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Sample records for active site disulfide

  1. The role of short-range Cys171-Cys178 disulfide bond in maintaining cutinase active site integrity: A molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Matak, Mehdi Youssefi; Moghaddam, Majid Erfani

    2009-12-11

    Understanding structural determinants in enzyme active site integrity can provide a good knowledge to design efficient novel catalytic machineries. Fusarium solani pisi cutinase with classic triad Ser-His-Asp is a promising enzyme to scrutinize these structural determinants. We performed two MD simulations: one, with the native structure, and the other with the broken Cys171-Cys178 disulfide bond. This disulfide bond stabilizes a turn in active site on which catalytic Asp175 is located. Functionally important H-bonds and atomic fluctuations in catalytic pocket have been changed. We proposed that this disulfide bond within active site can be considered as an important determinant of cutinase active site structural integrity.

  2. Localization of the labile disulfide bond between SU and TM of the murine leukemia virus envelope protein complex to a highly conserved CWLC motif in SU that resembles the active-site sequence of thiol-disulfide exchange enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Pinter, A; Kopelman, R; Li, Z; Kayman, S C; Sanders, D A

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits of the envelope protein (Env) of murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) are joined by a labile disulfide bond that can be stabilized by treatment of virions with thiol-specific reagents. In the present study this observation was extended to the Envs of additional classes of MuLV, and the cysteines of SU involved in this linkage were mapped by proteolytic fragmentation analyses to the CWLC sequence present at the beginning of the C-terminal domain of SU. This sequence is highly conserved across a broad range of distantly related retroviruses and resembles the CXXC motif present at the active site of thiol-disulfide exchange enzymes. A model is proposed in which rearrangements of the SU-TM intersubunit disulfide linkage, mediated by the CWLC sequence, play roles in the assembly and function of the Env complex. PMID:9311907

  3. Electrostatic stabilization and general base catalysis in the active site of the human protein disulfide isomerase a domain monitored by hydrogen exchange.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Griselda; Anderson, Janet S; LeMaster, David M

    2008-03-25

    The nucleophilic Cys36 thiol of the human protein disulfide isomerase a domain is positioned over the N terminus of the alpha(2) helix. Amides in the active site exhibit diffusion-limited, hydroxide-catalyzed exchange, indicating that the local positive electrostatic potential decreases the pK value for peptide anion formation by at least 2 units so as to equal or exceed the acidity of water. In stark contrast to the pH dependence of exchange for simple peptides, the His38 amide in the reduced enzyme exhibits a maximum rate of exchange at pH 5 due to efficient general base catalysis by the neutral imidazole of its own side chain and suppression of its exchange by the ionization of the Cys36 thiol. Ionization of this thiol and deprotonation of the His38 side chain suppress the Cys39 amide hydroxide-catalyzed exchange by a million-fold. The electrostatic potential within the active site monitored by these exchange experiments provides a means of stabilizing the two distinct transition states that lead to substrate reduction and oxidation. Molecular modeling offers a role for the conserved Arg103 in coordinating the oxidative transition-state complex, thus providing further support for mechanisms of disulfide isomerization that utilize enzymatic catalysis at each step of the overall reaction.

  4. Disulfide Bond Requirements for Active Wnt Ligands*

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Bryan T.; Hien, Annie; Zhang, Xinjun; Iranloye, Oladoyin; Virshup, David M.; Waterman, Marian L.; He, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Secreted Wnt lipoproteins are cysteine-rich and lipid-modified morphogens that bind to the Frizzled (FZD) receptor and LDL receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6). Wnt engages FZD through protruding thumb and index finger domains, which are each assembled from paired β strands secured by disulfide bonds and grasp two sides of the FZD ectodomain. The importance of Wnt disulfide bonds has been assumed but uncharacterized. We systematically analyzed cysteines and associated disulfide bonds in the prototypic Wnt3a. Our data show that mutation of any individual cysteine of Wnt3a results in covalent Wnt oligomers through ectopic intermolecular disulfide bond formation and diminishes/abolishes Wnt signaling. Although individual cysteine mutations in the amino part of the saposin-like domain and in the base of the index finger are better tolerated and permit residual Wnt3a secretion/activity, those in the amino terminus, the thumb, and at the tip of the index finger are incompatible with secretion and/or activity. A few select double cysteine mutants based on the disulfide bond pattern restore Wnt secretion/activity. Further, a double cysteine mutation at the index finger tip results in a Wnt3a with normal secretion but minimal FZD binding and dominant negative properties. Our results experimentally validate predictions from the Wnt crystal structure and highlight critical but different roles of the saposin-like and cytokine-like domains, including the thumb and the index finger in Wnt folding/secretion and FZD binding. Finally, we modified existing expression vectors for 19 epitope-tagged human WNT proteins by removal of a tag-supplied ectopic cysteine, thereby generating tagged WNT ligands active in canonical and non-canonical signaling. PMID:24841207

  5. Steps in reductive activation of the disulfide-generating enzyme Ero1p

    PubMed Central

    Heldman, Nimrod; Vonshak, Ohad; Sevier, Carolyn S; Vitu, Elvira; Mehlman, Tevie; Fass, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Ero1p is the primary catalyst of disulfide bond formation in the yeast endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Ero1p contains a pair of essential disulfide bonds that participate directly in the electron transfer pathway from substrate thiol groups to oxygen. Remarkably, elimination of certain other Ero1p disulfides by mutation enhances enzyme activity. In particular, the C150A/C295A Ero1p mutant exhibits increased thiol oxidation in vitro and in vivo and interferes with redox homeostasis in yeast cells by hyperoxidizing the ER. Inhibitory disulfides of Ero1p are thus important for enzyme regulation. To visualize the differences between de-regulated and wild-type Ero1p, we determined the crystal structure of Ero1p C150A/C295A. The structure revealed local changes compared to the wild-type enzyme around the sites of mutation, but no conformational transitions within 25 Å of the active site were observed. To determine how the C150—C295 disulfide nonetheless participates in redox regulation of Ero1p, we analyzed using mass spectrometry the changes in Ero1p disulfide connectivity as a function of time after encounter with reducing substrates. We found that the C150—C295 disulfide sets a physiologically appropriate threshold for enzyme activation by guarding a key neighboring disulfide from reduction. This study illustrates the diverse and interconnected roles that disulfides can play in redox regulation of protein activity. PMID:20669236

  6. Steric effects in peptide and protein exchange with activated disulfides.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jason; Schlosser, Jessica L; Griffin, Donald R; Wong, Darice Y; Kasko, Andrea M

    2013-08-12

    Disulfide exchange is an important bioconjugation tool, enabling chemical modification of peptides and proteins containing free cysteines. We previously reported the synthesis of a macromer bearing an activated disulfide and its incorporation into hydrogels. Despite their ability to diffuse freely into hydrogels, larger proteins were unable to undergo in-gel disulfide exchange. In order to understand this phenomenon, we synthesized four different activated disulfide-bearing model compounds (Mn = 300 Da to 10 kDa) and quantified their rate of disulfide exchange with a small peptide (glutathione), a moderate-sized protein (β-lactoglobulin), and a large protein (bovine serum albumin) in four different pH solutions (6.0, 7.0, 7.4, and 8.0) to mimic biological systems. Rate constants of exchange depend significantly on the size and accessibility of the thiolate. pH also significantly affects the rate of reaction, with the faster reactions occurring at higher pH. Surprisingly, little difference in exchange rates is seen between macromolecular disulfides of varying size (Mn = 2 kDa - 10 kDa), although all undergo exchange more slowly than their small molecule analogue (MW = 300 g/mol). The maximum exchange efficiencies (% disulfides exchanged after 24 h) are not siginificantly affected by thiol size or pH, but somewhat affected by disulfide size. Therefore, while all three factors investigated (pH, disulfide size, and thiolate size) can influence the exchange kinetics and extent of reaction, the size of the thiolate and its accessibility plays the most significant role.

  7. Role of disulfide bridges in the activity and stability of a cold-active alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail; Poljak, Anne; Guilhaus, Michael; Feller, Georges; D'Amico, Salvino; Gerday, Charles; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2005-09-01

    The cold-adapted alpha-amylase from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis unfolds reversibly and cooperatively according to a two-state mechanism at 30 degrees C and unfolds reversibly and sequentially with two transitions at temperatures below 12 degrees C. To examine the role of the four disulfide bridges in activity and conformational stability of the enzyme, the eight cysteine residues were reduced with beta-mercaptoethanol or chemically modified using iodoacetamide or iodoacetic acid. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-time of flight mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that all of the cysteines were modified. The iodoacetamide-modified enzyme reversibly folded/unfolded and retained approximately one-third of its activity. Removal of all disulfide bonds resulted in stabilization of the least stable region of the enzyme (including the active site), with a concomitant decrease in activity (increase in activation enthalpy). Disulfide bond removal had a greater impact on enzyme activity than on stability (particularly the active-site region). The functional role of the disulfide bridges appears to be to prevent the active site from developing ionic interactions. Overall, the study demonstrated that none of the four disulfide bonds are important in stabilizing the native structure of enzyme, and instead, they appear to promote a localized destabilization to preserve activity.

  8. Site-Selective Disulfide Modification of Proteins: Expanding Diversity beyond the Proteome.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Seah Ling; Wang, Tao; Weil, Tanja

    2016-11-21

    The synthetic transformation of polypeptides with molecular accuracy holds great promise for providing functional and structural diversity beyond the proteome. Consequently, the last decade has seen an exponential growth of site-directed chemistry to install additional features into peptides and proteins even inside living cells. The disulfide rebridging strategy has emerged as a powerful tool for site-selective modifications since most proteins contain disulfide bonds. In this Review, we present the chemical design, advantages and limitations of the disulfide rebridging reagents, while summarizing their relevance for synthetic customization of functional protein bioconjugates, as well as the resultant impact and advancement for biomedical applications.

  9. Methods of measuring Protein Disulfide Isomerase activity: a critical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Monica; Laurindo, Francisco; Fernandes, Denise

    2014-09-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase is an essential redox chaperone from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and is responsible for correct disulfide bond formation in nascent proteins. PDI is also found in other cellular locations in the cell, particularly the cell surface. Overall, PDI contributes to ER and global cell redox homeostasis and signaling. The knowledge about PDI structure and function progressed substantially based on in vitro studies using recombinant PDI and chimeric proteins. In these experimental scenarios, PDI reductase and chaperone activities are readily approachable. In contrast, assays to measure PDI isomerase activity, the hallmark of PDI family, are more complex. Assessment of PDI roles in cells and tissues mainly relies on gain- or loss-of-function studies. However, there is limited information regarding correlation of experimental readouts with the distinct types of PDI activities. In this mini-review, we evaluate the main methods described for measuring the different kinds of PDI activity: thiol reductase, thiol oxidase, thiol isomerase and chaperone. We emphasize the need to use appropriate controls and the role of critical interferents (e.g., detergent, presence of reducing agents). We also discuss the translation of results from in vitro studies with purified recombinant PDI to cellular and tissue samples, with critical comments on the interpretation of results.

  10. Protein disulfide isomerase acts as an injury response signal that enhances fibrin generation via tissue factor activation

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, Christoph; von Brühl, Marie-Luise; Manukyan, Davit; Grahl, Lenka; Lorenz, Michael; Altmann, Berid; Dlugai, Silke; Hess, Sonja; Konrad, Ildiko; Orschiedt, Lena; Mackman, Nigel; Ruddock, Lloyd; Massberg, Steffen; Engelmann, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    The activation of initiator protein tissue factor (TF) is likely to be a crucial step in the blood coagulation process, which leads to fibrin formation. The stimuli responsible for inducing TF activation are largely undefined. Here we show that the oxidoreductase protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) directly promotes TF-dependent fibrin production during thrombus formation in vivo. After endothelial denudation of mouse carotid arteries, PDI was released at the injury site from adherent platelets and disrupted vessel wall cells. Inhibition of PDI decreased TF-triggered fibrin formation in different in vivo murine models of thrombus formation, as determined by intravital fluorescence microscopy. PDI infusion increased — and, under conditions of decreased platelet adhesion, PDI inhibition reduced — fibrin generation at the injury site, indicating that PDI can directly initiate blood coagulation. In vitro, human platelet–secreted PDI contributed to the activation of cryptic TF on microvesicles (microparticles). Mass spectrometry analyses indicated that part of the extracellular cysteine 209 of TF was constitutively glutathionylated. Mixed disulfide formation contributed to maintaining TF in a state of low functionality. We propose that reduced PDI activates TF by isomerization of a mixed disulfide and a free thiol to an intramolecular disulfide. Our findings suggest that disulfide isomerases can act as injury response signals that trigger the activation of fibrin formation following vessel injury. PMID:18274674

  11. Method for removal of asphaltene depositions with amine-activated disulfide oil

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, S.P.

    1983-04-12

    A method for treating and removing unwanted asphaltene deposits from oil and gas wells, surface equipment, flow lines, and pore spaces of oil-baring formations comprises treatment with an amine -activated aliphatic disulfide oil as an asphaltene solvent. In a preferred aspect, the aliphatic disulfide oil is a dialkyl disulfide oil and is activated by the addition of 10 weight percent of diethylamine. In a specific use, the activated disulfide oil is used to remove asphaltene deposits from an oilbearing formation and a producing well penetrating the formation.

  12. Disulfide bridge regulates ligand-binding site selectivity in liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Clelia; Tomaselli, Simona; Assfalg, Michael; Pedò, Massimo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Zetta, Lucia; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Bile acid-binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones that play central roles in driving bile flow, as well as in the adaptation to various pathological conditions, contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Understanding the mode of binding of bile acids with their cytoplasmic transporters is a key issue in providing a model for the mechanism of their transfer from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, for delivery to nuclear receptors. A number of factors have been shown to modulate bile salt selectivity, stoichiometry, and affinity of binding to BABPs, e.g. chemistry of the ligand, protein plasticity and, possibly, the formation of disulfide bridges. Here, the effects of the presence of a naturally occurring disulfide bridge on liver BABP ligand-binding properties and backbone dynamics have been investigated by NMR. Interestingly, the disulfide bridge does not modify the protein-binding stoichiometry, but has a key role in modulating recognition at both sites, inducing site selectivity for glycocholic and glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Protein conformational changes following the introduction of a disulfide bridge are small and located around the inner binding site, whereas significant changes in backbone motions are observed for several residues distributed over the entire protein, both in the apo form and in the holo form. Site selectivity appears, therefore, to be dependent on protein mobility rather than being governed by steric factors. The detected properties further establish a parallelism with the behaviour of human ileal BABP, substantiating the proposal that BABPs have parallel functions in hepatocytes and enterocytes.

  13. Human β-defensin 4 with non-native disulfide bridges exhibit antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Himanshu; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Human defensins play multiple roles in innate immunity including direct antimicrobial killing and immunomodulatory activity. They have three disulfide bridges which contribute to the stability of three anti-parallel β-strands. The exact role of disulfide bridges and canonical β-structure in the antimicrobial action is not yet fully understood. In this study, we have explored the antimicrobial activity of human β-defensin 4 (HBD4) analogs that differ in the number and connectivity of disulfide bridges. The cysteine framework was similar to the disulfide bridges present in μ-conotoxins, an unrelated class of peptide toxins. All the analogs possessed enhanced antimicrobial potency as compared to native HBD4. Among the analogs, the single disulfide bridged peptide showed maximum potency. However, there were no marked differences in the secondary structure of the analogs. Subtle variations were observed in the localization and membrane interaction of the analogs with bacteria and Candida albicans, suggesting a role for disulfide bridges in modulating their antimicrobial action. All analogs accumulated in the cytosol where they can bind to anionic molecules such as nucleic acids which would affect several cellular processes leading to cell death. Our study strongly suggests that native disulfide bridges or the canonical β-strands in defensins have not evolved for maximal activity but they play important roles in determining their antimicrobial potency.

  14. Mechanistic study of the hydrodesulfurization of methanethiol over tungsten disulfide; a survey of rare earth sulfides for hydrodesulfurization activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dowd, D.Q.

    1985-06-01

    Hydrodesulfurization is a process whereby sulfur bound in organic compounds is removed as hydrogen sulfide, and is important to the control of sulfur dioxide emissions in the combustion of petroleum and coal fuels. It involves the cleavage of carbon sulfur bonds, and is catalyzed by layered disulfides such as molybdenum and tungsten disulfide. The simplest example is the reaction CH/sub 3/SH + H/sub 2/ ..-->.. CH/sub 4/ + H/sub 2/S. The mechanism of even this protypical reaction is unclear. In an effort to clarify it, the kinetics of methanethiol hydrodesulfurization over tungsten disulfide at low pressures was established, with partial pressures of methanethiol and hydrogen varied over a hundred fold. The kinetic order in each reactant was positive when its partial pressure was low negative when its partial pressure was high. The negative order in hydrogen had not been previously seen. The product gases, methane and hydrogen sulfide, each exhibited negative kinetic orders at high partial pressures, zero kinetic orders at low partial pressures. A dual site Langmuir-Hinshelwood type mechanism, which defines one active site as two adjacent edge sulfur vacancies and the second as a neighboring sulfur atom, describes these results quite well. Seventeen rare earth sulfides were surveyed for catalytic activity toward methanethiol hydrodesulfurization. These sulfides included both stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric compositions and four different morphologies. In general, nonconductors were inactive and conductors were active. This correlation extended to the nonstoichiometric ..gamma..-phase sesquisulfides which exhibit both insulating and conducting properties. 96 refs.

  15. Mechanistic study of the hydrodesulfurization of methanethiol over tungsten disulfide. II. A survey of rare earth sulfides for hydrodesulfurization activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dowd, D.Q.

    1985-01-01

    I. Hydrodesulfurization is a process whereby sulfur bound in organic compounds is removed as hydrogen sulfide, and is important to the control of sulfur dioxide emissions in the combustion of petroleum and coal fuels. It involves the cleavage of carbon sulfur bonds, and is catalyzed by layered disulfides such as molybdenum and tungsten disulfide. The simplest example is the reaction CH/sub 3/SH + H/sub 2/ ..-->.. CH/sub 4/ + H/sub 2/S. The mechanism of even this prototypical reaction is unclear. In an effort to clarify it, the kinetics of methanethiol hydro desulfurization over tungsten disulfide at low pressures was established, with partial pressures of methanethiol and hydrogen varied over a hundred fold. The kinetic order in each reactant was positive when its partial pressure was low, negative when its partial pressure was high. The negative order in hydrogen had not been previously seen. The product gases, methane and hydrogen sulfide, each exhibited negative kinetic orders at high partial pressures, zero kinetic orders at low partial pressures. A dual site Langmuir-Hinshelwood type mechanism, which defines one active site as two adjacent edge sulfur vacancies and the second as a neighboring sulfur atom, describes these results quite well. II. Seventeen rare earth sulfides were surveyed for catalytic activity toward methanethiol hydrodesulfurization. These sulfides included both stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric compositions and four different morphologies. In general, nonconductors were inactive and conductors were active. This correlation extended to the nonstoichiometric ..gamma..-phase sesquisulfides which exhibit both insulating and conducting properties.

  16. Differential roles for disulfide bonds in the structural integrity and biological activity of kappa-Bungarotoxin, a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Grant, G A; Luetje, C W; Summers, R; Xu, X L

    1998-09-01

    kappa-Bungarotoxin, a kappa-neurotoxin derived from the venom of the banded Krait, Bungarus multicinctus, is a homodimeric protein composed of subunits of 66 amino acid residues containing five disulfide bonds. kappa-Bungarotoxin is a potent, selective, and slowly reversible antagonist of alpha3 beta2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. kappa-Bungarotoxin is structurally related to the alpha-neurotoxins, such as alpha-bungarotoxin derived from the same snake, which are monomeric in solution and which effectively antagonize muscle type receptors (alpha1 beta1 gamma delta) and the homopentameric neuronal type receptors (alpha7, alpha8, and alpha9). Like the kappa-neurotoxins, the long alpha-neurotoxins contain the same five conserved disulfide bonds, while the short alpha-neurotoxins only contain four of the five. Systematic removal of single disulfide bonds in kappa-bungarotoxin by site-specific mutagenesis reveals a differential role for each of the disulfide bonds. Removal of either of the two disulfides connecting elements of the carboxy terminal loop of this toxin (Cys 46-Cys 58 and Cys 59-Cys 64) interferes with the ability of the toxin to fold. In contrast, removal of each of the other three disulfides does not interfere with the general folding of the toxin and yields molecules with biological activity. In fact, when either C3-C21 or C14-C42 are removed individually, no loss in biological activity is seen. However, removing both produces a polypeptide chain which fails to fold properly. Removal of the C27-C31 disulfide only reduces the activity of the toxin 46.6-fold. This disulfide may play a role in specific interaction of the toxin with specific neuronal receptors.

  17. Collision-activated cleavage of a peptide/antibiotic disulfide linkage: possible evidence for intramolecular disulfide bond rearrangement upon collisional activation.

    PubMed

    Fagerquist, Clifton K

    2004-01-01

    Ceftiofur is an important veterinary beta-lactam antibiotic whose bioactive metabolite, desfuroylceftiofur, has a free thiol group. Desfuroylceftiofur (DFC) was reacted with two peptides, [Arg8]-vasopressin and reduced glutathione, both of which have cysteine residues to form disulfide-linked peptide/antibiotic complexes. The products of the reaction, [vasopressin + (DFC-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+, [(vasopressin+H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ and [(glutathione-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+, were analyzed using collision-activated dissociation (CAD) with a quadrupole ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. MS/MS of [vasopressin + (DFC-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ resulted in facile dissociative loss of one and two covalently bound DFC moieties. Loss of one DFC resulted from either homolytic or heterolytic dissociation of the peptide/antibiotic disulfide bond with equal or unequal partitioning of the two sulfur atoms between the fragment ion and neutral loss. Hydrogen migration preceded heterolytic dissociation. Loss of two DFC moieties from [vasopressin + (DFC-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ appears to result from collision-activated intramolecular disulfide bond rearrangement (IDBR) to produce cyclic [vasopressin + H]+ (at m/z 1084) as well as other cyclic fragment ions at m/z 1084 +/- 32 and +64. The cyclic structure of these ions could only be inferred as MS/MS may result in rearrangement to non-cyclic structures prior to dissociative loss. IDBR was also detected from MS(3) experiments of [vasopressin + (DFC-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ fragment ions. MS/MS of [(glutathione-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ resulted in cleavage of the peptide backbone with retention of the DFC moiety as well as heterolytic cleavage of the peptide/antibiotic disulfide bond to produce the fragment ion: [(DFC-2H) + H]+. These results demonstrate the facile dissociative loss by CAD of DFC moieties covalently attached to peptides through disulfide bonds. Published in 2004 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. The significance of disulfide bonding in biological activity of HB-EGF, a mutagenesis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, J.T.; Zhou, Z.; Harding, P.A.

    2008-10-31

    A site-directed mutagenesis approach was taken to disrupt each of 3 disulfide bonds within human HB-EGF by substituting serine for both cysteine residues that contribute to disulfide bonding. Each HB-EGF disulfide analogue (HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 108/121}, HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 116/132}, and HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 134/143}) was cloned under the regulation of the mouse metallothionein (MT) promoter and stably expressed in mouse fibroblasts. HB-EGF immunoreactive proteins with M{sub r} of 6.5, 21 and 24 kDa were observed from lysates of HB-EGF and each HB-EGF disulfide analogue. HB-EGF immunohistochemical analyses of each HB-EGF stable cell line demonstrated ubiquitous protein expression except HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 108/121} and HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 116/132} stable cell lines which exhibited accumulated expression immediately outside the nucleus. rHB-EGF, HB-EGF, and HB-EGF{sub 134/143} proteins competed with {sup 125}I-EGF in an A431 competitive binding assay, whereas HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 108/121} and HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 116/132} failed to compete. Each HB-EGF disulfide analogue lacked the ability to stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation of the 170 kDa EGFR. These results suggest that HB-EGF-Cys/Ser{sub 134/143} antagonizes EGFRs.

  19. Identifying the presence of a disulfide linkage in peptides by the selective elimination of hydrogen disulfide from collisionally activated alkali and alkaline earth metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hugh I; Beauchamp, J L

    2008-01-30

    We report a new method for identifying disulfide linkages in peptides using mass spectrometry. This is accomplished by collisional activation of singly charged cationic alkali and alkaline earth metal complexes, which results in the highly selective elimination of hydrogen disulfide (H2S2). Complexes of peptides possessing disulfide bonds with sodium and alkaline earth metal are generated using electrospray ionization (ESI). Isolation followed by collision induced dissociation (CID) of singly charged peptide complexes results in selective elimination of H2S2 to leave newly formed dehydroalanine residues in the peptide. Further activation of the product yields sequence information in the region previously short circuited by the disulfide bond. For example, singly charged magnesium and calcium ion bound complexes of [Lys8]-vasopressin exhibit selective elimination of H2S2 via low-energy CID. Further isolation of the product followed by CID yields major b- and z-type fragments revealing the peptide sequence in the region between the newly formed dehydroalanine residues. Numerous model peptides provide mechanistic details for the selective elimination of H2S2. The process is initiated starting with a metal stabilized enolate anion at Cys, followed by cleavage of the S-C bond. An examination of the peptic digest of insulin provides an example of the application of the selective elimination of H2S2 for the identification of peptides with disulfide linkages. The energetics and mechanisms of H2S2 elimination from model compounds are investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  20. Changes in serum angiotensin I converting enzyme activity due to carbon disulfide exposure.

    PubMed

    Filipović, N; Bilalbegović, Z; Sefić, M; Djurić, D

    1984-01-01

    The activity of serum angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) was determined in 50 workers from a viscose factory in Banja Luka, Yugoslavia, and in 50 control subjects. Activity of serum ACE was significantly lower in workers exposed to carbon disulfide than in the control group. No correlation was found between a decrease of serum ACE in exposed workers and duration of exposure. These findings indicate that the serum ACE may be influenced by carbon disulfide, but the mechanism of these changes remains to be elucidated in this case.

  1. Disulfide Bond Formation and Activation of Escherichia coli β-Galactosidase under Oxidizing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Affentranger, Roman; Ferrer-Navarro, Mario; Daura, Xavier; Villaverde, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli β-galactosidase is probably the most widely used reporter enzyme in molecular biology, cell biology, and biotechnology because of the easy detection of its activity. Its large size and tetrameric structure make this bacterial protein an interesting model for crystallographic studies and atomic mapping. In the present study, we investigate a version of Escherichia coli β-galactosidase produced under oxidizing conditions, in the cytoplasm of an Origami strain. Our data prove the activation of this microbial enzyme under oxidizing conditions and clearly show the occurrence of a disulfide bond in the β-galactosidase structure. Additionally, the formation of this disulfide bond is supported by the analysis of a homology model of the protein that indicates that two cysteines located in the vicinity of the catalytic center are sufficiently close for disulfide bond formation. PMID:22286993

  2. CD44 Binding to Hyaluronic Acid Is Redox Regulated by a Labile Disulfide Bond in the Hyaluronic Acid Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Kellett-Clarke, Helena; Stegmann, Monika; Barclay, A. Neil; Metcalfe, Clive

    2015-01-01

    CD44 is the primary leukocyte cell surface receptor for hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix. Enzymatic post translational cleavage of labile disulfide bonds is a mechanism by which proteins are structurally regulated by imparting an allosteric change and altering activity. We have identified one such disulfide bond in CD44 formed by Cys77 and Cys97 that stabilises the HA binding groove. This bond is labile on the surface of leukocytes treated with chemical and enzymatic reducing agents. Analysis of CD44 crystal structures reveal the disulfide bond to be solvent accessible and in the–LH hook configuration characteristic of labile disulfide bonds. Kinetic trapping and binding experiments on CD44-Fc chimeric proteins show the bond is preferentially reduced over the other disulfide bonds in CD44 and reduction inhibits the CD44-HA interaction. Furthermore cells transfected with CD44 no longer adhere to HA coated surfaces after pre-treatment with reducing agents. The implications of CD44 redox regulation are discussed in the context of immune function, disease and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26379032

  3. Modulating Therapeutic Activity and Toxicity of Pyrrolobenzodiazepine Antibody-Drug Conjugates with Self-Immolative Disulfide Linkers.

    PubMed

    Pillow, Thomas H; Schutten, Melissa; Yu, Shang-Fan; Ohri, Rachana; Sadowsky, Jack; Poon, Kirsten Achilles; Solis, Willy; Zhong, Fiona; Del Rosario, Geoffrey; Go, Mary Ann T; Lau, Jeffery; Yee, Sharon; He, Jintang; Liu, Luna; Ng, Carl; Xu, Keyang; Leipold, Douglas D; Kamath, Amrita V; Zhang, Donglu; Masterson, Luke; Gregson, Stephen J; Howard, Philip W; Fang, Fan; Chen, Jinhua; Gunzner-Toste, Janet; Kozak, Katherine K; Spencer, Susan; Polakis, Paul; Polson, Andrew G; Flygare, John A; Junutula, Jagath R

    2017-02-21

    A novel disulfide linker was designed to enable a direct connection between cytotoxic pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) drugs and the cysteine on a targeting antibody for use in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs). ADCs composed of a cysteine-engineered antibody were armed with a PBD using a self-immolative disulfide linker. Both the chemical linker and the antibody site were optimized for this new bioconjugation strategy to provide a highly stable and efficacious ADC. This novel disulfide ADC was compared to a conjugate containing the same PBD drug, but attached to the antibody via a peptide linker. Both ADCs had similar efficacy in mice bearing human tumor xenografts. Safety studies in rats revealed that the disulfide-linked ADC had a higher maximum tolerated dose (MTD) than the peptide-linked ADC. Overall, these data suggest that the novel self-immolative disulfide linker represents a valuable way to construct ADCs with equivalent efficacy and improved safety.

  4. Importance of the disulfide bridges in the antibacterial activity of human hepcidin.

    PubMed

    Hocquellet, Agnès; le Senechal, Caroline; Garbay, Bertrand

    2012-08-01

    Hepcidin was first identified as an antimicrobial peptide present in human serum and urine. It was later demonstrated that hepcidin is the long sought hormone that regulates iron homeostasis in mammals. The native peptide of 25 amino acids (Hepc25) contains four disulfide bridges that maintain a β-hairpin motif. The aim of the present study was to assess whether the intramolecular disulfide bridges are necessary for Hepc25 antimicrobial activity. We show that a synthetic peptide corresponding to human Hepc25, and which contains the four disulfide bridges, has an antibacterial activity against several strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. On the contrary, a synthetic peptide where all cysteines were replaced by alanines (Hepc25-Ala) had no detectable activity against the same strains of bacteria. In a further step, the mode of action of Hepc25 on Escherichia coli was studied. SYTOX Green uptake was used to assess bacterial membrane integrity. No permeabilization of the membrane was observed with Hepc25, indicating that this peptide does not kill bacteria by destroying their membranes. Gel retardation assay showed that the Hepc25 binds to DNA with high efficiency, and that this binding ability is dependent on the presence of the intramolecular disulfide bridges. Reduction of Hepc25 or replacement of the eight cysteines by alanine residues led to peptides that were no longer able to bind DNA in the in vitro assay. Altogether, these results demonstrate that Hepc25 should adopt a three-dimensional structure stabilized by the intramolecular disulfide bridges in order to have antibacterial activity.

  5. Fusion expression and purification of four disulfide-rich peptides reveals enterokinase secondary cleavage sites in animal toxins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zongyun; Han, Song; Cao, Zhijian; Wu, Yingliang; Zhuo, Renxi; Li, Wenxin

    2013-01-01

    Animal toxins are powerful tools for testing the pharmacological, physiological, and structural characteristics of ion channels, proteases, and other receptors. However, most animal toxins are disulfide-rich peptides that are difficult to produce functionally. Here, a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion expression strategy was used to produce four recombinant animal toxin peptides, ChTX, StKTx23, BmP01, and ImKTx1, with different isoelectric points from 4.7 to 9.2. GST tags were removed by enterokinase, a widely used and effective commercial protease that cleaves after lysine at the cleavage site DDDDK. Using this strategy, two disulfide-rich animal toxins ChTX and StKTx23 were obtained successfully with a yield of approximately 1-2 mg/l culture. Electrophysiological experiments further showed that these two recombinant toxins showed good bioactivities, indicating that our method was effective in producing large amounts of functional disulfide-rich animal toxins. Interestingly, by analyzing the separated fractions of BmP01, StKTx23, and ImKTx1 using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, four new enterokinase secondary cleavage sites were found, consisting of the sequences "WEYR," "EDK," "QNAR," and "DNDK." To our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence of secondary cleavage sites for commercial enterokinase in animal toxins. These findings will help us use commercial enterokinase appropriately as a cleavage tool in the production of animal toxins.

  6. Linker Immolation Determines Cell Killing Activity of Disulfide-Linked Pyrrolobenzodiazepine Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Donglu; Pillow, Thomas H; Ma, Yong; Cruz-Chuh, Josefa Dela; Kozak, Katherine R; Sadowsky, Jack D; Lewis Phillips, Gail D; Guo, Jun; Darwish, Martine; Fan, Peter; Chen, Jingtian; He, Changrong; Wang, Tao; Yao, Hui; Xu, Zijin; Chen, Jinhua; Wai, John; Pei, Zhonghua; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Khojasteh, S Cyrus; Dragovich, Peter S

    2016-11-10

    Disulfide bonds could be valuable linkers for a variety of therapeutic applications requiring tunable cleavage between two parts of a molecule (e.g., antibody-drug conjugates). The in vitro linker immolation of β-mercaptoethyl-carbamate disulfides and DNA alkylation properties of associated payloads were investigated to understand the determinant of cell killing potency of anti-CD22 linked pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD-dimer) conjugates. Efficient immolation and release of a PBD-dimer with strong DNA alkylation properties were observed following disulfide cleavage of methyl- and cyclobutyl-substituted disulfide linkers. However, the analogous cyclopropyl-containing linker did not immolate, and the associated thiol-containing product was a poor DNA alkylator. As predicted from these in vitro assessments, the related anti-CD22 ADCs showed different target-dependent cell killing activities in WSU-DLCL2 and BJAB cell lines. These results demonstrate how the in vitro immolation models can be used to help design efficacious ADCs.

  7. Mixed Disulfide Formation at Cys141 Leads to Apparent Unidirectional Attenuation of Aspergillus niger NADP-Glutamate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Walvekar, Adhish S.; Choudhury, Rajarshi; Punekar, Narayan S.

    2014-01-01

    NADP-Glutamate dehydrogenase from Aspergillus niger (AnGDH) exhibits sigmoid 2-oxoglutarate saturation. Incubation with 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide (2-HED, the disulfide of 2-mercaptoethanol) resulted in preferential attenuation of AnGDH reductive amination (forward) activity but with a negligible effect on oxidative deamination (reverse) activity, when monitored in the described standard assay. Such a disulfide modified AnGDH displaying less than 1.0% forward reaction rate could be isolated after 2-HED treatment. This unique forward inhibited GDH form (FIGDH), resembling a hypothetical ‘one-way’ active enzyme, was characterized. Kinetics of 2-HED mediated inhibition and protein thiol titrations suggested that a single thiol group is modified in FIGDH. Two site-directed cysteine mutants, C141S and C415S, were constructed to identify the relevant thiol in FIGDH. The forward activity of C141S alone was insensitive to 2-HED, implicating Cys141 in FIGDH formation. It was observed that FIGDH displayed maximal reaction rate only after a pre-incubation with 2-oxoglutarate and NADPH. In addition, compared to the native enzyme, FIGDH showed a four fold increase in K0.5 for 2-oxoglutarate and a two fold increase in the Michaelis constants for ammonium and NADPH. With no change in the GDH reaction equilibrium constant, the FIGDH catalyzed rate of approach to equilibrium from reductive amination side was sluggish. Altered kinetic properties of FIGDH at least partly account for the observed apparent loss of forward activity when monitored under defined assay conditions. In sum, although Cys141 is catalytically not essential, its covalent modification provides a striking example of converting the biosynthetic AnGDH into a catabolic enzyme. PMID:24987966

  8. Oxidative modification of caspase-9 facilitates its activation via disulfide-mediated interaction with Apaf-1.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yong; Xiang, Binggang; Yang, Jie; Sun, Xuxu; Wang, Yumei; Cang, Hui; Yi, Jing

    2009-04-01

    Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to regulate apoptosis. Activation of caspase-9, the initial caspase in the mitochondrial apoptotic cascade, is closely associated with ROS, but it is unclear whether ROS regulate caspase-9 via direct oxidative modification. The present study aims to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which ROS mediate caspase-9 activation. Our results show that the cellular oxidative state facilitates caspase-9 activation. Hydrogen peroxide treatment causes the activation of caspase-9 and apoptosis, and promotes an interaction between caspase-9 and apoptotic protease-activating factor 1 (Apaf-1) via disulfide formation. In addition, in an in vitro mitochondria-free system, the thiol-oxidant diamide promotes auto-cleavage of caspase-9 and the caspase-9/Apaf-1 interaction by facilitating the formation of disulfide-linked complexes. Finally, a point mutation at C403 of caspase-9 impairs both H(2)O(2)-promoted caspase-9 activation and interaction with Apaf-1 through the abolition of disulfide formation. The association between cytochrome c and the C403S mutant is significantly weaker than that between cytochrome c and wild-type caspase-9, indicating that oxidative modification of caspase-9 contributes to apoptosome formation under oxidative stress. Taken together, oxidative modification of caspase-9 by ROS can mediate its interaction with Apaf-1, and can thus promote its auto-cleavage and activation. This mechanism may facilitate apoptosome formation and caspase-9 activation under oxidative stress.

  9. Aromatic glycosyl disulfide derivatives: evaluation of their inhibitory activities against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Bessy; Muñoz, Christian; Osorio, Luis; Fehér, Krisztina; Illyés, Tünde-Zita; Papp, Zsuzsa; Kumar, Ambati Ashok; Kövér, Katalin E; Sagua, Hernán; Araya, Jorge E; Morales, Patricio; Szilágyi, László; González, Jorge

    2013-06-15

    Aromatic oligovalent glycosyl disulfides and some diglycosyl disulfides were tested against three different Trypanosoma cruzi strains. Di-(β-D-galactopyranosyl-dithiomethylene) benzenes 2b and 4b proved to be the most active derivatives against all three strains of cell culture-derived trypomastigotes with IC50 values ranging from 4 to 11 μM at 37 °C. The inhibitory activities were maintained, although somewhat lowered, at a temperature of 4 °C as well. Three further derivatives displayed similar activities against at least one of the three strains. Low cytotoxicities of the active compounds, tested on confluent HeLa, Vero and peritoneal macrophage cell cultures, resulted in significantly higher selectivity indices (SI) than that of the reference drug benznidazole. Remarkably, several molecules of the tested panel strongly inhibited the parasite release from T. cruzi infected HeLa cell cultures suggesting an effect against the intracellular development of T. cruzi amastigotes as well.

  10. MetalDetector: a web server for predicting metal-binding sites and disulfide bridges in proteins from sequence

    PubMed Central

    Lippi, Marco; Passerini, Andrea; Punta, Marco; Rost, Burkhard; Frasconi, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Summary: The web server MetalDetector classifies histidine residues in proteins into one of two states (free or metal bound) and cysteines into one of three states (free, metal bound or disulfide bridged). A decision tree integrates predictions from two previously developed methods (DISULFIND and Metal Ligand Predictor). Cross-validated performance assessment indicates that our server predicts disulfide bonding state at 88.6% precision and 85.1% recall, while it identifies cysteines and histidines in transition metal-binding sites at 79.9% precision and 76.8% recall, and at 60.8% precision and 40.7% recall, respectively. Availability: Freely available at http://metaldetector.dsi.unifi.it Contact: metaldetector@dsi.unifi.it Supplementary Information: Details and data can be found at http://metaldetector.dsi.unifi.it/help.php PMID:18635571

  11. Solution structure and activity of the synthetic four-disulfide bond Mediterranean mussel defensin (MGD-1).

    PubMed

    Yang, Y S; Mitta, G; Chavanieu, A; Calas, B; Sanchez, J F; Roch, P; Aumelas, A

    2000-11-28

    MGD-1 is a 39-residue defensin-like peptide isolated from the edible Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis. This peptide is characterized by the presence of four disulfide bonds. We report here its solid-phase synthesis and an easy way to improve the yield of the four native disulfide bonds. Synthetic and native MGD-1 display similar antibacterial activity, suggesting that the hydroxylation of Trp28 observed in native MGD-1 is not involved in the antimicrobial effect. The three-dimensional solution structure of MGD-1 has been established using (1)H NMR and mainly consists of a helical part (Asn7-Ser16) and two antiparallel beta-strands (Arg20-Cys25 and Cys33-Arg37), together giving rise to the common cystine-stabilized alpha-beta motif frequently observed in scorpion toxins. In MGD-1, the cystine-stabilized alpha-beta motif is stabilized by four disulfide bonds (Cys4-Cys25, Cys10-Cys33, Cys14-Cys35, and Cys21-Cys38), instead of by the three disulfide bonds commonly found in arthropod defensins. Except for the Cys21-Cys38 disulfide bond which is solvent-exposed, the three others belong to the particularly hydrophobic core of the highly constrained structure. Moreover, the C4-P5 amide bond in the cis conformation characterizes the MGD-1 structure. MGD-1 and insect defensin A possess similar bactericidal anti-Gram-positive activity, suggesting that the fourth disulfide bond of MGD-1 is not essential for the biological activity. In agreement with the general features of antibacterial peptides, the MGD-1 and defensin A structures display a typical distribution of positively charged and hydrophobic side chains. The positively charged residues of MGD-1 are located in three clusters. For these two defensin peptides isolated from insects and mollusks, it appears that the rather well conserved location of certain positively charged residues and of the large hydrophobic cluster are enough to generate the bactericidal potency and the Gram-positive specificity.

  12. LEAP-1, a novel highly disulfide-bonded human peptide, exhibits antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Krause, A; Neitz, S; Mägert, H J; Schulz, A; Forssmann, W G; Schulz-Knappe, P; Adermann, K

    2000-09-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of a novel human peptide with antimicrobial activity, termed LEAP-1 (liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide). Using a mass spectrometric assay detecting cysteine-rich peptides, a 25-residue peptide containing four disulfide bonds was identified in human blood ultrafiltrate. LEAP-1 expression was predominantly detected in the liver, and, to a much lower extent, in the heart. In radial diffusion assays, Gram-positive Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus carnosus, and Gram-negative Neisseria cinerea as well as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae dose-dependently exhibited sensitivity upon treatment with synthetic LEAP-1. The discovery of LEAP-1 extends the known families of mammalian peptides with antimicrobial activity by its novel disulfide motif and distinct expression pattern.

  13. Mutagenesis of the redox-active disulfide in mercuric ion reductase: Catalysis by mutant enzymes restricted to flavin redox chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Distefano, M.D.; Au, K.G.; Walsh, C.T. )

    1989-02-07

    Mercuric reductase, a flavoenzyme that possesses a redox-active cystine, Cys{sub 135}Cys{sub 140}, catalyzes the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) by NADPH. As a probe of mechanism, the authors have constructed mutants lacking a redox-active disulfide by eliminating Cys{sub 135} (Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 140}), Cys{sub 14} (Cys{sub 135}Ala{sub 140}), or both (Ala{sub 135}Ala{sub 140}). Additionally, they have made double mutants that lack Cys{sub 135} (Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 139}Cys{sub 140}) or Cys{sub 140} (Cys{sub 135}Cys{sub 139}Ala{sub 140}) but introduce a new Cys in place of Gly{sub 139} with the aim of constructing dithiol pairs in the active site that do not form a redox-active disulfide. The resulting mutant enzymes all lack redox-active disulfides and are hence restricted to FAD/FADH{sub 2} redox chemistry. Each mutant enzyme possesses unique physical and spectroscopic properties that reflect subtle differences in the FAD microenvironment. Preliminary evidence for the Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 139}Cys{sub 14} mutant enzyme suggests that this protein forms a disulfide between the two adjacent Cys residues. Hg(II) titration experiments that correlate the extent of charge-transfer quenching with Hg(II) binding indicate that the Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 140} protein binds Hg(II) with substantially less avidity than does the wild-type enzyme. All mutant mercuric reductases catalyze transhydrogenation and oxygen reduction reactions through obligatory reduced flavin intermediates at rates comparable to or greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. In multiple-turnover assays which monitored the production of Hg(0), two of the mutant enzymes were observed to proceed through at least 30 turnovers at rates ca. 1000-fold slower than that of wild-type mercuric reductase. They conclude that the Cys{sub 135} and Cys{sub 140} thiols serve as Hg(II) ligands that orient the Hg(II) for subsequent reduction by a reduced flavin intermediate.

  14. The Dynamic Disulfide Relay of Quiescin Sulfhydryl Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Alon, Assaf; Grossman, Iris; Gat, Yair; Kodali, Vamsi K.; DiMaio, Frank; Mehlman, Tevie; Haran, Gilad; Baker, David; Thorpe, Colin; Fass, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Protein stability, assembly, localization, and regulation often depend on formation of disulfide cross-links between cysteine side chains. Enzymes known as sulfhydryl oxidases catalyze de novo disulfide formation and initiate intra- and intermolecular dithiol/disulfide relays to deliver the disulfides to substrate proteins1,2. Quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX) is a unique, multi-domain disulfide catalyst that is localized primarily to the Golgi apparatus and secreted fluids3 and has attracted attention due to its over-production in tumors4,5. In addition to its physiological importance, QSOX is a mechanistically intriguing enzyme, encompassing functions typically carried out by a series of proteins in other disulfide formation pathways. How disulfides are relayed through the multiple redox-active sites of QSOX and whether there is a functional benefit to concatenating these sites on a single polypeptide are open questions. We determined the first crystal structure of an intact QSOX enzyme, derived from a trypanosome parasite. Notably, sequential sites in the disulfide relay were found more than 40 Å apart in this structure, too far for direct disulfide transfer. To resolve this puzzle, we trapped and crystallized an intermediate in the disulfide hand-off, which showed a 165° domain rotation relative to the original structure, bringing the two active sites within disulfide bonding distance. The comparable structure of a mammalian QSOX enzyme, also presented herein, reveals additional biochemical features that facilitate disulfide transfer in metazoan orthologs. Finally, we quantified the contribution of concatenation to QSOX activity, providing general lessons for the understanding of multi-domain enzymes and the design of novel catalytic relays. PMID:22801504

  15. The drosomycin multigene family: three-disulfide variants from Drosophila takahashii possess antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bin; Zhu, Shunyi

    2016-01-01

    Drosomycin (DRS) is a strictly antifungal peptide in Drosophila melanogaster, which contains four disulfide bridges (DBs) with three buried in molecular interior and one exposed on molecular surface to tie the amino- and carboxyl-termini of the molecule together (called wrapper disulfide bridge, WDB). Based on computational analysis of genomes of Drosophila species belonging to the Oriental lineage, we identified a new multigene family of DRS in Drosphila takahashii that includes a total of 11 DRS-encoding genes (termed DtDRS-1 to DtDRS-11) and a pseudogene. Phylogenetic tree and synteny analyses reveal orthologous relationship between DtDRSs and DRSs, indicating that orthologous genes of DRS-1, DRS-2, DRS-3 and DRS-6 have undergone duplication in D. takahashii and three amplifications (DtDRS-9 to DtDRS-11) of DRS-3 have lost WDB. Among the 11 genes, five are transcriptionally active in adult fruitflies. The ortholog of DRS (DtDRS-1) shows high structural and functional similarity to DRS while two WDB-deficient members display antibacterial activity accompanying complete loss or remarkable reduction of antifungal activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the presence of three-disulfide antibacterial DRSs in a specific Drosophila species, suggesting a potential role of DB loss in neofunctionalization of a protein via structural adjustment. PMID:27562645

  16. Disulfide cross-linking influences symbiotic activities of nodule peptide NCR247.

    PubMed

    Shabab, Mohammed; Arnold, Markus F F; Penterman, Jon; Wommack, Andrew J; Bocker, Hartmut T; Price, Paul A; Griffitts, Joel S; Nolan, Elizabeth M; Walker, Graham C

    2016-09-06

    Interactions of rhizobia with legumes establish the chronic intracellular infection that underlies symbiosis. Within nodules of inverted repeat-lacking clade (IRLC) legumes, rhizobia differentiate into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. This terminal differentiation is driven by host nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides that orchestrate the adaptation of free-living bacteria into intracellular residents. Medicago truncatula encodes a family of >700 NCR peptides that have conserved cysteine motifs. NCR247 is a cationic peptide with four cysteines that can form two intramolecular disulfide bonds in the oxidized forms. This peptide affects Sinorhizobium meliloti transcription, translation, and cell division at low concentrations and is antimicrobial at higher concentrations. By preparing the three possible disulfide-cross-linked NCR247 regioisomers, the reduced peptide, and a variant lacking cysteines, we performed a systematic study of the effects of intramolecular disulfide cross-linking and cysteines on the activities of an NCR peptide. The relative activities of the five NCR247 variants differed strikingly among the various bioassays, suggesting that the NCR peptide-based language used by plants to control the development of their bacterial partners during symbiosis is even greater than previously recognized. These patterns indicate that certain NCR bioactivities require cysteines whereas others do not. The results also suggest that NCR247 may exert some of its effects within the cell envelope whereas other activities occur in the cytoplasm. BacA, a membrane protein that is critical for symbiosis, provides protection against all bactericidal forms of NCR247. Oxidative folding protects NCR247 from degradation by the symbiotically relevant metalloprotease HrrP (host range restriction peptidase), suggesting that disulfide bond formation may additionally stabilize NCR peptides during symbiosis.

