GAPDH under exposure to nitric oxide inhibited wild-type GAPDH aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro. Several lines of structural analysis revealed that C152A-GAPDH extensively interfered with nitric oxide-induced GAPDH-amyloidogenesis. Overexpression of doxycycline-inducible C152A-GAPDH in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma significantly rescued nitric oxide-induced death, concomitant with the decreased formation of GAPDH aggregates. Further, both co-immunoprecipitation assays and simulation models revealed a heterotetramer composed of one dimer each of wild-type GAPDH and C152A-GAPDH. These results suggest that the C152A-GAPDH mutant acts as a dominant-negative molecule against GAPDH aggregation via the formation of this GAPDH heterotetramer. This study may contribute to a new therapeutic approach utilizing C152A-GAPDH against brain damage in nitrosative stress-related disorders.

  16. SufE D74R Substitution Alters Active Site Loop Dynamics To Further Enhance SufE Interaction with the SufS Cysteine Desulfurase

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yuyuan; Kim, Dokyong; Dong, Guangchao; Busenlehner, Laura S.; Frantom, Patrick A.; Outten, F. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Many essential metalloproteins require iron–sulfur (Fe–S) cluster cofactors for their function. In vivo persulfide formation from L-cysteine is a key step in the biogenesis of Fe–S clusters in most organisms. In Escherichia coli, the SufS cysteine desulfurase mobilizes persulfide from L-cysteine via a PLP-dependent ping-pong reaction. SufS requires the SufE partner protein to transfer the persulfide to the SufB Fe–S cluster scaffold. Without SufE, the SufS enzyme fails to efficiently turn over and remains locked in the persulfide-bound state. Coordinated protein–protein interactions mediate sulfur transfer from SufS to SufE. Multiple studies have suggested that SufE must undergo a conformational change to extend its active site Cys loop during sulfur transfer from SufS. To test this putative model, we mutated SufE Asp74 to Arg (D74R) to increase the dynamics of the SufE Cys51 loop. Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) analysis of SufE D74R revealed an increase in solvent accessibility and dynamics in the loop containing the active site Cys51 used to accept persulfide from SufS. Our results indicate that the mutant protein has a stronger binding affinity for SufS than that of wild-type SufE. In addition, SufE D74R can still enhance SufS desulfurase activity and did not show saturation at higher SufE D74R concentrations, unlike wild-type SufE. These results show that dynamic changes may shift SufE to a sulfur-acceptor state that interacts more strongly with SufS. PMID:26171726

  17. SufE D74R Substitution Alters Active Site Loop Dynamics To Further Enhance SufE Interaction with the SufS Cysteine Desulfurase.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yuyuan; Kim, Dokyong; Dong, Guangchao; Busenlehner, Laura S; Frantom, Patrick A; Outten, F Wayne

    2015-08-11

    Many essential metalloproteins require iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster cofactors for their function. In vivo persulfide formation from l-cysteine is a key step in the biogenesis of Fe-S clusters in most organisms. In Escherichia coli, the SufS cysteine desulfurase mobilizes persulfide from l-cysteine via a PLP-dependent ping-pong reaction. SufS requires the SufE partner protein to transfer the persulfide to the SufB Fe-S cluster scaffold. Without SufE, the SufS enzyme fails to efficiently turn over and remains locked in the persulfide-bound state. Coordinated protein-protein interactions mediate sulfur transfer from SufS to SufE. Multiple studies have suggested that SufE must undergo a conformational change to extend its active site Cys loop during sulfur transfer from SufS. To test this putative model, we mutated SufE Asp74 to Arg (D74R) to increase the dynamics of the SufE Cys51 loop. Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) analysis of SufE D74R revealed an increase in solvent accessibility and dynamics in the loop containing the active site Cys51 used to accept persulfide from SufS. Our results indicate that the mutant protein has a stronger binding affinity for SufS than that of wild-type SufE. In addition, SufE D74R can still enhance SufS desulfurase activity and did not show saturation at higher SufE D74R concentrations, unlike wild-type SufE. These results show that dynamic changes may shift SufE to a sulfur-acceptor state that interacts more strongly with SufS.

  18. Zinc cysteine active sites of metalloproteins: a density functional theory and x-ray absorption fine structure study.

    PubMed

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Farooqi, Mohammed Junaid; Garza, Emily Sofia; Bunker, Grant

    2008-03-21

    Density functional theory (DFT) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy are complementary tools for the biophysical study of active sites in metalloproteins. DFT is used to compute XAFS multiple scattering Debye Waller factors, which are then employed in genetic algorithm-based fitting process to obtain a global fit to the XAFS in the space of fitting parameters. Zn-Cys sites, which serve important functions as transcriptional switches in Zn finger proteins and matrix metalloproteinases, previously have proven intractable by this method; here these limitations are removed. In this work we evaluate optimal DFT nonlocal functionals and basis sets for determining optimal geometries and vibrational densities of states of mixed ligation Zn(His)(4-n)(Cys)(n) sites. Theoretical results are compared to experimental XAFS measurements and Raman spectra from the literature and tabulated for use.

  19. Chicken scFvs with an Artificial Cysteine for Site-Directed Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Hyori; Chung, Junho

    2016-01-01

    For the site-directed conjugation of chemicals and radioisotopes to the chicken-derived single-chain variable fragment (scFv), we investigated amino acid residues replaceable with cysteine. By replacing each amino acid of the 157 chicken variable region framework residues (FR, 82 residues on VH and 75 on VL) with cysteine, 157 artificial cysteine mutants were generated and characterized. At least 27 residues on VL and 37 on VH could be replaced with cysteine while retaining the binding activity of the original scFv. We prepared three VL (L5, L6 and L7) and two VH (H13 and H16) mutants as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and showed that PEG-conjugation to the sulfhydryl group of the artificial cysteine was achievable in all five mutants. Because the charge around the cysteine residue affects the in vivo stability of thiol-maleimide conjugation, we prepared 16 charge-variant artificial cysteine mutants by replacing the flanking residues of H13 with charged amino acids and determined that the binding activity was not affected in any of the mutants except one. We prepared four charge-variant H13 artificial cysteine mutants (RCK, DCE, ECD and ECE) as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and confirmed that the reactivity of the sulfhydryl group on cysteine is active and their binding activity is retained after the conjugation process. PMID:26764487

  20. Chicken scFvs with an Artificial Cysteine for Site-Directed Conjugation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Aerin; Shin, Jung Won; Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Hyori; Chung, Junho

    2016-01-01

    For the site-directed conjugation of chemicals and radioisotopes to the chicken-derived single-chain variable fragment (scFv), we investigated amino acid residues replaceable with cysteine. By replacing each amino acid of the 157 chicken variable region framework residues (FR, 82 residues on VH and 75 on VL) with cysteine, 157 artificial cysteine mutants were generated and characterized. At least 27 residues on VL and 37 on VH could be replaced with cysteine while retaining the binding activity of the original scFv. We prepared three VL (L5, L6 and L7) and two VH (H13 and H16) mutants as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and showed that PEG-conjugation to the sulfhydryl group of the artificial cysteine was achievable in all five mutants. Because the charge around the cysteine residue affects the in vivo stability of thiol-maleimide conjugation, we prepared 16 charge-variant artificial cysteine mutants by replacing the flanking residues of H13 with charged amino acids and determined that the binding activity was not affected in any of the mutants except one. We prepared four charge-variant H13 artificial cysteine mutants (RCK, DCE, ECD and ECE) as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and confirmed that the reactivity of the sulfhydryl group on cysteine is active and their binding activity is retained after the conjugation process.

  1. Cysteine cathepsin activity regulation by glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Novinec, Marko; Lenarčič, Brigita; Turk, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are a group of enzymes normally found in the endolysosomes where they are primarily involved in intracellular protein turnover but also have a critical role in MHC II-mediated antigen processing and presentation. However, in a number of pathologies cysteine cathepsins were found to be heavily upregulated and secreted into extracellular milieu, where they were found to degrade a number of extracellular proteins. A major role in modulating cathepsin activities play glycosaminoglycans, which were found not only to facilitate their autocatalytic activation including at neutral pH, but also to critically modulate their activities such as in the case of the collagenolytic activity of cathepsin K. The interaction between cathepsins and glycosaminoglycans will be discussed in more detail.

  2. Activation Mechanism of the Bacteroides fragilis Cysteine Peptidase, Fragipain.

    PubMed

    Herrou, Julien; Choi, Vivian M; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane; Crosson, Sean

    2016-07-26

    Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis produces a secreted metalloprotease known as B. fragilis toxin (BFT), which contributes to anaerobic sepsis, colitis, and colonic malignancy in mouse models of disease. A C11 family cysteine protease, fragipain (Fpn), directly activates BFT in the B. fragilis cell by removing the BFT prodomain. Fpn is itself a proenzyme and is autoactivated upon cleavage at an arginine residue in its activation loop. We have defined the proteolytic active site of Fpn, demonstrated that Fpn autoactivation can occur by an in trans loop cleavage mechanism, and characterized structural features of the Fpn activation loop that control peptidase activity against several substrates, including BFT. An arginine residue at the autocleavage site determines the fast activation kinetics of Fpn relative to the homologous C11 protease, PmC11, which is cleaved at lysine. Arginine to alanine substitution at the cleavage site ablated peptidase activity, as did partial truncation of the Fpn activation loop. However, complete truncation of the activation loop yielded an uncleaved, pro form of Fpn that was active as a peptidase against both Fpn and BFT substrates. Thus, Fpn can be transformed into an active peptidase in the absence of activation loop cleavage. This study provides insight into the mechanism of fragipain activation and, more generally, defines the role of the C11 activation loop in the control of peptidase activity and substrate specificity.

  3. Salt Effect Accelerates Site-Selective Cysteine Bioconjugation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Highly efficient and selective chemical reactions are desired. For small molecule chemistry, the reaction rate can be varied by changing the concentration, temperature, and solvent used. In contrast for large biomolecules, the reaction rate is difficult to modify by adjusting these variables because stringent biocompatible reaction conditions are required. Here we show that adding salts can change the rate constant over 4 orders of magnitude for an arylation bioconjugation reaction between a cysteine residue within a four-residue sequence (π-clamp) and a perfluoroaryl electrophile. Biocompatible ammonium sulfate significantly enhances the reaction rate without influencing the site-specificity of π-clamp mediated arylation, enabling the fast synthesis of two site-specific antibody–drug conjugates that selectively kill HER2-positive breast cancer cells. Computational and structure–reactivity studies indicate that salts may tune the reaction rate through modulating the interactions between the π-clamp hydrophobic side chains and the electrophile. On the basis of this understanding, the salt effect is extended to other bioconjugation chemistry, and a new regioselective alkylation reaction at π-clamp cysteine is developed. PMID:27725962

  4. Phycobilin:cystein-84 biliprotein lyase, a near-universal lyase for cysteine-84-binding sites in cyanobacterial phycobiliproteins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai-Hong; Su, Ping; Tu, Jun-Ming; Wang, Xing; Liu, Hui; Plöscher, Matthias; Eichacker, Lutz; Yang, Bei; Zhou, Ming; Scheer, Hugo

    2007-09-01

    Phycobilisomes, the light-harvesting complexes of cyanobacteria and red algae, contain two to four types of chromophores that are attached covalently to seven or more members of a family of homologous proteins, each carrying one to four binding sites. Chromophore binding to apoproteins is catalyzed by lyases, of which only few have been characterized in detail. The situation is complicated by nonenzymatic background binding to some apoproteins. Using a modular multiplasmidic expression-reconstitution assay in Escherichia coli with low background binding, phycobilin:cystein-84 biliprotein lyase (CpeS1) from Anabaena PCC7120, has been characterized as a nearly universal lyase for the cysteine-84-binding site that is conserved in all biliproteins. It catalyzes covalent attachment of phycocyanobilin to all allophycocyanin subunits and to cysteine-84 in the beta-subunits of C-phycocyanin and phycoerythrocyanin. Together with the known lyases, it can thereby account for chromophore binding to all binding sites of the phycobiliproteins of Anabaena PCC7120. Moreover, it catalyzes the attachment of phycoerythrobilin to cysteine-84 of both subunits of C-phycoerythrin. The only exceptions not served by CpeS1 among the cysteine-84 sites are the alpha-subunits from phycocyanin and phycoerythrocyanin, which, by sequence analyses, have been defined as members of a subclass that is served by the more specialized E/F type lyases.

  5. The Active-Site Cysteines of the Periplasmic Thioredoxin-Like Protein CcmG of Escherichia coli Are Important but Not Essential for Cytochrome c Maturation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fabianek, Renata A.; Hennecke, Hauke; Thöny-Meyer, Linda

    1998-01-01

    A new member of the family of periplasmic protein thiol:disulfide oxidoreductases, CcmG (also called DsbE), was characterized with regard to its role in cytochrome c maturation in Escherichia coli. The CcmG protein was shown to be membrane bound, facing the periplasm with its C-terminal, hydrophilic domain. A chromosomal, nonpolar in-frame deletion in ccmG resulted in the complete absence of all c-type cytochromes. Replacement of either one or both of the two cysteine residues of the predicted active site in CcmG (WCPTC) led to low but detectable levels of Bradyrhizobium japonicum holocytochrome c550 expressed in E. coli. This defect, but not that of the ccmG null mutant, could be complemented by adding low-molecular-weight thiol compounds to growing cells, which is in agreement with a reducing function for CcmG. PMID:9537397

  6. A novel sulfate-reducing bacteria detection method based on inhibition of cysteine protease activity.

    PubMed

    Qi, Peng; Zhang, Dun; Wan, Yi

    2014-11-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have been extensively studied in corrosion and environmental science. However, fast enumeration of SRB population is still a difficult task. This work presents a novel specific SRB detection method based on inhibition of cysteine protease activity. The hydrolytic activity of cysteine protease was inhibited by taking advantage of sulfide, the characteristic metabolic product of SRB, to attack active cysteine thiol group in cysteine protease catalytic sites. The active thiol S-sulfhydration process could be used for SRB detection, since the amount of sulfide accumulated in culture medium was highly related with initial bacterial concentration. The working conditions of cysteine protease have been optimized to obtain better detection capability, and the SRB detection performances have been evaluated in this work. The proposed SRB detection method based on inhibition of cysteine protease activity avoided the use of biological recognition elements. In addition, compared with the widely used most probable number (MPN) method which would take up to at least 15days to accomplish whole detection process, the method based on inhibition of papain activity could detect SRB in 2 days, with a detection limit of 5.21×10(2) cfu mL(-1). The detection time for SRB population quantitative analysis was greatly shortened.

  7. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  8. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  9. One-Step Conjugation Method for Site-Specific Antibody-Drug Conjugates through Reactive Cysteine-Engineered Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Shinmi, Daisuke; Taguchi, Eri; Iwano, Junko; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Masuda, Kazuhiro; Enokizono, Junichi; Shiraishi, Yasuhisa

    2016-05-18

    Engineered cysteine residues are particularly convenient for site-specific conjugation of antibody-drug conjugates (ADC), because no cell engineering and additives are required. Usually, unpaired cysteine residues form mixed disulfides during fermentation in Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO) cells; therefore, additional reduction and oxidization steps are required prior to conjugation. In this study, we prepared light chain (Lc)-Q124C variants in IgG and examined the conjugation efficiency. Intriguingly, Lc-Q124C exhibited high thiol reactivity and directly generated site-specific ADC without any pretreatment (named active thiol antibody: Actibody). Most of the cysteine-maleimide conjugates including Lc-Q124C showed retro-Michael reaction with cysteine 34 in albumin and were decomposed over time. In order to acquire resistance to a maleimide exchange reaction, the facile procedure for succinimide hydrolysis on anion exchange resin was employed. Hydrolyzed Lc-Q124C conjugate prepared with anion exchange procedure retained high stability in plasma. Recently, various stable linkage schemes for cysteine conjugation have been reported. The combination with direct conjugation by the use of Actibody and stable linker technology could enable the generation of stable site-specific ADC through a simple method. Actibody technology with Lc-Q124C at a less exposed position opens a new path for cysteine-based conjugation, and contributes to reducing entry barriers to the preparation and evaluation of ADC. PMID:27074832

  10. Probing the specificity of cysteine proteinases at subsites remote from the active site: analysis of P4, P3, P2' and P3' variations in extended substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Portaro, F C; Santos, A B; Cezari, M H; Juliano, M A; Juliano, L; Carmona, E

    2000-01-01

    We have determined the kinetic parameters for the hydrolysis by papain, cathepsin B and cathepsin L of internally quenched fluorescent peptides derived from the lead peptides Abz-AAFRSAQ-EDDnp [in which Abz and EDDnp stand for o-aminobenzoic acid and N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)ethylenediamine respectively], to map the specificity of S(4) and S(3) subsites, and Abz-AFRSAAQ-EDDnp, to identify the specificity of S(2)' and S(3)'. Abz and EDDnp were the fluorescent quencher pair. These two series of peptides were cleaved at the Arg-Ser bond and systematic modifications at P(4), P(3), P(2)' and P(3)' were made. The S(4) to S(2)' subsites had a significant influence on the hydrolytic efficiencies of the three enzymes. Only papain activity was observed to be dependent on S(3)', indicating that its binding site is larger than those of cathepsins B and L. Hydrophobic amino acids were accepted at S(4), S(3), S(2)' and S(3)' of the three enzymes. The best substrates for cathepsins L and B had Trp and Asn at P(2)' respectively; variations at this position were less accepted by these enzymes. The best substrates for papain were peptides containing Trp, Tyr or Asn at P(3)'. Basic residues at P(3) and P(4) were well accepted by cathepsin L and papain. We also explored the susceptibility of substrates Abz-AFRSXAQ-EDDnp, modified at P(2)' (X), to human cathepsin B mutants from which one or two occluding loop contacts had been removed. The modifications at His(111) (H111A) and His(110) (H110A) of cathepsin B led to an increase in k(cat) values of one or two orders of magnitude. The hydrolytic efficiencies of these cathepsin B mutants became closer to those of papain or cathepsin L. PMID:10727410

  11. Correlation of loss of activity of human aldehyde dehydrogenase with reaction of bromoacetophenone with glutamic acid-268 and cysteine-302 residues. Partial-sites reactivity of aldehyde dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Abriola, D P; MacKerell, A D; Pietruszko, R

    1990-01-01

    Bromoacetophenone (2-bromo-1-phenylethanone) has been characterized as an affinity reagent for human aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.3) [MacKerell, MacWright & Pietruszko (1986) Biochemistry 25, 5182-5189], and has been shown to react specifically with the Glu-268 residue [Abriola, Fields, Stein, MacKerell & Pietruszko (1987) Biochemistry 26, 5679-5684] with an apparent inactivation stoichiometry of two molecules of bromoacetophenone per molecule of enzyme. The specificity of bromoacetophenone for reaction with Glu-268, however, is not absolute, owing to the extreme reactivity of this reagent. When bromo[14C]acetophenone was used to label the human cytoplasmic E1 isoenzyme radioactively and tryptic fragmentation was carried out, peptides besides that containing Glu-268 were found to have reacted with reagent. These peptides were purified by h.p.l.c. and analysed by sequencing and scintillation counting to quantify radioactive label in the material from each cycle of sequencing. Reaction of bromoacetophenone with the aldehyde dehydrogenase molecule during enzyme activity loss occurs with two residues, Glu-268 and Cys-302. The activity loss, however, appears to be proportional to incorporation of label at Glu-268. The large part of incorporation of label at Cys-302 occurs after the activity loss is essentially complete. With both Glu-268 and Cys-302, however, the incorporation of label stops after one molecule of bromoacetophenone has reacted with each residue. Reaction with other residues continues after activity loss is complete. PMID:1968743

  12. Mutation of active site serine residue with cysteine displays change in acyl-acceptor preference of β-peptidyl aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Arima, Jiro; Tanaka, Ayumi; Morimoto, Masazumi; Mori, Nobuhiro

    2014-02-01

    A β-peptidyl aminopeptidase, a peptidase belonging to the P1 family, catalyzes aminolysis in accordance with its hydrolytic activity. We specifically examined β-peptidyl aminopeptidase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (BapF) to assess the effects of mutation of catalytic Ser with Cys or Thr on its catalytic ability. Recombinant BapF and its S237C mutant exhibited p-nitroaniline release activity toward β-homo-Gly-p-nitroanilide (βhGly-pNA), but the products of the enzyme reaction differed completely from one another. Wild-type BapF showed βhGly-βhGly-pNA synthetic activity, but the product vanished in a few minutes and converted to free βhGly. In contrast, the product βhGly-βhGly-pNA was synthesized by S237C BapF efficiently without degradation, indicating that because of the mutation, the enzyme came to recognize only the amine group as an acyl acceptor instead of water. Furthermore, a difference in acyl acceptor preference between that of wild type and S237C BapF was observed. When using cysteamine as an acyl acceptor, βhGly-cysteamine was synthesized only in the reaction using S237C BapF. In contrast, S237C BapF was unable to synthesize βhGly-cystamine when using cystamine as an acyl acceptor, although it was synthesized by wild-type BapF. Such a dynamic change in the acyl acceptor by the mutation of catalytic Ser with Cys is regarded as a unique feature of family P1 peptidases.

  13. Role of cysteine-58 and cysteine-95 residues in the thiol di-sulfide oxidoreductase activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Nikhil; Hoti, S L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) is the first human cytokine reported and was thought to have a central role in the regulation of inflammatory responses. Homologs of this molecule have been reported in bacteria, invertebrates and plants. Apart from cytokine activity, it also has two catalytic activities viz., tautomerase and di-sulfide oxidoreductase, which appear to be involved in immunological functions. The CXXC catalytic site is responsible for di-sulfide oxidoreductase activity of MIF. We have recently reported thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti (Wba-MIF-2), although it lacks the CXXC motif. We hypothesized that three conserved cysteine residues might be involved in the formation of di-sulfide oxidoreductase catalytic site. Homology modeling of Wba-MIF-2 showed that among the three cysteine residues, Cys58 and Cys95 residues came in close proximity (3.23Å) in the tertiary structure with pKa value 9, indicating that these residues might play a role in the di-sulfide oxidoreductase catalytic activity. We carried out site directed mutagenesis of these residues (Cys58Ser & Cys95Ser) and expressed mutant proteins in Escherichia coli. The mutant proteins did not show any oxidoreductase activity in the insulin reduction assay, thus indicating that these two cysteine residues are vital for the catalytic activity of Wba-MIF-2. PMID:26432350

  14. Plant collagenase: unique collagenolytic activity of cysteine proteases from ginger.

    PubMed

    Kim, Misook; Hamilton, Susan E; Guddat, Luke W; Overall, Christopher M

    2007-12-01

    Two cysteine proteases, GP2 and GP3, have been isolated from ginger rhizomes (Zingiber officinale). GP2 is virtually identical to a previously identified ginger protease GPII [K.H. Choi, and R.A. Laursen, Amino-acid sequence and glycan structures of cysteine proteases with proline specificity from ginger rhizome Zingiber officinale, Eur. J. Biochem. 267 (2000) 1516-1526.], and cleaves native type I collagen at multiple discrete sites, which are in the interior of the triple helical region of this molecule. In reaction with proline-containing peptides GP2 shows preference for Pro in the P2 position, and at least 10-fold higher efficiency of hydrolysis than papain. Comparison of models of GP2 and GP3 with the crystal structure of papain shows that the three enzymes have different S2 pocket structures. The S2 pocket in GP2 and GP3 is half the size of that of papain. GP2 is the only reported plant cysteine protease with a demonstrated ability to hydrolyse native collagen. The results support a role for ginger proteases as an alternative to papain, in commercial applications such as meat tenderization, where collagen is the target substrate. PMID:17920199

  15. Frataxin directly stimulates mitochondrial cysteine desulfurase by exposing substrate-binding sites, and a mutant Fe-S cluster scaffold protein with frataxin-bypassing ability acts similarly.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Alok; Gordon, Donna M; Pain, Jayashree; Stemmler, Timothy L; Dancis, Andrew; Pain, Debkumar

    2013-12-27

    For iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster synthesis in mitochondria, the sulfur is derived from the amino acid cysteine by the cysteine desulfurase activity of Nfs1. The enzyme binds the substrate cysteine in the pyridoxal phosphate-containing site, and a persulfide is formed on the active site cysteine in a manner depending on the accessory protein Isd11. The persulfide is then transferred to the scaffold Isu, where it combines with iron to form the Fe-S cluster intermediate. Frataxin is implicated in the process, although it is unclear where and how, and deficiency causes Friedreich ataxia. Using purified proteins and isolated mitochondria, we show here that the yeast frataxin homolog (Yfh1) directly and specifically stimulates cysteine binding to Nfs1 by exposing substrate-binding sites. This novel function of frataxin does not require iron, Isu1, or Isd11. Once bound to Nfs1, the substrate cysteine is the source of the Nfs1 persulfide, but this step is independent of frataxin and strictly dependent on Isd11. Recently, a point mutation in Isu1 was found to bypass many frataxin functions. The data presented here show that the Isu1 suppressor mimics the frataxin effects on Nfs1, explaining the bypassing activity. We propose a regulatory mechanism for the Nfs1 persulfide-forming activity. Specifically, at least two separate conformational changes must occur in the enzyme for optimum activity as follows: one is mediated by frataxin interaction that exposes the "buried" substrate-binding sites, and the other is mediated by Isd11 interaction that brings the bound substrate cysteine and the active site cysteine in proximity for persulfide formation.

  16. The crystal structure of the cysteine protease Xylellain from Xylella fastidiosa reveals an intriguing activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Leite, Ney Ribeiro; Faro, Aline Regis; Dotta, Maria Amélia Oliva; Faim, Livia Maria; Gianotti, Andreia; Silva, Flavio Henrique; Oliva, Glaucius; Thiemann, Otavio Henrique

    2013-02-14

    Xylella fastidiosa is responsible for a wide range of economically important plant diseases. We report here the crystal structure and kinetic data of Xylellain, the first cysteine protease characterized from the genome of the pathogenic X. fastidiosa strain 9a5c. Xylellain has a papain-family fold, and part of the N-terminal sequence blocks the enzyme active site, thereby mediating protein activity. One novel feature identified in the structure is the presence of a ribonucleotide bound outside the active site. We show that this ribonucleotide plays an important regulatory role in Xylellain enzyme kinetics, possibly functioning as a physiological mediator.

  17. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of Cysteine and Site Specific Conjugated Herceptin Antibody-Drug Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Dowdy; Atkinson, John; Guevara, Claudia I.; Zhang, Chunying; Kery, Vladimir; Moon, Sung-Ju; Virata, Cyrus; Yang, Peng; Lowe, Christine; Pinkstaff, Jason; Cho, Ho; Knudsen, Nick; Manibusan, Anthony; Tian, Feng; Sun, Ying; Lu, Yingchun; Sellers, Aaron; Jia, Xiao-Chi; Joseph, Ingrid; Anand, Banmeet; Morrison, Kendall; Pereira, Daniel S.; Stover, David

    2014-01-01

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) are monoclonal antibodies designed to deliver a cytotoxic drug selectively to antigen expressing cells. Several components of an ADC including the selection of the antibody, the linker, the cytotoxic drug payload and the site of attachment used to attach the drug to the antibody are critical to the activity and development of the ADC. The cytotoxic drugs or payloads used to make ADCs are typically conjugated to the antibody through cysteine or lysine residues. This results in ADCs that have a heterogeneous number of drugs per antibody. The number of drugs per antibody commonly referred to as the drug to antibody ratio (DAR), can vary between 0 and 8 drugs for a IgG1 antibody. Antibodies with 0 drugs are ineffective and compete with the ADC for binding to the antigen expressing cells. Antibodies with 8 drugs per antibody have reduced in vivo stability, which may contribute to non target related toxicities. In these studies we incorporated a non-natural amino acid, para acetyl phenylalanine, at two unique sites within an antibody against Her2/neu. We covalently attached a cytotoxic drug to these sites to form an ADC which contains two drugs per antibody. We report the results from the first direct preclinical comparison of a site specific non-natural amino acid anti-Her2 ADC and a cysteine conjugated anti-Her2 ADC. We report that the site specific non-natural amino acid anti-Her2 ADCs have superior in vitro serum stability and preclinical toxicology profile in rats as compared to the cysteine conjugated anti-Her2 ADCs. We also demonstrate that the site specific non-natural amino acid anti-Her2 ADCs maintain their in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy against Her2 expressing human tumor cell lines. Our data suggests that site specific non-natural amino acid ADCs may have a superior therapeutic window than cysteine conjugated ADCs. PMID:24454709

  18. [Growth-inhibitory activity of Cladosporium cladosporioides by cysteine].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshihiko; Ueno, Yukihiro; Ogasawara, Ayako; Mikami, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Tatsuji

    2007-07-01

    When Cladosporium cladosporioides was cultured with cysteine, its growth was completely inhibited statically. The growth of C. cladosporioides cultured on potato-dextrose agar plates was also inhibited by the addition of cysteine. The production of ATP in C. cladosporioides was inhibited by cysteine. When a silicone block was incubated with C. cladosporioides, the surface of the block was coated with the biofilm of C. cladosporioides. However, the block containing cysteine was not covered with biofilm. These results indicate that cysteine is useful as a material to prevent the growth of C. cladosporioides.

  19. Cysteine cathepsin activity suppresses osteoclastogenesis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Edgington-Mitchell, Laura E; Rautela, Jai; Duivenvoorden, Hendrika M; Jayatilleke, Krishnath M; van der Linden, Wouter A; Verdoes, Martijn; Bogyo, Matthew; Parker, Belinda S

    2015-09-29

    Cysteine cathepsin proteases contribute to many normal cellular functions, and their aberrant activity within various cell types can contribute to many diseases, including breast cancer. It is now well accepted that cathepsin proteases have numerous cell-specific functions within the tumor microenvironment that function to promote tumor growth and invasion, such that they may be valid targets for anti-metastatic therapeutic approaches. Using activity-based probes, we have examined the activity and expression of cysteine cathepsins in a mouse model of breast cancer metastasis to bone. In mice bearing highly metastatic tumors, we detected abundant cysteine cathepsin expression and activity in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These immature immune cells have known metastasis-promoting roles, including immunosuppression and osteoclastogenesis, and we assessed the contribution of cysteine cathepsins to these functions. Blocking cysteine cathepsin activity with multiple small-molecule inhibitors resulted in enhanced differentiation of multinucleated osteoclasts. This highlights a potential role for cysteine cathepsin activity in suppressing the fusion of osteoclast precursor cells. In support of this hypothesis, we found that expression and activity of key cysteine cathepsins were downregulated during MDSC-osteoclast differentiation. Another cysteine protease, legumain, also inhibits osteoclastogenesis, in part through modulation of cathepsin L activity. Together, these data suggest that cysteine protease inhibition is associated with enhanced osteoclastogenesis, a process that has been implicated in bone metastasis.

  20. Cysteine cathepsin activity suppresses osteoclastogenesis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edgington-Mitchell, Laura E.; Rautela, Jai; Duivenvoorden, Hendrika M.; Jayatilleke, Krishnath M.; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Verdoes, Martijn; Bogyo, Matthew; Parker, Belinda S.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsin proteases contribute to many normal cellular functions, and their aberrant activity within various cell types can contribute to many diseases, including breast cancer. It is now well accepted that cathepsin proteases have numerous cell-specific functions within the tumor microenvironment that function to promote tumor growth and invasion, such that they may be valid targets for anti-metastatic therapeutic approaches. Using activity-based probes, we have examined the activity and expression of cysteine cathepsins in a mouse model of breast cancer metastasis to bone. In mice bearing highly metastatic tumors, we detected abundant cysteine cathepsin expression and activity in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These immature immune cells have known metastasis-promoting roles, including immunosuppression and osteoclastogenesis, and we assessed the contribution of cysteine cathepsins to these functions. Blocking cysteine cathepsin activity with multiple small-molecule inhibitors resulted in enhanced differentiation of multinucleated osteoclasts. This highlights a potential role for cysteine cathepsin activity in suppressing the fusion of osteoclast precursor cells. In support of this hypothesis, we found that expression and activity of key cysteine cathepsins were downregulated during MDSC-osteoclast differentiation. Another cysteine protease, legumain, also inhibits osteoclastogenesis, in part through modulation of cathepsin L activity. Together, these data suggest that cysteine protease inhibition is associated with enhanced osteoclastogenesis, a process that has been implicated in bone metastasis. PMID:26308073

  1. Cystalysin, a 46-kilodalton cysteine desulfhydrase from Treponema denticola, with hemolytic and hemoxidative activities.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, L; Ebersole, J L; Kurzban, G P; Holt, S C

    1997-01-01

    A 46-kDa hemolytic protein, referred to as cystalysin, from Treponema denticola ATCC 35404 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli LC-67. Both the native and recombinant 46-kDa proteins were purified to homogeneity. Both proteins expressed identical biological and functional characteristics. In addition to its biological function of lysing erythrocytes and hemoxidizing the hemoglobin to methemoglobin, cystalysin was also capable of removing the sulfhydryl and amino groups from selected S-containing compounds (e.g., cysteine) producing H2S, NH3, and pyruvate. This cysteine desulfhydrase resulted in the following Michaelis-Menten kinetics: Km = 3.6 mM and k(cat) = 12 s(-1). Cystathionine and S-aminoethyl-L-cysteine were also substrates for the protein. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the end products revealed NH3, pyruvate, homocysteine (from cystathionine), and cysteamine (from S-aminoethyl-L-cysteine). The enzyme was active over a broad pH range, with highest activity at pH 7.8 to 8.0. The enzymatic activity was increased by beta-mercaptoethanol. It was not inhibited by the proteinase inhibitor TLCK (N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone), pronase, or proteinase K, suggesting that the functional site was physically protected or located in a small fragment of the polypeptide. We hypothesize that cystalysin is a pyridoxal-5-phosphate-containing enzyme, with activity of an alphaC-N and betaC-S lyase (cystathionase) type. Since large amounts of H2S have been reported in deep periodontal pockets, cystalysin may also function in vivo as an important virulence molecule. PMID:9234780

  2. Role of cysteine residues in ribonuclease H from Escherichia coli. Site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification.

    PubMed Central

    Kanaya, S; Kimura, S; Katsuda, C; Ikehara, M

    1990-01-01

    The role of the three cysteine residues at positions 13, 63 and 133 in Escherichia coli RNAase H, an enzyme that is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide [Berkower, Leis & Hurwitz (1973) J. Biol. Chem. 248, 5914-5921], was examined by using both site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification. Novel aspects that were found are as follows. First, none of the cysteine residues is required for activity. Secondly, chemical modification of either Cys-13 or Cys-133 with thiol-blocking reagents inactivates the enzyme, but that of Cys-63 does not. Thus the sensitivity of E. coli RNAase H to N-ethylmaleimide arises not from blocking of the thiol group but from steric hindrance by the modifying group incorporated at either Cys-13 or Cys-133. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2171503

  3. S-nitrosation of conserved cysteines modulates activity and stability of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR)

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Damian; Ballard, Keith; Truebridge, Ian; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The free radical nitric oxide (NO•) regulates diverse physiological processes from vasodilation in humans to gas exchange in plants. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is considered a principal nitroso reservoir due to its chemical stability. GSNO accumulation is attenuated by GSNO reductase (GSNOR), a cysteine-rich cytosolic enzyme. Regulation of protein nitrosation is not well understood since NO•-dependent events proceed without discernible changes in GSNOR expression. Because GSNORs contain evolutionarily-conserved cysteines that could serve as nitrosation sites, we examined the effects of treating plant (Arabidopsis thaliana), mammalian (human), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) GSNORs with nitrosating agents in vitro. Enzyme activity was sensitive to nitroso donors, while the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) restored activity, suggesting catalytic impairment was due to S-nitrosation. Protein nitrosation was confirmed by mass spectrometry, by which mono-, di-, and tri-nitrosation were observed, and these signals were sensitive to DTT. GSNOR mutants in specific non-zinc coordinating cysteines were less sensitive to catalytic inhibition by nitroso donors and exhibited reduced nitrosation signals by mass spectrometry. Nitrosation also coincided with decreased tryptophan fluorescence, increased thermal aggregation propensity, and increased polydispersity—properties reflected by differential solvent accessibility of amino acids important for dimerization and the shape of the substrate and coenzyme binding pockets as assessed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Collectively, these data suggest a mechanism for NO• signal transduction in which GSNOR nitrosation and inhibition transiently permit GSNO accumulation. PMID:27064847

  4. Impact of cysteine variants on the structure, activity, and stability of recombinant human α-galactosidase A.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Huawei; Honey, Denise M; Kingsbury, Jonathan S; Park, Anna; Boudanova, Ekaterina; Wei, Ronnie R; Pan, Clark Q; Edmunds, Tim

    2015-09-01

    Recombinant human α-galactosidase A (rhαGal) is a homodimeric glycoprotein deficient in Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disorder. In this study, each cysteine residue in rhαGal was replaced with serine to understand the role each cysteine plays in the enzyme structure, function, and stability. Conditioned media from transfected HEK293 cells were assayed for rhαGal expression and enzymatic activity. Activity was only detected in the wild type control and in mutants substituting the free cysteine residues (C90S, C174S, and the C90S/C174S). Cysteine-to-serine substitutions at the other sites lead to the loss of expression and/or activity, consistent with their involvement in the disulfide bonds found in the crystal structure. Purification and further characterization confirmed that the C90S, C174S, and the C90S/C174S mutants are enzymatically active, structurally intact and thermodynamically stable as measured by circular dichroism and thermal denaturation. The purified inactive C142S mutant appeared to have lost part of its alpha-helix secondary structure and had a lower apparent melting temperature. Saturation mutagenesis study on Cys90 and Cys174 resulted in partial loss of activity for Cys174 mutants but multiple mutants at Cys90 with up to 87% higher enzymatic activity (C90T) compared to wild type, suggesting that the two free cysteines play differential roles and that the activity of the enzyme can be modulated by side chain interactions of the free Cys residues. These results enhanced our understanding of rhαGal structure and function, particularly the critical roles that cysteines play in structure, stability, and enzymatic activity.

  5. A C-terminal, cysteine-rich site in poliovirus 2CATPase is required for morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunling; Ma, Hsin-Chieh; Wimmer, Eckard; Paul, Aniko V.

    2014-01-01

    The morphogenesis of viruses belonging to the genus Enterovirus in the family Picornaviridae is still poorly understood despite decades-long investigations. However, we recently provided evidence that 2CATPase gives specificity to poliovirus encapsidation through an interaction with capsid protein VP3. The polypeptide 2CATPase is a highly conserved non-structural protein of enteroviruses with important roles in RNA replication, encapsidation and uncoating. We have identified a site (K279/R280) near the C terminus of the polypeptide that is required for morphogenesis. The aim of the current project was to search for additional functional sites near the C terminus of the 2CATPase polypeptide, with particular interest in those that are required for encapsidation. We selected for analysis a cysteine-rich site of the polypeptide and constructed four mutants in which cysteines or a histidine was changed to an alanine. The RNA transcripts were transfected into HeLa cells yielding two lethal, one temperature-sensitive and one quasi-infectious mutants. All four mutants exhibited normal protein translation in vitro and three of them possessed severe RNA replication defects. The quasi-infectious mutant (C286A) yielded variants with a pseudo-reversion at the original site (A286D), but some also contained one additional mutation: A138V or M293V. The temperature-sensitive mutant (C272A/H273A) exhibited an encapsidation and possibly also an uncoating defect at 37 °C. Variants of this mutant revealed suppressor mutations at three different sites in the 2CATPase polypeptide: A138V, M293V and K295R. We concluded that the cysteine-rich site near the C terminus of 2CATPase is involved in encapsidation, possibly through an interaction with an upstream segment located between boxes A and B of the nucleotide-binding domain. PMID:24558221

  6. Chemical Issues Addressing the Construction of the Distal Ni[Cysteine-Glycine-Cysteine]2- Site of Acetyl CoA Synthase: Why Not Copper?

    PubMed Central

    Green, Kayla. N.; Brothers, Scott M.; Lee, Boram; Darensbourg, Marcetta. Y.; Rockcliffe, David. A.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of the Ni(Cysteine-Glycine-Cysteine)2-, Ni(CGC)2-, in the A-cluster active site of Acetyl CoA Synthase has prompted the synthesis of many small molecule models which employ M(N2S2) complexes as metalloligands. In vitro studies have shown that nickel incorporates into the N2S2 binding pocket even when copper is in the enzyme growth medium, while copper is preferentially taken up in the proximal site, displacing the catalytically active nickel. (Darnault, C.; Volbeda, A.; Kim, E.J.; Legrand, P.; Vernede, X.; Lindahl, P.A.; Fontecilla-Camps, J.C. Nat. Struct. Biol. 2003, 10, 271-279.) The work herein has been designed to address the chemical viability of copper(II) within the tripeptide N2S2 ligand set. To this end, a series of CuN2S2 2- complexes, the resin-bound, O-Cu(CGC)2- (A) and free Cu(CGC)2- (B) complexes, as well as Cu(ema)2- (C) and Cu(emi)2- (D) dianions, have been characterized by UV-vis, EPR, and ESI-MS spectroscopies, cyclic voltammetry (CV), and, where appropriate, x-ray diffraction studies, and compared to the NiII congeners. EPR spectroscopic results have indicated that, in frozen DMF solution, the copper complexes are distorted square planar structures with nitrogen and sulfur donors. This is consistent with X-ray diffraction measurements which also show copper(II) in a distorted square planar environment that is bereft of CuN2S2 2- intermolecular interactions. DFT calculations resulted in optimized structures that are consistent with crystallographic data and indicated HOMO-SOMO gaps of 5.01 eV and 4.68 eV for C and D as respectively. Optimized structures of Ni(ema)2- and Ni(emi)2- share the same basic characteristics as for the copper(II) congeners. Electrochemical characterization of C and D resulted in a reversible CuIII/II couple at -1.20 V and - 1.40 V, respectively. Reactivity studies with Rh(CO)2+ show similar donor capabilities for complexes A-D. Analysis of A shows that transmetallation does not occur. From competitive metal

  7. The IRC7 gene encodes cysteine desulphydrase activity and confers on yeast the ability to grow on cysteine as a nitrogen source.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Margarita; Gardner, Richard C

    2015-07-01

    Although cysteine desulphydrase activity has been purified and characterized from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the gene encoding this activity in vivo has never been defined. We show that the full-length IRC7 gene, encoded by the YFR055W open reading frame, encodes a protein with cysteine desulphydrase activity. Irc7p purified to homogeneity is able to utilize l-cysteine as a substrate, producing pyruvate and hydrogen sulphide as products of the reaction. Purified Irc7p also utilized l-cystine and some other cysteine conjugates, but not l-cystathionine or l-methionine, as substrates. We further show that, in vivo, the IRC7 gene is both necessary and sufficient for yeast to grow on l-cysteine as a nitrogen source, and that overexpression of the gene results in increased H2 S production. Strains overexpressing IRC7 are also hypersensitive to a toxic analogue, S-ethyl-l-cysteine. While IRC7 has been identified as playing a critical role in converting cysteine conjugates to volatile thiols that are important in wine aroma, its biological role in yeast cells is likely to involve regulation of cysteine and redox homeostasis.

  8. Arrested cell proliferation through cysteine protease activity of eukaryotic ribosomal protein S4.

    PubMed

    Yadaiah, Madasu; Sudhamalla, Babu; Rao, P Nageswara; Roy, Karnati R; Ramakrishna, Dasari; Hussain Syed, Gulam; Ramaiah, Kolluru V A; Bhuyan, Abani K

    2013-02-01

    S4 is an integral protein of the smaller subunit of cytosolic ribosome. In prokaryotes, it regulates the synthesis of ribosomal proteins by feedback inhibition of the α-operon gene expression, and it facilitates ribosomal RNA synthesis by direct binding to RNA polymerase. However, functional roles of S4 in eukaryotes are poorly understood, although its deficiency in humans is thought to produce Turner syndrome. We report here that wheat S4 is a cysteine protease capable of abrogating total protein synthesis in an actively translating cell-free system of rabbit reticulocytes. The translation-blocked medium, imaged by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, shows dispersed polysomes, and the disbanded polyribosome elements aggregate to form larger bodies. We also show that human embryonic kidney cells transfected with recombinant wheat S4 are unable to grow and proliferate. The mutant S4 protein, where the putative active site residue Cys 41 is replaced by a phenylalanine, can neither suppress protein synthesis nor arrest cell proliferation, suggesting that the observed phenomenon arises from the cysteine protease attribute of S4. The results also inspire many questions concerning in vivo significance of extraribosomal roles of eukaryotic S4 performed through its protease activity.

  9. A computational analysis of S-(2-succino)cysteine sites in proteins.

    PubMed

    Miglio, Gianluca; Sabatino, Alessandro Damiano; Veglia, Eleonora; Giraudo, Maria Teresa; Beccuti, Marco; Cordero, Francesca

    2016-02-01

    The adduction of fumaric acid to the sulfhydryl group of certain cysteine (Cys) residues in proteins via a Michael-like reaction leads to the formation of S-(2-succino)cysteine (2SC) sites. Although its role remains to be fully understood, this post-translational Cys modification (protein succination) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes/obesity and fumarate hydratase-related diseases. In this study, theoretical approaches to address sequence- and 3D-structure-based features possibly underlying the specificity of protein succination have been applied to perform the first analysis of the available data on the succinate proteome. A total of 182 succinated proteins, 205 modifiable, and 1750 non-modifiable sites have been examined. The rate of 2SC sites per protein ranged from 1 to 3, and the overall relative abundance of modifiable sites was 10.8%. Modifiable and non-modifiable sites were not distinguishable when the hydrophobicity of the Cys-flaking peptides, the acid dissociation constant value of the sulfhydryl groups, and the secondary structure of the Cys-containing segments were compared. By contrast, significant differences were determined when the accessibility of the sulphur atoms and the amino acid composition of the Cys-flaking peptides were analysed. Based on these findings, a sequence-based score function has been evaluated as a descriptor for Cys residues. In conclusion, our results indicate that modifiable and non-modifiable sites form heterogeneous subsets when features often discussed to describe Cys reactivity are examined. However, they also suggest that some differences exist, which may constitute the baseline for further investigations aimed at the development of predictive methods for 2SC sites in proteins.

  10. A computational analysis of S-(2-succino)cysteine sites in proteins.

    PubMed

    Miglio, Gianluca; Sabatino, Alessandro Damiano; Veglia, Eleonora; Giraudo, Maria Teresa; Beccuti, Marco; Cordero, Francesca

    2016-02-01

    The adduction of fumaric acid to the sulfhydryl group of certain cysteine (Cys) residues in proteins via a Michael-like reaction leads to the formation of S-(2-succino)cysteine (2SC) sites. Although its role remains to be fully understood, this post-translational Cys modification (protein succination) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes/obesity and fumarate hydratase-related diseases. In this study, theoretical approaches to address sequence- and 3D-structure-based features possibly underlying the specificity of protein succination have been applied to perform the first analysis of the available data on the succinate proteome. A total of 182 succinated proteins, 205 modifiable, and 1750 non-modifiable sites have been examined. The rate of 2SC sites per protein ranged from 1 to 3, and the overall relative abundance of modifiable sites was 10.8%. Modifiable and non-modifiable sites were not distinguishable when the hydrophobicity of the Cys-flaking peptides, the acid dissociation constant value of the sulfhydryl groups, and the secondary structure of the Cys-containing segments were compared. By contrast, significant differences were determined when the accessibility of the sulphur atoms and the amino acid composition of the Cys-flaking peptides were analysed. Based on these findings, a sequence-based score function has been evaluated as a descriptor for Cys residues. In conclusion, our results indicate that modifiable and non-modifiable sites form heterogeneous subsets when features often discussed to describe Cys reactivity are examined. However, they also suggest that some differences exist, which may constitute the baseline for further investigations aimed at the development of predictive methods for 2SC sites in proteins. PMID:26589354

  11. Identification of highly reactive cysteine residues at less exposed positions in the Fab constant region for site-specific conjugation.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Yasuhisa; Muramoto, Takashige; Nagatomo, Kazutaka; Shinmi, Daisuke; Honma, Emiko; Masuda, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Motoo

    2015-06-17

    Engineered cysteine residues are currently used for the site-specific conjugation of antibody-drug conjugates (ADC). In general, positions on the protein surface have been selected for substituting a cysteine as a conjugation site; however, less exposed positions (with less than 20% of accessible surface area [ASA]) have not yet been evaluated. In this study, we engineered original cysteine positional variants of a Fab fragment, with less than 20% of ASA, and evaluated their thiol reactivities through conjugation with various kinds of payloads. As a result, we have identified three original cysteine positional variants (heavy chain: Hc-A140C, light chain: Lc-Q124C and Lc-L201C), which exhibited similar monomer content, thermal stability, and antigen binding affinity in comparison to the wild-type Fab. In addition, the presence of cysteine in these positions made it possible for the Fab variants to react with variable-sized molecules with high efficiency. The favorable physical properties of the cysteine positional variants selected in our study suggest that less exposed positions, with less than 20% of ASA, provide an alternative for creating conjugation sites.

  12. Small Molecule-Induced Allosteric Activation of the Vibrio Cholerae RTX Cysteine Protease Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lupardus, P.J.; Shen, A.; Bogyo, M.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-19

    Vibrio cholerae RTX (repeats in toxin) is an actin-disrupting toxin that is autoprocessed by an internal cysteine protease domain (CPD). The RTX CPD is efficiently activated by the eukaryote-specific small molecule inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP{sub 6}), and we present the 2.1 angstrom structure of the RTX CPD in complex with InsP{sub 6}. InsP{sub 6} binds to a conserved basic cleft that is distant from the protease active site. Biochemical and kinetic analyses of CPD mutants indicate that InsP{sub 6} binding induces an allosteric switch that leads to the autoprocessing and intracellular release of toxin-effector domains.

  13. Site-Specifically Labeled Immunoconjugates for Molecular Imaging--Part 1: Cysteine Residues and Glycans.

    PubMed

    Adumeau, Pierre; Sharma, Sai Kiran; Brent, Colleen; Zeglis, Brian M

    2016-02-01

    Due to their remarkable selectivity and specificity for cancer biomarkers, immunoconjugates have emerged as extremely promising vectors for the delivery of diagnostic radioisotopes and fluorophores to malignant tissues. Paradoxically, however, these tools for precision medicine are synthesized in a remarkably imprecise way. Indeed, the vast majority of immunoconjugates are created via the random conjugation of bifunctional probes (e.g., DOTA-NCS) to amino acids within the antibody (e.g., lysines). Yet antibodies have multiple copies of these residues throughout their macromolecular structure, making control over the location of the conjugation reaction impossible. This lack of site specificity can lead to the formation of poorly defined, heterogeneous immunoconjugates with suboptimal in vivo behavior. Over the past decade, interest in the synthesis and development of site-specifically labeled immunoconjugates--both antibody-drug conjugates as well as constructs for in vivo imaging--has increased dramatically, and a number of reports have suggested that these better defined, more homogeneous constructs exhibit improved performance in vivo compared to their randomly modified cousins. In this two-part review, we seek to provide an overview of the various methods that have been developed to create site-specifically modified immunoconjugates for positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, and fluorescence imaging. We will begin with an introduction to the structure of antibodies and antibody fragments. This is followed by the core of the work: sections detailing the four different approaches to site-specific modification strategies based on cysteine residues, glycans, peptide tags, and unnatural amino acids. These discussions will be divided into two installments: cysteine residues and glycans will be detailed in Part 1 of the review, while peptide tags and unnatural amino acids will be addressed in Part 2. Ultimately, we sincerely hope

  14. Crystal structure and activity studies of the C11 cysteine peptidase from Parabacteroides merdae in the human gut microbiome

    DOE PAGES

    McLuskey, Karen; Grewal, Jaspreet S.; Das, Debanu; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Coombs, Graham H.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Mottram, Jeremy C.

    2016-03-03

    Clan CD cysteine peptidases, a structurally related group of peptidases that include mammalian caspases, exhibit a wide range of important functions, along with a variety of specificities and activation mechanisms. However, for the clostripain family (denoted C11), little is currently known. Here, we describe the first crystal structure of a C11 protein from the human gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae (PmC11), determined to 1.7-Å resolution. PmC11 is a monomeric cysteine peptidase that comprises an extended caspase-like α/β/α sandwich and an unusual C-terminal domain. It shares core structural elements with clan CD cysteine peptidases but otherwise structurally differs from the other familiesmore » in the clan. These studies also revealed a well ordered break in the polypeptide chain at Lys147, resulting in a large conformational rearrangement close to the active site. Biochemical and kinetic analysis revealed Lys147 to be an intramolecular processing site at which cleavage is required for full activation of the enzyme, suggesting an autoinhibitory mechanism for self-preservation. PmC11 has an acidic binding pocket and a preference for basic substrates, and accepts substrates with Arg and Lys in P1 and does not require Ca2+ for activity. Altogether, these data provide insights into the mechanism and activity of PmC11 and a detailed framework for studies on C11 peptidases from other phylogenetic kingdoms.« less

  15. Crystal Structure and Activity Studies of the C11 Cysteine Peptidase from Parabacteroides merdae in the Human Gut Microbiome*

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debanu; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Coombs, Graham H.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    Clan CD cysteine peptidases, a structurally related group of peptidases that include mammalian caspases, exhibit a wide range of important functions, along with a variety of specificities and activation mechanisms. However, for the clostripain family (denoted C11), little is currently known. Here, we describe the first crystal structure of a C11 protein from the human gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae (PmC11), determined to 1.7-Å resolution. PmC11 is a monomeric cysteine peptidase that comprises an extended caspase-like α/β/α sandwich and an unusual C-terminal domain. It shares core structural elements with clan CD cysteine peptidases but otherwise structurally differs from the other families in the clan. These studies also revealed a well ordered break in the polypeptide chain at Lys147, resulting in a large conformational rearrangement close to the active site. Biochemical and kinetic analysis revealed Lys147 to be an intramolecular processing site at which cleavage is required for full activation of the enzyme, suggesting an autoinhibitory mechanism for self-preservation. PmC11 has an acidic binding pocket and a preference for basic substrates, and accepts substrates with Arg and Lys in P1 and does not require Ca2+ for activity. Collectively, these data provide insights into the mechanism and activity of PmC11 and a detailed framework for studies on C11 peptidases from other phylogenetic kingdoms. PMID:26940874

  16. Crystal Structure and Activity Studies of the C11 Cysteine Peptidase from Parabacteroides merdae in the Human Gut Microbiome.

    PubMed

    McLuskey, Karen; Grewal, Jaspreet S; Das, Debanu; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Deacon, Ashley M; Coombs, Graham H; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A; Mottram, Jeremy C

    2016-04-29

    Clan CD cysteine peptidases, a structurally related group of peptidases that include mammalian caspases, exhibit a wide range of important functions, along with a variety of specificities and activation mechanisms. However, for the clostripain family (denoted C11), little is currently known. Here, we describe the first crystal structure of a C11 protein from the human gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae (PmC11), determined to 1.7-Å resolution. PmC11 is a monomeric cysteine peptidase that comprises an extended caspase-like α/β/α sandwich and an unusual C-terminal domain. It shares core structural elements with clan CD cysteine peptidases but otherwise structurally differs from the other families in the clan. These studies also revealed a well ordered break in the polypeptide chain at Lys(147), resulting in a large conformational rearrangement close to the active site. Biochemical and kinetic analysis revealed Lys(147) to be an intramolecular processing site at which cleavage is required for full activation of the enzyme, suggesting an autoinhibitory mechanism for self-preservation. PmC11 has an acidic binding pocket and a preference for basic substrates, and accepts substrates with Arg and Lys in P1 and does not require Ca(2+) for activity. Collectively, these data provide insights into the mechanism and activity of PmC11 and a detailed framework for studies on C11 peptidases from other phylogenetic kingdoms. PMID:26940874

  17. Activation of human acid sphingomyelinase through modification or deletion of C-terminal cysteine.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Huawei; Edmunds, Tim; Baker-Malcolm, Jennifer; Karey, Kenneth P; Estes, Scott; Schwarz, Cordula; Hughes, Heather; Van Patten, Scott M

    2003-08-29

    One form of Niemann-Pick disease is caused by a deficiency in the enzymatic activity of acid sphingomyelinase. During efforts to develop an enzyme replacement therapy based on a recombinant form of human acid sphingomyelinase (rhASM), purified preparations of the recombinant enzyme were found to have substantially increased specific activity if cell harvest media were stored for several weeks at -20 degrees C prior to purification. This increase in activity was found to correlate with the loss of the single free thiol on rhASM, suggesting the involvement of a cysteine residue. It was demonstrated that a variety of chemical modifications of the free cysteine on rhASM all result in substantial activation of the enzyme, and the modified cysteine responsible for this activation was shown to be the C-terminal residue (Cys629). Activation was also achieved by copper-promoted dimerization of rhASM (via cysteine) and by C-terminal truncation using carboxypeptidase Y. The role of the C-terminal cysteine in activation was confirmed by creating mutant forms of rhASM in which this residue was either deleted or replaced by a serine, with both forms having substantially higher specific activity than wild-type rhASM. These results indicate that purified rhASM can be activated in vitro by loss of the free thiol on the C-terminal cysteine via chemical modification, dimerization, or deletion of this amino acid residue. This method of activation is similar to the cysteine switch mechanism described previously for matrix metalloproteinases and could represent a means of posttranslational regulation of ASM activity in vivo.

  18. Atypical thioredoxins in poplar: the glutathione-dependent thioredoxin-like 2.1 supports the activity of target enzymes possessing a single redox active cysteine.

    PubMed

    Chibani, Kamel; Tarrago, Lionel; Gualberto, José Manuel; Wingsle, Gunnar; Rey, Pascal; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2012-06-01

    Plant thioredoxins (Trxs) constitute a complex family of thiol oxidoreductases generally sharing a WCGPC active site sequence. Some recently identified plant Trxs (Clot, Trx-like1 and -2, Trx-lilium1, -2, and -3) display atypical active site sequences with altered residues between the two conserved cysteines. The transcript expression patterns, subcellular localizations, and biochemical properties of some representative poplar (Populus spp.) isoforms were investigated. Measurements of transcript levels for the 10 members in poplar organs indicate that most genes are constitutively expressed. Using transient expression of green fluorescent protein fusions, Clot and Trx-like1 were found to be mainly cytosolic, whereas Trx-like2.1 was located in plastids. All soluble recombinant proteins, except Clot, exhibited insulin reductase activity, although with variable efficiencies. Whereas Trx-like2.1 and Trx-lilium2.2 were efficiently regenerated both by NADPH-Trx reductase and glutathione, none of the proteins were reduced by the ferredoxin-Trx reductase. Only Trx-like2.1 supports the activity of plastidial thiol peroxidases and methionine sulfoxide reductases employing a single cysteine residue for catalysis and using a glutathione recycling system. The second active site cysteine of Trx-like2.1 is dispensable for this reaction, indicating that the protein possesses a glutaredoxin-like activity. Interestingly, the Trx-like2.1 active site replacement, from WCRKC to WCGPC, suppresses its capacity to use glutathione as a reductant but is sufficient to allow the regeneration of target proteins employing two cysteines for catalysis, indicating that the nature of the residues composing the active site sequence is crucial for substrate selectivity/recognition. This study provides another example of the cross talk existing between the glutathione/glutaredoxin and Trx-dependent pathways.

  19. Mechanistic study for immobilization of cysteine-labeled oligopeptides on UV-activated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ong, Lian Hao; Ding, Xiaokang; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we report immobilization of cysteine-labeled oligopeptides on UV activated surfaces decorated with N,N-dimethyl-n-octadecyl-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilyl chloride (DMOAP). Our result shows that cysteine group, regardless of its position in the oligopeptide, is essential for successful immobilization of oligopeptide on the UV-activated surface. A possible reaction mechanism is nucleophilic addition of thiolates to surface aldehyde groups generated during UV activation. By using this technique, we are able to incorporate anchoring points into oligopeptides through cysteine residues. Furthermore, immobilized oligopeptides on the UV-activated surface is very stable even under harsh washing conditions. Finally, we show that an HPQ-containing oligopeptide can be immobilized on the UV-activated surface, but the final surface density and its ability to bind streptavidin are affected by the position of cysteine and HPQ. An oligopeptide with a cysteine at the N-terminus and a HPQ motif at the C-terminus gives the highest binding signal in the streptavidin-binding assay. This result is potentially useful for the development of functional oligopeptide microarrays for detecting target protein molecules.

  20. Characterization of the active site of chloroperoxidase using physical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    Chloroperoxidase (CPO) and Cytochrome P-450, two very different hemeproteins, have been shown to have similar active sites by several techniques. Recent work has demonstrated thiolate ligation from a cysteine residue to the iron in P-450. A major portion of this research has been devoted to obtaining direct evidence that CPO also has a thiolate 5th ligand from a cysteine residue. This information will provide the framework for a detailed analysis of the structure-function relationships between peroxidases, catalase and cytochrome P-450 hemeproteins. To determine whether the 5th ligand is a cysteine, methionine or a unique amino acid, specific isotope enrichment experiments were used. Preliminary /sup 1/H-NMR studies show that the carbon monoxide-CPO complex has a peak in the upfield region corresponding to alpha-protons of a thiolate amino acid. C. fumago was grown on 95% D/sub 2/O media with a small amount of /sup 1/H-cysteine added. Under these conditions C. fumago slows down the biosynthesis of cysteine by at least 50% and utilizes the exogenous cysteine in the media. GC-MS was able to show that the methylene protons next to the sulfur atom in cysteine are 80-90% protonated while these positions in methionine are approximately 73% deuterated. Comparison of the /sup 1/H-NMR spectra of CO-CPO and CO-CPO indicate the presence of a cysteine ligand in chloroperoxidase.

  1. Functional cardiovascular action of L-cysteine microinjected into pressor sites of the rostral ventrolateral medulla of the rat.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Yumi

    2014-04-01

    The endogenous sulfur-containing amino acid L-cysteine injected into the cerebrospinal fluid space of the cisterna magna increases arterial blood pressure (ABP) and heart rate (HR) in the freely moving rat. The present study examined (1) cardiovascular responses to L-cysteine microinjected into the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), where a group of neurons regulate activities of cardiovascular sympathetic neurons and (2) involvement of ionotropic excitatory amino acid (iEAA) receptors in response. In the RVLM of urethane-anesthetized rats accessed ventrally and identified with pressor responses to L-glutamate (10 mM, 34 nl), microinjections of L-cysteine increased ABP and HR dose dependently (3-100 mM, 34 nl). The cardiovascular responses to L-cysteine (30 mM) were not attenuated by a prior injection of either antagonist alone, MK801 (20 mM, 68 nl) for the NMDA type of iEAA receptors, or CNQX (2 mM) for the non-NMDA type. However, inhibition of both NMDA and non-NMDA receptors with additional prior injection of either antagonist completely blocked those responses to L-cysteine. The results indicate that L-cysteine has functional cardiovascular action in the RVLM of the anesthetized rat, and the responses to L-cysteine involve both NMDA and non-NMDA receptors albeit in a mutually exclusive parallel fashion. The findings may suggest endogenous roles of L-cysteine indirectly via iEAA receptors in the neuronal network of the RVLM for cardiovascular regulation in physiological and pathological situations.

  2. Subfamily-Specific Fluorescent Probes for Cysteine Proteases Display Dynamic Protease Activities during Seed Germination1

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haibin; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Oeljeklaus, Julian; Misas-Villamil, Johana C.; Wang, Zheming; Shindo, Takayuki; Bogyo, Matthew; Kaiser, Markus; van der Hoorn, Renier A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine proteases are an important class of enzymes implicated in both developmental and defense-related programmed cell death and other biological processes in plants. Because there are dozens of cysteine proteases that are posttranslationally regulated by processing, environmental conditions, and inhibitors, new methodologies are required to study these pivotal enzymes individually. Here, we introduce fluorescence activity-based probes that specifically target three distinct cysteine protease subfamilies: aleurain-like proteases, cathepsin B-like proteases, and vacuolar processing enzymes. We applied protease activity profiling with these new probes on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protease knockout lines and agroinfiltrated leaves to identify the probe targets and on other plant species to demonstrate their broad applicability. These probes revealed that most commercially available protease inhibitors target unexpected proteases in plants. When applied on germinating seeds, these probes reveal dynamic activities of aleurain-like proteases, cathepsin B-like proteases, and vacuolar processing enzymes, coinciding with the remobilization of seed storage proteins. PMID:26048883

  3. A new autocatalytic activation mechanism for cysteine proteases revealed by Prevotella intermedia interpain A

    PubMed Central

    Mallorquí-Fernández, Noemí; Manandhar, Surya P.; Mallorquí-Fernández, Goretti; Usón, Isabel; Wawrzonek, Katarzyna; Kantyka, Tomasz; Solà, Maria; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Enghild, Jan J.; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F.Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Prevotella intermedia is a major periodontopathogen contributing to human gingivitis and periodontitis. Such pathogens release proteases as virulence factors that cause deterrence of host defences and tissue destruction. A new cysteine protease from the cysteine-histidine-dyad class, interpain A, was studied in its zymogenic and its self-processed mature form. The latter consists of a bivalved moiety made up by two subdomains. In the structure of a catalytic cysteine-to-alanine zymogen variant, the right subdomain interacts with an unusual prodomain, thus contributing to latency. Unlike the catalytic cysteine residue, already in its competent conformation in the zymogen, the catalytic histidine is swung out from its active conformation and trapped in a cage shaped by a backing helix, a zymogenic hairpin and a latency flap in the zymogen. Dramatic rearrangement of up to 20Å of these elements triggered by a tryptophan switch occurs during activation and accounts for a new activation mechanism for proteolytic enzymes. These findings can be extrapolated to related potentially pathogenic cysteine proteases such as Streprococcus pyogenes SpeB and Porphyromonas gingivalis periodontain. PMID:17993455

  4. Heparin Modulates the Endopeptidase Activity of Leishmania mexicana Cysteine Protease Cathepsin L-Like rCPB2.8

    PubMed Central

    Judice, Wagner A. S.; Manfredi, Marcella A.; Souza, Gerson P.; Sansevero, Thiago M.; Almeida, Paulo C.; Shida, Cláudio S.; Gesteira, Tarsis F.; Juliano, Luiz; Westrop, Gareth D.; Sanderson, Sanya J.; Coombs, Graham H.; Tersariol, Ivarne L. S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cysteine protease B is considered crucial for the survival and infectivity of the Leishmania in its human host. Several microorganism pathogens bind to the heparin-like glycosaminoglycans chains of proteoglycans at host-cell surface to promote their attachment and internalization. Here, we have investigated the influence of heparin upon Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease rCPB2.8 activity. Methodology/Principal Findings The data analysis revealed that the presence of heparin affects all steps of the enzyme reaction: (i) it decreases 3.5-fold the k1 and 4.0-fold the k−1, (ii) it affects the acyl-enzyme accumulation with pronounced decrease in k2 (2.7-fold), and also decrease in k3 (3.5-fold). The large values of ΔG  =  12 kJ/mol for the association and dissociation steps indicate substantial structural strains linked to the formation/dissociation of the ES complex in the presence of heparin, which underscore a conformational change that prevents the diffusion of substrate in the rCPB2.8 active site. Binding to heparin also significantly decreases the α-helix content of the rCPB2.8 and perturbs the intrinsic fluorescence emission of the enzyme. The data strongly suggest that heparin is altering the ionization of catalytic (Cys25)-S−/(His163)-Im+ H ion pair of the rCPB2.8. Moreover, the interaction of heparin with the N-terminal pro-region of rCPB2.8 significantly decreased its inhibitory activity against the mature enzyme. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, depending on their concentration, heparin-like glycosaminoglycans can either stimulate or antagonize the activity of cysteine protease B enzymes during parasite infection, suggesting that this glycoconjugate can anchor parasite cysteine protease at host cell surface. PMID:24278253

  5. Comparison of cysteine peptidase activities in Trichobilharzia regenti and Schistosoma mansoni cercariae.

    PubMed

    Kasný, M; Mikes, L; Dalton, J P; Mountford, A P; Horák, P

    2007-10-01

    Cercariae of the bird schistosome Trichobilharzia regenti and of the human schistosome Schistosoma mansoni employ proteases to invade the skin of their definitive hosts. To investigate whether a similar proteolytic mechanism is used by both species, cercarial extracts of T. regenti and S. mansoni were biochemically characterized, with the primary focus on cysteine peptidases. A similar pattern of cysteine peptidase activities was detected by zymography of cercarial extracts and their chromatographic fractions from T. regenti and S. mansoni. The greatest peptidase activity was recorded in both species against the fluorogenic peptide substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC, commonly used to detect cathepsins B and L, and was markedly inhibited (> 96%) by Z-Phe-Ala-CHN2 at pH 4.5. Cysteine peptidases of 33 kDa and 33-34 kDa were identified in extracts of T. regenti and S. mansoni cercariae employing a biotinylated Clan CA cysteine peptidase-specific inhibitor (DCG-04). Finally, cercarial extracts from both T. regenti and S. mansoni were able to degrade native substrates present in skin (collagen II and IV, keratin) at physiological pH suggesting that cysteine peptidases are important in the pentration of host skin. PMID:17517170

  6. The solution structure of the Raf-1 cysteine-rich domain: a novel ras and phospholipid binding site.

    PubMed

    Mott, H R; Carpenter, J W; Zhong, S; Ghosh, S; Bell, R M; Campbell, S L

    1996-08-01

    The Raf-1 protein kinase is the best-characterized downstream effector of activated Ras. Interaction with Ras leads to Raf-1 activation and results in transduction of cell growth and differentiation signals. The details of Raf-1 activation are unclear, but our characterization of a second Ras-binding site in the cysteine-rich domain (CRD) and the involvement of both Ras-binding sites in effective Raf-1-mediated transformation provides insight into the molecular aspects and consequences of Ras-Raf interactions. The Raf-1 CRD is a member of an emerging family of domains, many of which are found within signal transducing proteins. Several contain binding sites for diacylglycerol (or phorbol esters) and phosphatidylserine and are believed to play a role in membrane translocation and enzyme activation. The CRD from Raf-1 does not bind diacylglycerol but interacts with Ras and phosphatidylserine. To investigate the ligand-binding specificities associated with CRDs, we have determined the solution structure of the Raf-1 CRD using heteronuclear multidimensional NMR. We show that there are differences between this structure and the structures of two related domains from protein kinase C (PKC). The differences are confined to regions of the CRDs involved in binding phorbol ester in the PKC domains. Since phosphatidylserine is a common ligand, we expect its binding site to be located in regions where the structures of the Raf-1 and PKC domains are similar. The structure of the Raf-1 CRD represents an example of this family of domains that does not bind diacylglycerol and provides a framework for investigating its interactions with other molecules.

