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Sample records for active site directed

  1. Trichodiene synthase. Identification of active site residues by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Cane, D E; Shim, J H; Xue, Q; Fitzsimons, B C; Hohn, T M

    1995-02-28

    Derivatization of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-treated trichodiene synthase with [methyl-14C]methyl methanethiosulfonate and analysis of the derived tryptic peptides suggested the presence of two cysteine residues at the active site. The corresponding C146A and C190A mutants were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The C190A mutant displayed partial but significantly reduced activity, with a reduction in kcat/Km of 3000 compared to the wild-type trichodiene synthase, while the C146A mutant was essentially inactive. A hybrid trichodiene synthase, constructed from amino acids 1-309 of the Fusarium sporotrichioides enzyme and amino acids 310-383 of the Gibberella pulicaris cyclase, had steady state kinetic parameters nearly identical to those of the wild-type F. sporotrichioides enzyme. From this parent hybrid, a series of mutants was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis in which the amino acids in the base-rich region, 302-306 (DRRYR), were systematically modified. Three of these mutants were overexpressed and purified to homogeneity. The importance of Arg304 for catalysis was established by the observation that the R304K mutant showed a more than 25-fold increase in Km, as well as a 200-fold reduction in kcat. In addition, analysis of the incubation products of the R304K mutant by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) indicated that farnesyl diphosphate was converted not only to trichodiene but to at least two additional C15H24 hydrocarbons, mle 204. Replacement of the Tyr305 residue of trichodiene synthase with Phe had little effect on kcat, while increasing the Km by a factor of ca. 7-8.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7873527

  2. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site.

    PubMed

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called 'catalytic residues' are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. PMID:25902402

  3. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site.

    PubMed

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called 'catalytic residues' are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes.

  4. Site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis is a PCR-based method to mutate specified nucleotides of a sequence within a plasmid vector. This technique allows one to study the relative importance of a particular amino acid for protein structure and function. Typical mutations are designed to disrupt or map protein-protein interactions, mimic or block posttranslational modifications, or to silence enzymatic activity. Alternatively, noncoding changes are often used to generate rescue constructs that are resistant to knockdown via RNAi.

  5. Quantitative, directional measurement of electric field heterogeneity in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase.

    PubMed

    Fafarman, Aaron T; Sigala, Paul A; Schwans, Jason P; Fenn, Timothy D; Herschlag, Daniel; Boxer, Steven G

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the electrostatic forces and features within highly heterogeneous, anisotropic, and chemically complex enzyme active sites and their connection to biological catalysis remains a longstanding challenge, in part due to the paucity of incisive experimental probes of electrostatic properties within proteins. To quantitatively assess the landscape of electrostatic fields at discrete locations and orientations within an enzyme active site, we have incorporated site-specific thiocyanate vibrational probes into multiple positions within bacterial ketosteroid isomerase. A battery of X-ray crystallographic, vibrational Stark spectroscopy, and NMR studies revealed electrostatic field heterogeneity of 8 MV/cm between active site probe locations and widely differing sensitivities of discrete probes to common electrostatic perturbations from mutation, ligand binding, and pH changes. Electrostatic calculations based on active site ionization states assigned by literature precedent and computational pK(a) prediction were unable to quantitatively account for the observed vibrational band shifts. However, electrostatic models of the D40N mutant gave qualitative agreement with the observed vibrational effects when an unusual ionization of an active site tyrosine with a pK(a) near 7 was included. UV-absorbance and (13)C NMR experiments confirmed the presence of a tyrosinate in the active site, in agreement with electrostatic models. This work provides the most direct measure of the heterogeneous and anisotropic nature of the electrostatic environment within an enzyme active site, and these measurements provide incisive benchmarks for further developing accurate computational models and a foundation for future tests of electrostatics in enzymatic catalysis.

  6. Active sites and mechanisms for direct oxidation of benzene to phenol over carbon catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wen, Guodong; Wu, Shuchang; Li, Bo; Dai, Chunli; Su, Dang Sheng

    2015-03-23

    The direct oxidation of benzene to phenol with H2 O2 as the oxidizer, which is regarded as an environmentally friendly process, can be efficiently catalyzed by carbon catalysts. However, the detailed roles of carbon catalysts, especially what is the active site, are still a topic of debate controversy. Herein, we present a fundamental consideration of possible mechanisms for this oxidation reaction by using small molecular model catalysts, Raman spectra, static secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), DFT calculations, quasi in situ ATR-IR and UV spectra. Our study indicates that the defects, being favorable for the formation of active oxygen species, are the active sites for this oxidation reaction. Furthermore, one type of active defect, namely the armchair configuration defect was successfully identified.

  7. Improving the activity of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Meizhi; Deng, Xiongwei; Bao, Wei; Zhu, Li; Wu, Jieyuan; Cai, Yongjun; Jia, Yan; Zheng, Zhongliang; Zou, Guolin

    2015-09-25

    Nattokinase (NK), a bacterial serine protease from Bacillus subtilis var. natto, is a potential cardiovascular drug exhibiting strong fibrinolytic activity. To broaden its commercial and medical applications, we constructed a single-mutant (I31L) and two double-mutants (M222A/I31L and T220S/I31L) by site-directed mutagenesis. Active enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli with periplasmic secretion and were purified to homogeneity. The kinetic parameters of enzymes were examined by spectroscopy assay and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. The substitution of Leu(31) for Ile(31) resulted in about 2-fold enhancement of catalytic efficiency (Kcat/KM) compared with wild-type NK. The specific activities of both double-mutants (M222A/I31L and T220S/I31L) were significantly increased when compared with the single-mutants (M222A and T220S) and the oxidative stability of M222A/I31L mutant was enhanced with respect to wild-type NK. This study demonstrates the feasibility of improving activity of NK by site-directed mutagenesis and shows successful protein engineering cases to improve the activity of NK as a potent therapeutic agent.

  8. Alkyl isocyanates as active site-directed inactivators of guinea pig liver transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Gross, M; Whetzel, N K; Folk, J E

    1975-10-10

    Alkyl isocyanates are effective inactivators of guinea pig liver transglutaminase. Based on the specificity of the reaction the protection against inactivation by glutamine substrate, and the essential nature of calcium for the inactivation reaction, it is concluded that these reagents act as amide substrate analogs and, thus function in an active site-specific manner. Support for the contention that inactivation results from alkyl thiocarbamate ester formation through the single active site sulfhydryl group of the enzyme is (a) the loss of one free--SH group and the incorporation of 1 mol of reagent/mol of enzyme in the reaction, (b) similarity in chemical properties of the inactive enzyme derivative formed to those previously reported for another alkyl thiocarbamoylenzyme and an alkyl thiocarbamoylcysteine derivative, and (c) the finding that labeled peptides from digests of [methyl-14C]thiocarbamoyltransglutaminase and those from digests of iodoacetamide-inactivated enzyme occupy similar positions on peptide maps. Transglutaminase was found to be inactivated neither by urethan anlogs of its active ester substrates nor by urea analogs of its amide substrates. It is concluded on the basis of these findings that inactive carbamoylenzyme derivatives are formed only by direct addition of the transglutaminase active--SH group to the isocyanate C--N double bond, and not, like several serine active site enzymes, by nucleophilic displacement with urethan analogs of substrate, or by nucleophilic displacement with urea analogs of substrate. PMID:240837

  9. Active site-directed plasmin inhibitors: Extension on the P2 residue.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Koushi; Gohda, Keigo; Teno, Naoki; Wanaka, Keiko; Tsuda, Yuko

    2016-02-15

    Based on the structure of YO-2 [N-(trans-4-aminomethylcyclohexanecarbonyl)-l-Tyr(O-picolyl)-NH-octyl], active site-directed plasmin (Plm) inhibitors were explored. The picolyl moiety in the Tyr(O-picolyl) residue (namely, the P2 residue) was replaced with smaller or larger groups, such as hydrogen, tert-butyl, benzyl, (2-naphthyl)methyl, and (quinolin-2-yl)methyl. Those efforts produced compound 17 {N-(trans-4-aminomethylcyclohexanecarbonyl)-l-Tyr[O-(quinolin-2-yl)methyl]-NH-octyl} [IC50=0.22 and 77μM for Plm and urokinase (UK), respectively], which showed not only 2.4-fold greater Plm inhibition than YO-2, but also an improvement in selectivity (Plm/UK) by 35-fold. The docking experiments of the Plm-17 complexes disclosed that the amino group of the tranexamyl moiety interacted with the side-chain of Asp753 which formed S1 site.

  10. Direct Visualization of Catalytically Active Sites at the FeO-Pt(111) Interface.

    PubMed

    Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Peng, Guowen; Zeuthen, Helene; Bai, Yunhai; Merte, Lindsay R; Lammich, Lutz; Besenbacher, Flemming; Mavrikakis, Manos; Wendt, Stefan

    2015-08-25

    Within the area of surface science, one of the "holy grails" is to directly visualize a chemical reaction at the atomic scale. Whereas this goal has been reached by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in a number of cases for reactions occurring at flat surfaces, such a direct view is often inhibited for reaction occurring at steps and interfaces. Here we have studied the CO oxidation reaction at the interface between ultrathin FeO islands and a Pt(111) support by in situ STM and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Time-lapsed STM imaging on this inverse model catalyst in O2 and CO environments revealed catalytic activity occurring at the FeO-Pt(111) interface and directly showed that the Fe-edges host the catalytically most active sites for the CO oxidation reaction. This is an important result since previous evidence for the catalytic activity of the FeO-Pt(111) interface is essentially based on averaging techniques in conjunction with DFT calculations. The presented STM results are in accord with DFT+U calculations, in which we compare possible CO oxidation pathways on oxidized Fe-edges and O-edges. We found that the CO oxidation reaction is more favorable on the oxidized Fe-edges, both thermodynamically and kinetically.

  11. Direct Visualization of Catalytically Active Sites at the FeO-Pt(111) Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Peng, Guowen; Zeuthen, Helene; Bai, Yunhai; Merte, L. R.; Lammich, Lutz; Besenbacher, Fleming; Mavrikakis, Manos; Wendt, Stefen

    2015-08-25

    Within the area of surface science, one of the “holy grails” is to directly visualize a chemical reaction at the atomic scale. Whereas this goal has been reached by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in a number of cases for reactions occurring at flat surfaces, such a direct view is often inhibited for reaction occurring at steps and interfaces. Here we have studied the CO oxidation reaction at the interface between ultrathin FeO islands and a Pt(111) support by in situ STM and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Time-lapsed STM imaging on this inverse model catalyst in O2 and CO environments revealed catalytic activity occurring at the FeO-Pt(111) interface and directly showed that the Fe-edges host the catalytically most active sites for the CO oxidation reaction. This is an important result since previous evidence for the catalytic activity of the FeO-Pt(111) interface is essentially based on averaging techniques in conjunction with DFT calculations. The presented STM results are in accord with DFTþU calculations, in which we compare possible CO oxidation pathways on oxidized Fe-edges and O-edges. We found that the CO oxidation reaction is more favorable on the oxidized Fe-edges, both thermodynamically and kinetically.

  12. [Enhancing glutamate decarboxylase activity by site-directed mutagenesis: an insight from Ramachandran plot].

    PubMed

    Ke, Piyu; Huang, Jun; Hu, Sheng; Zhao, Weirui; Lü, Changjiang; Yu, Kai; Lei, Yinlin; Wang, Jinbo; Mei, Lehe

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can catalyze the decarboxylation of glutamate into γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) and is the only enzyme of GABA biosynthesis. Improving GAD activity and thermostability will be helpful for the highly efficient biosynthesis of GABA. According to the Ramachandran plot information of GAD 1407 three-dimensional structure from Lactobacillus brevis CGMCC No. 1306, we identified the unstable site K413 as the mutation target, constructed the mutant GAD by site-directed mutagenesis and measured the thermostability and activity of the wide type and mutant GAD. Mutant K413A led to a remarkably slower inactivation rate, and its half-life at 50 °C reached 105 min which was 2.1-fold higher than the wild type GAD1407. Moreover, mutant K413I exhibited 1.6-fold higher activity in comparison with the wide type GAD1407, although it had little improvement in thermostability of GAD. Ramachandran plot can be considered as a potential approach to increase GAD thermostability and activity. PMID:27443004

  13. [Enhancing glutamate decarboxylase activity by site-directed mutagenesis: an insight from Ramachandran plot].

    PubMed

    Ke, Piyu; Huang, Jun; Hu, Sheng; Zhao, Weirui; Lü, Changjiang; Yu, Kai; Lei, Yinlin; Wang, Jinbo; Mei, Lehe

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can catalyze the decarboxylation of glutamate into γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) and is the only enzyme of GABA biosynthesis. Improving GAD activity and thermostability will be helpful for the highly efficient biosynthesis of GABA. According to the Ramachandran plot information of GAD 1407 three-dimensional structure from Lactobacillus brevis CGMCC No. 1306, we identified the unstable site K413 as the mutation target, constructed the mutant GAD by site-directed mutagenesis and measured the thermostability and activity of the wide type and mutant GAD. Mutant K413A led to a remarkably slower inactivation rate, and its half-life at 50 °C reached 105 min which was 2.1-fold higher than the wild type GAD1407. Moreover, mutant K413I exhibited 1.6-fold higher activity in comparison with the wide type GAD1407, although it had little improvement in thermostability of GAD. Ramachandran plot can be considered as a potential approach to increase GAD thermostability and activity.

  14. Site directed recombination

    DOEpatents

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  15. Critical role of arg433 in rat transketolase activity as probed by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Y; Song, B J; Jeng, J; Kallarakal, A T

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that one arginine per monomer at an unknown position is essential for enzyme activity of the homodimeric transketolase (TK) [Kremer, Egan and Sable (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 2405-2410]. To identify the critical arginine, four highly conserved arginine residues of rat TK (Arg102, Arg350, Arg433 and Arg506) were replaced with alanine by site-directed mutagenesis. Wild-type and mutant TK proteins were produced in Escherichia coli and characterized. The Arg102-->Ala mutant exhibited similar catalytic activity to the wild-type enzyme, whereas Arg350-->Ala, Arg506-->Ala and Arg433-->Ala mutants exhibited 36.7, 37.0 and 6.1% of the wild-type activity respectively. Three recombinant proteins (wild-type, Arg350-->Ala and Arg433-->Ala) were purified to apparent homogeneity using Ni2+-affinity chromatography and further characterized. All these proteins were able to form homodimers (148 kDa), as shown by immunoblot analysis subsequent to non-denaturing gel electrophoresis. The Arg433-->Ala mutant protein was less stable than the wild-type and Arg350-->Ala proteins at 55 degrees C. Kinetic analyses revealed that both Vmax and Km values were markedly affected in the Arg433-->Ala mutant. The Km values for two substrates xylulose 5-phosphate and ribose 5-phosphate were 11.5- and 24.3-fold higher respectively. The kcat/Km values of the Arg433-->Ala mutant for the two substrates were less than 1% of those of the wild-type protein. Molecular modelling of the rat TK revealed that Arg433 of one monomer has three potential hydrogen-bond interactions with the catalytically important highly conserved loop of the other monomer. Thus, our biochemical analyses and modelling data suggest the critical role of the previously uncharacterized Arg433 in TK activity. PMID:9657977

  16. Conformational dynamics of the active site loop of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase illuminated by site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John C; Markham, George D

    2003-07-15

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase, methionine adenosyltransferase, a.k.a. MAT) is one of numerous enzymes that have a flexible polypeptide loop that moves to gate access to the active site in a motion that is closely coupled to catalysis. Crystallographic studies of this tetrameric enzyme have shown that the loop is closed in the absence of bound substrates. However, the loop must open to allow substrate binding and a variety of data indicate that the loop is closed during the catalytic steps. Previous kinetic studies indicate that during turnover loop motion occurs on a time scale of 10(-2)s, ca. 10-fold faster than chemical transformations and turnover. Site-directed spin labeling has been used to introduce nitroxide groups at two positions in the loop to illuminate how the motion of the loop is affected by substrate binding. The two loop mutants constructed, G105C and D107C, retain wild type levels of MAT activity; attachment of a methanethiosulfonate spin label to convert the cysteine to the "R1" residue reduced the k(cat) only for the labeled D107R1 form (7-fold). The K(m) value for methionine increased 2- to 4-fold for the cysteine mutants and 2- to 7-fold for the labeled proteins, whereas the K(m) for ATP was changed by at most 2-fold. EPR spectra for both labeled proteins are nearly identical and show the presence of two major spin label environments with rotational diffusion rates differing by approximately 10-fold; the slower rate is ca. 4-fold faster than the estimated protein rotational rate. The spectra are not altered by addition of substrates or products. At both positions the less mobile conformation constitutes ca. 65% of the total species, indicating an equilibrium that only slightly favors one form, that in which the label is more immobilized. The equilibrium constant that relates the two forms is comparable to the equilibrium constant of 1.5 for a conformational change that was previously deduced from the

  17. Site-directed mutagenesis and high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of the active site of porphobilinogen deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.I.; Roessner, C.A.; Stolowich, N.J.; Karuso, P.; Williams, H.J.; Grant, S.K.; Gonzalez, M.D.; Hoshino, T. )

    1988-10-18

    The active site of porphobilinogen (PBG){sup 1} deaminase from Escherichia coli has been found to contain an unusual dipyrromethane derived from four molecules of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) covalently linked to Cys-242, one of the two cysteine residues conserved in E. coli and human deaminase. By use of a hemA{sup {minus}} strain of E. coli the enzyme was enriched from (5-{sup 13}C)ALA and examined by {sup 1}H-detected multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy, which revealed all of the salient features of a dipyrromethane composed of two PBG units linked heat to tail and terminating in a CH{sub 2}-S bond to a cysteine residue. Site-specific mutagenesis of Cys-99 and Cys-242, respectively, has shown that substitution of Ser for Cys-99 does not affect the enzymatic activity, whereas substitution of Ser for Cys-242 removes essentially all of the catalytic activity as measured by the conversion of the substrate PBG to uro'gen I. The NMR spectrum of the covalent complex of deaminase with the suicide inhibitor 2-bromo-(2,11-{sup 13}C{sub 2})PBG reveals that the aminomethyl terminus of the inhibitor reacts with the enzyme's cofactor at the {alpha}-free pyrrole. NMR spectroscopy of the ES{sub 2} complex confirmed a PBG-derived head-to-tail dipyrromethane attached to the {alpha}-free pyrrole position of the enzyme. A mechanistic rationale for deaminase is presented.

  18. Conformational Change in the Active Site of Streptococcal Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase Through Site-Directed Mutagenesis at Asp-115.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Yusuke; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (UGL) degrades unsaturated disaccharides generated from mammalian extracellular matrices, glycosaminoglycans, by polysaccharide lyases. Two Asp residues, Asp-115 and Asp-175 of Streptococcus agalactiae UGL (SagUGL), are completely conserved in other bacterial UGLs, one of which (Asp-175 of SagUGL) acts as a general acid and base catalyst. The other Asp (Asp-115 of SagUGL) also affects the enzyme activity, although its role in the enzyme reaction has not been well understood. Here, we show substitution of Asp-115 in SagUGL with Asn caused a conformational change in the active site. Tertiary structures of SagUGL mutants D115N and D115N/K370S with negligible enzyme activity were determined at 2.00 and 1.79 Å resolution, respectively, by X-ray crystallography. The side chain of Asn-115 is drastically shifted in both mutants owing to the interaction with several residues, including Asp-175, by formation of hydrogen bonds. This interaction between Asn-115 and Asp-175 probably prevents the mutants from triggering the enzyme reaction using Asp-175 as an acid catalyst.

  19. Analysis of active site residues of the antiviral protein from summer leaves from Phytolacca americana by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Poyet, J L; Hoeveler, A; Jongeneel, C V

    1998-12-30

    The summer leaf isoform of the pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) antiviral protein, PAP II, was produced in high yields from inclusion bodies in recombinant E. coli. On the basis of its sequence similarity with the spring leaf isoform (PAP I) and with the A chain of ricin, a three-dimensional model of the protein was constructed as an aid in the design of active site mutants. PAP II variants mutated in residues Asp 88 (D88N), Tyr 117 (Y117S), Glu 172 (E172Q), Arg 175 (R175H) and a combination of Asp 88 and Arg 175 (D88N/R175H) were produced in E. coli and assayed for their ability to inhibit protein synthesis in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate. All of these mutations had effects deleterious to the enzymatic activity of PAP II. The results were interpreted in the light of three reaction mechanisms proposed for ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs). We conclude that none of the proposed mechanisms is entirely consistent with the data presented here.

  20. Direct measurement of metal ion chelation in the active site of human ferrochelatase.

    PubMed

    Hoggins, M; Dailey, H A; Hunter, C N; Reid, J D

    2007-07-10

    The final step in heme biosynthesis, insertion of ferrous iron into protoporphyrin IX, is catalyzed by protoporphyrin IX ferrochelatase (EC 4.99.1.1). We demonstrate that pre-steady state human ferrochelatase (R115L) exhibits a stoichiometric burst of product formation and substrate consumption, consistent with a rate-determining step following metal ion chelation. Detailed analysis shows that chelation requires at least two steps, rapid binding followed by a slower (k approximately 1 s-1) irreversible step, provisionally assigned to metal ion chelation. Comparison with steady state data reveals that the rate-determining step in the overall reaction, conversion of free porphyrin to free metalloporphyrin, occurs after chelation and is most probably product release. We have measured rate constants for significant steps on the enzyme and demonstrate that metal ion chelation, with a rate constant of 0.96 s-1, is approximately 10 times faster than the rate-determining step in the steady state (kcat = 0.1 s-1). The effect of an additional E343D mutation is apparent at multiple stages in the reaction cycle with a 7-fold decrease in kcat and a 3-fold decrease in kchel. This conservative mutation primarily affects events occurring after metal ion chelation. Further evaluation of structure-function data on site-directed mutants will therefore require both steady state and pre-steady state approaches.

  1. A rapid and direct method for the determination of active site accessibility in proteins based on ESI-MS and active site titrations.

    PubMed

    O'Farrell, Norah; Kreiner, Michaela; Moore, Barry D; Parker, Marie-Claire

    2006-11-01

    We have developed an electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) technique that can be applied to rapidly determine the number of intact active sites in proteins. The methodology relies on inhibiting the protein with an active-site irreversible inhibitor and then using ESI-MS to determine the extent of inhibition. We have applied this methodology to a test system: a serine protease, subtilisin Carlsberg, and monitored the extent of inhibition by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), an irreversible serine hydrolase inhibitor as a function of the changes in immobilisation and hydration conditions. Two types of enzyme preparation were investigated, lyophilised enzymes and protein-coated microcrystals (PCMC).

  2. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of RNase H Activity of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase by RNase H Active Site-Directed Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G. Sridhar; Smith, Robert F.; Daniels, Christopher L.; Abeywickrema, Pravien D.; Reid, John C.; Loughran, H. Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A.; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J.; Williams, Peter D.; Darke, Paul L.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Munshi, Sanjeev

    2010-09-02

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  3. Structural basis for the inhibition of RNase H activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by RNase H active site-directed inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G Sridhar; Smith, Robert F; Daniels, Christopher L; Abeywickrema, Pravien D; Reid, John C; Loughran, H Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J; Williams, Peter D; Darke, Paul L; Hazuda, Daria J; Munshi, Sanjeev

    2010-08-01

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  4. Antifreeze activity enhancement by site directed mutagenesis on an antifreeze protein from the beetle Rhagium mordax.

    PubMed

    Friis, Dennis Steven; Kristiansen, Erlend; von Solms, Nicolas; Ramløv, Hans

    2014-05-01

    The ice binding motifs of insect antifreeze proteins (AFPs) mainly consist of repetitive TxT motifs aligned on a flat face of the protein. However, these motifs often contain non-threonines that disrupt the TxT pattern. We substituted two such disruptive amino acids located in the ice binding face of an AFP from Rhagium mordax with threonine. Furthermore, a mutant with an extra ice facing TxT motif was constructed. These mutants showed enhanced antifreeze activity compared to the wild type at low concentrations. However, extrapolating the data indicates that the wild type will become the most active at concentrations above 270 μmol.

  5. Site-directed mutagenesis of Lysine{sup 382}, the activator-binding site, of ADP-Glucose pyrophosphorylase from Anabaena PCC 6120

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Jun; Charng, Yee-yung; Preiss, J.

    1996-03-05

    Previous studies have shown that a highly conserved lysyl residue (Lys{sup 419}) near the C-terminus of Anabaena ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is involved in the binding of 3-P-glycerate, the allosteric activator. Phosphopyridoxylation of the K419R mutant enzyme modified another conserved lysyl residue (Lys{sup 382}), suggesting that this residue might be also located within the activator-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of Lys{sup 382} of the Anabaena enzyme was performed to determine the role of this residue. Replacing Lys{sup 382} with either arginine, alanine, or glutamine produced mutant enzymes with apparent affinities for 3-P-glycerate 10-160-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme. The glutamic acid mutant enzyme was inhibited by 3-P-glycerate. These mutations had lesser impact on the kinetic constants for the substrates and inhibitor, P{sub i}, and on the thermal stability. These results indicate that both the charge and size of the residue at position 382 influence the binding of 3-P-glycerate. Site-directed mutagenesis was also performed to obtain a K382R-K419R double mutant. The apparent affinity for 3-P-glycerate of this double-mutant enzyme was 104-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme, and the specificity for activator of this mutant enzyme was altered. The K382R-K419R enzyme could not be phosphopyridoxylated, suggesting that other lysine residues are not involved in the binding of 3-P-glycerate. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Site-directed mutagenesis of tobacco anionic peroxidase: Effect of additional aromatic amino acids on stability and activity.

    PubMed

    Poloznikov, A A; Zakharova, G S; Chubar, T A; Hushpulian, D M; Tishkov, V I; Gazaryan, I G

    2015-08-01

    Tobacco anionic peroxidase (TOP) is known to effectively catalyze luminol oxidation without enhancers, in contrast to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). To pursue structure-activity relationship studies for TOP, two amino acids have been chosen for mutation, namely Thr151, close to the heme plane, and Phe140 at the entrance to the active site pocket. Three mutant forms TOP F140Y, T151W and F140Y/T151W have been expressed in Escherichia coli, and reactivated to yield active enzymes. Single-point mutations introducing additional aromatic amino acid residues at the surface of TOP exhibit a significant effect on the enzyme catalytic activity and stability as judged by the results of steady-state and transient kinetics studies. TOP T151W is up to 4-fold more active towards a number of aromatic substrates including luminol, whereas TOP F140Y is 2-fold more stable against thermal inactivation and 8-fold more stable in the reaction course. These steady-state observations have been rationalized with the help of transient kinetic studies on the enzyme reaction with hydrogen peroxide in a single turnover regime. The stopped-flow data reveal (a) an increased stability of F140Y Compound I towards hydrogen peroxide, and thus, a higher operational stability as compared to the wild-type enzyme, and (b) a lesser leakage of oxidative equivalents from TOP T151W Compound I resulting in the increased catalytic activity. The results obtained show that TOP unique properties can be further improved for practical applications by site-directed mutagenesis.

  7. Newly identified essential amino acid residues affecting Δ8-sphingolipid desaturase activity revealed by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Fen; Song, Li-Ying; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Yin, Wei-Bo; Chen, Yu-Hong; Wang, Richard R-C; Hu, Zan-Min

    2011-12-01

    In order to identify amino acid residues crucial for the enzymatic activity of Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturases, a sequence comparison was performed among Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturases and Δ(6)-fatty acid desaturases from various plants. In addition to the known conserved cytb(5) (cytochrome b(5)) HPGG motif and three conserved histidine boxes, they share additional 15 completely conserved residues. A series of site-directed mutants were generated using our previously isolated Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturase gene from Brassica rapa to evaluate the importance of these residues to the enzyme function. The mutants were functionally characterized by heterologous expression in yeast, allowing the identification of the products of the enzymes. The results revealed that residues H63, N203, D208, D210, and G368 were obligatorily required for the enzymatic activity, and substitution of the residues F59, W190, W345, L369 and Q372 markedly decreased the enzyme activity. Among them, replacement of the residues W190, L369 and Q372 also has significant influence on the ratio of the two enzyme products. Information obtained in this work provides the molecular basis for the Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturase activity and aids in our understanding of the structure-function relationships of the membrane-bound desaturases.

  8. Identification of essential active-site residues in the cyanogenic beta-glucosidase (linamarase) from cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Keresztessy, Z; Brown, K; Dunn, M A; Hughes, M A

    2001-01-01

    The coding sequence of the mature cyanogenic beta-glucosidase (beta-glucoside glucohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.21; linamarase) was cloned into the vector pYX243 modified to contain the SUC2 yeast secretion signal sequence and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The recombinant enzyme is active, glycosylated and showed similar stability to the plant protein. Michaelis constants for hydrolysis of the natural substrate, linamarin (K(m)=1.06 mM) and the synthetic p-nitrophenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside (PNP-Glc; K(m)=0.36 mM), as well as apparent pK(a) values of the free enzyme and the enzyme-substrate complexes (pK(E)(1)=4.4-4.8, pK(E)(2)=6.7-7.2, pK(ES)(1)=3.9-4.4, pK(ES)(2)=8.3) were very similar to those of the plant enzyme. Site-directed mutagenesis was carried out to study the function of active-site residues based on a homology model generated for the enzyme using the MODELLER program. Changing Glu-413 to Gly destroyed enzyme activity, consistent with it being the catalytic nucleophile. The Gln-339Glu mutation also abolished activity, confirming a function in positioning the catalytic diad. The Ala-201Val mutation shifted the pK(a) of the acid/base catalyst Glu-198 from 7.22 to 7.44, reflecting a change in its hydrophobic environment. A Phe-269Asn change increased K(m) for linamarin hydrolysis 16-fold (16.1 mM) and that for PNP-Glc only 2.5-fold (0.84 mM), demonstrating that Phe-269 contributes to the cyanogenic specificity of the cassava beta-glucosidase. PMID:11139381

  9. A solution NMR study showing that active site ligands and nucleotides directly perturb the allosteric equilibrium in aspartate transcarbamoylase.

    PubMed

    Velyvis, Algirdas; Yang, Ying R; Schachman, Howard K; Kay, Lewis E

    2007-05-22

    The 306-kDa aspartate transcarbamoylase is a well studied regulatory enzyme, and it has emerged as a paradigm for understanding allostery and cooperative binding processes. Although there is a consensus that the cooperative binding of active site ligands follows the Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) model of allostery, there is some debate about the binding of effectors such as ATP and CTP and how they influence the allosteric equilibrium between R and T states of the enzyme. In this article, the binding of substrates, substrate analogues, and nucleotides is studied, along with their effect on the R-T equilibrium by using highly deuterated, (1)H,(13)C-methyl-labeled protein in concert with methyl-transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) NMR. Although only the T state of the enzyme can be observed in spectra of wild-type unliganded aspartate transcarbamoylase, binding of active-site substrates shift the equilibrium so that correlations from the R state become visible, allowing the equilibrium constant (L') between ligand-saturated R and T forms of the enzyme to be measured quantitatively. The equilibrium constant between unliganded R and T forms (L) also is obtained, despite the fact that the R state is "invisible" in spectra, by means of an indirect process that makes use of relations that emerge from the fact that ligand binding and the R-T equilibrium are linked. Titrations with MgATP unequivocally establish that its binding directly perturbs the R-T equilibrium, consistent with the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model. This study emphasizes the utility of modern solution NMR spectroscopy in understanding protein function, even for systems with aggregate molecular masses in the hundreds of kilodaltons.

  10. Site-directed mutagenesis of porcine pepsin: Possible role of Asp32, Thr33, Asp215 and Gly217 in maintaining the nuclease activity of pepsin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanfang; Liu, Yu; Guo, Hui; Jiang, Wei; Dong, Ping; Liang, Xingguo

    2016-07-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of porcine pepsin was performed to identify its active sites that regulate nucleic acid (NA) digestion activity and to analyze the mechanism pepsin-mediated NA digestion. The mutation sites were distributed at the catalytic center of the enzyme (T33A, G34A, Y75H, T77A, Y189H, V214A, G217A and S219A) and at its active site (D32A and D215A) for protein digestion. Mutation of the active site residues Asp32 and Asp215 led to the inactivation of pepsin (both the NA and protein digestion activity), which demonstrated that the active sites of the pepsin protease activity were also important for its nuclease activity. Analysis of the variants revealed that T33A and G217A mutants showed a complete loss of NA digestion activity. In conclusion, residues Asp32, Thr33, Asp215 and Gly217 were related to the pepsin active sites for NA digestion. Moreover, the Y189H and V214A variants showed a loss of digestion activity on double-strand DNA (dsDNA) but only a decrease in digestion activity on single-strand DNA (ssDNA). On the contrary, the G34A variant showed a loss of digestion activity on ssDNA but only a decrease in digestion activity on dsDNA. Our findings are the first to identify the active sites of pepsin nuclease activity and lay the framework for further study of the mechanism of pepsin nuclease activity. PMID:27233129

  11. Short circuiting a sulfite oxidising enzyme with direct electrochemistry: active site substitutions and their effect on catalysis and electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Rapson, Trevor D; Kappler, Ulrike; Hanson, Graeme R; Bernhardt, Paul V

    2011-01-01

    Sulfite dehydrogenase (SDH) from Starkeya novella is a heterodimeric enzyme comprising a Mo active site and a heme c electron relay, which mediates electron transfer from the Mo cofactor to cytochrome c following sulfite oxidation. Studies on the wild type enzyme (SDH(WT)) and its variants have identified key amino acids at the active site, specifically Arg-55 and His-57. We report the Mo(VI/V), Mo(V/IV) and Fe(III/II) (heme) redox potentials of the variants SDH(R55K), SDH(R55M), SDH(R55Q) and SDH(H57A) in comparison with those of SDH(WT). For SDH(R55M), SDH(R55Q) and SDH(H57A) the heme potentials are lowered from ca. 240mV in SDH(WT) to ca. 200mV, while the heme potential in SDH(R55K) remains unchanged and the Mo redox potentials are not affected significantly in any of these variants. Protein film voltammetry reveals a pH dependence of the electrochemical catalytic half-wave potential (E(cat)) of -59mV/pH in SDH(WT) and SDH(R55K) which tracks the pH dependence of the Mo(VI/V) redox potential. By contrast, the catalytic potentials for SDH(R55M) and SDH(H57A) are pH-independent and follow the potential of the heme cofactor. These results highlight a switch in the pathway of electron exchange as a function of applied potential that is revealed by protein film voltammetry where an actuation of rate limiting intramolecular electron transfer (IET, Mo to heme) at high potential attenuates the catalytic current relative to faster, direct electron transfer (Mo to electrode) at lower potential. The same change in electron transfer pathway is linked to an unusual peak-shaped profile of the ideally sigmoidal steady state voltammogram in SDH(WT) alone, which has been associated with a potential dependent change in the orientation of the enzyme on the electrode surface. All other variants show purely sigmoidal voltammetry due to their inherently slower turnover numbers which are always lower than IET rates.

  12. Gating allosterism at a single class of etomidate sites on alpha1beta2gamma2L GABA A receptors accounts for both direct activation and agonist modulation.

    PubMed

    Rüsch, Dirk; Zhong, Huijun; Forman, Stuart A

    2004-05-14

    At clinical concentrations, the potent intravenous general anesthetic etomidate enhances gamma-aminobutyric acid, type A (GABA(A)) receptor activity elicited with low gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations, whereas much higher etomidate concentrations activate receptors in the absence of GABA. Therefore, GABA(A) receptors may possess two types of etomidate sites: high affinity GABA-modulating sites and low affinity channel-activating sites. However, GABA modulation and direct activation share stereoselectivity for the (R)(+)-etomidate isomer and display parallel dependence on GABA(A) beta subunit isoforms, suggesting that these two actions may be mediated by a single class of etomidate site(s) that exert one or more molecular effects. In this study, we assessed GABA modulation by etomidate using leftward shifts of electrophysiological GABA concentration responses in cells expressing human alpha1beta2gamma2L receptors. Etomidate at up to 100 microm reduced GABA EC(50) values by over 100-fold but without apparent saturation, indicating the absence of high affinity etomidate sites. In experiments using a partial agonist, P4S, etomidate both reduced EC(50) and increased maximal efficacy, demonstrating that etomidate shifts the GABA(A) receptor gating equilibrium toward open states. Results were quantitatively analyzed using equilibrium receptor gating models, wherein a postulated class of equivalent etomidate sites both directly activates receptors and enhances agonist gating. A Monod-Wyman-Changeux co-agonist mechanism with two equivalent etomidate sites that allosterically enhance GABA(A) receptor gating independently of agonist binding most simply accounts for direct activation and agonist modulation. This model also correctly predicts the actions of etomidate on GABA(A) receptors containing a point mutation that increases constitutive gating activity.

  13. Bromopyruvate, an active site-directed inactivator of E. coli 2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate(KHG) aldolase, modifies glutamic acid residue-45

    SciTech Connect

    Vlahos, C.J.; Dekker, E.E.

    1987-05-01

    E. coli KHG-aldolase (2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate in equilibrium pyruvate + glyoxylate), a novel trimeric Class I aldolase, requires one active-site lysine residue (Lys 133)/subunit for Schiff-base formation as well as one arginine residue (Arg 49)/subunit for catalytic activity. The substrate analog, 3-bromopyruvate (BRPY), causes a time- and concentration-dependent loss of KHG-aldolase activity. This inactivation is regarded as active site-directed since: (a) BRPY modification results in complete loss of enzymatic activity; (b) saturation kinetics are exhibited, suggesting that a reversible complex is formed between the aldolase and BRPY prior to the rate-limiting inactivation step; (c) over 90% of the initial aldolase activity is protected by either substrate, pyruvate or KHG; (d) 1.1 mol of /sup 14/C-BRPY is bound/enzyme subunit. Peptide isolation and sequencing show that the incorporated radioactivity is associated with residue Glu-45. Denaturation of the enzyme with guanidine x HCl following treatment with excess /sup 14/C-BRPY allows for the incorporation of carbon-14 at Cys-159 and Cys-180 as well. The presence of pyruvate protects Glu-45 from being esterified but does not prevent the alkylation of the two cysteine residues. These results suggest that Glu-45 is essential for the catalytic activity of E. coli KHG-aldolase, most likely functioning as the active-site amphoteric proton donor/acceptor moiety that is involved in the overall mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by this enzyme.

  14. Sequencing of the amylopullulanase (apu) gene of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E, and identification of the active site by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Mathupala, S P; Lowe, S E; Podkovyrov, S M; Zeikus, J G

    1993-08-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the dual active amylopullulanase of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E (formerly Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum) was determined. The structural gene (apu) contained a single open reading frame 4443 base pairs in length, corresponding to 1481 amino acids, with an estimated molecular weight of 162,780. Analysis of the deduced sequence of apu with sequences of alpha-amylases and alpha-1,6 debranching enzymes enabled the identification of four conserved regions putatively involved in substrate binding and in catalysis. The conserved regions were localized within a 2.9-kilobase pair gene fragment, which encoded a M(r) 100,000 protein that maintained the dual activities and thermostability of the native enzyme. The catalytic residues of amylopullulanase were tentatively identified by using hydrophobic cluster analysis for comparison of amino acid sequences of amylopullulanase and other amylolytic enzymes. Asp597, Glu626, and Asp703 were individually modified to their respective amide form, or the alternate acid form, and in all cases both alpha-amylase and pullulanase activities were lost, suggesting the possible involvement of 3 residues in a catalytic triad, and the presence of a putative single catalytic site within the enzyme. These findings substantiate amylopullulanase as a new type of amylosaccharidase.

  15. Direct measurement of metal-ion chelation in the active site of the AAA+ ATPase magnesium chelatase.

    PubMed

    Viney, Joanne; Davison, Paul A; Hunter, C Neil; Reid, James D

    2007-11-01

    Magnesium chelatase catalyzes the first committed step in chlorophyll biosynthesis. This complex enzyme has at least three substrates and couples ATP hydrolysis to the insertion of Mg2+ into protoporphyrin IX. We directly observed metal-ion chelation fluorometrically, providing the first data describing the on-enzyme reaction. We describe the transient-state kinetics of magnesium chelatase with direct observation of the evolution of an enzyme-product complex EMgDIX. We demonstrate that MgATP2- binding occurs after the rate-determining step. As nucleotide hydrolysis is essential for the overall reaction this must also occur after the rate-determining step. This provides the first evidence for the synchronization of the ATPase and chelatase pathways and suggests a mechanism where nucleotide binding acts to clamp the chelatase in a product complex. Comparison of rate constants for the slow step in the reaction with further transient kinetics under conditions where multiple turnovers can occur reveals that an additional activation step is required to explain the behavior of magnesium chelatase. These data provide a new view of the sequence of events occurring in the reaction catalyzed by magnesium chelatase.

  16. Role of arginine 285 in the active site of Rhodotorula gracilis D-amino acid oxidase. A site-directed mutagenesis study.

    PubMed

    Molla, G; Porrini, D; Job, V; Motteran, L; Vegezzi, C; Campaner, S; Pilone, M S; Pollegioni, L

    2000-08-11

    Arg(285), one of the very few conserved residues in the active site of d-amino acid oxidases, has been mutated to lysine, glutamine, aspartate, and alanine in the enzyme from the yeast Rhodotorula gracilis (RgDAAO). The mutated proteins are all catalytically competent. Mutations of Arg(285) result in an increase ( approximately 300-fold) of K(m) for the d-amino acid and in a large decrease ( approximately 500-fold) of turnover number. Stopped-flow analysis shows that the decrease in turnover is paralleled by a similar decrease in the rate of flavin reduction (k(2)), the latter still being the rate-limiting step of the reaction. In agreement with data from the protein crystal structure, loss of the guanidinium group of Arg(285) in the mutated DAAOs drastically reduces the binding of several carboxylic acids (e.g. benzoate). These results highlight the importance of this active site residue in the precise substrate orientation, a main factor in this redox reaction. Furthermore, Arg(285) DAAO mutants have spectral properties similar to those of the wild-type enzyme, but show a low degree of stabilization of the flavin semiquinone and a change in the redox properties of the free enzyme. From this, we can unexpectedly conclude that Arg(285) in the free enzyme form is involved in the stabilization of the negative charge on the N(1)-C(2)=O locus of the isoalloxazine ring of the flavin. We also suggest that the residue undergoes a conformational change in order to bind the carboxylate portion of the substrate/ligand in the complexed enzyme. PMID:10821840

  17. Probing the importance of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhong-liang; Ye, Mao-qing; Zuo, Zhen-yu; Liu, Zhi-gang; Tai, Keng-chang; Zou, Guo-lin

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds occurring in the catalytic triad (Asp32, His64 and Ser221) and the oxyanion hole (Asn155) are very important to the catalysis of peptide bond hydrolysis by serine proteases. For the subtilisin NK (nattokinase), a bacterial serine protease, construction and analysis of a three-dimensional structural model suggested that several hydrogen bonds formed by four residues function to stabilize the transition state of the hydrolysis reaction. These four residues are Ser33, Asp60, Ser62 and Thr220. In order to remove the effect of these hydrogen bonds, four mutants (Ser33→Ala33, Asp60→Ala60, Ser62→Ala62, and Thr220→Ala220) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The results of enzyme kinetics indicated that removal of these hydrogen bonds increases the free-energy of the transition state (ΔΔGT). We concluded that these hydrogen bonds are more important for catalysis than for binding the substrate, because removal of these bonds mainly affects the kcat but not the Km values. A substrate, SUB1 (succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide), was used during enzyme kinetics experiments. In the present study we have also shown the results of FEP (free-energy perturbation) calculations with regard to the binding and catalysis reactions for these mutant subtilisins. The calculated difference in FEP also suggested that these four residues are more important for catalysis than binding of the substrate, and the simulated values compared well with the experimental values from enzyme kinetics. The results of MD (molecular dynamics) simulations further demonstrated that removal of these hydrogen bonds partially releases Asp32, His64 and Asn155 so that the stability of the transition state decreases. Another substrate, SUB2 (H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-p-nitroanilide), was used for FEP calculations and MD simulations. PMID:16411898

  18. Probing the importance of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhong-liang; Ye, Mao-qing; Zuo, Zhen-yu; Liu, Zhi-gang; Tai, Keng-chang; Zou, Guo-lin

    2006-05-01

    Hydrogen bonds occurring in the catalytic triad (Asp32, His64 and Ser221) and the oxyanion hole (Asn155) are very important to the catalysis of peptide bond hydrolysis by serine proteases. For the subtilisin NK (nattokinase), a bacterial serine protease, construction and analysis of a three-dimensional structural model suggested that several hydrogen bonds formed by four residues function to stabilize the transition state of the hydrolysis reaction. These four residues are Ser33, Asp60, Ser62 and Thr220. In order to remove the effect of these hydrogen bonds, four mutants (Ser33-->Ala33, Asp60-->Ala60, Ser62-->Ala62, and Thr220-->Ala220) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The results of enzyme kinetics indicated that removal of these hydrogen bonds increases the free-energy of the transition state (DeltaDeltaG(T)). We concluded that these hydrogen bonds are more important for catalysis than for binding the substrate, because removal of these bonds mainly affects the kcat but not the K(m) values. A substrate, SUB1 (succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide), was used during enzyme kinetics experiments. In the present study we have also shown the results of FEP (free-energy perturbation) calculations with regard to the binding and catalysis reactions for these mutant subtilisins. The calculated difference in FEP also suggested that these four residues are more important for catalysis than binding of the substrate, and the simulated values compared well with the experimental values from enzyme kinetics. The results of MD (molecular dynamics) simulations further demonstrated that removal of these hydrogen bonds partially releases Asp32, His64 and Asn155 so that the stability of the transition state decreases. Another substrate, SUB2 (H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-p-nitroanilide), was used for FEP calculations and MD simulations.

  19. X-ray structure at 1.75 resolution of a norovirus 3C protease linked to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Jon; Coates, Leighton; Hussey, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses are recognized universally as the most important cause of human epidemic non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a 3C cysteine protease that cleaves a 200kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional proteins. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the Southampton norovirus 3C protease (SV3CP) bound to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor (MAPI) which has been refined at 1.75 resolution, following initial MAD phasing with a selenomethionine derivative. The inhibitor, acetyl-Glu-Phe-Gln-Leu-Gln-X, based on a 3C protease cleavage recognition sequences in the 200kDa polyprotein substrate, reacts covalently through its propenylethylester group (X) with the active site nucleophile, Cys 139. The 3C protease-inhibitor structure permits, for the first time, the identification of substrate recognition and binding groups and provides important new information for the development of antiviral prophylactics.

  20. Accurate Detection of Adenylation Domain Functions in Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases by an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay System Using Active Site-directed Probes for Adenylation Domains.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Miyamoto, Kengo; Konno, Sho; Kasai, Shota; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2015-12-18

    A significant gap exists between protein engineering and enzymes used for the biosynthesis of natural products, largely because there is a paucity of strategies that rapidly detect active-site phenotypes of the enzymes with desired activities. Herein, we describe a proof-of-concept study of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system for the adenylation (A) domains in nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) using a combination of active site-directed probes coupled to a 5'-O-N-(aminoacyl)sulfamoyladenosine scaffold with a biotin functionality that immobilizes probe molecules onto a streptavidin-coated solid support. The recombinant NRPSs have a C-terminal His-tag motif that is targeted by an anti-6×His mouse antibody as the primary antibody and a horseradish peroxidase-linked goat antimouse antibody as the secondary antibody. These probes can selectively capture the cognate A domains by ligand-directed targeting. In addition, the ELISA technique detected A domains in the crude cell-free homogenates from the Escherichia coli expression systems. When coupled with a chromogenic substrate, the antibody-based ELISA technique can visualize probe-protein binding interactions, which provides accurate readouts of the A-domain functions in NRPS enzymes. To assess the ELISA-based engineering of the A domains of NRPSs, we reprogramed 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB)-activating enzyme EntE toward salicylic acid (Sal)-activating enzymes and investigated a correlation between binding properties for probe molecules and enzyme catalysts. We generated a mutant of EntE that displayed negligible loss in the kcat/Km value with the noncognate substrate Sal and a corresponding 48-fold decrease in the kcat/Km value with the cognate substrate DHB. The resulting 26-fold switch in substrate specificity was achieved by the replacement of a Ser residue in the active site of EntE with a Cys toward the nonribosomal codes of Sal-activating enzymes. Bringing a laboratory ELISA technique

  1. Molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis of a Bacillus thuringiensis chitinase to improve chitinolytic, synergistic lepidopteran-larvicidal and nematicidal activities.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hong; Zeng, Siquan; Qin, Xu; Sun, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shan; Zhao, Xiuyun; Yu, Ziniu; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial chitinases are useful in the biocontrol of agriculturally important pests and fungal pathogens. However, the utility of naturally occurring bacterial chitinases is often limited by their low enzyme activity. In this study, we constructed mutants of a Bacillus thuringiensis chitinase with enhanced activity based on homology modeling, molecular docking, and the site-directed mutagenesis of target residues to modify spatial positions, steric hindrances, or hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity. We first identified a gene from B. thuringiensis YBT-9602 that encodes a chitinase (Chi9602) belonging to glycosyl hydrolase family 18 with conserved substrate-binding and substrate-catalytic motifs. We constructed a structural model of a truncated version of Chi9602 (Chi9602(35-459)) containing the substrate-binding domain using the homologous 1ITX protein of Bacillus circulans as the template. We performed molecular docking analysis of Chi9602(35-459) using di-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine as the ligand. We then selected 10 residues of interest from the docking area for the site-directed mutagenesis experiments and expression in Escherichia coli. Assays of the chitinolytic activity of the purified chitinases revealed that the three mutants exhibited increased chitinolytic activity. The ChiW50A mutant exhibited a greater than 60 % increase in chitinolytic activity, with similar pH, temperature and metal ion requirements, compared to wild-type Chi9602. Furthermore, ChiW50A exhibited pest-controlling activity and antifungal activity. Remarkable synergistic effects of this mutant with B. thuringiensis spore-crystal preparations against Helicoverpa armigera and Caenorhabditis elegans larvae and obvious activity against several plant-pathogenic fungi were observed.

  2. Molecular Docking and Site-directed Mutagenesis of a Bacillus thuringiensis Chitinase to Improve Chitinolytic, Synergistic Lepidopteran-larvicidal and Nematicidal Activities

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Hong; Zeng, Siquan; Qin, Xu; Sun, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shan; Zhao, Xiuyun; Yu, Ziniu; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial chitinases are useful in the biocontrol of agriculturally important pests and fungal pathogens. However, the utility of naturally occurring bacterial chitinases is often limited by their low enzyme activity. In this study, we constructed mutants of a Bacillus thuringiensis chitinase with enhanced activity based on homology modeling, molecular docking, and the site-directed mutagenesis of target residues to modify spatial positions, steric hindrances, or hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity. We first identified a gene from B. thuringiensis YBT-9602 that encodes a chitinase (Chi9602) belonging to glycosyl hydrolase family 18 with conserved substrate-binding and substrate-catalytic motifs. We constructed a structural model of a truncated version of Chi9602 (Chi960235-459) containing the substrate-binding domain using the homologous 1ITX protein of Bacillus circulans as the template. We performed molecular docking analysis of Chi960235-459 using di-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine as the ligand. We then selected 10 residues of interest from the docking area for the site-directed mutagenesis experiments and expression in Escherichia coli. Assays of the chitinolytic activity of the purified chitinases revealed that the three mutants exhibited increased chitinolytic activity. The ChiW50A mutant exhibited a greater than 60 % increase in chitinolytic activity, with similar pH, temperature and metal ion requirements, compared to wild-type Chi9602. Furthermore, ChiW50A exhibited pest-controlling activity and antifungal activity. Remarkable synergistic effects of this mutant with B. thuringiensis spore-crystal preparations against Helicoverpa armigera and Caenorhabditis elegans larvae and obvious activity against several plant-pathogenic fungi were observed. PMID:25678849

  3. Engineering of Alicyclobacillus hesperidum L-arabinose isomerase for improved catalytic activity and reduced pH optimum using random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chen; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Leon; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Wanmeng

    2015-12-01

    A mutation, D478N, was obtained by an error-prone polymerase chain reaction using the L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI) gene from Alicyclobacillus hesperidum URH17-3-68 as the template. The mutated isomerase showed higher activity for D-galactose isomerization. The mutation site obtained from random mutagenesis was then introduced as a single-site mutation using site-directed mutagenesis. Single-site variants, D478N, D478Q, D478A, D478K, and D478R, were constructed. The optimum temperatures were all higher than 60 °C. D478A, D478N, and D478Q retained more than 80 % of the maximum relative activity of the wild-type L-AI at 75 °C. With the exception of the D478A variant, all variants showed decreased optimum pH values in the acidic range (6.0-6.5). All of the variant L-AIs could be significantly activated by the addition of Co(2+) and Mn(2+). D478N and D478Q showed higher catalytic efficiencies (k cat/K m) toward D-galactose than that of wild-type L-AI. In addition, the D478N and D478Q variants exhibited a much higher conversion ratio of D-galactose to D-tagatose at 6.0 than the wild-type L-AI. According to the molecular model, residue D478 was located on the surface of the enzyme and distant from the active site. It was supposed that the charged state of residue 478 may influence the optimum pH for substrate binding or isomerization.

  4. Direct Measurement of the Nanomechanical Stability of a Redox Protein Active Site and Its Dependence upon Metal Binding.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Marina I; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Artés, Juan M; Sanz, Fausto; Guallar, Victor; Gorostiza, Pau

    2015-09-10

    The structural basis of the low reorganization energy of cupredoxins has long been debated. These proteins reconcile a conformationally heterogeneous and exposed metal-chelating site with the highly rigid copper center required for efficient electron transfer. Here we combine single-molecule mechanical unfolding experiments with statistical analysis and computer simulations to show that the metal-binding region of apo-azurin is mechanically flexible and that high mechanical stability is imparted by copper binding. The unfolding pathway of the metal site depends on the pulling residue and suggests that partial unfolding of the metal-binding site could be facilitated by the physical interaction with certain regions of the redox protein. PMID:26305718

  5. Direct Measurement of the Nanomechanical Stability of a Redox Protein Active Site and Its Dependence upon Metal Binding.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Marina I; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Artés, Juan M; Sanz, Fausto; Guallar, Victor; Gorostiza, Pau

    2015-09-10

    The structural basis of the low reorganization energy of cupredoxins has long been debated. These proteins reconcile a conformationally heterogeneous and exposed metal-chelating site with the highly rigid copper center required for efficient electron transfer. Here we combine single-molecule mechanical unfolding experiments with statistical analysis and computer simulations to show that the metal-binding region of apo-azurin is mechanically flexible and that high mechanical stability is imparted by copper binding. The unfolding pathway of the metal site depends on the pulling residue and suggests that partial unfolding of the metal-binding site could be facilitated by the physical interaction with certain regions of the redox protein.

  6. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site.

    PubMed

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-10-20

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme.

  7. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site

    PubMed Central

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme. PMID:26487708

  8. Direct Binding to Replication Protein A (RPA)-coated Single-stranded DNA Allows Recruitment of the ATR Activator TopBP1 to Sites of DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Julyana; Yan, Shan; Michael, W Matthew

    2016-06-17

    A critical event for the ability of cells to tolerate DNA damage and replication stress is activation of the ATR kinase. ATR activation is dependent on the BRCT (BRCA1 C terminus) repeat-containing protein TopBP1. Previous work has shown that recruitment of TopBP1 to sites of DNA damage and stalled replication forks is necessary for downstream events in ATR activation; however, the mechanism for this recruitment was not known. Here, we use protein binding assays and functional studies in Xenopus egg extracts to show that TopBP1 makes a direct interaction, via its BRCT2 domain, with RPA-coated single-stranded DNA. We identify a point mutant that abrogates this interaction and show that this mutant fails to accumulate at sites of DNA damage and that the mutant cannot activate ATR. These data thus supply a mechanism for how the critical ATR activator, TopBP1, senses DNA damage and stalled replication forks to initiate assembly of checkpoint signaling complexes.

  9. Site directed spin labelling and pulsed dipolar electron paramagnetic resonance (double electron electron resonance) of force activation in muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajer, Piotr G.

    2005-05-01

    The recent development of site specific spin labelling and advances in pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) have established spin labelling as a viable structural biology technique. Specific protein sites or whole domains can be selectively targeted for spin labelling by cysteine mutagenesis. The secondary structure of the proteins is determined from the trends in EPR signals of labels attached to consecutive residues. Solvent accessibility or label mobility display periodicities along the labelled polypeptide chain that are characteristic of β-strands (periodicity of 2 residues) or α-helices (3.6 residues). Low-resolution 3D structure of proteins is determined from the distance restraints. Two spin labels placed within 60-70 Å of each other create a local dipolar field experienced by the other spin labels. The strength of this field is related to the interspin distance, {\\propto } r^{-3 } . The dipolar field can be measured by the broadening of the EPR lines for the short distances (8-20 Å) or for the longer distances (17-70 Å) by the pulsed EPR methods, double electron-electron resonance (DEER) and double quantum coherence (DQC). A brief review of the methodology and its applications to the multisubunit muscle protein troponin is presented below.

  10. Probing the location and function of the conserved histidine residue of phosphoglucose isomerase by using an active site directed inhibitor N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Meng, M.; Chane, T. L.; Sun, Y. J.; Hsiao, C. D.

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase (EC 5.3.1.9) catalyzes the interconversion of D-glucopyranose-6-phosphate and D-fructofuranose-6-phosphate by promoting an intrahydrogen transfer between C1 and C2. A conserved histidine exists throughout all phosphoglucose isomerases and was hypothesized to be the base catalyzing the isomerization reaction. In the present study, this conserved histidine, His311, of the enzyme from Bacillus stearothermophilus was subjected to mutational analysis, and the mutational effect on the inactivation kinetics by N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate was investigated. The substitution of His311 with alanine, asparagine, or glutamine resulted in the decrease of activity, in k(cat)/K(M), by a factor of 10(3), indicating the importance of this residue. N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate inactivated irreversibly the activity of wild-type phosphoglucose isomerase; however, His311 --> Ala became resistant to this inhibitor, indicating that His311 is located in the active site and is responsible for the inactivation of the enzyme by this active site-directed inhibitor. The pKa of His311 was estimated to be 6.31 according to the pH dependence of the inactivation. The proximity of this value with the pKa value of 6.35, determined from the pH dependence of k(cat)/K(M), supports a role of His311 as a general base in the catalysis. PMID:10595547

  11. Enhancement of the catalytic activity of ferulic acid decarboxylase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 through random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jiyoung; Jung, Chaewon; Han, Dongfei; Seo, Jiyoung; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Chong, Youhoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2015-11-01

    The enzyme ferulic acid decarboxylase (FADase) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 catalyzes the decarboxylation reaction of lignin monomers and phenolic compounds such as p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid into their corresponding 4-vinyl derivatives, that is, 4-vinylphenol, 4-vinylcatechol, and 4-vinylguaiacol, respectively. Among various ferulic acid decarboxylase enzymes, we chose the FADase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4, whose crystal structure is known, and produced mutants to enhance its catalytic activity by random and site-directed mutagenesis. After three rounds of sequential mutations, FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) showed approximately 34-fold higher catalytic activity than wild-type for the production of 4-vinylguaiacol from ferulic acid. Docking analyses suggested that the increased activity of FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) could be due to formation of compact active site compared with that of the wild-type FADase. Considering the amount of phenolic compounds such as lignin monomers in the biomass components, successfully bioengineered FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 could provide an ecofriendly biocatalytic tool for producing diverse styrene derivatives from biomass.

  12. Enhancement of the catalytic activity of ferulic acid decarboxylase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 through random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jiyoung; Jung, Chaewon; Han, Dongfei; Seo, Jiyoung; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Chong, Youhoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2015-11-01

    The enzyme ferulic acid decarboxylase (FADase) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 catalyzes the decarboxylation reaction of lignin monomers and phenolic compounds such as p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid into their corresponding 4-vinyl derivatives, that is, 4-vinylphenol, 4-vinylcatechol, and 4-vinylguaiacol, respectively. Among various ferulic acid decarboxylase enzymes, we chose the FADase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4, whose crystal structure is known, and produced mutants to enhance its catalytic activity by random and site-directed mutagenesis. After three rounds of sequential mutations, FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) showed approximately 34-fold higher catalytic activity than wild-type for the production of 4-vinylguaiacol from ferulic acid. Docking analyses suggested that the increased activity of FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) could be due to formation of compact active site compared with that of the wild-type FADase. Considering the amount of phenolic compounds such as lignin monomers in the biomass components, successfully bioengineered FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 could provide an ecofriendly biocatalytic tool for producing diverse styrene derivatives from biomass. PMID:26059194

  13. Structure of Bacillus subtilis γ-glutamyltranspeptidase in complex with acivicin: diversity of the binding mode of a classical and electrophilic active-site-directed glutamate analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Ida, Tomoyo; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Fukuyama, Keiichi; Hiratake, Jun; Wada, Kei

    2014-02-01

    The binding modes of acivicin, a classical and an electrophilic active-site-directed glutamate analogue, to bacterial γ-glutamyltranspeptidases were found to be diverse. γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) is an enzyme that plays a central role in glutathione metabolism, and acivicin is a classical inhibitor of GGT. Here, the structure of acivicin bound to Bacillus subtilis GGT determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.8 Å resolution is presented, in which it binds to the active site in a similar manner to that in Helicobacter pylori GGT, but in a different binding mode to that in Escherichia coli GGT. In B. subtilis GGT, acivicin is bound covalently through its C3 atom with sp{sup 2} hybridization to Thr403 O{sup γ}, the catalytic nucleophile of the enzyme. The results show that acivicin-binding sites are common, but the binding manners and orientations of its five-membered dihydroisoxazole ring are diverse in the binding pockets of GGTs.

  14. Improved efficacy of soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) fusion protein by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Son, Young Jun; Han, Jihye; Lee, Jae Yeon; Kim, HaHyung; Chun, Taehoon

    2015-06-01

    Soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B fusion immunoglobulin (hRANK-Ig) has been considered as one of the therapeutic agents to treat osteoporosis or diseases associated with bone destruction by blocking the interaction between RANK and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). However, no scientific record showing critical amino acid residues within the structural interface between the human RANKL and RANK complex is yet available. In this study, we produced several mutants of hRANK-Ig by replacement of amino acid residue(s) and tested whether the mutants had increased binding affinity to human RANKL. Based on the results from flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance analyses, the replacement of E(125) with D(125), or E(125) and C(127) with D(125) and F(127) within loop 3 of cysteine-rich domain 3 of hRANK-Ig increases binding affinity to human RANKL over the wild-type hRANK-Ig. This result may provide the first example of improvement in the efficacy of hRANK-Ig by protein engineering and may give additional information to understand a more defined structural interface between hRANK and RANKL.