  17. Photonic activation of disulfide bridges achieves oriented protein immobilization on biosensor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Snabe, Torben; Klitgaard, Søren; Duroux, Meg; Petersen, Steffen B

    2006-02-01

    Photonic induced immobilization is a novel technology that results in spatially oriented and spatially localized covalent coupling of biomolecules onto thiol-reactive surfaces. Immobilization using this technology has been achieved for a wide selection of proteins, such as hydrolytic enzymes (lipases/esterases, lysozyme), proteases (human plasminogen), alkaline phosphatase, immunoglobulins' Fab fragment (e.g., antibody against PSA [prostate specific antigen]), Major Histocompability Complex class I protein, pepsin, and trypsin. The reaction mechanism behind the reported new technology involves "photonic activation of disulfide bridges," i.e., light-induced breakage of disulfide bridges in proteins upon UV illumination of nearby aromatic amino acids, resulting in the formation of free, reactive thiol groups that will form covalent bonds with thiol-reactive surfaces (see Fig. 1). Interestingly, the spatial proximity of aromatic residues and disulfide bridges in proteins has been preserved throughout molecular evolution. The new photonic-induced method for immobilization of proteins preserves the native structural and functional properties of the immobilized protein, avoiding the use of one or more chemical/thermal steps. This technology allows for the creation of spatially oriented as well as spatially defined multiprotein/DNA high-density sensor arrays with spot size of 1 microm or less, and has clear potential for biomedical, bioelectronic, nanotechnology, and therapeutic applications.

  18. Disulfide cross-linking influences symbiotic activities of nodule peptide NCR247

    PubMed Central

    Shabab, Mohammed; Arnold, Markus F. F.; Penterman, Jon; Wommack, Andrew J.; Bocker, Hartmut T.; Price, Paul A.; Griffitts, Joel S.; Nolan, Elizabeth M.; Walker, Graham C.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions of rhizobia with legumes establish the chronic intracellular infection that underlies symbiosis. Within nodules of inverted repeat-lacking clade (IRLC) legumes, rhizobia differentiate into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. This terminal differentiation is driven by host nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides that orchestrate the adaptation of free-living bacteria into intracellular residents. Medicago truncatula encodes a family of >700 NCR peptides that have conserved cysteine motifs. NCR247 is a cationic peptide with four cysteines that can form two intramolecular disulfide bonds in the oxidized forms. This peptide affects Sinorhizobium meliloti transcription, translation, and cell division at low concentrations and is antimicrobial at higher concentrations. By preparing the three possible disulfide–cross-linked NCR247 regioisomers, the reduced peptide, and a variant lacking cysteines, we performed a systematic study of the effects of intramolecular disulfide cross-linking and cysteines on the activities of an NCR peptide. The relative activities of the five NCR247 variants differed strikingly among the various bioassays, suggesting that the NCR peptide-based language used by plants to control the development of their bacterial partners during symbiosis is even greater than previously recognized. These patterns indicate that certain NCR bioactivities require cysteines whereas others do not. The results also suggest that NCR247 may exert some of its effects within the cell envelope whereas other activities occur in the cytoplasm. BacA, a membrane protein that is critical for symbiosis, provides protection against all bactericidal forms of NCR247. Oxidative folding protects NCR247 from degradation by the symbiotically relevant metalloprotease HrrP (host range restriction peptidase), suggesting that disulfide bond formation may additionally stabilize NCR peptides during symbiosis. PMID:27551097

  19. Targeting of arenavirus RNA synthesis by a carboxamide-derivatized aromatic disulfide with virucidal activity.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Claudia S; García, Cybele C; Levingston Macleod, Jesica M; López, Nora; Damonte, Elsa B

    2013-01-01

    Several arenaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever (HF) in humans, representing a public health threat in endemic areas of Africa and South America. The present study characterizes the potent virucidal activity of the carboxamide-derivatized aromatic disulfide NSC4492, an antiretroviral zinc finger-reactive compound, against Junín virus (JUNV), the causative agent of Argentine HF. The compound was able to inactivate JUNV in a time and temperature-dependent manner, producing more than 99 % reduction in virus titer upon incubation with virions at 37 °C for 90 min. The ability of NSC4492-treated JUNV to go through different steps of the multiplication cycle was then evaluated. Inactivated virions were able to bind and enter into the host cell with similar efficiency as control infectious particles. In contrast, treatment with NSC4492 impaired the capacity of JUNV to drive viral RNA synthesis, as measured by quantitative RT-PCR, and blocked viral protein expression, as determined by indirect immunofluorescence. These results suggest that the disulfide NSC4492 targets on the arenavirus replication complex leading to impairment in viral RNA synthesis. Additionally, analysis of VLP produced in NSC4492-treated cells expressing JUNV matrix Z protein revealed that the compound may interact with Z resulting in an altered aggregation behavior of this protein, but without affecting its intrinsic self-budding properties. The potential perspectives of NSC4492 as an inactivating vaccinal compound for pathogenic arenaviruses are discussed.

  20. Targeting of Arenavirus RNA Synthesis by a Carboxamide-Derivatized Aromatic Disulfide with Virucidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Claudia S.; García, Cybele C.; Levingston Macleod, Jesica M.

    2013-01-01

    Several arenaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever (HF) in humans, representing a public health threat in endemic areas of Africa and South America. The present study characterizes the potent virucidal activity of the carboxamide-derivatized aromatic disulfide NSC4492, an antiretroviral zinc finger-reactive compound, against Junín virus (JUNV), the causative agent of Argentine HF. The compound was able to inactivate JUNV in a time and temperature-dependent manner, producing more than 99 % reduction in virus titer upon incubation with virions at 37°C for 90 min. The ability of NSC4492-treated JUNV to go through different steps of the multiplication cycle was then evaluated. Inactivated virions were able to bind and enter into the host cell with similar efficiency as control infectious particles. In contrast, treatment with NSC4492 impaired the capacity of JUNV to drive viral RNA synthesis, as measured by quantitative RT-PCR, and blocked viral protein expression, as determined by indirect immunofluorescence. These results suggest that the disulfide NSC4492 targets on the arenavirus replication complex leading to impairment in viral RNA synthesis. Additionally, analysis of VLP produced in NSC4492-treated cells expressing JUNV matrix Z protein revealed that the compound may interact with Z resulting in an altered aggregation behavior of this protein, but without affecting its intrinsic self-budding properties. The potential perspectives of NSC4492 as an inactivating vaccinal compound for pathogenic arenaviruses are discussed. PMID:24278404

  1. Native disulfide bonds in plasma retinol-binding protein are not essential for all-trans-retinol-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Reznik, Gabriel O; Yu, Yong; Tarr, George E; Cantor, Charles R

    2003-01-01

    A human plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP) mutant, named RBP-S, has been designed and produced in which the six native cysteine residues, involved in the formation of three disulfide bonds, have been replaced with serine. A hexa-histidine tag was also added to the C-terminus of RBP for ease of purification. The removal of the disulfide bonds led to a decrease in the affinity of RBP for all trans-retinol. Data indicates all-trans-retinol binds RBP and RBP-S with Kd = 4 x 10(-8) M and 1 x 10(-7) M, respectively, at approximately 20 degrees C. RBP-S has reduced stability as compared to natural RBP below pH 8.0 and at room temperature. Circular dichroism in the far-UV shows that there is a relaxation of the RBP structure upon the removal of its disulfide bonds. Circular dichroism in the near-UV shows that in the absence of the disulfide bonds, the optical activity of RBP is higher in the 310-330 nm than in the 280-290 nm range. This work suggests that the three native disulfide bonds aid in the folding of RBP but are not essential to produce a soluble, active protein.

  2. Structure-activity relationships of the intramolecular disulfide bonds in coprisin, a defensin from the dung beetle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daeun; Choi, Hyemin; Kim, Ha Hyung; Kim, Ho; Hwang, Jae Sam; Lee, Dong Gun; Kim, Jae Il

    2014-01-01

    Defensins, which are small cationic molecules produced by organisms as part of their innate immune response, share a common structural scaffold that is stabilized by three disulfide bridges. Coprisin is a 43-amino acid defensin-like peptide from Copris tripartitus. Here, we report the intramolecular disulfide connectivity of cysteine-rich coprisin, and show that it is the same as in other insect defensins. The disulfide bond pairings of coprisin were determined by combining the enzymatic cleavage and mass analysis. We found that the loss of any single disulfide bond in coprisin eliminated all antibacterial, but not antifungal, activity. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis showed that two disulfide bonds, Cys20-Cys39 and Cys24-Cys41, stabilize coprisin’s α-helical region. Moreover, a BLAST search against UniProtKB database revealed that coprisin’s α-helical region is highly homologous to those of other insect defensins. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(11): 625-630] PMID:24393527

  3. Human protein-disulfide isomerase is a redox-regulated chaperone activated by oxidation of domain a'.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Jiang; Huo, Lin; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wei; Wang, Chih-chen

    2012-01-06

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI), with domains arranged as abb'xa'c, is a key enzyme and chaperone localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) catalyzing oxidative folding and preventing misfolding/aggregation of proteins. It has been controversial whether the chaperone activity of PDI is redox-regulated, and the molecular basis is unclear. Here, we show that both the chaperone activity and the overall conformation of human PDI are redox-regulated. We further demonstrate that the conformational changes are triggered by the active site of domain a', and the minimum redox-regulated cassette is located in b'xa'. The structure of the reduced bb'xa' reveals for the first time that domain a' packs tightly with both domain b' and linker x to form one compact structural module. Oxidation of domain a' releases the compact conformation and exposes the shielded hydrophobic areas to facilitate its high chaperone activity. Thus, the study unequivocally provides mechanistic insights into the redox-regulated chaperone activity of human PDI.

  4. Human Protein-disulfide Isomerase Is a Redox-regulated Chaperone Activated by Oxidation of Domain a′*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Jiang; Huo, Lin; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wei; Wang, Chih-chen

    2012-01-01

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI), with domains arranged as abb′xa′c, is a key enzyme and chaperone localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) catalyzing oxidative folding and preventing misfolding/aggregation of proteins. It has been controversial whether the chaperone activity of PDI is redox-regulated, and the molecular basis is unclear. Here, we show that both the chaperone activity and the overall conformation of human PDI are redox-regulated. We further demonstrate that the conformational changes are triggered by the active site of domain a′, and the minimum redox-regulated cassette is located in b′xa′. The structure of the reduced bb′xa′ reveals for the first time that domain a′ packs tightly with both domain b′ and linker x to form one compact structural module. Oxidation of domain a′ releases the compact conformation and exposes the shielded hydrophobic areas to facilitate its high chaperone activity. Thus, the study unequivocally provides mechanistic insights into the redox-regulated chaperone activity of human PDI. PMID:22090031

  5. Mass spectrometric identification of N- and O-glycosylation sites of full-length rat selenoprotein P and determination of selenide-sulfide and disulfide linkages in the shortest isoform.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuguang; Hill, Kristina E; Burk, Raymond F; Caprioli, Richard M

    2003-08-19

    Rat selenoprotein P is an extracellular glycoprotein of 366 amino acid residues that is rich in cysteine and selenocysteine. Plasma contains four isoforms that differ principally by length at the C-terminal end. Mass spectrometry was used to identify sites of glycosylation on the full-length protein. Of the potential N-glycosylation sites, three located at residues 64, 155, and 169 were occupied, while the two at residues 351 and 356 were not occupied. Threonine 346 was variably O-glycosylated. Thus, full-length selenoprotein P is both N- and O-glycosylated. The shortest isoform of selenoprotein P, which terminates at residue 244, was analyzed for selenide-sulfide and disulfide linkages. In this isoform, a single selenocysteine and seven cysteines are present. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated that a selenide-sulfide bond exists between Sec40 and Cys43. Two disulfides were also detected as Cys149-Cys167 and Cys153-Cys156. The finding of a selenide-sulfide bond in the shortest isoform is compatible with a redox function of this pair that might be analogous to the selenol-thiol pair near the C terminus of animal thioredoxin reductase. The disulfide formed by Cys153-Cys156 also has some characteristics of a redox active pair.

  6. List 9 - Active CERCLIS Sites:

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The List 9 displays the sequence of activities undertaken at active CERCLIS sites. An active site is one at which site assessment, removal, remedial, enforcement, cost recovery, or oversight activities are being planned or conducted.

  7. Endothelial cells microparticle-associated protein disulfide isomerase promotes platelet activation in metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-hui; Song, Dai-jun; Chen, Tong-shuai; Zhang, Wei; Zhong, Ming; Zhang, Yun; Xing, Yan-qiu; Wang, Zhi-hao

    2016-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a common challenge in the world, and the platelet activation is enhanced in MetS patients. However, the fundamental mechanism that underlies platelet activation in MetS remains incompletely understood. Endothelial cells are damaged seriously in MetS patients, then they release more endothelial microparticles (EMPs). After all, whether the EMPs participate in platelet activation is still obscure. If they were, how did they work? Results We demonstrated that the levels of EMPs, PMPs (platelet derived microparticles) and microparticle-carried-PDI activity increased in MetS patients. IR endothelial cells released more EMPs, the EMP-PDI was more activated. EMPs can enhance the activation of CD62P, GPIIb/IIIa and platelet aggregation and this process can be partly inhibited by PDI inhibitor such as RL90 and rutin. Activated platelets stimulated by EMPs expressed more PDI on cytoplasm and released more PMPs. Materials and Methods We obtained plasma from 23 MetS patients and 8 normal healthy controls. First we built insulin resistance (IR) model of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and then we separated EMPs from HUVECs culture medium and used these EMPs to stimulate platelets. Levels of microparticles, P-selectin(CD62P), Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GPIIb/IIIa) were detected by flow cytometry and levels of EMPs were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) activity was detected by insulin transhydrogenase assay. Platelet aggregation was assessed by turbidimetry. Conclusion EMPs can promote the activation of GPIIb/IIIa in platelets and platelet aggregation by the PDI which is carried on the surface of EMPs. PMID:27825126

  8. Human pancreas-specific protein disulfide-isomerase (PDIp) can function as a chaperone independently of its enzymatic activity by forming stable complexes with denatured substrate proteins.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xin-Miao; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2010-07-01

    Members of the PDI (protein disulfide-isomerase) family are critical for the correct folding of secretory proteins by catalysing disulfide bond formation as well as by serving as molecular chaperones to prevent protein aggregation. In the present paper, we report that the chaperone activity of the human pancreas-specific PDI homologue (PDIp) is independent of its enzymatic activity on the basis of the following lines of evidence. First, alkylation of PDIp by iodoacetamide fully abolishes its enzymatic activity, whereas it still retains most of its chaperone activity in preventing the aggregation of reduced insulin B chain and denatured GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase). Secondly, mutation of the cysteine residues in PDIp's active sites completely abolishes its enzymatic activity, but does not affect its chaperone activity. Thirdly, the b-b' fragment of PDIp, which does not contain the active sites and is devoid of enzymatic activity, still has chaperone activity. Mechanistically, we found that both the recombinant PDIp expressed in Escherichia coli and the natural PDIp present in human or monkey pancreas can form stable complexes with thermal-denatured substrate proteins independently of their enzymatic activity. The high-molecular-mass soluble complexes between PDIp and GAPDH are formed in a stoichiometric manner (subunit ratio of 1:3.5-4.5), and can dissociate after storage for a certain time. As a proof-of-concept for the biological significance of PDIp in intact cells, we demonstrated that its selective expression in E. coli confers strong protection of these cells against heat shock and oxidative-stress-induced death independently of its enzymatic activity.

  9. Acid-denatured Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as model substrate to study the chaperone activity of protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Mares, Rosa E; Meléndez-López, Samuel G; Ramos, Marco A

    2011-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been widely used in several molecular and cellular biology applications, since it is remarkably stable in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, native GFP is resistant to the most common chemical denaturants; however, a low fluorescence signal has been observed after acid-induced denaturation. Furthermore, this acid-denatured GFP has been used as substrate in studies of the folding activity of some bacterial chaperones and other chaperone-like molecules. Protein disulfide isomerase enzymes, a family of eukaryotic oxidoreductases that catalyze the oxidation and isomerization of disulfide bonds in nascent polypeptides, play a key role in protein folding and it could display chaperone activity. However, contrasting results have been reported using different proteins as model substrates. Here, we report the further application of GFP as a model substrate to study the chaperone activity of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) enzymes. Since refolding of acid-denatured GFP can be easily and directly monitored, a simple micro-assay was used to study the effect of the molecular participants in protein refolding assisted by PDI. Additionally, the effect of a well-known inhibitor of PDI chaperone activity was also analyzed. Because of the diversity their functional activities, PDI enzymes are potentially interesting drug targets. Since PDI may be implicated in the protection of cells against ER stress, including cancer cells, inhibitors of PDI might be able to enhance the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy; furthermore, it has been demonstrated that blocking the reductive cleavage of disulfide bonds of proteins associated with the cell surface markedly reduces the infectivity of the human immunodeficiency virus. Although several high-throughput screening (HTS) assays to test PDI reductase activity have been described, we report here a novel and simple micro-assay to test the chaperone activity of PDI enzymes, which is amenable for HTS of PDI

  10. Dithiolopyrrolones: Biosynthesis, Synthesis, and Activity of a Unique Class of Disulfide-Containing Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Wever, Walter J.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Bowers, Albert A.

    2014-01-01

    Dithiolopyrrolone (DTP) group antibiotics were first isolated in the early half of the 20th century, but only recently has research been reawakened by insights gained from the synthesis and biosynthesis of this structurally intriguing class of molecules. DTPs are characterized by an electronically unique bicyclic structure, which contains a compact disulfide bridge between two ene-thiols. Points of diversity within the compound class occur outside of the bicyclic core, at the two amide nitrogens. Such modifications distinguish three of the most well studied members of the class, holomycin, thiolutin, and aureothricin; the DTP core has also more recently been identified in the marine antibiotic thiomarinol, in which it is linked to a marinolic acid moiety, analog of the FDA-approved topical antibiotic Bactroban® (GlaxoSmithKline). Dithiolopyrrolones exhibit relatively broad-spectrum antibiotic activity against many Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Additionally, they have been shown to exhibit potent and selective anti-cancer activity. Despite this promising profile, there is still much unknown about the mechanisms of action for DTPs. Early reports suggested that they inhibit yeast growth at the level of transcription and that this effect is largely responsible for their distinctive microbial static properties; a similar mechanism is supported in bacteria. Elucidation of biosynthetic pathways for holomycin in Streptomyces clavuligerus and Yersinia ruckeri and thiomarinol in Alteromonas rava sp. nov. SANK 73390, have contributed evidence suggesting that multiple mechanisms may be operative in the activity of these compounds. This review will comprehensively cover the history and development of dithiolopyrrolones with particular emphasis on the biosynthesis, synthesis, biological activity and mechanism of action. PMID:24835149

  11. The biologically active form of the sea urchin egg receptor for sperm is a disulfide-bonded homo-multimer

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Since many cell surface receptors exist in their active form as oligomeric complexes, we have investigated the subunit composition of the biologically active sperm receptor in egg plasma membranes from Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Electrophoretic analysis of the receptor without prior reduction of disulfide bonds revealed that the surface receptor exists in the form of a disulfide-bonded multimer, estimated to be a tetramer. These findings are in excellent agreement with the fact that the NH2-terminus of the extracellular domain of the sperm receptor is rich in cysteine residues. Studies with cross-linking agents of various length and hydrophobicity suggest that no other major protein is tightly associated with the receptor. Given the multimeric structure of the receptor, we investigated the effect of disulfide bond reduction on its biological activity. Because in quantitative bioassays fertilization was found to be inhibited by treatment of eggs with 5 mM dithiothreitol, we undertook more direct studies of the effect of reduction on properties of the receptor. First, we studied the effect of addition of isolated, pure receptor on fertilization. Whereas the non-reduced, native receptor complex inhibited fertilization in a dose- dependent manner, the reduced and alkylated receptor was inactive. Second, we tested the ability of the isolated receptor to mediate binding of acrosome-reacted sperm to polystyrene beads. Whereas beads coated with native receptor bound sperm, those containing reduced and alkylated receptor did not. Thus, these results demonstrate that the biologically active form of the sea urchin sperm receptor consists only of 350 kD subunits and that these must be linked as a multimer via disulfide bonds to produce a complex that is functional in sperm recognition and binding. PMID:8188748

  12. Insulin analog with additional disulfide bond has increased stability and preserved activity

    PubMed Central

    Vinther, Tine N; Norrman, Mathias; Ribel, Ulla; Huus, Kasper; Schlein, Morten; Steensgaard, Dorte B; Pedersen, Thomas Å; Pettersson, Ingrid; Ludvigsen, Svend; Kjeldsen, Thomas; Jensen, Knud J; Hubálek, František

    2013-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone controlling glucose homeostasis. All known vertebrate insulin analogs have a classical structure with three 100% conserved disulfide bonds that are essential for structural stability and thus the function of insulin. It might be hypothesized that an additional disulfide bond may enhance insulin structural stability which would be highly desirable in a pharmaceutical use. To address this hypothesis, we designed insulin with an additional interchain disulfide bond in positions A10/B4 based on Cα-Cα distances, solvent exposure, and side-chain orientation in human insulin (HI) structure. This insulin analog had increased affinity for the insulin receptor and apparently augmented glucodynamic potency in a normal rat model compared with HI. Addition of the disulfide bond also resulted in a 34.6°C increase in melting temperature and prevented insulin fibril formation under high physical stress even though the C-terminus of the B-chain thought to be directly involved in fibril formation was not modified. Importantly, this analog was capable of forming hexamer upon Zn addition as typical for wild-type insulin and its crystal structure showed only minor deviations from the classical insulin structure. Furthermore, the additional disulfide bond prevented this insulin analog from adopting the R-state conformation and thus showing that the R-state conformation is not a prerequisite for binding to insulin receptor as previously suggested. In summary, this is the first example of an insulin analog featuring a fourth disulfide bond with increased structural stability and retained function. PMID:23281053

  13. Carbon disulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Carbon disulfide ; CASRN 75 - 15 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  14. The disulfide oxidoreductase SdbA is active in Streptococcus gordonii using a single C-terminal cysteine of the CXXC motif.

    PubMed

    Davey, Lauren; Cohen, Alejandro; LeBlanc, Jason; Halperin, Scott A; Lee, Song F

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we identified a novel disulfide oxidoreductase, SdbA, in the oral bacterium Streptococcus gordonii. Disulfide oxidoreductases form disulfide bonds in nascent proteins using a CXXC catalytic motif. Typically, the N-terminal cysteine interacts with substrates, whereas the C-terminal cysteine is buried and only reacts with the first cysteine of the motif. In this study, we investigated the SdbA C(86) P(87) D(88) C(89) catalytic motif. In vitro, SdbA single cysteine variants at the N or C-terminal position (SdbAC86P and SdbAC89A ) were active but displayed different susceptibility to oxidation, and N-terminal cysteine was prone to sulfenylation. In S. gordonii, mutants with a single N-terminal cysteine were inactive and formed unstable disulfide adducts with other proteins. Activity was partially restored by inactivation of pyruvate oxidase, a hydrogen peroxide generator. Presence of the C-terminal cysteine alone (in the SdbAC86P variant) could complement the ΔsdbA mutant and restore disulfide bond formation in recombinant and natural protein substrates. These results provide evidence that certain disulfide oxidoreductases can catalyze disulfide bond formation using a single cysteine of the CXXC motif, including the buried C-terminal cysteine.

  15. Protein disulfide isomerase inhibition blocks thrombin generation in humans by interfering with platelet factor V activation

    PubMed Central

    Stopa, Jack D.; Neuberg, Donna; Puligandla, Maneka; Furie, Bruce; Zwicker, Jeffrey I.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is required for thrombus formation. We previously demonstrated that glycosylated quercetin flavonoids such as isoquercetin inhibit PDI activity and thrombus formation in animal models, but whether extracellular PDI represents a viable anticoagulant target in humans and how its inhibition affects blood coagulation remain unknown. METHODS: We evaluated effects of oral administration of isoquercetin on platelet-dependent thrombin generation in healthy subjects and patients with persistently elevated anti-phospholipid antibodies. RESULTS: Following oral administration of 1,000 mg isoquercetin to healthy adults, the measured peak plasma quercetin concentration (9.2 μM) exceeded its IC50 for inhibition of PDI by isoquercetin in vitro (2.5 ± 0.4 μM). Platelet-dependent thrombin generation decreased by 51% in the healthy volunteers compared with baseline (P = 0.0004) and by 64% in the anti-phospholipid antibody cohort (P = 0.015) following isoquercetin ingestion. To understand how PDI affects thrombin generation, we evaluated substrates of PDI identified using an unbiased mechanistic-based substrate trapping approach. These studies identified platelet factor V as a PDI substrate. Isoquercetin blocked both platelet factor Va and thrombin generation with an IC50 of ~5 μM. Inhibition of PDI by isoquercetin ingestion resulted in a 53% decrease in the generation of platelet factor Va (P = 0.001). Isoquercetin-mediated inhibition was reversed with addition of exogenous factor Va. CONCLUSION: These studies show that oral administration of isoquercetin inhibits PDI activity in plasma and diminishes platelet-dependent thrombin generation predominantly by blocking the generation of platelet factor Va. These pharmacodynamic and mechanistic observations represent an important step in the development of a novel class of antithrombotic agents targeting PDI. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01722669) FUNDING: National Heart

  16. Identification of dimethyl disulfide-forming bacteria isolated from activated sludge.

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, B; Inoue, H; Chaya, K; Nakamura, A; Hamamura, N; Ueno, K; Watanabe, K; Ose, Y

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-four strains with high dimethyl disulfide (DMDS)-forming ability were isolated from activated sludge and identified to the genus level. These bacteria were classified into four groups (A, B, C, and D) by the API ZYM System (API System S.A., Montalieu, France). Group A (three strains) was identified as genus Lactobacillus by the API 20B System, by the method of Cowan and Steel, and by production of lactic acid as confirmed by gas-liquid chromatography. Group B (eight strains) was identified as genus Corynebacterium by API 20B and the Cowan and Steel method. Group C (one strain) was suggested to belong to genus Corynebacterium by the API 20B System. Group D (12 strains) was identified as genus Pseudomonas or Alcaligenes by the API 20B System, as genus Alcaligenes by the Cowan and Steel method, and as Achromobacter group Vd by the API 20NE System. However, on the basis of guanine-plus-cytosine contents in DNA and form of flagella, these strains were identified as genus Pseudomonas. Formation of DMDS from DL-methionine and S-methyl-L-cysteine was tested. DMDS-forming bacteria isolated from activated sludge formed DMDS from both precursors. In genus Pseudomonas, P. aeruginosa could not form DMDS from either precursor, but P. acidovorans, P. alcaligenes, P. pseudoalcaligenes, and P. testosteroni formed DMDS. In genus Alcaligenes, A. denitrificans subsp. xylosoxydans, A. denitrificans subsp. denitrificans, A. faecalis, and A. odorans formed DMDS from both precursors. Achromobacter group Vd formed DMDS from S-methyl-L-cysteine, but could not from DL-methionine. PMID:3662505

  17. Syntheses, spectroscopic characterization, crystal structure and natural rubber vulcanization activity of new disulfides derived from sulfonyldithiocarbimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Leandro de Carvalho; Rubinger, Mayura Marques Magalhães; Tavares, Eder do Couto; Janczak, Jan; Pacheco, Elen Beatriz Acordi Vasques; Visconte, Leila Lea Yuan; Oliveira, Marcelo Ribeiro Leite

    2013-09-01

    The compounds (Bu4N)2[(4-RC6H4SO2NCS2)2] [Bu4N = tetrabutylammonium cation; R = H (1), F (2), Cl (3) and Br (4)] and (Ph4P)2[(4-RC6H4SO2NCS2)2]ṡH2O [Ph4P = tetraphenylphosphonium cation and R = I (5)] were synthesized by the reaction of the potassium dithiocarbimates (4-RC6H4SO2NCS2K2ṡ2H2O) with I2 and Bu4NBr or Ph4PCl. The IR data were consistent with the formation of the dithiocarbimatodisulfides anions. The NMR spectra showed the expected signals for the cations and anions in a 2:1 proportion. The structures of compounds 1-5 were determined by the single crystal X-ray diffraction. The compounds 2, 3 and 4 are isostructural and crystallise in the centrosymmetric space group C2/c of the monoclinic system. Compound 1 crystallises in the monoclinic system in the space group of P21/n and the compound 5 crystallises in the centrosymmetric space group P-1 of the triclinic system. The complex anions of compounds 2, 3 and 4 exhibit similar conformations having twofold symmetry, while in 1 and 5 the anions exhibit C1 symmetry. The activity of the new compounds in the vulcanization of the natural rubber was evaluated and compared to the commercial accelerators ZDMC, TBBS and TMTD. These studies confirm that the sulfonyldithiocarbimato disulfides anions are new vulcanization accelerators, being slower than the commercial accelerators, but producing a greater degree of crosslinking, and scorch time values compatible with good processing safety for industrial applications. The mechanical properties, stress and tear resistances were determined and compared to those obtained with the commercial accelerators.

  18. Rapid activation of monocyte tissue factor by antithymocyte globulin is dependent on complement and protein disulfide isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Spath, Brigitte; Fischer, Cornelia; Stolz, Moritz; Ayuk, Francis A.; Kröger, Nicolaus; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Ruf, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Lymphocyte depletion with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) can be complicated by systemic coagulation activation. We found that ATG activated tissue factor procoagulant activity (TF PCA) on monocytic cells more potently than other stimuli that decrypt TF, including cell disruption, TF pathway inhibitor inhibition, and calcium ionophore treatment. Induction of TF PCA by ATG was dependent on lipid raft integrity and complement activation. We showed that ATG-mediated TF activation required complement activation until assembly of the C5b-7 membrane insertion complex, but not lytic pore formation by the membrane attack complex C5b-9. Consistently, induction of TF PCA by ATG did not require maximal phosphatidylserine membrane exposure and was not correlated with the magnitude of complement-induced lytic cell injury. Blockade of free thiols, an inhibitory monoclonal antibody to protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), and the small-molecule PDI antagonist quercetin-3-rutinoside prevented ATG-mediated TF activation, and C5 complement activation resulted in oxidation of cell surface PDI. This rapid and potent mechanism of cellular TF activation represents a novel connection between the complement system and cell surface PDI-mediated thiol-disulfide exchange. Delineation of this clinically relevant mechanism of activation of the extrinsic coagulation pathway during immunosuppressive therapy with ATG may have broader implications for vascular thrombosis associated with inflammatory disorders. PMID:23315166

  19. Substitution of lysine for arginine at position 42 of human transforming growth factor-alpha eliminates biological activity without changing internal disulfide bonds.

    PubMed Central

    Defeo-Jones, D; Tai, J Y; Vuocolo, G A; Wegrzyn, R J; Schofield, T L; Riemen, M W; Oliff, A

    1989-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) is a growth-promoting protein that binds to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. To identify critical residues that govern TGF-alpha-EGF receptor binding, we prepared site-specific substitution mutants of TGF-alpha. Mutant proteins were tested in receptor-binding and mitogenesis assays. Semiconservative substitutions at positions 4, 12, 18, and 45 decreased biological activity 2.1- to 14-fold. The conservative substitution of lysine for arginine at position 42 completely eliminated biological activity. Amino acid composition analysis of proteolytic fragments from TGF-alpha and the Lys-42 mutant indicated that these proteins contained the same disulfide bonds. These studies suggest that arginine 42 may be a contact point for TGF-alpha-EGF receptor interaction. PMID:2506441

  20. Direct interaction of multidrug efflux transporter AcrB and outer membrane channel TolC detected via site-directed disulfide cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Norihisa; Murakami, Satoshi; Oyama, Yoshiaki; Ishiguro, Masaji; Yamaguchi, Akihito

    2005-08-23

    The AcrAB-TolC system exports a wide variety of drugs and toxic compounds, and confers intrinsic drug tolerance on Escherichia coli. The crystal structures suggested that AcrB and TolC directly dock with each other. However, biochemical and biophysical evidence of their interaction has been contradictory until recently. In this study, we examine the interaction sites by means of in vivo disulfide cross-linking between cysteine residues introduced by site-directed mutagenesis at the tops of the vertical hairpins of AcrB and the bottoms of the coiled coils of polyhistidine-tagged TolC molecules, which are structurally predicted docking sites. The AcrB-TolC complex formed through disulfide cross-linking was detected when a specific pair of mutants was coexpressed in E. coli. Our observations suggested that the AcrB-TolC complex may be formed through a two-step mechanism via transient tip-to-tip interaction of AcrB and TolC. The cross-linking was not affected by AcrA, the substrate, or a putative proton coupling site mutation.

  1. Catalysis of Protein Disulfide Bond Isomerization in a Homogeneous Substrate†

    PubMed Central

    Kersteen, Elizabeth A.; Barrows, Seth R.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2008-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) catalyzes the rearrangement of nonnative disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum of eukaryotic cells, a process that often limits the rate at which polypeptide chains fold into a native protein conformation. The mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by PDI is unclear. In assays involving protein substrates, the reaction appears to involve the complete reduction of some or all of its nonnative disulfide bonds followed by oxidation of the resulting dithiols. The substrates in these assays are, however, heterogeneous, which complicates mechanistic analyses. Here, we report the first analysis of disulfide bond isomerization in a homogeneous substrate. Our substrate is based on tachyplesin I, a 17-mer peptide that folds into a _-hairpin stabilized by two disulfide bonds. We describe the chemical synthesis of a variant of tachyplesin I in which its two disulfide bonds are in a nonnative state and side chains near its N-and C-terminus contain a fluorescence donor (tryptophan) and acceptor (N_-dansyllysine). Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from 280 to 465 nm increases by 28-fold upon isomerization of the disulfide bonds into their native state (which has a lower E°_ = -0.313 V than does PDI). We use this continuous assay to analyze catalysis by wild-type human PDI and a variant in which the C-terminal cysteine residue within each Cys—Gly—His—Cys active site is replaced with alanine. We find that wild-type PDI catalyzes the isomerization of the substrate with kcat/KM = 1.7 _ 105 M–1M s–1, which is the largest value yet reported for catalysis of disulfide bond isomerization. The variant, which is a poor catalyst of disulfide bond reduction and dithiol oxidation, retains virtually all of the activity of wild-type PDI in catalysis of disulfide bond isomerization. Thus, the C-terminal cysteine residues play an insignificant role in the isomerization of the disulfide bonds in nonnative tachyplesin I. We conclude that

  2. Electrochemical behavior of polyamides with cyclic disulfide structure and their application to positive active material for lithium secondary battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, Hiromori; Oyari, Yoshiaki; Onimura, Kenjiro; Oishi, Tsutomu

    Polyamides (DTA-I, DTA-II, and DTA-III) containing cyclic disulfide structure were prepared by condensation between 1,2-dithiane-3,6-dicarboxylic acid (DTA) and alkyl diamine, NH 2-(CH 2) n-NH 2 (DTA-I; n=4, DTA-II; n=6, DTA-III; n=8) and their application to positive active material for lithium secondary batteries was investigated. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements under slow sweep rate (0.5 mV s -1) with a carbon paste electrode containing the polyamide (DTA-I, DTA-II, or DTA-III) were performed. The results indicated that the polyamides were electroactive in the organic electrolyte solution (propylene carbonate (PC)-1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME), 1:1 by volume containing lithium salt, such as LiClO 4). The responses based on the redox of the disulfide bonds in the polyamide were observed. Test cells, Li/PC-DME (1:1. by volume) with 1 mol dm -3 LiClO 4/the polyamide cathode, were constructed and their performance was tested under constant current charge/discharge condition. The average capacity of the test cells with the DTA-III cathode was 64.3 Ah kg -1 of cathode (135 Wh kg -1 of cathode, capacity (Ah kg -1) of the cathode×average cell voltage (2.10 V)). Performance of the cell with linear polyamide containing disulfide bond (-CO-(CH 2) 2-S-S-(CH 2) 2-CONH-(CH 2) 8-NH-, GTA-III) was also investigated and the average capacity was 56.8 Ah kg -1 of cathode (100 Wh kg -1 of cathode, capacity (Ah kg -1) of the cathode×average cell voltage (1.76 V)). Cycle efficiency of the test cell with the DTA-III cathode was higher than that with the GTA-III cathode.

  3. The b' domain provides the principal peptide-binding site of protein disulfide isomerase but all domains contribute to binding of misfolded proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Klappa, P; Ruddock, L W; Darby, N J; Freedman, R B

    1998-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is a very efficient catalyst of folding of many disulfide-bonded proteins. A great deal is known about the catalytic functions of PDI, while little is known about its substrate binding. We recently demonstrated by cross-linking that PDI binds peptides and misfolded proteins, with high affinity but broad specificity. To characterize the substrate-binding site of PDI, we investigated the interactions of various recombinant fragments of human PDI, expressed in Escherichia coli, with different radiolabelled model peptides. We observed that the b' domain of human PDI is essential and sufficient for the binding of small peptides. In the case of larger peptides, specifically a 28 amino acid fragment derived from bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, or misfolded proteins, the b' domain is essential but not sufficient for efficient binding, indicating that contributions from additional domains are required. Hence we propose that the different domains of PDI all contribute to the binding site, with the b' domain forming the essential core. PMID:9463371

  4. Barley γ3-hordein: glycosylation at an atypical site, disulfide bridge analysis, and reactivity with IgE from patients allergic to wheat.

    PubMed

    Snégaroff, Jacques; Bouchez, Isabelle; Smaali, Mohamed El Amine; Pecquet, Catherine; Raison-Peyron, Nadia; Jolivet, Pascale; Laurière, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Post translational modifications of a seed storage protein, barley γ3-hordein, were determined using immunochemical and mass spectrometry methods. IgE reactivity towards this protein was measured using sera from patients diagnosed with allergies to wheat. N-glycosylation was found at an atypical Asn-Leu-Cys site. The observed glycan contains xylose. This indicates that at least some γ3-hordein molecules trafficked through the Golgi apparatus. Disulfide bridges in native γ3-hordein were almost the same as those found in wheat γ46-gliadin, except the bridge involving the cysteine included in the glycosylation site. IgE reacted more strongly towards the recombinant than the natural γ3-hordein protein. IgE binding to γ3-hordein increased when the protein sample was reduced. Glycosylation and disulfide bridges therefore decrease epitope accessibility. Thus the IgE from patients sensitized to wheat cross-react with γ3-hordein due to sequence homology with wheat allergens rather than through shared carbohydrate determinants.

  5. Hapten-directed spontaneous disulfide shuffling: a universal technology for site-directed covalent coupling of payloads to antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dengl, Stefan; Hoffmann, Eike; Grote, Michael; Wagner, Cornelia; Mundigl, Olaf; Georges, Guy; Thorey, Irmgard; Stubenrauch, Kay-Gunnar; Bujotzek, Alexander; Josel, Hans-Peter; Dziadek, Sebastian; Benz, Joerg; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2015-05-01

    Humanized hapten-binding IgGs were designed with an accessible cysteine close to their binding pockets, for specific covalent payload attachment. Individual analyses of known structures of digoxigenin (Dig)- and fluorescein (Fluo) binding antibodies and a new structure of a biotin (Biot)-binder, revealed a "universal" coupling position (52(+2)) in proximity to binding pockets but without contributing to hapten interactions. Payloads that carry a free thiol are positioned on the antibody and covalently linked to it via disulfides. Covalent coupling is achieved and driven toward complete (95-100%) payload occupancy by spontaneous redox shuffling between antibody and payload. Attachment at the universal position works with different haptens, antibodies, and payloads. Examples are the haptens Fluo, Dig, and Biot combined with various fluorescent or peptidic payloads. Disulfide-bonded covalent antibody-payload complexes do not dissociate in vitro and in vivo. Coupling requires the designed cysteine and matching payload thiol because payload or antibody without the Cys/thiol are not linked (<5% nonspecific coupling). Hapten-mediated positioning is necessary as hapten-thiol-payload is only coupled to antibodies that bind matching haptens. Covalent complexes are more stable in vivo than noncovalent counterparts because digoxigeninylated or biotinylated fluorescent payloads without disulfide-linkage are cleared more rapidly in mice (approximately 50% reduced 48 hour serum levels) compared with their covalently linked counterparts. The coupling technology is applicable to many haptens and hapten binding antibodies (confirmed by automated analyses of the structures of 140 additional hapten binding antibodies) and can be applied to modulate the pharmacokinetics of small compounds or peptides. It is also suitable to link payloads in a reduction-releasable manner to tumor- or tissue-targeting delivery vehicles.

  6. Elimination of a Free Cysteine by Creation of a Disulfide Bond Increases the Activity and Stability of Candida boidinii Formate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Junxian; Yang, Taowei; Zhou, Junping; Xu, Meijuan; Zhang, Xian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase (FDH; EC 1.2.1.2) is an industrial enzyme widely used for NADH regeneration. However, enzyme inactivation caused by the oxidation of cysteine residues is a flaw of native FDH. In this study, we relieved the oxidation of the free cysteine of FDH from Candida boidinii (CboFDH) through the construction of disulfide bonds between A10 and C23 as well as I239 and C262. Variants A10C, I239C, and A10C/I239C were obtained by the site-directed mutagenesis and their properties were studied. Results showed that there were no significant changes in the optimum temperature and pH between variants and wild-type CboFDH. However, the stabilities of all variant enzymes were improved. Specifically, the CboFDH variant A10C (A10Cfdh) showed a significant increase in copper ion resistance and acid resistance, a 6.7-fold increase in half-life at 60°C, and a 1.4-fold increase in catalytic efficiency compared with the wild type. Asymmetric synthesis of l-tert-leucine indicated that the process time was reduced by 40% with variant A10Cfdh, which benefited from the increase in catalytic efficiency. Circular dichroism analysis and molecular dynamics simulation indicated that variants that contained disulfide bonds lowered the overall root mean square deviation (RMSD) and consequently increased the protein rigidity without affecting the secondary structure of enzyme. This work is expected to provide a viable strategy to avoid the microbial enzyme inactivation caused by the oxidation of the free cysteine residues and improving their performances. IMPORTANCE FDH is widely used for NADH regeneration in dehydrogenase-based synthesis of optically active compounds to decrease the cost of production. This study highlighted a viable strategy that was used to eliminate the oxidation of free cysteine residues of FDH from Candida boidinii by the introduction of disulfide bonds. Using this strategy, we obtained a variant FDH with improved activity and

  7. Centipede venom peptide SsmTX-I with two intramolecular disulfide bonds shows analgesic activities in animal models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Li, Xiaojie; Yang, Meifeng; Wu, Chunyun; Zou, Zhirong; Tang, Jing; Yang, Xinwang

    2017-03-01

    Pain is a major symptom of many diseases and results in enormous pressures on human body or society. Currently, clinically used analgesic drugs, including opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, have adverse reactions, and thus, the development of new types of analgesic drug candidates is urgently needed. Animal venom peptides have proven to have potential as new types of analgesic medicine. In this research, we describe the isolation and characterization of an analgesic peptide from the crude venom of centipede, Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans. The amino acid sequence of this peptide was identical with SsmTX-I that was previously reported as a specific Kv2.1 ion channel blocker. Our results revealed that SsmTX-I was produced by posttranslational processing of a 73-residue prepropeptide. The intramolecular disulfide bridge motifs of SsmTX-I was Cys1-Cys3 and Cys2-Cys4. Functional assay revealed that SsmTX-I showed potential analgesic activities in formalin-induced paw licking, thermal pain, and acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing mice models. Our research provides the first report of cDNA sequences, disulfide motif, successful synthesis, and analgesic potential of SsmTX-I for the development of pain-killing drugs. It indicates that centipede peptide toxins could be a treasure trove for the search of novel analgesic drug candidates. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus DsbA is a membrane-bound lipoprotein with thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase activity.

    PubMed

    Dumoulin, Alexis; Grauschopf, Ulla; Bischoff, Markus; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte

    2005-11-01

    DsbA proteins, the primary catalysts of protein disulfide bond formation, are known to affect virulence and penicillin resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. We identified a putative DsbA homologue in the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus that was able to restore the motility phenotype of an Escherichia coli dsbA mutant and thus demonstrated a functional thiol oxidoreductase activity. The staphylococcal DsbA (SaDsbA) had a strong oxidative redox potential of -131 mV. The persistence of the protein throughout the growth cycle despite its predominant transcription during exponential growth phase suggested a rather long half-life for the SaDsbA. SaDsbA was found to be a membrane localised lipoprotein, supporting a role in disulfide bond formation. But so far, neither in vitro nor in vivo phenotype could be identified in a staphylococcal dsbA mutant, leaving its physiological role unknown. The inability of SaDsbA to interact with the E. coli DsbB and the lack of an apparent staphylococcal DsbB homologue suggest an alternative re-oxidation pathway for the SaDsbA.

  9. Evidence for disulfide bonds in SR Protein Kinase 1 (SRPK1) that are required for activity and nuclear localization

    PubMed Central

    Koutroumani, Maria; Papadopoulos, Georgios E.; Vlassi, Metaxia; Nikolakaki, Eleni; Giannakouros, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Serine/arginine protein kinases (SRPKs) phosphorylate Arg/Ser dipeptide-containing proteins that play crucial roles in a broad spectrum of basic cellular processes. The existence of a large internal spacer sequence that separates the bipartite kinase catalytic core is a unique structural feature of SRPKs. Previous structural studies on a catalytically active fragment of SRPK1, which lacks the main part of the spacer domain, revealed that SRPK1 remains in an active state without any post-translational modifications or specific intra-protein interactions, while the spacer domain is depicted as a loop structure, outside the kinase core. Using systematic mutagenesis we now provide evidence that replacement of any individual cysteine residue in the spacer, apart from Cys414, or in its proximal flaking ends of the two kinase catalytic domains has an impact on kinase activity. Furthermore, the cysteine residues are critical for nuclear translocation of SRPK1 in response to genotoxic stress and SRPK1-dependent splicing of a reporter gene. While replacement of Cys207, Cys502 and Cys539 of the catalytic domains is predicted to distort the kinase active structure, our findings suggest that Cys356, Cys386, Cys427 and Cys455 of the spacer domain and Cys188 of the first catalytic domain are engaged in disulfide bridging. We propose that such a network of intramolecular disulfide bonds mediates the bending of the spacer region thus allowing the proximal positioning of the two catalytic subunits which is a prerequisite for SRPK1 activity. PMID:28166275

  10. Cu(II)-disulfide complexes display simultaneous superoxide dismutase- and catalase-like activities.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Margarita E; Andrade-Acuña, Daniela; López-Alarcón, Camilo; Sandoval-Acuña, Cristián; Speisky, Hernán

    2013-12-01

    Superoxide is a potentially toxic by-product of cellular metabolism. We have addressed here the in vitro ability of complexes formed between copper(II) ions and various biologically-occurring disulfides (RSSR: oxidized glutathione, cystine, homocystine and α-lipoic acid) to react with superoxide. The studied complexes were found to react with superoxide (generated by a xanthine/xanthine oxidase system) at rate constants (kCu(II)-RSSR) close to 10(6)M(-1)s(-1), which are three orders of magnitude lower than that reported for superoxide dismutase (SOD) but comparable to that of several other copper-containing complexes reported as SOD mimetics. The interaction between the tested Cu(II)-RSSR and superoxide, led to the generation and recovery of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and oxygen that were, respectively, below and above those theoretically-expected from a sole SOD mimetic action. Interestingly, oxygen was generated when the Cu(II)-RSSR complexes were directly incubated with hydrogen peroxide. Taken together, these results reveal that the Cu(II)-RSSR complexes not only have the capacity to dismutate superoxide but also to simultaneously act like catalase mimetic molecules. When added to superoxide-overproducing mitochondria (condition attained by its exposure to diclofenac), three of the tested complexes were able (2-4μM), not only to totally restore, but also to lower below the basal level the mitochondrial production of superoxide. The present study is first in reporting on the potential of Cu(II)-disulfide complexes to act as SOD and catalase like molecules, suggesting a potential for these types of molecules to act as such under physiological and/or oxidative-stress conditions.

  11. Novel molybdenum disulfide nanosheets-decorated polyaniline: Preparation, characterization and enhanced electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shuangshuang; He, Ping; Feng, Wanru; Li, Lian; Zhang, Guangli; Chen, Jingchao; Dong, Faqin; He, Huichao

    2016-04-01

    Novel molybdenum disulfide nanosheets-decorated polyaniline (MoS2/PANI) was synthesized and investigated as an efficient catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Compared with MoS2, MoS2/PANI nanocomposites exhibited higher catalytic activity and lower Tafel slope for HER in H2SO4 solution. The amount of 19 wt% PANI for coupling with MoS2 resulted in a high current density of 80 mA cm-2 at 400 mV (vs. RHE). In addition, the optimal MoS2/PANI nanocomposite showed impressive long-term stability even after 500 cycles. The enhanced catalytic activity of MoS2/PANI nanocomposites was primarily ascribed to the effective electron transport channels of PANI and the increase of electrochemically accessible surface area in composite materials, which was advantageous to facilitate the charge transfer at catalyst/electrolyte interface.

  12. Role of the intra-A-chain disulfide bond of insulin-like peptide 3 in binding and activation of its receptor, RXFP2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suode; Hughes, Richard A; Bathgate, Ross A D; Shabanpoor, Fazel; Hossain, M Akhter; Lin, Feng; van Lierop, Bianca; Robinson, Andrea J; Wade, John D

    2010-09-01

    INSL3 is a member of the insulin-IGF-relaxin superfamily and plays a key role in male fetal development and in adult germ cell maturation. It is the cognate ligand for RXFP2, a leucine-rich repeat containing G-protein coupled receptor. To date, and in contrast to our current knowledge of the key structural features that are required for the binding of INSL3 to RXFP2, comparatively little is known about the key residues that are required to elicit receptor activation and downstream cell signaling. Early evidence suggests that these are contained principally within the A-chain. To further explore this hypothesis, we have undertaken an examination of the functional role of the intra-A-chain disulfide bond. Using solid-phase peptide synthesis together with regioselective disulfide bond formation, two analogs of human INSL3 were prepared in which the intra-chain disulfide bond was replaced, one in which the corresponding Cys residues were substituted with the isosteric Ser and the other in which the Cys were removed altogether. Both of these peptides retained nearly full RXFP2 receptor binding but were devoid of cAMP activity (receptor activation), indicating that the intra-A-chain disulfide bond makes a significant contribution to the ability of INSL3 to act as an RXFP2 agonist. Replacement of the disulfide bond with a metabolically stable dicarba bond yielded two isomers of INSL3 that each exhibited bioactivity similar to native INSL3. This study highlights the critical structural role played by the intra-A-chain disulfide bond of INSL3 in mediating agonist actions through the RXFP2 receptor.

  13. Quantitative analysis of the temperature dependency in Raman active vibrational modes of molybdenum disulfide atomic layers.