  7. Mechanism of cysteine-dependent inactivation of aspartate/glutamate/cysteine sulfinic acid α-decarboxylases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingyang; Torrens-Spence, Michael P; Ding, Haizhen; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2013-02-01

    Animal aspartate decarboxylase (ADC), glutamate decarboxylase (GDC) and cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSADC) catalyze the decarboxylation of aspartate, glutamate and cysteine sulfinic acid to β-alanine, γ-aminobutyric acid and hypotaurine, respectively. Each enzymatic product has been implicated in different physiological functions. These decarboxylases use pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP) as cofactor and share high sequence homology. Analysis of the activity of ADC in the presence of different amino determined that beta-alanine production from aspartate was diminished in the presence of cysteine. Comparative analysis established that cysteine also inhibited GDC and CSADC in a concentration-dependent manner. Spectral comparisons of free PLP and cysteine, together with ADC and cysteine, result in comparable spectral shifts. Such spectral shifts indicate that cysteine is able to enter the active site of the enzyme, interact with the PLP-lysine internal aldimine, form a cysteine-PLP aldimine and undergo intramolecular nucleophilic cyclization through its sulfhydryl group, leading to irreversible ADC inactivation. Cysteine is the building block for protein synthesis and a precursor of cysteine sulfinic acid that is the substrate of CSADC and therefore is present in many cells, but the presence of cysteine (at comparable concentrations to their natural substrates) apparently could severely inhibit ADC, CSADC and GDC activity. This raises an essential question as to how animal species prevent these enzymes from cysteine-mediated inactivation. Disorders of cysteine metabolism have been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases. The results of our study should promote research in terms of mechanism by which animals maintain their cysteine homeostasis and possible relationship of cysteine-mediated GDC and CSADC inhibition in neurodegenerative disease development. PMID:22718265

  8. Mechanism of cysteine-dependent inactivation of aspartate/glutamate/cysteine sulfinic acid α-decarboxylases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingyang; Torrens-Spence, Michael P; Ding, Haizhen; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2013-02-01

    Animal aspartate decarboxylase (ADC), glutamate decarboxylase (GDC) and cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSADC) catalyze the decarboxylation of aspartate, glutamate and cysteine sulfinic acid to β-alanine, γ-aminobutyric acid and hypotaurine, respectively. Each enzymatic product has been implicated in different physiological functions. These decarboxylases use pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP) as cofactor and share high sequence homology. Analysis of the activity of ADC in the presence of different amino determined that beta-alanine production from aspartate was diminished in the presence of cysteine. Comparative analysis established that cysteine also inhibited GDC and CSADC in a concentration-dependent manner. Spectral comparisons of free PLP and cysteine, together with ADC and cysteine, result in comparable spectral shifts. Such spectral shifts indicate that cysteine is able to enter the active site of the enzyme, interact with the PLP-lysine internal aldimine, form a cysteine-PLP aldimine and undergo intramolecular nucleophilic cyclization through its sulfhydryl group, leading to irreversible ADC inactivation. Cysteine is the building block for protein synthesis and a precursor of cysteine sulfinic acid that is the substrate of CSADC and therefore is present in many cells, but the presence of cysteine (at comparable concentrations to their natural substrates) apparently could severely inhibit ADC, CSADC and GDC activity. This raises an essential question as to how animal species prevent these enzymes from cysteine-mediated inactivation. Disorders of cysteine metabolism have been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases. The results of our study should promote research in terms of mechanism by which animals maintain their cysteine homeostasis and possible relationship of cysteine-mediated GDC and CSADC inhibition in neurodegenerative disease development.

  9. N-acetyl cysteine, L-cysteine, and beta-mercaptoethanol augment selenium-glutathione peroxidase activity in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Alicigüzel, Y; Aslan, M

    2004-09-01

    In glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient erythrocytes, failure to maintain normal levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) due to decreased NADPH regeneration in the hexose monophosphate pathway results in acute hemolytic anemia following exposure to oxidative insults, such as ingestion of Vicia fava beans or use of certain drugs. GSH is a source of protection against oxidative attack, used by the selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSH-Px)/reductase (GR) system to detoxify hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides, provided that sufficient GSH is made available. In this study, Se-GSH-Px activity was analyzed in G6PD-deficient patients in the presence of reducing agents such as N-Acetyl cysteine, L-cysteine, and beta-mercaptoethanol. Se-GSH-Px activity was decreased in G6PD-deficient red blood cells (RBCs). N-Acetyl cysteine, L-cysteine, and beta-mercaptoethanol increased Se-GSH-Px activity in G6PD-deficient human erythrocytes, indicating that other reducing agents can be utilized to complement Se-GSH-Px activity in G6PD deficiency. Based on the increased susceptibility of G6PD-deficient patients to oxidative stress, the reported increase in Se-GSH-Px activity can facilitate the detoxification of reactive oxygen species. PMID:15598086

  10. HIGH-THROUGHPUT IDENTIFICATION OF CATALYTIC REDOX-ACTIVE CYSTEINE RESIDUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cysteine (Cys) residues often play critical roles in proteins; however, identification of their specific functions has been limited to case-by-case experimental approaches. We developed a procedure for high-throughput identification of catalytic redox-active Cys in proteins by se...

  11. Dipeptide frequency/bias analysis identifies conserved sites of nonrandomness shared by cysteine-rich motifs.

    PubMed

    Campion, S R; Ameen, A S; Lai, L; King, J M; Munzenmaier, T N

    2001-08-15

    This report describes the application of a simple computational tool, AAPAIR.TAB, for the systematic analysis of the cysteine-rich EGF, Sushi, and Laminin motif/sequence families at the two-amino acid level. Automated dipeptide frequency/bias analysis detects preferences in the distribution of amino acids in established protein families, by determining which "ordered dipeptides" occur most frequently in comprehensive motif-specific sequence data sets. Graphic display of the dipeptide frequency/bias data revealed family-specific preferences for certain dipeptides, but more importantly detected a shared preference for employment of the ordered dipeptides Gly-Tyr (GY) and Gly-Phe (GF) in all three protein families. The dipeptide Asn-Gly (NG) also exhibited high-frequency and bias in the EGF and Sushi motif families, whereas Asn-Thr (NT) was distinguished in the Laminin family. Evaluation of the distribution of dipeptides identified by frequency/bias analysis subsequently revealed the highly restricted localization of the G(F/Y) and N(G/T) sequence elements at two separate sites of extreme conservation in the consensus sequence of all three sequence families. The similar employment of the high-frequency/bias dipeptides in three distinct protein sequence families was further correlated with the concurrence of these shared molecular determinants at similar positions within the distinctive scaffolds of three structurally divergent, but similarly employed, motif modules.

  12. Metal-Mediated Modulation of Streptococcal Cysteine Protease Activity and Its Biological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chella Krishnan, Karthickeyan; Mukundan, Santhosh; Landero Figueroa, Julio A.; Caruso, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcal cysteine protease (SpeB), the major secreted protease produced by group A streptococcus (GAS), cleaves both host and bacterial proteins and contributes importantly to the pathogenesis of invasive GAS infections. Modulation of SpeB expression and/or its activity during invasive GAS infections has been shown to affect bacterial virulence and infection severity. Expression of SpeB is regulated by the GAS CovR-CovS two-component regulatory system, and we demonstrated that bacteria with mutations in the CovR-CovS two-component regulatory system are selected for during localized GAS infections and that these bacteria lack SpeB expression and exhibit a hypervirulent phenotype. Additionally, in a separate study, we showed that expression of SpeB can also be modulated by human transferrin- and/or lactoferrin-mediated iron chelation. Accordingly, the goal of this study was to investigate the possible roles of iron and other metals in modulating SpeB expression and/or activity in a manner that would potentiate bacterial virulence. Here, we report that the divalent metals zinc and copper inhibit SpeB activity at the posttranslational level. Utilizing online metal-binding site prediction servers, we identified two putative metal-binding sites in SpeB, one of which involves the catalytic-dyad residues 47Cys and 195His. Based on our findings, we propose that zinc and/or copper availability in the bacterial microenvironment can modulate the proteolytic activity of SpeB in a manner that preserves the integrity of several other virulence factors essential for bacterial survival and dissemination within the host and thereby may exacerbate the severity of invasive GAS infections. PMID:24799625

  13. Proteolytic activity and cysteine protease expression in wheat leaves under severe soil drought and recovery.

    PubMed

    Simova-Stoilova, Lyudmila; Vaseva, Irina; Grigorova, Biliana; Demirevska, Klimentina; Feller, Urs

    2010-01-01

    The involvement of acidic proteases in soil drought response of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) at seedling stage in three cultivars differing in water stress tolerance was studied. Withholding irrigation for seven days resulted in severe drought stress corresponding to 60% leaf water deficit. Stressed plants were recovered by providing optimal water supply for 3 days. Reversible changes in leaf pigment and protein content were registered, being least expressed in the drought-resistant cultivar Katya. Protein loss was inversely related to the increase in total proteolytic activity at pH 5 and in aminopeptidase activity at pH 7. Quantitative differences among the cultivars were established only for azocaseinolytic activity (pH 5). The drought-resistant cultivar (Katya) showed relatively little increase in acid protease activity whereas the highest values of this activity were detected in cultivar Pobeda. In-gel staining for cysteine-activated proteases revealed four to five separate activity bands. The upper band, specifically inhibited by E-64, was raised at severe drought. Transcript abundance of two wheat cysteine proteases -Ta.61026 putative thiol protease, and WCP2 peptidase of papain type was analyzed by RT-PCR. Gene expression of the cysteine proteases under study was suppressed in the drought-tolerant cultivar, while in the less resistant ones it remained unchanged or augmented. The results suggest that lower proteolytic activity and decreased expression of certain cysteine protease genes under water deficit during early developmental stage could be regarded as an indicator for drought resistance of winter wheat cultivars.

  14. Cysteine Cathepsins Activate ELR Chemokines and Inactivate Non-ELR Chemokines.

    PubMed

    Repnik, Urska; Starr, Amanda E; Overall, Christopher M; Turk, Boris

    2015-05-29

    Cysteine cathepsins are primarily lysosomal proteases involved in general protein turnover, but they also have specific proteolytic functions in antigen presentation and bone remodeling. Cathepsins are most stable at acidic pH, although growing evidence indicates that they have physiologically relevant activity also at neutral pH. Post-translational proteolytic processing of mature chemokines is a key, yet underappreciated, level of chemokine regulation. Although the role of selected serine proteases and matrix metalloproteases in chemokine processing has long been known, little has been reported about the role of cysteine cathepsins. Here we evaluated cleavage of CXC ELR (CXCL1, -2, -3, -5, and -8) and non-ELR (CXCL9-12) chemokines by cysteine cathepsins B, K, L, and S at neutral pH by high resolution Tris-Tricine SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Whereas cathepsin B cleaved chemokines especially in the C-terminal region, cathepsins K, L, and S cleaved chemokines at the N terminus with glycosaminoglycans modulating cathepsin processing of chemokines. The functional consequences of the cleavages were determined by Ca(2+) mobilization and chemotaxis assays. We show that cysteine cathepsins inactivate and in some cases degrade non-ELR CXC chemokines CXCL9-12. In contrast, cathepsins specifically process ELR CXC chemokines CXCL1, -2, -3, -5, and -8 N-terminally to the ELR motif, thereby generating agonist forms. This study suggests that cysteine cathepsins regulate chemokine activity and thereby leukocyte recruitment during protective or pathological inflammation.

  15. Cysteine Cathepsins Activate ELR Chemokines and Inactivate Non-ELR Chemokines*

    PubMed Central

    Repnik, Urska; Starr, Amanda E.; Overall, Christopher M.; Turk, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are primarily lysosomal proteases involved in general protein turnover, but they also have specific proteolytic functions in antigen presentation and bone remodeling. Cathepsins are most stable at acidic pH, although growing evidence indicates that they have physiologically relevant activity also at neutral pH. Post-translational proteolytic processing of mature chemokines is a key, yet underappreciated, level of chemokine regulation. Although the role of selected serine proteases and matrix metalloproteases in chemokine processing has long been known, little has been reported about the role of cysteine cathepsins. Here we evaluated cleavage of CXC ELR (CXCL1, -2, -3, -5, and -8) and non-ELR (CXCL9–12) chemokines by cysteine cathepsins B, K, L, and S at neutral pH by high resolution Tris-Tricine SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Whereas cathepsin B cleaved chemokines especially in the C-terminal region, cathepsins K, L, and S cleaved chemokines at the N terminus with glycosaminoglycans modulating cathepsin processing of chemokines. The functional consequences of the cleavages were determined by Ca2+ mobilization and chemotaxis assays. We show that cysteine cathepsins inactivate and in some cases degrade non-ELR CXC chemokines CXCL9–12. In contrast, cathepsins specifically process ELR CXC chemokines CXCL1, -2, -3, -5, and -8 N-terminally to the ELR motif, thereby generating agonist forms. This study suggests that cysteine cathepsins regulate chemokine activity and thereby leukocyte recruitment during protective or pathological inflammation. PMID:25833952

  16. Chemical modification of xylanase from Trichosporon cutaneum shows the presence of carboxyl groups and cysteine residues essential for enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Wen, L; Miao, Z W; Qing, W D

    1999-08-01

    The endo-beta-1,4-xylanase (EC 3.2.1.8) from Trichosporon cutaneum was chemically modified using amino acid-specific reagents. The enzyme does not bear arginines essential for activity, since 1,2-cyclohexanedione and 2,3-butanedione, although they modify the enzyme (after chromatographic analysis), have no effect on its activity. Reaction of the enzyme with tetranitromethane and N-acetylimidazole did not result in a significant activity loss as a result of modification of tyrosine residues. The water-soluble carbodiimide 1-[3-(dimethylamino) propyl]-3-ethylcarbodiimide inactivated the xylanase rapidly and completely in a pseudo-first-order process, and kinetic analysis indicated that at least one molecule of carbodiimide binds to the enzyme for inactivation. A mixture of neutral xylooligomers provided significant protection of the enzyme against this carbodiimide inactivation. Reaction of the xylanase with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid did not result in a significant activity loss as a result of modification of lysine residues. Titration of the enzyme with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and treatment with iodoacetamide and p-chloromercuribenzoate indicated the presence of a free/active thiol group. Xylan completely protected the enzyme from inactivation by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, suggesting the presence of cysteine at the substrate-binding site. Inactivation of xylanase by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate could be restored by cysteine. PMID:10609644

  17. Transsulfuration is an active pathway for cysteine biosynthesis in Trypanosoma rangeli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cysteine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, plays an important role in a variety of cellular functions such as protein biosynthesis, methylation, and polyamine and glutathione syntheses. In trypanosomatids, glutathione is conjugated with spermidine to form the specific antioxidant thiol trypanothione (T[SH]2) that plays a central role in maintaining intracellular redox homeostasis and providing defence against oxidative stress. Methods We cloned and characterised genes coding for a cystathionine β-synthase (CβS) and cysteine synthase (CS), key enzymes of the transsulfuration and assimilatory pathways, respectively, from the hemoflagellate protozoan parasite Trypanosoma rangeli. Results Our results show that T. rangeli CβS (TrCβS), similar to its homologs in T. cruzi, contains the catalytic domain essential for enzymatic activity. Unlike the enzymes in bacteria, plants, and other parasites, T. rangeli CS lacks two of the four lysine residues (Lys26 and Lys184) required for activity. Enzymatic studies using T. rangeli extracts confirmed the absence of CS activity but confirmed the expression of an active CβS. Moreover, CβS biochemical assays revealed that the T. rangeli CβS enzyme also has serine sulfhydrylase activity. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the RTS pathway is active in T. rangeli, suggesting that this may be the only pathway for cysteine biosynthesis in this parasite. In this sense, the RTS pathway appears to have an important functional role during the insect stage of the life cycle of this protozoan parasite. PMID:24761813

  18. Unexpected Activity of a Novel Kunitz-type Inhibitor: INHIBITION OF CYSTEINE PROTEASES BUT NOT SERINE PROTEASES.

    PubMed

    Smith, David; Tikhonova, Irina G; Jewhurst, Heather L; Drysdale, Orla C; Dvořák, Jan; Robinson, Mark W; Cwiklinski, Krystyna; Dalton, John P

    2016-09-01

    Kunitz-type (KT) protease inhibitors are low molecular weight proteins classically defined as serine protease inhibitors. We identified a novel secreted KT inhibitor associated with the gut and parenchymal tissues of the infective juvenile stage of Fasciola hepatica, a helminth parasite of medical and veterinary importance. Unexpectedly, recombinant KT inhibitor (rFhKT1) exhibited no inhibitory activity toward serine proteases but was a potent inhibitor of the major secreted cathepsin L cysteine proteases of F. hepatica, FhCL1 and FhCL2, and of human cathepsins L and K (Ki = 0.4-27 nm). FhKT1 prevented the auto-catalytic activation of FhCL1 and FhCL2 and formed stable complexes with the mature enzymes. Pulldown experiments from adult parasite culture medium showed that rFhKT1 interacts specifically with native secreted FhCL1, FhCL2, and FhCL5. Substitution of the unusual P1 Leu(15) within the exposed reactive loop of FhKT1 for the more commonly found Arg (FhKT1Leu(15)/Arg(15)) had modest adverse effects on the cysteine protease inhibition but conferred potent activity against the serine protease trypsin (Ki = 1.5 nm). Computational docking and sequence analysis provided hypotheses for the exclusive binding of FhKT1 to cysteine proteases, the importance of the Leu(15) in anchoring the inhibitor into the S2 active site pocket, and the inhibitor's selectivity toward FhCL1, FhCL2, and human cathepsins L and K. FhKT1 represents a novel evolutionary adaptation of KT protease inhibitors by F. hepatica, with its prime purpose likely in the regulation of the major parasite-secreted proteases and/or cathepsin L-like proteases of its host.

  19. Probing conformational changes in the I-like domain and the cysteine-rich repeat of human beta 3 integrins following disulfide bond disruption by cysteine mutations: identification of cysteine 598 involved in alphaIIbbeta3 activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, P; Melchior, C; Brons, N H; Schlegel, N; Caen, J; Kieffer, N

    2001-10-19

    We have investigated receptor function and epitope expression of recombinant alpha(IIb)beta(3) mutated at Cys(177) or Cys(273) in the I-like domain as well as Cys(598), located in the fourth repeat of the membrane-proximal cysteine-rich region and mutated in a Glanzmann's thrombasthenia type II patient. The beta(3) mutants beta(3)C177A, beta(3)C273A, and beta(3)C598Y exhibited a decreased electrophoretic mobility in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nonreducing conditions, confirming the disruption of the respective disulfide loops. Despite reduced surface expression, the alpha(IIb)beta(3)C177A, alpha(IIb)beta(3)C273A, and alpha(IIb)beta(3)C598Y receptors mediated cell adhesion to immobilized fibrinogen and translocated into focal adhesion plaques. The beta(3)C598Y mutation, but not the beta(3)C177A or beta(3)C273A mutations, induced spontaneous binding of the ligand mimetic monoclonal antibody PAC-1, while the beta(3)C177A and beta(3)C273A mutants exhibited reduced complex stability in the absence of Ca(2+). Epitope mapping of function-blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) allowed the identification of two distinct subgroups; mAbs A2A9, pl2-46, 10E5, and P256 did not interact with alpha(IIb)beta(3)C273A and bound only weakly to alpha(IIb)beta(3)C177A, while mAbs AP2, LM609 and 7E3 bound normally to mutant alpha(IIb)beta(3)C273A, but interacted only weakly with mutant alpha(IIb)beta(3)C177A. Furthermore, a cryptic epitope recognized by mAb 4D10G3 and not exposed on wild type alpha(IIb)beta(3) became accessible only on mutant alpha(IIb)beta(3)C177A and was mapped to the 60-kDa chymotrypsin fragment of beta(3). Finally, the ligand-induced binding site (LIBS) epitopes AP5, D3, LIBS1, and LIBS2 were spontaneously expressed on all three mutants independent of RGDS or dithiothreitol treatment. Our results provide evidence that disruption of a single cysteine disulfide bond in the cysteine-rich repeat domain, but not in the I-like domain, activates integrin

  20. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  1. Activation of Inhibitors by Sortase Triggers Irreversible Modification of the Active Site*S

    PubMed Central

    Maresso, Anthony W.; Wu, Ruiying; Kern, Justin W.; Zhang, Rongguang; Janik, Dorota; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Schneewind, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Sortases anchor surface proteins to the cell wall of Gram-positive pathogens through recognition of specific motif sequences. Loss of sortase leads to large reductions in virulence, which identifies sortase as a target for the development of antibacterials. By screening 135,625 small molecules for inhibition, we report here that aryl (β-amino)ethyl ketones inhibit sortase enzymes from staphylococci and bacilli. Inhibition of sortases occurs through an irreversible, covalent modification of their active site cysteine. Sortases specifically activate this class of molecules via β-elimination, generating a reactive olefin intermediate that covalently modifies the cysteine thiol. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of Bacillus anthracis sortase B with and without inhibitor provides insights into the mechanism of inhibition and reveals binding pockets that can be exploited for drug discovery. PMID:17545669

  2. Cysteine Protease Activity of Feline Tritrichomonas foetus Promotes Adhesion-Dependent Cytotoxicity to Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tolbert, M. K.; Stauffer, S. H.; Brand, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Trichomonads are obligate protozoan parasites most renowned as venereal pathogens of the reproductive tract of humans and cattle. Recently, a trichomonad highly similar to bovine venereal Tritrichomonas foetus but having a unique tropism for the intestinal tract was recognized as a significant cause of colitis in domestic cats. Despite a high prevalence, worldwide distribution, and lack of consistently effective drugs for treatment of the infection, the cellular mechanisms of T. foetus pathogenicity in the intestinal tract have not been examined. The aims of this study were to determine the pathogenic effect of feline T. foetus on porcine intestinal epithelial cells, the dependence of T. foetus pathogenicity on adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium, and the identity of mediators responsible for these effects. Using an in vitro coculture approach to model feline T. foetus infection of the intestinal epithelium, these studies demonstrate that T. foetus promotes a direct contact-dependent activation of intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis signaling and progressive monolayer destruction. Moreover, these pathological effects were demonstrated to be largely dependent on T. foetus cell-associated cysteine protease activity. Finally, T. foetus cysteine proteases were identified as enabling cytopathic effects by promoting adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium. The present studies are the first to examine the cellular mechanisms of pathogenicity of T. foetus toward the intestinal epithelium and support further investigation of the cysteine proteases as virulence factors in vivo and as potential therapeutic targets for ameliorating the pathological effects of intestinal trichomonosis. PMID:24752513

  3. Fibronectin-Degrading Activity of Trypanosoma cruzi Cysteine Proteinase Plays a Role in Host Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Fernando Yukio; Cortez, Cristian; Izidoro, Mario Augusto; Juliano, Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, binds to diverse extracellular matrix proteins. Such an ability prevails in the parasite forms that circulate in the bloodstream and contributes to host cell invasion. Whether this also applies to the insect-stage metacyclic trypomastigotes, the developmental forms that initiate infection in the mammalian host, is not clear. Using T. cruzi CL strain metacyclic forms, we investigated whether fibronectin bound to the parasites and affected target cell invasion. Fibronectin present in cell culture medium bound to metacyclic forms and was digested by cruzipain, the major T. cruzi cysteine proteinase. G strain, with negligible cruzipain activity, displayed a minimal fibronectin-degrading effect. Binding to fibronectin was mediated by gp82, the metacyclic stage-specific surface molecule implicated in parasite internalization. When exogenous fibronectin was present at concentrations higher than cruzipain can properly digest, or fibronectin expression was stimulated by treatment of epithelial HeLa cells with transforming growth factor beta, the parasite invasion was reduced. Treatment of HeLa cells with purified recombinant cruzipain increased parasite internalization, whereas the treatment of parasites with cysteine proteinase inhibitor had the opposite effect. Metacyclic trypomastigote entry into HeLa cells was not affected by anti-β1 integrin antibody but was inhibited by anti-fibronectin antibody. Overall, our results have indicated that the cysteine proteinase of T. cruzi metacyclic forms, through its fibronectin-degrading activity, is implicated in host cell invasion. PMID:25267835

  4. CS-AMPPred: An Updated SVM Model for Antimicrobial Activity Prediction in Cysteine-Stabilized Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Porto, William F.; Pires, Állan S.; Franco, Octavio L.

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptides (AMP) have been proposed as an alternative to control resistant pathogens. However, due to multifunctional properties of several AMP classes, until now there has been no way to perform efficient AMP identification, except through in vitro and in vivo tests. Nevertheless, an indication of activity can be provided by prediction methods. In order to contribute to the AMP prediction field, the CS-AMPPred (Cysteine-Stabilized Antimicrobial Peptides Predictor) is presented here, consisting of an updated version of the Support Vector Machine (SVM) model for antimicrobial activity prediction in cysteine-stabilized peptides. The CS-AMPPred is based on five sequence descriptors: indexes of (i) α-helix and (ii) loop formation; and averages of (iii) net charge, (iv) hydrophobicity and (v) flexibility. CS-AMPPred was based on 310 cysteine-stabilized AMPs and 310 sequences extracted from PDB. The polynomial kernel achieves the best accuracy on 5-fold cross validation (85.81%), while the radial and linear kernels achieve 84.19%. Testing in a blind data set, the polynomial and radial kernels achieve an accuracy of 90.00%, while the linear model achieves 89.33%. The three models reach higher accuracies than previously described methods. A standalone version of CS-AMPPred is available for download at and runs on any Linux machine. PMID:23240023

  5. Cysteine proteases from the Asclepiadaceae plants latex exhibited thrombin and plasmin like activities.

    PubMed

    Shivaprasad, H V; Riyaz, M; Venkatesh Kumar, R; Dharmappa, K K; Tarannum, Shaista; Siddesha, J M; Rajesh, R; Vishwanath, B S

    2009-10-01

    In the present study we evaluated the presence of cysteine protease from the latex of four plants Asclepias curassavica L., Calotropis gigantea R.Br., Pergularia extensa R.Br. and Cynanchum puciflorum R.Br. belongs to the family Asclepiadaceae. Cysteine proteases from these plants latex exhibited both thrombin and plasmin like activities. Latex enzyme fraction in a concentration dependent manner induced the formation of clot in citrated blood plasma. Direct incubation of fibrinogen with latex enzyme fraction resulted in the formation of fibrin clot similar to thrombin enzyme. However prolonged incubation resulted in degradation of the formed fibrin clot suggesting plasmin like activity. Latex enzyme fraction preferentially hydrolyzed Aalpha and Bbeta chains of fibrinogen to form fibrin clot. Latex enzyme fraction also hydrolyzed the subunits of fully cross linked fibrin efficiently, the order of hydrolysis was alpha-polymer > alpha-chains > beta-chain and gamma-gamma dimer. Cysteine proteases from all the four Asclepiadaceae plants latex exhibited similar action on fibrinogen and fibrin. This study scientifically validate the use of plant latex in stop bleeding and wound healing by traditional healers all over the world.

  6. Cysteine Sulfenylation Directs IRE-1 to Activate the SKN-1/Nrf2 Antioxidant Response.

    PubMed

    Hourihan, John M; Moronetti Mazzeo, Lorenza E; Fernández-Cárdenas, L Paulette; Blackwell, T Keith

    2016-08-18

    Emerging evidence suggests that many proteins may be regulated through cysteine modification, but the extent and functions of this signaling remain largely unclear. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) transmembrane protein IRE-1 maintains ER homeostasis by initiating the unfolded protein response (UPR(ER)). Here we show in C. elegans and human cells that IRE-1 has a distinct redox-regulated function in cytoplasmic homeostasis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are generated at the ER or by mitochondria sulfenylate a cysteine within the IRE-1 kinase activation loop. This inhibits the IRE-1-mediated UPR(ER) and initiates the p38/SKN-1(Nrf2) antioxidant response, thereby increasing stress resistance and lifespan. Many AGC-family kinases (AKT, p70S6K, PKC, ROCK1) seem to be regulated similarly. The data reveal that IRE-1 has an ancient function as a cytoplasmic sentinel that activates p38 and SKN-1(Nrf2) and indicate that cysteine modifications induced by ROS signals can direct proteins to adopt unexpected functions and may coordinate many cellular processes. PMID:27540856

  7. Site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modelling studies show the role of Asp82 and cysteines in rat acylase 1, a member of the M20 family

    SciTech Connect

    Herga, Sameh; Brutus, Alexandre; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Miche, Helene; Perrier, Josette; Puigserver, Antoine; Scaloni, Andrea; Giardina, Thierry . E-mail: thierry.giardina@univ.u-3mrs.fr

    2005-05-06

    Acylase 1 from rat kidney catalyzes the hydrolysis of acyl-amino acids. Sequence alignment has shown that this enzyme belongs to the metalloprotein family M20. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments led to the identification of one functionally important amino acid residue located near one of the zinc coordinating residues, which play a critical role in the enzymatic activity. The D82N- and D82E-substituted forms showed no significant activity and very low activity, respectively, along with a loss of zinc coordination. Molecular modelling investigations indicated a putative role of D82 in ensuring a proper protonation of catalytic histidine. In addition, none of the five cysteine residues present in the rat kidney acylase 1 sequence seemed involved in the catalytic process: the loss of activity induced by the C294A substitution was probably due to a conformational change in the 3D structure.

  8. Salicylic acid induced cysteine protease activity during programmed cell death in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Judit; Poór, Péter; Szepesi, Ágnes; Tari, Irma

    2016-06-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR), a type of programmed cell death (PCD) during biotic stress is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). The aim of this work was to reveal the role of proteolysis and cysteine proteases in the execution of PCD in response of SA. Tomato plants were treated with sublethal (0.1 mM) and lethal (1 mM) SA concentrations through the root system. Treatment with 1 mM SA increased the electrolyte leakage and proteolytic activity and reduced the total protein content of roots after 6 h, while the proteolytic activity did not change in the leaves and in plants exposed to 0.1 mM SA. The expression of the papain-type cysteine protease SlCYP1, the vacuolar processing enzyme SlVPE1 and the tomato metacaspase SlMCA1 was induced within the first three hours in the leaves and after 0.5 h in the roots in the presence of 1 mM SA but the transcript levels did not increase significantly at sublethal SA. The Bax inhibitor-1 (SlBI-1), an antiapoptotic gene was over-expressed in the roots after SA treatments and it proved to be transient in the presence of sublethal SA. Protease inhibitors, SlPI2 and SlLTC were upregulated in the roots by sublethal SA but their expression remained low at 1 mM SA concentration. It is concluded that in contrast to leaves the SA-induced PCD is associated with increased proteolytic activity in the root tissues resulting from a fast up-regulation of specific cysteine proteases and down-regulation of protease inhibitors. PMID:27165526

  9. Salicylic acid induced cysteine protease activity during programmed cell death in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Judit; Poór, Péter; Szepesi, Ágnes; Tari, Irma

    2016-06-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR), a type of programmed cell death (PCD) during biotic stress is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). The aim of this work was to reveal the role of proteolysis and cysteine proteases in the execution of PCD in response of SA. Tomato plants were treated with sublethal (0.1 mM) and lethal (1 mM) SA concentrations through the root system. Treatment with 1 mM SA increased the electrolyte leakage and proteolytic activity and reduced the total protein content of roots after 6 h, while the proteolytic activity did not change in the leaves and in plants exposed to 0.1 mM SA. The expression of the papain-type cysteine protease SlCYP1, the vacuolar processing enzyme SlVPE1 and the tomato metacaspase SlMCA1 was induced within the first three hours in the leaves and after 0.5 h in the roots in the presence of 1 mM SA but the transcript levels did not increase significantly at sublethal SA. The Bax inhibitor-1 (SlBI-1), an antiapoptotic gene was over-expressed in the roots after SA treatments and it proved to be transient in the presence of sublethal SA. Protease inhibitors, SlPI2 and SlLTC were upregulated in the roots by sublethal SA but their expression remained low at 1 mM SA concentration. It is concluded that in contrast to leaves the SA-induced PCD is associated with increased proteolytic activity in the root tissues resulting from a fast up-regulation of specific cysteine proteases and down-regulation of protease inhibitors.

  10. Sclerostin binds and regulates the activity of cysteine-rich protein 61

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Theodore A.; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Kumar, Rajiv

    2010-01-29

    Sclerostin, a secreted glycoprotein, regulates osteoblast function. Using yeast two-hybrid and direct protein interaction analyses, we demonstrate that sclerostin binds the Wnt-modulating and Wnt-modulated, extracellular matrix protein, cysteine-rich protein 61 (Cyr61, CCN1), which regulates mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and differentiation, osteoblast and osteoclast function, and angiogenesis. Sclerostin was shown to inhibit Cyr61-mediated fibroblast attachment, and Cyr61 together with sclerostin increases vascular endothelial cell migration and increases osteoblast cell division. The data show that sclerostin binds to and influences the activity of Cyr61.

  11. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of a Library of Thiocarbazates and their Activity as Cysteine Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhuqing; Myers, Michael C.; Shah, Parag P.; Beavers, Mary Pat; Benedetti, Phillip A.; Diamond, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we identified a novel class of potent cathepsin L inhibitors, characterized by a thiocarbazate warhead. Given the potential of these compounds to inhibit other cysteine proteases, we designed and synthesized a library of thiocarbazates containing diversity elements at three positions. Biological characterization of this library for activity against a panel proteases indicated a significant preference for members of the papain family of cysteine proteases over serine, metallo-, and certain classes of cysteine proteases, such as caspases. Several very potent inhibitors of Cathepsin L and S were identified. The SAR data was employed in docking studies in an effort to understand the structural elements required for Cathepsin S inhibition. This study provides the basis for the design of highly potent and selective inhibitors of the papain family of cysteine proteases. PMID:20438448

  12. Mechanisms of mitochondrial holocytochrome c synthase and the key roles played by cysteines and histidine of the heme attachment site, Cys-XX-Cys-His.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Shalon E; San Francisco, Brian; Mendez, Deanna L; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S; Rodgers, Kenton R; Bretsnyder, Eric C; Kranz, Robert G

    2014-10-17

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c assembly requires the covalent attachment of heme by thioether bonds between heme vinyl groups and a conserved CXXCH motif of cytochrome c/c1. The enzyme holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS) binds heme and apocytochrome c substrate to catalyze this attachment, subsequently releasing holocytochrome c for proper folding to its native structure. We address mechanisms of assembly using a functional Escherichia coli recombinant system expressing human HCCS. Human cytochrome c variants with individual cysteine, histidine, double cysteine, and triple cysteine/histidine substitutions (of CXXCH) were co-purified with HCCS. Single and double mutants form a complex with HCCS but not the triple mutant. Resonance Raman and UV-visible spectroscopy support the proposal that heme puckering induced by both thioether bonds facilitate release of holocytochrome c from the complex. His-19 (of CXXCH) supplies the second axial ligand to heme in the complex, the first axial ligand was previously shown to be from HCCS residue His-154. Substitutions of His-19 in cytochrome c to seven other residues (Gly, Ala, Met, Arg, Lys, Cys, and Tyr) were used with various approaches to establish other roles played by His-19. Three roles for His-19 in HCCS-mediated assembly are suggested: (i) to provide the second axial ligand to the heme iron in preparation for covalent attachment; (ii) to spatially position the two cysteinyl sulfurs adjacent to the two heme vinyl groups for thioether formation; and (iii) to aid in release of the holocytochrome c from the HCCS active site. Only H19M is able to carry out these three roles, albeit at lower efficiencies than the natural His-19.

  13. Benzophenone derivatives as cysteine protease inhibitors and biological activity against Leishmania(L.) amazonensis amastigotes.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Letícia; Alves, Karina Ferreira; Maciel-Rezende, Claudia Mara; Jesus, Larissa de Oliveira Passos; Pires, Francieli Ribeiro; Junior, Claudio Viegas; Izidoro, Mario Augusto; Júdice, Wagner Alves de Souza; dos Santos, Marcelo Henrique; Marques, Marcos José

    2015-10-01

    The leishmanicidal potential of benzophenones has been described, some of them highlighting their potential as cysteine protease inhibitors. Therefore, this work described leishmanicidal activity of nine benzophenone derivatives (1a-c;2a-c;3a-c) against intramacrophage amastigote forms of Leishmania(L.)amazonensis (IC50) and the cytotoxic effect on murine peritoneal macrophages (CC50). The derivative 1c exhibited a selectivity index SI (CC50/IC50) of 6.7, besides cytotoxicity lower than Amphotericin B (p< 0.05). Moreover it showed inhibitory activity against papain (42.8±0.3, p<0.05), and when tested on trypanosomatids cysteine proteases 1c also proved to be a potent inhibitor of rCPB2.8, rCPB3.0 and cruzain, showing non-competitive inhibition mechanism by enzymatic assays in vitro.So, benzophenone 1c is interesting drug candidate prototype, with a multi-target directed mode of action, inhibiting rCPB2.8, rCPB3.0 and cruzain.

  14. Lead detoxification activity and ADMET hepatotoxicity of N-(alpha-L-arabino-furanos-1-yl)-L-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Wang, Yuji; Huo, Caixia; Liu, Jiawang; Li, Chunyu; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Peng, Li; Peng, Shiqi

    2010-07-19

    N-(alpha-L-Arabinofuranos-1-yl)-L-cysteine was stereoselectively prepared from L-arabinose and l-cysteine. Its in vivo detoxification action was evaluated on lead loaded mice at the doses of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mmol/kg. The results show that lead accumulation in the livers, kidneys, brains, and femurs of the treated mice could be efficiently decreased by N-(alpha-L-arabinofuranos-1-yl)-L-cysteine, even at the dose of 0.1 mmol/kg. Compared with the lead detoxification efficacy, 0.4 mmol/kg of N-(alpha-L-arabinofuranos-1-yl)-L-cysteine did not affect the essential metals in the treated mice, such as Fe, Cu, Zn, and Ca. In the apparent permeability coefficient test, the values of P(app)(A-->B), P(app)(B-->A), and P(app)(A-->B)/P(app)(B-->A) indicated that N-(alpha-L-arabinofuranos-1-yl)-L-cysteine was transported actively across the Caco-2 cell monolayer. Silico molecular modeling results predicted that N-(alpha-L-arabinofuranos-1-yl)-L-cysteine had no hepatotoxicity.

  15. Cysteine dioxygenase type 1 promotes adipogenesis via interaction with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Peng; Chen, Yi; Ji, Ning; Lin, Yunfeng; Yuan, Quan; Ye, Ling; Chen, Qianming

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian cysteine dioxygenase type 1 (CDO1) is an essential enzyme for taurine biosynthesis and the biodegradation of toxic cysteine. As previously suggested, Cdo1 may be a marker of liposarcoma progression and adipogenic differentiation, but the role of Cdo1 in adipogenesis has yet been reported. In this study, we found that the expression of Cdo1 is dramatically elevated during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (mBMSCs). Conversely, knockdown of Cdo1 inhibited expression of adipogenic specific genes and lipid droplet formation in 3T3-L1 cells and mBMSCs. Mechanistically, we found Cdo1 interacted with Pparγ in response to adipogenic stimulus. Further, depletion of Cdo1 reduced the recruitment of Pparγ to the promoters of C/EBPα and Fabp4. Collectively, our finding indicates that Cdo1 may be a co-activator of Pparγ in adipogenesis, and may contribute to the development of disease associated with excessive adipose tissue. - Highlights: • Cdo1expression is highly up-regulated during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 and mBMSCs. • Depletion of Cdo1 inhibited expression of adipogenic specific genes and lipid droplet formation. • Cdo1interacts with Pparγ during adipogenesis. • Knockdown of Cdo1 inhibited Pparγ binding to the promoters of C/EBPα and Fabp4.

  16. Approaches for the generation of active papain-like cysteine proteases from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chunfang; Zhang, Junyan; Lin, Deqiu; Tao, Ailin

    2015-05-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases are widely expressed, fulfill specific functions in extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation and processing events, and may represent viable drug targets for major diseases. In depth and rigorous studies of the potential for these proteins to be targets for drug development require sufficient amounts of protease protein that can be used for both experimental and therapeutic purposes. Escherichia coli was widely used to express papain-like cysteine proteases, but most of those proteases are produced in insoluble inclusion bodies that need solubilizing, refolding, purifying and activating. Refolding is the most critical step in the process of generating active cysteine proteases and the current approaches to refolding include dialysis, dilution and chromatography. Purification is mainly achieved by various column chromatography. Finally, the attained refolded proteases are examined regarding their protease structures and activities.

  17. Evidence for a reactive cysteine at the nucleotide binding site of spinach ribulose-5-phosphate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Omnaas, J.; Porter, M.A.; Hartman, F.C.

    1985-02-01

    Ribulose-5-phosphate kinase from spinach was rapidly inactivated by N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate in a bimolecular fashion with a k2 of 2.0 m s at 2C and pH 8.0. Ribulose 5-phosphate had little effect on the rate of inactivation, whereas complete protection was afforded by ADP or ATP. The extent of incorporation as determined with UC-labeled reagent was about 1 molar equivalent per subunit in the presence of ATP with full retention of enzymatic activity, and about 2 molar equivalents per subunit in the completely inactivated enzyme. Amino acid analyses of enzyme derivatized with UC-labeled reagent reveal that all of the covalently incorporated reagent was associated with cysteinyl residues. Hence, two sulfhydryls are reactive, but the inactivation correlates with alkylation of one cysteinyl residue at or near the enzyme's nucleotide binding site. The kinase was also extremely sensitive to the sulfhydryl reagents 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and N-ethylmaleimide. The reactive sulfhydryl groups are likely to be those generated by reduction of a disulfide during activation. 20 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Reconstruction of Cysteine Biosynthesis Using Engineered Cysteine-Free and Methionine-Free Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Kendrick; Fujishima, Kosuke; Abe, Nozomi; Nakahigashi, Kenji; Endy, Drew; Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Ten of the proteinogenic amino acids can be generated abiotically while the remaining thirteen require biology for their synthesis. Paradoxically, the biosynthesis pathways observed in nature require enzymes that are made with the amino acids they produce. For example, Escherichia coli produces cysteine from serine via two enzymes that contain cysteine. Here, we substituted alternate amino acids for cysteine and also methionine, which is biosynthesized from cysteine, in serine acetyl transferase (CysE) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (CysM). CysE function was rescued by cysteine-and-methionine-free enzymes and CysM function was rescued by cysteine-free enzymes. Structural modeling suggests that methionine stabilizes CysM and is present in the active site of CysM. Cysteine is not conserved among CysE and CysM protein orthologs, suggesting that cysteine is not functionally important for its own synthesis. Engineering biosynthetic enzymes that lack the amino acids being synthesized provides insights into the evolution of amino acid biosynthesis and pathways for bioengineering.

  19. Crystal Structure of Mammalian Cysteine dioxygenase: A Novel Mononuclear Iron Center for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons,C.; Liu, Q.; Huang, Q.; Hao, Q.; Begley, T.; Karplus, P.; Stipanuk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a mononuclear iron-dependent enzyme responsible for the oxidation of cysteine with molecular oxygen to form cysteinesulfinate. This reaction commits cysteine to either catabolism to sulfate and pyruvate or to the taurine biosynthetic pathway. Cysteine dioxygenase is a member of the cupin superfamily of proteins. The crystal structure of recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase has been determined to 1.5 Angstroms resolution, and these results confirm the canonical cupin {beta}-sandwich fold and the rare cysteinyl-tyrosine intramolecular crosslink (between Cys93 and Tyr157) seen in the recently reported murine cysteine dioxygenase structure. In contrast to the catalytically inactive mononuclear Ni(II) metallocenter present in the murine structure, crystallization of a catalytically competent preparation of rat cysteine dioxygenase revealed a novel tetrahedrally coordinated mononuclear iron center involving three histidines (His86, His88, and His140) and a water molecule. Attempts to acquire a structure with bound ligand using either co-crystallization or soaks with cysteine revealed the formation of a mixed disulfide involving Cys164 near the active site, which may explain previously observed substrate inhibition. This work provides a framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in thiol dioxygenation and sets the stage for exploring the chemistry of both the novel mononuclear iron center and the catalytic role of the cysteinyl-tyrosine linkage.

  20. Active Site Characterization of Proteases Sequences from Different Species of Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Morya, V K; Yadav, Virendra K; Yadav, Sangeeta; Yadav, Dinesh

    2016-09-01

    A total of 129 proteases sequences comprising 43 serine proteases, 36 aspartic proteases, 24 cysteine protease, 21 metalloproteases, and 05 neutral proteases from different Aspergillus species were analyzed for the catalytically active site residues using MEROPS database and various bioinformatics tools. Different proteases have predominance of variable active site residues. In case of 24 cysteine proteases of Aspergilli, the predominant active site residues observed were Gln193, Cys199, His364, Asn384 while for 43 serine proteases, the active site residues namely Asp164, His193, Asn284, Ser349 and Asp325, His357, Asn454, Ser519 were frequently observed. The analysis of 21 metalloproteases of Aspergilli revealed Glu298 and Glu388, Tyr476 as predominant active site residues. In general, Aspergilli species-specific active site residues were observed for different types of protease sequences analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis of these 129 proteases sequences revealed 14 different clans representing different types of proteases with diverse active site residues.

  1. Trichomonas vaginalis Cysteine Proteinases: Iron Response in Gene Expression and Proteolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-Guerra, Rosa Elena; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa Elvira; Puente-Rivera, Jonathan; Zamudio-Prieto, Olga; Ortega-López, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    We focus on the iron response of Trichomonas vaginalis to gene family products such as the cysteine proteinases (CPs) involved in virulence properties. In particular, we examined the effect of iron on the gene expression regulation and function of cathepsin L-like and asparaginyl endopeptidase-like CPs as virulence factors. We addressed some important aspects about CPs genomic organization and we offer possible explanations to the fact that only few members of this large gene family are expressed at the RNA and protein levels and the way to control their proteolytic activity. We also summarized all known iron regulations of CPs at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational levels along with new insights into the possible epigenetic and miRNA processes. PMID:26090464

  2. Trichomonas vaginalis Cysteine Proteinases: Iron Response in Gene Expression and Proteolytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Rossana; Cárdenas-Guerra, Rosa Elena; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa Elvira; Puente-Rivera, Jonathan; Zamudio-Prieto, Olga; Ortega-López, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    We focus on the iron response of Trichomonas vaginalis to gene family products such as the cysteine proteinases (CPs) involved in virulence properties. In particular, we examined the effect of iron on the gene expression regulation and function of cathepsin L-like and asparaginyl endopeptidase-like CPs as virulence factors. We addressed some important aspects about CPs genomic organization and we offer possible explanations to the fact that only few members of this large gene family are expressed at the RNA and protein levels and the way to control their proteolytic activity. We also summarized all known iron regulations of CPs at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational levels along with new insights into the possible epigenetic and miRNA processes.

  3. Trichomonas vaginalis Cysteine Proteinases: Iron Response in Gene Expression and Proteolytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Rossana; Cárdenas-Guerra, Rosa Elena; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa Elvira; Puente-Rivera, Jonathan; Zamudio-Prieto, Olga; Ortega-López, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    We focus on the iron response of Trichomonas vaginalis to gene family products such as the cysteine proteinases (CPs) involved in virulence properties. In particular, we examined the effect of iron on the gene expression regulation and function of cathepsin L-like and asparaginyl endopeptidase-like CPs as virulence factors. We addressed some important aspects about CPs genomic organization and we offer possible explanations to the fact that only few members of this large gene family are expressed at the RNA and protein levels and the way to control their proteolytic activity. We also summarized all known iron regulations of CPs at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational levels along with new insights into the possible epigenetic and miRNA processes. PMID:26090464

  4. Cysteine protease cathepsin X modulates immune response via activation of β2 integrins

    PubMed Central

    Obermajer, Nataša; Repnik, Urška; Jevnikar, Zala; Turk, Boris; Kreft, Marko; Kos, Janko

    2008-01-01

    Cathepsin X is a lysosomal, cysteine dependent carboxypeptidase. Its expression is restricted to cells of the immune system, suggesting a function related to the processes of inflammatory and immune responses. It has been shown to stimulate macrophage antigen-1 (Mac-1) receptor-dependent adhesion and phagocytosis via interaction with integrin β2 subunit. Here its potential role in regulating lymphocyte proliferation via Mac-1 and the other β2 integrin receptor, lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) has been investigated. Cathepsin X has been shown to suppress proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, by activation of Mac-1, known as a suppressive factor for lymphocyte proliferation. On the other hand, co-localization of cathepsin X and LFA-1 supports the role of cathepsin X in regulating LFA-1 activity, which enhances lymphocyte proliferation. As shown by fluorescence resonance energy transfer, using U-937 and Jurkat cells transfected with αL-mCFP and β2-mYFP, recombinant cathepsin X directly activates LFA-1. The activation was confirmed by increased binding of monoclonal antibody 24, recognizing active LFA-1. We demonstrate that cathepsin X is involved in the regulation of two β2 integrin receptors, LFA-1 and Mac-1, which exhibit opposing roles in lymphocyte activation. PMID:18194276

  5. Nematotoxicity of Marasmius oreades Agglutinin (MOA) Depends on Glycolipid Binding and Cysteine Protease Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Wohlschlager, Therese; Butschi, Alex; Zurfluh, Katrin; Vonesch, Sibylle C.; auf dem Keller, Ulrich; Gehrig, Peter; Bleuler-Martinez, Silvia; Hengartner, Michael O.; Aebi, Markus; Künzler, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Fruiting body lectins have been proposed to act as effector proteins in the defense of fungi against parasites and predators. The Marasmius oreades agglutinin (MOA) is a Galα1,3Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin from the fairy ring mushroom that consists of an N-terminal ricin B-type lectin domain and a C-terminal dimerization domain. The latter domain shows structural similarity to catalytically active proteins, suggesting that, in addition to its carbohydrate-binding activity, MOA has an enzymatic function. Here, we demonstrate toxicity of MOA toward the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This toxicity depends on binding of MOA to glycosphingolipids of the worm via its lectin domain. We show further that MOA has cysteine protease activity and demonstrate a critical role of this catalytic function in MOA-mediated nematotoxicity. The proteolytic activity of MOA was dependent on high Ca2+ concentrations and favored by slightly alkaline pH, suggesting that these conditions trigger activation of the toxin at the target location. Our results suggest that MOA is a fungal toxin with intriguing similarities to bacterial binary toxins and has a protective function against fungivorous soil nematodes. PMID:21757752

  6. rlk/TXK Encodes Two Forms of a Novel Cysteine String Tyrosine Kinase Activated by Src Family Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Jayantha; Chamorro, Mario; Czar, Michael J.; Schaeffer, Edward M.; Lenardo, Michael J.; Varmus, Harold E.; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.

    1999-01-01

    Rlk/Txk is a member of the BTK/Tec family of tyrosine kinases and is primarily expressed in T lymphocytes. Unlike other members of this kinase family, Rlk lacks a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain near the amino terminus and instead contains a distinctive cysteine string motif. We demonstrate here that Rlk protein consists of two isoforms that arise by alternative initiation of translation from the same cDNA. The shorter, internally initiated protein species lacks the cysteine string motif and is located in the nucleus when expressed in the absence of the larger form. In contrast, the larger form is cytoplasmic. We show that the larger form is palmitoylated and that mutation of its cysteine string motif both abolishes palmitoylation and allows the protein to migrate to the nucleus. The cysteine string, therefore, is a critical determinant of both fatty acid modification and protein localization for the larger isoform of Rlk, suggesting that Rlk regulation is distinct from the other Btk family kinases. We further show that Rlk is phosphorylated and changes localization in response to T-cell-receptor (TCR) activation and, like the other Btk family kinases, can be phosphorylated and activated by Src family kinases. However, unlike the other Btk family members, Rlk is activated independently of the activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, consistent with its lack of a PH domain. Thus, Rlk has two distinct isoforms, each of which may have unique properties in signaling downstream from the TCR. PMID:9891083

  7. Influence of cysteine and methionine availability on protein peroxide scavenging activity and phenolic stability in emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lisa; Elias, Ryan J

    2014-03-01

    Plant phenolics are secondary metabolites that have been shown to confer beneficial health effects in humans. However, many of these compounds undergo metal-catalysed oxidation reactions, leading to the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and other reactive oxygen species that may negatively impact product stability. In proteins, methionine (Met) and cysteine (Cys) are capable of reacting directly with peroxides. Thus, the dairy proteins, casein (CAS) and β-lactoglobulin (BLG), were examined for their ability to scavenge H2O2 (400μM) and influence (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) oxidation (400μM) in Tween- or sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS)-stabilised hexadecane emulsions. To examine the effect that the accessibility of these amino acids have on their peroxide scavenging activities, proteins were pre-treated with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP), a bulky peroxide, to oxidise only solvent accessible Met residues or H2O2, the smallest peroxide, to oxidise buried Met residues. In CAS treatments, higher Met content yielded greater peroxide scavenging activity and EGCG stability. CAS treatments also showed significantly higher peroxide scavenging activity compared to the corresponding BLG treatment. However, BLG peroxide scavenging activity was greatly enhanced in SDS-stabilised emulsions due to protein denaturation and subsequent exposure of previously buried Cys residues.

  8. A cysteine endopeptidase from tick (Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus) larvae with vitellin digestion activity.

    PubMed

    Estrela, Andréia; Seixas, Adriana; Termignoni, Carlos

    2007-12-01

    The hard tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is a blood-sucking ectoparasite. R. microplus free-living stage comprises egg development, hatching, and subsequent larval development until encountering a host. In order to complete the embryological development, this tick relies on yolk reserve substances, mainly vitellin (Vt), which is still present in the larval stage. The present study demonstrates presence and digestion of Vt in unfed R. microplus larvae. An increasing proteolytic activity is observed in larval development, as well as a decrease in total protein and in Vt content. Partial purification and characterization of a R. microplus larval cysteine endopeptidase (RmLCE) with Vt-degrading activity is also described. RmLCE has optimal activity at 37 degrees C at pH 5.0, being unstable at pH > or =7.5. This enzyme is active upon fluorogenic peptide substrates and is able to degrade Vt, its putative natural substrate. These results indicate that RmLCE has a role in supporting the nutritional needs of unfed R. microplus larva through Vt proteolysis, allowing survival until the first blood meal.

  9. Use of Metallopeptide Based Mimics Demonstrates That the Metalloprotein Nitrile Hydratase Requires Two Oxidized Cysteinates for Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, J.; Callan, P; Amie, J

    2010-01-01

    Nitrile hydratases (NHases) are non-heme Fe{sup III} or non-corrin Co{sup III} containing metalloenzymes that possess an N{sub 2}S{sub 3} ligand environment with nitrogen donors derived from amidates and sulfur donors derived from cysteinates. A closely related enzyme is thiocyanate hydrolase (SCNase), which possesses a nearly identical active-site coordination environment as CoNHase. These enzymes are redox inactive and perform hydrolytic reactions; SCNase hydrolyzes thiocyanate anions while NHase converts nitriles into amides. Herein an active CoNHase metallopeptide mimic, [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] (NHase-m1 = AcNH-CCDLP-CGVYD-PA-COOH), that contains Co{sup III} in a similar N{sub 2}S{sub 3} coordination environment as CoNHase is reported. [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] was characterized by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), gel-permeation chromatography (GPC), Co K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (Co-S: 2.21 {angstrom}; Co-N: 1.93 {angstrom}), vibrational, and optical spectroscopies. We find that [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] will perform the catalytic conversion of acrylonitrile into acrylamide with up to 58 turnovers observed after 18 h at 25 C (pH 8.0). FTIR data used in concert with calculated vibrational data (mPWPW91/aug-cc-TZVPP) demonstrates that the active form of [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] has a ligated SO{sub 2} (? = 1091 cm{sup -1}) moiety and a ligated protonated SO(H) (? = 928 cm{sup -1}) moiety; when only one oxygenated cysteinate ligand (i.e., a mono-SO{sub 2} coordination motif) or the bis-SO{sub 2} coordination motif are found within [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] no catalytic activity is observed. Calculations of the thermodynamics of ligand exchange (B3LYP/aug-cc-TZVPP) suggest that the reason for this is that the SO{sub 2}/SO(H) equatorial ligand motif promotes both water dissociation from the Co{sup III}-center and nitrile coordination to the Co{sup III}-center. In contrast, the under- or overoxidized motifs will either strongly favor a five coordinate Co

  10. Discrimination of differentially inhibited cysteine proteases by activity-based profiling using cystatin variants with tailored specificities.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Frank; Rhéaume, Ann-Julie; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Vorster, Juan; Michaud, Dominique

    2012-12-01

    Recent research has shown the possibility of tailoring the inhibitory specificity of plant cystatins toward cysteine (Cys) proteases by single mutations at positively selected amino acid sites. Here we devised a cystatin activity-based profiling approach to assess the impact of such mutations at the proteome scale using single variants of tomato cystatin SlCYS8 and digestive Cys proteases of the herbivorous insect, Colorado potato beetle, as a model. Biotinylated forms of SlCYS8 and SlCYS8 variants were used to capture susceptible Cys proteases in insect midgut protein extracts by biotin immobilization on avidin-embedded beads. A quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis of the captured proteins was performed to compare the inhibitory profile of different SlCYS8 variants. The approach confirmed the relevance of phylogenetic inferences categorizing the insect digestive Cys proteases into six functionally distinct families. It also revealed significant variation in protease family profiles captured with N-terminal variants of SlCYS8, in line with in silico structural models for Cys protease-SlCYS8 interactions suggesting a functional role for the N-terminal region. Our data confirm overall the usefulness of cystatin activity-based protease profiling for the monitoring of Cys protease-inhibitor interactions in complex biological systems. They also illustrate the potential of biotinylated cystatins to identify recombinant cystatin candidates for the inactivation of specific Cys protease targets. PMID:23082957

  11. Discrimination of differentially inhibited cysteine proteases by activity-based profiling using cystatin variants with tailored specificities.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Frank; Rhéaume, Ann-Julie; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Vorster, Juan; Michaud, Dominique

    2012-12-01

    Recent research has shown the possibility of tailoring the inhibitory specificity of plant cystatins toward cysteine (Cys) proteases by single mutations at positively selected amino acid sites. Here we devised a cystatin activity-based profiling approach to assess the impact of such mutations at the proteome scale using single variants of tomato cystatin SlCYS8 and digestive Cys proteases of the herbivorous insect, Colorado potato beetle, as a model. Biotinylated forms of SlCYS8 and SlCYS8 variants were used to capture susceptible Cys proteases in insect midgut protein extracts by biotin immobilization on avidin-embedded beads. A quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis of the captured proteins was performed to compare the inhibitory profile of different SlCYS8 variants. The approach confirmed the relevance of phylogenetic inferences categorizing the insect digestive Cys proteases into six functionally distinct families. It also revealed significant variation in protease family profiles captured with N-terminal variants of SlCYS8, in line with in silico structural models for Cys protease-SlCYS8 interactions suggesting a functional role for the N-terminal region. Our data confirm overall the usefulness of cystatin activity-based protease profiling for the monitoring of Cys protease-inhibitor interactions in complex biological systems. They also illustrate the potential of biotinylated cystatins to identify recombinant cystatin candidates for the inactivation of specific Cys protease targets.

  12. Redox-Active Sensing by Bacterial DksA Transcription Factors Is Determined by Cysteine and Zinc Content

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Matthew A.; Tapscott, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Liam F.; Liu, Lin; Reyes, Aníbal M.; Libby, Stephen J.; Trujillo, Madia; Fang, Ferric C.; Radi, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The four-cysteine zinc finger motif of the bacterial RNA polymerase regulator DksA is essential for protein structure, canonical control of the stringent response to nutritional limitation, and thiol-based sensing of oxidative and nitrosative stress. This interdependent relationship has limited our understanding of DksA-mediated functions in bacterial pathogenesis. Here, we have addressed this challenge by complementing ΔdksA Salmonella with Pseudomonas aeruginosa dksA paralogues that encode proteins differing in cysteine and zinc content. We find that four-cysteine, zinc-bound (C4) and two-cysteine, zinc-free (C2) DksA proteins are able to mediate appropriate stringent control in Salmonella and that thiol-based sensing of reactive species is conserved among C2 and C4 orthologues. However, variations in cysteine and zinc content determine the threshold at which individual DksA proteins sense and respond to reactive species. In particular, zinc acts as an antioxidant, dampening cysteine reactivity and raising the threshold of posttranslational thiol modification with reactive species. Consequently, C2 DksA triggers transcriptional responses in Salmonella at levels of oxidative or nitrosative stress normally tolerated by Salmonella expressing C4 orthologues. Inappropriate transcriptional regulation by C2 DksA increases the susceptibility of Salmonella to the antimicrobial effects of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, and attenuates virulence in macrophages and mice. Our findings suggest that the redox-active sensory function of DksA proteins is finely tuned to optimize bacterial fitness according to the levels of oxidative and nitrosative stress encountered by bacterial species in their natural and host environments. PMID:27094335

  13. SARS-coronavirus spike S2 domain flanked by cysteine residues C822 and C833 is important for activation of membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Madu, Ikenna G; Belouzard, Sandrine; Whittaker, Gary R

    2009-10-25

    The S2 domain of the coronavirus spike (S) protein is known to be responsible for mediating membrane fusion. In addition to a well-recognized cleavage site at the S1-S2 boundary, a second proteolytic cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). C-terminal to this S2 cleavage site is a conserved region flanked by cysteine residues C822 and C833. Here, we investigated the importance of this well conserved region for SARS-CoV S-mediated fusion activation. We show that the residues between C822-C833 are well conserved across all coronaviruses. Mutagenic analysis of SARS-CoV S, combined with cell-cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for the core-conserved residues C822, D830, L831, and C833. Based on available predictive models, we propose that the conserved domain flanked by cysteines 822 and 833 forms a loop structure that interacts with components of the SARS-CoV S trimer to control the activation of membrane fusion.

  14. SARS-coronavirus spike S2 domain flanked by cysteine residues C822 and C833 is important for activation of membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Madu, Ikenna G.; Belouzard, Sandrine; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2013-01-01

    The S2 domain of the coronavirus spike (S) protein is known to be responsible for mediating membrane fusion. In addition to a well-recognized cleavage site at the S1–S2 boundary, a second proteolytic cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). C terminal to this S2 cleavage site is a conserved region flanked by cysteine residues C822 and C833. Here, we investigated the importance of this well conserved region for SARS-CoV S-mediated fusion activation. We show that the residues between C822-C833 are well conserved across all coronaviruses. Mutagenic analysis of SARS-CoV S, combined with cell–cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for the core-conserved residues C822, D830, L831, and C833. Based on available predictive models, we propose that the conserved domain flanked by cysteines 822 and 833 forms a loop structure that interacts with components of the SARS-CoV S trimer to control the activation of membrane fusion. PMID:19717178

  15. SARS-coronavirus spike S2 domain flanked by cysteine residues C822 and C833 is important for activation of membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Madu, Ikenna G.; Belouzard, Sandrine; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2009-10-25

    The S2 domain of the coronavirus spike (S) protein is known to be responsible for mediating membrane fusion. In addition to a well-recognized cleavage site at the S1-S2 boundary, a second proteolytic cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). C-terminal to this S2 cleavage site is a conserved region flanked by cysteine residues C822 and C833. Here, we investigated the importance of this well conserved region for SARS-CoV S-mediated fusion activation. We show that the residues between C822-C833 are well conserved across all coronaviruses. Mutagenic analysis of SARS-CoV S, combined with cell-cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for the core-conserved residues C822, D830, L831, and C833. Based on available predictive models, we propose that the conserved domain flanked by cysteines 822 and 833 forms a loop structure that interacts with components of the SARS-CoV S trimer to control the activation of membrane fusion.