  15. Beta-D-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium: Role of Glutamate 186 in Catalysis Revealed by Site-Directed Mutagenesis, Alternate Substrates, and Active-site Inhibitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-D-xylosidase/alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium (SXA) is the most active enzyme known for catalyzing hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-xylooligosaccharides to D xylose. Catalysis and inhibitor binding by the GH43 beta-xylosidase are governed by the protonation states of catalytic ...

  16. Site-directed immobilization of antibody using EDC-NHS-activated protein A on a bimetallic-based surface plasmon resonance chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Young-Soo; Lee, Yeon Kyung

    2014-05-01

    The characteristics of a waveguide-coupled bimetallic surface plasmon resonance (WcBiM SPR) sensor using (3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide(EDC)-N-hydroxysuccinimide(NHS)-activated protein A was investigated, and the detection of IgG using the EDC-NHS-activated protein A was studied in comparison with protein A and a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The WcBiM sensor, which has a narrower full width at half maximum (FWHM) and a steeper slope, was selected since it leads to a larger change in the reflectance in the intensity detection mode. A preparation of the EDC-NHS-activated protein A for site-directed immobilization of antibodies was relative easily compared to the engineered protein G and A. In antigen-antibody interactions, the response to IgG at the concentrations of 50, 100, and 150 ng/ml was investigated. The results showed that the sensitivity of the WcBiM sensor using the EDC-NHS-activated protein A, protein A, and SAM was 0.0185 [%/(ng/ml)], 0.0065 [%/(ng/ml)], and 0.0101 [%/(ng/ml)], respectively. The lowest detectable concentrations of IgG with the EDC-NHS-activated protein A, protein A, and SAM were 4.27, 12.83, and 8.24 ng/ml, respectively. Therefore, the increased sensitivity and lower detection capability of the WcBiM SPR chip with the EDC-NHS-activated protein A suggests that it could be used in early diagnosis where the trace level concentrations of biomolecules should be detected.

  17. Site-directed mutagenesis of the glycine-rich loop of death associated protein kinase (DAPK) identifies it as a key structure for catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Laurie K; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Schavocky, James P; Watterson, D Martin; Grum-Tokars, Valerie

    2011-05-01

    Death associated protein kinase (DAPK) is a calmodulin (CaM)-regulated protein kinase that is a therapeutic target for central nervous system (CNS) disorders. We report here the results of studies that test the hypothesis of McNamara et al. (2009) that conformational selection in DAPK's glycine-rich region is key for catalytic activity. The hypothesis was tested by site-directed mutagenesis of glutamine-23 (Q23) in the middle of this loop. The glycine-rich loop exhibits localized differences in structure among DAPK conformations that correlate with different stages of the catalytic cycle. Changing the Q23 to a Valine (V23), found at the corresponding position in another CaM regulated protein kinase, results in a reduced catalytic efficiency. High resolution X-ray crystal structures of various conformations of the Q23V mutant DAPK and their superimposition with the corresponding conformations from wild type catalytic domain reveal localized changes in the glycine-rich region. The effect of the mutation on DAPK catalytic activity and the finding of only localized changes in the DAPK structure provide experimental evidence implicating conformational selection in this domain with activity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium.

  18. Kinetic isotope effects for concerted multiple proton transfer: a direct dynamics study of an active-site model of carbonic anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Smedarchina, Zorka; Siebrand, Willem; Fernández-Ramos, Antonio; Cui, Qiang

    2003-01-01

    The rate constant of the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme carbonic anhydrase II, which removes carbon dioxide from body fluids, is calculated for a model of the active site. The rate-determining step is proton transfer from a zinc-bound water molecule to a histidine residue via a bridge of two or more water molecules. The structure of the active site is known from X-ray studies except for the number and location of the water molecules. Model calculations are reported for a system of 58 atoms including a four-coordinated zinc ion connected to a methylimidazole molecule by a chain of two waters, constrained to reproduce the size of the active site. The structure and vibrational force field are calculated by an approximate density functional treatment of the proton-transfer step at the Self-Consistent-Charge Density Functional Tight Binding (SCC-DFTB) level. A single transition state is found indicating concerted triple proton transfer. Direct-dynamics calculations for proton and deuteron transfer and combinations thereof, based on the Approximate Instanton Method and on Variational Transition State Theory with Tunneling Corrections, are in fair agreement and yield rates that are considerably higher and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) that are somewhat higher than experiment. Classical rate constants obtained from Transition State Theory are smaller than the quantum values but the corresponding KIEs are five times larger. For multiple proton transfer along water bridges classical KIEs are shown to be generally larger than quantum KIEs, which invalidates the standard method to distinguish tunneling and over-barrier transfer. In the present case, a three-way comparison of classical and quantum results with the observed data is necessary to conclude that proton transfer along the bridge proceeds by tunneling. The results suggest that the two-water bridge is present in low concentrations but makes a substantial contribution to proton transport because of its high

  19. Site-directed mutagenesis of the human DNA repair enzyme HAP1: identification of residues important for AP endonuclease and RNase H activity.

    PubMed

    Barzilay, G; Walker, L J; Robson, C N; Hickson, I D

    1995-05-11

    HAP1 protein, the major apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease in human cells, is a member of a homologous family of multifunctional DNA repair enzymes including the Escherichia coli exonuclease III and Drosophila Rrp1 proteins. The most extensively characterised member of this family, exonuclease III, exhibits both DNA- and RNA-specific nuclease activities. Here, we show that the RNase H activity characteristic of exonuclease III has been conserved in the human homologue, although the products resulting from RNA cleavage are dissimilar. To identify residues important for enzymatic activity, five mutant HAP1 proteins containing single amino acid substitutions were purified and analysed in vitro. The substitutions were made at sites of conserved amino acids and targeted either acidic or histidine residues because of their known participation in the active sites of hydrolytic nucleases. One of the mutant proteins (replacement of Asp-219 by alanine) showed a markedly reduced enzymatic activity, consistent with a greatly diminished capacity to bind DNA and RNA. In contrast, replacement of Asp-90, Asp-308 or Glu-96 by alanine led to a reduction in enzymatic activity without significantly compromising nucleic acid binding. Replacement of His-255 by alanine led to only a very small reduction in enzymatic activity. Our data are consistent with the presence of a single catalytic active site for the DNA- and RNA-specific nuclease activities of the HAP1 protein. PMID:7784208

  20. ER contact sites direct late endosome transport.

    PubMed

    Wijdeven, Ruud H; Jongsma, Marlieke L M; Neefjes, Jacques; Berlin, Ilana

    2015-12-01

    Endosomes shuttle select cargoes between cellular compartments and, in doing so, maintain intracellular homeostasis and enable interactions with the extracellular space. Directionality of endosomal transport critically impinges on cargo fate, as retrograde (microtubule minus-end directed) traffic delivers vesicle contents to the lysosome for proteolysis, while the opposing anterograde (plus-end directed) movement promotes recycling and secretion. Intriguingly, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is emerging as a key player in spatiotemporal control of late endosome and lysosome transport, through the establishment of physical contacts with these organelles. Earlier studies have described how minus-end-directed motor proteins become discharged from vesicles engaged at such contact sites. Now, Raiborg et al. implicate ER-mediated interactions, induced by protrudin, in loading plus-end-directed motor kinesin-1 onto endosomes, thereby stimulating their transport toward the cell's periphery. In this review, we recast the prevailing concepts on bidirectional late endosome transport and discuss the emerging paradigm of inter-compartmental regulation from the ER-endosome interface viewpoint. PMID:26440125

  1. Engineering of Recombinant Poplar Deoxy-D-Xylulose-5-Phosphate Synthase (PtDXS) by Site-Directed Mutagenesis Improves Its Activity

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Aparajita; Preiser, Alyssa L.

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS), a thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) dependent enzyme, plays a regulatory role in the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Isopentenyl diphosphate (IDP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), the end products of this pathway, inhibit DXS by competing with ThDP. Feedback inhibition of DXS by IDP and DMADP constitutes a significant metabolic regulation of this pathway. The aim of this work was to experimentally test the effect of key residues of recombinant poplar DXS (PtDXS) in binding both ThDP and IDP. This work also described the engineering of PtDXS to improve the enzymatic activity by reducing its inhibition by IDP and DMADP. We have designed and tested modifications of PtDXS in an attempt to reduce inhibition by IDP. This could possibly be valuable by removing a feedback that limits the usefulness of the MEP pathway in biotechnological applications. Both ThDP and IDP use similar interactions for binding at the active site of the enzyme, however, ThDP being a larger molecule has more anchoring sites at the active site of the enzyme as compared to the inhibitors. A predicted enzyme structure was examined to find ligand-enzyme interactions, which are relatively more important for inhibitor-enzyme binding than ThDP-enzyme binding, followed by their modifications so that the binding of the inhibitors can be selectively affected compared to ThDP. Two alanine residues important for binding ThDP and the inhibitors were mutated to glycine. In two of the cases, both the IDP inhibition and the overall activity were increased. In another case, both the IDP inhibition and the overall activity were reduced. This provides proof of concept that it is possible to reduce the feedback from IDP on DXS activity. PMID:27548482

  2. The vhs1 mutant form of herpes simplex virus virion host shutoff protein retains significant internal ribosome entry site-directed RNA cleavage activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, P; Saffran, H A; Smiley, J R

    2001-01-01

    The virion host shutoff (vhs) protein of herpes simplex virus (HSV) triggers global shutoff of host protein synthesis and accelerated turnover of host and viral mRNAs during HSV infection. As well, it induces endoribonucleolytic cleavage of RNA substrates when produced in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL) in vitro translation system. The vhs1 point mutation (Thr 214-->Ile) eliminates vhs function during virus infection and in transiently transfected mammalian cells and was therefore previously considered to abolish vhs activity. Here we demonstrate that the vhs1 mutant protein induces readily detectable endoribonuclease activity on RNA substrates bearing the internal ribosome entry site of encephalomyocarditis virus in the RRL assay system. These data document that the vhs1 mutation does not eliminate catalytic activity and raise the possibility that the vhs-dependent endoribonuclease employs more than one mode of substrate recognition.

  3. Ring-Closing and Cross-Metathesis with Artificial Metalloenzymes Created by Covalent Active Site-Directed Hybridization of a Lipase.

    PubMed

    Basauri-Molina, Manuel; Verhoeven, Dide G A; van Schaik, Arnoldus J; Kleijn, Henk; Klein Gebbink, Robertus J M

    2015-10-26

    A series of Grubbs-type catalysts that contain lipase-inhibiting phosphoester functionalities have been synthesized and reacted with the lipase cutinase, which leads to artificial metalloenzymes for olefin metathesis. The resulting hybrids comprise the organometallic fragment that is covalently bound to the active amino acid residue of the enzyme host in an orthogonal orientation. Differences in reactivity as well as accessibility of the active site by the functionalized inhibitor became evident through variation of the anchoring motif and substituents on the N-heterocyclic carbene ligand. Such observations led to the design of a hybrid that is active in the ring-closing metathesis and the cross-metathesis of N,N-diallyl-p-toluenesulfonamide and allylbenzene, respectively, the latter being the first example of its kind in the field of artificial metalloenzymes.

  4. Site-directed isotope labelling and FTIR spectroscopy of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S; Lee, C P; Coleman, M; Patel, N; Liu, X; Marti, T; Khorana, H G; RajBhandary, U L; Rothschild, K J

    1994-08-01

    Insight into integral membrane proteins function is presently limited by the difficulty of producing three-dimensional crystals. In addition, X-ray structures of proteins normally do not provide information about the protonation state and structural changes of individual residues. We report here the first use of site-directed isotope labelling and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy to detect structural changes at the level of single residues in an integral membrane protein. Two site-directed isotope labeled (SDIL) tyrosine analogues of bacteriorhodopsin were produced which exhibit normal activity. FTIR spectroscopy shows that out of 11 tyrosines, only Tyr 185 is structurally active during the early photocycle and may be part of a proton wire.

  5. Crystal structure and mapping by site-directed mutagenesis of the collagen-binding epitope of an activated form of BM-40/SPARC/osteonectin.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, T; Hohenester, E; Göhring, W; Timpl, R

    1998-01-01

    The extracellular calcium-binding domain (positions 138-286) of the matrix protein BM-40 possesses a binding epitope of moderate affinity for several collagen types. This epitope was predicted to reside in helix alphaA and to be partially masked by helix alphaC. Here we show that deletion of helix alphaC produces a 10-fold increase in collagen affinity similar to that seen after proteolytic cleavage of this helix. The predicted removal of the steric constraint was clearly demonstrated by the crystal structure of the mutant at 2.8 A resolution. This constitutively activated mutant was used to map the collagen-binding site following alanine mutagenesis at 13 positions. Five residues were crucial for binding, R149 and N156 in helix alphaA, and L242, M245 and E246 in a loop region connecting the two EF hands of BM-40. These residues are spatially close and form a flat ring of 15 A diameter which matches the diameter of a triple-helical collagen domain. The mutations showed similar effects on binding to collagens I and IV, indicating nearly identical binding sites on both collagens. Selected mutations in the non-activated mutant DeltaI also reduced collagen binding, consistent with the same location of the epitope but in a more cryptic form in intact BM-40. PMID:9501084

  6. Active site-directed inhibitors of cytochrome P-450scc. Structural and mechanistic implications of a side chain-substituted series of amino-steroids.

    PubMed

    Sheets, J J; Vickery, L E

    1983-10-10

    A series of analogues of cholesterol, each having a shortened side chain and a primary amine group, were prepared and tested for their effects on bovine adrenocortical cholesterol side chain cleavage cytochrome P-450 (P-450scc). A previous study had shown that one derivative, 22-amino-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3 beta-ol, is a potent competitive inhibitor of the enzyme and forms a complex in which the steroid ring binds to the cholesterol site and the side chain amine forms a bond with the heme iron (Sheets, J. J., and Vickery, L. E. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79, 5773-5777). In the studies reported here, the 23-amine derivative, 23-amino-24-nor-5-cholen-3 beta-ol, was found to be an equally potent inhibitor and to be competitive with respect to cholesterol (Ki = 38 nM). Binding of the 23-amine to P-450scc also caused formation of a low spin complex with an absorption maximum at 422 nm, indicative of a nitrogen-donor ligand. Other derivatives in which the side chain amine was linked closer to the steroid, 17 beta-amino-5-androsten-3 beta-ol and (20 R + S)-20-amino-5-pregnen-3 beta-ol, were found to be only very weak inhibitors (I50 greater than 100 microM) and did not produce the 422 nm spectral form when bound. Derivatives in which the amine was attached a greater distance from the steroid ring, 24-amino-5-cholen-3 beta-ol and 25-amino-26,27-bisnor-5-cholesten-3 beta-ol, caused a progressive decrease in inhibitory potency and a failure to produce the 422 nm form on binding. The dependence of the type of interaction of these amino-steroids with P-450scc upon the amine position establishes that the steroid binding site and the heme catalytic site of the enzyme are fixed within a specific distance of one another. The heme appears to be located sufficiently close to the position that the side chain of cholesterol would occupy to allow for direct attack of an iron-bound oxidant to occur during hydroxylation and side chain cleavage.

  7. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Low dielectric response in enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Edward L.; Krishtalik, Lev I.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of charge transfer depend crucially on the dielectric reorganization of the medium. In enzymatic reactions that involve charge transfer, atomic dielectric response of the active site and of its surroundings determines the efficiency of the protein as a catalyst. We report direct spectroscopic measurements of the reorganization energy associated with the dielectric response in the active site of α-chymotrypsin. A chromophoric inhibitor of the enzyme is used as a spectroscopic probe. We find that water strongly affects the dielectric reorganization in the active site of the enzyme in solution. The reorganization energy of the protein matrix in the vicinity of the active site is similar to that of low-polarity solvents. Surprisingly, water exhibits an anomalously high dielectric response that cannot be described in terms of the dielectric continuum theory. As a result, sequestering the active site from the aqueous environment inside low-dielectric enzyme body dramatically reduces the dielectric reorganization. This reduction is particularly important for controlling the rate of enzymatic reactions. PMID:10681440

  9. Supramolecular Chemistry And Self-assembly Special Feature: Selective immobilization of proteins to self-assembled monolayers presenting active site-directed capture ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodneland, Christian D.; Lee, Young-Sam; Min, Dal-Hee; Mrksich, Milan

    2002-04-01

    This paper describes a method for the selective and covalent immobilization of proteins to surfaces with control over the density and orientation of the protein. The strategy is based on binding of the serine esterase cutinase to a self-assembled monolayer presenting a phosphonate ligand and the subsequent displacement reaction that covalently binds the ligand to the enzyme active site. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy showed that cutinase binds irreversibly to a monolayer presenting the capture ligand at a density of 1% mixed among tri(ethylene glycol) groups. The covalent immobilization is specific for cutinase, and the glycol-terminated monolayer effectively prevents unwanted nonspecific adsorption of proteins. To demonstrate that the method could be used to immobilize proteins of interest, a cutinase-calmodulin fusion protein was constructed and immobilized to the monolayer. SPR showed that calcineurin selectively associated with the immobilized calmodulin. This capture ligand immobilization method combines the advantages that the immobilization reaction is highly selective for the intended protein, the tether is covalent and, hence, stable, and the method avoids the need for synthetic modification and rigorous purification of proteins before immobilization. These characteristics make the method well suited to a range of applications and, in particular, for constructing protein microarrays.

  10. Proinflammatory secreted phospholipase A2 type IIA (sPLA-IIA) induces integrin activation through direct binding to a newly identified binding site (site 2) in integrins αvβ3, α4β1, and α5β1.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masaaki; Zhu, Kan; Fujita, Chitose K; Zhao, Min; Lam, Kit S; Kurth, Mark J; Takada, Yoko K; Takada, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are activated by signaling from inside the cell (inside-out signaling) through global conformational changes of integrins. We recently discovered that fractalkine activates integrins in the absence of CX3CR1 through the direct binding of fractalkine to a ligand-binding site in the integrin headpiece (site 2) that is distinct from the classical RGD-binding site (site 1). We propose that fractalkine binding to the newly identified site 2 induces activation of site 1 though conformational changes (in an allosteric mechanism). We reasoned that site 2-mediated activation of integrins is not limited to fractalkine. Human secreted phospholipase A2 type IIA (sPLA2-IIA), a proinflammatory protein, binds to integrins αvβ3 and α4β1 (site 1), and this interaction initiates a signaling pathway that leads to cell proliferation and inflammation. Human sPLA2-IIA does not bind to M-type receptor very well. Here we describe that sPLA2-IIA directly activated purified soluble integrin αvβ3 and transmembrane αvβ3 on the cell surface. This activation did not require catalytic activity or M-type receptor. Docking simulation predicted that sPLA2-IIA binds to site 2 in the closed-headpiece of αvβ3. A peptide from site 2 of integrin β1 specifically bound to sPLA2-IIA and suppressed sPLA2-IIA-induced integrin activation. This suggests that sPLA2-IIA activates αvβ3 through binding to site 2. sPLA2-IIA also activated integrins α4β1 and α5β1 in a site 2-mediated manner. We recently identified small compounds that bind to sPLA2-IIA and suppress integrin-sPLA2-IIA interaction (e.g. compound 21 (Cmpd21)). Cmpd21 effectively suppressed sPLA2-IIA-induced integrin activation. These results define a novel mechanism of proinflammatory action of sPLA2-IIA through integrin activation. PMID:25398877

  11. Enhanced enzyme stability through site-directed covalent immobilization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jeffrey Chun Yu; Hutchings, Christopher Hayden; Lindsay, Mark Jeffrey; Werner, Christopher James; Bundy, Bradley Charles

    2015-01-10

    Breakthroughs in enzyme immobilization have enabled increased enzyme recovery and reusability, leading to significant decreases in the cost of enzyme use and fueling biocatalysis growth. However, current enzyme immobilization techniques suffer from leaching, enzyme stability, and recoverability and reusability issues. Moreover, these techniques lack the ability to control the orientation of the immobilized enzymes. To determine the impact of orientation on covalently immobilized enzyme activity and stability, we apply our PRECISE (Protein Residue-Explicit Covalent Immobilization for Stability Enhancement) system to a model enzyme, T4 lysozyme. The PRECISE system uses non-canonical amino acid incorporation and the Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition "click" reaction to enable directed enzyme immobilization at rationally chosen residues throughout an enzyme. Unlike previous site-specific systems, the PRECISE system is a truly covalent immobilization method. Utilizing this system, enzymes immobilized at proximate and distant locations from the active site were tested for activity and stability under denaturing conditions. Our results demonstrate that orientation control of covalently immobilized enzymes can provide activity and stability benefits exceeding that of traditional random covalent immobilization techniques. PRECISE immobilized enzymes were 50 and 73% more active than randomly immobilized enzymes after harsh freeze-thaw and chemical denaturant treatments.

  12. Engineering and Directed Evolution of a Ca2+ Binding Site A-Deficient AprE Mutant Reveal an Essential Contribution of the Loop Leu75–Leu82 to Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Romero-García, Eliel R.; Téllez-Valencia, Alfredo; Trujillo, María F.; Sampedro, José G.; Nájera, Hugo; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; García-Soto, Jesús; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario

    2009-01-01

    An aprE mutant from B. subtilis 168 lacking the connecting loop Leu75–Leu82 which is predicted to encode a Ca2+ binding site was constructed. Expression of the mutant gene (aprEΔLeu75–Leu82) produced B. subtilis colonies lacking protease activity. Intrinsic fluorescence analysis revealed spectral differences between wild-type AprE and AprEΔL75–L82. An AprEΔL75–L82 variant with reestablished enzyme activity was selected by directed evolution. The novel mutations Thr66Met/Gly102Asp located in positions which are predicted to be important for catalytic activity were identified in this variant. Although these mutations restored hydrolysis, they had no effect with respect to thermal inactivation of AprEΔL75–L82 T66M G102D. These results support the proposal that in addition to function as a calcium binding site, the loop that connects β-sheet e3 with α-helix c plays a structural role on enzyme activity of AprE from B. subtilis 168. PMID:19710937

  13. Direct Detection and Characterization of Chloride in the Active Site of the Low-pH Form of Sulfite Oxidase Using ESEEM Spectroscopy, Isotopic Labeling, and DFT Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Eric L.; Astashkin, Andrei V.; Ganyushin, Dmitry; Riplinger, Christoph; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Neese, Frank; Enemark, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) investigations were carried out on samples of the low-pH (lpH) form of vertebrate sulfite oxidase (SO) prepared with 35Cl- and 37Cl-enriched buffers as well as with buffer containing the natural abundance of Cl isotopes. The isotope-related changes observed in the ESEEM spectra provide direct and unequivocal evidence that Cl− is located in close proximity to the Mo(V) center of lpH SO. The measured isotropic hyperfine interaction constant of about 4 MHz (35Cl) suggests that the Cl− ion is either weakly coordinated to Mo(V) at its otherwise vacant axial position, trans to the oxo ligand, or is hydrogen-bonded to the equatorial exchangeable OH ligand. Scalar relativistic all-electron density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole interaction parameters, along with steric and energetic arguments, strongly support the possibility that Cl− is hydrogen-bonded to the equatorial OH ligand rather than being directly coordinated to the Mo(V). PMID:19402624

  14. Identification of essential residues for binding and activation in the human 5-HT7(a) serotonin receptor by molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Impellizzeri, Agata Antonina Rita; Pappalardo, Matteo; Basile, Livia; Manfra, Ornella; Andressen, Kjetil Wessel; Krobert, Kurt Allen; Messina, Angela; Levy, Finn Olav; Guccione, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The human 5-HT7 receptor is expressed in both the central nervous system and peripheral tissues and is a potential drug target in behavioral and psychiatric disorders. We examined molecular determinants of ligand binding and G protein activation by the human 5-HT7(a) receptor. The role of several key residues in the 7th transmembrane domain (TMD) and helix 8 were elucidated combining in silico and experimental mutagenesis. Several single and two double point mutations of the 5-HT7(a) wild type receptor were made (W7.33V, E7.35T, E7.35R, E7.35D, E7.35A, R7.36V, Y7.43A, Y7.43F, Y7.43T, R8.52D, D8.53K; E7.35T-R7.36V, R8.52D-D8.53K), and their effects upon ligand binding were assessed by radioligand binding using a potent agonist (5-CT) and a potent antagonist (SB269970). In addition, the ability of the mutated 5-HT7(a) receptors to activate G protein after 5-HT-stimulation was determined through activation of adenylyl cyclase. In silico investigation on mutated receptors substantiated the predicted importance of TM7 and showed critical roles of residues E7.35, W7.33, R7.36 and Y7.43 in agonist and antagonist binding and conformational changes of receptor structure affecting adenylyl cyclase activation. Experimental data showed that mutants E7.35T and E7.35R were incapable of ligand binding and adenylyl cyclase activation, consistent with a requirement for a negatively charged residue at this position. The mutant R8.52D was unable to activate adenylyl cyclase, despite unaffected ligand binding, consistent with the R8.52 residue playing an important role in the receptor-G protein interface. The mutants Y7.43A and Y7.43T displayed reduced agonist binding and AC agonist potency, not seen in Y7.43F, consistent with a requirement for an aromatic residue at this position. Knowledge of the molecular interactions important in h5-HT7 receptor ligand binding and G protein activation will aid the design of selective h5-HT7 receptor ligands for potential pharmacological use. PMID

  15. Documentation of cultural heritage sites using the INSPIRE directive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkadolou, Eleni; Prastacos, Poulicos

    2016-08-01

    The INSPIRE directive, adopted by the EC in 2007 provides the guidelines for the organization of all geographic data and is the basis for establishing a Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI). Documentation of cultural heritage sites such as archeological areas, historic places and others is not a thematic area addressed in the directive. However, as discussed in this paper the directive can be extended to cover the documentation of these sites as well. The location of an archaeological area and its monuments, its legal status, the surrounding physical environment (NATURA protected areas), the protection zones around the site and the permitted development can be documented following the INSPIRE directive. Additionally, results of research carried out in these sites such as geophysical surveys, use of satellite images or topographical surveys can be also organized using the INSPIRE guidelines.

  16. Expression of Bacillus protease (Protease BYA) from Bacillus sp. Y in Bacillus subtilis and enhancement of its specific activity by site-directed mutagenesis-improvement in productivity of detergent enzyme-.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Seiichi; Shimogaki, Hisao; Ohdera, Motoyasu; Asai, Yoshio; Oba, Kenkichi; Iwama, Masanori; Irie, Masachika

    2006-01-01

    An attempt was made to express protease BYA produced by an alkalophilic Bacillus sp. Y in Bacillus subtilis by gene engineering methods. The gene encoding protease BYA was cloned from Bacillus sp. Y, and expression vector pTA71 was constructed from the amylase promoter of Bacillus licheniformis, DNA fragments encoding the open reading frame of protease BYA, and pUB110. Protease BYA was secreted at an activity level of 5100 APU/ml in the common industrial culture medium of Bacillus subtilis transformed with pTA71. We then attempted to increase the specific activity of protease BYA by site-directed mutagenesis. Amino acid residue Ala29 next to catalytic Asp30 was replaced by one of three uncharged amino acid residues (Val29, Leu29, Ile29), and each mutant enzyme was expressed and isolated from the culture medium. Val29 mutant enzyme was secreted at an activity level of greater than 7000 APU/ml in culture medium, and its specific activity was 1.5-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. Other mutant enzymes had specific activity similar to that of the original one and were less stabile than the wild-type enzyme. It can be thought that the substitution at amino acid residue 29 affects the level of activity and stability of protease BYA.

  17. Expression of Bacillus protease (Protease BYA) from Bacillus sp. Y in Bacillus subtilis and enhancement of its specific activity by site-directed mutagenesis-improvement in productivity of detergent enzyme-.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Seiichi; Shimogaki, Hisao; Ohdera, Motoyasu; Asai, Yoshio; Oba, Kenkichi; Iwama, Masanori; Irie, Masachika

    2006-01-01

    An attempt was made to express protease BYA produced by an alkalophilic Bacillus sp. Y in Bacillus subtilis by gene engineering methods. The gene encoding protease BYA was cloned from Bacillus sp. Y, and expression vector pTA71 was constructed from the amylase promoter of Bacillus licheniformis, DNA fragments encoding the open reading frame of protease BYA, and pUB110. Protease BYA was secreted at an activity level of 5100 APU/ml in the common industrial culture medium of Bacillus subtilis transformed with pTA71. We then attempted to increase the specific activity of protease BYA by site-directed mutagenesis. Amino acid residue Ala29 next to catalytic Asp30 was replaced by one of three uncharged amino acid residues (Val29, Leu29, Ile29), and each mutant enzyme was expressed and isolated from the culture medium. Val29 mutant enzyme was secreted at an activity level of greater than 7000 APU/ml in culture medium, and its specific activity was 1.5-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. Other mutant enzymes had specific activity similar to that of the original one and were less stabile than the wild-type enzyme. It can be thought that the substitution at amino acid residue 29 affects the level of activity and stability of protease BYA. PMID:16394504

  18. Direct Raman measurement of an elevated base pKa in the active site of a small ribozyme in a precatalytic conformation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Man; Spitale, Robert C; Volpini, Rosaria; Krucinska, Jolanta; Cristalli, Gloria; Carey, Paul R; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2009-09-16

    Catalytic RNA molecules can achieve rate acceleration by shifting base pK(a) values toward neutrality. Prior evidence has suggested that base A38 of the hairpin ribozyme plays an important role in phosphoryl transfer, possibly functioning as a general acid, or by orienting a specific water molecule for proton transfer. To address the role of A38, we used Raman spectroscopy to measure directly the pK(a) of the N1-imino moiety in the context of hairpin ribozyme crystals representative of a "precatalytic" conformation. The results revealed that the pK(a) of A38 is shifted to 5.46 +/- 0.05 relative to 3.68 +/- 0.06 derived from a reference solution of the nucleotide AMP. The elevated pK(a) correlates well with the first titration point of the macroscopic pH-rate profile of the hairpin ribozyme in solution and strongly supports A38 as a general acid catalyst in bond scission. The results confirm that A38 is protonated before the transition state, which would promote phosphorane development. Overall, the results establish a cogent structure-function paradigm that expands our understanding of how RNA structure can enhance nucleobase reactivity to catalyze biological reactions.

  19. Dissecting the active site of a photoreceptor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Wouter; Hara, Miwa; Ren, Jie; Moghadam, Farzaneh; Xie, Aihua; Kumauchi, Masato

    While enzymes are quite large molecules, functionally important chemical events are often limited to a small region of the protein: the active site. The physical and chemical properties of residues at such active sites are often strongly altered compared to the same groups dissolved in water. Understanding such effects is important for unraveling the mechanisms underlying protein function and for protein engineering, but has proven challenging. Here we report on our ongoing efforts on using photoactive yellow protein (PYP), a bacterial photoreceptor, as a model system for such effects. We will report on the following questions: How many residues affect active site properties? Are these residues in direct physical contact with the active site? Can functionally important residues be recognized in the crystal structure of a protein? What structural resolution is needed to understand active sites? What spectroscopic techniques are most informative? Which weak interactions dominate active site properties?

  20. Characterization of active sites in zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, J.; Bug, A.; Nicol, J.M.

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Atomic-level details of the interaction of adsorbed molecules with active sites in catalysts are urgently needed to facilitate development of more effective and/or environmentally benign catalysts. To this end the authors have carried out neutron scattering studies combined with theoretical calculations of the dynamics of small molecules inside the cavities of zeolite catalysts. The authors have developed the use of H{sub 2} as a probe of adsorption sites by observing the hindered rotations of the adsorbed H{sub 2} molecule, and they were able to show that an area near the four-rings is the most likely adsorption site for H{sub 2} in zeolite A while adsorption of H{sub 2} near cations located on six-ring sites decreases in strength as Ni {approximately} Co > Ca > Zn {approximately} Na. Vibrational and rotational motions of ethylene and cyclopropane adsorption complexes were used as a measure for zeolite-adsorbate interactions. Preliminary studies of the binding of water, ammonia, and methylamines were carried out in a number of related guest-host materials.

  1. Efficient site-directed saturation mutagenesis using degenerate oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Steffens, David L; Williams, John G K

    2007-07-01

    We describe a reliable protocol for constructing single-site saturation mutagenesis libraries consisting of all 20 naturally occurring amino acids at a specific site within a protein. Such libraries are useful for structure-function studies and directed evolution. This protocol extends the utility of Stratagene's QuikChange Site-Directed Mutagenesis Kit, which is primarily recommended for single amino acid substitutions. Two complementary primers are synthesized, containing a degenerate mixture of the four bases at the three positions of the selected codon. These primers are added to starting plasmid template and thermal cycled to produce mutant DNA molecules, which are subsequently transformed into competent bacteria. The protocol does not require purification of mutagenic oligonucleotides or PCR products. This reduces both the cost and turnaround time in high-throughput directed evolution applications. We have utilized this protocol to generate over 200 site-saturation libraries in a DNA polymerase, with a success rate of greater than 95%. PMID:17595310

  2. Examination of the thiamin diphosphate binding site in yeast transketolase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Meshalkina, L; Nilsson, U; Wikner, C; Kostikowa, T; Schneider, G

    1997-03-01

    The role of two conserved amino acid residues in the thiamin diphosphate binding site of yeast transketolase has been analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis. Replacement of E162, which is part of a cluster of glutamic acid residues at the subunit interface, by alanine or glutamine results in mutant enzymes with most catalytic properties similar to wild-type enzyme. The two mutant enzymes show, however, significant increases in the K0.5 values for thiamin diphosphate in the absence of substrate and in the lag of the reaction progress curves. This suggests that the interaction of E162 with residue E418, and possibly E167, from the second subunit is important for formation and stabilization of the transketolase dimer. Replacement of the conserved residue D382, which is buried upon binding of thiamin diphosphate, by asparagine and alanine, results in mutant enzymes severely impaired in thiamin diphosphate binding and catalytic efficiency. The 25-80-fold increase in K0.5 for thiamin diphosphate suggests that D382 is involved in cofactor binding, probably by electrostatic compensation of the positive charge of the thiazolium ring and stabilization of a flexible loop at the active site. The decrease in catalytic activities in the D382 mutants indicates that this residue might also be important in subsequent steps in catalysis.

  3. Site-directed mutations in the lanthipeptide mutacin 1140.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaorong; Wilson-Stanford, Shawanda; Cromwell, William; Hillman, Jeffrey D; Guerrero, Adam; Allen, Charlotte A; Sorg, Joseph A; Smith, Leif

    2013-07-01

    The oral bacterium Streptococcus mutans, strain JH1140, produces the antibiotic mutacin 1140. Mutacin 1140 belongs to a group of antibiotics called lanthipeptides. More specifically, mutacin 1140 is related to the epidermin type A(I) lanthipeptides. Mutagenesis experiments of this group of lanthipeptides have been primarily restricted to the posttranslationally modified meso-lanthionine and 3-methyllanthionine residues. Site-directed mutagenesis of the core peptide of mutacin 1140 was performed using the suicide vector pVA891. Substitutions of the N-terminal residue, the charged residue in the hinge region, and residues in ring A and intertwined rings C and D were investigated. A truncation and insertion of residues in ring A and intertwined rings C and D were also performed to determine whether or not they would alter the antimicrobial activity of the producing strain. Bioassays revealed that five of 14 mutants studied had improved antimicrobial activity against the indicator strain Micrococcus luteus ATCC 10240. MICs against Streptococcus mutans UA159, Streptococcus pneumoniae ATCC 27336, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Clostridium difficile UK1, and Micrococcus luteus ATCC 10240 were determined for three mutacin 1140 variants that had the most significant increases in bioactivity in the M. luteus bioassay. This mutagenesis study of the epidermin group of lanthipeptides shows that antimicrobial activity can be significantly improved.

  4. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Catalytic efficiency of expressed aromatase following site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kadohama, N; Zhou, D; Chen, S; Osawa, Y

    1993-05-13

    Mutant aromatase cytochrome P-450s, expressed in CHO cells after transfection with cDNAs, have been characterized in terms of their catalytic efficiencies. After solubilization from microsomes, specific aromatase P-450 content of wild-type and mutants Pro308Phe, Asp309Asn, Asp309Ala and Phe406Arg was quantitated by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Microsomal aromatase activity was determined by the 3H-water method using [1 beta-3H]androstenedione as substrate. Estimations of the actual turnover rate (catalytic efficiency) were derived from the combined data. The P-450 content in the mutants varied but was always less than that in the wild type. Hence, the decreases in the Vmax observed in the mutant enzymes did not correlate completely with reductions in catalytic effectiveness. In recent studies on the structure-function relationship of aromatase cytochrome P-450, the observed reduction of enzyme activity in terms of Vmax following site-directed mutagenesis led to the assumption that there was a corresponding loss of catalytic effectiveness. The present study reveals that a lower P-450 content can contribute significantly to decreasing catalytic activity in the mutants. In fact, in mutant Phe406Arg which exhibited virtually no catalytically active aromatase, the specific P-450 content was below the detectable level. Because of its location, the result of this latter mutation could be a major structural perturbation of the heme-binding property. Thus, interpretation of losses and reductions in aromatase activity resulting from single amino-acid replacement should take into account changes in the specific content of aromatase cytochrome P-450.

  6. Binding of estrogen receptors to switch sites and regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus of activated B cells suggests a direct influence of estrogen on antibody expression.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bart G; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Neale, Geoff; Gearhart, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Females and males differ in antibody isotype expression patterns and in immune responses to foreign- and self-antigens. For example, systemic lupus erythematosus is a condition that associates with the production of isotype-skewed anti-self antibodies, and exhibits a 9:1 female:male disease ratio. To explain differences between B cell responses in males and females, we sought to identify direct interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus. This effort was encouraged by our previous identification of estrogen response elements (ERE) in heavy chain switch (S) regions. We conducted a full-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis (ChIP-seq) using DNA from LPS-activated B cells and an ERα-specific antibody. Results revealed ER binding to a wide region of DNA, spanning sequences from the JH cluster to Cδ, with peaks in Eμ and Sμ sites. Additional peaks of ERα binding were coincident with hs1,2 and hs4 sites in the 3' regulatory region (3'RR) of the heavy chain locus. This first demonstration of direct binding of ER to key regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin locus supports our hypothesis that estrogen and other nuclear hormone receptors and ligands may directly influence antibody expression and class switch recombination (CSR). Our hypothesis encourages the conduct of new experiments to evaluate the consequences of ER binding. A better understanding of ER:DNA interactions in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, and respective mechanisms, may ultimately translate to better control of antibody expression, better protection against pathogens, and prevention of pathologies caused by auto-immune disease. PMID:27494228

  7. Binding of estrogen receptors to switch sites and regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus of activated B cells suggests a direct influence of estrogen on antibody expression.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bart G; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Neale, Geoff; Gearhart, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Females and males differ in antibody isotype expression patterns and in immune responses to foreign- and self-antigens. For example, systemic lupus erythematosus is a condition that associates with the production of isotype-skewed anti-self antibodies, and exhibits a 9:1 female:male disease ratio. To explain differences between B cell responses in males and females, we sought to identify direct interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus. This effort was encouraged by our previous identification of estrogen response elements (ERE) in heavy chain switch (S) regions. We conducted a full-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis (ChIP-seq) using DNA from LPS-activated B cells and an ERα-specific antibody. Results revealed ER binding to a wide region of DNA, spanning sequences from the JH cluster to Cδ, with peaks in Eμ and Sμ sites. Additional peaks of ERα binding were coincident with hs1,2 and hs4 sites in the 3' regulatory region (3'RR) of the heavy chain locus. This first demonstration of direct binding of ER to key regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin locus supports our hypothesis that estrogen and other nuclear hormone receptors and ligands may directly influence antibody expression and class switch recombination (CSR). Our hypothesis encourages the conduct of new experiments to evaluate the consequences of ER binding. A better understanding of ER:DNA interactions in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, and respective mechanisms, may ultimately translate to better control of antibody expression, better protection against pathogens, and prevention of pathologies caused by auto-immune disease.

  8. Exposing a Hidden Functional Site of C-reactive Protein by Site-directed Mutagenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjay K.; Thirumalai, Avinash; Hammond, David J.; Pangburn, Michael K.; Mishra, Vinod K.; Johnson, David A.; Rusiñol, Antonio E.; Agrawal, Alok

    2012-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a cyclic pentameric protein whose major binding specificity, at physiological pH, is for substances bearing exposed phosphocholine moieties. Another pentameric form of CRP, which exists at acidic pH, displays binding activity for oxidized LDL (ox-LDL). The ox-LDL-binding site in CRP, which is hidden at physiological pH, is exposed by acidic pH-induced structural changes in pentameric CRP. The aim of this study was to expose the hidden ox-LDL-binding site of CRP by site-directed mutagenesis and to generate a CRP mutant that can bind to ox-LDL without the requirement of acidic pH. Mutation of Glu42, an amino acid that participates in intersubunit interactions in the CRP pentamer and is buried, to Gln resulted in a CRP mutant (E42Q) that showed significant binding activity for ox-LDL at physiological pH. For maximal binding to ox-LDL, E42Q CRP required a pH much less acidic than that required by wild-type CRP. At any given pH, E42Q CRP was more efficient than wild-type CRP in binding to ox-LDL. Like wild-type CRP, E42Q CRP remained pentameric at acidic pH. Also, E42Q CRP was more efficient than wild-type CRP in binding to several other deposited, conformationally altered proteins. The E42Q CRP mutant provides a tool to investigate the functions of CRP in defined animal models of inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis because wild-type CRP requires acidic pH to bind to deposited, conformationally altered proteins, including ox-LDL, and available animal models may not have sufficient acidosis or other possible modifiers of the pentameric structure of CRP at the sites of inflammation. PMID:22158621

  9. Protein engineering: single or multiple site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Pei-Chung; Vaisvila, Romualdas

    2013-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis techniques are invaluable tools in molecular biology to study the structural and functional properties of a protein. To expedite the time required and simplify methods for mutagenesis, we recommend two protocols in this chapter. The first method for single site-directed mutagenesis, which includes point mutations, insertions, or deletions, can be achieved by an inverse PCR strategy with mutagenic primers and the high-fidelity Phusion(®) DNA Polymerase to introduce a site-directed mutation with exceptional efficiency. The second method is for engineering multiple mutations into a gene of interest. This can be completed in one step by PCR with mutagenic primers and by assembling all mutagenized PCR products using the Gibson Assembly™ Master Mix. This method allows multiple nucleotides to be changed simultaneously, which not only saves time but also reagents compared to traditional methods of mutagenesis. PMID:23423897

  10. Directed site exploration for permeable reactive barrier design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.; Graettinger, A.J.; Moylan, J.; Reeves, H.W.

    2009-01-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are being employed for in situ site remediation of groundwater that is typically flowing under natural gradients. Site characterization is of critical importance to the success of a PRB. A design-specific site exploration approach called quantitatively directed exploration (QDE) is presented. The QDE approach employs three spatially related matrices: (1) covariance of input parameters, (2) sensitivity of model outputs, and (3) covariance of model outputs to identify the most important location to explore based on a specific design. Sampling at the location that most reduces overall site uncertainty produces a higher probability of success of a particular design. The QDE approach is demonstrated on the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO, a case study where a PRB was installed and failed. It is shown that additional quantitatively directed site exploration during the design phase could have prevented the remedial failure that was caused by missing a geologic body having high hydraulic conductivity at the south end of the barrier. The most contributing input parameter approach using head uncertainty clearly indicated where the next sampling should be made toward the high hydraulic conductivity zone. This case study demonstrates the need to include the specific design as well as site characterization uncertainty when choosing the sampling locations. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Directed site exploration for permeable reactive barrier design.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jejung; Graettinger, Andrew J; Moylan, John; Reeves, Howard W

    2009-02-15

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are being employed for in situ site remediation of groundwater that is typically flowing under natural gradients. Site characterization is of critical importance to the success of a PRB. A design-specific site exploration approach called quantitatively directed exploration (QDE) is presented. The QDE approach employs three spatially related matrices: (1) covariance of input parameters, (2) sensitivity of model outputs, and (3) covariance of model outputs to identify the most important location to explore based on a specific design. Sampling at the location that most reduces overall site uncertainty produces a higher probability of success of a particular design. The QDE approach is demonstrated on the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO, a case study where a PRB was installed and failed. It is shown that additional quantitatively directed site exploration during the design phase could have prevented the remedial failure that was caused by missing a geologic body having high hydraulic conductivity at the south end of the barrier. The most contributing input parameter approach using head uncertainty clearly indicated where the next sampling should be made toward the high hydraulic conductivity zone. This case study demonstrates the need to include the specific design as well as site characterization uncertainty when choosing the sampling locations. PMID:18573602

  12. Directed site exploration for permeable reactive barrier design.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jejung; Graettinger, Andrew J; Moylan, John; Reeves, Howard W

    2009-02-15

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are being employed for in situ site remediation of groundwater that is typically flowing under natural gradients. Site characterization is of critical importance to the success of a PRB. A design-specific site exploration approach called quantitatively directed exploration (QDE) is presented. The QDE approach employs three spatially related matrices: (1) covariance of input parameters, (2) sensitivity of model outputs, and (3) covariance of model outputs to identify the most important location to explore based on a specific design. Sampling at the location that most reduces overall site uncertainty produces a higher probability of success of a particular design. The QDE approach is demonstrated on the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO, a case study where a PRB was installed and failed. It is shown that additional quantitatively directed site exploration during the design phase could have prevented the remedial failure that was caused by missing a geologic body having high hydraulic conductivity at the south end of the barrier. The most contributing input parameter approach using head uncertainty clearly indicated where the next sampling should be made toward the high hydraulic conductivity zone. This case study demonstrates the need to include the specific design as well as site characterization uncertainty when choosing the sampling locations.

  13. An Approach to Identify Site Response Directivity of Accelerometer Sites and Application to the Iranian Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Gaudio, Vincenzo; Pierri, Pierpaolo; Rajabi, Ali M.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, several workers have found numerous cases of sites characterised by significant azimuthal variation of dynamic response to seismic shaking. The causes of this phenomenon are still unclear, but are possibly related to combinations of geological and geomorphological factors determining a polarisation of resonance effects. To improve their comprehension, it would be desirable to extend the database of observations on this phenomenon. Thus, considering that unrevealed cases of site response directivity can be "hidden" among the sites of accelerometer networks, we developed a two-stage approach of data mining from existing strong motion databases to identify sites affected by directional amplification. The proposed procedure first calculates Arias Intensity tensor components from accelerometer recordings of each site to determine mean directional variations of total shaking energy. Then, at the sites where a significant anisotropy appears in ground motion, azimuthal variations of HVSR values (spectral ratios between horizontal and vertical components of recordings) are analysed to confirm the occurrence of site resonance conditions. We applied this technique to a database of recordings acquired by accelerometer stations in the Iranian area. The results of this investigation pointed out some sites affected by directional resonance that appear to be correlated to the orientation of local tectonic lineaments, these being mostly transversal to the direction of maximum shaking. Comparing Arias Intensities observed at these sites with theoretical estimates provided by ground motion prediction equations, the presence of significant site amplifications was confirmed. The magnitude of the amplification factors appear to be correlated to the results of HVSR analysis, even though the pattern of dispersion of HVSR values suggests that while high peak values of spectral ratios are indicative of strong amplifications, lower values do not necessarily imply lower

  14. Site-Directed Spectroscopic Probes of Actomyosin Structural Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, David D.; Kast, David; Korman, Vicci L.

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopy of myosin and actin has entered a golden age. High-resolution crystal structures of isolated actin and myosin have been used to construct detailed models for the dynamic actomyosin interactions that move muscle. Improved protein mutagenesis and expression technologies have facilitated site-directed labeling with fluorescent and spin probes. Spectroscopic instrumentation has achieved impressive advances in sensitivity and resolution. Here we highlight the contributions of site-directed spectroscopic probes to understanding the structural dynamics of myosin II and its actin complexes in solution and muscle fibers. We emphasize studies that probe directly the movements of structural elements within the myosin catalytic and light-chain domains, and changes in the dynamics of both actin and myosin due to their alternating strong and weak interactions in the ATPase cycle. A moving picture emerges in which single biochemical states produce multiple structural states, and transitions between states of order and dynamic disorder power the actomyosin engine. PMID:19416073

  15. Direct GR Binding Sites Potentiate Clusters of TF Binding across the Human Genome.

    PubMed

    Vockley, Christopher M; D'Ippolito, Anthony M; McDowell, Ian C; Majoros, William H; Safi, Alexias; Song, Lingyun; Crawford, Gregory E; Reddy, Timothy E

    2016-08-25

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds the human genome at >10,000 sites but only regulates the expression of hundreds of genes. To determine the functional effect of each site, we measured the glucocorticoid (GC) responsive activity of nearly all GR binding sites (GBSs) captured using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in A549 cells. 13% of GBSs assayed had GC-induced activity. The responsive sites were defined by direct GR binding via a GC response element (GRE) and exclusively increased reporter-gene expression. Meanwhile, most GBSs lacked GC-induced reporter activity. The non-responsive sites had epigenetic features of steady-state enhancers and clustered around direct GBSs. Together, our data support a model in which clusters of GBSs observed with ChIP-seq reflect interactions between direct and tethered GBSs over tens of kilobases. We further show that those interactions can synergistically modulate the activity of direct GBSs and may therefore play a major role in driving gene activation in response to GCs. PMID:27565349

  16. Direct GR Binding Sites Potentiate Clusters of TF Binding across the Human Genome.

    PubMed

    Vockley, Christopher M; D'Ippolito, Anthony M; McDowell, Ian C; Majoros, William H; Safi, Alexias; Song, Lingyun; Crawford, Gregory E; Reddy, Timothy E

    2016-08-25

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds the human genome at >10,000 sites but only regulates the expression of hundreds of genes. To determine the functional effect of each site, we measured the glucocorticoid (GC) responsive activity of nearly all GR binding sites (GBSs) captured using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in A549 cells. 13% of GBSs assayed had GC-induced activity. The responsive sites were defined by direct GR binding via a GC response element (GRE) and exclusively increased reporter-gene expression. Meanwhile, most GBSs lacked GC-induced reporter activity. The non-responsive sites had epigenetic features of steady-state enhancers and clustered around direct GBSs. Together, our data support a model in which clusters of GBSs observed with ChIP-seq reflect interactions between direct and tethered GBSs over tens of kilobases. We further show that those interactions can synergistically modulate the activity of direct GBSs and may therefore play a major role in driving gene activation in response to GCs.

  17. Site-directed deep electronic tunneling through a molecular network

    SciTech Connect

    Caspary, Maytal; Peskin, Uri

    2005-10-15

    Electronic tunneling in a complex molecular network of N(>2) donor/acceptor sites, connected by molecular bridges, is analyzed. The 'deep' tunneling dynamics is formulated using a recursive perturbation expansion, yielding a McConnell-type reduced N-level model Hamiltonian. Applications to models of molecular junctions demonstrate that the donor-bridge contact parameters can be tuned in order to control the tunneling dynamics and particularly to direct the tunneling pathway to either one of the various acceptors.

  18. Catalysis: Elusive active site in focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labinger, Jay A.

    2016-08-01

    The identification of the active site of an iron-containing catalyst raises hopes of designing practically useful catalysts for the room-temperature conversion of methane to methanol, a potential fuel for vehicles. See Letter p.317

  19. Site-directed isotope labeling and ATR-FTIR difference spectroscopy of bacteriorhodopsin: the peptide carbonyl group of Tyr 185 is structurally active during the bR-->N transition.

    PubMed

    Ludlam, C F; Sonar, S; Lee, C P; Coleman, M; Herzfeld, J; RajBhandary, U L; Rothschild, K J

    1995-01-10

    The largest secondary structural change occurs in the bacteriorhodopsin (bR) photocycle during the M-->N transition. In this work site-directed isotope labeling (SDIL) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) difference spectroscopy were used to investigate this conformational change. L-Tyrosine containing a 13C isotope at the carbonyl carbon was selectively incorporated at Tyr 57, Tyr 147, and Tyr 185 by SDIL. This involves the cell-free expression of bR in the presence of Escherichia coli suppressor tRNA(CUATyr) aminoacylated with L-[1-13C]Tyr. ATR-FTIR difference spectroscopy reveals that of the 11 tyrosines, only the peptide carbonyl group of Tyr 185 undergoes a significant structural change during the bR-->N transition. Along with other spectroscopic evidence, this result suggests that the Tyr 185-Pro 186 region of the protein is structurally active and may function as a hinge which facilitates the tilt of the cytoplasmic portion of the F-helix in bacteriorhodopsin during the M-->N transition.

  20. Macromolecular recognition directs calcium ions to coccolith mineralization sites.

    PubMed

    Gal, Assaf; Wirth, Richard; Kopka, Joachim; Fratzl, Peter; Faivre, Damien; Scheffel, André

    2016-08-01

    Many organisms form elaborate mineralized structures, constituted of highly organized arrangements of crystals and organic macromolecules. The localization of crystals within these structures is presumably determined by the interaction of nucleating macromolecules with the mineral phase. Here we show that, preceding nucleation, a specific interaction between soluble organic molecules and an organic backbone structure directs mineral components to specific sites. This strategy underlies the formation of coccoliths, which are highly ordered arrangements of calcite crystals produced by marine microalgae. On combining the insoluble organic coccolith scaffold with coccolith-associated soluble macromolecules in vitro, we found a massive accretion of calcium ions at the sites where the crystals form in vivo. The in vitro process exhibits profound similarities to the initial stages of coccolith biogenesis in vivo. PMID:27493186

  1. Macromolecular recognition directs calcium ions to coccolith mineralization sites.

    PubMed

    Gal, Assaf; Wirth, Richard; Kopka, Joachim; Fratzl, Peter; Faivre, Damien; Scheffel, André

    2016-08-01

    Many organisms form elaborate mineralized structures, constituted of highly organized arrangements of crystals and organic macromolecules. The localization of crystals within these structures is presumably determined by the interaction of nucleating macromolecules with the mineral phase. Here we show that, preceding nucleation, a specific interaction between soluble organic molecules and an organic backbone structure directs mineral components to specific sites. This strategy underlies the formation of coccoliths, which are highly ordered arrangements of calcite crystals produced by marine microalgae. On combining the insoluble organic coccolith scaffold with coccolith-associated soluble macromolecules in vitro, we found a massive accretion of calcium ions at the sites where the crystals form in vivo. The in vitro process exhibits profound similarities to the initial stages of coccolith biogenesis in vivo.

  2. Site-directed, on-surface assembly of DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Rebecca; Saccà, Barbara; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional DNA lattices have been assembled from DNA double-crossover (DX) motifs on DNA-encoded surfaces in a site-specific manner. The lattices contained two types of single-stranded protruding arms pointing into opposite directions of the plane. One type of these protruding arms served to anchor the DNA lattice on the solid support through specific hybridization with surface-bound, complementary capture oligomers. The other type of arms allowed for further attachment of DNA-tethered probe molecules on the opposite side of the lattices exposed to the solution. Site-specific lattice assembly and attachment of fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotides and DNA-protein conjugates was demonstrated using DNA microarrays on flat, transparent mica substrates. Owing to their programmable orientation and addressability over a broad dynamic range from the nanometer to the millimeter length scale, such supramolecular architecture might be used for presenting biomolecules on surfaces, for instance, in biosensor applications. PMID:26306556

  3. Technological advances in site-directed spin labeling of proteins.

    PubMed

    Hubbell, Wayne L; López, Carlos J; Altenbach, Christian; Yang, Zhongyu

    2013-10-01

    Molecular flexibility over a wide time range is of central importance to the function of many proteins, both soluble and membrane. Revealing the modes of flexibility, their amplitudes, and time scales under physiological conditions is the challenge for spectroscopic methods, one of which is site-directed spin labeling EPR (SDSL-EPR). Here we provide an overview of some recent technological advances in SDSL-EPR related to investigation of structure, structural heterogeneity, and dynamics of proteins. These include new classes of spin labels, advances in measurement of long range distances and distance distributions, methods for identifying backbone and conformational fluctuations, and new strategies for determining the kinetics of protein motion.

  4. Direct measurements of transport properties are essential for site characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.; Conca, J.L.

    1994-08-01

    Direct measurements of transport parameters on subsurface sediments using, the UFA method provided detailed hydrostratigraphic mapping, and subsurface flux distributions at a mixed-waste disposal site at Hanford. Seven hundred unsaturated conductivity measurements on fifty samples were obtained in only six months total of UFA run time. These data are used to provide realistic information to conceptual models, predictive models and restoration strategies. The UFA instrument consists of an ultracentrifuge with a constant, ultralow flow pump that provides fluid to the sample surface through a rotating seal assembly and microdispersal system. Effluent from the sample is collected in a transparent, volumetrically-calibrated chamber at the bottom of the sample assembly. Using a strobe light, an observer can check the chamber while the sample is being centrifuged. Materials can be run in the UFA as recomposited samples or in situ samples can be subcored directly into the sample UFA chamber.

  5. Site-directed mutagenesis of the CC chemokine binding protein 35K-Fc reveals residues essential for activity and mutations that increase the potency of CC chemokine blockade.

    PubMed

    White, Gemma E; McNeill, Eileen; Christou, Ivy; Channon, Keith M; Greaves, David R

    2011-08-01

    Chemokines of the CC class are key mediators of monocyte recruitment and macrophage differentiation and have a well documented role in many inflammatory diseases. Blockade of chemokine activity is therefore an attractive target for anti-inflammatory therapy. 35K (vCCI) is a high-affinity chemokine binding protein expressed by poxviruses, which binds all human and murine CC chemokines, preventing their interaction with chemokine receptors. We developed an Fc-fusion protein of 35K with a modified human IgG1 Fc domain and expressed this construct in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. Purified 35K-Fc is capable of inhibiting CC chemokine-induced calcium flux, chemotaxis, and β-arrestin recruitment in primary macrophages and transfected cells. To elucidate the residues involved in chemokine neutralization, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of six key amino acids in 35K and expressed the mutant Fc-fusion proteins in vitro. We screened the mutants for their ability to block chemokine-induced β-arrestin recruitment in transfected cells and to inhibit primary macrophage signaling in an electric cell substrate impedance sensing assay. Using a sterile model of acute inflammation, zymosan-induced peritonitis, we confirmed that wild-type 35K-Fc can reduce monocyte recruitment, whereas one mutant (R89A) showed a more pronounced blockade of monocyte influx and another mutant (E143K) showed total loss of function. We believe that 35K-Fc will be a useful tool for exploring the role of CC chemokines in chronic inflammatory pathologies, and we have identified a higher potency form of the molecule that may have potential therapeutic applications in chronic inflammatory disease.

  6. Directional Site Amplification Effect on Tarzana Hill, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graizer, V.; Shakal, A.

    2003-12-01

    Significantly amplified ground accelerations at the Tarzana Hill station were recorded during the 1987 Mw 5.9 Whittier Narrows and the 1994 Mw 6.7 Northridge earthquakes. Peak horizontal ground acceleration at the Tarzana station during the 1999 Mw 7.1 Hector Mine earthquake was almost twice as large as the accelerations recorded at nearby stations. The Tarzana site was drilled to a depth of 100 m. A low shear-wave velocity near the surface of 100 m/sec increasing to near 750 m/sec at 100 m depth was measured. The 20 m high hill was found to be well drained with a water table near 17 m. Modelo formation (extremely weathered at the surface to fresh at depth) underlies the hill. The subsurface geology and velocities obtained allow classification of this location as a soft-rock site. After the Northridge earthquake the California Strong Motion Instrumentation Program significantly increased instrumentation at Tarzana to study the unusual site amplification effect. Current instrumentation at Tarzana consists of an accelerograph at the top of Tarzana hill (Tarzana - Cedar Hill B), a downhole instrument at 60 m depth, and an accelerograph at the foot of the hill (Tarzana - Clubhouse), 180 m from the Cedar Hill B station. The original station, Tarzana - Cedar Hill Nursery A, was lost in 1999 due to construction. More than twenty events, including the Hector Mine earthquake, were recorded by all these instruments at Tarzana. Comparison of recordings and response spectra demonstrates strong directional resonance on the top of the hill in a direction perpendicular to the strike of the hill in the period range from 0.04 to 0.8 sec (1.2 to 25 Hz). There is practically no amplification from the bottom to the top of the hill for the component parallel to the strike of the hill. In contrast to accelerations recorded during the Hector Mine earthquake (high frequency part of seismic signal), displacements (relatively low frequency part of seismic signal) demonstrate almost no site

  7. General method for sequence-independent site-directed chimeragenesis.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Kaori; Arnold, Frances H

    2003-07-01

    We have developed a simple and general method that allows for the facile recombination of distantly related (or unrelated) proteins at multiple discrete sites. To evaluate the sequence-independent site-directed chimeragenesis (SISDC) method, we have recombined beta-lactamases TEM-1 and PSE-4 at seven sites, examined the quality of the chimeric genes created, and screened the library of 2(8) (256) chimeras for functional enzymes. Probe hybridization and sequencing analyses revealed that SISDC generated a random library with little sequence bias and in which all targeted fragments were recombined in the desired order. Sequencing the genes from clones having functional lactamases identified 14 unique chimeras. These chimeras are characterized by a lower level of disruption, as calculated by the SCHEMA algorithm, than the library as a whole. These results illustrate the use of SISDC in creating designed chimeric protein libraries and further illustrate the ability of SCHEMA to identify chimeras whose folded structures are likely not to be disrupted by recombination. PMID:12823968

  8. NLR activation takes a direct route.

    PubMed

    Monie, Tom P

    2013-03-01

    For the first time there is now clear biochemical and biophysical evidence indicating that members of the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing (NLR) family can be activated as a result of direct interaction between the receptor and ligand. NLRX1 leucine-rich repeats bind to RNA; murine NAIP (NLR family, apoptosis inhibitory protein) 5 binds flagellin directly; and NOD (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing) 1 and NOD2 may interact directly with fragments of peptidoglycan. It remains to be seen if NLRP3 has a specific ligand, but progress has been made in addressing its mechanism of activation, with cellular imbalances and mitochondrial dysfunction being important. This review updates our understanding of NLR activation in light of these recent advances and their impact on the NLR research. PMID:23394939

  9. Active site directed irreversible inactivation of brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase by the conjugated substrate analogue (E)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid: development of a suicide substrate.