    PubMed

    Najmaei, Sina; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Lou, J

    2013-10-21

    Raman spectroscopy is utilized to quantify the temperature dependency of the vibrational modes in molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) atomic layers. These analyses are essential for understanding the structural properties and phononic behaviors of this two-dimensional (2D) material. We quantitatively analyze the temperature dependent shifts of the Raman peak positions in the temperature range from 300 to 550 K, and find that both planar and out-of-plane characteristic modes are highly sensitive to temperature variations. This temperature dependency is linear and can be fully explained by the first-order temperature coefficient. Using a semi-quantitative model, we evaluate the contributions of the material's thermal expansion and intrinsic temperature effects to this dependency. We reveal that the dominating source of shift in the peak position of planar mode E2g(1) for samples of all thicknesses investigated is the four-phonon process. In addition to the four-phonon process, thermal expansion plays a significant role in the temperature dependency of the out-of-plane mode, A1g. The thickness dependency of the temperature coefficient for MoS2 and a drastic change in behaviors of samples from bi- to single-layered are also demonstrated. We further explore the role of defects in the thermal properties of MoS2 by examining the temperature dependency of Raman modes in CVD-grown samples.

  14. The in vitro ejection of zinc from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 nucleocapsid protein by disulfide benzamides with cellular anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed Central

    Tummino, P J; Scholten, J D; Harvey, P J; Holler, T P; Maloney, L; Gogliotti, R; Domagala, J; Hupe, D

    1996-01-01

    Several disulfide benzamides have been shown to possess wide-spectrum antiretroviral activity in cell culture at low micromolar to submicromolar concentrations, inhibiting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) clinical and drug-resistant strains along with HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus [Rice, W. G., Supko, J. G., Malspeis, L., Buckheit, R. W., Jr., Clanton, D., Bu, M., Graham, L., Schaeffer, C. A., Turpin, J. A., Domagala, J., Gogliotti, R., Bader, J. P., Halliday, S. M., Coren, L., Sowder, R. C., II, Arthur, L. O. & Henderson, L. E. (1995) Science 270, 1194-1197]. Rice and coworkers have proposed that the compounds act by "attacking" the two zinc fingers of HIV nucleocapsid protein. Shown here is evidence that low micromolar concentrations of the anti-HIV disulfide benzamides eject zinc from HIV nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) in vitro, as monitored by the zinc-specific fluorescent probe N-(6-methoxy-8-quinoyl)-p-toluenesulfonamide (TSQ). Structurally similar disulfide benzamides that do not inhibit HIV-1 in culture do not eject zinc, nor do analogs of the antiviral compounds with the disulfide replaced with a methylene sulfide. The kinetics of NCp7 zinc ejection by disulfide benzamides were found to be nonsaturable and biexponential, with the rate of ejection from the C-terminal zinc finger 7-fold faster than that from the N-terminal. The antiviral compounds were found to inhibit the zinc-dependent binding of NCp7 to HIV psi RNA, as studied by gel-shift assays, and the data correlated well with the zinc ejection data. Anti-HIV disulfide benzamides specifically eject NCp7 zinc and abolish the protein's ability to bind psi RNA in vitro, providing evidence for a possible antiretroviral mechanism of action of these compounds. Congeners of this class are under advanced preclinical evaluation as a potential chemotherapy for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Images Fig. 7 PMID:8577770

  15. Docking and molecular dynamics studies at trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase active sites.

    PubMed

    Iribarne, Federico; Paulino, Margot; Aguilera, Sara; Murphy, Miguel; Tapia, Orlando

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical docking study on the active sites of trypanothione reductase (TR) and glutathione reductase (GR) with the corresponding natural substrates, trypanothione disulfide (T[S]2) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), is reported. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to check the robustness of the docking results. The energetic results are in agreement with previous experimental findings and show the crossed complexes have lower stabilization energies than the natural ones. To test DOCK3.5, four nitro furanic compounds, previously designed as potentially active anti-chagasic molecules, were docked at the GR and TR active sites with the DOCK3.5 procedure. A good correlation was found between differential inhibitory activity and relative interaction energy (affinity). The results provide a validation test for the use of DOCK3.5 in connection with the design of anti-chagasic drugs.

  16. Structural Asymmetry and Disulfide Bridges among Subunits Modulate the Activity of Human Malonyl-CoA Decarboxylase*

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, David; Pérez-Luque, Rosa; Carpena, Xavier; Díaz, Mireia; Ferrer, Joan C.; Loewen, Peter C.; Fita, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA by malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD; EC 4.1.1.9) is an essential facet in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism. The structure of human peroxisomal MCD reveals a molecular tetramer that is best described as a dimer of structural heterodimers, in which the two subunits present markedly different conformations. This molecular organization is consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity. Each subunit has an all-helix N-terminal domain and a catalytic C-terminal domain with an acetyltransferase fold (GNAT superfamily). Intersubunit disulfide bridges, Cys-206–Cys-206 and Cys-243–Cys-243, can link the four subunits of the tetramer, imparting positive cooperativity to the catalytic process. The combination of a half-of-the-sites mechanism within each structural heterodimer and positive cooperativity in the tetramer produces a complex regulatory picture that is further complicated by the multiple intracellular locations of the enzyme. Transport into the peroxisome has been investigated by docking human MCD onto the peroxisomal import protein peroxin 5, which revealed interactions that extend beyond the C-terminal targeting motif. PMID:23482565

  17. The remarkable efficiency of a Pin-II proteinase inhibitor sans two conserved disulfide bonds is due to enhanced flexibility and hydrogen bond density in the reactive site loop.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rakesh S; Mishra, Manasi; Tamhane, Vaijayanti A; Ghosh, Anirban; Sonavane, Uddhavesh; Suresh, C G; Joshi, Rajendra; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2014-01-01

    Capsicum annuum (L.) expresses diverse potato type II family proteinase inhibitors comprising of inhibitory repeat domain (IRD) as basic functional unit. Most IRDs contain eight conserved cysteines forming four disulfide bonds, which are indispensible for their stability and activity. We investigated the functional significance of evolutionary variations in IRDs and their role in mediating interaction between the inhibitor and cognate proteinase. Among the 18 IRDs encoded by C. annuum, IRD-7, -9, and -12 were selected for further characterization on the basis of variation in their reactive site loop, number of conserved cysteine residues, and higher theoretical ΔGbind for interaction with Helicoverpa armigera trypsin. Moreover, inhibition kinetics showed that IRD-9, despite loss of some of the disulfide bonds, was a more potent proteinase inhibitor among the three selected IRDs. Molecular dynamic simulations revealed that serine residues in the place of cysteines at seventh and eighth positions of IRD-9 resulted in an increase in the density of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and reactive site loop flexibility. Results of the serine residues chemical modification also supported this observation and provided a possible explanation for the remarkable inhibitory potential of IRD-9. Furthermore, this natural variant among IRDs showed special attributes like stability to proteolysis and synergistic inhibitory effect on other IRDs. It is likely that IRDs have coevolved selective specialization of their structure and function as a response towards specific insect proteases they encountered. Understanding the molecular mechanism of pest protease-plant proteinaceous inhibitor interaction will help in developing effective pest control strategies. An animated interactive 3D complement (I3DC) is available in Proteopedia at http://proteopedia.org/w/Journal:JBSD:39.

  18. Role of individual disulfide bridges in the conformation and activity of spinoxin (α-KTx6.13), a potassium channel toxin from Heterometrus spinifer scorpion venom.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoko; Peigneur, Steve; Liu, Junyi; Uemura, Shiho; Nose, Takeru; Nirthanan, Selvanayagam; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam; Tytgat, Jan; Sato, Kazuki

    2016-11-01

    Spinoxin (SPX; α-KTx6.13), isolated from venom of the scorpion Heterometrus spinifer, is a K(+) channel-specific peptide toxin (KTx), which adopts a cysteine-stabilized α/β scaffold that is cross-linked by four disulfide bridges (Cys1-Cys5, Cys2-Cys6, Cys3-Cys7, and Cys4-Cys8). To investigate the role of the individual disulfide bonds in the structure-activity relationship of SPX, we synthesized four SPX analogs in which each pair of cysteine residues was replaced by alanine residues. The analysis of circular dichroism spectra and inhibitory activity against Kv1.3 channels showed that the SPX analogs lacking any of three specific disulfide bonds (Cys1-Cys5, Cys2-Cys6, and Cys3-Cys7) were unable to form the native secondary structure and completely lost inhibitory activities. Thus, we conclude that Cys1-Cys5, Cys2-Cys6, and Cys3-Cys7 are required for the inhibition of the Kv1.3 channel by SPX. In contrast, the analog lacking Cys4-Cys8 retained both native secondary structure and inhibitory activity. Interestingly, one of the isomers of the analog lacking Cys1-Cys5 also showed inhibitory activities, although its inhibition was ∼18-fold weaker than native SPX. This isomer had an atypical disulfide bond pairing (Cys3-Cys4 and Cys7-Cys8) that corresponds to that of maurotoxin (MTX), another α-KTx6 family member. These results indicate that the Cys1-Cys5 and Cys2-Cys6 bonds are important for restricting the toxin from forming an atypical (MTX-type) disulfide bond pairing among the remaining four cysteine residues (Cys3, Cys4, Cys7, and Cys8) in native SPX.

  19. Thiol/disulfide redox states in signaling and sensing

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in redox systems biology are creating new opportunities to understand complexities of human disease and contributions of environmental exposures. New understanding of thiol-disulfide systems have occurred during the past decade as a consequence of the discoveries that thiol and disulfide systems are maintained in kinetically controlled steady-states displaced from thermodynamic equilibrium, that a widely distributed family of NADPH oxidases produces oxidants that function in cell signaling, and that a family of peroxiredoxins utilize thioredoxin as a reductant to complement the well-studied glutathione antioxidant system for peroxide elimination and redox regulation. This review focuses on thiol/disulfide redox state in biologic systems and the knowledge base available to support development of integrated redox systems biology models to better understand the function and dysfunction of thiol-disulfide redox systems. In particular, central principles have emerged concerning redox compartmentalization and utility of thiol/disulfide redox measures as indicators of physiologic function. Advances in redox proteomics show that, in addition to functioning in protein active sites and cell signaling, cysteine residues also serve as redox sensors to integrate biologic functions. These advances provide a framework for translation of redox systems biology concepts to practical use in understanding and treating human disease. Biological responses to cadmium, a widespread environmental agent, are used to illustrate the utility of these advances to the understanding of complex pleiotropic toxicities. PMID:23356510

  20. Vitamin K epoxide reductase: homology, active site and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P

    2004-06-01

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) recycles reduced vitamin K, which is used subsequently as a co-factor in the gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid residues in blood coagulation enzymes. VKORC1, a subunit of the VKOR complex, has recently been shown to possess this activity. Here, we show that VKORC1 is a member of a large family of predicted enzymes that are present in vertebrates, Drosophila, plants, bacteria and archaea. Four cysteine residues and one residue, which is either serine or threonine, are identified as likely active-site residues. In some plant and bacterial homologues the VKORC1 homologous domain is fused with domains of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. These might reduce disulfide bonds of VKORC1-like enzymes as a prerequisite for their catalytic activities.

  1. Evidence for the participation of Cys sub 558 and Cys sub 559 at the active site of mercuric reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.M.; Moore, M.J.; Massey, V.; Williams, C.H. Jr.; Distefano, M.D.; Ballou, D.P.; Walsh, C.T. )

    1989-02-07

    Mercuric reductase, with FAD and a reducible disulfide at the active site, catalyzes the two-electron reduction of Hg(II) by NADPH. Addition of reducing equivalents rapidly produces a spectrally distinct EH{sub 2} form of the enzyme containing oxidized FAD and reduced active site thiols. Formation of EH{sub 2} has previously been reported to require only 2 electrons for reduction of the active site disulfide. The authors present results of anaerobic titrations of mercuric reductase with NADPH and dithionite showing that the equilibrium conversion of oxidized enzyme to EH{sub 2} actually requires 2 equiv of reducing agent or 4 electrons. Kinetic studies conducted both at 4{degree}C and at 25{degree}C indicate that reduction of the active site occurs rapidly, as previously reported; this is followed by a slower reduction of another redox group via reaction with the active site. ({sup 14}C)Iodoacetamide labeling experiments demonstrate that the C-terminal residues, Cys{sub 558} and Cys{sub 559}, are involved in this disulfide. The fluorescence, but not the absorbance, of the enzyme-bound FAD was found to be highly dependent on the redox state of the C-terminal thiols. Thus, E{sub ox} with Cys{sub 558} and Cys{sub 559} as thiols exhibits less than 50% of the fluorescence of E{sub ox} where these residues are present as a disulfide, indicating that the thiols remain intimately associated with the active site. Initial velocity measurements show that the auxiliary disulfide must be reduced before catalytic Hg(II) reduction can occur, consistent with the report of a preactivation phenomenon with NADPH or cysteine. A modified minimal catalytic mechanism is proposed as well as several chemical mechanisms for the Hg(II) reduction step.

  2. Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase activities and tightening of tight junctions by diallyl disulfide in AGS human gastric carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Gi-Young; Choi, Il-Whan; Kim, Nam Deuk; Hwang, Hye Jin; Choi, Young-Whan; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2011-05-01

    The effect of diallyl disulfide (DADS), a major component of an oil-soluble allyl sulfide garlic (Allium sativum) derivative, on the correlation between anti-invasive activity and tightening of tight junctions (TJs) was investigated in human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cells. Our data indicated that the inhibitory effects of DADS on cell motility and invasiveness were found to be associated with increased tightness of the TJs, which was demonstrated by an increase in transepithelial electrical resistance. Activities of matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-2 and -9 in AGS cells were dose-dependently inhibited by treatment with DADS, and this was also correlated with a decrease in expression of their mRNA and proteins; however, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and -2 mRNA levels and proteins were increased. Additionally, immunoblotting results indicated that DADS repressed the levels of claudin proteins (claudin-2, -3, and -4), major components of TJs that play key roles in control and selectivity of paracellular transport. Although further studies are needed, these results suggest that DADS treatment may inhibit tumor cell motility and invasion and, therefore, act as a dietary source to decrease the risk of cancer metastasis.

  3. Structure-activity relation of human beta-defensin 3: influence of disulfide bonds and cysteine substitution on antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Klüver, Enno; Schulz-Maronde, Sandra; Scheid, Svenja; Meyer, Bernd; Forssmann, Wolf-Georg; Adermann, Knut

    2005-07-19

    Human beta-defensins form a group of cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides which have been found in epithelial tissue and, more recently, in the male genital tract. They play a role in the defense against microbial pathogens in innate immunity and display additional chemotactic functions in the adaptive immune system. An important characteristic of antimicrobial peptides is that they also exhibit toxic potential on eukaryotic cells. Very little is known about the structure dependence of antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects. We investigated human beta-defensin 3 (hBD-3), a potent broad-spectrum antimicrobial effector peptide, regarding the influence of structural parameters on the antimicrobial and cytotoxic activity. We have established a structure-activity relation of the hBD-3 using synthetic derivatives differing in length, charge, disulfide connectivity, and overall hydrophobicity. The antimicrobial activity of the peptides was compared to the cyctotoxic effects on monocytic THP-1 cells and the hemolytic activity on human erythrocytes. We found that it is not important for antimicrobial and cytotoxic activity whether and how cysteine residues are arranged to form disulfide bonds. Substitution of half-cystinyl residues by tryptophan resulted in increased activities, while other substitutions did not change activity. Correlation of activities with the structural changes demonstrates that the activity on eukaryotic cells appears to depend strongly on the overall hydrophobicity. In contrast, the antimicrobial potency of hBD-3 peptides is determined by the distribution of positively charged amino acid residues and hydrophobic side chains. The results facilitate the understanding of beta-defensin interaction with different cell types and guide the design of antimicrobially active peptides.

  4. Inhibitory effects of diallyl disulfide on the production of inflammatory mediators and cytokines in lipopolysaccharide-activated BV2 microglia

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hye Young; Kim, Nam Deuk; Kim, Gi-Young; Hwang, Hye Jin; Kim, Byung-Woo; Kim, Wun Jae; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2012-07-15

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS), a main organosulfur component responsible for the diverse biological effects of garlic, displays a wide variety of internal biological activities. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying DADS' anti-inflammatory activity remain poorly understood. In this study, therefore, the anti-inflammatory effects of DADS were studied to investigate its potential therapeutic effects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglia. We found that pretreatment with DADS prior to treatment with LPS significantly inhibited excessive production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was associated with down-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. DADS also attenuated the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) by suppressing the expression of mRNAs for these proteins. The mechanism underlying this protective effect might be related to the inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB, Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway activation in LPS-stimulated microglial cells. These findings indicated that DADS is potentially a novel therapeutic candidate for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases. -- Highlights: ► DADS attenuates production of NO and PGE2 in LPS-activated BV2 microglia. ► DADS downregulates levels of iNOS and COX-2. ► DADS inhibits production and expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokine. ► DADS exhibits these effects by suppression of NF-κB, PI3K/Akt and MAPKs pathways.

  5. Conferring specificity in redox pathways by enzymatic thiol/disulfide exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Netto, Luis Eduardo S; de Oliveira, Marcos Antonio; Tairum, Carlos A; da Silva Neto, José Freire

    2016-01-01

    Thiol-disulfide exchange reactions are highly reversible, displaying nucleophilic substitutions mechanism (S(N)2 type). For aliphatic, low molecular thiols, these reactions are slow, but can attain million times faster rates in enzymatic processes. Thioredoxin (Trx) proteins were the first enzymes described to accelerate thiol-disulfide exchange reactions and their high reactivity is related to the high nucleophilicity of the attacking thiol. Substrate specificity in Trx is achieved by several factors, including polar, hydrophobic, and topological interactions through a groove in the active site. Glutaredoxin (Grx) enzymes also contain the Trx fold, but they do not share amino acid sequence similarity with Trx. A conserved glutathione binding site is a typical feature of Grx that can reduce substrates by two mechanisms (mono and dithiol). The high reactivity of Grx enzymes is related to the very acid pK(a) values of reactive Cys that plays roles as good leaving groups. Therefore, although distinct oxidoreductases catalyze similar thiol–disulfide exchange reactions, their enzymatic mechanisms vary. PDI and DsbA are two other oxidoreductases, but they are involved in disulfide bond formation, instead of disulfide reduction, which is related to the oxidative environment where they are found. PDI enzymes and DsbC are endowed with disulfide isomerase activity, which is related with their tetra-domain architecture. As illustrative description of specificity in thiol-disulfide exchange, redox aspects of transcription activation in bacteria, yeast, and mammals are presented in an evolutionary perspective. Therefore, thiol-disulfide exchange reactions play important roles in conferring specificity to pathways, a required feature for signaling.

  6. Proapoptotic Activities of Protein Disulfide Isomerase (PDI) and PDIA3 Protein, a Role of the Bcl-2 Protein Bak*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guoping; Lu, Huayi; Li, Chi

    2015-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family proteins are classified as enzymatic chaperones for reconstructing misfolded proteins. Previous studies have shown that several PDI members possess potential proapoptotic functions. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms of PDI-mediated apoptosis are not completely known. In this study, we investigated how two members of PDI family, PDI and PDIA3, modulate apoptotic signaling. Inhibiting PDI and PDIA3 activities pharmacologically alleviates apoptosis induced by various apoptotic stimuli. Although a decrease of PDIA3 expression alleviates apoptotic responses, overexpression of PDIA3 exacerbates apoptotic signaling. Importantly, Bak, but not Bax, is essential for PDIA3-induced proapoptotic signaling. Furthermore, both purified PDI and PDIA3 proteins induce Bak-dependent, but not Bax-dependent, mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization in vitro, probably through triggering Bak oligomerization on mitochondria. Our results suggest that both of PDI and PDIA3 possess Bak-dependent proapoptotic function through inducing mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, which provides a new mechanism linking ER chaperone proteins and apoptotic signaling. PMID:25697356

  7. The Disulfide Bond of the Peptide Thanatin Is Dispensible for Its Antimicrobial Activity In Vivo and In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bo; Niu, Chao; Zhou, Ying; Xue, Xiaoyan; Meng, Jingru; Luo, Xiaoxing; Hou, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Thanatin (THA) displays potent antibiotic activity, especially against extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli both in vitro and in vivo, with minimal hemolytic toxicity and satisfactory stability in plasma. However, the high cost of thanatin significantly limits its development and clinical application. To reduce the cost of peptide synthesis, a formulation of cyclic thanatin (C-thanatin) called linear thanatin (L-thanatin) was synthesized and its activity was evaluated in vivo and in vitro Results showed that C-thanatin and L-thanatin MICs did not differ against eight Gram-negative and two Gram-positive bacterial strains. Furthermore, the survival rates of ESBL-producing-E. coli-infected mice were consistent after C-thanatin or L-thanatin treatment at 5 or 10 mg/kg of body weight. Neither C-thanatin nor L-thanatin showed toxicity for human red blood cells (hRBCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) at a concentration as high as 256 μg/ml. Results of circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the secondary structure of L-thanatin is extremely similar to that of C-thanatin. Membrane permeabilization and depolarization assays showed that C-thanatin and L-thanatin have similar abilities to permeabilize the outer and inner membranes and to induce membrane depolarization in ESBL-producing E. coli However, neither of them caused significant HUVEC membrane permeability. These findings indicate that the two peptides have similar effects on bacterial cell membranes and that the disulfide bond in thanatin is not essential for its antimicrobial activities in vivo and in vitro L-thanatin is thus a promising low-cost peptide candidate for treating ESBL-producing E. coli infections.

  8. The Disulfide Bond of the Peptide Thanatin Is Dispensible for Its Antimicrobial Activity In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bo; Niu, Chao; Zhou, Ying; Xue, Xiaoyan; Meng, Jingru

    2016-01-01

    Thanatin (THA) displays potent antibiotic activity, especially against extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli both in vitro and in vivo, with minimal hemolytic toxicity and satisfactory stability in plasma. However, the high cost of thanatin significantly limits its development and clinical application. To reduce the cost of peptide synthesis, a formulation of cyclic thanatin (C-thanatin) called linear thanatin (L-thanatin) was synthesized and its activity was evaluated in vivo and in vitro. Results showed that C-thanatin and L-thanatin MICs did not differ against eight Gram-negative and two Gram-positive bacterial strains. Furthermore, the survival rates of ESBL-producing-E. coli-infected mice were consistent after C-thanatin or L-thanatin treatment at 5 or 10 mg/kg of body weight. Neither C-thanatin nor L-thanatin showed toxicity for human red blood cells (hRBCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) at a concentration as high as 256 μg/ml. Results of circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the secondary structure of L-thanatin is extremely similar to that of C-thanatin. Membrane permeabilization and depolarization assays showed that C-thanatin and L-thanatin have similar abilities to permeabilize the outer and inner membranes and to induce membrane depolarization in ESBL-producing E. coli. However, neither of them caused significant HUVEC membrane permeability. These findings indicate that the two peptides have similar effects on bacterial cell membranes and that the disulfide bond in thanatin is not essential for its antimicrobial activities in vivo and in vitro. L-thanatin is thus a promising low-cost peptide candidate for treating ESBL-producing E. coli infections. PMID:27161645

  9. Crystal Structures of the Reduced, Sulfenic Acid, and Mixed Disulfide Forms of SarZ, a Redox Active Global Regulator in Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Poor, Catherine B.; Chen, Peng R.; Duguid, Erica; Rice, Phoebe A.; He, Chuan

    2010-01-20

    SarZ is a global transcriptional regulator that uses a single cysteine residue, Cys{sup 13}, to sense peroxide stress and control metabolic switching and virulence in Staphylococcus aureus. SarZ belongs to the single-cysteine class of OhrR-MgrA proteins that play key roles in oxidative resistance and virulence regulation in various bacteria. We present the crystal structures of the reduced form, sulfenic acid form, and mixed disulfide form of SarZ. Both the sulfenic acid and mixed disulfide forms are structurally characterized for the first time for this class of proteins. The Cys{sup 13} sulfenic acid modification is stabilized through two hydrogen bonds with surrounding residues, and the overall DNA-binding conformation is retained. A further reaction of the Cys{sup 13} sulfenic acid with an external thiol leads to formation of a mixed disulfide bond, which results in an allosteric change in the DNA-binding domains, disrupting DNA binding. Thus, the crystal structures of SarZ in three different states provide molecular level pictures delineating the mechanism by which this class of redox active regulators undergoes activation. These structures help to understand redox-mediated virulence regulation in S. aureus and activation of the MarR family proteins in general.

  10. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Protein disulfide engineering.

    PubMed

    Dombkowski, Alan A; Sultana, Kazi Zakia; Craig, Douglas B

    2014-01-21

    Improving the stability of proteins is an important goal in many biomedical and industrial applications. A logical approach is to emulate stabilizing molecular interactions found in nature. Disulfide bonds are covalent interactions that provide substantial stability to many proteins and conform to well-defined geometric conformations, thus making them appealing candidates in protein engineering efforts. Disulfide engineering is the directed design of novel disulfide bonds into target proteins. This important biotechnological tool has achieved considerable success in a wide range of applications, yet the rules that govern the stabilizing effects of disulfide bonds are not fully characterized. Contrary to expectations, many designed disulfide bonds have resulted in decreased stability of the modified protein. We review progress in disulfide engineering, with an emphasis on the issue of stability and computational methods that facilitate engineering efforts.

  12. Loop recognition and copper-mediated disulfide reduction underpin metal site assembly of CuA in human cytochrome oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Morgada, Marcos N.; Abriata, Luciano A.; Cefaro, Chiara; Gajda, Karolina; Banci, Lucia; Vila, Alejandro J.

    2015-01-01

    Maturation of cytochrome oxidases is a complex process requiring assembly of several subunits and adequate uptake of the metal cofactors. Two orthologous Sco proteins (Sco1 and Sco2) are essential for the correct assembly of the dicopper CuA site in the human oxidase, but their function is not fully understood. Here, we report an in vitro biochemical study that shows that Sco1 is a metallochaperone that selectively transfers Cu(I) ions based on loop recognition, whereas Sco2 is a copper-dependent thiol reductase of the cysteine ligands in the oxidase. Copper binding to Sco2 is essential to elicit its redox function and as a guardian of the reduced state of its own cysteine residues in the oxidizing environment of the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS). These results provide a detailed molecular mechanism for CuA assembly, suggesting that copper and redox homeostasis are intimately linked in the mitochondrion. PMID:26351686

  13. Biological activity of volatile di-n-propyl disulfide from seeds of neem, Azadirachta indica (Meliaceae), to two species of stored grain pests, Sitophilus oryzae (L.) and Tribolium castaneum (Herbst).

    PubMed

    Koul, Opender

    2004-06-01

    Head space volatiles, including 73% di-n-propyl disulfide, were collected from freshly crushed neem seeds. This compound along with previously reported diallyl disulfide (di-2-propenyl disulfide) were toxic when applied topically or as a fumigant to Tribolium castaneum adults and 8-, 12-, and 16-d-old larvae, and Sitophilus oryzae adults. Di-n-propyl disulfide significantly decreased the growth rate and dietary utilization with moderate inhibition of food consumption in both insects. The total coefficient of deterrence for this compound ranged between 68.5 and 178.6, which suggests that it has medium to very good deterrent activity vis-à-vis the treatment concentration and instar. Di-n-propyl disulfide and diallyl disulfide presented a similar effect on efficiency of conversion of ingested food, which is reduced 3-fold; this implies that both compounds are physiological toxicants. Present studies clearly demonstrate that di-n-propyl disulfide could be a potent toxicant, fumigant, and feeding deterrent for stored grain pests, if a suitable formulation and application procedure are developed.

  14. Evidence for thiol/disulfide exchange reactions between tubulin and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Landino, Lisa M; Hagedorn, Tara D; Kennett, Kelly L

    2014-12-01

    While thiol redox reactions are a common mechanism to regulate protein structure and function, protein disulfide bond formation is a marker of oxidative stress that has been linked to neurodegeneration. Both tubulin and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) contain multiple cysteines that have been identified as targets for oxidation to disulfides, S-nitrosation and S-glutathionylation. We show that GAPDH is one of three prominent brain microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), in addition to MAP-2 and tau, with reactive cysteines. We detected a threefold to fourfold increase in tubulin cysteine oxidation by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of rabbit muscle GAPDH by 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein labeling and by Western blot detection of higher molecular weight inter-chain tubulin disulfides. In thiol/disulfide exchange experiments, tubulin restored ∼50% of oxidized GAPDH cysteines and the equilibrium favored reduced GAPDH. Further, we report that oxidized GAPDH is repaired by the thioredoxin reductase system (TRS). Restoration of GAPDH activity after reduction by both tubulin and the TRS was time-dependent suggesting conformational changes near the active site cysteine149. The addition of brain MAPs to oxidized tubulin reduced tubulin disulfides and labeling of MAP-2 and of GAPDH decreased. Because the extent of tubulin repair of oxidized GAPDH was dependent on buffer strength, we conclude that electrostatics influence thiol/disulfide exchange between the two proteins. The novel interactions presented herein may protect GAPDH from inhibition under oxidative stress conditions.

  15. Folic acid-targeted disulfide-based cross-linking micelle for enhanced drug encapsulation stability and site-specific drug delivery against tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumin; Zhou, Junhui; Yang, Cuihong; Wang, Weiwei; Chu, Liping; Huang, Fan; Liu, Qiang; Deng, Liandong; Kong, Deling; Liu, Jianfeng; Liu, Jinjian

    2016-01-01

    Although the shortcomings of small molecular antitumor drugs were efficiently improved by being entrapped into nanosized vehicles, premature drug release and insufficient tumor targeting demand innovative approaches that boost the stability and tumor responsiveness of drug-loaded nanocarriers. Here, we show the use of the core cross-linking method to generate a micelle with enhanced drug encapsulation ability and sensitivity of drug release in tumor. This kind of micelle could increase curcumin (Cur) delivery to HeLa cells in vitro and improve tumor accumulation in vivo. We designed and synthesized the core cross-linked micelle (CCM) with polyethylene glycol and folic acid-polyethylene glycol as the hydrophilic units, pyridyldisulfide as the cross-linkable and hydrophobic unit, and disulfide bond as the cross-linker. CCM showed spherical shape with a diameter of 91.2 nm by the characterization of dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscope. Attributed to the core cross-linking, drug-loaded CCM displayed higher Nile Red or Cur-encapsulated stability and better sensitivity to glutathione than noncross-linked micelle (NCM). Cellular uptake and in vitro antitumor studies proved the enhanced endocytosis and better cytotoxicity of CCM-Cur against HeLa cells, which had a high level of glutathione. Meanwhile, the folate receptor-mediated drug delivery (FA-CCM-Cur) further enhanced the endocytosis and cytotoxicity. Ex vivo imaging studies showed that CCM-Cur and FA-CCM-Cur possessed higher tumor accumulation until 24 hours after injection. Concretely, FA-CCM-Cur exhibited the highest tumor accumulation with 1.7-fold of noncross-linked micelle Cur and 2.8-fold of free Cur. By combining cross-linking of the core with active tumor targeting of FA, we demonstrated a new and effective way to design nanocarriers for enhanced drug encapsulation, smart tumor responsiveness, and elevated tumor accumulation. PMID:27051287

  16. Lid mobility in lipase SMG1 validated using a thiol/disulfide redox potential probe.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shaohua; Popowicz, Grzegorz Maria; Li, Daoming; Yuan, Dongjuan; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-05-01

    Most lipases possess a lid domain above the catalytic site that is responsible for their activation. Lipase SMG1 from Malassezia globose CBS 7966 (Malassezia globosa LIP1), is a mono- and diacylglycerol lipase with an atypical loop-like lid domain. Activation of SMG1 was proposed to be solely through a gating mechanism involving two residues (F278 and N102). However, through disulfide bond cross-linking of the lid, this study shows that full activation also requires mobility of the lid domain, contrary to a previous proposal. The newly introduced disulfide bond makes lipase SMG1 eligible as a ratiometric thiol/disulfide redox potential probe, when it is coupled with chromogenic substrates. This redox-switch lipase could also be of potential use in cascade biocatalysis.

  17. Antileishmanial Activity of Disulfiram and Thiuram Disulfide Analogs in an Ex Vivo Model System Is Selectively Enhanced by the Addition of Divalent Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Peniche, Alex G.; Renslo, Adam R.; Melby, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Current treatments for cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis are toxic, expensive, difficult to administer, and limited in efficacy and availability. Disulfiram has primarily been used to treat alcoholism. More recently, it has shown some efficacy as therapy against protozoan pathogens and certain cancers, suggesting a wide range of biological activities. We used an ex vivo system to screen several thiuram disulfide compounds for antileishmanial activity. We found five compounds (compound identifier [CID] 7188, 5455, 95876, 12892, and 3117 [disulfiram]) with anti-Leishmania activity at nanomolar concentrations. We further evaluated these compounds with the addition of divalent metal salts based on studies that indicated these salts could potentiate the action of disulfiram. In addition, clinical studies suggested that zinc has some efficacy in treating cutaneous leishmaniasis. Several divalent metal salts were evaluated at 1 μM, which is lower than the normal levels of copper and zinc in plasma of healthy individuals. The leishmanicidal activity of disulfiram and CID 7188 were enhanced by several divalent metal salts at 1 μM. The in vitro therapeutic index (IVTI) of disulfiram and CID 7188 increased 12- and 2.3-fold, respectively, against L. major when combined with ZnCl2. The combination of disulfiram with ZnSO4 resulted in a 1.8-fold increase in IVTI against L. donovani. This novel combination of thiuram disulfides and divalent metal ions salts could have application as topical and/or oral therapies for treatment of cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:26239994

  18. Anti-invasive activity of diallyl disulfide through tightening of tight junctions and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase activities in LNCaP prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Yeok; Kim, Gi-Young; Kim, Jung-In; Yoon, Moo Kyoung; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Lee, Su Jae; Choi, Young-Whan; Kang, Ho Sung; Yoo, Young Hyun; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2010-09-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a major component of an oil-soluble allyl sulfide garlic (Allium sativum) derivative, which has been shown to exert a potential for anti-cancer activity. However, the biochemical mechanisms underlying DADS-induced anti-invasiveness and anti-metastasis have not been thoroughly studied. In this study, we investigated the effect of DADS on the correlation between tightening of tight junctions (TJs) and anti-invasive activity in human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells. Inhibitory effects of DADS on cell motility and invasiveness were found to be associated with increased tightness of the TJ, which was demonstrated by an increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). Additionally, immunoblotting results indicated that DADS repressed the levels of the claudin proteins, which are major components of TJs that play a key role in control and selectivity of paracellular transport. Furthermore, the activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 in LNCaP cells were dose-dependently inhibited by treatment with DADS, and this was also correlated with a decrease in expression of their mRNA and proteins. Although further studies are needed, the present study indicates that TJs and MMPs are critical targets of DADS-induced anti-invasiveness in human prostate cancer LNCaP cells.

  19. Role for the disulfide-bonded region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 in receptor-triggered activation of membrane fusion function

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy-McIntyre, Anna K.; Baer, Severine; Ludlow, Louise; Drummer, Heidi E.; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2010-04-16

    The conserved disulfide-bonded region (DSR) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fusion glycoprotein, gp41, mediates association with the receptor-binding glycoprotein, gp120. Interactions between gp120, CD4 and chemokine receptors activate the fusion activity of gp41. The introduction of W596L and W610F mutations to the DSR of HIV-1{sub QH1549.13} blocked viral entry and hemifusion without affecting gp120-gp41 association. The fusion defect correlated with inhibition of CD4-triggered gp41 pre-hairpin formation, consistent with the DSR mutations having decoupled receptor-induced conformational changes in gp120 from gp41 activation. Our data implicate the DSR in sensing conformational changes in the gp120-gp41 complex that lead to fusion activation.

  20. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  1. Identification of Allosteric Disulfides from Prestress Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Beifei; Baldus, Ilona B.; Li, Wenjin; Edwards, Scott A.; Gräter, Frauke

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide bonds serve to form physical cross-links between residues in protein structures, thereby stabilizing the protein fold. Apart from this purely structural role, they can also be chemically active, participating in redox reactions, and they may even potentially act as allosteric switches controlling protein functions. Specific types of disulfide bonds have been identified in static protein structures from their distinctive pattern of dihedral bond angles, and the allosteric function of such bonds is purported to be related to the torsional strain they store. Using all-atom molecular-dynamics simulations for ∼700 disulfide bonded proteins, we analyzed the intramolecular mechanical forces in 20 classes of disulfide bonds. We found that two particular classes, the −RHStaple and the −/+RHHook disulfides, are indeed more stressed than other disulfide bonds, but the stress is carried primarily by stretching of the S-S bond and bending of the neighboring bond angles, rather than by dihedral torsion. This stress corresponds to a tension force of magnitude ∼200 pN, which is balanced by repulsive van der Waals interactions between the cysteine Cα atoms. We confirm stretching of the S-S bond to be a general feature of the −RHStaples and the −/+RHHooks by analyzing ∼20,000 static protein structures. Given that forced stretching of S-S bonds is known to accelerate their cleavage, we propose that prestress of allosteric disulfide bonds has the potential to alter the reactivity of a disulfide, thereby allowing us to readily switch between functional states. PMID:25099806

  2. From structure to redox: the diverse functional roles of disulfides and implications in disease

    PubMed Central

    Bechtel, Tyler J.; Weerapana, Eranthie

    2017-01-01

    This review provides a comprehensive overview of the functional roles of disulfide bonds and their relevance to human disease. The critical roles of disulfide bonds in protein structure stabilization and redox regulation of protein activity are addressed. Disulfide bonds are essential to the structural stability of many proteins within the secretory pathway and can exist as intramolecular or inter-domain disulfides. The proper formation of these bonds often relies on folding chaperones and oxidases such as members of the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family. Many of the PDI family members catalyze disulfide-bond formation, reduction and isomerization through redox-active disulfides and perturbed PDI activity is characteristic of carcinomas and neurodegenerative diseases. In addition to catalytic function in oxidoreductases, redox-active disulfides are also found on a diverse array of cellular proteins and act to regulate protein activity and localization in response to oxidative changes in the local environment. These redox-active disulfides are either dynamic intramolecular protein disulfides or mixed disulfides with small-molecule thiols generating glutathionylation and cysteinylation adducts. The oxidation and reduction of redox-active disulfides are mediated by cellular reactive oxygen species and activity of reductases, such as glutaredoxin and thioredoxin. Dysregulation of cellular redox conditions and resulting changes in mixed disulfide formation are directly linked to diseases such as cardiovascular disease and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:28044432

  3. Homodimeric chicken galectin CG-1B (C-14): Crystal structure and detection of unique redox-dependent shape changes involving inter- and intrasubunit disulfide bridges by gel filtration, ultracentrifugation, site-directed mutagenesis, and peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    López-Lucendo, María F; Solís, Dolores; Sáiz, José Luis; Kaltner, Herbert; Russwurm, Roland; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Romero, Antonio

    2009-02-20

    Intrafamily gene diversification has led to three prototype galectins in chicken [i.e., chicken galectin (CG)-1A, CG-1B, and CG-2] that show distinct expression profiles and developmental regulation. In order to pinpoint structural disparities among them, we determined the crystal structure of CG-1B. Alteration of the position of the Trp ring in the lectin site and the presence of only two ordered water molecules therein, as well as changes in the interface region between the two subunits, set the structure of CG-1B clearly apart from that of CG-1A. Intriguingly, the unique presence of two Cys residues at positions 2 and 7 in the N-terminal region translated into formation of an intersubunit disulfide bridge between the Cys7 residues of the homodimer in the crystal. In solution, oxidation is associated with significant shape changes in the dimeric protein and the additional occurrence of a compacted form with an intrasubunit disulfide bridge between Cys2 and Cys7. The single-site mutant C7S/C7V was not subjected to such changes, supporting the crucial role of Cys7 in redox-dependent shape changes. These results point to the functional significance of the distinctive presence of the two Cys residues in the N-terminal region of CG-1B.

  4. Identification of the unpaired cysteine status and complete mapping of the 17 disulfides of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator using LC-MS with electron transfer dissociation/collision induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Jiang, Haitao; Hancock, William S; Karger, Barry L

    2010-06-15

    Recombinant tissue plasminogen (rt-PA) with 35 cysteine residues has been completely assigned by mapping the 17 disulfide linkages and the unpaired cysteine. The result is consistent with the prediction from homology except for the unassigned cysteine, which was identified at Cys83. This cysteine was found to be blocked and paired with either a glutathione or cysteine residue in an approximately 60:40 ratio, respectively. The analysis was conducted using a multifragmentation approach consisting of electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision induced dissociation (CID), in combination with a multienzyme digestion strategy (Lys-C, trypsin, and Glu-C). The disulfide-linked peptides, even those containing N- or O-linked glycosylation, could be assigned since the disulfide bonds were still preferably cleaved over the glycosidic cleavages under ETD fragmentation. The use of a multiple and sequential enzymatic digestion strategy was important in producing fragment sizes suitable for analysis. For the analysis of complex intertwined disulfides, the use of CID-MS(3) to target partially disulfide-dissociated peptides from the ETD fragmentation was necessary for linkage assignment. The ability to identify the exact location and status of the unpaired cysteine (free or blocked with a glutathione or cysteine) could shed light on the activation of rt-PA, upon stimulation by either oxidative or ischemic stress.

  5. Disulfide-Trapping Identifies a New, Effective Chemical Probe for Activating the Nuclear Receptor Human LRH-1 (NR5A2)

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus Cortez, Felipe; Suzawa, Miyuki; Irvy, Sam; Bruning, John M.; Sablin, Elena; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Fletterick, Robert J.; Ingraham, Holly A.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional efforts relying on high-throughput physical and virtual screening of large compound libraries have failed to yield high-efficiency chemical probes for many of the 48 human nuclear receptors. Here, we investigated whether disulfide-trapping, an approach new to nuclear receptors, would provide effective lead compounds targeting human liver receptor homolog 1 (hLRH-1, NR5A2). Despite the fact that hLRH-1 contains a large ligand binding pocket and binds phospholipids with high affinity, existing synthetic hLRH-1 ligands are of limited utility due to poor solubility, low efficacy or significant off-target effects. Using disulfide-trapping, we identified a lead compound that conjugates with remarkably high-efficiency to a native cysteine residue (Cys346) lining the hydrophobic cavity in the ligand binding domain of hLRH-1. Guided by computational modeling and cellular assays, the lead compound was elaborated into ligands PME8 and PME9 that bind hLRH-1 reversibly (no cysteine reactivity) and increase hLRH-1 activity in cells. When compared with the existing hLRH-1 synthetic agonist RJW100, both PME8 and PME9 showed comparable induction of the LRH-1 dependent target gene CYP24A1 in human HepG2 cells, beginning as early as 3 h after drug treatment. The induction is specific as siRNA-mediated knock-down of hLRH-1 renders both PME8 and PME9 ineffective. These data show that PME8 and PME9 are potent activators of hLRH-1 and suggest that with further development this lead series may yield useful chemical probes for manipulating LRH-1 activity in vivo. PMID:27467220

  6. Electrocatalytic activity of molybdenum disulfide nanosheets enhanced by self-doped polyaniline for highly sensitive and synergistic determination of adenine and guanine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Yang, Ruirui; Chen, Huaiyin; Nan, Fuxin; Ge, Tong; Jiao, Kui

    2015-02-04

    Recently, easy, green, and low-cost liquild exfoliation of bulk materials to obtain thin-layered nanostructure significantly emerged. In this work, thin-layered molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanosheets were fabricated through intercalation of self-doped polyaniline (SPAN) to layer space of bulk MoS2 by ultrasonic exfoliating method to effectively prevent reaggregation of MoS2 nanosheets. The obtained hybrid showed specific surface area, a large number of electroactive species, and open accessible space, accompanied by rich negative charged and special conjugated structure, which was applied to adopt positively charged guanine and adenine, based on their strong π-π* interactions and electrostatic adsorption. Also, the SPAN-MoS2 interface exhibited the synergistic effect and good electrocatalytic activity compared with the sole SPAN or MoS2 modified electrode.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations on pars intercerebralis major peptide-C (PMP-C) reveal the role of glycosylation and disulfide bonds in its enhanced structural stability and function.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Sandeep; Mohanty, Debasisa; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2012-01-01

    Fucosylation of Thr 9 in pars intercerebralis major peptide-C (PMP-C) enhances its structural stability and functional ability as a serine protease inhibitor. In order to understand the role of disulfide bonds and glycosylation on the structure and function of PMP-C, we have carried out multiple explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on fucosylated and non-fucosylated forms of PMP-C, both in the presence and absence of the disulfide bonds. Our simulations revealed that there were no significant structural changes in the native disulfide bonded forms of PMP-C due to fucosylation. On the other hand, the non-fucosylated form of PMP-C without disulfide bonds showed larger deviations from the starting structure than the fucosylated form. However, the structural deviations were restricted to the terminal regions while core β-sheet retained its hydrogen bonded structure even in absence of disulfide bonds as well as fucosylation. Interestingly, fucosylation of disulfide bonded native PMP-C led to a decreased thermal flexibility in the residue stretch 29-32 which is known to interact with the active site of the target proteases. Our analysis revealed that disulfide bonds covalently connect the residue stretch 29-32 to the central β-sheet of PMP-C and using a novel network of side chain interactions and disulfide bonds fucosylation at Thr 9 is altering the flexibility of the stretch 29-32 located at a distal site. Thus, our simulations explain for the first time, how presence of disulfide bonds between conserved cysteines and fucosylation enhance the function of PMP-C as a protease inhibitor.

  8. Identification and reactivity of the catalytic site of pig liver thioltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Z.R.; Wells, W.W.

    1987-05-01

    The active site cysteine of pig liver thioltransferase was identified as Cys 22. The kinetics of the reaction between Cys 22 of the reduced enzyme and iodoacetic acid as a function of pH revealed that the active site sulfhydryl group had a pKa of 2.5. Incubation of reduced enzyme with (1-/sup 14/C)cystine prevented the inactivation of the enzyme by iodoacetic acid at pH 6.5 and no stable protein-cysteine disulfide was found suggesting an intramolecular disulfide formation. The reaction rate between reduced enzyme and S-sulfocysteine was concentration dependent, but not pH dependent, whereas the reaction between oxidized enzyme and reduced glutathione was both concentration and pH dependent. The results suggested a reaction mechanism for thioltransferase. The thiolated Cys 22 first initiates a nucleophilic attack on a disulfide substrate, resulting in the formation of an unstable mixed disulfide between Cys 22 and the substrate. Subsequently, the sulfhydryl group at Cys 25 is deprotonated as a result of microenvironmental changes within the active site domain, releasing the mixed disulfide and forming an intramolecular disulfide bond. Reduced glutathione, the second substrate, reduces the intramolecular disulfide forming a transient mixed disulfide which is then further reduced by glutathione to regenerate the reduced enzyme and form oxidized glutathione. The rate limiting step is proposed to be the reduction of the intramolecular disulfide form of the enzyme by reduced glutathione.

  9. Disulfide-activated protein kinase G Iα regulates cardiac diastolic relaxation and fine-tunes the Frank–Starling response

    PubMed Central

    Scotcher, Jenna; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Boguslavskyi, Andrii; Kistamas, Kornel; Hadgraft, Natasha; Martin, Eva D.; Worthington, Jenny; Rudyk, Olena; Rodriguez Cutillas, Pedro; Cuello, Friederike; Shattock, Michael J.; Marber, Michael S.; Conte, Maria R.; Greenstein, Adam; Greensmith, David J.; Venetucci, Luigi; Timms, John F.; Eaton, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The Frank–Starling mechanism allows the amount of blood entering the heart from the veins to be precisely matched with the amount pumped out to the arterial circulation. As the heart fills with blood during diastole, the myocardium is stretched and oxidants are produced. Here we show that protein kinase G Iα (PKGIα) is oxidant-activated during stretch and this form of the kinase selectively phosphorylates cardiac phospholamban Ser16—a site important for diastolic relaxation. We find that hearts of Cys42Ser PKGIα knock-in (KI) mice, which are resistant to PKGIα oxidation, have diastolic dysfunction and a diminished ability to couple ventricular filling with cardiac output on a beat-to-beat basis. Intracellular calcium dynamics of ventricular myocytes isolated from KI hearts are altered in a manner consistent with impaired relaxation and contractile function. We conclude that oxidation of PKGIα during myocardial stretch is crucial for diastolic relaxation and fine-tunes the Frank–Starling response. PMID:27782102

  10. Disulfide-activated protein kinase G Iα regulates cardiac diastolic relaxation and fine-tunes the Frank-Starling response.

    PubMed

    Scotcher, Jenna; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Boguslavskyi, Andrii; Kistamas, Kornel; Hadgraft, Natasha; Martin, Eva D; Worthington, Jenny; Rudyk, Olena; Rodriguez Cutillas, Pedro; Cuello, Friederike; Shattock, Michael J; Marber, Michael S; Conte, Maria R; Greenstein, Adam; Greensmith, David J; Venetucci, Luigi; Timms, John F; Eaton, Philip

    2016-10-26

    The Frank-Starling mechanism allows the amount of blood entering the heart from the veins to be precisely matched with the amount pumped out to the arterial circulation. As the heart fills with blood during diastole, the myocardium is stretched and oxidants are produced. Here we show that protein kinase G Iα (PKGIα) is oxidant-activated during stretch and this form of the kinase selectively phosphorylates cardiac phospholamban Ser16-a site important for diastolic relaxation. We find that hearts of Cys42Ser PKGIα knock-in (KI) mice, which are resistant to PKGIα oxidation, have diastolic dysfunction and a diminished ability to couple ventricular filling with cardiac output on a beat-to-beat basis. Intracellular calcium dynamics of ventricular myocytes isolated from KI hearts are altered in a manner consistent with impaired relaxation and contractile function. We conclude that oxidation of PKGIα during myocardial stretch is crucial for diastolic relaxation and fine-tunes the Frank-Starling response.

  11. Role of cysteine residues and disulfide bonds in the activity of a legume root nodule-specific, cysteine-rich peptide.