  16. The disulfide oxidoreductase SdbA is active in Streptococcus gordonii using a single C-terminal cysteine of the CXXC motif.

    PubMed

    Davey, Lauren; Cohen, Alejandro; LeBlanc, Jason; Halperin, Scott A; Lee, Song F

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we identified a novel disulfide oxidoreductase, SdbA, in the oral bacterium Streptococcus gordonii. Disulfide oxidoreductases form disulfide bonds in nascent proteins using a CXXC catalytic motif. Typically, the N-terminal cysteine interacts with substrates, whereas the C-terminal cysteine is buried and only reacts with the first cysteine of the motif. In this study, we investigated the SdbA C(86) P(87) D(88) C(89) catalytic motif. In vitro, SdbA single cysteine variants at the N or C-terminal position (SdbAC86P and SdbAC89A ) were active but displayed different susceptibility to oxidation, and N-terminal cysteine was prone to sulfenylation. In S. gordonii, mutants with a single N-terminal cysteine were inactive and formed unstable disulfide adducts with other proteins. Activity was partially restored by inactivation of pyruvate oxidase, a hydrogen peroxide generator. Presence of the C-terminal cysteine alone (in the SdbAC86P variant) could complement the ΔsdbA mutant and restore disulfide bond formation in recombinant and natural protein substrates. These results provide evidence that certain disulfide oxidoreductases can catalyze disulfide bond formation using a single cysteine of the CXXC motif, including the buried C-terminal cysteine.

  17. Reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetyl cysteine reduces methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia without affecting motor activity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Bortell, Nikki; Galmozzi, Andrea; Conti, Bruno; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia G.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthermia is a potentially lethal side effect of Methamphetamine (Meth) abuse, which involves the participation of peripheral thermogenic sites such as the Brown Adipose Tissue (BAT). In a previous study we found that the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) can prevent the high increase in temperature in a mouse model of Meth-hyperthermia. Here, we have further explored the ability of NAC to modulate Meth-induced hyperthermia in correlation with changes in BAT. We found that NAC treatment in controls causes hypothermia, and, when administered prior or upon the onset of Meth-induced hyperthermia, can ameliorate the temperature increase and preserve mitochondrial numbers and integrity, without affecting locomotor activity. This was different from Dantrolene, which decreased motor activity without affecting temperature. The effects of NAC were seen in spite of its inability to recover the decrease of mitochondrial superoxide induced in BAT by Meth. In addition, NAC did not prevent the Meth-induced decrease of BAT glutathione. Treatment with S-adenosyl-L-methionine, which improves glutathione activity, had an effect in ameliorating Meth-induced hyperthermia, but also modulated motor activity. This suggests a role for the remaining glutathione for controlling temperature. However, the mechanism by which NAC operates is independent of glutathione levels in BAT and specific to temperature. Our results show that, in spite of the absence of a clear mechanism of action, NAC is a pharmacological tool to examine the dissociation between Meth-induced hyperthermia and motor activity, and a drug of potential utility in treating the hyperthermia associated with Meth-abuse. PMID:26346736

  18. Substrate activation of brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase is abolished by mutation of cysteine 221 to serine.

    PubMed

    Baburina, I; Gao, Y; Hu, Z; Jordan, F; Hohmann, S; Furey, W

    1994-05-10

    Brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1), a thiamin diphosphate and Mg(II)-dependent enzyme, isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae possesses four cysteines/subunit at positions 69, 152, 221, and 222. Earlier studies conducted on a variant of the enzyme with a single Cys at position 221 (derived from a gene that was the product of spontaneous fusion) showed that this enzyme is still subject to substrate activation [Zeng, X., Farrenkopf, B., Hohmann, S., Jordan, F., Dyda, F., & Furey, W. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 2704-2709], indicating that if Cys was responsible for this activation, it had to be C221. To further test the hypothesis, the C221S and C222S single and the C221S-C222S double mutants were constructed. It is clearly shown that the mutation at C221, but not at C222, leads to abolished substrate activation according to a number of kinetic criteria, both steady state and pre steady state. On the basis of the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme [Dyda, F., Furey, W., Swaminathan, S., Sax, M., Farrenkopf, B., Jordan, F. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 6165-6170], it is obvious that while C221 is located on the beta domain, whereas thiamin diphosphate is wedged at the interface of the alpha and gamma domains, addition of pyruvate or pyruvamide as a hemiketal adduct to the sulfur of C221 can easily bridge the gap between the beta and alpha domains. In fact, residues in one or both domains must be dislocated by this adduct formation. It is very likely that regulation as expressed in substrate activation is transmitted via this direct contact made between the two domains in the presence of the activator.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Gastrointestinal absorption and biological activities of serine and cysteine proteases of animal and plant origin: review on absorption of serine and cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Lorkowski, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Research has confirmed that peptides and larger protein molecules pass through the mucosal barrier of the gastrointestinal tract. Orally administered serine and cysteine proteases of plant and animal origin also reach blood and lymph as intact, high molecular weight and physiologically active protein molecules. Their absorption may be supported by a self-enhanced paracellular transport mechanism resulting in sub-nanomolar concentration of transiently free protease molecules or, in a complex with anti-proteases, at higher concentrations. Data from pharmacokinetic investigations reveals dose linearity for maximum plasma levels of free proteases not unusual for body proteases and a high inter-individual variability. There is no interference with each other after oral administration of protease combinations, and absorption follows an unusual invasion and elimination kinetic due to slow velocity of absorption and a fast 100% protein binding to anti-proteases. Oral application of proteases leads to increased proteolytic serum activity and increased plasma concentrations of the corresponding anti-proteases. Their biological activity is determined by their proteolytic activity as free proteases on soluble peptides/proteins or cell surface receptors (e.g. protease activated receptors) and their activity in the complex formed with their specific and/or unspecific anti-proteases. The anti-protease-complexes, during immune reaction and injuries often loaded with different cytokines, are cleared from body fluids and tissue by receptor mediated endocytosis on hepatocytes and/or blood cells. Oral administration of enteric coated tablets containing proteolytic enzymes of plant and animal origin may be a safe method to stabilize, positively influence or enhance physiological and immunological processes during disease processes and in healthy consumers.

  20. Gastrointestinal absorption and biological activities of serine and cysteine proteases of animal and plant origin: review on absorption of serine and cysteine proteases

    PubMed Central

    Lorkowski, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Research has confirmed that peptides and larger protein molecules pass through the mucosal barrier of the gastrointestinal tract. Orally administered serine and cysteine proteases of plant and animal origin also reach blood and lymph as intact, high molecular weight and physiologically active protein molecules. Their absorption may be supported by a self-enhanced paracellular transport mechanism resulting in sub-nanomolar concentration of transiently free protease molecules or, in a complex with anti-proteases, at higher concentrations. Data from pharmacokinetic investigations reveals dose linearity for maximum plasma levels of free proteases not unusual for body proteases and a high inter-individual variability. There is no interference with each other after oral administration of protease combinations, and absorption follows an unusual invasion and elimination kinetic due to slow velocity of absorption and a fast 100% protein binding to anti-proteases. Oral application of proteases leads to increased proteolytic serum activity and increased plasma concentrations of the corresponding anti-proteases. Their biological activity is determined by their proteolytic activity as free proteases on soluble peptides/proteins or cell surface receptors (e.g. protease activated receptors) and their activity in the complex formed with their specific and/or unspecific anti-proteases. The anti-protease-complexes, during immune reaction and injuries often loaded with different cytokines, are cleared from body fluids and tissue by receptor mediated endocytosis on hepatocytes and/or blood cells. Oral administration of enteric coated tablets containing proteolytic enzymes of plant and animal origin may be a safe method to stabilize, positively influence or enhance physiological and immunological processes during disease processes and in healthy consumers. PMID:22461953

  1. The site of activation of factor X by cancer procoagulant.

    PubMed

    Gordon, S G; Mourad, A M

    1991-12-01

    Cancer procoagulant (CP) is a cysteine proteinase found in a variety of malignant cells and tissues and in human amnion-chorion tissue. It initiates coagulation by activating factor X. However, the amino acid sequence of the substrate protein that determines the cleavage site of cysteine proteinases is different from that of the serine proteinases that normally activate factor X, such as factor IXa, VIIa and Russell's Viper Venom (RVV). Therefore, it was of interest to determine the site of cleavage of human factor X by CP. Purified CP was incubated with purified factor X and the reaction mixture was electrophoresed on a 10% Tris-tricine SDS-PAGE gel. The proteins were electroeluted on to a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane, and stained with Coomassie blue. The heavy chain of activated factor X was cut out of the PVDF membrane and sequenced with an Applied Biosystems 477A with on-line HPLC. The primary cleavage sequence was Asp-Ala-Ala-Asp-Leu-Asp-Pro-; two other secondary sequences Ser-Ile-Thr-Trp-Lys-Pro- and Glu-Asn-Pro-Phe-Asp-Leu were found. The penultimate amino acid on the carbonyl side of the hydrolysed amide bond plays a critical role for the recognition of the cleavage site of cysteine proteinases. These data indicate that the penultimate amino acid for the primary cleavage site of factor X by CP is proline-20 and for the secondary sites, proline-13 and proline-28. This is in contrast to arginine-52 that determines the specificity of the cleavage by normal serine proteinase activation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Site-directed mutagenesis substituting cysteine for serine in 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx A) of Arabidopsis thaliana effectively improves its peroxidase and chaperone functions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Mi; Lee, Seung Sik; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Jung, Hyun Suk; Cao, Guang Ping; Lee, Yuno; Singh, Sudhir; Hong, Sung Hyun; Lee, Keun Woo; Lee, Sang Yeol; Cho, Jae-Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx) A protein of Arabidopsis thaliana performs the dual functions of a peroxidase and a molecular chaperone depending on its conformation and the metabolic conditions. However, the precise mechanism responsible for the functional switching of 2-Cys Prx A is poorly known. This study examines various serine-to-cysteine substitutions on α-helix regions of 2-Cys Prx A in Arabidopsis mutants and the effects they have on the dual function of the protein. Methods Various mutants of 2-Cys Prx A were generated by replacing serine (Ser) with cysteine (Cys) at different locations by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutants were then over-expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein was further analysed by size exclusion chromatography, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and image analysis. Peroxidase activity, molecular chaperone activity and hydrophobicity of the proteins were also determined. Molecular modelling analysis was performed in order to demonstrate the relationship between mutation positions and switching of 2-Cys Prx A activity. Key Results Replacement of Ser150 with Cys150 led to a marked increase in holdase chaperone and peroxidase activities of 2-Cys Prx A, which was associated with a change in the structure of an important domain of the protein. Molecular modelling demonstrated the relationship between mutation positions and the switching of 2-Cys Prx A activity. Examination of the α2 helix, dimer–dimer interface and C-term loop indicated that the peroxidase function is associated with a fully folded α2 helix and easy formation of a stable reduced decamer, while a more flexible C-term loop makes the chaperone function less likely. Conclusions Substitution of Cys for Ser at amino acid location 150 of the α-helix of 2-Cys Prx A regulates/enhances the dual enzymatic functions of the 2-Cys Prx A protein. If confirmed in planta, this

  3. Excessive L-cysteine induces vacuole-like cell death by activating endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yun; Wu, Zhenlong; Dai, Zhaolai; Sun, Kaiji; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    High intake of dietary cysteine is extremely toxic to animals and the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that excessive L-cysteine induces cell death by activating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in intestinal porcine epithelial cells. Jejunal enterocytes were cultured in the presence of 0-10 mmol/L L-cysteine. Cell viability, morphologic alterations, mRNA levels for genes involved in ER stress, protein abundances for glucose-regulated protein 78, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF2α), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), p38 MAPK, and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK1/2) were determined. The results showed that L-cysteine (5-10 mmol/L) reduced cell viability (P < 0.05) and led to vacuole-like cell death in intestinal porcine epithelial cells. These adverse effects of L-cysteine were not affected by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. The protein abundances for CHOP, phosphorylated (p)-eIF2α, p-JNK1/2, p-p38 MAPK, and the spliced form of XBP-1 mRNA were enhanced (P < 0.05), whereas those for p-ERK1/2 were reduced (P < 0.05). Collectively, excessive L-cysteine induces vacuole-like cell death via the activation of ER stress and MAPK signaling in small intestinal epithelial cells. These signaling pathways may be potential targets for developing effective strategies to prevent the toxicity of dietary cysteine.

  4. Silk gland-specific proteinase inhibitor serpin16 from the Bombyx mori shows cysteine proteinase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng-Chao; Dong, Zhaoming; Xiao, Li; Li, Tao; Zhang, Yan; He, Huawei; Xia, Qingyou; Zhao, Ping

    2015-01-30

    Serpins (serine proteinase inhibitors) are widely distributed in different species and are well known for their inhibitory activities towards serine proteinases. Here, we report the functional characterization of Bombyx mori serpin16. Expression analysis showed that serpin16 was specifically expressed at high levels in the silk gland at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Moreover, homology modeling and multi-sequence alignment suggested that serpin16 had a canonical serpin fold, but it contained a unique reactive center loop, which was obviously shorter than that of typical serpins. Inhibitory activity analyses revealed that the target proteinase of serpin18 is a cysteine proteinase, rather than a serine proteinase. Furthermore, a Michaelis complex model of serpin16 with its target proteinase was constructed to explain the structural basis of how serpin16 recognizes the cysteine proteinase and its target specificity.

  5. Characterization of zinc-binding sites in human stromelysin-1: stoichiometry of the catalytic domain and identification of a cysteine ligand in the proenzyme.

    PubMed

    Salowe, S P; Marcy, A I; Cuca, G C; Smith, C K; Kopka, I E; Hagmann, W K; Hermes, J D

    1992-05-19

    A determination of the zinc stoichiometry of the catalytic domain of the human matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1 has been carried out using enzyme purified from recombinant Escherichia coli that express C-terminally truncated protein. Atomic absorption spectrometry revealed that both the proenzyme (prostrom255) and the mature active form (strom255) contained nearly 2 mol of Zn/mol of protein. Full-length prostromelysin purified from a mammalian cell culture line also contained zinc in excess of 1 equiv. While zinc in prostrom255 could not be removed by dialysis against o-phenanthroline, similar treatment of mature strom255 resulted in the loss of one-half of the original zinc content. The peptidase activity of the zinc-depleted protein was reduced by greater than 85% but could be restored upon addition of Zn2+ or Co2+. Addition of a thiol-containing inhibitor to a CoZn hybrid enzyme resulted in marked spectral changes in both the visible and ultraviolet regions characteristic of sulfur ligation to Co2+. This direct evidence for an integral role in catalysis and inhibitor binding confirms the location of the exchangeable metal at the active site. To examine the environment of zinc in the proenzyme, a fully cobalt-substituted proenzyme was prepared by in vivo metal replacement. The absorbance features of dicobalt prostrom255 were consistent with metal coordination by the single cysteine present in the propeptide, although the data do not allow assignment to a particular zinc site.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1581308

  6. Molecular cloning, recombinant expression, and antimicrobial activity of EC-hepcidin3, a new four-cysteine hepcidin isoform from Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Qu, HaiDong; Chen, Bei; Peng, Hui; Wang, KeJian

    2013-01-01

    Hepcidin, a cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptide, is widespread in fish and shows multiple activities, including antimicrobial, antivirus, and antitumor. Here, a new four-cysteine hepcidin isoform gene, EC-hepcidin3, was cloned from the marine-cultured orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). The complete cDNA sequence consisted of 603 bases with an open reading frame (ORF) of 270 bases. The genomic DNA sequence was composed of two introns and three exons, and its 312-bp upstream region had multiple putative transcription factor binding sites. Soluble recombinant protein EC-proHep3 containing a His-tag at the C-terminus was obtained from expression plasmid pET-28a/EC-proHep3 in Escherichia coli Rosetta. It was purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC), and it showed antibacterial activity in vitro. Kinetic studies indicated that recombinant EC-proHep3 has strong, rapid activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas stutzeri. The results indicate that EC-hepcidin3 might be an effective component in the innate immune system of groupers. PMID:23291752

  7. Developing a rapid throughput screen for detection of nematicidal activity of plant cysteine proteinases: the role of Caenorhabditis elegans cystatins.

    PubMed

    Phiri, A M; De Pomerai, D; Buttle, D J; Behnke, J M B

    2014-02-01

    Plant cysteine proteinases (CPs) from papaya (Carica papaya) are capable of killing parasitic nematode worms in vitro and have been shown to possess anthelmintic effects in vivo. The acute damage reported in gastrointestinal parasites has not been found in free-living nematodes such as Caenorhabditis elegans nor among the free-living stages of parasitic nematodes. This apparent difference in susceptibility might be the result of active production of cysteine proteinase inhibitors (such as cystatins) by the free-living stages or species. To test this possibility, a supernatant extract of refined papaya latex (PLS) with known active enzyme content was used. The effect on wild-type (Bristol N2) and cystatin null mutant (cpi-1(-/-) and cpi-2(-/-)) C. elegans was concentration-, temperature- and time-dependent. Cysteine proteinases digested the worm cuticle leading to release of internal structures and consequent death. Both cystatin null mutant strains were highly susceptible to PLS attack irrespective of the temperature and concentration of exposure, whereas wild-type N2 worms were generally resistant but far more susceptible to attack at low temperatures. PLS was able to induce elevated cpi-1 and cpi-2 cystatin expression. We conclude that wild-type C. elegans deploy cystatins CPI-1 and CPI-2 to resist CP attack. The results suggest that the cpi-1 or cpi-2 null mutants (or a double mutant combination of the two) could provide a cheap and effective rapid throughput C. elegans-based assay for screening plant CP extracts for anthelmintic activity.

  8. An Unprecedented Combination of Serine and Cysteine Nucleophiles in a Split Intein with an Atypical Split Site.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Anne-Lena; Mootz, Henning D

    2015-11-27

    Protein splicing mediated by inteins is a self-processive reaction leading to the excision of the internal intein domain from a precursor protein and the concomitant ligation of the flanking sequences, the extein-N and extein-C parts, thereby reconstituting the host protein. Most inteins employ a splicing pathway in which the upstream scissile peptide bond is consecutively rearranged into two thioester or oxoester intermediates before intein excision and rearrangement into the new peptide bond occurs. The catalytically critical amino acids involved at the two splice junctions are cysteine, serine, or threonine. Notably, the only potential combination not observed so far in any of the known or engineered inteins corresponds to the transesterification from an oxoester to a thioester, which suggested that this formal uphill reaction with regard to the thermodynamic stability might be incompatible with intein-mediated catalysis. We show that corresponding mutations also led to inactive gp41-1 and AceL-TerL inteins. We report the novel GOS-TerL split intein identified from metagenomic databases as the first intein harboring the combination of Ser1 and Cys+1 residues. Mutational analysis showed that its efficient splicing reaction indeed follows the shift from oxoester to thioester and thus represents a rare diversion from the canonical pathway. Furthermore, the GOS-TerL intein has an atypical split site close to the N terminus. The Int(N) fragment could be shortened from 37 to 28 amino acids and exchanged with the 25-amino acid Int(N) fragment from the AceL-TerL intein, indicating a high degree of promiscuity of the Int(C) fragment of the GOS-TerL intein.

  9. Oxidation and nitrosylation of cysteines proximal to the intermediate filament (IF)-binding site of plectin: effects on structure and vimentin binding and involvement in IF collapse.

    PubMed

    Spurny, Radovan; Abdoulrahman, Kamaran; Janda, Lubomir; Rünzler, Dominik; Köhler, Gottfried; Castañón, Maria J; Wiche, Gerhard

    2007-03-16

    As an intermediate filament (IF)-based cytolinker protein, plectin plays a key role in the maintenance of cellular cytoarchitecture and serves at the same time as a scaffolding platform for signaling cascades. Consisting of six structural repeats (R1-6) and harboring binding sites for different IF proteins and proteins involved in signaling, the plectin C-terminal domain is of strategic functional importance. Depending on the species, it contains at least 13 cysteines, 4 of which reside in the R5 domain. To investigate the structural and biological functions of R5 cysteines, we used cysteine-to-serine mutagenesis and spectroscopic, biochemical, and functional analyses. Urea-induced unfolding experiments indicated that wild-type R5 in the oxidized, disulfide bond-mediated conformation was more stable than its cysteine-free mutant derivative. The binding affinity of R5 for vimentin was significantly higher, however, when the protein was in the reduced, more relaxed conformation. Of the four R5 cysteines, one (Cys4) was particularly reactive as reflected by its ability to form disulfide bridges with R5 Cys1 and to serve as a target for nitrosylation in vitro. Using immortalized endothelial cell cultures from mice, we show that endogenous plectin is nitrosylated in vivo, and we found that NO donor-induced IF collapse proceeds dramatically faster in plectin-deficient compared with wild-type cells. Our data suggest an antagonistic role of plectin in nitrosylation (oxidative stress)-mediated alterations of IF cytoarchitecture and a possible role of R5 Cys4 as a regulatory switch. PMID:17224453

  10. Active conformation of the erythropoietin receptor: random and cysteine-scanning mutagenesis of the extracellular juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaohui; Gross, Alec W; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-03-17

    In the absence of erythropoietin (Epo) cell surface Epo receptors (EpoR) are dimeric; dimerization is mediated mainly by the transmembrane domain. Binding of Epo changes the orientation of the two receptor subunits. This conformational change is transmitted through the juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase and induction of proliferation and survival signals. To define the active EpoR conformation(s) we screened libraries of EpoRs with random mutations in the transmembrane domain and identified several point mutations that activate the EpoR in the absence of ligand, including changes of either of the first two transmembrane domain residues (Leu(226) and Ile(227)) to cysteine. Following this discovery, we performed cysteine-scanning mutagenesis in the EpoR juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains. Many mutants formed disulfide-linked receptor dimers, but only EpoR dimers linked by cysteines at positions 223, 226, or 227 activated EpoR signal transduction pathways and supported proliferation of Ba/F3 cells in the absence of cytokines. These data suggest that activation of dimeric EpoR by Epo binding is achieved by reorienting the EpoR transmembrane and the connected cytosolic domains and that certain disulfide-bonded dimers represent the activated dimeric conformation of the EpoR, constitutively activating downstream signaling. Based on our data and the previously determined structure of Epo bound to a dimer of the EpoR extracellular domain, we present a model of the active and inactive conformations of the Epo receptor.

  11. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-01-01

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2327970

  12. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    PubMed

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-03-15

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct.

  13. Spectroscopic and Computational Characterization of the NO Adduct of Substrate-Bound Fe(II) Cysteine Dioxygenase: Insights into the Mechanism of O2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Blaesi, Elizabeth J.; Gardner, Jessica D.; Fox, Brian G.; Brunold, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) is a mononuclear non-heme iron(II)-dependent enzyme critical for maintaining appropriate cysteine (Cys) and taurine levels in eukaryotic systems. Since CDO possesses both an unusual 3-His facial ligation sphere to the iron center and a rare Cys-Tyr crosslink near the active site, the mechanism by which it converts Cys and molecular oxygen to cysteine sulfinic acid is of broad interest. However, as of yet direct experimental support for any of the proposed mechanisms is still lacking. In this study, we have used NO as a substrate analogue for O2 to prepare a species that mimics the geometric and electronic structures of an early reaction intermediate. The resultant unusual S=1/2 {FeNO}7 species was characterized by magnetic circular dichroism, electron paramagnetic resonance, and electronic absorption spectroscopies, as well as computational methods including density functional theory and semi-empirical calculations. The NO adducts of Cys- and selenocysteine (Sec)-bound Fe(II)CDO exhibit virtually identical electronic properties; yet, CDO is unable to oxidize Sec. To explore the differences in reactivity between Cys- and Sec-bound CDO, the geometries and energies of viable O2-bound intermediates were evaluated computationally, and it was found that a low-energy quintet-spin intermediate on the Cys reaction pathway adopts a different geometry for the Sec-bound adduct. The absence of a low-energy O2 adduct for Sec-bound CDO is consistent with our experimental data and may explain why Sec does not act as a substrate for CDO. PMID:23906193

  14. Significance of redox-active cysteines in human FAD synthase isoform 2.

    PubMed

    Miccolis, Angelica; Galluccio, Michele; Nitride, Chiara; Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Ferranti, Pasquale; Iametti, Stefania; Indiveri, Cesare; Bonomi, Francesco; Barile, Maria

    2014-12-01

    FAD synthase (FMN:ATP adenylyl transferase, FMNAT or FADS, EC 2.7.7.2) is the last enzyme in the pathway converting riboflavin into FAD. In humans, FADS is localized in different subcellular compartments and exists in different isoforms. Isoform 2 (490-amino acids) is organized in two domains: the 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) reductase domain, that is the FAD-forming catalytic domain, and one resembling a molybdopterin-binding (MPTb) domain, with a hypothetical regulatory role. hFADS2 contains ten Cys residues, seven of which located in the PAPS reductase domain, with a possible involvement either in FAD synthesis or in FAD delivery to cognate apo-flavoproteins. A homology model of the PAPS reductase domain of hFADS2 revealed a co-ordinated network among the Cys residues in this domain. In this model, C312 and C303 are very close to the flavin substrate, consistent with a significantly lowered FAD synthesis rate in C303A and C312A mutants. FAD synthesis is also inhibited by thiol-blocking reagents, suggesting the involvement of free cysteines in the hFADS2 catalytic cycle. Mass spectrometry measurements and titration with thiol reagents on wt hFADS2 and on several individual cysteine/alanine mutants allowed us to detect two stably reduced cysteines (C139 and C241, one for each protein domain), two stable disulfide bridges (C399-C402, C303-C312, both in the PAPS domain), and two unstable disulfides (C39-C50; C440-C464). Whereas the C39-C50 unstable disulfide is located in the MPTb domain and appears to have no catalytic relevance, a cysteine-based redox switch may involve formation and breakdown of a disulfide between C440 and C464 in the PAPS domain. PMID:25135855

  15. Redox factor-1 activates endothelial SIRTUIN1 through reduction of conserved cysteine sulfhydryls in its deacetylase domain.

    PubMed

    Jung, Saet-Byel; Kim, Cuk-Seong; Kim, Young-Rae; Naqvi, Asma; Yamamori, Tohru; Kumar, Santosh; Kumar, Ajay; Irani, Kaikobad

    2013-01-01

    Apurinic/Apyrmidinic Endonuclease 1/Redox Factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a reductant which is important for vascular homeostasis. SIRTUIN1 (SIRT1) is a lysine deacetylase that also promotes endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. We asked if APE1/Ref-1 governs the redox state and activity of SIRT1, and whether SIRT1 mediates the effect of APE1/Ref-1 on endothelium-dependent vascular function. APE1/Ref-1 maintains sulfhydryl (thiol) groups of cysteine residues in SIRT1 in the reduced form and promotes endothelial SIRT1 activity. APE1/Ref-1 stimulates SIRT1 activity by targeting highly conserved vicinal thiols 371 and 374 which form a zinc tetra-thiolate motif in the deacetylase domain of SIRT1. Cysteine residues in the N-terminal redox domain of APE1/Ref-1 are essential for reducing SIRT1 and stimulating its activity. APE1/Ref-1 protects endothelial SIRT1 from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidation of sulfhydryls and from inactivation. APE1/Ref-1 also promotes lysine deacetylation of the SIRT1 target endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). SIRT1 mutated at cysteines 371 and 374, which renders it non-reducible by APE1/Ref-1, prevents lysine deacetylation of eNOS by APE1/Ref-1. SIRT1 free thiol (reduced sulfhydryl) content and deacetylase activity are diminished in all examined tissues of APE1/Ref-1(+/-) mice, including the vasculature. Overexpression of SIRT1 in aortas of APE1/Ref-1(+/-) mice restores endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) to levels similar to those observed in wild-type mice. Thus, APE1/Ref-1, by maintaining functionally important cysteine sulfhydryls in SIRT1 in the reduced form, promotes endothelial SIRT1 activity. This reductive activation of endothelial SIRT1 by APE1/Ref-1 mediates the effect of APE1/Ref-1 on eNOS acetylation, promoting endothelium-derived NO and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation.

  16. Modulation of Active Site Electronic Structure by the Protein Matrix to Control [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Raugei, Simone; Squier, Thomas C.

    2014-09-30

    Control of the reactivity of the nickel center of the [NiFe] hydrogenase and other metalloproteins commonly involves outer coordination sphere ligands that act to modify the geometry and physical properties of the active site metal centers. We carried out a combined set of classical molecular dynamics and quantum/classical mechanics calculations to provide quantitative estimates of how dynamic fluctuations of the active site within the protein matrix modulate the electronic structure at the catalytic center. Specifically we focused on the dynamics of the inner and outer coordination spheres of the cysteinate-bound Ni–Fe cluster in the catalytically active Ni-C state. There are correlated movements of the cysteinate ligands and the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, which modulate the electron affinity at the active site and the proton affinity of a terminal cysteinate. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesize a coupling between protein dynamics and electron and proton transfer reactions critical to dihydrogen production.

  17. Thioredoxin A Active-Site Mutants Form Mixed Disulfide Dimers That Resemble Enzyme–Substrate Reaction Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Kouwen, Thijs R.H.M.; Andréll, Juni; Schrijver, Rianne; Dubois, Jean-Yves F.; Maher, Megan J.; Iwata, So; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Thioredoxin functions in nearly all organisms as the major thiol–disulfide oxidoreductase within the cytosol. Its prime purpose is to maintain cysteine-containing proteins in the reduced state by converting intramolecular disulfide bonds into dithiols in a disulfide exchange reaction. Thioredoxin has been reported to contribute to a wide variety of physiological functions by interacting with specific sets of substrates in different cell types. To investigate the function of the essential thioredoxin A (TrxA) in the low-GC Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, we purified wild-type TrxA and three mutant TrxA proteins that lack either one or both of the two cysteine residues in the CxxC active site. The pure proteins were used for substrate-binding studies known as “mixed disulfide fishing” in which covalent disulfide-bonded reaction intermediates can be visualized. An unprecedented finding is that both active-site cysteine residues can form mixed disulfides with substrate proteins when the other active-site cysteine is absent, but only the N-terminal active-site cysteine forms stable interactions. A second novelty is that both single-cysteine mutant TrxA proteins form stable homodimers due to thiol oxidation of the remaining active-site cysteine residue. To investigate whether these dimers resemble mixed enzyme–substrate disulfides, the structure of the most abundant dimer, C32S, was characterized by X-ray crystallography. This yielded a high-resolution (1.5Å) X-ray crystallographic structure of a thioredoxin homodimer from a low-GC Gram-positive bacterium. The C32S TrxA dimer can be regarded as a mixed disulfide reaction intermediate of thioredoxin, which reveals the diversity of thioredoxin/substrate-binding modes. PMID:18455736

  18. Structure and mechanism of mouse cysteine dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Jason G.; Bailey, Lucas J.; Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Aceti, David J.; Fox, Brian G.; Phillips, George N.

    2006-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) catalyzes the oxidation of l-cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid. Deficiencies in this enzyme have been linked to autoimmune diseases and neurological disorders. The x-ray crystal structure of CDO from Mus musculus was solved to a nominal resolution of 1.75 Å. The sequence is 91% identical to that of a human homolog. The structure reveals that CDO adopts the typical β-barrel fold of the cupin superfamily. The NE2 atoms of His-86, -88, and -140 provide the metal binding site. The structure further revealed a covalent linkage between the side chains of Cys-93 and Tyr-157, the cysteine of which is conserved only in eukaryotic proteins. Metal analysis showed that the recombinant enzyme contained a mixture of iron, nickel, and zinc, with increased iron content associated with increased catalytic activity. Details of the predicted active site are used to present and discuss a plausible mechanism of action for the enzyme. PMID:16492780

  19. EndoS from Streptococcus pyogenes is hydrolyzed by the cysteine proteinase SpeB and requires glutamic acid 235 and tryptophans for IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity

    PubMed Central

    Allhorn, Maria; Olsén, Arne; Collin, Mattias

    2008-01-01

    Background The endoglycosidase EndoS and the cysteine proteinase SpeB from the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes are functionally related in that they both hydrolyze IgG leading to impairment of opsonizing antibodies and thus enhance bacterial survival in human blood. In this study, we further investigated the relationship between EndoS and SpeB by examining their in vitro temporal production and stability and activity of EndoS. Furthermore, theoretical structure modeling of EndoS combined with site-directed mutagenesis and chemical blocking of amino acids was used to identify amino acids required for the IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity of EndoS. Results We could show that during growth in vitro S. pyogenes secretes the IgG glycan-hydrolyzing endoglycosidase EndoS prior to the cysteine proteinase SpeB. Upon maturation SpeB hydrolyzes EndoS that then loses its IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity. Sequence analysis and structural homology modeling of EndoS provided a basis for further analysis of the prerequisites for IgG glycan-hydrolysis. Site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification of amino acids revealed that glutamic acid 235 is an essential catalytic residue, and that tryptophan residues, but not the abundant lysine or the single cysteine residues, are important for EndoS activity. Conclusion We present novel information about the amino acid requirements for IgG glycan-hydrolyzing activity of the immunomodulating enzyme EndoS. Furthermore, we show that the cysteine proteinase SpeB processes/degrades EndoS and thus emphasize the importance of the SpeB as a degrading/processing enzyme of proteins from the bacterium itself. PMID:18182097

  20. Functional constituents of the active site of human neutrophil collagenase.

    PubMed

    Mookhtiar, K A; Wang, F; Van Wart, H E

    1986-05-01

    A series of chemical modification reactions has been carried out to identify functional constituents of the active site of human neutrophil collagenase. The enzyme is reversibly inhibited by the transition metal chelating agent 1,10-phenanthroline, and inhibition is fully reversed by zinc. Removal of weakly bound metal ions by gel filtration inactivates collagenase, and activity is fully restored on immediate readdition of calcium. The enzyme is unaffected by reagents that modify serine, cysteine, and arginine residues. However, reaction with the carboxyl reagents cyclohexylmorpholinocarbodiimide and Woodward's Reagent K lowers the activity of the enzyme substantially. Acetylimidazole inactivates the enzyme, but activity is completely restored on addition of hydroxylamine. The enzyme is also inactivated by tetranitromethane, indicating that it contains an essential tyrosine residue. Acylation of collagenase with diethyl pyrocarbonate, diketene, acetic anhydride, or trinitrobenzenesulfonate inactivates the enzyme, and activity is not restored on addition of hydroxylamine, indicating the presence of an essential lysine residue.

  1. A C69-family cysteine dipeptidase from Lactobacillus farciminis JCM1097 possesses strong Gly-Pro hydrolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Takuma; Otokawa, Takuya; Kono, Ryosuke; Shigeri, Yasushi; Watanabe, Kunihiko

    2013-11-01

    Dipeptide Gly-Pro, a hard-to-degrade and collagenous peptide, is thought to be hydrolysed by prolidases that can work on various X-Pro dipeptides. Here, we found an entirely different type of dipeptidase from Lactobacillus farciminis JCM1097 that cleaves Gly-Pro far more efficiently and with higher specificity than prolidases, and then investigated its properties by use of a recombinant enzyme. Although L. farciminis dipeptidase was expressed in the form of an inclusion body in Escherichia coli at 37 °C, it was smoothly over-expressed in a soluble form at a lower temperature. The maximal Gly-Pro hydrolytic activity was attained in E. coli at 30 °C. In contrast to prolidases that are metallopeptidases showing the modest or marginal activity toward Gly-Pro, this L. farciminis dipeptidase belongs to the cysteine peptidase family C69. Lactobacillus farciminis dipeptidase occurs in cytoplasm and utilizes the side chain of an amino-terminal cysteine residue to perform the nucleophilic attack on the target amide bond between Gly-Pro after processing eight amino acid residues at the N-terminus. Furthermore, L. farciminis dipeptidase is potent enough to synthesize Gly-Pro from Gly and Pro by a reverse reaction. These novel properties could be revealed by virtue of the success in preparing recombinant enzymes in higher yield and in a stable form.

  2. Proteolytic Activation of the Essential Parasitophorous Vacuole Cysteine Protease SERA6 Accompanies Malaria Parasite Egress from Its Host Erythrocyte*

    PubMed Central

    Ruecker, Andrea; Shea, Michael; Hackett, Fiona; Suarez, Catherine; Hirst, Elizabeth M. A.; Milutinovic, Katarina; Withers-Martinez, Chrislaine; Blackman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The malaria parasite replicates within an intraerythrocytic parasitophorous vacuole (PV). The PV and host cell membranes eventually rupture, releasing merozoites in a process called egress. Certain inhibitors of serine and cysteine proteases block egress, indicating a crucial role for proteases. The Plasmodium falciparum genome encodes nine serine-repeat antigens (SERAs), each of which contains a central domain homologous to the papain-like (clan CA, family C1) protease family. SERA5 and SERA6 are indispensable in blood-stage parasites, but the function of neither is known. Here we show that SERA6 localizes to the PV where it is precisely cleaved just prior to egress by an essential serine protease called PfSUB1. Mutations that replace the predicted catalytic Cys of SERA6, or that block SERA6 processing by PfSUB1, could not be stably introduced into the parasite genomic sera6 locus, indicating that SERA6 is an essential enzyme and that processing is important for its function. We demonstrate that cleavage of SERA6 by PfSUB1 converts it to an active cysteine protease. Our observations reveal a proteolytic activation step in the malarial PV that may be required for release of the parasite from its host erythrocyte. PMID:22984267

  3. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Voltage-gated Sodium Channel Activity Promotes Cysteine Cathepsin-dependent Invasiveness and Colony Growth of Human Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Gillet, Ludovic; Roger, Sébastien; Besson, Pierre; Lecaille, Fabien; Gore, Jacques; Bougnoux, Philippe; Lalmanach, Gilles; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves

    2009-03-27

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)) are functionally expressed in highly metastatic cancer cells derived from nonexcitable epithelial tissues (breast, prostate, lung, and cervix). MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells express functional sodium channel complexes, consisting of Na(V)1.5 and associated auxiliary beta-subunits, that are responsible for a sustained inward sodium current at the membrane potential. Although these channels do not regulate cellular multiplication or migration, their inhibition by the specific blocker tetrodotoxin impairs both the extracellular gelatinolytic activity (monitored with DQ-gelatin) and cell invasiveness leading to the attenuation of colony growth and cell spreading in three-dimensional Matrigel-composed matrices. MDA-MB-231 cells express functional cysteine cathepsins, which we found play a predominant role ( approximately 65%) in cancer invasiveness. Matrigel invasion is significantly decreased in the presence of specific inhibitors of cathepsins B and S (CA-074 and Z-FL-COCHO, respectively), and co-application of tetrodotoxin does not further reduce cell invasion. This suggests that cathepsins B and S are involved in invasiveness and that their proteolytic activity partly depends on Na(V) function. Inhibiting Na(V) has no consequence for cathepsins at the transcription, translation, and secretion levels. However, Na(V) activity leads to an intracellular alkalinization and a perimembrane acidification favorable for the extracellular activity of these acidic proteases. We propose that Na(v) enhance the invasiveness of cancer cells by favoring the pH-dependent activity of cysteine cathepsins. This general mechanism could lead to the identification of new targets allowing the therapeutic prevention of metastases. PMID:19176528

  5. The RafC1 cysteine-rich domain contains multiple distinct regulatory epitopes which control Ras-dependent Raf activation.

    PubMed

    Daub, M; Jöckel, J; Quack, T; Weber, C K; Schmitz, F; Rapp, U R; Wittinghofer, A; Block, C

    1998-11-01

    Activation of c-Raf-1 (referred to as Raf) by Ras is a pivotal step in mitogenic signaling. Raf activation is initiated by binding of Ras to the regulatory N terminus of Raf. While Ras binding to residues 51 to 131 is well understood, the role of the RafC1 cysteine-rich domain comprising residues 139 to 184 has remained elusive. To resolve the function of the RafC1 domain, we have performed an exhaustive surface scanning mutagenesis. In our study, we defined a high-resolution map of multiple distinct functional epitopes within RafC1 that are required for both negative control of the kinase and the positive function of the protein. Activating mutations in three different epitopes enhanced Ras-dependent Raf activation, while only some of these mutations markedly increased Raf basal activity. One contiguous inhibitory epitope consisting of S177, T182, and M183 clearly contributed to Ras-Raf binding energy and represents the putative Ras binding site of the RafC1 domain. The effects of all RafC1 mutations on Ras binding and Raf activation were independent of Ras lipid modification. The inhibitory mutation L160A is localized to a position analogous to the phorbol ester binding site in the protein kinase C C1 domain, suggesting a function in cofactor binding. Complete inhibition of Ras-dependent Raf activation was achieved by combining mutations K144A and L160A, which clearly demonstrates an absolute requirement for correct RafC1 function in Ras-dependent Raf activation.

  6. L-Cysteine and glutathione restore the reduction of rat hippocampal Na+, K+-ATPase activity induced by aspartame metabolites.

    PubMed

    Simintzi, Irene; Schulpis, Kleopatra H; Angelogianni, Panagoula; Liapi, Charis; Tsakiris, Stylianos

    2007-07-31

    Studies have implicated aspartame (ASP) ingestion in neurological problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate hippocampal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase activities after incubation with ASP or each of ASP metabolites, phenylalanine (Phe), methanol (MeOH) and aspartic acid (asp) separately. Suckling rat hippocampal homogenates or pure Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were incubated with ASP metabolites. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase activities were measured spectrophotometrically. Incubation of hippocampal or pure Na(+),K(+)-ATPase with ASP concentrations (expected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)) after ASP consumption of 34, 150 or 200mg/kg resulted in hippocampal enzyme activity reduction of 26%, 50% or 59%, respectively, whereas pure enzyme was remarkably stimulated. Moreover, incubation with hippocampal homogenate of each one of the corresponding in the CSF ASP metabolites related to the intake of common, high/abuse doses of the sweetener, inhibited Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, while pure enzyme was activated. Hippocampal Mg(2+)-ATPase remained unaltered. Addition of l-cysteine (cys) or reduced glutathione (GSH) in ASP mixtures, related with high/toxic doses of the sweetener, completely or partially restored the inactivated membrane Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, whereas the activated pure enzyme activity returned to normal. CSF concentrations of ASP metabolites related to common, abuse/toxic doses of the additive significantly reduced rat hippocampal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, whereas pure enzyme was activated. Cys or GSH completely or partially restored both enzyme activities.

  7. In vitro ANTIGIARDIAL ACTIVITY OF THE CYSTEINE PROTEASE INHIBITOR E-64

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Thaís Batista; Oliveira-Sequeira, Teresa Cristina Goulart; Guimarães, Semíramis

    2014-01-01

    The quest for new antiparasitic alternatives has led researchers to base their studies on insights into biology, host-parasite interactions and pathogenesis. In this context, proteases and their inhibitors are focused, respectively, as druggable targets and new therapy alternatives. Herein, we proposed to evaluate the in vitro effect of the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64 on Giardia trophozoites growth, adherence and viability. Trophozoites (105) were exposed to E-64 at different final concentrations, for 24, 48 and 72 h at 37 °C. In the growth and adherence assays, the number of trophozoites was estimated microscopically in a haemocytometer, whereas cell viability was evaluated by a dye-reduction assay using MTT. The E-64 inhibitor showed effect on growth, adherence and viability of trophozoites, however, its better performance was detected in the 100 µM-treated cultures. Although metronidazole was more effective, the E-64 was shown to be able to inhibit growth, adherence and viability rates by ≥ 50%. These results reveal that E-64 can interfere in some crucial processes to the parasite survival and they open perspectives for future investigations in order to confirm the real antigiardial potential of the protease inhibitors. PMID:24553607

  8. Radiation inactivation study of aminopeptidase: probing the active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamadar, V. K.; Jamdar, S. N.; Mohan, Hari; Dandekar, S. P.; Harikumar, P.

    2004-04-01

    Ionizing radiation inactivated purified chicken intestinal aminopeptidase in media saturated with gases in the order N 2O>N 2>air. The D 37 values in the above conditions were 281, 210 and 198 Gy, respectively. OH radical scavengers such as t-butanol and isopropanol effectively nullified the radiation-induced damage in N 2O. The radicals (SCN) 2•-, Br 2•- and I 2•- inactivated the enzyme, pointing to the involvement of aromatic amino acids and cysteine in its catalytic activity. The enzyme exhibited fluorescence emission at 340 nm which is characteristic of tryptophan. The radiation-induced loss of activity was accompanied by a decrease in the fluorescence of the enzyme suggesting a predominant influence on tryptophan residues. The enzyme inhibition was associated with a marked increase in the Km and a decrease in the Vmax and kcat values, suggesting an irreversible alteration in the catalytic site. The above observations were confirmed by pulse radiolysis studies.

  9. Mutations of two transmembrane cysteines of hemagglutinin (HA) from influenza A H3N2 virus affect HA thermal stability and fusion activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shun; Zhou, Jianqiang; Liu, Kang; Liu, Qiliang; Xue, Chunyi; Li, Xiaoming; Zheng, Jing; Luo, Dongyu; Cao, Yongchang

    2013-08-01

    Influenza A H3N2 virus caused 1968 Hong Kong influenza pandemic, and has since been one of the most prevalent seasonal influenza viruses in global populations, representing a credible pandemic candidate in future. Previous studies have established that the hemagglutinin (HA) protein is the predominant antigen and executes receptor binding and membrane fusion. Homologous sequence analysis of all HA subtypes of influenza viruses revealed that two cysteine residues (540 and 544) are uniquely present in the transmembrane domain (TM) of HA proteins from all influenza A H3N2 viruses. However, the functions of these two cysteines have not been fully studied. Here, we generated three mutants (C540S, C544L, and 2C/SL) to investigate the effects of the two TM cysteines on the biological functions of H3 HA. We herein presented evidences that the mutations of one or two of the cysteines did not affect the proper expressions of HA proteins in cells, and more importantly all mutant H3 HAs showed decreased thermal stability but increased fusion activity in comparison with wildtype HA. Our results taken together demonstrated that the two TM cysteines are important for the biological functions of H3 HA proteins.

  10. Fluorescent labeling of specific cysteine residues using CyMPL

    PubMed Central

    Puljung, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    The unique reactivity and relative scarcity of cysteine among amino acids makes it a convenient target for the site-specific chemical modification of proteins. Commercially available fluorophores and modifiers react with cysteine through a variety of electrophilic functional groups. However, it can be difficult to obtain specific labeling of a desired cysteine residue in a protein with multiple cysteines, in a mixture of proteins, or in a protein's native environment. CyMPL (Cysteine Metal Protection and Labeling) enables specific labeling by incorporating a cysteine of interest into a minimal binding site for group 12 metal ions (e.g. Cd2+ and Zn2+). These sites can be inserted into any region of known secondary structure in virtually any protein and cause minimal structural perturbation. Bound metal ions protect the cysteine from reaction while background cysteines are blocked with non-fluorescent modifiers. The metal ions are subsequently removed and the deprotected cysteine is labeled specifically. PMID:23151742

  11. Inhibition of sulfur mustard-increased protease activity by niacinamide, N-acetyl-L-cysteine or dexamethasone

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, F.M.; Broomfield, C.A.; Smith, W.J.

    1991-03-11

    The pathologic mechanism of sulfur mustard-induced skin vesication is as yet undefined. Papirmeister et al. have postulated a biochemical mechanism for sulfur mustard-induced cutaneous injury involving sequelae of DNA alkylation, metabolic disruption resulting in NAD+ depletion and activation of protease. The authors have utilized a chromogenic peptide substrate assay to establish that human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed 24 hr previously to sulfur mustard exhibited an increase in proteolytic activity. Doses of compounds known to alter the biochemical events associated with sulfur mustard exposure or reduce protease activity were tested in this system for their ability to block the sulfur mustard-induced protease activity. Treatment with niacinamide 1 hr after or with N-acetyl-L-cysteine or dexamethasone 24 hr prior to sulfur mustard exposure resulted in a decrease of 39%, 33% and 42% respectively of sulfur mustard-increased protease activity. These data suggest that therapeutic intervention into the biochemical pathways that culminate in protease activation might serve as an approach to treatment of sulfur mustard-induced pathology.

  12. Cysteine and cysteine-related signaling pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Romero, Luis C; Aroca, M Ángeles; Laureano-Marín, Ana M; Moreno, Inmaculada; García, Irene; Gotor, Cecilia

    2014-02-01

    Cysteine occupies a central position in plant metabolism because it is a reduced sulfur donor molecule involved in the synthesis of essential biomolecules and defense compounds. Moreover, cysteine per se and its derivative molecules play roles in the redox signaling of processes occurring in various cellular compartments. Cysteine is synthesized during the sulfate assimilation pathway via the incorporation of sulfide to O-acetylserine, catalyzed by O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL). Plant cells contain OASTLs in the mitochondria, chloroplasts, and cytosol, resulting in a complex array of isoforms and subcellular cysteine pools. In recent years, significant progress has been made in Arabidopsis, in determining the specific roles of the OASTLs and the metabolites produced by them. Thus, the discovery of novel enzymatic activities of the less-abundant, like DES1 with L-cysteine desulfhydrase activity and SCS with S-sulfocysteine synthase activity, has provided new perspectives on their roles, besides their metabolic functions. Thereby, the research has been demonstrated that cytosolic sulfide and chloroplastic S-sulfocysteine act as signaling molecules regulating autophagy and protecting the photosystems, respectively. In the cytosol, cysteine plays an essential role in plant immunity; in the mitochondria, this molecule plays a central role in the detoxification of cyanide, which is essential for root hair development and plant responses to pathogens.

  13. A free cysteine prolongs the half-life of a homing peptide and improves its tumor-penetrating activity.

    PubMed

    Pang, Hong-Bo; Braun, Gary B; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata R; Sugahara, Kazuki N; Teesalu, Tambet; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2014-02-10

    The accessibility of extravascular tumor tissue to drugs is critical for therapeutic efficacy. We previously described a tumor-targeting peptide (iRGD) that elicits active transport of drugs and macromolecules (covalently coupled or co-administered) across the vascular wall into tumor tissue. Short peptides (iRGD is a 9-amino acid cyclic peptide) generally have a plasma half-life measured in minutes. Since short half-life limits the window of activity obtained with a bolus injection of iRGD, we explored to extend the half-life of the peptide. We show here that addition of a cysteine residue prolongs the plasma half-life of iRGD and increases the accumulation of the peptide in tumors. This modification prolongs the activity of iRGD in inducing macromolecular extravasation and leads to greater drug accumulation in tumors than is obtained with the unmodified peptide. This effect is mediated by covalent binding of iRGD to plasma albumin through a disulfide bond. Our study provides a simple strategy to improve peptide pharmacokinetics and activity. Applied to RGD, it provides a means to increase the entry of therapeutic agents into tumors.

  14. A Minimal Cysteine Motif Required to Activate the SKOR K+ Channel of Arabidopsis by the Reactive Oxygen Species H2O2*

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Mata, Carlos; Wang, Jianwen; Gajdanowicz, Pawel; Gonzalez, Wendy; Hills, Adrian; Donald, Naomi; Riedelsberger, Janin; Amtmann, Anna; Dreyer, Ingo; Blatt, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are essential for development and stress signaling in plants. They contribute to plant defense against pathogens, regulate stomatal transpiration, and influence nutrient uptake and partitioning. Although both Ca2+ and K+ channels of plants are known to be affected, virtually nothing is known of the targets for ROS at a molecular level. Here we report that a single cysteine (Cys) residue within the Kv-like SKOR K+ channel of Arabidopsis thaliana is essential for channel sensitivity to the ROS H2O2. We show that H2O2 rapidly enhanced current amplitude and activation kinetics of heterologously expressed SKOR, and the effects were reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT). Both H2O2 and DTT were active at the outer face of the membrane and current enhancement was strongly dependent on membrane depolarization, consistent with a H2O2-sensitive site on the SKOR protein that is exposed to the outside when the channel is in the open conformation. Cys substitutions identified a single residue, Cys168 located within the S3 α-helix of the voltage sensor complex, to be essential for sensitivity to H2O2. The same Cys residue was a primary determinant for current block by covalent Cys S-methioylation with aqueous methanethiosulfonates. These, and additional data identify Cys168 as a critical target for H2O2, and implicate ROS-mediated control of the K+ channel in regulating mineral nutrient partitioning within the plant. PMID:20605786

  15. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2015-11-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy.

  16. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy. PMID:26713267

  17. L-Cysteine and L-AP4 microinjections in the rat caudal ventrolateral medulla decrease arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Yumi

    2014-12-01

    The thiol amino acid L-cysteine increases arterial blood pressure (ABP) when injected into the cerebrospinal fluid space in conscious rats, indicating a pressor response to centrally acting L-cysteine. A prior synaptic membrane binding assay suggests that L-cysteine has a strong affinity for the L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4) binding site. The central action of L-cysteine may be vial-AP4 sensitive receptors. The present study investigated cardiovascular responses to L-cysteine and L-ap4 microinjected into the autonomic area of the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) where inhibitory neurons regulate ABP via pre-sympathetic vasomotor neurons. Both the injection of L-cysteine and L-AP4 in the CVLM sites identified with L-glutamate produced the same depressor and bradycardic responses in urethane-anesthetized rats. Neither a prior antagonist microinjection of MK801 for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor nor CNQX for the non-NMDA receptor attenuated the responses to L-cysteine, but the combination of the two receptor blocking with an additional prior injection abolished the response. In contrast, either receptor blockade alone abolished the response to L-AP4, indicating distinct mechanisms between responses to L-cysteine and L-AP4 in the CVLM. The results indicate that the CVLM is a central active site for L-cysteine's cardiovascular response. Central L-cysteine's action could be independent of the L-AP4 sensitive receptors. Cardiovascular regulation may involve endogenous L-cysteine in the CVLM. Further multidisciplinary examinations are required to elaborate on L-cysteine's functional roles in the CVLM.

  18. Pathogenesis of periodontitis: a major arginine-specific cysteine proteinase from Porphyromonas gingivalis induces vascular permeability enhancement through activation of the kallikrein/kinin pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, T; Pike, R N; Potempa, J; Travis, J

    1994-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of production of an inflammatory exudate, gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), from periodontal pockets in periodontitis, we examined the vascular permeability enhancement (VPE) activity induced by an arginine-specific cysteine proteinase, Arg-gingipain-1 (RGP-1), produced by a major periopathogenic bacterium, Porphyromonas gingivalis. Intradermal injections into guinea pigs of RGP-1 (> 10(-8) M), or human plasma incubated with RGP-1 (> 10(-9) M), induced VPE in a dose- and activity-dependent manner but with different time courses for the two routes of production. VPE activity induced by RGP-1 was augmented by kininase inhibitors, inhibited by a kallikrein inhibitor and unaffected by an antihistamine drug. The VPE activity in human plasma incubated with RGP-1 also correlated closely with generation of bradykinin (BK). RGP-1 induced 30-40% less VPE activity in Hageman factor-deficient plasma and no VPE in plasma deficient in either prekallikrein (PK) or high molecular weight kininogen (HMWK). After incubation with RGP-1, plasma deficient in PK or HMWK, reconstituted with each missing protein, caused VPE, as did a mixture of purified PK and HMWK, but RGP-1 induced no VPE from HMWK. The VPE of extracts of clinically isolated P. gingivalis were reduced to about 10% by anti-RGP-1-IgG, leupeptin, or tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone, which paralleled effects observed with RGP-1. These results indicate that RGP-1 is the major VPE factor of P. gingivalis, inducing this activity through PK activation and subsequent BK release, resulting in GCF production at sites of periodontitis caused by infection with this organism. Images PMID:8040277

  19. Role of the transsulfuration pathway and of gamma-cystathionase activity in the formation of cysteine and sulfate from methionine in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, A.M.; Drake, M.R.; Stipanuk, M.H. )

    1990-08-01

    To assess the extent to which low hepatic gamma-cystathionase levels affect methionine flux to cysteine in hepatocytes, the effect of inhibition of gamma-cystathionase activity with propargylglycine on the metabolism of L-({sup 35}S)methionine was determined in studies with freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. gamma-Cystathionase activity was inhibited 25%, 42%, 63% and 76% (maximal inhibition) by treatment with 2.5 mumol/L, 0.01 mmol/L, 0.02 mmol/L and 2 mmol/l propargylglycine, respectively. Inhibition of gamma-cystathionase activity with up to 0.02 mmol/L propargylglycine had no statistically significant effect on ({sup 35}S)glutathione, ({sup 35}S)sulfate or ({sup 35}S)cysteine formation from ({sup 35}S)methionine. However, treatment of cells with 2 mmol/L propargylglycine markedly inhibited the metabolism of ({sup 35}S)methionine to ({sup 35}S)glutathione by 93%, to ({sup 35}S)sulfate by 88% and to ({sup 35}S)cysteine by 89%; ({sup 35}S)cystathionine accumulation in these incubation systems was 60 times control. Hepatic gamma-cystathionase activity in premature infants has been reported to be about 23% of mature levels; this level of gamma-cystathionase activity may limit cysteine synthesis by the methionine transsulfuration pathway. No evidence for cysteine synthesis from serine and sulfide, which can be catalyzed by cystathionine beta-synthase, or for methionine metabolism by an S-adenosylmethionine-independent pathway was obtained.

  20. Cysteines in the Stalk of the Nipah Virus G Glycoprotein Are Located in a Distinct Subdomain Critical for Fusion Activation

    PubMed Central

    Maar, Dianna; Harmon, Brooke; Chu, David; Schulz, Belinda; Aguilar, Hector C.; Lee, Benhur

    2012-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses initiate entry through the concerted action of the tetrameric attachment glycoprotein (HN, H, or G) and the trimeric fusion glycoprotein (F). The ectodomains of HN/H/G contain a stalk region important for oligomeric stability and for the F triggering resulting in membrane fusion. Paramyxovirus HN, H, and G form a dimer-of-dimers consisting of disulfide-linked dimers through their stalk domain cysteines. The G attachment protein stalk domain of the highly pathogenic Nipah virus (NiV) contains a distinct but uncharacterized cluster of three cysteine residues (C146, C158, C162). On the basis of a panoply of assays, we report that C158 and C162 of NiV-G likely mediate covalent subunit dimerization, while C146 mediates the stability of higher-order oligomers. For HN or H, mutation of stalk cysteines attenuates but does not abrogate the ability to trigger fusion. In contrast, the NiV-G stalk cysteine mutants were completely deficient in triggering fusion, even though they could still bind the ephrinB2 receptor and associate with F. Interestingly, all cysteine stalk mutants exhibited constitutive exposure of the Mab45 receptor binding-enhanced epitope, previously implicated in F triggering. The enhanced binding of Mab45 to the cysteine mutants relative to wild-type NiV-G, without the addition of the receptor, implicates the stalk cysteines in the stabilization of a pre-receptor-bound conformation and the regulation of F triggering. Sequence alignments revealed that the stalk cysteines were adjacent to a proline-rich microdomain unique to the Henipavirus genus. Our data propose that the cysteine cluster in the NiV-G stalk functions to maintain oligomeric stability but is more importantly involved in stabilizing a unique microdomain critical for triggering fusion. PMID:22496210

  1. A novel cysteine-rich neurotrophic factor in Aplysia facilitates growth, MAPK activation, and long-term synaptic facilitation.

    PubMed

    Pu, Lu; Kopec, Ashley M; Boyle, Heather D; Carew, Thomas J

    2014-04-01

    Neurotrophins are critically involved in developmental processes such as neuronal cell survival, growth, and differentiation, as well as in adult synaptic plasticity contributing to learning and memory. Our previous studies examining neurotrophins and memory formation in Aplysia showed that a TrkB ligand is required for MAPK activation, long-term synaptic facilitation (LTF), and long-term memory (LTM) for sensitization. These studies indicate that neurotrophin-like molecules in Aplysia can act as key elements in a functionally conserved TrkB signaling pathway. Here we report that we have cloned and characterized a novel neurotrophic factor, Aplysia cysteine-rich neurotrophic factor (apCRNF), which shares classical structural and functional characteristics with mammalian neurotrophins. We show that apCRNF (1) is highly enriched in the CNS, (2) enhances neurite elongation and branching, (3) interacts with mammalian TrkB and p75(NTR), (4) is released from Aplysia CNS in an activity-dependent fashion, (5) facilitates MAPK activation in a tyrosine kinase dependent manner in response to sensitizing stimuli, and (6) facilitates the induction of LTF. These results show that apCRNF is a native neurotrophic factor in Aplysia that can engage the molecular and synaptic mechanisms underlying memory formation.

  2. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine.

    PubMed

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2015-09-24

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases.

  3. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C.

    2015-01-01

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases. PMID:26400108

  4. Development of nitrile-based peptidic inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins.

    PubMed

    Frizler, Maxim; Stirnberg, Marit; Sisay, Mihiret Tekeste; Gütschow, Michael

    2010-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that several papain-like cysteine cathepsins are involved in the pathophysiology of diseases such as osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. Therefore, the development of potent and selective cathepsin inhibitors is an attractive subject for medicinal chemists. New advances have been made for nitrile-based inhibitors, leading to the identification of the cathepsin K inhibitor odanacatib and other candidates with potential for therapeutic use. This review summarizes the development of peptidic and peptidomimetic compounds with an electrophilic nitrile 'warhead' as inhibitors of the cysteine cathepsins B, S, L, C, and K. Peptide nitriles have been shown to reversibly react with the active site cysteine under formation of a covalent thioimidate adduct. The structural optimization with respect to the positions P3, P2, P1, P1', and P2' resulted in the identification of potent and selective inhibitors of the corresponding cathepsins. The underlying structure-activity relationships are discussed herein. PMID:20166952

  5. Fluorescence energy transfer distance measurements using site-directed single cysteine mutants. The membrane insertion of colicin A.

    PubMed

    Lakey, J H; Baty, D; Pattus, F

    1991-04-01

    The ion-channel-forming C-terminal fragment of colicin A binds to negatively charged lipid vesicles and provides an example of insertion of a soluble protein into a lipid bilayer. The soluble structure is known from X-ray crystallography and consists of a ten-helix bundle containing a hydrophobic helical hairpin. In this work fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study the membrane-bound structure. An extrinsic probe, N'-(iodoacetyl)-N'-(5-sulfol-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (IAEDANS) was attached to mutant proteins each of which bears a unique cysteine residue. Three mutants K39C (helix 2), T127C (between helices 6 and 7) and S16Crpt (helix 1, which bears a decapeptide repeat before the mutation) gave useful derivatives. In the soluble protein they showed emission wavelengths decreasing in the order K39C greater than T127C greater than S16Crpt and although all showed blue shifts on addition of dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) this order was maintained in the membrane-bound state. These shifts were not indicative of deep membrane insertion. Polarization of IAEDANS revealed differences in mobility between mutants. The three tryptophan residues were used as a compound donor to IAEDANS in resonance energy transfer distance determinations. The values obtained for the soluble form were 1.2 A to 3.2 A longer than in the crystal structure. On addition of lipids the indicated distances increased: S16Crpt-I(AEDANS) 6.45 A (22%), K39C-I 5.45 A (18%) and T127C-I 2.4 A (14%). N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) completely abolishes the tryptophan emission from the thermolytic fragment. When lipids were added to a mixture containing ten NBS-treated channel-forming fragments to one IAEDANS labelled fragment the indicated distances increased rather more: S16Crpt-I 9.7 A (38%), K39C-I 8.1 A (36%) and T127C-I 2.5 A (16%). This showed that intermolecular transfer reduces the distance estimated in samples containing only labelled protein. The ensemble of results shows that the amphipathic

  6. Modulation of the catalytic activity of cruzipain, the major cysteine proteinase from Trypanosoma cruzi, by temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Salvati, L; Mattu, M; Polticelli, F; Tiberi, F; Gradoni, L; Venturini, G; Bolognesi, M; Ascenzi, P

    2001-06-01

    Cysteine proteinases are relevant to several aspects of the parasite life cycle and of parasite-host relationships. Here, a quantitative investigation of the effect of temperature and pH on the total substrate inhibition of cruzipain, the major papain-like cysteine proteinase from Trypanosoma cruzi, is reported. Values of the apparent catalytic and inhibition parameters Km, Vmax, Vmax/Km, and K(i) for the cruzipain-catalysed hydrolysis of N-alpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-arginine-(7-amino-4-methylcoumarin) (Z-Phe-Arg-AMC) and azocasein were determined between 10.0 degrees C and 40.0 degrees C and between pH 4.5 and 8.5. Values of Km were independent of temperature and pH, whereas values of Vmax, Vmax/Km, and K(i) were temperature-dependent and pH-dependent. Over the whole pH range explored, values of logVmax, log(Vmax/Km), and logK(i) increased linearly with respect to T(-1). Values of Vmax and Vmax/Km were affected by the acid-base equilibrium of one temperature-independent ionizing group (i.e. pK(unl)' = pK(lig)' = 5.7 +/- 0.1, at 25.0 degrees C). Moreover, values of K(i) were affected by the alkaline pK shift of one ionizing group of active cruzipain (from pK(unl)" = 5.7 +/- 0.1 to pK(lig)" = 6.1 +/- 0.1, at 25.0 degrees C) upon Z-Phe-Arg-AMC binding. Values of logK(unl)', logK(lig)', and logK(lig)" were temperature-independent. Conversely, values of logK(unl)" were linearly dependent on T(-1). As a whole, total substrate inhibition of cruzipain decreased with increasing temperature and pH. These data suggest that both synthetic and protein substrates can bind to the unique active centre of cruzipain either productively or following a binding mode which results in enzyme inhibition. However, allosteric effect(s) cannot be excluded.

  7. Ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester binding orients the misaligned active site of the ubiquitin hydrolase UCHL1 into productive conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreaux, David A.; Maiti, Tushar K.; Davies, Christopher W.; Das, Chittaranjan

    2010-07-06

    Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) is a Parkinson disease-associated, putative cysteine protease found abundantly and selectively expressed in neurons. The crystal structure of apo UCHL1 showed that the active-site residues are not aligned in a canonical form, with the nucleophilic cysteine being 7.7 {angstrom} from the general base histidine, an arrangement consistent with an inactive form of the enzyme. Here we report the crystal structures of the wild type and two Parkinson disease-associated variants of the enzyme, S18Y and I93M, bound to a ubiquitin-based suicide substrate, ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester. These structures reveal that ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester binds primarily at two sites on the enzyme, with its carboxy terminus at the active site and with its amino-terminal {beta}-hairpin at the distal site - a surface-exposed hydrophobic crevice 17 {angstrom} away from the active site. Binding at the distal site initiates a cascade of side-chain movements in the enzyme that starts at a highly conserved, surface-exposed phenylalanine and is relayed to the active site resulting in the reorientation and proximal placement of the general base within 4 {angstrom} of the catalytic cysteine, an arrangement found in productive cysteine proteases. Mutation of the distal-site, surface-exposed phenylalanine to alanine reduces ubiquitin binding and severely impairs the catalytic activity of the enzyme. These results suggest that the activity of UCHL1 may be regulated by its own substrate.