    PubMed

    Kuo, D J; Jordan, F

    1983-08-01

    (E)-4-(4-Chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid (CPB) was found to irreversibly inactivate brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC, EC 4.1.1.1) in a biphasic, sigmoidal manner, as is found for the kinetic behavior of substrate. An expression was derived for two-site irreversible inhibition of allosteric enzymes, and the kinetic behavior of CPB fit the expression for two-site binding. The calculated Ki's of 0.7 mM and 0.3 mM for CPB were assigned to the catalytic site and the regulatory site, respectively. The presence of pyruvic acid at high concentrations protected PDC from inactivation, whereas low concentrations of pyruvic acid accelerated inactivation by CPB. Pyruvamide, a known allosteric activator of PDC, was found to enhance inactivation by CPB. The results can be explained if pyruvamide binds only to a regulatory site, but CPB and pyruvic acid compete for both the regulatory and the catalytic centers. [1-14C]CPB was found to lose 14CO2 concurrently with the inactivation of the enzyme. Therefore, CPB was being turned over by PDC, in addition to inactivating it. CPB can be labeled a suicide-type inactivator for PDC.

  10. Architecture and active site of particulate methane monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Culpepper, Megen A.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria, organisms that live on methane gas as their sole carbon source. Understanding pMMO function has important implications for bioremediation applications and for the development of new, environmentally friendly catalysts for the direct conversion of methane to methanol. Crystal structures of pMMOs from three different methanotrophs reveal a trimeric architecture, consisting of three copies each of the pmoB, pmoA, and pmoC subunits. There are three distinct metal centers in each protomer of the trimer, mononuclear and dinuclear copper sites in the periplasmic regions of pmoB and a mononuclear site within the membrane that can be occupied by copper or zinc. Various models for the pMMO active site have been proposed within these structural constraints, including dicopper, tricopper, and diiron centers. Biochemical and spectroscopic data on pMMO and recombinant soluble fragments, denoted spmoB proteins, indicate that the active site involves copper and is located at the site of the dicopper center in the pmoB subunit. Initial spectroscopic evidence for O2 binding at this site has been obtained. Despite these findings, questions remain about the active site identity and nuclearity and will be the focus of future studies. PMID:22725967

  11. Directional analysis of CO2 persistence at a rural site.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Isidro A; Sánchez, M Luisa; García, M Ángeles; Paredes, Vanessa

    2011-09-01

    Conditional probability was used to establish persistence of CO(2) concentrations at a rural site. Measurements extended over three years and were performed with a CO(2) continuous monitor and a sodar. Concentrations in the usual range at this site were proposed as the truncation level to calculate conditional probability, allowing us to determine the extent of CO(2) sequences. Extension of episodes may be inferred from these values. Persistence of wind directions revealed two groups of sectors, one with a persistence of about 16 h and another of about 9 h. Cumulative distribution of CO(2) was calculated in each wind sector and three groups, associated with different concentration origins, were established. One group was linked to transport and local sources, another to the rural environment, and a third to transport of clean air masses. Daily evolution of concentrations revealed major differences during the night and monthly analysis allowed us to associate group 1 with the vegetation cycle and group 3 with wind speed from December to April. Persistence of concentrations was obtained, and group 3 values were lower for concentrations above the truncation level, whereas persistence of groups 1 and 2 was similar. However, group 3 persistence was, in general, between group 1 and 2 persistence for concentrations below the truncation level.

  12. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Action levels

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, J.S.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1991-10-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide for early leak detection and to monitor performance of the active low-level waste disposal facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and the transuranic waste storage areas in SWSA 5 North. Early leak detection is accomplished by sampling runoff, groundwater, and perched water in burial trenches. Sample results are compared to action levels that represent background contamination by naturally occurring and fallout-derived radionuclides. 15 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. Tetragonal Lysozyme Interactions Studied by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    A number of recent experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth proceeds by the addition of aggregates, formed by reversible self association of the solute molecules in the bulk'solution. Periodic bond chain and atomic force microscopy studies have indicated that the probable growth unit is at minimum a 43 tetramer, and most likely an octamer composed of two complete turns about the 4(sub 3) axis. If these results are correct, then there are intermolecular interactions which are only formed in the solution and others only formed at the joining of the growth unit to the crystal surface. We have set out to study these interactions, and the correctness of this hypothesis, using site directed mutagenesis of specific amino acid residues involved in the different bonds. We had initially expressed wild type lysozyme in S. cervasiae with yields of approximately 5 mg/L, which were eventually raised to approximately 40 mg/L. We are now moving the expression to the Pichia system, with anticipated yields of 300 to greater than 500 mg/L, comparable to what can be obtained from egg whites. An additional advantage of using recombinant protein is the greater genetic homogeneity of the material obtained and the absence of any other contaminating egg proteins. The first mutation experiments are TYR 23 yields PHE or ALA and ASN 113 yields ALA or ASP. Both TYR 23 and ASN 113 form part of the postulated dimerization intermolecular binding site which lead to the formation of the 4(sub 3) helix. Tyrosine also participates in an intermolecular hydrogen bond with ARG 114. The results of these and subsequent experiments will be discussed.

  14. Tetragonal Lysozyme Interactions Studied by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel J.; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc

    1999-01-01

    A number of recent experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth proceeds by the addition of aggregates, formed by reversible self association of the solute molecules in the bulk solution. Periodic bond chain and atomic force microscopy studies have indicated that the probable growth unit is at minimum a 43 tetramer, and most likely an octamer composed of two complete turns about the 43 axis. If these results are correct, then there are intermolecular interactions which are only formed in the solution and others only formed at the joining of the growth unit to the crystal surface. We have set out to study these interactions, and the correctness of this hypothesis, using site directed mutagenesis of specific amino acid residues involved in the different bonds. We had initially expressed wild type lysozyme in S. cervasiae with yields of approximately 5 mg/L, which were eventually raised to approximately 40 mg/L. We are now moving the expression to the Pichia system, with anticipated yields of 300 to (3)500 mg/L, comparable to what can be obtained from egg whites. An additional advantage of using recombinant protein is the greater genetic homogeneity of the material obtained and the absence of any other contaminating egg proteins. The first mutation experiments are TYR 23 (Registered) PHE or ALA and ASN 113 (Registered) ALA or ASP. Both TYR 23 and ASN 113 form part of the postulated dimerization intermolecular binding site which lead to the formation of the 43 helix. Tyrosine also participates in an intermolecular hydrogen bond with ARG 114. The results of these and subsequent experiments will be discussed.

  15. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  16. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined. PMID:27243042

  17. Voluntary vs directed siting -- or somewhere in-between?

    SciTech Connect

    Peelle, E.B.

    1994-04-01

    Waste siting gridlock in the United States and Canada has led to experimentation with voluntary and hybrid or ``mixed mode`` siting. We review nuclear and hazardous waste voluntary siting (VS) results for selected cases in the U.S, and Canada. Findings indicate that VS is not a panacea, but that current siting efforts are inadequate tests of its potential. We suggest trials of improved VS protocols and more effort on hybrid approaches in which the developer chooses the site but is required to reach agreement on conditions with local stakeholders. Mixed mode siting may be better suited to the US context and its three-tiered governmental system.

  18. Direct Epoxidation of Propylene over Stabilized Cu+ Surface Sites on Ti Modified Cu2O

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, X.; Kattel, S.; Xiong, K.; Mudiyanselage, K.; Rykov, S.; Senanayake, S. D.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Liu, P.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Chen, J. G.

    2015-07-17

    Direct propylene epoxidation by O2 is a challenging reaction because of the strong tendency for complete combustion. Results from the current study demonstrate the feasibility to tune the epoxidation selectivity by generating highly dispersed and stabilized Cu+ active sites in a TiCuOx mixed oxide. The TiCuOx surface anchors the key surface intermediate, oxametallacycle, leading to higher selectivity for epoxidation of propylene.

  19. Characterization of NO adducts of the diiron center in protein R2 of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase and site-directed variants; implications for the O2 activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shen; Libby, Eduardo; Saleh, Lana; Xing, Gang; Bollinger, J Martin; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre

    2004-10-01

    The R2 subunit of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase contains a diiron site that reacts with O(2) to produce a tyrosine radical (Y122.). In wild-type R2 (R2-wt), the first observable reaction intermediate is a high-valent [Fe(III)-Fe(IV)] state called compound X, but in related diiron proteins such as methane monooxygenase, Delta(9)-desaturase, and ferritin, peroxodiiron(III) complexes have been characterized. Substitution of iron ligand D84 by E within the active site of R2 allows an intermediate (mu-1,2-peroxo)diiron species to accumulate. To investigate the possible involvement of a bridging peroxo species within the O(2) activation sequence of R2-wt, we have characterized the iron-nitrosyl species that form at the diiron sites in R2-wt, R2-D84E, and R2-W48F/D84E by using vibrational spectroscopy. Previous work has shown that the diiron center in R2-wt binds one NO per iron to form an antiferromagnetically coupled [(FeNO)(7)](2) center. In the wt and variant proteins, we also observe that both irons bind one NO to form a (FeNO)(7) dimer where both Fe-N-O units share a common vibrational signature. In the wt protein, nu(Fe-NO), delta(Fe-N-O), and nu(N-O) bands are observed at 445, 434 and 1742 cm(-1), respectively, while in the variant proteins the nu(Fe-NO) and delta(Fe-N-O) bands are observed approximately 10 cm(-1) higher and the nu(N-O) approximately 10 cm(-1) lower at 1735 cm(-1). These results demonstrate that all three proteins accommodate fully symmetric [(FeNO)(7)](2) species with two identical Fe-N-O units. The formation of equivalent NO adducts in the wt and variant proteins strongly favors the formation of a symmetric bridging peroxo intermediate during the O(2) activation process in R2-wt.

  20. Active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Stringer, C.D.; Milanez, S.; Lee, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Previous affinity labeling studies and comparative sequence analyses have identified two different lysines at the active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and have suggested their essentiality to function. The essential lysines occupy positions 166 and 329 in the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and positions 175 and 334 in the spinach enzyme. Based on the pH-dependencies of inactivations of the two enzymes by trinitrobenzene sulfonate, Lys-166 (R. rubrum enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 7.9 and Lys-334 (spinach enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 9.0. These low pK/sub a/ values as well as the enhanced nucleophilicities of the lysyl residues argue that both are important to catalysis rather than to substrate binding. Lys-166 may correspond to the essential base that initiates catalysis and that displays a pK/sub a/ of 7.5 in the pH-curve for V/sub max//K/sub m/. Cross-linking experiments with 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonate stilbene demonstrate that the two active-site lysines are within 12 A. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  2. Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2014 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, H. A.

    2015-04-22

    The reports contained herein are for project activities that occurred from October 2013 through September 2014. Project life cycle is indicated under the title as well as the original proposal number (in the following format: site abbreviation--ID #--originating fiscal year; e.g., STL-03-14). Each of the reports describes in detail the discoveries, achievements, and challenges encountered by our principal investigators. As SDRD, by definition, invests in “high-risk” and hopefully “high-payoff” research, the element of uncertainty is inherent. While many of our efforts are “successful” and result in positive outcomes or technology utilization, some fall short of expectations, but cannot be construed as “failure” in the negative sense. The latter is a natural and valid part of the process of advanced research and often leads to unforeseen new pathways to future discovery. Regardless, either result advances our knowledge base and increases our ability to identify solutions and/or avoid costly and unwarranted paths for future challenges. In summary, the SDRD program continues to provide an unfettered mechanism for innovation that returns multifold to our customers, to national security, and to the general public. The program is a vibrant R&D innovation engine, benefited by its discretionary pedigree, enhanced mission spectrum, committed resources, and sound competitiveness to yield maximum taxpayer benefit. The 25 projects described exemplify the creativity and ability of a diverse scientific and engineering talent base. The efforts also showcase an impressive capability and resource that can be brought to find solutions to a broad array of technology needs and applications relevant to the NNSS mission and national security. Further SDRD performance metrics can be found in the appendix at the end of this report.

  3. Water in the Active Site of Ketosteroid Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Hanoian, Philip; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to investigate the structural and dynamical properties of water in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) to provide insight into the role of these water molecules in the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. This reaction is thought to proceed via a dienolate intermediate that is stabilized by hydrogen bonding with residues Tyr16 and Asp103. A comparative study was performed for the wild-type (WT) KSI and the Y16F, Y16S, and Y16F/Y32F/Y57F (FFF) mutants. These systems were studied with three different bound ligands: equilenin, which is an intermediate analog, and the intermediate states of two steroid substrates. Several distinct water occupation sites were identified in the active site of KSI for the WT and mutant systems. Three additional sites were identified in the Y16S mutant that were not occupied in WT KSI or the other mutants studied. The number of water molecules directly hydrogen bonded to the ligand oxygen was approximately two waters in the Y16S mutant, one water in the Y16F and FFF mutants, and intermittent hydrogen bonding of one water molecule in WT KSI. The molecular dynamics trajectories of the Y16F and FFF mutants reproduced the small conformational changes of residue 16 observed in the crystal structures of these two mutants. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations of 1H NMR chemical shifts of the protons in the active site hydrogen-bonding network suggest that the presence of water in the active site does not prevent the formation of short hydrogen bonds with far-downfield chemical shifts. The molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the active site water molecules exchange much more frequently for WT KSI and the FFF mutant than for the Y16F and Y16S mutants. This difference is most likely due to the hydrogen-bonding interaction between Tyr57 and an active site water molecule that is persistent in the Y16F and Y16S mutants but absent in the FFF mutant and significantly less

  4. Activity plan: Directional drilling and environmental measurements while drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.A.

    1998-07-16

    This activity plan describes the testing of directional drilling combined with environmental measurements while drilling at two Hanford Site locations. A cold test is to be conducted at the 105A Mock Tank Leak Facility in the 200 East Area. A hot test is proposed to be run at the 216-B-8 tile field north of the 241-B Tank Farm in 200 East Area. Criteria to judge the success, partial success or failure of various aspects of the test are included. The TWRS program is assessing the potential for use of directional drilling because of an identified need to interrogate the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tanks. Because every precaution must be taken to assure that investigation activities do not violate the integrity of the tanks, control of the drill bit and ability to follow a predetermined drill path are of utmost importance and are being tested.

  5. Active-Site-Accessible, Porphyrinic Metal;#8722;Organic Framework Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Omar K.; Shultz, Abraham M.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2012-02-06

    On account of their structural similarity to cofactors found in many metallo-enzymes, metalloporphyrins are obvious potential building blocks for catalytically active, metal-organic framework (MOF) materials. While numerous porphyrin-based MOFs have already been described, versions featuring highly accessible active sites and permanent microporosity are remarkably scarce. Indeed, of the more than 70 previously reported porphyrinic MOFs, only one has been shown to be both permanently microporous and contain internally accessible active sites for chemical catalysis. Attempts to generalize the design approach used in this single successful case have failed. Reported here, however, is the synthesis of an extended family of MOFs that directly incorporate a variety of metalloporphyrins (specifically Al{sup 3+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Pd{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 3+}, and Fe{sup 3+} complexes). These robust porphyrinic materials (RPMs) feature large channels and readily accessible active sites. As an illustrative example, one of the manganese-containing RPMs is shown to be catalytically competent for the oxidation of alkenes and alkanes.

  6. A direct measurement of strontium-89 activity in bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Ben-Josef, E; Maughan, R L; Vasan, S; Porter, A T

    1995-06-01

    The total absorbed dose after systemic administration of 89Sr has been determined by measuring directly its activity in bone metastases. Autoradiography was performed on sections of bones obtained from patients treated with 89Sr to study the pattern of deposition. Discs of 5 and 8 mm diameter were cut from metastatic sites and normal bone. The beta-ray activity was determined with a scintillation counter, which was calibrated using similar bovine cancellous bone discs, onto which a known activity of 89Sr was transferred by pipette. From the activity measured, the initial activity (at the time of 89Sr administration) was calculated. The absorbed dose was estimated using the methodology described in NCRP Report No. 58. The estimated initial activity of 89Sr in the bone metastases varied from 2.3 to 240 MBq kg-1, with a mean value of 31 +/- 27 MBq kg-1. The total absorbed dose ranged from 1.3 to 64 Gy, with a mean of 18 +/- 16 Gy. The average total dose to normal bone sites was 1.1 +/- 0.4 Gy. The metastases to normal bone dose ratio in individual samples varied from 8 +/- 4 to 40 +/- 25. These estimates are in agreement with those obtained previously by indirect methods. PMID:7675358

  7. ⁵¹V NMR Crystallography of Vanadium Chloroperoxidase and Its Directed Evolution P395D/L241V/T343A Mutant: Protonation Environments of the Active Site.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupal; Hou, Guangjin; Renirie, Rokus; Wever, Ron; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-29

    Vanadium-dependent haloperoxidases (VHPOs) perform two-electron oxidation of halides using hydrogen peroxide. Their mechanism, including the factors determining the substrate specificity and the pH-dependence of the catalytic rates, is poorly understood. The vanadate cofactor in the active site of VHPOs contains "spectroscopically silent" V(V), which does not change oxidation state during the reaction. We employed an NMR crystallography approach based on (51)V magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory, to gain insights into the structure and coordination environment of the cofactor in the resting state of vanadium-dependent chloroperoxidases (VCPO). The cofactor environments in the wild-type VCPO and its P395D/L241V/T343A mutant exhibiting 5-100-fold improved catalytic activity are examined at various pH values. Optimal sensitivity attained due to the fast MAS probe technologies enabled the assignment of the location and number of protons on the vanadate as a function of pH. The vanadate cofactor changes its protonation from quadruply protonated at pH 6.3 to triply protonated at pH 7.3 to doubly protonated at pH 8.3. In contrast, in the mutant, the vanadate protonation is the same at pH 5.0 and 8.3, and the cofactor is doubly protonated. This methodology to identify the distinct protonation environments of the cofactor, which are also pH-dependent, could help explain the different reactivities of the wild-type and mutant VCPO and their pH-dependence. This study demonstrates that (51)V-based NMR crystallography can be used to derive the detailed coordination environments of vanadium centers in large biological molecules.

  8. Development of Therapeutic Chimeric Uricase by Exon Replacement/Restoration and Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guangrong; Yang, Weizhen; Chen, Jing; Li, Miaomiao; Jiang, Nan; Zhao, Baixue; Chen, Si; Wang, Min; Chen, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    The activity of urate oxidase was lost during hominoid evolution, resulting in high susceptibility to hyperuricemia and gout in humans. In order to develop a more “human-like” uricase for therapeutic use, exon replacement/restoration and site-directed mutagenesis were performed to obtain porcine–human uricase with higher homology to deduced human uricase (dHU) and increased uricolytic activity. In an exon replacement study, substitution of exon 6 in wild porcine uricase (wPU) gene with corresponding exon in dhu totally abolished its activity. Substitutions of exon 5, 3, and 1–2 led to 85%, 60%, and 45% loss of activity, respectively. However, replacement of exon 4 and 7–8 did not significantly change the enzyme activity. When exon 5, 6, and 3 in dhu were replaced by their counterparts in wpu, the resulting chimera H1-2P3H4P5-6H7-8 was active, but only about 28% of wPU. Multiple sequence alignment and homology modeling predicted that mutations of E24D and E83G in H1-2P3H4P5-6H7-8 were favorable for further increase of its activity. After site-directed mutagenesis, H1-2P3H4P5-6H7-8 (E24D & E83G) with increased homology (91.45%) with dHU and higher activity and catalytic efficiency than the FDA-approved porcine–baboon chimera (PBC) was obtained. It showed optimum activity at pH 8.5 and 35 °C and was stable in a pH range of 6.5–11.0 and temperature range of 20–40 °C. PMID:27213357

  9. Development of Therapeutic Chimeric Uricase by Exon Replacement/Restoration and Site-Directed Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guangrong; Yang, Weizhen; Chen, Jing; Li, Miaomiao; Jiang, Nan; Zhao, Baixue; Chen, Si; Wang, Min; Chen, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    The activity of urate oxidase was lost during hominoid evolution, resulting in high susceptibility to hyperuricemia and gout in humans. In order to develop a more "human-like" uricase for therapeutic use, exon replacement/restoration and site-directed mutagenesis were performed to obtain porcine-human uricase with higher homology to deduced human uricase (dHU) and increased uricolytic activity. In an exon replacement study, substitution of exon 6 in wild porcine uricase (wPU) gene with corresponding exon in dhu totally abolished its activity. Substitutions of exon 5, 3, and 1-2 led to 85%, 60%, and 45% loss of activity, respectively. However, replacement of exon 4 and 7-8 did not significantly change the enzyme activity. When exon 5, 6, and 3 in dhu were replaced by their counterparts in wpu, the resulting chimera H1-2P₃H₄P5-6H7-8 was active, but only about 28% of wPU. Multiple sequence alignment and homology modeling predicted that mutations of E24D and E83G in H1-2P₃H₄P5-6H7-8 were favorable for further increase of its activity. After site-directed mutagenesis, H1-2P₃H₄P5-6H7-8 (E24D & E83G) with increased homology (91.45%) with dHU and higher activity and catalytic efficiency than the FDA-approved porcine-baboon chimera (PBC) was obtained. It showed optimum activity at pH 8.5 and 35 °C and was stable in a pH range of 6.5-11.0 and temperature range of 20-40 °C. PMID:27213357

  10. Site-directed nanoparticle labeling of cytochrome c

    PubMed Central

    Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve; Hwang, Wonmuk; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    Although nanoparticle-protein conjugates have been synthesized for numerous applications, bioconjugation remains a challenge, often resulting in denaturation or loss of protein function. This is partly because the protein–nanoparticle interface is poorly understood, which impedes the use of nanoparticles in nanomedicine. Although the effects of nanoparticle ligand and material on protein structure have been explored, the choice of the labeling site on the protein has not yet been systematically studied. To address this issue, we label cytochrome c site-specifically with a negatively charged Au nanoparticle via a covalent thiol–Au bond. The attachment site is controlled by cysteine mutations of surface residues. The effect of labeling on protein structure is probed by circular dichroism. Protein unfolding is the most severe when the nanoparticle is attached to the N- and C-terminal foldon, the core motif of cytochrome c. Also, when the nanoparticle is attached in the vicinity of charged residues, the amount of structural damage is greater because of salt-dependent electrostatic interactions with charged ligand bis(p-sulfonatophenyl) phenylphosphine on the nanoparticle. Molecular dynamics simulations also elucidate local to global structural perturbation depending on labeling site. These results suggest that the labeling site must be considered as one of the main design criteria for nanoparticle–protein conjugates. PMID:19251670

  11. Probing the chemical mechanism of saccharopine reductase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae using site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Vashishtha, Ashwani K; West, Ann H; Cook, Paul F

    2015-10-15

    Saccharopine reductase catalyzes the reductive amination of l-α-aminoadipate-δ-semialdehyde with l-glutamate to give saccharopine. Two mechanisms have been proposed for the reductase, one that makes use of enzyme side chains as acid-base catalytic groups, and a second, in which the reaction is catalyzed by enzyme-bound reactants. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to change acid-base candidates in the active site of the reductase to eliminate their ionizable side chain. Thus, the D126A, C154S and Y99F and several double mutant enzymes were prepared. Kinetic parameters in the direction of glutamate formation exhibited modest decreases, inconsistent with the loss of an acid-base catalyst. The pH-rate profiles obtained with all mutant enzymes decrease at low and high pH, suggesting acid and base catalytic groups are still present in all enzymes. Solvent kinetic deuterium isotope effects are all larger than those observed for wild type enzyme, and approximately equal to one another, suggesting the slow step is the same as that of wild type enzyme, a conformational change to open the site and release products (in the direction of saccharopine formation). Overall, the acid-base chemistry is likely catalyzed by bound reactants, with the exception of deprotonation of the α-amine of glutamate, which likely requires an enzyme residue. PMID:26342457

  12. Probing the chemical mechanism of saccharopine reductase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae using site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Vashishtha, Ashwani K; West, Ann H; Cook, Paul F

    2015-10-15

    Saccharopine reductase catalyzes the reductive amination of l-α-aminoadipate-δ-semialdehyde with l-glutamate to give saccharopine. Two mechanisms have been proposed for the reductase, one that makes use of enzyme side chains as acid-base catalytic groups, and a second, in which the reaction is catalyzed by enzyme-bound reactants. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to change acid-base candidates in the active site of the reductase to eliminate their ionizable side chain. Thus, the D126A, C154S and Y99F and several double mutant enzymes were prepared. Kinetic parameters in the direction of glutamate formation exhibited modest decreases, inconsistent with the loss of an acid-base catalyst. The pH-rate profiles obtained with all mutant enzymes decrease at low and high pH, suggesting acid and base catalytic groups are still present in all enzymes. Solvent kinetic deuterium isotope effects are all larger than those observed for wild type enzyme, and approximately equal to one another, suggesting the slow step is the same as that of wild type enzyme, a conformational change to open the site and release products (in the direction of saccharopine formation). Overall, the acid-base chemistry is likely catalyzed by bound reactants, with the exception of deprotonation of the α-amine of glutamate, which likely requires an enzyme residue.

  13. Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling System and Horizontal Directional Drilling Technology Demonstration, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.V.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Myers, D.A.; Gardner, M.G.; Williamson, T.; Huffman, J.

    1999-06-01

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling (EMWD) system and Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) were successfully demonstrated at the Mock Tank Leak Simulation Site and the Drilling Technology Test Site, Hanford, Washington. The use of directional drilling offers an alternative to vertical drilling site characterization. Directional drilling can develop a borehole under a structure, such as a waste tank, from an angled entry and leveling off to horizontal at the desired depth. The EMWD system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides the capability of producing real-time environmental and drill bit data during drilling operations. The technology demonstration consisted of the development of one borehole under a mock waste tank at a depth of {approximately} {minus}8 m ({minus}27 ft.), following a predetermined drill path, tracking the drill path to within a radius of {approximately}1.5 m (5 ft.), and monitoring for zones of radiological activity using the EMWD system. The purpose of the second borehole was to demonstrate the capability of drilling to a depth of {approximately} {minus}21 m ({minus}70 ft.), the depth needed to obtain access under the Hanford waste tanks, and continue drilling horizontally. This report presents information on the HDD and EMWD technologies, demonstration design, results of the demonstrations, and lessons learned.

  14. Persistent neural activity in head direction cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taube, Jeffrey S.; Bassett, Joshua P.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Many neurons throughout the rat limbic system discharge in relation to the animal's directional heading with respect to its environment. These so-called head direction (HD) cells exhibit characteristics of persistent neural activity. This article summarizes where HD cells are found, their major properties, and some of the important experiments that have been conducted to elucidate how this signal is generated. The number of HD and angular head velocity cells was estimated for several brain areas involved in the generation of the HD signal, including the postsubiculum, anterior dorsal thalamus, lateral mammillary nuclei and dorsal tegmental nucleus. The HD cell signal has many features in common with what is known about how neural integration is accomplished in the oculomotor system. The nature of the HD cell signal makes it an attractive candidate for using neural network models to elucidate the signal's underlying mechanisms. The conditions that any network model must satisfy in order to accurately represent how the nervous system generates this signal are highlighted and areas where key information is missing are discussed.

  15. Functional evaluation of residues in the herbicide-binding site of Mycobacterium tuberculosis acetohydroxyacid synthase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Jung, In-Pil; Cho, Jun-Haeng; Koo, Bon-Sung; Yoon, Moon-Young

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis acetohydroxyacid synthase (M. tuberculosis AHAS) has been proposed to bean essential target for novel herbicide- and chemical-based antibacterial agents. Therefore, here we investigated the roles of multiple conserved herbicide-binding site residues (R318, A146, Q148, M512, and V513) in M. tuberculosis AHAS through site-directed mutagenesis by characterizing the kinetic parameters and herbicide sensitivities of various point mutants. Interestingly, all mutant enzymes showed significantly altered kinetic parameters, specifically reduced affinity towards both the substrate and cofactor. Importantly, mutation of R318 led to a complete loss of AHAS activity, indicating a key role for this residue in substrate binding. Furthermore, all mutants demonstrated significant herbicide resistance against chlorimuron ethyl (CE), with several-fold higher IC50 than that of wild type AHAS. Docking analysis also indicated that binding of CE was slightly affected upon mutation of these residues. Taken together, these data suggest that the residues examined here mediate CE binding and may also be important for the catalytic activity of AHAS. This study will pave the way for future structure-function studies of CE and will also aid the development of novel anti-tuberculosis agents based on this chemical scaffold. PMID:26215340

  16. Probing the aromatic-donor-binding site of horseradish peroxidase using site-directed mutagenesis and the suicide substrate phenylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Gilfoyle, D J; Rodriguez-Lopez, J N; Smith, A T

    1996-03-01

    The haem groups from two classes of site-directed mutants of horseradish peroxidase isoenzyme C (HRP-C) (distal haem pocket mutants, [H42L]HRP-C* and [R38K]-HRP-C* and peripheral-haem-access-channel mutants, [F142A]HRP-C* and [F143A]HRP-C*) were extracted and analysed by reverse-phase HPLC after phenylhydrazine-induced suicide inactivation. The relative abundance of the two covalently modified haems, C20-phenyl (delta-meso phenyl) and C18-hydroxymethyl haem, provided a sensitive topological probe for changes induced in the protein architecture in the vicinity of the haem active site and substrate-access channel. Although differing considerably in their efficiency as peroxidases ([H42L]HRP-C* exhibited only approximately 0.03% of the peroxidase activity of wild type), the variants studied gave rise to a modification pattern typical of an exposed haem edge thereby strengthening the argument that it is the overall protein topology rather than the intrinsic catalytic activity of the active site that determines the sites of covalent haem modification. Mutants which showed impaired ability to bind the aromatic donor benzhydroxamic acid were less readily modified by the phenyl radical at the haem C18-methyl position although the level of arylation at the haem C20 position remained remarkable constant. Our findings suggest that the overall efficacy of haem modification catalysed by HRP-C during turnover with phenylhydrazine and its vulnerability towards inactivation are related to its general ability to bind aromatic donor molecules. Results from phenylhydrazine treatment of HRP-C wild-type and mutant variants were compared with those obtained for Coprinus cinereus peroxidase, an enzyme which from its structure is known to have a remarkably open access channel to the haem edge. We show evidence that C. cinereus peroxidase is able to bind benzhydroxamic acid, albeit with a relatively high Kd (Kd 3.7 mM), a probe for aromatic-donor binding. We suggest reasons why

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation and site-directed mutagenesis of alcohol acyltransferase: a proposed mechanism of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Morales-Quintana, Luis; Nuñez-Tobar, María Ximena; Moya-León, María Alejandra; Herrera, Raúl

    2013-10-28

    Aroma in Vasconcellea pubescens fruit is determined by esters, which are the products of catalysis by alcohol acyltransferase (VpAAT1). VpAAT1 protein structure displayed the conserved HxxxD motif facing the solvent channel in the center of the structure. To gain insight into the role of these catalytic residues, kinetic and site-directed mutagenesis studies were carried out in VpAAT1 protein. Based on dead-end inhibition studies, the kinetic could be described in terms of a ternary complex mechanism with the H166 residue as the catalytic base. Kinetic results showed the lowest Km value for hexanoyl-CoA. Additionally, the most favorable predicted substrate orientation was observed for hexanoyl-CoA, showing a coincidence between kinetic studies and molecular docking analysis. Substitutions H166A, D170A, D170N, and D170E were evaluated in silico. The solvent channel in all mutant structures was lost, showing large differences with the native structure. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were able to describe unfavored energies for the interaction of the mutant proteins with different alcohols and acyl-CoAs. Additionally, in vitro site-directed mutagenesis of H166 and D170 in VpAAT1 induced a loss of activity, confirming the functional role of both residues for the activity, H166 being directly involved in catalysis.

  18. Management of investigation-derived wastes during site inspections. Directive

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    The guidance presents a general regulatory background and options for management of investigation-derived wastes (IDW) generated during Superfund site inspections (SIs). These wastes include soil cuttings, drilling muds, purged ground water decontamination fluids (water and other fluids), disposable sampling equipment (DE), and disposable personal protective equipment (PPE). The National Contingency Plan (NCP) requires that management of IDW generated during SIs compiles with all applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARS) to the extent practicable. In addition, other legal and practical consideration may affect the handling of IDW. Therefore, site inspection managers and other involved parties should be familiar with this guidance, as well as the requirements of the NCP, ARARs, and EPA's interpretation of these requirements.

  19. Public participation in energy facility siting. Part 2; Future directions

    SciTech Connect

    Whitlatch, E.E. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1990-08-01

    The first planning era for energy facility siting was typified by technological decision making in a climate of eminent domain. The second planning era, from 1970 to present, involves regulatory/adjudicatory decision making in a climate of adversarial proceedings. However, outcomes are not much different than in the first: Decisions are still largely made on technological grounds, sites are secretly selected and anonymously secured, and public participation has little effect on decisions. The result has been endgame litigation that delays needed projects increases cost, and polarizes participants. Utilities are understandably reluctant to plan large base-load plants, yet almost all projections of electricity use indicate that such plants will be needed after 1996, if not before. The author discusses how it is in the self-interest of all three principal actors---industry, environmental groups, and state and local government---to move beyond confrontation to a third planning era based on negotiation. Unassisted negotiation (open siting or open planning) and assisted negotiation (facilitation and mediation) promise to produce mutual gain for all parties through cooperative and creative problem solving. Most importantly, they lay the groundwork for future productive interaction.

  20. Site-directed mutagenesis around the CuA site of a polyphenol oxidase from Coreopsis grandiflora (cgAUS1).

    PubMed

    Kaintz, Cornelia; Mayer, Rupert L; Jirsa, Franz; Halbwirth, Heidi; Rompel, Annette

    2015-03-24

    Aurone synthase from Coreopsis grandiflora (cgAUS1), catalyzing conversion of butein to sulfuretin in a type-3 copper center, is a rare example of a polyphenol oxidase involved in anabolism. Site-directed mutagenesis around the CuA site of AUS1 was performed, and recombinant enzymes were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Replacement of the coordinating CuA histidines with alanine resulted in the presence of a single copper and loss of diphenolase activity. The thioether bridge-building cysteine and a phenylalanine over the CuA site, exchanged to alanine, have no influence on copper content but appear to play an important role in substrate binding.

  1. Functional Analysis by Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the NAD+-Reducing Hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha

    PubMed Central

    Burgdorf, Tanja; De Lacey, Antonio L.; Friedrich, Bärbel

    2002-01-01

    The tetrameric cytoplasmic [NiFe] hydrogenase (SH) of Ralstonia eutropha couples the oxidation of hydrogen to the reduction of NAD+ under aerobic conditions. In the catalytic subunit HoxH, all six conserved motifs surrounding the [NiFe] site are present. Five of these motifs were altered by site-directed mutagenesis in order to dissect the molecular mechanism of hydrogen activation. Based on phenotypic characterizations, 27 mutants were grouped into four different classes. Mutants of the major class, class I, failed to grow on hydrogen and were devoid of H2-oxidizing activity. In one of these isolates (HoxH I64A), H2 binding was impaired. Class II mutants revealed a high D2/H+ exchange rate relative to a low H2-oxidizing activity. A representative (HoxH H16L) displayed D2/H+ exchange but had lost electron acceptor-reducing activity. Both activities were equally affected in class III mutants. Mutants forming class IV showed a particularly interesting phenotype. They displayed O2-sensitive growth on hydrogen due to an O2-sensitive SH protein. PMID:12399498

  2. Control of active sites in flocculation: Concept of equivalent active sites''

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Flocculation and dispersion of solids are strong functions of the amount and conformation of the adsorbed polymer. Regions of dispersion and flocculation of solids with particular polymer molecules may be deduced from saturation adsorption data. The concept of equivalent active sites'' is proposed to explain flocculation and dispersion behavior irrespective of the amount or conformation of the adsorbed polymer. The concept has been further extended to study the selective flocculation process.

  3. Direct numerical simulation of active fiber composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung J.; Hwang, Joon S.; Paik, Seung H.

    2003-08-01

    Active Fiber Composites (AFC) possess desirable characteristics for smart structure applications. One major advantage of AFC is the ability to create anisotropic laminate layers useful in applications requiring off-axis or twisting motions. AFC is naturally composed of two different constituents: piezoelectric fiber and matrix. Therefore, homogenization method, which is utilized in the analysis of laminated composite material, has been used to characterize the material properties. Using this approach, the global behaviors of the structures are predicted in an averaged sense. However, this approach has intrinsic limitations in describing the local behaviors in the level of the constituents. Actually, the failure analysis of AFC requires the knowledge of the local behaviors. Therefore, microscopic approach is necessary to predict the behaviors of AFC. In this work, a microscopic approach for the analysis of AFC was performed. Piezoelectric fiber and matrix were modeled separately and finite element method using three-dimensional solid elements was utilized. Because fine mesh is essential, high performance computing technology was applied to the solution of the immense degree-of-freedom problem. This approach is called Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of structure. Through the DNS of AFC, local stress distribution around the interface of fiber and matrix was analyzed.

  4. Mapping epitopes and antigenicity by site-directed masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paus, Didrik; Winter, Greg

    2006-06-01

    Here we describe a method for mapping the binding of antibodies to the surface of a folded antigen. We first created a panel of mutant antigens (-lactamase) in which single surface-exposed residues were mutated to cysteine. We then chemically tethered the cysteine residues to a solid phase, thereby masking a surface patch centered on each cysteine residue and blocking the binding of antibodies to this region of the surface. By these means we mapped the epitopes of several mAbs directed to -lactamase. Furthermore, by depleting samples of polyclonal antisera to the masked antigens and measuring the binding of each depleted sample of antisera to unmasked antigen, we mapped the antigenicity of 23 different epitopes. After immunization of mice and rabbits with -lactamase in Freund's adjuvant, we found that the antisera reacted with both native and denatured antigen and that the antibody response was mainly directed to an exposed and flexible loop region of the native antigen. By contrast, after immunization in PBS, we found that the antisera reacted only weakly with denatured antigen and that the antibody response was more evenly distributed over the antigenic surface. We suggest that denatured antigen (created during emulsification in Freund's adjuvant) elicits antibodies that bind mainly to the flexible regions of the native protein and that this explains the correlation between antigenicity and backbone flexibility. Denaturation of antigen during vaccination or natural infections would therefore be expected to focus the antibody response to the flexible loops. backbone flexibility | Freund's adjuvant | conformational epitope | antisera

  5. Horizontal directional drilling: a green and sustainable technology for site remediation.

    PubMed

    Lubrecht, Michael D

    2012-03-01

    Sustainability has become an important factor in the selection of remedies to clean up contaminated sites. Horizontal directional drilling (HDD) is a relatively new drilling technology that has been successfully adapted to site remediation. In addition to the benefits that HDD provides for the logistics of site cleanup, it also delivers sustainability advantages, compared to alternative construction methods.

  6. Mutation at a Strictly Conserved, Active Site Tyrosine in the Copper Amine Oxidase Leads to Uncontrolled Oxygenase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhi-wei; Datta, Saumen; DuBois, Jennifer L.; Klinman, Judith P.; Mathews, F. Scott

    2010-09-07

    The copper amine oxidases carry out two copper-dependent processes: production of their own redox-active cofactor (2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine quinone, TPQ) and the subsequent oxidative deamination of substrate amines. Because the same active site pocket must facilitate both reactions, individual active site residues may serve multiple roles. We have examined the roles of a strictly conserved active site tyrosine Y305 in the copper amine oxidase from Hansenula polymorpha kinetically, spetroscopically (Dubois and Klinman (2006) Biochemistry 45, 3178), and, in the present work, structurally. While the Y305A enzyme is almost identical to the wild type, a novel, highly oxygenated species replaces TPQ in the Y305F active sites. This new structure not only provides the first direct detection of peroxy intermediates in cofactor biogenesis but also indicates the critical control of oxidation chemistry that can be conferred by a single active site residue.

  7. Development of an Innovative Direct Push Sensor System for Long Term Monitoring of Environmental Waste Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddy-Dilek, C. A.; Riha, B. D.; Bosze, S.; Rossabi, J.

    2001-12-01

    As the focus of environmental restoration in the federal complex moves from active characterization and remediation to long term monitoring, the costs of long-term monitoring will escalate and eventually dominate ongoing environmental restoration budgets. Most of the major DOE sites including the Savannah River Site have a documented need for some type of long term monitoring system that does not rely on the use of standard groundwater monitoring wells. We have developed and installed a prototype monitoring system that can be used to measure and/or sample multiple parameters appropriate for long term monitoring of environmental waste sites. This system is designed to function as a sentinel system that detects when a significant change in water quality parameters or contaminant concentration occurs in a well characterized system. The sensor drive configuration is flexible and the sensor system is installed using direct push methods. Site specific monitoring scenarios will be need to be developed to address the specific long term monitoring objectives at a given site. The drive point has a sample port (soil gas or groundwater) and windows/ports for additional sensors. A prototype system was installed and has been monitored at the D-area at the Savannah River Site since July. The probes are located in an area where multiple contaminant plumes dominated by volatile organic compounds, metals and tritium are currently monitored using standard groundwater wells. Currently, the prototype system measures temperature, resisitivity, ORP and pH on a continuous basis. In addition, concetrations of volatile organic compounds and tritium are measured periodically by laboratory analysis of diffusion bag samples deployed in the sample ports of the prototype system. Results will be reported from a three-month monitoring interval. The results will be compared with baseline analyses of samples collected from the adjacent groundwater well.

  8. Curcumin directly inhibits the transport activity of GLUT1

    PubMed Central

    Gunnink, Leesha K.; Alabi, Ola D.; Kuiper, Benjamin D.; Gunnink, Stephen M.; Schuiteman, Sam J.; Strohbehn, Lauren E.; Hamilton, Kathryn E.; Wrobel, Kathryn E.; Louters, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, a major ingredient in turmeric, has a long history of medicinal applications in a wide array of maladies including treatment for diabetes and cancer. Seemingly counterintuitive to the documented hypoglycemic effects of curcumin, however, a recent report indicates that curcumin directly inhibits glucose uptake in adipocytes. The major glucose transporter in adipocytes is GLUT4. Therefore, this study investigates the effects of curcumin in cell lines where the major transporter is GLUT1. We report that curcumin has an immediate inhibitory effect on basal glucose uptake in L929 fibroblast cells with a maximum inhibition of 80% achieved at 75 μM curcumin. Curcumin also blocks activation of glucose uptake by azide, glucose deprivation, hydroxylamine, or phenylarsine oxide. Inhibition does not increase with exposure time and the inhibitory effects reverse within an hour. Inhibition does not appear to involve a reaction between curcumin and the thiol side chain of a cysteine residue since neither prior treatment of cells with iodoacetamide nor curcumin with cysteine alters curcumin’s inhibitory effects. Curcumin is a mixed inhibitor reducing the Vmax of 2DG transport by about half with little effect on the Km. The inhibitory effects of curcumin are not additive to the effects of cytochalasin B and 75 μM curcumin actually reduces specific cytochalasin B binding by 80%. Taken together, the data suggest that curcumin binds directly to GLUT1 at a site that overlaps with the cytochalasin B binding site and thereby inhibits glucose transport. A direct inhibition of GLUT proteins in intestinal epithelial cells would likely reduce absorption of dietary glucose and contribute to a hypoglycemic effect of curcumin. Also, inhibition of GLUT1 activity might compromise cancer cells that overexpress GLUT1 and be another possible mechanism for the documented anticancer effects of curcumin. PMID:27039889

  9. Resolving the active versus passive conundrum for head direction cells.

    PubMed

    Shinder, M E; Taube, J S

    2014-06-13

    Head direction (HD) cells have been identified in a number of limbic system structures. These cells encode the animal's perceived directional heading in the horizontal plane and are dependent on an intact vestibular system. Previous studies have reported that the responses of vestibular neurons within the vestibular nuclei are markedly attenuated when an animal makes a volitional head turn compared to passive rotation. This finding presents a conundrum in that if vestibular responses are suppressed during an active head turn how is a vestibular signal propagated forward to drive and update the HD signal? This review identifies and discusses four possible mechanisms that could resolve this problem. These mechanisms are: (1) the ascending vestibular signal is generated by more than just vestibular-only neurons, (2) not all vestibular-only neurons contributing to the HD pathway have firing rates that are attenuated by active head turns, (3) the ascending pathway may be spared from the affects of the attenuation in that the HD system receives information from other vestibular brainstem sites that do not include vestibular-only cells, and (4) the ascending signal is affected by the inhibited vestibular signal during an active head turn, but the HD circuit compensates and uses the altered signal to accurately update the current HD. Future studies will be needed to decipher which of these possibilities is correct.

  10. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program --now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human Exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines be opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  11. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program -- now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history. The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines the opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  12. Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2012 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2013-04-01

    The reports included in this report are for project activities that occurred from October 2011 through September 2012. These reports describe in detail the discoveries, achievements, and challenges encountered by our talented and enthusiastic principal investigators (PIs). Many of the reports describe R&D efforts that were “successful” in their pursuits and resulted in a positive outcome or technology realization. As we’ve stated before, and continue to stress, in some cases the result is a “negative” finding, for instance a technology is currently impractical or out of reach. This can often be viewed erroneously as a “failure,” but is actually a valid outcome in the pursuit of high-risk research, which often leads to unforeseen new paths of discovery. Either result advances our knowledge and increases our ability to identify solutions and/or likewise avoid costly paths not appropriate for the challenges presented. The SDRD program continues to provide an unfettered mechanism for innovation and development that returns multifold to the NNSS mission. Overall the program is a strong R&D innovation engine, benefited by an enhanced mission, committed resources, and sound competitiveness to yield maximum benefit. The 23 projects described exemplify the creativity and ability of a diverse scientific and engineering talent base. The efforts also showcase an impressive capability and resource that can be brought to find solutions to a broad array of technology needs and applications relevant to the NNSS mission and national security.

  13. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors via their allosteric binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, J; Bacáková, L; Lisá, V; el-Fakahany, E E; Tucek, S

    1996-01-01

    Ligands that bind to the allosteric-binding sites on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors alter the conformation of the classical-binding sites of these receptors and either diminish or increase their affinity for muscarinic agonists and classical antagonists. It is not known whether the resulting conformational change also affects the interaction between the receptors and the G proteins. We have now found that the muscarinic receptor allosteric modulators alcuronium, gallamine, and strychnine (acting in the absence of an agonist) alter the synthesis of cAMP in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the M2 or the M4 subtype of muscarinic receptors in the same direction as the agonist carbachol. In addition, most of their effects on the production of inositol phosphates in CHO cells expressing the M1 or the M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes are also similar to (although much weaker than) those of carbachol. The agonist-like effects of the allosteric modulators are not observed in CHO cells that have not been transfected with the gene for any of the subtypes of muscarinic receptors. The effects of alcuronium on the formation of cAMP and inositol phosphates are not prevented by the classical muscarinic antagonist quinuclidinyl benzilate. These observations demonstrate for the first time that the G protein-mediated functional responses of muscarinic receptors can be evoked not only from their classical, but also from their allosteric, binding sites. This represents a new mechanism of receptor activation. PMID:8710935

  14. Formation of proteasome-PA700 complexes directly correlates with activation of peptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Adams, G M; Crotchett, B; Slaughter, C A; DeMartino, G N; Gogol, E P

    1998-09-15

    The proteolytic activity of the eukaryotic 20S proteasome is stimulated by a multisubunit activator, PA700, which forms both 1:1 and 2:1 complexes with the proteasome. Formation of the complexes is enhanced by an additional protein assembly called modulator, which also stimulates the enzymatic activity of the proteasome only in the presence of PA700. Here we show that the binding of PA700 to the proteasome is cooperative, as is the activation of the proteasome's intrinsic peptidase activity. Modulator increases the extent of complex formation and peptidase activation, while preserving the cooperative kinetics. Furthermore, the increase in activity is not linear with the number of PA700 assemblies bound to the proteasome, but rather with the number of proteasome-PA700 complexes, regardless of the PA700:proteasome stoichiometry. Hence the stimulation of peptidase activity is fully (or almost fully) effected by the binding of a single PA700 to the 20S proteasome. The stimulation of peptidase by modulator is explained entirely by the increased number of proteasome-PA700 complexes formed in its presence, rather than by any substantial direct stimulation of catalysis. These observations are consistent with a model in which PA700, either alone or assisted by modulator, promotes conformational changes in the proteasome that activate the catalytic sites and/or facilitate access of peptide substrates to these sites. PMID:9737872

  15. Activation of Inhibitors by Sortase Triggers Irreversible Modification of the Active Site*S

    PubMed Central

    Maresso, Anthony W.; Wu, Ruiying; Kern, Justin W.; Zhang, Rongguang; Janik, Dorota; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Schneewind, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Sortases anchor surface proteins to the cell wall of Gram-positive pathogens through recognition of specific motif sequences. Loss of sortase leads to large reductions in virulence, which identifies sortase as a target for the development of antibacterials. By screening 135,625 small molecules for inhibition, we report here that aryl (β-amino)ethyl ketones inhibit sortase enzymes from staphylococci and bacilli. Inhibition of sortases occurs through an irreversible, covalent modification of their active site cysteine. Sortases specifically activate this class of molecules via β-elimination, generating a reactive olefin intermediate that covalently modifies the cysteine thiol. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of Bacillus anthracis sortase B with and without inhibitor provides insights into the mechanism of inhibition and reveals binding pockets that can be exploited for drug discovery. PMID:17545669

  16. The bifunctional active site of s-adenosylmethionine synthetase. Roles of the active site aspartates.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J C; Markham, G D

    1999-11-12

    S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzes the biosynthesis of AdoMet in a unique enzymatic reaction. Initially the sulfur of methionine displaces the intact tripolyphosphate chain (PPP(i)) from ATP, and subsequently PPP(i) is hydrolyzed to PP(i) and P(i) before product release. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli AdoMet synthetase shows that the active site contains four aspartate residues. Aspartate residues Asp-16* and Asp-271 individually provide the sole protein ligand to one of the two required Mg(2+) ions (* denotes a residue from a second subunit); aspartates Asp-118 and Asp-238* are proposed to interact with methionine. Each aspartate has been changed to an uncharged asparagine, and the metal binding residues were also changed to alanine, to assess the roles of charge and ligation ability on catalytic efficiency. The resultant enzyme variants all structurally resemble the wild type enzyme as indicated by circular dichroism spectra and are tetramers. However, all have k(cat) reductions of approximately 10(3)-fold in AdoMet synthesis, whereas the MgATP and methionine K(m) values change by less than 3- and 8-fold, respectively. In the partial reaction of PPP(i) hydrolysis, mutants of the Mg(2+) binding residues have >700-fold reduced catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)), whereas the D118N and D238*N mutants are impaired less than 35-fold. The catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by Mg(2+) site mutants is improved by AdoMet, like the wild type enzyme. In contrast AdoMet reduces the catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by the D118N and D238*N mutants, indicating that the events involved in AdoMet activation are hindered in these methionyl binding site mutants. Ca(2+) uniquely activates the D271A mutant enzyme to 15% of the level of Mg(2+), in contrast to the approximately 1% Ca(2+) activation of the wild type enzyme. This indicates that the Asp-271 side chain size is a discriminator between the activating ability of Ca(2+) and the

  17. Protonation States of the Tryptophan Synthase Internal Aldimine Active Site from Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Direct Observation of the Protonated Schiff Base Linkage to Pyridoxal-5′-Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The acid–base chemistry that drives catalysis in pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes has been the subject of intense interest and investigation since the initial identification of PLP’s role as a coenzyme in this extensive class of enzymes. It was first proposed over 50 years ago that the initial step in the catalytic cycle is facilitated by a protonated Schiff base form of the holoenzyme in which the linking lysine ε-imine nitrogen, which covalently binds the coenzyme, is protonated. Here we provide the first 15N NMR chemical shift measurements of such a Schiff base linkage in the resting holoenzyme form, the internal aldimine state of tryptophan synthase. Double-resonance experiments confirm the assignment of the Schiff base nitrogen, and additional 13C, 15N, and 31P chemical shift measurements of sites on the PLP coenzyme allow a detailed model of coenzyme protonation states to be established. PMID:25148001

  18. Bipartite functions of the CREB co-activators selectively direct alternative splicing or transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Amelio, Antonio L; Caputi, Massimo; Conkright, Michael D

    2009-09-16

    The CREB regulated transcription co-activators (CRTCs) regulate many biological processes by integrating and converting environmental inputs into transcriptional responses. Although the mechanisms by which CRTCs sense cellular signals are characterized, little is known regarding how CRTCs contribute to the regulation of cAMP inducible genes. Here we show that these dynamic regulators, unlike other co-activators, independently direct either pre-mRNA splice-site selection or transcriptional activation depending on the cell type or promoter context. Moreover, in other scenarios, the CRTC co-activators coordinately regulate transcription and splicing. Mutational analyses showed that CRTCs possess distinct functional domains responsible for regulating either pre-mRNA splicing or transcriptional activation. Interestingly, the CRTC1-MAML2 oncoprotein lacks the splicing domain and is incapable of altering splice-site selection despite robustly activating transcription. The differential usage of these distinct domains allows CRTCs to selectively mediate multiple facets of gene regulation, indicating that co-activators are not solely restricted to coordinating alternative splicing with increase in transcriptional activity.

  19. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  20. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  1. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  2. Mapping site-specific endonuclease binding to DNA by direct imaging with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, D.P.; Thundat, T.; Doktycz, M.J.; Kerper, P.S.; Warmack, R.J.; Modrich, P.; Isfort, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    Physical mapping of DNA can be accomplished by direct AFM imaging of site specific proteins bound to DNA molecules. Using Gln-111, a mutant of EcoRI endonuclease with a specific affinity for EcoRI sites 1,000 times greater than wild type enzyme but with cleavage rate constants reduced by a factor of 10{sup 4}, the authors demonstrate site-specific mapping by direct AFM imaging. Images are presented showing specific-site binding of Gln-111 to plasmids having either one (pBS{sup +}) or two (pMP{sup 32}) EcoRI sites. Identification of the Gln-111/DNA complex is greatly enhanced by biotinylation of the complex followed by reaction with streptavidin gold prior to imaging. Image enhancement coupled with improvements in the preparation techniques for imaging large DNA molecules, such as lambda DNA (47 kb), has the potential to contribute to direct AFM restriction mapping of cosmid-sized genomic DNAs.

  3. Mapping site-specific endonuclease binding to DNA by direct imaging with atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, David P.; Thundat, Thomas G.; Modrich, P.; Isfort, R. J.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Kerper, P. S.; Warmack, R. J.

    1995-04-01

    Physical mapping of DNA can be accomplished by direct AFM imaging of site specific proteins bound to DNA molecules. Using Gln-111, a mutant of EcoRI endonuclease with a specific affinity for EcoRI sites 1000 times greater than wild type enzyme but with cleavage rate constants reduced by a factor of 104, we demonstrate site-specific mapping by direct AFM imaging. Images are presented showing specific-site binding of Gln-111 to plasmids having either one (pBS+) or two (pMP32) EcoRI sites. Identification of the Gln-111/DNA complex is greatly enhanced by biotinylation of the complex followed by reaction with streptavidin gold prior to imaging. Image enhancement coupled with improvements in our preparation techniques for imaging large DNA molecules, such as lambda DNA (47 kb), has the potential to contribute to direct AFM restriction mapping of cosmid-sized genomic DNAs.

  4. Site-Directed Mutagenesis to Improve Sensitivity of a Synthetic Two-Component Signaling System

    PubMed Central

    Kuldell, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Two-component signaling (2CS) systems enable bacterial cells to respond to changes in their local environment, often using a membrane-bound sensor protein and a cytoplasmic responder protein to regulate gene expression. Previous work has shown that Escherichia coli’s natural EnvZ/OmpR 2CS could be modified to construct a light-sensing bacterial photography system. The resulting bacterial photographs, or “coliroids,” rely on a phosphotransfer reaction between Cph8, a synthetic version of EnvZ that senses red light, and OmpR. Gene expression changes can be visualized through upregulation of a LacZ reporter gene by phosphorylated OmpR. Unfortunately, basal LacZ expression leads to a detectable reporter signal even when cells are grown in the light, diminishing the contrast of the coliroids. We performed site-directed mutagenesis near the phosphotransfer site of Cph8 to isolate mutants with potentially improved image contrast. Five mutants were examined, but only one of the mutants, T541S, increased the ratio of dark/light gene expression, as measured by β-galactosidase activity. The ratio changed from 2.57 fold in the starting strain to 5.59 in the T541S mutant. The ratio decreased in the four other mutant strains we examined. The phenotype observed in the T541S mutant strain may arise because the serine sidechain is chemically similar but physically smaller than the threonine sidechain. This may minimally change the protein’s local structure, but may be less sterically constrained when compared to threonine, resulting in a higher probability of a phosphotransfer event. Our initial success pairing synthetic biology and site-directed mutagenesis to optimize the bacterial photography system’s performance encourages us to imagine further improvements to the performance of this and other synthetic systems, especially those based on 2CS signaling. PMID:26799494

  5. Site-Directed Mutagenesis to Improve Sensitivity of a Synthetic Two-Component Signaling System.

    PubMed

    Olshefsky, Audrey; Shehata, Laila; Kuldell, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Two-component signaling (2CS) systems enable bacterial cells to respond to changes in their local environment, often using a membrane-bound sensor protein and a cytoplasmic responder protein to regulate gene expression. Previous work has shown that Escherichia coli's natural EnvZ/OmpR 2CS could be modified to construct a light-sensing bacterial photography system. The resulting bacterial photographs, or "coliroids," rely on a phosphotransfer reaction between Cph8, a synthetic version of EnvZ that senses red light, and OmpR. Gene expression changes can be visualized through upregulation of a LacZ reporter gene by phosphorylated OmpR. Unfortunately, basal LacZ expression leads to a detectable reporter signal even when cells are grown in the light, diminishing the contrast of the coliroids. We performed site-directed mutagenesis near the phosphotransfer site of Cph8 to isolate mutants with potentially improved image contrast. Five mutants were examined, but only one of the mutants, T541S, increased the ratio of dark/light gene expression, as measured by β-galactosidase activity. The ratio changed from 2.57 fold in the starting strain to 5.59 in the T541S mutant. The ratio decreased in the four other mutant strains we examined. The phenotype observed in the T541S mutant strain may arise because the serine sidechain is chemically similar but physically smaller than the threonine sidechain. This may minimally change the protein's local structure, but may be less sterically constrained when compared to threonine, resulting in a higher probability of a phosphotransfer event. Our initial success pairing synthetic biology and site-directed mutagenesis to optimize the bacterial photography system's performance encourages us to imagine further improvements to the performance of this and other synthetic systems, especially those based on 2CS signaling. PMID:26799494

  6. Mutations of fumarase that distinguish between the active site and a nearby dicarboxylic acid binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, T.; Lees, M.; Banaszak, L.

    1997-01-01

    Two mutant forms of fumarase C from E. coli have been made using PCR and recombinant DNA. The recombinant form of the protein included a histidine arm on the C-terminal facilitating purification. Based on earlier studies, two different carboxylic acid binding sites, labeled A- and B-, were observed in crystal structures of the wild type and inhibited forms of the enzyme. A histidine at each of the sites was mutated to an asparagine. H188N at the A-site resulted in a large decrease in specific activity, while the H129N mutation at the B-site had essentially no effect. From the results, we conclude that the A-site is indeed the active site, and a dual role for H188 as a potential catalytic base is proposed. Crystal structures of the two mutant proteins produced some unexpected results. Both mutations reduced the affinity for the carboxylic acids at their respective sites. The H129N mutant should be particularly useful in future kinetic studies because it sterically blocks the B-site with the carboxyamide of asparagine assuming the position of the ligand's carboxylate. In the H188N mutation at the active site, the new asparagine side chain still interacts with an active site water that appears to have moved slightly as a result of the mutation. PMID:9098893

  7. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  8. Chicken scFvs with an Artificial Cysteine for Site-Directed Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Hyori; Chung, Junho

    2016-01-01

    For the site-directed conjugation of chemicals and radioisotopes to the chicken-derived single-chain variable fragment (scFv), we investigated amino acid residues replaceable with cysteine. By replacing each amino acid of the 157 chicken variable region framework residues (FR, 82 residues on VH and 75 on VL) with cysteine, 157 artificial cysteine mutants were generated and characterized. At least 27 residues on VL and 37 on VH could be replaced with cysteine while retaining the binding activity of the original scFv. We prepared three VL (L5, L6 and L7) and two VH (H13 and H16) mutants as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and showed that PEG-conjugation to the sulfhydryl group of the artificial cysteine was achievable in all five mutants. Because the charge around the cysteine residue affects the in vivo stability of thiol-maleimide conjugation, we prepared 16 charge-variant artificial cysteine mutants by replacing the flanking residues of H13 with charged amino acids and determined that the binding activity was not affected in any of the mutants except one. We prepared four charge-variant H13 artificial cysteine mutants (RCK, DCE, ECD and ECE) as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and confirmed that the reactivity of the sulfhydryl group on cysteine is active and their binding activity is retained after the conjugation process. PMID:26764487

  9. Chicken scFvs with an Artificial Cysteine for Site-Directed Conjugation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Aerin; Shin, Jung Won; Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Hyori; Chung, Junho

    2016-01-01

    For the site-directed conjugation of chemicals and radioisotopes to the chicken-derived single-chain variable fragment (scFv), we investigated amino acid residues replaceable with cysteine. By replacing each amino acid of the 157 chicken variable region framework residues (FR, 82 residues on VH and 75 on VL) with cysteine, 157 artificial cysteine mutants were generated and characterized. At least 27 residues on VL and 37 on VH could be replaced with cysteine while retaining the binding activity of the original scFv. We prepared three VL (L5, L6 and L7) and two VH (H13 and H16) mutants as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and showed that PEG-conjugation to the sulfhydryl group of the artificial cysteine was achievable in all five mutants. Because the charge around the cysteine residue affects the in vivo stability of thiol-maleimide conjugation, we prepared 16 charge-variant artificial cysteine mutants by replacing the flanking residues of H13 with charged amino acids and determined that the binding activity was not affected in any of the mutants except one. We prepared four charge-variant H13 artificial cysteine mutants (RCK, DCE, ECD and ECE) as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and confirmed that the reactivity of the sulfhydryl group on cysteine is active and their binding activity is retained after the conjugation process.