    PubMed

    Haag, Andreas F; Kerscher, Bernhard; Dall'Angelo, Sergio; Sani, Monica; Longhi, Renato; Baloban, Mikhail; Wilson, Heather M; Mergaert, Peter; Zanda, Matteo; Ferguson, Gail P

    2012-03-30

    The root nodules of certain legumes including Medicago truncatula produce >300 different nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides. Medicago NCR antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) mediate the differentiation of the bacterium, Sinorhizobium meliloti into a nitrogen-fixing bacteroid within the legume root nodules. In vitro, NCR AMPs such as NCR247 induced bacteroid features and exhibited antimicrobial activity against S. meliloti. The bacterial BacA protein is critical to prevent S. meliloti from being hypersensitive toward NCR AMPs. NCR AMPs are cationic and have conserved cysteine residues, which form disulfide (S-S) bridges. However, the natural configuration of NCR AMP S-S bridges and the role of these in the activity of the peptide are unknown. In this study, we found that either cysteine replacements or S-S bond modifications influenced the activity of NCR247 against S. meliloti. Specifically, either substitution of cysteines for serines, changing the S-S bridges from cysteines 1-2, 3-4 to 1-3, 2-4 or oxidation of NCR247 lowered its activity against S. meliloti. We also determined that BacA specifically protected S. meliloti against oxidized NCR247. Due to the large number of different NCRs synthesized by legume root nodules and the importance of bacterial BacA proteins for prolonged host infections, these findings have important implications for analyzing the function of these novel peptides and the protective role of BacA in the bacterial response toward these peptides.

  12. An efficient molybdenum disulfide/cobalt diselenide hybrid catalyst for electrochemical hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Min-Rui; Liang, Jin-Xia; Zheng, Ya-Rong; Xu, Yun-Fei; Jiang, Jun; Gao, Qiang; Li, Jun; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2015-01-14

    The electroreduction of water for sustainable hydrogen production is a critical component of several developing clean-energy technologies, such as water splitting and fuel cells. However, finding a cheap and efficient alternative catalyst to replace currently used platinum-based catalysts is still a prerequisite for the commercialization of these technologies. Here we report a robust and highly active catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction that is constructed by in situ growth of molybdenum disulfide on the surface of cobalt diselenide. In acidic media, the molybdenum disulfide/cobalt diselenide catalyst exhibits fast hydrogen evolution kinetics with onset potential of -11 mV and Tafel slope of 36 mV per decade, which is the best among the non-noble metal hydrogen evolution catalysts and even approaches to the commercial platinum/carbon catalyst. The high hydrogen evolution activity of molybdenum disulfide/cobalt diselenide hybrid is likely due to the electrocatalytic synergistic effects between hydrogen evolution-active molybdenum disulfide and cobalt diselenide materials and the much increased catalytic sites.

  13. An efficient molybdenum disulfide/cobalt diselenide hybrid catalyst for electrochemical hydrogen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Min-Rui; Liang, Jin-Xia; Zheng, Ya-Rong; Xu, Yun-Fei; Jiang, Jun; Gao, Qiang; Li, Jun; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The electroreduction of water for sustainable hydrogen production is a critical component of several developing clean-energy technologies, such as water splitting and fuel cells. However, finding a cheap and efficient alternative catalyst to replace currently used platinum-based catalysts is still a prerequisite for the commercialization of these technologies. Here we report a robust and highly active catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction that is constructed by in situ growth of molybdenum disulfide on the surface of cobalt diselenide. In acidic media, the molybdenum disulfide/cobalt diselenide catalyst exhibits fast hydrogen evolution kinetics with onset potential of -11 mV and Tafel slope of 36 mV per decade, which is the best among the non-noble metal hydrogen evolution catalysts and even approaches to the commercial platinum/carbon catalyst. The high hydrogen evolution activity of molybdenum disulfide/cobalt diselenide hybrid is likely due to the electrocatalytic synergistic effects between hydrogen evolution-active molybdenum disulfide and cobalt diselenide materials and the much increased catalytic sites.

  14. Radically different thioredoxin domain arrangement of ERp46, an efficient disulfide bond introducer of the mammalian PDI family.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Rieko; Okumura, Masaki; Masui, Shoji; Kanemura, Shingo; Inoue, Michio; Saiki, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Hikima, Takaaki; Suzuki, Mamoru; Akiyama, Shuji; Inaba, Kenji

    2014-03-04

    The mammalian endoplasmic reticulum (ER) contains a diverse oxidative protein folding network in which ERp46, a member of the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family, serves as an efficient disulfide bond introducer together with Peroxiredoxin-4 (Prx4). We revealed a radically different molecular architecture of ERp46, in which the N-terminal two thioredoxin (Trx) domains with positively charged patches near their peptide-binding site and the C-terminal Trx are linked by unusually long loops and arranged extendedly, forming an opened V-shape. Whereas PDI catalyzes native disulfide bond formation by the cooperative action of two mutually facing redox-active sites on folding intermediates bound to the central cleft, ERp46 Trx domains are separated, act independently, and engage in rapid but promiscuous disulfide bond formation during early oxidative protein folding. Thus, multiple PDI family members likely contribute to different stages of oxidative folding and work cooperatively to ensure the efficient production of multi-disulfide proteins in the ER.

  15. Comparison of Self-Assembled Monolayers on Gold: Coadsorption of Thiols and Disulfides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-15

    self-assembled monolayers of thiols and disulfides. Previous studies by Dubois et alt t of the adsorption of dimethyl disulfide and methanethiol on...with an activation energy of desorption of 28 kcal/mol of disulfide, but the methanethiol was only physisorbed on the gold surface and desorbed intact

  16. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  17. Direct observation of disulfide isomerization in a single protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Kosuri, Pallav; Rivas-Pardo, Jaime Andrés; Fernández, Julio M.

    2011-11-01

    Photochemical uncaging techniques use light to release active molecules from otherwise inert compounds. Here we expand this class of techniques by demonstrating the mechanical uncaging of a reactive species within a single protein. We proved this novel technique by capturing the regiospecific reaction between a thiol and a vicinal disulfide bond. We designed a protein that includes a caged cysteine and a buried disulfide. The mechanical unfolding of this protein in the presence of an external nucleophile frees the single reactive cysteine residue, which now can cleave the target disulfide via a nucleophilic attack on either one of its two sulfur atoms. This produces two different and competing reaction pathways. We used single-molecule force spectroscopy to monitor the cleavage of the disulfides, which extends the polypeptide by a magnitude unambiguously associated with each reaction pathway. This allowed us to measure, for the first time, the kinetics of disulfide-bond isomerization in a protein.

  18. Probing S4 and S5 Segment Proximity in Mammalian Hyperpolarization Activated HCN Channels by Disulfide Bridging and Cd2+ Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Damian C.; Turbendian, Harma K.; Valley, Matthew T.; Zhou, Lei; Riley, John H.; Siegelbaum, Steven A.; Tibbs, Gareth R.

    2009-01-01

    We explored the structural basis of voltage sensing in HCN1 hyperpolarization-activated channels by examining the relative orientation of the voltage-sensor and pore domains. The opening of channels engineered to contain single cysteine residues at the extracellular ends of the voltage-sensing S4 (V246C) and pore-forming S5 (C303) domains is inhibited by formation of disulfide or cysteine:Cd2+ bonds. As Cd2+ coordination is promoted by depolarization, the S4-S5 interaction occurs preferentially in the closed state. The failure of oxidation to catalyze dimer formation, as assayed by Western blotting, indicates the V246C:C303 interaction occurs within a subunit. Intriguingly, a similar interaction has been observed in depolarization-activated Shaker Kv channels at depolarized potentials but such an intrasubunit interaction is inconsistent with the X-ray crystal structure of Kv1.2, wherein S4 approaches S5 of an adjacent subunit. These findings suggest channels of opposite voltage-sensing polarity adopt a conserved S4-S5 orientation in the depolarized state that is distinct from that trapped upon crystallization. PMID:19034494

  19. 46 CFR 153.1040 - Carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon disulfide. 153.1040 Section 153.1040 Shipping... § 153.1040 Carbon disulfide. (a) No person may load, carry, or discharge carbon disulfide unless the... charge of a carbon disulfide transfer operation shall ensure that carbon disulfide is discharged only...

  20. 46 CFR 153.1040 - Carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon disulfide. 153.1040 Section 153.1040 Shipping... § 153.1040 Carbon disulfide. (a) No person may load, carry, or discharge carbon disulfide unless the... charge of a carbon disulfide transfer operation shall ensure that carbon disulfide is discharged only...

  1. 46 CFR 153.1040 - Carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon disulfide. 153.1040 Section 153.1040 Shipping... § 153.1040 Carbon disulfide. (a) No person may load, carry, or discharge carbon disulfide unless the... charge of a carbon disulfide transfer operation shall ensure that carbon disulfide is discharged only...

  2. 46 CFR 153.1040 - Carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon disulfide. 153.1040 Section 153.1040 Shipping... § 153.1040 Carbon disulfide. (a) No person may load, carry, or discharge carbon disulfide unless the... charge of a carbon disulfide transfer operation shall ensure that carbon disulfide is discharged only...

  3. 46 CFR 153.1040 - Carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon disulfide. 153.1040 Section 153.1040 Shipping... § 153.1040 Carbon disulfide. (a) No person may load, carry, or discharge carbon disulfide unless the... charge of a carbon disulfide transfer operation shall ensure that carbon disulfide is discharged only...

  4. A protein disulfide isomerase gene fusion expression system that increases the extracellular productivity of Bacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Kajino, T; Ohto, C; Muramatsu, M; Obata, S; Udaka, S; Yamada, Y; Takahashi, H

    2000-02-01

    We have developed a versatile Bacillus brevis expression and secretion system based on the use of fungal protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) as a gene fusion partner. Fusion with PDI increased the extracellular production of heterologous proteins (light chain of immunoglobulin G, 8-fold; geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase, 12-fold). Linkage to PDI prevented the aggregation of the secreted proteins, resulting in high-level accumulation of fusion proteins in soluble and biologically active forms. We also show that the disulfide isomerase activity of PDI in a fusion protein is responsible for the suppression of the aggregation of the protein with intradisulfide, whereas aggregation of the protein without intradisulfide was prevented even when the protein was fused to a mutant PDI whose two active sites were disrupted, suggesting that another PDI function, such as chaperone-like activity, synergistically prevented the aggregation of heterologous proteins in the PDI fusion expression system.

  5. Quantification of Thiols and Disulfides

    PubMed Central

    Winther, Jakob R.; Thorpe, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Background Disulfide bond formation is a key posttranslational modification, with implications for structure, function and stability of numerous proteins. While disulfide bond formation is a necessary and essential process for many proteins, it is deleterious and disruptive for others. Cells go to great lengths to regulate thiol-disulfide bond homeostasis, typically with several, apparently redundant, systems working in parallel. Dissecting the extent of oxidation and reduction of disulfides is an ongoing challenge due, in part, to the facility of thiol/disulfide exchange reactions. Scope of the review In the present account, we briefly survey the toolbox available to the experimentalist for the chemical determination of thiols and disulfides. We have chosen to focus on the key chemical aspects of current methodology, together with identifying potential difficulties inherent in their experimental implementation. Major conclusions While many reagents have been described for the measurement and manipulation of the redox status of thiols and disulfides, a number of these methods remain underutilized. The ability to effectively quantify changes in redox conditions in living cells presents a continuing challenge. General Significance Many unresolved questions in the metabolic interconversion of thiols and disulfides remain. For example, while pool sizes of redox pairs and their intracellular distribution are being uncovered, very little is known about the flux in thiol-disulfide exchange pathways. New tools are needed to address this important aspect of cellular metabolism. PMID:23567800

  6. Multiple disulfide bridges modulate conformational stability and flexibility in hyperthermophilic archaeal purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Bagarolo, Maria Libera; Porcelli, Marina; Martino, Elisa; Feller, Georges; Cacciapuoti, Giovanna

    2015-10-01

    5'-Deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase from Sulfolobus solfataricus is a hexameric hyperthermophilic protein containing in each subunit two pairs of disulfide bridges, a CXC motif, and one free cysteine. The contribution of each disulfide bridge to the protein conformational stability and flexibility has been assessed by comparing the thermal unfolding and the limited proteolysis of the wild-type enzyme and its variants obtained by site-directed mutagenesis of the seven cysteine residues. All variants catalyzed efficiently MTA cleavage with specific activity similar to the wild-type enzyme. The elimination of all cysteine residues caused a substantial decrease of ΔHcal (850 kcal/mol) and Tmax (39°C) with respect to the wild-type indicating that all cysteine pairs and especially the CXC motif significantly contribute to the enzyme thermal stability. Disulfide bond Cys200-Cys262 and the CXC motif weakly affected protein flexibility while the elimination of the disulfide bond Cys138-Cys205 lead to an increased protease susceptibility. Experimental evidence from limited proteolysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing and nonreducing conditions also allowed to propose a stabilizing role for the free Cys164.

  7. Edge-terminated molybdenum disulfide with a 9.4-Å interlayer spacing for electrochemical hydrogen production

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Min -Rui; Chan, Maria K. Y.; Sun, Yugang

    2015-07-03

    In this study, layered molybdenum disulfide has demonstrated great promise as a low-cost alternative to platinum-based catalysts for electrochemical hydrogen production from water. Research effort on this material has focused mainly on synthesizing highly nanostructured molybdenum disulfide that allows the exposure of a large fraction of active edge sites. Here we report a promising microwave-assisted strategy for the synthesis of narrow molybdenum disulfide nanosheets with edge-terminated structure and a significantly expanded interlayer spacing, which exhibit striking kinetic metrics with onset potential of -103 mV, Tafel slope of 49 mV per decade and exchange current density of 9.62 × 10-3 mAmore » cm-2, performing among the best of current molybdenum disulfide catalysts. Besides benefits from the edge-terminated structure, the expanded interlayer distance with modified electronic structure is also responsible for the observed catalytic improvement, which suggests a potential way to design newly advanced molybdenum disulfide catalysts through modulating the interlayer distance.« less

  8. Edge-terminated molybdenum disulfide with a 9.4-Å interlayer spacing for electrochemical hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Min -Rui; Chan, Maria K. Y.; Sun, Yugang

    2015-07-03

    In this study, layered molybdenum disulfide has demonstrated great promise as a low-cost alternative to platinum-based catalysts for electrochemical hydrogen production from water. Research effort on this material has focused mainly on synthesizing highly nanostructured molybdenum disulfide that allows the exposure of a large fraction of active edge sites. Here we report a promising microwave-assisted strategy for the synthesis of narrow molybdenum disulfide nanosheets with edge-terminated structure and a significantly expanded interlayer spacing, which exhibit striking kinetic metrics with onset potential of -103 mV, Tafel slope of 49 mV per decade and exchange current density of 9.62 × 10-3 mA cm-2, performing among the best of current molybdenum disulfide catalysts. Besides benefits from the edge-terminated structure, the expanded interlayer distance with modified electronic structure is also responsible for the observed catalytic improvement, which suggests a potential way to design newly advanced molybdenum disulfide catalysts through modulating the interlayer distance.

  9. Interdisciplinary neurotoxicity inhalation studies: Carbon disulfide and carbonyl sulfide research in F344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sills, Robert C. . E-mail: sills@niehs.nih.gov; Harry, G. Jean; Valentine, William M.; Morgan, Daniel L.

    2005-09-01

    Inhalation studies were conducted on the hazardous air pollutants, carbon disulfide, which targets the central nervous system (spinal cord) and peripheral nervous system (distal portions of long myelinated axons), and carbonyl sulfide, which targets the central nervous system (brain). The objectives were to investigate the neurotoxicity of these compounds by a comprehensive evaluation of function, structure, and mechanisms of disease. Through interdisciplinary research, the major finding in the carbon disulfide inhalation studies was that carbon disulfide produced intra- and intermolecular protein cross-linking in vivo. The observation of dose-dependent covalent cross-linking in neurofilament proteins prior to the onset of lesions is consistent with this process contributing to the development of the neurofilamentous axonal swellings characteristic of carbon disulfide neurotoxicity. Of significance is that valine-lysine thiourea cross-linking on rat globin and lysine-lysine thiourea cross-linking on erythrocyte spectrin reflect cross-linking events occurring within the axon and could potentially serve as biomarkers of carbon disulfide exposure and effect. In the carbonyl sulfide studies, using magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM), we determined that carbonyl sulfide targets the auditory pathway in the brain. MRM allowed the examination of 200 brain slices and made it possible to identify the most vulnerable sites of neurotoxicity, which would have been missed in our traditional neuropathology evaluations. Electrophysiological studies were focused on the auditory system and demonstrated decreases in auditory brain stem evoked responses. Similarly, mechanistic studies focused on evaluating cytochrome oxidase activity in the posterior colliculus and parietal cortex. A decrease in cytochrome oxidase activity was considered to be a contributing factor to the pathogenesis of carbonyl sulfide neurotoxicity.

  10. The Pediocin PA-1 Accessory Protein Ensures Correct Disulfide Bond Formation in the Antimicrobial Peptide Pediocin PA-1.

    PubMed

    Oppegård, Camilla; Fimland, Gunnar; Anonsen, Jan Haug; Nissen-Meyer, Jon

    2015-05-19

    Peptides, in contrast to proteins, are generally not large enough to form stable and well-defined three-dimensional structures. However, peptides are still able to form correct disulfide bonds. Using pediocin-like bacteriocins, we have examined how this may be achieved. Some pediocin-like bacteriocins, such as pediocin PA-1 and sakacin P[N24C+44C], have four cysteines. There are three possible ways by which the four cysteines may combine to form two disulfide bonds, and the three variants are expected to be produced in approximately equal amounts if their formation is random. Pediocin PA-1 and sakacin P[N24C+44C] with correct disulfide bonds were the main products when they were secreted by the pediocin PA-1 ABC transporter and accessory protein, but when they were secreted by the corresponding secretion machinery for sakacin A, a pediocin-like bacteriocin with one disulfide bond (two cysteines), peptides with all three possible disulfide bonds were produced in approximately equal amounts. All five cysteines in the pediocin PA-1 ABC transporter and the two cysteines (that form a CxxC motif) in the accessory protein were individually replaced with serines to examine their involvement in disulfide bond formation in pediocin PA-1. The Cys86Ser mutation in the accessory protein caused a 2-fold decrease in the amount of pediocin PA-1 with correct disulfide bonds, while the Cys83Ser mutation nearly abolished the production of pediocin PA-1 and resulted in the production of all three disufide bond variants in equal amounts. The Cys19Ser mutation in the ABC transporter completely abolished secretion of pediocin PA-1, suggesting that Cys19 is in the proteolytic active site and involved in cleaving the prebacteriocin. Replacing the other four cysteines in the ABC transporter with serines caused a slight reduction in the overall amount of secreted pediocin PA-1, but the relative amount with the correct disulfide bonds remained large. These results indicate that the pediocin

  11. Tungsten disulfide nanosheet and exonuclease III co-assisted amplification strategy for highly sensitive fluorescence polarization detection of DNA glycosylase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingjin; Ma, Yefei; Kong, Rongmei; Zhang, Liangliang; Yang, Wen; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-08-05

    Herein, we introduced a tungsten disulfide (WS2) nanosheet and exonuclease III (Exo III) co-assisted signal amplification strategy for highly sensitive fluorescent polarization (FP) assay of DNA glycosylase activity. Two DNA glycosylases, uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) and human 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1), were tested. A hairpin-structured probe (HP) which contained damaged bases in the stem was used as the substrate. The removal of damaged bases from substrate by DNA glycosylase would lower the melting temperature of HP. The HP was then opened and hybridized with a FAM dye-labeled single strand DNA (DP), generating a duplex with a recessed 3'-terminal of DP. This design facilitated the Exo III-assisted amplification by repeating the hybridization and digestion of DP, liberating numerous FAM fluorophores which could not be adsorbed on WS2 nanosheet. Thus, the final system exhibited a small FP signal. However, in the absence of DNA glycosylases, no hybridization between DP and HP was occurred, hampering the hydrolysis of DP by Exo III. The intact DP was then adsorbed on the surface of WS2 nanosheet that greatly amplified the mass of the labeled-FAM fluorophore, resulting in a large FP value. With the co-assisted amplification strategy, the sensitivity was substantially improved. In addition, this method was applied to detect UDG activity in cell extracts. The study of the inhibition of UDG was also performed. Furthermore, this method is simple in design, easy in implementation, and selective, which holds potential applications in the DNA glycosylase related mechanism research and molecular diagnostics.

  12. Lysine Decarboxylase with an Enhanced Affinity for Pyridoxal 5-Phosphate by Disulfide Bond-Mediated Spatial Reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    Sagong, Hye-Young; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Lysine decarboxylase (LDC) catalyzes the decarboxylation of l-lysine to produce cadaverine, an important industrial platform chemical for bio-based polyamides. However, due to high flexibility at the pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP) binding site, use of the enzyme for cadaverine production requires continuous supplement of large amounts of PLP. In order to develop an LDC enzyme from Selenomonas ruminantium (SrLDC) with an enhanced affinity for PLP, we introduced an internal disulfide bond between Ala225 and Thr302 residues with a desire to retain the PLP binding site in a closed conformation. The SrLDCA225C/T302C mutant showed a yellow color and the characteristic UV/Vis absorption peaks for enzymes with bound PLP, and exhibited three-fold enhanced PLP affinity compared with the wild-type SrLDC. The mutant also exhibited a dramatically enhanced LDC activity and cadaverine conversion particularly under no or low PLP concentrations. Moreover, introduction of the disulfide bond rendered SrLDC more resistant to high pH and temperature. The formation of the introduced disulfide bond and the maintenance of the PLP binding site in the closed conformation were confirmed by determination of the crystal structure of the mutant. This study shows that disulfide bond-mediated spatial reconstitution can be a platform technology for development of enzymes with enhanced PLP affinity. PMID:28095457

  13. Enzyme structure captures four cysteines aligned for disulfide relay

    PubMed Central

    Gat, Yair; Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Grossman, Iris; Major, Dan Thomas; Fass, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin superfamily proteins introduce disulfide bonds into substrates, catalyze the removal of disulfides, and operate in electron relays. These functions rely on one or more dithiol/disulfide exchange reactions. The flavoenzyme quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX), a catalyst of disulfide bond formation with an interdomain electron transfer step in its catalytic cycle, provides a unique opportunity for exploring the structural environment of enzymatic dithiol/disulfide exchange. Wild-type Rattus norvegicus QSOX1 (RnQSOX1) was crystallized in a conformation that juxtaposes the two redox-active di-cysteine motifs in the enzyme, presenting the entire electron-transfer pathway and proton-transfer participants in their native configurations. As such a state cannot generally be enriched and stabilized for analysis, RnQSOX1 gives unprecedented insight into the functional group environments of the four cysteines involved in dithiol/disulfide exchange and provides the framework for analysis of the energetics of electron transfer in the presence of the bound flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor. Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) free energy simulations based on the X-ray crystal structure suggest that formation of the interdomain disulfide intermediate is highly favorable and secures the flexible enzyme in a state from which further electron transfer via the flavin can occur. PMID:24888638

  14. The dehydrogenase region of the NADPH oxidase component Nox2 acts as a protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) resembling PDIA3 with a role in the binding of the activator protein p67phox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechor, Edna; Dahan, Iris; Fradin, Tanya; Berdichevsky, Yevgeny; Zahavi, Anat; Rafalowski, Meirav; Federman-Gross, Aya; Pick, Edgar

    2015-02-01

    The superoxide (O2.-)-generating NADPH oxidase of phagocytes consists of a membrane component, cytochrome b558 (a heterodimer of Nox2 and p22phox), and four cytosolic components, p47phox, p67phox, p40phox, and Rac. The catalytic component, responsible for O2.- generation, is Nox2. It is activated by the interaction of the dehydrogenase region (DHR) of Nox2 with the cytosolic components, principally with p67phox. Using a peptide-protein binding assay, we found that Nox2 peptides containing a 369CysGlyCys371 triad (CGC) bound p67phox with high affinity, dependent upon the establishment of a disulfide bond between the two cysteines. Serially truncated recombinant Nox2 DHR proteins bound p67phox only when they comprised the CGC triad. CGC resembles the catalytic motif (CGHC) of protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs). This led to the hypothesis that Nox2 establishes disulfide bonds with p67phox via a thiol-dilsulfide exchange reaction and, thus, functions as a PDI. Evidence for this was provided by the following: 1. Recombinant Nox2 protein, which contained the CGC triad, exhibited PDI-like disulfide reductase activity; 2. Truncation of Nox2 C-terminal to the CGC triad or mutating C369 and C371 to R, resulted in loss of PDI activity; 3. Comparison of the sequence of the DHR of Nox2 with PDI family members revealed three small regions of homology with PDIA3; 4. Two monoclonal anti-Nox2 antibodies, with epitopes corresponding to regions of Nox2/PDIA3 homology, reacted with PDIA3 but not with PDIA1; 5. A polyclonal anti-PDIA3 (but not an anti-PDIA1) antibody reacted with Nox2; 6. p67phox, in which all cysteines were mutated to serines, lost its ability to bind to a Nox2 peptide containing the CGC triad and had an impaired capacity to support oxidase activity in vitro. We propose a model of oxidase assembly in which binding of p67phox to Nox2 via disulfide bonds, by virtue of the intrinsic PDI activity of Nox2, stabilizes the primary interaction between the two components.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of visible-active molybdenum disulfide (2H-MoS{sub 2}) nanospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Cheah, A. J. Chiu, W. S.; Khiew, P. S.; Radiman, S. Hamid, M. A. A.

    2015-07-22

    In current study, a novel 2H-MoS{sub 2} nanospheres were successfully synthesized and underwent structural- as well as optical-property characterizations. The MoS{sub 2} were prepared by one pot hydrothermal approach through adopting L-cysteine as environmentally-benignchalcogenide precursor. TEM image shows that the as-synthesized MoS{sub 2} appear to be spherical in shape with size distribution in the range of 120 nm – 180 nm. HRTEM lattice-fringes imaging further elucidate that the interlayer spacing at the edges is equal to be 0.62 nm that correspond to (002) plane stacking. Also, the HRTEM image clearly-illustrate that the internal microstructure of MoS{sub 2} composed of randomly-arrayed alternating layers, which render the postulation that the formation of nanosphere is driven by self-assembly of individual layers into globular morphology. XRD diffractogram that appear to be broad and unresolved reveal the partially crystalline nature of the sample. Optical-absorption spectra depicts the sample is visible active with featureless absorption, which can attribute to indirect transition of the excitions generated. By using Tauc plot, the bandgap energy is determined to be 1.75 eV, which reflect the nanospheres are indeed visible-active nanostructures.

  16. Corrosion Research And Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  17. Corrosion Research and Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  18. Redox-coupled structural changes of the catalytic a' domain of protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Koya; Satoh, Tadashi; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Le Gulluche, Anne-Charlotte; Anzai, Takahiro; Uekusa, Yoshinori; Kamiya, Yukiko; Kato, Koichi

    2015-09-14

    Protein disulfide isomerase functions as a folding catalyst in the endoplasmic reticulum. Its b' and a' domains provide substrate-binding sites and undergo a redox-dependent domain rearrangement coupled to an open-closed structural change. Here we determined the first solution structure of the a' domain in its oxidized form and thereby demonstrate that oxidation of the a' domain induces significant conformational changes not only in the vicinity of the active site but also in the distal b'-interfacial segment. Based on these findings, we propose that this conformational transition triggers the domain segregation coupled with the exposure of the hydrophobic surface.

  19. Protein disulfide isomerase is essential for viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, R; Honey, N; Murant, S J; Bossier, P; Schultz, L; Montgomery, D; Ellis, R W; Freedman, R B; Tuite, M F

    1991-12-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is an enzyme involved in the catalysis of disulfide bond formation in secretory and cell-surface proteins. Using an oligodeoxyribonucleotide designed to detect the conserved 'thioredoxin-like' active site of vertebrate PDIs, we have isolated a gene encoding PDI from the lower eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The nucleotide sequence and deduced open reading frame of the cloned gene predict a 530-amino-acid (aa) protein of Mr 59,082 and a pI of 4.1, physical properties characteristic of mammalian PDIs. Furthermore, the aa sequence shows 30-32% identity with mammalian and avian PDI sequences and has a very similar overall organisation, namely the presence of two approx. 100-aa segments, each of which is repeated, with the most significant homologies to mammalian and avian PDIs being in the regions (a, a') that contain the conserved 'thioredoxin-like' active site. The N-terminal region has the characteristics of a cleavable secretory signal sequence and the C-terminal four aa (-His-Asp-Glu-Leu) are consistent with the protein being a component of the S. cerevisiae endoplasmic reticulum. Transformants carrying multiple copies of this gene (designated PDI1) have tenfold higher levels of PDI activity and overproduce a protein of the predicted Mr. The PDI1 gene is unique in the yeast genome and encodes a single 1.8-kb transcript that is not found in stationary phase cells. Disruption of the PDI1 gene is haplo-lethal indicating that the product of this gene is essential for viability.

  20. Disulfide-Bridged (Mo3S11) Cluster Polymer: Molecular Dynamics and Application as Electrode Material for a Rechargeable Magnesium Battery.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang Duc; Kempaiah Devaraju, Murukanahally; Nguyen, Duc N; Gambe, Yoshiyuki; Nayuki, Keiichiro; Sasaki, Yoshikazu; Tran, Phong D; Honma, Itaru

    2016-09-14

    Exploring novel electrode materials is critical for the development of a next-generation rechargeable magnesium battery with high volumetric capacity. Here, we showed that a distinct amorphous molybdenum sulfide, being a coordination polymer of disulfide-bridged (Mo3S11) clusters, has great potential as a rechargeable magnesium battery cathode. This material provided good reversible capacity, attributed to its unique structure with high flexibility and capability of deformation upon Mg insertion. Free-terminal disulfide moiety may act as the active site for reversible insertion and extraction of magnesium.

  1. Examination of the effect of increasing the number of intra-disulfide amino functional groups on the performance of small molecule cyclic polyamine disulfide vectors.

    PubMed

    Drake, Christopher R; Aissaoui, Abderrahim; Argyros, Orestis; Thanou, Maya; Steinke, Joachim H G; Miller, Andrew D

    2013-10-10

    Establishing structure-activity relationships is vital if the efficacy of non-viral vectors is to match that of their viral counter-parts. Recently, we reported on the ability of a series of small molecule, cyclic polyamine disulfides to condense and cage plasmid DNA (pDNA) by a process of thermodynamically controlled templated polymerization, leading to a series of corresponding pDNA-polyplex nanoparticles able to mediate high levels of transfection with no associated cytotoxicities. The leading cyclic polyamine disulfide was shown to be the spermine tetra-amine disulfide (TetraN-3,4,3). Herein we report on the significantly more challenging syntheses of cyclic disulfides with longer polyamine motifs. Two new cyclic polyamine disulfides, based on hexa- and octa-amine inserts, were prepared and their transfection efficacies and cytotoxicities compared with our previously reported cyclic tri- and tetra-amine disulfides. The new cyclic hexa- and octa-amine disulfides prove more effective at transfection in vitro, especially of lung epithelial A549 cell line. By contrast, our original cyclic tetra-amine disulfide remains the most efficient agent for the transfection of lung epithelial cells in vivo following intra-nasal administration. Hypothetical mechanistic reasons are presented to explain this outcome. Our data in toto support the concept of shorter cyclic polyamine disulfides as preferred agents for polycation-mediated controlled condensation and functional delivery of pDNA to lung epithelial cells in vivo.

  2. The influence of zinc(II) on thioredoxin/glutathione disulfide exchange: QM/MM studies to explore how zinc(II) accelerates exchange in higher dielectric environments.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Roby; Bruce, Mitchell R M; Bruce, Alice E; Amar, François G

    2015-08-01

    QM/MM studies were performed to explore the energetics of exchange reactions of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) and the active site of thioredoxin [Cys32-Gly33-Pro34-Cys35] with and without zinc(II), in vacuum and solvated models. The activation energy for exchange, in the absence of zinc, is 29.7 kcal mol(-1) for the solvated model. This is 3.3 kcal mol(-1) higher than the activation energy for exchange in the gas phase, due to ground state stabilization of the active site Cys-32 thiolate in a polar environment. In the presence of zinc, the activation energy for exchange is 4.9 kcal mol(-1) lower than in the absence of zinc (solvated models). The decrease in activation energy is attributed to stabilization of the charge-separated transition state, which has a 4-centered, cyclic arrangement of Zn-S-S-S with an estimated dipole moment of 4.2 D. A difference of 4.9 kcal mol(-1) in activation energy would translate to an increase in rate by a factor of about 4000 for zinc-assisted thiol-disulfide exchange. The calculations are consistent with previously reported experimental results, which indicate that metal-thiolate, disulfide exchange rates increase as a function of solvent dielectric. This trend is opposite to that observed for the influence of the dielectric environment on the rate of thiol-disulfide exchange in the absence of metal. The results suggest a dynamic role for zinc in thiol-disulfide exchange reactions, involving accessible cysteine sites on proteins, which may contribute to redox regulation and mechanistic pathways during oxidative stress.

  3. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  4. [Structural regularities in activated cleavage sites of thrombin receptors].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlik, I V; Verevka, S V

    1999-01-01

    Comparison of thrombin receptors activation splitting sites sequences testifies to their similarity both in activation splitting sites of protein precursors and protein proteinase inhibitors reactive sites. In all these sites corresponded to effectory sites P2'-positions are placed by hydrophobic amino-acids only. The regularity defined conforms with previous thesis about the role of effectory S2'-site in regulation of the processes mediated by serine proteinases.

  5. Selective Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Reactions: Enabling Disulfide Mapping via Oxidation and Cleavage of Disulfide Bonds in Intermolecularly-Linked Polypeptide Ions.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Alice L; McLuckey, Scott A

    2016-09-20

    The selective gas-phase oxidation of disulfide bonds to their thiosulfinate form using ion/ion reactions and subsequent cleavage is demonstrated here. Oxidizing reagent anions are observed to attach to all polypeptides, regardless of amino acid composition. Direct proton transfer yielding a charge-reduced peptide is also frequently observed. Activation of the ion/ion complex between an oxidizing reagent anion and a disulfide-containing peptide cation results in oxygen transfer from the reagent anion to the peptide cation to form the [M+H+O](+) species. This thiosulfinate derivative can undergo one of several rearrangements that result in cleavage of the disulfide bond. Species containing an intermolecular disulfide bond undergo separation of the two chains upon activation. Further activation can be used to generate more sequence information from each chain. These oxidation ion/ion reactions have been used to illustrate the identification of S-glutathionylated and S-cysteinylated peptides, in which low molecular weight thiols are attached to cysteine residues in peptides via disulfide bonds. The oxidation chemistry effectively labels peptide ions with readily oxidized groups, such as disulfide bonds. This enables a screening approach for the identification of disulfide-linked peptides in a disulfide mapping application involving enzymatic digestion. The mixtures of ions generated by tryptic and peptic digestions of lysozyme and insulin, respectively, without prior separation or isolation were subjected both to oxidation and proton transfer ion/ion chemistry to illustrate the identification of peptides in the mixtures with readily oxidized groups.

  6. Design of disulfide bridge as an alternative mechanism for color shift in firefly luciferase and development of secreted luciferase.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Mahboobeh; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2011-07-01

    The bioluminescence reaction, which uses luciferin, Mg(2+)-ATP and molecular oxygen to yield an electronically excited oxyluciferin, is carried out by luciferase and emits visible light. The bioluminescence color of firefly luciferases is determined by the luciferase structure and assay conditions. It is proposed that the stability of a protein can be increased by introduction of disulfide bridge that decreases the configurational entropy of unfolding. A disulfide bridge is introduced into Photinus pyralis firefly luciferase to make three separate mutant enzymes with a single bridge. Moreover, C(81)-A(105)C mutant luciferase was modified and successfully secreted to the extracellular medium. By introduction of disulfide bridges using site-directed mutagenesis in Photinus pyralis luciferase the color of emitted light was changed to red and the optimum temperature of activity was also increased (up to 10 °C more than wild type). Amongst mutants with a disulfide bridge, P(451)C-V(469)C and L(306)C-L(309)C mutants exhibit a single peak in the red region of the spectrum at pH 7.8. It is worthwhile to note that with the design of a secreted luciferase, the increased optimum temperature, thermostability and emission of red light might make mutant luciferase suitable reporters for the study of gene expression in high through-put screening.

  7. Redox-dependent domain rearrangement of protein disulfide isomerase from a thermophilic fungus.

    PubMed

    Nakasako, Masayoshi; Maeno, Aya; Kurimoto, Eiji; Harada, Takushi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Oka, Toshihiko; Takayama, Yuki; Iwata, Aya; Kato, Koichi

    2010-08-17

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) acts as folding catalyst and molecular chaperone for disulfide-containing proteins through the formation, breakage, and rearrangement of disulfide bonds. PDI has a modular structure comprising four thioredoxin domains, a, b, b', and a', followed by a short segment, c. The a and a' domains have an active site cysteine pair for the thiol-disulfide exchange reaction, which alters PDI between the reduced and oxidized forms, and the b' domain provides a primary binding site for substrate proteins. Although the structures and functions of PDI have studied, it is still argued whether the overall conformation of PDI depends on the redox state of the active site cysteine pair. Here, we report redox-dependent conformational and solvation changes of PDI from a thermophilic fungus elucidated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis. The redox state and secondary structures of PDI were also characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroic spectroscopy, respectively. The oxidized form of PDI showed SAXS differences from the reduced form, and the low-resolution molecular models restored from the SAXS profiles differed between the two forms regarding the positions of the a'-c region relative to the a-b-b' region. The normal mode analysis of the crystal structure of yeast PDI revealed that the inherent motions of the a-b-b' and a'-c regions expose the substrate binding surface of the b' domain. The apparent molecular weight of the oxidized form estimated from SAXS was 1.1 times larger than that of the reduced form, whereas the radius of gyration (ca. 33 A) was nearly independent of the redox state. These results suggest that the conformation of PDI is controlled by the redox state of the active site cysteine residues in the a and a' domains and that the conformational alternation accompanies solvation changes in the active site cleft formed by the a, b, b', and a' domains. On the basis of the results presented here, we

  8. Radiation inactivation of ricin occurs with transfer of destructive energy across a disulfide bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Haigler, H.T.; Woodbury, D.J.; Kempner, E.S.

    1985-08-01

    The ionizing radiation sensitivity of ricin, a disulfide-linked heterodimeric protein, was studied as a model to determine the ability of disulfide bonds to transmit destructive energy. The radiation-dependent loss of A chain enzymatic activity after irradiation of either intact ricin or ricin in which the interchain disulfide bond was disrupted gave target sizes corresponding to the molecular size of dimeric ricin or monomeric A chain, respectively. These results clearly show that a disulfide bond can transmit destructive energy between protein subunits.

  9. Disulfides as cyanide antidotes: evidence for a new in vivo oxidative pathway for cyanide detoxification.

    PubMed

    Zottola, Mark A; Beigel, Keith; Soni, Sunil-Datta; Lawrence, Richard

    2009-12-01

    It is known that cyanide is converted to thiocyanate in the presence of the enzyme rhodanese. The enzyme is activated by sulfur transfer from an appropriate sulfur donor. The activated enzyme then binds cyanide and transfers the sulfur atom to cyanide to form thiocyanate. This project began as an exploration of the ability of disulfides to act as sulfur donors in the rhodanese-mediated detoxification of cyanide. To our surprise, and contrary to expectations based on efficacy studies in vivo, our in vitro results showed that disulfides are rather poor sulfur donors. The transfer of a sulfur atom from a disulfide to the enzyme must occur via cleavage of a carbon-sulfur bond either of the original disulfide or in a mixed disulfide arising from the reaction of rhodanese with the original disulfide. Extending the reaction time and addition of chloride anion (a nucleophile) did not significantly change the results of the experiment. Using ultrasound as a means of accelerating bond cleavage also had a minimal effect. Those results ruled out cleavage of the carbon-sulfur bond in the original disulfide but did not preclude formation of a mixed disulfide. S-Methyl methylthiosulfonate (MTSO) was used to determine whether a mixed disulfide, if formed, would result in transfer of a sulfur atom to rhodanese. While no thiocyanate was formed in the reaction between cyanide and rhodanese exposed to MTSO, NMR analysis revealed that MTSO reacted directly with cyanide anion to form methyl thiocyanate. This result reveals the body's possible use of oxidized disulfides as a first line of defense against cyanide intoxication. The oxidation of disulfides to the corresponding thiosulfinate or thiosulfonate will result in facilitating their reaction with other nucleophiles. The reaction of an oxidized disulfide with a sulfur nucleophile from glutathione could be a plausible origin for the cyanide metabolite 2-aminothiazoline-4-carboxylic acid.

  10. Resolution of Disulfide Heterogeneity in Nogo Receptor 1 Fusion Proteins by Molecular Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    P Weinreb; D Wen; F Qian; C Wildes; E Garber; L Walus; M Jung; J Wang; J Relton; et al.

    2011-12-31

    NgRI (Nogo-66 receptor) is part of a signalling complex that inhibits axon regeneration in the central nervous system. Truncated soluble versions of NgRI have been used successfully to promote axon regeneration in animal models of spinal-cord injury, raising interest in this protein as a potential therapeutic target. The LRR (leucine-rich repeat) regions in NgRI are flanked by N- and C-terminal disulfide-containing 'cap' domains (LRRNT and LRRCT respectively). In the present work we show that, although functionally active, the NgRI(310)-Fc fusion protein contains mislinked and heterogeneous disulfide patterns in the LRRCT domain, and we report the generation of a series of variant molecules specifically designed to prevent this heterogeneity. Using these variants we explored the effects of modifying the NgRI truncation site or the spacing between the NgRI and Fc domains, or replacing cysteines within the NgRI or IgG hinge regions. One variant, which incorporates replacements of Cys{sup 266} and Cys{sup 309} with alanine residues, completely eliminated disulfide scrambling while maintaining functional in vitro and in vivo efficacy. This modified NgRI-Fc molecule represents a significantly improved candidate for further pharmaceutical development, and may serve as a useful model for the optimization of other IgG fusion proteins made from LRR proteins.

  11. Prm1 Functions as a Disulfide-linked Complex in Yeast Mating*

    PubMed Central

    Olmo, Valerie N.; Grote, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Prm1 is a pheromone-induced membrane glycoprotein that promotes plasma membrane fusion in yeast mating pairs. HA-Prm1 migrates at twice its expected molecular weight on non-reducing SDS-PAGE gels and coprecipitates with Prm1-TAP, indicating that Prm1 is a disulfide-linked homodimer. The N terminus of a plasma membrane-localized GFP-Prm1 endocytic mutant projects into the cytoplasm, where it is protected from low pH quenching in live cells and from external protease in spheroplasts. In a revised topological map, Prm1 has four transmembrane domains and two large extracellular loops. Mutation of all four cysteines in the extracellular loops blocked disulfide bond formation and destabilized the Prm1 homodimer without preventing Prm1 transport to contact sites in mating pairs. Cys120 in loop 1 and Cys545 in loop 2 form disulfide cross-links in the Prm1 homodimer and are required for fusion activity. Cys120 lies between a hydrophobic segment formerly thought to be a transmembrane domain and an amphipathic helix. An interaction between either of these regions and the opposing membrane could promote fusion. PMID:19933274

  12. Depletion of bovine pituitary prolactin by cysteamine involves a thiol:disulfide mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenson, M.Y.; Jacobs, L.S.

    1984-10-01

    Cysteamine (2-aminoethanethiol (CySH)) reduces measurable PRL concentrations in vivo and in vitro. Since secretion is also inhibited, CySH may block conversion from a poorly assayable hormone storage form(s) to readily assayable, releasable PRL. This would represent a previously unrecognized mechanism for secretory regulation. We undertook the present study to identify the sites involved in the loss of measurable PRL (depletion) induced by cysteamine. The disulfide cystamine was ineffective on secretory granules unless combined with reduced glutathione, indicating the generation of the active CySH-thiol form. Pretreatment of granules with thiol-blocking agents resulted in dose-dependent enhancement of CySH inhibition, achieving nearly complete inhibition with 5 mM iodoacetamide. In contrast, pretreatment with reduced glutathione or dithiothreitol, respectively, impaired or abolished the CySH effect. These data suggest that the mechanism by which CySH causes PRL depletion is mediated by granule disulfides and the -SH of CySH. The regulation of thiol:disulfide equilibria appears to be an important determinant of the detectability of PRL storage forms and of their secretion.

  13. The oxidation state of active site thiols determines activity of saccharopine dehydrogenase at low pH.

    PubMed

    Bobyk, Kostyantyn D; Kim, Sang Gon; Kumar, Vidya Prasanna; Kim, Sung-Kun; West, Ann H; Cook, Paul F

    2011-09-15

    Saccharopine dehydrogenase catalyzes the NAD-dependent conversion of saccharopine to generate L-lysine and α-ketoglutarate. A disulfide bond between cysteine 205 and cysteine 249, in the vicinity of the dinucleotide-binding site, is observed in structures of the apoenzyme, while a dithiol is observed in a structure with AMP bound, suggesting preferential binding of the dinucleotide to reduced enzyme. Mutation of C205 to S gave increased values of V/E(t) and V/KE(t) at pH 7 compared to wild type. Primary deuterium and solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effects suggest the catalytic pathway, which includes the hydride transfer and hydrolysis steps, contributes more to rate limitation in C205S, but the rates of the two steps relative to one another remain the same. There is a large increase in the rate constants V₁/E(t) and V₁/K(NAD)Et at pH values below 7 compared to WT. Data indicate the low pH increase in activity results from a decreased sensitivity of the C205S mutant enzyme to the protonation state of an enzyme group with a pK(a) of about 7, likely responsible for a pH-dependent conformational change. Reduction of WT and C205S mutant enzymes with TCEP gives equal activities at pH 6, consistent with the increased activity observed for the C205S mutant enzyme.

  14. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-04

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases.

  15. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases. PMID:22020126

  16. Reactivity of disulfide bonds is markedly affected by structure and environment: implications for protein modification and stability

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Maryam; Ignasiak, Marta T.; Chan, Bun; Croft, Anna K.; Radom, Leo; Schiesser, Carl H.; Pattison, David I.; Davies, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Disulfide bonds play a key role in stabilizing protein structures, with disruption strongly associated with loss of protein function and activity. Previous data have suggested that disulfides show only modest reactivity with oxidants. In the current study, we report kinetic data indicating that selected disulfides react extremely rapidly, with a variation of 104 in rate constants. Five-membered ring disulfides are particularly reactive compared with acyclic (linear) disulfides or six-membered rings. Particular disulfides in proteins also show enhanced reactivity. This variation occurs with multiple oxidants and is shown to arise from favorable electrostatic stabilization of the incipient positive charge on the sulfur reaction center by remote groups, or by the neighboring sulfur for conformations in which the orbitals are suitably aligned. Controlling these factors should allow the design of efficient scavengers and high-stability proteins. These data are consistent with selective oxidative damage to particular disulfides, including those in some proteins. PMID:27941824

  17. Reactivity of disulfide bonds is markedly affected by structure and environment: implications for protein modification and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Maryam; Ignasiak, Marta T.; Chan, Bun; Croft, Anna K.; Radom, Leo; Schiesser, Carl H.; Pattison, David I.; Davies, Michael J.

    2016-12-01

    Disulfide bonds play a key role in stabilizing protein structures, with disruption strongly associated with loss of protein function and activity. Previous data have suggested that disulfides show only modest reactivity with oxidants. In the current study, we report kinetic data indicating that selected disulfides react extremely rapidly, with a variation of 104 in rate constants. Five-membered ring disulfides are particularly reactive compared with acyclic (linear) disulfides or six-membered rings. Particular disulfides in proteins also show enhanced reactivity. This variation occurs with multiple oxidants and is shown to arise from favorable electrostatic stabilization of the incipient positive charge on the sulfur reaction center by remote groups, or by the neighboring sulfur for conformations in which the orbitals are suitably aligned. Controlling these factors should allow the design of efficient scavengers and high-stability proteins. These data are consistent with selective oxidative damage to particular disulfides, including those in some proteins.

  18. Reactivity of disulfide bonds is markedly affected by structure and environment: implications for protein modification and stability.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Maryam; Ignasiak, Marta T; Chan, Bun; Croft, Anna K; Radom, Leo; Schiesser, Carl H; Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2016-12-12

    Disulfide bonds play a key role in stabilizing protein structures, with disruption strongly associated with loss of protein function and activity. Previous data have suggested that disulfides show only modest reactivity with oxidants. In the current study, we report kinetic data indicating that selected disulfides react extremely rapidly, with a variation of 10(4) in rate constants. Five-membered ring disulfides are particularly reactive compared with acyclic (linear) disulfides or six-membered rings. Particular disulfides in proteins also show enhanced reactivity. This variation occurs with multiple oxidants and is shown to arise from favorable electrostatic stabilization of the incipient positive charge on the sulfur reaction center by remote groups, or by the neighboring sulfur for conformations in which the orbitals are suitably aligned. Controlling these factors should allow the design of efficient scavengers and high-stability proteins. These data are consistent with selective oxidative damage to particular disulfides, including those in some proteins.