  8. Direct targeting of Arabidopsis cysteine synthase complexes with synthetic polypeptides to selectively deregulate cysteine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, Anna; Kurzyk, Agata; Mierzwińska, Monika; Płochocka, Danuta; Wieczorek, Grzegorz; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2013-06-01

    Biosynthesis of cysteine is one of the fundamental processes in plants providing the reduced sulfur for cell metabolism. It is accomplished by the sequential action of two enzymes, serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine (thiol) lyase (OAS-TL). Together they constitute the hetero-oligomeric cysteine synthase (CS) complex through specific protein-protein interactions influencing the rate of cysteine production. The aim of our studies was to deregulate the CS complex formation in order to investigate its function in the control of sulfur homeostasis and optimize cysteine synthesis. Computational modeling was used to build a model of the Arabidopsis thaliana mitochondrial CS complex. Several polypeptides based on OAS-TL C amino-acid sequence found at SAT-OASTL interaction sites were designed as probable competitors for SAT3 binding. After verification of the binding in a yeast two-hybrid assay, the most strongly interacting polypeptide was introduced to different cellular compartments of Arabidopsis cell via genetic transformation. Moderate increase in total SAT and OAS-TL activities, but not thiols content, was observed dependent on the transgenic line and sulfur availability in the hydroponic medium. Though our studies demonstrate the proof of principle, they also suggest more complex interaction of both enzymes underlying the mechanism of their reciprocal regulation. PMID:23602110

  9. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs: Arg- and Gln-type Bacterial CDO Homologs

    SciTech Connect

    Driggers, Camden M.; Hartman, Steven J.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ~15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog of uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases.

  10. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs: Arg- and Gln-type Bacterial CDO Homologs

    DOE PAGES

    Driggers, Camden M.; Hartman, Steven J.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ~15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog ofmore » uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases.« less

  11. Differential reconstitution of mitochondrial respiratory chain activity and plasma redox state by cysteine and ornithine in a model of cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Ushmorov, A; Hack, V; Dröge, W

    1999-07-15

    The mechanism of wasting, as it occurs in malignant diseases and various etiologically unrelated conditions, is still poorly understood. We have, therefore, studied putative cause/effect relationships in a murine model of cancer cachexia, C57BL/6 mice bearing the fibrosarcoma MCA-105. The plasma of these mice showed decreased albumin and increased glutamate levels, which are typically found in practically all catabolic conditions. Skeletal muscles from tumor-bearing mice were found to have an abnormally low mitochondrial respiratory chain activity (mito.RCA) and significantly decreased glutathione (GSH) levels. The decrease in mito.RCA was correlated with an increase in the i.m. GSH disulfide/GSH ratio, the plasma cystine/thiol ratio, and the GSH disulfide/GSH ratio in the bile. This is indicative of a generalized shift in the redox state extending through different body fluids. Treatment of tumor-bearing mice with ornithine, a precursor of the radical scavenger spermine, reversed both the decrease in mito.RCA and the change in the redox state, whereas treatment with cysteine, a GSH precursor, normalized only the redox state. Treatment of normal mice with difluoromethyl-ornithine, a specific inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase and spermine biosynthesis, inhibited the mito.RCA in the skeletal muscle tissue, thus illustrating the importance of the putrescine/spermine pathway in the maintenance of mito.RCA. Ornithine, cysteine, and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) also reconstituted the abnormally low concentrations of the GSH precursor glutamate in the skeletal muscle tissue of tumor-bearing mice. Higher doses, however, enhanced tumor growth and increased the plasma glucose level in normal mice. In the latter, cysteine and NAC also decreased i.m. catalase and GSH peroxidase activities. Taken together, our studies on the effects of ornithine, cysteine, and NAC illuminate some of the mechanistic pathways involved in cachexia and suggest targets for therapeutic intervention.

  12. Expression of human recombinant granzyme A zymogen and its activation by the cysteine proteinase cathepsin C.

    PubMed

    Kummer, J A; Kamp, A M; Citarella, F; Horrevoets, A J; Hack, C E

    1996-04-19

    Human granzyme A is one of the serine proteinases present in the granules of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Granzymes are synthesized as inactive proenzymes with an amino-terminal prodipeptide, which is processed during transport of granzymes to the cytotoxic granules, where they are stored as active proteinases. In this study, we explored the possibility of producing recombinant granzymes. Recombinant human granzyme A zymogen was expressed in several eukaryotic cell lines (HepG2, Jurkat, and COS-1) after infection with a recombinant vaccinia virus containing full-length granzyme A cDNA. Immunoblot analysis of cell lysates showed that all infected cells produced a disulfide-linked homodimer of identical molecular weight as natural granzyme A. Infected HepG2 cells produced the largest amount of this protease (approximately 160 times more than lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells). The recombinant protein only had high mannose type oligosaccharides as did the natural protein. Although infected HepG2 and COS cells contained high granzyme A antigen levels, lysates from these cells did not show any granzyme A proteolytic activity. However, the inactive proenzyme could be converted into active granzyme A by incubation with the thiol proteinase cathepsin C (dipeptidyl peptidase I). This study is the first to demonstrate expression of an active recombinant human cytotoxic lymphocyte proteinase and conversion of inactive progranzyme A into an active enzyme by cathepsin C. We suggest that a similar approach can be used for the production of other granzymes and related proteinases.

  13. Structure-activity relationships for a class of selective inhibitors of the major cysteine protease from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Guido, Rafael V C; Trossini, Gustavo H G; Castilho, Marcelo S; Oliva, Glaucius; Ferreira, Elizabeth I; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2008-12-01

    Chagas' disease is a parasitic infection widely distributed throughout Latin America, with devastating consequences in terms of human morbidity and mortality. Cruzain, the major cysteine protease from Trypanosoma cruzi, is an attractive target for antitrypanosomal chemotherapy. In the present work, classical two-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (2D QSAR) and hologram QSAR (HQSAR) studies were performed on a training set of 45 thiosemicarbazone and semicarbazone derivatives as inhibitors of T. cruzi cruzain. Significant statistical models (HQSAR, q(2) = 0.75 and r(2) = 0.96; classical QSAR, q(2) = 0.72 and r(2) = 0.83) were obtained, indicating their consistency for untested compounds. The models were then used to evaluate an external test set containing 10 compounds which were not included in the training set, and the predicted values were in good agreement with the experimental results (HQSAR, r(2)(pred) = 0.95; classical QSAR, r(2)(pred) = 0.91), indicating the existence of complementary between the two ligand-based drug design techniques.

  14. Binding of the Extracellular Eight-Cysteine Motif of Opy2 to the Putative Osmosensor Msb2 Is Essential for Activation of the Yeast High-Osmolarity Glycerol Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Katsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    To adapt to environmental high osmolarity, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae activates the Hog1 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which regulates diverse osmoadaptive responses. Hog1 is activated through the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway, which consists of independent upstream signaling routes termed the SLN1 branch and the SHO1 branch. Here, we report that the extracellular cysteine-rich (CR) domain of the transmembrane-anchor protein Opy2 binds to the Hkr1-Msb2 homology (HMH) domain of the putative osmosensor Msb2 and that formation of the Opy2-Msb2 complex is essential for osmotic activation of Hog1 through the MSB2 subbranch of the SHO1 branch. By analyzing the phenotypes of mutants with Opy2 cysteine-to-alanine mutations, we deduced that the CR domain forms four intramolecular disulfide bonds. To probe for the potential induction of conformational changes in the Opy2-Msb2 complex by osmostress, we constructed mutants with a site-specific Cys-to-Ala mutation of the Opy2 CR domain and mutants with a Cys substitution of the Msb2 HMH domain. Each of these mutants had a reduced cysteine. These mutants were then combinatorially cross-linked using chemical cross-linkers of different lengths. Cross-linking between Opy2 Cys48 and Msb2 Cys1023 was sensitive to osmotic changes, suggesting that osmostress induced a conformational change. We therefore propose that the Opy2-Msb2 complex might serve as an osmosensor. PMID:26598606

  15. A novel approach to the site-selective dual labelling of a protein via chemoselective cysteine modification† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: LC-MS, ES-MS, deconvoluted spectra and fluorescence emission spectra for all reactions with proteins described herein. Fluorescence emission spectra of superfolder GFP, all the cysteine mutants and their derivatives are given. See DOI: 10.1039/c3sc51333e Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Nathani, Ramiz I.; Moody, Paul; Chudasama, Vijay; Smith, Mark E. B.; Fitzmaurice, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Local protein microenvironment is used to control the outcome of reaction between cysteine residues and 2,5-dibromohexanediamide. The differential reactivity is exploited to introduce two orthogonal reactive handles onto the surface of a double cysteine mutant of superfolder green fluorescent protein in a regioselective manner. Subsequent elaboration with commonly used thiol and alkyne containing reagents affects site-selective protein dual labelling. PMID:24741436

  16. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Kenny, Paul J; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-05-29

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets.

  17. Crovirin, a Snake Venom Cysteine-Rich Secretory Protein (CRISP) with Promising Activity against Trypanosomes and Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Adade, Camila M.; Carvalho, Ana Lúcia O.; Tomaz, Marcelo A.; Costa, Tatiana F. R.; Godinho, Joseane L.; Melo, Paulo A.; Lima, Ana Paula C. A.; Rodrigues, Juliany C. F.; Zingali, Russolina B.; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs

    2014-01-01

    Background The neglected human diseases caused by trypanosomatids are currently treated with toxic therapy with limited efficacy. In search for novel anti-trypanosomatid agents, we showed previously that the Crotalus viridis viridis (Cvv) snake venom was active against infective forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. Here, we describe the purification of crovirin, a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) from Cvv venom with promising activity against trypanosomes and Leishmania. Methodology/Principal Findings Crude venom extract was loaded onto a reverse phase analytical (C8) column using a high performance liquid chromatographer. A linear gradient of water/acetonitrile with 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid was used. The peak containing the isolated protein (confirmed by SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry) was collected and its protein content was measured. T. cruzi trypomastigotes and amastigotes, L. amazonensis promastigotes and amastigotes and T. brucei rhodesiense procyclic and bloodstream trypomastigotes were challenged with crovirin, whose toxicity was tested against LLC-MK2 cells, peritoneal macrophages and isolated murine extensor digitorum longus muscle. We purified a single protein from Cvv venom corresponding, according to Nano-LC MS/MS sequencing, to a CRISP of 24,893.64 Da, henceforth referred to as crovirin. Human infective trypanosomatid forms, including intracellular amastigotes, were sensitive to crovirin, with low IC50 or LD50 values (1.10–2.38 µg/ml). A considerably higher concentration (20 µg/ml) of crovirin was required to elicit only limited toxicity on mammalian cells. Conclusions This is the first report of CRISP anti-protozoal activity, and suggests that other members of this family might have potential as drugs or drug leads for the development of novel agents against trypanosomatid-borne neglected diseases. PMID:25330220

  18. Site-directed mutagenesis and high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of the active site of porphobilinogen deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.I.; Roessner, C.A.; Stolowich, N.J.; Karuso, P.; Williams, H.J.; Grant, S.K.; Gonzalez, M.D.; Hoshino, T. )

    1988-10-18

    The active site of porphobilinogen (PBG){sup 1} deaminase from Escherichia coli has been found to contain an unusual dipyrromethane derived from four molecules of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) covalently linked to Cys-242, one of the two cysteine residues conserved in E. coli and human deaminase. By use of a hemA{sup {minus}} strain of E. coli the enzyme was enriched from (5-{sup 13}C)ALA and examined by {sup 1}H-detected multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy, which revealed all of the salient features of a dipyrromethane composed of two PBG units linked heat to tail and terminating in a CH{sub 2}-S bond to a cysteine residue. Site-specific mutagenesis of Cys-99 and Cys-242, respectively, has shown that substitution of Ser for Cys-99 does not affect the enzymatic activity, whereas substitution of Ser for Cys-242 removes essentially all of the catalytic activity as measured by the conversion of the substrate PBG to uro'gen I. The NMR spectrum of the covalent complex of deaminase with the suicide inhibitor 2-bromo-(2,11-{sup 13}C{sub 2})PBG reveals that the aminomethyl terminus of the inhibitor reacts with the enzyme's cofactor at the {alpha}-free pyrrole. NMR spectroscopy of the ES{sub 2} complex confirmed a PBG-derived head-to-tail dipyrromethane attached to the {alpha}-free pyrrole position of the enzyme. A mechanistic rationale for deaminase is presented.

  19. A theoretical study of the active sites of papain and S195C rat trypsin: implications for the low reactivity of mutant serine proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    The serine and cysteine proteinases represent two important classes of enzymes that use a catalytic triad to hydrolyze peptides and esters. The active site of the serine proteinases consists of three key residues, Asp...His...Ser. The hydroxyl group of serine functions as a nucleophile and the imidazole ring of histidine functions as a general acid/general base during catalysis. Similarly, the active site of the cysteine proteinases also involves three key residues: Asn, His, and Cys. The active site of the cysteine proteinases is generally believed to exist as a zwitterion (Asn...His+...Cys-) with the thiolate anion of the cysteine functioning as a nucleophile during the initial stages of catalysis. Curiously, the mutant serine proteinases, thiol subtilisin and thiol trypsin, which have the hybrid Asp...His...Cys triad, are almost catalytically inert. In this study, ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations have been performed on the active sites of papain and the mutant serine proteinase S195C rat trypsin. These calculations predict that the active site of papain exists predominately as a zwitterion (Cys-...His+...Asn). However, similar calculations on S195C rat trypsin demonstrate that the thiol mutant is unable to form a reactive thiolate anion prior to catalysis. Furthermore, structural comparisons between native papain and S195C rat trypsin have demonstrated that the spatial juxtapositions of the triad residues have been inverted in the serine and cysteine proteinases and, on this basis, I argue that it is impossible to convert a serine proteinase to a cysteine proteinase by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:8819168

  20. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  1. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted.

  2. Clustered Conserved Cysteines in Hyaluronan Synthase Mediate Cooperative Activation by Mg(2+) Ions and Severe Inhibitory Effects of Divalent Cations.

    PubMed

    Tlapak-Simmons, Valarie L; Medina, Andria P; Baggenstoss, Bruce A; Nguyen, Long; Baron, Christina A; Weigel, Paul H

    2011-11-15

    Hyaluronan synthase (HAS) uses UDP-GlcUA and UDP-GlcNAc to make hyaluronan (HA). Streptococcus equisimilis HAS (SeHAS) contains four conserved cysteines clustered near the membrane, and requires phospholipids and Mg(2+) for activity. Activity of membrane-bound or purified enzyme displayed a sigmoidal saturation profile for Mg(2+) with a Hill coefficient of 2. To assess if Cys residues are important for cooperativity we examined the Mg(2+) dependence of mutants with various combinations of Cys-to-Ala mutations. All Cys-mutants lost the cooperative response to Mg(2+). In the presence of Mg(2+), other divalent cations inhibited SeHAS with different potencies (Cu(2+)~Zn(2+) >Co(2+) >Ni(2+) >Mn(2+) >Ba(2+) Sr(2+) Ca(2+)). Some divalent metal ions likely inhibit by displacement of Mg(2+)-UDP-Sugar complexes (e.g. Ca(2+), Sr(2+) and Ba(2+) had apparent Ki values of 2-5 mM). In contrast, Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) inhibited more potently (apparent Ki ≤ 0.2 mM). Inhibition of Cys-null SeHAS by Cu(2+), but not Zn(2+), was greatly attenuated compared to wildtype. Double and triple Cys-mutants showed differing sensitivities to Zn(2+) or Cu(2+). Wildtype SeHAS allowed to make HA prior to exposure to Zn(2+) or Cu(2+) was protected from inhibition, indicating that access of metal ions to sensitive functional groups was hindered in processively acting HA•HAS complexes. We conclude that clustered Cys residues mediate cooperative interactions with Mg(2+) and that transition metal ions inhibit SeHAS very potently by interacting with one or more of these -SH groups.

  3. Crystal structure of the cysteine desulfurase DndA from Streptomyces lividans which is involved in DNA phosphorothioation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fukun; Zhang, Zhenyi; Lin, Kui; Qian, Tianle; Zhang, Yan; You, Delin; He, Xinyi; Wang, Zhijun; Liang, Jingdan; Deng, Zixin; Wu, Geng

    2012-01-01

    DNA phosphorothioation is widespread among prokaryotes, and might function to restrict gene transfer among different kinds of bacteria. There has been little investigation into the structural mechanism of the DNA phosphorothioation process. DndA is a cysteine desulfurase which is involved in the first step of DNA phosphorothioation. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of Streptomyces lividans DndA in complex with its covalently bound cofactor PLP, to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Our structure reveals the molecular mechanism that DndA employs to recognize its cofactor PLP, and suggests the potential binding site for the substrate L-cysteine on DndA. In contrast to previously determined structures of cysteine desulfurases, the catalytic cysteine of DndA was found to reside on a β strand. This catalytic cysteine is very far away from the presumable location of the substrate, suggesting that a conformational change of DndA is required during the catalysis process to bring the catalytic cysteine close to the substrate cysteine. Moreover, our in vitro enzymatic assay results suggested that this conformational change is unlikely to be a simple result of random thermal motion, since moving the catalytic cysteine two residues forward or backward in the primary sequence completely disabled the cysteine desulfurase activity of DndA.

  4. Kynurenine aminotransferase III and glutamine transaminase L are identical enzymes that have cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity and can transaminate L-selenomethionine.

    PubMed

    Pinto, John T; Krasnikov, Boris F; Alcutt, Steven; Jones, Melanie E; Dorai, Thambi; Villar, Maria T; Artigues, Antonio; Li, Jianyong; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2014-11-01

    Three of the four kynurenine aminotransferases (KAT I, II, and IV) that synthesize kynurenic acid, a neuromodulator, are identical to glutamine transaminase K (GTK), α-aminoadipate aminotransferase, and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, respectively. GTK/KAT I and aspartate aminotransferase/KAT IV possess cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity. The gene for the former enzyme, GTK/KAT I, is listed in mammalian genome data banks as CCBL1 (cysteine conjugate beta-lyase 1). Also listed, despite the fact that no β-lyase activity has been assigned to the encoded protein in the genome data bank, is a CCBL2 (synonym KAT III). We show that human KAT III/CCBL2 possesses cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity, as does mouse KAT II. Thus, depending on the nature of the substrate, all four KATs possess cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity. These present studies show that KAT III and glutamine transaminase L are identical enzymes. This report also shows that KAT I, II, and III differ in their ability to transaminate methyl-L-selenocysteine (MSC) and L-selenomethionine (SM) to β-methylselenopyruvate (MSP) and α-ketomethylselenobutyrate, respectively. Previous studies have identified these seleno-α-keto acids as potent histone deacetylase inhibitors. Methylselenol (CH3SeH), also purported to have chemopreventive properties, is the γ-elimination product of SM and the β-elimination product of MSC catalyzed by cystathionine γ-lyase (γ-cystathionase). KAT I, II, and III, in part, can catalyze β-elimination reactions with MSC generating CH3SeH. Thus, the anticancer efficacy of MSC and SM will depend, in part, on the endogenous expression of various KAT enzymes and cystathionine γ-lyase present in target tissue coupled with the ability of cells to synthesize in situ either CH3SeH and/or seleno-keto acid metabolites. PMID:25231977

  5. S-allyl cysteine activates the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant response and protects neurons against ischemic injury in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huanying; Jing, Xu; Wei, Xinbing; Perez, Ruth G; Ren, Manru; Zhang, Xiumei; Lou, Haiyan

    2015-04-01

    Stroke is a devastating clinical condition for which an effective neuroprotective treatment is currently unavailable. S-allyl cysteine (SAC), the most abundant organosulfur compound in aged garlic extract, has been reported to possess neuroprotective effects against stroke. However, the mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects remain poorly defined. The present study tests the hypothesis that SAC attenuates ischemic neuronal injury by activating the nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-dependent antioxidant response in both in vitro and in vivo models. Our findings demonstrate that SAC treatment resulted in an increase in Nrf2 protein levels and subsequent activation of antioxidant response element pathway genes in primary cultured neurons and mice. Exposure of primary neurons to SAC provided protection against oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced oxidative insults. In wild-type (Nrf2(+/+) ) mice, systemic administration of SAC attenuated middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced ischemic damage, a protective effect not observed in Nrf2 knockout (Nrf2(-/-) ) mice. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence that activation of the Nrf2 antioxidant response by SAC is strongly associated with its neuroprotective effects against experimental stroke and suggest that targeting the Nrf2 pathway may provide therapeutic benefit for the treatment of stroke. The transcription factor Nrf2 is involved in cerebral ischemic disease and may be a promising target for the treatment of stroke. We provide novel evidence that SAC confers neuroprotection against ischemic stroke by activating the antioxidant Nrf2 signaling pathway. ARE, antioxidant response element; GCLC, glutathione cysteine ligase regulatory subunit; GCLM, glutathione cysteine ligase modulatory subunit; HO-1, heme oxygenase-1; JNK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase; Keap1, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1; Maf, musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma; Nrf2, nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2

  6. Kynurenine Aminotransferase III and Glutamine Transaminase L Are Identical Enzymes that have Cysteine S-Conjugate β-Lyase Activity and Can Transaminate l-Selenomethionine*

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, John T.; Krasnikov, Boris F.; Alcutt, Steven; Jones, Melanie E.; Dorai, Thambi; Villar, Maria T.; Artigues, Antonio; Li, Jianyong; Cooper, Arthur J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Three of the four kynurenine aminotransferases (KAT I, II, and IV) that synthesize kynurenic acid, a neuromodulator, are identical to glutamine transaminase K (GTK), α-aminoadipate aminotransferase, and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, respectively. GTK/KAT I and aspartate aminotransferase/KAT IV possess cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity. The gene for the former enzyme, GTK/KAT I, is listed in mammalian genome data banks as CCBL1 (cysteine conjugate beta-lyase 1). Also listed, despite the fact that no β-lyase activity has been assigned to the encoded protein in the genome data bank, is a CCBL2 (synonym KAT III). We show that human KAT III/CCBL2 possesses cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity, as does mouse KAT II. Thus, depending on the nature of the substrate, all four KATs possess cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity. These present studies show that KAT III and glutamine transaminase L are identical enzymes. This report also shows that KAT I, II, and III differ in their ability to transaminate methyl-l-selenocysteine (MSC) and l-selenomethionine (SM) to β-methylselenopyruvate (MSP) and α-ketomethylselenobutyrate, respectively. Previous studies have identified these seleno-α-keto acids as potent histone deacetylase inhibitors. Methylselenol (CH3SeH), also purported to have chemopreventive properties, is the γ-elimination product of SM and the β-elimination product of MSC catalyzed by cystathionine γ-lyase (γ-cystathionase). KAT I, II, and III, in part, can catalyze β-elimination reactions with MSC generating CH3SeH. Thus, the anticancer efficacy of MSC and SM will depend, in part, on the endogenous expression of various KAT enzymes and cystathionine γ-lyase present in target tissue coupled with the ability of cells to synthesize in situ either CH3SeH and/or seleno-keto acid metabolites. PMID:25231977

  7. S-allyl cysteine activates the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant response and protects neurons against ischemic injury in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huanying; Jing, Xu; Wei, Xinbing; Perez, Ruth G; Ren, Manru; Zhang, Xiumei; Lou, Haiyan

    2015-04-01

    Stroke is a devastating clinical condition for which an effective neuroprotective treatment is currently unavailable. S-allyl cysteine (SAC), the most abundant organosulfur compound in aged garlic extract, has been reported to possess neuroprotective effects against stroke. However, the mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects remain poorly defined. The present study tests the hypothesis that SAC attenuates ischemic neuronal injury by activating the nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-dependent antioxidant response in both in vitro and in vivo models. Our findings demonstrate that SAC treatment resulted in an increase in Nrf2 protein levels and subsequent activation of antioxidant response element pathway genes in primary cultured neurons and mice. Exposure of primary neurons to SAC provided protection against oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced oxidative insults. In wild-type (Nrf2(+/+) ) mice, systemic administration of SAC attenuated middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced ischemic damage, a protective effect not observed in Nrf2 knockout (Nrf2(-/-) ) mice. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence that activation of the Nrf2 antioxidant response by SAC is strongly associated with its neuroprotective effects against experimental stroke and suggest that targeting the Nrf2 pathway may provide therapeutic benefit for the treatment of stroke. The transcription factor Nrf2 is involved in cerebral ischemic disease and may be a promising target for the treatment of stroke. We provide novel evidence that SAC confers neuroprotection against ischemic stroke by activating the antioxidant Nrf2 signaling pathway. ARE, antioxidant response element; GCLC, glutathione cysteine ligase regulatory subunit; GCLM, glutathione cysteine ligase modulatory subunit; HO-1, heme oxygenase-1; JNK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase; Keap1, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1; Maf, musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma; Nrf2, nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2

  8. Kynurenine aminotransferase III and glutamine transaminase L are identical enzymes that have cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity and can transaminate L-selenomethionine.

    PubMed

    Pinto, John T; Krasnikov, Boris F; Alcutt, Steven; Jones, Melanie E; Dorai, Thambi; Villar, Maria T; Artigues, Antonio; Li, Jianyong; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2014-11-01

    Three of the four kynurenine aminotransferases (KAT I, II, and IV) that synthesize kynurenic acid, a neuromodulator, are identical to glutamine transaminase K (GTK), α-aminoadipate aminotransferase, and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, respectively. GTK/KAT I and aspartate aminotransferase/KAT IV possess cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity. The gene for the former enzyme, GTK/KAT I, is listed in mammalian genome data banks as CCBL1 (cysteine conjugate beta-lyase 1). Also listed, despite the fact that no β-lyase activity has been assigned to the encoded protein in the genome data bank, is a CCBL2 (synonym KAT III). We show that human KAT III/CCBL2 possesses cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity, as does mouse KAT II. Thus, depending on the nature of the substrate, all four KATs possess cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity. These present studies show that KAT III and glutamine transaminase L are identical enzymes. This report also shows that KAT I, II, and III differ in their ability to transaminate methyl-L-selenocysteine (MSC) and L-selenomethionine (SM) to β-methylselenopyruvate (MSP) and α-ketomethylselenobutyrate, respectively. Previous studies have identified these seleno-α-keto acids as potent histone deacetylase inhibitors. Methylselenol (CH3SeH), also purported to have chemopreventive properties, is the γ-elimination product of SM and the β-elimination product of MSC catalyzed by cystathionine γ-lyase (γ-cystathionase). KAT I, II, and III, in part, can catalyze β-elimination reactions with MSC generating CH3SeH. Thus, the anticancer efficacy of MSC and SM will depend, in part, on the endogenous expression of various KAT enzymes and cystathionine γ-lyase present in target tissue coupled with the ability of cells to synthesize in situ either CH3SeH and/or seleno-keto acid metabolites.

  9. An oxidative coupling product of luteolin with cysteine ester and its enhanced inhibitory activity for xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Toshiya; Nojima, Shoko; Miura, Yukari; Honda, Sari; Masuda, Akiko

    2015-08-15

    Oxidative coupling reactions of several flavonoids with a cysteine ester (a radicalic and nucleophilic biochemical) were carried out and the abilities of the coupling products against xanthine oxidase (XO) were screened. One of the products, derived from luteolin, showed a notable inhibitory effect. A potent XO inhibitory compound was isolated from the complex mixture of the product of the coupling of luteolin and cysteine ethyl ester, and its structure was determined by NMR and MS analysis. The compound has a unique 1,4-thiazine ring unit on the luteolin B-ring and is inhibited XO 4.5 times more strongly than it did luteolin.

  10. 'Pergularain e I'--a plant cysteine protease with thrombin-like activity from Pergularia extensa latex.

    PubMed

    Shivaprasad, Holenarasipura V; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Frey, Brigitte M; Frey, Felix J; Vishwanath, Bannikuppe S

    2010-03-01

    Pergularain e I, a cysteine protease with thrombin-like activity, was purified by ion exchange chromatography from the latex of Pergularia extensa. Its homogeneity was characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), native PAGE and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The molecular mass of pergularain e I by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) was found to be 23.356 kDa and the N-terminal sequence is L-P-H-D-V-E. Pergularain e I is a glycoprotein containing approximately 20% of carbohydrate. Pergularain e I constituted 6.7% of the total protein with a specific activity of 9.5 units/mg/min with a 2.11-fold increased purity. Proteolytic activity of the pergularain e I was completely inhibited by iodoacetic acid (IAA). Pergularain e I exhibited procoagulant activity with citrated plasma and fibrinogen similar to thrombin. Pergularain e I increases the absorbance of fibrinogen solution in concentration-dependent and time-dependent manner. At 10 microg concentration, an absorbance of 0.48 was reached within 10 min of incubation time. Similar absorbance was observed when 0.2 NIH units of thrombin were used. Thrombin-like activity of pergularain e I is because of the selective hydrolysis of A alpha and B beta chains of fibrinogen and gamma-chain was observed to be insusceptible to hydrolysis. Molecular masses of the two peptide fragments released from fibrinogen due to the hydrolysis by pergularain e I at 5-min incubation time were found to be 1537.21 and 1553.29 and were in close agreement with the molecular masses of 16 amino acid sequence of fibrinopeptide A and 14 amino acid sequence of fibrinopeptide B, respectively. Prolonged fibrinogen-pergularain e I incubation releases additional peptides and their sequence comparison of molecular masses of the released peptides suggested that pergularain e I hydrolyzes specifically after arginine residues.

  11. Mechanism of Thiosulfate Oxidation in the SoxA Family of Cysteine-ligated Cytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Grabarczyk, Daniel B.; Chappell, Paul E.; Eisel, Bianca; Johnson, Steven; Lea, Susan M.; Berks, Ben C.

    2015-01-01

    Thiosulfate dehydrogenase (TsdA) catalyzes the oxidation of two thiosulfate molecules to form tetrathionate and is predicted to use an unusual cysteine-ligated heme as the catalytic cofactor. We have determined the structure of Allochromatium vinosum TsdA to a resolution of 1.3 Å. This structure confirms the active site heme ligation, identifies a thiosulfate binding site within the active site cavity, and reveals an electron transfer route from the catalytic heme, through a second heme group to the external electron acceptor. We provide multiple lines of evidence that the catalytic reaction proceeds through the intermediate formation of a S-thiosulfonate derivative of the heme cysteine ligand: the cysteine is reactive and is accessible to electrophilic attack; cysteine S-thiosulfonate is formed by the addition of thiosulfate or following the reverse reaction with tetrathionate; the S-thiosulfonate modification is removed through catalysis; and alkylating the cysteine blocks activity. Active site amino acid residues required for catalysis were identified by mutagenesis and are inferred to also play a role in stabilizing the S-thiosulfonate intermediate. The enzyme SoxAX, which catalyzes the first step in the bacterial Sox thiosulfate oxidation pathway, is homologous to TsdA and can be inferred to use a related catalytic mechanism. PMID:25673696

  12. Mechanism of thiosulfate oxidation in the SoxA family of cysteine-ligated cytochromes.

    PubMed

    Grabarczyk, Daniel B; Chappell, Paul E; Eisel, Bianca; Johnson, Steven; Lea, Susan M; Berks, Ben C

    2015-04-01

    Thiosulfate dehydrogenase (TsdA) catalyzes the oxidation of two thiosulfate molecules to form tetrathionate and is predicted to use an unusual cysteine-ligated heme as the catalytic cofactor. We have determined the structure of Allochromatium vinosum TsdA to a resolution of 1.3 Å. This structure confirms the active site heme ligation, identifies a thiosulfate binding site within the active site cavity, and reveals an electron transfer route from the catalytic heme, through a second heme group to the external electron acceptor. We provide multiple lines of evidence that the catalytic reaction proceeds through the intermediate formation of a S-thiosulfonate derivative of the heme cysteine ligand: the cysteine is reactive and is accessible to electrophilic attack; cysteine S-thiosulfonate is formed by the addition of thiosulfate or following the reverse reaction with tetrathionate; the S-thiosulfonate modification is removed through catalysis; and alkylating the cysteine blocks activity. Active site amino acid residues required for catalysis were identified by mutagenesis and are inferred to also play a role in stabilizing the S-thiosulfonate intermediate. The enzyme SoxAX, which catalyzes the first step in the bacterial Sox thiosulfate oxidation pathway, is homologous to TsdA and can be inferred to use a related catalytic mechanism.

  13. A sensitive fluorescent assay for measuring the cysteine protease activity of Der p 1, a major allergen from the dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus.

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, O; Sewell, H F; Shakib, F

    1998-01-01

    The potent allergenicity of Der p 1, a major allergen of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, is thought to be related to its cysteine protease activity. Therefore, there is considerable interest in developing a sensitive assay for measuring Der p 1 activity to screen for specific inhibitors. This study demonstrates for the first time that the activity of Der p 1 can be measured conveniently in a continuous rate assay with the fluorogenic substrate Boc-Gln-Ala-Arg-AMC (K(m) = 280 microM and kcat/K(m) = 4.6 x 10(3)/M/s). PMID:9893750

  14. Traceless splicing enabled by substrate-induced activation of the Nostoc punctiforme Npu DnaE intein after mutation of a catalytic cysteine to serine.

    PubMed

    Cheriyan, Manoj; Chan, Siu-Hong; Perler, Francine

    2014-12-12

    Inteins self-catalytically cleave out of precursor proteins while ligating the surrounding extein fragments with a native peptide bond. Much attention has been lavished on these molecular marvels with the hope of understanding and harnessing their chemistry for novel biochemical transformations including coupling peptides from synthetic or biological origins and controlling protein function. Despite an abundance of powerful applications, the use of inteins is still hampered by limitations in our understanding of their specificity (defined as flanking sequences that permit splicing) and the challenge of inserting inteins into target proteins. We examined the frequently used Nostoc punctiforme Npu DnaE intein after the C-extein cysteine nucleophile (Cys+1) was mutated to serine or threonine. Previous studies demonstrated reduced rates and/or splicing yields with the Npu DnaE intein after mutation of Cys+1 to Ser+1. In this study, genetic selection identified extein sequences with Ser+1 that enabled the Npu DnaE intein to splice with only a 5-fold reduction in rate compared to the wild-type Cys+1 intein and without mutation of the intein itself to activate Ser+1 as a nucleophile. Three different proteins spliced efficiently after insertion of the intein flanked by the selected sequences. We then used this selected specificity to achieve traceless splicing in a targeted enzyme at a location predicted by primary sequence similarity to only the selected C-extein sequence. This study highlights the latent catalytic potential of the Npu DnaE intein to splice with an alternative nucleophile and enables broader intein utility by increasing insertion site choices.

  15. TRPA1 is activated by direct addition of cysteine residues to the N-hydroxysuccinyl esters of acrylic and cinnamic acids.

    PubMed

    Sadofsky, Laura R; Boa, Andrew N; Maher, Sarah A; Birrell, Mark A; Belvisi, Maria G; Morice, Alyn H

    2011-01-01

    The nociceptor TRPA1 is thought to be activated through covalent modification of specific cysteine residues on the N terminal of the channel. The precise mechanism of covalent modification with unsaturated carbonyl-containing compounds is unclear, therefore by examining a range of compounds which can undergo both conjugate and/or direct addition reactions we sought to further elucidate the mechanism(s) whereby TRPA1 can be activated by covalent modification. Calcium signalling was used to determine the mechanism of activation of TRPA1 expressed in HEK293 cells with a series of related compounds which were capable of either direct and/or conjugate addition processes. These results were confirmed using physiological recordings with isolated vagus nerve preparations. We found negligible channel activation with chemicals which could only react with cysteine residues via conjugate addition such as acrylamide, acrylic acid, and cinnamic acid. Compounds able to react via either conjugate or direct addition, such as acrolein, methyl vinyl ketone, mesityl oxide, acrylic acid NHS ester, cinnamaldehyde and cinnamic acid NHS ester, activated TRPA1 in a concentration dependent manner as did compounds only capable of direct addition, namely propionic acid NHS ester and hydrocinnamic acid NHS ester. These compounds failed to activate TRPV1 expressed in HEK293 cells or mock transfected HEK293 cells. For molecules capable of direct or conjugate additions, the results suggest for the first time that TRPA1 may be activated preferentially by direct addition of the thiol group of TRPA1 cysteines to the agonist carbonyl carbon of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl-containing compounds.

  16. IscS from Archaeoglobus fulgidus has no desulfurase activity but may provide a cysteine ligand for [Fe2S2] cluster assembly.

    PubMed

    Pagnier, Adrien; Nicolet, Yvain; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C

    2015-06-01

    Iron sulfur ([Fe-S]) clusters are essential prosthetic groups involved in fundamental cell processes such as gene expression regulation, electron transfer and Lewis acid base chemistry. Central components of their biogenesis are pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent l-cysteine desulfurases, which provide the necessary S atoms for [Fe-S] cluster assembly. The archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus (Af) has two ORFs, which although annotated as l-cysteine desulfurases of the ISC type (IscS), lack the essential Lys residue (K199 in Af) that forms a Schiff base with PLP. We have previously determined the structure of an Af(IscU-D35A-IscS)2 complex heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and found it to contain a [Fe2S2] cluster. In order to understand the origin of sulfide in that structure we have performed a series of functional tests using wild type and mutated forms of AfIscS. In addition, we have determined the crystal structure of an AfIscS-D199K mutant. From these studies we conclude that: i) AfIscS has no desulfurase activity; ii) in our in vitro [Fe2S2] cluster assembly experiments, sulfide ions are non-enzymatically generated by a mixture of iron, l-cysteine and PLP and iii) the physiological role of AfIscS may be to provide a cysteine ligand to the nascent cluster as observed in the [Fe2S2]-Af(IscU-D35A-IscS)2 complex. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases.

  17. Reductive activation with cysteine represents a chromium(III)-dependent pathway in the induction of genotoxicity by carcinogenic chromium(VI).

    PubMed

    Zhitkovich, Anatoly; Quievryn, George; Messer, Joseph; Motylevich, Zhanna

    2002-10-01

    Induction of DNA damage by carcinogenic hexavalent chromium compounds [Cr(VI)] results from its reduction to lower oxidation states. Reductive metabolism of Cr(VI) generates intermediate Cr(V/IV)species, organic radicals, and finally Cr(III), which forms stable complexes with many biological ligands, including DNA. To determine the biological significance of different reaction products, we examined genotoxic responses and the formation of DNA damage during reduction of Cr(VI) by its biological reducer, cysteine. We have found that cysteine-dependent activation of Cr(VI) led to the formation of Cr-DNA and cysteine-Cr-DNA adducts as well as interstrand DNA cross-links. The yield of binary and ternary DNA adducts was relatively constant at different concentrations of Cr(VI) and averaged approximately 54 and 45%, respectively. Interstrand DNA cross-links accounted on average for 1% of adducts, and their yield was even less significant at low Cr(VI) concentrations. Reduction of Cr(VI) in several commonly used buffers did not induce detectable damage to the sugar-phosphate backbone of DNA. Replication of Cr(VI)-modified plasmids in intact human fibroblasts has shown that cysteine-dependent metabolism of Cr(VI) resulted in the formation of mutagenic and replication-blocking DNA lesions. Selective elimination of Cr-DNA adducts from Cr(VI)-treated plasmids abolished all genotoxic responses, indicating that nonoxidative, Cr(III)-dependent reactions were responsible for the induction of both mutagenicity and replication blockage by Cr(VI). The demonstration of the mutagenic potential of Cr-DNA adducts suggests that these lesions can be explored in the development of specific and mechanistically important biomarkers of exposure to toxic forms of Cr.

  18. Trichodiene synthase. Identification of active site residues by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Cane, D E; Shim, J H; Xue, Q; Fitzsimons, B C; Hohn, T M

    1995-02-28

    Derivatization of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-treated trichodiene synthase with [methyl-14C]methyl methanethiosulfonate and analysis of the derived tryptic peptides suggested the presence of two cysteine residues at the active site. The corresponding C146A and C190A mutants were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The C190A mutant displayed partial but significantly reduced activity, with a reduction in kcat/Km of 3000 compared to the wild-type trichodiene synthase, while the C146A mutant was essentially inactive. A hybrid trichodiene synthase, constructed from amino acids 1-309 of the Fusarium sporotrichioides enzyme and amino acids 310-383 of the Gibberella pulicaris cyclase, had steady state kinetic parameters nearly identical to those of the wild-type F. sporotrichioides enzyme. From this parent hybrid, a series of mutants was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis in which the amino acids in the base-rich region, 302-306 (DRRYR), were systematically modified. Three of these mutants were overexpressed and purified to homogeneity. The importance of Arg304 for catalysis was established by the observation that the R304K mutant showed a more than 25-fold increase in Km, as well as a 200-fold reduction in kcat. In addition, analysis of the incubation products of the R304K mutant by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) indicated that farnesyl diphosphate was converted not only to trichodiene but to at least two additional C15H24 hydrocarbons, mle 204. Replacement of the Tyr305 residue of trichodiene synthase with Phe had little effect on kcat, while increasing the Km by a factor of ca. 7-8.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7873527

  19. Structure-Function Relationship of the Chloroplastic Glutaredoxin S12 with an Atypical WCSYS Active Site*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Couturier, Jeremy; Koh, Cha San; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Winger, Alison M.; Gualberto, Jose Manuel; Corbier, Catherine; Decottignies, Paulette; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Didierjean, Claude; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Glutaredoxins (Grxs) are efficient catalysts for the reduction of mixed disulfides in glutathionylated proteins, using glutathione or thioredoxin reductases for their regeneration. Using GFP fusion, we have shown that poplar GrxS12, which possesses a monothiol 28WCSYS32 active site, is localized in chloroplasts. In the presence of reduced glutathione, the recombinant protein is able to reduce in vitro substrates, such as hydroxyethyldisulfide and dehydroascorbate, and to regenerate the glutathionylated glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Although the protein possesses two conserved cysteines, it is functioning through a monothiol mechanism, the conserved C terminus cysteine (Cys87) being dispensable, since the C87S variant is fully active in all activity assays. Biochemical and crystallographic studies revealed that Cys87 exhibits a certain reactivity, since its pKa is around 5.6. Coupled with thiol titration, fluorescence, and mass spectrometry analyses, the resolution of poplar GrxS12 x-ray crystal structure shows that the only oxidation state is a glutathionylated derivative of the active site cysteine (Cys29) and that the enzyme does not form inter- or intramolecular disulfides. Contrary to some plant Grxs, GrxS12 does not incorporate an iron-sulfur cluster in its wild-type form, but when the active site is mutated into YCSYS, it binds a [2Fe-2S] cluster, indicating that the single Trp residue prevents this incorporation. PMID:19158074

  20. Structural Insights into the Protease-like Antigen Plasmodium falciparum SERA5 and Its Noncanonical Active-Site Serine

    SciTech Connect

    Hodder, Anthony N.; Malby, Robyn L.; Clarke, Oliver B.; Fairlie, W. Douglas; Colman, Peter M.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Smith, Brian J.

    2009-08-28

    The sera genes of the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium encode a family of unique proteins that are maximally expressed at the time of egress of parasites from infected red blood cells. These multi-domain proteins are unique, containing a central papain-like cysteine-protease fragment enclosed between the disulfide-linked N- and C-terminal domains. However, the central fragment of several members of this family, including serine repeat antigen 5 (SERA5), contains a serine (S596) in place of the active-site cysteine. Here we report the crystal structure of the central protease-like domain of Plasmodium falciparum SERA5, revealing a number of anomalies in addition to the putative nucleophilic serine: (1) the structure of the putative active site is not conducive to binding substrate in the canonical cysteine-protease manner; (2) the side chain of D594 restricts access of substrate to the putative active site; and (3) the S{sub 2} specificity pocket is occupied by the side chain of Y735, reducing this site to a small depression on the protein surface. Attempts to determine the structure in complex with known inhibitors were not successful. Thus, despite having revealed its structure, the function of the catalytic domain of SERA5 remains an enigma.

  1. Effects of the terminal sire type and sex on pork muscle cathepsins (B, B+L and H), cysteine proteinase inhibitors and lipolytic enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Armero, E; Barbosa, J A; Toldra, F; Baselga, M; Pla, M

    1999-02-01

    Pork muscle cathepsins (B, B+L, and H), cysteine proteinase inhibitors and lipolytic enzyme activities were measured in the offspring of five different genetic sire types: Danish Duroc (DU), Dutch Large White (LW(D)), English Large White (LW(E)), Belgian Landrace × Landrace (BL×LR) and Belgian Landrace (BL). Cathepsin B and B+L activities were higher for LW(E) and LW(D) sires than for BL×LR and BL. Cathepsin H activity showed an opposite evolution, being higher for BL and BL×LR sires than for DU, LW(D) and LW(E). Cysteine proteinase inhibitor activity was higher for LW(E) sires than for DU and BL. In lipolytic enzymes, BL sires had a lower acid lipase activity than DU and LW(E) sires and also a lower neutral esterase activity than LW(E) and LW(D) sires. Significant differences between sexes were found for cathepsin H activity only, being higher for females. PMID:22061703

  2. Catalysis: Elusive active site in focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labinger, Jay A.

    2016-08-01

    The identification of the active site of an iron-containing catalyst raises hopes of designing practically useful catalysts for the room-temperature conversion of methane to methanol, a potential fuel for vehicles. See Letter p.317

  3. Π-Clamp-mediated cysteine conjugation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J; Santos, Michael S; Van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-02-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is one of the most significant challenges in chemistry. Typically, protecting groups or catalysts must be used to enable the selective modification of one site among many that are similarly reactive, and general strategies that selectively tune the local chemical environment around a target site are rare. Here, we show a four-amino-acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the 'π-clamp', that tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We use the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues. These examples include antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes that would be difficult to modify selectively using standard cysteine-based methods. Antibodies modified using the π-clamp retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach to mediate site-selective chemistry and provides new avenues to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics.

  4. π-Clamp-mediated cysteine conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J.; Santos, Michael S.; van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L.

    2016-02-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is one of the most significant challenges in chemistry. Typically, protecting groups or catalysts must be used to enable the selective modification of one site among many that are similarly reactive, and general strategies that selectively tune the local chemical environment around a target site are rare. Here, we show a four-amino-acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the ‘π-clamp’, that tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We use the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues. These examples include antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes that would be difficult to modify selectively using standard cysteine-based methods. Antibodies modified using the π-clamp retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach to mediate site-selective chemistry and provides new avenues to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics.

  5. Π-Clamp-mediated cysteine conjugation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J; Santos, Michael S; Van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-02-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is one of the most significant challenges in chemistry. Typically, protecting groups or catalysts must be used to enable the selective modification of one site among many that are similarly reactive, and general strategies that selectively tune the local chemical environment around a target site are rare. Here, we show a four-amino-acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the 'π-clamp', that tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We use the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues. These examples include antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes that would be difficult to modify selectively using standard cysteine-based methods. Antibodies modified using the π-clamp retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach to mediate site-selective chemistry and provides new avenues to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics. PMID:26791894

  6. π-Clamp Mediated Cysteine Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J.; Santos, Michael S.; Van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L.

    2016-01-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is a grand challenge in chemistry. Protecting groups or catalysts must be used to selectively modify one site among many that are similarly reactive. General strategies are rare such the local chemical environment around the target site is tuned for selective transformation. Here we show a four amino acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the “π-clamp”, tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for the site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We used the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues (e.g. antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes), which was impossible with prior cysteine modification methods. The modified π-clamp antibodies retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach for site-selective chemistry and provides opportunities to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics. PMID:26791894

  7. Conserved Cysteine Residue in the DNA-Binding Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 E2 Protein Confers Redox Regulation of the DNA- Binding Activity in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Alison A.; Klausner, Richard D.; Howley, Peter M.

    1992-08-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 open reading frame encodes three proteins involved in viral DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. These polypeptides share a carboxyl-terminal domain with a specific DNA-binding activity; through this domain the E2 polypeptides form dimers. In this study, we demonstrate the inhibition of E2 DNA binding in vitro by reagents that oxidize or otherwise chemically modify the free sulfydryl groups of reactive cysteine residues. However, these reagents had no effect on DNA-binding activity when the E2 polypeptide was first bound to DNA, suggesting that the free sulfydryl group(s) may be protected by DNA binding. Sensitivity to sulfydryl modification was mapped to a cysteine residue at position 340 in the E2 DNA-binding domain, an amino acid that is highly conserved among the E2 proteins of different papillomaviruses. Replacement of this residue with other amino acids abrogated the sensitivity to oxidation-reduction changes but did not affect the DNA-binding property of the E2 protein. These results suggest that papillomavirus DNA replication and transcriptional regulation could be modulated through the E2 proteins by changes in the intracellular redox environment. Furthermore, a motif consisting of a reactive cysteine residue carboxyl-terminal to a lysine residue in a basic region of the DNA-binding domain is a feature common to a number of transcriptional regulatory proteins that, like E2, are subject to redox regulation. Thus, posttranslational regulation of the activity of these proteins by the intracellular redox environment may be a general phenomenon.

  8. Cysteine pK(a) values for the bacterial peroxiredoxin AhpC.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Kimberly J; Parsonage, Derek; Hall, Andrea; Karplus, P Andrew; Poole, Leslie B

    2008-12-01

    Salmonella typhimurium AhpC is a founding member of the peroxiredoxin family, a ubiquitous group of cysteine-based peroxidases with high reactivity toward hydrogen peroxide, organic hydroperoxides, and peroxynitrite. For all of the peroxiredoxins, the catalytic cysteine, referred to as the peroxidatic cysteine (C(P)), acts as a nucleophile in attacking the peroxide substrate, forming a cysteine sulfenic acid at the active site. Because thiolates are far stronger nucleophiles than thiol groups, it is generally accepted that cysteine-based peroxidases should exhibit pK(a) values lower than an unperturbed value of 8.3-8.5. In this investigation, several independent approaches were used to assess the pK(a) of the two cysteinyl residues of AhpC. Methods using two different iodoacetamide derivatives yielded unperturbed pK(a) values (7.9-8.7) for both cysteines, apparently due to reactivity with the wrong conformation of C(P) (i.e., locally unfolded and flipped out of the active site), as supported by X-ray crystallographic analyses. A functional pK(a) of 5.94 +/- 0.10 presumably reflecting the titration of C(P) within the fully folded active site was obtained by measuring AhpC competition with horseradish peroxidase for hydrogen peroxide; this value is quite similar to that obtained by analyzing the pH dependence of the epsilon(240) of wild-type AhpC (5.84 +/- 0.02) and similar to those obtained for two typical 2-cysteine peroxiredoxins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (5.4 and 6.0). Thus, the pK(a) value of AhpC balances the need for a deprotonated thiol (at pH 7, approximately 90% of the C(P) would be deprotonated) with the fact that thiolates with higher pK(a) values are stronger nucleophiles. PMID:18986167

  9. The Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) V2 protein inhibits enzymatic activity of the host papain-like cysteine protease CYP1.

    PubMed

    Bar-Ziv, Amalia; Levy, Yael; Citovsky, Vitaly; Gafni, Yedidya

    2015-05-01

    The viral V2 protein is one of the key factors that Tomato yellow leaf curl geminivirus (TYLCV), a major tomato pathogen worldwide, utilizes to combat the host defense. Besides suppressing the plant RNA silencing defense by targeting the host SGS3 component of the silencing machinery, V2 also interacts with the host CYP1 protein, a papain-like cysteine protease likely involved in hypersensitive response reactions. The biological effects of the V2-CYP1 interaction, however, remain unknown. We addressed this question by demonstrating that V2 inhibits the enzymatic activity of CYP1, but does not interfere with post-translational maturation of this protein. PMID:25797621

  10. The Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) V2 protein inhibits enzymatic activity of the host papain-like cysteine protease CYP1

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Ziv, Amalia; Levy, Yael; Citovsky, Vitaly; Gafni, Yedidya

    2015-01-01

    The viral V2 protein is one of the key factors that Tomato yellow leaf curl geminivirus (TYLCV), a major tomato pathogen worldwide, utilizes to combat the host defense. Besides suppressing the plant RNA silencing defense by targeting the host SGS3 component of the silencing machinery, V2 also interacts with the host CYP1 protein, a papain-like cysteine protease likely involved in hypersensitive response reactions. The biological effects of the V2-CYP1 interaction, however, remain unknown. We addressed this question by demonstrating that V2 inhibits the enzymatic activity of CYP1, but does not interfere with post-translational maturation of this protein. PMID:25797621

  11. The Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) V2 protein inhibits enzymatic activity of the host papain-like cysteine protease CYP1.

    PubMed

    Bar-Ziv, Amalia; Levy, Yael; Citovsky, Vitaly; Gafni, Yedidya

    2015-05-01

    The viral V2 protein is one of the key factors that Tomato yellow leaf curl geminivirus (TYLCV), a major tomato pathogen worldwide, utilizes to combat the host defense. Besides suppressing the plant RNA silencing defense by targeting the host SGS3 component of the silencing machinery, V2 also interacts with the host CYP1 protein, a papain-like cysteine protease likely involved in hypersensitive response reactions. The biological effects of the V2-CYP1 interaction, however, remain unknown. We addressed this question by demonstrating that V2 inhibits the enzymatic activity of CYP1, but does not interfere with post-translational maturation of this protein.

  12. Neutral sphingomyelinase-2 is a redox sensitive enzyme: role of catalytic cysteine residues in regulation of enzymatic activity through changes in oligomeric state.

    PubMed

    Dotson, P Patrick; Karakashian, Alexander A; Nikolova-Karakashian, Mariana N

    2015-02-01

    Neutral sphingomyelinase-2 (nSMase-2) is the major sphingomyelinase activated in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines and during oxidative stress. It is a membrane-bound 655 amino acid protein containing 22 cysteine residues. In this study, we expressed recombinant mouse nSMase-2 protein in Escherichia coli, and investigated whether nSMase-2 is a redox sensitive enzyme. Our results demonstrate that nSMase-2 exists as both monomers and multimers that are associated with high and low enzymatic activity respectively. Mutational analysis of nSMase-2 identified within its C-terminal catalytic domain several oxidant-sensitive cysteine residues that were shown to be involved in enzyme oligomerization. Changing Cys(617) to Ser for example is a gain-of-function mutation associated with a decreased propensity for oligomerization. Alternatively, nSMase-2 expression in a bacterial strain that lacks endogenous thioredoxin, Rosetta-gami2, results in increased oligomer formation and lower enzyme activity. Phenotypic rescue was accomplished by treating nSMase-2 lysates with recombinant human thioredoxin. This indicates that nSMase-2 may be a novel substrate for thioredoxin. FRET analysis confirmed the presence of nSMase-2 multimers in mammalian HEK cells and their localization to the plasma membrane. In conclusion, our results identify nSMase-2 as a redox-sensitive enzyme, whose basal activity is influenced by thioredoxin-mediated changes in its oligomeric state. PMID:25287744

  13. Protein Topology Determines Cysteine Oxidation Fate: The Case of Sulfenyl Amide Formation among Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Defelipe, Lucas A.; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A.; Turjanski, Adrián G.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function. PMID:25741692

  14. Role of cysteine residues in pseudouridine synthases of different families.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, V; Swann, S L; Spedaliere, C J; Mueller, E G

    1999-10-01

    The pseudouridine synthases catalyze the isomerization of uridine to pseudouridine in RNA molecules. An attractive mechanism was proposed based on that of thymidylate synthase, in which the thiol(ate) group of a cysteine side chain serves as the nucleophile in a Michael addition to C6 of the isomerized uridine. Such a role for cysteine in the pseudouridine synthase TruA (also named Psi synthase I) has been discredited by site-directed mutagenesis, but sequence alignments have led to the conclusion that there are four distinct "families" of pseudouridine synthases that share no statistically significant global sequence similarity. It was, therefore, necessary to probe the role of cysteine residues in pseudouridine synthases of the families that do not include TruA. We examined the enzymes RluA and TruB, which are members of different families than TruA and each other. Substitution of cysteine for amino acids with nonnucleophilic side chains did not significantly alter the catalytic activity of either pseudouridine synthase. We conclude, therefore, that neither TruB nor RluA require thiol(ate) groups to effect catalysis, excluding their participation in a Michael addition to C6 of uridine, although not eliminating that mechanism (with an alternate nucleophile) from future consideration.

  15. Amphibian DNases I are characterized by a C-terminal end with a unique, cysteine-rich stretch and by the insertion of a serine residue into the Ca2+-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, H; Yasuda, T; Iida, R; Nakajima, T; Mori, S; Mogi, K; Kaneko, Y; Kishi, K

    2001-01-01

    We purified four amphibian deoxyribonucleases I from the pancreases of one toad, two frog and one newt species, by using three different column chromatography methods in sequence. Each of the purified enzymes had a molecular mass of approx. 40 kDa and an optimal pH for activity of approx. 8.0. These values were significantly greater than those for other vertebrate DNases I. The full-length cDNA encoding each amphibian DNase I was constructed from the total RNA of the pancreas by using rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Nucleotide sequence analyses revealed two structural characteristics unique to amphibian DNases I: a stretch of approx. 70 amino acids with a high cysteine content (approx. 15%) in the C-terminal region, and the insertion of a serine residue at position 205 (in a domain containing an essential Ca2+-binding site). Expression analysis of a series of mutant constructs indicated that both of these structures are essential in generating the active form of the enzyme. 'DNase I signature sequences', which are well conserved in other vertebrate DNases I, could not be found in any of the amphibian DNases I tested, whereas a 'somatomedin B motif' was identified in the Cys-rich stretches of all four. Although DNase I has so far been considered to be a secretory glycoprotein, amphibian DNase I seems to be non-glycosylated. These structural findings indicate strongly that amphibian DNases I are situated in a unique position on the phylogenetic tree of the DNase I family. PMID:11439097

  16. Role of Cysteine Residues in the Structure, Stability, and Alkane Producing Activity of Cyanobacterial Aldehyde Deformylating Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yuuki; Yasugi, Fumitaka; Arai, Munehito

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (AD) is a key enzyme for alkane biosynthesis in cyanobacteria, and it can be used as a catalyst for alkane production in vitro and in vivo. However, three free Cys residues in AD may impair its catalytic activity by undesired disulfide bond formation and oxidation. To develop Cys-deficient mutants of AD, we examined the roles of the Cys residues in the structure, stability, and alkane producing activity of AD from Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 by systematic Cys-to-Ala/Ser mutagenesis. The C71A/S mutations reduced the hydrocarbon producing activity of AD and facilitated the formation of a dimer, indicating that the conserved Cys71, which is located in close proximity to the substrate-binding site, plays crucial roles in maintaining the activity, structure, and stability of AD. On the other hand, mutations at Cys107 and Cys117 did not affect the hydrocarbon producing activity of AD. Therefore, we propose that the C107A/C117A double mutant is preferable to wild type AD for alkane production and that the double mutant may be used as a pseudo-wild type protein for further improvement of the alkane producing activity of AD. PMID:25837679

  17. Role of cysteine residues in the structure, stability, and alkane producing activity of cyanobacterial aldehyde deformylating oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuuki; Yasugi, Fumitaka; Arai, Munehito

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (AD) is a key enzyme for alkane biosynthesis in cyanobacteria, and it can be used as a catalyst for alkane production in vitro and in vivo. However, three free Cys residues in AD may impair its catalytic activity by undesired disulfide bond formation and oxidation. To develop Cys-deficient mutants of AD, we examined the roles of the Cys residues in the structure, stability, and alkane producing activity of AD from Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 by systematic Cys-to-Ala/Ser mutagenesis. The C71A/S mutations reduced the hydrocarbon producing activity of AD and facilitated the formation of a dimer, indicating that the conserved Cys71, which is located in close proximity to the substrate-binding site, plays crucial roles in maintaining the activity, structure, and stability of AD. On the other hand, mutations at Cys107 and Cys117 did not affect the hydrocarbon producing activity of AD. Therefore, we propose that the C107A/C117A double mutant is preferable to wild type AD for alkane production and that the double mutant may be used as a pseudo-wild type protein for further improvement of the alkane producing activity of AD.

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of cystatin, a cysteine protease inhibitor, from bufo melanostictus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wa; Ji, Senlin; Zhang, A-Mei; Han, Qinqin; Feng, Yue; Song, Yuzhu

    2013-01-01

    Cystatins are efficient inhibitors of papain-like cysteine proteinases, and they serve various important physiological functions. In this study, a novel cystatin, Cystatin-X, was cloned from a cDNA library of the skin of Bufo melanostictus. The single nonglycosylated polypeptide chain of Cystatin-X consisted of 102 amino acid residues, including seven cysteines. Evolutionary analysis indicated that Cystatin-X can be grouped with family 1 cystatins. It contains cystatin-conserved motifs known to interact with the active site of cysteine proteinases. Recombinant Cystatin-X expressed and purified from Escherichia coli exhibited obvious inhibitory activity against cathepsin B. rCystatin-X at a concentration of 8 µM inhibited nearly 80% of cathepsin B activity within 15 s, and about 90% of cathepsin B activity within 15 min. The Cystatin-X identified in this study can play an important role in host immunity and in the medical effect of B. melanostictus.

  19. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine

    PubMed Central

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO2. We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O2 and CO2 bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO2 defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg2+ surrounded by three H2O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming. PMID:23112176

  20. Low dielectric response in enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Edward L.; Krishtalik, Lev I.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of charge transfer depend crucially on the dielectric reorganization of the medium. In enzymatic reactions that involve charge transfer, atomic dielectric response of the active site and of its surroundings determines the efficiency of the protein as a catalyst. We report direct spectroscopic measurements of the reorganization energy associated with the dielectric response in the active site of α-chymotrypsin. A chromophoric inhibitor of the enzyme is used as a spectroscopic probe. We find that water strongly affects the dielectric reorganization in the active site of the enzyme in solution. The reorganization energy of the protein matrix in the vicinity of the active site is similar to that of low-polarity solvents. Surprisingly, water exhibits an anomalously high dielectric response that cannot be described in terms of the dielectric continuum theory. As a result, sequestering the active site from the aqueous environment inside low-dielectric enzyme body dramatically reduces the dielectric reorganization. This reduction is particularly important for controlling the rate of enzymatic reactions. PMID:10681440

  1. Structure and mechanism leading to formation of the cysteine sulfinate product complex of a biomimetic cysteine dioxygenase model.

    PubMed

    Sallmann, Madleen; Kumar, Suresh; Chernev, Petko; Nehrkorn, Joscha; Schnegg, Alexander; Kumar, Devesh; Dau, Holger; Limberg, Christian; de Visser, Sam P

    2015-05-11

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a unique nonheme iron enzyme that is involved in the metabolism of cysteine in the body. It contains an iron active site with an unusual 3-His ligation to the protein, which contrasts with the structural features of common nonheme iron dioxygenases. Recently, some of us reported a truly biomimetic model for this enzyme, namely a trispyrazolylborato iron(II) cysteinato complex, which not only has a structure very similar to the enzyme-substrate complex but also represents a functional model: Treatment of the model with dioxygen leads to cysteine dioxygenation, as shown by isolating the cysteine part of the product in the course of the work-up. However, little is known on the conversion mechanism and, so far, not even the structure of the actual product complex had been characterised, which is also unknown in case of the enzyme. In a multidisciplinary approach including density functional theory calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we have now determined the structure of the actual sulfinato complex for the first time. The Cys-SO2 (-) functional group was found to be bound in an η(2) -O,O-coordination mode, which, based on the excellent resemblance between model and enzyme, also provides the first support for a corresponding binding mode within the enzymatic product complex. Indeed, this is again confirmed by theory, which had predicted a η(2) -O,O-binding mode for synthetic as well as the natural enzyme.

  2. The Cysteine Dioxygenase Homologue from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is a 3-Mercaptopropionate Dioxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    Tchesnokov, Egor P.; Fellner, Matthias; Siakkou, Eleni; Kleffmann, Torsten; Martin, Lois W.; Aloi, Sekotilani; Lamont, Iain L.; Wilbanks, Sigurd M.; Jameson, Guy N. L.

    2015-01-01

    Thiol dioxygenation is the initial oxidation step that commits a thiol to important catabolic or biosynthetic pathways. The reaction is catalyzed by a family of specific non-heme mononuclear iron proteins each of which is reported to react efficiently with only one substrate. This family of enzymes includes cysteine dioxygenase, cysteamine dioxygenase, mercaptosuccinate dioxygenase, and 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenase. Using sequence alignment to infer cysteine dioxygenase activity, a cysteine dioxygenase homologue from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (p3MDO) has been identified. Mass spectrometry of P. aeruginosa under standard growth conditions showed that p3MDO is expressed in low levels, suggesting that this metabolic pathway is available to the organism. Purified recombinant p3MDO is able to oxidize both cysteine and 3-mercaptopropionic acid in vitro, with a marked preference for 3-mercaptopropionic acid. We therefore describe this enzyme as a 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenase. Mössbauer spectroscopy suggests that substrate binding to the ferrous iron is through the thiol but indicates that each substrate could adopt different coordination geometries. Crystallographic comparison with mammalian cysteine dioxygenase shows that the overall active site geometry is conserved but suggests that the different substrate specificity can be related to replacement of an arginine by a glutamine in the active site. PMID:26272617

  3. Cathepsin B- and L-like cysteine protease activities during the in vitro development of Hysterothylacium aduncum (Nematoda: Anisakidae), a worldwide fish parasite.

    PubMed

    Malagón, David; Díaz-López, Manuel; Benítez, Rocío; Adroher, Francisco Javier

    2010-03-01

    Proteinases play an important role as virulence factors both in the life-cycle of parasites and in the pathogen-host relationship. Hysterothylacium aduncum is a worldwide fish parasite nematode which has been associated with non-invasive anisakidosis and allergic responses to fish consumption in humans. Cysteine proteinases have been associated with allergy to plant pollens, detergents and dust mites. In this study the presence of two types of cysteine proteinases (cathepsin B and cathepsin L) during in vitro development of H. aduncum is investigated. Specific fluorescent substrates were used to determine cathepsin activities. The activity detected with substrate Z-FR-AMC was identified as cathepsin L (optimum pH=5.5; range 3.5-6.5). Cathepsin B activity was only identified with Z-RR-AMC (optimum pH=7.0-7.5; range 5.0-8.0). The start of cultivation led to increased activity of both cathepsins (1.8-fold for cathepsin B and 6.3-fold for cathepsin L). These activities varied according to the developmental stage. Cathepsin B activity decreased after M4, returning to its initial level. Cathepsin L activity also decreased after M4, but still maintained a high level (4-6 times the initial level) in adult stages. Having considered these activity variations and the optimum pH values, we suggest that cathepsin L has a role in digestive processes while cathepsin B could be involved in cuticle renewal, among other possible functions. PMID:19932193

  4. Synthesis of a Sugar-Based Thiosemicarbazone Series and Structure-Activity Relationship versus the Parasite Cysteine Proteases Rhodesain, Cruzain, and Schistosoma mansoni Cathepsin B1

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Nayara Cristina; da Cruz, Luana Faria; da Silva Villela, Filipe; do Nascimento Pereira, Glaécia Aparecida; de Siqueira-Neto, Jair Lage; Kellar, Danielle; Suzuki, Brian M.; Ray, Debalina; de Souza, Thiago Belarmino; Alves, Ricardo José; Júnior, Policarpo Ademar Sales; Romanha, Alvaro José; Murta, Silvane Maria Fonseca; McKerrow, James H.; Caffrey, Conor R.; de Oliveira, Renata Barbosa

    2015-01-01

    The pressing need for better drugs against Chagas disease, African sleeping sickness, and schistosomiasis motivates the search for inhibitors of cruzain, rhodesain, and Schistosoma mansoni CB1 (SmCB1), the major cysteine proteases from Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, and S. mansoni, respectively. Thiosemicarbazones and heterocyclic analogues have been shown to be both antitrypanocidal and inhibitory against parasite cysteine proteases. A series of compounds was synthesized and evaluated against cruzain, rhodesain, and SmCB1 through biochemical assays to determine their potency and structure-activity relationships (SAR). This approach led to the discovery of 6 rhodesain, 4 cruzain, and 5 SmCB1 inhibitors with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of ≤10 μM. Among the compounds tested, the thiosemicarbazone derivative of peracetylated galactoside (compound 4i) was discovered to be a potent rhodesain inhibitor (IC50 = 1.2 ± 1.0 μM). The impact of a range of modifications was determined; removal of thiosemicarbazone or its replacement by semicarbazone resulted in virtually inactive compounds, and modifications in the sugar also diminished potency. Compounds were also evaluated in vitro against the parasites T. cruzi, T. brucei, and S. mansoni, revealing active compounds among this series. PMID:25712353

  5. Two Pairs of Conserved Cysteines Are Required for the Oxidative Activity of Ero1p in Protein Disulfide Bond Formation in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Frand, Alison R.; Kaiser, Chris A.