  10. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration. FY2005 report

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Will

    2006-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2005. Fifty new projects were selected for funding this year, and five FY 2004 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.4 million, for an average per project cost of just under $100,000. Two external audits of SDRD accounting practices were conducted in FY 2005. Both audits found the program's accounting practices consistent with the requirements of DOE Order 413.2A, and one included the observation that the NTS contractor ''did an exceptional job in planning and executing year-start activities.'' Highlights for the year included: the filing of 18 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2005 projects; programmatic adoption of 17 FY 2004 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2005 projects; and the successful completion of 55 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

  11. Ionizable Side Chains at Catalytic Active Sites of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic active sites of enzymes of known structure can be well defined by a modern program of computational geometry. The CASTp program was used to define and measure the volume of the catalytic active sites of 573 enzymes in the Catalytic Site Atlas database. The active sites are identified as catalytic because the amino acids they contain are known to participate in the chemical reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Acid and base side chains are reliable markers of catalytic active sites. The catalytic active sites have 4 acid and 5 base side chains, in an average volume of 1072 Å3. The number density of acid side chains is 8.3 M (in chemical units); the number density of basic side chains is 10.6 M. The catalytic active site of these enzymes is an unusual electrostatic and steric environment in which side chains and reactants are crowded together in a mixture more like an ionic liquid than an ideal infinitely dilute solution. The electrostatics and crowding of reactants and side chains seems likely to be important for catalytic function. In three types of analogous ion channels, simulation of crowded charges accounts for the main properties of selectivity measured in a wide range of solutions and concentrations. It seems wise to use mathematics designed to study interacting complex fluids when making models of the catalytic active sites of enzymes. PMID:22484856

  12. Probing the substrate binding site of Candida tenuis xylose reductase (AKR2B5) with site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kratzer, Regina; Leitgeb, Stefan; Wilson, David K.; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how substrates bind to CtXR (Candida tenuis xylose reductase; AKR2B5) and other members of the AKR (aldo–keto reductase) protein superfamily. Modelling of xylose into the active site of CtXR suggested that Trp23, Asp50 and Asn309 are the main components of pentose-specific substrate-binding recognition. Kinetic consequences of site-directed substitutions of these residues are reported. The mutants W23F and W23Y catalysed NADH-dependent reduction of xylose with only 4 and 1% of the wild-type efficiency (kcat/Km) respectively, but improved the wild-type selectivity for utilization of ketones, relative to xylose, by factors of 156 and 471 respectively. Comparison of multiple sequence alignment with reported specificities of AKR members emphasizes a conserved role of Trp23 in determining aldehyde-versus-ketone substrate selectivity. D50A showed 31 and 18% of the wild-type catalytic-centre activities for xylose reduction and xylitol oxidation respectively, consistent with a decrease in the rates of the chemical steps caused by the mutation, but no change in the apparent substrate binding constants and the pattern of substrate specificities. The 30-fold preference of the wild-type for D-galactose compared with 2-deoxy-D-galactose was lost completely in N309A and N309D mutants. Comparison of the 2.4 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) X-ray crystal structure of mutant N309D bound to NAD+ with the previous structure of the wild-type holoenzyme reveals no major structural perturbations. The results suggest that replacement of Asn309 with alanine or aspartic acid disrupts the function of the original side chain in donating a hydrogen atom for bonding with the substrate C-2(R) hydroxy group, thus causing a loss of transition-state stabilization energy of 8–9 kJ/mol. PMID:16336198

  13. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-10-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism. PMID:24909063

  14. Site-directed mutagenesis of the substrate-binding cleft of human estrogen sulfotransferase.

    PubMed

    Hempel, N; Barnett, A C; Bolton-Grob, R M; Liyou, N E; McManus, M E

    2000-09-16

    The sulfonation of estrogens by human estrogen sulfotransferase (humSULT1E1) plays a vital role in controlling the active levels of these hormones in the body. To understand more fully the structural and functional characteristics of humSULT1E1, we have carried out site-directed mutagenesis of critical amino acids found in the substrate-binding cleft. Three single amino acid mutations of humSULT1E1 (V145E, H107A, and K85A) were created in this study. Kinetic studies were used to provide information about the importance of these residues in substrate specificity and catalysis, using a variety of substrates. Lysine at position 85 has been proposed to be within hydrogen bonding distance to the 3alpha-phenol group of beta-estradiol, thereby stabilising the substrate in the active site. However, substitution to a neutral alanine at this position improved substrate specificity of humSULT1E1 for beta-estradiol, estrone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). The exchange of valine 145 for negatively charged glutamic acid markedly improved the ability of humSULT1E1 to sulfonate dopamine, but caused a reduction in specificity constants toward steroids tested, in particular DHEA. The presence of a histidine residue at position 107 was shown to be essential for the production of a functional protein, as substitution of this amino acid to alanine resulted in complete loss of activity of humSULT1E1 towards all substrates tested. PMID:11006110

  15. Site-directed mutagenesis around the CuA site of a polyphenol oxidase from Coreopsis grandiflora (cgAUS1)

    PubMed Central

    Kaintz, Cornelia; Mayer, Rupert L.; Jirsa, Franz; Halbwirth, Heidi; Rompel, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Aurone synthase from Coreopsis grandiflora (cgAUS1), catalyzing conversion of butein to sulfuretin in a type-3 copper center, is a rare example of a polyphenol oxidase involved in anabolism. Site-directed mutagenesis around the CuA site of AUS1 was performed, and recombinant enzymes were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Replacement of the coordinating CuA histidines with alanine resulted in the presence of a single copper and loss of diphenolase activity. The thioether bridge-building cysteine and a phenylalanine over the CuA site, exchanged to alanine, have no influence on copper content but appear to play an important role in substrate binding. PMID:25697959

  16. Direct charge radioisotope activation and power generation

    DOEpatents

    Lal, Amit; Li, Hui; Blanchard, James P.; Henderson, Douglass L.

    2002-01-01

    An activator has a base on which is mounted an elastically deformable micromechanical element that has a section that is free to be displaced toward the base. An absorber of radioactively emitted particles is formed on the base or the displaceable section of the deformable element and a source is formed on the other of the displaceable section or the base facing the absorber across a small gap. The radioactive source emits charged particles such as electrons, resulting in a buildup of charge on the absorber, drawing the absorber and source together and storing mechanical energy as the deformable element is bent. When the force between the absorber and the source is sufficient to bring the absorber into effective electrical contact with the source, discharge of the charge between the source and absorber allows the deformable element to spring back, releasing the mechanical energy stored in the element. An electrical generator such as a piezoelectric transducer may be secured to the deformable element to convert the released mechanical energy to electrical energy that can be used to provide power to electronic circuits.

  17. Site-directed introduction of disulfide groups on antibodies for highly sensitive immunosensors.

    PubMed

    Acero Sánchez, Josep Ll; Fragoso, Alex; Joda, Hamdi; Suárez, Guillaume; McNeil, Calum J; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2016-07-01

    The interface between the sample and the transducer surface is critical to the performance of a biosensor. In this work, we compared different strategies for covalent self-assembly of antibodies onto bare gold substrates by introducing disulfide groups into the immunoglobulin structure, which acted as anchor molecules able to chemisorb spontaneously onto clean gold surfaces. The disulfide moieties were chemically introduced to the antibody via the primary amines, carboxylic acids, and carbohydrates present in its structure. The site-directed modification via the carbohydrate chains exhibited the best performance in terms of analyte response using a model system for the detection of the stroke marker neuron-specific enolase. SPR measurements clearly showed the potential for creating biologically active densely packed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) in a one-step protocol compared to both mixed SAMs of alkanethiol compounds and commercial immobilization layers. The ability of the carbohydrate strategy to construct an electrochemical immunosensor was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) transduction. Graphical Abstract Left: Functionalization strategies of bare gold substrates via direct bio-SAM using disulfide-containing antibody chemically modified via their primary amines (A), carbohydrates (B) and carboxylic acids (C). Right: Dependence of the peak height with NSE concentration at NSE21-CHO modified electrochemical immunosensor. Inset: Logarithmic calibration plot. PMID:27220524

  18. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  19. Active site - a site of binding of affinity inhibitors in baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Svyato, I.E.; Sklyankina, V.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-03-20

    The interaction of the enzyme-substrate complex with methyl phosphate, O-phosphoethanolamine, O-phosphopropanolamine, N-acetylphosphoserine, and phosphoglyolic acid, as well as pyrophosphatase, modified by monoesters of phosphoric acid, with pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate, was investigated. It was shown that the enzyme containing the substrate in the active site does not react with monophosphates, but modified pyrophosphatase entirely retains the ability to bind polyanions to the regulatory site. It is concluded that the inactivation of baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase by monoesters of phosphoric acid, which are affinity inhibitors of it, is the result of modification of the active site of the enzyme.

  20. Control of active sites in selective flocculation: III -- Mechanism of site blocking

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    It has been shown in Parts I and II of this paper that heteroflocculation can be controlled by poisoning the sites for flocculant adsorption using a site blocking agent (SBA). An efficient SBA was determined to be the lower molecular weight fraction of the flocculant. In this paper, the underlying mechanism of SBA action is described. Also, the mathematical model detailed in Part I is used to determine the effect of different SBAs on apatite-dolomite separation efficiency. It has been demonstrated that the depression in flocculation is directly related to the site blocking parameter ([bar [Phi

  1. Mechanism of allosteric modulation of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase probed by site-directed mutagenesis of ornithine site residues.

    PubMed

    Rochera, Lourdes; Fresquet, Vicente; Rubio, Vicente; Cervera, Javier

    2002-03-13

    The role of residues of the ornithine activator site is probed by mutagenesis in Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS). Mutations E783A, E783L, E892A and E892L abolish ornithine binding, E783D and T1042V decrease 2-3 orders of magnitude and E892D decreased 10-fold apparent affinity for ornithine. None of the mutations inactivates CPS. E783 mutations hamper carbamate phosphorylation and increase K(+) and MgATP requirements, possibly by perturbing the K(+)-loop near the carbamate phosphorylation site. Mutation E892A activates the enzyme similarly to ornithine, possibly by altering the position of K891 at the opening of the tunnel that delivers the carbamate to its phosphorylation site. T1042V also influences modulation by IMP and UMP, supporting signal transmission from the nucleotide effector to the ornithine site mediated by a hydrogen bond network involving T1042. Ornithine activation of CPS may be mediated by K(+)-loop and tunnel gating changes. PMID:11943174

  2. A novel approach to predict active sites of enzyme molecules.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kuo-Chen; Cai, Yu-dong

    2004-04-01

    Enzymes are critical in many cellular signaling cascades. With many enzyme structures being solved, there is an increasing need to develop an automated method for identifying their active sites. However, given the atomic coordinates of an enzyme molecule, how can we predict its active site? This is a vitally important problem because the core of an enzyme molecule is its active site from the viewpoints of both pure scientific research and industrial application. In this article, a topological entity was introduced to characterize the enzymatic active site. Based on such a concept, the covariant discriminant algorithm was formulated for identifying the active site. As a paradigm, the serine hydrolase family was demonstrated. The overall success rate by jackknife test for a data set of 88 enzyme molecules was 99.92%, and that for a data set of 50 independent enzyme molecules was 99.91%. Meanwhile, it was shown through an example that the prediction algorithm can also be used to find any typographic error of a PDB file in annotating the constituent amino acids of catalytic triad and to suggest a possible correction. The very high success rates are due to the introduction of a covariance matrix in the prediction algorithm that makes allowance for taking into account the coupling effects among the key constituent atoms of active site. It is anticipated that the novel approach is quite promising and may become a useful high throughput tool in enzymology, proteomics, and structural bioinformatics. PMID:14997541

  3. Growth exponents in surface models with non-active sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Figueiredo, W.; Aarão Reis, F. D. A.

    2006-11-01

    In this work, we studied the role played by the inactive sites present on the substrate of a growing surface. In our model, one particle sticks at the surface if the site where it falls is an active site. However, we allow the deposited particle to diffuse along the surface in accordance with some mechanism previously defined. Using Monte Carlo simulations, and some analytical results, we have investigated the model in (1+1) and (2+1) dimensions considering different relaxation mechanisms. We show that the consideration of non-active sites is a crucial point in the model. In fact, we have seen that the saturation regime is not observed for any value of the density of inactive sites. Besides, the growth exponent β turns to be one, at long times, whatever the mechanism of diffusion we consider in one and two dimensions.

  4. A small ribozyme with dual-site kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Elisa; Maxwell, Adam W.R.; Burke, Donald H.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoryl transfer onto backbone hydroxyls is a recognized catalytic activity of nucleic acids. We find that kinase ribozyme K28 possesses an unusually complex active site that promotes (thio)phosphorylation of two residues widely separated in primary sequence. After allowing the ribozyme to radiolabel itself by phosphoryl transfer from [γ-32P]GTP, DNAzyme-mediated cleavage yielded two radiolabeled cleavage fragments, indicating phosphorylation sites within each of the two cleavage fragments. These sites were mapped by alkaline digestion and primer extension pausing. Enzymatic digestion and mutational analysis identified nucleotides important for activity and established the active structure as being a constrained pseudoknot with unusual connectivity that may juxtapose the two reactive sites. Nuclease sensitivities for nucleotides near the pseudoknot core were altered in the presence of GTPγS, indicating donor-induced folding. The 5′ target site was more strongly favored in full-length ribozyme K28 (128 nt) than in truncated RNAs (58 nt). Electrophoretic mobilities of self-thiophosphorylated products on organomercurial gels are distinct from the 5′ mono-thiophosphorylated product produced by reaction with polynucleotide kinase, potentially indicating simultaneous labeling of both sites within individual RNA strands. Our evidence supports a single, compact structure with local dynamics, rather than global rearrangement, as being responsible for dual-site phosphorylation. PMID:22618879

  5. Site-directed ELISA identifies a highly antigenic region of the simian immunodeficiency virus transmembrane glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, P R; Parks, D E; Norrby, E; Lerner, R A; Purcell, R H; Chanock, R M

    1988-06-01

    The transmembrane glycoprotein (gp32) of the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) contains a highly antigenic region that includes amino acid residues 606-628. A synthetic peptide representing this region was highly immunoreactive with sera from SIV-infected primates in a site-directed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This reactivity extended across four primate species from three genera and identified infection with at least two distinct isolates of SIV. This site-directed ELISA represents a simple, accessible method with broad specificity for screening large numbers of primates for antibodies against SIV.

  6. Mapping the heparin-binding site of the osteoinductive protein NELL1 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kaneyoshi; Imai, Arisa; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Maturana, Andrés D; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Niimi, Tomoaki

    2015-12-21

    Neural epidermal growth factor-like (NEL)-like 1 (NELL1) is a secretory osteogenic protein comprising an N-terminal thrombospondin-1-like (TSPN) domain, four von Willebrand factor type C domains, and six epidermal growth factor-like repeats. NELL1 shows heparin-binding activity; however, the biological significance remains to be explored. In this report, we demonstrate that NELL1 binds to cell surface proteoglycans through its TSPN domain. Major heparin-binding sites were identified on the three-dimensional structural model of the TSPN domain of NELL1. Mutant analysis of the heparin-binding sites indicated that the heparin-binding activity of the TSPN domain is involved in interaction of NELL1 with cell surface proteoglycans.

  7. Spectroscopic definition of the copper active sites in mordenite: selective methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Vanelderen, Pieter; Snyder, Benjamin E R; Tsai, Ming-Li; Hadt, Ryan G; Vancauwenbergh, Julie; Coussens, Olivier; Schoonheydt, Robert A; Sels, Bert F; Solomon, Edward I

    2015-05-20

    Two distinct [Cu-O-Cu](2+) sites with methane monooxygenase activity are identified in the zeolite Cu-MOR, emphasizing that this Cu-O-Cu active site geometry, having a ∠Cu-O-Cu ∼140°, is particularly formed and stabilized in zeolite topologies. Whereas in ZSM-5 a similar [Cu-O-Cu](2+) active site is located in the intersection of the two 10 membered rings, Cu-MOR provides two distinct local structures, situated in the 8 membered ring windows of the side pockets. Despite their structural similarity, as ascertained by electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy, the two Cu-O-Cu active sites in Cu-MOR clearly show different kinetic behaviors in selective methane oxidation. This difference in reactivity is too large to be ascribed to subtle differences in the ground states of the Cu-O-Cu sites, indicating the zeolite lattice tunes their reactivity through second-sphere effects. The MOR lattice is therefore functionally analogous to the active site pocket of a metalloenzyme, demonstrating that both the active site and its framework environment contribute to and direct reactivity in transition metal ion-zeolites.

  8. Direct-current resistivity data from 94 sites in northeastern Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Cathleen J.

    1988-01-01

    Direct-current resistivity data were collected from 94 vertical electric sounding profiles in northeastern Palm Beach County, Florida. Direct-current resistivity data, which may be used to determine the location and thicknesses of shallow, semipermeable marls or locate zones of high chloride concentration, are presented in this report. The resistivity data consist of field data, smoothed data, layer resistivity from smoothed data, and Cartesian graphs of resistivity in relation to depth for 94 sites located in northeastern Palm Beach County. (USGS)

  9. Direct volatilization of naphthalene to the atmosphere at a phytoremediation site.

    PubMed

    Marr, Linsey C; Booth, Elizabeth C; Andersen, Rikke G; Widdowson, Mark A; Novak, John T

    2006-09-01

    Phytoremediation systems are known to reduce groundwater contamination by at least three major mechanisms: plant uptake, phytovolatilization, and enhanced rhizosphere bioremediation. The potential for such systems to enhance a fourth remediation pathway--direct surface volatilization of contaminants through the subsurface and into the atmosphere-has not yet been investigated in the field. A vertical flux chamber was used to measure direct surface volatilization of naphthalene over nine months at a creosote-contaminated site in Oneida, Tennessee, where a phytoremediation system of poplar trees was installed in 1997. A maximum flux of 23 microg m(-2) h(-1) was measured in August 2004, and naphthalene removal by the direct volatilization pathway is estimated to be 50 g yr(-1) at this site. Results suggest that direct volatilization fluxes are most strongly affected by the groundwater level (thickness of the saturated zone), soil moisture, and changes in atmospheric pressure. At this site, transpiration and canopy interception resulting from the phytoremediation system significantly reduce the saturated thickness, increasing the vertical concentration gradient of naphthalene in the groundwater and thus increasing the upward diffusive flux of naphthalene through the subsurface. The presence of the trees, therefore, promotes direct volatilization into the atmosphere. This research represents the first known measurement of naphthalene attenuation by the direct volatilization pathway.

  10. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  11. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  12. Characterization of the active site of chloroperoxidase using physical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    Chloroperoxidase (CPO) and Cytochrome P-450, two very different hemeproteins, have been shown to have similar active sites by several techniques. Recent work has demonstrated thiolate ligation from a cysteine residue to the iron in P-450. A major portion of this research has been devoted to obtaining direct evidence that CPO also has a thiolate 5th ligand from a cysteine residue. This information will provide the framework for a detailed analysis of the structure-function relationships between peroxidases, catalase and cytochrome P-450 hemeproteins. To determine whether the 5th ligand is a cysteine, methionine or a unique amino acid, specific isotope enrichment experiments were used. Preliminary /sup 1/H-NMR studies show that the carbon monoxide-CPO complex has a peak in the upfield region corresponding to alpha-protons of a thiolate amino acid. C. fumago was grown on 95% D/sub 2/O media with a small amount of /sup 1/H-cysteine added. Under these conditions C. fumago slows down the biosynthesis of cysteine by at least 50% and utilizes the exogenous cysteine in the media. GC-MS was able to show that the methylene protons next to the sulfur atom in cysteine are 80-90% protonated while these positions in methionine are approximately 73% deuterated. Comparison of the /sup 1/H-NMR spectra of CO-CPO and CO-CPO indicate the presence of a cysteine ligand in chloroperoxidase.

  13. Localization of the site for the nucleotide effectors of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase using site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Mora, P; Rubio, V; Fresquet, V; Cervera, J

    1999-03-01

    Replacement by alanine of Ser-948, Thr-974 and Lys-954 of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) shows that these residues are involved in binding the allosteric inhibitor UMP and the activator IMP. The mutant CPSs are active in vivo and in vitro and exhibit normal activation by ornithine, but the modulation by both UMP and IMP is either lost or diminished. The results demonstrate that the sites for UMP and IMP overlap and that the activator ornithine binds elsewhere. Since the mutated residues were found in the crystal structure of CPS near a bound phosphate, Ser-948, Thr-974 and Lys-954 bind the phosphate moiety of UMP and IMP. PMID:10100629

  14. Control of directionality in Streptomyces phage φBT1 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Binyan; Dai, Ruixue; Zhao, Guoping; Ding, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Streptomyces phage φBT1 integrates its genome into the attB site of the host chromosome with the attP site to generate attL and attR. The φBT1 integrase belongs to the large serine recombinase subfamily which directly binds to target sites to initiate double strand breakage and exchange. A recombination directionality factor (RDF) is commonly required for switching integration to excision. Here we report the characterization of the RDF protein for φBT1 recombination. The RDF, is a phage-encoded gp3 gene product (28 KDa), which allows efficient active excision between attL and attR, and inhibits integration between attB and attP; Gp3 can also catalyze topological relaxation with the integrase of supercoiled plasmids containing a single excision site. Further study showed that Gp3 could form a dimer and interact with the integrase whether it bound to the substrate or not. The synapse formation of attL or attR alone with integrase and Gp3 showed that synapsis did not discriminate between the two sites, indicating that complementarity of central dinucleotides is the sole determinant of outcome in correct excision synapses. Furthermore, both in vitro and in vivo evidence support that the RDFs of φBT1 and φC31 were fully exchangeable, despite the low amino acid sequence identity of the two integrases.

  15. Thrombin-Mediated Direct Activation of Proteinase-Activated Receptor-2: Another Target for Thrombin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Hansen, Kristina K; Renaux, Bernard; Polley, Danny; Gibson, Stacy; Vanderboor, Christina; Hollenberg, Morley D

    2016-05-01

    Thrombin is known to signal to cells by cleaving/activating a G-protein-coupled family of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs). The signaling mechanism involves the proteolytic unmasking of an N-terminal receptor sequence that acts as a tethered receptor-activating ligand. To date, the recognized targets of thrombin cleavage and activation for signaling are PAR1 and PAR4, in which thrombin cleaves at a conserved target arginine to reveal a tethered ligand. PAR2, which like PAR1 is also cleaved at an N-terminal arginine to unmask its tethered ligand, is generally regarded as a target for trypsin but not for thrombin signaling. We now show that thrombin, at concentrations that can be achieved at sites of acute injury or in a tumor microenvironment, can directly activate PAR2 vasorelaxation and signaling, stimulating calcium and mitogen-activated protein kinase responses along with triggeringβ-arrestin recruitment. Thus, PAR2 can be added alongside PAR1 and PAR4 to the targets, whereby thrombin can affect tissue function.

  16. Site directed spin labeling studies of Escherichia coli dihydroorotate dehydrogenase N-terminal extension

    SciTech Connect

    Couto, Sheila G.; Cristina Nonato, M.

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EcDHODH is a membrane-associated enzyme and a promising target for drug design. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzyme's N-terminal extension is responsible for membrane association. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal works as a molecular lid regulating access to the protein interior. -- Abstract: Dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (DHODHs) are enzymes that catalyze the fourth step of the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. In this reaction, DHODH converts dihydroorotate to orotate, using a flavine mononucleotide as a cofactor. Since the synthesis of nucleotides has different pathways in mammals as compared to parasites, DHODH has gained much attention as a promising target for drug design. Escherichia coli DHODH (EcDHODH) is a family 2 DHODH that interacts with cell membranes in order to promote catalysis. The membrane association is supposedly made via an extension found in the enzyme's N-terminal. In the present work, we used site directed spin labeling (SDSL) to specifically place a magnetic probe at positions 2, 5, 19, and 21 within the N-terminal and thus monitor, by using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), dynamics and structural changes in this region in the presence of a membrane model system. Overall, our ESR spectra show that the N-terminal indeed binds to membranes and that it experiences a somewhat high flexibility that could be related to the role of this region as a molecular lid controlling the entrance of the enzyme's active site and thus allowing the enzyme to give access to quinones that are dispersed in the membrane and that are necessary for the catalysis.

  17. Sequences flanking the core-binding site modulate glucocorticoid receptor structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Schöne, Stefanie; Jurk, Marcel; Helabad, Mahdi Bagherpoor; Dror, Iris; Lebars, Isabelle; Kieffer, Bruno; Imhof, Petra; Rohs, Remo; Vingron, Martin; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H

    2016-09-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds as a homodimer to genomic response elements, which have particular sequence and shape characteristics. Here we show that the nucleotides directly flanking the core-binding site, differ depending on the strength of GR-dependent activation of nearby genes. Our study indicates that these flanking nucleotides change the three-dimensional structure of the DNA-binding site, the DNA-binding domain of GR and the quaternary structure of the dimeric complex. Functional studies in a defined genomic context show that sequence-induced changes in GR activity cannot be explained by differences in GR occupancy. Rather, mutating the dimerization interface mitigates DNA-induced changes in both activity and structure, arguing for a role of DNA-induced structural changes in modulating GR activity. Together, our study shows that DNA sequence identity of genomic binding sites modulates GR activity downstream of binding, which may play a role in achieving regulatory specificity towards individual target genes.

  18. Direct growth of polyaniline chains from N-doped sites of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Haq, Atta Ul; Lim, Joonwon; Yun, Je Moon; Lee, Won Jun; Han, Tae Hee; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2013-11-25

    Polymer grafting from graphitic carbon materials has been pursued for several decades. Unfortunately, currently available methods mostly rely on the harsh chemical treatment of graphitic carbons which causes severe degradation of chemical structure and material properties. A straightforward growth of polyaniline chain from the nitrogen (N)-doped sites of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is presented. N-doping sites along the CNT wall nucleate the polymerization of aniline, which generates seamless hybrids consisting of polyaniline directly grafted onto the CNT walls. The resultant materials exhibit excellent synergistic electrochemical performance, and can be employed for charge collectors of supercapacitors. This approach introduces an efficient route to hybrid systems consisting of conducting polymers directly grafted from graphitic dopant sites.

  19. Archaeomagnetic Directional Determinations On Various Archaeological Materials From The Late Minoan Destruction Site At Malia, Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, W. S.

    An archaeomagnetic directional study of Late Minoan archaeological materials, (burnt mud brick, a clay/ash horizon and hearth material), was carried out at locations within the archaeological complex at Malia, Crete. The study aimed to establish the suitability of materials for archaeomagnetic sampling and to obtain archaeomagnetic directions for comparison with other Late Minoan "fired" sites on Crete. Results from 42 oriented samples measured on a fluxgate spinner magnetometer from homogeneously distributed burnt mud brick (constituting low elevation, in situ, partition walls), gave precise values of ancient field directions for, Malia Palace (area 13) and Maison äα. These directions are statistically identical (at a 95% confidence level) and also identical to directions obtained from other Late Minoan archaeological sites, on Crete. This, may suggest, simultaneous 'fire-involved' destruction. Other archaeomagnetic directions obtained from Malia (Quartier ɛ), from a 'clay/ash' horizon (34 samples) and hearth (19 samples), produced some spurious results, with detrimental consequences for directional accuracy. For the burnt mud brick, small viscous components were easily removed and evidence from coercivity spectra obtained, after step-wise alternating field demagnetizations, suggests that, the magnetic carriers are single domain, (low titanium), titanomagnetite.

  20. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development, FY 2007 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wil Lewis, editor

    2008-02-20

    The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2007. Twenty-nine new projects were selected for funding this year, and eight projects started in FY 2006 were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.67 million, for an average per-project cost of $153 thousand. An external audit conducted in September 2007 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: programmatic adoption of 8 SDRD-developed technologies; the filing of 9 invention disclosures for innovation evolving from SDRD projects; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD Symposium that was broadly attended by Nevada Test Site (NTS), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), LDRD, U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2007 projects; and the successful completion of 37 R&D projects, as presented in this report. In response to a company-wide call, authors throughout the NTS complex submitted 182 proposals for FY 2007 SDRD projects. The SDRD program has seen a dramatic increase in the yearly total of submitted proposals--from 69 in FY 2002 to 182 this year--while the number of projects funded has actually decreased from a program high of 57 in FY 2004. The overall effect of this trend has helped ensure an increasingly competitive program that benefited from a broader set of innovative ideas, making project selection both challenging and rewarding. Proposals were evaluated for technical merit, including such factors as innovation, probability of success, potential benefit, and mission applicability. Authors and reviewers benefited from the use of a shortfalls list entitled the 'NTS Technology Needs Assessment' that was compiled from NTS, National Weapons Laboratory (NWL), and

  1. Site-Specific Gene Expression in Vivo by Direct Gene Transfer into the Arterial Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Elizabeth G.; Plautz, Gregory; Nabel, Gary J.

    1990-09-01

    A recombinant β-galactosidase gene has been expressed in a specific arterial segment in vivo by direct infection with a murine amphotropic retroviral vector or by DNA transfection with the use of liposomes. Several cell types in the vessel wall were transduced, including endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. After retroviral infection, a recombinant reporter gene was expressed for at least 5 months, and no helper virus was detected. Recombinant gene expression achieved by direct retroviral infection or liposome-mediated DNA transfection was limited to the site of infection and was absent from liver, lung, kidney, and spleen. These results demonstrate that site-specific gene expression can be achieved by direct gene transfer in vivo and could be applied to the treatment of such human diseases as atherosclerosis or cancer.

  2. Directing cell therapy to anatomic target sites in vivo with magnetic resonance targeting

    PubMed Central

    Muthana, Munitta; Hughes, Russell; Fagnano, Ester; Richardson, Jay; Paul, Melanie; Murdoch, Craig; Wright, Fiona; Payne, Christopher; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Farrow, Neil; Dobson, Jon; Conner, Joe; Wild, Jim M; Lewis, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy exploits modified human cells to treat diseases but its targeted application in specific tissues, particularly those lying deep in the body where direct injection is not possible, has been problematic. Here we use a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system to direct macrophages carrying an oncolytic virus, Seprehvir, into primary and metastatic tumour sites in mice. To achieve this, we magnetically label macrophages with super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) and apply pulsed magnetic-field gradients in the direction of the tumour sites. Magnetic resonance targeting guides macrophages from the bloodstream into tumors, resulting in increased tumour macrophage infiltration and reduction in tumor burden and metastasis. Our study indicates that clinical MRI scanners can not only track the location of magnetically labelled cells but also have the potential to steer them into one or more target tissues. PMID:26284300

  3. Directing cell therapy to anatomic target sites in vivo with magnetic resonance targeting.

    PubMed

    Muthana, Munitta; Kennerley, Aneurin J; Hughes, Russell; Fagnano, Ester; Richardson, Jay; Paul, Melanie; Murdoch, Craig; Wright, Fiona; Payne, Christopher; Lythgoe, Mark F; Farrow, Neil; Dobson, Jon; Conner, Joe; Wild, Jim M; Lewis, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy exploits modified human cells to treat diseases but its targeted application in specific tissues, particularly those lying deep in the body where direct injection is not possible, has been problematic. Here we use a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system to direct macrophages carrying an oncolytic virus, Seprehvir, into primary and metastatic tumour sites in mice. To achieve this, we magnetically label macrophages with super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and apply pulsed magnetic field gradients in the direction of the tumour sites. Magnetic resonance targeting guides macrophages from the bloodstream into tumours, resulting in increased tumour macrophage infiltration and reduction in tumour burden and metastasis. Our study indicates that clinical MRI scanners can not only track the location of magnetically labelled cells but also have the potential to steer them into one or more target tissues. PMID:26284300

  4. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  5. Radial Glial Cell–Neuron Interaction Directs Axon Formation at the Opposite Side of the Neuron from the Contact Site

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Takano, Tetsuya; Nakamuta, Shinichi; Namba, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    How extracellular cues direct axon–dendrite polarization in mouse developing neurons is not fully understood. Here, we report that the radial glial cell (RGC)–cortical neuron interaction directs axon formation at the opposite side of the neuron from the contact site. N-cadherin accumulates at the contact site between the RGC and cortical neuron. Inhibition of the N-cadherin-mediated adhesion decreases this oriented axon formation in vitro, and disrupts the axon–dendrite polarization in vivo. Furthermore, the RGC–neuron interaction induces the polarized distribution of active RhoA at the contacting neurite and active Rac1 at the opposite neurite. Inhibition of Rho–Rho-kinase signaling in a neuron impairs the oriented axon formation in vitro, and prevents axon–dendrite polarization in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that the N-cadherin-mediated radial glia–neuron interaction determines the contacting neurite as the leading process for radial glia-guided neuronal migration and directs axon formation to the opposite side acting through the Rho family GTPases. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons are highly polarized cell lines typically with a single axon and multiple dendrites, which underlies the ability of integrating and transmitting the information in the brain. How is the axon–dendrite polarity of neurons established in the developing neocortex? Here we show that the N-cadherin-mediated radial glial cell–neuron interaction directs axon–dendrite polarization, the radial glial cell–neuron interaction induces polarized distribution of active RhoA and active Rac1 in neurons, and Rho–Rho-kinase signaling is required for axon–dendrite polarization. Our work advances the overall understanding of how extracellular cues direct axon–dendrite polarization in mouse developing neurons. PMID:26511243

  6. Copper and protons directly activate the zinc-activated channel.

    PubMed

    Trattnig, Sarah M; Gasiorek, Agnes; Deeb, Tarek Z; Ortiz, Eydith J Comenencia; Moss, Stephen J; Jensen, Anders A; Davies, Paul A

    2016-03-01

    The zinc-activated channel (ZAC) is a cationic ion channel belonging to the superfamily of Cys-loop receptors, which consists of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels. ZAC is the least understood member of this family so in the present study we sought to characterize the properties of this channel further. We demonstrate that not only zinc (Zn(2+)) but also copper (Cu(2+)) and protons (H(+)) are agonists of ZAC, displaying potencies and efficacies in the rank orders of H(+)>Cu(2+)>Zn(2+) and H(+)>Zn(2+)>Cu(2+), respectively. The responses elicited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+) through ZAC are all characterized by low degrees of desensitization. In contrast, currents evoked by high concentrations of the three agonists comprise distinctly different activation and decay components, with transitions to and from an open state being significantly faster for H(+) than for the two metal ions. The permeabilities of ZAC for Na(+) and K(+) relative to Cs(+) are indistinguishable, whereas replacing all of extracellular Na(+) and K(+) with the divalent cations Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) results in complete elimination of Zn(2+)-activated currents at both negative and positive holding potentials. This indicates that ZAC is non-selectively permeable to monovalent cations, whereas Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) inhibit the channel. In conclusion, this is the first report of a Cys-loop receptor being gated by Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+). ZAC could be an important mediator of some of the wide range of physiological functions regulated by or involving Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+).

  7. Studies on the active site of pig plasma amine oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Collison, D; Knowles, P F; Mabbs, F E; Rius, F X; Singh, I; Dooley, D M; Cote, C E; McGuirl, M

    1989-01-01

    Amine oxidase from pig plasma (PPAO) has two bound Cu2+ ions and at least one pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) moiety as cofactors. It is shown that recovery of activity by copper-depleted PPAO is linear with respect to added Cu2+ ions. Recovery of e.s.r. and optical spectral characteristics of active-site copper parallel the recovery of catalytic activity. These results are consistent with both Cu2+ ions contributing to catalysis. Further e.s.r. studies indicate that the two copper sites in PPAO, unlike those in amine oxidases from other sources, are chemically distinct. These comparative studies establish that non-identity of the Cu2+ ions in PPAO is not a requirement for amine oxidase activity. It is shown through the use of a new assay procedure that there are two molecules of PQQ bound per molecule of protein in PPAO; only the more reactive of these PQQ moieties is required for activity. PMID:2559715

  8. Site-directed spin labeling reveals pentameric ligand-gated ion channel gating motions.

    PubMed

    Dellisanti, Cosma D; Ghosh, Borna; Hanson, Susan M; Raspanti, James M; Grant, Valerie A; Diarra, Gaoussou M; Schuh, Abby M; Satyshur, Kenneth; Klug, Candice S; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2013-11-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are neurotransmitter-activated receptors that mediate fast synaptic transmission. In pLGICs, binding of agonist to the extracellular domain triggers a structural rearrangement that leads to the opening of an ion-conducting pore in the transmembrane domain and, in the continued presence of neurotransmitter, the channels desensitize (close). The flexible loops in each subunit that connect the extracellular binding domain (loops 2, 7, and 9) to the transmembrane channel domain (M2-M3 loop) are essential for coupling ligand binding to channel gating. Comparing the crystal structures of two bacterial pLGIC homologues, ELIC and the proton-activated GLIC, suggests channel gating is associated with rearrangements in these loops, but whether these motions accurately predict the motions in functional lipid-embedded pLGICs is unknown. Here, using site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and functional GLIC channels reconstituted into liposomes, we examined if, and how far, the loops at the ECD/TMD gating interface move during proton-dependent gating transitions from the resting to desensitized state. Loop 9 moves ∼9 Å inward toward the channel lumen in response to proton-induced desensitization. Loop 9 motions were not observed when GLIC was in detergent micelles, suggesting detergent solubilization traps the protein in a nonactivatable state and lipids are required for functional gating transitions. Proton-induced desensitization immobilizes loop 2 with little change in position. Proton-induced motion of the M2-M3 loop was not observed, suggesting its conformation is nearly identical in closed and desensitized states. Our experimentally derived distance measurements of spin-labeled GLIC suggest ELIC is not a good model for the functional resting state of GLIC, and that the crystal structure of GLIC does not correspond to a desensitized state. These findings advance our understanding

  9. Determinants governing the CYP74 catalysis: conversion of allene oxide synthase into hydroperoxide lyase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Toporkova, Yana Y; Gogolev, Yuri V; Mukhtarova, Lucia S; Grechkin, Alexander N

    2008-10-15

    Bioinformatics analyses enabled us to identify the hypothetical determinants of catalysis by CYP74 family enzymes. To examine their recognition, two mutant forms F295I and S297A of tomato allene oxide synthase LeAOS3 (CYP74C3) were prepared by site-directed mutagenesis. Both mutations dramatically altered the enzyme catalysis. Both mutant forms possessed the activity of hydroperoxide lyase, while the allene oxide synthase activity was either not detectable (F295I) or significantly reduced (S297A) compared to the wild-type LeAOS3. Thus, both sites 295 and 297 localized within the "I-helix central domain" ("oxygen binding domain") are the primary determinants of CYP74 type of catalysis.

  10. Transcriptional activation through ETS domain binding sites in the cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV gene

    SciTech Connect

    Virbasius, J.V.; Scarpulla, R.C. )

    1991-11-01

    A mutational analysis of the rat cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (RCO4) promoter region revealed the presence of a major control element consisting of a tandemly repeated pair of binding sites for a nuclear factor from HeLa cells. This factor was designated NRF-2 (nuclear respiratory factor 2) because a functional recognition site was also found in the human ATP synthase {beta}-subunit gene. Deletion or site-directed point mutations of the NRF-2 binding sites in the RCO4 promoter resulted in substantial loss of transcriptional activity, and synthetic oligomers of the NRF-2 binding sites from both genes stimulated a heterologous promoter when cloned in cis. NRF-2 binding a transcriptional activation required a purine-rich core sequence, GGAA. This motif is characteristic of the recognition site for a family of activators referred to as ETS domain proteins because of the similarity within their DNA-binding domains to the ets-1 proto-oncogene product. NRF-2 recognized an authentic Ets-1 site within the Moloney murine sarcoma virus long terminal repeat, and this site was able to compete for NRF-2 binding to the RCO4 promoter sequence. However, in contrast to Ets-1, which appears to be exclusive to lymphoid tissues, NRF-2 has the broad tissue distribution expected of a regulator of respiratory chain expression.

  11. Direct potentiometric determination of diastase activity in honey.

    PubMed

    Sak-Bosnar, Milan; Sakač, Nikola

    2012-11-15

    A novel method for the determination of diastase activity is reported. The method is based on a direct potentiometric measurement of triiodide ion that is released when a starch-triiodide complex is hydrolysed by honey diastase. The increase of free triiodide ion concentration in a sample is found to be directly proportional to the diastase activity of the sample. A response mechanism of the platinum redox electrode is proposed, allowing a calculation of the diastase activity factor (F). The sensor and analyte parameters, including F, were obtained by least squares fitting of potentiometric data using the optimisation function of the Solver add-in of Microsoft Excel. The values of F obtained by the new direct potentiometric method were compared with those obtained using the standard Phadebas method (DN values), and the two values were found to agree within experimental error. Finally, the diastase activity of nine varieties of honey was determined using the novel method developed here.

  12. Computer simulation of the active site of human serum cholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Kefang Jiao; Song Li; Zhengzheng Lu

    1996-12-31

    The first 3D-structure of acetylchelinesterase from Torpedo California electric organ (T.AChE) was published by JL. Sussman in 1991. We have simulated 3D-structure of human serum cholinesterase (H.BuChE) and the active site of H.BuChE. It is discovered by experiment that the residue of H.BuChE is still active site after a part of H.BuChE is cut. For example, the part of 21KD + 20KD is active site of H.BuChE. The 20KD as it is. Studies on these peptides by Hemelogy indicate that two active peptides have same negative electrostatic potential maps diagram. These negative electrostatic areas attached by acetyl choline with positive electrostatic potency. We predict that 147...236 peptide of AChE could be active site because it was as 20KD as with negative electrostatic potential maps. We look forward to proving from other ones.

  13. Cellular Cholesterol Directly Activates Smoothened in Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pengxiang; Nedelcu, Daniel; Watanabe, Miyako; Jao, Cindy; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Jing; Salic, Adrian

    2016-08-25

    In vertebrates, sterols are necessary for Hedgehog signaling, a pathway critical in embryogenesis and cancer. Sterols activate the membrane protein Smoothened by binding its extracellular, cysteine-rich domain (CRD). Major unanswered questions concern the nature of the endogenous, activating sterol and the mechanism by which it regulates Smoothened. We report crystal structures of CRD complexed with sterols and alone, revealing that sterols induce a dramatic conformational change of the binding site, which is sufficient for Smoothened activation and is unique among CRD-containing receptors. We demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling requires sterol binding to Smoothened and define key residues for sterol recognition and activity. We also show that cholesterol itself binds and activates Smoothened. Furthermore, the effect of oxysterols is abolished in Smoothened mutants that retain activation by cholesterol and Hedgehog. We propose that the endogenous Smoothened activator is cholesterol, not oxysterols, and that vertebrate Hedgehog signaling controls Smoothened by regulating its access to cholesterol. PMID:27545348

  14. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  15. Recruitment of Mcm10 to Sites of Replication Initiation Requires Direct Binding to the Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Max E.

    2016-01-01

    Mcm10 is required for the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication and contributes in some unknown way to the activation of the Cdc45-MCM-GINS (CMG) helicase. How Mcm10 is localized to sites of replication initiation is unclear, as current models indicate that direct binding to minichromosome maintenance (MCM) plays a role, but the details and functional importance of this interaction have not been determined. Here, we show that purified Mcm10 can bind both DNA-bound double hexamers and soluble single hexamers of MCM. The binding of Mcm10 to MCM requires the Mcm10 C terminus. Moreover, the binding site for Mcm10 on MCM includes the Mcm2 and Mcm6 subunits and overlaps that for the loading factor Cdt1. Whether Mcm10 recruitment to replication origins depends on CMG helicase assembly has been unclear. We show that Mcm10 recruitment occurs via two modes: low affinity recruitment in the absence of CMG assembly (“G1-like”) and high affinity recruitment when CMG assembly takes place (“S-phase-like”). Mcm10 that cannot bind directly to MCM is defective in both modes of recruitment and is unable to support DNA replication. These findings indicate that Mcm10 is localized to replication initiation sites by directly binding MCM through the Mcm10 C terminus. PMID:26719337

  16. Multi-site Phosphorylation Regulates Bim Stability and Apoptotic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Anette; Barrett, Tamera; Flavell, Richard A.; Davis, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim is established to be an important mediator of signaling pathways that induce cell death. Multi-site phosphorylation of Bim by several members of the MAP kinase group is implicated as a regulatory mechanism that controls the apoptotic activity of Bim. To test the role of Bim phosphorylation in vivo, we constructed mice with a series of mutant alleles that express phosphorylation-defective Bim proteins. We show that mutation of the phosphorylation site Thr-112 causes decreased binding of Bim to the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 and can increase cell survival. In contrast, mutation of the phosphorylation sites Ser-55, Ser-65, and Ser-73 can cause increased apoptosis because of reduced proteasomal degradation of Bim. Together, these data indicate that phosphorylation can regulate Bim by multiple mechanisms and that the phosphorylation of Bim on different sites can contribute to the sensitivity of cellular apoptotic responses. PMID:18498746

  17. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  18. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  19. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  20. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  1. Data Quality Objectives Supporting the Environmental Direct Radiation Monitoring Program for the INL Site

    SciTech Connect

    Lundell, J. F.; Magnuson, S. O.; Scherbinske, P.; Case, M. J.

    2015-07-01

    This document presents the development of the data quality objectives (DQOs) for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Environmental Direct Radiation Monitoring Program and follows the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) DQO process (EPA 2006). This document also develops and presents the logic to determine the specific number of direct radiation monitoring locations around INL facilities on the desert west of Idaho Falls and in Idaho Falls, at locations bordering the INL Site, and in the surrounding regional area. The selection logic follows the guidance from the Department of Energy (DOE) (2015) for environmental surveillance of DOE facilities.

  2. Molecular dynamics explorations of active site structure in designed and evolved enzymes.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Sílvia; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Noey, Elizabeth L; Houk, K N

    2015-04-21

    , a noncatalytic arrangement of the catalytic triad is dominant. Unnatural truncated substrates are inactive because of the lack of protein-protein interactions provided by the ACP. Directed evolution is able to gradually restore the catalytic organization of the active site by motion of the protein backbone that alters the active site geometry. In the third case, we demonstrate the key role of MD in combination with crystallography to identify the origins of substrate-dependent stereoselectivities in a number of Codexis-engineered ketoreductases, one of which is used commercially for the production of the antibiotic sulopenem. Here, mutations alter the shape of the active site as well as the accessibility of water to different regions of it. Each of these examples reveals something different about how mutations can influence enzyme activity and shows that directed evolution, like natural evolution, can increase catalytic activity in a variety of remarkable and often subtle ways.

  3. Conformational Transitions in Human AP Endonuclease 1 and Its Active Site Mutant during Abasic Site Repair†

    PubMed Central

    Kanazhevskaya, Lyubov Yu.; Koval, Vladimir V.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Strauss, Phyllis R.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2010-01-01

    AP endonuclease 1 (APE 1) is a crucial enzyme of the base excision repair pathway (BER) in human cells. APE1 recognizes apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and makes a nick in the phosphodiester backbone 5′ to them. The conformational dynamics and presteady-state kinetics of wild-type APE1 and its active site mutant, Y171F-P173L-N174K, have been studied. To observe conformational transitions occurring in the APE1 molecule during the catalytic cycle, we detected intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the enzyme under single turnover conditions. DNA duplexes containing a natural AP site, its tetrahydrofuran analogue, or a 2′-deoxyguanosine residue in the same position were used as specific substrates or ligands. The stopped-flow experiments have revealed high flexibility of the APE1 molecule and the complexity of the catalytic process. The fluorescent traces indicate that wild-type APE1 undergoes at least four conformational transitions during the processing of abasic sites in DNA. In contrast, nonspecific interactions of APE1 with undamaged DNA can be described by a two-step kinetic scheme. Rate and equilibrium constants were extracted from the stopped-flow and fluorescence titration data for all substrates, ligands, and products. A replacement of three residues at the enzymatic active site including the replacement of tyrosine 171 with phenylalanine in the enzyme active site resulted in a 2 × 104-fold decrease in the reaction rate and reduced binding affinity. Our data indicate the important role of conformational changes in APE1 for substrate recognition and catalysis. PMID:20575528

  4. Radial Glial Cell-Neuron Interaction Directs Axon Formation at the Opposite Side of the Neuron from the Contact Site.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Takano, Tetsuya; Nakamuta, Shinichi; Namba, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-10-28

    How extracellular cues direct axon-dendrite polarization in mouse developing neurons is not fully understood. Here, we report that the radial glial cell (RGC)-cortical neuron interaction directs axon formation at the opposite side of the neuron from the contact site. N-cadherin accumulates at the contact site between the RGC and cortical neuron. Inhibition of the N-cadherin-mediated adhesion decreases this oriented axon formation in vitro, and disrupts the axon-dendrite polarization in vivo. Furthermore, the RGC-neuron interaction induces the polarized distribution of active RhoA at the contacting neurite and active Rac1 at the opposite neurite. Inhibition of Rho-Rho-kinase signaling in a neuron impairs the oriented axon formation in vitro, and prevents axon-dendrite polarization in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that the N-cadherin-mediated radial glia-neuron interaction determines the contacting neurite as the leading process for radial glia-guided neuronal migration and directs axon formation to the opposite side acting through the Rho family GTPases.

  5. Software-supported USER cloning strategies for site-directed mutagenesis and DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Jespersen, Jakob Berg; Sommer, Morten O A; Wernersson, Rasmus; Olsen, Lars Rønn

    2015-03-20

    USER cloning is a fast and versatile method for engineering of plasmid DNA. We have developed a user friendly Web server tool that automates the design of optimal PCR primers for several distinct USER cloning-based applications. Our Web server, named AMUSER (Automated DNA Modifications with USER cloning), facilitates DNA assembly and introduction of virtually any type of site-directed mutagenesis by designing optimal PCR primers for the desired genetic changes. To demonstrate the utility, we designed primers for a simultaneous two-position site-directed mutagenesis of green fluorescent protein (GFP) to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), which in a single step reaction resulted in a 94% cloning efficiency. AMUSER also supports degenerate nucleotide primers, single insert combinatorial assembly, and flexible parameters for PCR amplification. AMUSER is freely available online at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/AMUSER/. PMID:24847672

  6. Software-supported USER cloning strategies for site-directed mutagenesis and DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Jespersen, Jakob Berg; Sommer, Morten O A; Wernersson, Rasmus; Olsen, Lars Rønn

    2015-03-20

    USER cloning is a fast and versatile method for engineering of plasmid DNA. We have developed a user friendly Web server tool that automates the design of optimal PCR primers for several distinct USER cloning-based applications. Our Web server, named AMUSER (Automated DNA Modifications with USER cloning), facilitates DNA assembly and introduction of virtually any type of site-directed mutagenesis by designing optimal PCR primers for the desired genetic changes. To demonstrate the utility, we designed primers for a simultaneous two-position site-directed mutagenesis of green fluorescent protein (GFP) to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), which in a single step reaction resulted in a 94% cloning efficiency. AMUSER also supports degenerate nucleotide primers, single insert combinatorial assembly, and flexible parameters for PCR amplification. AMUSER is freely available online at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/AMUSER/.

  7. Alternate site infusion: the physician-directed, office-based model.

    PubMed

    Tice, A D

    1996-01-01

    The physician-directed, clinic-based system for alternate site infusion therapy offers the advantages of easy communication and integrated decision making through the close teamwork and particular expertise of the nurse, physician, and pharmacist. With this system, any type of delivery model for home or outpatient IV antibiotic can be administered safely and efficiently. Through the involvement of the physician, it is easy to do clinical outcomes studies and develop bundling of services for risk-sharing contracts under managed care.

  8. Collagen protein abnormalities produced by site-directed mutagenesis of the pro alpha 1(I) gene.

    PubMed

    Bateman, J F; Mascara, T; Cole, W G; Stacey, A; Jaenisch, R

    1989-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of collagen genes offers a powerful new approach for studying structure-function relationships. The construction of engineered mutant collagen genes coding for glycine substitutions and their expression giving rise to the osteogenesis imperfecta type II phenotype in cells and transgenic mice has recently been achieved. This paper further defines the molecular abnormalities of collagen and bone pathology resulting from the expression of the mutant genes.

  9. Approach for addressing dioxin in soils at CERCLA and RCRA sites. Directive

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-13

    The purpose of this Directive is to recommend preliminary remediation goals (PRGs) or starting points for setting cleanup levels for dioxin in soil at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action sites. These recommended levels are to be used pending the release of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) comprehensive dioxin reassessment report and cross-program assessment of the impacts of the report.

  10. N-methyl-D-aspartate recognition site ligands modulate activity at the coupled glycine recognition site.

    PubMed

    Hood, W F; Compton, R P; Monahan, J B

    1990-03-01

    In synaptic plasma membranes from rat forebrain, the potencies of glycine recognition site agonists and antagonists for modulating [3H]1-[1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl]piperidine ([3H]TCP) binding and for displacing strychnine-insensitive [3H]glycine binding are altered in the presence of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) recognition site ligands. The NMDA competitive antagonist, cis-4-phosphonomethyl-2-piperidine carboxylate (CGS 19755), reduces [3H]glycine binding, and the reduction can be fully reversed by the NMDA recognition site agonist, L-glutamate. Scatchard analysis of [3H]glycine binding shows that in the presence of CGS 19755 there is no change in Bmax (8.81 vs. 8.79 pmol/mg of protein), but rather a decrease in the affinity of glycine (KD of 0.202 microM vs. 0.129 microM). Similar decreases in affinity are observed for the glycine site agonists, D-serine and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate, in the presence of CGS 19755. In contrast, the affinity of glycine antagonists, 1-hydroxy-3-amino-2-pyrrolidone and 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylate, at this [3H]glycine recognition site increases in the presence of CGS 19755. The functional consequence of this change in affinity was addressed using the modulation of [3H]TCP binding. In the presence of L-glutamate, the potency of glycine agonists for the stimulation of [3H]TCP binding increases, whereas the potency of glycine antagonists decreases. These data are consistent with NMDA recognition site ligands, through their interactions at the NMDA recognition site, modulating activity at the associated glycine recognition site.

  11. Catalysis-dependent selenium incorporation and migration in the nitrogenase active site iron-molybdenum cofactor

    PubMed Central

    Spatzal, Thomas; Perez, Kathryn A; Howard, James B; Rees, Douglas C

    2015-01-01

    Dinitrogen reduction in the biological nitrogen cycle is catalyzed by nitrogenase, a two-component metalloenzyme. Understanding of the transformation of the inert resting state of the active site FeMo-cofactor into an activated state capable of reducing dinitrogen remains elusive. Here we report the catalysis dependent, site-selective incorporation of selenium into the FeMo-cofactor from selenocyanate as a newly identified substrate and inhibitor. The 1.60 Å resolution structure reveals selenium occupying the S2B site of FeMo-cofactor in the Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe-protein, a position that was recently identified as the CO-binding site. The Se2B-labeled enzyme retains substrate reduction activity and marks the starting point for a crystallographic pulse-chase experiment of the active site during turnover. Through a series of crystal structures obtained at resolutions of 1.32–1.66 Å, including the CO-inhibited form of Av1-Se2B, the exchangeability of all three belt-sulfur sites is demonstrated, providing direct insights into unforeseen rearrangements of the metal center during catalysis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11620.001 PMID:26673079

  12. Catalysis-dependent selenium incorporation and migration in the nitrogenase active site iron-molybdenum cofactor.

    PubMed

    Spatzal, Thomas; Perez, Kathryn A; Howard, James B; Rees, Douglas C

    2015-12-16

    Dinitrogen reduction in the biological nitrogen cycle is catalyzed by nitrogenase, a two-component metalloenzyme. Understanding of the transformation of the inert resting state of the active site FeMo-cofactor into an activated state capable of reducing dinitrogen remains elusive. Here we report the catalysis dependent, site-selective incorporation of selenium into the FeMo-cofactor from selenocyanate as a newly identified substrate and inhibitor. The 1.60 Å resolution structure reveals selenium occupying the S2B site of FeMo-cofactor in the Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe-protein, a position that was recently identified as the CO-binding site. The Se2B-labeled enzyme retains substrate reduction activity and marks the starting point for a crystallographic pulse-chase experiment of the active site during turnover. Through a series of crystal structures obtained at resolutions of 1.32-1.66 Å, including the CO-inhibited form of Av1-Se2B, the exchangeability of all three belt-sulfur sites is demonstrated, providing direct insights into unforeseen rearrangements of the metal center during catalysis.

  13. Control of active sites in selective flocculation: I -- Mathematical model

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M.; Prakash, T.S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Heteroflocculation has been determined to be another major reason for loss in selectivity for flocculation process. In a mathematical model developed earlier, conditions for controlling heteroflocculation were discussed. Blocking active sites to control selective adsorption of a flocculant oil a desirable solid surface is discussed. It has been demonstrated that the lower molecular weight fraction of a flocculant which is incapable of flocculating the particles is an efficient site blocking agent. The major application of selective flocculation has been in mineral processing but many potential uses exist in biological and other colloidal systems. These include purification of ceramic powders, separating hazardous solids from chemical waste, and removal of deleterious components from paper pulp.

  14. The site of activation of factor X by cancer procoagulant.

    PubMed

    Gordon, S G; Mourad, A M

    1991-12-01

    Cancer procoagulant (CP) is a cysteine proteinase found in a variety of malignant cells and tissues and in human amnion-chorion tissue. It initiates coagulation by activating factor X. However, the amino acid sequence of the substrate protein that determines the cleavage site of cysteine proteinases is different from that of the serine proteinases that normally activate factor X, such as factor IXa, VIIa and Russell's Viper Venom (RVV). Therefore, it was of interest to determine the site of cleavage of human factor X by CP. Purified CP was incubated with purified factor X and the reaction mixture was electrophoresed on a 10% Tris-tricine SDS-PAGE gel. The proteins were electroeluted on to a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane, and stained with Coomassie blue. The heavy chain of activated factor X was cut out of the PVDF membrane and sequenced with an Applied Biosystems 477A with on-line HPLC. The primary cleavage sequence was Asp-Ala-Ala-Asp-Leu-Asp-Pro-; two other secondary sequences Ser-Ile-Thr-Trp-Lys-Pro- and Glu-Asn-Pro-Phe-Asp-Leu were found. The penultimate amino acid on the carbonyl side of the hydrolysed amide bond plays a critical role for the recognition of the cleavage site of cysteine proteinases. These data indicate that the penultimate amino acid for the primary cleavage site of factor X by CP is proline-20 and for the secondary sites, proline-13 and proline-28. This is in contrast to arginine-52 that determines the specificity of the cleavage by normal serine proteinase activation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. A Tale of Two Isomerases: Compact versus Extended Active Sites in Ketosteroid Isomerase and Phosphoglucose Isomerase

    SciTech Connect

    Somarowthu, Srinivas; Brodkin, Heather R.; D’Aquino, J. Alejandro; Ringe, Dagmar; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Beuning, Penny J.

    2012-07-11

    Understanding the catalytic efficiency and specificity of enzymes is a fundamental question of major practical and conceptual importance in biochemistry. Although progress in biochemical and structural studies has enriched our knowledge of enzymes, the role in enzyme catalysis of residues that are not nearest neighbors of the reacting substrate molecule is largely unexplored experimentally. Here computational active site predictors, THEMATICS and POOL, were employed to identify functionally important residues that are not in direct contact with the reacting substrate molecule. These predictions then guided experiments to explore the active sites of two isomerases, Pseudomonas putida ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) and human phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), as prototypes for very different types of predicted active sites. Both KSI and PGI are members of EC 5.3 and catalyze similar reactions, but they represent significantly different degrees of remote residue participation, as predicted by THEMATICS and POOL. For KSI, a compact active site of mostly first-shell residues is predicted, but for PGI, an extended active site in which residues in the first, second, and third layers around the reacting substrate are predicted. Predicted residues that have not been previously tested experimentally were investigated by site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic analysis. In human PGI, single-point mutations of the predicted second- and third-shell residues K362, H100, E495, D511, H396, and Q388 show significant decreases in catalytic activity relative to that of the wild type. The results of these experiments demonstrate that, as predicted, remote residues are very important in PGI catalysis but make only small contributions to catalysis in KSI.

  16. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2010 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Howard Bender, comp.

    2011-04-04

    This annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program represents the highly significant R&D accomplishments conducted during fiscal year 2010. This year was noteworthy historically, as the Nevada Test Site was renamed to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This change not only recognizes how the site's mission has evolved, but also heralds a future of new challenges and opportunities for the NNSS. In many ways, since its inception in 2002, the SDRD program has helped shape that evolving mission. As we approach 2012, SDRD will also mark a milestone, having completed its first full decade of innovative R&D in support of the site and national security. The program continues to fund advanced science and technology development across traditional Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear security areas such as stockpile stewardship and non-proliferation while also supporting Department of Homeland Security (DHS) needs, and specialized work for government agencies like the Department of Defense (DoD) and others. The NNSS will also contribute technologies in the areas of treaty verification and monitoring, two areas of increasing importance to national security. Keyed to the NNSS's broadened scope, the SDRD program will continue to anticipate and advance R&D projects that will help the NNSS meet forthcoming challenges.

  17. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling

    PubMed Central

    Dods, Rachel L.; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7–36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide–receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design. PMID:26598711

  18. A general strategy for site-directed enzyme immobilization by using NiO nanoparticle decorated mesoporous silica.

    PubMed

    Ling, Daishun; Gao, Liqian; Wang, Jianpeng; Shokouhimehr, Mohammadreza; Liu, Jiahui; Yu, Yongsheng; Hackett, Michael J; So, Pui-Kin; Zheng, Bo; Yao, Zhongping; Xia, Jiang; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2014-06-23

    Mesoporous materials have recently gained much attention owing to their large surface area, narrow pore size distribution, and superior pore structure. These materials have been demonstrated as excellent solid supports for immobilization of a variety of proteins and enzymes for their potential applications as biocatalysts in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. However, the lack of efficient and reproducible methods for immobilization has limited the activity and recyclability of these biocatalysts. Furthermore, the biocatalysts are usually not robust owing to their rapid denaturation in bulk solvents. To solve these problems, we designed a novel hybrid material system, mesoporous silica immobilized with NiO nanoparticles (SBA-NiO), wherein enzyme immobilization is directed to specific sites on the pore surface of the material. This yielded the biocatalytic species with higher activity than free enzyme in solution. These biocatalytic species are recyclable with minimal loss of activity after several cycles, demonstrating an advantage over free enzymes.

  19. Mapping the heparin-binding site of the BMP antagonist gremlin by site-directed mutagenesis based on predictive modelling.

    PubMed

    Tatsinkam, Arnold Junior; Mulloy, Barbara; Rider, Christopher C

    2015-08-15

    Gremlin is a member of the CAN (cerberus and DAN) family of secreted BMP (bone morphogenetic protein) antagonists and also an agonist of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) receptor-2. It is critical in limb skeleton and kidney development and is re-expressed during tissue fibrosis. Gremlin binds strongly to heparin and heparan sulfate and, in the present study, we sought to investigate its heparin-binding site. In order to explore a putative non-contiguous binding site predicted by computational molecular modelling, we substituted a total of 11 key arginines and lysines located in three basic residue sequence clusters with homologous sequences from cerberus and DAN (differential screening selected gene abberative in neuroblastoma), CAN proteins which lack basic residues in these positions. A panel of six Myc-tagged gremlin mutants, MGR-1-MGR-6 (MGR, mutant gremlin), each containing different combinations of targeted substitutions, all showed markedly reduced affinity for heparin as demonstrated by their NaCl elution on heparin affinity chromatography, thus verifying our predictions. Both MGR-5 and MGR-6 retained BMP-4-binding activity comparable to that of wild-type gremlin. Low-molecular-mass heparin neither promoted nor inhibited BMP-4 binding. Finally, glutaraldehyde cross-linking demonstrated that gremlin forms non-covalent dimers, similar behaviour to that of DAN and also PRDC (protein related to cerberus and DAN), another CAN protein. The resulting dimer would possess two heparin-binding sites, each running along an exposed surface on the second β-strand finger loop of one of the monomers.