  19. The Effect of Tensile Stress on the Conformational Free Energy Landscape of Disulfide Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Anjukandi, Padmesh; Dopieralski, Przemyslaw; Ribas–Arino, Jordi; Marx, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide bridges are no longer considered to merely stabilize protein structure, but are increasingly recognized to play a functional role in many regulatory biomolecular processes. Recent studies have uncovered that the redox activity of native disulfides depends on their C–C–S–S dihedrals, and . Moreover, the interplay of chemical reactivity and mechanical stress of disulfide switches has been recently elucidated using force–clamp spectroscopy and computer simulation. The and angles have been found to change from conformations that are open to nucleophilic attack to sterically hindered, so–called closed states upon exerting tensile stress. In view of the growing evidence of the importance of C–C–S–S dihedrals in tuning the reactivity of disulfides, here we present a systematic study of the conformational diversity of disulfides as a function of tensile stress. With the help of force-clamp metadynamics simulations, we show that tensile stress brings about a large stabilization of the closed conformers, thereby giving rise to drastic changes in the conformational free energy landscape of disulfides. Statistical analysis shows that native TDi, DO and interchain Ig protein disulfides prefer open conformations, whereas the intrachain disulfide bridges in Ig proteins favor closed conformations. Correlating mechanical stress with the distance between the two –carbons of the disulfide moiety reveals that the strain of intrachain Ig protein disulfides corresponds to a mechanical activation of about 100 pN. Such mechanical activation leads to a severalfold increase of the rate of the elementary redox reaction step. All these findings constitute a step forward towards achieving a full understanding of functional disulfides. PMID:25286308

  20. The flexibility and dynamics of protein disulfide isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Stephen A.; Emilio Jimenez‐Roldan, J.; Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Vishweshwara, Saraswathi; Freedman, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have studied the mobility of the multidomain folding catalyst, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), by a coarse‐graining approach based on flexibility. We analyze our simulations of yeast PDI (yPDI) using measures of backbone movement, relative positions and orientations of domains, and distances between functional sites. We find that there is interdomain flexibility at every interdomain junction but these show very different characteristics. The extent of interdomain flexibility is such that yPDI's two active sites can approach much more closely than is found in crystal structures—and indeed hinge motion to bring these sites into proximity is the lowest energy normal mode of motion of the protein. The flexibility predicted for yPDI (based on one structure) includes the other known conformation of yPDI and is consistent with (i) the mobility observed experimentally for mammalian PDI and (ii) molecular dynamics. We also observe intradomain flexibility and clear differences between the domains in their propensity for internal motion. Our results suggest that PDI flexibility enables it to interact with many different partner molecules of widely different sizes and shapes, and highlights considerable similarities of yPDI and mammalian PDI. Proteins 2016; 84:1776–1785. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27616289

  1. Semienzymatic cyclization of disulfide-rich peptides using Sortase A.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xinying; Kwon, Soohyun; Wang, Ching-I Anderson; Huang, Yen-Hua; Chan, Lai Y; Tan, Chia Chia; Rosengren, K Johan; Mulvenna, Jason P; Schroeder, Christina I; Craik, David J

    2014-03-07

    Disulfide-rich cyclic peptides have generated great interest in the development of peptide-based therapeutics due to their exceptional stability toward chemical, enzymatic, or thermal attack. In particular, they have been used as scaffolds onto which bioactive epitopes can be grafted to take advantage of the favorable biophysical properties of disulfide-rich cyclic peptides. To date, the most commonly used method for the head-to-tail cyclization of peptides has been native chemical ligation. In recent years, however, enzyme-mediated cyclization has become a promising new technology due to its efficiency, safety, and cost-effectiveness. Sortase A (SrtA) is a bacterial enzyme with transpeptidase activity. It recognizes a C-terminal penta-amino acid motif, LPXTG, and cleaves the amide bond between Thr and Gly to form a thioacyl-linked intermediate. This intermediate undergoes nucleophilic attack by an N-terminal poly-Gly sequence to form an amide bond between the Thr and N-terminal Gly. Here, we demonstrate that sortase A can successfully be used to cyclize a variety of small disulfide-rich peptides, including the cyclotide kalata B1, α-conotoxin Vc1.1, and sunflower trypsin inhibitor 1. These peptides range in size from 14 to 29 amino acids and contain three, two, or one disulfide bond, respectively, within their head-to-tail cyclic backbones. Our findings provide proof of concept for the potential broad applicability of enzymatic cyclization of disulfide-rich peptides with therapeutic potential.

  2. Mechanism of SN2 disulfide bond cleavage by phosphorus nucleophiles. Implications for biochemical disulfide reducing agents.

    PubMed

    Dmitrenko, Olga; Thorpe, Colin; Bach, Robert D

    2007-10-26

    The B3LYP variant of DFT has been used to study the mechanism of S-S bond scission in dimethyl disulfide by a phosphorus nucleophile, trimethylphospine (TMP). The reaction is highly endothermic in the gas phase and requires significant external stabilization of the charged products. DFT calculations (B3LYP) were performed with explicit (water molecules added) and implicit solvent corrections (COSMO model). The transition structures for this SN2 displacement reaction in a number of model systems have been located and fully characterized. The reaction barriers calculated with different approaches for different systems are quite close (around 11 kcal/mol). Remarkably, the calculations suggest that the reaction is almost barrierless with respect to the preorganized reaction complex and that most of the activation energy is required to rearrange the disulfide and TMP to its most effective orientation for the SMe group transfer way. Different reactivities of different phosphorus nucleophiles were suggested to be the result of steric effects, as manifested largely by varying amounts of hindrance to solvation of the initial product phosphonium ion. These data indicate that the gas-phase addition of a phosphine to the disulfide moiety will most likely form a phosphonium cation-thiolate anion salt, in the presence of four or more water molecules, that provide sufficient H-bonding stabilization to allow displacement of the thiolate anion, a normal uncomplicated SN2 transition state is to be expected.

  3. Structural basis of protein disulfide bond generation in the cell.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Kenji

    2010-09-01

    The formation of protein disulfide bonds is an oxidative reaction that is crucial for the folding and maturation of many secreted and membrane proteins. Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells possess various disulfide oxidoreductases and redox-active cofactors to accelerate this oxidative reaction in a correct manner. Crystal or solution structures have been solved for some of the oxidoreductases in the past 10 years, leading to remarkable progress in the field of thiol-based redox cell biology. Consequently, structural and mechanistic similarities in the disulfide bond formation pathways have been uncovered. This review highlights the molecular basis of the elaborate oxidative systems operating in the Escherichia coli periplasm, the endoplasmic reticulum lumen and the mitochondrial intermembrane space. The accumulated knowledge provides important insights into how protein and redox homeostasis are maintained in the cell.

  4. Structure of protein O-mannose kinase reveals a unique active site architecture

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qinyu; Venzke, David; Walimbe, Ameya S; Anderson, Mary E; Fu, Qiuyu; Kinch, Lisa N; Wang, Wei; Chen, Xing; Grishin, Nick V; Huang, Niu; Yu, Liping; Dixon, Jack E; Campbell, Kevin P; Xiao, Junyu

    2016-01-01

    The ‘pseudokinase’ SgK196 is a protein O-mannose kinase (POMK) that catalyzes an essential phosphorylation step during biosynthesis of the laminin-binding glycan on α-dystroglycan. However, the catalytic mechanism underlying this activity remains elusive. Here we present the crystal structure of Danio rerio POMK in complex with Mg2+ ions, ADP, aluminum fluoride, and the GalNAc-β3-GlcNAc-β4-Man trisaccharide substrate, thereby providing a snapshot of the catalytic transition state of this unusual kinase. The active site of POMK is established by residues located in non-canonical positions and is stabilized by a disulfide bridge. GalNAc-β3-GlcNAc-β4-Man is recognized by a surface groove, and the GalNAc-β3-GlcNAc moiety mediates the majority of interactions with POMK. Expression of various POMK mutants in POMK knockout cells further validated the functional requirements of critical residues. Our results provide important insights into the ability of POMK to function specifically as a glycan kinase, and highlight the structural diversity of the human kinome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22238.001 PMID:27879205

  5. Structural changes upon peroxynitrite-mediated nitration of peroxiredoxin 2; nitrated Prx2 resembles its disulfide-oxidized form.

    PubMed

    Randall, Lía; Manta, Bruno; Nelson, Kimberly J; Santos, Javier; Poole, Leslie B; Denicola, Ana

    2016-01-15

    Peroxiredoxins are cys-based peroxidases that function in peroxide detoxification and H2O2-induced signaling. Human Prx2 is a typical 2-Cys Prx arranged as pentamers of head-to-tail homodimers. During the catalytic mechanism, the active-site cysteine (CP) cycles between reduced, sulfenic and disulfide state involving conformational as well as oligomeric changes. Several post-translational modifications were shown to affect Prx activity, in particular CP overoxidation which leads to inactivation. We have recently reported that nitration of Prx2, a post-translational modification on non-catalytic tyrosines, unexpectedly increases its peroxidase activity and resistance to overoxidation. To elucidate the cross-talk between this post-translational modification and the enzyme catalysis, we investigated the structural changes of Prx2 after nitration. Analytical ultracentrifugation, UV absorption, circular dichroism, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence were used to connect catalytically relevant redox changes with tyrosine nitration. Our results show that the reduced nitrated Prx2 structurally resembles the disulfide-oxidized native form of the enzyme favoring a locally unfolded conformation that facilitates disulfide formation. These results provide structural basis for the kinetic analysis previously reported, the observed increase in activity and the resistance to overoxidation of the peroxynitrite-treated enzyme.

  6. Structural Insights into the Protease-like Antigen Plasmodium falciparum SERA5 and Its Noncanonical Active-Site Serine

    SciTech Connect

    Hodder, Anthony N.; Malby, Robyn L.; Clarke, Oliver B.; Fairlie, W. Douglas; Colman, Peter M.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Smith, Brian J.

    2009-08-28

    The sera genes of the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium encode a family of unique proteins that are maximally expressed at the time of egress of parasites from infected red blood cells. These multi-domain proteins are unique, containing a central papain-like cysteine-protease fragment enclosed between the disulfide-linked N- and C-terminal domains. However, the central fragment of several members of this family, including serine repeat antigen 5 (SERA5), contains a serine (S596) in place of the active-site cysteine. Here we report the crystal structure of the central protease-like domain of Plasmodium falciparum SERA5, revealing a number of anomalies in addition to the putative nucleophilic serine: (1) the structure of the putative active site is not conducive to binding substrate in the canonical cysteine-protease manner; (2) the side chain of D594 restricts access of substrate to the putative active site; and (3) the S{sub 2} specificity pocket is occupied by the side chain of Y735, reducing this site to a small depression on the protein surface. Attempts to determine the structure in complex with known inhibitors were not successful. Thus, despite having revealed its structure, the function of the catalytic domain of SERA5 remains an enigma.

  7. Structures and related properties of helical, disulfide-stabilized peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, Mark D.

    1993-11-01

    The three dimensional structure of several peptides were determined by NMR spectroscopy and distance geometry calculations. Each peptide formed a predictable, rigid structure, consisting of an α-helix, a "scaffold" region which packed along one face of the helix, and two disulfide bridges which covalently connect the helix and scaffold regions. The peptide Apa-M5 was designed to constrain the M5 peptide from MLCK in a helical geometry using the apamin disulfide scaffold. This scaffold constrains the N- terminal end of the helix with two disulfide bridges and a reverse turn. Like the M5 peptide, Apa-M5 was found to bind calmodulin in a Ca2+-dependent 1:1 stoichiometry. However, the dissociation constant of the (Apa-M5)-calmodulin complex, 107 nM, was 100-fold higher than the dissociation constant of the M5-calmodulin complex. This difference was due to a putative steric overlap between the Apa-M5 scaffold and calmodulin. The peptide Apa-Cro was designed to replace the large structural protein matrix of λ Cro with the apamin disulfide scaffold. However, Apa-Cro did not bind the consensus DNA operator half-site of λ Cro, probably due to a steric overlap between the Apa-Cro disulfide framework and the DNA. The amino acid sequence of the scaffold-disulfide bridge arrangement of the peptide Max was derived from the core sequence of scyllatoxin, which contains an α-helix constrained at the C-terminal end by two disulfide bridges and a two-stranded βsheet scaffold. Max was shown to fold with >84% yield to form a predictable, stable structure that is similar to scyllatoxin. The folding and stability properties of Max make this scaffold and disulfide bridge arrangement an ideal candidate for the development of hybrid sequence peptides. The dynamics of a fraying C-terminal end of the helix of the peptide Apa-AlaN was determined by analysis of 15N NMR relaxation properties.

  8. Regulation of interleukin-4 signaling by extracellular reduction of intramolecular disulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Curbo, Sophie; Gaudin, Raphael; Carlsten, Mattias; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Ahlborg, Niklas; Karlsson, Anna; Johansson, Magnus; Lundberg, Mathias

    2009-12-25

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) contains three structurally important intramolecular disulfides that are required for the bioactivity of the cytokine. We show that the cell surface of HeLa cells and endotoxin-activated monocytes can reduce IL-4 intramolecular disulfides in the extracellular space and inhibit binding of IL-4 to the IL-4R{alpha} receptor. IL-4 disulfides were in vitro reduced by thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). Reduction of IL-4 disulfides by the cell surface of HeLa cells was inhibited by auranofin, an inhibitor of thioredoxin reductase that is an electron donor to both Trx1 and PDI. Both Trx1 and PDI have been shown to be located at the cell surface and our data suggests that these enzymes are involved in catalyzing reduction of IL-4 disulfides. The pro-drug N-acetylcysteine (NAC) that promotes T-helper type 1 responses was also shown to mediate the reduction of IL-4 disulfides. Our data provides evidence for a novel redox dependent pathway for regulation of cytokine activity by extracellular reduction of intramolecular disulfides at the cell surface by members of the thioredoxin enzyme family.

  9. Structural and functional consequences of the presence of a fourth disulfide bridge in the scorpion short toxins: solution structure of the potassium channel inhibitor HsTX1.

    PubMed Central

    Savarin, P.; Romi-Lebrun, R.; Zinn-Justin, S.; Lebrun, B.; Nakajima, T.; Gilquin, B.; Menez, A.

    1999-01-01

    We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the potassium channel inhibitor HsTX1, using nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular modeling. This protein belongs to the scorpion short toxin family, which essentially contains potassium channel blockers of 29 to 39 amino acids and three disulfide bridges. It is highly active on voltage-gated Kv1.3 potassium channels. Furthermore, it has the particularity to possess a fourth disulfide bridge. We show that HsTX1 has a fold similar to that of the three-disulfide-bridged toxins and conserves the hydrophobic core found in the scorpion short toxins. Thus, the fourth bridge has no influence on the global conformation of HsTX1. Most residues spatially analogous to those interacting with voltage-gated potassium channels in the three-disulfide-bridged toxins are conserved in HsTX1. Thus, we propose that Tyr21, Lys23, Met25, and Asn26 are involved in the biological activity of HsTX1. As an additional positively charged residue is always spatially close to the aromatic residue in toxins blocking the voltage-gated potassium channels, and as previous mutagenesis experiments have shown the critical role played by the C-terminus in HsTX1, we suggest that Arg33 is also important for the activity of the four disulfide-bridged toxin. Docking calculations confirm that, if Lys23 and Met25 interact with the GYGDMH motif of Kv1.3, Arg33 can contact Asp386 and, thus, play the role of the additional positively charged residue of the toxin functional site. This original configuration of the binding site of HsTX1 for Kv1.3, if confirmed experimentally, offers new structural possibilities for the construction of a molecule blocking the voltage-gated potassium channels. PMID:10631983

  10. Functional coupling of Cys-226 and Cys-296 in the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor indicates a disulfide bond that is close to the activation pocket.

    PubMed

    Mann, Rosalind J; Al-Sabah, Suleiman; de Maturana, Rakel López; Sinfield, John K; Donnelly, Dan

    2010-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane α-helical (7TM) integral membrane proteins that play a central role in both cell signaling and in the action of many pharmaceuticals. The crystal structures of several Family A GPCRs have shown the presence of a disulfide bond linking transmembrane helix 3 (TM3) to the second extracellular loop (ECL2), enabling ECL2 to stabilize and contribute to the ligand binding pocket. Family B GPCRs share no significant sequence identity with those in Family A but nevertheless share two conserved cysteines in topologically equivalent positions. Since there are no available crystal structures for the 7TM domain of any Family B GPCR, we used mutagenesis alongside pharmacological analysis to investigate the role of ECL2 and the conserved cysteine residues. We mutated Cys-226, at the extracellular end of TM3 of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor, to alanine and observed a 38-fold reduction in GLP-1 potency. Interestingly, this potency loss was restored by the additional substitution of Cys-296 in ECL2 to alanine. Alongside the complete conservation of these cysteine residues in Family B GPCRs, this functional coupling suggested the presence of a disulfide bond. Further mutagenesis demonstrated that the low potency observed at the C226A mutant, compared with the C226A-C296A double mutant, was the result of the bulky nature of the released Cys-296 side chain. Since this suggested that ECL2 was in close proximity to the agonist activation pocket, an alanine scan of ECL2 was carried out which confirmed the important role of this loop in agonist-induced receptor activation.

  11. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  12. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  13. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  14. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  15. Challenges in the expression of disulfide bonded, threonine-rich antifreeze proteins in bacteria and yeast.

    PubMed

    Tyshenko, Michael G; d'Anjou, Marc; Davies, Peter L; Daugulis, Andrew J; Walker, Virginia K

    2006-05-01

    Certain freeze-intolerant insects produce antifreeze proteins (AFPs) during overwintering including the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) and yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) AFP gene families. However, only a few of the isoforms, encoded by their multiple-copy gene families, have been characterized. When expressed in bacterial systems the insect AFPs have to be denatured and refolded in vitro, a procedure that is not uniformly successful, presumably due to the beta-helix structure and the requirement for disulfide bonds. In an attempt to overcome these difficulties, bacterial vectors and hosts that have been developed to produce soluble, folded proteins, as well as a yeast expression system (Pichia pastoris) were employed. Bacterial expression resulted in low quantities of active recombinant protein for certain isoforms. In contrast, both small and large-scale fermentation of recombinant AFP in Pichia yielded substantial protein production (100 mg/L) but functional ice binding activity of protein produced in three different transformed yeast strains (KM71, X33 or GS115) was low. Inappropriate O-linked glycosylation of the Thr-rich AFPs appeared to be partially reversed by mild chemical deglycosylation, but activity remained low. Substantial quantities, as well as activity were recovered when a fish AFP, with disulfide bonds, but without potential Thr glycosylation sites was expressed in the yeast system.

  16. Locking the beta3 integrin I-like domain into high and low affinity conformations with disulfides.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bing-Hao; Takagi, Junichi; Springer, Timothy A

    2004-03-12

    Although integrin alpha subunit I domains exist in multiple conformations, it is controversial whether integrin beta subunit I-like domains undergo structurally analogous movements of the alpha7-helix that are linked to affinity for ligand. Disulfide bonds were introduced into the beta(3) integrin I-like domain to lock its beta6-alpha7 loop and alpha7-helix in two distinct conformations. Soluble ligand binding, ligand mimetic mAb binding and cell adhesion studies showed that disulfide-bonded receptor alpha(IIb)beta(3)(T329C/A347C) was locked in a low affinity state, and dithiothreitol treatment restored the capability of being activated to high affinity binding; by contrast, disulfide-bonded alpha(IIb)beta(3)(V332C/M335C) was locked in a high affinity state. The results suggest that activation of the beta subunit I-like domain is analogous to that of the alpha subunit I domain, i.e. that axial movement in the C-terminal direction of the alpha7-helix is linked to rearrangement of the I-like domain metal ion-dependent adhesion site into a high affinity conformation.

  17. Controlled Orientation of Active Sites in a Nanostructured Multienzyme Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Yang, Byungseop; Jung, Younghan; Cha, Jaehyun; Cho, Jinhwan; Choi, Eun-Sil; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-01-01

    Multistep cascade reactions in nature maximize reaction efficiency by co-assembling related enzymes. Such organization facilitates the processing of intermediates by downstream enzymes. Previously, the studies on multienzyme nanocomplexes assembled on DNA scaffolds demonstrated that closer interenzyme distance enhances the overall reaction efficiency. However, it remains unknown how the active site orientation controlled at nanoscale can have an effect on multienzyme reaction. Here, we show that controlled alignment of active sites promotes the multienzyme reaction efficiency. By genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and two compatible bioorthogonal chemistries, we conjugated mannitol dehydrogenase to formate dehydrogenase with the defined active site arrangement with the residue-level accuracy. The study revealed that the multienzyme complex with the active sites directed towards each other exhibits four-fold higher relative efficiency enhancement in the cascade reaction and produces 60% more D-mannitol than the other complex with active sites directed away from each other. PMID:28004799

  18. Human Growth Hormone: 45-kDa Isoform with Extraordinarily Stable Interchain Disulfide Links has Attenuated Receptor-Binding and Cell-Proliferative Activities

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Juan J.; Grigorian, Alexei L.; Muñoz, Jesus; Aguilar, Roberto M.; Treviño, Lisa R.; Martinez, Andrew O.; Haro, Luis S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Human growth hormone (hGH) is a complex mixture of molecular isoforms. Gaps in our knowledge exist regarding the structures and biological significances of the uncharacterized hGH molecular variants. Mercaptoethanol-resistant 45-kDa human growth hormone (MER-45kDa hGH) is an extraordinarily stable disulfide-linked hGH homodimer whose biological significance is unknown. Objectives To elucidate the pharmacokinetic abilities of dimeric MER-45-kDa hGH to bind to GH and prolactin (PRL) receptors and to elucidate its abilities to stimulate cell-proliferation in lactogen-induced and somatogen-induced in vitro cell proliferation bioassays. Design The binding of MER-45-kDa hGH to GH and PRL receptors was tested in radioreceptorassays (RRAs). Competitive displacements of [125I]-bovine GH from bovine liver membranes, [125I]-ovine PRL from lactating rabbit mammary gland membranes and [125I]-hGH from human IM-9 lymphocytes by unlabelled GHs, PRLs or dimeric MER-45-kDa hGH were evaluated. The abilities of dimeric MER-45-kDa hGH to stimulate proliferation of lactogen-responsive Nb2 lymphoma cells and to stimulate proliferation of somatogen-responsive T47-D human breast cancer cells was assessed by incubation of cells with GHs or PRLs and subsequently measuring growth using the MTS cell proliferation assay. Results Dimeric MER-45-kDa hGH, compared to monomeric hGH, had reduced binding affinities to both GH and prolactin receptors. In a bovine liver GH radioreceptorassay its ED50 (197.5 pM) was 40.8% that of monomeric hGH. In a human IM-9 lymphocyte hGH RRA its ED50 (2.96 nM) was 26.2% that of monomeric hGH. In a lactating rabbit mammary gland prolactin RRA its ED50 (3.56 nM) was 16.8% that of a monomeric hGH. Dimeric MER-45-kDa hGH, compared to monomeric hGH, had a diminished capacity to stimulate proliferation of cells in vitro. In a dose-response relationship assessing proliferation of Nb2 lymphoma cells its ED50 (191 pM) was 18.0% that of monomeric hGH. While

  19. Simple plate-based, parallel synthesis of disulfide fragments using the CuAAC click reaction.

    PubMed

    Turner, David M; Tom, Christopher T M B; Renslo, Adam R

    2014-12-08

    Disulfide exchange screening is a site-directed approach to fragment-based lead discovery that requires a bespoke library of disulfide-containing fragments. Previously, we described a simple one-pot, two-step synthesis of disulfide fragments from amine- or acid-bearing starting materials. Here, we describe the synthesis of disulfide fragments that bear a 1,4-substituted-1,2,3-triazole linkage between disulfide and molecular diversity element. This work establishes the compatibility of copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) chemistry with a one-pot, two-step reaction sequence that can be readily parallelized. We performed 96 reactions in a single deep-well microtiter plate, employing 48 alkynes and two different azide linker reagents. From this effort, a total of 81 triazole-containing disulfide fragments were obtained in useful isolated yields. Thus, CuAAC chemistry offers an experimentally convenient method to rapidly prepare disulfide fragments that are structurally distinct from fragments accessed via amide, sulfonamide, or isocyanate chemistries.

  20. Perspective: On the active site model in computational catalyst screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Karsten; Plaisance, Craig P.; Oberhofer, Harald; Andersen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    First-principles screening approaches exploiting energy trends in surface adsorption represent an unparalleled success story in recent computational catalysis research. Here we argue that our still limited understanding of the structure of active sites is one of the major bottlenecks towards an ever extended and reliable use of such computational screening for catalyst discovery. For low-index transition metal surfaces, the prevalently chosen high-symmetry (terrace and step) sites offered by the nominal bulk-truncated crystal lattice might be justified. For more complex surfaces and composite catalyst materials, computational screening studies will need to actively embrace a considerable uncertainty with respect to what truly are the active sites. By systematically exploring the space of possible active site motifs, such studies might eventually contribute towards a targeted design of optimized sites in future catalysts.

  1. Diffusional correlations among multiple active sites in a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-04-07

    Simulations of the enzymatic dynamics of a model enzyme containing multiple substrate binding sites indicate the existence of diffusional correlations in the chemical reactivity of the active sites. A coarse-grain, particle-based, mesoscopic description of the system, comprising the enzyme, the substrate, the product and solvent, is constructed to study these effects. The reactive and non-reactive dynamics is followed using a hybrid scheme that combines molecular dynamics for the enzyme, substrate and product molecules with multiparticle collision dynamics for the solvent. It is found that the reactivity of an individual active site in the multiple-active-site enzyme is reduced substantially, and this effect is analyzed and attributed to diffusive competition for the substrate among the different active sites in the enzyme.

  2. Structural and biochemical characterization of the essential DsbA-like disulfide bond forming protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial Disulfide bond forming (Dsb) proteins facilitate proper folding and disulfide bond formation of periplasmic and secreted proteins. Previously, we have shown that Mycobacterium tuberculosis Mt-DsbE and Mt-DsbF aid in vitro oxidative folding of proteins. The M. tuberculosis proteome contains another predicted membrane-tethered Dsb protein, Mt-DsbA, which is encoded by an essential gene. Results Herein, we present structural and biochemical analyses of Mt-DsbA. The X-ray crystal structure of Mt-DsbA reveals a two-domain structure, comprising a canonical thioredoxin domain with the conserved CXXC active site cysteines in their reduced form, and an inserted α-helical domain containing a structural disulfide bond. The overall fold of Mt-DsbA resembles that of other DsbA-like proteins and not Mt-DsbE or Mt-DsbF. Biochemical characterization demonstrates that, unlike Mt-DsbE and Mt-DsbF, Mt-DsbA is unable to oxidatively fold reduced, denatured hirudin. Moreover, on the substrates tested in this study, Mt-DsbA has disulfide bond isomerase activity contrary to Mt-DsbE and Mt-DsbF. Conclusion These results suggest that Mt-DsbA acts upon a distinct subset of substrates as compared to Mt-DsbE and Mt-DsbF. One could speculate that Mt-DsbE and Mt-DsbF are functionally redundant whereas Mt-DsbA is not, offering an explanation for the essentiality of Mt-DsbA in M. tuberculosis. PMID:24134223

  3. Robotics at Savannah River site: activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.S.

    1984-09-01

    The objectives of the Robotics Technology Group at the Savannah River Laboratory are to employ modern industrial robots and to develop unique automation and robotic systems to enhance process operations at the Savannah River site (SRP and SRL). The incentives are to improve safety, reduce personnel radiation exposure, improve product quality and productivity, and to reduce operating costs. During the past year robotic systems have been installed to fill chemical dilution vials in a SRP laboratory at 772-F and remove radioactive waste materials in the SRL Californium Production Facility at 773-A. A robotic system to lubricate an extrusion press has been developed and demonstrated in the SRL robotics laboratory and is scheduled for installation at the 321-M fuel fabrication area. A mobile robot was employed by SRP for a radiation monitoring task at a waste tank top in H-Area. Several other robots are installed in the SRL robotics laboratories and application development programs are underway. The status of these applications is presented in this report.

  4. Expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic studies of different redox states of the active site of thioredoxin 1 from the whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Acevedo, Adam A.; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D.; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a 12 kDa cellular redox protein that belongs to a family of small redox proteins which undergo reversible oxidation to produce a cystine disulfide bond through the transfer of reducing equivalents from the catalytic site cysteine residues (Cys32 and Cys35) to a disulfide substrate. In this study, crystals of thioredoxin 1 from the Pacific whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (LvTrx) were successfully obtained. One data set was collected from each of four crystals at 100 K and the three-dimensional structures of the catalytic cysteines in different redox states were determined: reduced and oxidized forms at 2.00 Å resolution using data collected at a synchrotron-radiation source and two partially reduced structures at 1.54 and 1.88 Å resolution using data collected using an in-house source. All of the crystals belonged to space group P3212, with unit-cell parameters a = 57.5 (4), b = 57.5 (4), c = 118.1 (8) Å. The asymmetric unit contains two subunits of LvTrx, with a Matthews coefficient (V M) of 2.31 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 46%. Initial phases were determined by molecular replacement using the crystallographic model of Trx from Drosophila melanogaster as a template. In the present work, LvTrx was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Structural analysis of the different redox states at the Trx active site highlights its reactivity and corroborates the existence of a dimer in the crystal. In the crystallographic structures the dimer is stabilized by several interactions, including a disulfide bridge between Cys73 of each LvTrx monomer, a hydrogen bond between the side chain of Asp60 of each monomer and several hydrophobic interactions, with a noncrystallographic twofold axis. PMID:23695560

  5. Expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic studies of different redox states of the active site of thioredoxin 1 from the whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Campos-Acevedo, Adam A; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2013-05-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a 12 kDa cellular redox protein that belongs to a family of small redox proteins which undergo reversible oxidation to produce a cystine disulfide bond through the transfer of reducing equivalents from the catalytic site cysteine residues (Cys32 and Cys35) to a disulfide substrate. In this study, crystals of thioredoxin 1 from the Pacific whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (LvTrx) were successfully obtained. One data set was collected from each of four crystals at 100 K and the three-dimensional structures of the catalytic cysteines in different redox states were determined: reduced and oxidized forms at 2.00 Å resolution using data collected at a synchrotron-radiation source and two partially reduced structures at 1.54 and 1.88 Å resolution using data collected using an in-house source. All of the crystals belonged to space group P3212, with unit-cell parameters a = 57.5 (4), b = 57.5 (4), c = 118.1 (8) Å. The asymmetric unit contains two subunits of LvTrx, with a Matthews coefficient (VM) of 2.31 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 46%. Initial phases were determined by molecular replacement using the crystallographic model of Trx from Drosophila melanogaster as a template. In the present work, LvTrx was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Structural analysis of the different redox states at the Trx active site highlights its reactivity and corroborates the existence of a dimer in the crystal. In the crystallographic structures the dimer is stabilized by several interactions, including a disulfide bridge between Cys73 of each LvTrx monomer, a hydrogen bond between the side chain of Asp60 of each monomer and several hydrophobic interactions, with a noncrystallographic twofold axis.

  6. Synthesis of unsymmetric disulfides as potential antiradiation drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Womble, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    This research involved the synthesis of unsymmetric disulfides which contain the radioprotective compound cysteamine attached to a biologically active molecule via a disulfide linkage. This study involved the synthesis of unsymmetric disulfides of cysteamine with amino acids, amino acid esters, steroidal thiols, glutathione, and other known radio-protective compounds which were submitted for biological evaluation. It is hoped that by attaching a known radioprotective compound to a molecule such as an amino acid or steroid we may obtain an enhanced concentration of the radioprotective substance in the target areas within the cell. The use of steroidal thiols coupled to cysteamine may result in the protection of the central nervous system for which there is no known radioprotective agent available. In the second part of this work a synthesis of a thiol containing polymer was developed which would give a highly functionalized product. This thiol containing polymer can be utilized in a solid phase synthesis scheme for the preparation of unsymmetric disulfides free of side products.

  7. Disulfide isoforms of recombinant glia maturation factor beta.

    PubMed

    Zaheer, A; Lim, R

    1990-09-14

    Recombinant human glia maturation factor beta (r-hGMF-beta) is a single-chain polypeptide (141 amino acid residues) containing three cysteines, at positions 7, 86 and 95. Nascent r-hGMF-beta exists in the reduced state and has no biological activity. The protein can be activated through oxidative refolding by incubation with a mixture of reduced and oxidized glutathione. Reverse-phase HPLC analysis of the refolded r-hGMF-beta shows the presence of four peaks, corresponding to the reduced form plus three newly generated intrachain disulfide-containing isoforms predicted from the number of cysteine residues. Only one isoform shows biological activity when tested for growth suppression on C6 glioma cells. We infer from the HPLC elution pattern that the active form contains the disulfide bridge Cys86-Cys95.

  8. Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: why selenoproteins?

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Johansson, Linda; Bauer, Holger; Arscott, L David; Rauch, Susanne; Ballou, David P; Williams, Charles H; Schirmer, R Heiner; Arnér, Elias S J

    2003-10-28

    Selenium, an essential trace element for mammals, is incorporated into a selected class of selenoproteins as selenocysteine. All known isoenzymes of mammalian thioredoxin (Trx) reductases (TrxRs) employ selenium in the C-terminal redox center -Gly-Cys-Sec-Gly-COOH for reduction of Trx and other substrates, whereas the corresponding sequence in Drosophila melanogaster TrxR is -Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser-COOH. Surprisingly, the catalytic competence of these orthologous enzymes is similar, whereas direct Sec-to-Cys substitution of mammalian TrxR, or other selenoenzymes, yields almost inactive enzyme. TrxRs are therefore ideal for studying the biology of selenocysteine by comparative enzymology. Here we show that the serine residues flanking the C-terminal Cys residues of Drosophila TrxRs are responsible for activating the cysteines to match the catalytic efficiency of a selenocysteine-cysteine pair as in mammalian TrxR, obviating the need for selenium. This finding suggests that the occurrence of selenoenzymes, which implies that the organism is selenium-dependent, is not necessarily associated with improved enzyme efficiency. Our data suggest that the selective advantage of selenoenzymes is a broader range of substrates and a broader range of microenvironmental conditions in which enzyme activity is possible.

  9. Thiol/disulfide homeostasis in asphalt workers.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ömer Hınç; Bal, Ceylan; Neşelioglu, Salim; Büyükşekerci, Murat; Gündüzöz, Meşide; Eren, Funda; Tutkun, Lutfiye; Yilmaz, Fatma Meric

    2016-09-02

    The aim of this study was to investigate thiol/disulfide homeostasis in asphalt workers who are exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons occupationally. The study was carried out in 34 nonsmoker asphalt workers. Additionally, 35 healthy nonsmoker volunteers were recruited as control group. Thiol and disulfide concentrations were determined using the novel automated measurement method. Levels of urinary 1-OH-pyrene were analyzed by liquid chromatography. Disulfide/thiol ratio was significantly higher in exposed group (p = .034). Also, a positive correlation was detected between disulfide/thiol ratio and 1-OH-pyrene values (r = .249, p = .036). Thiol/disulfide homeostasis was found to be disturbed in asphalt workers. The novel test used in this study may be useful for evaluating the oxidative status in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure.

  10. Topology of the disulfide bonds in the antiviral lectin scytovirin

    PubMed Central

    Moulaei, Tinoush; Stuchlik, Olga; Reed, Matthew; Yuan, Weirong; Pohl, Jan; Lu, Wuyuan; Haugh-Krumpe, Lauren; O'Keefe, Barry R; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The antiviral lectin scytovirin (SVN) contains a total of five disulfide bonds in two structurally similar domains. Previous reports provided contradictory results on the disulfide pairing in each individual domain, and we have now re-examined the disulfide topology. N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry were used to analyze proteolytic fragments of native SVN obtained at acidic pH, yielding the assignment as Cys7–Cys55, Cys20–Cys32, Cys26–Cys38, Cys68–Cys80, and Cys74–Cys86. We also analyzed the N-terminal domain of SVN (SD1, residues 1–48) prepared by expression/oxidative folding of the recombinant protein and by chemical synthesis. The disulfide pairing in the chemically synthesized SD1 was forced into predetermined topologies: SD1A (Cys20–Cys26, Cys32–Cys38) or SD1B (Cys20–Cys32, Cys26–Cys38). The topology of native SVN was found to be in agreement with the SD1B and the one determined for the recombinant SD1 domain. Although the two synthetic forms of SD1 were distinct when subjected to chromatography, their antiviral properties were indistinguishable, having low nM activity against HIV. Tryptic fragments, the “cystine clusters” [Cys20–Cys32/Cys26–Cys38; SD1] and [Cys68–Cys80/Cys74–C-86; SD2], were found to undergo rapid disulfide interchange at pH 8. This interchange resulted in accumulation of artifactual fragments in alkaline pH digests that are structurally unrelated to the original topology, providing a rational explanation for the differences between the topology reported herein and the one reported earlier (Bokesh et al., Biochemistry 2003;42:2578–2584). Our observations emphasize the fact that proteins such as SVN, with disulfide bonds in close proximity, require considerable precautions when being fragmented for the purpose of disulfide assignment. PMID:20572021

  11. Community Update on Site Activities, July 19, 2013

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In an effort to engage and inform community members interested in the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site cleanup, EPA will be issuing periodic topic-based fact sheets that will provide background information and updates about ongoing activities.

  12. Semienzymatic Cyclization of Disulfide-rich Peptides Using Sortase A*

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xinying; Kwon, Soohyun; Wang, Ching-I Anderson; Huang, Yen-Hua; Chan, Lai Y.; Tan, Chia Chia; Rosengren, K. Johan; Mulvenna, Jason P.; Schroeder, Christina I.; Craik, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide-rich cyclic peptides have generated great interest in the development of peptide-based therapeutics due to their exceptional stability toward chemical, enzymatic, or thermal attack. In particular, they have been used as scaffolds onto which bioactive epitopes can be grafted to take advantage of the favorable biophysical properties of disulfide-rich cyclic peptides. To date, the most commonly used method for the head-to-tail cyclization of peptides has been native chemical ligation. In recent years, however, enzyme-mediated cyclization has become a promising new technology due to its efficiency, safety, and cost-effectiveness. Sortase A (SrtA) is a bacterial enzyme with transpeptidase activity. It recognizes a C-terminal penta-amino acid motif, LPXTG, and cleaves the amide bond between Thr and Gly to form a thioacyl-linked intermediate. This intermediate undergoes nucleophilic attack by an N-terminal poly-Gly sequence to form an amide bond between the Thr and N-terminal Gly. Here, we demonstrate that sortase A can successfully be used to cyclize a variety of small disulfide-rich peptides, including the cyclotide kalata B1, α-conotoxin Vc1.1, and sunflower trypsin inhibitor 1. These peptides range in size from 14 to 29 amino acids and contain three, two, or one disulfide bond, respectively, within their head-to-tail cyclic backbones. Our findings provide proof of concept for the potential broad applicability of enzymatic cyclization of disulfide-rich peptides with therapeutic potential. PMID:24425873

  13. Interactions of Methylene Blue with Human Disulfide Reductases and Their Orthologues from Plasmodium falciparum▿

    PubMed Central

    Buchholz, Kathrin; Schirmer, R. Heiner; Eubel, Jana K.; Akoachere, Monique B.; Dandekar, Thomas; Becker, Katja; Gromer, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Methylene blue (MB) has experienced a renaissance mainly as a component of drug combinations against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Here, we report biochemically relevant pharmacological data on MB such as rate constants for the uncatalyzed reaction of MB at pH 7.4 with cellular reductants like NAD(P)H (k = 4 M−1 s−1), thioredoxins (k = 8.5 to 26 M−1 s−1), dihydrolipoamide (k = 53 M−1 s−1), and slowly reacting glutathione. As the disulfide reductases are prominent targets of MB, optical tests for enzymes reducing MB at the expense of NAD(P)H under aerobic conditions were developed. The product leucomethylene blue (leucoMB) is auto-oxidized back to MB at pH 7 but can be stabilized by enzymes at pH 5.0, which makes this colorless compound an interesting drug candidate. MB was found to be an inhibitor and/or a redox-cycling substrate of mammalian and P. falciparum disulfide reductases, with the kcat values ranging from 0.03 s−1 to 10 s−1 at 25°C. Kinetic spectroscopy of mutagenized glutathione reductase indicates that MB reduction is conducted by enzyme-bound reduced flavin rather than by the active-site dithiol Cys58/Cys63. The enzyme-catalyzed reduction of MB and subsequent auto-oxidation of the product leucoMB mean that MB is a redox-cycling agent which produces H2O2 at the expense of O2 and of NAD(P)H in each cycle, turning the antioxidant disulfide reductases into pro-oxidant enzymes. This explains the terms subversive substrate or turncoat inhibitor for MB. The results are discussed in cell-pathological and clinical contexts. PMID:17967916

  14. Disarming Burkholderia pseudomallei: Structural and Functional Characterization of a Disulfide Oxidoreductase (DsbA) Required for Virulence In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Róisín M.; Marshall, Laura E.; Halili, Maria; Furlong, Emily; Tay, Stephanie; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The intracellular pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei causes the disease melioidosis, a major source of morbidity and mortality in southeast Asia and northern Australia. The need to develop novel antimicrobials is compounded by the absence of a licensed vaccine and the bacterium's resistance to multiple antibiotics. In a number of clinically relevant Gram-negative pathogens, DsbA is the primary disulfide oxidoreductase responsible for catalyzing the formation of disulfide bonds in secreted and membrane-associated proteins. In this study, a putative B. pseudomallei dsbA gene was evaluated functionally and structurally and its contribution to infection assessed. Results: Biochemical studies confirmed the dsbA gene encodes a protein disulfide oxidoreductase. A dsbA deletion strain of B. pseudomallei was attenuated in both macrophages and a BALB/c mouse model of infection and displayed pleiotropic phenotypes that included defects in both secretion and motility. The 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of BpsDsbA revealed differences from the classic member of this family Escherichia coli DsbA, in particular within the region surrounding the active site disulfide where EcDsbA engages with its partner protein E. coli DsbB, indicating that the interaction of BpsDsbA with its proposed partner BpsDsbB may be distinct from that of EcDsbA-EcDsbB. Innovation: This study has characterized BpsDsbA biochemically and structurally and determined that it is required for virulence of B. pseudomallei. Conclusion: These data establish a critical role for BpsDsbA in B. pseudomallei infection, which in combination with our structural characterization of BpsDsbA will facilitate the future development of rationally designed inhibitors against this drug-resistant organism. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 606–617. PMID:23901809

  15. Thermodynamic and mechanical effects of disulfide bonds in CXCLl7 chemokine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Christopher

    Chemokines are a family of signaling proteins mainly responsible for the chemotaxis of leukocytes, where their biological activity is modulated by their oligomerization state. Here, the dynamics and thermodynamic stability are characterized in monomer and homodimer structures of CXCL7, one of the most abundant platelet chemokines. The effects of dimerization and disulfide bond formation are investigated using computational methods that include molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the Distance Constraint Model (DCM). A consistent picture emerges for the effect of dimerization and role of the Cys5-Cys31 and Cys7- Cys47 disulfide bonds. Surprisingly, neither disulfide bond is critical for maintaining structural stability in the monomer or dimer, although the monomer is destabilized more than the dimer upon removal of disulfide bonds. Instead, it is found that disulfide bonds influence the native state dynamics as well as modulates the relative stability between monomer and dimer. The combined analysis elucidates how CXCL7 is mechanically stable as a monomer, and how upon dimerization flexibly correlated motions are induced between the 30s and 50s loop within each monomer and across the dimer interface. Interestingly, the greatest gain in flexibility upon dimerization occurs when both disulfide bonds are present in each domain, and the homodimer is least stable relative to its two monomers. These results suggest the highly conserved disulfide bonds in chemokines facilitate a structural mechanism for distinguishing functional characteristics between monomer and dimer.

  16. An in vivo pathway for disulfide bond isomerization in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rietsch, A; Belin, D; Martin, N; Beckwith, J

    1996-11-12

    Biochemical studies have shown that the periplasmic protein disulfide oxidoreductase DsbC can isomerize aberrant disulfide bonds. Here we present the first evidence for an in vivo role of DsbC in disulfide bond isomerization. Furthermore, our data suggest that the enzymes DsbA and DsbC play distinct roles in the cell in disulfide bond formation and isomerization, respectively. We have shown that mutants in dsbC display a defect in disulfide bond formation specific for proteins with multiple disulfide bonds. The defect can be complemented by the addition of reduced dithiothreitol to the medium, suggesting that absence of DsbC results in accumulation of misoxidized proteins. Mutations in the dipZ and trxA genes have similar phenotypes. We propose that DipZ, a cytoplasmic membrane protein with a thioredoxin-like domain, and thioredoxin, the product of the trxA gene, are components of a pathway for maintaining DsbC active as a protein disulfide bond isomerase.

  17. Structure of PEP carboxykinase from the succinate-producing Actinobacillus succinogenes: a new conserved active-site motif.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Yvonne A; Prasad, Lata; Laivenieks, Maris; Zeikus, J Gregory; Delbaere, Louis T J

    2005-07-01

    Actinobacillus succinogenes can produce, via fermentation, high concentrations of succinate, an important industrial commodity. A key enzyme in this pathway is phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK), which catalyzes the production of oxaloacetate from phosphoenolpyruvate and carbon dioxide, with the concomitant conversion of adenosine 5'-diphosphate to adenosine 5'-triphosphate. 1.85 and 1.70 A resolution structures of the native and a pyruvate/Mn(2+)/phosphate complex have been solved, respectively. The structure of the complex contains sulfhydryl reducing agents covalently bound to three cysteine residues via disulfide bonds. One of these cysteine residues (Cys285) is located in the active-site cleft and may be analogous to the putative reactive cysteine of PCK from Trypanosoma cruzi. Cys285 is also part of a previously unreported conserved motif comprising residues 280-287 and containing the pattern NXEXGXY(/F)A(/G); this new motif appears to have a structural role in stabilizing and positioning side chains that bind substrates and metal ions. The first few residues of this motif connect the two domains of the enzyme and a fulcrum point appears to be located near Asn280. In addition, an active-site Asp residue forms two coordinate bonds with the Mn(2+) ion present in the structure of the complex in a symmetrical bidentate manner, unlike in other PCK structures that contain a manganese ion.

  18. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2008-08-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes.

  19. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  20. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide.

  1. Overexpression of the rhodanese PspE, a single cysteine-containing protein, restores disulfide bond formation to an Escherichia coli strain lacking DsbA

    PubMed Central

    Chng, Shu-Sin; Dutton, Rachel J.; Denoncin, Katleen; Vertommen, Didier; Collet, Jean-Francois; Kadokura, Hiroshi; Beckwith, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Summary Escherichia coli uses the DsbA/DsbB system for introducing disulfide bonds into proteins in the cell envelope. Deleting either dsbA or dsbB or both reduces disulfide bond formation but does not entirely eliminate it. Whether such background disulfide bond forming activity is enzyme-catalyzed is not known. To identify possible cellular factors that might contribute to the background activity, we studied the effects of overexpressing endogenous proteins on disulfide bond formation in the periplasm. We find that overexpressing PspE, a periplasmic rhodanese, partially restores substantial disulfide bond formation to a dsbA strain. This activity depends on DsbC, the bacterial disulfide bond isomerase, but not on DsbB. We show that overexpressed PspE is oxidized to the sulfenic acid form and reacts with substrate proteins to form mixed disulfide adducts. DsbC either prevents the formation of these mixed disulfides or resolves these adducts subsequently. In the process, DsbC itself gets oxidized and proceeds to catalyze disulfide bond formation. Although this PspE/DsbC system is not responsible for the background disulfide bond forming activity, we suggest that it might be utilized in other organisms lacking the DsbA/DsbB system. PMID:22809289

  2. Activation of Membrane Fusion by Murine Leukemia Viruses Is Controlled in cis or in trans by Interactions between the Receptor-Binding Domain and a Conserved Disulfide Loop of the Carboxy Terminus of the Surface Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Lavillette, Dimitri; Boson, Bertrand; Russell, Stephen J.; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2001-01-01

    Cell entry of retroviruses is initiated by the recognition of cellular receptors and the subsequent membrane fusion between viral and cellular membranes. These two steps are mediated by the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits of the retroviral envelope glycoprotein (Env), respectively. Determinants regulating membrane fusion have been described throughout SU and TM, but the processes coupling receptor recognition to fusion are still elusive. Here we establish that a critical interaction is formed between the receptor-binding domain (RBD) and the major disulfide loop of the carboxy-terminal domain (C domain) of the murine leukemia virus SU. Receptor binding causes an alteration of this interaction and, in turn, promotes further events of Env fusion activation. We characterize mutations which, by lowering this interaction and reducing the compatibility between the RBD and C domains of Env glycoprotein chimeras, affect both Env fusogenicity and sensitivity to receptor interference. Additionally, we demonstrate that suboptimal interactions in such mutant Env proteins can be compensated in trans by soluble RBDs in a manner that depends on their compatibility with the C domain. Our results therefore indicate that RBD/C domain interactions may occur in cis, via the proper RBD of the viral Env itself, or in trans, via a distinct RBD expressed by virion-free Env glycoproteins expressed endogenously by the infected cells or provided by neighboring Env trimers. PMID:11264358

  3. A Primary Role for Disulfide Formation in the Productive Folding of Prokaryotic Cu,Zn-superoxide Dismutase*

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Yasuyuki; Anzai, Itsuki; Furukawa, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Enzymatic activation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) requires not only binding of a catalytic copper ion but also formation of an intramolecular disulfide bond. Indeed, the disulfide bond is completely conserved among all species possessing SOD1; however, it remains obscure how disulfide formation controls the enzymatic activity of SOD1. Here, we show that disulfide formation is a primary event in the folding process of prokaryotic SOD1 (SodC) localized to the periplasmic space. Escherichia coli SodC was found to attain β-sheet structure upon formation of the disulfide bond, whereas disulfide-reduced SodC assumed little secondary structure even in the presence of copper and zinc ions. Moreover, reduction of the disulfide bond made SodC highly susceptible to proteolytic degradation. We thus propose that the thiol-disulfide status in SodC controls the intracellular stability of this antioxidant enzyme and that the oxidizing environment of the periplasm is required for the enzymatic activation of SodC. PMID:24917671

  4. Iron Binding Properties of Recombinant Class A Protein Disulfide Isomerase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Remelli, William; Santabarbara, Stefano; Carbonera, Donatella; Bonomi, Francesco; Ceriotti, Aldo; Casazza, Anna Paola

    2017-04-07

    The protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family comprises a wide set of enzymes mainly involved in thiol-disulfide exchange reactions in the endoplasmic reticulum. Class A PDIs (PDI-A) constitute the smallest members of the family, consisting of a single thioredoxin (TRX) module without any additional domains. To date, their catalytic activity and cellular function are still poorly understood. To gain insight into the role of higher-plant class A PDIs, the biochemical properties of rAtPDI-A, the recombinant form of Arabidopsis thaliana PDI-A, have been investigated. As expressed, rAtPDI-A has only little oxidoreductase activity, but it appears to be capable of binding an iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster, most likely a [2Fe-2S] center, at the interface between two protein monomers. A mutational survey of all cysteine residues of rAtPDI-A indicates that only the second and third cysteines of the CXXXCKHC stretch, containing the putative catalytic site CKHC, are primarily involved in cluster coordination. A key role is also played by the lysine residue. Its substitution with glycine, which restores the canonical PDI active site CGHC, does not influence the oxidoreductase activity of the protein, which remains marginal, but strongly affects the binding of the cluster. It is therefore proposed that the unexpected ability of rAtPDI-A to accommodate an Fe-S cluster is due to its very unique CKHC motif, which is conserved in all higher-plant class A PDIs, differentiating them from all other members of the PDI family.