    2000-01-01

    In the major pathway for protein disulfide-bond formation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), oxidizing equivalents flow from the conserved ER-membrane protein Ero1p to secretory proteins via protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). Herein, a mutational analysis of the yeast ERO1 gene identifies two pairs of conserved cysteines likely to form redox-active disulfide bonds in Ero1p. Cys100, Cys105, Cys352, and Cys355 of Ero1p are important for oxidative protein folding and for cell viability, whereas Cys90, Cys208, and Cys349 are dispensable for these functions. Substitution of Cys100 with alanine impedes the capture of Ero1p-Pdi1p mixed-disulfide complexes from yeast, and also blocks oxidation of Pdi1p in vivo. Cys352 and Cys355 are required to maintain the fully oxidized redox state of Ero1p, and also play an auxiliary role in thiol–disulfide exchange with Pdi1p. These results suggest a model for the function of Ero1p wherein Cys100 and Cys105 form a redox-active disulfide bond that engages directly in thiol–disulfide exchange with ER oxidoreductases. The Cys352–Cys355 disulfide could then serve to reoxidize the Cys100–Cys105 cysteine pair, possibly through an intramolecular thiol–disulfide exchange reaction. PMID:10982384

  6. Biological activities of Zn(II)-S-methyl-cysteine complex as antiradical, inhibitor of acid phosphatase enzyme and in vivo antidepressant effects.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Graciela E; Martini, Nancy; Jori, Khalil; Jori, Nadir; Maresca, Nahuel R; Laino, Carlos H; Naso, Luciana G; Williams, Patricia A M; Ferrer, Evelina G

    2016-12-01

    The antidepressant effect of simple Zn(II) salts has been proved in several animal models of depression. In this study, a coordination metal complex of Zn(II) having a sulfur containing ligand is tested as antidepressant for the first time. Forced swimming test method on male Wistar rats shows a decrease in the immobility and an increase in the swimming behavior after treatment with [Zn(S-Met)2] (S-Met=S-methyl-l-cysteine) being more effective and remarkable than ZnCl2. The thiobarbituric acid and the pyranine consumption (hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals, respectively) methods were applied to evaluate the antioxidant activity of S-Met and [Zn(S-Met)2] showing evidence of attenuation of hydroxyl but not peroxyl radicals activities. UV-vis studies on the inhibition of acid phosphatase enzyme (AcP) demonstrated that S-methyl-l-cysteine did not produce any effect but, in contrast, [Zn(S-Met)2] complex behaved as a moderate inhibitor. Finally, bioavailability studies were performed by fluorescence spectroscopy denoting the ability of the albumin to transport the complex.

  7. Differential expression of cysteine desulfurases in soybean

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Iron-sulfur [Fe-S] clusters are prosthetic groups required to sustain fundamental life processes including electron transfer, metabolic reactions, sensing, signaling, gene regulation and stabilization of protein structures. In plants, the biogenesis of Fe-S protein is compartmentalized and adapted to specific needs of the cell. Many environmental factors affect plant development and limit productivity and geographical distribution. The impact of these limiting factors is particularly relevant for major crops, such as soybean, which has worldwide economic importance. Results Here we analyze the transcriptional profile of the soybean cysteine desulfurases NFS1, NFS2 and ISD11 genes, involved in the biogenesis of [Fe-S] clusters, by quantitative RT-PCR. NFS1, ISD11 and NFS2 encoding two mitochondrial and one plastid located proteins, respectively, are duplicated and showed distinct transcript levels considering tissue and stress response. NFS1 and ISD11 are highly expressed in roots, whereas NFS2 showed no differential expression in tissues. Cold-treated plants showed a decrease in NFS2 and ISD11 transcript levels in roots, and an increased expression of NFS1 and ISD11 genes in leaves. Plants treated with salicylic acid exhibited increased NFS1 transcript levels in roots but lower levels in leaves. In silico analysis of promoter regions indicated the presence of different cis-elements in cysteine desulfurase genes, in good agreement with differential expression of each locus. Our data also showed that increasing of transcript levels of mitochondrial genes, NFS1/ISD11, are associated with higher activities of aldehyde oxidase and xanthine dehydrogenase, two cytosolic Fe-S proteins. Conclusions Our results suggest a relationship between gene expression pattern, biochemical effects, and transcription factor binding sites in promoter regions of cysteine desulfurase genes. Moreover, data show proportionality between NFS1 and ISD11 genes expression. PMID:22099069

  8. Elevated hepatic gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase activity and abnormal sulfate levels in liver and muscle tissue may explain abnormal cysteine and glutathione levels in SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Gross, A; Hack, V; Stahl-Hennig, C; Dröge, W

    1996-11-20

    To establish whether the low cysteine and glutathione levels in HIV-infected patients and SIV-infected rhesus macaques may be consequences of an abnormal cysteine catabolism, we analyzed sulfate and glutathione levels in macaques. Muscle tissue (m. vastus lateralis and m. gastrocnemius) of SIV-infected macaques (n = 25) had higher sulfate and lower glutathione and glutamate levels than that of uninfected controls (n =9). Hepatic tissue, in contrast, showed decreased sulfate and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels, and increased gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS) activity. These findings suggest drainage of the cysteine pool by increased cysteine catabolism in skeletal muscle tissue, and by increased hepatic glutathione biosynthesis. Cachectic macaques also showed increased urea levels and decreased glutamine/urea ratios in the liver, which are obviously related to the abnormal urea excretion and negative nitrogen balance commonly observed in cachexia. As urea production and net glutamine synthesis in the liver are strongly influenced by proton-generating processes, the abnormal hepatic urea production may be the direct consequence of the cysteine deficiency and the decreased catabolic conversion of cysteine into sulfate and protons in the liver.

  9. Contribution of active-site glutamine to rate enhancement in ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Boudreaux, David; Chaney, Joseph; Maiti, Tushar K.; Das, Chittaranjan

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases (UCHs) are cysteine proteases featuring a classical cysteine-histidine-aspartate catalytic triad, also a highly conserved glutamine thought to be a part of the oxyanion hole. However, the contribution of this side chain to the catalysis by UCH enzymes is not known. Herein, we demonstrate that the glutamine side chain contributes to rate enhancement in UCHL1, UCHL3 and UCHL5. Mutation of the glutamine to alanine in these enzymes impairs the catalytic efficiency mainly due to a 16 to 30-fold reduction in kcat, which is consistent with a loss of approximately 2 kcal/mol in transition-state stabilization. However, the contribution to transition-state stabilization observed here is rather modest for the side chain’s role in oxyanion stabilization. Interestingly, we discovered that the carbonyl oxygen of this side chain is engaged in a C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding contact with the CεH group of the catalytic histidine. Upon further analysis, we found that this interaction is a common active-site structural feature in most cysteine proteases, including papain, belonging to families with the QCH(N/D) type of active-site configuration. It is possible that removal of the glutamine side chain might have abolished the C—H•••O interaction, which typically accounts for 2 kcal/mol of stabilization, leading to the effect on catalysis observed here. Additional studies performed on UCHL3 by mutating the glutamine to glutamate (strong C—H•••O acceptor but oxyanion destabilizer) and to lysine (strong oxyanion stabilizer but lacking C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding property) suggest that the C—H•••O hydrogen bond could contribute to catalysis. PMID:22284438

  10. Human plasma alpha-cysteine proteinase inhibitor. Purification by affinity chromatography, characterization and isolation of an active fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Gounaris, A D; Brown, M A; Barrett, A J

    1984-01-01

    Human plasma alpha-cysteine proteinase inhibitor (alpha CPI) was purified by a two-stage method: affinity chromatography on S-carboxymethyl-papain-Sepharose, and high-resolution anion-exchange chromatography. The protein was obtained as a form of Mr about 64 000 and material of higher Mr (about 100 000). In sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis with reduction, both forms showed a major component of Mr 64 000. An antiserum was raised against alpha CPI, and 'rocket' immunoassays showed the mean concentration in sera from 19 individuals to be 35.9 mg/dl. Both low-Mr and high-Mr forms of alpha CPI were confirmed to be sialoglycoproteins by the decrease in electrophoretic mobility after treatment with neuraminidase. alpha CPI was shown immunologically to be distinct from antithrombin III and alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, two serine proteinase inhibitors from plasma with somewhat similar Mr values. alpha CPI was also distinct from cystatins A and B, the two intracellular low-Mr cysteine proteinase inhibitors from human liver. Complexes of alpha CPI with papain were detectable in immunoelectrophoresis, but dissociated to free enzyme and intact inhibitor in sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The stoichiometry of binding of papain was close to 1:1 for both low-Mr and high-Mr forms. alpha CPI was found to be a tight-binding inhibitor of papain and human cathepsins H and L (Ki 34 pM, 1.1 nM and 62 pM respectively). By contrast, inhibition of cathepsin B was much weaker, Ki being about 35 microM. Dipeptidyl peptidase I also was weakly inhibited. Digestion of alpha CPI with bromelain gave rise to an inhibitory fragment of Mr about 22 000, which was isolated. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6548132

  11. Cytoplasmic localization and redox cysteine residue of APE1/Ref-1 are associated with its anti-inflammatory activity in cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Myoung Soo; Kim, Cuk-Seong; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Gun; Kim, Soo Jin; Choi, Sunga; Lee, Sang Do; Park, Jin Bong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2013-11-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein involved in base excision DNA repair and transcriptional regulation of gene expression. APE1/Ref-1 is mainly localized in the nucleus, but cytoplasmic localization has also been reported. However, the functional role of cytoplasmic APE1/Ref-1 and its redox cysteine residue are still unknown. We investigated the role of cytoplasmic APE1/Ref-1 on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expressions in endothelial cells. Endogenous APE1/Ref-1 was mainly observed in the nucleus, however, cytoplasmic APE1/Ref-1 was increased by TNF-α. Cytoplasmic APE1/Ref-1 expression was not blunted by cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, suggesting cytoplasmic translocation of APE1/Ref-1. Transfection of an N-terminus deletion mutant APE1/Ref-1(29-318) inhibited TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression, indicating an anti-inflammatory role for APE1/Ref-1 in the cytoplasm. In contrast, redox mutant of APE1/Ref-1 (C65A/C93A) transfection led to increased TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression. Our findings suggest cytoplasmic APE1/Ref-1 localization and redox cysteine residues of APE1/Ref-1 are associated with its anti-inflammatory activity in endothelial cells.

  12. X-ray structures of Nfs2, the plastidial cysteine desulfurase from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Roret, Thomas; Pégeot, Henri; Couturier, Jérémy; Mulliert, Guillermo; Rouhier, Nicolas; Didierjean, Claude

    2014-01-01

    The chloroplastic Arabidopsis thaliana Nfs2 (AtNfs2) is a group II pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent cysteine desulfurase that is involved in the initial steps of iron–sulfur cluster biogenesis. The group II cysteine desulfurases require the presence of sulfurtransferases such as SufE proteins for optimal activity. Compared with group I cysteine desulfurases, proteins of this group contains a smaller extended lobe harbouring the catalytic cysteine and have a β-hairpin constraining the active site. Here, two crystal structures of AtNfs2 are reported: a wild-type form with the catalytic cysteine in a persulfide-intermediate state and a C384S variant mimicking the resting state of the enzyme. In both structures the well conserved Lys241 covalently binds pyridoxal 5′-phosphate, forming an internal aldimine. Based on available homologous bacterial complexes, a model of a complex between AtNfs2 and the SufE domain of its biological partner AtSufE1 is proposed, revealing the nature of the binding sites. PMID:25195888

  13. Cysteine 532 and cysteine 545 are the N-ethylmaleimide-reactive residues of the Neurospora plasma membrane H+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Pardo, J P; Slayman, C W

    1989-06-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory (Brooker, R. J., and Slayman, C. W. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 222-226; Davenport, J. W., and Slayman, C. W. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 16007-16013) have used the sulfhydryl reagent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) to define two sites on the Neurospora plasma membrane H+-ATPase: a "fast" site which reacts in several minutes with no loss of enzymatic activity and a "slow" site which reacts in tens of minutes to produce complete inactivation of the enzyme. The slow site is protected when MgATP or MgADP is bound to the catalytic site of the ATPase. The present study demonstrates that the fluorescent reagent 5-[2-iodoacetamido)ethyl)-1-aminonaphthalenesulfonic acid (IAEDANS) can be used to label five of the eight cysteine residues of the Neurospora ATPase (Cys376, Cys409, Cys472, Cys532, Cys545). Tryptic peptides bearing those residues have been purified by high performance liquid chromatography and located within the known primary structure of the ATPase by amino acid analysis and/or sequencing. By pretreating the enzyme with NEM in the presence or absence of MgADP before incubation with IAEDANS, it has been possible to identify the fast NEM site as Cys545 and the slow MgADP-protectable NEM site as Cys532. Both residues lie within the central hydrophilic domain of the protein, close to a highly conserved stretch of amino acids that may be involved in nucleotide binding. However, all five IAEDANS-reactive cysteines can be nearly completely modified by the less bulky sulfhydryl reagent methyl methanethiosulfonate with less than 20% inhibition of enzyme activity; thus, none of the five cysteines can be considered to play a direct role in the reaction cycle of the ATPase.

  14. Voltage-gated Sodium Channel Activity Promotes Cysteine Cathepsin-dependent Invasiveness and Colony Growth of Human Cancer Cells*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Ludovic; Roger, Sébastien; Besson, Pierre; Lecaille, Fabien; Gore, Jacques; Bougnoux, Philippe; Lalmanach, Gilles; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) are functionally expressed in highly metastatic cancer cells derived from nonexcitable epithelial tissues (breast, prostate, lung, and cervix). MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells express functional sodium channel complexes, consisting of NaV1.5 and associated auxiliary β-subunits, that are responsible for a sustained inward sodium current at the membrane potential. Although these channels do not regulate cellular multiplication or migration, their inhibition by the specific blocker tetrodotoxin impairs both the extracellular gelatinolytic activity (monitored with DQ-gelatin) and cell invasiveness leading to the attenuation of colony growth and cell spreading in three-dimensional Matrigel®-composed matrices. MDA-MB-231 cells express functional cysteine cathepsins, which we found play a predominant role (∼65%) in cancer invasiveness. Matrigel® invasion is significantly decreased in the presence of specific inhibitors of cathepsins B and S (CA-074 and Z-FL-COCHO, respectively), and co-application of tetrodotoxin does not further reduce cell invasion. This suggests that cathepsins B and S are involved in invasiveness and that their proteolytic activity partly depends on NaV function. Inhibiting NaV has no consequence for cathepsins at the transcription, translation, and secretion levels. However, NaV activity leads to an intracellular alkalinization and a perimembrane acidification favorable for the extracellular activity of these acidic proteases. We propose that Nav enhance the invasiveness of cancer cells by favoring the pH-dependent activity of cysteine cathepsins. This general mechanism could lead to the identification of new targets allowing the therapeutic prevention of metastases. PMID:19176528

  15. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cysteine increase intracellular calcium concentration in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Ashraful; Ahn, Won-Gyun; Song, Dong-Keun

    2016-09-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine have been implicated in a number of human neutrophils' functional responses. However, though Ca(2+) signaling is one of the key signalings contributing to the functional responses of human neutrophils, effects of NAC and cysteine on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in human neutrophils have not been investigated yet. Thus, this study was carried out with an objective to investigate the effects of NAC and cysteine on [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils. We observed that NAC (1 µM ~ 1 mM) and cysteine (10 µM ~ 1 mM) increased [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In NAC pre-supplmented buffer, an additive effect on N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils was observed. In Ca(2+)-free buffer, NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase in human neutrophils completely disappeared, suggesting that NAC- and cysteine-mediated increase in [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils occur through Ca(2+) influx. NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase was effectively inhibited by calcium channel inhibitors SKF96365 (10 µM) and ruthenium red (20 µM). In Na(+)-free HEPES, both NAC and cysteine induced a marked increase in [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils, arguing against the possibility that Na(+)-dependent intracellular uptake of NAC and cysteine is necessary for their [Ca(2+)]i increasing activity. Our results show that NAC and cysteine induce [Ca(2+)]i increase through Ca(2+) influx in human neutrophils via SKF96365- and ruthenium red-dependent way. PMID:27610031

  16. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cysteine increase intracellular calcium concentration in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Md. Ashraful; Ahn, Won-Gyun

    2016-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine have been implicated in a number of human neutrophils' functional responses. However, though Ca2+ signaling is one of the key signalings contributing to the functional responses of human neutrophils, effects of NAC and cysteine on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in human neutrophils have not been investigated yet. Thus, this study was carried out with an objective to investigate the effects of NAC and cysteine on [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils. We observed that NAC (1 µM ~ 1 mM) and cysteine (10 µM ~ 1 mM) increased [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In NAC pre-supplmented buffer, an additive effect on N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils was observed. In Ca2+-free buffer, NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase in human neutrophils completely disappeared, suggesting that NAC- and cysteine-mediated increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils occur through Ca2+ influx. NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase was effectively inhibited by calcium channel inhibitors SKF96365 (10 µM) and ruthenium red (20 µM). In Na+-free HEPES, both NAC and cysteine induced a marked increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils, arguing against the possibility that Na+-dependent intracellular uptake of NAC and cysteine is necessary for their [Ca2+]i increasing activity. Our results show that NAC and cysteine induce [Ca2+]i increase through Ca2+ influx in human neutrophils via SKF96365- and ruthenium red-dependent way. PMID:27610031

  17. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cysteine increase intracellular calcium concentration in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Md. Ashraful; Ahn, Won-Gyun

    2016-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine have been implicated in a number of human neutrophils' functional responses. However, though Ca2+ signaling is one of the key signalings contributing to the functional responses of human neutrophils, effects of NAC and cysteine on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in human neutrophils have not been investigated yet. Thus, this study was carried out with an objective to investigate the effects of NAC and cysteine on [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils. We observed that NAC (1 µM ~ 1 mM) and cysteine (10 µM ~ 1 mM) increased [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In NAC pre-supplmented buffer, an additive effect on N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils was observed. In Ca2+-free buffer, NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase in human neutrophils completely disappeared, suggesting that NAC- and cysteine-mediated increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils occur through Ca2+ influx. NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase was effectively inhibited by calcium channel inhibitors SKF96365 (10 µM) and ruthenium red (20 µM). In Na+-free HEPES, both NAC and cysteine induced a marked increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils, arguing against the possibility that Na+-dependent intracellular uptake of NAC and cysteine is necessary for their [Ca2+]i increasing activity. Our results show that NAC and cysteine induce [Ca2+]i increase through Ca2+ influx in human neutrophils via SKF96365- and ruthenium red-dependent way.

  18. Role of cysteines in the activation and inactivation of brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase investigated with a PDC1-PDC6 fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Zeng, X; Farrenkopf, B; Hohmann, S; Dyda, F; Furey, W; Jordan, F

    1993-03-16

    Possible roles of the Cys side chains in the activation and inactivation mechanisms of brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase were investigated by comparing the behavior of the tetrameric enzyme pdc1 containing four cysteines/subunit (positions 69, 152, 221, and 222) with that of a fusion enzyme (pdc1-6, a result of spontaneous gene fusion between PDC1 and PDC6 genes) that is 84% identical in sequence with pdc1 and has only Cys221 (the other three Cys being replaced by aliphatic side chains). The two forms of the enzyme are rather similar so far as steady-state kinetic parameters and substrate activation are considered, as tested for activation by the substrate surrogate pyruvamide. Therefore, if a cysteine is responsible for substrate activation, it must be Cys221. The inactivation of the two enzymes was tested with several inhibitors. Methylmethanethiol sulfonate, a broad spectrum sulfhydryl reagent, could substantially inactivate both enzymes, but was slightly less effective toward the fusion enzyme. (p-Nitrobenzoyl)formic acid is an excellent alternate substrate, whose decarboxylation product p-nitrobenzaldehyde inhibited both enzymes possibly at a Cys221, the only one still present in the fusion enzyme. Exposure of the fusion enzyme, just as of pdc1, to (E)-2-oxo-4-phenyl-3-butenoic acid type inhibitors/alternate substrates enabled detection of the enzyme-bound enamine intermediate at 440 nm. However, unlike pdc1, the fusion enzyme was not irreversibly inactivated by these substrates. These substrates are now known to cause inactivation of pdc1 with concomitant modification of one Cys of the four [Zeng, X.; Chung, A.; Haran, M.; Jordan, F. (1991) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 113, 5842-49].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. A protein extract and a cysteine protease inhibitor enriched fraction from Jatropha curcas seed cake have in vitro anti-Toxoplasma gondii activity.

    PubMed

    Soares, A M S; Carvalho, L P; Melo, E J T; Costa, H P S; Vasconcelos, I M; Oliveira, J T A

    2015-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a parasite of great medical and veterinary importance that has worldwide distribution and causes toxoplasmosis. There are few treatments available for toxoplasmosis and the search for plant extracts and compounds with anti-Toxoplasma activity is of utmost importance for the discovery of new active drugs. The objective of this study was to investigate the action of a protein extract and a protease inhibitor enriched fraction from J. curcas seed cake on developing tachyzoites of T. gondii-infected Vero cells. The protein extract (JcCE) was obtained after solubilization of the J. curcas seed cake with 100 mM sodium borate buffer, pH 10, centrifugation and dialysis of the resulting supernatant with the extracting buffer. JcCE was used for the in vitro assays of anti-Toxoplasma activity at 0.01, 0.1, 0.5, 1.5, 3.0 and 5.0 mg/ml concentration for 24 h. The results showed that JcCE reduced the percentage of infection and the number of intracellular parasites, but had no effect on the morphology of Vero cells up to 3.0 mg/mL. The cysteine protease inhibitor enriched fraction, which was obtained after chromatography of JcCE on Sephadex G-75 and presented a unique protein band following SDS-PAGE, reduced both the number of T. gondii infected cells and intracellular parasites. These results suggest that both JcCE and the cysteine protease inhibitor enriched fraction interfere with the intracellular growth of T. gondii. PMID:25816973

  20. Oxidation and S-nitrosylation of cysteines in human cytosolic and mitochondrial glutaredoxins: effects on structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Hashemy, Seyed Isaac; Johansson, Catrine; Berndt, Carsten; Lillig, Christopher Horst; Holmgren, Arne

    2007-05-11

    Glutathione (GSH) is the major intracellular thiol present in 1-10-mm concentrations in human cells. However, the redox potential of the 2GSH/GSSG (glutathione disulfide) couple in cells varies in association with proliferation, differentiation, or apoptosis from -260 mV to -200 or -170 mV. Hydrogen peroxide is transiently produced as second messenger in receptor-mediated growth factor signaling. To understand oxidation mechanisms by GSSG or nitric oxide-related nitrosylation we studied effects on glutaredoxins (Grx), which catalyze GSH-dependent thiol-disulfide redox reactions, particularly reversible glutathionylation of protein sulfhydryl groups. Human Grx1 and Grx2 contain Cys-Pro-Tyr-Cys and Cys-Ser-Tyr-Cys active sites and have three and two additional structural Cys residues, respectively. We analyzed the redox state and disulfide pairing of Cys residues upon GSSG oxidation and S-nitrosylation. Cytosolic/nuclear Grx1 was partly inactivated by both S-nitrosylation and oxidation. Inhibition by nitrosylation was reversible under anaerobic conditions; aerobically it was stronger and irreversible, indicating inactivation by nitration. Oxidation of Grx1 induced a complex pattern of disulfide-bonded dimers and oligomers formed between Cys-8 and either Cys-79 or Cys-83. In addition, an intramolecular disulfide between Cys-79 and Cys-83 was identified, predicted to have a profound effect on the three-dimensional structure. In contrast, mitochondrial Grx2 retains activity upon oxidation, did not form disulfide-bonded dimers or oligomers, and could not be S-nitrosylated. The dimeric iron sulfur cluster-coordinating inactive form of Grx2 dissociated upon nitrosylation, leading to activation of the protein. The striking differences between Grx1 and Grx2 reflect their diverse regulatory functions in vivo and also adaptation to different subcellular localization.

  1. Role of the Chemical Environment beyond the Coordination Site: Structural Insight into Fe(III) Protoporphyrin Binding to Cysteine-Based Heme-Regulatory Protein Motifs.

    PubMed

    Brewitz, Hans Henning; Kühl, Toni; Goradia, Nishit; Galler, Kerstin; Popp, Jürgen; Neugebauer, Ute; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Imhof, Diana

    2015-10-12

    The importance of heme as a transient regulatory molecule has become a major focus in biochemical research. However, detailed information about the molecular basis of transient heme-protein interactions is still missing. We report an in-depth structural analysis of Fe(III) heme-peptide complexes by a combination of UV/Vis, resonance Raman, and 2D-NMR spectroscopic methods. The experiments reveal insights both into the coordination to the central iron ion and into the spatial arrangement of the amino acid sequences interacting with protoporphyrin IX. Cysteine-based peptides display different heme-binding behavior as a result of the existence of ordered, partially ordered, and disordered conformations in the heme-unbound state. Thus, the heme-binding mode is clearly the consequence of the nature and flexibility of the residues surrounding the iron ion coordinating cysteine. Our analysis reveals scenarios for transient binding of heme to heme-regulatory motifs in proteins and demonstrates that a thorough structural analysis is required to unravel how heme alters the structure and function of a particular protein. PMID:26260099

  2. Role of the Chemical Environment beyond the Coordination Site: Structural Insight into Fe(III) Protoporphyrin Binding to Cysteine-Based Heme-Regulatory Protein Motifs.

    PubMed

    Brewitz, Hans Henning; Kühl, Toni; Goradia, Nishit; Galler, Kerstin; Popp, Jürgen; Neugebauer, Ute; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Imhof, Diana

    2015-10-12

    The importance of heme as a transient regulatory molecule has become a major focus in biochemical research. However, detailed information about the molecular basis of transient heme-protein interactions is still missing. We report an in-depth structural analysis of Fe(III) heme-peptide complexes by a combination of UV/Vis, resonance Raman, and 2D-NMR spectroscopic methods. The experiments reveal insights both into the coordination to the central iron ion and into the spatial arrangement of the amino acid sequences interacting with protoporphyrin IX. Cysteine-based peptides display different heme-binding behavior as a result of the existence of ordered, partially ordered, and disordered conformations in the heme-unbound state. Thus, the heme-binding mode is clearly the consequence of the nature and flexibility of the residues surrounding the iron ion coordinating cysteine. Our analysis reveals scenarios for transient binding of heme to heme-regulatory motifs in proteins and demonstrates that a thorough structural analysis is required to unravel how heme alters the structure and function of a particular protein.

  3. Zwitterion L-cysteine adsorbed on the Au₂₀ cluster: enhancement of infrared active normal modes.

    PubMed

    Tlahuice-Flores, Alfredo

    2013-04-01

    The study reported herein addressed the structure, adsorption energy and normal modes of zwitterion L-cysteine (Z-cys) adsorbed on the Au₂₀ cluster by using density functional theory (DFT). It was found that four Z-cys are bound to the Au₂₀ apexes preferentially through S atoms. Regarding normal modes, after adsorption of four Z-cys molecules, a more intense infrared (IR) peak is maintained around 1,631.4 cm(-1) corresponding with a C=O stretching mode, but its intensity is enhanced approximately six times. The enhancement in the intensity of modes between 0 to 300 cm(-1) is around 4.5 to 5.0 times for normal modes that involve O-C=O and C-S bending modes. Other two normal modes in the range from 300 to 3,500 cm(-1) show enhancements of 6.0 and 7.4 times. In general, four peaks show major intensities and they are related with normal modes of carboxyl and NH₃ groups of Z-cys.

  4. Reduction of Urease Activity by Interaction with the Flap Covering the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Macomber, Lee; Minkara, Mona S.; Hausinger, Robert P.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing appreciation for the human microbiome coupled with the global rise of antibiotic resistant organisms, it is imperative that new methods be developed to specifically target pathogens. To that end, a novel computational approach was devised to identify compounds that reduce the activity of urease, a medically important enzyme of Helicobacter pylori, Proteus mirabilis, and many other microorganisms. Urease contains a flexible loop that covers its active site; Glide was used to identify small molecules predicted to lock this loop in an open conformation. These compounds were screened against the model urease from Klebsiella aerogenes and the natural products epigallocatechin and quercetin were shown to inhibit at low and high micromolar concentrations, respectively. These molecules exhibit a strong time-dependent inactivation of urease that was not due to their oxygen sensitivity. Rather, these compounds appear to inactivate urease by reacting with a specific Cys residue located on the flexible loop. Substitution of this cysteine by alanine in the C319A variant increased the urease resistance to both epigallocatechin and quercetin, as predicted by the computational studies. Protein dynamics are integral to the function of many enzymes; thus, identification of compounds that lock an enzyme into a single conformation presents a useful approach to define potential inhibitors. PMID:25594724

  5. Peptide-formation on cysteine-containing peptide scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, B. C.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Monomeric cysteine residues attached to cysteine-containing peptides by disulfide bonds can be activated by carbonyldiimidazole. If two monomeric cysteine residues, attached to a 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Glyn-Cys-Glu10, (n = 0, 1, 2, 3) are activated, they react to form the dipeptide Cys-Cys. in 25-65% yield. Similarly, the activation of a cysteine residue attached to the 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Gly-Glu10 in the presence of Arg5 leads to the formation of Cys-Arg5 in 50% yield. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  6. Exogenous Thyropin from p41 Invariant Chain Diminishes Cysteine Protease Activity and Affects IL-12 Secretion during Maturation of Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zavašnik-Bergant, Tina; Bergant Marušič, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal role as antigen presenting cells (APC) and their maturation is crucial for effectively eliciting an antigen-specific immune response. The p41 splice variant of MHC class II-associated chaperone, called invariant chain p41 Ii, contains an amino acid sequence, the p41 fragment, which is a thyropin-type inhibitor of proteolytic enzymes. The effects of exogenous p41 fragment and related thyropin inhibitors acting on human immune cells have not been reported yet. In this study we demonstrate that exogenous p41 fragment can enter the endocytic pathway of targeted human immature DC. Internalized p41 fragment has contributed to the total amount of the immunogold labelled p41 Ii-specific epitope, as quantified by transmission electron microscopy, in particular in late endocytic compartments with multivesicular morphology where antigen processing and binding to MHC II take place. In cell lysates of treated immature DC, diminished enzymatic activity of cysteine proteases has been confirmed. Internalized exogenous p41 fragment did not affect the perinuclear clustering of acidic cathepsin S-positive vesicles typical of mature DC. p41 fragment is shown to interfere with the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 subunit in LPS-stimulated DC. p41 fragment is also shown to reduce the secretion of interleukin-12 (IL-12/p70) during the subsequent maturation of treated DC. The inhibition of proteolytic activity of lysosomal cysteine proteases in immature DC and the diminished capability of DC to produce IL-12 upon their subsequent maturation support the immunomodulatory potential of the examined thyropin from p41 Ii. PMID:26960148

  7. Genetic encoding of caged cysteine and caged homocysteine in bacterial and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Uprety, Rajendra; Luo, Ji; Liu, Jihe; Naro, Yuta; Samanta, Subhas; Deiters, Alexander

    2014-08-18

    We report the genetic incorporation of caged cysteine and caged homocysteine into proteins in bacterial and mammalian cells. The genetic code of these cells was expanded with an engineered pyrrolysine tRNA/tRNA synthetase pair that accepts both light-activatable amino acids as substrates. Incorporation was validated by reporter assays, western blots, and mass spectrometry, and differences in incorporation efficiency were explained by molecular modeling of synthetase-amino acid interactions. As a proof-of-principle application, the genetic replacement of an active-site cysteine residue with a caged cysteine residue in Renilla luciferase led to a complete loss of enzyme activity; however, upon brief exposure to UV light, a >150-fold increase in enzymatic activity was observed, thus showcasing the applicability of the caged cysteine in live human cells. A simultaneously conducted genetic replacement with homocysteine yielded an enzyme with greatly reduced activity, thereby demonstrating the precise probing of a protein active site. These discoveries provide a new tool for the optochemical control of protein function in mammalian cells and expand the set of genetically encoded unnatural amino acids.

  8. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Action levels

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, J.S.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1991-10-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide for early leak detection and to monitor performance of the active low-level waste disposal facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and the transuranic waste storage areas in SWSA 5 North. Early leak detection is accomplished by sampling runoff, groundwater, and perched water in burial trenches. Sample results are compared to action levels that represent background contamination by naturally occurring and fallout-derived radionuclides. 15 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. Cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases: Important roles in the metabolism of naturally occurring sulfur and selenium-containing compounds, xenobiotics and anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Arthur J. L.; Krasnikov, Boris F.; Niatsetskaya, Zoya V.; Pinto, John T.; Callery, Patrick S.; Villar, Maria T.; Artigues, Antonio; Bruschi, Sam A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases are pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-containing enzymes that catalyze β-elimination reactions with cysteine S-conjugates that possess a good leaving group in the β-position. The end products are aminoacrylate and a sulfur-containing fragment. The aminoacrylate tautomerizes and hydrolyzes to pyruvate and ammonia. The mammalian cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases thus far identified are enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism that catalyze β-lyase reactions as non-physiological side reactions. Most are aminotransferases. In some cases the lyase is inactivated by reaction products. The cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases are of much interest to toxicologists because they play an important key role in the bioactivation (toxication) of halogenated alkenes, some of which are produced on an industrial scale and are environmental contaminants. The cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases have been reviewed in this journal previously [Cooper and Pinto, 2006]. Here we focus on more recent findings regarding: 1) the identification of enzymes associated with high-Mr cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases in the cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions of rat liver and kidney; 2) the mechanism of syncatalytic inactivation of rat liver mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase by the nephrotoxic β-lyase substrate S-(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl)-L-cysteine (the cysteine S-conjugate of tetrafluoroethylene); 3) toxicant channeling of reactive fragments from the active site of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase to susceptible proteins in the mitochondria; 4) the involvement of cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases in the metabolism/bioactivation of drugs and natural products; and 5) the role of cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases in the metabolism of selenocysteine Se-conjugates. This review emphasizes the fact that the cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases are biologically more important than hitherto appreciated. PMID:20306345

  10. Cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases: important roles in the metabolism of naturally occurring sulfur and selenium-containing compounds, xenobiotics and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Arthur J L; Krasnikov, Boris F; Niatsetskaya, Zoya V; Pinto, John T; Callery, Patrick S; Villar, Maria T; Artigues, Antonio; Bruschi, Sam A

    2011-06-01

    Cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases are pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-containing enzymes that catalyze β-elimination reactions with cysteine S-conjugates that possess a good leaving group in the β-position. The end products are aminoacrylate and a sulfur-containing fragment. The aminoacrylate tautomerizes and hydrolyzes to pyruvate and ammonia. The mammalian cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases thus far identified are enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism that catalyze β-lyase reactions as non-physiological side reactions. Most are aminotransferases. In some cases the lyase is inactivated by reaction products. The cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases are of much interest to toxicologists because they play an important key role in the bioactivation (toxication) of halogenated alkenes, some of which are produced on an industrial scale and are environmental contaminants. The cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases have been reviewed in this journal previously (Cooper and Pinto in Amino Acids 30:1-15, 2006). Here, we focus on more recent findings regarding: (1) the identification of enzymes associated with high-M(r) cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases in the cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions of rat liver and kidney; (2) the mechanism of syncatalytic inactivation of rat liver mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase by the nephrotoxic β-lyase substrate S-(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl)-L-cysteine (the cysteine S-conjugate of tetrafluoroethylene); (3) toxicant channeling of reactive fragments from the active site of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase to susceptible proteins in the mitochondria; (4) the involvement of cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases in the metabolism/bioactivation of drugs and natural products; and (5) the role of cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases in the metabolism of selenocysteine Se-conjugates. This review emphasizes the fact that the cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases are biologically more important than hitherto appreciated.

  11. Avian 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase: sensitivity of enzyme activity to thiol/disulfide exchange and identification of proximal reactive cysteines.

    PubMed Central

    Hruz, P. W.; Miziorko, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    Catalysis by purified avian 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase is critically dependent on the reduction state of the enzyme, with less than 1% of optimal activity being observed with the air-oxidized enzyme. The enzyme is irreversibly inactivated by sulfhydryl-directed reagents with the rate of this inactivation being highly dependent upon the redox state of a critical cysteine. Methylation of reduced avian lyase with 1 mM 4-methylnitrobenzene sulfonate results in rapid inactivation of the enzyme with a k(inact) of 0.178 min-1. The oxidized enzyme is inactivated at a sixfold slower rate (k(inact) = 0.028 min-1). Inactivation of the enzyme with the reactive substrate analog 2-butynoyl-CoA shows a similar dependence upon the enzyme's redox state, with a sevenfold difference in k(inact) observed with oxidized vs. reduced forms of the enzyme. Chemical cross-linking of the reduced enzyme with stoichiometric amounts of the bifunctional reagents 1,3-dibromo-2-propanone (DBP) or N,N'-ortho-phenylene-dimaleimide (PDM) coincides with rapid inactivation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of enzyme treated with bifunctional reagent reveals a band of twice the molecular weight of the lyase monomer, indicating that an intersubunit cross-link has been formed. Differential labeling of native and cross-linked protein with [1-14C]iodoacetate has identified as the primary cross-linking target a cysteine within the sequence VSQAACR, which maps at the carboxy-terminus of the cDNA-deduced sequence of the avian enzyme (Mitchell, G.A., et al., 1991, Am. J. Hum. Genet. 49, 101). In contrast, bacterial HMG-CoA lyase, which contains no corresponding cysteine, is not cross-linked by comparable treatment with bifunctional reagent. These results provide evidence for a potential regulatory mechanism for the eukaryotic enzyme via thiol/disulfide exchange and identify a cysteinyl residue with the reactivity and juxtaposition required for participation in disulfide

  12. Mutagenesis and crystallographic studies of the catalytic residues of the papain family protease bleomycin hydrolase: new insights into active-site structure

    PubMed Central

    O'Farrell, Paul A.; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2006-01-01

    Bleomycin hydrolase (BH) is a hexameric papain family cysteine protease which is involved in preparing peptides for antigen presentation and has been implicated in tumour cell resistance to bleomycin chemotherapy. Structures of active-site mutants of yeast BH yielded unexpected results. Replacement of the active-site asparagine with alanine, valine or leucine results in the destabilization of the histidine side chain, demonstrating unambiguously the role of the asparagine residue in correctly positioning the histidine for catalysis. Replacement of the histidine with alanine or leucine destabilizes the asparagine position, indicating a delicate arrangement of the active-site residues. In all of the mutants, the C-terminus of the protein, which lies in the active site, protrudes further into the active site. All mutants were compromised in their catalytic activity. The structures also revealed the importance of a tightly bound water molecule which stabilizes a loop near the active site and which is conserved throughout the papain family. It is displaced in a number of the mutants, causing destabilization of this loop and a nearby loop, resulting in a large movement of the active-site cysteine. The results imply that this water molecule plays a key structural role in this family of enzymes. PMID:17007609

  13. Caught in the act: the crystal structure of cleaved cathepsin L bound to the active site of Cathepsin L.

    PubMed

    Sosnowski, Piotr; Turk, Dušan

    2016-04-01

    Cathepsin L is a ubiquitously expressed papain-like cysteine protease involved in the endosomal degradation of proteins and has numerous roles in physiological and pathological processes, such as arthritis, osteoporosis, and cancer. Insight into the specificity of cathepsin L is important for elucidating its physiological roles and drug discovery. To study interactions with synthetic ligands, we prepared a presumably inactive mutant and crystallized it. Unexpectedly, the crystal structure determined at 1.4 Å revealed that the cathepsin L molecule is cleaved, with the cleaved region trapped in the active site cleft of the neighboring molecule. Hence, the catalytic mutant demonstrated low levels of catalytic activity. PMID:26992470

  14. Caught in the act: the crystal structure of cleaved cathepsin L bound to the active site of Cathepsin L.

    PubMed

    Sosnowski, Piotr; Turk, Dušan

    2016-04-01

    Cathepsin L is a ubiquitously expressed papain-like cysteine protease involved in the endosomal degradation of proteins and has numerous roles in physiological and pathological processes, such as arthritis, osteoporosis, and cancer. Insight into the specificity of cathepsin L is important for elucidating its physiological roles and drug discovery. To study interactions with synthetic ligands, we prepared a presumably inactive mutant and crystallized it. Unexpectedly, the crystal structure determined at 1.4 Å revealed that the cathepsin L molecule is cleaved, with the cleaved region trapped in the active site cleft of the neighboring molecule. Hence, the catalytic mutant demonstrated low levels of catalytic activity.

  15. Characterization of active sites in zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, J.; Bug, A.; Nicol, J.M.

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Atomic-level details of the interaction of adsorbed molecules with active sites in catalysts are urgently needed to facilitate development of more effective and/or environmentally benign catalysts. To this end the authors have carried out neutron scattering studies combined with theoretical calculations of the dynamics of small molecules inside the cavities of zeolite catalysts. The authors have developed the use of H{sub 2} as a probe of adsorption sites by observing the hindered rotations of the adsorbed H{sub 2} molecule, and they were able to show that an area near the four-rings is the most likely adsorption site for H{sub 2} in zeolite A while adsorption of H{sub 2} near cations located on six-ring sites decreases in strength as Ni {approximately} Co > Ca > Zn {approximately} Na. Vibrational and rotational motions of ethylene and cyclopropane adsorption complexes were used as a measure for zeolite-adsorbate interactions. Preliminary studies of the binding of water, ammonia, and methylamines were carried out in a number of related guest-host materials.

  16. A Secreted Protein with Plant-Specific Cysteine-Rich Motif Functions as a Mannose-Binding Lectin That Exhibits Antifungal Activity1[W

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Takuya; Hatano, Ken-ichi; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Suwa, You-ichi; Sawano, Yoriko; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Plants have a variety of mechanisms for defending against plant pathogens and tolerating environmental stresses such as drought and high salinity. Ginkbilobin2 (Gnk2) is a seed storage protein in gymnosperm that possesses antifungal activity and a plant-specific cysteine-rich motif (domain of unknown function26 [DUF26]). The Gnk2-homologous sequence is also observed in an extracellular region of cysteine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases that function in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we report the lectin-like molecular function of Gnk2 and the structural basis of its monosaccharide recognition. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments showed that mannan was the only yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cell wall polysaccharide that interacted with Gnk2. Gnk2 also interacted with mannose, a building block of mannan, with a specificity that was similar to those of mannose-binding legume lectins, by strictly recognizing the configuration of the hydroxy group at the C4 position of the monosaccharide. The crystal structure of Gnk2 in complex with mannose revealed that three residues (asparagine-11, arginine-93, and glutamate-104) recognized mannose by hydrogen bonds, which defined the carbohydrate-binding specificity. These interactions were directly related to the ability of Gnk2 to inhibit the growth of fungi, including the plant pathogenic Fusarium spp., which were disrupted by mutation of arginine-93 or the presence of yeast mannan in the assay system. In addition, Gnk2 did not inhibit the growth of a yeast mutant strain lacking the α1,2-linked mannose moiety. These results provide insights into the molecular basis of the DUF26 protein family. PMID:25139159

  17. Slow binding kinetics of secreted protein, acidic, rich in cysteine-VEGF interaction limit VEGF activation of VEGF receptor 2 and attenuate angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cydzik, Marzena; Abdul-Wahid, Aws; Park, Soyeon; Bourdeau, Annie; Bowden, Katherine; Prodeus, Aaron; Kollara, Alexandra; Brown, Theodore J; Ringuette, Maurice J; Gariépy, Jean

    2015-08-01

    VEGF-A (VEGF) drives angiogenesis through activation of downstream effectors to promote endothelial cell proliferation and migration. Although VEGF binds both VEGF receptor 1 (R1) and receptor 2 (R2), its proangiogenic effects are attributed to R2. Secreted protein, acidic, rich in cysteine (SPARC) is a matricellular glycoprotein thought to inhibit angiogenesis by preventing VEGF from activating R1, but not R2. Because R2 rather than R1 mediates proangiogenic activities of VEGF, the role of human SPARC in angiogenesis was reevaluated. We confirm that association of SPARC with VEGF inhibits VEGF-induced HUVEC adherence, motility, and proliferation in vitro and blocks VEGF-induced blood vessel formation ex vivo. SPARC decreases VEGF-induced phosphorylation of R2 and downstream effectors ERK, Akt, and p38 MAPK as shown by Western blot and/or phosphoflow analysis. Surface plasmon resonance indicates that SPARC binds slowly to VEGF (0.865 ± 0.02 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) with a Kd of 150 nM, forming a stable complex that dissociates slowly (1.26 ± 0.003 × 10(-3) s(-1)). Only domain III of SPARC binds VEGF, exhibiting a 15-fold higher affinity than full-length SPARC. These findings support a model whereby SPARC regulates angiogenesis by sequestering VEGF, thus restricting the activation of R2 and the subsequent activation of downstream targets critical for endothelial cell functions.

  18. X-ray Structure of a Hg2+ Complex of Mercuric Reductase (MerA) and Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Study of Hg2+ Transfer between the C-Terminal and Buried Catalytic Site Cysteine Pairs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mercuric reductase, MerA, is a key enzyme in bacterial mercury resistance. This homodimeric enzyme captures and reduces toxic Hg2+ to Hg0, which is relatively unreactive and can exit the cell passively. Prior to reduction, the Hg2+ is transferred from a pair of cysteines (C558′ and C559′ using Tn501 numbering) at the C-terminus of one monomer to another pair of cysteines (C136 and C141) in the catalytic site of the other monomer. Here, we present the X-ray structure of the C-terminal Hg2+ complex of the C136A/C141A double mutant of the Tn501 MerA catalytic core and explore the molecular mechanism of this Hg transfer with quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. The transfer is found to be nearly thermoneutral and to pass through a stable tricoordinated intermediate that is marginally less stable than the two end states. For the overall process, Hg2+ is always paired with at least two thiolates and thus is present at both the C-terminal and catalytic binding sites as a neutral complex. Prior to Hg2+ transfer, C141 is negatively charged. As Hg2+ is transferred into the catalytic site, a proton is transferred from C136 to C559′ while C558′ becomes negatively charged, resulting in the net transfer of a negative charge over a distance of ∼7.5 Å. Thus, the transport of this soft divalent cation is made energetically feasible by pairing a competition between multiple Cys thiols and/or thiolates for Hg2+ with a competition between the Hg2+ and protons for the thiolates. PMID:25343681

  19. Gp130-mediated STAT3 activation by S-propargyl-cysteine, an endogenous hydrogen sulfide initiator, prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Guo, W; Lin, S-Z; Wang, Z-J; Kan, J-T; Chen, S-Y; Zhu, Y-Z

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) could trigger a large amount of apoptotic cells in the myocardium, which leads to dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure. S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC), a producing agent of endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S), possesses cardioprotective efficacy. However, the specific effect and mechanism of SPRC in Dox-induced cardiotoxicity remain elusive. Given gp130 with its main downstream signaling molecule, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), is involved in cardiac myocyte survival and growth; the present study was performed to elucidate whether SPRC counteracts Dox-induced cardiotoxicity, and if so, whether the gp130/STAT3 pathway is involved in this cardioprotective activity. SPRC stimulated the activation of STAT3 via gp130-mediated transduction tunnel in vitro and in vivo. In Dox-stimulated cardiotoxicity, SPRC enhanced cell viability, restored expression of gp130/STAT3-regulated downstream genes, inhibited apoptosis and oxidative stress, and antagonized mitochondrial dysfunction and intracellular Ca(2+) overload. Intriguingly, blockade of gp130/STAT3 signaling abrogated all these beneficial capacities of SPRC. Our findings present the first piece of evidence for the therapeutic properties of SPRC in alleviating Dox cardiotoxicity, which could be attributed to the activation of gp130-mediated STAT3 signaling. This will offer a novel molecular basis and therapeutic strategy of H2S donor for the treatment of heart failure. PMID:27537522

  20. The N-terminal cysteine-rich domain of tobacco class I chitinase is essential for chitin binding but not for catalytic or antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Iseli, B; Boller, T; Neuhaus, J M

    1993-09-01

    The vacuolar chitinases of class I possess an N-terminal cysteine-rich domain homologous to hevein and chitin-binding lectins such as wheat germ agglutinin and Urtica dioica lectin. To investigate the significance of this domain for the biochemical and functional characteristics of chitinase, chimeric genes encoding the basic chitinase A of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with and without this domain were constructed and constitutively expressed in transgenic Nicotiana sylvestris. The chitinases were subsequently isolated and purified to homogeneity from the transgenic plants. Chromatography on colloidal chitin revealed that only the form with the N-terminal domain, and not the one without it, had chitin-binding properties, demonstrating directly that the domain is a chitin-binding domain (CBD). Under standard assay conditions with radioactive colloidal chitin, both forms of chitinase had approximately the same catalytic activity. However, kinetic analysis demonstrated that the enzyme without CBD had a considerably lower apparent affinity for its substrate. The pH and temperature optima of the two chitinases were similar, but the form with the CBD had an approximately 3-fold higher activation energy and retained a higher activity at low pH values. Both chitinases were capable of inhibiting growth of Trichoderma viride, although the form with the CBD was about three times more effective than the one without it. Thus, the CBD is not necessary for catalytic or antifungal activity of chitinase. PMID:8208848

  1. S-allyl cysteine protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in the rat striatum: involvement of Nrf2 transcription factor activation and modulation of signaling kinase cascades.

    PubMed

    Tobón-Velasco, Julio César; Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Macías-Silva, Marina; Cuevas, Elvis; Ali, Syed F; Maldonado, Perla D; González-Trujano, María Eva; Cuadrado, Antonio; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Santamaría, Abel

    2012-09-01

    Pharmacological activation at the basal ganglia of the transcription factor Nrf2, guardian of redox homeostasis, holds a strong promise for the slow progression of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, a potent Nrf2 activator in the brain still must be found. In this study, we have investigated the potential use of the antioxidant compound S-allyl cysteine (SAC) in the activation of Nrf2 in 6-hydoxydopamine (6-OHDA)-intoxicated rats. In the rat striatum, SAC by itself promoted the Nrf2 dissociation of Keap-1, its nuclear translocation, the subsequent association with small MafK protein, and further binding of the Nrf2/MafK complex to ARE sequence, as well as the up-regulation of Nrf2-dependent genes encoding the antioxidant enzymes HO-1, NQO-1, GR, and SOD-1. In vivo and in vitro experiments to identify signaling pathways activated by SAC pointed to Akt as the most likely kinase participating in Nrf2 activation by SAC. In PC12 cells, SAC stimulated the activation of Akt and ERK1/2 and inhibited JNK1/2/3 activation. In the rat striatum, the SAC-induced activation of Nrf2 is likely to contribute to inhibit the toxic effects of 6-OHDA evidenced by phase 2 antioxidant enzymes up-regulation, glutathione recovery, and attenuation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and lipid peroxides formation. These early protective effects correlated with the long-term preservation of the cellular redox status, the striatal dopamine (DA) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels, and the improvement of motor skills. Therefore, this study indicates that, in addition to direct scavenging actions, the activation of Nrf2 by SAC might confer neuroprotective responses through the modulation of kinase signaling pathways in rodent models of PD, and suggests that this antioxidant molecule may have a therapeutic value in this human pathology.

  2. Active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Stringer, C.D.; Milanez, S.; Lee, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Previous affinity labeling studies and comparative sequence analyses have identified two different lysines at the active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and have suggested their essentiality to function. The essential lysines occupy positions 166 and 329 in the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and positions 175 and 334 in the spinach enzyme. Based on the pH-dependencies of inactivations of the two enzymes by trinitrobenzene sulfonate, Lys-166 (R. rubrum enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 7.9 and Lys-334 (spinach enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 9.0. These low pK/sub a/ values as well as the enhanced nucleophilicities of the lysyl residues argue that both are important to catalysis rather than to substrate binding. Lys-166 may correspond to the essential base that initiates catalysis and that displays a pK/sub a/ of 7.5 in the pH-curve for V/sub max//K/sub m/. Cross-linking experiments with 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonate stilbene demonstrate that the two active-site lysines are within 12 A. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Function of the active site lysine autoacetylation in Tip60 catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Wu, Jiang; Zheng, Y George

    2012-01-01

    The 60-kDa HIV-Tat interactive protein (Tip60) is a key member of the MYST family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) that plays critical roles in multiple cellular processes. We report here that Tip60 undergoes autoacetylation at several lysine residues, including a key lysine residue (i.e. Lys-327) in the active site of the MYST domain. The mutation of K327 to arginine led to loss of both the autoacetylation activity and the cognate HAT activity. Interestingly, deacetylated Tip60 still kept a substantial degree of HAT activity. We also investigated the effect of cysteine 369 and glutamate 403 in Tip60 autoacetylation in order to understand the molecular pathway of the autoacetylation at K327. Together, we conclude that the acetylation of K327 which is located in the active site of Tip60 regulates but is not obligatory for the catalytic activity of Tip60. Since acetylation at this key residue appears to be evolutionarily conserved amongst all MYST proteins, our findings provide an interesting insight into the regulatory mechanism of MYST activities. PMID:22470428

  4. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  5. N-acetyl-L-cysteine increases MnSOD activity and enhances the recruitment of quiescent human fibroblasts to the proliferation cycle during wound healing.

    PubMed

    Mao, Gaowei; Goswami, Monali; Kalen, Amanda L; Goswami, Prabhat C; Sarsour, Ehab H

    2016-01-01

    The rebuilding of the connective tissue during wound healing requires the recruitment of fibroblasts to the wound area as well as reentry of quiescent fibroblasts to the proliferative cycle. Whether this process can be modulated by a small molecular weight thiol antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) was tested in normal human skin fibroblasts (NHFs) using a uni-directional wound healing assay. NAC treated cells demonstrated a decreased migration rate but increased number of proliferating cells recruited into the wound area post wounding. Fifteen day quiescent control and NAC treated NHFs were re-plated at a lower density and cell numbers counted at different days post-plating. Interestingly, NAC treated cells exhibited increased cellular proliferation indicated by both decreased cell population doubling time and increased S phase cells. NAC treated cells demonstrated decreased steady state levels of reactive oxygen species as well as increased protein and activity levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). NAC treatment failed to induce proliferation in quiescent cells lacking MnSOD expression. These results demonstrate that NAC enhanced the recruitment of quiescent NHFs into proliferation cycle during wound healing. Our results also suggest that the wound healing properties of NAC might be due to its ability to induce and enhance MnSOD expression and activity. Altogether, these findings suggest NAC might be potentially developed as a dietary intervention to improve tissue injury in animals and humans.

  6. A cysteine-rich metal-binding domain from rubella virus non-structural protein is essential for viral protease activity and virus replication.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yubin; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Ye, Yiming; Huang, Yun; Li, Shunyi; Chen, Yanyi; Frey, Teryl K; Yang, Jenny J

    2009-01-15

    The protease domain within the RUBV (rubella virus) NS (non-structural) replicase proteins functions in the self-cleavage of the polyprotein precursor into the two mature proteins which form the replication complex. This domain has previously been shown to require both zinc and calcium ions for optimal activity. In the present study we carried out metal-binding and conformational experiments on a purified cysteine-rich minidomain of the RUBV NS protease containing the putative Zn(2+)-binding ligands. This minidomain bound to Zn(2+) with a stoichiometry of approximately 0.7 and an apparent dissociation constant of <500 nM. Fluorescence quenching and 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid fluorescence methods revealed that Zn(2+) binding resulted in conformational changes characterized by shielding of hydrophobic regions from the solvent. Mutational analyses using the minidomain identified residues Cys(1175), Cys(1178), Cys(1225) and Cys(1227) were required for the binding of Zn(2+). Corresponding mutational analyses using a RUBV replicon confirmed that these residues were necessary for both proteolytic activity of the NS protease and viability. The present study demonstrates that the CXXC(X)(48)CXC Zn(2+)-binding motif in the RUBV NS protease is critical for maintaining the structural integrity of the protease domain and essential for proteolysis and virus replication. PMID:18795894

  7. Conformational dynamics of the active site loop of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase illuminated by site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John C; Markham, George D

    2003-07-15

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase, methionine adenosyltransferase, a.k.a. MAT) is one of numerous enzymes that have a flexible polypeptide loop that moves to gate access to the active site in a motion that is closely coupled to catalysis. Crystallographic studies of this tetrameric enzyme have shown that the loop is closed in the absence of bound substrates. However, the loop must open to allow substrate binding and a variety of data indicate that the loop is closed during the catalytic steps. Previous kinetic studies indicate that during turnover loop motion occurs on a time scale of 10(-2)s, ca. 10-fold faster than chemical transformations and turnover. Site-directed spin labeling has been used to introduce nitroxide groups at two positions in the loop to illuminate how the motion of the loop is affected by substrate binding. The two loop mutants constructed, G105C and D107C, retain wild type levels of MAT activity; attachment of a methanethiosulfonate spin label to convert the cysteine to the "R1" residue reduced the k(cat) only for the labeled D107R1 form (7-fold). The K(m) value for methionine increased 2- to 4-fold for the cysteine mutants and 2- to 7-fold for the labeled proteins, whereas the K(m) for ATP was changed by at most 2-fold. EPR spectra for both labeled proteins are nearly identical and show the presence of two major spin label environments with rotational diffusion rates differing by approximately 10-fold; the slower rate is ca. 4-fold faster than the estimated protein rotational rate. The spectra are not altered by addition of substrates or products. At both positions the less mobile conformation constitutes ca. 65% of the total species, indicating an equilibrium that only slightly favors one form, that in which the label is more immobilized. The equilibrium constant that relates the two forms is comparable to the equilibrium constant of 1.5 for a conformational change that was previously deduced from the

  8. Hydrogen peroxide: a key messenger that modulates protein phosphorylation through cysteine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Rhee, S G; Bae, Y S; Lee, S R; Kwon, J

    2000-10-10

    Ligand-receptor interactions can generate the production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in cells, the implications of which are becoming appreciated. Fluctuations in H(2)O(2) levels can affect the intracellular activity of key signaling components including protein kinases and protein phosphatases. Rhee et al. discuss recent findings on the role of H(2)O(2) in signal transduction. Specifically, H(2)O(2) appears to oxidize active site cysteines in phosphatases, thereby inactivating them. H(2)O(2) also can activate protein kinases; however, although the mechanism of activation for some kinases appears to be similar to that of phosphatase inactivation (cysteine oxidation), it is unclear how H(2)O(2) promotes increased activation of other kinases. Thus, the higher levels of intracellular phosphoproteins observed in cells most likely occur because of the concomitant inhibition of protein phosphatases and activation of protein kinases.

  9. Chemical Synthesis of Proteins with Non-Strategically Placed Cysteines Using Selenazolidine and Selective Deselenization.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Post Sai; Dery, Shahar; Metanis, Norman

    2016-01-18

    Although native chemical ligation has enabled the synthesis of hundreds of proteins, not all proteins are accessible through typical ligation conditions. The challenging protein, 125-residue human phosphohistidine phosphatase 1 (PHPT1), has three cysteines near the C-terminus, which are not strategically placed for ligation. Herein, we report the first sequential native chemical ligation/deselenization reaction. PHPT1 was prepared from three unprotected peptide segments using two ligation reactions at cysteine and alanine junctions. Selenazolidine was utilized as a masked precursor for N-terminal selenocysteine in the middle segment, and, following ligation, deselenization provided the native alanine residue. This approach was used to synthesize both the wild-type PHPT1 and an analogue in which the active-site histidine was substituted with the unnatural and isosteric amino acid β-thienyl-l-alanine. The activity of both proteins was studied and compared, providing insights into the enzyme active site. PMID:26636774

  10. Cysteine Modification: Probing Channel Structure, Function and Conformational Change.

    PubMed

    Akabas, Myles H

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine substitution has been a powerful tool to investigate the structure and function of proteins. It has been particularly useful for studies of membrane proteins in their native environment, embedded in phospholipid membranes. Among the 20 amino acids, cysteine is uniquely reactive. This reactivity has motivated the synthesis of a wide array of sulfhydryl reactive chemicals. The commercially available array of sulfhydryl reactive reagents has allowed investigators to probe the local steric and electrostatic environment around engineered cysteines and to position fluorescent, paramagnetic and mass probes at specific sites within proteins and for distance measurements between pairs of sites. Probing the reactivity and accessibility of engineered cysteines has been extensively used in Substituted Cysteine Accessibility Method (SCAM) investigations of ion channels, membrane transporters and receptors. These studies have successfully identified the residues lining ion channels, agonist/antagonist and allosteric modulator binding sites, and regions whose conformation changes as proteins transition between different functional states. The thousands of cysteine-substitution mutants reported in the literature demonstrate that, in general, mutation to cysteine is well tolerated. This has allowed systematic studies of residues in transmembrane segments and in other parts of membrane proteins. Finally, by inserting pairs of cysteines and assaying their ability to form disulfide bonds, changes in proximity and mobility relationships between specific positions within a protein can be inferred. Thus, cysteine mutagenesis has provided a wealth of data on the structure of membrane proteins in their functional environment. This data can complement the structural insights obtained from the burgeoning number of crystal structures of detergent solubilized membrane proteins whose functional state is often uncertain. This article will review the use of cysteine mutagenesis to probe

  11. The Molybdenum Active Site of Formate Dehydrogenase Is Capable of Catalyzing C-H Bond Cleavage and Oxygen Atom Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Tobias; Schrapers, Peer; Utesch, Tillmann; Nimtz, Manfred; Rippers, Yvonne; Dau, Holger; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Haumann, Michael; Leimkühler, Silke

    2016-04-26

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are capable of performing the reversible oxidation of formate and are enzymes of great interest for fuel cell applications and for the production of reduced carbon compounds as energy sources from CO2. Metal-containing FDHs in general contain a highly conserved active site, comprising a molybdenum (or tungsten) center coordinated by two molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide molecules, a sulfido and a (seleno-)cysteine ligand, in addition to a histidine and arginine residue in the second coordination sphere. So far, the role of these amino acids in catalysis has not been studied in detail, because of the lack of suitable expression systems and the lability or oxygen sensitivity of the enzymes. Here, the roles of these active site residues is revealed using the Mo-containing FDH from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Our results show that the cysteine ligand at the Mo ion is displaced by the formate substrate during the reaction, the arginine has a direct role in substrate binding and stabilization, and the histidine elevates the pKa of the active site cysteine. We further found that in addition to reversible formate oxidation, the enzyme is further capable of reducing nitrate to nitrite. We propose a mechanistic scheme that combines both functionalities and provides important insights into the distinct mechanisms of C-H bond cleavage and oxygen atom transfer catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase. PMID:27054466

  12. N-acetyl-L-cysteine protects against cadmium-induced neuronal apoptosis by inhibiting ROS-dependent activation of Akt/mTOR pathway in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sujuan; Ren, Qian; Zhang, Jinfei; Ye, Yangjing; Zhang, Zhen; Xu, Yijiao; Guo, Min; Ji, Haiyan; Xu, Chong; Gu, Chenjian; Gao, Wei; Huang, Shile; Chen, Long

    2014-01-01

    Aims This study explores the neuroprotective effects and mechanisms of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) in mice exposed to cadmium (Cd). Methods NAC (150 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally administered to mice exposed to Cd (10-50 mg/L) in drinking water for 6 weeks. The changes of cell damage and death, reactive oxygen species (ROS), antioxidant enzymes, as well as Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in brain neurons were assessed. To verify the role of mTOR activation in Cd-induced neurotoxicity, mice also received a subacute regimen of intraperitoneally administered Cd (1 mg/kg) with/without rapamycin (7.5 mg/kg) for 11 days. Results Chronic exposure of mice to Cd induced brain damage or neuronal cell death, due to ROS induction. Co-administration of NAC significantly reduced Cd levels in the plasma and brain of the animals. NAC prevented Cd-induced ROS and significantly attenuated Cd-induced brain damage or neuronal cell death. The protective effect of NAC was mediated, at least partially, by elevating the activities of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, as well as the level of glutathione in the brain. Furthermore, Cd-induced activation of Akt/mTOR pathway in the brain was also inhibited by NAC. Rapamycin in vitro and in vivo protected against Cd-induced neurotoxicity. Conclusions NAC protects against Cd-induced neuronal apoptosis in mouse brain partially by inhibiting ROS-dependent activation of Akt/mTOR pathway. The findings highlight that NAC may be exploited for prevention and treatment of Cd-induced neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24299490

  13. Ethylene-regulated expression of a carnation cysteine proteinase during flower petal senescence.

    PubMed

    Jones, M L; Larsen, P B; Woodson, W R

    1995-06-01

    The senescence of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) flower petals is regulated by the phytohormone ethylene and is associated with considerable catabolic activity including the loss of protein. In this paper we present the molecular cloning of a cysteine proteinase and show that its expression is regulated by ethylene and associated with petal senescence. A 1600 bp cDNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using a 5'-specific primer and 3'-nonspecific primer designed to amplify a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase cDNA from reverse-transcribed stylar RNA. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned product (pDCCP1) was found to share significant homology to several cysteine proteinases rather than ACC synthase. A single open reading frame of 428 amino acids was shown to share significant homology with other plant cysteine proteinases including greater than 70% identity with a cysteine proteinase from Arabidopsis thaliana. Amino acids in the active site of cysteine proteinases were conserved in the pDCCP1 peptide. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that the expression of pDCCP1 increased substantially with the onset of ethylene production and senescence of petals. Increased pDCCP1 expression was also associated with ethylene production in other senescing floral organs including ovaries and styles. The pDCCP1 transcript accumulated in petals treated with exogenous ethylene within 3 h and treatment of flowers with 2,5-norbornadiene, an inhibitor of ethylene action, prevented the increase in pDCCP1 expression in petals. The temporal and spatial patterns of pDCCP1 expression suggests a role for cysteine proteinase in the loss of protein during floral senescence.