  20. Site-Directed RNA Editing in Vivo Can Be Triggered by the Light-Driven Assembly of an Artificial Riboprotein

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Site-directed RNA editing allows for the manipulation of RNA and protein function by reprogramming genetic information at the RNA level. For this we assemble artificial RNA-guided editases and demonstrate their transcript repair activity in cells and in developing embryos of the annelid Platynereis dumerilii. A hallmark of our assembly strategy is the covalent attachment of guideRNA and editing enzyme by applying the SNAP-tag technology, a process that we demonstrate here to be readily triggered by light in vitro, in mammalian cell culture, and also in P. dumerilii. Lacking both sophisticated chemistry and extensive genetic engineering, this technology provides a convenient route for the light-dependent switching of protein isoforms. The presented strategy may also serve as a blue-print for the engineering of addressable machineries that apply tailored nucleic acid analogues to manipulate RNA or DNA site-specifically in living organisms. PMID:26594902

  1. Crystal structure of an avian influenza polymerase PA[subscript N] reveals an endonuclease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Puwei; Bartlam, Mark; Lou, Zhiyong; Chen, Shoudeng; Zhou, Jie; He, Xiaojing; Lv, Zongyang; Ge, Ruowen; Li, Xuemei; Deng, Tao; Fodor, Ervin; Rao, Zihe; Liu, Yingfang

    2009-11-10

    The heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase, containing the PA, PB1 and PB2 proteins, catalyses viral RNA replication and transcription in the nucleus of infected cells. PB1 holds the polymerase active site and reportedly harbours endonuclease activity, whereas PB2 is responsible for cap binding. The PA amino terminus is understood to be the major functional part of the PA protein and has been implicated in several roles, including endonuclease and protease activities as well as viral RNA/complementary RNA promoter binding. Here we report the 2.2 angstrom (A) crystal structure of the N-terminal 197 residues of PA, termed PA(N), from an avian influenza H5N1 virus. The PA(N) structure has an alpha/beta architecture and reveals a bound magnesium ion coordinated by a motif similar to the (P)DX(N)(D/E)XK motif characteristic of many endonucleases. Structural comparisons and mutagenesis analysis of the motif identified in PA(N) provide further evidence that PA(N) holds an endonuclease active site. Furthermore, functional analysis with in vivo ribonucleoprotein reconstitution and direct in vitro endonuclease assays strongly suggest that PA(N) holds the endonuclease active site and has critical roles in endonuclease activity of the influenza virus polymerase, rather than PB1. The high conservation of this endonuclease active site among influenza strains indicates that PA(N) is an important target for the design of new anti-influenza therapeutics.

  2. Family Therapy: A Phenomenological and Active Directive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Albert

    1978-01-01

    A "third force" in family therapy is outlined in this paper, which combines a phenomenological-humanistic approach with a highly active-directive attempt to help family members surrender their misperceptions of themselves and others and to make profound philosophic changes in their intrapersonal and interpersonal attitudes and behaviors. (Author)

  3. Functional constituents of the active site of human neutrophil collagenase.

    PubMed

    Mookhtiar, K A; Wang, F; Van Wart, H E

    1986-05-01

    A series of chemical modification reactions has been carried out to identify functional constituents of the active site of human neutrophil collagenase. The enzyme is reversibly inhibited by the transition metal chelating agent 1,10-phenanthroline, and inhibition is fully reversed by zinc. Removal of weakly bound metal ions by gel filtration inactivates collagenase, and activity is fully restored on immediate readdition of calcium. The enzyme is unaffected by reagents that modify serine, cysteine, and arginine residues. However, reaction with the carboxyl reagents cyclohexylmorpholinocarbodiimide and Woodward's Reagent K lowers the activity of the enzyme substantially. Acetylimidazole inactivates the enzyme, but activity is completely restored on addition of hydroxylamine. The enzyme is also inactivated by tetranitromethane, indicating that it contains an essential tyrosine residue. Acylation of collagenase with diethyl pyrocarbonate, diketene, acetic anhydride, or trinitrobenzenesulfonate inactivates the enzyme, and activity is not restored on addition of hydroxylamine, indicating the presence of an essential lysine residue.

  4. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  5. Parameterization of an Active Thermal Erosion Site, Caribou Creek, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busey, R.; Bolton, W. R.; Cherry, J. E.; Hinzman, L. D.

    2012-12-01

    Thermokarst features are thought to be an important mechanism for landscape change in permafrost-dominated cold regions, but few such features have been incorporated into full featured landscape models. The root of this shortcoming is that historic observations are not detailed enough to parameterize a model, and the models typically do not include the relevant processes for thermal erosion. A new, dynamic thermokarst feature has been identified at the Caribou-Poker Creek Research Watershed (CPCRW) in the boreal forest of Interior Alaska. Located adjacent to a traditional use trail, this feature terminates directly in Caribou Creek. Erosion within the feature is driven predominantly by fluvial interflow. CPCRW is a Long-Term Ecological Research site underlain by varying degrees of relatively warm, discontinuous permafrost. This poster will describe the suite of measurements that have been undertaken to parameterize the ERODE model for this site, including thorough surveys, time lapse- and aerial photography, and 3-D structure from motion algorithms.

  6. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  7. Enhancement of oxidative stability of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Weng, MeiZhi; Zheng, ZhongLiang; Bao, Wei; Cai, YongJun; Yin, Yan; Zou, GuoLin; Zou, GouLin

    2009-11-01

    Nattokinase (subtilisin NAT, NK) is a bacterial serine protease with strong fibrinolytic activity and it is a potent cardiovascular drug. In medical and commercial applications, however, it is susceptible to chemical oxidation, and subsequent inactivation or denaturation. Here we show that the oxidative stability of NK was substantially increased by optimizing the amino acid residues Thr(220) and Met(222), which were in the vicinity of the catalytic residue Ser(221) of the enzyme. Two nonoxidative amino acids (Ser and Ala) were introduced at these sites using site-directed mutagenesis. Active enzymes were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with periplasmic secretion and enzymes were purified to homogeneity. The purified enzymes were analyzed with respect to oxidative stability, kinetic parameters, fibrinolytic activity and thermal stability. M222A mutant was found to have a greatly increased oxidative stability compared with wild-type enzyme and it was resistant to inactivation by more than 1 M H(2)O(2), whereas the wild-type enzyme was inactivated by 0.1 M H(2)O(2) (t(1/2) approximately 11.6 min). The other mutant (T220S) also showed an obvious increase in antioxidative ability. Molecular dynamic simulations on wild-type and T220S mutant proteins suggested that a hydrogen bond was formed between Ser(220) and Asn(155), and the spatial structure of Met(222) was changed compared with the wild-type. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of improving oxidative stability of NK by site-directed mutagenesis and shows successful protein engineering cases to improve stability of NK as a potent therapeutic agent.

  8. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  9. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Hicks, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from April 1991 through September 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations (SWO) and the Environmental Sciences Division, both of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level (radioactive) waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. A new set of action levels was developed on the basis of a statistical analysis of background contamination. These new action levels have been used to evaluate results in this report. Results of ASEMP monitoring continue to demonstrate that no LLW (except [sup 3]H) is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II, which began in early FY 1991, was >90% complete at the end of September 1991. Results of sampling of groundwater and surface waters is presented.

  10. Inhibition and active-site modelling of prolidase.

    PubMed

    King, G F; Crossley, M J; Kuchel, P W

    1989-03-15

    Consideration of the active-site model of prolidase led us to examine azetidine, pyrrolidine and piperidine substrate analogs as potential in vivo inhibitors of the enzyme. One of these, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-proline, was shown to be a potent competitive inhibitor of porcine kidney prolidase (Ki = 90 microM); its rapid protein-mediated permeation of human and sheep erythrocytes suggests that it may be effective in vivo. The higher homolog, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-pipecolic acid, was also a potent inhibitor of the enzyme while the antihypertensive drugs, captopril and enalaprilat, were shown to have mild and no inhibitory effects, respectively. Analysis of inhibitor action and consideration of X-ray crystallographic data of relevant Mn2+ complexes allowed the active-site model of prolidase to be further refined; a new model is presented in which the substrate acts as a bidentate ligand towards the active-site manganous ion. Various aspects of the new model help to explain why Mn2+ has been 'chosen' by the enzyme in preference to other biologically available metal ions. PMID:2924773

  11. A unique DNase activity shares the active site with ATPase activity of the RecA/Rad51 homologue (Pk-REC) from a hyperthermophilic archaeon.

    PubMed

    Rashid, N; Morikawa, M; Kanaya, S; Atomi, H; Imanaka, T

    1999-02-19

    A RecA/Rad51 homologue from Pyrococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 (Pk-REC) is the smallest protein among various RecA/Rad51 homologues. Nevertheless, Pk-Rec is a super multifunctional protein and shows a deoxyribonuclease activity. This deoxyribonuclease activity was inhibited by 3 mM or more ATP, suggesting that the catalytic centers of the ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities are overlapped. To examine whether these two enzymatic activities share the same active site, a number of site-directed mutations were introduced into Pk-REC and the ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities of the mutant proteins were determined. The mutant enzyme in which double mutations Lys-33 to Ala and Thr-34 to Ala were introduced, fully lost both of these activities, indicating that Lys-33 and/or Thr-34 are important for both ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities. The mutation of Asp-112 to Ala slightly and almost equally reduced both ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities. In addition, the mutation of Glu-54 to Gln did not seriously affect the ATPase, deoxyribonuclease, and UV tolerant activities. These results strongly suggest that the active sites of the ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities of Pk-REC are common. It is noted that unlike Glu-96 in Escherichia coli RecA, which has been proposed to be a catalytic residue for the ATPase activity, the corresponding residual Glu-54 in Pk-REC is not involved in the catalytic function of the protein.

  12. Direct radiative feedback due to biogenic secondary organic aerosol estimated from boreal forest site observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihavainen, H.; Asmi, E.; Aaltonen, V.; Makkonen, U.; Kerminen, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) originating from the emissions of volatile organic compounds from terrestrial vegetation constitutes an important part of the natural aerosol system. According to large-scale model simulations, the direct and indirect radiative effects of the BSOA are potentially large, yet poorly quantified. We used more than 5 years of continuous aerosol measurements to estimate the direct radiative feedback associated with the formation of biogenic secondary organic aerosol at a remote continental site at the edge of the boreal forest zone in Northern Finland. Our upper-limit estimate for this feedback during the summer period (ambient temperatures above 10 °C) was -97±66 mW m-2 K-1 (mean ± STD) when using measurements of the aerosol optical depth (fAOD) and -63±40 mW m-2 K-1 when using measurements of the "dry" aerosol scattering coefficient at the ground level (fσ). Here STD represents the variability in f caused by the observed variability in the quantities used to derive the value of f. Compared with our measurement site, the magnitude of this direct radiative feedback is expected to be larger in warmer continental regions with more abundant biogenic emissions, and even larger in regions where biogenic emissions are mixed with anthropogenic pollution.

  13. Site-directed mutagenesis of a tetrameric dandelion polyphenol oxidase (PPO-6) reveals the site of subunit interaction.

    PubMed

    Dirks-Hofmeister, Mareike E; Inlow, Jennifer K; Moerschbacher, Bruno M

    2012-09-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) catalyze the oxidation of ortho-diphenols to the corresponding quinones (EC 1.10.3.1). In plants PPOs appear in gene families, and the corresponding isoenzymes are located to the thylakoid lumen of chloroplasts. Although plant PPOs are often discussed with regard to their role in defense reactions, a common physiological function has not yet been defined. We analyzed a tetrameric PPO isoenzyme (PPO-6) from dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and found it to display cooperativity in catalysis, a phenomenon that has rarely been shown for plant PPOs previously. The identification of a surface-exposed cysteine (197) through molecular modeling followed by site-directed mutagenesis proved this amino acid residue to stabilize the tetramer via a disulfide linkage. The C197S-mutein still forms a tetrameric structure but shows impaired enzymatic efficiency and cooperativity and a reduction in stability. These findings indicate that oligomerization may be a physiological requirement for PPO-6 stability and function in vivo and raise new questions regarding distinct functions for specific PPO isoenzymes in plants.

  14. A model system for investigating lineshape/structure correlations in RNA site-directed spin labeling☆

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Peter Z.; Iseri, Jennifer; Oki, Arisa

    2008-01-01

    In RNA site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) studies, structural and dynamic information at the individual RNA nucleotide level is derived from the observed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of a covalently attached nitroxide. A systematic approach for RNA SDSL is to establish a library that categorizes observed spectral lineshapes based on known RNA structures, thus enabling lineshape-based structure identification at any RNA site. To establish the first RNA SDSL library, selective secondary structure elements have been systematically engineered into a model RNA. Nitroxide lineshapes reporting features specific to each element were obtained utilizing a new avidin-tethering scheme for suppressing spectral effects due to uniform RNA tumbling. The data demonstrated two key features required for a SDSL library with a predicting power: (i) spectral divergence—distinctive lineshape for different elements; and (ii) spectral convergence—similar lineshape for the same element in different contexts. This sets the foundation for further RNA SDSL library development. PMID:16530169

  15. Complementary-addressed site-directed spin labeling of long natural RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Babaylova, Elena S.; Malygin, Alexey A.; Lomzov, Alexander A.; Pyshnyi, Dmitrii V.; Yulikov, Maxim; Jeschke, Gunnar; Krumkacheva, Olesya A.; Fedin, Matvey V.; Karpova, Galina G.; Bagryanskaya, Elena G.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale distance measurements by pulse dipolar Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy allow new insights into the structure and dynamics of complex biopolymers. EPR detection requires site directed spin labeling (SDSL) of biomolecule(s), which remained challenging for long RNAs up-to-date. Here, we demonstrate that novel complementary-addressed SDSL approach allows efficient spin labeling and following structural EPR studies of long RNAs. We succeeded to spin-label Hepatitis C Virus RNA internal ribosome entry site consisting of ≈330 nucleotides and having a complicated spatial structure. Application of pulsed double electron–electron resonance provided spin–spin distance distribution, which agrees well with the results of molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. Thus, novel SDSL approach in conjunction with EPR and MD allows structural studies of long natural RNAs with nanometer resolution and can be applied to systems of biological and biomedical significance. PMID:27269581

  16. Evolution of flavone synthase I from parsley flavanone 3beta-hydroxylase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Yvonne Helen; Witte, Simone; Steuber, Holger; Matern, Ulrich; Martens, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    Flavanone 3beta-hydroxylase (FHT) and flavone synthase I (FNS I) are 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases with 80% sequence identity, which catalyze distinct reactions in flavonoid biosynthesis. However, FNS I has been reported exclusively from a few Apiaceae species, whereas FHTs are more abundant. Domain-swapping experiments joining the N terminus of parsley (Petroselinum crispum) FHT with the C terminus of parsley FNS I and vice versa revealed that the C-terminal portion is not essential for FNS I activity. Sequence alignments identified 26 amino acid substitutions conserved in FHT versus FNS I genes. Homology modeling, based on the related anthocyanidin synthase structure, assigned seven of these amino acids (FHT/FNS I, M106T, I115T, V116I, I131F, D195E, V200I, L215V, and K216R) to the active site. Accordingly, FHT was modified by site-directed mutagenesis, creating mutants encoding from one to seven substitutions, which were expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) for FNS I and FHT assays. The exchange I131F in combination with either M106T and D195E or L215V and K216R replacements was sufficient to confer some FNS I side activity. Introduction of all seven FNS I substitutions into the FHT sequence, however, caused a nearly complete change in enzyme activity from FHT to FNS I. Both FHT and FNS I were proposed to initially withdraw the beta-face-configured hydrogen from carbon-3 of the naringenin substrate. Our results suggest that the 7-fold substitution affects the orientation of the substrate in the active-site pocket such that this is followed by syn-elimination of hydrogen from carbon-2 (FNS I reaction) rather than the rebound hydroxylation of carbon-3 (FHT reaction).

  17. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzner, R.E.; Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  18. SUMMARY OF TECHNIQUES AND UNIQUE USES FOR DIRECT PUSH METHODS IN SITE CHARACTERIZATION ON CONTAMINATED FIELD SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Site characterization of subsurface contaminant transport is often hampered by a lack of knowledge of site heterogeneity and temporal variations in hydrogeochemistry. Two case studies are reviewed to illustrate the utility of macro-scale mapping information along with spatially-...

  19. Structural insight into the active site of a Bombyx mori unclassified glutathione transferase.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are major detoxification enzymes that play central roles in the defense against various environmental toxicants as well as oxidative stress. Here, we identify amino acid residues of an unclassified GST from Bombyx mori, bmGSTu-interacting glutathione (GSH). Site-directed mutagenesis of bmGSTu mutants indicated that amino acid residues Asp103, Ser162, and Ser166 contribute to catalytic activity.

  20. Pulsed EPR Distance Measurements in Soluble Proteins by Site-directed Spin-labeling (SDSL)

    PubMed Central

    de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Blackburn, Mandy E.; Galiano, Luis; Fanucci, Gail E.

    2015-01-01

    The resurgence of pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in structural biology centers on recent improvements in distance measurements using the double electron-electron resonance (DEER) technique. This unit focuses on EPR-based distance measurements by site-directed spin-labeling (SDSL) of engineered cysteine residues in soluble proteins, with HIV-1 protease used as a model. To elucidate conformational changes in proteins, experimental protocols were optimized and existing data analysis programs were employed to derive distance distribution profiles. Experimental considerations, sample preparation and error analysis for artifact suppression are also outlined here. PMID:24510645

  1. A Relaxed Active Site After Exon Ligation by the Group I Intron

    SciTech Connect

    Lipchock,S.; Strobel, S.

    2008-01-01

    During RNA maturation, the group I intron promotes two sequential phosphorotransfer reactions resulting in exon ligation and intron release. Here, we report the crystal structure of the intron in complex with spliced exons and two additional structures that examine the role of active-site metal ions during the second step of RNA splicing. These structures reveal a relaxed active site, in which direct metal coordination by the exons is lost after ligation, while other tertiary interactions are retained between the exon and the intron. Consistent with these structural observations, kinetic and thermodynamic measurements show that the scissile phosphate makes direct contact with metals in the ground state before exon ligation and in the transition state, but not after exon ligation. Despite no direct exonic interactions and even in the absence of the scissile phosphate, two metal ions remain bound within the active site. Together, these data suggest that release of the ligated exons from the intron is preceded by a change in substrate-metal coordination before tertiary hydrogen bonding contacts to the exons are broken.

  2. Site-directed mutagenesis of serine 158 demonstrates its role in spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toroser, D.; McMichael, R. Jr; Krause, K. P.; Kurreck, J.; Sonnewald, U.; Stitt, M.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of spinach sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) was performed to investigate the role of Ser158 in the modulation of spinach leaf SPS. Tobacco plants expressing the spinach wild-type (WT), S158A, S158T and S157F/S158E SPS transgenes were produced. Expression of transgenes appeared not to reduce expression of the tobacco host SPS. SPS activity in the WT and the S158T SPS transgenics showed light/dark modulation, whereas the S158A and S157F/S158E mutants were not similarly light/dark modulated: the S158A mutant enzyme was not inactivated in the dark, and the S157F/S158E was not activated in the light. The inability to modulate the activity of the S158A mutant enzyme by protein phosphorylation was demonstrated in vitro. The WT spinach enzyme immunopurified from dark transgenic tobacco leaves had a low initial activation state, and could be activated by PP2A and subsequently inactivated by SPS-kinase plus ATP. Rapid purification of the S158A mutant enzyme from dark leaves of transgenic plants using spinach-specific monoclonal antibodies yielded enzyme that had a high initial activation state, and pre-incubation with leaf PP2A or ATP plus SPS-kinase (the PKIII enzyme) caused little modulation of activity. The results demonstrate the regulatory significance of Ser158 as the major site responsible for dark inactivation of spinach SPS in vivo, and indicate that the significance of phosphorylation is the introduction of a negative charge at the Ser158 position.

  3. Direct selection for mutations affecting specific splice sites in a hamster dihydrofolate reductase minigene.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, I T; Chasin, L A

    1993-01-01

    A Chinese hamster cell line containing an extra exon 2 (50 bp) inserted into a single intron of a dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) minigene was constructed. The extra exon 2 was efficiently spliced into the RNA, resulting in an mRNA that is incapable of coding for the DHFR enzyme. Mutations that decreased splicing of this extra exon 2 caused it to be skipped and so produced normal dhfr mRNA. In contrast to the parental cell line, the splicing mutants display a DHFR-positive growth phenotype. Splicing mutants were isolated from this cell line after treatment with four different mutagens (racemic benzo[c]phenanthrene diol epoxide, ethyl methanesulfonate, ethyl nitrosourea, and UV irradiation). By polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct DNA sequencing, we determined the base changes in 66 mutants. Each of the mutagens generated highly specific base changes. All mutations were single-base substitutions and comprised 24 different changes distributed over 16 positions. Most of the mutations were within the consensus sequences at the exon 2 splice donor, acceptor, and branch sites. The RNA splicing patterns in the mutants were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The recruitment of cryptic sites was rarely seen; simple exon skipping was the predominant mutant phenotype. The wide variety of mutations that produced exon skipping suggests that this phenotype is the typical consequence of splice site damage and supports the exon definition model of splice site selection. A few mutations were located outside the consensus sequences, in the exon or between the branch point and the polypyrimidine tract, identifying additional positions that play a role in splice site definition. That most of these 66 mutations fell within consensus sequences in this near-saturation mutagenesis suggests that splicing signals beyond the consensus may consist of robust RNA structures. Images PMID:8417332

  4. Druggability analysis and classification of protein tyrosine phosphatase active sites

    PubMed Central

    Ghattas, Mohammad A; Raslan, Noor; Sadeq, Asil; Al Sorkhy, Mohammad; Atatreh, Noor

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many diseases. The fact that no PTP inhibitors have reached the market so far has raised many questions about their druggability. In this study, the active sites of 17 PTPs were characterized and assessed for its ability to bind drug-like molecules. Consequently, PTPs were classified according to their druggability scores into four main categories. Only four members showed intermediate to very druggable pocket; interestingly, the rest of them exhibited poor druggability. Particularly focusing on PTP1B, we also demonstrated the influence of several factors on the druggability of PTP active site. For instance, the open conformation showed better druggability than the closed conformation, while the tight-bound water molecules appeared to have minimal effect on the PTP1B druggability. Finally, the allosteric site of PTP1B was found to exhibit superior druggability compared to the catalytic pocket. This analysis can prove useful in the discovery of new PTP inhibitors by assisting researchers in predicting hit rates from high throughput or virtual screening and saving unnecessary cost, time, and efforts via prioritizing PTP targets according to their predicted druggability. PMID:27757011

  5. Direct activation of cardiac pacemaker channels by intracellular cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    DiFrancesco, D; Tortora, P

    1991-05-01

    Cyclic AMP acts as a second messenger in the modulation of several ion channels that are typically controlled by a phosphorylation process. In cardiac pacemaker cells, adrenaline and acetylcholine regulate the hyperpolarization-activated current (if), but in opposite ways; this current is involved in the generation and modulation of pacemaker activity. These actions are mediated by cAMP and underlie control of spontaneous rate by neurotransmitters. Whether the cAMP modulation of if is mediated by channel phosphorylation is, however, still unknown. Here we investigate the action of cAMP on if in excised patches of cardiac pacemaker cells and find that cAMP activates if by a mechanism independent of phosphorylation, involving a direct interaction with the channels at their cytoplasmic side. Cyclic AMP activates if by shifting its activation curve to more positive voltages, in agreement with whole-cell results. This is the first evidence of an ion channel whose gating is dually regulated by voltage and direct cAMP binding.

  6. Hapten-directed spontaneous disulfide shuffling: a universal technology for site-directed covalent coupling of payloads to antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Dengl, Stefan; Hoffmann, Eike; Grote, Michael; Wagner, Cornelia; Mundigl, Olaf; Georges, Guy; Thorey, Irmgard; Stubenrauch, Kay-Gunnar; Bujotzek, Alexander; Josel, Hans-Peter; Dziadek, Sebastian; Benz, Joerg; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    ., Georges, G., Thorey, I., Stubenrauch, K.-G., Bujotzek, A., Josel, H.-P., Dziadek, S., Benz, J., Brinkmann, U. Hapten-directed spontaneous disulfide shuffling: a universal technology for site-directed covalent coupling of payloads to antibodies. PMID:25670234

  7. The Asymmetric Active Coupler: Stable Nonlinear Supermodes and Directed Transport

    PubMed Central

    Kominis, Yannis; Bountis, Tassos; Flach, Sergej

    2016-01-01

    We consider the asymmetric active coupler (AAC) consisting of two coupled dissimilar waveguides with gain and loss. We show that under generic conditions, not restricted by parity-time symmetry, there exist finite-power, constant-intensity nonlinear supermodes (NS), resulting from the balance between gain, loss, nonlinearity, coupling and dissimilarity. The system is shown to possess non-reciprocal dynamics enabling directed power transport functionality. PMID:27640818

  8. The Asymmetric Active Coupler: Stable Nonlinear Supermodes and Directed Transport.

    PubMed

    Kominis, Yannis; Bountis, Tassos; Flach, Sergej

    2016-01-01

    We consider the asymmetric active coupler (AAC) consisting of two coupled dissimilar waveguides with gain and loss. We show that under generic conditions, not restricted by parity-time symmetry, there exist finite-power, constant-intensity nonlinear supermodes (NS), resulting from the balance between gain, loss, nonlinearity, coupling and dissimilarity. The system is shown to possess non-reciprocal dynamics enabling directed power transport functionality. PMID:27640818

  9. The Asymmetric Active Coupler: Stable Nonlinear Supermodes and Directed Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kominis, Yannis; Bountis, Tassos; Flach, Sergej

    2016-09-01

    We consider the asymmetric active coupler (AAC) consisting of two coupled dissimilar waveguides with gain and loss. We show that under generic conditions, not restricted by parity-time symmetry, there exist finite-power, constant-intensity nonlinear supermodes (NS), resulting from the balance between gain, loss, nonlinearity, coupling and dissimilarity. The system is shown to possess non-reciprocal dynamics enabling directed power transport functionality.

  10. Active-Site Monovalent Cations Revealed in a 1.55 Å Resolution Hammerhead Ribozyme Structure

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Michael; Schultz, Eric P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.

    2013-01-01

    We have obtained a 1.55 Å crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme derived from Schistosoma mansoni in conditions that permit detailed observations of Na+ ion binding in the ribozyme's active site. At least two such Na+ ions are observed. The first Na+ ion binds to the N7 of G10.1 and the adjacent A9 phosphate in a manner identical to that previously observed for divalent cations. A second Na+ ion binds to the Hoogsteen face of G12, the general base in the hammerhead cleavage reaction, thereby potentially dissipating the negative charge of the catalytically active enolate form of the nucleotide base. A potential but more ambiguous third site bridges the A9 and scissile phosphates in a manner consistent with previous predictions. Hammerhead ribozymes have been observed to be active in the presence of high concentrations of monovalent cations, including Na+, but the mechanism by which monovalent cations substitute for divalent cations in hammerhead catalysis remains unclear. Our results enable us to suggest that Na+ directly and specifically substitutes for divalent cations in the hammerhead active site. The detailed geometry of the pre-catalytic active site complex is also revealed with a new level of precision, thanks to the quality of the electron density maps obtained from what is currently the highest resolution ribozyme structure in the protein data bank. PMID:23711504

  11. Defining the Q-site of Escherichia coli fumarate reductase by site-directed mutagenesis, fluorescence quench titrations and EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rothery, Richard A; Seime, Andrea M; Spiers, A-M Caroline; Maklashina, Elena; Schröder, Imke; Gunsalus, Robert P; Cecchini, Gary; Weiner, Joel H

    2005-01-01

    We have used fluorescence quench titrations, EPR spectroscopy and steady-state kinetics to study the effects of site-directed mutants of FrdB, FrdC and FrdD on the proximal menaquinol (MQH(2)) binding site (Q(P)) of Escherichia coli fumarate reductase (FrdABCD) in cytoplasmic membrane preparations. Fluorescence quench (FQ) titrations with the fluorophore and MQH(2) analog 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HOQNO) indicate that the Q(P) site is defined by residues from FrdB, FrdC and FrdD. In FQ titrations, wild-type FrdABCD binds HOQNO with an apparent K(d) of 2.5 nM, and the following mutations significantly increase this value: FrdB-T205H (K(d) = 39 nM); FrdB-V207C (K(d) = 20 nM); FrdC-E29L (K(d) = 25 nM); FrdC-W86R (no detectable binding); and FrdD-H80K (K(d) = 20 nM). In all titrations performed, data were fitted to a monophasic binding equation, indicating that no additional high-affinity HOQNO binding sites exist in FrdABCD. In all cases where HOQNO binding is detectable by FQ titration, it can also be observed by EPR spectroscopy. Steady-state kinetic studies of fumarate-dependent quinol oxidation indicate that there is a correlation between effects on HOQNO binding and effects on the observed K(m) and k(cat) values, except in the FrdC-E29L mutant, in which HOQNO binding is observed, but no enzyme turnover is detected. In this case, EPR studies indicate that the lack of activity arises because the enzyme can only remove one electron from reduced MQH(2), resulting in it being trapped in a form with a bound menasemiquinone radical anion. Overall, the data support a model for FrdABCD in which there is a single redox-active and dissociable Q-site.

  12. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  13. NMR structure of the active conformation of the Varkud satellite ribozyme cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Mitchell, G. Thomas; Gendron, Patrick; Major, François; Andersen, Angela A.; Collins, Richard A.; Legault, Pascale

    2003-01-01

    Substrate cleavage by the Neurospora Varkud satellite (VS) ribozyme involves a structural change in the stem-loop I substrate from an inactive to an active conformation. We have determined the NMR solution structure of a mutant stem-loop I that mimics the active conformation of the cleavage site internal loop. This structure shares many similarities, but also significant differences, with the previously determined structures of the inactive internal loop. The active internal loop displays different base-pairing interactions and forms a novel RNA fold composed exclusively of sheared G-A base pairs. From chemical-shift mapping we identified two Mg2+ binding sites in the active internal loop. One of the Mg2+ binding sites forms in the active but not the inactive conformation of the internal loop and is likely important for catalysis. Using the structure comparison program mc-search, we identified the active internal loop fold in other RNA structures. In Thermus thermophilus 16S rRNA, this RNA fold is directly involved in a long-range tertiary interaction. An analogous tertiary interaction may form between the active internal loop of the substrate and the catalytic domain of the VS ribozyme. The combination of NMR and bioinformatic approaches presented here has identified a novel RNA fold and provides insights into the structural basis of catalytic function in the Neurospora VS ribozyme. PMID:12782785

  14. Improvements in Glucose Sensitivity and Stability of Trichoderma reesei β-Glucosidase Using Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Glucose sensitivity and pH and thermal stabilities of Trichoderma reesei Cel1A (Bgl II) were improved by site-directed mutagenesis of only two amino acid residues (L167W or P172L) at the entrance of the active site. The Cel1A mutant showed high glucose tolerance (50% of inhibitory concentration = 650 mM), glucose stimulation (2.0 fold at 50 mM glucose), and enhanced specific activity (2.4-fold) compared with those of the wild-type Cel1A. Furthermore, the mutant enzyme showed stability at a wide pH range of 4.5–9.0 and possessed high thermal stability up to 50°C with 80% of the residual activities compared with the stability seen at the pH range of 6.5–7.0 and temperatures of up to 40°C in the wild-type Cel1A. Kinetic studies for hydrolysis revealed that the Cel1A mutant was competitively inhibited by glucose at similar levels as the wild-type enzyme. Additionally, the mutant enzyme exhibited substrate inhibition, which gradually disappeared with an increasing glucose concentration. These data suggest that the glucose stimulation was caused by relieve the substrate inhibition in the presence of glucose. To conclude, all the properties improved by the mutagenesis would be great advantages in degradation of cellulosic biomass together with cellulases. PMID:26790148

  15. Improvements in Glucose Sensitivity and Stability of Trichoderma reesei β-Glucosidase Using Site-Directed Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Boyang; Amano, Yoshihiko; Nozaki, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Glucose sensitivity and pH and thermal stabilities of Trichoderma reesei Cel1A (Bgl II) were improved by site-directed mutagenesis of only two amino acid residues (L167W or P172L) at the entrance of the active site. The Cel1A mutant showed high glucose tolerance (50% of inhibitory concentration = 650 mM), glucose stimulation (2.0 fold at 50 mM glucose), and enhanced specific activity (2.4-fold) compared with those of the wild-type Cel1A. Furthermore, the mutant enzyme showed stability at a wide pH range of 4.5-9.0 and possessed high thermal stability up to 50 °C with 80% of the residual activities compared with the stability seen at the pH range of 6.5-7.0 and temperatures of up to 40 °C in the wild-type Cel1A. Kinetic studies for hydrolysis revealed that the Cel1A mutant was competitively inhibited by glucose at similar levels as the wild-type enzyme. Additionally, the mutant enzyme exhibited substrate inhibition, which gradually disappeared with an increasing glucose concentration. These data suggest that the glucose stimulation was caused by relieve the substrate inhibition in the presence of glucose. To conclude, all the properties improved by the mutagenesis would be great advantages in degradation of cellulosic biomass together with cellulases.

  16. Discovery of novel STAT3 small molecule inhibitors via in silico site-directed fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenying; Xiao, Hui; Lin, Jiayuh; Li, Chenglong

    2013-06-13

    Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been validated as an attractive therapeutic target for cancer therapy. To stop both STAT3 activation and dimerization, a viable strategy is to design inhibitors blocking its SH2 domain phosphotyrosine binding site that is responsible for both actions. A new fragment-based drug design (FBDD) strategy, in silico site-directed FBDD, was applied in this study. A designed novel compound, 5,8-dioxo-6-(pyridin-3-ylamino)-5,8-dihydronaphthalene-1-sulfonamide (LY5), was confirmed to bind to STAT3 SH2 by fluorescence polarization assay. In addition, four out of the five chosen compounds have IC50 values lower than 5 μM for the U2OS cancer cells. 8 (LY5) has an IC50 range in 0.5-1.4 μM in various cancer cell lines. 8 also suppresses tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model. This study has demonstrated the utility of this approach and could be used to other drug targets in general. PMID:23651330

  17. 78 FR 52169 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct... of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program Federal Direct PLUS...

  18. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of human septin 1 with site-directed mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Hao; Yu, Wen-bo; Li, Shu-xing; Ding, Xiang-ming; Yu, Long; Bi, Ru-Chang

    2006-02-01

    The homogeneity of septin 1 has been improved by site-directed mutation of serine residues and only a small alteration in the secondary structure is observed to arise from the mutations. Crystals of the septin 1 mutant were grown and diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Septin 1 is a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of GTP-binding and filament-forming proteins named septins, which function in diverse processes including cytokinasis, vesicle trafficking, apoptosis, remodelling of the cytoskeleton, infection, neurodegeneration and neoplasia. Human septin 1 has been expressed and purified, but suffers from severe aggregation. Studies have shown that septin 1 with site-directed mutations of five serine residues (Ser19, Ser206, Ser307, Ser312 and Ser315) has a much lower degree of aggregation and better structural homogeneity and that the mutations cause only slight perturbations in the secondary structure of septin 1. This septin 1 mutant was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. The space group is P422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.028, c = 137.852 Å.

  19. Direct radiative feedback due to biogenic secondary organic aerosol estimated from boreal forest site observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihavainen, Heikki; Asmi, Eija; Aaltonen, Veijo; Makkonen, Ulla; Kerminen, Veli-Matti

    2015-10-01

    We used more than five years of continuous aerosol measurements to estimate the direct radiative feedback parameter associated with the formation of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) at a remote continental site at the edge of the boreal forest zone in Northern Finland. Our upper-limit estimate for this feedback parameter during the summer period (ambient temperatures above 10 °C) was -97 ± 66 mW m-2 K-1 (mean ± STD) when using measurements of the aerosol optical depth (fAOD) and -63 ± 40 mW m-2 K-1 when using measurements of the ‘dry’ aerosol scattering coefficient at the ground level (fσ). Here STD represents the variability in f caused by the observed variability in the quantities used to derive the value of f. Compared with our measurement site, the magnitude of the direct radiative feedback associated with BSOA is expected to be larger in warmer continental regions with more abundant biogenic emissions, and even larger in regions where biogenic emissions are mixed with anthropogenic pollution.

  20. Molecular dioxygen enters the active site of 12/15-lipoxygenase via dynamic oxygen access channels.

    PubMed

    Saam, Jan; Ivanov, Igor; Walther, Matthias; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg; Kuhn, Hartmut

    2007-08-14

    Cells contain numerous enzymes that use molecular oxygen for their reactions. Often, their active sites are buried deeply inside the protein, which raises the question whether there are specific access channels guiding oxygen to the site of catalysis. Choosing 12/15-lipoxygenase as a typical example for such oxygen-dependent enzymes, we determined the oxygen distribution within the protein and defined potential routes for oxygen access. For this purpose, we have applied an integrated strategy of structural modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, site-directed mutagenesis, and kinetic measurements. First, we computed the 3D free-energy distribution for oxygen, which led to identification of four oxygen channels in the protein. All channels connect the protein surface with a region of high oxygen affinity at the active site. This region is localized opposite to the nonheme iron providing a structural explanation for the reaction specificity of this lipoxygenase isoform. The catalytically most relevant path can be obstructed by L367F exchange, which leads to a strongly increased Michaelis constant for oxygen. The blocking mechanism is explained in detail by reordering the hydrogen-bonding network of water molecules. Our results provide strong evidence that the main route for oxygen access to the active site of the enzyme follows a channel formed by transiently interconnected cavities whereby the opening and closure are governed by side chain dynamics. PMID:17675410

  1. Pathogen corruption and site-directed recombination at a plant disease resistance gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Ervin D; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L

    2008-12-01

    The Pc locus of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) determines dominant sensitivity to a host-selective toxin produced by the fungal pathogen Periconia circinata. The Pc region was cloned by a map-based approach and found to contain three tandemly repeated genes with the structures of nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) disease resistance genes. Thirteen independent Pc-to-pc mutations were analyzed, and each was found to remove all or part of the central gene of the threesome. Hence, this central gene is Pc. Most Pc-to-pc mutations were associated with unequal recombination. Eight recombination events were localized to different sites in a 560-bp region within the approximately 3.7-kb NBS-LRR genes. Because any unequal recombination located within the flanking NBS-LRR genes would have removed Pc, the clustering of cross-over events within a 560-bp segment indicates that a site-directed recombination process exists that specifically targets unequal events to generate LRR diversity in NBS-LRR loci.

  2. Targeted Isolation of Antibodies Directed against Major Sites of SIV Env Vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Mason, Rosemarie D; Welles, Hugh C; Adams, Cameron; Chakrabarti, Bimal K; Gorman, Jason; Zhou, Tongqing; Nguyen, Richard; O'Dell, Sijy; Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A; Li, Hui; Shaw, George M; Sheng, Zizhang; Shapiro, Lawrence; Wyatt, Richard; Kwong, Peter D; Mascola, John R; Roederer, Mario

    2016-04-01

    The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) challenge model of lentiviral infection is often used as a model to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) for studying vaccine mediated and immune correlates of protection. However, knowledge of the structure of the SIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein is limited, as is knowledge of binding specificity, function and potential efficacy of SIV antibody responses. In this study we describe the use of a competitive probe binding sort strategy as well as scaffolded probes for targeted isolation of SIV Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). We isolated nearly 70 SIV-specific mAbs directed against major sites of SIV Env vulnerability analogous to broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) targets of HIV-1, namely, the CD4 binding site (CD4bs), CD4-induced (CD4i)-site, peptide epitopes in variable loops 1, 2 and 3 (V1, V2, V3) and potentially glycan targets of SIV Env. The range of SIV mAbs isolated includes those exhibiting varying degrees of neutralization breadth and potency as well as others that demonstrated binding but not neutralization. Several SIV mAbs displayed broad and potent neutralization of a diverse panel of 20 SIV viral isolates with some also neutralizing HIV-2(7312A). This extensive panel of SIV mAbs will facilitate more effective use of the SIV non-human primate (NHP) model for understanding the variables in development of a HIV vaccine or immunotherapy. PMID:27064278

  3. Targeted Isolation of Antibodies Directed against Major Sites of SIV Env Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Rosemarie D.; Welles, Hugh C.; Adams, Cameron; Chakrabarti, Bimal K.; Gorman, Jason; Zhou, Tongqing; Nguyen, Richard; O’Dell, Sijy; Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.; Li, Hui; Shaw, George M.; Sheng, Zizhang; Shapiro, Lawrence; Wyatt, Richard; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Roederer, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) challenge model of lentiviral infection is often used as a model to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) for studying vaccine mediated and immune correlates of protection. However, knowledge of the structure of the SIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein is limited, as is knowledge of binding specificity, function and potential efficacy of SIV antibody responses. In this study we describe the use of a competitive probe binding sort strategy as well as scaffolded probes for targeted isolation of SIV Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). We isolated nearly 70 SIV-specific mAbs directed against major sites of SIV Env vulnerability analogous to broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) targets of HIV-1, namely, the CD4 binding site (CD4bs), CD4-induced (CD4i)-site, peptide epitopes in variable loops 1, 2 and 3 (V1, V2, V3) and potentially glycan targets of SIV Env. The range of SIV mAbs isolated includes those exhibiting varying degrees of neutralization breadth and potency as well as others that demonstrated binding but not neutralization. Several SIV mAbs displayed broad and potent neutralization of a diverse panel of 20 SIV viral isolates with some also neutralizing HIV-27312A. This extensive panel of SIV mAbs will facilitate more effective use of the SIV non-human primate (NHP) model for understanding the variables in development of a HIV vaccine or immunotherapy. PMID:27064278

  4. Electrostatic fields in the active sites of lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Sun, D P; Liao, D I; Remington, S J

    1989-07-01

    Considerable experimental evidence is in support of several aspects of the mechanism that has been proposed for the catalytic activity of lysozyme. However, the enzymatically catalyzed hydrolysis of polysaccharides proceeds over 5 orders of magnitude faster than that of model compounds that mimic the configuration of the substrate in the active site of the enzyme. Although several possible explanations for this rate enhancement have been discussed elsewhere, a definitive mechanism has not emerged. Here we report striking results obtained by classical electrodynamics, which suggest that bond breakage and the consequent separation of charge in lysozyme is promoted by a large electrostatic field across the active site cleft, produced in part by a very asymmetric distribution of charged residues on the enzyme surface. Lysozymes unrelated in amino acid sequence have similar distributions of charged residues and electric fields. The results reported here suggest that the electrostatic component of the rate enhancement is greater than 9 kcal.mol-1. Thus, electrostatic interactions may play a more important role in the enzymatic mechanism than has generally been appreciated.

  5. Histidine at the active site of Neurospora tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Pfiffner, E; Lerch, K

    1981-10-13

    The involvement of histidyl residues as potential ligands to the binuclear active-site copper of Neurospora tyrosinase was explored by dye-sensitized photooxidation. The enzymatic activity of the holoenzyme was shown to be unaffected by exposure to light in the presence of methylene blue; however, irradiation of the apoenzyme under the same conditions led to a progressive loss of its ability to be reactivated with Cu2+. This photoinactivation was paralleled by a decrease in the histidine content whereas the number of histidyl residues in the holoenzyme remained constant. Copper measurements of photooxidized, reconstituted apoenzyme demonstrated the loss of binding of one copper atom per mole of enzyme as a consequence of photosensitized oxidation of three out of nine histidine residues. Their sequence positions were determined by a comparison of the relative yields of the histidine containing peptides of photooxidized holo- and apotyrosinases. The data obtained show the preferential modification of histidyl residues 188, 193, and 289 and suggest that they constitute metal ligands to one of the two active-site copper atoms. Substitution of copper by cobalt was found to afford complete protection of the histidyl residues from being modified by dye-sensitized photooxidation. PMID:6458322

  6. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-12-15

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser(696) and Ser(698) in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser(886) and/or Ser(893) in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser(717) in the JM, and at Ser(733), Thr(752), Ser(783), Ser(864), Ser(911), Ser(958) and Thr(998) in the kinase domain. The LC-ESI-MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr(890), Ser(893) and Thr(894)) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr(890), Ser(893), Thr(894) and Thr(899), differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response.

  7. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-01-01

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser696 and Ser698 in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser886 and/or Ser893 in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser717 in the JM, and at Ser733, Thr752, Ser783, Ser864, Ser911, Ser958 and Thr998 in the kinase domain. The LC–ESI–MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr890, Ser893 and Thr894) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr890, Ser893, Thr894 and Thr899, differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response. PMID:26472115

  8. The phosphate site of trehalose phosphorylase from Schizophyllum commune probed by site-directed mutagenesis and chemical rescue studies.

    PubMed

    Goedl, Christiane; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2008-03-01

    Schizophyllum communealpha,alpha-trehalose phosphorylase utilizes a glycosyltransferase-like catalytic mechanism to convert its disaccharide substrate into alpha-d-glucose 1-phosphate and alpha-d-glucose. Recruitment of phosphate by the free enzyme induces alpha,alpha-trehalose binding recognition and promotes the catalytic steps. Like the structurally related glycogen phosphorylase and other retaining glycosyltransferases of fold family GT-B, the trehalose phosphorylase contains an Arg507-XXXX-Lys512 consensus motif (where X is any amino acid) comprising key residues of its putative phosphate-binding sub-site. Loss of wild-type catalytic efficiency for reaction with phosphate (kcat/Km=21,000 m(-1).s(-1)) was dramatic (>or=10(7)-fold) in purified Arg507-->Ala (R507A) and Lys512-->Ala (K512A) enzymes, reflecting a corresponding change of comparable magnitude in kcat (Arg507) and Km (Lys512). External amine and guanidine derivatives selectively enhanced the activity of the K512A mutant and the R507A mutant respectively. Analysis of the pH dependence of chemical rescue of the K512A mutant by propargylamine suggested that unprotonated amine in combination with H2PO4-, the protonic form of phosphate presumably utilized in enzymatic catalysis, caused restoration of activity. Transition state-like inhibition of the wild-type enzyme A by vanadate in combination with alpha,alpha-trehalose (Ki=0.4 microm) was completely disrupted in the R507A mutant but only weakened in the K512A mutant (Ki=300 microm). Phosphate (50 mm) enhanced the basal hydrolase activity of the K512A mutant toward alpha,alpha-trehalose by 60% but caused its total suppression in wild-type and R507A enzymes. The results portray differential roles for the side chains of Lys512 and Arg507 in trehalose phosphorylase catalysis, reactant state binding of phosphate and selective stabilization of the transition state respectively. PMID:18205830

  9. Testing the applicability of rapid on-site enzymatic activity detection for surface water monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Philipp; Vogl, Wolfgang; Juri, Koschelnik; Markus, Epp; Maximilian, Lackner; Markus, Oismüller; Monika, Kumpan; Peter, Strauss; Regina, Sommer; Gabriela, Ryzinska-Paier; Farnleitner Andreas, H.; Matthias, Zessner

    2015-04-01

    bacteria. Therefore the applicability of on-site enzymatic activity determination as a direct surrogate or proxy parameter for microbiological standard assays and quantification of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentration could not be approved and further research in this field is necessary. Presently we conclude that rapid on-site detection of enzymatic activity is applicable for surface water monitoring and that it constitutes a complementary on-site monitoring parameter with high potential. Selection of the type of measured enzymatic activities has to be done on a catchment-specific basis and further work is needed to learn more about its detailed information characteristics in different habitats. The accomplishment of this method detecting continuous data of enzymatic activity in high temporal resolution caused by a target bacterial member is on the way of becoming a powerful tool for water quality monitoring, health related water quality- and early warning requirements.

  10. A site-directed mutagenesis analysis of tNOX functional domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chueh, Pin-Ju; Morre, Dorothy M.; Morre, D. James

    2002-01-01

    Constitutive NADH oxidase proteins of the mammalian cell surface exhibit two different activities, oxidation of hydroquinones (or NADH) and protein disulfide-thiol interchange which alternate to yield oscillatory patterns with period lengths of 24 min. A drug-responsive tNOX (tumor-associated NADH oxidase) has a period length of about 22 min. The tNOX cDNA has been cloned and expressed. These two proteins are representative of cycling oxidase proteins of the plant and animal cell surface. In this report, we describe a series of eight amino acid replacements in tNOX which, when expressed in Escherichia coli, were analyzed for enzymatic activity, drug response and period length. Replacement sites selected include six cysteines that lie within the processed plasma membrane (34 kDa) form of the protein, and amino acids located in putative drug and adenine nucleotide (NADH) binding domains. The latter, plus two of the cysteine replacements, resulted in a loss of enzymatic activity. The recombinant tNOX with the modified drug binding site retained activity but the activity was no longer drug-responsive. The four remaining cysteine replacements were of interest in that both activity and drug response were retained but the period length for both NADH oxidation and protein disulfide-thiol interchange was increased from 22 min to 36 or 42 min. The findings confirm the correctness of the drug and adenine nucleotide binding motifs within the tNOX protein and imply a potential critical role of cysteine residues in determining the period length.

  11. Construction of a dimeric form of glutamate dehydrogenase from Clostridium symbiosum by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Pasquo, A; Britton, K L; Stillman, T J; Rice, D W; Cölfen, H; Harding, S E; Scandurra, R; Engel, P C

    1996-10-17

    By using site-directed mutagenesis, Phe-187, one of the amino-acid residues involved in hydrophobic interaction between the three identical dimers comprising the hexamer of Clostridium symbiosum glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), has been replaced by an aspartic acid residue. Over-expression in Escherichia coli led to production of large amounts of a soluble protein which, though devoid of GDH activity, showed the expected subunit M(r) on SDS-PAGE, and cross-reacted with an anti-GDH antibody preparation in Western blots. The antibody was used to monitor purification of the inactive protein. F187D GDH showed altered mobility on non-denaturing electrophoresis, consistent with changed size and/or surface charge. Gel filtration on a calibrated column indicated an M(r) of 87000 +/- 3000. The mutant enzyme did not bind to the dye column routinely used in preparing wild-type GDH. Nevertheless suspicions of major misfolding were allayed by the results of chemical modification studies: as with wild-type GDH, NAD+ completely protected one-SH group against modification by DTNB, implying normal coenzyme binding. A significant difference, however, is that in the mutant enzyme both cysteine groups were modified by DTNB, rather than C320 only. The CD spectrum in the far-UV region indicated no major change in secondary structure in the mutant protein. The near-UV CD spectrum, however, was less intense and showed a pronounced Phe contribution, possibly reflecting the changed environment of Phe-199, which would be buried in the hexamer. Sedimentation velocity experiments gave corrected coefficients S20,W of 11.08 S and 5.29 S for the wild-type and mutant proteins. Sedimentation equilibrium gave weight average molar masses M(r,app) of 280000 +/- 5000 g/mol. consistent with the hexameric structure for the wild-type protein and 135000 +/- 3000 g/mol for F187D. The value for the mutant is intermediate between the values expected for a dimer (98000) and a trimer (147000). To investigate the

  12. The pepsin residue glycine-76 contributes to active-site loop flexibility and participates in catalysis.

    PubMed Central

    Okoniewska, M; Tanaka, T; Yada, R Y

    2000-01-01

    Glycine residues are known to contribute to conformational flexibility of polypeptide chains, and have been found to contribute to flexibility of some loops associated with enzymic catalysis. A comparison of porcine pepsin in zymogen, mature and inhibited forms revealed that a loop (a flap), consisting of residues 71--80, located near the active site changed its position upon substrate binding. The loop residue, glycine-76, has been implicated in the catalytic process and thought to participate in a hydrogen-bond network aligning the substrate. This study investigated the role of glycine-76 using site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutants, G76A, G76V and G76S, were constructed to increase conformational restriction of a polypeptide chain. In addition, the serine mutant introduced a hydrogen-bonding potential at position 76 similar to that observed in human renin. All the mutants, regardless of amino acid size and polarity, had lower catalytic efficiency and activated more slowly than the wild-type enzyme. The slower activation process was associated directly with altered proteolytic activity. Consequently, it was proposed that a proteolytic cleavage represents a limiting step of the activation process. Lower catalytic efficiency of the mutants was explained as a decrease in the flap flexibility and, therefore, a different pattern of hydrogen bonds responsible for substrate alignment and flap conformation. The results demonstrated that flap flexibility is essential for efficient catalytic and activation processes. PMID:10861225

  13. Impact of prolonged storm activity on the Ecological Status of intertidal benthic habitats within oyster (Crassostrea gigas) trestle cultivation sites.

    PubMed

    O'Carroll, Jack P J; Quinn, Christina; Forde, James; Patterson, Adrian; O'Beirn, Francis X; Kennedy, Robert

    2016-09-15

    The Ecological Status (ES; sensu the Water Framework Directive) of intertidal benthic communities within six oyster trestle cultivation sites was found to be negatively impacted along the access routes to trestles in a 2013 study. All cultivation sites occur within Natura 2000 sites. The current study revisited four of the 2013 cultivation sites in February 2014 one month after the storm activity of winter 2013/14 to test if the compaction effect along access routes persisted after the storms. Three levels of the fixed factor treatment were sampled; immediately below the trestles, along the access route and 300m away from any anthropogenic activity. The compaction effect at the Access treatment persisted in spite of the major storm activity. The current study showed the IQI to be effective for assessing the impacts of aquaculture and highlights the IQI as a tool for monitoring Conservation Status of intertidal communities under the Habitats Directive.

  14. Impact of prolonged storm activity on the Ecological Status of intertidal benthic habitats within oyster (Crassostrea gigas) trestle cultivation sites.

    PubMed

    O'Carroll, Jack P J; Quinn, Christina; Forde, James; Patterson, Adrian; O'Beirn, Francis X; Kennedy, Robert

    2016-09-15

    The Ecological Status (ES; sensu the Water Framework Directive) of intertidal benthic communities within six oyster trestle cultivation sites was found to be negatively impacted along the access routes to trestles in a 2013 study. All cultivation sites occur within Natura 2000 sites. The current study revisited four of the 2013 cultivation sites in February 2014 one month after the storm activity of winter 2013/14 to test if the compaction effect along access routes persisted after the storms. Three levels of the fixed factor treatment were sampled; immediately below the trestles, along the access route and 300m away from any anthropogenic activity. The compaction effect at the Access treatment persisted in spite of the major storm activity. The current study showed the IQI to be effective for assessing the impacts of aquaculture and highlights the IQI as a tool for monitoring Conservation Status of intertidal communities under the Habitats Directive. PMID:27373942

  15. Site-directed mutagenesis provides insight into racemization and transamination of alanine catalyzed by Treponema denticola cystalysin.

    PubMed

    Cellini, Barbara; Bertoldi, Mariarita; Paiardini, Alessandro; D'Aguanno, Simona; Voltattorni, Carla Borri

    2004-08-27

    In addition to alpha, beta-elimination of L-cysteine, Treponema denticola cystalysin catalyzes the racemization of both enantiomers of alanine accompanied by an overall transamination. Lys-238 and Tyr-123 or a water molecule located on the si and re face of the cofactor, respectively, have been proposed to act as the acid/base catalysts in the proton abstraction/donation at Calpha/C4' of the external aldimine. In this investigation, two site-directed mutants, K238A and Y123F, have been characterized. The Lys --> Ala mutation results in the complete loss of either lyase activity or racemase activity in both directions or transaminase activity toward L-alanine. However, the K238A mutant is able to catalyze the overall transamination of D-alanine, and only D-alanine is the product of the reverse transamination. For Y123F the k(cat)/K(m) is reduced 3.5-fold for alpha, beta-elimination, whereas it is reduced 300-400-fold for racemization. Y123F has approximately 18% of wild type transaminase activity with L-alanine and an extremely low transaminase activity with D-alanine. Moreover, the catalytic properties of the Y124F and Y123F/Y124F mutants rule out the possibility that the residual racemase and transaminase activities displayed by Y123F are due to Tyr-124. All these data, together with computational results, indicate a two-base racemization mechanism for cystalysin in which Lys-238 has been unequivocally identified as the catalyst acting on the si face of the cofactor. Moreover, this study highlights the importance of the interaction of Tyr-123 with water molecules for efficient proton abstraction/donation function on the re face. PMID:15210695

  16. Dengue Virus Directly Stimulates Polyclonal B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Michelle Premazzi; de Morais, Ana Theresa Silveira; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is associated to vigorous inflammatory response, to a high frequency of activated B cells, and to increased levels of circulating cross-reactive antibodies. We investigated whether direct infection of B cells would promote activation by culturing primary human B lymphocytes from healthy donors with DENV in vitro. B cells were susceptible, but poorly permissive to infection. Even though, primary B cells cultured with DENV induced substantial IgM secretion, which is a hallmark of polyclonal B cell activation. Notably, DENV induced the activation of B cells obtained from either DENV immune or DENV naïve donors, suggesting that it was not dependent on DENV-specific secondary/memory response. B cell stimulation was dependent on activation of MAPK and CD81. B cells cultured with DENV also secreted IL-6 and presented increased expression of CD86 and HLA-DR, which might contribute to B lymphocyte co-stimulatory function. Indeed, PBMCs, but not isolated B cells, secreted high amounts of IgG upon DENV culture, suggesting that interaction with other cell types in vivo might promote Ig isotype switching and IgG secretion from different B cell clones. These findings suggest that activation signaling pathways triggered by DENV interaction with non-specific receptors on B cells might contribute to the exacerbated response observed in dengue patients. PMID:26656738

  17. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhongyuan; Do, Le Duy; Bechkoff, Géraldine; Mebarek, Saida; Keloglu, Nermin; Ahamada, Saandia; Meena, Saurabh; Magne, David; Pikula, Slawomir; Wu, Yuqing; Buchet, René

    2015-01-01

    A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes. PMID:25785438

  18. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhongyuan; Do, Le Duy; Bechkoff, Géraldine; Mebarek, Saida; Keloglu, Nermin; Ahamada, Saandia; Meena, Saurabh; Magne, David; Pikula, Slawomir; Wu, Yuqing; Buchet, René

    2015-01-01

    A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes.

  19. Highly effective hydrogen isotope separation in nanoporous metal-organic frameworks with open metal sites: direct measurement and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyunchul; Savchenko, Ievgeniia; Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Heine, Thomas; Hirscher, Michael

    2014-01-28

    Separating gaseous mixtures that consist of very similar size is one of the critical issues in modern separation technology. Especially, the separation of the isotopes hydrogen and deuterium requires special efforts, even though these isotopes show a very large mass ratio. Conventionally, H/D separation can be realized through cryogenic distillation of the molecular species or the Girdler-sulfide process, which are among the most energy-intensive separation techniques in the chemical industry. However, costs can be significantly reduced by using highly mass-selective nanoporous sorbents. Here, we describe a hydrogen isotope separation strategy exploiting the strongly attractive open metal sites present in nanoporous metal-organic frameworks of the CPO-27 family (also referred to as MOF-74). A theoretical analysis predicts an outstanding hydrogen isotopologue separation at open metal sites due to isotopal effects, which has been directly observed through cryogenic thermal desorption spectroscopy. For H2/D2 separation of an equimolar mixture at 60 K, the selectivity of 12 is the highest value ever measured, and this methodology shows extremely high separation efficiencies even above 77 K. Our theoretical results imply also a high selectivity for HD/H2 separation at similar temperatures, and together with catalytically active sites, we propose a mechanism to produce D2 from HD/H2 mixtures with natural or enriched deuterium content. PMID:24359584

  20. Highly effective hydrogen isotope separation in nanoporous metal-organic frameworks with open metal sites: direct measurement and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyunchul; Savchenko, Ievgeniia; Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Heine, Thomas; Hirscher, Michael

    2014-01-28

    Separating gaseous mixtures that consist of very similar size is one of the critical issues in modern separation technology. Especially, the separation of the isotopes hydrogen and deuterium requires special efforts, even though these isotopes show a very large mass ratio. Conventionally, H/D separation can be realized through cryogenic distillation of the molecular species or the Girdler-sulfide process, which are among the most energy-intensive separation techniques in the chemical industry. However, costs can be significantly reduced by using highly mass-selective nanoporous sorbents. Here, we describe a hydrogen isotope separation strategy exploiting the strongly attractive open metal sites present in nanoporous metal-organic frameworks of the CPO-27 family (also referred to as MOF-74). A theoretical analysis predicts an outstanding hydrogen isotopologue separation at open metal sites due to isotopal effects, which has been directly observed through cryogenic thermal desorption spectroscopy. For H2/D2 separation of an equimolar mixture at 60 K, the selectivity of 12 is the highest value ever measured, and this methodology shows extremely high separation efficiencies even above 77 K. Our theoretical results imply also a high selectivity for HD/H2 separation at similar temperatures, and together with catalytically active sites, we propose a mechanism to produce D2 from HD/H2 mixtures with natural or enriched deuterium content.

  1. The copper active site of CBM33 polysaccharide oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Hemsworth, Glyn R; Taylor, Edward J; Kim, Robbert Q; Gregory, Rebecca C; Lewis, Sally J; Turkenburg, Johan P; Parkin, Alison; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2013-04-24

    The capacity of metal-dependent fungal and bacterial polysaccharide oxygenases, termed GH61 and CBM33, respectively, to potentiate the enzymatic degradation of cellulose opens new possibilities for the conversion of recalcitrant biomass to biofuels. GH61s have already been shown to be unique metalloenzymes containing an active site with a mononuclear copper ion coordinated by two histidines, one of which is an unusual τ-N-methylated N-terminal histidine. We now report the structural and spectroscopic characterization of the corresponding copper CBM33 enzymes. CBM33 binds copper with high affinity at a mononuclear site, significantly stabilizing the enzyme. X-band EPR spectroscopy of Cu(II)-CBM33 shows a mononuclear type 2 copper site with the copper ion in a distorted axial coordination sphere, into which azide will coordinate as evidenced by the concomitant formation of a new absorption band in the UV/vis spectrum at 390 nm. The enzyme's three-dimensional structure contains copper, which has been photoreduced to Cu(I) by the incident X-rays, confirmed by X-ray absorption/fluorescence studies of both aqueous solution and intact crystals of Cu-CBM33. The single copper(I) ion is ligated in a T-shaped configuration by three nitrogen atoms from two histidine side chains and the amino terminus, similar to the endogenous copper coordination geometry found in fungal GH61. PMID:23540833

  2. SUMMARY OF TECNIQUES AND UNIQUE USES FOR DIRECT PUSH METHODS IN SITE CHARACTERIZATION ON CONTAMINATED FIELD SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    At many of the sites where we have been asked to assist in site characterization, we have discovered severe discrepancies that new technologies may be able to prevent. This presentation is designed to illustrate these new technologies or unique uses of existing technology and the...