  5. Structure-based approach to the prediction of disulfide bonds in proteins.

    PubMed

    Salam, Noeris K; Adzhigirey, Matvey; Sherman, Woody; Pearlman, David A

    2014-10-01

    Protein engineering remains an area of growing importance in pharmaceutical and biotechnology research. Stabilization of a folded protein conformation is a frequent goal in projects that deal with affinity optimization, enzyme design, protein construct design, and reducing the size of functional proteins. Indeed, it can be desirable to assess and improve protein stability in order to avoid liabilities such as aggregation, degradation, and immunogenic response that may arise during development. One way to stabilize a protein is through the introduction of disulfide bonds. Here, we describe a method to predict pairs of protein residues that can be mutated to form a disulfide bond. We combine a physics-based approach that incorporates implicit solvent molecular mechanics with a knowledge-based approach. We first assign relative weights to the terms that comprise our scoring function using a genetic algorithm applied to a set of 75 wild-type structures that each contains a disulfide bond. The method is then tested on a separate set of 13 engineered proteins comprising 15 artificial stabilizing disulfides introduced via site-directed mutagenesis. We find that the native disulfide in the wild-type proteins is scored well, on average (within the top 6% of the reasonable pairs of residues that could form a disulfide bond) while 6 out of the 15 artificial stabilizing disulfides scored within the top 13% of ranked predictions. Overall, this suggests that the physics-based approach presented here can be useful for triaging possible pairs of mutations for disulfide bond formation to improve protein stability.

  6. Soft Computing Methods for Disulfide Connectivity Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Márquez-Chamorro, Alfonso E.; Aguilar-Ruiz, Jesús S.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of protein structure prediction (PSP) is one of the main challenges in structural bioinformatics. To tackle this problem, PSP can be divided into several subproblems. One of these subproblems is the prediction of disulfide bonds. The disulfide connectivity prediction problem consists in identifying which nonadjacent cysteines would be cross-linked from all possible candidates. Determining the disulfide bond connectivity between the cysteines of a protein is desirable as a previous step of the 3D PSP, as the protein conformational search space is highly reduced. The most representative soft computing approaches for the disulfide bonds connectivity prediction problem of the last decade are summarized in this paper. Certain aspects, such as the different methodologies based on soft computing approaches (artificial neural network or support vector machine) or features of the algorithms, are used for the classification of these methods. PMID:26523116

  7. Transfer of molybdenum disulfide to various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, G. C.; Pepper, S. V.

    1977-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with molybdenum disulfide single crystals in contact with sputter cleaned surfaces of copper, nickel, gold, and 304 stainless steel. Transfer of the molybdenum disulfide to the metals was monitored with Auger electron spectroscopy. Results of the investigation indicate molybdenum disulfide transfers to all clean metal surfaces after a single pass over the metal surface with film thickness observed to increase with repeated passes over the same surfaces. Large particle transfer occurs when the orientation of the crystallites is other than basal. This is frequently accompanied by abrasion of the metal. Adhesion of molybdenum disulfide films occurred readily to copper and nickel, less readily to 304 stainless steel, and even less effectively to the gold, which indicates a chemical effect.

  8. Interface confined hydrogen evolution reaction in zero valent metal nanoparticles-intercalated molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhongxin; Leng, Kai; Zhao, Xiaoxu; Malkhandi, Souradip; Tang, Wei; Tian, Bingbing; Dong, Lei; Zheng, Lirong; Lin, Ming; Yeo, Boon Siang; Loh, Kian Ping

    2017-02-01

    Interface confined reactions, which can modulate the bonding of reactants with catalytic centres and influence the rate of the mass transport from bulk solution, have emerged as a viable strategy for achieving highly stable and selective catalysis. Here we demonstrate that 1T'-enriched lithiated molybdenum disulfide is a highly powerful reducing agent, which can be exploited for the in-situ reduction of metal ions within the inner planes of lithiated molybdenum disulfide to form a zero valent metal-intercalated molybdenum disulfide. The confinement of platinum nanoparticles within the molybdenum disulfide layered structure leads to enhanced hydrogen evolution reaction activity and stability compared to catalysts dispersed on carbon support. In particular, the inner platinum surface is accessible to charged species like proton and metal ions, while blocking poisoning by larger sized pollutants or neutral molecules. This points a way forward for using bulk intercalated compounds for energy related applications.

  9. Interface confined hydrogen evolution reaction in zero valent metal nanoparticles-intercalated molybdenum disulfide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhongxin; Leng, Kai; Zhao, Xiaoxu; Malkhandi, Souradip; Tang, Wei; Tian, Bingbing; Dong, Lei; Zheng, Lirong; Lin, Ming; Yeo, Boon Siang; Loh, Kian Ping

    2017-01-01

    Interface confined reactions, which can modulate the bonding of reactants with catalytic centres and influence the rate of the mass transport from bulk solution, have emerged as a viable strategy for achieving highly stable and selective catalysis. Here we demonstrate that 1T′-enriched lithiated molybdenum disulfide is a highly powerful reducing agent, which can be exploited for the in-situ reduction of metal ions within the inner planes of lithiated molybdenum disulfide to form a zero valent metal-intercalated molybdenum disulfide. The confinement of platinum nanoparticles within the molybdenum disulfide layered structure leads to enhanced hydrogen evolution reaction activity and stability compared to catalysts dispersed on carbon support. In particular, the inner platinum surface is accessible to charged species like proton and metal ions, while blocking poisoning by larger sized pollutants or neutral molecules. This points a way forward for using bulk intercalated compounds for energy related applications. PMID:28230105

  10. Promoter-proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Pia K.; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites on transcription requires promoter proximity, as demonstrated using artificial constructs and supported by a genome-wide data set. Importantly, transcription down-regulation can be recapitulated in a gene context devoid of splice sites by placing a functional bona fide pA site/transcription terminator within ∼500 base pairs of the promoter. In contrast, promoter-proximal positioning of a pA site-independent histone gene terminator supports high transcription levels. We propose that optimal communication between a pA site-dependent gene terminator and its promoter critically depends on gene length and that short RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels. PMID:23028143

  11. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  12. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  13. Scorpion venom peptides with no disulfide bridges: a review.

    PubMed

    Almaaytah, Ammar; Albalas, Qosay

    2014-01-01

    Scorpion venoms are rich sources of biologically active peptides that are classified into disulfide-bridged peptides (DBPs) and non-disulfide-bridged peptides (NDBPs). DBPs are the main scorpion venom components responsible for the neurotoxic effects observed during scorpion envenomation as they usually target membrane bound ion channels of excitable and non-excitable cells. Several hundred DBPs have been identified and functionally characterized in the past two decades. The NDBPs represent a novel group of molecules that have gained great interest only recently due to their high diversity both in their primary structures and bioactivities. This review provides an overview of scorpion NDBPs focusing on their therapeutic applications, modes of discovery, mechanisms of NDBPs genetic diversity and structural properties. It also provides a simple classification for NDBPs that could be adopted and applied to other NDBPs identified in future studies.

  14. Active and regulatory sites of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Pesi, Rossana; Allegrini, Simone; Careddu, Maria Giovanna; Filoni, Daniela Nicole; Camici, Marcella; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2010-12-01

    Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II), which acts preferentially on 6-hydroxypurine nucleotides, is essential for the survival of several cell types. cN-II catalyses both the hydrolysis of nucleotides and transfer of their phosphate moiety to a nucleoside acceptor through formation of a covalent phospho-intermediate. Both activities are regulated by a number of phosphorylated compounds, such as diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap₄A), ADP, ATP, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) and phosphate. On the basis of a partial crystal structure of cN-II, we mutated two residues located in the active site, Y55 and T56. We ascertained that the ability to catalyse the transfer of phosphate depends on the presence of a bulky residue in the active site very close to the aspartate residue that forms the covalent phospho-intermediate. The molecular model indicates two possible sites at which adenylic compounds may interact. We mutated three residues that mediate interaction in the first activation site (R144, N154, I152) and three in the second (F127, M436 and H428), and found that Ap₄A and ADP interact with the same site, but the sites for ATP and BPG remain uncertain. The structural model indicates that cN-II is a homotetrameric protein that results from interaction through a specific interface B of two identical dimers that have arisen from interaction of two identical subunits through interface A. Point mutations in the two interfaces and gel-filtration experiments indicated that the dimer is the smallest active oligomerization state. Finally, gel-filtration and light-scattering experiments demonstrated that the native enzyme exists as a tetramer, and no further oligomerization is required for enzyme activation.

  15. BAX Activation is Initiated at a Novel Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Suzuki, Motoshi; Davis, Marguerite L.; Pitter, Kenneth; Bird, Gregory H.; Katz, Samuel G.; Tu, Ho-Chou; Kim, Hyungjin; Cheng, Emily H.-Y.; Tjandra, Nico; Walensky, Loren D.

    2008-01-01

    BAX is a pro-apoptotic protein of the BCL-2 family stationed in the cytosol until activated by a diversity of stress stimuli to induce cell death. Anti-apoptotic proteins such as BCL-2 counteract BAX-mediated cell death. Although an interaction site that confers survival functionality has been defined for anti-apoptotic proteins, an activation site has not been identified for BAX, rendering its explicit trigger mechanism unknown. We previously developed Stabilized Alpha-Helix of BCL-2 domains (SAHBs) that directly initiate BAX-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis. Here we demonstrate by NMR analysis that BIM SAHB binds BAX at an interaction site that is distinct from the canonical binding groove characterized for anti-apoptotic proteins. The specificity of the BIM SAHB-BAX interaction is highlighted by point mutagenesis that abrogates functional activity, confirming that BAX activation is initiated at this novel structural location. Thus, we have now defined a BAX interaction site for direct activation, establishing a new target for therapeutic modulation of apoptosis. PMID:18948948

  16. Involvement of novel autophosphorylation sites in ATM activation.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Graham, Mark E; Peng, Cheng; Chen, Philip; Robinson, Phillip J; Lavin, Martin F

    2006-08-09

    ATM kinase plays a central role in signaling DNA double-strand breaks to cell cycle checkpoints and to the DNA repair machinery. Although the exact mechanism of ATM activation remains unknown, efficient activation requires the Mre11 complex, autophosphorylation on S1981 and the involvement of protein phosphatases and acetylases. We report here the identification of several additional phosphorylation sites on ATM in response to DNA damage, including autophosphorylation on pS367 and pS1893. ATM autophosphorylates all these sites in vitro in response to DNA damage. Antibodies against phosphoserine 1893 revealed rapid and persistent phosphorylation at this site after in vivo activation of ATM kinase by ionizing radiation, paralleling that observed for S1981 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation was dependent on functional ATM and on the Mre11 complex. All three autophosphorylation sites are physiologically important parts of the DNA damage response, as phosphorylation site mutants (S367A, S1893A and S1981A) were each defective in ATM signaling in vivo and each failed to correct radiosensitivity, genome instability and cell cycle checkpoint defects in ataxia-telangiectasia cells. We conclude that there are at least three functionally important radiation-induced autophosphorylation events in ATM.

  17. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  18. A Ferredoxin Disulfide Reductase Delivers Electrons to the Methanosarcina barkeri Class III Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two subtypes of class III anaerobic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) studied so far couple the reduction of ribonucleotides to the oxidation of formate, or the oxidation of NADPH via thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. Certain methanogenic archaea contain a phylogenetically distinct third subtype of class III RNR, with distinct active-site residues. Here we report the cloning and recombinant expression of the Methanosarcina barkeri class III RNR and show that the electrons required for ribonucleotide reduction can be delivered by a [4Fe-4S] protein ferredoxin disulfide reductase, and a conserved thioredoxin-like protein NrdH present in the RNR operon. The diversity of class III RNRs reflects the diversity of electron carriers used in anaerobic metabolism. PMID:26536144

  19. Electronic properties of monolayer tungsten disulfide grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, Abdullah; Shahrjerdi, Davood

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate chemical vapor deposition of large monolayer tungsten disulfide (WS2) (>200 μm). Photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy provide insight into the structural and strain heterogeneity of the flakes. We observe exciton quenching at grain boundaries that originate from the nucleation site at the center of the WS2 flakes. Temperature variable transport measurements of top-gated WS2 transistors show an apparent metal-to-insulator transition. Variable range and thermally activated hopping mechanisms can explain the carrier transport in the insulating phase at low and intermediate temperatures. The devices exhibit room-temperature field-effect electron mobility as high as 48 cm2/V.s. The mobility increases with decreasing temperature and begins to saturate at below 100 °K, possibly due to Coulomb scattering or defects.

  20. Combined use of ion mobility and collision-induced dissociation to investigate the opening of disulfide bridges by electron-transfer dissociation in peptides bearing two disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Massonnet, Philippe; Upert, Gregory; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Gilles, Nicolas; Quinton, Loïc; De Pauw, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Disulfide bonds are post-translational modifications (PTMs) often found in peptides and proteins. They increase their stability toward enzymatic degradations and provide the structure and (consequently) the activity of such folded proteins. The characterization of disulfide patterns, i.e., the cysteine connectivity, is crucial to achieve a global picture of the active conformation of the protein of interest. Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) constitutes a valuable tool to cleave the disulfide bonds in the gas phase, avoiding chemical reduction/alkylation in solution. To characterize the cysteine pairing, the present work proposes (i) to reduce by ETD one of the two disulfide bridges of model peptides, resulting in the opening of the cyclic structures, (ii) to separate the generated species by ion mobility, and (iii) to characterize the species using collision-induced dissociation (CID). Results of this strategy applied to several peptides show different behaviors depending on the connectivity. The loss of SH· radical species, observed for all the peptides, confirms the cleavage of the disulfides during the ETD process.

  1. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  2. Spectroscopic studies of the active site of galactose oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, P.F.; Brown, R.D. III; Koenig, S.H.

    1995-07-19

    X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopy have been used to probe the copper site structure in galactose oxidase at pH 4.5 and 7.0. the results suggest that there are no major differences in the structure of the tetragonal Cu(II) site at these pH values. Analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicates that four N,O scatterers are present at approximately 2 {Angstrom}; these are presumably the equatorial ligands. In addition, the EXAFS data establish that oxidative activation to produce the active-site tyrosine radical does not cause major changes in the copper coordination environment. Therefore results obtained on the one-electron reduced enzyme, containing Cu(II) but not the tyrosine radical, probably also apply to the catalytically active Cu(II)/tyrosine radical state. Solvent water exchange, inhibitor binding, and substrate binding have been probed via nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) measurements. The NMRD profile of galactose oxidase is quantitatively consistent with the rapid exchange of a single, equatorial water ligand with a Cu(II)-O separation of about 2.4 {Angstrom}. Azide and cyanide displace this coordinated water. The binding of azide and the substrate dihydroxyacetone produce very similar effects on the NMRD profile of galactose oxidase, indicating that substrates also bind to the active site Cu(II) in an equatorial position.

  3. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  4. The α-proteobacteria Wolbachia pipientis protein disulfide machinery has a regulatory mechanism absent in γ-proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Walden, Patricia M; Halili, Maria A; Archbold, Julia K; Lindahl, Fredrik; Fairlie, David P; Inaba, Kenji; Martin, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    The α-proteobacterium Wolbachia pipientis infects more than 65% of insect species worldwide and manipulates the host reproductive machinery to enable its own survival. It can live in mutualistic relationships with hosts that cause human disease, including mosquitoes that carry the Dengue virus. Like many other bacteria, Wolbachia contains disulfide bond forming (Dsb) proteins that introduce disulfide bonds into secreted effector proteins. The genome of the Wolbachia strain wMel encodes two DsbA-like proteins sharing just 21% sequence identity to each other, α-DsbA1 and α-DsbA2, and an integral membrane protein, α-DsbB. α-DsbA1 and α-DsbA2 both have a Cys-X-X-Cys active site that, by analogy with Escherichia coli DsbA, would need to be oxidized to the disulfide form to serve as a disulfide bond donor toward substrate proteins. Here we show that the integral membrane protein α-DsbB oxidizes α-DsbA1, but not α-DsbA2. The interaction between α-DsbA1 and α-DsbB is very specific, involving four essential cysteines located in the two periplasmic loops of α-DsbB. In the electron flow cascade, oxidation of α-DsbA1 by α-DsbB is initiated by an oxidizing quinone cofactor that interacts with the cysteine pair in the first periplasmic loop. Oxidizing power is transferred to the second cysteine pair, which directly interacts with α-DsbA1. This reaction is inhibited by a non-catalytic disulfide present in α-DsbA1, conserved in other α-proteobacterial DsbAs but not in γ-proteobacterial DsbAs. This is the first characterization of the integral membrane protein α-DsbB from Wolbachia and reveals that the non-catalytic cysteines of α-DsbA1 regulate the redox relay system in cooperation with α-DsbB.

  5. Tissue factor de-encryption, thrombus formation, and thiol-disulfide exchange.

    PubMed

    Chen, Vivien M Y

    2013-02-01

    Tissue factor (TF) by forming a complex with factor VIIa (FVIIa) initiates blood coagulation. It was traditionally believed that the separation of FVIIa in circulation from subendothelial TF was the main control that was preventing spontaneous initiation of thrombosis and that circulating cells and endothelium did not express TF protein at rest in healthy individuals. However, TF has been detected in healthy human plasma and animal models of thrombosis, which indicate that TF in circulation can contribute to thrombin generation and fibrin formation after an activation event. Circulating TF-and indeed, most of the TF on the cell surface-is "encrypted" or coagulation inactive. The de-encryption step involves exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS), but PS exposure alone is insufficient for full TF activity. Allosteric disulfide bonds control protein function by mediating conformal change through the formation and breaking of disulfide bonds. TF contains a typical surface exposed allosteric bond in the membrane proximal fibronectin type III domain. Thiol-disulfide exchange involving this disulfide is implicated in TF activation with the formation of the disulfide bond corresponding with the active conformation of TF and free thiol or thiol-modified forms corresponding with encryption. Although the exact mechanism by which TF de-encryption occurs remains a subject of debate, thiol blockade and inhibition of oxidoreductases show an important role for thiol-disulfide reactions in platelet-independent pathways of coagulation in vitro and in vivo. In particular, redox active extracellular protein disulfide isomerase is involved in the earliest stages of thrombus initiation and has proven to be a potential target for antithrombotic drug development.

  6. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  7. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-06

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions.

  8. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C.; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F.; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W.; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa. Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  9. Probing the promiscuous active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase using synthetic substrates, homology modeling, and active site modification.

    PubMed

    Daniellou, Richard; Zheng, Hongyan; Langill, David M; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2007-06-26

    The active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase (IDH, EC 1.1.1.18) from Bacillus subtilis recognizes a variety of mono- and disaccharides, as well as 1l-4-O-substituted inositol derivatives. It catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the axial alcohol of these substrates with comparable kinetic constants. We have found that 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol does not act as a substrate for IDH, in contrast to structurally similar compounds such as those bearing substituted benzyl substituents in the same position. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol and 4-O-(2-naphthyl)methyl-myo-inositol, which is a substrate for IDH, shows a distinct difference in the preferred conformation of the aryl substituent. Conformational analysis of known substrates of IDH suggests that this conformational difference may account for the difference in reactivity of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol in the presence of IDH. A sequence alignment of IDH with the homologous glucose-fructose oxidoreductase allowed the construction of an homology model of inositol dehydrogenase, to which NADH and 4-O-benzyl-scyllo-inosose were docked and the active site energy minimized. The active site model is consistent with all experimental results and suggests that a conserved tyrosine-glycine-tyrosine motif forms the hydrophobic pocket adjoining the site of inositol recognition. Y233F and Y235F retain activity, while Y233R and Y235R do not. A histidine-aspartate pair, H176 and D172, are proposed to act as a dyad in which H176 is the active site acid/base. The enzyme is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate, and the mutants H176A and D172N show a marked loss of activity. Kinetic isotope effect experiments with D172N indicate that chemistry is rate-determining for this mutant.

  10. Display of disulfide-rich proteins by complementary DNA display and disulfide shuffling assisted by protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Naimuddin, Mohammed; Kubo, Tai

    2011-12-01

    We report an efficient system to produce and display properly folded disulfide-rich proteins facilitated by coupled complementary DNA (cDNA) display and protein disulfide isomerase-assisted folding. The results show that a neurotoxin protein containing four disulfide linkages can be displayed in the folded state. Furthermore, it can be refolded on a solid support that binds efficiently to its natural acetylcholine receptor. Probing the efficiency of the display proteins prepared by these methods provided up to 8-fold higher enrichment by the selective enrichment method compared with cDNA display alone, more than 10-fold higher binding to its receptor by the binding assays, and more than 10-fold higher affinities by affinity measurements. Cotranslational folding was found to have better efficiency than posttranslational refolding between the two investigated methods. We discuss the utilities of efficient display of such proteins in the preparation of superior quality proteins and protein libraries for directed evolution leading to ligand discovery.

  11. The active site structure and mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Arginine specific reagents showed irreversible inhibition of avian liver mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Potent protection against modification was elicited by CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} in the presence of other substrates. Labeling of enzyme with (7-{sup 14}C) phenylglyoxal showed that 1 or 2 arginines are involved in CO{sub 2} binding and activation. Peptide map studies showed this active site arginine residues is located at position 289. Histidine specific reagents showed pseudo first order inhibition of avian mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity. The best protection against modification was elicited by IDP or IDP and Mn{sup +2}. One histidine residue is at or near the phosphoenolpyruvate binding site as demonstrated in the increased absorbance at 240 nm and proton relaxation rate studies. Circular dichroism studies reveal that enzyme structure was perturbed by diethylpyrocarbonate modification. Metal binding studies suggest that this enzyme has only one metal binding site. The putative binding sites from several GTP and phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes are observed in P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase from different species.

  12. Cellular disulfide bond formation in bioactive peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nitin A; Tailhades, Julien; Hughes, Richard Anthony; Separovic, Frances; Wade, John D; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter

    2015-01-14

    Bioactive peptides play important roles in metabolic regulation and modulation and many are used as therapeutics. These peptides often possess disulfide bonds, which are important for their structure, function and stability. A systematic network of enzymes--a disulfide bond generating enzyme, a disulfide bond donor enzyme and a redox cofactor--that function inside the cell dictates the formation and maintenance of disulfide bonds. The main pathways that catalyze disulfide bond formation in peptides and proteins in prokaryotes and eukaryotes are remarkably similar and share several mechanistic features. This review summarizes the formation of disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins by cellular and recombinant machinery.

  13. Terminal Uranium(V/VI) Nitride Activation of Carbon Dioxide and Carbon Disulfide: Factors Governing Diverse and Well-Defined Cleavage and Redox Reactions.

    PubMed

    Cleaves, Peter A; Kefalidis, Christos E; Gardner, Benedict M; Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J L; Lewis, William; Maron, Laurent; Liddle, Stephen T

    2017-02-24

    The reactivity of terminal uranium(V/VI) nitrides with CE2 (E=O, S) is presented. Well-defined C=E cleavage followed by zero-, one-, and two-electron redox events is observed. The uranium(V) nitride [U(Tren(TIPS) )(N)][K(B15C5)2 ] (1, Tren(TIPS) =N(CH2 CH2 NSiiPr3 )3 ; B15C5=benzo-15-crown-5) reacts with CO2 to give [U(Tren(TIPS) )(O)(NCO)][K(B15C5)2 ] (3), whereas the uranium(VI) nitride [U(Tren(TIPS) )(N)] (2) reacts with CO2 to give isolable [U(Tren(TIPS) )(O)(NCO)] (4); complex 4 rapidly decomposes to known [U(Tren(TIPS) )(O)] (5) with concomitant formation of N2 and CO proposed, with the latter trapped as a vanadocene adduct. In contrast, 1 reacts with CS2 to give [U(Tren(TIPS) )(κ(2) -CS3 )][K(B15C5)2 ] (6), 2, and [K(B15C5)2 ][NCS] (7), whereas 2 reacts with CS2 to give [U(Tren(TIPS) )(NCS)] (8) and "S", with the latter trapped as Ph3 PS. Calculated reaction profiles reveal outer-sphere reactivity for uranium(V) but inner-sphere mechanisms for uranium(VI); despite the wide divergence of products the initial activation of CE2 follows mechanistically related pathways, providing insight into the factors of uranium oxidation state, chalcogen, and NCE groups that govern the subsequent divergent redox reactions that include common one-electron reactions and a less-common two-electron redox event. Caution, we suggest, is warranted when utilising CS2 as a reactivity surrogate for CO2 .

  14. Observation of two distinct negative trions in tungsten disulfide monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Huang, Bing; Wang, Kai; Lin, Ming-Wei; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Xiao, Kai; Yoon, Mina; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.

    2015-09-25

    We report on the observation of two distinct photogenerated negative trion states TA and TB in two-dimensional tungsten disulfide (2D-WS2) monolayers. These trions are postulated to emerge from their parent excitons XA and XB, which originate from spin-orbit-split (SOS) levels in the conduction band (CB) and valence band (VB). Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements suggests that Pauli blocking controls a competition process between TA and TB photoformation, following dissociation of XA and XB through hole trapping at internal or substrate defect sites. While TA arises directly from its parent XA, TB emerges through a different transition accessible only after XB dissociates through a hole trapping channel. This discovery of additional optically-active band-edge transitions in atomically-thin metal dichalcogenides may revolutionize optoelectronic applications and fundamental research opportunities for many-body interaction physics. Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy of two-dimensional tungsten disulfide monolayers (2D-WS2) grown on sapphire substrates revealed two transient absorption spectral peaks that are attributed to distinct negative trions at ~2.02 eV (T1) and ~1.98 eV (T2). The dynamics measurements indicate that trion formation by the probe is enabled by photodoped electrons that remain after trapping of holes from excitons or free electron-hole pairs at defect sites in the crystal or on the substrate. Dynamics of the excitons XA and XB’s characteristic absorption bands, at ~2.03 and ~2.40 eV, respectively, were separately monitored and compared with the photoinduced absorption features. Selective excitation of the lowest exciton level XA using λpump < 2.4 eV forms only trion T1, which implies that the electron that remains

  15. Observation of two distinct negative trions in tungsten disulfide monolayers

    DOE PAGES

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Huang, Bing; Wang, Kai; ...

    2015-09-25

    We report on the observation of two distinct photogenerated negative trion states TA and TB in two-dimensional tungsten disulfide (2D-WS2) monolayers. These trions are postulated to emerge from their parent excitons XA and XB, which originate from spin-orbit-split (SOS) levels in the conduction band (CB) and valence band (VB). Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements suggests that Pauli blocking controls a competition process between TA and TB photoformation, following dissociation of XA and XB through hole trapping at internal or substrate defect sites. While TA arises directly from its parent XA, TB emerges through a different transition accessible only after XB dissociates throughmore » a hole trapping channel. This discovery of additional optically-active band-edge transitions in atomically-thin metal dichalcogenides may revolutionize optoelectronic applications and fundamental research opportunities for many-body interaction physics. Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy of two-dimensional tungsten disulfide monolayers (2D-WS2) grown on sapphire substrates revealed two transient absorption spectral peaks that are attributed to distinct negative trions at ~2.02 eV (T1) and ~1.98 eV (T2). The dynamics measurements indicate that trion formation by the probe is enabled by photodoped electrons that remain after trapping of holes from excitons or free electron-hole pairs at defect sites in the crystal or on the substrate. Dynamics of the excitons XA and XB’s characteristic absorption bands, at ~2.03 and ~2.40 eV, respectively, were separately monitored and compared with the photoinduced absorption features. Selective excitation of the lowest exciton level XA using λpump < 2.4 eV forms only trion T1, which implies that the electron that remains from the dissociation of exciton XA is involved in the creation of this trion with a binding energy ~ 10 meV with respect to XA. The absorption peak that corresponds to trion T2 appears when λpump > 2.4 eV, which is just

  16. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Silicate Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts [1-3]. Nevertheless, among those structures K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. In this study, the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars were investigated in closer details. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. We give a potential explanation of the increased ice nucleation activity of K-feldspar. The ice nucleating sites are very much dependent on the alkali ion present by altering the water structure and the feldspar surface. The higher activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to the presence of potassium ions on the surface and surface bilayer. The alkali-ions have different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar. Chaotropic behavior of Calcium and Sodium ions are lowering the ice nucleation potential of the other feldspars, while kosmotropic Potassium has a neutral or even positive effect. Furthermore we investigated the influence of milling onto the ice nucleation of quartz particles. The ice nucleation activity can be increased by mechanical milling, by introducing more molecular, nucleation active defects to the particle surface. This effect is larger than expected by plane surface increase. [1] Atkinson et al. The Importance of Feldspar for Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust in Mixed-Phase Clouds. Nature 2013, 498, 355-358. [2] Yakobi-Hancock et al.. Feldspar Minerals as Efficient Deposition Ice Nuclei. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2013, 13, 11175-11185. [3] Zolles et al. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015 accepted.

  17. Face the Edges: Catalytic Active Sites of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Edges are special sites in nanomaterials. The atoms residing on the edges have different environments compared to those in other parts of a nanomaterial and, therefore, they may have different properties. Here, recent progress in nanomaterial fields is summarized from the viewpoint of the edges. Typically, edge sites in MoS2 or metals, other than surface atoms, can perform as active centers for catalytic reactions, so the method to enhance performance lies in the optimization of the edge structures. The edges of multicomponent interfaces present even more possibilities to enhance the activities of nanomaterials. Nanoframes and ultrathin nanowires have similarities to conventional edges of nanoparticles, the application of which as catalysts can help to reduce the use of costly materials. Looking beyond this, the edge structures of graphene are also essential for their properties. In short, the edge structure can influence many properties of materials. PMID:27980960

  18. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  19. Rv2969c, essential for optimal growth in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a DsbA-like enzyme that interacts with VKOR-derived peptides and has atypical features of DsbA-like disulfide oxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Premkumar, Lakshmanane Heras, Begoña; Duprez, Wilko; Walden, Patricia; Halili, Maria; Kurth, Fabian; Fairlie, David P.; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2013-10-01

    The gene product of M. tuberculosis Rv2969c is shown to be a disulfide oxidase enzyme that has a canonical DsbA-like fold with novel structural and functional characteristics. The bacterial disulfide machinery is an attractive molecular target for developing new antibacterials because it is required for the production of multiple virulence factors. The archetypal disulfide oxidase proteins in Escherichia coli (Ec) are DsbA and DsbB, which together form a functional unit: DsbA introduces disulfides into folding proteins and DsbB reoxidizes DsbA to maintain it in the active form. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), no DsbB homologue is encoded but a functionally similar but structurally divergent protein, MtbVKOR, has been identified. Here, the Mtb protein Rv2969c is investigated and it is shown that it is the DsbA-like partner protein of MtbVKOR. It is found that it has the characteristic redox features of a DsbA-like protein: a highly acidic catalytic cysteine, a highly oxidizing potential and a destabilizing active-site disulfide bond. Rv2969c also has peptide-oxidizing activity and recognizes peptide segments derived from the periplasmic loops of MtbVKOR. Unlike the archetypal EcDsbA enzyme, Rv2969c has little or no activity in disulfide-reducing and disulfide-isomerase assays. The crystal structure of Rv2969c reveals a canonical DsbA fold comprising a thioredoxin domain with an embedded helical domain. However, Rv2969c diverges considerably from other DsbAs, including having an additional C-terminal helix (H8) that may restrain the mobility of the catalytic helix H1. The enzyme is also characterized by a very shallow hydrophobic binding surface and a negative electrostatic surface potential surrounding the catalytic cysteine. The structure of Rv2969c was also used to model the structure of a paralogous DsbA-like domain of the Ser/Thr protein kinase PknE. Together, these results show that Rv2969c is a DsbA-like protein with unique properties and a limited

  20. Disulfide-Functionalized Diblock Copolymer Worm Gels.

    PubMed

    Warren, Nicholas J; Rosselgong, Julien; Madsen, Jeppe; Armes, Steven P

    2015-08-10

    Two strategies for introducing disulfide groups at the outer surface of RAFT-synthesized poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)-poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate) (PGMA-PHPMA, or Gx-Hy for brevity) diblock copolymer worms are investigated. The first approach involved statistical copolymerization of GMA with a small amount of disulfide dimethacrylate (DSDMA, or D) comonomer to afford a G54-D0.50 macromolecular chain transfer agent (macro-CTA); this synthesis was conducted in relatively dilute solution in order to ensure mainly intramolecular cyclization and hence the formation of linear chains. Alternatively, a new disulfide-based bifunctional RAFT agent (DSDB) was used to prepare a G45-S-S-G45 (or (G45-S)2) macro-CTA. A binary mixture of a non-functionalized G55 macro-CTA was utilized with each of these two disulfide-based macro-CTAs in turn for the RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization of 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA). By targeting a PHPMA DP of 130 and systematically varying the molar ratio of the two macro-CTAs, a series of disulfide-functionalized diblock copolymer worm gels were obtained. For both formulations, oscillatory rheology studies confirmed that higher disulfide contents led to stronger gels, presumably as a result of inter-worm covalent bond formation via disulfide/thiol exchange. Using the DSDB-based macro-CTA led to the strongest worm gels, and this formulation also proved to be more effective in suppressing the thermosensitive behavior that is observed for the nondisulfide-functionalized control worm gel. However, macroscopic precipitation occurred when the proportion of DSDB-based macro-CTA was increased to 50 mol %, whereas the DSDMA-based macro-CTA could be utilized at up to 80 mol %. Finally, the worm gel modulus could be reduced to that of a nondisulfide-containing worm gel by reductive cleavage of the inter-worm disulfide bonds using excess tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) to yield thiol groups. These new biomimetic worm gels are

  1. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  2. Nest predation increases with parental activity: separating nest site and parental activity effects.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T E; Scott, J; Menge, C

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection. PMID:11413645

  3. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  4. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  5. [Mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2012-04-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent for inhibiting arginine-auxotrophic tumors (such as melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas) in phase III clinical trials. In this work, we studied the molecular mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutation sites, A128, H404 and 1410, were introduced into wild-type ADI gene by QuikChange site-directed mutagenesis method, and four ADI mutants M1 (A128T), M2 (H404R), M3 (I410L), and M4 (A128T, H404R) were obtained. The ADI mutants were individually expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the enzymatic properties of the purified mutant proteins were determined. The results show that both A128T and H404R had enhanced optimum pH, higher activity and stability of ADI under physiological condition (pH 7.4), as well as reduced K(m) value. This study provides an insight into the molecular mechanism of the ADI activity, and also the experimental evidence for the rational protein evolution in the future.

  6. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J.; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  7. MSK1 activity is controlled by multiple phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    McCOY, Claire E.; Campbell, David G.; Deak, Maria; Bloomberg, Graham B.; Arthur, J. Simon C.

    2004-01-01

    MSK1 (mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase) is a kinase activated in cells downstream of both the ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades. In the present study, we show that, in addition to being phosphorylated on Thr-581 and Ser-360 by ERK1/2 or p38, MSK1 can autophosphorylate on at least six sites: Ser-212, Ser-376, Ser-381, Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758. Of these sites, the N-terminal T-loop residue Ser-212 and the ‘hydrophobic motif’ Ser-376 are phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain of MSK1, and their phosphorylation is essential for the catalytic activity of the N-terminal kinase domain of MSK1 and therefore for the phosphorylation of MSK1 substrates in vitro. Ser-381 is also phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain, and mutation of Ser-381 decreases MSK1 activity, probably through the inhibition of Ser-376 phosphorylation. Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758 are phosphorylated by the N-terminal kinase domain; however, their function is not known. The activation of MSK1 in cells therefore requires the activation of the ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK cascades and does not appear to require additional signalling inputs. This is in contrast with the closely related RSK (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase) proteins, whose activity requires phosphorylation by PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1) in addition to phosphorylation by ERK1/2. PMID:15568999

  8. Molybdenum disulfide/pyrolytic carbon hybrid electrodes for scalable hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Hugo; McEvoy, Niall; O'Brien, Maria; Berner, Nina C.; Yim, Chanyoung; Hallam, Toby; McDonald, Aidan R.; Duesberg, Georg S.

    2014-06-01

    The electrochemical generation of hydrogen fuel via the proton reduction in the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER) in aqueous media is currently dependent on the use expensive noble metal catalysts for which alternatives must be sought. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has shown great promise as a suitable electrocatalyst in this regard. While many lab-scale experiments on the HER activity of this material have demonstrated its viability and explored some fundamental mechanistic features of HER at MoS2, these experimental techniques are often ill-suited to large scale production of such electrodes. In this study we present work on the fabrication of MoS2/pyrolytic carbon (PyC) electrodes via vapour phase sulfurization of Mo thin films. These hybrid electrodes combine the catalytic activity of MoS2 with the conductivity and stability of PyC, whilst using industrially compatible processing techniques. Structural defects in the sulfur lattice were found to be key catalytically active sites for HER and thinner MoS2 films displayed a higher quantity of these defects and, hence, an improved HER activity. The observed Tafel slope of 95 mV decade-1 is comparable to previous literature works on MoS2 HER performance.The electrochemical generation of hydrogen fuel via the proton reduction in the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER) in aqueous media is currently dependent on the use expensive noble metal catalysts for which alternatives must be sought. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has shown great promise as a suitable electrocatalyst in this regard. While many lab-scale experiments on the HER activity of this material have demonstrated its viability and explored some fundamental mechanistic features of HER at MoS2, these experimental techniques are often ill-suited to large scale production of such electrodes. In this study we present work on the fabrication of MoS2/pyrolytic carbon (PyC) electrodes via vapour phase sulfurization of Mo thin films. These hybrid electrodes combine the

  9. Diaryl Disulfides as Novel Stabilizers of Tumor Suppressor Pdcd4

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Tobias; Blees, Johanna S.; Bajer, Magdalena M.; Wild, Janine; Pescatori, Luca; Cuzzucoli Crucitti, Giuliana; Scipione, Luigi; Costi, Roberta; Henrich, Curtis J.; Brüne, Bernhard; Colburn, Nancy H.; Di Santo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The translation inhibitor and tumor suppressor Pdcd4 was reported to be lost in various tumors and put forward as prognostic marker in tumorigenesis. Decreased Pdcd4 protein stability due to PI3K-mTOR-p70S6K1 dependent phosphorylation of Pdcd4 followed by β-TrCP1-mediated ubiquitination, and proteasomal destruction of the protein was characterized as a major mechanism contributing to the loss of Pdcd4 expression in tumors. In an attempt to identify stabilizers of Pdcd4, we used a luciferase-based high-throughput compatible cellular assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent proteasomal degradation of Pdcd4 in response to mitogen stimulation. Following a screen of approximately 2000 compounds, we identified 1,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)disulfide as a novel Pdcd4 stabilizer. To determine an initial structure-activity relationship, we used 3 additional compounds, synthesized according to previous reports, and 2 commercially available compounds for further testing, in which either the linker between the aryls was modified (compounds 2–4) or the chlorine residues were replaced by groups with different electronic properties (compounds 5 and 6). We observed that those compounds with alterations in the sulfide linker completely lost the Pdcd4 stabilizing potential. In contrast, modifications in the chlorine residues showed only minor effects on the Pdcd4 stabilizing activity. A reporter with a mutated phospho-degron verified the specificity of the compounds for stabilizing the Pdcd4 reporter. Interestingly, the active diaryl disulfides inhibited proliferation and viability at concentrations where they stabilized Pdcd4, suggesting that Pdcd4 stabilization might contribute to the anti-proliferative properties. Finally, computational modelling indicated that the flexibility of the disulfide linker might be necessary to exert the biological functions of the compounds, as the inactive compound appeared to be energetically more restricted. PMID:26982744

  10. Linear array of conserved sequence motifs to discriminate protein subfamilies: study on pyridine nucleotide-disulfide reductases

    PubMed Central

    Avila, César L; Rapisarda, Viviana A; Farías, Ricardo N; De Las Rivas, Javier; Chehín, Rosana

    2007-01-01

    Background The pyridine nucleotide disulfide reductase (PNDR) is a large and heterogeneous protein family divided into two classes (I and II), which reflect the divergent evolution of its characteristic disulfide redox active site. However, not all the PNDR members fit into these categories and this suggests the need of further studies to achieve a more comprehensive classification of this complex family. Results A workflow to improve the clusterization of protein families based on the array of linear conserved motifs is designed. The method is applied to the PNDR large family finding two main groups, which correspond to PNDR classes I and II. However, two other separate protein clusters, previously classified as class I in most databases, are outgrouped: the peroxide reductases (NAOX, NAPE) and the type II NADH dehydrogenases (NDH-2). In this way, two novel PNDR classes III and IV for NAOX/NAPE and NDH-2 respectively are proposed. By knowledge-driven biochemical and functional data analyses done on the new class IV, a linear array of motifs putatively related to Cu(II)-reductase activity is detected in a specific subset of NDH-2. Conclusion The results presented are a novel contribution to the classification of the complex and large PNDR protein family, supporting its reclusterization into four classes. The linear array of motifs detected within the class IV PNDR subfamily could be useful as a signature for a particular subgroup of NDH-2. PMID:17367536

  11. 46 CFR 153.520 - Special requirements for carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special requirements for carbon disulfide. 153.520... Equipment Special Requirements § 153.520 Special requirements for carbon disulfide. A containment system carrying carbon disulfide must meet the following: (a) Each cargo pump must be of the intank type...

  12. 40 CFR 180.467 - Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carbon disulfide; tolerances for... § 180.467 Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues. Tolerances are established for the nematicide, insecticide, and fungicide carbon disulfide, from the application of sodium tetrathiocarbonate, in or on...

  13. 40 CFR 180.467 - Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carbon disulfide; tolerances for... § 180.467 Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues. Tolerances are established for the nematicide, insecticide, and fungicide carbon disulfide, from the application of sodium tetrathiocarbonate, in or on...

  14. 46 CFR 153.520 - Special requirements for carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special requirements for carbon disulfide. 153.520... Equipment Special Requirements § 153.520 Special requirements for carbon disulfide. A containment system carrying carbon disulfide must meet the following: (a) Each cargo pump must be of the intank type...

  15. 40 CFR 180.467 - Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon disulfide; tolerances for... § 180.467 Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues. Tolerances are established for the nematicide, insecticide, and fungicide carbon disulfide, from the application of sodium tetrathiocarbonate, in or on...

  16. 40 CFR 180.467 - Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carbon disulfide; tolerances for... § 180.467 Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues. Tolerances are established for the nematicide, insecticide, and fungicide carbon disulfide, from the application of sodium tetrathiocarbonate, in or on...

  17. 40 CFR 180.467 - Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carbon disulfide; tolerances for... § 180.467 Carbon disulfide; tolerances for residues. Tolerances are established for the nematicide, insecticide, and fungicide carbon disulfide, from the application of sodium tetrathiocarbonate, in or on...

  18. 46 CFR 153.520 - Special requirements for carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special requirements for carbon disulfide. 153.520... Equipment Special Requirements § 153.520 Special requirements for carbon disulfide. A containment system carrying carbon disulfide must meet the following: (a) Each cargo pump must be of the intank type...

  19. 46 CFR 153.520 - Special requirements for carbon disulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special requirements for carbon disulfide. 153.520... Equipment Special Requirements § 153.520 Special requirements for carbon disulfide. A containment system carrying carbon disulfide must meet the following: (a) Each cargo pump must be of the intank type...

  20. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  1. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  2. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  3. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  4. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in weight (w/w) selenium disulfide (1-percent weight in volume (w/v)). (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061,...

  5. Structure of Coenzyme A-Disulfide Reductase from Staphylococcus aureus at 1.54 Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett,T.; Wallen, J.; Karplus, P.; Sakai, H.; Tsukihara, T.; Claiborne, A.

    2006-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoASH) replaces glutathione as the major low molecular weight thiol in Staphylococcus aureus; it is maintained in the reduced state by coenzyme A-disulfide reductase (CoADR), a homodimeric enzyme similar to NADH peroxidase but containing a novel Cys43-SSCoA redox center. The crystal structure of S. aureus CoADR has been solved using multiwavelength anomalous dispersion data and refined at a resolution of 1.54 {angstrom}. The resulting electron density maps define the Cys43-SSCoA disulfide conformation, with Cys43-S{gamma} located at the flavin si face, 3.2 {angstrom} from FAD-C4aF, and the CoAS- moiety lying in an extended conformation within a cleft at the dimer interface. A well-ordered chloride ion is positioned adjacent to the Cys43-SSCoA disulfide and receives a hydrogen bond from Tyr361'-OH of the complementary subunit, suggesting a role for Tyr361' as an acid-base catalyst during the reduction of CoAS-disulfide. Tyr419'-OH is located 3.2 {angstrom} from Tyr361'-OH as well and, based on its conservation in known functional CoADRs, also appears to be important for activity. Identification of residues involved in recognition of the CoAS-disulfide substrate and in formation and stabilization of the Cys43-SSCoA redox center has allowed development of a CoAS-binding motif. Bioinformatics analyses indicate that CoADR enzymes are broadly distributed in both bacterial and archaeal kingdoms, suggesting an even broader significance for the CoASH/CoAS-disulfide redox system in prokaryotic thiol/disulfide homeostasis.

  6. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  7. Mutations in domain a′ of protein disulfide isomerase affect the folding pathway of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A

    PubMed Central

    Ruoppolo, Margherita; Orrù, Stefania; Talamo, Fabio; Ljung, Johanna; Pirneskoski, Annamari; Kivirikko, Kari I.; Marino, Gennaro; Koivunen, Peppi

    2003-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI, EC 5.3.4.1), an enzyme and chaperone, catalyses disulfide bond formation and rearrangements in protein folding. It is also a subunit in two proteins, the enzyme collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase and the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein. It consists of two catalytically active domains, a and a′, and two inactive ones, b and b′, all four domains having the thioredoxin fold. Domain b′ contains the primary peptide binding site, but a′ is also critical for several of the major PDI functions. Mass spectrometry was used here to follow the folding pathway of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) in the presence of three PDI mutants, F449R, Δ455–457, and abb′, and the individual domains a and a′. The first two mutants contained alterations in the last α helix of domain a′, while the third lacked the entire domain a′. All mutants produced genuine, correctly folded RNase A, but the appearance rate of 50% of the product, as compared to wild-type PDI, was reduced 2.5-fold in the case of PDI Δ455–457, 7.5-fold to eightfold in the cases of PDI F449R and PDI abb′, and over 15-fold in the cases of the individual domains a and a′. In addition, PDI F449R and PDI abb′ affected the distribution of folding intermediates. Domains a and a′ catalyzed the early steps in the folding but no disulfide rearrangements, and therefore the rate observed in the presence of these individual domains was similar to that of the spontaneous process. PMID:12717017

  8. Interplay between disulfide bonding and N-glycosylation defines SLC4 Na+-coupled transporter extracellular topography.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quansheng; Kao, Liyo; Azimov, Rustam; Abuladze, Natalia; Newman, Debra; Kurtz, Ira

    2015-02-27

    The extracellular loop 3 (EL-3) of SLC4 Na(+)-coupled transporters contains 4 highly conserved cysteines and multiple N-glycosylation consensus sites. In the electrogenic Na(+)-HCO3(-) cotransporter NBCe1-A, EL-3 is the largest extracellular loop and is predicted to consist of 82 amino acids. To determine the structural-functional importance of the conserved cysteines and the N-glycosylation sites in NBCe1-A EL-3, we analyzed the potential interplay between EL-3 disulfide bonding and N-glycosylation and their roles in EL-3 topological folding. Our results demonstrate that the 4 highly conserved cysteines form two intramolecular disulfide bonds, Cys(583)-Cys(585) and Cys(617)-Cys(642), respectively, that constrain EL-3 in a folded conformation. The formation of the second disulfide bond is spontaneous and unaffected by the N-glycosylation state of EL-3 or the first disulfide bond, whereas formation of the first disulfide bond relies on the presence of the second disulfide bond and is affected by N-glycosylation. Importantly, EL-3 from each monomer is adjacently located at the NBCe1-A dimeric interface. When the two disulfide bonds are missing, EL-3 adopts an extended conformation highly accessible to protease digestion. This unique adjacent parallel location of two symmetrically folded EL-3 loops from each monomer resembles a domain-like structure that is potentially important for NBCe1-A function in vivo. Moreover, the formation of this unique structure is critically dependent on the finely tuned interplay between disulfide bonding and N-glycosylation in the membrane processed NBCe1-A dimer.

  9. A Disulfide Bond-forming Machine Is Linked to the Sortase-mediated Pilus Assembly Pathway in the Gram-positive Bacterium Actinomyces oris*

    PubMed Central

    Reardon-Robinson, Melissa E.; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Chang, Chungyu; Wu, Chenggang; Jooya, Neda; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2015-01-01

    Export of cell surface pilins in Gram-positive bacteria likely occurs by the translocation of unfolded precursor polypeptides; however, how the unfolded pilins gain their native conformation is presently unknown. Here, we present physiological studies to demonstrate that the FimA pilin of Actinomyces oris contains two disulfide bonds. Alanine substitution of cysteine residues forming the C-terminal disulfide bridge abrogates pilus assembly, in turn eliminating biofilm formation and polymicrobial interaction. Transposon mutagenesis of A. oris yielded a mutant defective in adherence to Streptococcus oralis, and revealed the essential role of a vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) gene in pilus assembly. Targeted deletion of vkor results in the same defects, which are rescued by ectopic expression of VKOR, but not a mutant containing an alanine substitution in its conserved CXXC motif. Depletion of mdbA, which encodes a membrane-bound thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase, abrogates pilus assembly and alters cell morphology. Remarkably, overexpression of MdbA or a counterpart from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, rescues the Δvkor mutant. By alkylation assays, we demonstrate that VKOR is required for MdbA reoxidation. Furthermore, crystallographic studies reveal that A. oris MdbA harbors a thioredoxin-like fold with the conserved CXXC active site. Consistently, each MdbA enzyme catalyzes proper disulfide bond formation within FimA in vitro that requires the catalytic CXXC motif. Because the majority of signal peptide-containing proteins encoded by A. oris possess multiple Cys residues, we propose that MdbA and VKOR constitute a major folding machine for the secretome of this organism. This oxidative protein folding pathway may be a common feature in Actinobacteria. PMID:26170452

  10. Formation of methanethiol and dimethyl disulfide in crushed tissues of broccoli florets and their inhibition by freeze-thawing.