  14. Protein cysteine modifications: (2) reactivity specificity and topics of medicinal chemistry and protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Nagahara, Noriyuki; Matsumura, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Ryo; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2009-01-01

    Cysteine (cysteinyl residue) modifications in proteins result in diversity in protein functions. The reaction specificity of a protein with a modified cysteine residue is determined by the overall conditions of the protein, including the spatial position of the cysteine residue, electrostatic interactions between cysteine residue and other charged residues, spatial interactions between the cysteine residue and a chemical compound, electrophilicity of the chemical compound, and the pH of the solution. In cysteine-dependant enzymes, each specific type of cysteine modification characterizes the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. Recently, the catalytic mechanisms of peroxiredoxins and cysteine proteases, which contain a cysteine residue(s) in their catalytic sites, have been elucidated. In the catalytic process of peroxiredoxins, a sulfenyl intermediate is formed by oxidation of the catalytic cysteine residue. On the other hand, in cysteine proteases, the catalytic cysteine residue reacts with the carboxyl carbon of a peptide substrate to form an intermediate complex via S-alkylation. In this review, we introduce the most current information on the applications of cysteine thiol chemistry for in vitro glycoprotein synthesis. Recently, a glycoprotein (monocyte chemotactic protein-3), containing an intact human complex-type sialyloligosaccharide has been chemically synthesized. The procedure used for this could have applications in the development of new protein-based drugs, including antineoplastic drugs and antibiotics. It can also potentially be applied for improving the half-life and reducing the toxicity of these drugs, and for preventing the development of multidrug resistance.

  15. Atorvastatin acts synergistically with N-acetyl cysteine to provide therapeutic advantage against Fas-activated erythrocyte apoptosis during chronic arsenic exposure in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Debabrata; Sen, Gargi; Sarkar, Avik; Biswas, Tuli

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is an environmental toxicant that reduces the lifespan of circulating erythrocytes during chronic exposure. Our previous studies had indicated involvement of hypercholesterolemia and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in arsenic-induced apoptotic death of erythrocytes. In this study, we have shown an effective recovery from arsenic-induced death signaling in erythrocytes in response to treatment with atorvastatin (ATV) and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) in rats. Our results emphasized on the importance of cholesterol in the promotion of ROS-mediated Fas signaling in red cells. Arsenic-induced activation of caspase 3 was associated with phosphatidylserine exposure on the cell surface and microvesiculation of erythrocyte membrane. Administration of NAC in combination with ATV, proved to be more effective than either of the drugs alone towards the rectification of arsenic-mediated disorganization of membrane structural integrity, and this could be linked with decreased ROS accumulation through reduced glutathione (GSH) repletion along with cholesterol depletion. Moreover, activation of caspase 3 was capable of promoting aggregation of band 3 with subsequent binding of autologous IgG and opsonization by C3b that led to phagocytosis of the exposed cells by the macrophages. NAC-ATV treatment successfully amended these events and restored lifespan of erythrocytes from the exposed animals almost to the control level. This work helped us to identify intracellular membrane cholesterol enrichment and GSH depletion as the key regulatory points in arsenic-mediated erythrocyte destruction and suggested a therapeutic strategy against Fas-activated cell death related to enhanced cholesterol and accumulation of ROS.

  16. A novel cysteine desulfurase influencing organosulfur compounds in Lentinula edodes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Lei, Xiao-Yu; Chen, Lian-Fu; Bian, Yin-Bing; Yang, Hong; Ibrahim, Salam A.; Huang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Organosulfur compounds are the basis for the unique aroma of Lentinula edodes, and cysteine sulfoxide lyase (C-S lyase) is the key enzyme in this trait. The enzyme from Alliium sativum has been crystallized and well-characterized; however, there have been no reports of the characterization of fungi C-S lyase at the molecular level. We identified a L. edodes C-S lyase (Lecsl), cloned a gene of Csl encoded Lecsl and then combined modeling, simulations, and experiments to understand the molecular basis of the function of Lecsl. Our analysis revealed Lecsl to be a novel cysteine desulfurase and not a type of cysteine sulfoxide lyase. The pyridoxal-5-phosphate (PLP) molecule bonded tightly to Lecsl to form a Lecsl-PLP complex. Moreover, the Lecsl had one active center that served to bind two kinds of substrates, S-methyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide and L-cysteine, and had both cysteine sulfoxide lyase and cysteine desulfurase activity. We found that the amino acid residue Asn393 was essential for the catalytic activity of Lecsl and that the gene Csl encoded a novel cysteine desulfurase to influence organosulfur compounds in L. edodes. Our results provide a new insight into understanding the formation of the unique aroma of L. edodes. PMID:26054293

  17. A novel cysteine desulfurase influencing organosulfur compounds in Lentinula edodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Lei, Xiao-Yu; Chen, Lian-Fu; Bian, Yin-Bing; Yang, Hong; Ibrahim, Salam A; Huang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Organosulfur compounds are the basis for the unique aroma of Lentinula edodes, and cysteine sulfoxide lyase (C-S lyase) is the key enzyme in this trait. The enzyme from Alliium sativum has been crystallized and well-characterized; however, there have been no reports of the characterization of fungi C-S lyase at the molecular level. We identified a L. edodes C-S lyase (Lecsl), cloned a gene of Csl encoded Lecsl and then combined modeling, simulations, and experiments to understand the molecular basis of the function of Lecsl. Our analysis revealed Lecsl to be a novel cysteine desulfurase and not a type of cysteine sulfoxide lyase. The pyridoxal-5-phosphate (PLP) molecule bonded tightly to Lecsl to form a Lecsl-PLP complex. Moreover, the Lecsl had one active center that served to bind two kinds of substrates, S-methyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide and L-cysteine, and had both cysteine sulfoxide lyase and cysteine desulfurase activity. We found that the amino acid residue Asn393 was essential for the catalytic activity of Lecsl and that the gene Csl encoded a novel cysteine desulfurase to influence organosulfur compounds in L. edodes. Our results provide a new insight into understanding the formation of the unique aroma of L. edodes.

  18. Cysteine metabolism and metal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Quig, D

    1998-08-01

    Chronic, low level exposure to toxic metals is an increasing global problem. The symptoms associated with the slow accumulation of toxic metals are multiple and rather nondescript, and overt expression of toxic effects may not appear until later in life. The sulfhydryl-reactive metals (mercury, cadmium, lead, arsenic) are particularly insidious and can affect a vast array of biochemical and nutritional processes. The primary mechanisms by which the sulfhydryl-reactive metals elicit their toxic effects are summarized. The pro-oxidative effects of the metals are compounded by the fact that the metals also inhibit antioxidative enzymes and deplete intracellular glutathione. The metals also have the potential to disrupt the metabolism and biological activities of many proteins due to their high affinity for free sulfhydryl groups. Cysteine has a pivotal role in inducible, endogenous detoxication mechanisms in the body, and metal exposure taxes cysteine status. The protective effects of glutathione and the metallothioneins are discussed in detail. Basic research pertaining to the transport of toxic metals into the brain is summarized, and a case is made for the use of hydrolyzed whey protein to support metal detoxification and neurological function. Metal exposure also affects essential element status, which can further decrease antioxidation and detoxification processes. Early detection and treatment of metal burden is important for successful detoxification, and optimization of nutritional status is paramount to the prevention and treatment of metal toxicity.

  19. Tricyclic Covalent Inhibitors Selectively Target Jak3 through an Active Site Thiol*

    PubMed Central

    Goedken, Eric R.; Argiriadi, Maria A.; Banach, David L.; Fiamengo, Bryan A.; Foley, Sage E.; Frank, Kristine E.; George, Jonathan S.; Harris, Christopher M.; Hobson, Adrian D.; Ihle, David C.; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J.; Michalak, Mark E.; Murdock, Sara E.; Tomlinson, Medha J.; Voss, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. We have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nm) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. These results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:25552479

  20. Cysteine Prevents Menopausal Syndromes in Ovariectomized Mouse.

    PubMed

    Han, Na-Ra; Kim, Na-Rae; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2016-05-01

    Cysteine (Cys) is well known to be involved in oxidation-reduction reactions, serving as a source of sulfides in the body. Amino acids are known to improve menopausal symptoms and significantly reduce morbidity. This study aims to find an unrevealed effect of Cys with estrogenic and osteogenic actions. Ovariectomized (OVX) mice were treated with Cys daily for 8 weeks. Estrogen-related and osteoporosis-related factors were analyzed in the vagina, serum, and tibia. Cys was treated in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells and ER-positive human breast cancer Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) cells. Cysteine administration ameliorated overweightness of the body and vaginal atrophy in the OVX mice. Cysteine increased the levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and 17β-estradiol in the serum of the OVX mice and improved the bone mineral density in the OVX mice. In MG-63 cells, Cys increased the proliferation, ERβ messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, and estrogen response element (ERE) activity. Cysteine increased the ALP activity and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. In MCF-7 cells, Cys also increased the proliferation, ERβ mRNA expression, and ERE activity. Taken together, these results demonstrated that Cys has estrogenic and osteogenic activities in OVX mice, MG-63 cells, and MCF-7 cells. The novel insights gained here strongly imply the potential use of Cys as a new agent for postmenopausal women. PMID:26494699

  1. Structure, activity and interactions of the cysteine deleted analog of tachyplesin-1 with lipopolysaccharide micelle: Mechanistic insights into outer-membrane permeabilization and endotoxin neutralization.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Rathi; Mohanram, Harini; Joshi, Mangesh; Domadia, Prerna N; Torres, Jaume; Ruedl, Christiane; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2012-07-01

    Tachyplesin-1, a disulfide stabilized beta-hairpin antimicrobial peptide, can be found at the hemocytes of horse shoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. A cysteine deleted linear analog of tachyplesin-1 or CDT (KWFRVYRGIYRRR-NH2) contains a broad spectrum of bactericidal activity with a reduced hemolytic property. The bactericidal activity of CDT stems from selective interactions with the negatively charged lipids including LPS. In this work, CDT-LPS interactions were investigated using NMR spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy and functional assays. We found that CDT neutralized LPS and disrupted permeability barrier of the outer membrane. Zeta potential and ITC studies demonstrated charge compensation and hydrophobic interactions of CDT with the LPS-outer membrane, respectively. Secondary structure of the peptide was probed by CD and FT-IR experiments indicating beta-strands and/or beta-turn conformations in the LPS micelle. An ensemble of structures, determined in LPS micelle by NMR, revealed a beta-hairpin like topology of the CDT peptide that was typified by an extended cationic surface and a relatively shorter segment of hydrophobic region. Interestingly, at the non-polar face, residue R11 was found to be in a close proximity to the indole ring of W2, suggesting a cation-n type interactions. Further, saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR studies established intimate contacts among the aromatic and cationic residues of CDT with the LPS micelle. Fluorescence and dynamic light scattering experiments demonstrated that CDT imparted structural destabilization to the aggregated states of LPS. Collectively, atomic resolution structure and interactions of CDT with the outer membrane-LPS could be exploited for developing potent broad spectrum antimicrobial and anti-sepsis agents. PMID:22464970

  2. Control of active sites in flocculation: Concept of equivalent active sites''

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Flocculation and dispersion of solids are strong functions of the amount and conformation of the adsorbed polymer. Regions of dispersion and flocculation of solids with particular polymer molecules may be deduced from saturation adsorption data. The concept of equivalent active sites'' is proposed to explain flocculation and dispersion behavior irrespective of the amount or conformation of the adsorbed polymer. The concept has been further extended to study the selective flocculation process.

  3. Dual effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine dependent on NQO1 activity: Suppressive or promotive of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone-induced toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Toyooka, Tatsushi; Shinmen, Takuya; Aarts, Jac M.M.J.G.; Ibuki, Yuko

    2012-11-01

    A typical antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) generally protects cells from oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). 9,10-Phenanthrenequinone (9,10-PQ), a major quinone in diesel exhaust particles, produces ROS in redox cycling following two-electron reduction by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), which has been considered as a cause of its cyto- and genotoxicity. In this study, we show that NAC unexpectedly augments the toxicity of 9,10-PQ in cells with low NQO1 activity. In four human skin cell lines, the expression and the activity of NQO1 were lower than in human adenocarcinoma cell lines, A549 and MCF7. In the skin cells, the cytotoxicity of 9,10-PQ was significantly enhanced by addition of NAC. The formation of DNA double strand breaks accompanying phosphorylation of histone H2AX, was also remarkably augmented. On the other hand, the cyto- and genotoxicity were suppressed by addition of NAC in the adenocarcinoma cells. Two contrasting experiments: overexpression of NQO1 in CHO-K1 cells which originally expressed low NQO1 levels, and knock‐down of NQO1 in the adenocarcinoma cell line A549 by transfection of RNAi, also showed that NAC suppressed 9,10-PQ-induced toxicity in cell lines expressing high NQO1 activity and enhanced it in cell lines with low NQO1 activity. The results suggested that dual effects of NAC on the cyto- and genotoxicity of 9,10-PQ were dependent on tissue-specific NQO1 activity. -- Highlights: ► NAC augmented the cytotoxicity of 9,10-PQ in skin cell lines. ► 9,10-PQ-induced DSBs accompanying γ-H2AX were also augmented by NAC. ► NAC suppressed the cyto- and genotoxicity of 9,10-PQ in adenocarcinoma cell lines. ► The dual effects of NAC on toxicity of 9,10-PQ were dependent on NQO1 activity.

  4. Shifting redox states of the iron center partitions CDO between crosslink formation or cysteine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Njeri, Catherine W; Ellis, Holly R

    2014-09-15

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) is a mononuclear iron-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of L-cysteine to L-cysteine sulfinic acid. The mammalian CDO enzymes contain a thioether crosslink between Cys93 and Tyr157, and purified recombinant CDO exists as a mixture of the crosslinked and non crosslinked isoforms. The current study presents a method of expressing homogenously non crosslinked CDO using a cell permeative metal chelator in order to provide a comprehensive investigation of the non crosslinked and crosslinked isoforms. Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of purified non crosslinked CDO revealed that the iron was in the EPR silent Fe(II) form. Activity of non crosslinked CDO monitoring dioxygen utilization showed a distinct lag phase, which correlated with crosslink formation. Generation of homogenously crosslinked CDO resulted in an ∼5-fold higher kcat/Km value compared to the enzyme with a heterogenous mixture of crosslinked and non crosslinked CDO isoforms. EPR analysis of homogenously crosslinked CDO revealed that this isoform exists in the Fe(III) form. These studies present a new perspective on the redox properties of the active site iron and demonstrate that a redox switch commits CDO towards either formation of the Cys93-Tyr157 crosslink or oxidation of the cysteine substrate.

  5. A Methionine Residue Promotes Hyperoxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine of Mouse Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geumsoo; Levine, Rodney L

    2016-06-28

    Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (msrA) reduces methionine sulfoxide in proteins back to methionine. Its catalytic cysteine (Cys72-SH) has a low pKa that facilitates oxidation by methionine sulfoxide to cysteine sulfenic acid. If the catalytic cycle proceeds efficiently, the sulfenic acid is reduced back to cysteine at the expense of thioredoxin. However, the sulfenic acid is vulnerable to "irreversible" oxidation to cysteine sulfinic acid that inactivates msrA (hyperoxidation). We observed that human msrA is resistant to hyperoxidation while mouse msrA is readily hyperoxidized by micromolar concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. We investigated the basis of this difference in susceptibility to hyperoxidation and established that it is controlled by the presence or absence of a Met residue in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the enzyme, Met229. This residue is Val in human msrA, and when it was mutated to Met, human msrA became sensitive to hyperoxidation. Conversely, mouse msrA was rendered insensitive to hyperoxidation when Met229 was mutated to Val or one of five other residues. Positioning of the methionine at residue 229 is not critical, as hyperoxidation occurred as long as the methionine was located within the group of 14 carboxyl-terminal residues. The carboxyl domain of msrA is known to be flexible and to have access to the active site, and Met residues are known to form stable, noncovalent bonds with aromatic residues through interaction of the sulfur atom with the aromatic ring. We propose that Met229 forms such a bond with Trp74 at the active site, preventing formation of a protective sulfenylamide with Cys72 sulfenic acid. As a consequence, the sulfenic acid is available for facile, irreversible oxidation to cysteine sulfinic acid. PMID:27259041

  6. The "aged garlic extract:" (AGE) and one of its active ingredients S-allyl-L-cysteine (SAC) as potential preventive and therapeutic agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD).

    PubMed

    Ray, B; Chauhan, N B; Lahiri, D K

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the older people and 7(th) leading cause of death in the United States. Deposition of amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaques, hyperphosphorylation of microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT), neuroinflammation and cholinergic neuron loss are the major hallmarks of AD. Deposition of Aβ peptides, which takes place years before the clinical onset of the disease can trigger hyperphophorylation of tau proteins and neuroinflammation, and the latter is thought to be primarily involved in neuronal and synaptic damage seen in AD. To date, four cholinesterase inhibitors or ChEI (tacrine, rivastigmine, donepezil and galantamine) and a partial NMDA receptor antagonist (memantine) are the only approved treatment options for AD. However, these drugs fail to completely cure the disease, which warrants a search for newer class of targets that would eventually lead to effective drugs for the treatment of AD. In addition to selected pharmacological agents, botanical and medicinal plant extracts are also being investigated. Apart from its culinary use, garlic (Allium sativum) is being used to treat several ailments like cancer and diabetes. Herein we have discussed the effects of a specific 'Aged Garlic Extract' (AGE) and one of its active ingredients, S-allyl-L-cysteine (SAC) in restricting several pathological cascades related to the synaptic degeneration and neuroinflammatory pathways associated with AD. Thus, based on the reported positive preliminary results reviewed herein, further research is required to develop the full potential of AGE and/or SAC into an effective preventative strategy for AD. PMID:21728972

  7. The matricellular "cysteine-rich protein 61" is released from activated platelets and increased in the circulation during experimentally induced sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hviid, Claus Vinter B; Samulin Erdem, Johanna; Drechsler, Susanne; Weixelbaumer, Katrin; Ahmed, M Shakil; Attramadal, Håvard; Redl, Heinz; Bahrami, Soheyl; Osuchowski, Marcin F; Aasen, Ansgar O

    2014-03-01

    Sepsis and sepsis-induced organ dysfunction remain lethal and common conditions among intensive care patients. Accumulating evidence suggests that the matricellular Cyr61/CCN1 (cysteine-rich, angiogenic-inducer, 61) protein is involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses and possesses organ-protective capabilities in diseases of an inflammatory etiology. However, its regulation in sepsis remains largely unexplored. The present study provides a comprehensive description of CCN1 regulation in the circulation and vital organs during experimentally induced sepsis with developing organ dysfunction. Female CD-1 mice served as baseline controls or were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) for 18 to 96 h, and CCN1 regulation was analyzed in selected organs and in the circulation. A 5-, 5-, and 3-fold increases in circulating CCN1 protein were observed at 18, 48, and 96 h after CLP, respectively. Hepatic and pulmonary CCN1 mRNA expression was down-regulated by 80%, 60%, and 55% and 85%, 80%, and 65% at 18, 48, and 96 h after CLP and undetectable in circulating white blood cells. To identify a potential source for the circulating protein, mouse and human platelets were explored and revealed to contain CCN1. Human platelets were stimulated by thrombin and a specific PAR1 agonist (SFLLRN) in vitro. Both agonists induced an instant CCN1 release, and the effect of SFLLRN was blocked by the specific antagonist RWJ56110. The current study demonstrates that experimental sepsis is associated with a robust increase in circulating CCN1 protein levels and a paradoxical downregulation of CCN1 mRNA expression in vital organs. It provides evidence that CCN1 is released from activated platelets, suggesting that platelets constitute a novel source for CCN1 release to the circulation during sepsis. PMID:24430538

  8. The matricellular "cysteine-rich protein 61" is released from activated platelets and increased in the circulation during experimentally induced sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hviid, Claus Vinter B; Samulin Erdem, Johanna; Drechsler, Susanne; Weixelbaumer, Katrin; Ahmed, M Shakil; Attramadal, Håvard; Redl, Heinz; Bahrami, Soheyl; Osuchowski, Marcin F; Aasen, Ansgar O

    2014-03-01

    Sepsis and sepsis-induced organ dysfunction remain lethal and common conditions among intensive care patients. Accumulating evidence suggests that the matricellular Cyr61/CCN1 (cysteine-rich, angiogenic-inducer, 61) protein is involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses and possesses organ-protective capabilities in diseases of an inflammatory etiology. However, its regulation in sepsis remains largely unexplored. The present study provides a comprehensive description of CCN1 regulation in the circulation and vital organs during experimentally induced sepsis with developing organ dysfunction. Female CD-1 mice served as baseline controls or were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) for 18 to 96 h, and CCN1 regulation was analyzed in selected organs and in the circulation. A 5-, 5-, and 3-fold increases in circulating CCN1 protein were observed at 18, 48, and 96 h after CLP, respectively. Hepatic and pulmonary CCN1 mRNA expression was down-regulated by 80%, 60%, and 55% and 85%, 80%, and 65% at 18, 48, and 96 h after CLP and undetectable in circulating white blood cells. To identify a potential source for the circulating protein, mouse and human platelets were explored and revealed to contain CCN1. Human platelets were stimulated by thrombin and a specific PAR1 agonist (SFLLRN) in vitro. Both agonists induced an instant CCN1 release, and the effect of SFLLRN was blocked by the specific antagonist RWJ56110. The current study demonstrates that experimental sepsis is associated with a robust increase in circulating CCN1 protein levels and a paradoxical downregulation of CCN1 mRNA expression in vital organs. It provides evidence that CCN1 is released from activated platelets, suggesting that platelets constitute a novel source for CCN1 release to the circulation during sepsis.

  9. Mechanistic pathways of mercury removal from the organomercurial lyase active site.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pedro J; Rodrigues, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial populations present in Hg-rich environments have evolved biological mechanisms to detoxify methylmercury and other organometallic mercury compounds. The most common resistance mechanism relies on the H(+)-assisted cleavage of the Hg-C bond of methylmercury by the organomercurial lyase MerB. Although the initial reaction steps which lead to the loss of methane from methylmercury have already been studied experimentally and computationally, the reaction steps leading to the removal of Hg(2+) from MerB and regeneration of the active site for a new round of catalysis have not yet been elucidated. In this paper, we have studied the final steps of the reaction catalyzed by MerB through quantum chemical computations at the combined MP2/CBS//B3PW91/6-31G(d) level of theory. While conceptually simple, these reaction steps occur in a complex potential energy surface where several distinct pathways are accessible and may operate concurrently. The only pathway which clearly emerges as forbidden in our analysis is the one arising from the sequential addition of two thiolates to the metal atom, due to the accumulation of negative charges in the active site. The addition of two thiols, in contrast, leads to two feasible mechanistic possibilities. The most straightforward pathway proceeds through proton transfer from the attacking thiol to Cys159 , leading to its removal from the mercury coordination sphere, followed by a slower attack of a second thiol, which removes Cys96. The other pathway involves Asp99 in an accessory role similar to the one observed earlier for the initial stages of the reaction and affords a lower activation enthalpy, around 14 kcal mol(-1), determined solely by the cysteine removal step rather than by the thiol ligation step. Addition of one thiolate to the intermediates arising from either thiol attack occurs without a barrier and produces an intermediate bound to one active site cysteine and from which Hg(SCH3)2 may be removed only after

  10. Mechanistic pathways of mercury removal from the organomercurial lyase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial populations present in Hg-rich environments have evolved biological mechanisms to detoxify methylmercury and other organometallic mercury compounds. The most common resistance mechanism relies on the H+-assisted cleavage of the Hg–C bond of methylmercury by the organomercurial lyase MerB. Although the initial reaction steps which lead to the loss of methane from methylmercury have already been studied experimentally and computationally, the reaction steps leading to the removal of Hg2+ from MerB and regeneration of the active site for a new round of catalysis have not yet been elucidated. In this paper, we have studied the final steps of the reaction catalyzed by MerB through quantum chemical computations at the combined MP2/CBS//B3PW91/6-31G(d) level of theory. While conceptually simple, these reaction steps occur in a complex potential energy surface where several distinct pathways are accessible and may operate concurrently. The only pathway which clearly emerges as forbidden in our analysis is the one arising from the sequential addition of two thiolates to the metal atom, due to the accumulation of negative charges in the active site. The addition of two thiols, in contrast, leads to two feasible mechanistic possibilities. The most straightforward pathway proceeds through proton transfer from the attacking thiol to Cys159 , leading to its removal from the mercury coordination sphere, followed by a slower attack of a second thiol, which removes Cys96. The other pathway involves Asp99 in an accessory role similar to the one observed earlier for the initial stages of the reaction and affords a lower activation enthalpy, around 14 kcal mol−1, determined solely by the cysteine removal step rather than by the thiol ligation step. Addition of one thiolate to the intermediates arising from either thiol attack occurs without a barrier and produces an intermediate bound to one active site cysteine and from which Hg(SCH3)2 may be removed only after

  11. Role of cysteines in mammalian VDAC isoforms' function.

    PubMed

    De Pinto, Vito; Reina, Simona; Gupta, Ankit; Messina, Angela; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    In this mini-review, we analyze the influence of cysteines in the structure and activity of mitochondrial outer membrane mammalian VDAC isoforms. The three VDAC isoforms show conserved sequences, similar structures and the same gene organization. The meaning of three proteins encoded in different chromosomes must thus be searched for subtle differences at the amino acid level. Among others, cysteine content is noticeable. In humans, VDAC1 has 2, VDAC2 has 9 and VDAC3 has 6 cysteines. Recent works have shown that, at variance from VDAC1, VDAC2 and VDAC3 exhibit cysteines predicted to protrude towards the intermembrane space, making them a preferred target for oxidation by ROS. Mass spectrometry in VDAC3 revealed that a disulfide bridge can be formed and other cysteine oxidations are also detectable. Both VDAC2 and VDAC3 cysteines were mutagenized to highlight their role in vitro and in complementation assays in Δporin1 yeast. Chemico-physical techniques revealed an important function of cysteines in the structural stabilization of the pore. In conclusion, the works available on VDAC cysteines support the notion that the three proteins are paralogs with a similar pore-function and slightly different, but important, ancillary biological functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26947058

  12. Transforming a Blue Copper into a Red Copper Protein: Engineering Cysteine and Homocysteine into the Axial Position of Azurin using Site-Directed Mutagenesis and Expressed Protein Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Kevin M.; Yu, Yang; Marshall, Nicholas M.; Sieracki, Nathan A.; Nilges, Mark J.; Blackburn, Ninian J.; van der Donk, Wilfred; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The interactions of the axial ligands with copper are known to be important in tuning spectroscopic and redox properties of cupredoxins. While conversion of blue copper sites with a weak axial ligand to green copper sites containing a medium strength axial ligand has been demonstrated in cupredoxins, converting blue copper sites to a red copper site with a strong axial ligand has not been reported. Here we show that replacing Met121 in azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa with Cys caused an increased ratio (RL) of absorption at 447 nm over that at 621 nm. While no axial Cu-S(Cys121) interaction in Met121Cys was detectable by the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at pH 5, similar to what was observed in WT azurin with Met121 as the axial ligand, the Cu-S(Cys121) interaction at 2.74 Å is clearly visible at higher pH. Despite the higher RL and stronger axial Cys121 interaction with Cu(II) ion, the Met121Cys variant remains largely a type 1 copper protein at low pH (with hyperfine coupling constant A|| = 54 × 10−4 cm−1 at pH 4 and 5), or distorted type 1 or green copper protein at high pH (A|| = 87 × 10−4 cm−1 at pH 8 and 9), attributable to the relatively long distance between the axial ligand and copper and the constraint placed by the protein scaffold. To shorten the distance between axial ligand and copper, we replaced Met121 with the nonproteinogenic amino acid homocysteine that contains an extra methylene group, resulting in a variant whose spectra (RL= 1.5, and A|| = 180 × 10−4 cm−1) and Cu-S(Cys) distance (2.22 Å) are very similar to those of the red copper protein nitrosocyanin. Replacing Met121 with Cys resulted in lowering of the reduction potential from 222 mV in the native azurin to 95 ± 3 mV for Met121Cys azurin and 113 ± 6 mV for Met121Hcy at pH 7. The results strongly support the “coupled distortion” model that helps explain axial ligand tuning of spectroscopic properties in cupredoxins, and demonstrate the power of

  13. Formation of cysteine-S-conjugates in the Maillard reaction of cysteine and xylose.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Christoph; Guntz-Dubini, Renée

    2013-11-15

    Cysteine-S-conjugates (CS-conjugates) occur in foods derived from plant sources like grape, passion fruit, onion, garlic, bell pepper and hops. During eating CS-conjugates are degraded into aroma-active thiols by β-lyases that originate from oral microflora. The present study provides evidence for the formation of the CS-conjugates S-furfuryl-l-cysteine (FFT-S-Cys) and S-(2-methyl-3-furyl)-l-cysteine (MFT-S-Cys) in the Maillard reaction of xylose with cysteine at 100°C for 2h. The CS-conjugates were isolated using cationic exchange and reversed-phase chromatography and identified by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and LC-MS(2). Spectra and LC retention times matched those of authentic standards. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that CS-conjugates are described as Maillard reaction products. Furfuryl alcohol (FFA) is proposed as an intermediate which undergoes a nucleophilic substitution with cysteine. Both FFT-S-Cys and MFT-S-Cys are odourless but produce strong aroma when tasted in aqueous solutions, supposedly induced by β -lyases from the oral microflora. The perceived aromas resemble those of the corresponding aroma-active thiols 2-furfurylthiol (FFT) and 2-methyl-3-furanthiol (MFT) which smell coffee-like and meaty, respectively.

  14. Formation of cysteine-S-conjugates in the Maillard reaction of cysteine and xylose.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Christoph; Guntz-Dubini, Renée

    2013-11-15

    Cysteine-S-conjugates (CS-conjugates) occur in foods derived from plant sources like grape, passion fruit, onion, garlic, bell pepper and hops. During eating CS-conjugates are degraded into aroma-active thiols by β-lyases that originate from oral microflora. The present study provides evidence for the formation of the CS-conjugates S-furfuryl-l-cysteine (FFT-S-Cys) and S-(2-methyl-3-furyl)-l-cysteine (MFT-S-Cys) in the Maillard reaction of xylose with cysteine at 100°C for 2h. The CS-conjugates were isolated using cationic exchange and reversed-phase chromatography and identified by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and LC-MS(2). Spectra and LC retention times matched those of authentic standards. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that CS-conjugates are described as Maillard reaction products. Furfuryl alcohol (FFA) is proposed as an intermediate which undergoes a nucleophilic substitution with cysteine. Both FFT-S-Cys and MFT-S-Cys are odourless but produce strong aroma when tasted in aqueous solutions, supposedly induced by β -lyases from the oral microflora. The perceived aromas resemble those of the corresponding aroma-active thiols 2-furfurylthiol (FFT) and 2-methyl-3-furanthiol (MFT) which smell coffee-like and meaty, respectively. PMID:23790889

  15. Dissecting the active site of a photoreceptor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Wouter; Hara, Miwa; Ren, Jie; Moghadam, Farzaneh; Xie, Aihua; Kumauchi, Masato

    While enzymes are quite large molecules, functionally important chemical events are often limited to a small region of the protein: the active site. The physical and chemical properties of residues at such active sites are often strongly altered compared to the same groups dissolved in water. Understanding such effects is important for unraveling the mechanisms underlying protein function and for protein engineering, but has proven challenging. Here we report on our ongoing efforts on using photoactive yellow protein (PYP), a bacterial photoreceptor, as a model system for such effects. We will report on the following questions: How many residues affect active site properties? Are these residues in direct physical contact with the active site? Can functionally important residues be recognized in the crystal structure of a protein? What structural resolution is needed to understand active sites? What spectroscopic techniques are most informative? Which weak interactions dominate active site properties?

  16. Modeling the Active Sites in Metalloenzymes 5. The Heterolytic Bond Cleavage of H2 in the [NiFe] Hydrogenase of DesulfoWibrio gigas by a Nucleophilic Addition Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Shuqiang; Hall, Michael B.

    2001-11-19

    The H2 activation catalyzed by an Fe(II)-Ni(III) model of the [NiFe] hydrogenase of DesulfoVibrio gigas has been investigated by density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) calculations on the neutral and anionic active site complexes, [(CO)(CN)2Fe(Mu-SH)2Ni(SH)(SH2)]0 and [(CO)(CN)2Fe(Mu-SH)2Ni(SH)2]-. The results suggest that the reaction proceeds by a nucleophilic addition mechanism that cleaves the H-H bond heterolytically. The terminal cysteine residue Cys530 in the [NiFe] hydrogenase active site of the D. gigas enzyme plays a crucial role in the catalytic process by accepting the proton. The active site is constructed to provide access by this cysteine residue, and this role explains the change in activity observed when this cysteine is replaced by a selenocysteine. Furthermore, the optimized geometry of the transition state in the model bears a striking resemblance to the geometry of the active site as determined by X-ray crystallography.

  17. Covalent Inhibition of Ubc13 Affects Ubiquitin Signaling and Reveals Active Site Elements Important for Targeting.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Curtis D; Edwards, Ross A; Markin, Craig J; McDonald, Darin; Pulvino, Mary; Huen, Michael S Y; Zhao, Jiyong; Spyracopoulos, Leo; Hendzel, Michael J; Glover, J N Mark

    2015-07-17

    Ubc13 is an E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme that functions in nuclear DNA damage signaling and cytoplasmic NF-κB signaling. Here, we present the structures of complexes of Ubc13 with two inhibitors, NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082, which inhibit DNA damage and NF-κB signaling in human cells. NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082 both inhibit Ubc13 by covalent adduct formation through a Michael addition at the Ubc13 active site cysteine. The resulting adducts of both compounds exploit a binding groove unique to Ubc13. We developed a Ubc13 mutant which resists NSC697923 inhibition and, using this mutant, we show that the inhibition of cellular DNA damage and NF-κB signaling by NSC697923 is largely due to specific Ubc13 inhibition. We propose that unique structural features near the Ubc13 active site could provide a basis for the rational development and design of specific Ubc13 inhibitors. PMID:25909880

  18. Covalent Inhibition of Ubc13 Affects Ubiquitin Signaling and Reveals Active Site Elements Important for Targeting.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Curtis D; Edwards, Ross A; Markin, Craig J; McDonald, Darin; Pulvino, Mary; Huen, Michael S Y; Zhao, Jiyong; Spyracopoulos, Leo; Hendzel, Michael J; Glover, J N Mark

    2015-07-17

    Ubc13 is an E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme that functions in nuclear DNA damage signaling and cytoplasmic NF-κB signaling. Here, we present the structures of complexes of Ubc13 with two inhibitors, NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082, which inhibit DNA damage and NF-κB signaling in human cells. NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082 both inhibit Ubc13 by covalent adduct formation through a Michael addition at the Ubc13 active site cysteine. The resulting adducts of both compounds exploit a binding groove unique to Ubc13. We developed a Ubc13 mutant which resists NSC697923 inhibition and, using this mutant, we show that the inhibition of cellular DNA damage and NF-κB signaling by NSC697923 is largely due to specific Ubc13 inhibition. We propose that unique structural features near the Ubc13 active site could provide a basis for the rational development and design of specific Ubc13 inhibitors.

  19. Covalent Inhibition of Ubc13 Affects Ubiquitin Signaling and Reveals Active Site Elements Important for Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Curtis D.; Edwards, Ross A.; Markin, Craig J.; McDonald, Darin; Pulvino, Mary; Huen, Michael S. Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Spyracopoulos, Leo; Hendzel, Michael J.; Glover, J.N. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Ubc13 is an E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme that functions in nuclear DNA damage signaling and cytoplasmic NF-κB signaling. Here we present the structures of complexes of Ubc13 with two inhibitors, NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082, which inhibit DNA damage and NF-κB signaling in human cells. NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082 both inhibit Ubc13 by covalent adduct formation through a Michael addition at the Ubc13 active site cysteine. The resulting adducts of both compounds exploit a binding groove unique to Ubc13. We developed a Ubc13 mutant which resists NSC697923 inhibition and, using this mutant, we show that the inhibition of cellular DNA damage and NF-κB signaling by NSC697923 is largely due to specific Ubc13 inhibition. We propose that unique structural features near the Ubc13 active site could provide a basis for the rational development and design of specific Ubc13 inhibitors. PMID:25909880

  20. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program --now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human Exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines be opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  1. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program -- now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history. The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines the opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  2. Mechanistic Details of Glutathione Biosynthesis Revealed by Crystal Structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Glutamate Cysteine Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2009-12-01

    Glutathione is a thiol-disulfide exchange peptide critical for buffering oxidative or chemical stress, and an essential cofactor in several biosynthesis and detoxification pathways. The rate-limiting step in its de novo biosynthesis is catalyzed by glutamate cysteine ligase, a broadly expressed enzyme for which limited structural information is available in higher eukaryotic species. Structural data are critical to the understanding of clinical glutathione deficiency, as well as rational design of enzyme modulators that could impact human disease progression. Here, we have determined the structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutamate cysteine ligase (ScGCL) in the presence of glutamate and MgCl{sub 2} (2.1 {angstrom}; R = 18.2%, R{sub free} = 21.9%), and in complex with glutamate, MgCl{sub 2}, and ADP (2.7 {angstrom}; R = 19.0%, R{sub free} = 24.2%). Inspection of these structures reveals an unusual binding pocket for the {alpha}-carboxylate of the glutamate substrate and an ATP-independent Mg{sup 2+} coordination site, clarifying the Mg{sup 2+} dependence of the enzymatic reaction. The ScGCL structures were further used to generate a credible homology model of the catalytic subunit of human glutamate cysteine ligase (hGCLC). Examination of the hGCLC model suggests that post-translational modifications of cysteine residues may be involved in the regulation of enzymatic activity, and elucidates the molecular basis of glutathione deficiency associated with patient hGCLC mutations.

  3. The bifunctional active site of s-adenosylmethionine synthetase. Roles of the active site aspartates.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J C; Markham, G D

    1999-11-12

    S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzes the biosynthesis of AdoMet in a unique enzymatic reaction. Initially the sulfur of methionine displaces the intact tripolyphosphate chain (PPP(i)) from ATP, and subsequently PPP(i) is hydrolyzed to PP(i) and P(i) before product release. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli AdoMet synthetase shows that the active site contains four aspartate residues. Aspartate residues Asp-16* and Asp-271 individually provide the sole protein ligand to one of the two required Mg(2+) ions (* denotes a residue from a second subunit); aspartates Asp-118 and Asp-238* are proposed to interact with methionine. Each aspartate has been changed to an uncharged asparagine, and the metal binding residues were also changed to alanine, to assess the roles of charge and ligation ability on catalytic efficiency. The resultant enzyme variants all structurally resemble the wild type enzyme as indicated by circular dichroism spectra and are tetramers. However, all have k(cat) reductions of approximately 10(3)-fold in AdoMet synthesis, whereas the MgATP and methionine K(m) values change by less than 3- and 8-fold, respectively. In the partial reaction of PPP(i) hydrolysis, mutants of the Mg(2+) binding residues have >700-fold reduced catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)), whereas the D118N and D238*N mutants are impaired less than 35-fold. The catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by Mg(2+) site mutants is improved by AdoMet, like the wild type enzyme. In contrast AdoMet reduces the catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by the D118N and D238*N mutants, indicating that the events involved in AdoMet activation are hindered in these methionyl binding site mutants. Ca(2+) uniquely activates the D271A mutant enzyme to 15% of the level of Mg(2+), in contrast to the approximately 1% Ca(2+) activation of the wild type enzyme. This indicates that the Asp-271 side chain size is a discriminator between the activating ability of Ca(2+) and the

  4. A comprehensive search for calcium binding sites critical for TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel activity.

    PubMed

    Tien, Jason; Peters, Christian J; Wong, Xiu Ming; Cheng, Tong; Jan, Yuh Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh; Yang, Huanghe

    2014-06-30

    TMEM16A forms calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) that regulate physiological processes such as the secretions of airway epithelia and exocrine glands, the contraction of smooth muscles, and the excitability of neurons. Notwithstanding intense interest in the mechanism behind TMEM16A-CaCC calcium-dependent gating, comprehensive surveys to identify and characterize potential calcium sensors of this channel are still lacking. By aligning distantly related calcium-activated ion channels in the TMEM16 family and conducting systematic mutagenesis of all conserved acidic residues thought to be exposed to the cytoplasm, we identify four acidic amino acids as putative calcium-binding residues. Alterations of the charge, polarity, and size of amino acid side chains at these sites alter the ability of different divalent cations to activate the channel. Furthermore, TMEM16A mutant channels containing double cysteine substitutions at these residues are sensitive to the redox potential of the internal solution, providing evidence for their physical proximity and solvent accessibility.

  5. Mitochondrial thiol oxidase Erv1: both shuttle cysteine residues are required for its function with distinct roles.

    PubMed

    Ang, Swee Kim; Zhang, Mengqi; Lodi, Tiziana; Lu, Hui

    2014-06-01

    Erv1 (essential for respiration and viability 1), is an essential component of the MIA (mitochondrial import and assembly) pathway, playing an important role in the oxidative folding of mitochondrial intermembrane space proteins. In the MIA pathway, Mia40, a thiol oxidoreductase with a CPC motif at its active site, oxidizes newly imported substrate proteins. Erv1 a FAD-dependent thiol oxidase, in turn reoxidizes Mia40 via its N-terminal Cys30-Cys33 shuttle disulfide. However, it is unclear how the two shuttle cysteine residues of Erv1 relay electrons from the Mia40 CPC motif to the Erv1 active-site Cys130-Cys133 disulfide. In the present study, using yeast genetic approaches we showed that both shuttle cysteine residues of Erv1 are required for cell growth. In organelle and in vitro studies confirmed that both shuttle cysteine residues were indeed required for import of MIA pathway substrates and Erv1 enzyme function to oxidize Mia40. Furthermore, our results revealed that the two shuttle cysteine residues of Erv1 are functionally distinct. Although Cys33 is essential for forming the intermediate disulfide Cys33-Cys130' and transferring electrons to the redox active-site directly, Cys30 plays two important roles: (i) dominantly interacts and receives electrons from the Mia40 CPC motif; and (ii) resolves the Erv1 Cys33-Cys130 intermediate disulfide. Taken together, we conclude that both shuttle cysteine residues are required for Erv1 function, and play complementary, but distinct, roles to ensure rapid turnover of active Erv1.

  6. Structure and Mechanism of Cysteine Peptidase Gingipain K (Kgp), a Major Virulence Factor of Porphyromonas gingivalis in Periodontitis*

    PubMed Central

    de Diego, Iñaki; Veillard, Florian; Sztukowska, Maryta N.; Guevara, Tibisay; Potempa, Barbara; Pomowski, Anja; Huntington, James A.; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine peptidases are key proteolytic virulence factors of the periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, which causes chronic periodontitis, the most prevalent dysbiosis-driven disease in humans. Two peptidases, gingipain K (Kgp) and R (RgpA and RgpB), which differ in their selectivity after lysines and arginines, respectively, collectively account for 85% of the extracellular proteolytic activity of P. gingivalis at the site of infection. Therefore, they are promising targets for the design of specific inhibitors. Although the structure of the catalytic domain of RgpB is known, little is known about Kgp, which shares only 27% sequence identity. We report the high resolution crystal structure of a competent fragment of Kgp encompassing the catalytic cysteine peptidase domain and a downstream immunoglobulin superfamily-like domain, which is required for folding and secretion of Kgp in vivo. The structure, which strikingly resembles a tooth, was serendipitously trapped with a fragment of a covalent inhibitor targeting the catalytic cysteine. This provided accurate insight into the active site and suggested that catalysis may require a catalytic triad, Cys477-His444-Asp388, rather than the cysteine-histidine dyad normally found in cysteine peptidases. In addition, a 20-Å-long solvent-filled interior channel traverses the molecule and links the bottom of the specificity pocket with the molecular surface opposite the active site cleft. This channel, absent in RgpB, may enhance the plasticity of the enzyme, which would explain the much lower activity in vitro toward comparable specific synthetic substrates. Overall, the present results report the architecture and molecular determinants of the working mechanism of Kgp, including interaction with its substrates. PMID:25266723

  7. Mitochondrial thiol oxidase Erv1: both shuttle cysteine residues are required for its function with distinct roles.

    PubMed

    Ang, Swee Kim; Zhang, Mengqi; Lodi, Tiziana; Lu, Hui

    2014-06-01

    Erv1 (essential for respiration and viability 1), is an essential component of the MIA (mitochondrial import and assembly) pathway, playing an important role in the oxidative folding of mitochondrial intermembrane space proteins. In the MIA pathway, Mia40, a thiol oxidoreductase with a CPC motif at its active site, oxidizes newly imported substrate proteins. Erv1 a FAD-dependent thiol oxidase, in turn reoxidizes Mia40 via its N-terminal Cys30-Cys33 shuttle disulfide. However, it is unclear how the two shuttle cysteine residues of Erv1 relay electrons from the Mia40 CPC motif to the Erv1 active-site Cys130-Cys133 disulfide. In the present study, using yeast genetic approaches we showed that both shuttle cysteine residues of Erv1 are required for cell growth. In organelle and in vitro studies confirmed that both shuttle cysteine residues were indeed required for import of MIA pathway substrates and Erv1 enzyme function to oxidize Mia40. Furthermore, our results revealed that the two shuttle cysteine residues of Erv1 are functionally distinct. Although Cys33 is essential for forming the intermediate disulfide Cys33-Cys130' and transferring electrons to the redox active-site directly, Cys30 plays two important roles: (i) dominantly interacts and receives electrons from the Mia40 CPC motif; and (ii) resolves the Erv1 Cys33-Cys130 intermediate disulfide. Taken together, we conclude that both shuttle cysteine residues are required for Erv1 function, and play complementary, but distinct, roles to ensure rapid turnover of active Erv1. PMID:24625320

  8. Active site studies of Escherichia coli 2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate aldolase

    SciTech Connect

    Vlahos, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    The data presented delineate the complete amino acid sequence of E. coli KHG aldolase and also identify Lys-133, Glu-45, and Arg-49 as aminoacyl residues required for catalytic activity. Incubation of E. coli KHG aldolase with (/sup 14/C)pyruvate in the presence of NaCNBH/sub 3/ results in the incorporation of one mol of /sup 14/C per mol of enzyme subunit. Digestion of this enzyme-adduct with trypsin, followed by purification of the peptides, allowed for the isolation of a unique radioactive peptide. Its amino acid sequence showed that the pyruvate-binding (i.e., Schiff-base forming) lysine residue is located at position 133 in the intact enzyme. E. coli KHG aldolase activity is lost when the enzyme is reacted with bromopyruvate; saturation kinetics are observed. The substrates, pyruvate and KHG, protect the enzyme from inactivation. Both facts suggest that the reagent is active-site specific. Incubation of the aldolase with (3-/sup 14/C)bromopyruvate is associated with a concomitant loss of enzymatic activity and esterification of Glu-45; if the enzyme is denatured in the presence of excess bromopyruvate, Cys-159 and Cys-180 are also alkylated. Blocking the active-site lysine residue with pyruvate prevents Glu-45 from being esterified but does not eliminate alkylation of these two cysteine residues. Woodward's Reagent K was also found to inactivate the aldolase under conditions that are usually specific for carboxyl group modification. This aldolase is also inactivated by 1,2-cyclohexanedione. Loss of enzymatic activity occurs concomitantly with modification of one arginine residue per enzyme subunit. Treatment of the aldolase with the arginine-specific reagent, 4-(oxyacetyl)phenoxyacetic acid, followed by digestion with trypsin allowed for the isolation of a unique peptide and the identification of Arg-49 as the specific residue involved.

  9. Identification of non-peptidic cysteine reactive fragments as inhibitors of cysteine protease rhodesain.

    PubMed

    McShan, Danielle; Kathman, Stefan; Lowe, Brittiney; Xu, Ziyang; Zhan, Jennifer; Statsyuk, Alexander; Ogungbe, Ifedayo Victor

    2015-10-15

    Rhodesain, the major cathepsin L-like cysteine protease in the protozoan Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, is a well-validated drug target. In this work, we used a fragment-based approach to identify inhibitors of this cysteine protease, and identified inhibitors of T. brucei. To discover inhibitors active against rhodesain and T. brucei, we screened a library of covalent fragments against rhodesain and conducted preliminary SAR studies. We envision that in vitro enzymatic assays will further expand the use of the covalent tethering method, a simple fragment-based drug discovery technique to discover covalent drug leads.

  10. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  12. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  13. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  14. Mutations of fumarase that distinguish between the active site and a nearby dicarboxylic acid binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, T.; Lees, M.; Banaszak, L.

    1997-01-01

    Two mutant forms of fumarase C from E. coli have been made using PCR and recombinant DNA. The recombinant form of the protein included a histidine arm on the C-terminal facilitating purification. Based on earlier studies, two different carboxylic acid binding sites, labeled A- and B-, were observed in crystal structures of the wild type and inhibited forms of the enzyme. A histidine at each of the sites was mutated to an asparagine. H188N at the A-site resulted in a large decrease in specific activity, while the H129N mutation at the B-site had essentially no effect. From the results, we conclude that the A-site is indeed the active site, and a dual role for H188 as a potential catalytic base is proposed. Crystal structures of the two mutant proteins produced some unexpected results. Both mutations reduced the affinity for the carboxylic acids at their respective sites. The H129N mutant should be particularly useful in future kinetic studies because it sterically blocks the B-site with the carboxyamide of asparagine assuming the position of the ligand's carboxylate. In the H188N mutation at the active site, the new asparagine side chain still interacts with an active site water that appears to have moved slightly as a result of the mutation. PMID:9098893

  15. A role for cysteine 3635 of RYR1 in redox modulation and calmodulin binding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter Moore, C.; Zhang, J. Z.; Hamilton, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    Oxidation of the skeletal muscle Ca(2+) release channel (RYR1) increases its activity, produces intersubunit disulfide bonds, and blocks its interaction with calmodulin. Conversely, bound calmodulin protects RYR1 from the effects of oxidants (Zhang, J.-Z., Wu, Y., Williams, B. Y., Rodney, G., Mandel, F., Strasburg, G. M., and Hamilton, S. L. (1999) Am. J. Physiol. 276, Cell Physiol. C46-C53). In addition, calmodulin protects RYR1 from trypsin cleavage at amino acids 3630 and 3637 (Moore, C. P., Rodney, G., Zhang, J.-Z., Santacruz-Toloza, L., Strasburg, G. M., and Hamilton, S. L. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 8532-8537). The sequence between these two tryptic sites is AVVACFR. Alkylation of RYR1 with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) blocks both (35)S-apocalmodulin binding and oxidation-induced intersubunit cross-linking. In the current work, we demonstrate that both cysteines needed for the oxidation-induced intersubunit cross-link are protected from alkylation with N-ethylmaleimide by bound calmodulin. We also show, using N-terminal amino acid sequencing together with analysis of the distribution of [(3)H]NEM labeling with each sequencing cycle, that cysteine 3635 of RYR1 is rapidly labeled by NEM and that this labeling is blocked by bound calmodulin. We propose that cysteine 3635 is located at an intersubunit contact site that is close to or within a calmodulin binding site. These findings suggest that calmodulin and oxidation modulate RYR1 activity by regulating intersubunit interactions in a mutually exclusive manner and that these interactions involve cysteine 3635.

  16. Mutational analysis of Raf-1 cysteine rich domain: requirement for a cluster of basic aminoacids for interaction with phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Improta-Brears, T; Ghosh, S; Bell, R M

    1999-08-01

    Activation of Raf-1 kinase is preceded by a translocation of Raf-1 to the plasma membrane in response to external stimuli. The membrane localization of Raf-1 is facilitated through its interaction with activated Ras and with membrane phospholipids. Previous evidence suggests that the interaction of Raf-1 with Ras is mediated by two distinct domains within the N-terminal region of Raf-1 comprising amino acid residues 51-131 and residues 139-184, the latter of which codes for a zinc containing cysteine-rich domain. The cysteine-rich domain of Raf-1 is also reported to associate with other proteins, such as 14-3-3, and for selectively binding acidic phospholipids, particularly phosphatidylserine (PS). In the present study, we have investigated the consequences of progressive deletions and point mutations within the cysteine-rich domain of Raf-1 on its ability to bind PS. A reduced interaction with PS was observed in vitro for all deletion mutants of Raf-1 expressed either as full-length proteins or as fragments containing the isolated cysteine-rich domain. In particular, the cluster of basic amino acids R143, K144, and K148 appeared to be critical for interaction with PS, since substitution of all three residues to alanine resulted in a protein that failed to interact with liposomes enriched for PS. Expression of Raf-1 in vivo, containing point mutations in the cysteine-rich domain resulted in a truncated polypeptide that lacked both the Ras and PS binding sites and could no longer translocate to the plasma membrane upon serum stimulation. These results indicate that the basic residues 143, 144 and 148 in the anterior half of Raf-1 cysteine-rich domain play a role in the association with the lipid bilayer and possibly in protein stability, therefore they might contribute to Raf-1 localization and subsequent activation.

  17. Ionizable Side Chains at Catalytic Active Sites of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic active sites of enzymes of known structure can be well defined by a modern program of computational geometry. The CASTp program was used to define and measure the volume of the catalytic active sites of 573 enzymes in the Catalytic Site Atlas database. The active sites are identified as catalytic because the amino acids they contain are known to participate in the chemical reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Acid and base side chains are reliable markers of catalytic active sites. The catalytic active sites have 4 acid and 5 base side chains, in an average volume of 1072 Å3. The number density of acid side chains is 8.3 M (in chemical units); the number density of basic side chains is 10.6 M. The catalytic active site of these enzymes is an unusual electrostatic and steric environment in which side chains and reactants are crowded together in a mixture more like an ionic liquid than an ideal infinitely dilute solution. The electrostatics and crowding of reactants and side chains seems likely to be important for catalytic function. In three types of analogous ion channels, simulation of crowded charges accounts for the main properties of selectivity measured in a wide range of solutions and concentrations. It seems wise to use mathematics designed to study interacting complex fluids when making models of the catalytic active sites of enzymes. PMID:22484856

  18. Mutational analysis of the active site of indoleglycerol phosphate synthase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Darimont, B.; Stehlin, C.; Szadkowski, H.; Kirschner, K.

    1998-01-01

    Indoleglycerol phosphate synthase catalyzes the ring closure of 1-(2-carboxyphenylamino)-1-deoxyribulose 5'-phosphate to indoleglycerol phosphate, the fifth step in the pathway of tryptophan biosynthesis from chorismate. Because chemical synthesis of indole derivatives from arylamino ketones requires drastic solvent conditions, it is interesting by what mechanism the enzyme catalyzes the same condensation reaction. Seven invariant polar residues in the active site of the enzyme from Escherichia coli have been mutated directly or randomly, to identify the catalytically essential ones. A strain of E. coli suitable for selecting and classifying active mutants by functional complementation was constructed by precise deletion of the trpC gene from the genome. Judged by growth rates of transformants on selective media, mutants with either S58 or S60 replaced by alanine were indistinguishable from the wild-type, but R186 replaced by alanine was still partially active. Saturation random mutagenesis of individual codons showed that E53 was partially replaceable by aspartate and cysteine, whereas K114, E163, and N184 could not be replaced by any other residue. Partially active mutant proteins were purified and their steady-state kinetic and inhibitor binding constants determined. Their relative catalytic efficiencies paralleled their relative complementation efficiencies. These results are compatible with the location of the essential residues in the active site of the enzyme and support a chemically plausible catalytic mechanism. It involves two enzyme-bound intermediates and general acid-base catalysis by K114 and E163 with the support of E53 and N184. PMID:9605328

  19. The role of amino acid residues in the active site of L-methionine γ-lyase from Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Mitsuki; Kudou, Daizou; Murano, Shouko; Shiba, Tomoo; Sato, Dan; Tamura, Takashi; Harada, Shigeharu; Inagaki, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Cys116, Lys240*, and Asp241* (asterisks indicate residues from the second subunit of the active dimer) at the active site of L-methionine γ-lyase of Pseudomonas putida (MGL_Pp) are highly conserved among heterologous MGLs. In a previous study, we found that substitution of Cys116 for His led to a drastic increase in activity toward L-cysteine and a decrease in that toward L-methionine. In this study, we examined some properties of the C116H mutant by kinetic analysis and 3D structural analysis. We assumed that substitution of Cys116 for His broke the original hydrogen-bond network and that this induced a significant effect of Tyr114 as a general acid catalyst, possibly due to the narrow space in the active site. The C116H mutant acquired a novel β-elimination activity and lead a drastic conformation change in the histidine residue at position 116 by binding the substrate, suggesting that this His residue affects the reaction specificity of C116H. Furthermore, we suggest that Lys240* is important for substrate recognition and structural stability and that Asp241* is also involved in substrate specificity in the elimination reaction. Based on this, we suggest that the hydrogen-bond network among Cys116, Lys240*, and Asp241* contributes to substrate specificity that is, to L-methionine recognition at the active site in MGL_Pp.

  20. Enantiospecific adsorption of cysteine on a chiral Au34 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelayo, José de Jesús; Valencia, Israel; Díaz, Gabriela; López-Lozano, Xóchitl; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological molecules like chiral amino acids with chiral metal clusters is becoming an interesting and active field of research because of its potential impact in, for example, chiral molecular recognition phenomena. In particular, the enantiospecific adsorption (EA) of cysteine (Cys) on a chiral Au55 cluster was theoretically predicted a few years ago. In this work, we present theoretical results, based on density functional theory, of the EA of non-zwitterionic cysteine interacting with the C3-Au34 chiral cluster, which has been experimentally detected in gas phase, using trapped ion electron diffraction. Our results show that, indeed, the adsorption energy of the amino acid depends on which enantiomers participate in the formation Cys-Au34 chiral complex. EA was obtained in the adsorption modes where both the thiol, and the thiol-amino functional groups of Cys are adsorbed on low-coordinated sites of the metal cluster surface. Similarly to what was obtained for the Cys-Au55 chiral complex, in the present work, it is found that the EA is originated from the different strength and location of the bond between the COOH functional group and surface Au atoms of the Au34 chiral cluster. Calculations of the vibrational spectrum for the different Cys-Au34 diastereomeric complexes predict the existence of a vibro-enantiospecific effect, indicating that the vibrational frequencies of the adsorbed amino acid depend on its handedness.

  1. Structure of a Berberine Bridge Enzyme-Like Enzyme with an Active Site Specific to the Plant Family Brassicaceae

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Bastian; Wallner, Silvia; Steiner, Barbara; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Kumar, Prashant; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas; Sensen, Christoph W.; Gruber, Karl; Macheroux, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Berberine bridge enzyme-like (BBE-like) proteins form a multigene family (pfam 08031), which is present in plants, fungi and bacteria. They adopt the vanillyl alcohol-oxidase fold and predominantly show bi-covalent tethering of the FAD cofactor to a cysteine and histidine residue, respectively. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome was recently shown to contain genes coding for 28 BBE-like proteins, while featuring four distinct active site compositions. We determined the structure of a member of the AtBBE-like protein family (termed AtBBE-like 28), which has an active site composition that has not been structurally and biochemically characterized thus far. The most salient and distinguishing features of the active site found in AtBBE-like 28 are a mono-covalent linkage of a histidine to the 8α-position of the flavin-isoalloxazine ring and the lack of a second covalent linkage to the 6-position, owing to the replacement of a cysteine with a histidine. In addition, the structure reveals the interaction of a glutamic acid (Glu426) with an aspartic acid (Asp369) at the active site, which appear to share a proton. This arrangement leads to the delocalization of a negative charge at the active site that may be exploited for catalysis. The structure also indicates a shift of the position of the isoalloxazine ring in comparison to other members of the BBE-like family. The dioxygen surrogate chloride was found near the C(4a) position of the isoalloxazine ring in the oxygen pocket, pointing to a rapid reoxidation of reduced enzyme by dioxygen. A T-DNA insertional mutant line for AtBBE-like 28 results in a phenotype, that is characterized by reduced biomass and lower salt stress tolerance. Multiple sequence analysis showed that the active site composition found in AtBBE-like 28 is only present in the Brassicaceae, suggesting that it plays a specific role in the metabolism of this plant family. PMID:27276217

  2. Structure of a Berberine Bridge Enzyme-Like Enzyme with an Active Site Specific to the Plant Family Brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Bastian; Wallner, Silvia; Steiner, Barbara; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Kumar, Prashant; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas; Sensen, Christoph W; Gruber, Karl; Macheroux, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Berberine bridge enzyme-like (BBE-like) proteins form a multigene family (pfam 08031), which is present in plants, fungi and bacteria. They adopt the vanillyl alcohol-oxidase fold and predominantly show bi-covalent tethering of the FAD cofactor to a cysteine and histidine residue, respectively. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome was recently shown to contain genes coding for 28 BBE-like proteins, while featuring four distinct active site compositions. We determined the structure of a member of the AtBBE-like protein family (termed AtBBE-like 28), which has an active site composition that has not been structurally and biochemically characterized thus far. The most salient and distinguishing features of the active site found in AtBBE-like 28 are a mono-covalent linkage of a histidine to the 8α-position of the flavin-isoalloxazine ring and the lack of a second covalent linkage to the 6-position, owing to the replacement of a cysteine with a histidine. In addition, the structure reveals the interaction of a glutamic acid (Glu426) with an aspartic acid (Asp369) at the active site, which appear to share a proton. This arrangement leads to the delocalization of a negative charge at the active site that may be exploited for catalysis. The structure also indicates a shift of the position of the isoalloxazine ring in comparison to other members of the BBE-like family. The dioxygen surrogate chloride was found near the C(4a) position of the isoalloxazine ring in the oxygen pocket, pointing to a rapid reoxidation of reduced enzyme by dioxygen. A T-DNA insertional mutant line for AtBBE-like 28 results in a phenotype, that is characterized by reduced biomass and lower salt stress tolerance. Multiple sequence analysis showed that the active site composition found in AtBBE-like 28 is only present in the Brassicaceae, suggesting that it plays a specific role in the metabolism of this plant family. PMID:27276217

  3. Use of Recombinant Entamoeba histolytica Cysteine Proteinase 1 To Identify a Potent Inhibitor of Amebic Invasion in a Human Colonic Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Meléndez-López, Samuel G.; Herdman, Scott; Hirata, Ken; Choi, Min-Ho; Choe, Youngchool; Craik, Charles; Caffrey, Conor R.; Hansell, Elisabeth; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Chen, Yen Ting; Roush, William R.; McKerrow, James; Eckmann, Lars; Guo, Jianhua; Stanley, Samuel L.; Reed, Sharon L.

    2007-01-01

    Cysteine proteinases are key virulence factors of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We have shown that cysteine proteinases play a central role in tissue invasion and disruption of host defenses by digesting components of the extracellular matrix, immunoglobulins, complement, and cytokines. Analysis of the E. histolytica genome project has revealed more than 40 genes encoding cysteine proteinases. We have focused on E. histolytica cysteine proteinase 1 (EhCP1) because it is one of two cysteine proteinases unique to invasive E. histolytica and is highly expressed and released. Recombinant EhCP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and refolded to an active enzyme with a pH optimum of 6.0. We used positional-scanning synthetic tetrapeptide combinatorial libraries to map the specificity of the P1 to P4 subsites of the active site cleft. Arginine was strongly preferred at P2, an unusual specificity among clan CA proteinases. A new vinyl sulfone inhibitor, WRR483, was synthesized based on this specificity to target EhCP1. Recombinant EhCP1 cleaved key components of the host immune system, C3, immunoglobulin G, and pro-interleukin-18, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. EhCP1 localized to large cytoplasmic vesicles, distinct from the sites of other proteinases. To gain insight into the role of secreted cysteine proteinases in amebic invasion, we tested the effect of the vinyl sulfone cysteine proteinase inhibitors K11777 and WRR483 on invasion of human colonic xenografts. The resultant dramatic inhibition of invasion by both inhibitors in this human colonic model of amebiasis strongly suggests a significant role of secreted amebic proteinases, such as EhCP1, in the pathogenesis of amebiasis. PMID:17513563

  4. The Cysteine Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Chandler, Joshua D.; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    The cysteine (Cys) proteome is a major component of the adaptive interface between the genome and the exposome. The thiol moiety of Cys undergoes a range of biologic modifications enabling biological switching of structure and reactivity. These biological modifications include sulfenylation and disulfide formation, formation of higher oxidation states, S-nitrosylation, persulfidation, metallation, and other modifications. Extensive knowledge about these systems and their compartmentalization now provides a foundation to develop advanced integrative models of Cys proteome regulation. In particular, detailed understanding of redox signaling pathways and sensing networks is becoming available to discriminate network structures. This research focuses attention on the need for atlases of Cys modifications to develop systems biology models. Such atlases will be especially useful for integrative studies linking the Cys proteome to imaging and other omics platforms, providing a basis for improved redox-based therapeutics. Thus, a framework is emerging to place the Cys proteome as a complement to the quantitative proteome in the omics continuum connecting the genome to the exposome. PMID:25843657

  5. Substitution of the cysteine 438 residue in the cytoplasmic tail of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor alters signal transduction activity.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Patricia; Roncero, Isabel; Blázquez, Enrique; Alvarez, Elvira

    2005-04-01

    Several G-protein-coupled receptors contain cysteine residues in the C-terminal tail that may modulate receptor function. In this work we analysed the substitution of Cys438 by alanine in the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLPR), which led to a threefold decrease in cAMP production, although endocytosis and cellular redistribution of GLP-1 receptor agonist-induced processes were unaffected. Additionally, cysteine residues in the C-terminal tail of several G-protein-coupled receptors were found to act as substrates for palmitoylation, which might modify the access of protein kinases to this region. His-tagged GLP-1 receptors incorporated 3H-palmitate. Nevertheless, substitution of Cys438 prevented the incorporation of palmitate. Accordingly, we also investigated the effect of substitution of the consensus sequence by protein kinase C (PKC) Ser431/432 in both wild-type and Ala438 GLP-1 receptors. Substitution of Ser431/432 by alanine did not modify the ability of wild-type receptors to stimulate adenylate cyclase or endocytosis and recycling processes. By contrast, the substitution of Ser431/432 by alanine in the receptor containing Ala438 increased the ability to stimulate adenylate cyclase. All types of receptors were mainly internalised through coated pits. Thus, cysteine 438 in the cytoplasmic tail of the GLP-1 receptor would regulate its interaction with G-proteins and the stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. Palmitoylation of this residue might control the access of PKC to Ser431/432.