  3. Identification of an activation site in Bak and mitochondrial Bax triggered by antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Sweta; Anwari, Khatira; Alsop, Amber E.; Yuen, Wai Shan; Huang, David C. S.; Carroll, John; Smith, Nicholas A.; Smith, Brian J.; Dewson, Grant; Kluck, Ruth M.

    2016-01-01

    During apoptosis, Bak and Bax are activated by BH3-only proteins binding to the α2–α5 hydrophobic groove; Bax is also activated via a rear pocket. Here we report that antibodies can directly activate Bak and mitochondrial Bax by binding to the α1–α2 loop. A monoclonal antibody (clone 7D10) binds close to α1 in non-activated Bak to induce conformational change, oligomerization, and cytochrome c release. Anti-FLAG antibodies also activate Bak containing a FLAG epitope close to α1. An antibody (clone 3C10) to the Bax α1–α2 loop activates mitochondrial Bax, but blocks translocation of cytosolic Bax. Tethers within Bak show that 7D10 binding directly extricates α1; a structural model of the 7D10 Fab bound to Bak reveals the formation of a cavity under α1. Our identification of the α1–α2 loop as an activation site in Bak paves the way to develop intrabodies or small molecules that directly and selectively regulate these proteins. PMID:27217060

  4. Radiation inactivation study of aminopeptidase: probing the active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamadar, V. K.; Jamdar, S. N.; Mohan, Hari; Dandekar, S. P.; Harikumar, P.

    2004-04-01

    Ionizing radiation inactivated purified chicken intestinal aminopeptidase in media saturated with gases in the order N 2O>N 2>air. The D 37 values in the above conditions were 281, 210 and 198 Gy, respectively. OH radical scavengers such as t-butanol and isopropanol effectively nullified the radiation-induced damage in N 2O. The radicals (SCN) 2•-, Br 2•- and I 2•- inactivated the enzyme, pointing to the involvement of aromatic amino acids and cysteine in its catalytic activity. The enzyme exhibited fluorescence emission at 340 nm which is characteristic of tryptophan. The radiation-induced loss of activity was accompanied by a decrease in the fluorescence of the enzyme suggesting a predominant influence on tryptophan residues. The enzyme inhibition was associated with a marked increase in the Km and a decrease in the Vmax and kcat values, suggesting an irreversible alteration in the catalytic site. The above observations were confirmed by pulse radiolysis studies.

  5. Mimicking enzymatic active sites on surfaces for energy conversion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gutzler, Rico; Stepanow, Sebastian; Grumelli, Doris; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Kern, Klaus

    2015-07-21

    Metal-organic supramolecular chemistry on surfaces has matured to a point where its underlying growth mechanisms are well understood and structures of defined coordination environments of metal atoms can be synthesized in a controlled and reproducible procedure. With surface-confined molecular self-assembly, scientists have a tool box at hand which can be used to prepare structures with desired properties, as for example a defined oxidation number and spin state of the transition metal atoms within the organic matrix. From a structural point of view, these coordination sites in the supramolecular structure resemble the catalytically active sites of metallo-enzymes, both characterized by metal centers coordinated to organic ligands. Several chemical reactions take place at these embedded metal ions in enzymes and the question arises whether these reactions also take place using metal-organic networks as catalysts. Mimicking the active site of metal atoms and organic ligands of enzymes in artificial systems is the key to understanding the selectivity and efficiency of enzymatic reactions. Their catalytic activity depends on various parameters including the charge and spin configuration in the metal ion, but also on the organic environment, which can stabilize intermediate reaction products, inhibits catalytic deactivation, and serves mostly as a transport channel for the reactants and products and therefore ensures the selectivity of the enzyme. Charge and spin on the transition metal in enzymes depend on the one hand on the specific metal element, and on the other hand on its organic coordination environment. These two parameters can carefully be adjusted in surface confined metal-organic networks, which can be synthesized by virtue of combinatorial mixing of building synthons. Different organic ligands with varying functional groups can be combined with several transition metals and spontaneously assemble into ordered networks. The catalytically active metal

  6. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-06-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work.

  7. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  8. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  9. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-10

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  10. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  11. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal–nitrogen coordination

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon–nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  12. Repeated games and direct reciprocity under active linking.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Jorge M; Traulsen, Arne; Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Nowak, Martin A

    2008-02-21

    Direct reciprocity relies on repeated encounters between the same two individuals. Here we examine the evolution of cooperation under direct reciprocity in dynamically structured populations. Individuals occupy the vertices of a graph, undergoing repeated interactions with their partners via the edges of the graph. Unlike the traditional approach to evolutionary game theory, where individuals meet at random and have no control over the frequency or duration of interactions, we consider a model in which individuals differ in the rate at which they seek new interactions. Moreover, once a link between two individuals has formed, the productivity of this link is evaluated. Links can be broken off at different rates. Whenever the active dynamics of links is sufficiently fast, population structure leads to a simple transformation of the payoff matrix, effectively changing the game under consideration, and hence paving the way for reciprocators to dominate defectors. We derive analytical conditions for evolutionary stability.

  13. Spectroscopic Definition of the Ferroxidase Site in M Ferritin: Comparison of Binuclear Substrate vs. Cofactor Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jennifer K.; Liu, Xiaofeng S.; Tosha, Takehiko; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2008-01-01

    Maxi ferritins, 24 subunit protein nanocages, are essential in humans, plants, bacteria, and other animals for the concentration and storage of iron as hydrated ferric oxide, while minimizing free radical generation or use by pathogens. Formation of the precursors to these ferric oxides is catalyzed at a non-heme biferrous substrate site, which has some parallels with the cofactor sites in other biferrous enzymes. A combination of circular dichroism (CD), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH MCD) has been used to probe Fe(II) binding to the substrate active site in frog M ferritin. These data determined that the active site within each subunit consists of two inequivalent five-coordinate (5C) ferrous centers that are weakly anti-ferromagnetically coupled, consistent with a μ-1,3 carboxylate bridge. The active site ligand set is unusual and likely includes a terminal water bound to each Fe(II) center. The Fe(II) ions bind to the active sites in a concerted manner, and cooperativity among the sites in each subunit is observed, potentially providing a mechanism for the control of ferritin iron loading. Differences in geometric and electronic structure – including a weak ligand field, availability of two water ligands at the biferrous substrate site, and the single carboxylate bridge in ferritin – coincide with the divergent reaction pathways observed between this substrate site and the previously studied cofactor active sites. PMID:18576633

  14. Probing impact of active site residue mutations on stability and activity of Neisseria polysaccharea amylosucrase.

    PubMed

    Daudé, David; Topham, Christopher M; Remaud-Siméon, Magali; André, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    The amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea is a transglucosidase from the GH13 family of glycoside-hydrolases that naturally catalyzes the synthesis of α-glucans from the widely available donor sucrose. Interestingly, natural molecular evolution has modeled a dense hydrogen bond network at subsite -1 responsible for the specific recognition of sucrose and conversely, it has loosened interactions at the subsite +1 creating a highly promiscuous subsite +1. The residues forming these subsites are considered to be likely involved in the activity as well as the overall stability of the enzyme. To assess their role, a structure-based approach was followed to reshape the subsite -1. A strategy based on stability change predictions, using the FoldX algorithm, was considered to identify the best candidates for site-directed mutagenesis and guide the construction of a small targeted library. A miniaturized purification protocol was developed and both mutant stability and substrate promiscuity were explored. A range of 8 °C between extreme melting temperature values was observed and some variants were able to synthesize series of oligosaccharides with distributions differing from that of the parental enzyme. The crucial role of subsite -1 was thus highlighted and the biocatalysts generated can now be considered as starting points for further engineering purposes.

  15. An active-site lysine in avian liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase

    SciTech Connect

    Guidinger, P.F.; Nowak, T. )

    1991-09-10

    The participation of lysine in the catalysis by avian liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was studied by chemical modification and by a characterization of the modified enzyme. The rate of inactivation by 2,4-pentanedione is pseudo-first-order and linearly dependent on reagent concentration with a second-order rate constant of 0.36 {plus minus} 0.025 M{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}. Inactivation by pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate of the reversible reaction catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase follows bimolecular kinetics with a second-order rate constant of 7,700 {plus minus} 860 m{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}. Treatment of the enzyme or one lysine residue modified concomitant with 100% loss in activity. A stoichiometry of 1:1 is observed when either the reversible or the irreversible reactions catalyzed by the enzyme are monitored. A study of k{sub obs} vs pH suggests this active-site lysine has a pK{sub a} of 8.1 and a pH-independent rate constant of inactivation of 47,700 m{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}. Proton relaxation rate measurements suggest that pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate modification alters binding of the phosphate-containing substrates. {sup 31}P NMR relaxation rate measurements show altered binding of the substrates in the ternary enzyme {center dot}Mn{sup 2+}{center dot}substrate complex. Circular dichroism studies show little change in secondary structure of pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate modified phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. These results indicate that avian liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase has one reactive lysine at the active site and it is involved in the binding and activation of the phosphate-containing substrates.

  16. High-activity barley alpha-amylase by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dominic W S; Batt, Sarah B; Lee, Charles C; Robertson, George H

    2004-10-01

    Barley alpha-amylase isozyme 2 was cloned into and constitutively secreted by Saccharomyces cervisiae. The gene coding for the wild-type enzyme was subjected to directed evolution. Libraries of mutants were screened by halo formation on starch agar plates, followed by high-throughput liquid assay using dye-labeled starch as the substrate. The concentration of recombinant enzyme in the culture supernatant was determined by immunodetection, and used for the calculation of specific activity. After three rounds of directed evolution, one mutant (Mu322) showed 1000 times the total activity and 20 times the specific activity of the wild-type enzyme produced by the same yeast expression system. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of this mutant with the wild type revealed five substitutions: Q44H, R303K and F325Y in domain A, and T94A and R128Q in domain B. Two of these mutations. Q44H and R303K, result in amino acids highly conserved in cereal alpha-amylases. R303K and F325Y are located in the raw starch-binding fragment of the enzyme molecule. PMID:15635937

  17. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth.

  18. Eel calcitonin binding site distribution and antinociceptive activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Guidobono, F.; Netti, C.; Sibilia, V.; Villa, I.; Zamboni, A.; Pecile, A.

    1986-03-01

    The distribution of binding site for (/sup 125/I)-eel-calcitonin (ECT) to rat central nervous system, studied by an autoradiographic technique, showed concentrations of binding in the diencephalon, the brain stem and the spinal cord. Large accumulations of grains were seen in the hypothalamus, the amygdala, in the fasciculus medialis prosencephali, in the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, in the ventrolateral part of the periventricular gray matter, in the lemniscus medialis and in the raphe nuclei. The density of grains in the reticular formation and in the nucleus tractus spinalis nervi trigemini was more moderate. In the spinal cord, grains were scattered throughout the dorsal horns. Binding of the ligand was displaced equally by cold ECT and by salmon CT(sCT), indicating that both peptides bind to the same receptors. Human CT was much weaker than sCT in displacing (/sup 125/I)-ECT binding. The administration of ECT into the brain ventricles of rats dose-dependently induced a significant and long-lasting enhancement of hot-plate latencies comparable with that obtained with sCT. The antinociceptive activity induced by ECT is compatible with the topographical distribution of binding sites for the peptide and is a further indication that fish CTs are active in the mammalian brain.

  19. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  20. The two active sites in human branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase operate independently without an obligatory alternating-site mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Machius, Mischa; Chuang, Jacinta L; Wynn, R Max; Chuang, David T

    2007-04-20

    A long standing controversy is whether an alternating activesite mechanism occurs during catalysis in thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzymes. We address this question by investigating the ThDP-dependent decarboxylase/dehydrogenase (E1b) component of the mitochondrial branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC). Our crystal structure reveals that conformations of the two active sites in the human E1b heterotetramer harboring the reaction intermediate are identical. Acidic residues in the core of the E1b heterotetramer, which align with the proton-wire residues proposed to participate in active-site communication in the related pyruvate dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus, are mutated. Enzyme kinetic data show that, except in a few cases because of protein misfolding, these alterations are largely without effect on overall activity of BCKDC, ruling out the requirement of a proton-relay mechanism in E1b. BCKDC overall activity is nullified at 50% phosphorylation of E1b, but it is restored to nearly half of the pre-phosphorylation level after dissociation and reconstitution of BCKDC with the same phosphorylated E1b. The results suggest that the abolition of overall activity likely results from the specific geometry of the half-phosphorylated E1b in the BCKDC assembly and not due to a disruption of the alternating active-site mechanism. Finally, we show that a mutant E1b containing only one functional active site exhibits half of the wild-type BCKDC activity, which directly argues against the obligatory communication between active sites. The above results provide evidence that the two active sites in the E1b heterotetramer operate independently during the ThDP-dependent decarboxylation reaction. PMID:17329260

  1. Bullous pemphigoid autoantibodies directly induce blister formation without complement activation.

    PubMed

    Ujiie, Hideyuki; Sasaoka, Tetsumasa; Izumi, Kentaro; Nishie, Wataru; Shinkuma, Satoru; Natsuga, Ken; Nakamura, Hideki; Shibaki, Akihiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Complement activation and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells at the dermal/epidermal junction are thought to be essential for blister formation in bullous pemphigoid (BP), an autoimmune blistering disease induced by autoantibodies against type XVII collagen (COL17); however, this theory does not fully explain the pathological features of BP. Recently, the involvement of complement-independent pathways has been proposed. To directly address the question of the necessity of the complement activation in blister formation, we generated C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice. First, we show that passive transfer of autoantibodies from BP patients induced blister formation in neonatal C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice without complement activation. By using newly generated human and murine mAbs against the pathogenic noncollagenous 16A domain of COL17 with high (human IgG1, murine IgG2), low (murine IgG1), or no (human IgG4) complement activation abilities, we demonstrate that the deposition of Abs, and not complements, is relevant to the induction of blister formation in neonatal and adult mice. Notably, passive transfer of BP autoantibodies reduced the amount of COL17 in lesional mice skin, as observed in cultured normal human keratinocytes treated with the same Abs. Moreover, the COL17 depletion was associated with a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. In conclusion, the COL17 depletion induced by BP autoantibodies, and not complement activation, is essential for the blister formation under our experimental system.

  2. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  3. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  4. Direct detection of relic active and sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Both active and sterile sub-eV neutrinos can form the cosmic neutrino background in the early Universe. We consider the beta-decaying (e.g., 3H) and EC-decaying (e.g., 163Ho) nuclei as the promising targets to capture relic neutrinos in the laboratory. We calculate the capture rates of relic electron neutrinos and antineutrinos against the corresponding beta decay or electron capture (EC) decay backgrounds in the (3+Ns) flavor mixing scheme, and discuss the future prospect in terms of the PTOLEMY project. We stress that such direct measurements of hot DM might not be hopeless in the long term.

  5. Preliminary Work in Obtaining Site-Directed Mutants of Hen Egg White Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Leonard D.

    1996-01-01

    < ------ > dimer < ------- > tetramer < ------ > octamer < ------ > higher order. It is believed that multimer aggregation of lysozyme occurs by interaction at specific binding sites on the surface of the protein crystals. If the presence of discrete binding sites and the aggregation hypothesis is true, then it follows that the alteration of the binding site(s) should have significant effect on the measurements obtained during growth experiments. Site-directed mutagenesis allows the specific alteration of proteins by replacement, deletion or addition of specific amino acid residues. This report outlines the approach for this strategy and the progress made thus far toward that end.

  6. Locomotor activity influences muscle architecture and bone growth but not muscle attachment site morphology

    PubMed Central

    Rabey, Karyne N.; Green, David J.; Taylor, Andrea B.; Begun, David R.; Richmond, Brian G.; McFarlin, Shannon C.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to make behavioural inferences from skeletal remains is critical to understanding the lifestyles and activities of past human populations and extinct animals. Muscle attachment site (enthesis) morphology has long been assumed to reflect muscle strength and activity during life, but little experimental evidence exists to directly link activity patterns with muscle development and the morphology of their attachments to the skeleton. We used a mouse model to experimentally test how the level and type of activity influences forelimb muscle architecture of spinodeltoideus, acromiodeltoideus, and superficial pectoralis, bone growth rate and gross morphology of their insertion sites. Over an 11-week period, we collected data on activity levels in one control group and two experimental activity groups (running, climbing) of female wild-type mice. Our results show that both activity type and level increased bone growth rates influenced muscle architecture, including differences in potential muscular excursion (fibre length) and potential force production (physiological cross-sectional area). However, despite significant influences on muscle architecture and bone development, activity had no observable effect on enthesis morphology. These results suggest that the gross morphology of entheses is less reliable than internal bone structure for making inferences about an individual’s past behaviour. PMID:25467113

  7. Roles of s3 site residues of nattokinase on its activity and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuming; Feng, Chi; Zhong, Jin; Huan, Liandong

    2007-09-01

    Nattokinase (Subtilisin NAT, NK) is a bacterial serine protease with high fibrinolytic activity. To probe their roles on protease activity and substrate specificity, three residues of S3 site (Gly(100), Ser(101) and Leu(126)) were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis. Kinetics parameters of 20 mutants were measured using tetrapeptides as substrates, and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. Results of mutation analysis showed that Gly(100) and Ser(101) had reverse steric and electrostatic effects. Residues with bulky or positively charged side chains at position 100 decreased the substrate binding and catalytic activity drastically, while residues with the same characters at position 101 could obviously enhance protease and fibrinolytic activity of NK. Mutation of Leu(126) might impair the structure of the active cleft and drastically decreased the activity of NK. Kinetics studies of the mutants showed that S3 residues were crucial to keep protease activity while they moderately affected substrate specificity of NK. The present study provided some original insight into the P3-S3 interaction in NK and other subtilisins, as well as showed successful protein engineering cases to improve NK as a potential therapeutic agent.

  8. Quantity, Quality, and Variety of Pupil Responses during an Open-Communication Structured Group Directed Reading-Thinking Activity and a Closed Communication Structured Group Directed Reading Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petre, Richard M.

    The quality, quantity, and variety of pupil responses while using two different group directed reading activities, the Directed Reading Activity (DRA), and the Directed Reading-Thinking Activity (DRTA) were investigated in this study. The subjects, all fourth graders in two nearby communities, were grouped into above-grade-level, at-grade-level,…

  9. An efficient method for multiple site-directed mutagenesis using type IIs restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Kun; Xin, Ying; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-05-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) methods are very important in modern molecular biology, biochemistry, and protein engineering. Here, we present a novel SDM method that can be used for multiple mutation generation using type IIs restriction enzymes. This approach is faster and more convenient than the overlap polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method due to its having fewer reaction steps and being cheaper than, but as convenient as, enzymatic assembly. We illustrate the usefulness of our method by introducing three mutations into the bacterial Streptococcus thermophilus Cas9 (bStCas9) gene, converting the humanized S. thermophilus Cas9 (hStCas9) gene into nuclease dead or H847A nickase mutants and generating sunnyTALEN mutagenesis from a wild-type TALEN backbone.

  10. Biomolecular DNP-Supported NMR Spectroscopy using Site-Directed Spin Labeling.

    PubMed

    van der Cruijsen, Elwin A W; Koers, Eline J; Sauvée, Claire; Hulse, Raymond E; Weingarth, Markus; Ouari, Olivier; Perozo, Eduardo; Tordo, Paul; Baldus, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has been shown to greatly enhance spectroscopic sensitivity, creating novel opportunities for NMR studies on complex and large molecular assemblies in life and material sciences. In such applications, however, site-specificity and spectroscopic resolution become critical factors that are usually difficult to control by current DNP-based approaches. We have examined in detail the effect of directly attaching mono- or biradicals to induce local paramagnetic relaxation effects and, at the same time, to produce sizable DNP enhancements. Using a membrane-embedded ion channel as an example, we varied the degree of paramagnetic labeling and the location of the DNP probes. Our results show that the creation of local spin clusters can generate sizable DNP enhancements while preserving the intrinsic benefits of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE)-based NMR approaches. DNP using chemical labeling may hence provide an attractive route to introduce molecular specificity into DNP studies in life science applications and beyond.

  11. Structural Characterization of Membrane-Curving Proteins: Site-Directed Spin Labeling, EPR, and Computational Refinement.

    PubMed

    Ambroso, Mark R; Haworth, Ian S; Langen, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis and other membrane remodeling processes require the coordinated generation of different membrane shapes. Proteins capable of manipulating lipid bilayers mediate these events using mechanisms that are not fully understood. Progress is limited by the small number of structures solved for proteins bound to different membrane shapes and tools capable of resolving such information. However, recent studies have shown site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to be capable of obtaining high-resolution structural information for proteins bound to different membrane shapes. This technique can be applied to proteins with no known structure or proteins with structures known in solution. By refining the data obtained by EPR with computational modeling, 3D structures or structural models of membrane-bound proteins can be generated. In this chapter, we highlight the basic considerations and steps required to investigate the structures of membrane-bound proteins using SDSL, EPR, and computational refinement. PMID:26477254

  12. Directional changes of the geomagnetic field in West Africa: Insights from the metallurgical site of Korsimoro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donadini, Fabio; Serneels, Vincent; Kapper, Lisa; El Kateb, Akram

    2015-11-01

    This work shows the first archeomagnetic directions from Western Africa measured on 32 iron smelting kilns dated between 650 and 1800 AD. The archeological excavation of the vast metallurgical site of Korsimoro established the existence of four distinct iron-smelting techniques. The time-frame of each technique could be clearly determined with radiocarbon dating. Many of the kilns investigated in this study could also be dated individually with residual charcoals found in their inside. The results indicate that the inclination of the field changed gradually from shallow normal to shallow reversed during 800 to 1300 AD, and then went back to shallow normal around 1600-1700 AD. The declination was instead stable around 10°E between 800 and 1400 AD, thereafter it started changing towards North. This trend correlates well with available secular variation curves from the Balkan and from Spain, and indicates that the field variation in West Africa was similar to the one in Europe.

  13. Isolation of temperature-sensitive Abelson virus mutants by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Rosenberg, N

    1987-01-01

    Mutants of Abelson virus encoding temperature-sensitive protein-tyrosine kinase (EC 2.7.1.112) were created by site-directed mutagenesis using sequence information from temperature-sensitive mutants of the related v-src oncogene. Expression of these two independent mutations in Escherichia coli resulted in reduced phosphorylation of the mutant proteins at high temperature. Viruses containing one of the mutations induced conditional transformation of both NIH 3T3 and lymphoid cells when expressed in the context of a truncated transforming protein. These results underscore the functional homology between protein-tyrosine kinases and suggest that transfer of mutations within a related gene family may provide a rapid method to create mutants. Images PMID:2825174

  14. Fluorescence Enhancement at Docking Sites of DNA-Directed Self-Assembled Nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acuna, G. P.; Möller, F. M.; Holzmeister, P.; Beater, S.; Lalkens, B.; Tinnefeld, P.

    2012-10-01

    We introduce self-assembled nanoantennas to enhance the fluorescence intensity in a plasmonic hotspot of zeptoliter volume. The nanoantennas are prepared by attaching one or two gold nanoparticles (NPs) to DNA origami structures, which also incorporated docking sites for a single fluorescent dye next to one NP or in the gap between two NPs. We measured the dependence of the fluorescence enhancement on NP size and number and compare it to numerical simulations. A maximum of 117-fold fluorescence enhancement was obtained for a dye molecule positioned in the 23-nanometer gap between 100-nanometer gold NPs. Direct visualization of the binding and unbinding of short DNA strands, as well as the conformational dynamics of a DNA Holliday junction in the hotspot of the nanoantenna, show the compatibility with single-molecule assays.

  15. Fluorescence enhancement at docking sites of DNA-directed self-assembled nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Acuna, G P; Möller, F M; Holzmeister, P; Beater, S; Lalkens, B; Tinnefeld, P

    2012-10-26

    We introduce self-assembled nanoantennas to enhance the fluorescence intensity in a plasmonic hotspot of zeptoliter volume. The nanoantennas are prepared by attaching one or two gold nanoparticles (NPs) to DNA origami structures, which also incorporated docking sites for a single fluorescent dye next to one NP or in the gap between two NPs. We measured the dependence of the fluorescence enhancement on NP size and number and compare it to numerical simulations. A maximum of 117-fold fluorescence enhancement was obtained for a dye molecule positioned in the 23-nanometer gap between 100-nanometer gold NPs. Direct visualization of the binding and unbinding of short DNA strands, as well as the conformational dynamics of a DNA Holliday junction in the hotspot of the nanoantenna, show the compatibility with single-molecule assays.

  16. Site-directed nucleases: a paradigm shift in predictable, knowledge-based plant breeding.

    PubMed

    Podevin, Nancy; Davies, Howard V; Hartung, Frank; Nogué, Fabien; Casacuberta, Josep M

    2013-06-01

    Conventional plant breeding exploits existing genetic variability and introduces new variability by mutagenesis. This has proven highly successful in securing food supplies for an ever-growing human population. The use of genetically modified plants is a complementary approach but all plant breeding techniques have limitations. Here, we discuss how the recent evolution of targeted mutagenesis and DNA insertion techniques based on tailor-made site-directed nucleases (SDNs) provides opportunities to overcome such limitations. Plant breeding companies are exploiting SDNs to develop a new generation of crops with new and improved traits. Nevertheless, some technical limitations as well as significant uncertainties on the regulatory status of SDNs may challenge their use for commercial plant breeding.

  17. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  18. Sequences flanking the core-binding site modulate glucocorticoid receptor structure and activity

    PubMed Central

    Schöne, Stefanie; Jurk, Marcel; Helabad, Mahdi Bagherpoor; Dror, Iris; Lebars, Isabelle; Kieffer, Bruno; Imhof, Petra; Rohs, Remo; Vingron, Martin; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H.

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds as a homodimer to genomic response elements, which have particular sequence and shape characteristics. Here we show that the nucleotides directly flanking the core-binding site, differ depending on the strength of GR-dependent activation of nearby genes. Our study indicates that these flanking nucleotides change the three-dimensional structure of the DNA-binding site, the DNA-binding domain of GR and the quaternary structure of the dimeric complex. Functional studies in a defined genomic context show that sequence-induced changes in GR activity cannot be explained by differences in GR occupancy. Rather, mutating the dimerization interface mitigates DNA-induced changes in both activity and structure, arguing for a role of DNA-induced structural changes in modulating GR activity. Together, our study shows that DNA sequence identity of genomic binding sites modulates GR activity downstream of binding, which may play a role in achieving regulatory specificity towards individual target genes. PMID:27581526

  19. Sequences flanking the core-binding site modulate glucocorticoid receptor structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Schöne, Stefanie; Jurk, Marcel; Helabad, Mahdi Bagherpoor; Dror, Iris; Lebars, Isabelle; Kieffer, Bruno; Imhof, Petra; Rohs, Remo; Vingron, Martin; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds as a homodimer to genomic response elements, which have particular sequence and shape characteristics. Here we show that the nucleotides directly flanking the core-binding site, differ depending on the strength of GR-dependent activation of nearby genes. Our study indicates that these flanking nucleotides change the three-dimensional structure of the DNA-binding site, the DNA-binding domain of GR and the quaternary structure of the dimeric complex. Functional studies in a defined genomic context show that sequence-induced changes in GR activity cannot be explained by differences in GR occupancy. Rather, mutating the dimerization interface mitigates DNA-induced changes in both activity and structure, arguing for a role of DNA-induced structural changes in modulating GR activity. Together, our study shows that DNA sequence identity of genomic binding sites modulates GR activity downstream of binding, which may play a role in achieving regulatory specificity towards individual target genes. PMID:27581526

  20. CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technique and its application in site-directed genome modification of animals.

    PubMed

    Jinwei, Zhou; Qipin, Xu; Jing, Yao; Shumin, Yu; Suizhong, Cao

    2015-10-01

    CRISPR/Cas system, which uses CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) to guide Cas nuclease to silence invading nucleic acids, is self-defense system against exogenous virus or plasmid in bacteria and archaea. Through molecular modification, the typeⅡCRISPR/Cas system has become a highly efficient site-directed genome editing technique, which is simpler than zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs) and easier to be designed and applied. In this review, we summarize the evolutionary history of CRISPR/Cas9 system, the working principle and modification process of type Ⅱ CRISPR/Cas and its application in animal genome modification. We also analyze the existing problems and improvement program of the CRISPR/Cas9 system as well as its application prospect combined with successful cases, which may provide innovative perspectives on improving animal traits and establishing animal models of human diseases.

  1. Role of cysteine residues in ribonuclease H from Escherichia coli. Site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification.

    PubMed Central

    Kanaya, S; Kimura, S; Katsuda, C; Ikehara, M

    1990-01-01

    The role of the three cysteine residues at positions 13, 63 and 133 in Escherichia coli RNAase H, an enzyme that is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide [Berkower, Leis & Hurwitz (1973) J. Biol. Chem. 248, 5914-5921], was examined by using both site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification. Novel aspects that were found are as follows. First, none of the cysteine residues is required for activity. Secondly, chemical modification of either Cys-13 or Cys-133 with thiol-blocking reagents inactivates the enzyme, but that of Cys-63 does not. Thus the sensitivity of E. coli RNAase H to N-ethylmaleimide arises not from blocking of the thiol group but from steric hindrance by the modifying group incorporated at either Cys-13 or Cys-133. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2171503

  2. Nevada National Security Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2011 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Howard Bender, comp.

    2012-04-25

    This fiscal year 2011 annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development program, the 10th anniversary edition, recognizes a full decade of innovative R&D accomplishments in support of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Last year the NNSS itself was renamed to reflect a diversifying mission, and our R&D program has contributed significantly to shape emerging missions that will continue to evolve. New initiatives in stockpile stewardship science, nonproliferation, and treaty verification and monitoring have had substantial successes in FY 2011, and many more accomplishments are expected. SDRD is the cornerstone on which many of these initiatives rest. Historically supporting our main focus areas, SDRD is also building a solid foundation for new, and non-traditional, emerging national security missions. The program continues its charter to advance science and technology for a broad base of agencies including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and many others.

  3. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  4. Improvement in the thermostability of D-psicose 3-epimerase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens by random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Geun; Ju, Yo-Han; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2011-10-01

    The S213C, I33L, and I33L S213C variants of D-psicose 3-epimerase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, which were obtained by random and site-directed mutagenesis, displayed increases of 2.5, 5, and 7.5°C in the temperature for maximal enzyme activity, increases of 3.3-, 7.2-, and 29.9-fold in the half-life at 50°C, and increases of 3.1, 4.3, and 7.6°C in apparent melting temperature, respectively, compared with the wild-type enzyme. Molecular modeling suggests that the improvement in thermostability in these variants may have resulted from increased putative hydrogen bonds and formation of new aromatic stacking interactions. The immobilized wild-type enzyme with and without borate maintained activity for 8 days at a conversion yield of 70% (350 g/liter psicose) and for 16 days at a conversion yield of 30% (150 g/liter psicose), respectively. After 8 or 16 days, the enzyme activity gradually decreased, and the conversion yields with and without borate were reduced to 22 and 9.6%, respectively, at 30 days. In contrast, the activities of the immobilized I33L S213C variant with and without borate did not decrease during the operation time of 30 days. These results suggest that the I33L S213C variant may be useful as an industrial producer of D-psicose.

  5. A Frontier Molecular Orbital determination of the active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on a dispersed metal catalysts. The basis for these calculations is the reported finding that a large number of catalyzed reactions take place on single atom active sites on the metal surface. Thus, these sites can be considered as surface complexes made up of the central active atom surrounded by near-neighbor metal atom ``ligands`` with localized surface orbitals perturbed only by these ``ligands``. These ``complexes`` are based on a twelve coordinate species with the ``ligands`` attached to the t{sub 2g} orbitals and the coordinate axes coincident with the direction of the e{sub g} orbitals on the central atom. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  6. A Frontier Molecular Orbital determination of the active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on a dispersed metal catalysts. The basis for these calculations is the reported finding that a large number of catalyzed reactions take place on single atom active sites on the metal surface. Thus, these sites can be considered as surface complexes made up of the central active atom surrounded by near-neighbor metal atom ligands'' with localized surface orbitals perturbed only by these ligands''. These complexes'' are based on a twelve coordinate species with the ligands'' attached to the t{sub 2g} orbitals and the coordinate axes coincident with the direction of the e{sub g} orbitals on the central atom. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  7. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of a Hyperthermophilic Endoglucanase Cel12B from Thermotoga maritima Based on Rational Design

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Shi, Hao; Xu, Linyu; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Li, Xiangqian

    2015-01-01

    To meet the demand for the application of high activity and thermostable cellulases in the production of new-generation bioethanol from nongrain-cellulose sources, a hyperthermostable β-1,4-endoglucase Cel12B from Thermotoga maritima was selected for further modification by gene site-directed mutagenesis method in the present study, based on homology modeling and rational design. As a result, two recombinant enzymes showed significant improvement in enzyme activity by 77% and 87%, respectively, higher than the parental enzyme TmCel12B. Furthermore, the two mutants could retain 80% and 90.5% of their initial activity after incubation at 80°C for 8 h, while only 45% for 5 h to TmCel12B. The Km and Vmax of the two recombinant enzymes were 1.97±0.05 mM, 4.23±0.15 μmol·mg-1·min-1 of TmCel12B-E225H-K207G-D37V, and 2.97±0.12 mM, 3.15±0.21 μmol·mg-1·min-1 of TmCel12B-E225H-K207G, respectively, when using CMC-Na as the substrate. The roles of the mutation sites were also analyzed and evaluated in terms of electron density, hydrophobicity of the modeled protein structures. The recombinant enzymes may be used in the hydrolysis of cellulose at higher temperature in the future. It was concluded that the gene mutagenesis approach of a certain active residues may effectively improve the performance of cellulases for the industrial applications and contribute to the study the thermostable mechanism of thermophilic enzymes. PMID:26218520

  8. Active site loop conformation regulates promiscuous activity in a lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a "hot spot" in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity.

  9. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  10. Molecular Study of the Effects of Chemical Processing on Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation: Role of Active Sites and Product Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihvonen, S.; Schill, G. P.; Murphy, K. A.; Mueller, K.; Tolbert, M. A.; Freedman, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosol is the largest global source of ice nuclei, but the identity of the active sites for nucleation is unknown. During atmospheric transport, mineral dust aerosol can encounter and react with sulfuric acid, which affects the ice nucleation activity either due to changes to reactive surface sites or product formation. In this study, we reacted two types of clays found in mineral dust, kaolinite and montmorillonite, with sulfuric acid. Variation in the mineral due to acid treatment was separated from product formation through rinsing techniques. The samples were subsequently reacted with a probe molecule, (3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)dimethylchlorosilane, that selectively binds to edge hydroxyl groups that are bonded to a silicon atom with three bridging oxygens. Hydroxyl groups are considered potential active sites, because they can hydrogen bond with water and facilitate ice nucleation. Attachment to these sites was quantified by 19F magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) of the 19F atoms on the probe molecule, which provided a direct correlation of the number of hydroxyl groups. Our results indicate that the number of edge-site hydroxyl groups increases with exposure to acid. Ice nucleation measurements indicate that the sulfuric acid-treated mineral is less ice active than the untreated mineral. Surprisingly, no difference between the nucleation activity of the untreated mineral and acid-treated, rinsed mineral is observed. As a result, we hypothesize that once a critical density of active sites is reached for ice nucleation, there is no further change in nucleation activity despite a continued increase in active sites. We additionally propose that the reduced activity of the acid-treated mineral is due to product formation that blocks active sites on the mineral, rather than changes to active sites.

  11. Utilizing Chimeric Antigen Receptors to Direct Natural Killer Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hermanson, David L.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells represent an attractive lymphocyte population for cancer immunotherapy due to their ability to lyse tumor targets without prior sensitization and without need for human leukocyte antigens-matching. Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are able to enhance lymphocyte targeting and activation toward diverse malignancies. CARs consist of an external recognition domain (typically a small chain variable fragment) directed at a specific tumor antigen that is linked with one or more intracellular signaling domains that mediate lymphocyte activation. Most CAR studies have focused on their expression in T cells. However, use of CARs in NK cells is starting to gain traction because they provide a method to redirect these cells more specifically to target refractory cancers. CAR-mediated anti-tumor activity has been demonstrated using NK cell lines, as well as NK cells isolated from peripheral blood, and NK cells produced from human pluripotent stem cells. This review will outline the CAR constructs that have been reported in NK cells with a focus on comparing the use of different signaling domains in combination with other co-activating domains. PMID:25972867

  12. Direct inhibitors of InhA active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Manjunatha, Ujjini H.; Rao, Srinivasa P. S.; Kondreddi, Ravinder Reddy; Noble, Christian G.; Camacho, Luis R.; Tan, Bee H.; Ng, Seow H.; Ng, Pearly Shuyi; Ma, N. L.; Lakshminarayana, Suresh B.; Herve, Maxime; Barnes, S. Whitney; Yu, Weixuan; Kuhen, Kelli; Blasco, Francesca; Beer, David; Walker, John R.; Tonge, Peter J.; Glynne, Richard; Smith, Paul W.; Diagana, Thierry T.

    2015-01-01

    New chemotherapeutic agents are urgently required to combat the global spread of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The mycobacterial enoyl reductase, InhA, is one of the few clinically-validated targets in tuberculosis drug discovery. Here, we report the identification of a new class of direct InhA inhibitors, the 4-hydroxy-2-pyridones, using phenotypic high-throughput whole-cell screening. This class of orally-active compounds showed potent bactericidal activity against common isoniazid-resistant TB clinical isolates. Biophysical studies revealed that 4-hydroxy-2-pyridones bound specifically to InhA in an NADH-dependent manner and blocked the enoyl-substrate binding pocket. The lead compound NITD-916 directly blocked InhA in a dose-dependent manner and showed in vivo efficacy in acute and established mouse models of infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Collectively, our structural and biochemical data open up new avenues for rational structure-guided optimization of the 4-hydroxy-2-pyridone class of compounds for the treatment of MDR-TB. PMID:25568071

  13. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Newman,L.

    2007-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2007 budget was $515 million. There are about 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2007. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. In the solicitation for new proposals for Fiscal Year 2007 we especially requested innovative new projects in support of RHIC and the Light Source and any of

  14. Myosin binding surface on actin probed by hydroxyl radical footprinting and site-directed labels.

    PubMed

    Oztug Durer, Zeynep A; Kamal, J K Amisha; Benchaar, Sabrina; Chance, Mark R; Reisler, Emil

    2011-11-25

    Actin and myosin are the two main proteins required for cell motility and muscle contraction. The structure of their strongly bound complex-rigor state-is a key for delineating the functional mechanism of actomyosin motor. Current knowledge of that complex is based on models obtained from the docking of known atomic structures of actin and myosin subfragment 1 (S1; the head and neck region of myosin) into low-resolution electron microscopy electron density maps, which precludes atomic- or side-chain-level information. Here, we use radiolytic protein footprinting for global mapping of sites across the actin molecules that are impacted directly or allosterically by myosin binding to actin filaments. Fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and cysteine actin mutants are used for independent, residue-specific probing of S1 effects on two structural elements of actin. We identify actin residue candidates involved in S1 binding and provide experimental evidence to discriminate between the regions of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Focusing on the role of the DNase I binding loop (D-loop) and the W-loop residues of actin in their interactions with S1, we found that the emission properties of acrylodan and the mobility of electron paramagnetic resonance spin labels attached to cysteine mutants of these residues change strongly and in a residue-specific manner upon S1 binding, consistent with the recently proposed direct contacts of these loops with S1. As documented in this study, the direct and indirect changes on actin induced by myosin are more extensive than known until now and attest to the importance of actin dynamics to actomyosin function. PMID:21986200

  15. Metals in the active site of native protein phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Heroes, Ewald; Rip, Jens; Beullens, Monique; Van Meervelt, Luc; De Gendt, Stefan; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a major protein Ser/Thr phosphatase in eukaryotic cells. Its activity depends on two metal ions in the catalytic site, which were identified as manganese in the bacterially expressed phosphatase. However, the identity of the metal ions in native PP1 is unknown. In this study, total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to detect iron and zinc in PP1 that was purified from rabbit skeletal muscle. Metal exchange experiments confirmed that the distinct substrate specificity of recombinant and native PP1 is determined by the nature of their associated metals. We also found that the iron level associated with native PP1 is decreased by incubation with inhibitor-2, consistent with a function of inhibitor-2 as a PP1 chaperone. PMID:25890482

  16. Regeneration of active enzyme by formation of hybrids from inactive derivatives: implications for active sites shared between polypeptide chains of aspartate transcarbamoylase.

    PubMed Central

    Robey, E A; Schachman, H K

    1985-01-01

    Crystallographic studies of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (aspartate carbamoyltransferase, EC 2.1.3.2) in conjunction with chemical modification experiments have led to the suggestion that the active sites of the enzyme are at the interfaces between adjacent polypeptide chains of the catalytic trimers and involve joint participation of amino acid residues from the adjoining chains. However, the precise locations of the active sites and of the residues involved in catalysis are not known. To test the hypothesis that the active sites are shared between chains, we constructed hybrid trimers in which two chains were modified at one presumed active site residue and the third chain was altered at a different active site residue. One parental trimer was a reduced pyridoxal phosphate derivative in which lysine-84 was modified and the other was a mutant protein in which tyrosine-165 was converted to serine by site-directed mutagenesis. Incubating mixtures of these two virtually inactive derivatives under conditions promoting interchain exchange led to a large increase in enzyme activity corresponding approximately to the formation of one active site per trimer. The purified hybrid trimers, containing either two pyridoxylated and one mutant chain or vice versa, had 23% and 28%, respectively, the activity of native wild-type catalytic trimers, compared to 5% and 3% for the parental trimers. The most likely explanation for this large increase in activity is the formation of one "native" active site in each of the hybrid trimers. The results constitute strong evidence for shared active sites in aspartate transcarbamoylase. Images PMID:3881763

  17. Using a simple apparatus to measure direct and diffuse photosynthetically active radiation at remote locations.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Michael J; Kucharik, Christopher J; Norman, John M

    2015-01-01

    Plant canopy interception of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) drives carbon dioxide (CO2), water and energy cycling in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Quantifying intercepted PAR requires accurate measurements of total incident PAR above canopies and direct beam and diffuse PAR components. While some regional data sets include these data, e.g. from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites, they are not often applicable to local research sites because of the variable nature (spatial and temporal) of environmental variables that influence incoming PAR. Currently available instrumentation that measures diffuse and direct beam radiation separately can be cost prohibitive and require frequent adjustments. Alternatively, generalized empirical relationships that relate atmospheric variables and radiation components can be used but require assumptions that increase the potential for error. Our goal here was to construct and test a cheaper, highly portable instrument alternative that could be used at remote field sites to measure total, diffuse and direct beam PAR for extended time periods without supervision. The apparatus tested here uses a fabricated, solar powered rotating shadowband and other commercially available parts to collect continuous hourly PAR data. Measurements of total incident PAR had nearly a one-to-one relationship with total incident radiation measurements taken at the same research site by an unobstructed point quantum sensor. Additionally, measurements of diffuse PAR compared favorably with modeled estimates from previously published data, but displayed significant differences that were attributed to the important influence of rapidly changing local environmental conditions. The cost of the system is about 50% less than comparable commercially available systems that require periodic, but not continual adjustments. Overall, the data produced using this apparatus indicates that this instrumentation has the potential to support

  18. Using a Simple Apparatus to Measure Direct and Diffuse Photosynthetically Active Radiation at Remote Locations

    PubMed Central

    Cruse, Michael J.; Kucharik, Christopher J.; Norman, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Plant canopy interception of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) drives carbon dioxide (CO2), water and energy cycling in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Quantifying intercepted PAR requires accurate measurements of total incident PAR above canopies and direct beam and diffuse PAR components. While some regional data sets include these data, e.g. from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites, they are not often applicable to local research sites because of the variable nature (spatial and temporal) of environmental variables that influence incoming PAR. Currently available instrumentation that measures diffuse and direct beam radiation separately can be cost prohibitive and require frequent adjustments. Alternatively, generalized empirical relationships that relate atmospheric variables and radiation components can be used but require assumptions that increase the potential for error. Our goal here was to construct and test a cheaper, highly portable instrument alternative that could be used at remote field sites to measure total, diffuse and direct beam PAR for extended time periods without supervision. The apparatus tested here uses a fabricated, solar powered rotating shadowband and other commercially available parts to collect continuous hourly PAR data. Measurements of total incident PAR had nearly a one-to-one relationship with total incident radiation measurements taken at the same research site by an unobstructed point quantum sensor. Additionally, measurements of diffuse PAR compared favorably with modeled estimates from previously published data, but displayed significant differences that were attributed to the important influence of rapidly changing local environmental conditions. The cost of the system is about 50% less than comparable commercially available systems that require periodic, but not continual adjustments. Overall, the data produced using this apparatus indicates that this instrumentation has the potential to support

  19. Metavanadate at the active site of the phosphatase VHZ.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav I; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Hengge, Alvan C

    2012-09-01

    Vanadate is a potent modulator of a number of biological processes and has been shown by crystal structures and NMR spectroscopy to interact with numerous enzymes. Although these effects often occur under conditions where oligomeric forms dominate, the crystal structures and NMR data suggest that the inhibitory form is usually monomeric orthovanadate, a particularly good inhibitor of phosphatases because of its ability to form stable trigonal-bipyramidal complexes. We performed a computational analysis of a 1.14 Å structure of the phosphatase VHZ in complex with an unusual metavanadate species and compared it with two classical trigonal-bipyramidal vanadate-phosphatase complexes. The results support extensive delocalized bonding to the apical ligands in the classical structures. In contrast, in the VHZ metavanadate complex, the central, planar VO(3)(-) moiety has only one apical ligand, the nucleophilic Cys95, and a gap in electron density between V and S. A computational analysis showed that the V-S interaction is primarily ionic. A mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of metavanadate in the active site from a dimeric vanadate species that previous crystallographic evidence has shown to be able to bind to the active sites of phosphatases related to VHZ. Together, the results show that the interaction of vanadate with biological systems is not solely reliant upon the prior formation of a particular inhibitory form in solution. The catalytic properties of an enzyme may act upon the oligomeric forms primarily present in solution to generate species such as the metavanadate ion observed in the VHZ structure. PMID:22876963

  20. Zymogen Activation and Subcellular Activity of Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme 1/Site 1 Protease*

    PubMed Central

    da Palma, Joel Ramos; Burri, Dominique Julien; Oppliger, Joël; Salamina, Marco; Cendron, Laura; de Laureto, Patrizia Polverino; Seidah, Nabil Georges; Kunz, Stefan; Pasquato, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin isozyme 1 (SKI-1)/site 1 protease (S1P) plays crucial roles in cellular homeostatic functions and is hijacked by pathogenic viruses for the processing of their envelope glycoproteins. Zymogen activation of SKI-1/S1P involves sequential autocatalytic processing of its N-terminal prodomain at sites B′/B followed by the herein newly identified C′/C sites. We found that SKI-1/S1P autoprocessing results in intermediates whose catalytic domain remains associated with prodomain fragments of different lengths. In contrast to other zymogen proprotein convertases, all incompletely matured intermediates of SKI-1/S1P showed full catalytic activity toward cellular substrates, whereas optimal cleavage of viral glycoproteins depended on B′/B processing. Incompletely matured forms of SKI-1/S1P further process cellular and viral substrates in distinct subcellular compartments. Using a cell-based sensor for SKI-1/S1P activity, we found that 9 amino acid residues at the cleavage site (P1–P8) and P1′ are necessary and sufficient to define the subcellular location of processing and to determine to what extent processing of a substrate depends on SKI-1/S1P maturation. In sum, our study reveals novel and unexpected features of SKI-1/S1P zymogen activation and subcellular specificity of activity toward cellular and pathogen-derived substrates. PMID:25378398

  1. Identification of essential histidine residues in the active site of Escherichia coli xylose (glucose) isomerase.

    PubMed

    Batt, C A; Jamieson, A C; Vandeyar, M A

    1990-01-01

    Two conserved histidine residues (His-101 and His-271) appear to be essential components in the active site of the enzyme xylose (glucose) isomerase (EC 5.3.1.5). These amino acid residues were targeted for mutagenesis on the basis of sequence homology among xylose isomerases isolated from Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Ampullariella sp. strain 3876, and Streptomyces violaceus-niger. Each residue was selectively replaced by site-directed mutagenesis and shown to be essential for activity. No measurable activity was observed for any mutations replacing either His-101 or His-271. Circular dichroism measurements revealed no significant change in the overall conformation of the mutant enzymes, and all formed dimers similar to the wild-type enzyme. Mutations at His-271 could be distinguished from those at His-101, since the former resulted in a thermolabile protein whereas no significant change in heat stability was observed for the latter. Based upon these results and structural data recently reported, we speculate that His-101 is the catalytic base mediating the reaction. Replacement of His-271 may render the enzyme thermolabile, since this residue appears to be a ligand for one of the metal ions in the active site of the enzyme. PMID:2405386

  2. Activation of human 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptors via an allosteric transmembrane site.

    PubMed

    Lansdell, Stuart J; Sathyaprakash, Chaitra; Doward, Anne; Millar, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    In common with other members of the Cys-loop family of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptors (5-HT3Rs) are activated by the binding of a neurotransmitter to an extracellular orthosteric site, located at the interface of two adjacent receptor subunits. In addition, a variety of compounds have been identified that modulate agonist-evoked responses of 5-HT3Rs, and other Cys-loop receptors, by binding to distinct allosteric sites. In this study, we examined the pharmacological effects of a group of monoterpene compounds on recombinant 5-HT3Rs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Two phenolic monoterpenes (carvacrol and thymol) display allosteric agonist activity on human homomeric 5-HT3ARs (64 ± 7% and 80 ± 4% of the maximum response evoked by the endogenous orthosteric agonist 5-HT, respectively). In addition, at lower concentrations, where agonist effects are less apparent, carvacrol and thymol act as potentiators of responses evoked by submaximal concentrations of 5-HT. By contrast, carvacrol and thymol have no agonist or potentiating activity on the closely related mouse 5-HT3ARs. Using subunit chimeras containing regions of the human and mouse 5-HT3A subunits, and by use of site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified transmembrane amino acids that either abolish the agonist activity of carvacrol and thymol on human 5-HT3ARs or are able to confer this property on mouse 5-HT3ARs. By contrast, these mutations have no significant effect on orthosteric activation of 5-HT3ARs by 5-HT. We conclude that 5-HT3ARs can be activated by the binding of ligands to an allosteric transmembrane site, a conclusion that is supported by computer docking studies. PMID:25338672

  3. Heterogeneous Effects of Direct Hypoxia Pathway Activation in Kidney Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Rafik; Masson, Norma; Simpson, Peter; Sciesielski, Lina Katrin; Sun, Min; Tian, Ya-Min; Ratcliffe, Peter John; Mole, David Robert

    2015-01-01

    General activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathways is classically associated with adverse prognosis in cancer and has been proposed to contribute to oncogenic drive. In clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC) HIF pathways are upregulated by inactivation of the von-Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor. However HIF-1α and HIF-2α have contrasting effects on experimental tumor progression. To better understand this paradox we examined pan-genomic patterns of HIF DNA binding and associated gene expression in response to manipulation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α and related the findings to CCRC prognosis. Our findings reveal distinct pan-genomic organization of canonical and non-canonical HIF isoform-specific DNA binding at thousands of sites. Overall associations were observed between HIF-1α-specific binding, and genes associated with favorable prognosis and between HIF-2α-specific binding and adverse prognosis. However within each isoform-specific set, individual gene associations were heterogeneous in sign and magnitude, suggesting that activation of each HIF-α isoform contributes a highly complex mix of pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects. PMID:26262842

  4. Direct activation and anti-repression functions of GAL4-VP16 use distinct molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, J G; Chambon, P

    1995-01-01

    In order to determine whether the molecular mechanisms used for direct activation by GAL4-VP16 are the same as those used for anti-repression, we have employed monoclonal antibodies specific for the VP16 activation domain. In the absence of added repressors, GAL4-VP16 was able to stimulate transcription from a template containing GAL4-binding sites, and the antibodies raised against the VP16 activation domain failed to inhibit this direct activation. GAL4-VP16 also was able to prevent histone H1-mediated repression by a mechanism that was strongly dependent on the presence of specific GAL4-binding elements in the promoter. However, in contrast to the assays conducted in the absence of repressors, the antibodies were strong inhibitors of GAL4-VP16-activated transcription in the presence of histone H1. Thus the binding of the antibodies distinguished between the direct activation and anti-repression functions of GAL4-VP16, indicating that these functions operate through distinct molecular mechanisms. The anti-repression-specific mechanism that is inhibitable by the antibodies acted at an early stage of preinitiation complex formation. Deletions of individual subdomains of the VP16 activation domain demonstrated that there was not a discrete subdomain responsible for the anti-repression function of GAL4-VP16. Thus, the inhibitory effect of the antibodies appeared to be due to the location of the epitope within the activator protein rather than to some inherent biochemical property of that region of the protein that is required specifically for anti-repression. The inhibitory effect of the antibodies also ruled out the possibility that steric exclusion of repressor proteins from the promoter was the sole means of anti-repression by the transcriptional activator. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8554536

  5. Site-directed mutagenesis of the heterotrimeric killer toxin zymocin identifies residues required for early steps in toxin action.

    PubMed

    Wemhoff, Sabrina; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2014-10-01

    Zymocin is a Kluyveromyces lactis protein toxin composed of αβγ subunits encoded by the cytoplasmic virus-like element k1 and functions by αβ-assisted delivery of the anticodon nuclease (ACNase) γ into target cells. The toxin binds to cells' chitin and exhibits chitinase activity in vitro that might be important during γ import. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains carrying k1-derived hybrid elements deficient in either αβ (k1ORF2) or γ (k1ORF4) were generated. Loss of either gene abrogates toxicity, and unexpectedly, Orf2 secretion depends on Orf4 cosecretion. Functional zymocin assembly can be restored by nuclear expression of k1ORF2 or k1ORF4, providing an opportunity to conduct site-directed mutagenesis of holozymocin. Complementation required active site residues of α's chitinase domain and the sole cysteine residue of β (Cys250). Since βγ are reportedly disulfide linked, the requirement for the conserved γ C231 was probed. Toxicity of intracellularly expressed γ C231A indicated no major defect in ACNase activity, while complementation of k1ΔORF4 by γ C231A was lost, consistent with a role of β C250 and γ C231 in zymocin assembly. To test the capability of αβ to carry alternative cargos, the heterologous ACNase from Pichia acaciae (P. acaciae Orf2 [PaOrf2]) was expressed, along with its immunity gene, in k1ΔORF4. While efficient secretion of PaOrf2 was detected, suppression of the k1ΔORF4-derived k1Orf2 secretion defect was not observed. Thus, the dependency of k1Orf2 on k1Orf4 cosecretion needs to be overcome prior to studying αβ's capability to deliver other cargo proteins into target cells. PMID:25128337

  6. Characterization and site-directed mutagenesis of an α-galactosidase from the deep-sea bacterium Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haibo; Qin, Yongjun; Huang, Zongqing; Liu, Ziduo

    2014-03-01

    A novel gene (BmelA) (1323bp) encoding an α-galactosidase of 440 amino acids was cloned from the deep-sea bacterium Bacillus megaterium and the protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) with an estimated molecular mass of about 45 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The enzyme belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 4, with the highest identity (74%) to α-galactosidase Mel4A from Bacillus halodurans among the characterized α-galactosidases. The recombinant BmelA displayed its maximum activity at 35 °C and pH 8.5-9.0 in 50 mM Tris-HCl buffer, and could hydrolyze different substrates with the Km values against p-nitrophenyl-α-D-galactopyranoside (pNP-α-Gal), raffinose and stachyose being 1.02±0.02, 2.24±0.11 and 3.42±0.17 mM, respectively. Besides, 4 mutants (I38 V, I38A, I38F and Q84A) were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis based on molecular modeling and sequence alignment. The kinetic analysis indicated that mutants I38 V and I38A exhibited a 1.7- and 1.4-fold increase over the wild type enzyme in catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) against pNP-α-Gal, respectively, while mutant I38F showed a 3.5-fold decrease against pNP-α-Gal and mutant Q84A almost completely lost its activity. All the results suggest that I38 and Q84 sites play a vital role in enzyme activity probably due to their steric and polar effects on the predicted "tunnel" structure and NAD+ binding to the enzyme.

  7. Distinct ETA Receptor Binding Mode of Macitentan As Determined by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gatfield, John; Mueller Grandjean, Celia; Bur, Daniel; Bolli, Martin H.; Nayler, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The competitive endothelin receptor antagonists (ERA) bosentan and ambrisentan, which have long been approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, are characterized by very short (1 min) occupancy half-lives at the ETA receptor. The novel ERA macitentan, displays a 20-fold increased receptor occupancy half-life, causing insurmountable antagonism of ET-1-induced signaling in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. We show here that the slow ETA receptor dissociation rate of macitentan was shared with a set of structural analogs, whereas compounds structurally related to bosentan displayed fast dissociation kinetics. NMR analysis showed that macitentan adopts a compact structure in aqueous solution and molecular modeling suggests that this conformation tightly fits into a well-defined ETA receptor binding pocket. In contrast the structurally different and negatively charged bosentan-type molecules only partially filled this pocket and expanded into an extended endothelin binding site. To further investigate these different ETA receptor-antagonist interaction modes, we performed functional studies using ETA receptor variants harboring amino acid point mutations in the presumed ERA interaction site. Three ETA receptor residues significantly and differentially affected ERA activity: Mutation R326Q did not affect the antagonist activity of macitentan, however the potencies of bosentan and ambrisentan were significantly reduced; mutation L322A rendered macitentan less potent, whereas bosentan and ambrisentan were unaffected; mutation I355A significantly reduced bosentan potency, but not ambrisentan and macitentan potencies. This suggests that – in contrast to bosentan and ambrisentan - macitentan-ETA receptor binding is not dependent on strong charge-charge interactions, but depends predominantly on hydrophobic interactions. This different binding mode could be the reason for macitentan's sustained target occupancy and insurmountable antagonism. PMID

  8. Distinct ETA receptor binding mode of macitentan as determined by site directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Gatfield, John; Mueller Grandjean, Celia; Bur, Daniel; Bolli, Martin H; Nayler, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The competitive endothelin receptor antagonists (ERA) bosentan and ambrisentan, which have long been approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, are characterized by very short (1 min) occupancy half-lives at the ET(A) receptor. The novel ERA macitentan, displays a 20-fold increased receptor occupancy half-life, causing insurmountable antagonism of ET-1-induced signaling in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. We show here that the slow ET(A) receptor dissociation rate of macitentan was shared with a set of structural analogs, whereas compounds structurally related to bosentan displayed fast dissociation kinetics. NMR analysis showed that macitentan adopts a compact structure in aqueous solution and molecular modeling suggests that this conformation tightly fits into a well-defined ET(A) receptor binding pocket. In contrast the structurally different and negatively charged bosentan-type molecules only partially filled this pocket and expanded into an extended endothelin binding site. To further investigate these different ET(A) receptor-antagonist interaction modes, we performed functional studies using ET(A) receptor variants harboring amino acid point mutations in the presumed ERA interaction site. Three ET(A) receptor residues significantly and differentially affected ERA activity: Mutation R326Q did not affect the antagonist activity of macitentan, however the potencies of bosentan and ambrisentan were significantly reduced; mutation L322A rendered macitentan less potent, whereas bosentan and ambrisentan were unaffected; mutation I355A significantly reduced bosentan potency, but not ambrisentan and macitentan potencies. This suggests that--in contrast to bosentan and ambrisentan--macitentan-ET(A) receptor binding is not dependent on strong charge-charge interactions, but depends predominantly on hydrophobic interactions. This different binding mode could be the reason for macitentan's sustained target occupancy and insurmountable

  9. Site-directed mutagenesis of the GTP-binding domain of beta-tubulin.

    PubMed

    Farr, G W; Sternlicht, H

    1992-09-01

    Tubulin binds guanine nucleotides with high affinity and specificity. GTP, an allosteric effector of microtubule assembly, requires Mg2+ for its interaction with beta-tubulin and binds as the MgGTP complex. In contrast, GDP binding does not require Mg2+. The structural basis for this difference is not understood but may be of fundamental importance for microtubule assembly. We investigated the interaction of beta-tubulin with guanine nucleotides using site-directed mutagenesis. Acidic amino acid residues have been shown to interact with nucleotide in numerous nucleotide-binding proteins. In this study, we mutated seven highly conserved aspartic acid residues and one highly conserved glutamic acid residue in the putative GTP-binding domain of beta-tubulin (N-terminal 300 amino acids) to asparagine and glutamine, respectively. The mutants were synthesized in vitro using rabbit reticulocyte lysates, and their affinities for nucleotide determined by an h.p.l.c.-based assay. Our results indicate that the mutations can be placed in six separate categories on the basis of their effects on nucleotide binding. These categories range from having no effect on nucleotide binding to a mutation that apparently abolishes nucleotide binding. One mutation at Asp224 reduced the affinity of beta-tubulin for GTP in the presence but not in the absence of Mg2+. The specific effect of this mutation on nucleotide binding is consistent with an interaction of this amino acid with the Mg2+ moiety of MgGTP. This residue is in a region sharing sequence homology with the putative Mg2+ site in myosin and other ATP-binding proteins. As a result, tubulin belongs to a distinct class of GTP-binding proteins which may be evolutionarily related to the ATP-binding proteins.

  10. Site-specific PEGylation of lidamycin and its antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Shang, Boyang; Hu, Lei; Shao, Rongguang; Zhen, Yongsu

    2015-05-01

    In this study, N-terminal site-specific mono-PEGylation of the recombinant lidamycin apoprotein (rLDP) of lidamycin (LDM) was prepared using a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) derivative (M w 20 kDa) through a reactive terminal aldehyde group under weak acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The biochemical properties of mPEG-rLDP-AE, an enediyne-integrated conjugate, were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of mPEG-rLDP-AE was evaluated by MTT assays and in xenograft model. The results indicated that mPEG-rLDP-AE showed significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. After PEGylation, mPEG-rLDP still retained the binding capability to the enediyne AE and presented the physicochemical characteristics similar to that of native LDP. It is of interest that the PEGylation did not diminish the antitumor efficacy of LDM, implying the possibility that this derivative may function as a payload to deliver novel tumor-targeted drugs. PMID:26579455

  11. Altered binding of thioflavin t to the peripheral anionic site of acetylcholinesterase after phosphorylation of the active site by chlorpyrifos oxon or dichlorvos

    SciTech Connect

    Sultatos, L.G. Kaushik, R.