    PubMed

    Tulio, Artemio Z; Yamanaka, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Yoshinori; Imahori, Yoshihiro

    2002-03-13

    The formation of methanethiol and dimethyl disulfide in crushed, homogenized, and frozen-thawed tissues of broccoli florets was investigated. These volatile sulfur compounds were produced in crushed florets, but their formation was inhibited in frozen-thawed tissues. Only dimethyl disulfide was formed in homogenized tissues. High pH treatment triggered the release of dimethyl disulfide in frozen-thawed tissues and also enhanced the action of cysteine sulfoxide lyase in all disrupted tissues. Methyl methanethiosulfinate and methyl methanethiosulfonate were not detected in crushed florets; thus, the favored mechanism for the formation of methanethiol and dimethyl disulfide is the chemical disproportionation of methanesulfenic acid. In contrast, the formation of dimethyl disulfide in frozen-thawed and homogenized tissues occurs from the chemical disproportionation of methyl methanethiosulfinate that was detected in these tissues. The inhibition of dimethyl disulfide production during freeze-thawing must be caused by a sudden drop in the pH of the tissue, adherence of dimethyl disulfide on the tissue surfaces, and weakening of the cysteine sulfoxide lyase activity under acidic conditions.

  11. Identification of disulfide bond formation between MitoNEET and glutamate dehydrogenase 1.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Morgan E; Crail, Jacquelyn P; Laffoon, Megan M; Fernandez, William G; Menze, Michael A; Konkle, Mary E

    2013-12-17

    MitoNEET is a protein that was identified as a drug target for diabetes, but its cellular function as well as its role in diabetes remains elusive. Protein pull-down experiments identified glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) as a potential binding partner. GDH1 is a key metabolic enzyme with emerging roles in insulin regulation. MitoNEET forms a covalent complex with GDH1 through disulfide bond formation and acts as an activator. Proteomic analysis identified the specific cysteine residues that participate in the disulfide bond. This is the first report that effectively links mitoNEET to activation of the insulin regulator GDH1.

  12. New analogs of the CART peptide with anorexigenic potency: the importance of individual disulfide bridges.

    PubMed

    Blechová, Miroslava; Nagelová, Veronika; Záková, Lenka; Demianová, Zuzana; Zelezná, Blanka; Maletínská, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    The CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript) peptide is an anorexigenic neuropeptide that acts in the hypothalamus. The receptor and the mechanism of action of this peptide are still unknown. In our previous study, we showed that the CART peptide binds specifically to PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells in both the native and differentiated into neuronal phenotype. Two biologically active forms, CART(55-102) and CART(61-102), with equal biological activity, contain three disulfide bridges. To clarify the importance of each of these disulfide bridges in maintaining the biological activity of CART(61-102), an Ala scan at particular S-S bridges forming cysteines was performed, and analogs with only one or two disulfide bridges were synthesized. In this study, a stabilized CART(61-102) analog with norleucine instead of methionine at position 67 was also prepared and was found to bind to PC12 cells with an anorexigenic potency similar to that of CART(61-102). The binding study revealed that out of all analogs tested, [Ala(68,86)]CART(61-102), which contains two disulfide bridges (positions 74-94 and 88-101), preserved a high affinity to both native PC12 cells and those that had been differentiated into neurons. In food intake and behavioral tests with mice after intracerebroventricular administration, this analog showed strong and long-lasting anorexigenic potency. Therefore, the disulfide bridge between cysteines 68 and 86 in CART(61-102) can be omitted without a loss of biological activity, but the preservation of two other disulfide bridges and the full-length peptide are essential for biological activity.

  13. Legionella pneumophila utilizes a single-player disulfide-bond oxidoreductase system to manage disulfide bond formation and isomerization.

    PubMed

    Kpadeh, Zegbeh Z; Day, Shandra R; Mills, Brandy W; Hoffman, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila uses a single homodimeric disulfide bond (DSB) oxidoreductase DsbA2 to catalyze extracytoplasmic protein folding and to correct DSB errors through protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) activity. In Escherichia coli, these functions are separated to avoid futile cycling. In L. pneumophila, DsbA2 is maintained as a mixture of disulfides (S-S) and free thiols (SH), but when expressed in E. coli, only the SH form is observed. We provide evidence to suggest that structural differences in DsbB oxidases (LpDsbB1 and LpDsbB2) and DsbD reductases (LpDsbD1 and LpDsbD2) (compared with E. coli) permit bifunctional activities without creating a futile cycle. LpdsbB1 and LpdsbB2 partially complemented an EcdsbB mutant while neither LpdsbD1 nor LpdsbD2 complemented an EcdsbD mutant unless DsbA2 was also expressed. When the dsb genes of E. coli were replaced with those of L. pneumophila, motility was restored and DsbA2 was present as a mixture of redox forms. A dominant-negative approach to interfere with DsbA2 function in L. pneumophila determined that DSB oxidase activity was necessary for intracellular multiplication and assembly/function of the Dot/Icm Type IVb secretion system. Our studies show that a single-player system may escape the futile cycle trap by limiting transfer of reducing equivalents from LpDsbDs to DsbA2.

  14. Assigning Peptide Disulfide Linkage Pattern Among Regio-Isomers via Methoxy Addition to Disulfide and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Kirt L.; Tan, Lei; Stinson, Craig A.; Love-Nkansah, Chasity B.; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Xia, Yu

    2017-02-01

    Pinpointing disulfide linkage pattern is critical in the characterization of proteins and peptides consisting of multiple disulfide bonds. Herein, we report a method based on coupling online disulfide modification and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to distinguish peptide disulfide regio-isomers. Such a method relies on a new disulfide bond cleavage reaction in solution, involving methanol as a reactant and 254 nm ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. This reaction leads to selective cleavage of a disulfide bond and formation of sulfenic methyl ester (-SOCH3) at one cysteine residue and a thiol (-SH) at the other. Under low energy collision-induced dissociation (CID), cysteine sulfenic methyl ester motif produces a signature methanol loss (-32 Da), allowing its identification from other possible isomeric structures such as S-hydroxylmethyl (-SCH2OH) and methyl sulfoxide (-S(O)-CH3). Since disulfide bond can be selectively cleaved and modified upon methoxy addition, subsequent MS2 CID of the methoxy addition product provides enhanced sequence coverage as demonstrated by the analysis of bovine insulin. More importantly, this reaction does not induce disulfide scrambling, likely due to the fact that radical intermediates are not involved in the process. An approach based on methoxy addition followed by MS3 CID has been developed for assigning disulfide linkage patterns in peptide disulfide regio-isomers. This methodology was successfully applied to characterizing peptide systems having two disulfide bonds and three disulfide linkage isomers: side-by-side, overlapped, and looped-within-a-loop configurations.

  15. Protein stabilization by introduction of cross-strand disulfides.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kausik; Thakurela, Sudhir; Prajapati, Ravindra Singh; Indu, S; Ali, P Shaik Syed; Ramakrishnan, C; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2005-11-08

    Disulfides cross-link residues in a protein that are separated in primary sequence and stabilize the protein through entropic destabilization of the unfolded state. While the removal of naturally occurring disulfides leads to protein destabilization, introduction of engineered disulfides does not always lead to significant stabilization of a protein. We have analyzed naturally occurring disulfides that span adjacent antiparallel strands of beta sheets (cross-strand disulfides). Cross-strand disulfides have recently been implicated as redox-based conformational switches in proteins such as gp120 and CD4. The propensity of these disulfides to act as conformational switches was postulated on the basis of the hypothesis that this class of disulfide is conformationally strained. In the present analysis, there was no evidence to suggest that cross-strand disulfides are more strained compared to other disulfides as assessed by their torsional energy. It was also observed that these disulfides occur solely at non-hydrogen-bonded (NHB) registered pairs of adjacent antiparallel strands and not at hydrogen-bonded (HB) positions as suggested previously. One of the half-cystines involved in cross-strand disulfide formation often occurs at an edge strand. Experimental confirmation of the stabilizing effects of such disulfides was carried out in Escherichia coli thioredoxin. Four pairs of cross-strand cysteines were introduced, two at HB and two at NHB pairs. Disulfides were formed in all four cases. However, as predicted from our analysis, disulfides at NHB positions resulted in an increase in melting temperature of 7-10 degrees C, while at HB positions there was a corresponding decrease of -7 degrees C. The reduced state of all proteins had similar stability.

  16. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  17. Target-classification approach applied to active UXO sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Shamatava, Irma; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study is designed to illustrate the discrimination performance at two UXO active sites (Oklahoma's Fort Sill and the Massachusetts Military Reservation) of a set of advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) inversion/discrimination models which include the orthonormalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS), joint diagonalization (JD), and differential evolution (DE) approaches and whose power and flexibility greatly exceed those of the simple dipole model. The Fort Sill site is highly contaminated by a mix of the following types of munitions: 37-mm target practice tracers, 60-mm illumination mortars, 75-mm and 4.5'' projectiles, 3.5'', 2.36'', and LAAW rockets, antitank mine fuzes with and without hex nuts, practice MK2 and M67 grenades, 2.5'' ballistic windshields, M2A1-mines with/without bases, M19-14 time fuzes, and 40-mm practice grenades with/without cartridges. The site at the MMR site contains targets of yet different sizes. In this work we apply our models to EMI data collected using the MetalMapper (MM) and 2 × 2 TEMTADS sensors. The data for each anomaly are inverted to extract estimates of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters associated with each buried target. (The latter include the total volume magnetic source or NVMS, which relates to size, shape, and material properties; the former includes location, depth, and orientation). The estimated intrinsic parameters are then used for classification performed via library matching and the use of statistical classification algorithms; this process yielded prioritized dig-lists that were submitted to the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) for independent scoring. The models' classification performance is illustrated and assessed based on these independent evaluations.

  18. Delicate balance of electrostatic interactions and disulfide bridges in thermostability of firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Karimzadeh, Somayeh; Moradi, Maryam; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2012-12-01

    The wild type Photinus pyralis luciferase does not have any disulfide bridge. Disulfide bridges are determinant in inherent stability of protein at moderate temperatures. Meanwhile, arginin is responsible for thermostability at higher temperatures. In this study, by concomitant introduction of disulfide bridge and a surface arginin in a mutant (A296C-A326C/I232R), the contribution of disulfide bridge introduction and surface hydrophilic residue on activity and global stability of P. pyralis luciferase is investigated. In addition to the mentioned mutant; I232R, A296C-A326C and wild type luciferases are characterized. Though addition of Arg caused stability against proteolysis but in combination with disulfide bridge resulted in decreased thermal stability compared to A296C-A326C mutant. In spite of long distance of two different mutations (A296C-A326C and I232R) from each other in the three-dimensional structure, combination of their effects on the stability of luciferase was not cumulative.

  19. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Altering Pollen Soluble Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Deborah J; Haque, Tamanna; Tudor, Richard L; Barron, Yoshimi; Zampronio, Cleidiane G; Cotton, Nicholas P J; de Graaf, Barend H J; White, Scott A; Cooper, Helen J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Harper, Jeffery F; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2017-03-01

    Protein phosphorylation regulates numerous cellular processes. Identifying the substrates and protein kinases involved is vital to understand how these important posttranslational modifications modulate biological function in eukaryotic cells. Pyrophosphatases catalyze the hydrolysis of inorganic phosphate (PPi) to inorganic phosphate Pi, driving biosynthetic reactions; they are essential for low cytosolic inorganic phosphate. It was suggested recently that posttranslational regulation of Family I soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (sPPases) may affect their activity. We previously demonstrated that two pollen-expressed sPPases, Pr-p26.1a and Pr-p26.1b, from the flowering plant Papaver rhoeas were inhibited by phosphorylation. Despite the potential significance, there is a paucity of data on sPPase phosphorylation and regulation. Here, we used liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry to map phosphorylation sites to the otherwise divergent amino-terminal extensions on these pollen sPPases. Despite the absence of reports in the literature on mapping phosphorylation sites on sPPases, a database survey of various proteomes identified a number of examples, suggesting that phosphorylation may be a more widely used mechanism to regulate these enzymes. Phosphomimetic mutants of Pr-p26.1a/b significantly and differentially reduced PPase activities by up to 2.5-fold at pH 6.8 and 52% in the presence of Ca(2+) and hydrogen peroxide over unmodified proteins. This indicates that phosphoregulation of key sites can inhibit the catalytic responsiveness of these proteins in concert with key intracellular events. As sPPases are essential for many metabolic pathways in eukaryotic cells, our findings identify the phosphorylation of sPPases as a potential master regulatory mechanism that could be used to attenuate metabolism.

  20. Evidence for segmental mobility in the active site of pepsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, J.; Strop, P.; Senn, H.; Foundling, S.; Kostka, V.

    1986-05-01

    The low hydrolytic activity (k/sub cat/ < 0.001 s/sup -1/) of chicken pepsin (CP) towards tri- and tetrapeptides is enhanced at least 100 times by modification of its single sulfhydryl group of Cys-115, with little effect on K/sub m/-values. Modification thus simulates the effect of secondary substrate binding on pepsin catalysis. The rate of Cys-115 modification is substantially decreased in the presence of some competitive inhibitors, suggesting its active site location. Experiments with CP alkylated at Cys-115 with Acrylodan as a fluorescent probe or with N-iodoacetyl-(4-fluoro)-aniline as a /sup 19/F-nmr probe suggest conformation change around Cys-115 to occur on substrate or substrate analog binding. The difference /sup 1/H-nmr spectra (500 MHz) of unmodified free and inhibitor-complexed CP reveal chemical shifts almost exclusively in the aromatic region. The effects of Cu/sup + +/ on /sup 19/F- and /sup 1/H-nmr spectra have been studied. Examination of a computer graphics model of CP based on E. parasitica pepsin-inhibitor complex X-ray coordinates suggests that Cys-115 is located near the S/sub 3//S/sub 5/ binding site. The results are interpreted in favor of segmental mobility of this region important for pepsin substrate binding and catalysis.

  1. First Principles Computational Study of the Active Site of Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Ivaylo; Klien, Micheal

    2004-01-14

    Ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to investigate the structural features of the active site of the binuclear enzyme rat liver arginase. Special emphasis was placed on the crucial role of the second shell ligand interactions. These interactions were systematically studied by performing calculations on models of varying size. It was determined that a water molecule, and not hydroxide, is the bridging exogenous ligand. The carboxylate ligands facilitate the close approach of the Mn (II) ions by attenuating the metal-metal electrostatic repulsion. Of the two metals, MnA was shown to carry a larger positive charge. Analysis of the electronic properties of the active site revealed that orbitals involving the terminal Asp234 residue, as well as the flexible -1,1 bridging Asp232, lie at high energies, suggesting weaker coordination. This is reflected in certain structural variability present in our models and is also consistent with recent experimental findings. Finally, implications of our findings for the biological function of the enzyme are delineated.

  2. C-H Activation on Co,O Sites: Isolated Surface Sites versus Molecular Analogs.

    PubMed

    Estes, Deven P; Siddiqi, Georges; Allouche, Florian; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Safonova, Olga V; Trigub, Alexander L; Koptyug, Igor V; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-11-16

    The activation and conversion of hydrocarbons is one of the most important challenges in chemistry. Transition-metal ions (V, Cr, Fe, Co, etc.) isolated on silica surfaces are known to catalyze such processes. The mechanisms of these processes are currently unknown but are thought to involve C-H activation as the rate-determining step. Here, we synthesize well-defined Co(II) ions on a silica surface using a metal siloxide precursor followed by thermal treatment under vacuum at 500 °C. We show that these isolated Co(II) sites are catalysts for a number of hydrocarbon conversion reactions, such as the dehydrogenation of propane, the hydrogenation of propene, and the trimerization of terminal alkynes. We then investigate the mechanisms of these processes using kinetics, kinetic isotope effects, isotopic labeling experiments, parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) NMR, and comparison with a molecular analog. The data are consistent with all of these reactions occurring by a common mechanism, involving heterolytic C-H or H-H activation via a 1,2 addition across a Co-O bond.

  3. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  4. The unique extracellular disulfide loop of the glycine receptor is a principal ligand binding element.

    PubMed Central

    Rajendra, S; Vandenberg, R J; Pierce, K D; Cunningham, A M; French, P W; Barry, P H; Schofield, P R

    1995-01-01

    A loop structure, formed by the putative disulfide bridging of Cys198 and Cys209, is a principal element of the ligand binding site in the glycine receptor (GlyR). Disruption of the loop's tertiary structure by Ser mutations of these Cys residues either prevented receptor assembly on the cell surface, or created receptors unable to be activated by agonists or to bind the competitive antagonist, strychnine. Mutation of residues Lys200, Tyr202 and Thr204 within this loop reduced agonist binding and channel activation sensitivities by up to 55-, 520- and 190-fold, respectively, without altering maximal current sizes, and mutations of Lys200 and Tyr202 abolished strychnine binding to the receptor. Removal of the hydroxyl moiety from Tyr202 by mutation to Phe profoundly reduced agonist sensitivity, whilst removal of the benzene ring abolished strychnine binding, thus demonstrating that Tyr202 is crucial for both agonist and antagonist binding to the GlyR. Tyr202 also influences receptor assembly on the cell surface, with only large chain substitutions (Phe, Leu and Arg, but not Thr, Ser and Ala) forming functional receptors. Our data demonstrate the presence of a second ligand binding site in the GlyR, consistent with the three-loop model of ligand binding to the ligand-gated ion channel superfamily. Images PMID:7621814

  5. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  6. Cytosolic disulfide bond formation in cells infected with large nucleocytoplasmic DNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Motti; Fass, Deborah

    2010-10-01

    Proteins that have evolved to contain stabilizing disulfide bonds generally fold in a membrane-delimited compartment in the cell [i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS)]. These compartments contain sulfhydryl oxidase enzymes that catalyze the pairing and oxidation of cysteine residues. In contrast, most proteins in a healthy cytosol are maintained in reduced form through surveillance by NADPH-dependent reductases and the lack of sulfhydryl oxidases. Nevertheless, one of the core functionalities that unify the broad and diverse set of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) is the ability to catalyze disulfide formation in the cytosol. The substrates of this activity are proteins that contribute to the assembly, structure, and infectivity of the virions. If the last common ancestor of NCLDVs was present during eukaryogenesis as has been proposed, it is interesting to speculate that viral disulfide bond formation pathways may have predated oxidative protein folding in intracellular organelles.

  7. Green polymer chemistry: Synthesis of poly(disulfide) polymers and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal-Kim, Emily Quinn

    The disulfide group is unique in that it presents a covalent bond that is easily formed and cleaved under certain biological conditions. While the ease of disulfide bond cleavage is often harnessed as a method of biodegradation, the ease of disulfide bond formation as a synthetic strategy is often overlooked. The objective this research was to synthesize poly(disulfide) polymers and disulfide crosslinked networks from a green chemistry approach. The intent of the green chemistry approach was to take advantage of the mild conditions applicable to disulfide bond synthesis from thiols. With anticipated use as biomaterials, it was also desired that the polymer materials could be degraded under biological conditions. Here, a new method of poly(disulfide) polymer synthesis is introduced which was inspired by the reaction conditions and reagents found in Nature. Ambient temperatures and aqueous mixtures were used in the new method. Hydrogen peroxide, one of the Nature's most powerful oxidizing species was used as the oxidant in the new polymerization reaction. The dithiol monomer, 3,6-dioxa-1,8-octanedithiol was first solubilized in triethylamine, which activated the thiol groups and made the monomer water soluble. At room temperature, the organic dithiol/amine solution was then mixed with dilute aqueous hydrogen peroxide (3% by weight) to make the poly(disulfide) polymers. The presence of a two phase system (organic and aqueous phases) was critical to the polymerization reaction. As the reaction progresses, a third, polymer phase appeared. At ambient temperatures and above, this phase separated from the reaction mixture and the polymer product was easily removed from the reaction solution. These polymers reach Mn > 250,000 g/mol in under two hours. Molecular weight distributions were between 1.5 and 2.0. Reactions performed in an ice bath which remain below room temperature contain high molecular weight polymers with Mn ≈ 120,000 g/mol and have a molecular weight

  8. Arginine residues on the opposite side of the active site stimulate the catalysis of ribosome depurination by ricin A chain by interacting with the P-protein stalk.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Ping; Kahn, Peter C; Kahn, Jennifer Nielsen; Grela, Przemyslaw; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2013-10-18

    Ricin inhibits protein synthesis by depurinating the α-sarcin/ricin loop (SRL). Ricin holotoxin does not inhibit translation unless the disulfide bond between the A (RTA) and B (RTB) subunits is reduced. Ricin holotoxin did not bind ribosomes or depurinate them but could depurinate free RNA. When RTA is separated from RTB, arginine residues located at the interface are exposed to the solvent. Because this positively charged region, but not the active site, is blocked by RTB, we mutated arginine residues at or near the interface of RTB to determine if they are critical for ribosome binding. These variants were structurally similar to wild type RTA but could not bind ribosomes. Their K(m) values and catalytic rates (k(cat)) for an SRL mimic RNA were similar to those of wild type, indicating that their activity was not altered. However, they showed an up to 5-fold increase in K(m) and up to 38-fold decrease in kcat toward ribosomes. These results suggest that the stalk binding stimulates the catalysis of ribosome depurination by RTA. The mutated arginines have side chains behind the active site cleft, indicating that the ribosome binding surface of RTA is on the opposite side of the surface that interacts with the SRL. We propose that stalk binding stimulates the catalysis of ribosome depurination by orienting the active site of RTA toward the SRL and thereby allows docking of the target adenine into the active site. This model may apply to the translation factors that interact with the stalk.

  9. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  10. Reduction of the secretory response to Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin by thiol and disulfide compounds. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.N.; Dunn, J.A.; Guerrant, R.L.

    1983-07-01

    We examined the effects of disulfide and thiol compounds on Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) and cyclic GMP-induced secretion. Both cystamine and cystine (disulfide compounds) reduced the secretory responses to submaximal doses of ST in suckling mice (at 0.5 mumol per mouse) and reduced ST activation of guanylate cyclase (by 33 to 73% at 1 mM). In higher doses, cystamine completely eradicated a maximally effective ST dose as well. In addition, the sulfhydryl (thiol) compounds cysteamine, cysteine, and acetylcysteine strikingly reduced the secretory response and the guanylate cyclase response to ST. Neither the disulfide nor the thiol compounds tested reduced cyclic GMP-induced secretion. These studies suggest that disulfide and thiol compounds both block ST-induced secretion before its activation of guanylate cyclase. Taken with the work of others, these findings suggest that disulfide compounds may alter the oxidation reduction state of a cell or act directly on the guanylate cyclase enzyme, whereas thiol compounds may inactivate ST itself by breaking its disulfide bridges, or it may alter guanylate cyclase activation by ST. Both families of compounds deserve further consideration among potential antisecretory agents for application in the control of ST-induced diarrhea.

  11. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  12. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  13. An active site water network in the plasminogen activator pla from Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-07-14

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 A. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  14. Highly conductive carbon black supported amorphous molybdenum disulfide for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Pengfei; Peng, Jing; Li, Jiuqiang; Zhai, Maolin

    2017-04-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a promising electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), however, the catalytic activity of reported MoS2-based materials towards HER still can't satisfy the requirement of practical application. Herein, highly conductive carbon black (CB) supported amorphous MoS2 nanocomposite is synthesized by a facile one-pot hydrothermal process. XRD and TEM analysis proves the amorphous morphology of MoS2. XPS further confirms both hexagonal and orthorhombic S ligands exist in the amorphous MoS2. Compared with crystalline MoS2, amorphous MoS2/CB shows an onset overpotential of 78 mV and current density of 470 mA cm-2 at the overpotential of 200 mV, which is even 50% higher than that of the commercial 20% Pt/C catalyst. Furthermore, a fairly stable performance can be achieved even after 5000 CV cycles. The outstanding HER activity and stability of the amorphous MoS2/CB nanocomposite can be attributed to these advantages: (1) amorphous structure offers more active sites in MoS2; (2) highly conductive CB reduces the charge transfer resistance (RCT); (3) relative hydrophilic CB can largely reduce the resistance between catalyst/electrolyte interface and allows rapid mass transport; (4) electron penetration effect between amorphous MoS2 and CB increases the intrinsic activity of amorphous MoS2 by two orders of magnitude.

  15. The alkaline earth intercalates of molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.; Samson, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide has been intercalated with calcium and strontium by means of the liquid ammonia technique. Chemical, X-ray, and superconductivity data are presented. The X-ray data reveal a lowering of crystal symmetry and increase of complexity of the structure upon intercalation with the alkaline earth metals. The Ca and Sr intercalates start to superconduct at 4 and 5.6 K, respectively, and show considerable anisotropy regarding the critical magnetic field.

  16. Spectroscopic insights into axial ligation and active-site H-bonding in substrate-bound human heme oxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jessica D; Yi, Li; Ragsdale, Stephen W; Brunold, Thomas C

    2010-09-01

    Heme oxygenases (HOs) are monooxygenases that catalyze the first step in heme degradation, converting heme to biliverdin with concomitant release of Fe(II) and CO from the porphyrin macrocycle. Two heme oxygenase isoforms, HO-1 and HO-2, exist that differ in several ways, including a complete lack of Cys residues in HO-1 and the presence of three Cys residues as part of heme-regulatory motifs (HRMs) in HO-2. HRMs in other heme proteins are thought to directly bind heme, or to otherwise regulate protein stability or activity; however, it is not currently known how the HRMs exert these effects on HO-2 function. To better understand the properties of this vital enzyme and to elucidate possible roles of its HRMs, various forms of HO-2 possessing distinct alterations to the HRMs were prepared. In this study, variants with Cys265 in a thiol form are compared with those with this residue in an oxidized (part of a disulfide bond or existing as a sulfenate moiety) form. Absorption and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopic data of these HO-2 variants clearly demonstrate that a new low-spin Fe(III) heme species characteristic of thiolate ligation is formed when Cys265 is reduced. Additionally, absorption, magnetic circular dichroism, and resonance Raman data collected at different temperatures reveal an intriguing temperature dependence of the iron spin state in the heme-HO-2 complex. These findings are consistent with the presence of a hydrogen-bonding network at the heme's distal side within the active site of HO-2 with potentially significant differences from that observed in HO-1.

  17. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  18. Characterization of the active site of ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munshi, C; Thiel, D J; Mathews, I I; Aarhus, R; Walseth, T F; Lee, H C

    1999-10-22

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase synthesizes two Ca(2+) messengers by cyclizing NAD to produce cyclic ADP-ribose and exchanging nicotinic acid with the nicotinamide group of NADP to produce nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Recombinant Aplysia cyclase was expressed in yeast and co-crystallized with a substrate, nicotinamide. x-ray crystallography showed that the nicotinamide was bound in a pocket formed in part by a conserved segment and was near the central cleft of the cyclase. Glu(98), Asn(107) and Trp(140) were within 3.5 A of the bound nicotinamide and appeared to coordinate it. Substituting Glu(98) with either Gln, Gly, Leu, or Asn reduced the cyclase activity by 16-222-fold, depending on the substitution. The mutant N107G exhibited only a 2-fold decrease in activity, while the activity of W140G was essentially eliminated. The base exchange activity of all mutants followed a similar pattern of reduction, suggesting that both reactions occur at the same active site. In addition to NAD, the wild-type cyclase also cyclizes nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide to cyclic GDP-ribose. All mutant enzymes had at least half of the GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity of the wild type, some even 2-3-fold higher, indicating that the three coordinating amino acids are responsible for positioning of the substrate but not absolutely critical for catalysis. To search for the catalytic residues, other amino acids in the binding pocket were mutagenized. E179G was totally devoid of GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity, and both its ADP-ribosyl cyclase and the base exchange activities were reduced by 10,000- and 18,000-fold, respectively. Substituting Glu(179) with either Asn, Leu, Asp, or Gln produced similar inactive enzymes, and so was the conversion of Trp(77) to Gly. However, both E179G and the double mutant E179G/W77G retained NAD-binding ability as shown by photoaffinity labeling with [(32)P]8-azido-NAD. These results indicate that both Glu(179) and Trp(77) are crucial for catalysis and

  19. Mutations inducing an active-site aperture in Rhizobium sp. sucrose isomerase confer hydrolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Alexandra; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Robert, Xavier; Rhimi, Moez; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Aghajari, Nushin

    2013-02-01

    Sucrose isomerase is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of sucrose isomers of high biotechnological and pharmaceutical interest. Owing to the complexity of the chemical synthesis of these isomers, isomaltulose and trehalulose, enzymatic conversion remains the preferred method for obtaining these products. Depending on the microbial source, the ratio of the sucrose-isomer products varies significantly. In studies aimed at understanding and explaining the underlying molecular mechanisms of these reactions, mutations obtained using a random-mutagenesis approach displayed a major hydrolytic activity. Two of these variants, R284C and F164L, of sucrose isomerase from Rhizobium sp. were therefore crystallized and their crystal structures were determined. The three-dimensional structures of these mutants allowed the identification of the molecular determinants that favour hydrolytic activity compared with transferase activity. Substantial conformational changes resulting in an active-site opening were observed, as were changes in the pattern of water molecules bordering the active-site region.

  20. Characterization and 2D NMR study of the stable [9-21, 15-27] 2 disulfide intermediate in the folding of the 3 disulfide trypsin inhibitor EETI II.

    PubMed Central

    Le-Nguyen, D.; Heitz, A.; Chiche, L.; el Hajji, M.; Castro, B.

    1993-01-01

    The three disulfide Ecballium elaterium trypsin inhibitor II (EETI II) reduction with dithiothreitol (DTT) and reoxidation of the fully reduced derivative have been examined. A common stable intermediate has been observed for both processes. Isolation and sequencing of carboxymethylated material showed that the intermediate lacks the [2-19] bridge. The NMR study showed a very strong structural conservation as compared to the native EETI II, suggesting that the bridges are the [9-21] and [15-27] native ones. The differences occurred in sections 2-7 (containing the free cysteine 2 and the Arg 4-Ile 5 active site) and 19-21 (containing the second free cysteine). Distance geometry calculations and restrained molecular dynamics refinements were also in favor of a [9-21, 15-27] arrangement and resulted in a well-conserved (7-28) segment. PMID:8443596

  1. Characterization of Sviceucin from Streptomyces Provides Insight into Enzyme Exchangeability and Disulfide Bond Formation in Lasso Peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Ducasse, Rémi; Zirah, Séverine; Blond, Alain; Goulard, Christophe; Lescop, Ewen; Giraud, Caroline; Hartke, Axel; Guittet, Eric; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Rebuffat, Sylvie

    2015-11-20

    Lasso peptides are bacterial ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides. They have sparked increasing interest in peptide-based drug development because of their compact, interlocked structure, which offers superior stability and protein-binding capacity. Disulfide bond-containing lasso peptides are rare and exhibit highly sought-after activities. In an effort to expand the repertoire of such molecules, we heterologously expressed, in Streptomyces coelicolor, the gene cluster encoding sviceucin, a type I lasso peptide with two disulfide bridges originating from Streptomyces sviceus, which allowed it to be fully characterized. Sviceucin and its reduced forms were characterized by mass spectrometry and peptidase digestion. The three-dimensional structure of sviceucin was determined using NMR. Sviceucin displayed antimicrobial activity selectively against Gram-positive bacteria and inhibition of fsr quorum sensing in Enterococcus faecalis. This study adds sviceucin to the type I lasso peptide family as a new representative. Moreover, new clusters encoding disulfide-bond containing lasso peptides from Actinobacteria were identified by genome mining. Genetic and functional analyses revealed that the formation of disulfide bonds in sviceucin does not require a pathway-encoded thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase. Most importantly, we demonstrated the functional exchangeability of the sviceucin and microcin J25 (a non-disulfide-bridged lasso peptide) macrolactam synthetases in vitro, highlighting the potential of hybrid lasso synthetases in lasso peptide engineering.

  2. Amino acid function relates to its embedded protein microenvironment: A study on disulfide-bridged cystine.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Akshay; Apostol, Marcin I; Bandyopadhyay, Debashree

    2016-11-01

    In our previous study, we have shown that the microenvironments around conserved amino acids are also conserved in protein families (Bandyopadhyay and Mehler, Proteins 2008; 72:646-659). In this study, we have hypothesized that amino acids perform similar functions when embedded in a certain type of protein microenvironment. We have tested this hypothesis on the microenvironments around disulfide-bridged cysteines from high-resolution protein crystal structures. Although such cystines mainly play structural role in proteins, in certain enzymes they participate in catalysis and redox reactions. We have performed and report a functional annotation of enzymatically active cystines to their respective microenvironments. Three protein microenvironment clusters were identified: (i) buried-hydrophobic, (ii) exposed-hydrophilic, and (iii) buried-hydrophilic. The buried-hydrophobic cluster encompasses a small group of 22 redox-active cystines, mostly in alpha-helical conformations in a -C-x-x-C- motif from the Oxido-reductase enzyme class. All these cystines have high strain energy and near identical microenvironments. Most of the active cystines in hydrolase enzyme class belong to buried hydrophilic microenvironment cluster. In total there are 34 half-cystines detected in buried hydrophilic cluster from hydrolases, as a part of enzyme active site. Even within the buried hydrophilic cluster, there is clear separation of active half-cystines between surface exposed part of the protein and protein interior. Half-cystines toward the surface exposed region are higher in number compared to those in protein interior. Apart from cystines at the active sites of the enzymes, many more half-cystines were detected in buried hydrophilic cluster those are part of the microenvironment of enzyme active sites. However, no active half-cystines were detected in extremely hydrophilic microenvironment cluster, that is, exposed hydrophilic cluster, indicating that total exposure of cystine

  3. Protein disulfide isomerase homolog TrPDI2 contributing to cellobiohydrolase production in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guokun; Lv, Pin; He, Ronglin; Wang, Haijun; Wang, Lixian; Zhang, Dongyuan; Chen, Shulin

    2015-09-01

    The majority of the cysteine residues in the secreted proteins form disulfide bonds via protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-mediated catalysis, stabilizing the enzyme activity. The role of PDI in cellulase production is speculative, as well as the possibility of PDI as a target for improving enzyme production efficiency of Trichoderma reesei, a widely used producer of enzyme for the production of lignocellulose-based biofuels and biochemicals. Here, we report that a PDI homolog, TrPDI2 in T. reesei exhibited a 36.94% and an 11.81% similarity to Aspergillus niger TIGA and T. reesei PDI1, respectively. The capability of TrPDI2 to recover the activity of reduced and denatured RNase by promoting refolding verified its protein disulfide isomerase activity. The overexpression of Trpdi2 increased the secretion and the activity of CBH1 at the early stage of cellulase induction. In addition, both the expression level and redox state of TrPDI2 responded to cellulase induction in T. reesei, providing sustainable oxidative power to ensure cellobiohydrolase maturation and production. The results suggest that TrPDI2 may contribute to cellobiohydrolase secretion by enhancing the capability of disulfide bond formation, which is essential for protein folding and maturation.

  4. Soil biotic and abiotic responses to dimethyl disulfide spot drip fumigation in established grape vines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) is a soil fumigant used in agricultural systems as an alternative to methyl bromide (MeBr) for the control of soilborne pests and pathogens. However, fumigants including DMDS that have broad biocidal activity can affect both target and non-target organisms in soil. Many bio...

  5. Electrochemical Performance of Titanium Disulfide and Molybdenum Disulfide Nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siordia, Andrew Francisco

    Composite materials are widely used in various structural applications, including within the automotive and aerospace industries. Unidirectional composite layups have replaced other materials such as metals due to composites' high strength-to-weight ratio and durability. Finite-element (FE) models are actively being developed to model response of composite systems subjected to a variety of loads including impact loads. These FE models rely on an array of measured material properties as input for accuracy. This work focuses on an orthotropic plasticity constitutive model that has three components - deformation, damage and failure. The model relies on the material properties of the composite such as Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, stress-strain curves in the principal and off-axis material directions, etc. This thesis focuses on two areas important to the development of the FE model - tabbing of the test specimens and data processing of the tests used to generate the required stress-strain curves. A comparative study has been performed on three candidate adhesives using double lap-shear testing to determine their effectiveness in composite specimen tabbing. These tests determined the 3M DP460 epoxy performs best in shear. The Loctite Superglue with 80% the ultimate stress of the 3M DP460 epoxy is acceptable when test specimens have to be ready for testing within a few hours. JB KwikWeld is not suitable for tabbing. In addition, the Experimental Data Processing (EDP) program has been improved for use in post-processing raw data from composites test. EDP has improved to allow for complete processing with the implementation of new weighted least squares smoothing options, curve averaging techniques, and new functionality for data manipulation.

  6. Active Sites of Spinoxin, a Potassium Channel Scorpion Toxin, Elucidated by Systematic Alanine Scanning.

    PubMed

    Peigneur, Steve; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Kawano, Chihiro; Nose, Takeru; Nirthanan, Selvanayagam; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam; Tytgat, Jan; Sato, Kazuki

    2016-05-31

    Peptide toxins from scorpion venoms constitute the largest group of toxins that target the voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv). Spinoxin (SPX) isolated from the venom of scorpion Heterometrus spinifer is a 34-residue peptide neurotoxin cross-linked by four disulfide bridges. SPX is a potent inhibitor of Kv1.3 potassium channels (IC50 = 63 nM), which are considered to be valid molecular targets in the diagnostics and therapy of various autoimmune disorders and cancers. Here we synthesized 25 analogues of SPX and analyzed the role of each amino acid in SPX using alanine scanning to study its structure-function relationships. All synthetic analogues showed similar disulfide bond pairings and secondary structures as native SPX. Alanine replacements at Lys(23), Asn(26), and Lys(30) resulted in loss of activity against Kv1.3 potassium channels, whereas replacements at Arg(7), Met(14), Lys(27), and Tyr(32) also largely reduced inhibitory activity. These results suggest that the side chains of these amino acids in SPX play an important role in its interaction with Kv1.3 channels. In particular, Lys(23) appears to be a key residue that underpins Kv1.3 channel inhibition. Of these seven amino acid residues, four are basic amino acids, suggesting that the positive electrostatic potential on the surface of SPX is likely required for high affinity interaction with Kv1.3 channels. This study provides insight into the structure-function relationships of SPX with implications for the rational design of new lead compounds targeting potassium channels with high potency.

  7. Diversity of the Epsilonproteobacteria Dsb (disulfide bond) systems.

    PubMed

    Bocian-Ostrzycka, Katarzyna M; Grzeszczuk, Magdalena J; Dziewit, Lukasz; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial proteins of the Dsb family-important components of the post-translational protein modification system-catalyze the formation of disulfide bridges, a process that is crucial for protein structure stabilization and activity. Dsb systems play an essential role in the assembly of many virulence factors. Recent rapid advances in global analysis of bacteria have thrown light on the enormous diversity among bacterial Dsb systems. While the Escherichia coli disulfide bond-forming system is quite well understood, the mechanisms of action of Dsb systems in other bacteria, including members of class Epsilonproteobacteria that contain pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria colonizing extremely diverse ecological niches, are poorly characterized. Here we present a review of current knowledge on Epsilonproteobacteria Dsb systems. We have focused on the Dsb systems of Campylobacter spp. and Helicobacter spp. because our knowledge about Dsb proteins of Wolinella and Arcobacter spp. is still scarce and comes mainly from bioinformatic studies. Helicobacter pylori is a common human pathogen that colonizes the gastric epithelium of humans with severe consequences. Campylobacter spp. is a leading cause of zoonotic enteric bacterial infections in most developed and developing nations. We focus on various aspects of the diversity of the Dsb systems and their influence on pathogenicity, particularly because Dsb proteins are considered as potential targets for a new class of anti-virulence drugs to treat human infections by Campylobacter or Helicobacter spp.

  8. Fragmentation of intra-peptide and inter-peptide disulfide bonds of proteolytic peptides by nanoESI collision-induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Mormann, Michael; Eble, Johannes; Schwöppe, Christian; Mesters, Rolf M; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna; Pohlentz, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    Characterisation and identification of disulfide bridges is an important aspect of structural elucidation of proteins. Covalent cysteine-cysteine contacts within the protein give rise to stabilisation of the native tertiary structure of the molecules. Bottom-up identification and sequencing of proteins by mass spectrometry most frequently involves reductive cleavage and alkylation of disulfide links followed by enzymatic digestion. However, when using this approach, information on cysteine-cysteine contacts within the protein is lost. Mass spectrometric characterisation of peptides containing intra-chain disulfides is a challenging analytical task, because peptide bonds within the disulfide loop are believed to be resistant to fragmentation. In this contribution we show recent results on the fragmentation of intra and inter-peptide disulfide bonds of proteolytic peptides by nano electrospray ionisation collision-induced dissociation (nanoESI CID). Disulfide bridge-containing peptides obtained from proteolytic digests were submitted to low-energy nanoESI CID using a quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) instrument as a mass analyser. Fragmentation of the gaseous peptide ions gave rise to a set of b and y-type fragment ions which enabled derivation of the sequence of the amino acids located outside the disulfide loop. Surprisingly, careful examination of the fragment-ion spectra of peptide ions comprising an intramolecular disulfide bridge revealed the presence of low-abundance fragment ions formed by the cleavage of peptide bonds within the disulfide loop. These fragmentations are preceded by proton-induced asymmetric cleavage of the disulfide bridge giving rise to a modified cysteine containing a disulfohydryl substituent and a dehydroalanine residue on the C-S cleavage site.

  9. Stabilization of HIV-1 gp120-CD4 Receptor Complex through Targeted Interchain Disulfide Exchange*

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Nichole; Mendelow, Barry V.; Napier, Grant B.; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A.; Killick, Mark; Khati, Makobetsa; Stevens, Wendy; Capovilla, Alexio

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 enters cells via interaction between the trimeric envelope (Env) glycoprotein gp120/gp41 and the host cell surface receptor molecule CD4. The requirement of CD4 for viral entry has rationalized the development of recombinant CD4-based proteins as competitive viral attachment inhibitors and immunotherapeutic agents. In this study, we describe a novel recombinant CD4 protein designed to bind gp120 through a targeted disulfide-exchange mechanism. According to structural models of the gp120-CD4 receptor complex, substitution of Ser60 on the CD4 domain 1 α-helix with Cys positions a thiol in proximity of the gp120 V1/V2 loop disulfide (Cys126–Cys196), satisfying the stereochemical and geometric conditions for redox exchange between CD4 Cys60 and gp120 Cys126, and the consequent formation of an interchain disulfide bond. In this study, we provide experimental evidence for this effect by describing the expression, purification, refolding, receptor binding and antiviral activity analysis of a recombinant two-domain CD4 variant containing the S60C mutation (2dCD4-S60C). We show that 2dCD4-S60C binds HIV-1 gp120 with a significantly higher affinity than wild-type protein under conditions that facilitate disulfide exchange and that this translates into a corresponding increase in the efficacy of CD4-mediated viral entry inhibition. We propose that targeted redox exchange between conserved gp120 disulfides and nucleophilic moieties positioned strategically on CD4 (or CD4-like scaffolds) conceptualizes a new strategy in the development of high affinity HIV-1 Env ligands, with important implications for therapy and vaccine development. More generally, this chalcogen substitution approach provides a general means of stabilizing receptor-ligand complexes where the structural and biophysical conditions for disulfide exchange are satisfied. PMID:20538591

  10. Site-specific PEGylation of lidamycin and its antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Shang, Boyang; Hu, Lei; Shao, Rongguang; Zhen, Yongsu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, N-terminal site-specific mono-PEGylation of the recombinant lidamycin apoprotein (rLDP) of lidamycin (LDM) was prepared using a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) derivative (Mw 20 kDa) through a reactive terminal aldehyde group under weak acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The biochemical properties of mPEG-rLDP-AE, an enediyne-integrated conjugate, were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of mPEG-rLDP-AE was evaluated by MTT assays and in xenograft model. The results indicated that mPEG-rLDP-AE showed significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. After PEGylation, mPEG-rLDP still retained the binding capability to the enediyne AE and presented the physicochemical characteristics similar to that of native LDP. It is of interest that the PEGylation did not diminish the antitumor efficacy of LDM, implying the possibility that this derivative may function as a payload to deliver novel tumor-targeted drugs. PMID:26579455

  11. Highly efficient supercapacitor electrode with two-dimensional tungsten disulfide and reduced graphene oxide hybrid nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chao-Chi; Lin, Lu-Yin; Xiao, Bing-Chang; Chen, Yu-Shiang

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures with their high surface area and large in-plane conductivity have been regarded as promising materials for supercapacitors (SCs). Tungsten disulfide (WS2) is highly suitable for charge accumulation with its abundant active sites in the interspacing between the 2D structures and the intraspacing of each atomic layer, as well as on the tungsten centers with the charges generated by the Faradaic reactions. This study proposes the preparation of well-constructed WS2/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets using a simple molten salt process as the electroactive material for SCs, which presents a high specific capacitance (CF) of 2508.07 F g-1 at the scan rate of 1 mV s-1, because of the synergic effect of WS2 with its large charge-accumulating sites on the 2D planes and RGO with its highly enhanced conductivity and improved connections in the WS2 networks. The excellent cycling stability of 98.6% retention after 5000 cycles charge/discharge process and the Coulombic efficiency close to 100% for the entire measurement are also achieved for the WS2/RGO-based SC electrode. The results suggest the potential for the combination of the 2D metal sulfide and carbon materials as the charge storage material to solve the energy problems and attain a sustainable society.

  12. Analysis of the interaction of calcitriol with the disulfide isomerase ERp57

    PubMed Central

    Gaucci, Elisa; Raimondo, Domenico; Grillo, Caterina; Cervoni, Laura; Altieri, Fabio; Nittari, Giulio; Eufemi, Margherita; Chichiarelli, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D3, can regulate the gene expression through the binding to the nuclear receptor VDR, but it can also display nongenomic actions, acting through a membrane-associated receptor, which has been discovered as the disulfide isomerase ERp57. The aim of our research is to identify the binding sites for calcitriol in ERp57 and to analyze their interaction. We first studied the interaction through bioinformatics and fluorimetric analyses. Subsequently, we focused on two protein mutants containing the predicted interaction domains with calcitriol: abb’-ERp57, containing the first three domains, and a’-ERp57, the fourth domain only. To consolidate the achievements we used the calorimetric approach to the whole protein and its mutants. Our results allow us to hypothesize that the interaction with the a’ domain contributes to a greater extent than the other potential binding sites to the dissociation constant, calculated as a Kd of about 10−9 M. PMID:27897272

  13. Analysis of the interaction of calcitriol with the disulfide isomerase ERp57

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaucci, Elisa; Raimondo, Domenico; Grillo, Caterina; Cervoni, Laura; Altieri, Fabio; Nittari, Giulio; Eufemi, Margherita; Chichiarelli, Silvia

    2016-11-01

    Calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D3, can regulate the gene expression through the binding to the nuclear receptor VDR, but it can also display nongenomic actions, acting through a membrane-associated receptor, which has been discovered as the disulfide isomerase ERp57. The aim of our research is to identify the binding sites for calcitriol in ERp57 and to analyze their interaction. We first studied the interaction through bioinformatics and fluorimetric analyses. Subsequently, we focused on two protein mutants containing the predicted interaction domains with calcitriol: abb’-ERp57, containing the first three domains, and a’-ERp57, the fourth domain only. To consolidate the achievements we used the calorimetric approach to the whole protein and its mutants. Our results allow us to hypothesize that the interaction with the a’ domain contributes to a greater extent than the other potential binding sites to the dissociation constant, calculated as a Kd of about 10‑9 M.

  14. Potential Role of Protein Disulfide Isomerase in Metabolic Syndrome-Derived Platelet Hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Renato Simões; Trostchansky, Andrés; Paes, Antonio Marcus de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) has become a worldwide epidemic, alongside with a high socioeconomic cost, and its diagnostic criteria must include at least three out of the five features: visceral obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and high fasting glucose levels. MetS shows an increased oxidative stress associated with platelet hyperactivation, an essential component for thrombus formation and ischemic events in MetS patients. Platelet aggregation is governed by the peroxide tone and the activity of Protein Disulfide Isomerase (PDI) at the cell membrane. PDI redox active sites present active cysteine residues that can be susceptible to changes in plasma oxidative state, as observed in MetS. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the relationship between PDI and platelet hyperactivation under MetS and its metabolic features, in spite of PDI being a mediator of important pathways implicated in MetS-induced platelet hyperactivation, such as insulin resistance and nitric oxide dysfunction. Thus, the aim of this review is to analyze data available in the literature as an attempt to support a possible role for PDI in MetS-induced platelet hyperactivation.

  15. Potential Role of Protein Disulfide Isomerase in Metabolic Syndrome-Derived Platelet Hyperactivity

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Renato Simões

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) has become a worldwide epidemic, alongside with a high socioeconomic cost, and its diagnostic criteria must include at least three out of the five features: visceral obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and high fasting glucose levels. MetS shows an increased oxidative stress associated with platelet hyperactivation, an essential component for thrombus formation and ischemic events in MetS patients. Platelet aggregation is governed by the peroxide tone and the activity of Protein Disulfide Isomerase (PDI) at the cell membrane. PDI redox active sites present active cysteine residues that can be susceptible to changes in plasma oxidative state, as observed in MetS. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the relationship between PDI and platelet hyperactivation under MetS and its metabolic features, in spite of PDI being a mediator of important pathways implicated in MetS-induced platelet hyperactivation, such as insulin resistance and nitric oxide dysfunction. Thus, the aim of this review is to analyze data available in the literature as an attempt to support a possible role for PDI in MetS-induced platelet hyperactivation. PMID:28053690

  16. Specific disulfide cross-linking to constrict the mobile carrier domain of nonribosomal peptide synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Tarry, Michael J.; Schmeing, T. Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases are large, multi-domain enzymes that produce peptide molecules with important biological activity such as antibiotic, antiviral, anti-tumor, siderophore and immunosuppressant action. The adenylation (A) domain catalyzes two reactions in the biosynthetic pathway. In the first reaction, it activates the substrate amino acid by adenylation and in the second reaction it transfers the amino acid onto the phosphopantetheine arm of the adjacent peptide carrier protein (PCP) domain. The conformation of the A domain differs significantly depending on which of these two reactions it is catalyzing. Recently, several structures of A–PCP di-domains have been solved using mechanism-based inhibitors to trap the PCP domain in the A domain active site. Here, we present an alternative strategy to stall the A–PCP di-domain, by engineering a disulfide bond between the native amino acid substrate and the A domain. Size exclusion studies showed a significant shift in apparent size when the mutant A–PCP was provided with cross-linking reagents, and this shift was reversible in the presence of high concentrations of reducing agent. The cross-linked protein crystallized readily in several of the conditions screened and the best crystals diffracted to ≈8 Å. PMID:25713404

  17. Allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a using Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside and its combination.