  6. Cysteine-Based Redox Switches in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Klomsiri, Chananat; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The enzymes involved in metabolism and signaling are regulated by posttranslational modifications that influence their catalytic activity, rates of turnover, and targeting to subcellular locations. Most prominent among these has been phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, but now a distinct class of modification coming to the fore is a set of versatile redox modifications of key cysteine residues. Here we review the chemical, structural, and regulatory aspects of such redox regulation of enzymes and discuss examples of how these regulatory modifications often work in concert with phosphorylation/dephosphorylation events, making redox dependence an integral part of many cell signaling processes. Included are the emerging roles played by peroxiredoxins, a family of cysteine-based peroxidases that now appear to be major players in both antioxidant defense and cell signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1065–1077. PMID:20799881

  7. Chemical evidence for the pH-dependent control of ion-pair geometry in cathepsin B. Benzofuroxan as a reactivity probe sensitive to differences in the mutual disposition of the thiolate and imidazolium components of cysteine proteinase catalytic sites.

    PubMed

    Willenbrock, F; Brocklehurst, K

    1986-08-15

    Benzofuroxan reacts with the catalytic-site thiol group of cathepsin B (EC 3.4.22.1) to produce stoichiometric amount of the chromophoric reduction product, o-benzoquinone dioxime. In a study of the pH-dependence of the kinetics of this reaction, most data were collected for the bovine spleen enzyme, but the more limited data collected for the rat liver enzyme were closely similar both in the magnitude of the values of the second-order rate constants (k) and in the shape of the pH-k profile. In acidic and weakly alkaline media, the reaction is faster than the reactions of benzofuroxan with some other cysteine proteinases. For example, in the pH region around 5-6, the reaction of cathepsin B is about 10 times faster than that of papain, 15 times faster than that of stem bromelain and 6 times faster than that of ficin. The pH-dependence of k for the reaction of cathepsin B with benzofuroxan was determined in the pH range 2.7-8.3. In marked contrast with the analogous reactions of papain, ficin and stem bromelain [reported by Shipton & Brocklehurst (1977) Biochem. J. 167, 799-810], the pH-k profile for the cathepsin B reaction contains a sigmoidal component with pKa 5.2 in which k increases with decrease in pH. This modulation of the reactivity of the catalytic-site -S-/-ImH+ ion-pair state of cathepsin B (produced by protonic dissociation from -SH/-ImH+ with pKa approx. 3) towards a small, rigid, electrophilic reagent, in a reaction that appears to involve both components of the ion-pair for efficient reaction, suggests that the state of ionization of a group associated with a molecular pKa of approx. 5 may control ion-pair geometry. This might account for the remarkable finding [reported by Willenbrock & Brocklehurst (1984) Biochem. J. 222, 805-814] that, although the ion-pair appears to be generated in cathepsin B as the pH is increased across pKa 3.4, catalytic competence is not generated until the pH is increased across pKa 5-6.

  8. The maize cystatin CC9 interacts with apoplastic cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    van der Linde, Karina; Mueller, André N; Hemetsberger, Christoph; Kashani, Farnusch; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2012-11-01

    In a recent study we identified corn cystain9 (CC9) as a novel compatibility factor for the interaction of the biotrophic smut fungus Ustilago maydis with its host plant maize. CC9 is transcriptionally induced during the compatible interaction with U. maydis and localizes in the maize apoplast where it inhibits apoplastic papain-like cysteine proteases. The proteases are activated during incompatible interaction and salicylic acid (SA) treatment and, in turn, are sufficient to induce SA signaling including PR-gene expression. Therefore the inhibition of apoplastic papain-like cysteine proteases by CC9 is essential to suppress host immunity during U. maydis infection. Here were present new experimental data on the cysteine protease-cystatin interaction and provide an in silco analysis of plant cystatins and the identified apoplastic cysteine proteases.

  9. Active site - a site of binding of affinity inhibitors in baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Svyato, I.E.; Sklyankina, V.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-03-20

    The interaction of the enzyme-substrate complex with methyl phosphate, O-phosphoethanolamine, O-phosphopropanolamine, N-acetylphosphoserine, and phosphoglyolic acid, as well as pyrophosphatase, modified by monoesters of phosphoric acid, with pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate, was investigated. It was shown that the enzyme containing the substrate in the active site does not react with monophosphates, but modified pyrophosphatase entirely retains the ability to bind polyanions to the regulatory site. It is concluded that the inactivation of baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase by monoesters of phosphoric acid, which are affinity inhibitors of it, is the result of modification of the active site of the enzyme.

  10. A novel approach to predict active sites of enzyme molecules.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kuo-Chen; Cai, Yu-dong

    2004-04-01

    Enzymes are critical in many cellular signaling cascades. With many enzyme structures being solved, there is an increasing need to develop an automated method for identifying their active sites. However, given the atomic coordinates of an enzyme molecule, how can we predict its active site? This is a vitally important problem because the core of an enzyme molecule is its active site from the viewpoints of both pure scientific research and industrial application. In this article, a topological entity was introduced to characterize the enzymatic active site. Based on such a concept, the covariant discriminant algorithm was formulated for identifying the active site. As a paradigm, the serine hydrolase family was demonstrated. The overall success rate by jackknife test for a data set of 88 enzyme molecules was 99.92%, and that for a data set of 50 independent enzyme molecules was 99.91%. Meanwhile, it was shown through an example that the prediction algorithm can also be used to find any typographic error of a PDB file in annotating the constituent amino acids of catalytic triad and to suggest a possible correction. The very high success rates are due to the introduction of a covariance matrix in the prediction algorithm that makes allowance for taking into account the coupling effects among the key constituent atoms of active site. It is anticipated that the novel approach is quite promising and may become a useful high throughput tool in enzymology, proteomics, and structural bioinformatics. PMID:14997541

  11. Topology of transmembrane proteins by scanning cysteine accessibility mutagenesis methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quansheng; Casey, Joseph R

    2007-04-01

    Integral membrane proteins of the plasma membrane span from the inside to the outside of the cell. The primary structural element of integral membrane proteins is their topology: the pattern in which the protein traverses the membrane. A full description of topology, defining which parts of the protein face outside versus inside, goes a long way toward understanding the folding of these proteins. Many approaches have been established to define membrane protein topology. Here, we present the technique of scanning cysteine accessibility mutagenesis (SCAM). This approach uses the unique chemical reactivity of the cysteine sulfhydryl to probe membrane protein structure. Individual cysteine residues are introduced into the target protein by mutagenesis. The ability to chemically react these residues using sulfhydryl-directed reagents (either membrane permeant or impermeant) defines each site as either extracellular or intracellular, thus establishing topology of a location. This analysis performed on many sites in the protein will define the protein's topology. PMID:17367716

  12. Hydride binding to the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Chernev, Petko; Lambertz, Camilla; Brünje, Annika; Leidel, Nils; Sigfridsson, Kajsa G V; Kositzki, Ramona; Hsieh, Chung-Hung; Yao, Shenglai; Schiwon, Rafael; Driess, Matthias; Limberg, Christian; Happe, Thomas; Haumann, Michael

    2014-11-17

    [FeFe]-hydrogenase from green algae (HydA1) is the most efficient hydrogen (H2) producing enzyme in nature and of prime interest for (bio)technology. Its active site is a unique six-iron center (H-cluster) composed of a cubane cluster, [4Fe4S]H, cysteine-linked to a diiron unit, [2Fe]H, which carries unusual carbon monoxide (CO) and cyanide ligands and a bridging azadithiolate group. We have probed the molecular and electronic configurations of the H-cluster in functional oxidized, reduced, and super-reduced or CO-inhibited HydA1 protein, in particular searching for intermediates with iron-hydride bonds. Site-selective X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy were used to distinguish between low- and high-spin iron sites in the two subcomplexes of the H-cluster. The experimental methods and spectral simulations were calibrated using synthetic model complexes with ligand variations and bound hydride species. Distinct X-ray spectroscopic signatures of electronic excitation or decay transitions in [4Fe4S]H and [2Fe]H were obtained, which were quantitatively reproduced by density functional theory calculations, thereby leading to specific H-cluster model structures. We show that iron-hydride bonds are absent in the reduced state, whereas only in the super-reduced state, ligand rotation facilitates hydride binding presumably to the Fe-Fe bridging position at [2Fe]H. These results are in agreement with a catalytic cycle involving three main intermediates and at least two protonation and electron transfer steps prior to the H2 formation chemistry in [FeFe]-hydrogenases. PMID:25369169

  13. Identification of the reactive cysteine residue (Cys227) in human carbonyl reductase.

    PubMed

    Tinguely, J N; Wermuth, B

    1999-02-01

    Carbonyl reductase is highly susceptible to inactivation by organomercurials suggesting the presence of a reactive cysteine residue in, or close to, the active site. This residue is also close to a site which binds glutathione. Structurally, carbonyl reductase belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family and contains five cysteine residues, none of which is conserved within the family. In order to identify the reactive residue and investigate its possible role in glutathione binding, alanine was substituted for each cysteine residue of human carbonyl reductase by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Four of the five mutants (C26A, C122A C150A and C226A) exhibited wild-type-like enzyme activity, although K(m) values of C226A for three structurally different substrates were increased threefold to 10-fold. The fifth mutant, C227A, showed a 10-15-fold decrease in kcat and a threefold to 40-fold increase in K(m), resulting in a 30-500-fold drop in kcat/K(m). NaCl (300 mM) increased the activity of C227A 16-fold, whereas the activity of the wild-type enzyme was only doubled. Substitution of serine rather than alanine for Cys227 similarly affected the kinetic constants with the exception that NaCl did not activate the enzyme. Both C227A and C227S mutants were insensitive to inactivation by 4-hydroxymercuribenzoate. Unlike the parent carbonyl compounds, the glutathione adducts of menadione and prostaglandin A1 were better substrates for the C227A and C227S mutants than the wild-type enzyme. Conversely, the binding of free glutathione to both mutants was reduced. Our findings indicate that Cys227 is the reactive residue and suggest that it is involved in the binding of both substrate and glutathione. PMID:10091578

  14. Growth exponents in surface models with non-active sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Figueiredo, W.; Aarão Reis, F. D. A.

    2006-11-01

    In this work, we studied the role played by the inactive sites present on the substrate of a growing surface. In our model, one particle sticks at the surface if the site where it falls is an active site. However, we allow the deposited particle to diffuse along the surface in accordance with some mechanism previously defined. Using Monte Carlo simulations, and some analytical results, we have investigated the model in (1+1) and (2+1) dimensions considering different relaxation mechanisms. We show that the consideration of non-active sites is a crucial point in the model. In fact, we have seen that the saturation regime is not observed for any value of the density of inactive sites. Besides, the growth exponent β turns to be one, at long times, whatever the mechanism of diffusion we consider in one and two dimensions.

  15. Bacterial AvrRpt2-Like Cysteine Proteases Block Activation of the Arabidopsis Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, MPK4 and MPK111[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Jiang, Xiyuan; Elmore, James Mitch; Mackey, David; Shan, Libo

    2016-01-01

    To establish infection, pathogens deliver effectors into host cells to target immune signaling components, including elements of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) cascades. The virulence function of AvrRpt2, one of the first identified Pseudomonas syringae effectors, involves cleavage of the plant defense regulator, RPM1-INTERACTING PROTEIN4 (RIN4), and interference with plant auxin signaling. We show now that AvrRpt2 specifically suppresses the flagellin-induced phosphorylation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MPK4 and MPK11 but not MPK3 or MPK6. This inhibition requires the proteolytic activity of AvrRpt2, is associated with reduced expression of some plant defense genes, and correlates with enhanced pathogen infection in AvrRpt2-expressing transgenic plants. Diverse AvrRpt2-like homologs can be found in some phytopathogens, plant-associated and soil bacteria. Employing these putative bacterial AvrRpt2 homologs and inactive AvrRpt2 variants, we can uncouple the inhibition of MPK4/MPK11 activation from the cleavage of RIN4 and related members from the so-called nitrate-induced family as well as from auxin signaling. Thus, this selective suppression of specific mitogen-activated protein kinases is independent of the previously known AvrRpt2 targets and potentially represents a novel virulence function of AvrRpt2. PMID:27208280

  16. A small ribozyme with dual-site kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Elisa; Maxwell, Adam W.R.; Burke, Donald H.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoryl transfer onto backbone hydroxyls is a recognized catalytic activity of nucleic acids. We find that kinase ribozyme K28 possesses an unusually complex active site that promotes (thio)phosphorylation of two residues widely separated in primary sequence. After allowing the ribozyme to radiolabel itself by phosphoryl transfer from [γ-32P]GTP, DNAzyme-mediated cleavage yielded two radiolabeled cleavage fragments, indicating phosphorylation sites within each of the two cleavage fragments. These sites were mapped by alkaline digestion and primer extension pausing. Enzymatic digestion and mutational analysis identified nucleotides important for activity and established the active structure as being a constrained pseudoknot with unusual connectivity that may juxtapose the two reactive sites. Nuclease sensitivities for nucleotides near the pseudoknot core were altered in the presence of GTPγS, indicating donor-induced folding. The 5′ target site was more strongly favored in full-length ribozyme K28 (128 nt) than in truncated RNAs (58 nt). Electrophoretic mobilities of self-thiophosphorylated products on organomercurial gels are distinct from the 5′ mono-thiophosphorylated product produced by reaction with polynucleotide kinase, potentially indicating simultaneous labeling of both sites within individual RNA strands. Our evidence supports a single, compact structure with local dynamics, rather than global rearrangement, as being responsible for dual-site phosphorylation. PMID:22618879

  17. Cysteine-reactive covalent capture tags for enrichment of cysteine-containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Giron, Priscille; Dayon, Loïc; Mihala, Nikolett; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Rose, Keith

    2009-11-01

    Considering the tremendous complexity and the wide dynamic range of protein samples from biological origin and their proteolytic peptide mixtures, proteomics largely requires simplification strategies. One common approach to reduce sample complexity is to target a particular amino acid in proteins or peptides, such as cysteine (Cys), with chemical tags in order to reduce the analysis to a subset of the whole proteome. The present work describes the synthesis and the use of two new cysteinyl tags, so-called cysteine-reactive covalent capture tags (C3T), for the isolation of Cys-containing peptides. These bifunctional molecules were specifically designed to react with cysteines through iodoacetyl and acryloyl moieties and permit efficient selection of the tagged peptides. To do so, a thioproline was chosen as the isolating group to form, after a deprotection/activation step, a thiazolidine with an aldehyde resin by the covalent capture (CC) method. The applicability of the enrichment strategy was demonstrated on small synthetic peptides as well as on peptides derived from digested proteins. Mass spectrometric (MS) analysis and tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) sequencing confirmed the efficient and straightforward selection of the cysteine-containing peptides. The combination of C3T and CC methods provides an effective alternative to reduce sample complexity and access low abundance proteins. PMID:19813279

  18. A novel allosteric mechanism in the cysteine peptidase cathepsin K discovered by computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novinec, Marko; Korenč, Matevž; Caflisch, Amedeo; Ranganathan, Rama; Lenarčič, Brigita; Baici, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Allosteric modifiers have the potential to fine-tune enzyme activity. Therefore, targeting allosteric sites is gaining increasing recognition as a strategy in drug design. Here we report the use of computational methods for the discovery of the first small-molecule allosteric inhibitor of the collagenolytic cysteine peptidase cathepsin K, a major target for the treatment of osteoporosis. The molecule NSC13345 is identified by high-throughput docking of compound libraries to surface sites on the peptidase that are connected to the active site by an evolutionarily conserved network of residues (protein sector). The crystal structure of the complex shows that NSC13345 binds to a novel allosteric site on cathepsin K. The compound acts as a hyperbolic mixed modifier in the presence of a synthetic substrate, it completely inhibits collagen degradation and has good selectivity for cathepsin K over related enzymes. Altogether, these properties qualify our methodology and NSC13345 as promising candidates for allosteric drug design.

  19. Chemical proteomic map of dimethyl fumarate-sensitive cysteines in primary human T cells.

    PubMed

    Blewett, Megan M; Xie, Jiji; Zaro, Balyn W; Backus, Keriann M; Altman, Amnon; Teijaro, John R; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-01-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an electrophilic drug that is used to treat autoimmune conditions, including multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. The mechanism of action of DMF is unclear but may involve the covalent modification of proteins or DMF serving as a prodrug that is converted to monomethyl fumarate (MMF). We found that DMF, but not MMF, blocked the activation of primary human and mouse T cells. Using a quantitative, site-specific chemical proteomic platform, we determined the DMF sensitivity of >2400 cysteine residues in human T cells. Cysteines sensitive to DMF, but not MMF, were identified in several proteins with established biochemical or genetic links to T cell function, including protein kinase Cθ (PKCθ). DMF blocked the association of PKCθ with the costimulatory receptor CD28 by perturbing a CXXC motif in the C2 domain of this kinase. Mutation of these DMF-sensitive cysteines also impaired PKCθ-CD28 interactions and T cell activation, designating the C2 domain of PKCθ as a key functional, electrophile-sensing module important for T cell biology. PMID:27625306

  20. Chemical proteomic map of dimethyl fumarate-sensitive cysteines in primary human T cells.

    PubMed

    Blewett, Megan M; Xie, Jiji; Zaro, Balyn W; Backus, Keriann M; Altman, Amnon; Teijaro, John R; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-09-13

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an electrophilic drug that is used to treat autoimmune conditions, including multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. The mechanism of action of DMF is unclear but may involve the covalent modification of proteins or DMF serving as a prodrug that is converted to monomethyl fumarate (MMF). We found that DMF, but not MMF, blocked the activation of primary human and mouse T cells. Using a quantitative, site-specific chemical proteomic platform, we determined the DMF sensitivity of >2400 cysteine residues in human T cells. Cysteines sensitive to DMF, but not MMF, were identified in several proteins with established biochemical or genetic links to T cell function, including protein kinase Cθ (PKCθ). DMF blocked the association of PKCθ with the costimulatory receptor CD28 by perturbing a CXXC motif in the C2 domain of this kinase. Mutation of these DMF-sensitive cysteines also impaired PKCθ-CD28 interactions and T cell activation, designating the C2 domain of PKCθ as a key functional, electrophile-sensing module important for T cell biology.

  1. Chemical proteomic map of dimethyl fumarate–sensitive cysteines in primary human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Blewett, Megan M.; Xie, Jiji; Zaro, Balyn W.; Backus, Keriann M.; Altman, Amnon; Teijaro, John R.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2016-01-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an electrophilic drug that is used to treat autoimmune conditions, including multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. The mechanism of action of DMF is unclear, but may involve the covalent modification of proteins or DMF serving as a pro-drug that is converted to monomethyl fumarate (MMF). Here, we found that DMF, but not MMF, blocked the activation of primary human and mouse T cells. Using a quantitative, site-specific chemical proteomic platform, we determined the DMF-sensitivity of > 2400 cysteine residues in human T cells. Cysteines sensitive to DMF, but not MMF, were identified in several proteins with established biochemical or genetic links to T cell function, including protein kinase C θ (PKCθ). Furthermore, DMF blocked the association of PKCθ with the costimulatory receptor CD28 by perturbing a CXXC motif in the C2 domain of this kinase. Mutation of these DMF-sensitive cysteines also impaired PKCθ-CD28 interactions and T cell activation, designating the C2 domain of PKCθ as a key functional, electrophile-sensing module important for T cell biology. PMID:27625306

  2. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.

    2008-10-21

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  3. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.

    2009-10-13

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  4. Architecture and active site of particulate methane monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Culpepper, Megen A.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria, organisms that live on methane gas as their sole carbon source. Understanding pMMO function has important implications for bioremediation applications and for the development of new, environmentally friendly catalysts for the direct conversion of methane to methanol. Crystal structures of pMMOs from three different methanotrophs reveal a trimeric architecture, consisting of three copies each of the pmoB, pmoA, and pmoC subunits. There are three distinct metal centers in each protomer of the trimer, mononuclear and dinuclear copper sites in the periplasmic regions of pmoB and a mononuclear site within the membrane that can be occupied by copper or zinc. Various models for the pMMO active site have been proposed within these structural constraints, including dicopper, tricopper, and diiron centers. Biochemical and spectroscopic data on pMMO and recombinant soluble fragments, denoted spmoB proteins, indicate that the active site involves copper and is located at the site of the dicopper center in the pmoB subunit. Initial spectroscopic evidence for O2 binding at this site has been obtained. Despite these findings, questions remain about the active site identity and nuclearity and will be the focus of future studies. PMID:22725967

  5. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  6. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  7. Evidence That the [beta] Subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase Is Active with the Manganese Ion of Its Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Site 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dassama, Laura M.K.; Boal, Amie K.; Krebs, Carsten; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Bollinger, Jr., J. Martin

    2014-10-02

    The reaction of a class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) begins when a cofactor in the {beta} subunit oxidizes a cysteine residue {approx}35 {angstrom} away in the {alpha} subunit, generating a thiyl radical. In the class Ic enzyme from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), the cysteine oxidant is the Mn{sup IV} ion of a Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} cluster, which assembles in a reaction between O{sub 2} and the Mn{sup II}/Fe{sup II} complex of {beta}. The heterodinuclear nature of the cofactor raises the question of which site, 1 or 2, contains the Mn{sup IV} ion. Because site 1 is closer to the conserved location of the cysteine-oxidizing tyrosyl radical of class Ia and Ib RNRs, we suggested that the Mn{sup IV} ion most likely resides in this site (i.e., {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}), but a subsequent computational study favored its occupation of site 2 ({sup 1}Fe{sup III}/{sup 2}Mn{sup IV}). In this work, we have sought to resolve the location of the Mn{sup IV} ion in Ct RNR-{beta} by correlating X-ray crystallographic anomalous scattering intensities with catalytic activity for samples of the protein reconstituted in vitro by two different procedures. In samples containing primarily Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} clusters, Mn preferentially occupies site 1, but some anomalous scattering from site 2 is observed, implying that both {sup 1}Mn{sup II}/{sup 2}Fe{sup II} and {sup 1}Fe{sup II}/{sup 2}Mn{sup II} complexes are competent to react with O{sub 2} to produce the corresponding oxidized states. However, with diminished Mn{sup II} loading in the reconstitution, there is no evidence for Mn occupancy of site 2, and the greater activity of these 'low-Mn' samples on a per-Mn basis implies that the {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}-{beta} is at least the more active of the two oxidized forms and may be the only active form.

  8. Cwp84, a Clostridium difficile cysteine protease, exhibits conformational flexibility in the absence of its propeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, William J.; Roberts, April K.; Shone, Clifford C.; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2015-02-19

    Two structures of Cwp84, a cysteine protease from the S-layer of C. difficile, are presented after propeptide cleavage. They reveal the movement of three loops, two in the active-site groove and one on the surface of the lectin-like domain, exposing a hydrophobic pocket. In recent decades, the global healthcare problems caused by Clostridium difficile have increased at an alarming rate. A greater understanding of this antibiotic-resistant bacterium, particularly with respect to how it interacts with the host, is required for the development of novel strategies for fighting C. difficile infections. The surface layer (S-layer) of C. difficile is likely to be of significant importance to host–pathogen interactions. The mature S-layer is formed by a proteinaceous array consisting of multiple copies of a high-molecular-weight and a low-molecular-weight S-layer protein. These components result from the cleavage of SlpA by Cwp84, a cysteine protease. The structure of a truncated Cwp84 active-site mutant has recently been reported and the key features have been identified, providing the first structural insights into the role of Cwp84 in the formation of the S-layer. Here, two structures of Cwp84 after propeptide cleavage are presented and the three conformational changes that are observed are discussed. These changes result in a reconfiguration of the active site and exposure of the hydrophobic pocket.

  9. Improvement of the Pharmacological Properties of Maize RIP by Cysteine-Specific PEGylation

    PubMed Central

    Au, Ka-Yee; Shi, Wei-Wei; Qian, Shuai; Zuo, Zhong; Shaw, Pang-Chui

    2016-01-01

    To improve the pharmacological properties of maize ribosome-inactivating protein (maize RIP) for targeting HIV-infected cells, the previously engineered TAT-fused active form of maize RIP (MOD) was further engineered for cysteine-directed PEGylation. In this work, two potential antigenic sites, namely Lys-78 and Lys-264, were identified. They were mutated to cysteine residue and conjugated with PEG5k or PEG20k. The resultant PEG derivatives of MOD variants were examined for ribosome-inactivating activity, circulating half-life and immunogenicity. Our results showed that MOD-PEG conjugates had two- to five-fold lower biological activity compared to the wild-type. Mutation of the two sites respectively did not decrease the anti-MOD IgG and IgE level in mice, but the conjugation of PEG did dramatically reduce the antigenicity. Furthermore, pharmacokinetics studies demonstrated that attachment of PEG20k prolonged the plasma half-life by five-fold for MOD-K78C and 17-fold for MOD-K264C, respectively. The site-specific mutation together with PEGylation therefore generated MOD derivatives with improved pharmacological properties. PMID:27763506

  10. Addition of a C-Terminal Cysteine Improves the Anti-Herpes Simplex Virus Activity of a Peptide Containing the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 TAT Protein Transduction Domain▿

    PubMed Central

    Bultmann, Hermann; Teuton, Jeremy; Brandt, Curtis R.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that peptides containing the protein transduction domain (PTD) of the human immunodeficiency virus tat protein (GRKKRRQRRR) were effective inhibitors of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) entry (H. Bultmann and C. R. Brandt, J. Biol. Chem. 277:36018-36023, 2002). We now show that the addition of a single cysteine residue to the C terminus of the TAT PTD (TAT-C peptide) improves the antiviral activity against HSV-1 and HSV-2. The principle effect of adding the cysteine was to enable the peptide to inactivate virions and to induce a state of resistance to infection in cells pretreated with peptide. The TAT-C peptide acted extracellularly, immediately blocked entry of adsorbed virus, prevented VP16 translocation to the nucleus, and blocked syncytium formation and cell-cell spread. Thus, TAT-C peptides are fusion inhibitors. The induction of the resistance of cells to infection was rapid, recovered with a half-life of 5 to 6 h, and could be reinduced by peptide treatment. TAT-C bound to heparan sulfate but was a poor competitor for viral attachment. The antiviral activity depended on the net positive charge of the peptide but not on chirality, and a free sulfhydryl group was not essential for antiviral activity because TAT-C dimers were at least as effective as monomers. The unique combination of antiviral activities and low toxicity combine to make TAT-C a strong candidate for further development as a drug to block HSV infection. PMID:17261627

  11. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  12. Metabolism of cysteine, cysteinesulfinate and cysteinesulfonate in rats fed adequate and excess levels of sulfur-containing amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Stipanuk, M.H.; Rotter, M.A.

    1984-08-01

    The oxidation of cysteine, cysteinesulfinate and cysteinesulfonate labeled with 14C in the 1- and 3-positions was studied in rats that had been fed diets with adequate or excess cysteine. Consumption of excess cysteine for 5 or 10 days resulted in an increase in hepatic cysteine dioxygenase activity and a decrease in hepatic cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase activity but had no effect on the oxidation of the C-1 or C-3 of cysteine, cysteinesulfinate or cysteinesulfonate. When the labeled compounds were administered by intraperitoneal injection, 41% of cysteine, 100% of cysteinesulfinate and 37% of cysteinesulfonate were oxidized over an 8-hour period. The percentage of the oxidized cysteine, cysteinesulfinate and cysteinesulfonate that was converted to taurine was calculated to be 83, 70 and 100%, respectively. When these same compounds were administered intragastrically, the relative flux to taurine was lower for all compounds; 41% of the oxidized cysteine, none of the cysteinesulfinate and 11% of the oxidized cysteinesulfonate appeared to be converted to taurine. Metabolism of intragastrically administered cysteine may be more indicative of what happens to dietary cysteine, whereas metabolism of intraperitoneally administered cysteine and cysteinesulfinate may be more indicative of liver metabolism and of the metabolism of endogenous cysteine and cysteinesulfinate.

  13. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  14. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined. PMID:27243042

  15. Mutation in the Pro-Peptide Region of a Cysteine Protease Leads to Altered Activity and Specificity-A Structural and Biochemical Approach.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sruti; Choudhury, Debi; Roy, Sumana; Dattagupta, Jiban Kanti; Biswas, Sampa

    2016-01-01

    Papain-like proteases contain an N-terminal pro-peptide in their zymogen form that is important for correct folding and spatio-temporal regulation of the proteolytic activity of these proteases. Catalytic removal of the pro-peptide is required for the protease to become active. In this study, we have generated three different mutants of papain (I86F, I86L and I86A) by replacing the residue I86 in its pro-peptide region, which blocks the specificity determining S2-subsite of the catalytic cleft of the protease in its zymogen form with a view to investigate the effect of mutation on the catalytic activity of the protease. Steady-state enzyme kinetic analyses of the corresponding mutant proteases with specific peptide substrates show significant alteration of substrate specificity-I86F and I86L have 2.7 and 29.1 times higher kcat/Km values compared to the wild-type against substrates having Phe and Leu at P2 position, respectively, while I86A shows lower catalytic activity against majority of the substrates tested. Far-UV CD scan and molecular mass analyses of the mature form of the mutant proteases reveal similar CD spectra and intact masses to that of the wild-type. Crystal structures of zymogens of I86F and I86L mutants suggest that subtle reorganization of active site residues, including water, upon binding of the pro-peptide may allow the enzyme to achieve discriminatory substrate selectivity and catalytic efficiency. However, accurate and reliable predictions on alteration of substrate specificity require atomic resolution structure of the catalytic domain after zymogen activation, which remains a challenging task. In this study we demonstrate that through single amino acid substitution in pro-peptide, it is possible to modify the substrate specificity of papain and hence the pro-peptide of a protease can also be a useful target for altering its catalytic activity/specificity. PMID:27352302

  16. Mutation in the Pro-Peptide Region of a Cysteine Protease Leads to Altered Activity and Specificity—A Structural and Biochemical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sruti; Choudhury, Debi; Roy, Sumana; Dattagupta, Jiban Kanti; Biswas, Sampa

    2016-01-01

    Papain-like proteases contain an N-terminal pro-peptide in their zymogen form that is important for correct folding and spatio-temporal regulation of the proteolytic activity of these proteases. Catalytic removal of the pro-peptide is required for the protease to become active. In this study, we have generated three different mutants of papain (I86F, I86L and I86A) by replacing the residue I86 in its pro-peptide region, which blocks the specificity determining S2-subsite of the catalytic cleft of the protease in its zymogen form with a view to investigate the effect of mutation on the catalytic activity of the protease. Steady-state enzyme kinetic analyses of the corresponding mutant proteases with specific peptide substrates show significant alteration of substrate specificity—I86F and I86L have 2.7 and 29.1 times higher kcat/Km values compared to the wild-type against substrates having Phe and Leu at P2 position, respectively, while I86A shows lower catalytic activity against majority of the substrates tested. Far-UV CD scan and molecular mass analyses of the mature form of the mutant proteases reveal similar CD spectra and intact masses to that of the wild-type. Crystal structures of zymogens of I86F and I86L mutants suggest that subtle reorganization of active site residues, including water, upon binding of the pro-peptide may allow the enzyme to achieve discriminatory substrate selectivity and catalytic efficiency. However, accurate and reliable predictions on alteration of substrate specificity require atomic resolution structure of the catalytic domain after zymogen activation, which remains a challenging task. In this study we demonstrate that through single amino acid substitution in pro-peptide, it is possible to modify the substrate specificity of papain and hence the pro-peptide of a protease can also be a useful target for altering its catalytic activity/specificity. PMID:27352302

  17. Studies on the active site of pig plasma amine oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Collison, D; Knowles, P F; Mabbs, F E; Rius, F X; Singh, I; Dooley, D M; Cote, C E; McGuirl, M

    1989-01-01

    Amine oxidase from pig plasma (PPAO) has two bound Cu2+ ions and at least one pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) moiety as cofactors. It is shown that recovery of activity by copper-depleted PPAO is linear with respect to added Cu2+ ions. Recovery of e.s.r. and optical spectral characteristics of active-site copper parallel the recovery of catalytic activity. These results are consistent with both Cu2+ ions contributing to catalysis. Further e.s.r. studies indicate that the two copper sites in PPAO, unlike those in amine oxidases from other sources, are chemically distinct. These comparative studies establish that non-identity of the Cu2+ ions in PPAO is not a requirement for amine oxidase activity. It is shown through the use of a new assay procedure that there are two molecules of PQQ bound per molecule of protein in PPAO; only the more reactive of these PQQ moieties is required for activity. PMID:2559715

  18. Computer simulation of the active site of human serum cholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Kefang Jiao; Song Li; Zhengzheng Lu

    1996-12-31

    The first 3D-structure of acetylchelinesterase from Torpedo California electric organ (T.AChE) was published by JL. Sussman in 1991. We have simulated 3D-structure of human serum cholinesterase (H.BuChE) and the active site of H.BuChE. It is discovered by experiment that the residue of H.BuChE is still active site after a part of H.BuChE is cut. For example, the part of 21KD + 20KD is active site of H.BuChE. The 20KD as it is. Studies on these peptides by Hemelogy indicate that two active peptides have same negative electrostatic potential maps diagram. These negative electrostatic areas attached by acetyl choline with positive electrostatic potency. We predict that 147...236 peptide of AChE could be active site because it was as 20KD as with negative electrostatic potential maps. We look forward to proving from other ones.

  19. Discovery of Potent Cysteine-Containing Dipeptide Inhibitors against Tyrosinase: A Comprehensive Investigation of 20 × 20 Dipeptides in Inhibiting Dopachrome Formation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Tien-Sheng; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chen, Wang-Chuan; Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Lee, Yu-Ching; Lu, Chung-Kuang; Don, Ming-Jaw; Chang, Chang-Yu; Lee, Ching-Hsiao; Lin, Hui-Hsiung; Hsu, Hung-Ju; Hsiao, Nai-Wan

    2015-07-15

    Tyrosinase is an essential copper-containing enzyme required for melanin synthesis. The overproduction and abnormal accumulation of melanin cause hyperpigmentation and neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, tyrosinase is promising for use in medicine and cosmetics. Our previous study identified a natural product, A5, resembling the structure of the dipeptide WY and apparently inhibiting tyrosinase. Here, we comprehensively estimated the inhibitory capability of 20 × 20 dipeptides against mushroom tyrosinase. We found that cysteine-containing dipeptides, directly blocking the active site of tyrosinase, are highly potent in inhibition; in particular, N-terminal cysteine-containing dipeptides markedly outperform the C-terminal-containing ones. The cysteine-containing dipeptides, CE, CS, CY, and CW, show comparative bioactivities, and tyrosine-containing dipeptides are substrate-like inhibitors. The dipeptide PD attenuates 16.5% melanin content without any significant cytotoxicity. This study reveals the functional role of cysteine residue positional preference and the selectivity of specific amino acids in cysteine-containing dipeptides against tyrosinase, aiding in developing skin-whitening products. PMID:26083974

  20. X-ray structure at 1.75 resolution of a norovirus 3C protease linked to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Jon; Coates, Leighton; Hussey, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses are recognized universally as the most important cause of human epidemic non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a 3C cysteine protease that cleaves a 200kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional proteins. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the Southampton norovirus 3C protease (SV3CP) bound to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor (MAPI) which has been refined at 1.75 resolution, following initial MAD phasing with a selenomethionine derivative. The inhibitor, acetyl-Glu-Phe-Gln-Leu-Gln-X, based on a 3C protease cleavage recognition sequences in the 200kDa polyprotein substrate, reacts covalently through its propenylethylester group (X) with the active site nucleophile, Cys 139. The 3C protease-inhibitor structure permits, for the first time, the identification of substrate recognition and binding groups and provides important new information for the development of antiviral prophylactics.

  1. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  2. Multi-site Phosphorylation Regulates Bim Stability and Apoptotic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Anette; Barrett, Tamera; Flavell, Richard A.; Davis, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim is established to be an important mediator of signaling pathways that induce cell death. Multi-site phosphorylation of Bim by several members of the MAP kinase group is implicated as a regulatory mechanism that controls the apoptotic activity of Bim. To test the role of Bim phosphorylation in vivo, we constructed mice with a series of mutant alleles that express phosphorylation-defective Bim proteins. We show that mutation of the phosphorylation site Thr-112 causes decreased binding of Bim to the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 and can increase cell survival. In contrast, mutation of the phosphorylation sites Ser-55, Ser-65, and Ser-73 can cause increased apoptosis because of reduced proteasomal degradation of Bim. Together, these data indicate that phosphorylation can regulate Bim by multiple mechanisms and that the phosphorylation of Bim on different sites can contribute to the sensitivity of cellular apoptotic responses. PMID:18498746

  3. 21 CFR 582.5271 - Cysteine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cysteine. 582.5271 Section 582.5271 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... § 582.5271 Cysteine. (a) Product. Cysteine (L-forms). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  4. A Conus regularis Conotoxin with a Novel Eight-Cysteine Framework Inhibits CaV2.2 Channels and Displays an Anti-Nociceptive Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bernáldez, Johanna; Román-González, Sergio A.; Martínez, Oscar; Jiménez, Samanta; Vivas, Oscar; Arenas, Isabel; Corzo, Gerardo; Arreguín, Roberto; García, David E.; Possani, Lourival D.; Licea, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    A novel peptide, RsXXIVA, was isolated from the venom duct of Conus regularis, a worm-hunting species collected in the Sea of Cortez, México. Its primary structure was determined by mass spectrometry and confirmed by automated Edman degradation. This conotoxin contains 40 amino acids and exhibits a novel arrangement of eight cysteine residues (C-C-C-C-CC-CC). Surprisingly, two loops of the novel peptide are highly identical to the amino acids sequence of ω-MVIIA. The total length and disulfide pairing of both peptides are quite different, although the two most important residues for the described function of ω-MVIIA (Lys2 and Tyr13) are also present in the peptide reported here. Electrophysiological analysis using superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons indicates that RsXXIVA inhibits CaV2.2 channel current in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of 2.8 μM, whose effect is partially reversed after washing. Furthermore, RsXXIVA was tested in hot-plate assays to measure the potential anti-nociceptive effect to an acute thermal stimulus, showing an analgesic effect in acute thermal pain at 30 and 45 min post-injection. Also, the toxin shows an anti-nociceptive effect in a formalin chronic pain test. However, the low affinity for CaV2.2 suggests that the primary target of the peptide could be different from that of ω-MVIIA. PMID:23567319

  5. Thiazolidine-4-carboxylate and 2-phenylthiazolidine-4-carboxylate are active as cysteine precursors but have no effect on growth of a methionine-dependent tumor in rats.

    PubMed

    Recasens, M A; Possompes, B; Astre, C; Saint Aubert, B; Joyeux, H

    1992-01-01

    Diets with partial replacement of sulfur amino acids by thiazolidine-4-carboxylate or 2-phenylthiazolidine-4-carboxylate were fed to normal and to rhabdomyosarcoma-bearing rats (methionine-dependent tumor) to evaluate their efficacy as cysteine precursors and as antitumor agents. Food intake, weight gain, food efficiency and plasma albumin and plasma sulfur amino acid concentrations were not different when these diets were compared with isosulfurous diets containing either methionine or N-acetylcysteine. 2-Phenylthiazolidine-4-carboxylate induced a lower plasma glutathione (GSH) level than the latter diets. Tumor-bearing rats had lower plasma GSH concentration. A negative linear relationship was found between plasma GSH levels and tumor weight and also the tumor weight: body weight ratio. This could mean that the tumor becomes the most important organ in the uptake of GSH. However, there was also a significant positive correlation between plasma GSH and albumin, suggesting a reduced GSH hepatic synthesis due to amino acid uptake by the tumor. There were no differences in tumor growth among rats receiving diets containing N-acetylcysteine, thiazolidine-4-carboxylate or 2-phenylthiazolidine-4-carboxylate.

  6. Water in the Active Site of Ketosteroid Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Hanoian, Philip; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to investigate the structural and dynamical properties of water in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) to provide insight into the role of these water molecules in the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. This reaction is thought to proceed via a dienolate intermediate that is stabilized by hydrogen bonding with residues Tyr16 and Asp103. A comparative study was performed for the wild-type (WT) KSI and the Y16F, Y16S, and Y16F/Y32F/Y57F (FFF) mutants. These systems were studied with three different bound ligands: equilenin, which is an intermediate analog, and the intermediate states of two steroid substrates. Several distinct water occupation sites were identified in the active site of KSI for the WT and mutant systems. Three additional sites were identified in the Y16S mutant that were not occupied in WT KSI or the other mutants studied. The number of water molecules directly hydrogen bonded to the ligand oxygen was approximately two waters in the Y16S mutant, one water in the Y16F and FFF mutants, and intermittent hydrogen bonding of one water molecule in WT KSI. The molecular dynamics trajectories of the Y16F and FFF mutants reproduced the small conformational changes of residue 16 observed in the crystal structures of these two mutants. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations of 1H NMR chemical shifts of the protons in the active site hydrogen-bonding network suggest that the presence of water in the active site does not prevent the formation of short hydrogen bonds with far-downfield chemical shifts. The molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the active site water molecules exchange much more frequently for WT KSI and the FFF mutant than for the Y16F and Y16S mutants. This difference is most likely due to the hydrogen-bonding interaction between Tyr57 and an active site water molecule that is persistent in the Y16F and Y16S mutants but absent in the FFF mutant and significantly less

  7. Effect of L-cysteine on the oxidation of cyclohexane catalyzed by manganeseporphyrin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-You; Tian, Peng; Chen, Yong; He, Ming-Yang; Chen, Qun; Chen, Zai Xin

    2015-06-01

    Effect of L-cysteine as the cocatalyst on the oxidation of cyclohexane by tert-butylhydroperoxide (TBHP) catalyzed by manganese tetraphenylporphyrin (MnTPP) has been investigated. The results showed that L-cysteine could moderately improve the catalytic activity of MnTPP and significantly increase the selectivity of cyclohexanol. Different from imidazole and pyridine, the L-cysteine may perform dual roles in the catalytic oxidation of cyclohexane. Besides as the axial ligand for MnTPP, the L-cysteine could also react with cyclohexyl peroxide formed as the intermediate to produce alcohol as the main product.

  8. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  9. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  10. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  11. Targeted reengineering of protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I selectivity functionally implicates active-site residues in protein-substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Soumyashree A; Losito, Erica L; Hougland, James L

    2014-01-21

    Posttranslational modifications are vital for the function of many proteins. Prenylation is one such modification, wherein protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I (GGTase-I) or protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) modify proteins by attaching a 20- or 15-carbon isoprenoid group, respectively, to a cysteine residue near the C-terminus of a target protein. These enzymes require a C-terminal Ca1a2X sequence on their substrates, with the a1, a2, and X residues serving as substrate-recognition elements for FTase and/or GGTase-I. While crystallographic structures of rat GGTase-I show a tightly packed and hydrophobic a2 residue binding pocket, consistent with a preference for moderately sized a2 residues in GGTase-I substrates, the functional impact of enzyme-substrate contacts within this active site remains to be determined. Using site-directed mutagenesis and peptide substrate structure-activity studies, we have identified specific active-site residues within rat GGTase-I involved in substrate recognition and developed novel GGTase-I variants with expanded/altered substrate selectivity. The ability to drastically alter GGTase-I selectivity mirrors similar behavior observed in FTase but employs mutation of a distinct set of structurally homologous active-site residues. Our work demonstrates that tunable selectivity may be a general phenomenon among multispecific enzymes involved in posttranslational modification and raises the possibility of variable substrate selectivity among GGTase-I orthologues from different organisms. Furthermore, the GGTase-I variants developed herein can serve as tools for studying GGTase-I substrate selectivity and the effects of prenylation pathway modifications on specific proteins. PMID:24344934

  12. Solution oxygen-17 NMR application for observing a peroxidized cysteine residue in oxidized human SOD1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Noriko; Yoshihara, Daisaku; Sakiyama, Haruhiko; Eguchi, Hironobu; Suzuki, Keiichiro

    2016-12-01

    NMR active nuclei, 1H, 13C and 15N, are usually used for determination of protein structure. However, solution 17O-NMR application to proteins is extremely limited although oxygen is an essential element in biomolecules. Proteins are oxidized through cysteine residues by two types of oxidation. One is reversible oxidation such as disulphide bonding (Cys-S-S-Cys) and the other is irreversible oxidation to cysteine sulfinic acid (Cys-SO 2H) and cysteine sulfonic acid (Cys-SO 3H). Copper,Zinc-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a key enzyme in the protection of cells from the superoxide anion radical. The SH group at Cys 111 residue in human SOD1 is selectively oxidized to -SO 2H and -SO 3H with atmospheric oxygen, and this oxidized human SOD1 is also suggested to play an important role in the pathophysiology of various neurodegenerative diseases, probably mainly via protein aggregation. Therefore, information on the structural and the dynamics of the oxidized cysteine residue would be crucial for the understanding of protein aggregation mechanism. Although the -SO 3H group on proteins cannot be directly detected by conventional NMR techniques, we successfully performed the site-specific 17O-labeling of Cys 111 in SOD1 using ^{17}it {O}2 gas and the 17O-NMR analysis for the first time. We observed clear 17O signal derived from a protein molecule and show that 17O-NMR is a sensitive probe for studying the structure and dynamics of the 17O-labeled protein molecule. This novel and unique strategy can have great impact on many research fields in biology and chemistry.

  13. Natural cysteine protease inhibitors in protozoa: Fifteen years of the chagasin family.

    PubMed

    Costa, Tatiana F R; Lima, Ana Paula C A

    2016-03-01

    Chagasin-type inhibitors comprise natural inhibitors of papain-like cysteine proteases that are distributed among Protist, Bacteria and Archaea. Chagasin was identified in the pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi as an approximately 11 kDa protein that is a tight-binding and highly thermostable inhibitor of papain, cysteine cathepsins and endogenous parasite cysteine proteases. It displays an Imunoglobulin-like fold with three exposed loops to one side of the molecule, where amino acid residues present in conserved motifs at the tips of each loop contact target proteases. Differently from cystatins, the loop 2 of chagasin enters the active-site cleft, making direct contact with the catalytic residues, while loops 4 and 6 embrace the enzyme from the sides. Orthologues of chagasin are named Inhibitors of Cysteine Peptidases (ICP), and share conserved overall tri-dimensional structure and mode of binding to proteases. ICPs are tentatively distributed in three families: in family I42 are grouped chagasin-type inhibitors that share conserved residues at the exposed loops; family I71 contains Plasmodium ICPs, which are large proteins having a chagasin-like domain at the C-terminus, with lower similarity to chagasin in the conserved motif at loop 2; family I81 contains Toxoplasma ICP. Recombinant ICPs tested so far can inactivate protozoa cathepsin-like proteases and their mammalian counterparts. Studies on their biological roles were carried out in a few species, mainly using transgenic protozoa, and the conclusions vary. However, in all cases, alterations in the levels of expression of chagasin/ICPs led to substantial changes in one or more steps of parasite biology, with higher incidence in influencing their interaction with the hosts. We will cover most of the findings on chagasin/ICP structural and functional properties and overview the current knowledge on their roles in protozoa.

  14. Conformational Transitions in Human AP Endonuclease 1 and Its Active Site Mutant during Abasic Site Repair†

    PubMed Central

    Kanazhevskaya, Lyubov Yu.; Koval, Vladimir V.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Strauss, Phyllis R.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2010-01-01

    AP endonuclease 1 (APE 1) is a crucial enzyme of the base excision repair pathway (BER) in human cells. APE1 recognizes apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and makes a nick in the phosphodiester backbone 5′ to them. The conformational dynamics and presteady-state kinetics of wild-type APE1 and its active site mutant, Y171F-P173L-N174K, have been studied. To observe conformational transitions occurring in the APE1 molecule during the catalytic cycle, we detected intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the enzyme under single turnover conditions. DNA duplexes containing a natural AP site, its tetrahydrofuran analogue, or a 2′-deoxyguanosine residue in the same position were used as specific substrates or ligands. The stopped-flow experiments have revealed high flexibility of the APE1 molecule and the complexity of the catalytic process. The fluorescent traces indicate that wild-type APE1 undergoes at least four conformational transitions during the processing of abasic sites in DNA. In contrast, nonspecific interactions of APE1 with undamaged DNA can be described by a two-step kinetic scheme. Rate and equilibrium constants were extracted from the stopped-flow and fluorescence titration data for all substrates, ligands, and products. A replacement of three residues at the enzymatic active site including the replacement of tyrosine 171 with phenylalanine in the enzyme active site resulted in a 2 × 104-fold decrease in the reaction rate and reduced binding affinity. Our data indicate the important role of conformational changes in APE1 for substrate recognition and catalysis. PMID:20575528

  15. Enantiospecific adsorption of cysteine on a chiral Au34 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesús Pelayo, José; Valencia, Israel; Díaz, Gabriela; López-Lozano, Xóchitl; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological molecules like chiral amino acids with chiral metal clusters is becoming an interesting and active field of research because of its potential impact in, for example, chiral molecular recognition phenomena. In particular, the enantiospecific adsorption (EA) of cysteine (Cys) on a chiral Au55 cluster was theoretically predicted a few years ago. In this work, we present theoretical results, based on density functional theory, of the EA of non-zwitterionic cysteine interacting with the C3-Au34 chiral cluster, which has been experimentally detected in gas phase, using trapped ion electron diffraction. Our results show that, indeed, the adsorption energy of the amino acid depends on which enantiomers participate in the formation Cys-Au34 chiral complex. EA was obtained in the adsorption modes where both the thiol, and the thiol-amino functional groups of Cys are adsorbed on low-coordinated sites of the metal cluster surface. Similarly to what was obtained for the Cys-Au55 chiral complex, in the present work, it is found that the EA is originated from the different strength and location of the bond between the COOH functional group and surface Au atoms of the Au34 chiral cluster. Calculations of the vibrational spectrum for the different Cys-Au34 diastereomeric complexes predict the existence of a vibro-enantiospecific effect, indicating that the vibrational frequencies of the adsorbed amino acid depend on its handedness. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by G. Delgado Barrio, A. Solov'Yov, P. Villarreal, R. Prosmiti.

  16. N-methyl-D-aspartate recognition site ligands modulate activity at the coupled glycine recognition site.

    PubMed

    Hood, W F; Compton, R P; Monahan, J B

    1990-03-01

    In synaptic plasma membranes from rat forebrain, the potencies of glycine recognition site agonists and antagonists for modulating [3H]1-[1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl]piperidine ([3H]TCP) binding and for displacing strychnine-insensitive [3H]glycine binding are altered in the presence of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) recognition site ligands. The NMDA competitive antagonist, cis-4-phosphonomethyl-2-piperidine carboxylate (CGS 19755), reduces [3H]glycine binding, and the reduction can be fully reversed by the NMDA recognition site agonist, L-glutamate. Scatchard analysis of [3H]glycine binding shows that in the presence of CGS 19755 there is no change in Bmax (8.81 vs. 8.79 pmol/mg of protein), but rather a decrease in the affinity of glycine (KD of 0.202 microM vs. 0.129 microM). Similar decreases in affinity are observed for the glycine site agonists, D-serine and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate, in the presence of CGS 19755. In contrast, the affinity of glycine antagonists, 1-hydroxy-3-amino-2-pyrrolidone and 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylate, at this [3H]glycine recognition site increases in the presence of CGS 19755. The functional consequence of this change in affinity was addressed using the modulation of [3H]TCP binding. In the presence of L-glutamate, the potency of glycine agonists for the stimulation of [3H]TCP binding increases, whereas the potency of glycine antagonists decreases. These data are consistent with NMDA recognition site ligands, through their interactions at the NMDA recognition site, modulating activity at the associated glycine recognition site.

  17. S-benzyl-cysteine-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis involving activation of mitochondrial-dependent caspase cascade through the p53 pathway in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua-Jun; Meng, Lin-Yi; Shen, Yang; Zhu, Yi-Zhun; Liu, Hong-Rui

    2013-01-01

    S-benzyl-cysteine (SBC) is a structural analog of S-allylcysteine (SAC), which is one of the major water- soluble compounds in aged garlic extract. In this study, anticancer activities and the underlying mechanisms of SBC action were investigated and compared these with those of SAC using human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. SBC significantly suppressed the survival rate of SGC-7901 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and the inhibitory activities of SBC were stronger than those of SAC. Flow cytometry revealed that SBC induced G2-phase arrest and apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells. Typical apoptotic morphological changes were observed by Hoechst 33258 dye assay. SBC-treatment dramatically induced the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), and enhanced the enzymatic activities of caspase-9 and caspase-3 whilst hardly affecting caspase-8 activity. Furthermore, Western blotting indicated that SBC-induced apoptosis was accompanied by up-regulation of the expression of p53, Bax and the down-regulation of Bcl-2. Taken together, this study suggested that SBC exerts cytotoxic activity involving activation of mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis through p53 and Bax/Bcl-2 pathways in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. PMID:24377536

  18. Different cysteine proteinases involved in bone resorption and osteoclast formation.

    PubMed

    Brage, M; Abrahamson, M; Lindström, V; Grubb, A; Lerner, U H

    2005-06-01

    Cysteine proteinases, especially cathepsin K, play an important role in osteoclastic degradation of bone matrix proteins and the process can, consequently, be significantly inhibited by cysteine proteinase inhibitors. We have recently reported that cystatin C and other cysteine proteinase inhibitors also reduce osteoclast formation. However, it is not known which cysteine proteinase(s) are involved in osteoclast differentiation. In the present study, we compared the relative potencies of cystatins C and D as inhibitors of bone resorption in cultured mouse calvariae, osteoclastogenesis in mouse bone marrow cultures, and cathepsin K activity. Inhibition of cathepsin K activity was assessed by determining equilibrium constants for inhibitor complexes in fluorogenic substrate assays. The data demonstrate that whereas human cystatins C and D are equipotent as inhibitors of bone resorption, cystatin D is 10-fold less potent as an inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis and 200-fold less potent as an inhibitor of cathepsin K activity. A recombinant human cystatin C variant with Gly substitutions for residues Arg8, Leu9, Val10, and Trp106 did not inhibit bone resorption, had 1,000-fold decreased inhibitory effect on cathepsin K activity compared to wildtype cystatin C, but was equipotent with wildtype cystatin C as an inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis. It is concluded that (i) different cysteine proteinases are likely to be involved in bone resorption and osteoclast formation, (ii) cathepsin K may not be an exclusive target enzyme in any of the two systems, and (iii) the enzyme(s) involved in osteoclastogenesis might not be a typical papain-like cysteine proteinase.

  19. Browning inhibition mechanisms by cysteine, ascorbic acid and citric acid, and identifying PPO-catechol-cysteine reaction products.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hussein M; El-Gizawy, Ahmed M; El-Bassiouny, Rawia E I; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2015-06-01

    The titled compounds were examined as PPO inhibitors and antibrowning agents; their various mechanisms were investigated and discussed. All compounds reduced significantly both the browning process and PPO activity. Browning index gave strong correlation with PPO activity (r(2) = 0.96, n = 19) indicating that the browning process is mainly enzymatic. Ascorbic acid could reduce the formed quinone instantly to the original substrate (catechol) at high concentration (>1.5 %) while at lower concentrations acted as competitive inhibitor (KI = 0.256 ± 0.067 mM). Cysteine, at higher concentrations (≥1.0 %), reacted with the resulted quinone to give a colorless products while at the low concentrations, cysteine worked as competitive inhibitor (KI = 1.113 ± 0.176 mM). Citric acid acted only as PPO non-competitive inhibitor with KI = 2.074 ± 0.363 mM. The products of PPO-catechole-cysteine reaction could be separation and identification by LC-ESI-MS. Results indicated that the product of the enzymatic oxidation of catechol, quinone, undergoes two successive nucleophilic attacks by cysteine thiol group. Cysteine was condensed with the resulted mono and dithiocatechols to form peptide side chains.

  20. Browning inhibition mechanisms by cysteine, ascorbic acid and citric acid, and identifying PPO-catechol-cysteine reaction products.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hussein M; El-Gizawy, Ahmed M; El-Bassiouny, Rawia E I; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2015-06-01

    The titled compounds were examined as PPO inhibitors and antibrowning agents; their various mechanisms were investigated and discussed. All compounds reduced significantly both the browning process and PPO activity. Browning index gave strong correlation with PPO activity (r(2) = 0.96, n = 19) indicating that the browning process is mainly enzymatic. Ascorbic acid could reduce the formed quinone instantly to the original substrate (catechol) at high concentration (>1.5 %) while at lower concentrations acted as competitive inhibitor (KI = 0.256 ± 0.067 mM). Cysteine, at higher concentrations (≥1.0 %), reacted with the resulted quinone to give a colorless products while at the low concentrations, cysteine worked as competitive inhibitor (KI = 1.113 ± 0.176 mM). Citric acid acted only as PPO non-competitive inhibitor with KI = 2.074 ± 0.363 mM. The products of PPO-catechole-cysteine reaction could be separation and identification by LC-ESI-MS. Results indicated that the product of the enzymatic oxidation of catechol, quinone, undergoes two successive nucleophilic attacks by cysteine thiol group. Cysteine was condensed with the resulted mono and dithiocatechols to form peptide side chains. PMID:26028748

  1. Control of active sites in selective flocculation: I -- Mathematical model

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M.; Prakash, T.S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Heteroflocculation has been determined to be another major reason for loss in selectivity for flocculation process. In a mathematical model developed earlier, conditions for controlling heteroflocculation were discussed. Blocking active sites to control selective adsorption of a flocculant oil a desirable solid surface is discussed. It has been demonstrated that the lower molecular weight fraction of a flocculant which is incapable of flocculating the particles is an efficient site blocking agent. The major application of selective flocculation has been in mineral processing but many potential uses exist in biological and other colloidal systems. These include purification of ceramic powders, separating hazardous solids from chemical waste, and removal of deleterious components from paper pulp.

  2. Identification of papain-like cysteine proteases from the bovine piroplasm Babesia bigemina and evolutionary relationship of piroplasms C1 family of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Martins, Tiago M; do Rosário, Virgílio E; Domingos, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases have been shown to have essential roles in parasitic protozoa and are under study as promising drug targets. Five genes were identified by sequence similarity search to be homologous to the cysteine protease family in the ongoing Babesia bigemina genome sequencing project database and were compared with the annotated genes from the complete bovine piroplasm genomes of Babesia bovis, Theileria annulata, and Theileria parva. Multiple genome alignments and sequence analysis were used to evaluate the molecular evolution events that occurred in the C1 family of cysteine proteases in these piroplasms of veterinary importance. BbiCPL1, one of the newly identified cysteine protease genes in the B. bigemina genome was expressed in Escherichia coli and shows activity against peptide substrates. Considerable differences were observed in the cysteine protease family between Babesia and Theileria genera, and this may partially explain the diverse infection mechanisms of these tick-borne diseases. PMID:20655912

  3. The antihypertensive effect of cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Vasdev, Sudesh; Singal, Pawan; Gill, Vicki

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Individuals with hypertension are at an increased risk for stroke, heart disease and kidney failure. Essential hypertension results from a combination of genetic and lifestyle factors. One such lifestyle factor is diet, and its role in the control of blood pressure has come under much scrutiny. Just as increased salt and sugar are known to elevate blood pressure, other dietary factors may have antihypertensive effects. Studies including the Optimal Macronutrient Intake to Prevent Heart Disease (OmniHeart) study, Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT), International Study of Salt and Blood Pressure (INTERSALT) and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) study have demonstrated an inverse relationship between dietary protein and blood pressure. One component of dietary protein that may partially account for its antihypertensive effect is the nonessential amino acid cysteine. Studies in hypertensive humans and animal models of hypertension have shown that N-acetylcysteine, a stable cysteine analogue, lowers blood pressure, which substantiates this idea. Cysteine may exert its antihypertensive effects directly or through its storage form, glutathione, by decreasing oxidative stress, improving insulin resistance and glucose metabolism, lowering advanced glycation end products, and modulating levels of nitric oxide and other vasoactive molecules. Therefore, adopting a balanced diet containing cysteine-rich proteins may be a beneficial lifestyle choice for individuals with hypertension. An example of such a diet is the DASH diet, which is low in salt and saturated fat; includes whole grains, poultry, fish and nuts; and is rich in vegetables, fruits and low-fat dairy products. PMID:22477470

  4. Active-Site-Accessible, Porphyrinic Metal;#8722;Organic Framework Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Omar K.; Shultz, Abraham M.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2012-02-06

    On account of their structural similarity to cofactors found in many metallo-enzymes, metalloporphyrins are obvious potential building blocks for catalytically active, metal-organic framework (MOF) materials. While numerous porphyrin-based MOFs have already been described, versions featuring highly accessible active sites and permanent microporosity are remarkably scarce. Indeed, of the more than 70 previously reported porphyrinic MOFs, only one has been shown to be both permanently microporous and contain internally accessible active sites for chemical catalysis. Attempts to generalize the design approach used in this single successful case have failed. Reported here, however, is the synthesis of an extended family of MOFs that directly incorporate a variety of metalloporphyrins (specifically Al{sup 3+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Pd{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 3+}, and Fe{sup 3+} complexes). These robust porphyrinic materials (RPMs) feature large channels and readily accessible active sites. As an illustrative example, one of the manganese-containing RPMs is shown to be catalytically competent for the oxidation of alkenes and alkanes.

  5. Bromopyruvate, an active site-directed inactivator of E. coli 2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate(KHG) aldolase, modifies glutamic acid residue-45

    SciTech Connect

    Vlahos, C.J.; Dekker, E.E.

    1987-05-01

    E. coli KHG-aldolase (2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate in equilibrium pyruvate + glyoxylate), a novel trimeric Class I aldolase, requires one active-site lysine residue (Lys 133)/subunit for Schiff-base formation as well as one arginine residue (Arg 49)/subunit for catalytic activity. The substrate analog, 3-bromopyruvate (BRPY), causes a time- and concentration-dependent loss of KHG-aldolase activity. This inactivation is regarded as active site-directed since: (a) BRPY modification results in complete loss of enzymatic activity; (b) saturation kinetics are exhibited, suggesting that a reversible complex is formed between the aldolase and BRPY prior to the rate-limiting inactivation step; (c) over 90% of the initial aldolase activity is protected by either substrate, pyruvate or KHG; (d) 1.1 mol of /sup 14/C-BRPY is bound/enzyme subunit. Peptide isolation and sequencing show that the incorporated radioactivity is associated with residue Glu-45. Denaturation of the enzyme with guanidine x HCl following treatment with excess /sup 14/C-BRPY allows for the incorporation of carbon-14 at Cys-159 and Cys-180 as well. The presence of pyruvate protects Glu-45 from being esterified but does not prevent the alkylation of the two cysteine residues. These results suggest that Glu-45 is essential for the catalytic activity of E. coli KHG-aldolase, most likely functioning as the active-site amphoteric proton donor/acceptor moiety that is involved in the overall mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by this enzyme.

  6. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  7. Chemoproteomic Strategy to Quantitatively Monitor Transnitrosation Uncovers Functionally Relevant S-Nitrosation Sites on Cathepsin D and HADH2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yani; Wynia-Smith, Sarah L; Couvertier, Shalise M; Kalous, Kelsey S; Marletta, Michael A; Smith, Brian C; Weerapana, Eranthie

    2016-06-23

    S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is an endogenous transnitrosation donor involved in S-nitrosation of a variety of cellular proteins, thereby regulating diverse protein functions. Quantitative proteomic methods are necessary to establish which cysteine residues are most sensitive to GSNO-mediated transnitrosation. Here, a competitive cysteine-reactivity profiling strategy was implemented to quantitatively measure the sensitivity of >600 cysteine residues to transnitrosation by GSNO. This platform identified a subset of cysteine residues with a high propensity for GSNO-mediated transnitrosation. Functional characterization of previously unannotated S-nitrosation sites revealed that S-nitrosation of a cysteine residue distal to the 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase type 2 (HADH2) active site impaired catalytic activity. Similarly, S-nitrosation of a non-catalytic cysteine residue in the lysosomal aspartyl protease cathepsin D (CTSD) inhibited proteolytic activation. Together, these studies revealed two previously uncharacterized cysteine residues that regulate protein function, and established a chemical-proteomic platform with capabilities to determine substrate specificity of other cellular transnitrosation agents.

  8. Chemoproteomic Strategy to Quantitatively Monitor Transnitrosation Uncovers Functionally Relevant S-Nitrosation Sites on Cathepsin D and HADH2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yani; Wynia-Smith, Sarah L; Couvertier, Shalise M; Kalous, Kelsey S; Marletta, Michael A; Smith, Brian C; Weerapana, Eranthie

    2016-06-23

    S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is an endogenous transnitrosation donor involved in S-nitrosation of a variety of cellular proteins, thereby regulating diverse protein functions. Quantitative proteomic methods are necessary to establish which cysteine residues are most sensitive to GSNO-mediated transnitrosation. Here, a competitive cysteine-reactivity profiling strategy was implemented to quantitatively measure the sensitivity of >600 cysteine residues to transnitrosation by GSNO. This platform identified a subset of cysteine residues with a high propensity for GSNO-mediated transnitrosation. Functional characterization of previously unannotated S-nitrosation sites revealed that S-nitrosation of a cysteine residue distal to the 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase type 2 (HADH2) active site impaired catalytic activity. Similarly, S-nitrosation of a non-catalytic cysteine residue in the lysosomal aspartyl protease cathepsin D (CTSD) inhibited proteolytic activation. Together, these studies revealed two previously uncharacterized cysteine residues that regulate protein function, and established a chemical-proteomic platform with capabilities to determine substrate specificity of other cellular transnitrosation agents. PMID:27291402

  9. Cysteine dietary supplementation reverses the decrease in mitochondrial ROS production at complex I induced by methionine restriction.

    PubMed

    Gomez, A; Gomez, J; Lopez Torres, M; Naudi, A; Mota-Martorell, N; Pamplona, R; Barja, G

    2015-06-01

    It has been described that dietary cysteine reverses many of the beneficial changes induced by methionine restriction in aging rodents. In this investigation male Wistar rats were subjected to diets low in methionine, supplemented with cysteine, or simultaneously low in methionine and supplemented with cysteine. The results obtained in liver showed that cysteine supplementation reverses the decrease in mitochondrial ROS generation induced by methionine restriction at complex I. Methionine restriction also decreased various markers of oxidative and non-oxidative stress on mitochondrial proteins which were not reversed by cysteine. Instead, cysteine supplementation also lowered protein damage in association with decreases in mTOR activation. The results of the present study add the decrease in mitochondrial ROS production to the various beneficial changes induced by methionine restriction that are reversed by cysteine dietary supplementation.

  10. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  11. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  12. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Hicks, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from April 1991 through September 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations (SWO) and the Environmental Sciences Division, both of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level (radioactive) waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. A new set of action levels was developed on the basis of a statistical analysis of background contamination. These new action levels have been used to evaluate results in this report. Results of ASEMP monitoring continue to demonstrate that no LLW (except [sup 3]H) is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II, which began in early FY 1991, was >90% complete at the end of September 1991. Results of sampling of groundwater and surface waters is presented.