    2008-08-01

    The peripheral anionic site of acetylcholinesterase, when occupied by a ligand, is known to modulate reaction rates at the active site of this important enzyme. The current report utilized the peripheral anionic site specific fluorogenic probe thioflavin t to determine if the organophosphates chlorpyrifos oxon and dichlorvos bind to the peripheral anionic site of human recombinant acetylcholinesterase, since certain organophosphates display concentration-dependent kinetics when inhibiting this enzyme. Incubation of 3 nM acetylcholinesterase active sites with 50 nM or 2000 nM inhibitor altered both the B{sub max} and K{sub d} for thioflavin t binding to the peripheral anionic site. However, these changes resulted from phosphorylation of Ser203 since increasing either inhibitor from 50 nM to 2000 nM did not alter further thioflavin t binding kinetics. Moreover, the organophosphate-induced decrease in B{sub max} did not represent an actual reduction in binding sites, but instead likely resulted from conformational interactions between the acylation and peripheral anionic sites that led to a decrease in the rigidity of bound thioflavin t. A drop in fluorescence quantum yield, leading to an apparent decrease in B{sub max}, would accompany the decreased rigidity of bound thioflavin t molecules. The organophosphate-induced alterations in K{sub d} represented changes in binding affinity of thioflavin t, with diethylphosphorylation of Ser203 increasing K{sub d}, and dimethylphosphorylation of Ser203 decreasing K{sub d}. These results indicate that chlorpyrifos oxon and dichlorvos do not bind directly to the peripheral anionic site of acetylcholinesterase, but can affect binding to that site through phosphorylation of Ser203.

  12. Direct normal irradiance forecasting at dust sites based on aerosol data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Charlotte; Friese, Elmar; Berndt, Jonas; Elbern, Hendrik

    2016-04-01

    The optimal operation of concentrating solar thermal power plants (CSP) or concentrating photovoltaic plants (CPV) requires precise forecasts of direct normal irradiance (DNI). Aerosols have a strong impact on DNI. High aerosol loads may cause a reduction of DNI of up to 20-30% under clear-sky conditions. Thus, an accurate representation of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) is crucial for reliable DNI forecasts. Concentrating solar power plants are often located in desert/arid regions where dust events are likely to occur. For those locations with strong aerosol or especially dust sources in the vicinity, using only large scale, low resolution aerosol information from satellites might not be sufficient. Ground-based measurements of particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) provide additional, more precise, local information. On the other hand, sparsely populated desert areas are only poorly equipped with in-situ measurement devices. Thus, data assimilation seeks to make optimal use of all available observations. Within the EU FP7 project DNICast, assimilation based simulations are performed using the EURopean pollution Dispersion-Inverse Model (EURAD-IM) including a 3D/4D- Var data assimilation scheme and sophisticated aerosol dynamics and aerosol chemistry schemes. The setup includes all aerosol related observation streams along with routine data assimilation plus available on-site data and will provide assimilation based short term forecasts of AOD at selected test sites. The system is embedded in the European Earth observation system MACC (now: CAMS) and benefits from near-real time in situ and space borne measurements. The system is coupled to the WRF model to provide radiation forecasts based on aerosol information from the EURAD-IM data assimilation scheme. We will present simulation results for CSP sites on the Iberian Peninsula evaluating the gain of information obtained by data assimilation to capture small-scale dust events and large scale Saharan dust events

  13. Palladium-catalyzed regioselective intramolecular coupling of o-carborane with aromatics via direct cage B-H activation.

    PubMed

    Quan, Yangjian; Xie, Zuowei

    2015-03-18

    Palladium-catalyzed intramolecular coupling of o-carborane with aromatics via direct cage B-H bond activation has been achieved, leading to the synthesis of a series of o-carborane-functionalized aromatics in high yields with excellent regioselectivity. In addition, the site selectivity can also be tuned by the substituents on cage carbon atom.

  14. Hybrid [FeFe]-hydrogenases with modified active sites show remarkable residual enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Siebel, Judith F; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Weber, Katharina; Rumpel, Sigrun; Reijerse, Edward; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-02-24

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are to date the only enzymes for which it has been demonstrated that the native inorganic binuclear cofactor of the active site Fe2(adt)(CO)3(CN)2 (adt = azadithiolate = [S-CH2-NH-CH2-S](2-)) can be synthesized on the laboratory bench and subsequently inserted into the unmaturated enzyme to yield fully functional holo-enzyme (Berggren, G. et al. (2013) Nature 499, 66-70; Esselborn, J. et al. (2013) Nat. Chem. Biol. 9, 607-610). In the current study, we exploit this procedure to introduce non-native cofactors into the enzyme. Mimics of the binuclear subcluster with a modified bridging dithiolate ligand (thiodithiolate, N-methylazadithiolate, dimethyl-azadithiolate) and three variants containing only one CN(-) ligand were inserted into the active site of the enzyme. We investigated the activity of these variants for hydrogen oxidation as well as proton reduction and their structural accommodation within the active site was analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Interestingly, the monocyanide variant with the azadithiolate bridge showed ∼50% of the native enzyme activity. This would suggest that the CN(-) ligands are not essential for catalytic activity, but rather serve to anchor the binuclear subsite inside the protein pocket through hydrogen bonding. The inserted artificial cofactors with a propanedithiolate and an N-methylazadithiolate bridge as well as their monocyanide variants also showed residual activity. However, these activities were less than 1% of the native enzyme. Our findings indicate that even small changes in the dithiolate bridge of the binuclear subsite lead to a rather strong decrease of the catalytic activity. We conclude that both the Brønsted base function and the conformational flexibility of the native azadithiolate amine moiety are essential for the high catalytic activity of the native enzyme. PMID:25633077

  15. Alignment of Synaptic Vesicle Macromolecules with the Macromolecules in Active Zone Material that Direct Vesicle Docking

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Jung, Jae Hoon; Marshall, Robert M.; McMahan, Uel J.

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of a neuron’s axon terminals as a precondition for fusing with the membrane and releasing their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Typically, docked vesicles are next to aggregates of plasma membrane-bound macromolecules called active zone material (AZM). Electron tomography on tissue sections from fixed and stained axon terminals of active and resting frog neuromuscular junctions has led to the conclusion that undocked vesicles are directed to and held at the docking sites by the successive formation of stable connections between vesicle membrane proteins and proteins in different classes of AZM macromolecules. Using the same nanometer scale 3D imaging technology on appropriately stained frog neuromuscular junctions, we found that ∼10% of a vesicle’s luminal volume is occupied by a radial assembly of elongate macromolecules attached by narrow projections, nubs, to the vesicle membrane at ∼25 sites. The assembly’s chiral, bilateral shape is nearly the same vesicle to vesicle, and nubs, at their sites of connection to the vesicle membrane, are linked to macromolecules that span the membrane. For docked vesicles, the orientation of the assembly’s shape relative to the AZM and the presynaptic membrane is the same vesicle to vesicle, whereas for undocked vesicles it is not. The connection sites of most nubs on the membrane of docked vesicles are paired with the connection sites of the different classes of AZM macromolecules that regulate docking, and the membrane spanning macromolecules linked to these nubs are also attached to the AZM macromolecules. We conclude that the luminal assembly of macromolecules anchors in a particular arrangement vesicle membrane macromolecules, which contain the proteins that connect the vesicles to AZM macromolecules during docking. Undocked vesicles must move in a way that aligns this arrangement with the AZM macromolecules for

  16. Alignment of synaptic vesicle macromolecules with the macromolecules in active zone material that direct vesicle docking.

    PubMed

    Harlow, Mark L; Szule, Joseph A; Xu, Jing; Jung, Jae Hoon; Marshall, Robert M; McMahan, Uel J

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of a neuron's axon terminals as a precondition for fusing with the membrane and releasing their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Typically, docked vesicles are next to aggregates of plasma membrane-bound macromolecules called active zone material (AZM). Electron tomography on tissue sections from fixed and stained axon terminals of active and resting frog neuromuscular junctions has led to the conclusion that undocked vesicles are directed to and held at the docking sites by the successive formation of stable connections between vesicle membrane proteins and proteins in different classes of AZM macromolecules. Using the same nanometer scale 3D imaging technology on appropriately stained frog neuromuscular junctions, we found that ∼10% of a vesicle's luminal volume is occupied by a radial assembly of elongate macromolecules attached by narrow projections, nubs, to the vesicle membrane at ∼25 sites. The assembly's chiral, bilateral shape is nearly the same vesicle to vesicle, and nubs, at their sites of connection to the vesicle membrane, are linked to macromolecules that span the membrane. For docked vesicles, the orientation of the assembly's shape relative to the AZM and the presynaptic membrane is the same vesicle to vesicle, whereas for undocked vesicles it is not. The connection sites of most nubs on the membrane of docked vesicles are paired with the connection sites of the different classes of AZM macromolecules that regulate docking, and the membrane spanning macromolecules linked to these nubs are also attached to the AZM macromolecules. We conclude that the luminal assembly of macromolecules anchors in a particular arrangement vesicle membrane macromolecules, which contain the proteins that connect the vesicles to AZM macromolecules during docking. Undocked vesicles must move in a way that aligns this arrangement with the AZM macromolecules for docking

  17. Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlynn, Shawn E.; Chadwick, Grayson L.; Kempes, Christopher P.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2015-10-01

    Multicellular assemblages of microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and the proximity afforded by aggregation is thought to permit intercellular metabolic coupling that can accommodate otherwise unfavourable reactions. Consortia of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria are a well-known environmental example of microbial co-aggregation; however, the coupling mechanisms between these paired organisms is not well understood, despite the attention given them because of the global significance of anaerobic methane oxidation. Here we examined the influence of interspecies spatial positioning as it relates to biosynthetic activity within structurally diverse uncultured methane-oxidizing consortia by measuring stable isotope incorporation for individual archaeal and bacterial cells to constrain their potential metabolic interactions. In contrast to conventional models of syntrophy based on the passage of molecular intermediates, cellular activities were found to be independent of both species intermixing and distance between syntrophic partners within consortia. A generalized model of electric conductivity between co-associated archaea and bacteria best fit the empirical data. Combined with the detection of large multi-haem cytochromes in the genomes of methanotrophic archaea and the demonstration of redox-dependent staining of the matrix between cells in consortia, these results provide evidence for syntrophic coupling through direct electron transfer.

  18. Active Learning for Directed Exploration of Complex Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, Michael C.; Wang, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Physics-based simulation codes are widely used in science and engineering to model complex systems that would be infeasible to study otherwise. Such codes provide the highest-fidelity representation of system behavior, but are often so slow to run that insight into the system is limited. For example, conducting an exhaustive sweep over a d-dimensional input parameter space with k-steps along each dimension requires k(sup d) simulation trials (translating into k(sup d) CPU-days for one of our current simulations). An alternative is directed exploration in which the next simulation trials are cleverly chosen at each step. Given the results of previous trials, supervised learning techniques (SVM, KDE, GP) are applied to build up simplified predictive models of system behavior. These models are then used within an active learning framework to identify the most valuable trials to run next. Several active learning strategies are examined including a recently-proposed information-theoretic approach. Performance is evaluated on a set of thirteen synthetic oracles, which serve as surrogates for the more expensive simulations and enable the experiments to be replicated by other researchers.

  19. Discoveries from Revisiting Apollo Direct Active Measurements of Lunar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Brian

    2010-05-01

    New missions to the moon being developed by China, Japan, India, USA, Russia and Europe and possibilities of human missions about 2020 face the reality that 6 Apollo expeditions did not totally manage or mitigate effects of easily-mobilised and very "sticky" lunar dust on humans and hardware. Laboratory and theoretical modelling cannot reliably simulate the complex lunar environments that affect dynamical movements of lunar dust. The only direct active measurements of lunar dust during Apollo were made by matchbox-sized minimalist Dust Detector Experiments (DDEs) deployed to transmit some 30 million digital measurements from Apollo 11, 12, 14 and 15. These were misplaced or relatively ignored until 2009, when a self-funded suite of discoveries (O'Brien Geophys. Research Letters FIX 6 May 2099) revealed unexpected properties of lunar dust, such as the adhesive force being stronger as illumination increased. We give the first reports of contrasting effects, contamination or cleansing, from rocket exhausts of Apollo 11, 12, 14 and 15 Lunar Modules leaving the moon. We further strengthen the importance of collateral dust inadvertently splashed on Apollo hardware by human activities. Dust management designs and mission plans require optimum use of such in situ measurements, extended by laboratory simulations and theoretical modelling.

  20. Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Shawn E; Chadwick, Grayson L; Kempes, Christopher P; Orphan, Victoria J

    2015-10-22

    Multicellular assemblages of microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and the proximity afforded by aggregation is thought to permit intercellular metabolic coupling that can accommodate otherwise unfavourable reactions. Consortia of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria are a well-known environmental example of microbial co-aggregation; however, the coupling mechanisms between these paired organisms is not well understood, despite the attention given them because of the global significance of anaerobic methane oxidation. Here we examined the influence of interspecies spatial positioning as it relates to biosynthetic activity within structurally diverse uncultured methane-oxidizing consortia by measuring stable isotope incorporation for individual archaeal and bacterial cells to constrain their potential metabolic interactions. In contrast to conventional models of syntrophy based on the passage of molecular intermediates, cellular activities were found to be independent of both species intermixing and distance between syntrophic partners within consortia. A generalized model of electric conductivity between co-associated archaea and bacteria best fit the empirical data. Combined with the detection of large multi-haem cytochromes in the genomes of methanotrophic archaea and the demonstration of redox-dependent staining of the matrix between cells in consortia, these results provide evidence for syntrophic coupling through direct electron transfer. PMID:26375009

  1. Bi-Directional SIFT Predicts a Subset of Activating Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, William; Lazarus, Robert A.; Zhang, Zemin

    2009-01-01

    Advancements in sequencing technologies have empowered recent efforts to identify polymorphisms and mutations on a global scale. The large number of variations and mutations found in these projects requires high-throughput tools to identify those that are most likely to have an impact on function. Numerous computational tools exist for predicting which mutations are likely to be functional, but none that specifically attempt to identify mutations that result in hyperactivation or gain-of-function. Here we present a modified version of the SIFT (Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant) algorithm that utilizes protein sequence alignments with homologous sequences to identify functional mutations based on evolutionary fitness. We show that this bi-directional SIFT (B-SIFT) is capable of identifying experimentally verified activating mutants from multiple datasets. B-SIFT analysis of large-scale cancer genotyping data identified potential activating mutations, some of which we have provided detailed structural evidence to support. B-SIFT could prove to be a valuable tool for efforts in protein engineering as well as in identification of functional mutations in cancer. PMID:20011534

  2. Mitochondrial nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase: active site modification by 5'-(p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl)adenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, D.C.; Hatefi, Y.

    1985-07-02

    Membrane-bound and purified mitochondrial energy-linked nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (TH) was inhibited by incubation with 5'-(p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl)adenosine (FSBA), which is an analogue of TH substrates and their competitive inhibitors, namely, 5'-, 2'-, or 3'-AMP. NAD(H) and analogues, NADP, 5'-AMP, 5'-ADP, and 2'-AMP/3'-AMP mixed isomers protected TH against inhibition by FSBA, but NADPH accelerated the inhibition rate. In the absence of protective ligands or in the presence of NADP, FSBA appeared to modify the NAD(H) binding site of TH, because, unlike unmodified TH, the enzyme modified by FSBA under these conditions did not bind to an NAD-affinity column (NAD-agarose). However, when the NAD(H) binding site of TH was protected in the presence of 5'-AMP or NAD, then FSBA modification resulted in an inhibited enzyme that did bind to NAD-agarose, suggesting FSBA modification of the NADP(H) binding site or an essential residue outside the active site. (/sup 3/H)FSBA was covalently bound to TH, and complete inhibition corresponded to the binding of about 0.5 mol of (3H)FSBA/mol of TH. Since purified TH is known to be dimeric in the isolated state, this binding stoichiometry suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity. A similar binding stoichiometry was found earlier for complete inhibition of TH by (/sup 14/C)DCCD. The active site directed labeling of TH by radioactive FSBA should allow isolation of appropriate peptides for sequence analysis of the NAD(H) and possibly the NADP(H) binding domains.

  3. NMR crystallography of enzyme active sites: probing chemically detailed, three-dimensional structure in tryptophan synthase.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Leonard J; Dunn, Michael F

    2013-09-17

    NMR crystallography--the synergistic combination of X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry--offers unprecedented insight into three-dimensional, chemically detailed structure. Initially, researchers used NMR crystallography to refine diffraction data from organic and inorganic solids. Now we are applying this technique to explore active sites in biomolecules, where it reveals chemically rich detail concerning the interactions between enzyme site residues and the reacting substrate. Researchers cannot achieve this level of detail from X-ray, NMR,or computational methodologies in isolation. For example, typical X-ray crystal structures (1.5-2.5 Å resolution) of enzyme-bound intermediates identify possible hydrogen-bonding interactions between site residues and substrate but do not directly identify the protonation states. Solid-state NMR can provide chemical shifts for selected atoms of enzyme-substrate complexes, but without a larger structural framework in which to interpret them only empirical correlations with local chemical structure are possible. Ab initio calculations and molecular mechanics can build models for enzymatic processes, but they rely on researcher-specified chemical details. Together, however, X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry can provide consistent and testable models for structure and function of enzyme active sites: X-ray crystallography provides a coarse framework upon which scientists can develop models of the active site using computational chemistry; they can then distinguish these models by comparing calculated NMR chemical shifts with the results of solid-state NMR spectroscopy experiments. Conceptually, each technique is a puzzle piece offering a generous view of the big picture. Only when correctly pieced together, however, can they reveal the big picture at the highest possible resolution. In this Account, we detail our first steps in the development of

  4. Site Directed Spin Labeling and EPR Spectroscopic Studies of Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Basak, Sandip; Chatterjee, Soumili; Chakrapani, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Ion channel gating is a stimulus-driven orchestration of protein motions that leads to transitions between closed, open, and desensitized states. Fundamental to these transitions is the intrinsic flexibility of the protein, which is critically modulated by membrane lipid-composition. To better understand the structural basis of channel function, it is necessary to study protein dynamics in a physiological membrane environment. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is an important tool to characterize conformational transitions between functional states. In comparison to NMR and X-ray crystallography, the information obtained from EPR is intrinsically of lower resolution. However, unlike in other techniques, in EPR there is no upper-limit to the molecular weight of the protein, the sample requirements are significantly lower, and more importantly the protein is not constrained by the crystal lattice forces. Therefore, EPR is uniquely suited for studying large protein complexes and proteins in reconstituted systems. In this article, we will discuss general protocols for site-directed spin labeling and membrane reconstitution using a prokaryotic proton-gated pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel (pLGIC) from Gloeobacter violaceus (GLIC) as an example. A combination of steady-state Continuous Wave (CW) and Pulsed (Double Electron Electron Resonance-DEER) EPR approaches will be described that will enable a complete quantitative characterization of channel dynamics. PMID:27403967

  5. Metallic conduction induced by direct anion site doping in layered SnSe2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Il; Hwang, Sungwoo; Kim, Se Yun; Lee, Woo-Jin; Jung, Doh Won; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Park, Hee Jung; Cho, Young-Jin; Cho, Yong-Hee; Kim, Jung-Hwa; Yun, Dong-Jin; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Han, In-taek; Lee, Kimoon; Sohn, Yoonchul

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of metallic conduction in layered dichalcogenide semiconductor materials by chemical doping is one of key issues for two-dimensional (2D) materials engineering. At present, doping methods for layered dichalcogenide materials have been limited to an ion intercalation between layer units or electrostatic carrier doping by electrical bias owing to the absence of appropriate substitutional dopant for increasing the carrier concentration. Here, we report the occurrence of metallic conduction in the layered dichalcogenide of SnSe2 by the direct Se-site doping with Cl as a shallow electron donor. The total carrier concentration up to ~10(20) cm(-3) is achieved by Cl substitutional doping, resulting in the improved conductivity value of ~170 S · cm(-1) from ~1.7 S · cm(-1) for non-doped SnSe2. When the carrier concentration exceeds ~10(19) cm(-3), the conduction mechanism is changed from hopping to degenerate conduction, exhibiting metal-insulator transition behavior. Detailed band structure calculation reveals that the hybridized s-p orbital from Sn 5s and Se 4p states is responsible for the degenerate metallic conduction in electron-doped SnSe2. PMID:26792630

  6. Metallic conduction induced by direct anion site doping in layered SnSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Il; Hwang, Sungwoo; Kim, Se Yun; Lee, Woo-Jin; Jung, Doh Won; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Park, Hee Jung; Cho, Young-Jin; Cho, Yong-Hee; Kim, Jung-Hwa; Yun, Dong-Jin; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Han, In-Taek; Lee, Kimoon; Sohn, Yoonchul

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of metallic conduction in layered dichalcogenide semiconductor materials by chemical doping is one of key issues for two-dimensional (2D) materials engineering. At present, doping methods for layered dichalcogenide materials have been limited to an ion intercalation between layer units or electrostatic carrier doping by electrical bias owing to the absence of appropriate substitutional dopant for increasing the carrier concentration. Here, we report the occurrence of metallic conduction in the layered dichalcogenide of SnSe2 by the direct Se-site doping with Cl as a shallow electron donor. The total carrier concentration up to ~1020 cm‑3 is achieved by Cl substitutional doping, resulting in the improved conductivity value of ~170 S·cm‑1 from ~1.7 S·cm‑1 for non-doped SnSe2. When the carrier concentration exceeds ~1019 cm‑3, the conduction mechanism is changed from hopping to degenerate conduction, exhibiting metal-insulator transition behavior. Detailed band structure calculation reveals that the hybridized s-p orbital from Sn 5s and Se 4p states is responsible for the degenerate metallic conduction in electron-doped SnSe2.

  7. A fully enzymatic method for site-directed spin labeling of long RNA.

    PubMed

    Lebars, Isabelle; Vileno, Bertrand; Bourbigot, Sarah; Turek, Philippe; Wolff, Philippe; Kieffer, Bruno

    2014-09-01

    Site-directed spin labeling is emerging as an essential tool to investigate the structural and dynamical features of RNA. We propose here an enzymatic method, which allows the insertion of a paramagnetic center at a specific position in an RNA molecule. The technique is based on a segmental approach using a ligation protocol with T4 RNA ligase 2. One transcribed acceptor RNA is ligated to a donor RNA in which a thio-modified nucleotide is introduced at its 5'-end by in vitro transcription with T7 RNA polymerase. The paramagnetic thiol-specific reagent is subsequently attached to the RNA ligation product. This novel strategy is demonstrated by introducing a paramagnetic probe into the 55 nucleotides long RNA corresponding to K-turn and Specifier Loop domains from the Bacillus subtilis tyrS T-Box leader RNA. The efficiency of the coupling reaction and the quality of the resulting spin-labeled RNA were assessed by Mass Spectrometry, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). This method enables various combinations of isotopic segmental labeling and spin labeling schemes, a strategy that will be of particular interest to investigate the structural and dynamical properties of large RNA complexes by NMR and EPR spectroscopies.

  8. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, G H; Duez, C; Lepage, S; Forceille, C; Rhazi, N; Klein, D; Ghuysen, J M; Frère, J M

    1997-01-01

    The role of various residues in the conserved structural elements of the Actinomadura R39 penicillin-sensitive dd-peptidase has been studied by site-directed mutagenesis. Replacement of Ser-298 of the 'SDN loop' by Ala or Gly significantly decreased the kcat/Km value for the peptide substrate, but only by a factor of 15 and had little effect on the other catalytic properties. Mutations of Asn-300 of the same loop and of Lys-410 of the KTG triad yielded very unstable proteins. However, the N300S mutant could be purified as a fusion protein with thioredoxin that exhibited decreased rates of acylation by the peptide substrate and various cephalosporins. Similar fusion proteins obtained with the N300A, K410H and K410N mutants were unstable and their catalytic and penicillin-binding properties were very strongly affected. In transpeptidation reactions, the presence of the acceptor influenced the kcat/Km values, which suggested a catalytic pathway more complex than a simple partition of the acyl-enzyme between hydrolysis and aminolysis. These results are compared with those obtained with two other penicillin-sensitive enzymes, the Streptomyces R61 dd-peptidase and Escherichia coli penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 5. PMID:9359404

  9. REPLACR-mutagenesis, a one-step method for site-directed mutagenesis by recombineering.

    PubMed

    Trehan, Ashutosh; Kiełbus, Michał; Czapinski, Jakub; Stepulak, Andrzej; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Mutagenesis is an important tool to study gene regulation, model disease-causing mutations and for functional characterisation of proteins. Most of the current methods for mutagenesis involve multiple step procedures. One of the most accurate methods for genetically altering DNA is recombineering, which uses bacteria expressing viral recombination proteins. Recently, the use of in vitro seamless assembly systems using purified enzymes for multiple-fragment cloning as well as mutagenesis is gaining ground. Although these in vitro isothermal reactions are useful when cloning multiple fragments, for site-directed mutagenesis it is unnecessary. Moreover, the use of purified enzymes in vitro is not only expensive but also more inaccurate than the high-fidelity recombination inside bacteria. Here we present a single-step method, named REPLACR-mutagenesis (Recombineering of Ends of linearised PLAsmids after PCR), for creating mutations (deletions, substitutions and additions) in plasmids by in vivo recombineering. REPLACR-mutagenesis only involves transformation of PCR products in bacteria expressing Red/ET recombineering proteins. Modifications in a variety of plasmids up to bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs; 144 kb deletion) have been achieved by this method. The presented method is more robust, involves fewer steps and is cost-efficient. PMID:26750263

  10. High-Pressure EPR and Site-Directed Spin Labeling for Mapping Molecular Flexibility in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Michael T; Yang, Zhongyu; Altenbach, Christian; Hubbell, Wayne L

    2015-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure is a powerful probe of protein conformational flexibility. Pressurization reveals regions of elevated compressibility, and thus flexibility, within individual conformational states, but also shifts conformational equilibria such that "invisible" excited states become accessible for spectroscopic characterization. The central aim of this chapter is to describe recently developed instrumentation and methodologies that enable high-pressure site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL-EPR) experiments on proteins and to demonstrate the information content of these experiments by highlighting specific recent applications. A brief introduction to the thermodynamics of proteins under pressure is presented first, followed by a discussion of the principles underlying SDSL-EPR detection of pressure effects in proteins, and the suitability of SDSL-EPR for this purpose in terms of timescale and ability to characterize conformational heterogeneity. Instrumentation and practical considerations for variable-pressure continuous wave EPR and pressure-resolved double electron-electron resonance (PR DEER) experiments are reviewed, and finally illustrations of data analysis using recent applications are presented. Although high-pressure SDSL-EPR is in its infancy, the recent applications presented highlight the considerable potential of the method to (1) identify compressible (flexible) regions in a folded protein; (2) determine thermodynamic parameters that relate conformational states in equilibrium; (3) populate and characterize excited states of proteins undetected at atmospheric pressure; (4) reveal the structural heterogeneity of conformational ensembles and provide distance constraints on the global structure of pressure-populated states with PR DEER.

  11. Ground penetrating radar and direct current resistivity evaluation of the desiccation test cap, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, D.E.; Cumbest, R.J.

    1996-04-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has a variety of waste units that may be temporarily or permanently stabilized by closure using an impermeable cover to prevent groundwater infiltration. The placement of an engineered kaolin clay layer over a waste unit is an accepted and economical technique for providing an impermeable cover but the long term stability and integrity of the clay in non-arid conditions is unknown. A simulated kaolin cap has been constructed at the SRA adjacent to the Burial Ground Complex. The cap is designed to evaluate the effects of desiccation on clay integrity, therefore half of the cap is covered with native soil to prevent drying, while the remainder of the cap is exposed. Measurements of the continuing impermeability of a clay cap are difficult because intrusive techniques may locally compromise the structure. Point measurements made to evaluate clay integrity, such as those from grid sampling or coring and made through a soil cover, may miss cracks, joints or fissures, and may not allow for mapping of the lateral extent of elongate features. Because of these problems, a non-invasive technique is needed to map clay integrity, below a soil or vegetation cover, which is capable of moderate to rapid investigation speeds. Two non-intrusive geophysical techniques, direct current resistivity and ground penetrating radar (GPR), have been successful at the SRS in geologically mapping shallow subsurface clay layers. The applicability of each technique in detecting the clay layer in the desiccation test cap and associated anomalies was investigated.

  12. Metallic conduction induced by direct anion site doping in layered SnSe2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Il; Hwang, Sungwoo; Kim, Se Yun; Lee, Woo-Jin; Jung, Doh Won; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Park, Hee Jung; Cho, Young-Jin; Cho, Yong-Hee; Kim, Jung-Hwa; Yun, Dong-Jin; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Han, In-taek; Lee, Kimoon; Sohn, Yoonchul

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of metallic conduction in layered dichalcogenide semiconductor materials by chemical doping is one of key issues for two-dimensional (2D) materials engineering. At present, doping methods for layered dichalcogenide materials have been limited to an ion intercalation between layer units or electrostatic carrier doping by electrical bias owing to the absence of appropriate substitutional dopant for increasing the carrier concentration. Here, we report the occurrence of metallic conduction in the layered dichalcogenide of SnSe2 by the direct Se-site doping with Cl as a shallow electron donor. The total carrier concentration up to ~1020 cm−3 is achieved by Cl substitutional doping, resulting in the improved conductivity value of ~170 S·cm−1 from ~1.7 S·cm−1 for non-doped SnSe2. When the carrier concentration exceeds ~1019 cm−3, the conduction mechanism is changed from hopping to degenerate conduction, exhibiting metal-insulator transition behavior. Detailed band structure calculation reveals that the hybridized s-p orbital from Sn 5s and Se 4p states is responsible for the degenerate metallic conduction in electron-doped SnSe2. PMID:26792630

  13. Photoreduction of the active site of the metalloprotein putidaredoxin by synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Mary C; Latimer, Matthew J; Poulos, Thomas L; Sevrioukova, Irina F; Hodgson, Keith O; Hedman, Britt

    2007-09-01

    X-ray damage to protein crystals is often assessed on the basis of the degradation of diffraction intensity, yet this measure is not sensitive to the rapid changes that occur at photosensitive groups such as the active sites of metalloproteins. Here, X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to study the X-ray dose-dependent photoreduction of crystals of the [Fe(2)S(2)]-containing metalloprotein putidaredoxin. A dramatic decrease in the rate of photoreduction is observed in crystals cryocooled with liquid helium at 40 K compared with those cooled with liquid nitrogen at 110 K. Whereas structural changes consistent with cluster reduction occur in the active site of the crystal measured at 110 K, no such changes occur in the crystal measured at 40 K, even after an eightfold increase in dose. When the structural results from extended X-ray absorption fine-structure measurements are compared with those obtained by crystallography on this and similar proteins, it is apparent that X-ray-induced photoreduction has had an impact on the crystallographic data and subsequent structure solutions. These results strongly indicate the importance of using liquid-helium-based cooling for metalloprotein crystallography in order to avoid the subtle yet important changes that can take place at the metalloprotein active sites when liquid-nitrogen-based cooling is used. The study also illustrates the need for direct measurement of the redox states of the metals, through X-ray absorption spectroscopy, simultaneously with the crystallographic measurements.

  14. Computational characterization of ketone-ketal transformations at the active site of matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Khrenova, Maria G; Nemukhin, Alexander V; Savitsky, Alexander P

    2014-04-24

    We modeled the first steps of hydrolysis reactions of a natural oligopeptide substrate of matrix metalloproteinase MMP-2 as well as of a substrate analogue. In the latter, the scissile amide group is substituted by a ketomethylene group which can be transformed to the ketal group upon binding of this compound to the enzyme active site. According to our quantum mechanical-molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations, the reaction of the ketone-ketal transformation proceeds with a low energy barrier (3.4 kcal/mol) and a high equilibrium constant (10(4)). The reaction product with the ketal group formed directly at the active site of the enzyme works as an inhibitor that chelates the zinc ion. On the other hand, the oligopeptide mimetic retains molecular groups responsible for binding of this compound to the enzyme active site. This example illustrates a strategy to design MMP inhibitors in situ by using data on binding specificity of substrates to a particular type of MMP and details of the reaction mechanism. PMID:24684684

  15. Encroachment of Human Activity on Sea Turtle Nesting Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziskin, D.; Aubrecht, C.; Elvidge, C.; Tuttle, B.; Baugh, K.; Ghosh, T.

    2008-12-01

    The encroachment of anthropogenic lighting on sea turtle nesting sites poses a serious threat to the survival of these animals [Nicholas, 2001]. This danger is quantified by combining two established data sets. The first is the Nighttime Lights data produced by the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center [Elvidge et al., 1997]. The second is the Marine Turtle Database produced by the World Conservation Monitoring Centre (WCMC). The technique used to quantify the threat of encroachment is an adaptation of the method described in Aubrecht et al. [2008], which analyzes the stress on coral reef systems by proximity to nighttime lights near the shore. Nighttime lights near beaches have both a direct impact on turtle reproductive success since they disorient hatchlings when they mistake land-based lights for the sky-lit surf [Lorne and Salmon, 2007] and the lights are also a proxy for other anthropogenic threats. The identification of turtle nesting sites with high rates of encroachment will hopefully steer conservation efforts to mitigate their effects [Witherington, 1999]. Aubrecht, C, CD Elvidge, T Longcore, C Rich, J Safran, A Strong, M Eakin, KE Baugh, BT Tuttle, AT Howard, EH Erwin, 2008, A global inventory of coral reef stressors based on satellite observed nighttime lights, Geocarto International, London, England: Taylor and Francis. In press. Elvidge, CD, KE Baugh, EA Kihn, HW Kroehl, ER Davis, 1997, Mapping City Lights with Nighttime Data from the DMSP Operational Linescan System, Photogrammatic Engineering and Remote Sensing, 63:6, pp. 727-734. Lorne, JK, M Salmon, 2007, Effects of exposure to artificial lighting on orientation of hatchling sea turtles on the beach and in the ocean, Endangered Species Research, Vol. 3: 23-30. Nicholas, M, 2001, Light Pollution and Marine Turtle Hatchlings: The Straw that Breaks the Camel's Back?, George Wright Forum, 18:4, p77-82. Witherington, BE, 1999, Reducing Threats To Nesting Habitat, Research and Management Techniques for

  16. Functional significance of Glu-77 and Tyr-137 within the active site of isoaspartyl dipeptidase.

    PubMed

    Martí-Arbona, Ricardo; Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M; Raushel, Frank M

    2005-12-01

    Isoaspartyl dipeptidase (IAD) is a binuclear metalloenzyme and a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. This enzyme catalyzes the hydrolytic cleavage of beta-aspartyl dipeptides. The pH-rate profiles for the hydrolysis of beta-Asp-Leu indicates that catalysis is dependent on the ionization of two groups; one that ionizes at a pH approximately 6 and the other approximately 9. The group that must be ionized for catalysis is directly dependent on the identity of the metal ion bound to the active site. This result is consistent with the ionization of the hydroxide that bridges the two divalent cations. In addition to the residues that interact directly with the divalent cations there are two other residues that are highly conserved and found within the active site: Glu-77 and Tyr-137. Mutation of Tyr-137 to phenylalanine reduced the rate of catalysis by three orders of magnitude. The three dimensional X-ray structure of the Y137F mutant did not show any significant conformation changes relative to the three dimensional structure of the wild-type enzyme. The positioning of the side-chain phenolic group of Tyr-137 in the active site of IAD is consistent with the stabilization of the tetrahedral adduct concomitant with nucleophilic attack by the hydroxide that bridges the two divalent cations. Mutation of Glu-77 resulted in the reduction of catalytic activity by five orders of magnitude. The three dimensional structure of the E77Q mutant did not show any significant conformational changes in the mutant relative to the three dimensional structure of the wild-type enzyme. The positioning of the side-chain carboxylate of Glu-77 is consistent with the formation of an ion pair interaction with the free alpha-amino group of the substrate.

  17. Direct Epoxidation of Propylene over Stabilized Cu+ Surface Sites on Ti Modified Cu2O

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Kattel, S.; Xiong, K.; Mudiyanselage, K.; Rykov, S.; Senanayake, S. D.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Liu, P.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Chen, J. G.

    2015-07-17

    Direct propylene epoxidation by O2 is a challenging reaction because of the strong tendency for complete combustion. Results from the current study demonstrate the feasibility to tune the epoxidation selectivity by generating highly dispersed and stabilized Cu+ active sites in a TiCuOx mixed oxide. The TiCuOx surface anchors the key surface intermediate, oxametallacycle, leading to higher selectivity for epoxidation of propylene.

  18. Site-directed alkylation of multiple opioid receptors. I. Binding selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    James, I.F.; Goldstein, A.

    1984-05-01

    A method for measuring and expressing the binding selectivity of ligands for mu, delta, and kappa opioid binding sites is reported. Radioligands are used that are partially selective for these sites in combination with membrane preparations enriched in each site. Enrichment was obtained by treatment of membranes with the alkylating agent beta-chlornaltrexamine in the presence of appropriate protecting ligands. After enrichment for mu receptors, (/sup 3/H) dihydromorphine bound to a single type of site as judged by the slope of competition binding curves. After enrichment for delta or kappa receptors, binding sites for (/sup 3/H) (D-Ala2, D-Leu5)enkephalin and (3H)ethylketocyclazocine, respectively, were still not homogeneous. There were residual mu sites in delta-enriched membranes but no evidence for residual mu or delta sites in kappa-enriched membranes were found. This method was used to identify ligands that are highly selective for each of the three types of sites.

  19. Zinc Metalloproteinase ProA Directly Activates Legionella pneumophila PlaC Glycerophospholipid:cholesterol Acyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Christina; Rastew, Elena; Hermes, Björn; Siegbrecht, Enrico; Ahrends, Robert; Banerji, Sangeeta; Flieger, Antje

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes secreted by Legionella pneumophila, such as phospholipases A (PLAs) and glycerophospholipid:cholesterol acyltransferases (GCATs), may target host cell lipids and therefore contribute to the establishment of Legionnaires disease. L. pneumophila possesses three proteins, PlaA, PlaC, and PlaD, belonging to the GDSL family of lipases/acyltransferases. We have shown previously that PlaC is the major GCAT secreted by L. pneumophila and that the zinc metalloproteinase ProA is essential for GCAT activity. Here we characterized the mode of PlaC GCAT activation and determined that ProA directly processes PlaC. We further found that not only cholesterol but also ergosterol present in protozoa was palmitoylated by PlaC. Such ester formations were not induced by either PlaA or PlaD. PlaD was shown here to possess lysophospholipase A activity, and interestingly, all three GDSL enzymes transferred short chain fatty acids to sterols. The three single putative catalytic amino acids (Ser-37, Asp-398, and His-401) proved essential for all PlaC-associated PLA, lysophospholipase A, and GCAT activities. A further four cysteine residues are important for the PLA/GCAT activities as well as their oxidized state, and we therefore conclude that PlaC likely forms at least one disulfide loop. Analysis of cleavage site and loop deletion mutants suggested that for GCAT activation deletion of several amino acids within the loop is necessary rather than cleavage at a single site. Our data therefore suggest a novel enzyme inhibition/activation mechanism where a disulfide loop inhibits PlaC GCAT activity until the protein is exported to the external space where it is ProA-activated. PMID:22582391

  20. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development: FY 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wil Lewis, editor

    2007-08-01

    The Nevada Test Site–Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program completed its fifth successful year of research and development activities in FY 2006. Forty new projects were selected for funding this year, and ten FY 2005 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $6 million, for an average per-project cost of $120 thousand. Beginning in May, 2006 programmatic burden rates were applied to SDRD project costs. An external audit conducted in September 2006 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: the filing of 27 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2006 projects; programmatic adoption of four FY 2005 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2006 projects; and the successful completion of 50 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

  1. N6-Methyldeoxyadenosine Marks Active Transcription Start Sites in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Deng, Xin; Yu, Miao; Han, Dali; Hao, Ziyang; Liu, Jianzhao; Lu, Xingyu; Dore, Louis C; Weng, Xiaocheng; Ji, Quanjiang; Mets, Laurens; He, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY N6-methyldeoxyadenosine (6mA or m6A) is a DNA modification preserved in prokaryotes to eukaryotes. It is widespread in bacteria, and functions in DNA mismatch repair, chromosome segregation, and virulence regulation. In contrast, the distribution and function of 6mA in eukaryotes have been unclear. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the 6mA landscape in the genome of Chlamydomonas using new sequencing approaches. We identified the 6mA modification in 84% of genes in Chlamydomonas. We found that 6mA mainly locates at ApT dinucleotides around transcription start sites (TSS) with a bimodal distribution, and appears to mark active genes. A periodic pattern of 6mA deposition was also observed at base resolution, which is associated with nucleosome distribution near the TSS, suggesting a possible role in nucleosome positioning. The new genome-wide mapping of 6mA and its unique distribution in the Chlamydomonas genome suggest potential regulatory roles of 6mA in gene expression in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:25936837

  2. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  3. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems. PMID:25727891

  4. Active Site Characterization of Proteases Sequences from Different Species of Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Morya, V K; Yadav, Virendra K; Yadav, Sangeeta; Yadav, Dinesh

    2016-09-01

    A total of 129 proteases sequences comprising 43 serine proteases, 36 aspartic proteases, 24 cysteine protease, 21 metalloproteases, and 05 neutral proteases from different Aspergillus species were analyzed for the catalytically active site residues using MEROPS database and various bioinformatics tools. Different proteases have predominance of variable active site residues. In case of 24 cysteine proteases of Aspergilli, the predominant active site residues observed were Gln193, Cys199, His364, Asn384 while for 43 serine proteases, the active site residues namely Asp164, His193, Asn284, Ser349 and Asp325, His357, Asn454, Ser519 were frequently observed. The analysis of 21 metalloproteases of Aspergilli revealed Glu298 and Glu388, Tyr476 as predominant active site residues. In general, Aspergilli species-specific active site residues were observed for different types of protease sequences analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis of these 129 proteases sequences revealed 14 different clans representing different types of proteases with diverse active site residues.

  5. A proposed definition of the 'activity' of surface sites on lactose carriers for dry powder inhalation.

    PubMed

    Grasmeijer, Floris; Frijlink, Henderik W; de Boer, Anne H

    2014-06-01

    A new definition of the activity of surface sites on lactose carriers for dry powder inhalation is proposed which relates to drug detachment during dispersion. The new definition is expected to improve the understanding of 'carrier surface site activity', which stimulates the unambiguous communication about this subject and may aid in the rational design and interpretation of future formulation studies. In contrast to the currently prevailing view on carrier surface site activity, it follows from the newly proposed definition that carrier surface site activity depends on more variables than just the physicochemical properties of the carrier surface. Because the term 'active sites' is ambiguous, it is recommended to use the term 'highly active sites' instead to denote carrier surface sites with a relatively high activity. PMID:24613490

  6. Non-specific binding sites help to explain mixed inhibition in mushroom tyrosinase activities.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Sorour; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Fazli, Mostafa

    2016-10-21

    Inhibition and activation studies of tyrosinase could prove beneficial to agricultural, food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. Although non-competitive and mixed-inhibition are frequent modes observed in kinetics studies on mushroom tyrosinase (MT) activities, the phenomena are left unexplained. In this study, dual effects of phthalic acid (PA) and cinnamic acid (CA) on MT during mono-phenolase activity were demonstrated. PA activated and inhibited MT at concentrations lower and higher than 150 μM, respectively. In contrast, CA inhibited and activated MT at concentrations lower and higher than 5 μM. The mode of inhibition for both effectors was mixed-type. Complex kinetics of MT in the presence of a modulator could partly be ascribed to its mixed-cooperativity. However, to explain mixed-inhibition mode, it is necessary to demonstrate how the ternary complex of substrate/enzyme/effector is formed. Therefore, we looked for possible non-specific binding sites using MT tropolone-bound PDB (2Y9X) in the computational studies. When tropolone was in MTPa (active site), PA and CA occupied different pockets (named MTPb and MTPc, respectively). The close Moldock scores of PA binding posed in MTPb and MTPa suggested that MTPb could be a secondary binding site for PA. Similar results were obtained for CA. Ensuing results from 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations for 2Y9X-effector complexes indicated that the structures were gradually stabilized during simulation. Tunnel analysis by using CAVER Analyst and CHEXVIS resulted in identifying two distinct channels that assumingly participate in exchanging the effectors when the direct channel to MTPa is not accessible.

  7. Non-specific binding sites help to explain mixed inhibition in mushroom tyrosinase activities.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Sorour; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Fazli, Mostafa

    2016-10-21

    Inhibition and activation studies of tyrosinase could prove beneficial to agricultural, food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. Although non-competitive and mixed-inhibition are frequent modes observed in kinetics studies on mushroom tyrosinase (MT) activities, the phenomena are left unexplained. In this study, dual effects of phthalic acid (PA) and cinnamic acid (CA) on MT during mono-phenolase activity were demonstrated. PA activated and inhibited MT at concentrations lower and higher than 150 μM, respectively. In contrast, CA inhibited and activated MT at concentrations lower and higher than 5 μM. The mode of inhibition for both effectors was mixed-type. Complex kinetics of MT in the presence of a modulator could partly be ascribed to its mixed-cooperativity. However, to explain mixed-inhibition mode, it is necessary to demonstrate how the ternary complex of substrate/enzyme/effector is formed. Therefore, we looked for possible non-specific binding sites using MT tropolone-bound PDB (2Y9X) in the computational studies. When tropolone was in MTPa (active site), PA and CA occupied different pockets (named MTPb and MTPc, respectively). The close Moldock scores of PA binding posed in MTPb and MTPa suggested that MTPb could be a secondary binding site for PA. Similar results were obtained for CA. Ensuing results from 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations for 2Y9X-effector complexes indicated that the structures were gradually stabilized during simulation. Tunnel analysis by using CAVER Analyst and CHEXVIS resulted in identifying two distinct channels that assumingly participate in exchanging the effectors when the direct channel to MTPa is not accessible. PMID:27344491

  8. Identification of a novel phosphorylation site in c-jun directly targeted in vitro by protein kinase D

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, Richard T. . E-mail: rwaldron@mednet.ucla.edu; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Faull, Kym F.; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2007-05-04

    Protein kinase D (PKD) phosphorylates the c-jun amino-terminal in vitro at site(s) distinct from JNK [C. Hurd, R.T. Waldron, E. Rozengurt, Protein kinase D complexes with c-jun N-terminal kinase via activation loop phosphorylation and phosphorylates the c-jun N-terminus, Oncogene 21 (2002) 2154-2160], but the sites have not been identified. Here, metabolic {sup 32}P-labeling of c-jun protein in COS-7 cells indicated that PKD phosphorylates c-jun in vivo at a site(s) between aa 43-93, a region containing important functional elements. On this basis, the PKD-mediated phosphorylation site(s) was further characterized in vitro using GST-c-jun fusion proteins. PKD did not incorporate phosphate into Ser63 and Ser73, the JNK sites in GST-c-jun(1-89). Rather, PKD and JNK could sequentially phosphorylate distinct site(s) simultaneously. By mass spectrometry of tryptic phosphopeptides, Ser58 interposed between the JNK-binding portion of the delta domain and the adjacent TAD1 was identified as a prominent site phosphorylated in vitro by PKD. These data were further supported by kinase reactions using truncations or point-mutations of GST-c-jun. Together, these data suggest that PKD-mediated phosphorylation modulates c-jun at the level of its N-terminal functional domains.

  9. Following [FeFe] Hydrogenase Active Site Intermediates by Time-Resolved Mid-IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mirmohades, Mohammad; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Sommer, Constanze; Reijerse, Edward; Lomoth, Reiner; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-08-18

    Time-resolved nanosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy is for the first time employed to study the [FeFe] hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and to investigate relevant intermediates of the enzyme active site. An actinic 355 nm, 10 ns laser flash triggered photodissociation of a carbonyl group from the CO-inhibited state Hox-CO to form the state Hox, which is an intermediate of the catalytic proton reduction cycle. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy allowed us to directly follow the subsequent rebinding of the carbonyl, re-forming Hox-CO, and determine the reaction half-life to be t1/2 ≈ 13 ± 5 ms at room temperature. This gives direct information on the dynamics of CO inhibition of the enzyme. PMID:27494400

  10. Following [FeFe] Hydrogenase Active Site Intermediates by Time-Resolved Mid-IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mirmohades, Mohammad; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Sommer, Constanze; Reijerse, Edward; Lomoth, Reiner; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-08-18

    Time-resolved nanosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy is for the first time employed to study the [FeFe] hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and to investigate relevant intermediates of the enzyme active site. An actinic 355 nm, 10 ns laser flash triggered photodissociation of a carbonyl group from the CO-inhibited state Hox-CO to form the state Hox, which is an intermediate of the catalytic proton reduction cycle. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy allowed us to directly follow the subsequent rebinding of the carbonyl, re-forming Hox-CO, and determine the reaction half-life to be t1/2 ≈ 13 ± 5 ms at room temperature. This gives direct information on the dynamics of CO inhibition of the enzyme.

  11. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ACTIVITIES FOR FY2002.

    SciTech Connect

    FOX,K.J.

    2002-12-31

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 1 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence

  12. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  13. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  14. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  15. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  16. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  17. The relative merits of therapies being developed to tackle inappropriate ('self'-directed) complement activation.

    PubMed

    Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Kyeremeh, Ransford; Adjei, Jonathan Kofi; Aryeh, Claudia; Kpentey, George

    2016-12-01

    The complement system is an enzyme cascade that helps defend against infection. Many complement proteins occur in serum as inactive enzyme precursors or reside on cell surfaces. Complement components have many biologic functions and their activation can eventually damage the plasma membranes of cells and some bacteria. Although a direct link between complement activation and autoimmune diseases has not been found, there is increasing evidence that complement activation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory diseases that may have autoimmune linkage. The inhibition of complement may therefore be very important in a variety of autoimmune diseases since their activation may be detrimental to the individual involved. However, a complete and long-term inhibition of complement may have some contra side effects such as increased susceptibility to infection. The site of complement activation will, however, determine the type of inhibitor to be used, its route of application and dosage level. Compared with conventional drugs, complement inhibitors may be the best option for treatment of autoimmune diseases. The review takes a critical look at the relative merits of therapies being developed to tackle inappropriate complement activation that are likely to result in sporadic autoimmune diseases or worsen already existing one. It covers the complement system, general aspects of complement inhibition therapy, therapeutic strategies and examples of complement inhibitors. It concludes by highlighting on the possibility that a better inhibitor of complement activation when found will help provide a formidable treatment for autoimmune diseases as well as preventing one.

  18. O2 activation by binuclear Cu sites: Noncoupled versus exchange coupled reaction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Solomon, Edward I.

    2004-09-01

    Binuclear Cu proteins play vital roles in O2 binding and activation in biology and can be classified into coupled and noncoupled binuclear sites based on the magnetic interaction between the two Cu centers. Coupled binuclear Cu proteins include hemocyanin, tyrosinase, and catechol oxidase. These proteins have two Cu centers strongly magnetically coupled through direct bridging ligands that provide a mechanism for the 2-electron reduction of O2 to a µ-2:2 side-on peroxide bridged species. This side-on bridged peroxo-CuII2 species is activated for electrophilic attack on the phenolic ring of substrates. Noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins include peptidylglycine -hydroxylating monooxygenase and dopamine -monooxygenase. These proteins have binuclear Cu active sites that are distant, that exhibit no exchange interaction, and that activate O2 at a single Cu center to generate a reactive CuII/O2 species for H-atom abstraction from the C-H bond of substrates. O2 intermediates in the coupled binuclear Cu enzymes can be trapped and studied spectroscopically. Possible intermediates in noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins can be defined through correlation to mononuclear CuII/O2 model complexes. The different intermediates in these two classes of binuclear Cu proteins exhibit different reactivities that correlate with their different electronic structures and exchange coupling interactions between the binuclear Cu centers. These studies provide insight into the role of exchange coupling between the Cu centers in their reaction mechanisms.

  19. Topoisomerase I-Mediated DNA Cleavage Induced by the Minor Groove-Directed Binding of Bibenzimidazoles to a Distal Site

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Qasim A.; Pilch, Daniel S.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Many agents (e.g., camptothecins, indolocarbazoles, indenoisoquinolines, and dibenzonaphthyridines) stimulate topoisomerase I-mediated DNA cleavage (a behavior termed topoisomerase I poisoning) by interacting with both the DNA and the enzyme at the site of cleavage (typically by intercalation between the −1 and +1 base pairs). The bibenzimidazoles, which include Hoechst 33258 and 33342, are a family of DNA minor groove-directed agents that also stimulate topoisomerase I-mediated DNA cleavage. However, the molecular mechanism by which these ligands poison TOP1 is poorly understood. Toward this goal, we have used a combination of mutational, footprinting, and DNA binding affinity analyses to define the DNA binding site for Hoechst 33258 and a related derivative that results in optimal induction of TOP1-mediated DNA cleavage. We show that this DNA binding site is located downstream from the site of DNA cleavage, encompassing the base pairs from position +4 to +8. The distal nature of this binding site relative to the site of DNA cleavage suggests that minor groove-directed agents like the bibenzimidazoles poison TOP1 via a mechanism distinct from compounds like the camptothecins, which interact at the site of cleavage. PMID:17095016

  20. Mutational Analysis of Substrate Interactions with the Active Site of Dialkylglycine Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Fogle, Emily J.; Toney, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes catalyze many different types of reactions at the α-, β-, and γ-carbons of amine and amino acid substrates. Dialkylglycine decarboxylase (DGD) is an unusual PLP dependent enzyme that catalyzes two reaction types, decarboxylation and transamination, in the same active site. A structurally-based, functional model has been proposed for the DGD active site, which maintains that R406 is important in determining substrate specificity through interactions with the substrate carboxylate while W138 provides specificity for short-chain alkyl groups. The mechanistic roles of R406 and W138 were investigated using site directed mutagenesis, alternate substrates, and analysis of steady-state and half-reaction kinetics. Experiments on the R406M and R406K mutants confirm the importance of R406 in substrate binding. Surprisingly, this work also shows that the positive charge of R406 facilitates catalysis of decarboxylation. The W138F mutant demonstrates that W138 indeed acts to limit the size of the subsite C binding pocket, determining specificity for 2,2-dialkylglycines with small side chains as predicted by the model. Finally, work with the double mutant W138F/M141R shows that these mutations expand substrate specificity to include L-glutamate and lead to an increase in specificity for L-glutamate over 2-aminoisobutyrate of approximately eight orders of magnitude compared to WT DGD. PMID:20540501

  1. Increasing activity and thermal resistance of Bacillus gibsonii alkaline protease (BgAP) by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ronny; Jakob, Felix; Tu, Ran; Siegert, Petra; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus gibsonii Alkaline Protease (BgAP) is a recently reported subtilisin protease exhibiting activity and stability properties suitable for applications in laundry and dish washing detergents. However, BgAP suffers from a significant decrease of activity at low temperatures. In order to increase BgAP activity at 15°C, a directed evolution campaign based on the SeSaM random mutagenesis method was performed. An optimized microtiter plate expression system in B. subtilis was established and classical proteolytic detection methods were adapted for high throughput screening. In parallel, the libraries were screened for increased residual proteolytic activity after incubation at 58°C. Three iterative rounds of directed BgAP evolution yielded a set of BgAP variants with increased specific activity (K(cat)) at 15°C and increased thermal resistance. Recombination of both sets of amino acid substitutions resulted finally in variant MF1 with a 1.5-fold increased specific activity (15°C) and over 100 times prolonged half-life at 60°C (224 min compared to 2 min of the WT BgAP). None of the introduced amino acid substitutions were close to the active site of BgAP. Activity-altering amino acid substitutions were from non-charged to non-charged or from sterically demanding to less demanding. Thermal stability improvements were achieved by substitutions to negatively charged amino acids in loop areas of the BgAP surface which probably fostered ionic and hydrogen bonds interactions.

  2. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Looney,J.P.; Fox, K.

    2009-04-01

    with limited management filtering to encourage the creativity of individual researchers. The competition is open to all BNL staff in programmatic, scientific, engineering, and technical support areas. Researchers submit their project proposals to the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning. A portion of the LDRD budget is held for the Strategic LDRD (S-LDRD) category. Projects in this category focus on innovative R&D activities that support the strategic agenda of the Laboratory. The Laboratory Director entertains requests or articulates the need for S-LDRD funds at any time. Strategic LDRD Proposals also undergo rigorous peer review; the approach to review is tailored to the size and scope of the proposal. These Projects are driven by special opportunities, including: (1) Research project(s) in support of Laboratory strategic initiatives as defined and articulated by the Director; (2) Research project(s) in support of a Laboratory strategic hire; (3) Evolution of Program Development activities into research and development activities; and (4) ALD proposal(s) to the Director to support unique research opportunities. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred fronl the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. To be one of the premier DOE National Laboratories, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program

  3. GAS HYDRATES AT TWO SITES OF AN ACTIVE CONTINENTAL MARGIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart on the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m.

  4. Polypyrimidine tract sequences direct selection of alternative branch sites and influence protein binding.

    PubMed Central

    Norton, P A

    1994-01-01

    IVS1, an intron derived from the rat fibronectin gene, is spliced inefficiently in vitro, involving the use of three alternative branch sites. Mutation of one branch point site, BP3, so as to increase complementarity to U2 snRNA resulted in exclusive use of that site and improved splicing efficiency, indicating that the wild type BP3 site is one determinant of poor IVS1 splicing. Deletions within the polypyrimidine tract had a variable effect on splicing efficiency and altered the pattern of branch site usage. Selection of each branch site was influenced negatively by purine substitutions ca. 20 nucleotides downstream. It is proposed that all three IVS1 branch sites are pyrimidine tract-dependent. Pyrimidine tract deletions also influenced the crosslinking of PTB (the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein), hnRNP C, and splicing factor U2AF65. All three proteins bound preferentially to distinct regions within the polypyrimidine tract and thus are candidates for mediating pyrimidine tract-dependent branch site selection. The findings indicate the complexity of the IVS1 polypyrimidine tract and suggest a crucial role for this region in modulating branch site selection and IVS1 splicing. Images PMID:7937104

  5. Dynamically achieved active site precision in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes' enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme-substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C-H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed.

  6. Discovery and Characterization of Non-ATP Site Inhibitors of the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Comess, Kenneth M.; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R.; Gum, Rebecca J.; Borhani, David W.; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R.; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E.; Haasch, Deanna L.; Smith, Harriet T.; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L.; Cloutier, Timothy E.; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I.; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J.; Calderwood, David J.; Hajduk, Philip J.

    2012-03-02

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38{alpha} (involved in the formation of TNF{alpha} and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38{alpha} both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in

  7. Dynamics of the active site architecture in plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases catalytic complexes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Azqueta, Ana; Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L; López-Rivero, Arleth; Tondo, María Laura; Orellano, Elena G; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A; Medina, Milagros

    2014-10-01

    Kinetic isotope effects in reactions involving hydride transfer and their temperature dependence are powerful tools to explore dynamics of enzyme catalytic sites. In plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases the FAD cofactor exchanges a hydride with the NADP(H) coenzyme. Rates for these processes are considerably faster for the plastidic members (FNR) of the family than for those belonging to the bacterial class (FPR). Hydride transfer (HT) and deuteride transfer (DT) rates for the NADP(+) coenzyme reduction of four plant-type FNRs (two representatives of the plastidic type FNRs and the other two from the bacterial class), and their temperature dependences are here examined applying a full tunnelling model with coupled environmental fluctuations. Parameters for the two plastidic FNRs confirm a tunnelling reaction with active dynamics contributions, but isotope effects on Arrhenius factors indicate a larger contribution for donor-acceptor distance (DAD) dynamics in the Pisum sativum FNR reaction than in the Anabaena FNR reaction. On the other hand, parameters for bacterial FPRs are consistent with passive environmental reorganisation movements dominating the HT coordinate and no contribution of DAD sampling or gating fluctuations. This indicates that active sites of FPRs are more organised and rigid than those of FNRs. These differences must be due to adaptation of the active sites and catalytic mechanisms to fulfil their particular metabolic roles, establishing a compromise between protein flexibility and functional optimisation. Analysis of site-directed mutants in plastidic enzymes additionally indicates the requirement of a minimal optimal architecture in the catalytic complex to provide a favourable gating contribution. PMID:24953402

  8. LE135, a retinoid acid receptor antagonist, produces pain through direct activation of TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shijin; Luo, Jialie; Qian, Aihua; Yu, Weihua; Hu, Hongzhen

    2014-01-01

    Background and PurposeRetinoids, through their activation of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors, regulate diverse cellular processes, and pharmacological intervention in their actions has been successful in the treatment of skin disorders and cancers. Despite the many beneficial effects, administration of retinoids causes irritating side effects with unknown mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that LE135 [4-(7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-5,7,7,10,10-pentamethyl-5H-benzo[e]naphtho[2,3-b][1,4]diazepin-13-yl)benzoic acid], a selective antagonist of RARβ, is a potent activator of the capsaicin (TRPV1) and wasabi (TRPA1) receptors, two critical pain-initiating cation channels. Experimental ApproachWe performed to investigate the excitatory effects of LE135 on TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels expressed in HEK293T cells and in dorsal root ganglia neurons with calcium imaging and patch-clamp recordings. We also used site-directed mutagenesis of the channels to determine the structural basis of LE135-induced activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels and behavioural testing to examine if pharmacological inhibition and genetic deletion of the channels affected LE135-evoked pain-related behaviours. Key ResultsLE135 activated both the capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) and the allyl isothiocyanate receptor (TRPA1) heterologously expressed in HEK293T cells and endogenously expressed by sensory nociceptors. Mutations disrupting the capsaicin-binding site attenuated LE135 activation of TRPV1 channels and a single mutation (K170R) eliminated TRPA1 activity evoked by LE135. Intraplantar injection of LE135 evoked pain-related behaviours. Both TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels were involved in LE135-elicited pain-related responses, as shown by pharmacological and genetic ablation studies. Conclusions and ImplicationsThis blocker of retinoid acid signalling also exerted non-genomic effects through activating the pain-initiating TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels. PMID:24308840

  9. Monoclonal antibody against the active site of caeruloplasmin and the ELISA system detecting active caeruloplasmin.

    PubMed

    Hiyamuta, S; Ito, K

    1994-04-01

    Serum caeruloplasmin deficiency is a characteristic biochemical abnormality found in patients with Wilson's disease, but the mechanism of this disease is unknown. Although the phenylenediamine oxidase activity of serum caeruloplasmin is markedly low in patients with Wilson's disease, mRNA of caeruloplasmin exists to some extent. To investigate the deficiency of caeruloplasmin oxidase activity in Wilson's disease, we generated 14 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and selected ID1, which had the strongest reactivity, and ID2, which had neutralizing ability. We also established a system to measure active caeruloplasmin specifically using these MAbs. These MAbs and the system will be useful tools in analyzing the active site of caeruloplasmin in patients with Wilson's disease.

  10. Site-directed mutations reveal long-range compensatory interactions in the Adh gene of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Parsch, John; Tanda, Soichi; Stephan, Wolfgang

    1997-01-01

    Long-range interactions between the 5′ and 3′ ends of mRNA molecules have been suggested to play a role in the initiation of translation and the regulation of gene expression. To identify such interactions and to study their molecular evolution, we used phylogenetic analysis to generate a model of mRNA higher-order structure in the Adh transcript of Drosophila melanogaster. This model predicts long-range, tertiary contacts between a region of the protein-encoding sequence just downstream of the start codon and a conserved sequence in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR). To further examine the proposed structure, site-directed mutations were generated in vitro in a cloned D. melanogaster Adh gene, and the mutant constructs were introduced into the Drosophila germ line through P-element mediated transformation. Transformants were spectrophotometrically assayed for alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Our results indicate that transformants containing a silent mutation near the start of the protein-encoding sequence show an ≈15% reduction in alcohol dehydrogenase activity relative to wild-type transformants. This activity can be restored to wild-type levels by a second, compensatory mutation in the 3′ UTR. These observations are consistent with a higher-order structure model that includes long-range interactions between the 5′ and 3′ ends of the Adh mRNA. However, our results do not fit the classical compensatory substitution model because the second mutation by itself (in the 3′ UTR) did not show a measurable reduction in gene expression. PMID:9023359

  11. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signals activation of p70 S6 kinase in situ through site-specific p70 phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Q P; Andrabi, K; Klippel, A; Kozlowski, M T; Williams, L T; Avruch, J

    1995-01-01

    The p70 S6 kinase is activated by insulin and mitogens through multisite phosphorylation of the enzyme. One set of activating phosphorylations occurs in a putative autoinhibitory domain in the noncatalytic carboxyl-terminal tail. Deletion of this tail yields a variant (p70 delta CT104) that nevertheless continues to be mitogen regulated. Coexpression with a recombinant constitutively active phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase (EC 2.7.1.137) gives substantial activation of both full-length p70 and p70 delta CT104 but not Rsk. Activation of p70 delta CT104 by PI 3-kinase and inhibition by wortmannin are each accompanied by parallel and selective changes in the phosphorylation of p70 Thr-252. A Thr or Ser at this site, in subdomain VIII of the catalytic domain just amino-terminal to the APE motif, is necessary for p70 40S kinase activity. The inactive ATP-binding site mutant K123M p70 delta CT104 undergoes phosphorylation of Thr-252 in situ but does not undergo direct phosphorylation by the active PI 3-kinase in vitro. PI 3-kinase provides a signal necessary for the mitogen activation of the p70 S6 kinase, which directs the site-specific phosphorylation of Thr-252 in the p70 catalytic domain, through a distinctive signal transduction pathway. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7777579

  12. Robotics and Automation Activities at the Savannah River Site: A Site Report for SUBWOG 39F

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.

    1995-09-28

    The Savannah River Site has successfully used robots, teleoperators, and remote video to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, improve worker safety, and improve the quality of operations. Previous reports have described the use of mobile teleoperators in coping with a high level liquid waste spill, the removal of highly contaminated equipment, and the inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. This report will cover recent applications at the Savannah River, as well as systems which SRS has delivered to other DOE site customers.

  13. Control of active sites in selective flocculation: II -- Role of site blocking agents

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Control of heteroflocculation using a lower molecular weight fraction of the flocculant as a site blocking agent is demonstrated in the apatite-dolomite-polyethylene oxide system. The most effective SBA (site blocking agent) was determined to be the highest molecular weight fraction of the flocculant itself which was not capable of flocculating any of the components of the mixture. In the presence of the SBA, flocculant adsorption decreased significantly on apatite particles, thereby inhibiting coflocculation.

  14. High-resolution mapping of the HyHEL-10 epitope of chicken lysozyme by site-directed mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kam-Morgan, L.N.; Taylor, M.G.; Kirsch, J.F. ); Smith-Gill, S.J. ); Wilson, A.C.

    1993-05-01

    The complex formed between hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) and the monoclonal antibody HyHEL-10 Fab fragment has an interface composed of van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonds, and a single ion pair. The antibody overlaps part of the active site cleft. Putative critical residues within the epitope region of HEL, identified from the x-ray crystallographic structure of the complex, were replaced by site-directed mutagenesis to probe their relative importance in determining affinity of the antibody for HEL. Twenty single mutations of HEL at three contact residues (Arg-21[sub HEL], Asp-101[sub HEL], and Gly-102[sub HEL]) and at a partially buried residue (Asn-19[sub HEL]) in the epitope were made, and the effects on the free energies of dissociation were measured. A correlation between increased amino acid side-chain volume and reduced affinity for HELs with mutations at position 101 was observed. The D101G[sub HEL] mutant is bound to HyHEL-10 as tightly as wild-type enzyme, but the [delta][delta]G[sub dissoc] is increased by about 2.2 kcal (9.2 kJ)/mol for the larger residues in this position. HEL variants with lysine or histidine replacements for arginine at position 21 are bound 1.4-2.7 times more tightly than those with neutral or negatively charged amino acids in this position. These exhibit 1/40 the affinity for HyHEL-10 Fab compared with wild type. There is no side-chain volume correlation with [delta][delta]G[sub dissoc] at position 21. Although Gly-102[sub HEL] and Asn-19[sub HEL] are in the epitope, replacements at these positions have no effect on the affinity of HEL for the antibody. 34 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. TALEN-Mediated Homologous Recombination Produces Site-Directed DNA Base Change and Herbicide-Resistant Rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Liu, Bo; Chen, Chih Ying; Yang, Bing

    2016-05-20

    Over the last decades, much endeavor has been made to advance genome editing technology due to its promising role in both basic and synthetic biology. The breakthrough has been made in recent years with the advent of sequence-specific endonucleases, especially zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) guided nucleases (e.g., Cas9). In higher eukaryotic organisms, site-directed mutagenesis usually can be achieved through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair to the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) caused by the exogenously applied nucleases. However, site-specific gene replacement or genuine genome editing through homologous recombination (HR) repair to DSBs remains a challenge. As a proof of concept gene replacement through TALEN-based HR in rice (Oryza sativa), we successfully produced double point mutations in rice acetolactate synthase gene (OsALS) and generated herbicide resistant rice lines by using TALENs and donor DNA carrying the desired mutations. After ballistic delivery into rice calli of TALEN construct and donor DNA, nine HR events with different genotypes of OsALS were obtained in T0 generation at the efficiency of 1.4%-6.3% from three experiments. The HR-mediated gene edits were heritable to the progeny of T1 generation. The edited T1 plants were as morphologically normal as the control plants while displayed strong herbicide resistance. The results demonstrate the feasibility of TALEN-mediated genome editing in rice and provide useful information for further genome editing by other nuclease-based genome editing platforms. PMID:27180265

  16. The ligand for osteoprotegerin (OPGL) directly activates mature osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Burgess, T L; Qian, Y; Kaufman, S; Ring, B D; Van, G; Capparelli, C; Kelley, M; Hsu, H; Boyle, W J; Dunstan, C R; Hu, S; Lacey, D L

    1999-05-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) and OPG-ligand (OPGL) potently inhibit and stimulate, respectively, osteoclast differentiation (Simonet, W.S., D.L. Lacey, C.R. Dunstan, M. Kelley, M.-S. Chang, R. Luethy, H.Q. Nguyen, S. Wooden, L. Bennett, T. Boone, et al. 1997. Cell. 89:309-319; Lacey, D.L., E. Timms, H.-L. Tan, M.J. Kelley, C.R. Dunstan, T. Burgess, R. Elliott, A. Colombero, G. Elliott, S. Scully, et al. 1998. Cell. 93: 165-176), but their effects on mature osteoclasts are not well understood. Using primary cultures of rat osteoclasts on bone slices, we find that OPGL causes approximately sevenfold increase in total bone surface erosion. By scanning electron microscopy, OPGL-treated osteoclasts generate more clusters of lacunae on bone suggesting that multiple, spatially associated cycles of resorption have occurred. However, the size of individual resorption events are unchanged by OPGL treatment. Mechanistically, OPGL binds specifically to mature OCs and rapidly (within 30 min) induces actin ring formation; a marked cytoskeletal rearrangement that necessarily precedes bone resorption. Furthermore, we show that antibodies raised against the OPGL receptor, RANK, also induce actin ring formation. OPGL-treated mice exhibit increases in blood ionized Ca++ within 1 h after injections, consistent with immediate OC activation in vivo. Finally, we find that OPG blocks OPGL's effects on both actin ring formation and bone resorption. Together, these findings indicate that, in addition to their effects on OC precursors, OPGL and OPG have profound and direct effects on mature OCs and indicate that the OC receptor, RANK, mediates OPGL's effects. PMID:10225954

  17. Direct Observations Of Microbial Activity At Extreme Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Scott, J. H.; Cody, G. D.; Fogel, M.; Hazen, R. M.; Hemley, R. J.; Huntress, W. T.

    2002-12-01

    Microbial communities adapt to a wide range of pressures, temperatures, salinities, pH, and oxidation states. Although, significant attention has been focused on the effects of high and low temperature on physiology, there is some evidence that elevated pressure may also manifest interesting effects on cellular physiology, such as enzyme inactivation, cell-membrane breach, and suppression of protein interactions with various substrates. However, exactly how these factors affect intact cells is not well understood. In this study, we have adapted diamond anvil cells to explore the effects of high pressure on microbial life. We used the rate of microbial formate oxidation as a probe of metabolic viability. The utilization of formate by microorganisms is a fundamental metabolic process in anaerobic environments. We monitored in-situ microbial formate oxidation via molecular spectroscopy for Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1 and Escherichia coli strain MG1655 at high pressures (68 to 1060 MPa). At pressures of 1200 to 1600 MPa, living bacteria resided in fluid inclusions in ice-VI crystals and continued to be viable upon subsequent release to ambient pressures (0.1 MPa). Furthermore, direct microscopic observations indicate that these cells maintain their ability for cellular division upon decompression from such high pressures. Evidence of microbial viability and activity at these extreme pressures expands by an order of magnitude the range of conditions representing the habitable zone in the solar system. These results imply that pressure may not be a significant impediment to life. The maximum pressure explored in this work is equivalent to a depth of ~ 50 km below Earth's crust, or ~ 160 km in a hypothetical ocean. The pressures encountered at the depths of thick ice caps and deep crustal subsurface may not be a limiting factor for the existence of life. This suggests that deep (water/ice) layers of Europa, Callisto, or Ganymede, subduction zones on Earth, and the

  18. Future directions for the remediation of sites contaminated by Nonaqueous Phase Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCray, J. E.; Tick, G. R.; Carroll, K. C.; Boving, T. B.; Johnson, G. R.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Sites contaminated with immiscible nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) present unique and difficult challenges for remediation. A large breadth of research has been conducted and it is for the most part agreed (consensus) that many sites require site specific strategies and that a significant portion of contaminant mass remains (incomplete removal) within the subsurface even after aggressive remediation techniques were implemented. It is the aim of this talk to initiate next step discussions on proposing new strategies, combined remediation scenarios, and different means of evaluating risk and cleanup goals. A major part in doing so involves establishing well-studied contamination sites as collaborative working "field observatories", assemble and develop collective data sets to better understand contaminant transport and factors limiting effective cleanup for the ultimate development of more effective remediation strategies. Integration and availability to comprehensive data-sets from "legacy" sites such as Dover AFB, Hill AFB, Cape Cod, Borden AFB, AFP-44, and other sites wherein the authors have experience (Little Creek Amphibious Base, Camp Legune, etc) have great potential to lead to more research and discoveries for more effective remediation strategies. What is the next step for dealing with NAPL contaminated sites? We propose a more collaborative approach for solving some of these most challenging issues for researchers and practitioners when it comes to cleaning up and understanding difficulties specific to NAPL-contaminated sites.

  19. Maternal celiac disease autoantibodies bind directly to syncytiotrophoblast and inhibit placental tissue transglutaminase activity

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Naheed; Baker, Philip N; Robinson, Nicola J; Aplin, John D

    2009-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) occurs in as many as 1 in 80 pregnant women and is associated with poor pregnancy outcome, but it is not known if this is an effect on maternal nutrient absorption or, alternatively, if the placenta is an autoimmune target. The major autoantigen, tissue transglutaminase (tTG), has previously been shown to be present in the maternal-facing syncytiotrophoblast plasma membrane of the placenta. Methods ELISA was used to demonstrate the presence of antibodies to tissue transglutaminase in a panel of CD sera. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the binding of IgA autoantibodies from CD serum to term placenta. In addition, novel direct binding and activity assays were developed to mimic the in vivo exposure of the villous placenta to maternal autoantibody. Results and Discussion CD IgA autoantibodies located to the syncytial surface of the placenta significantly more than IgA antibodies in control sera (P < 0.0001). The distribution of antigen was similar to that observed using a monoclonal antibody to tissue transglutaminase. Staining was reduced by pre-absorption of CD serum with recombinant human tissue transglutaminase. In direct binding assays, autoimmune immunoglobulin A (IgA) from the maternal compartment became associated with antigen at the syncytial surface of the placenta, as a result of which transglutaminase activity at this site was inhibited. Conclusion These data indicate that direct immune effects in untreated CD women may compromise placental function. PMID:19228395

  20. Cells activated for wound repair have the potential to direct collective invasion of an epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Bleaken, Brigid M.; Menko, A. Sue; Walker, Janice L.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms regulating how groups of cells are signaled to move collectively from their original site and invade surrounding matrix are poorly understood. Here we develop a clinically relevant ex vivo injury invasion model to determine whether cells involved in directing wound healing have invasive function and whether they can act as leader cells to direct movement of a wounded epithelium through a three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) environment. Similar to cancer invasion, we found that the injured cells invade into the ECM as cords, involving heterotypical cell–cell interactions. Mesenchymal cells with properties of activated repair cells that typically locate to a wound edge are present in leader positions at the front of ZO-1–rich invading cords of cells, where they extend vimentin intermediate filament–enriched protrusions into the 3D ECM. Injury-induced invasion depends on both vimentin cytoskeletal function and MMP-2/9 matrix remodeling, because inhibiting either of these suppressed invasion. Potential push and pull forces at the tips of the invading cords were revealed by time-lapse imaging, which showed cells actively extending and retracting protrusions into the ECM. This 3D injury invasion model can be used to investigate mechanisms of leader cell–directed invasion and understand how mechanisms of wound healing are hijacked to cause disease. PMID:26658613

  1. [Rapid site-directed mutagenesis on full-length plasmid DNA by using designed restriction enzyme assisted mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baozhong; Ran, Duoliang; Zhang, Xin; An, Xiaoping; Shan, Yunzhu; Zhou, Yusen; Tong, Yigang

    2009-02-01

    To use the designed restriction enzyme assisted mutagenesis technique to perform rapid site-directed mutagenesis on double-stranded plasmid DNA. The target amino acid sequence was reversely translated into DNA sequences with degenerate codons, resulting in large amount of silently mutated sequences containing various restriction endonucleases (REs). Certain mutated sequence with an appropriate RE was selected as the target DNA sequence for designing mutation primers. The full-length plasmid DNA was amplified with high-fidelity Phusion DNA polymerase and the amplified product was 5' phosphorylated by T4 polynucleotide kinase and then self-ligated. After transformation into an E. coli host the transformants were rapidly screened by cutting with the designed RE. With this strategy we successfully performed the site-directed mutagenesis on an 8 kb plasmid pcDNA3.1-pIgR and recovered the wild-type amino acid sequence of human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). A novel site-directed mutagenesis strategy based on DREAM was developed which exploited RE as a rapid screening measure. The highly efficient, high-fidelity Phusion DNA polymerase was applied to ensure the efficient and faithful amplification of the full-length sequence of a plasmid of up to 8 kb. This rapid mutagenesis strategy avoids using any commercial site-directed mutagenesis kits, special host strains or isotopes. PMID:19459340

  2. Nanog Increases Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) Promoter Activity and Expression and Directly Binds to FAK Protein to Be Phosphorylated*

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Baotran; Olson, Gretchen; Figel, Sheila; Gelman, Irwin; Cance, William G.; Golubovskaya, Vita M.

    2012-01-01

    Nanog and FAK were shown to be overexpressed in cancer cells. In this report, the Nanog overexpression increased FAK expression in 293, SW480, and SW620 cancer cells. Nanog binds the FAK promoter and up-regulates its activity, whereas Nanog siRNA decreases FAK promoter activity and FAK mRNA. The FAK promoter contains four Nanog-binding sites. The site-directed mutagenesis of these sites significantly decreased up-regulation of FAK promoter activity by Nanog. EMSA showed the specific binding of Nanog to each of the four sites, and binding was confirmed by ChIP assay. Nanog directly binds the FAK protein by pulldown and immunoprecipitation assays, and proteins co-localize by confocal microscopy. Nanog binds the N-terminal domain of FAK. In addition, FAK directly phosphorylates Nanog in a dose-dependent manner by in vitro kinase assay and in cancer cells in vivo. The site-directed mutagenesis of Nanog tyrosines, Y35F and Y174F, blocked phosphorylation and binding by FAK. Moreover, overexpression of wild type Nanog increased filopodia/lamellipodia formation, whereas mutant Y35F and Y174F Nanog did not. The wild type Nanog increased cell invasion that was inhibited by the FAK inhibitor and increased by FAK more significantly than with the mutants Y35F and Y174F Nanog. Down-regulation of Nanog with siRNA decreased cell growth reversed by FAK overexpression. Thus, these data demonstrate the regulation of the FAK promoter by Nanog, the direct binding of the proteins, the phosphorylation of Nanog by FAK, and the effect of FAK and Nanog cross-regulation on cancer cell morphology, invasion, and growth that plays a significant role in carcinogenesis. PMID:22493428

  3. Binding of Mn-deoxyribonucleoside Triphosphates to the Active Site of the DNA Polymerase of Bacteriophage T7

    SciTech Connect

    B Akabayov; C Richardson

    2011-12-31

    Divalent metal ions are crucial as cofactors for a variety of intracellular enzymatic activities. Mg{sup 2+}, as an example, mediates binding of deoxyribonucleoside 5'-triphosphates followed by their hydrolysis in the active site of DNA polymerase. It is difficult to study the binding of Mg{sup 2+} to an active site because Mg{sup 2+} is spectroscopically silent and Mg{sup 2+} binds with low affinity to the active site of an enzyme. Therefore, we substituted Mg{sup 2+} with Mn{sup 2+}:Mn{sup 2+} that is not only visible spectroscopically but also provides full activity of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7. In order to demonstrate that the majority of Mn{sup 2+} is bound to the enzyme, we have applied site-directed titration analysis of T7 DNA polymerase using X-ray near edge spectroscopy. Here we show how X-ray near edge spectroscopy can be used to distinguish between signal originating from Mn{sup 2+} that is free in solution and Mn{sup 2+} bound to the active site of T7 DNA polymerase. This method can be applied to other enzymes that use divalent metal ions as a cofactor.

  4. Binding of Mn-deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates to the active site of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7

    PubMed Central

    Akabayov, Barak; Richardson, Charles C.

    2013-01-01

    Divalent metal ions are crucial as cofactors for a variety of intracellular enzymatic activities. Mg2+, as an example, mediates binding of deoxyribonucleoside 5′-triphosphates followed by their hydrolysis in the active site of DNA polymerase. It is difficult to study the binding of Mg2+ to an active site because Mg2+ is spectroscopically silent and Mg2+ binds with low affinity to the active site of an enzyme. Therefore, we substituted Mg2+ with Mn2+:Mn2+ that is not only visible spectroscopically but also provides full activity of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7. In order to demonstrate that the majority of Mn2+ is bound to the enzyme, we have applied site-directed titration analysis of T7 DNA polymerase using X-ray near edge spectroscopy. Here we show how X-ray near edge spectroscopy can be used to distinguish between signal originating from Mn2+ that is free in solution and Mn2+ bound to the active site of T7 DNA polymerase. This method can be applied to other enzymes that use divalent metal ions as a cofactor. PMID:23761703

  5. Frataxin directly stimulates mitochondrial cysteine desulfurase by exposing substrate-binding sites, and a mutant Fe-S cluster scaffold protein with frataxin-bypassing ability acts similarly.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Alok; Gordon, Donna M; Pain, Jayashree; Stemmler, Timothy L; Dancis, Andrew; Pain, Debkumar

    2013-12-27

    For iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster synthesis in mitochondria, the sulfur is derived from the amino acid cysteine by the cysteine desulfurase activity of Nfs1. The enzyme binds the substrate cysteine in the pyridoxal phosphate-containing site, and a persulfide is formed on the active site cysteine in a manner depending on the accessory protein Isd11. The persulfide is then transferred to the scaffold Isu, where it combines with iron to form the Fe-S cluster intermediate. Frataxin is implicated in the process, although it is unclear where and how, and deficiency causes Friedreich ataxia. Using purified proteins and isolated mitochondria, we show here that the yeast frataxin homolog (Yfh1) directly and specifically stimulates cysteine binding to Nfs1 by exposing substrate-binding sites. This novel function of frataxin does not require iron, Isu1, or Isd11. Once bound to Nfs1, the substrate cysteine is the source of the Nfs1 persulfide, but this step is independent of frataxin and strictly dependent on Isd11. Recently, a point mutation in Isu1 was found to bypass many frataxin functions. The data presented here show that the Isu1 suppressor mimics the frataxin effects on Nfs1, explaining the bypassing activity. We propose a regulatory mechanism for the Nfs1 persulfide-forming activity. Specifically, at least two separate conformational changes must occur in the enzyme for optimum activity as follows: one is mediated by frataxin interaction that exposes the "buried" substrate-binding sites, and the other is mediated by Isd11 interaction that brings the bound substrate cysteine and the active site cysteine in proximity for persulfide formation.

  6. Directed divergent evolution of a thermostable D-tagatose epimerase towards improved activity for two hexose substrates.

    PubMed

    Bosshart, Andreas; Hee, Chee Seng; Bechtold, Matthias; Schirmer, Tilman; Panke, Sven

    2015-03-01

    Functional promiscuity of enzymes can often be harnessed as the starting point for the directed evolution of novel biocatalysts. Here we describe the divergent morphing of an engineered thermostable variant (Var8) of a promiscuous D-tagatose epimerase (DTE) into two efficient catalysts for the C3 epimerization of D-fructose to D-psicose and of L-sorbose to L-tagatose. Iterative single-site randomization and screening of 48 residues in the first and second shells around the substrate-binding site of Var8 yielded the eight-site mutant IDF8 (ninefold improved kcat for the epimerization of D-fructose) and the six-site mutant ILS6 (14-fold improved epimerization of L-sorbose), compared to Var8. Structure analysis of IDF8 revealed a charged patch at the entrance of its active site; this presumably facilitates entry of the polar substrate. The improvement in catalytic activity of variant ILS6 is thought to relate to subtle changes in the hydration of the bound substrate. The structures can now be used to select additional sites for further directed evolution of the ketohexose epimerase.

  7. Autoantibodies to the thyroid microsomal/thyroid peroxidase antigen are polyclonal and directed to several distinct antigenic sites.

    PubMed Central

    Doble, N D; Banga, J P; Pope, R; Lalor, E; Kilduff, P; McGregor, A M

    1988-01-01

    A detailed examination of the epitopes recognized by autoantibodies (aAbs) to the thyroid microsomal antigen/thyroid peroxidase (TMA/TPO) in patients with thyroid autoimmune disease has been made using a combination of immunochemical and enzymatic techniques. Our results demonstrate the the autoimmune response to thyroid microsomal antigen/thyroid peroxidase (TMA/TPO) is multifocal and far more heterogeneous than hitherto recognized. By immunoblotting with aAbs, antigenic determinants on the TMA/TPO have been recognized that are either susceptible to polypeptide denaturation and/or sensitive to the effects of reducing agents. Furthermore, these aAbs can inhibit, to varying degrees, the enzymatic activity of solubilized preparations of TPO in microsomes, as ascertained by peroxidation of guaiacol and iodide. A large proportion of the autoimmune response is directed to the guaiacol peroxidation site. The data support the view that the autoimmune reactivity to the TMA/TPO is a specific polyclonal response with a minimum of six distinct, independent determinants that are recognized by aAbs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2454886

  8. Site-directed Mutagenesis Switching a Dimethylallyl Tryptophan Synthase to a Specific Tyrosine C3-Prenylating Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Aili; Zocher, Georg; Stec, Edyta; Stehle, Thilo; Li, Shu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The tryptophan prenyltransferases FgaPT2 and 7-DMATS (7-dimethylallyl tryptophan synthase) from Aspergillus fumigatus catalyze C4- and C7-prenylation of the indole ring, respectively. 7-DMATS was found to accept l-tyrosine as substrate as well and converted it to an O-prenylated derivative. An acceptance of l-tyrosine by FgaPT2 was also observed in this study. Interestingly, isolation and structure elucidation revealed the identification of a C3-prenylated l-tyrosine as enzyme product. Molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis led to creation of a mutant FgaPT2_K174F, which showed much higher specificity toward l-tyrosine than l-tryptophan. Its catalytic efficiency toward l-tyrosine was found to be 4.9-fold in comparison with that of non-mutated FgaPT2, whereas the activity toward l-tryptophan was less than 0.4% of that of the wild-type. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on an enzymatic C-prenylation of l-tyrosine as free amino acid and altering the substrate preference of a prenyltransferase by mutagenesis. PMID:25477507

  9. Site-directed mutagenesis of yeast eEF1A. Viable mutants with altered nucleotide specificity.

    PubMed

    Cavallius, J; Merrick, W C

    1998-10-30

    Site-directed mutants of eEF1A (formerly eEF-1alpha) were generated using a modification of a highly versatile yeast shuttle vector (Cavallius, J., Popkie, A. P., and Merrick, W. C. (1997) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1350, 345-358). The nucleotide specificity sequence NKMD (residues number 153-156) was targeted for mutagenesis, and the following mutants were obtained: N153D (DKMD), N153T (TKMD), D156N (NKMN), D156W (NKMW), and the double mutant N153T,D156E (TKNE). All of the yeast strains containing the mutant eEF1As as the sole source of eEF1A were viable except for the N153D mutant. Most of the purified mutant eEF1As had specific activities in the poly(U)-directed synthesis of polyphenylalanine similar to wild type, although with a Km for GTP increased by 1-2 orders of magnitude. The mutants showed a reduced rate of GTP hydrolysis, and most displayed misincorporation rates greater than wild type. The mutant NKMW eEF1A showed unusual properties. The yeast strain was temperature sensitive for growth, although the purified protein was not. Second, this form of eEF1A was 10-fold more accurate in protein synthesis, and its rate of GTP hydrolysis was about 20% of wild type. In total, the wild-type protein contains the most optimal nucleotide specificity sequence, NKMD, and even subtle changes in this sequence have drastic consequences on eEF1A function in vitro or yeast viability. PMID:9786872

  10. DNA abasic site-directed formation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters for selective nucleobase recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kun; Cui, Qinghua; Liu, Guiying; Wu, Fei; Xu, Shujuan; Shao, Yong

    2011-07-01

    DNA single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection has attracted much attention due to mutation related diseases. Various methods for SNP detection have been proposed and many are already in use. Here, we find that the abasic site (AP site) in the DNA duplex can be developed as a capping scaffold for the generation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs). As a proof of concept, the DNA sequences from fragments near codon 177 of cancer supression gene p53 were used as a model for SNP detection by in situ formed Ag NCs. The formation of fluorescent Ag NCs in the AP site-containing DNA duplex is highly selective for cytosine facing the AP site and guanines flanking the site and can be employed in situ as readout for SNP detection. The fluorescent signal-on sensing for SNP based on this inorganic fluorophore is substantially advantageous over the previously reported signal-off responses using low-molecular-weight organic ligands. The strong dependence of fluorescent Ag NC formation on the sequences surrounding the AP site was successfully used to identify mutations in codon 177 of cancer supression gene p53. We anticipate that this approach will be employed to develop a practical SNP detection method by locating an AP site toward the midway cytosine in a target strand containing more than three consecutive cytosines.

  11. Quality control of astrocyte-directed Cre transgenic mice: the benefits of a direct link between loss of gene expression and reporter activation.

    PubMed

    Requardt, Robert Pascal; Kaczmarczyk, Lech; Dublin, Pavel; Wallraff-Beck, Anke; Mikeska, Thomas; Degen, Joachim; Waha, Andreas; Steinhäuser, Christian; Willecke, Klaus; Theis, Martin

    2009-04-15

    Cre recombinase activity for cell-type restricted deletion of floxed target genes (i.e., flanked by Cre recognition loxP-sites) is often measured by separate matings with recombination-activated reporter gene mice. Using a floxed Gja1 (Cx43) allele, we demonstrate the benefits of a direct link between reporter gene expression and target gene deletion to overcome critical limitations of the Cre/loxP system. The widely used human glial fibrillary acidic protein (hGFAP)-Cre transgene exhibits variable recombination activity and requires postexperimental validation. Such quality control is essential to correlate the extent of Cre-mediated Gja1 ablation with phenotypical alterations and to maintain the activity status of hGFAP-Cre in transgenic mouse colonies. We present several strategies to control for the fidelity of hGFAP-Cre mediated recombination. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K.; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)] in vitro and in vivo and that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation. PMID:26711267

  13. Biochemical studies of the multicopper oxidase (small laccase) from Streptomyces coelicolor using bioactive phytochemicals and site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Mohammed; Waung, Debbie; Korbeci, Bihter; Mavisakalyan, Valentina; Flick, Robert; Brown, Greg; Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh; Yakunin, Alexander F; Master, Emma R

    2013-01-01

    Summary Multicopper oxidases can act on a broad spectrum of phenolic and non-phenolic compounds. These enzymes include laccases, which are widely distributed in plants and fungi, and were more recently identified in bacteria. Here, we present the results of biochemical and mutational studies of small laccase (SLAC), a multicopper oxidase from Streptomyces coelicolor (SCO6712). In addition to typical laccase substrates, SLAC was tested using phenolic compounds that exhibit antioxidant activity. SLAC showed oxidase activity against 12 of 23 substrates tested, including caffeic acid, ferulic acid, resveratrol, quercetin, morin, kaempferol and myricetin. The kinetic parameters of SLAC were determined for 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid), 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, quercetin, morin and myricetin, and maximum reaction rates were observed with myricetin, where kcat and Km values at 60°C were 8.1 (± 0.8) s−1 and 0.9 (± 0.3) mM respectively. SLAC had a broad pH optimum for activity (between pH 4 and 8) and temperature optimum at 60–70°C. It demonstrated remarkable thermostability with a half-life of over 10 h at 80°C and over 7 h at 90°C. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed 17 amino acid residues important for SLAC activity including the 10 His residues involved in copper coordination. Most notably, the Y229A and Y230A mutant proteins showed over 10-fold increase in activity compared with the wild-type SLAC, which was correlated to higher copper incorporation, while kinetic analyses with S929A predicts localization of this residue near the meta-position of aromatic substrates. Funding Information Funding for this research was provided by the Government of Ontario for the project ‘FFABnet: Functionalized Fibre and Biochemicals’ (ORF-RE-05-005), and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. PMID:23815400

  14. Endonucleolytic activity directed towards 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl) purines in double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Livneh, Z; Elad, D; Sperling, J

    1979-11-01

    Photoalkylation of circular covalently closed DNA from phage PM2 with isopropyl alcohol by using a free radical photoinitiator and UV light of lambda greater than 305 nm led to the specific 8-substitution of purine moieties in the DNA, yielding 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl)adenine and 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl)guanine as the only detectable damage in the DNA. Using this specifically photoalkylated DNA as a substrate, we discovered in extracts of Micrococcus luteus an endonucleolytic activity that is directed towards 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl) purines in DNA. The activity is not a combination of a DNA-glycosylase and an apurinic site endonuclease. It is not inhibited by single-stranded DNA, by UV- or gamma-irradiated single-stranded DNA, or by normal or depurinated double-stranded DNA. however, gamma- or UV-(254 nm) irradiated double-stranded DNAs to inhibit the activity, hinting at the possibility of a common type of lesion in these damaged DNAs. Divalent cations are not required for the incising activity, and it is fully active in 1 mM EDTA, whereas caffeine and ATP cause inhibition. Extracts of mutant M. luteus lacking pyrimidine-dimer-directed endonucleases were found to contain the endonucleolytic activity in levels comparable to those present in the wild type. After the incision, we could demonstrate the specific excision of the 8-alkylated purines from the damaged DNA. The special conformational consequences of the 8-alkylation of purines, at the nucleotide level, namely their nonregular syn conformation, suggest that it is the distortion in the DNA that is recognized by the endonuclease. PMID:293658

  15. New method for evaluating antibacterial activity directly on fabric.

    PubMed

    Lashen, E S

    1971-04-01

    Bacteriostasis of treated fabric was evaluated directly by a colony count made on the treated fabric after impregnation with seeded agar containing triphenyltetrazolium chloride and incubation in a horizontal, suspended position in a petri dish.

  16. Nanoscale electrochemical patterning reveals the active sites for catechol oxidation at graphite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anisha N; McKelvey, Kim; Unwin, Patrick R

    2012-12-19

    Graphite-based electrodes (graphite, graphene, and nanotubes) are used widely in electrochemistry, and there is a long-standing view that graphite step edges are needed to catalyze many reactions, with the basal surface considered to be inert. In the present work, this model was tested directly for the first time using scanning electrochemical cell microscopy reactive patterning and shown to be incorrect. For the electro-oxidation of dopamine as a model process, the reaction rate was measured at high spatial resolution across a surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Oxidation products left behind in a pattern defined by the scanned electrochemical cell served as surface-site markers, allowing the electrochemical activity to be correlated directly with the graphite structure on the nanoscale. This process produced tens of thousands of electrochemical measurements at different locations across the basal surface, unambiguously revealing it to be highly electrochemically active, with step edges providing no enhanced activity. This new model of graphite electrodes has significant implications for the design of carbon-based biosensors, and the results are additionally important for understanding electrochemical processes on related sp(2)-hybridized materials such as pristine graphene and nanotubes.

  17. Practical 4′-Phosphopantetheine Active Site Discovery from Proteomic Samples

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Jordan L.; Patel, Anand D.; Niessen, Sherry; Meehan, Michael; Kersten, Roland; Yang, Jane Y.; Rothmann, Michael; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Dorrestein, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    Polyketide and nonribosomal peptides constitute important classes of small molecule natural products. Due to the proven biological activities of these compounds, novel methods for discovery and study of the polyketide synthase (PKS) and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) enzymes responsible for their production remains an area of intense interest, and proteomic approaches represent a relatively unexplored avenue. While these enzymes may be distinguished from the proteomic milieu by their use of the 4′-phosphopantetheine (PPant) posttranslational modification, proteomic detection of PPant peptides is hindered by their low abundance and labile nature which leaves them unassigned using traditional database searching. Here we address key experimental and computational challenges to facilitate practical discovery of this important posttranslational modification during shotgun proteomics analysis using low-resolution ion-trap mass spectrometers. Activity-based enrichment maximizes MS input of PKS/NRPS peptides, while targeted fragmentation detects putative PPant active sites. An improved data analysis pipeline allows experimental identification and validation of these PPant peptides directly from MS2 data. Finally, a machine learning approach is developed to directly detect PPant peptides from only MS2 fragmentation data. By providing new methods for analysis of an often cryptic posttranslational modification, these methods represent a first step towards the study of natural product biosynthesis in proteomic settings. PMID:21067235

  18. Kindlin-2 cooperates with talin to activate integrins and induces cell spreading by directly binding paxillin

    PubMed Central

    Theodosiou, Marina; Widmaier, Moritz; Böttcher, Ralph T; Rognoni, Emanuel; Veelders, Maik; Bharadwaj, Mitasha; Lambacher, Armin; Austen, Katharina; Müller, Daniel J; Zent, Roy; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Integrins require an activation step prior to ligand binding and signaling. How talin and kindlin contribute to these events in non-hematopoietic cells is poorly understood. Here we report that fibroblasts lacking either talin or kindlin failed to activate β1 integrins, adhere to fibronectin (FN) or maintain their integrins in a high affinity conformation induced by Mn2+. Despite compromised integrin activation and adhesion, Mn2+ enabled talin- but not kindlin-deficient cells to initiate spreading on FN. This isotropic spreading was induced by the ability of kindlin to directly bind paxillin, which in turn bound focal adhesion kinase (FAK) resulting in FAK activation and the formation of lamellipodia. Our findings show that talin and kindlin cooperatively activate integrins leading to FN binding and adhesion, and that kindlin subsequently assembles an essential signaling node at newly formed adhesion sites in a talin-independent manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10130.001 PMID:26821125

  19. Identification by site-directed mutagenesis of three essential histidine residues in membrane dipeptidase, a novel mammalian zinc peptidase.

    PubMed

    Keynan, S; Hooper, N M; Turner, A J

    1997-08-15

    Membrane dipeptidase (EC 3.4.13.19) is a plasma membrane zinc peptidase that is involved in the renal metabolism of glutathione and its conjugates, such as leukotriene D4. The enzyme lacks the classical signatures of other zinc-dependent hydrolases and shows no homology with any other mammalian protein. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to explore the roles of five histidine residues in pig membrane dipeptidase that are conserved among mammalian species. When expressed in COS-1 cells, the mutants H49K and H128L exhibited a specific activity and Km for the substrate Gly-D-Phe comparable with those of the wild-type enzyme. However, the mutants H20L, H152L and H198K were inactive, but were expressed at the cell surface at equivalent levels to the wild-type, as assessed by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. These three mutants were compared with regard to their ability to bind to the competitive inhibitor cilastatin, which binds with equal efficacy to native and EDTA-treated pig kidney membrane dipeptidase. Expressed wild-type enzyme and mutants H20L and H198K were efficiently bound by cilastatin-Sepharose, but H152L failed to bind. Thus His-152 appears to be involved in the binding of substrate or inhibitor, whereas His-20 and His-198 appear to be involved in catalysis. Membrane dipeptidase shares some similarity with a dipeptidase recently cloned from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. In particular, His-20 and His-198 of membrane dipeptidase are conserved in the bacterial enzyme, as are Glu-125 and His-219, previously shown to be required for catalytic activity.

  20. Characterization of cyclo-Acetoacetyl-L-Tryptophan Dimethylallyltransferase in Cyclopiazonic Acid Biosynthesis: Substrate Promiscuity and Site Directed Mutagenesis Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyu; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2009-01-01

    The fungal neurotoxin α-cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), a nanomolar inhibitor of Ca2+-ATPase with a unique pentacyclic indole tetramic acid scaffold is assembled by a three enzyme pathway CpaS, CpaD and CpaO in Aspergillus sp. We recently characterized the first pathway-specific enzyme CpaS, a hybrid two module polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS) that generates cyclo-acetoacetyl-L-tryptophan (cAATrp). Here we report the characterization of the second pathway-specific enzyme CpaD that regiospecifically dimethylallylates cAATrp to form β-cyclopiazonic acid. By exploring the tryptophan and tetramate moieties of cAATrp, we demonstrate that CpaD discriminates against free Trp but accepts tryptophan-containing thiohydantoins, diketopiperazines and linear peptides as substrates for C4-prenylation and also acts as regiospecific O-dimethylallyltransferase (DMAT) on a tyrosine-derived tetramic acid. Comparative evaluation of CpaDs from A. oryzae RIB40 and A. flavus NRRL3357 indicated the importance of the N-terminal region for its activity. Sequence alignment of CpaD with eleven homologous fungal Trp-DMATs revealed five regions of conservation suggesting the presense of critical motifs that could be diagonostic for discovering additional Trp-DMATs. Subsequent site-directed mutagenesis studies identified five polar/charged residues and five tyrosine residues within these motifs that are critical for CpaD activity. This motif characerization will enable a gene probe-based approach to discover additional biosynthetic Trp-DMATs. PMID:19877600

  1. Future Directions of Inquiry in Adapted Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Greg

    2000-01-01

    Sketches some future trends of inquiry in adapted physical activity. These include investigation into ethics in adapted physical activity. Empirically based issues of inquiry include physical activity as a dependent measure, diverse and changing populations, theoretical and applied research, nomothetic and idiographic research perspectives,…

  2. Structure-guided inhibitor design for human FAAH by interspecies active site conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Mileni, Mauro; Johnson, Douglas S.; Wang, Zhigang; Everdeen, Daniel S.; Liimatta, Marya; Pabst, Brandon; Bhattacharya, Keshab; Nugent, Richard A.; Kamtekar, Satwik; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Ahn, Kay; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2008-11-24

    The integral membrane enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) hydrolyzes the endocannabinoid anandamide and related amidated signaling lipids. Genetic or pharmacological inactivation of FAAH produces analgesic, anxiolytic, and antiinflammatory phenotypes but not the undesirable side effects of direct cannabinoid receptor agonists, indicating that FAAH may be a promising therapeutic target. Structure-based inhibitor design has, however, been hampered by difficulties in expressing the human FAAH enzyme. Here, we address this problem by interconverting the active sites of rat and human FAAH using site-directed mutagenesis. The resulting humanized rat (h/r) FAAH protein exhibits the inhibitor sensitivity profiles of human FAAH but maintains the high-expression yield of the rat enzyme. We report a 2.75-{angstrom} crystal structure of h/rFAAH complexed with an inhibitor, N-phenyl-4-(quinolin-3-ylmethyl)piperidine-1-carboxamide (PF-750), that shows strong preference for human FAAH. This structure offers compelling insights to explain the species selectivity of FAAH inhibitors, which should guide future drug design programs.

  3. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  4. Probing the active site of cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 (Ll-CCRH1) from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant; Patel, Krunal; Vishwakarma, Rishi Kishore; Srivastava, Sameer; Singh, Somesh; Gaikwad, Sushama; Khan, Bashir M

    2013-09-01

    Lack of three dimensional crystal structure of cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) limits its detailed active site characterization studies. Putative active site residues involved in the substrate/NADPH binding and catalysis for Leucaena leucocephala CCR (Ll-CCRH1; GenBank: DQ986907) were identified by amino acid sequence alignment and homology modeling. Putative active site residues and proximal H215 were subjected for site directed mutagenesis, and mutated enzymes were expressed, purified and assayed to confirm their functional roles. Mutagenesis of S136, Y170 and K174 showed complete loss of activity, indicating their pivotal roles in catalysis. Mutant S212G exhibited the catalytic efficiencies less than 10% of wild type, showing its indirect involvement in substrate binding or catalysis. R51G, D77G, F30V and I31N double mutants showed significant changes in Km values, specifying their roles in substrate binding. Finally, chemical modification and substrate protection studies corroborated the presence Ser, Tyr, Lys, Arg and carboxylate group at the active site of Ll-CCRH1. PMID:23688416

  5. Nucleotide replacement at two sites can be directed by modified single-stranded oligonucleotides in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sheba; Gamper, Howard B; Kmiec, Eric B

    2003-01-01

    Studies involving the alteration of DNA sequences by modified single-stranded oligonucleotides in vitro and in vivo have revealed potential applications for functional genomics. Repair of a replacement, deletion, or insertion mutation has already been achieved with molecules having lengths between 25 and 74 bases. But, other vector parameters still remain to be explored. Here, the position of the single base in the vector directing the alteration was examined and the optimal site was found to be at or near the center of the vector. If that position is staggered 3' or 5', the frequencies of gene repair in vitro decreases. The potential of a single vector to direct two nucleotide changes at a specific site in a target sequence was also examined. Both targeted bases are corrected together at the same frequency if the sites are separated by three bases, but conversion linkage decreases precipitously when the distance is expanded to 15 and 27 nucleotides, respectively. These results suggest that single oligonucleotides can be used to direct nucleotide exchange at two independent sites, a reaction characteristic that may be useful for many genomics applications.

  6. Slimhole drilling and directional drilling for on-site inspections under a Comprehensive Test Ban: An initial assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F. E.

    1995-07-01

    On Site-Inspection (OSI), under the Comprehensive Test Ban being negotiated in the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva, may include drilling at the site of a suspected clandestine underground nuclear explosion to recover radioactive samples. It is in the interest of the drilling party to operate as light and compact a system as possible because it is likely that the drilling equipment will first be airlifted to the country being inspected, and then will be carried by air or surface to the inspection site. It will be necessary for the inspection party to have the capability for more than vertical drilling since there may not be a drilling site available vertically above the suspected nuclear cavity location. This means having, the ability to perform directional drilling and to obtain accurate positioning of the drilling tool. Consequently, several directions may be explored from a single surface drilling pad. If the target depth is expected to be at or less than 600 m (2000 ft), slant drilling may be required to a length well in excess of 600 m. Clearly, the operation must be designed with health and safety features to prevent radioactive exposure if the drilling encounters a nuclear source region. The DOE/LLNL community has developed a strong expertise in this regard. In this initial assessment we focus on the portability and directionality of drilling systems.

  7. An ionizable active-site tryptophan imparts catalase activity to a peroxidase core.

    PubMed

    Loewen, Peter C; Carpena, Xavi; Vidossich, Pietro; Fita, Ignacio; Rovira, Carme

    2014-05-21

    Catalase peroxidases (KatG's) are bifunctional heme proteins that can disproportionate hydrogen peroxide (catalatic reaction) despite their structural dissimilarity with monofunctional catalases. Using X-ray crystallography and QM/MM calculations, we demonstrate that the catalatic reaction of KatG's involves deprotonation of the active-site Trp, which plays a role similar to that of the distal His in monofunctional catalases. The interaction of a nearby mobile arginine with the distal Met-Tyr-Trp essential adduct (in/out) acts as an electronic switch, triggering deprotonation of the adduct Trp.

  8. Nuclear Site Security in the Event of Terrorist Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M.L.; Sims, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper, presented as a poster, identifies why ballistic protection should now be considered at nuclear sites to counter terrorist threats. A proven and flexible form of multi purpose protection is described in detail with identification of trial results that show its suitability for this role. (authors)

  9. Estimating Am-241 activity in the body: comparison of direct measurements and radiochemical analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Timothy P.; Tolmachev, Sergei Y.; James, Anthony C.

    2009-06-01

    The assessment of dose and ultimately the health risk from intakes of radioactive materials begins with estimating the amount actually taken into the body. An accurate estimate provides the basis to best assess the distribution in the body, the resulting dose, and ultimately the health risk. This study continues the time-honored practice of evaluating the accuracy of results obtained using in vivo measurement methods and techniques. Results from the radiochemical analyses of the 241Am activity content of tissues and organs from four donors to the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries were compared to the results from direct measurements of radioactive material in the body performed in vivo and post mortem. Two were whole body donations and two were partial body donations The skeleton was the organ with the highest deposition of 241Am activity in all four cases. The activities ranged from 30 Bq to 300 Bq. The skeletal estimates obtained from measurements over the forehead were within 20% of the radiochemistry results in three cases and differed by 78% in one case. The 241Am lung activity estimates ranged from 1 Bq to 30 Bq in the four cases. The results from the direct measurements were within 40% of the radiochemistry results in 3 cases and within a factor of 3 for the other case. The direct measurement estimates of liver activity ranged from 2 Bq to 60 Bq and were generally lower than the radiochemistry results. The results from this study suggest that the measurement methods and calibration techniques used at the In Vivo Radiobioassay and Research Facility to quantify the activity in the lungs, skeleton and liver are reasonable under the most challenging conditions where there is 241Am activity in multiple organs. These methods and techniques are comparable to those used at other Department of Energy sites. This suggests that the current in vivo methods and calibration techniques provide reasonable estimates of radioactive material in the body. Not

  10. Mutational analysis of the active site of indoleglycerol phosphate synthase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Darimont, B.; Stehlin, C.; Szadkowski, H.; Kirschner, K.

    1998-01-01

    Indoleglycerol phosphate synthase catalyzes the ring closure of 1-(2-carboxyphenylamino)-1-deoxyribulose 5'-phosphate to indoleglycerol phosphate, the fifth step in the pathway of tryptophan biosynthesis from chorismate. Because chemical synthesis of indole derivatives from arylamino ketones requires drastic solvent conditions, it is interesting by what mechanism the enzyme catalyzes the same condensation reaction. Seven invariant polar residues in the active site of the enzyme from Escherichia coli have been mutated directly or randomly, to identify the catalytically essential ones. A strain of E. coli suitable for selecting and classifying active mutants by functional complementation was constructed by precise deletion of the trpC gene from the genome. Judged by growth rates of transformants on selective media, mutants with either S58 or S60 replaced by alanine were indistinguishable from the wild-type, but R186 replaced by alanine was still partially active. Saturation random mutagenesis of individual codons showed that E53 was partially replaceable by aspartate and cysteine, whereas K114, E163, and N184 could not be replaced by any other residue. Partially active mutant proteins were purified and their steady-state kinetic and inhibitor binding constants determined. Their relative catalytic efficiencies paralleled their relative complementation efficiencies. These results are compatible with the location of the essential residues in the active site of the enzyme and support a chemically plausible catalytic mechanism. It involves two enzyme-bound intermediates and general acid-base catalysis by K114 and E163 with the support of E53 and N184. PMID:9605328

  11. Mapping membrane protein backbone dynamics: a comparison of site-directed spin labeling with NMR 15N-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Solomon, Tsega L; Columbus, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The ability to detect nanosecond backbone dynamics with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in soluble proteins has been well established. However, for membrane proteins, the nitroxide appears to have more interactions with the protein surface, potentially hindering the sensitivity to backbone motions. To determine whether membrane protein backbone dynamics could be mapped with SDSL, a nitroxide was introduced at 55 independent sites in a model polytopic membrane protein, TM0026. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral parameters were compared with NMR (15)N-relaxation data. Sequential scans revealed backbone dynamics with the same trends observed for the R1 relaxation rate, suggesting that nitroxide dynamics remain coupled to the backbone on membrane proteins.

  12. Active Layer and Moisture Measurements for Intensive Site 0 and 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-04-17

    These are measurements of Active Layer Thickness collected along several lines beginning in September, 2011 to the present. The data were collected at several time periods along the Site0 L2 Line, the Site1 AB Line, and an ERT Monitoring Line near Area A in Site1.

  13. Seismic Hazard Maps for Seattle, Washington, Incorporating 3D Sedimentary Basin Effects, Nonlinear Site Response, and Rupture Directivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur D.; Stephenson, William J.; Carver, David L.; Williams, Robert A.; Odum, Jack K.; Rhea, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This report presents probabilistic seismic hazard maps for Seattle, Washington, based on over 500 3D simulations of ground motions from scenario earthquakes. These maps include 3D sedimentary basin effects and rupture directivity. Nonlinear site response for soft-soil sites of fill and alluvium was also applied in the maps. The report describes the methodology for incorporating source and site dependent amplification factors into a probabilistic seismic hazard calculation. 3D simulations were conducted for the various earthquake sources that can affect Seattle: Seattle fault zone, Cascadia subduction zone, South Whidbey Island fault, and background shallow and deep earthquakes. The maps presented in this document used essentially the same set of faults and distributed-earthquake sources as in the 2002 national seismic hazard maps. The 3D velocity model utilized in the simulations was validated by modeling the amplitudes and waveforms of observed seismograms from five earthquakes in the region, including the 2001 M6.8 Nisqually earthquake. The probabilistic seismic hazard maps presented here depict 1 Hz response spectral accelerations with 10%, 5%, and 2% probabilities of exceedance in 50 years. The maps are based on determinations of seismic hazard for 7236 sites with a spacing of 280 m. The maps show that the most hazardous locations for this frequency band (around 1 Hz) are soft-soil sites (fill and alluvium) within the Seattle basin and along the inferred trace of the frontal fault of the Seattle fault zone. The next highest hazard is typically found for soft-soil sites in the Duwamish Valley south of the Seattle basin. In general, stiff-soil sites in the Seattle basin exhibit higher hazard than stiff-soil sites outside the basin. Sites with shallow bedrock outside the Seattle basin have the lowest estimated hazard for this frequency band.

  14. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine

    PubMed Central

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO2. We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O2 and CO2 bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO2 defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg2+ surrounded by three H2O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming. PMID:23112176

  15. Site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modelling studies show the role of Asp82 and cysteines in rat acylase 1, a member of the M20 family

    SciTech Connect

    Herga, Sameh; Brutus, Alexandre; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Miche, Helene; Perrier, Josette; Puigserver, Antoine; Scaloni, Andrea; Giardina, Thierry . E-mail: thierry.giardina@univ.u-3mrs.fr

    2005-05-06

    Acylase 1 from rat kidney catalyzes the hydrolysis of acyl-amino acids. Sequence alignment has shown that this enzyme belongs to the metalloprotein family M20. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments led to the identification of one functionally important amino acid residue located near one of the zinc coordinating residues, which play a critical role in the enzymatic activity. The D82N- and D82E-substituted forms showed no significant activity and very low activity, respectively, along with a loss of zinc coordination. Molecular modelling investigations indicated a putative role of D82 in ensuring a proper protonation of catalytic histidine. In addition, none of the five cysteine residues present in the rat kidney acylase 1 sequence seemed involved in the catalytic process: the loss of activity induced by the C294A substitution was probably due to a conformational change in the 3D structure.

  16. Using catalytic atom maps to predict the catalytic functions present in enzyme active sites.

    PubMed

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R; Houk, K N

    2012-09-18

    Catalytic atom maps (CAMs) are minimal models of enzyme active sites. The structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were examined to determine if proteins with CAM-like geometries in their active sites all share the same catalytic function. We combined the CAM-based search protocol with a filter based on the weighted contact number (WCN) of the catalytic residues, a measure of the "crowdedness" of the microenvironment around a protein residue. Using this technique, a CAM based on the Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad of trypsin was able to correctly identify catalytic triads in other enzymes within 0.5 Å rmsd of the CAM with 96% accuracy. A CAM based on the Cys-Arg-(Asp/Glu) active site residues from the tyrosine phosphatase active site achieved 89% accuracy in identifying this type of catalytic functionality. Both of these CAMs were able to identify active sites across different fold types. Finally, the PDB was searched to locate proteins with catalytic functionality similar to that present in the active site of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase), whose mechanism is not known with certainty. A CAM, based on the conserved Lys-Asp-Lys-Asp tetrad in the ODCase active site, was used to search the PDB for enzymes with similar active sites. The ODCase active site has a geometry similar to that of Schiff base-forming Class I aldolases, with lowest aldolase rmsd to the ODCase CAM at 0.48 Å. The similarity between this CAM and the aldolase active site suggests that ODCase has the correct catalytic functionality present in its active site for the generation of a nucleophilic lysine. PMID:22909276

  17. Using Catalytic Atom Maps to Predict the Catalytic Functions Present in Enzyme Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R.; Houk, K. N.

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic Atom Maps (CAMs) are minimal models of enzyme active sites. The structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were examined to determine if proteins with CAM-like geometries in their active sites all share the same catalytic function. We combined the CAM-based search protocol with a filter based on the weighted contact number (WCN) of the catalytic residues, a measure of the “crowdedness” of the microenvironment around a protein residue. Using this technique, a CAM based on the Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad of trypsin was able to correctly identify catalytic triads in other enzymes within 0.5 Å RMSD of the Catalytic Atom Map with 96% accuracy. A CAM based on the Cys-Arg-(Asp/Glu) active site residues from the tyrosine phosphatase active site achieved 89% accuracy in identifying this type of catalytic functionality. Both of these Catalytic Atom Maps were able to identify active sites across different fold types. Finally, the PDB was searched to locate proteins with catalytic functionality similar to that present in the active site of orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase), whose mechanism is not known with certainty. A CAM, based on the conserved Lys-Asp-Lys-Asp tetrad in the ODCase active site, was used to search the PDB for enzymes with similar active sites. The ODCase active site has a geometry similar to that of Schiff base-forming Class I aldolases, with lowest aldolase RMSD to the ODCase CAM at 0.48 Å. The similarity between this CAM and the aldolase active site suggests that ODCase has the correct catalytic functionality present in its active site for the generation of a nucleophilic lysine. PMID:22909276

  18. Roles of Conserved Active Site Residues in the Ketosynthase Domain of an Assembly Line Polyketide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Thomas; Kapilivsky, Joshuah; Cane, David E; Khosla, Chaitan

    2016-08-16

    Ketosynthase (KS) domains of assembly line polyketide synthases (PKSs) catalyze intermodular translocation of the growing polyketide chain as well as chain elongation via decarboxylative Claisen condensation. The mechanistic roles of ten conserved residues in the KS domain of Module 1 of the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase were interrogated via site-directed mutagenesis and extensive biochemical analysis. Although the C211A mutant at the KS active site exhibited no turnover activity, it was still a competent methylmalonyl-ACP decarboxylase. The H346A mutant exhibited reduced rates of both chain translocation and chain elongation, with a greater effect on the latter half-reaction. H384 contributed to methylmalonyl-ACP decarboxylation, whereas K379 promoted C-C bond formation. S315 played a role in coupling decarboxylation to C-C bond formation. These findings support a mechanism for the translocation and elongation half-reactions that provides a well-defined starting point for further analysis of the key chain-building domain in assembly line PKSs.

  19. Multiple, Ligand-Dependent Routes from the Active Site of Cytochrome P450 2C9

    SciTech Connect

    Cojocaru, Vlad; Winn, Peter J.; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-02-13

    The active site of liver-specific, drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenases is deeply buried in the protein and is connected to the protein surface through multiple tunnels, many of which were found open in different CYP crystal structures. It has been shown that different tunnels could serve as ligand passage routes in different CYPs. However, it is not understood whether one CYP uses multiple routes for substrate access and product release and whether these routes depend on ligand properties. From 300 ns of molecular dynamics simulations of CYP2C9, the second most abundant CYP in the human liver we found four main ligand exit routes, the occurrence of each depending on the ligand type and the conformation of the F-G loop, which is likely to be affected by the CYP-membrane interaction. A non-helical F-G loop favored exit towards the putative membrane-embedded region. Important protein features that direct ligand exit include aromatic residues that divide the active site and whose motions control access to two pathways. The ligands interacted with positively charged residues on the protein surface through hydrogen bonds that appear to select for acidic substrates. The observation of multiple, ligand-dependent routes in a CYP aids understanding of how CYP mutations affect drug metabolism and provides new possibilities for CYP inhibition.

  20. Leaving Group Ability Observably Affects Transition State Structure in a Single Enzyme Active Site.

    PubMed

    Roston, Daniel; Demapan, Darren; Cui, Qiang

    2016-06-15

    A reaction's transition state (TS) structure plays a critical role in determining reactivity and has important implications for the design of catalysts, drugs, and other applications. Here, we explore TS structure in the enzyme alkaline phosphatase using hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics simulations. We find that minor perturbations to the substrate have major effects on TS structure and the way the enzyme stabilizes the TS. Substrates with good leaving groups (LGs) have little cleavage of the phosphorus-LG bond at the TS, while substrates with poor LGs have substantial cleavage of that bond. The results predict nonlinear free energy relationships for a single rate-determining step, and substantial differences in kinetic isotope effects for different substrates; both trends were observed in previous experimental studies, although the original interpretations differed from the present model. Moreover, due to different degrees of phosphorus-LG bond cleavage at the TS for different substrates, the LG is stabilized by different interactions at the TS: while a poor LG is directly stabilized by an active site zinc ion, a good LG is mainly stabilized by active site water molecules. Our results demonstrate the considerable plasticity of TS structure and stabilization in enzymes. Furthermore, perturbations to reactivity that probe TS structure experimentally (i.e., substituent effects) may substantially perturb the TS they aim to probe, and thus classical experimental approaches such as free energy relations should be interpreted with care. PMID:27186960

  1. Roles of Conserved Active Site Residues in the Ketosynthase Domain of an Assembly Line Polyketide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Thomas; Kapilivsky, Joshuah; Cane, David E; Khosla, Chaitan

    2016-08-16

    Ketosynthase (KS) domains of assembly line polyketide synthases (PKSs) catalyze intermodular translocation of the growing polyketide chain as well as chain elongation via decarboxylative Claisen condensation. The mechanistic roles of ten conserved residues in the KS domain of Module 1 of the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase were interrogated via site-directed mutagenesis and extensive biochemical analysis. Although the C211A mutant at the KS active site exhibited no turnover activity, it was still a competent methylmalonyl-ACP decarboxylase. The H346A mutant exhibited reduced rates of both chain translocation and chain elongation, with a greater effect on the latter half-reaction. H384 contributed to methylmalonyl-ACP decarboxylation, whereas K379 promoted C-C bond formation. S315 played a role in coupling decarboxylation to C-C bond formation. These findings support a mechanism for the translocation and elongation half-reactions that provides a well-defined starting point for further analysis of the key chain-building domain in assembly line PKSs. PMID:27441852

  2. Novel assay for direct fluorescent imaging of sialidase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomin, A.; Shkandina, T.; Bilyy, R.

    2011-07-01

    Here we describe a novel approach to sialidase activity estimation. Sialidases (EC 3.2.1.18, exo-α-sialidases), also known as neuraminidases, are the group of enzymes, which hydrolyze the glycoside bound between terminal sialic acid and subsequent carbohydrate residue in glycoproteins and glycolipids. Sialic acids are the group of monosaccharides with acidic properties, since they are acetylated or glycolylated derivates of neuraminic acid. Flu and some other viruses use neuraminidase activity to infect host cells. The level of sialylation was shown to be tightly connected with tumor cell invasiveness and metastatic potential, sialylation level also determines the clearance of aged or virus-infected cells. Thus, detection of sialidase activity is of primary importance for clinical diagnostics as well as life science research. The authors developed the assay for both visualization and estimation of sialidase activity in living cells. Previously known methods for sialidase activity detection required destruction of cellular material, or were low-sensitive, or provided no information on the activity localization in certain intracellular compartment. To overcome these problems, a fluorogenic neuraminidase substrate, 4-MUNA was utilized, and the method for detection of neuraminidase activity using fluorescent microscopy was proposed, it provided a high signal level and information on cellular localization of the studied enzyme. By using this approach the increase of sialidase activity on apoptotic cells was demonstrated in comparison to viable and primary necrotic cells.

  3. FSA future directions: FSA technology activities in FY86

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    The silicon material, advanced silicon sheet, device research, and process research activities are explained. There will be no new initiatives. Many activities are targeted for completion and the emphasis will then be on technology transfer. Industrial development of the fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) deposition technology is proceeding. Technology transfer and industry funding of sheet development are continuing.

  4. A Conserved Surface Loop in Type I Dehydroquinate Dehydratases Positions an Active Site Arginine and Functions in Substrate Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Peterson, Scott N.; Caffrey, Michael; Anderson, Wayne F.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-04-18

    Dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD) catalyzes the third step in the biosynthetic shikimate pathway. We presen