  13. Inhibition and active-site modelling of prolidase.

    PubMed

    King, G F; Crossley, M J; Kuchel, P W

    1989-03-15

    Consideration of the active-site model of prolidase led us to examine azetidine, pyrrolidine and piperidine substrate analogs as potential in vivo inhibitors of the enzyme. One of these, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-proline, was shown to be a potent competitive inhibitor of porcine kidney prolidase (Ki = 90 microM); its rapid protein-mediated permeation of human and sheep erythrocytes suggests that it may be effective in vivo. The higher homolog, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-pipecolic acid, was also a potent inhibitor of the enzyme while the antihypertensive drugs, captopril and enalaprilat, were shown to have mild and no inhibitory effects, respectively. Analysis of inhibitor action and consideration of X-ray crystallographic data of relevant Mn2+ complexes allowed the active-site model of prolidase to be further refined; a new model is presented in which the substrate acts as a bidentate ligand towards the active-site manganous ion. Various aspects of the new model help to explain why Mn2+ has been 'chosen' by the enzyme in preference to other biologically available metal ions. PMID:2924773

  14. Mutant form C115H of Clostridium sporogenes methionine γ-lyase efficiently cleaves S-Alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides to antibacterial thiosulfinates.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Vitalia V; Anufrieva, Natalya V; Revtovich, Svetlana V; Chernov, Alexander S; Telegin, Georgii B; Morozova, Elena A; Demidkina, Tatyana V

    2016-10-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent methionine γ-lyase (MGL) catalyzes the β-elimination reaction of S-alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides to thiosulfinates, which possess antimicrobial activity. Partial inactivation of the enzyme in the course of the reaction occurs due to oxidation of active site cysteine 115 conserved in bacterial MGLs. In this work, the C115H mutant form of Clostridium sporogenes MGL was prepared and the steady-state kinetic parameters of the enzyme were determined. The substitution results in an increase in the catalytic efficiency of the mutant form towards S-substituted l-cysteine sulfoxides compared to the wild type enzyme. We used a sulfoxide/enzyme system to generate antibacterial activity in situ. Two-component systems composed of the mutant enzyme and three S-substituted l-cysteine sulfoxides were demonstrated to be effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and three clinical isolates from mice. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(10):830-835, 2016. PMID:27647488

  15. Mutant form C115H of Clostridium sporogenes methionine γ-lyase efficiently cleaves S-Alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides to antibacterial thiosulfinates.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Vitalia V; Anufrieva, Natalya V; Revtovich, Svetlana V; Chernov, Alexander S; Telegin, Georgii B; Morozova, Elena A; Demidkina, Tatyana V

    2016-10-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent methionine γ-lyase (MGL) catalyzes the β-elimination reaction of S-alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides to thiosulfinates, which possess antimicrobial activity. Partial inactivation of the enzyme in the course of the reaction occurs due to oxidation of active site cysteine 115 conserved in bacterial MGLs. In this work, the C115H mutant form of Clostridium sporogenes MGL was prepared and the steady-state kinetic parameters of the enzyme were determined. The substitution results in an increase in the catalytic efficiency of the mutant form towards S-substituted l-cysteine sulfoxides compared to the wild type enzyme. We used a sulfoxide/enzyme system to generate antibacterial activity in situ. Two-component systems composed of the mutant enzyme and three S-substituted l-cysteine sulfoxides were demonstrated to be effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and three clinical isolates from mice. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(10):830-835, 2016.

  16. Endogenous H2O2 produced by Streptococcus pneumoniae controls FabF activity.

    PubMed

    Benisty, Rachel; Cohen, Aharon Yehonatan; Feldman, Alexandra; Cohen, Zvi; Porat, Nurith

    2010-09-01

    FabF elongation condensing enzyme is a critical factor in determining the spectrum of products produced by the FASII pathway. Its active site contains a critical cysteine-thiol residue, which is a plausible target for oxidation by H2O2. Streptococcus pneumoniae produces exceptionally high levels of H2O2, mainly through the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-P via pyruvate oxidase (SpxB). We present evidence showing that endogenous H2O2 inhibits FabF activity by specifically oxidizing its active site cysteine-thiol residue. Thiol trapping methods revealed that one of the three FabF cysteines in the wild-type strain was oxidized, whereas in an spxB mutant, defective in H2O2 production, none of the cysteines was oxidized, indicating that the difference in FabF redox state originated from endogenous H2O2. In vitro exposure of the spxB mutant to various H2O2 concentrations further confirmed that only one cysteine residue was susceptible to oxidation. By blocking FabF active site cysteine with cerulenin we show that the oxidized cysteine was the catalytic one. Inhibition of FabF activity by either H2O2 or cerulenin resulted in altered membrane fatty acid composition. We conclude that FabF activity is inhibited by H2O2 produced by S. pneumoniae. PMID:20601114

  17. Granulosain I, a cysteine protease isolated from ripe fruits of Solanum granuloso-leprosum (Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Vallés, Diego; Bruno, Mariela; López, Laura M I; Caffini, Néstor O; Cantera, Ana María B

    2008-08-01

    A new cysteine peptidase (Granulosain I) was isolated from ripe fruits of Solanum granuloso-leprosum Dunal (Solanaceae) by means of precipitation with organic solvent and cation exchange chromatography. The enzyme showed a single band by SDS-PAGE, its molecular mass was 24,746 Da (MALDI-TOF/MS) and its isoelectric point was higher than 9.3. It showed maximum activity (more than 90%) in the pH range 7-8.6. Granulosain I was completely inhibited by E-64 and activated by the addition of cysteine or 2-mercaptoethanol, confirming its cysteinic nature. The kinetic studies carried out with PFLNA as substrate, showed an affinity (Km 0.6 mM) slightly lower than those of other known plant cysteine proteases (papain and bromelain). The N-terminal sequence of granulosain I (DRLPASVDWRGKGVLVLVKNQGQC) exhibited a close homology with other cysteine proteases belonging to the C1A family.

  18. Imaging Sites of Inhibition of Proteolysis in Pathomimetic Human Breast Cancer Cultures by Light-Activated Ruthenium Compound

    PubMed Central

    Ramalho, Suelem D.; Sharma, Rajgopal; White, Jessica K.; Aggarwal, Neha; Chalasani, Anita; Sameni, Mansoureh; Moin, Kamiar; Vieira, Paulo C.; Turro, Claudia; Kodanko, Jeremy J.; Sloane, Bonnie F.

    2015-01-01

    The cysteine protease cathepsin B has been causally linked to progression and metastasis of breast cancers. We demonstrate inhibition by a dipeptidyl nitrile inhibitor (compound 1) of cathepsin B activity and also of pericellular degradation of dye-quenched collagen IV by living breast cancer cells. To image, localize and quantify collagen IV degradation in real-time we used 3D pathomimetic breast cancer models designed to mimic the in vivo microenvironment of breast cancers. We further report the synthesis and characterization of a caged version of compound 1, [Ru(bpy)2(1)2](BF4)2 (compound 2), which can be photoactivated with visible light. Upon light activation, compound 2, like compound 1, inhibited cathepsin B activity and pericellular collagen IV degradation by the 3D pathomimetic models of living breast cancer cells, without causing toxicity. We suggest that caged inhibitor 2 is a prototype for cathepsin B inhibitors that can control both the site and timing of inhibition in cancer. PMID:26562785

  19. Cystatin D locates in the nucleus at sites of active transcription and modulates gene and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Mayorga, Gemma; Alvarez-Díaz, Silvia; Valle, Noelia; De Las Rivas, Javier; Mendes, Marta; Barderas, Rodrigo; Canals, Francesc; Tapia, Olga; Casal, J Ignacio; Lafarga, Miguel; Muñoz, Alberto

    2015-10-30

    Cystatin D is an inhibitor of lysosomal and secreted cysteine proteases. Strikingly, cystatin D has been found to inhibit proliferation, migration, and invasion of colon carcinoma cells indicating tumor suppressor activity that is unrelated to protease inhibition. Here, we demonstrate that a proportion of cystatin D locates within the cell nucleus at specific transcriptionally active chromatin sites. Consistently, transcriptomic analysis show that cystatin D alters gene expression, including that of genes encoding transcription factors such as RUNX1, RUNX2, and MEF2C in HCT116 cells. In concordance with transcriptomic data, quantitative proteomic analysis identified 292 proteins differentially expressed in cystatin D-expressing cells involved in cell adhesion, cytoskeleton, and RNA synthesis and processing. Furthermore, using cytokine arrays we found that cystatin D reduces the secretion of several protumor cytokines such as fibroblast growth factor-4, CX3CL1/fractalkine, neurotrophin 4 oncostatin-M, pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine/CCL18, and transforming growth factor B3. These results support an unanticipated role of cystatin D in the cell nucleus, controlling the transcription of specific genes involved in crucial cellular functions, which may mediate its protective action in colon cancer.

  20. Cystatin D Locates in the Nucleus at Sites of Active Transcription and Modulates Gene and Protein Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-Mayorga, Gemma; Alvarez-Díaz, Silvia; Valle, Noelia; De Las Rivas, Javier; Mendes, Marta; Barderas, Rodrigo; Canals, Francesc; Tapia, Olga; Casal, J. Ignacio; Lafarga, Miguel; Muñoz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Cystatin D is an inhibitor of lysosomal and secreted cysteine proteases. Strikingly, cystatin D has been found to inhibit proliferation, migration, and invasion of colon carcinoma cells indicating tumor suppressor activity that is unrelated to protease inhibition. Here, we demonstrate that a proportion of cystatin D locates within the cell nucleus at specific transcriptionally active chromatin sites. Consistently, transcriptomic analysis show that cystatin D alters gene expression, including that of genes encoding transcription factors such as RUNX1, RUNX2, and MEF2C in HCT116 cells. In concordance with transcriptomic data, quantitative proteomic analysis identified 292 proteins differentially expressed in cystatin D-expressing cells involved in cell adhesion, cytoskeleton, and RNA synthesis and processing. Furthermore, using cytokine arrays we found that cystatin D reduces the secretion of several protumor cytokines such as fibroblast growth factor-4, CX3CL1/fractalkine, neurotrophin 4 oncostatin-M, pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine/CCL18, and transforming growth factor B3. These results support an unanticipated role of cystatin D in the cell nucleus, controlling the transcription of specific genes involved in crucial cellular functions, which may mediate its protective action in colon cancer. PMID:26364852

  1. Quantification of oxidative post-translational modifications of cysteine thiols of p21ras associated with redox modulation of activity using isotope-coded affinity tags (ICAT) and mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sethuraman, Mahadevan; Clavreul, Nicolas; Huang, Hua; McComb, Mark E; Costello, Catherine E; Cohen, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    p21ras GTPase is the protein product of the most commonly mutated human oncogene and has been identified as a target for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). Post-translational modification of reactive thiols, by reversible S-glutathiolation and S-nitrosation, and potentially also by irreversible oxidation, may have significant effects on p21ras activity. Here we used an isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) and mass spectrometry to quantitate the reversible and irreversible oxidative post-translational thiol modifications of p21ras caused by peroxynitrite (ONOO−) or glutathione disulfide (GSSG). The activity of p21ras was significantly increased following exposure to GSSG, but not to ONOO−. The results of LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides of p21ras treated with ONOO− showed that ICAT labeling of Cys118 was decreased by 47%, whereas Cys80 was not significantly affected and was thereby shown to be less reactive. The extent of S-glutathiolation of Cys118 by GSSG was 53%, and that of the terminal cysteines was 85%, as estimated by the decrease in ICAT labeling. The changes in ICAT labeling caused by GSSG were reversible by chemical reduction, but those caused by peroxynitrite were irreversible. The quantitative changes in thiol modification caused by GSSG associated with increased activity demonstrate the potential importance of redox modulation of p21ras. PMID:17320764

  2. Evolution of New Enzymatic Function by Structural Modulation of Cysteine Reactivity in Pseudomonas fluorescens Isocyanide Hydratase*

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Madzelan, Peter; Nan, Ruth; Milkovic, Nicole M.; Wilson, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Isocyanide (formerly isonitrile) hydratase (EC 4.2.1.103) is an enzyme of the DJ-1 superfamily that hydrates isocyanides to yield the corresponding N-formamide. In order to understand the structural basis for isocyanide hydratase (ICH) catalysis, we determined the crystal structures of wild-type and several site-directed mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens ICH at resolutions ranging from 1.0 to 1.9 Å. We also developed a simple UV-visible spectrophotometric assay for ICH activity using 2-naphthyl isocyanide as a substrate. ICH contains a highly conserved cysteine residue (Cys101) that is required for catalysis and interacts with Asp17, Thr102, and an ordered water molecule in the active site. Asp17 has carboxylic acid bond lengths that are consistent with protonation, and we propose that it activates the ordered water molecule to hydrate organic isocyanides. In contrast to Cys101 and Asp17, Thr102 is tolerant of mutagenesis, and the T102V mutation results in a substrate-inhibited enzyme. Although ICH is similar to human DJ-1 (1.6 Å C-α root mean square deviation), structural differences in the vicinity of Cys101 disfavor the facile oxidation of this residue that is functionally important in human DJ-1 but would be detrimental to ICH activity. The ICH active site region also exhibits surprising conformational plasticity and samples two distinct conformations in the crystal. ICH represents a previously uncharacterized clade of the DJ-1 superfamily that possesses a novel enzymatic activity, demonstrating that the DJ-1 core fold can evolve diverse functions by subtle modulation of the environment of a conserved, reactive cysteine residue. PMID:20630867

  3. The cysteine-cluster motif of c-Yes, Lyn and FAK as a suppressive module for the kinases.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Aminur; Senga, Takeshi; Oo, Myat Lin; Hasegawa, Hitoki; Biswas, Md Helal Uddin; Mon, Naing Naing; Huang, Pengyu; Ito, Satoko; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Hamaguchi, Michinari

    2008-04-01

    The Src family of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases plays a critical role in the progression of human cancers so that the development of its specific inhibitors is important as a therapeutic tool. We previously reported that cysteine residues in the cysteine-cluster (CC) motif of v-Src were critical for the kinase inactivation by the SH-alkylating agents such as N-(9-acridinyl) maleimide (NAM), whereas other cysteine residues were dispensable. We found similar CC-motifs in other Src-family kinases and a non-Src-family kinase, FAK. In this study, we explored the function of the CC-motif in Yes, Lyn and FAK. While Src has four cysteines in the CC-motif, c-Yes and Lyn have three and two of the four cysteines, respectively. Two conserved cysteines of the Src family kinases, corresponding to Cys487 and Cys498 of Src, were essential for the resistance to the inactivation of the kinase activity by NAM, whereas the first cysteine of c-Yes, which is absent in Lyn, was less important. FAK has similar CC-motifs with two cysteines and both cysteines were again essential for the resistance to the inactivation of the kinase activity by NAM. Taken together, modification of cysteine residues of the CC-motif causes a repressor effect on the catalytic activity of the Src family kinases and FAK.

  4. Modulation of cysteine biosynthesis in chloroplasts of transgenic tobacco overexpressing cysteine synthase [O-acetylserine(thiol)-lyase].

    PubMed

    Saito, K; Kurosawa, M; Tatsuguchi, K; Takagi, Y; Murakoshi, I

    1994-11-01

    Cysteine synthase [O-acetyl-L-serine(thiol)-lyase, EC 4.2.99.8] (CSase), which is responsible for the terminal step of cysteine biosynthesis, catalyzes the formation of L-cysteine from O-acetyl-L-serine (OAS) and hydrogen sulfide. Three T-DNA vectors carrying a spinach (Spinacia oleracea) cytoplasmic CSase A cDNA (K. Saito, N. Miura, M. Yamazaki, H. Horano, I. Murakoshi [1992] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 89: 8078-8082) were constructed as follows: pCSK3F, cDNA driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S RNA promoter with a sense orientation; pCSK3R, cDNA driven by the CaMV 355 promoter with an antisense orientation; pCSK4F, cDNA fused with the sequence for chloroplast-targeting transit peptide of pea ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase small subunit driven by the CaMV 35S promoter with a sense orientation. These chimeric genes were transferred into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and self-fertilized progeny were obtained. CSase activities in cell-free extracts of pCSK3F and pCSK4F transformants were 2- to 3-fold higher than those of control and pCSK3R plants. CSase activities in chloroplasts of pCSK4F transformants were severalfold higher than those of control and pCSK3F plants, indicating that the foreign CSase protein is transported and accumulated in a functionally active form in chloroplasts of pCSK4F plants. Isolated chloroplasts of a pCSK4F transformant had a more pronounced ability to form cysteine in response to addition of OAS and sulfur compounds than those of a control plant. In particular, feeding of OAS and sulfite resulted in enhanced cysteine formation, which required photoreduction of sulfite in chloroplasts. The enhanced cysteine formation in a pCSK4F plant responding to sulfite was also observed in leaf discs. In addition, these leaf discs were partially resistant to sulfite toxicity, possibly due to metabolic detoxification of sulfite by fixing into cysteine. These results suggested that overaccumulated

  5. Druggability analysis and classification of protein tyrosine phosphatase active sites

    PubMed Central

    Ghattas, Mohammad A; Raslan, Noor; Sadeq, Asil; Al Sorkhy, Mohammad; Atatreh, Noor

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many diseases. The fact that no PTP inhibitors have reached the market so far has raised many questions about their druggability. In this study, the active sites of 17 PTPs were characterized and assessed for its ability to bind drug-like molecules. Consequently, PTPs were classified according to their druggability scores into four main categories. Only four members showed intermediate to very druggable pocket; interestingly, the rest of them exhibited poor druggability. Particularly focusing on PTP1B, we also demonstrated the influence of several factors on the druggability of PTP active site. For instance, the open conformation showed better druggability than the closed conformation, while the tight-bound water molecules appeared to have minimal effect on the PTP1B druggability. Finally, the allosteric site of PTP1B was found to exhibit superior druggability compared to the catalytic pocket. This analysis can prove useful in the discovery of new PTP inhibitors by assisting researchers in predicting hit rates from high throughput or virtual screening and saving unnecessary cost, time, and efforts via prioritizing PTP targets according to their predicted druggability. PMID:27757011

  6. Simultaneous Enrichment of Cysteine-containing Peptides and Phosphopeptides Using a Cysteine-specific Phosphonate Adaptable Tag (CysPAT) in Combination with titanium dioxide (TiO2) Chromatography*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Honggang; Haar Petersen, Martin; Ibañez-Vea, Maria; Lassen, Pernille S.; Larsen, Martin R.; Palmisano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine is a rare and conserved amino acid involved in most cellular functions. The thiol group of cysteine can be subjected to diverse oxidative modifications that regulate many physio-pathological states. In the present work, a Cysteine-specific Phosphonate Adaptable Tag (CysPAT) was synthesized to selectively label cysteine-containing peptides (Cys peptides) followed by their enrichment with titanium dioxide (TiO2) and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. The CysPAT strategy was developed using a synthetic peptide, a standard protein and subsequently the strategy was applied to protein lysates from Hela cells, achieving high specificity and enrichment efficiency. In particular, for Cys proteome analysis, the method led to the identification of 7509 unique Cys peptides from 500 μg of HeLa cell lysate starting material. Furthermore, the method was developed to simultaneously enrich Cys peptides and phosphorylated peptides. This strategy was applied to SILAC labeled Hela cells subjected to 5 min epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation. In total, 10440 unique reversibly modified Cys peptides (3855 proteins) and 7339 unique phosphopeptides (2234 proteins) were simultaneously identified from 250 μg starting material. Significant regulation was observed in both phosphorylation and reversible Cys modification of proteins involved in EGFR signaling. Our data indicates that EGF stimulation can activate the well-known phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream signaling molecules, such as mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK1 and MAPK3), however, it also leads to substantial modulation of reversible cysteine modifications in numerous proteins. Several protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) showed a reduction of the catalytic Cys site in the conserved putative phosphatase HC(X)5R motif indicating an activation and subsequent de-phosphorylation of proteins involved in the EGF signaling pathway. Overall, the CysPAT strategy is a straight forward, easy and promising

  7. [Functional groups in the alpha-galactosidase active site in Cladosporium cladosporioides].

    PubMed

    Malanchuk, V M; Buglova, T T; Varbanets, L D; Zakharova, I Ia

    2000-01-01

    The activity of alpha-galactosidase isolated from culture fluid of micromycete Cladosporium cladosporioides (Fres.) de Vries 16,038 has been studied as affected by cations, anions and specific chemical reagents (p-chlormercurybenzoate (p-ChMB), iodacetamide, N-ethylmaleimide, L-cysteine, dithiotreitol, beta-mercaptoethanol, EDTA, o-phenanthroline, sodium azide). It has been established that Ag+ ions inhibited competitively alpha-galactosidase at pH 4.0 and 6.0, the inhibition constants (Ki) made 3.6 x 10(-5) M and 4.3 x 10(-6) M, respectively. Galactose in concentration of 1 mM to 5 mM preserved the enzyme from the negative effect of Ag+ ions, while L-cysteine did not manifest the protective effect. Ions of Hg2+ p-ChMB inhibited noncompetitively the activity of alpha-galactosidase, Ki for Hg2+ and p-ChMB made 5.7 x 10(-7) M and 4.7 x 10(-6) M, respectively. Preincubation with galactose does not preserve alpha-galactosidase from the inhibiting effect of Ag+ and p-ChMB, but th[not readable: see text] compounds (L-cysteine, dithiotreitol, beta-mercaptoethanol) restore the enzyme activity. Participation of histidine imidazole group in the catalytic action is supposed on the basis of the inhibitory and kinetic analysis. Sulphydryl groups do not take part in the catalysis but play an important role in supporting the active conformation of the protein molecule. The groups containing the atoms of metals are absent in the alpha-galactosidase molecule.

  8. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  9. Functional characterization of enzymes involved in cysteine biosynthesis and H(2)S production in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Marciano, Daniela; Santana, Marianela; Nowicki, Cristina

    2012-10-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is expected to synthetize de novo cysteine by different routes, among which the two-step pathway involving serine acetyltransferase and cysteine synthase (CS) is comprised. Also, cystathionine β synthase (CBS) might contribute to the de novo generation of cysteine in addition to catalyze the first step of the reverse transsulfuration route producing cystathionine. However, neither the functionality of CS nor that of cystathionine γ lyase (CGL) has been assessed. Our results show that T. cruzi CS could participate notably more actively than CBS in the de novo synthesis of cysteine. Interestingly, at the protein level T. cruzi CS is more abundant in amastigotes than in epimastigotes. Unlike the mammalian homologues, T. cruzi CGL specifically cleaves cystathionine into cysteine and is unable to produce H(2)S. The expression pattern of T. cruzi CGL parallels that of CBS, which unexpectedly suggests that in addition to the de novo synthesis of cysteine, the reverse transsulfuration pathway could be operative in the mammalian and insect stages. Besides, T. cruzi CBS produces H(2)S by decomposing cysteine or via condensation of cysteine with homocysteine. The latter reaction leads to cystathionine production, and is catalyzed remarkably more efficiently than the breakdown of cysteine. In T. cruzi like in other organisms, H(2)S could exert regulatory effects on varied metabolic processes. Notably, T. cruzi seems to count on stage-specific routes involved in cysteine production, the multiple cysteine-processing alternatives could presumably reflect this parasite's high needs of reducing power for detoxification of reactive oxygen species.

  10. Structural and Immunological Characteristics of a 28-Kilodalton Cruzipain-Like Cysteine Protease of Paragonimus westermani Expressed in the Definitive Host Stage

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Doo-Hee; Chung, Joon-Yong; Chung, Young-Bae; Bahk, Young-Yil; Kang, Shin-Yong; Kong, Yoon; Cho, Seung-Yull

    2000-01-01

    A complete cDNA sequence encoding a 28-kDa cruzipain-like cysteine protease of adult Paragonimus westermani, termed Pw28CCP, was isolated from an adult cDNA library. The cDNA contained a single open reading frame of 975 bp encoding 325 amino acids, which exhibited the structural motif and domain organization characteristic of cysteine proteases of non-cathepsin Bs including a hydrophobic signal sequence, an ERFNIN motif, and essential cysteine residues as well as active sites in the mature catalytic region. Analysis of its phylogenetic position revealed that this novel enzyme belonged to the cruzipain-like cysteine proteases. The sequence of the first 13 amino acids predicted from the mature domain of Pw28CCP was in accord with that determined from the native 28-kDa enzyme purified from the adult worm. Expression of Pw28CCP was observed specifically in juvenile and adult worms, with a location in the intestinal epithelium, suggesting that this enzyme could be secreted and involved in nutrient uptake and immune modulation. The recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli was used to assess antigenicity by immunoblotting with sera from patients with active paragonimiasis and from those with other parasitic infections. The resulting sensitivity of 86.2% (56 of 65 samples) and specificity of 98% (147 of 150 samples) suggest its potential as an antigen for use in immunodiagnosis. PMID:11063501

  11. Glutathione and cysteine biosynthesis in two varieties of Abelmoschus esculentus in response to mine spoil.

    PubMed

    Arya, Shashi K; Khalique, Shaista; Kumar, Sanjay; Roy, B K

    2008-01-01

    The extent of accumulation of some heavy metals and glutathione and cysteine levels in the roots and aerial plant parts in two genotypically different varieties of A. esculentus (KS404 and BO2) exposed to mine spoil were investigated. Glutathione (GSH) level in both the varieties on control sites increased from basal level to 155.15 nmol g(-1) dry weight (d.wt.), almost 1.5 fold on 30 day and attained a plateau within 60 day Mine spoil exposure of both the varieties decreased glutathione 1.13 fold (89.2 nmol g(-1) dry weight) during 60 day from its basal level. GSH concentration in shoots of these varieties increased accompanying growth contrary to roots where it finally declined 2 fold. Cysteine content in control plants increased 2 fold (31.6 nmol g(-1) dry weight) on 30 day and finally declined 1.38 fold (22.35 nmol g(-1) dry weight, at 60 day). Both the varieties, when exposed to mine spoil, showed enhanced cysteine content almost 2 fold during 30 day (50.95 nmol g(-1) dry weight) but failed to increase further Forshoots in both the varieties challenged with mine spoil, cysteine maxima reached late (15.2 nmol g(-1) dry weight, at 40 day) relative to control but the levels declined subsequently (11.85 nmol g(-l) dry weight). Contrary to GSH, cysteine content in roots of both the varieties responded positively to mine spoil as apparent from the 2.23 fold increase during 30 d than basal level although it lowered to a level of 12.85 nmol g(-1) dry weight finally at 60 day. Both the varieties accumulated almost maximum level of selected cations (Fe > Mn> Zn> Cu > Ni) during 30 day, but BO2 variety was significantly superior in this regard. Invariably high accumulation of such cations in roots over shoots indicated accumulation, retention or restricted translocation from root to shoot. The metal share of the edible part was just 6% of the plant load. Thus, present work reflects a genotypic differences in metal accumulation and that affected the major non

  12. Roles of histidines 154 and 189 and aspartate 139 in the active site of serine acetyltransferase from Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Guan, Rong; Roderick, Steven L; Huang, Bin; Cook, Paul F

    2008-06-17

    A crystal structure of serine acetyltransferase (SAT) with cysteine bound in the serine subsite of the active site shows that both H154 and H189 are within hydrogen-bonding distance to the cysteine thiol [Olsen, L. R., Huang, B., Vetting, M. W., and Roderick, S. L. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 6013 -6019]. In addition, H154 is in an apparent dyad linkage with D139. The structure suggests that H154 is the most likely catalytic general base and that H189 and D139 may also play important roles during the catalytic reaction. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to mutate each of these three residues to Asn, one at a time. The V1/Et value of all of the single mutant enzymes decreased, with the largest decrease (approximately 1240-fold) exhibited by the H154N mutant enzyme. Mutation of both histidines, H154N/H189N, gave a V1/Et approximately 23700-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme. An increase in K Ser was observed for the H189N, D139N, and H154N/H189N mutant enzymes, while the H154N mutant enzyme gave an 8-fold decrease in K Ser. For all three single mutant enzymes, V1/Et and V1/K Ser Et decrease at low pH and give a pKa of about 7, while the V1/Et of the double mutant enzyme was pH independent. The solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V 1 and V1/K Ser decreased compared to wild type for the H154N mutant enzyme and increased for the H189N mutant enzyme but was about the same as that of wild type for D139N and H154N/H189N. Data suggest that H154, H189, and D139 play different catalytic roles for SAT. H154 likely serves as a general base, accepting a proton from the beta-hydroxyl of serine as the tetrahedral intermediate is formed upon nucleophilic attack on the thioester carbonyl of acetyl-CoA. However, activity is not completely lost upon elimination of H154, and thus, H189 may be able to serve as a backup general base at a lower efficiency compared to H154; it also aids in binding and orienting the serine substrate. Aspartate 139, in dyad linkage with

  13. The protective effects of endogenous hydrogen sulfide modulator, S-propargyl-cysteine, on high glucose-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes: A novel mechanism mediated by the activation of Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hebei; Mao, Yicheng; Tan, Bo; Luo, Shanshan; Zhu, Yizhun

    2015-08-15

    S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC) is a novel synthetic molecule exerting antioxidant effects via elevating generation of endogenous H2S. Our study aimed to elucidate possible antioxidant mechanisms of SPRC in hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. H9C2 cells were treated with SPRC or NaHS at the indicated concentration before being treated with high glucose for 48h. Follow-up experiments were based on detailed description given in Section 2. SD rats were injected with Streptozocin (STZ) to induce diabetes as previously reported. Diabetic rats were administrated with SPRC, NaHS or solution respectively for one week before the rats were killed for follow-up experiments. Our work found that SPRC remarkably attenuated high glucose induced generation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis in H9C2 cells. SPRC increased stability and nuclear translocation of Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), up-regulated expression of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) and interfered with the interaction between Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1) and Nrf2. SPRC activated Nrf2 via Cystathionase-γ-lyase (CSE) and Akt pathway. CSE inhibitor PAG and Akt inhibitor LY294002 could reverse the protective effects of SPRC. Knockdown of Nrf2 by shRNA also blocked SPRC up-regulated expression of CSE. Similar results of protein expression and hypoglycemic activity of SPRC were observed in STZ induced diabetic rats.

  14. Electrostatic fields in the active sites of lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Sun, D P; Liao, D I; Remington, S J

    1989-07-01

    Considerable experimental evidence is in support of several aspects of the mechanism that has been proposed for the catalytic activity of lysozyme. However, the enzymatically catalyzed hydrolysis of polysaccharides proceeds over 5 orders of magnitude faster than that of model compounds that mimic the configuration of the substrate in the active site of the enzyme. Although several possible explanations for this rate enhancement have been discussed elsewhere, a definitive mechanism has not emerged. Here we report striking results obtained by classical electrodynamics, which suggest that bond breakage and the consequent separation of charge in lysozyme is promoted by a large electrostatic field across the active site cleft, produced in part by a very asymmetric distribution of charged residues on the enzyme surface. Lysozymes unrelated in amino acid sequence have similar distributions of charged residues and electric fields. The results reported here suggest that the electrostatic component of the rate enhancement is greater than 9 kcal.mol-1. Thus, electrostatic interactions may play a more important role in the enzymatic mechanism than has generally been appreciated.

  15. Histidine at the active site of Neurospora tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Pfiffner, E; Lerch, K

    1981-10-13

    The involvement of histidyl residues as potential ligands to the binuclear active-site copper of Neurospora tyrosinase was explored by dye-sensitized photooxidation. The enzymatic activity of the holoenzyme was shown to be unaffected by exposure to light in the presence of methylene blue; however, irradiation of the apoenzyme under the same conditions led to a progressive loss of its ability to be reactivated with Cu2+. This photoinactivation was paralleled by a decrease in the histidine content whereas the number of histidyl residues in the holoenzyme remained constant. Copper measurements of photooxidized, reconstituted apoenzyme demonstrated the loss of binding of one copper atom per mole of enzyme as a consequence of photosensitized oxidation of three out of nine histidine residues. Their sequence positions were determined by a comparison of the relative yields of the histidine containing peptides of photooxidized holo- and apotyrosinases. The data obtained show the preferential modification of histidyl residues 188, 193, and 289 and suggest that they constitute metal ligands to one of the two active-site copper atoms. Substitution of copper by cobalt was found to afford complete protection of the histidyl residues from being modified by dye-sensitized photooxidation. PMID:6458322

  16. The intrinsic cysteine and histidine residues of the anti-Salmonella antibody Se155-4: a model for the introduction of new functions into antibody-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Young, N Martin; Watson, David C; Cunningham, Anna M; MacKenzie, C Roger

    2014-10-01

    New functions can be incorporated into anti-hapten or anti-protein antibodies by mutating selected residues in the binding-site region either to Cys, to allow alkylation with reagents bearing the desired functional groups, or to His, to create metal-binding sites or to make antigen binding pH-sensitive. However, choosing suitable sites for these mutations has been hampered by the lack of antibodies with these features, to serve as models. Remarkably, the anti-carbohydrate antibody Se155-4, specific for the Salmonella group B lipopolysaccharide, already has a Cys and two pairs of His residues close to the antigen-binding pocket in its structure, and shows pH-dependent antigen binding. We therefore investigated modification of its Cys94L in an scFv version of the antibody with the aims of creating a 'reagentless' fluorescent sensor and attaching a metal-binding group that might confer lyase activity. These groups were successfully introduced, as judged by mass spectrometry, and had only slightly reduced antigen binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The fluorescent product was sensitive to addition of antigen in a solution format, unlike a modification of a more distant Cys introduced into the VH CDR4 loop. Two other routes to modulate antigen binding were also explored, metal binding by the His pair alongside the antigen-binding pocket and insertions into CDR4 to extend the antigen-contact area. His residues adjacent to the antigen-binding pocket bound copper, causing a 5-fold decrease in antigen binding. In CDR4 of the VH domain, the preferred insert length was four residues, which gave stable antigen-binding products but did not improve overall antigen affinity.

  17. Specific Prenylation of Tomato Rab Proteins by Geranylgeranyl Type-II Transferase Requires a Conserved Cysteine-Cysteine Motif.

    PubMed

    Yalovsky, S.; Loraine, A. E.; Gruissem, W.

    1996-04-01

    Posttranslational isoprenylation of some small GTP-binding proteins is required for their biological activity. Rab geranylgeranyl transferase (Rab GGTase) uses geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to modify Rab proteins, its only known substrates. Geranylgeranylation of Rabs is believed to promote their association with target membranes and interaction with other proteins. Plants, like other eukaryotes, contain Rab-like proteins that are associated with intracellular membranes. However, to our knowledge, the geranylgeranylation of Rab proteins has not yet been characterized from any plant source. This report presents an activity assay that allows the characterization of prenylation of Rab-like proteins in vitro, by protein extracts prepared from plants. Tomato Rab1 proteins and mammalian Rab1a were modified by geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate but not by farnesyl pyrophosphate. This modification required a conserved cysteine-cysteine motif. A mutant form lacking the cysteine-cysteine motif could not be modified, but inhibited the geranylgeranylation of its wild-type homolog. The tomato Rab proteins were modified in vitro by protein extract prepared from yeast, but failed to become modified when the protein extract was prepared from a yeast strain containing a mutant allele for the [alpha] subunit of yeast Rab GGTase (bet4 ts). These results demonstrate that plant cells, like other eukaryotes, contain Rab GGTase-like activity.

  18. Viral cysteine proteases are homologous to the trypsin-like family of serine proteases: structural and functional implications.

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, J F; Fletterick, R J

    1988-01-01

    Proteases that are encoded by animal picornaviruses and plant como- and potyviruses form a related group of cysteine-active-center enzymes that are essential for virus maturation. We show that these proteins are homologous to the family of trypsin-like serine proteases. In our model, the active-site nucleophile of the trypsin catalytic triad, Ser-195, is changed to a Cys residue in these viral proteases. The other two residues of the triad, His-57 and Asp-102, are otherwise absolutely conserved in all the viral protease sequences. Secondary structure analysis of aligned sequences suggests the location of the component strands of the twin beta-barrel trypsin fold in the viral proteases. Unexpectedly, the 2a and 3c subclasses of viral cysteine proteases are, respectively, homologous to the small and large structural subclasses of trypsin-like serine proteases. This classification allows the molecular mapping of residues from viral sequences onto related tertiary structures; we precisely identify amino acids that are strong determinants of specificity for both small and large viral cysteine proteases. Images PMID:3186696

  19. Sequence comparison, molecular modeling, and network analysis predict structural diversity in cysteine proteases from the Cape sundew, Drosera capensis.

    PubMed

    Butts, Carter T; Zhang, Xuhong; Kelly, John E; Roskamp, Kyle W; Unhelkar, Megha H; Freites, J Alfredo; Tahir, Seemal; Martin, Rachel W

    2016-01-01

    Carnivorous plants represent a so far underexploited reservoir of novel proteases with potentially useful activities. Here we investigate 44 cysteine proteases from the Cape sundew, Drosera capensis, predicted from genomic DNA sequences. D. capensis has a large number of cysteine protease genes; analysis of their sequences reveals homologs of known plant proteases, some of which are predicted to have novel properties. Many functionally significant sequence and structural features are observed, including targeting signals and occluding loops. Several of the proteases contain a new type of granulin domain. Although active site residues are conserved, the sequence identity of these proteases to known proteins is moderate to low; therefore, comparative modeling with all-atom refinement and subsequent atomistic MD-simulation is used to predict their 3D structures. The structure prediction data, as well as analysis of protein structure networks, suggest multifarious variations on the papain-like cysteine protease structural theme. This in silico methodology provides a general framework for investigating a large pool of sequences that are potentially useful for biotechnology applications, enabling informed choices about which proteins to investigate in the laboratory. PMID:27471585

  20. Crystal structure of the cysteine protease inhibitor 2 from Entamoeba histolytica: Functional convergence of a common protein fold

    SciTech Connect

    Casados-Vázquez, Luz E.; Lara-González, Samuel; Brieb, Luis G.

    2012-04-18

    Cysteine proteases (CP) are key pathogenesis and virulence determinants of protozoan parasites. Entamoeba histolytica contains at least 50 cysteine proteases; however, only three (EhCP1, EhCP2 and EhCP5) are responsible for approximately 90% of the cysteine protease activity in this parasite. CPs are expressed as inactive zymogens. Because the processed proteases are potentially cytotoxic, protozoan parasites have developed mechanisms to regulate their activity. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases (ICP) of the chagasin-like inhibitor family (MEROPS family I42) were recently identified in bacteria and protozoan parasites. E. histolytica contains two ICP-encoding genes of the chagasin-like inhibitor family. EhICP1 localizes to the cytosol, whereas EhICP2 is targeted to phagosomes. Herein, we report two crystal structures of EhICP2. The overall structure of EhICP2 consists of eight {beta}-strands and closely resembles the immunoglobulin fold. A comparison between the two crystal forms of EhICP2 indicates that the conserved BC, DE and FG loops form a flexible wedge that may block the active site of CPs. The positively charged surface of the wedge-forming loops in EhICP2 contrasts with the neutral surface of the wedge-forming loops in chagasin. We postulate that the flexibility and positive charge observed in the DE and FG loops of EhICP2 may be important to facilitate the initial binding of this inhibitor to the battery of CPs present in E. histolytica.

  1. Multiple Transport-Active Binding Sites Are Available for a Single Substrate on Human P-Glycoprotein (ABCB1)

    PubMed Central

    Chufan, Eduardo E.; Kapoor, Khyati; Sim, Hong-May; Singh, Satyakam; Talele, Tanaji T.; Durell, Stewart R.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2013-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1) is an ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter that is associated with the development of multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Pgp transports a variety of chemically dissimilar amphipathic compounds using the energy from ATP hydrolysis. In the present study, to elucidate the binding sites on Pgp for substrates and modulators, we employed site-directed mutagenesis, cell- and membrane-based assays, molecular modeling and docking. We generated single, double and triple mutants with substitutions of the Y307, F343, Q725, F728, F978 and V982 residues at the proposed drug-binding site with cys in a cysless Pgp, and expressed them in insect and mammalian cells using a baculovirus expression system. All the mutant proteins were expressed at the cell surface to the same extent as the cysless wild-type Pgp. With substitution of three residues of the pocket (Y307, Q725 and V982) with cysteine in a cysless Pgp, QZ59S-SSS, cyclosporine A, tariquidar, valinomycin and FSBA lose the ability to inhibit the labeling of Pgp with a transport substrate, [125I]-Iodoarylazidoprazosin, indicating these drugs cannot bind at their primary binding sites. However, the drugs can modulate the ATP hydrolysis of the mutant Pgps, demonstrating that they bind at secondary sites. In addition, the transport of six fluorescent substrates in HeLa cells expressing triple mutant (Y307C/Q725C/V982C) Pgp is also not significantly altered, showing that substrates bound at secondary sites are still transported. The homology modeling of human Pgp and substrate and modulator docking studies support the biochemical and transport data. In aggregate, our results demonstrate that a large flexible pocket in the Pgp transmembrane domains is able to bind chemically diverse compounds. When residues of the primary drug-binding site are mutated, substrates and modulators bind to secondary sites on the transporter and more than one transport-active binding site is available for each substrate

  2. Application of iTRAQ Reagents to Relatively Quantify the Reversible Redox State of Cysteine Residues

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, Brian; Martínez-Acedo, Pablo; Vázquez, Jesús; Padilla, C. Alicia; Sheehan, David; Bárcena, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Cysteines are one of the most rarely used amino acids, but when conserved in proteins they often play critical roles in structure, function, or regulation. Reversible cysteine modifications allow for potential redox regulation of proteins. Traditional measurement of the relative absolute quantity of a protein between two samples is not always necessarily proportional to the activity of the protein. We propose application of iTRAQ reagents in combination with a previous thiol selection method to relatively quantify the redox state of cysteines both within and between samples in a single analysis. Our method allows for the identification of the proteins, identification of redox-sensitive cysteines within proteins, and quantification of the redox status of individual cysteine-containing peptides. As a proof of principle, we applied this technique to yeast alcohol dehydrogenase-1 exposed in vitro to H2O2 and also in vivo to the complex proteome of the Gram-negative bacterium Bacillus subtilis. PMID:22844595

  3. Chicoric acid binds to two sites and decreases the activity of the YopH bacterial virulence factor

    PubMed Central

    Kuban-Jankowska, Alicja; Sahu, Kamlesh K.; Gorska, Magdalena; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Wozniak, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Chicoric acid (CA) is a phenolic compound present in dietary supplements with a large spectrum of biological properties reported ranging from antioxidant, to antiviral, to immunostimulatory properties. Due to the fact that chicoric acid promotes phagocytic activity and was reported as an allosteric inhibitor of the PTP1B phosphatase, we examined the effect of CA on YopH phosphatase from pathogenic bacteria, which block phagocytic processes of a host cell. We performed computational studies of chicoric acid binding to YopH as well as validation experiments with recombinant enzymes. In addition, we performed similar studies for caffeic and chlorogenic acids to compare the results. Docking experiments demonstrated that, from the tested compounds, only CA binds to both catalytic and secondary binding sites of YopH. Our experimental results showed that CA reduces activity of recombinant YopH phosphatase from Yersinia enterocolitica and human CD45 phosphatase. The inhibition caused by CA was irreversible and did not induce oxidation of catalytic cysteine. We proposed that inactivation of YopH induced by CA is involved with allosteric inhibition by interacting with essential regions responsible for ligand binding. PMID:26735581

  4. Isolation and characterization of a cysteine protease from the latex of Araujia hortorum fruits.

    PubMed

    Priolo, N; Morcelle del Valle, S; Arribére, M C; López, L; Caffini, N

    2000-01-01

    A new protease (araujiain h I) was purified to mass spectroscopy homogeneity from the latex of Araujia hortorum Fourn. (Asclepiadaceae) fruits by ultracentrifugation and ion exchange chromatography. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 24,031 (mass spectrometry) and an iso-electric point higher than 9.3. The optimum pH range for casein hydrolysis was 8.0-9.5. The enzyme showed remarkable caseinolytic activity at high temperatures, although its thermal stability decayed rapidly. The proteinase was activated by thiol compounds and inhibited by common thiol-blocking reagents, particularly E-64 and HgCl2, suggesting the enzyme belongs to the cysteine protease family. The concentration of active sites as determined by titration with E-64 was 3.3 microM. When assayed on N-alpha-CBZ-amino acid-p-nitrophenyl esters, the enzyme showed higher preference for the glutamine derivative, followed by those of alanine, asparagine, glycine, and leucine, in decreasing order. Partial homology (36-48%) with other plant cysteine proteinases was observed in an internal fragment obtained by Protease V8 treatment. PMID:10882171

  5. Structural Basis for Feedback and Pharmacological Inhibition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Glutamate Cysteine Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2010-04-30

    Structural characterization of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), the enzyme that catalyzes the initial, rate-limiting step in glutathione biosynthesis, has revealed many of the molecular details of substrate recognition. To further delineate the mechanistic details of this critical enzyme, we have determined the structures of two inhibited forms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCL (ScGCL), which shares significant sequence identity with the human enzyme. In vivo, GCL activity is feedback regulated by glutathione. Examination of the structure of ScGCL-glutathione complex (2.5 A; R = 19.9%, R(free) = 25.1%) indicates that the inhibitor occupies both the glutamate- and the presumed cysteine-binding site and disrupts the previously observed Mg(2+) coordination in the ATP-binding site. l-Buthionine-S-sulfoximine (BSO) is a mechanism-based inhibitor of GCL and has been used extensively to deplete glutathione in cell culture and in vivo model systems. Inspection of the ScGCL-BSO structure (2.2 A; R = 18.1%, R(free) = 23.9%) confirms that BSO is phosphorylated on the sulfoximine nitrogen to generate the inhibitory species and reveals contacts that likely contribute to transition state stabilization. Overall, these structures advance our understanding of the molecular regulation of this critical enzyme and provide additional details of the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme.

  6. Selective electrochemical determination of cysteine with a cyclotricatechylene modified carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Lee, Patricia T; Thomson, James E; Karina, Athanasia; Salter, Chris; Johnston, Colin; Davies, Stephen G; Compton, Richard G

    2015-01-01

    We report the selective electrochemical detection of cysteine in the presence of homocysteine and glutathione with the use of an electrode modified with cyclotricatechylene (CTC). A carbon electrode was first modified with cyclotriveratrylene (CTV) and then electrochemically converted into CTC. Using cyclic voltammetry, the redox activity of CTC was investigated along with its electrochemical response to cysteine and the closely related compounds, glutathione and homocysteine which are commonly found in biological media alongside cysteine. The selective detection of cysteine was achieved with the use of the electrocatalytic oxidation reaction and exploiting the different rates of reaction of each thiol with the oxidized CTC via variable scan rate studies. The analytical parameters consisting of sensitivity, range of linear detection, and limit of detection were determined for selective cysteine detection in phosphate buffer solution and tissue culture media where the sensitivity of the system is ca. 0.023 μA μM(-1) and ca. 0.031 μA μM(-1) with a limit of detection of ca. 0.6 μM and ca. 0.9 μM for buffer solution and tissue culture media respectively. Practical assessment of this analytical method was carried out in mixed solutions containing a combination of cysteine, homocysteine and glutathione in both media. The determined results agree well with the added cysteine content. This work presents a novel way of utilizing CTC into detecting cysteine, and is well-suited for bio-marker sensing.

  7. Polycarbophil-cysteine conjugates as platforms for oral polypeptide delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Bernkop-Schnürch, A; Thaler, S C

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential of polycarbophil-cysteine conjugates as carrier systems for orally administered peptide and protein drugs. Mediated by a carbodiimide, cysteine was covalently attached to polycarbophil. The properties of resulting conjugates, displaying 35-50 microM thiol groups per gram of polymer, to bind polypeptides and to inhibit pancreatic proteases was evaluated in vitro. Results demonstrated that only some polypeptides are immobilized to the polycarbophil-cysteine conjugate. Due to the covalent attachment of cysteine to polycarbophil, the inhibitory effect of the polymer toward carboxypeptidase A (EC 3.4. 17.1) and carboxypeptidase B (EC 3.4.17.2) could be significantly (p < 0.05) improved. As the zinc binding affinity of polycarbophil could be improved by the covalent attachment of cysteine, the raised inhibitory effect seems to be based on the complexation of this divalent cation from the enzyme structure. Whereas the covalent attachment of cysteine on polycarbophil had no influence on the enzymatic activity of trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) and elastase (EC 3.4.21. 36), the inhibitory effect of the polymer-cysteine conjugate toward chymotrypsin (EC 3.4.21.1) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than that of the unmodified polymer. Because of these inhibitory features, polycarbophil-cysteine conjugates seem to be a promising tool in protecting orally administered therapeutic polypeptides, which are not bound to the polymer, from presystemic metabolism in the intestine.

  8. The copper active site of CBM33 polysaccharide oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Hemsworth, Glyn R; Taylor, Edward J; Kim, Robbert Q; Gregory, Rebecca C; Lewis, Sally J; Turkenburg, Johan P; Parkin, Alison; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2013-04-24

    The capacity of metal-dependent fungal and bacterial polysaccharide oxygenases, termed GH61 and CBM33, respectively, to potentiate the enzymatic degradation of cellulose opens new possibilities for the conversion of recalcitrant biomass to biofuels. GH61s have already been shown to be unique metalloenzymes containing an active site with a mononuclear copper ion coordinated by two histidines, one of which is an unusual τ-N-methylated N-terminal histidine. We now report the structural and spectroscopic characterization of the corresponding copper CBM33 enzymes. CBM33 binds copper with high affinity at a mononuclear site, significantly stabilizing the enzyme. X-band EPR spectroscopy of Cu(II)-CBM33 shows a mononuclear type 2 copper site with the copper ion in a distorted axial coordination sphere, into which azide will coordinate as evidenced by the concomitant formation of a new absorption band in the UV/vis spectrum at 390 nm. The enzyme's three-dimensional structure contains copper, which has been photoreduced to Cu(I) by the incident X-rays, confirmed by X-ray absorption/fluorescence studies of both aqueous solution and intact crystals of Cu-CBM33. The single copper(I) ion is ligated in a T-shaped configuration by three nitrogen atoms from two histidine side chains and the amino terminus, similar to the endogenous copper coordination geometry found in fungal GH61. PMID:23540833

  9. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors via their allosteric binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, J; Bacáková, L; Lisá, V; el-Fakahany, E E; Tucek, S

    1996-01-01

    Ligands that bind to the allosteric-binding sites on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors alter the conformation of the classical-binding sites of these receptors and either diminish or increase their affinity for muscarinic agonists and classical antagonists. It is not known whether the resulting conformational change also affects the interaction between the receptors and the G proteins. We have now found that the muscarinic receptor allosteric modulators alcuronium, gallamine, and strychnine (acting in the absence of an agonist) alter the synthesis of cAMP in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the M2 or the M4 subtype of muscarinic receptors in the same direction as the agonist carbachol. In addition, most of their effects on the production of inositol phosphates in CHO cells expressing the M1 or the M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes are also similar to (although much weaker than) those of carbachol. The agonist-like effects of the allosteric modulators are not observed in CHO cells that have not been transfected with the gene for any of the subtypes of muscarinic receptors. The effects of alcuronium on the formation of cAMP and inositol phosphates are not prevented by the classical muscarinic antagonist quinuclidinyl benzilate. These observations demonstrate for the first time that the G protein-mediated functional responses of muscarinic receptors can be evoked not only from their classical, but also from their allosteric, binding sites. This represents a new mechanism of receptor activation. PMID:8710935

  10. Mimicking enzymatic active sites on surfaces for energy conversion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gutzler, Rico; Stepanow, Sebastian; Grumelli, Doris; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Kern, Klaus

    2015-07-21

    Metal-organic supramolecular chemistry on surfaces has matured to a point where its underlying growth mechanisms are well understood and structures of defined coordination environments of metal atoms can be synthesized in a controlled and reproducible procedure. With surface-confined molecular self-assembly, scientists have a tool box at hand which can be used to prepare structures with desired properties, as for example a defined oxidation number and spin state of the transition metal atoms within the organic matrix. From a structural point of view, these coordination sites in the supramolecular structure resemble the catalytically active sites of metallo-enzymes, both characterized by metal centers coordinated to organic ligands. Several chemical reactions take place at these embedded metal ions in enzymes and the question arises whether these reactions also take place using metal-organic networks as catalysts. Mimicking the active site of metal atoms and organic ligands of enzymes in artificial systems is the key to understanding the selectivity and efficiency of enzymatic reactions. Their catalytic activity depends on various parameters including the charge and spin configuration in the metal ion, but also on the organic environment, which can stabilize intermediate reaction products, inhibits catalytic deactivation, and serves mostly as a transport channel for the reactants and products and therefore ensures the selectivity of the enzyme. Charge and spin on the transition metal in enzymes depend on the one hand on the specific metal element, and on the other hand on its organic coordination environment. These two parameters can carefully be adjusted in surface confined metal-organic networks, which can be synthesized by virtue of combinatorial mixing of building synthons. Different organic ligands with varying functional groups can be combined with several transition metals and spontaneously assemble into ordered networks. The catalytically active metal

  11. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-06-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work.

  12. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  13. Spectroscopic Definition of the Ferroxidase Site in M Ferritin: Comparison of Binuclear Substrate vs. Cofactor Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jennifer K.; Liu, Xiaofeng S.; Tosha, Takehiko; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2008-01-01

    Maxi ferritins, 24 subunit protein nanocages, are essential in humans, plants, bacteria, and other animals for the concentration and storage of iron as hydrated ferric oxide, while minimizing free radical generation or use by pathogens. Formation of the precursors to these ferric oxides is catalyzed at a non-heme biferrous substrate site, which has some parallels with the cofactor sites in other biferrous enzymes. A combination of circular dichroism (CD), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH MCD) has been used to probe Fe(II) binding to the substrate active site in frog M ferritin. These data determined that the active site within each subunit consists of two inequivalent five-coordinate (5C) ferrous centers that are weakly anti-ferromagnetically coupled, consistent with a μ-1,3 carboxylate bridge. The active site ligand set is unusual and likely includes a terminal water bound to each Fe(II) center. The Fe(II) ions bind to the active sites in a concerted manner, and cooperativity among the sites in each subunit is observed, potentially providing a mechanism for the control of ferritin iron loading. Differences in geometric and electronic structure – including a weak ligand field, availability of two water ligands at the biferrous substrate site, and the single carboxylate bridge in ferritin – coincide with the divergent reaction pathways observed between this substrate site and the previously studied cofactor active sites. PMID:18576633

  14. An active-site lysine in avian liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase

    SciTech Connect

    Guidinger, P.F.; Nowak, T. )

    1991-09-10

    The participation of lysine in the catalysis by avian liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was studied by chemical modification and by a characterization of the modified enzyme. The rate of inactivation by 2,4-pentanedione is pseudo-first-order and linearly dependent on reagent concentration with a second-order rate constant of 0.36 {plus minus} 0.025 M{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}. Inactivation by pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate of the reversible reaction catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase follows bimolecular kinetics with a second-order rate constant of 7,700 {plus minus} 860 m{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}. Treatment of the enzyme or one lysine residue modified concomitant with 100% loss in activity. A stoichiometry of 1:1 is observed when either the reversible or the irreversible reactions catalyzed by the enzyme are monitored. A study of k{sub obs} vs pH suggests this active-site lysine has a pK{sub a} of 8.1 and a pH-independent rate constant of inactivation of 47,700 m{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}. Proton relaxation rate measurements suggest that pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate modification alters binding of the phosphate-containing substrates. {sup 31}P NMR relaxation rate measurements show altered binding of the substrates in the ternary enzyme {center dot}Mn{sup 2+}{center dot}substrate complex. Circular dichroism studies show little change in secondary structure of pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate modified phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. These results indicate that avian liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase has one reactive lysine at the active site and it is involved in the binding and activation of the phosphate-containing substrates.

  15. Food-derived opioid peptides inhibit cysteine uptake with redox and epigenetic consequences.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Malav S; Shah, Jayni S; Al-Mughairy, Sara; Hodgson, Nathaniel W; Simms, Benjamin; Trooskens, Geert A; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deth, Richard C

    2014-10-01

    Dietary interventions like gluten-free and casein-free diets have been reported to improve intestinal, autoimmune and neurological symptoms in patients with a variety of conditions; however, the underlying mechanism of benefit for such diets remains unclear. Epigenetic programming, including CpG methylation and histone modifications, occurring during early postnatal development can influence the risk of disease in later life, and such programming may be modulated by nutritional factors such as milk and wheat, especially during the transition from a solely milk-based diet to one that includes other forms of nutrition. The hydrolytic digestion of casein (a major milk protein) and gliadin (a wheat-derived protein) releases peptides with opioid activity, and in the present study, we demonstrate that these food-derived proline-rich opioid peptides modulate cysteine uptake in cultured human neuronal and gastrointestinal (GI) epithelial cells via activation of opioid receptors. Decreases in cysteine uptake were associated with changes in the intracellular antioxidant glutathione and the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine. Bovine and human casein-derived opioid peptides increased genome-wide DNA methylation in the transcription start site region with a potency order similar to their inhibition of cysteine uptake. Altered expression of genes involved in redox and methylation homeostasis was also observed. These results illustrate the potential of milk- and wheat-derived peptides to exert antioxidant and epigenetic changes that may be particularly important during the postnatal transition from placental to GI nutrition. Differences between peptides derived from human and bovine milk may contribute to developmental differences between breastfed and formula-fed infants. Restricted antioxidant capacity, caused by wheat- and milk-derived opioid peptides, may predispose susceptible individuals to inflammation and systemic oxidation, partly explaining the benefits of gluten-free or

  16. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth.

  17. Eel calcitonin binding site distribution and antinociceptive activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Guidobono, F.; Netti, C.; Sibilia, V.; Villa, I.; Zamboni, A.; Pecile, A.

    1986-03-01

    The distribution of binding site for (/sup 125/I)-eel-calcitonin (ECT) to rat central nervous system, studied by an autoradiographic technique, showed concentrations of binding in the diencephalon, the brain stem and the spinal cord. Large accumulations of grains were seen in the hypothalamus, the amygdala, in the fasciculus medialis prosencephali, in the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, in the ventrolateral part of the periventricular gray matter, in the lemniscus medialis and in the raphe nuclei. The density of grains in the reticular formation and in the nucleus tractus spinalis nervi trigemini was more moderate. In the spinal cord, grains were scattered throughout the dorsal horns. Binding of the ligand was displaced equally by cold ECT and by salmon CT(sCT), indicating that both peptides bind to the same receptors. Human CT was much weaker than sCT in displacing (/sup 125/I)-ECT binding. The administration of ECT into the brain ventricles of rats dose-dependently induced a significant and long-lasting enhancement of hot-plate latencies comparable with that obtained with sCT. The antinociceptive activity induced by ECT is compatible with the topographical distribution of binding sites for the peptide and is a further indication that fish CTs are active in the mammalian brain.

  18. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  19. Staphylococcus haemolyticus prophage ΦSH2 endolysin relies on Cysteine, Histidine-dependent Amidohydrolases/Peptidases activity for lysis ‘from without’

    PubMed Central

    Schmelcher, Mathias; Korobova, Olga; Schischkova, Nina; Kiseleva, Natalia; Kopylov, Paul; Pryamchuk, Sergey; Donovan, David M.; Abaev, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen, with methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and multi-drug resistant strains becoming increasingly prevalent in both human and veterinary clinics. S. aureus causing bovine mastitis yields high annual losses to the dairy industry. Conventional treatment of mastitis by broad range antibiotics is often not successful and may contribute to development of antibiotic resistance. Bacteriophage endolysins present a promising new source of antimicrobials. The endolysin of prophage ΦSH2 of Staphylococcus haemolyticus strain JCSC1435 (ΦSH2 lysin) is a peptidoglycan hydrolase consisting of two catalytic domains (CHAP and amidase) and an SH3b cell wall binding domain. In this work, we demonstrated its lytic activity against live staphylococcal cells and investigated the contribution of each functional module to bacterial lysis by testing a series of deletion constructs in zymograms and turbidity reduction assays. The CHAP domain exhibited three-fold higher activity than the full length protein and optimum activity in physiological saline. This activity was further enhanced by the presence of bivalent calcium ions. The SH3b domain was shown to be required for full activity of the complete ΦSH2 lysin. The full length enzyme and the CHAP domain showed activity against multiple staphylococcal strains, including MRSA strains, mastitis isolates, and CoNS. PMID:23026556

  20. Identification of natural inhibitors of Entamoeba histolytica cysteine synthase from microbial secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Mihoko; Jeelani, Ghulam; Masuda, Yui; Sakai, Kazunari; Tsukui, Kumiko; Waluyo, Danang; Tarwadi; Watanabe, Yoshio; Nonaka, Kenichi; Matsumoto, Atsuko; Ōmura, Satoshi; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Shiomi, Kazuro

    2015-01-01

    Amebiasis is a common worldwide diarrheal disease, caused by the protozoan parasite, Entamoeba histolytica. Metronidazole has been a drug of choice against amebiasis for decades despite its known side effects and low efficacy against asymptomatic cyst carriers. E. histolytica is also capable of surviving sub-therapeutic levels of metronidazole in vitro. Novel drugs with different mode of action are therefore urgently needed. The sulfur assimilatory de novo L-cysteine biosynthetic pathway is essential for various cellular activities, including the proliferation and anti-oxidative defense of E. histolytica. Since the pathway, consisting of two reactions catalyzed by serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and cysteine synthase (CS, O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase), does not exist in humans, it is a rational drug target against amebiasis. To discover inhibitors against the CS of E. histolytica (EhCS), the compounds of Kitasato Natural Products Library were screened against two recombinant CS isozymes: EhCS1 and EhCS3. Nine compounds inhibited EhCS1 and EhCS3 with IC50 values of 0.31–490 μM. Of those, seven compounds share a naphthoquinone moiety, indicating the structural importance of the moiety for binding to the active site of EhCS1 and EhCS3. We further screened >9,000 microbial broths for CS inhibition and purified two compounds, xanthofulvin and exophillic acid from fungal broths. Xanthofulvin inhibited EhCS1 and EhCS3. Exophillic acid showed high selectivity against EhCS1, but exhibited no inhibition against EhCS3. In vitro anti-amebic activity of the 11 EhCS inhibitors was also examined. Deacetylkinamycin C and nanaomycin A showed more potent amebicidal activity with IC50 values of 18 and 0.8 μM, respectively, in the cysteine deprived conditions. The differential sensitivity of trophozoites against deacetylkinamycin C in the presence or absence of L-cysteine in the medium and the IC50 values against EhCS suggest the amebicidal effect of deacetylkinamycin C is due to

  1. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  2. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  3. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  4. Novel L-cysteine-dependent maleylpyruvate isomerase in the gentisate pathway of Paenibacillus sp. strain NyZ101.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-Ting; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2012-08-01

    Glutathione- and mycothiol-dependent maleylpyruvate isomerases are known to be involved, respectively, in gentisate catabolism in Gram-negative and high G+C Gram-positive strains. In the present study, a low-G+C Gram-positive Paenibacillus sp. strain, NyZ101, was isolated and shown to degrade 3-hydroxybenzoate via gentisate. A 6.5-kb fragment containing a conserved region of gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase genes was cloned and sequenced, and four genes (bagKLIX) were shown to encode the enzymes involved in the catabolism to central metabolites of 3-hydroxybenzoate via gentisate. The Bag proteins share moderate identities with the reported enzymes in the 3-hydroxybenzoate catabolism, except BagL that had no obvious homology with any functionally characterized proteins. Recombinant BagL was purified to homogeneity as a His-tagged protein and likely a dimer by gel filtration. BagL was demonstrated to be a novel thiol-dependent maleylpyruvate isomerase catalyzing the isomerization of maleylpyruvate to fumarylpyruvate with L-cysteine, cysteinylglycine, or glutathione, as its cofactor. The K(m) values of these three thiols for BagL were 15.5, 8.4, and 552 μM, respectively. Since cysteine and coenzyme A were reported to be abundant in low-G+C Gram-positive strains, BagL should utilize L-cysteine as its physiological cofactor in vivo. The addition of Ni(2+) increased BagL activity, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicated that three conserved histidines in BagL were associated with binding to Ni(2+) ion and were necessary for its enzyme activity. BagL is the first characterized L-cysteine-dependent catabolic enzyme in microbial metabolism and is likely a new and distinct member of DinB family, with a four-helix-bundle topology, as deduced by sequence analysis and homology modeling.

  5. Escherichia coli SufE sulfur transfer protein modulates the SufS cysteine desulfurase through allosteric conformational dynamics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harsimran; Dai, Yuyuan; Outten, F Wayne; Busenlehner, Laura S

    2013-12-20

    Fe-S clusters are critical metallocofactors required for cell function. Fe-S cluster biogenesis is carried out by assembly machinery consisting of multiple proteins. Fe-S cluster biogenesis proteins work together to mobilize sulfide and iron, form the nascent cluster, traffic the cluster to target metalloproteins, and regulate the assembly machinery in response to cellular Fe-S cluster demand. A complex series of protein-protein interactions is required for the assembly machinery to function properly. Despite considerable progress in obtaining static three-dimensional structures of the assembly proteins, little is known about transient protein-protein interactions during cluster assembly or the role of protein dynamics in the cluster assembly process. The Escherichia coli cysteine desulfurase SufS (EC 2.8.1.7) and its accessory protein SufE work together to mobilize persulfide from L-cysteine, which is then donated to the SufB Fe-S cluster scaffold. Here we use amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to characterize SufS-SufE interactions and protein dynamics in solution. HDX-MS analysis shows that SufE binds near the SufS active site to accept persulfide from Cys-364. Furthermore, SufE binding initiates allosteric changes in other parts of the SufS structure that likely affect SufS catalysis and alter SufS monomer-monomer interactions. SufE enhances the initial l-cysteine substrate binding to SufS and formation of the external aldimine with pyridoxal phosphate required for early steps in SufS catalysis. Together, these results provide a new picture of the SufS-SufE sulfur transferase pathway and suggest a more active role for SufE in promoting the SufS cysteine desulfurase reaction for Fe-S cluster assembly.

  6. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  7. Hierarchical effect behind the supramolecular chirality of silver(I)-cysteine coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, Rosalba; Di Mauro, Alessandro; D'Urso, Alessandro; Messina, Gabriele C; Compagnini, Giuseppe; Villari, Valentina; Micali, Norberto; Purrello, Roberto; Fragalà, Maria Elena

    2015-04-01

    Cysteine is a sulfur-containing amino acid that easily coordinates to soft metal ions and grafts to noble metal surfaces. Recently, chiroptical activity of Ag(+)/cysteine coordination polymers has been widely studied, while, on the other hand, the appearance of a plasmon-enhanced circular dichroic signal (PECD) at the plasmonic spectral region (λ > 400 nm) has been observed for AgNPs capped with chiral sulfur-containing amino acids. These two events are both potentially exploited for sensing applications. However, the presence of Ag(+) ions in AgNP colloidal solution deals with the competition of cysteine grafting at the metal NP surface and/or metal ion coordination. Herein we demonstrate that the chiroptical activity observed by adding cysteine to AgNP colloids prepared by pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL) is mainly related to the formation of CD-active Ag(+)/cysteine supramolecular polymers. The strict correlation between supramolecular chirality and hierarchical effects, driven by different chemical environments experienced by cysteine when different titration modalities are used, is pivotal to validate cysteine as a fast and reliable probe to characterize the surface oxidation of AgNPs prepared by pulsed laser ablation in liquids by varying the laser wavelengths.

  8. Hierarchical effect behind the supramolecular chirality of silver(I)-