    PubMed

    Rani, Nidhi; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; P T V, Lakshmi; Arunachalam, Annamalai

    2016-08-01

    Recent crystallographic study revealed the involvement of allosteric site in active site inhibition of penicillin binding protein (PBP2a), where one molecule of Ceftaroline (Cef) binds to the allosteric site of PBP2a and paved way for the other molecule (Cef) to bind at the active site. Though Cef has the potency to inhibit the PBP2a, its adverse side effects are of major concern. Previous studies have reported the antibacterial property of Quercetin derivatives, a group of natural compounds. Hence, the present study aims to evaluate the effect of Quercetin 3-o-rutinoside (Rut) in allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a. The molecular docking studies between allosteric site and ligands (Rut, Que, and Cef) revealed a better binding efficiency (G-score) of Rut (-7.790318) and Cef (-6.194946) with respect to Que (-5.079284). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies showed significant changes at the active site in the presence of ligands (Rut and Cef) at allosteric site. Four different combinations of Rut and Cef were docked and their G-scores ranged between -6.320 and -8.623. MD studies revealed the stability of the key residue (Ser403) with Rut being at both sites, compared to other complexes. Morphological analysis through electron microscopy confirmed that combination of Rut and Cefixime was able to disturb the bacterial cell membrane in a similar fashion to that of Rut and Cefixime alone. The results of this study indicate that the affinity of Rut at both sites were equally good, with further validations Rut could be considered as an alternative for inhibiting MRSA growth.

  18. GAMMA-RADIOLYSIS OF DISULFIDES IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION. II. D-PENICILLAMINE DISULFIDE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The gamma-radiolysis of D- penicillamine disulfide (PenSSPen) in an aqueous solution has been studied under aerated and deaerated conditions. G...values were determined for the following products: penicillamine sulfinic acid (PenSO2H), penicillaminic acid (PenSO3H), beta-hydroxyvaline (PenOH), 2...amino-3-methylbut-3-enoic acid (HOOC.CH(NH2).C(CH3)=CH2), penicillamine (PenSH), penicillamine disulfide-S-monoxide (PenS(O)SPen), valine (PenH

  19. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site

    PubMed Central

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called ‘catalytic residues’ are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06181.001 PMID:25902402

  20. A split active site couples cap recognition by Dcp2 to activation

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N.; Jones, Brittnee N.; Hernandez, Gail A.; Gross, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Decapping by Dcp2 is an essential step in 5′-3′ mRNA decay. In yeast, decapping requires an open-to-closed transition in Dcp2, though the link between closure and catalysis remains elusive. Here we show using NMR that cap binds conserved residues on both the catalytic and regulatory domains of Dcp2. Lesions in the cap-binding site on the regulatory domain reduce the catalytic step two orders of magnitude and block formation of the closed state whereas Dcp1 enhances the catalytic step by a factor of ten and promotes closure. We conclude that closure occurs during the rate-limiting catalytic step of decapping, juxtaposing the cap-binding region of each domain to form a composite active site. This work suggests a model for regulation of decapping, where coactivators trigger decapping by stabilizing a labile composite active site. PMID:20711189

  1. Selective disulfide bond cleavage in gold(I) cationized polypeptide ions formed via gas-phase ion/ion cation switching.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Harsha P; O'Hair, Richard A J; McLuckey, Scott A

    2006-09-01

    Gaseous multiply protonated disulfide-linked peptides have been subjected to reactions with AuCl2(-) ions to explore the possibility of effecting cation switching of Au+ for two protons and to determine whether cationization by Au+ ions affords selective dissociation of disulfide linkages. The incorporation of Au+ into several model disulfide-linked peptides proved to be straightforward. The primary ion/ion reaction channels were proton transfer, which does not lead to Au+ incorporation, and attachment of AuCl2(-) ions to the polypeptide cation, which does incorporate Au+. Fragmentation of the attachment product, the extent of which varied with peptide and charge state, led to losses of one or more molecules of HCl and, to some extent, cleavage of polypeptides at the disulfide linkage into its two constituent chains. Collisional activation of the intact metal-ion-incorporated peptides showed cleavage of the disulfide linkage to be a major, and in some cases exclusive, process. Cations with protons as the only cationizing agents showed only small contributions from cleavage of the disulfide linkage. These results indicate that Au+ incorporation into a disulfide-linked polypeptide ion is a promising way to effect selective dissociation of disulfide bonds. Cation switching via ion/ion reactions is a convenient means for incorporating gold and is attractive because it avoids the requirement of adding metal salts to the analyte solution.

  2. Molecular Bases of Cyclic and Specific Disulfide Interchange between Human ERO1α Protein and Protein-disulfide Isomerase (PDI)*

    PubMed Central

    Masui, Shoji; Vavassori, Stefano; Fagioli, Claudio; Sitia, Roberto; Inaba, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of human cells, ERO1α and protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) constitute one of the major electron flow pathways that catalyze oxidative folding of secretory proteins. Specific and limited PDI oxidation by ERO1α is essential to avoid ER hyperoxidation. To investigate how ERO1α oxidizes PDI selectively among more than 20 ER-resident PDI family member proteins, we performed docking simulations and systematic biochemical analyses. Our findings reveal that a protruding β-hairpin of ERO1α specifically interacts with the hydrophobic pocket present in the redox-inactive PDI b′-domain through the stacks between their aromatic residues, leading to preferred oxidation of the C-terminal PDI a′-domain. ERO1α associated preferentially with reduced PDI, explaining the stepwise disulfide shuttle mechanism, first from ERO1α to PDI and then from oxidized PDI to an unfolded polypeptide bound to its hydrophobic pocket. The interaction of ERO1α with ERp44, another PDI family member protein, was also analyzed. Notably, ERO1α-dependent PDI oxidation was inhibited by a hyperactive ERp44 mutant that lacks the C-terminal tail concealing the substrate-binding hydrophobic regions. The potential ability of ERp44 to inhibit ERO1α activity may suggest its physiological role in ER redox and protein homeostasis. PMID:21398518

  3. Active site cysteine-null glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) rescues nitric oxide-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takeya; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Nakatsuji, Masatoshi; Itakura, Masanori; Kaneshige, Akihiro; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Inui, Takashi; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2016-02-29

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a homotetrameric enzyme involved in a key step of glycolysis, also has a role in mediating cell death under nitrosative stress. Our previous reports suggest that nitric oxide-induced intramolecular disulfide-bonding GAPDH aggregation, which occurs through oxidation of the active site cysteine (Cys-152), participates in a mechanism to account for nitric oxide-induced death signaling in some neurodegenerative/neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we demonstrate a rescue strategy for nitric oxide-induced cell death accompanied by GAPDH aggregation in a mutant with a substitution of Cys-152 to alanine (C152A-GAPDH). Pre-incubation of purified wild-type GAPDH with C152A-GAPDH under exposure to nitric oxide inhibited wild-type GAPDH aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro. Several lines of structural analysis revealed that C152A-GAPDH extensively interfered with nitric oxide-induced GAPDH-amyloidogenesis. Overexpression of doxycycline-inducible C152A-GAPDH in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma significantly rescued nitric oxide-induced death, concomitant with the decreased formation of GAPDH aggregates. Further, both co-immunoprecipitation assays and simulation models revealed a heterotetramer composed of one dimer each of wild-type GAPDH and C152A-GAPDH. These results suggest that the C152A-GAPDH mutant acts as a dominant-negative molecule against GAPDH aggregation via the formation of this GAPDH heterotetramer. This study may contribute to a new therapeutic approach utilizing C152A-GAPDH against brain damage in nitrosative stress-related disorders.

  4. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry as a Tool for the Structural Characterization of Peptides Bearing Intramolecular Disulfide Bond(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massonnet, Philippe; Haler, Jean R. N.; Upert, Gregory; Degueldre, Michel; Morsa, Denis; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Mourier, Gilles; Gilles, Nicolas; Quinton, Loïc; De Pauw, Edwin

    2016-10-01

    Disulfide bonds are post-translationnal modifications that can be crucial for the stability and the biological activities of natural peptides. Considering the importance of these disulfide bond-containing peptides, the development of new techniques in order to characterize these modifications is of great interest. For this purpose, collision cross cections (CCS) of a large data set of 118 peptides (displaying various sequences) bearing zero, one, two, or three disulfide bond(s) have been measured in this study at different charge states using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. From an experimental point of view, CCS differences (ΔCCS) between peptides bearing various numbers of disulfide bonds and peptides having no disulfide bonds have been calculated. The ΔCCS calculations have also been applied to peptides bearing two disulfide bonds but different cysteine connectivities (Cys1-Cys2/Cys3-Cys4; Cys1-Cys3/Cys2-Cys4; Cys1-Cys4/Cys2-Cys3). The effect of the replacement of a proton by a potassium adduct on a peptidic structure has also been investigated.

  5. Roles of tryptophan residue and disulfide bond in the variable lid region of oxidized polyvinyl alcohol hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Liu, Long; Li, Jianghua; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Chen, Jian; Guo, Rey-Ting; Du, Guocheng

    2014-09-26

    Oxidized polyvinyl alcohol hydrolase (OPH) catalyzes the cleavage of C-C bond in β-diketone. It belongs to the α/β-hydrolase family and contains a unique lid region that covers the active site. The lid is the most variable region when pOPH from Pseudomonas sp. VM15C and sOPH from Sphingopyxis sp. 113P3 are compared. The wild-type enzymes and the pOPH mutants W255A, W255Y and W255F were analyzed for lipase activity by using p-nitrophenyl (pNP) esters as the substrates. The wild-type enzymes showed increased Km and decreased kcat/Km with the acyl chain length, and the mutants showed reduced kcat/Km for pNP acetate, indicating the importance of Trp255 in sequestering the active site from solvent. The significantly lower activity for pNP butyrate can be a result of product inhibition, as suggested by the complex crystal structures, in which butyric acid, DMSO or PEG occupied the same substrate-binding cleft. The mutant activity was retained with pNP caprylate and pNP laurate as the substrates, reflecting the amphipathic nature of the cleft. Moreover, the disulfide bond formation of Cys257/267 is important for the activity of pOPH, but it is not essential for sOPH, which has a shorter lid structure.

  6. Characterization of Active Site Residues of Nitroalkane Oxidase†

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Michael P.; Fenny, Nana S.; Ali, Shah R.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of primary and secondary nitrolkanes to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones plus nitrite. The structure of the enzyme shows that Serl71 forms a hydrogen bond to the flavin N5, suggesting that it plays a role in catalysis. Cys397 and Tyr398 were previously identified by chemical modification as potential active site residues. To more directly probe the roles of these residues, the S171A, S171V, S171T, C397S, and Y398F enzymes have been characterized with nitroethane as substrate. The C397S and Y398 enzymes were less stable than the wild-type enzyme, and the C397S enzyme routinely contained a substoichiometric amount of FAD. Analysis of the steady-state kinetic parameters for the mutant enzymes, including deuterium isotope effects, establishes that all of the mutations result in decreases in the rate constants for removal of the substrate proton by ~5-fold and decreases in the rate constant for product release of ~2-fold. Only the S171V and S171T mutations alter the rate constant for flavin oxidation. These results establish that these residues are not involved in catalysis, but rather are required for maintaining the protein structure. PMID:20056514

  7. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  8. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems.

  9. The Plastid Casein Kinase 2 Phosphorylates Rubisco Activase at the Thr-78 Site but Is Not Essential for Regulation of Rubisco Activation State

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Y.; Bender, Kyle W.; Walker, Berkley J.; Zielinski, Raymond E.; Spalding, Martin H.; Ort, Donald R.; Huber, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Rubisco activase (RCA) is essential for the activation of Rubisco, the carboxylating enzyme of photosynthesis. In Arabidopsis, RCA is composed of a large RCAα and small RCAβ isoform that are formed by alternative splicing of a single gene (At2g39730). The activity of Rubisco is controlled in response to changes in irradiance by regulation of RCA activity, which is known to involve a redox-sensitive disulfide bond located in the carboxy-terminal extension of the RCAα subunit. Additionally, phosphorylation of RCA threonine-78 (Thr-78) has been reported to occur in the dark suggesting that phosphorylation may also be associated with dark-inactivation of RCA and deactivation of Rubisco. In the present study, we developed site-specific antibodies to monitor phosphorylation of RCA at the Thr-78 site and used non-reducing SDS-PAGE to monitor the redox status of the RCAα subunit. By immunoblotting, phosphorylation of both RCA isoforms occurred at low light and in the dark and feeding peroxide or DTT to leaf segments indicated that redox status of the chloroplast stroma was a critical factor controlling RCA phosphorylation. Use of a knockout mutant identified the plastid-targeted casein kinase 2 (cpCK2α) as the major protein kinase involved in RCA phosphorylation. Studies with recombinant cpCK2α and synthetic peptide substrates identified acidic residues at the –1, +2, and +3 positions surrounding Thr-78 as strong positive recognition elements. The cpck2 knockout mutant had strongly reduced phosphorylation at the Thr-78 site but was similar to wild type plants in terms of induction kinetics of photosynthesis following transfer from darkness or low light to high light, suggesting that if phosphorylation of RCA Thr-78 plays a direct role it would be redundant to redox regulation for control of Rubisco activation state under normal conditions. PMID:27064346

  10. Selective disulfide reduction for labeling and enhancement of Fab antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Kirley, Terence L; Greis, Kenneth D; Norman, Andrew B

    2016-11-25

    Many methods have been developed for chemical labeling and enhancement of the properties of antibodies and their common fragments, including the Fab and F(ab')2 fragments. Somewhat selective reduction of some antibody disulfide bonds has been previously achieved, yielding antibodies and antibody fragments that can be labeled at defined sites, enhancing their utility and properties. Selective reduction of the two hinge disulfide bonds present in F(ab')2 fragments using mild reduction has been useful. However, such reduction is often not quantitative and results in the reduction of multiple disulfide bonds, and therefore subsequent multiple labeling or conjugation sites are neither homogenous nor stoichiometric. Here, a simple and efficient selective reduction of the single disulfide bond linking the partial heavy chain and the intact light chain which compose the Fab fragment is accomplished utilizing tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) immobilized on agarose beads. The resultant reduced cysteine residues were labeled with several cysteine-selective fluorescent reagents, as well as by cysteine-directed PEGylation. These two cysteine residues can also be re-ligated by means of a bifunctional cysteine cross-linking agent, dibromobimane, thereby both restoring a covalent linkage between the heavy and light chains at this site, far removed from the antigen binding site, and also introducing a fluorescent probe. There are many other research and clinical uses for these selectively partially reduced Fab fragments, including biotinylation, toxin and drug conjugation, and incorporation of radioisotopes, and this technique enables simple generation of very useful Fab fragment derivatives with many potential applications.

  11. Assigning Peptide Disulfide Linkage Pattern Among Regio-Isomers via Methoxy Addition to Disulfide and Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Durand, Kirt L; Tan, Lei; Stinson, Craig A; Love-Nkansah, Chasity B; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Xia, Yu

    2017-02-13

    Pinpointing disulfide linkage pattern is critical in the characterization of proteins and peptides consisting of multiple disulfide bonds. Herein, we report a method based on coupling online disulfide modification and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to distinguish peptide disulfide regio-isomers. Such a method relies on a new disulfide bond cleavage reaction in solution, involving methanol as a reactant and 254 nm ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. This reaction leads to selective cleavage of a disulfide bond and formation of sulfenic methyl ester (-SOCH3) at one cysteine residue and a thiol (-SH) at the other. Under low energy collision-induced dissociation (CID), cysteine sulfenic methyl ester motif produces a signature methanol loss (-32 Da), allowing its identification from other possible isomeric structures such as S-hydroxylmethyl (-SCH2OH) and methyl sulfoxide (-S(O)-CH3). Since disulfide bond can be selectively cleaved and modified upon methoxy addition, subsequent MS(2) CID of the methoxy addition product provides enhanced sequence coverage as demonstrated by the analysis of bovine insulin. More importantly, this reaction does not induce disulfide scrambling, likely due to the fact that radical intermediates are not involved in the process. An approach based on methoxy addition followed by MS(3) CID has been developed for assigning disulfide linkage patterns in peptide disulfide regio-isomers. This methodology was successfully applied to characterizing peptide systems having two disulfide bonds and three disulfide linkage isomers: side-by-side, overlapped, and looped-within-a-loop configurations. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Carbon disulfide assisted polymerization of benzene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Li, Zhanlong; Men, Zhiwei; Gao, Shuqin; Li, Zuowei; Lu, Guohui; Sun, Chenglin

    2012-03-01

    The chemical transformation of benzene (C(6)H(6)) and carbon disulfide (CS(2)) binary solution under high pressure condition is investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy up to 6.8 GPa. On increasing the pressure, all the Raman bands of benzene decrease in intensity, whereas new broad bands start to be observed at 1520 and 1450 cm(-1), indicating that a highly cross-linked polymer is formed. The recovered sample is analyzed through Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy and is identified as a saturated hydrocarbon and element sulfur.

  13. Crystallographic studies evidencing the high energy tolerance to disrupting the interface disulfide bond of thioredoxin 1 from white leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Campos-Acevedo, Adam A; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2014-12-15

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a small 12-kDa redox protein that catalyzes the reduction of disulfide bonds in proteins from different biological systems. A recent study of the crystal structure of white leg shrimp thioredoxin 1 from Litopenaeus vannamei (LvTrx) revealed a dimeric form of the protein mediated by a covalent link through a disulfide bond between Cys73 from each monomer. In the present study, X-ray-induced damage in the catalytic and the interface disulfide bond of LvTrx was studied at atomic resolution at different transmission energies of 8% and 27%, 12.8 keV at 100 K in the beamline I-24 at Diamond Light Source. We found that at an absorbed dose of 32 MGy, the X-ray induces the cleavage of the disulfide bond of each catalytic site; however, the interface disulfide bond was cleaved at an X-ray adsorbed dose of 85 MGy; despite being the most solvent-exposed disulfide bond in LvTrx (~50 Å2). This result clearly established that the interface disulfide bond is very stable and, therefore, less susceptible to being reduced by X-rays. In fact, these studies open the possibility of the existence in solution of a dimeric LvTrx.

  14. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  15. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  16. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  17. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  18. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  19. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  20. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  1. Robotics and Automation Activities at the Savannah River Site: A Site Report for SUBWOG 39F

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.

    1995-09-28

    The Savannah River Site has successfully used robots, teleoperators, and remote video to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, improve worker safety, and improve the quality of operations. Previous reports have described the use of mobile teleoperators in coping with a high level liquid waste spill, the removal of highly contaminated equipment, and the inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. This report will cover recent applications at the Savannah River, as well as systems which SRS has delivered to other DOE site customers.

  2. GAS HYDRATES AT TWO SITES OF AN ACTIVE CONTINENTAL MARGIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart on the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m.

  3. Lidar research activities and observations at NARL site, Gadanki, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellapragada, Bhavani Kumar

    2016-05-01

    The National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), a unit of Department of Space (DOS), located at Gadanki village (13.5°N, 79.2°E, 370 m AMSL) in India, is involved in the development of lidar remote sensing technologies for atmospheric research. Several advanced lidar technologies employing micropulse, polarization, Raman and scanning have been developed at this site and demonstrated for atmospheric studies during the period between 2008 and 2015. The technology of micropulse lidar, operates at 532 nm wavelength, was successfully transferred to an industry and the commercial version has been identified for Indian Lidar network (I-LINK) programme. Under this lidar network activity, several lidar units were installed at different locations in India to study tropospheric aerosols and clouds. The polarization sensitive lidar technology was realized using a set of mini photomultiplier tube (PMT) units and has the capability to operate during day and night without a pause. The lidar technology uses a compact flashlamp pumped Qswitched laser and employs biaxial configuration between the transmitter and receiver units. The lidar technology has been utilized for understanding the polarization characteristics of boundary layer aerosols during the mixed layer development. The demonstrated Raman lidar technology, uses the third harmonic wavelength of Nd:YAG laser, provides the altitude profiles of aerosol backscattering, extinction and water vapor covering the boundary layer range and allows operation during nocturnal periods. The Raman lidar derived height profiles of aerosol backscattering and extinction coefficient, lidar ratio, and watervapor mixing ratio inform the tropical boundary layer aerosol characteristics. The scanning lidar technology uses a near infrared laser wavelength for probing the lower atmosphere and has been utilized for high resolution cloud profiling during convective periods. The lidar technology is also used for rain rate measurement during

  4. Dynamically achieved active site precision in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes' enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme-substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C-H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed.

  5. Selective and efficient electrochemical biosensing of ultrathin molybdenum disulfide sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Tharangattu N.; Vusa, Chiranjeevi S. R.; Alwarappan, Subbiah

    2014-08-01

    Atomically thin molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) sheets were synthesized and isolated via solvent-assisted chemical exfoliation. The charge-dependent electrochemical activities of these MoS2 sheets were studied using positively charged hexamine ruthenium (III) chloride and negatively charged ferricyanide/ferrocyanide redox probes. Ultrathin MoS2 sheet-based electrodes were employed for the electrochemical detection of an important neurotransmitter, namely dopamine (DA), in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA). MoS2 electrodes were identified as being capable of distinguishing the coexistence of the DA and the AA with an excellent stability. Moreover, the enzymatic detection of the glucose was studied by immobilizing glucose oxidase on the MoS2. This study opens enzymatic and non-enzymatic electrochemical biosensing applications of atomic MoS2 sheets, which will supplement their established electronic applications.

  6. Direct evidence that two cysteines in the dopamine transporter form a disulfide bond.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Wei, Hua; Hill, Erik R; Chen, Lucy; Jiang, Liying; Han, Dawn D; Gu, Howard H

    2007-04-01

    We have generated a fully functional dopamine transporter (DAT) mutant (dmDATx7) with all cysteines removed except the two cysteines in extracellular loop 2 (EL2). Random mutagenesis at either or both EL2 cysteines did not produce any functional transporter mutants, suggesting that the two cysteines cannot be replaced by any other amino acids. The cysteine-specific reagent MTSEA-biotin labeled dmDATx7 only after a DTT treatment which reduces disulfide bond. Since there are no other cysteines in dmDATx7, the MTSEA-biotin labeling must be on the EL2 cysteines made available by the DTT treatment. This result provides the first direct evidence that the EL2 cysteines form a disulfide bond. Interestingly, the DTT treatment had little effect on transport activity suggesting that the disulfide bond is not necessary for the uptake function of DAT. Our results and previous results are consistent with the notion that the disulfide bond between EL2 cysteines is required for DAT biosynthesis and/or its delivery to the cell surface.

  7. Atypical protein disulfide isomerases (PDI): Comparison of the molecular and catalytic properties of poplar PDI-A and PDI-M with PDI-L1A

    PubMed Central

    Selles, Benjamin; Zannini, Flavien; Couturier, Jérémy; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerases are overwhelmingly multi-modular redox catalysts able to perform the formation, reduction or isomerisation of disulfide bonds. We present here the biochemical characterization of three different poplar PDI isoforms. PDI-A is characterized by a single catalytic Trx module, the so-called a domain, whereas PDI-L1a and PDI-M display an a-b-b’-a’ and a°-a-b organisation respectively. Their activities have been tested in vitro using purified recombinant proteins and a series of model substrates as insulin, NADPH thioredoxin reductase, NADP malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH), peroxiredoxins or RNase A. We demonstrated that PDI-A exhibited none of the usually reported activities, although the cysteines of the WCKHC active site signature are able to form a disulfide with a redox midpoint potential of -170 mV at pH 7.0. The fact that it is able to bind a [Fe2S2] cluster upon Escherichia coli expression and anaerobic purification might indicate that it does not have a function in dithiol-disulfide exchange reactions. The two other proteins were able to catalyze oxidation or reduction reactions, PDI-L1a being more efficient in most cases, except that it was unable to activate the non-physiological substrate NADP-MDH, in contrast to PDI-M. To further evaluate the contribution of the catalytic domains of PDI-M, the dicysteinic motifs have been independently mutated in each a domain. The results indicated that the two a domains seem interconnected and that the a° module preferentially catalyzed oxidation reactions whereas the a module catalyzed reduction reactions, in line with the respective redox potentials of -170 mV and -190 mV at pH 7.0. Overall, these in vitro results illustrate that the number and position of a and b domains influence the redox properties and substrate recognition (both electron donors and acceptors) of PDI which contributes to understand why this protein family expanded along evolution. PMID:28362814

  8. Active-site zinc ligands and activated H2O of zinc enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Vallee, B L; Auld, D S

    1990-01-01

    The x-ray crystallographic structures of 12 zinc enzymes have been chosen as standards of reference to identify the ligands to the catalytic and structural zinc atoms of other members of their respective enzyme families. Universally, H2O is a ligand and critical component of the catalytically active zinc sites. In addition, three protein side chains bind to the catalytic zinc atom, whereas four protein ligands bind to the structural zinc atom. The geometry and coordination number of zinc can vary greatly to accommodate particular ligands. Zinc forms complexes with nitrogen and oxygen just as readily as with sulfur, and this is reflected in catalytic zinc sites having a binding frequency of His much greater than Glu greater than Asp = Cys, three of which bind to the metal atom. The systematic spacing between the ligands is striking. For all catalytic zinc sites except the coenzyme-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase, the first two ligands are separated by a "short-spacer" consisting of 1 to 3 amino acids. These ligands are separated from the third ligand by a "long spacer" of approximately 20 to approximately 120 amino acids. The spacer enables formation of a primary bidentate zinc complex, whereas the long spacer contributes flexibility to the coordination sphere, which can poise the zinc for catalysis as well as bring other catalytic and substrate binding groups into apposition with the active site. The H2O is activated by ionization, polarization, or poised for displacement. Collectively, the data imply that the preferred mechanistic pathway for activating the water--e.g., zinc hydroxide or Lewis acid catalysis--will be determined by the identity of the other three ligands and their spacing. Images PMID:2104979

  9. Converting a Sulfenic Acid Reductase into a Disulfide Bond Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Chatelle, Claire; Kraemer, Stéphanie; Ren, Guoping; Chmura, Hannah; Marechal, Nils; Boyd, Dana; Roggemans, Caroline; Ke, Na; Riggs, Paul; Bardwell, James

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Posttranslational formation of disulfide bonds is essential for the folding of many secreted proteins. Formation of disulfide bonds in a protein with more than two cysteines is inherently fraught with error and can result in incorrect disulfide bond pairing and, consequently, misfolded protein. Protein disulfide bond isomerases, such as DsbC of Escherichia coli, can recognize mis-oxidized proteins and shuffle the disulfide bonds of the substrate protein into their native folded state. Results: We have developed a simple blue/white screen that can detect disulfide bond isomerization in vivo, using a mutant alkaline phosphatase (PhoA*) in E. coli. We utilized this screen to isolate mutants of the sulfenic acid reductase (DsbG) that allowed this protein to act as a disulfide bond isomerase. Characterization of the isolated mutants in vivo and in vitro allowed us to identify key amino acid residues responsible for oxidoreductase properties of thioredoxin-like proteins such as DsbC or DsbG. Innovation and Conclusions: Using these key residues, we also identified and characterized interesting environmental homologs of DsbG with novel properties, thus demonstrating the capacity of this screen to discover and elucidate mechanistic details of in vivo disulfide bond isomerization. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 945–957. PMID:26191605

  10. 46 CFR 151.50-41 - Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). 151.50-41 Section... CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-41 Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). (a) All openings shall be in the top of the tank. (b) Loading lines...

  11. 46 CFR 151.50-41 - Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). 151.50-41 Section... CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-41 Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). (a) All openings shall be in the top of the tank. (b) Loading lines...

  12. 46 CFR 151.50-41 - Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). 151.50-41 Section... CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-41 Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). (a) All openings shall be in the top of the tank. (b) Loading lines...

  13. 46 CFR 151.50-41 - Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). 151.50-41 Section... CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-41 Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide). (a) All openings shall be in the top of the tank. (b) Loading lines...

  14. Disulfide bond cleavage in TEMPO-free radical initiated peptide sequencing mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minhee; Lee, Younjin; Kang, Minhyuk; Park, Hyeyeon; Seong, Yeonmi; Sung, Bong June; Moon, Bongjin; Oh, Han Bin

    2011-08-01

    The gas-phase free radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) fragmentation behavior of o-TEMPO-Bz-conjugated peptides with an intra- and intermolecular disulfide bond was investigated using MS(n) tandem mass spectrometry experiments. Investigated peptides included four peptides with an intramolecular cyclic disulfide bond, Bactenecin (RLCRIVVIRVCR), TGF-α (CHSGYVGVRC), MCH (DFDMLRCMLGRVFRPCWQY) and Adrenomedullin (16-31) (CRFGTCTVQKLAHQIY), and two peptides with an intermolecular disulfide bond. Collisional activation of the benzyl radical conjugated peptide cation, which was generated through the release of a TEMPO radical from o-TEMPO-Bz-conjugated peptides upon initial collisional activation, produced a large number of peptide backbone fragments in which the S-S or C-S bond was readily cleaved. The observed peptide backbone fragments included a-, c-, x- or z-types, which indicates that the radical-driven peptide fragmentation mechanism plays an important role in TEMPO-FRIPS mass spectrometry. FRIPS application of the linearly linked disulfide peptides further showed that the S-S or C-S bond was selectively and preferentially cleaved, followed by peptide backbone dissociations. In the FRIPS mass spectra, the loss of •SH or •SSH was also abundantly found. On the basis of these findings, FRIPS fragmentation pathways for peptides with a disulfide bond are proposed. For the cleavage of the S-S bond, the abstraction of a hydrogen atom at C(β) by the benzyl radical is proposed to be the initial radical abstraction/transfer reaction. On the other hand, H-abstraction at C(α) is suggested to lead to C-S bond cleavage, which yields [ion ± S] fragments or the loss of •SH or •SSH.

  15. Characterization of an alternative low energy fold for bovine α-lactalbumin formed by disulfide bond shuffling.

    PubMed

    Lewney, Sarah; Smith, Lorna J

    2012-03-01

    Bovine α-lactalbumin (αLA) forms a misfolded disulfide bond shuffled isomer, X-αLA. This X-αLA isomer contains two native disulfide bridges (Cys 6-Cys 120 and Cys 28-Cys 111) and two non-native disulfide bridges (Cys 61-Cys 73 and Cys 77-Cys 91). MD simulations have been used to characterize the X-αLA isomer and its formation via disulfide bond shuffling and to compare it with the native fold of αLA. In the simulations of the X-αLA isomer the structure of the α-domain of native αLA is largely retained in agreement with experimental data. However, there are significant rearrangements in the β-domain, including the loss of the native β-sheet and calcium binding site. Interestingly, the energies of X-αLA and native αLA in simulations in the absence of calcium are closely similar. Thus, the X-αLA isomer represents a different low energy fold for the protein. Calcium binding to native αLA is shown to help preserve the structure of the β-domain of the protein limiting possibilities for disulfide bond shuffling. Hence, binding calcium plays an important role in both maintaining the native structure of αLA and providing a mechanism for distinguishing between folded and misfolded species.

  16. Stabilizing the integrin alpha M inserted domain in alternative conformations with a range of engineered disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Shimaoka, Motomu; Lu, Chafen; Salas, Azucena; Xiao, Tsan; Takagi, Junichi; Springer, Timothy A

    2002-12-24

    Conformational movement of the C-terminal alpha7 helix in the integrin inserted (I) domain, a major ligand-binding domain that adopts an alpha/beta Rossmann fold, has been proposed to allosterically regulate ligand-binding activity. Disulfide bonds were engineered here to reversibly lock the position of the alpha7 helix in one of two alternative conformations seen in crystal structures, termed open and closed. Our results show that pairs of residues with Cbeta atoms farther apart than optimal for disulfide bond stereochemistry can be successfully replaced by cysteine, suggesting that backbone movement accommodates disulfide formation. We also find more success with substituting partially exposed than buried residues. Disulfides stabilizing the open conformation resulted in constitutively active alphaMbeta2 heterodimers and isolated alphaM inserted domains, which were reverted to an inactive form by dithiothreitol reduction. By contrast, a disulfide stabilizing the closed conformation resulted in inactive alphaMbeta2 that was resistant to activation but became activatable after dithiothreitol treatment.

  17. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  18. Patagonfibrase modifies protein expression of tissue factor and protein disulfide isomerase in rat skin.

    PubMed

    Peichoto, María Elisa; Santoro, Marcelo Larami

    2016-09-01

    Patagonfibrase is a hemorrhagic metalloproteinase isolated from the venom of the South American rear-fanged snake Philodryas patagoniensis, and is an important contributor to local lesions inflicted by this species. The tissue factor (TF)-factor VIIa complex, besides triggering the coagulation cascade, has been demonstrated to be involved in inflammatory events. Our aim was to determine whether patagonfibrase affects the expression of TF and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an enzyme that controls TF biological activity, at the site of patagonfibrase injection, and thus if they may play a role in hemostatic and inflammatory events induced by snake venoms. Patagonfibrase (60 μg/kg) was administered s.c. to rats, and after 3 h blood was collected to evaluate hemostasis parameters, and skin fragments close to the site of injection were taken to assess TF and PDI expression. Patagonfibrase did not alter blood cell counts, plasma fibrinogen levels, or levels of TF activity in plasma. However, by semiquantitative Western blotting, patagonfibrase increased TF expression by 2-fold, and decreased PDI expression by 3-fold in skin samples. In agreement, by immunohistochemical analyses, prominent TF expression was observed in the subcutaneous tissue. Thus, patagonfibrase affects the local expression of TF and PDI without inducing any systemic hemostatic disturbance, although that they may be involved in the local inflammatory events induced by hemorrhagic metalloproteinases. Once antivenom therapy is not totally effective to treat the local injury induced by snake venoms, modulation of the activity and expression of TF and/or PDI might become a strategy for treating snake envenomation.

  19. The yeast regulator of transcription protein Rtr1 lacks an active site and phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kehui; Manley, James L; Tong, Liang

    2012-07-10

    The activity of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is controlled in part by the phosphorylation state of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Recent reports have suggested that yeast regulator of transcription protein, Rtr1, and its human homologue RPAP2, possess Pol II CTD Ser5 phosphatase activity. Here we report the crystal structure of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1, which reveals a new type of zinc finger protein and does not have any close structural homologues. Importantly, the structure does not show evidence of an active site, and extensive experiments to demonstrate its CTD phosphatase activity have been unsuccessful, suggesting that Rtr1 has a non-catalytic role in CTD dephosphorylation.

  20. The Structure of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor-4E from Wheat Reveals a Novel Disulfide Bond

    SciTech Connect

    Monzingo,A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dutt-Chaudhuri, A.; Lyon, A.; Sadow, J.; Hoffman, D.; Robertus, J.; Browning, K.

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor-4E (eIF4E) recognizes and binds the m{sup 7} guanosine nucleotide at the 5' end of eukaryotic messenger RNAs; this protein-RNA interaction is an essential step in the initiation of protein synthesis. The structure of eIF4E from wheat (Triticum aestivum) was investigated using a combination of x-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. The overall fold of the crystallized protein was similar to eIF4E from other species, with eight {beta}-strands, three {alpha}-helices, and three extended loops. Surprisingly, the wild-type protein did not crystallize with m{sup 7}GTP in its binding site, despite the ligand being present in solution; conformational changes in the cap-binding loops created a large cavity at the usual cap-binding site. The eIF4E crystallized in a dimeric form with one of the cap-binding loops of one monomer inserted into the cavity of the other. The protein also contained an intramolecular disulfide bridge between two cysteines (Cys) that are conserved only in plants. A Cys-to-serine mutant of wheat eIF4E, which lacked the ability to form the disulfide, crystallized with m{sup 7}GDP in its binding pocket, with a structure similar to that of the eIF4E-cap complex of other species. NMR spectroscopy was used to show that the Cys that form the disulfide in the crystal are reduced in solution but can be induced to form the disulfide under oxidizing conditions. The observation that the disulfide-forming Cys are conserved in plants raises the possibility that their oxidation state may have a role in regulating protein function. NMR provided evidence that in oxidized eIF4E, the loop that is open in the ligand-free crystal dimer is relatively flexible in solution. An NMR-based binding assay showed that the reduced wheat eIF4E, the oxidized form with the disulfide, and the Cys-to-serine mutant protein each bind m{sup 7}GTP in a similar and labile manner, with dissociation rates in the range of 20

  1. Purely heterometallic lanthanide(III) macrocycles through controlled assembly of disulfide bonds for dual color emission.

    PubMed

    Lewis, David J; Glover, Peter B; Solomons, Melissa C; Pikramenou, Zoe

    2011-02-02

    Lanthanide complexes based on bis(amides) of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid with thiol functionalities are modified with 2,2'-dipyridyl disulfide to give activated complexes that can selectively react with thiol-functionalized complexes to form heterometallic lanthanide macrocycles. The preparation and full characterization of the polyaminocarboxylate ligands N,N''-bis[p-thiophenyl(aminocarbonyl)]diethylenetriamine-N,N',N''-triacetic acid (H(3)L(x)) and the activated N,N''-bis[p-(pyridyldithio)[phenyl(aminocarbonyl)

  2. Early events in the disulfide-coupled folding of BPTI.

    PubMed Central

    Bulaj, G.; Goldenberg, D. P.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies of the refolding of reduced bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) have shown that a previously unidentified intermediate with a single disulfide is formed much more rapidly than any other one-disulfide species. This intermediate contains a disulfide that is present in the native protein (between Cys14 and 38), but it is thermodynamically less stable than the other two intermediates with single native disulfides. To characterize the role of the [14-38] intermediate and the factors that favor its formation, detailed kinetic and mutational analyses of the early disulfide-formation steps were carried out. The results of these studies indicate that the formation of [14-38] from the fully reduced protein is favored by both local electrostatic effects, which enhance the reactivities of the Cys14 and 38 thiols, and conformational tendencies that are diminished by the addition of urea and are enhanced at lower temperatures. At 25 degrees C and pH 7.3, approximately 35% of the reduced molecules were found to initially form the 14-38 disulfide, but the majority of these molecules then undergo intramolecular rearrangements to generate non-native disulfides, and subsequently the more stable intermediates with native disulfides. Amino acid replacements, other than those involving Cys residues, were generally found to have only small effects on either the rate of forming [14-38] or its thermodynamic stability, even though many of the same substitutions greatly destabilized the native protein and other disulfide-bonded intermediates. In addition, those replacements that did decrease the steady-state concentration of [14-38] did not adversely affect further folding and disulfide formation. These results suggest that the weak and transient interactions that are often detected in unfolded proteins and early folding intermediates may, in some cases, not persist or promote subsequent folding steps. PMID:10493584

  3. Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction on Edges of a Few Layer Molybdenum Disulfide Nanodots.

    PubMed

    Benson, John; Li, Meixian; Wang, Shuangbao; Wang, Peng; Papakonstantinou, Pagona

    2015-07-01

    The design and development of inexpensive highly efficient electrocatalysts for hydrogen production underpins several emerging clean-energy technologies. In this work, for the first time, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanodots have been synthesized by ionic liquid assisted grinding exfoliation of bulk platelets and isolated by sequential centrifugation. The nanodots have a thickness of up to 7 layers (∼4 nm) and an average lateral size smaller than 20 nm. Detailed structural characterization established that the nanodots retained the crystalline quality and low oxidation states of the bulk material. The small lateral size and reduced number of layers provided these nanodots with an easier path for the electron transport and plentiful active sites for the catalysis of hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in acidic electrolyte. The MoS2 nanodots exhibited good durability and a Tafel slope of 61 mV dec(-1) with an estimated onset potential of -0.09 V vs RHE, which are considered among the best values achieved for 2H phase. It is envisaged that this work may provide a simplistic route to synthesize a wide range of 2D layered nanodots that have applications in water splitting and other energy related technologies.

  4. Disulfide isomerase-like protein AtPDIL1–2 is a good candidate for trichlorophenol phytodetoxification

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ri-He; Qiu, Jin; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Gao, Jian-jie; Han, Hong-juan; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Zhu, Bo; Xu, Jing; Wang, Bo; Li, Zhen-jun; Wang, Li-juan; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Trichlorophenol (TCP) is a widely used and persistent environmentally toxic compound that poses a carcinogenic risk to humans. Phytoremediation is a proficient cleanup technology for organic pollutants. In this study, we found that the disulfide isomerase-like protein AtPDIL1–2 in plants is a good candidate for enhancing 2,4,6-TCP phytoremediation. The expression of AtPDIL1-2 in Arabidopsis was induced by 2,4,6-TCP. The heterologously expressed AtPDIL1-2 in Escherichia coli exhibited both oxidase and isomerase activities as protein disulfide isomerase and improved bacteria tolerance to 2,4,6-TCP. Further research revealed that transgenic tobacco overexpressing AtPDIL1-2 was more tolerant to high concentrations of 2,4,6-TCP and removed the toxic compound at far greater rates than the control plants. To elucidate the mechanism of action of AtPDIL1-2, we investigated the chemical interaction of AtPDIL1-2 with 2,4,6-TCP for the first time. HPLC analysis implied that AtPDIL1-2 exerts a TCP-binding activity. A suitable configuration of AtPDIL1-2-TCP binding was obtained by molecular docking studies using the AutoDock program. It predicted that the TCP binding site is located in the b-b′ domain of AtPDIL1-2 and that His254 of the protein is critical for the binding interaction. These findings imply that AtPDIL1-2 can be used for TCP detoxification by the way of overexpression in plants. PMID:28059139

  5. Different disulfide bridge connectivity drives alternative folds in highly homologous Brassicaceae trypsin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Leboffe, Loris; Angelini, Riccardo; Menegatti, Enea; Polticelli, Fabio; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Low-molecular-mass trypsin inhibitors from Arabidopsis thaliana, Brassica napus var. oleifera, and Sinapis alba L. (ATTI, RTI, and MTI, respectively) display more than 69% amino acid sequence identity. Among others, the amino acid sequence Cys-Ala-Pro-Arg-Ile building up the inhibitor reactive site, and the eight Cys residues forming four disulfide bridges are conserved. However, the disulfide bridge connectivity of RTI and MTI (C1-C3, C2-C4, C5-C6, and C7-C8) is different from that of ATTI Cys (C1-C8, C2-C5, C3-C6, and C4-C7). Despite the different disulfide bridge connectivity, the reactive site loop of ATTI, RTI, and MTI is solvent exposed permitting trypsin recognition. Structural considerations here reported suggest that proteins showing high amino acid sequence identity and common functional properties could display different three-dimensional structures. This may reflect high inhibitor plasticity in relation to plant-pathogen interactions, plant tissue development as well as the different redox potential of cell compartments.

  6. Role of disulfide bonds in modulating internal motions of proteins to tune their function: molecular dynamics simulation of scorpion toxin Lqh III.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Majid Erfani; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2006-04-01

    A series of 1-ns MD simulations were performed on the scorpion toxin Lqh III in native and disulfide bond broken states. The removal of disulfide bonds has caused hydrogen bond network alteration in the five-residue turn, the long loop, the alpha-helix, the loop connecting strands II and III, and the C-terminal region. In addition and more importantly, it has influenced the amplitude of the fluctuations of five-residue turn, loops, and C-terminal region with a minor effect on the fluctuations of the cysteines in the broken bond sites. These findings suggest that disulfide bonds are not the most important factors in rigidifying their own locations, while they have more important effects at a global scale. Furthermore, our results reveal that disulfide bonds have considerable influence on the functionally important essential modes of motions and the correlations between the motions of the binding site residues. Therefore, we can conclude that disulfide bonds have a crucial role in modulating the function via adjusting the dynamics of scorpion toxin molecules. Although this conclusion cannot be generalized to all peptides and proteins, it demonstrates the importance of more investigations on this aspect of disulfide bond efficacy.

  7. Enhancing the Thermal Resistance of a Novel Acidobacteria-Derived Phytase by Engineering of Disulfide Bridges.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hao; Miao, Renyun; Liu, Tianhai; Cao, Xuelian; Wu, Xiang; Xie, Liyuan; Huang, Zhongqian; Peng, Weihong; Gan, Bingcheng

    2016-10-28

    A novel phytase of Acidobacteria was identified from a soil metagenome, cloned, overexpressed, and purified. It has low sequence similarity (<44%) to all the known phytases. At the optimum pH (2.5), the phytase shows an activity level of 1,792 μmol/min/mg at physiological temperature (37°C) and could retain 92% residual activity after 30 min, indicating the phytase is acidophilic and acidostable. However the phytase shows poor stability at high temperatures. To improve its thermal resistance, the enzyme was redesigned using Disulfide by Design 2.0, introducing four additional disulfide bridges. The half-life time of the engineered phytase at 60°C and 80°C, respectively, is 3.0× and 2.8× longer than the wild-type, and its activity and acidostability are not significantly affected.

  8. Characterization of mutant xylanases using fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: stabilizing contributions of disulfide bridges and N-terminal extensions.

    PubMed

    Jänis, Janne; Turunen, Ossi; Leisola, Matti; Derrick, Peter J; Rouvinen, Juha; Vainiotalo, Pirjo

    2004-07-27

    Structural properties and thermal stability of Trichoderma reesei endo-1,4-beta-xylanase II (TRX II) and its three recombinant mutants were characterized using electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI FT-ICR) mass spectrometry and hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions. TRX II has been previously stabilized by a disulfide bridge C110-C154 and other site-directed mutations (TRX II mutants DS2 and DS5). Very recently, a highly thermostable mutant was introduced by combining mutations of DS5 with an N-terminal disulfide bridge C2-C28 (mutant DB1). Accurate mass measurements of TRX II, DS2, DS5, and DB1 verified the expected DNA-encoded protein sequences (average mass error 1.3 ppm) and allowed unequivocal assignment of the disulfides without chemical reduction and subsequent alkylation of the expected cross-links. Moreover, H/D exchange reactions provided means for the detection of a major heat-induced conformational change comprising two interconverting conformers of very different H/D exchange rates as well as allowed the apparent melting temperatures (T(m)) to be determined (62.6, 65.1, 68.0, and 82.2 degrees C for TRX II, DS2, DS5, and DB1, respectively). Residual activity measurements verified that the enzymes inactivated at significantly lower temperatures than expected on the basis of the apparent T(m) values, strongly suggesting that the inactivation takes place through minor conformational change other than observed by H/D exchange. ESI FT-ICR analyses also revealed molecular heterogeneity in DS5 and DB1 due to the propeptide incorporation. Resulting unintentional N-terminal extensions were observed to further improve the stability of the DB1 mutant. The extension of six amino acid residues upstream from the protein N-terminus increased stability by approximately 5 degrees C.

  9. Chemical methods for producing disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins to study folding regulation.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Masaki; Shimamoto, Shigeru; Hidaka, Yuji

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds play a critical role in the folding of secretory and membrane proteins. Oxidative folding reactions of disulfide bond-containing proteins typically require several hours or days, and numerous misbridged disulfide isomers are often observed as intermediates. The rate-determining step in refolding is thought to be the disulfide-exchange reaction from nonnative to native disulfide bonds in folding intermediates, which often precipitate during the refolding process because of their hydrophobic properties. To overcome this, chemical additives or a disulfide catalyst, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), are generally used in refolding experiments to regulate disulfide-coupled peptide and protein folding. This unit describes such methods in the context of the thermodynamic and kinetic control of peptide and protein folding, including (1) regulation of disulfide-coupled peptides and protein folding assisted by chemical additives, (2) reductive unfolding of disulfide-containing peptides and proteins, and (3) regulation of disulfide-coupled peptide and protein folding using PDI.

  10. Superconductivity in highly disordered dense carbon disulfide.

    PubMed

    Dias, Ranga P; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Struzhkin, Viktor V; Kim, Minseob; Muramatsu, Takaki; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo; Sinogeikin, Stanislav

    2013-07-16

    High pressure plays an increasingly important role in both understanding superconductivity and the development of new superconducting materials. New superconductors were found in metallic and metal oxide systems at high pressure. However, because of the filled close-shell configuration, the superconductivity in molecular systems has been limited to charge-transferred salts and metal-doped carbon species with relatively low superconducting transition temperatures. Here, we report the low-temperature superconducting phase observed in diamagnetic carbon disulfide under high pressure. The superconductivity arises from a highly disordered extended state (CS4 phase or phase III[CS4]) at ~6.2 K over a broad pressure range from 50 to 172 GPa. Based on the X-ray scattering data, we suggest that the local structural change from a tetrahedral to an octahedral configuration is responsible for the observed superconductivity.

  11. Advances in rechargeable lithium molybdenum disulfide batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, K.; Stiles, J. A. R.

    1985-01-01

    The lithium molybdenum disulfide system as demonstrated in a C size cell, offers performance characteristics for applications where light weight and low volume are important. A gravimetric energy density of 90 watt hours per kilogram can be achieved in a C size cell package. The combination of charge retention capabilities, high energy density and a state of charge indicator in a rechargeable cell provides power package for a wide range of devices. The system overcomes the memory effect in Nicads where the full capacity of the battery cannot be utilized unless it was utilized on previous cycles. The development of cells with an advanced electrolyte formulation led to an improved rate capability especially at low temperatures and to a significantly improved life cycle.

  12. Ultrafast response of monolayer molybdenum disulfide photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haining; Zhang, Changjian; Chan, Weimin; Tiwari, Sandip; Rana, Farhan

    2015-01-01

    The strong light emission and absorption exhibited by single atomic layer transitional metal dichalcogenides in the visible to near-infrared wavelength range make them attractive for optoelectronic applications. In this work, using two-pulse photovoltage correlation technique, we show that monolayer molybdenum disulfide photodetector can have intrinsic response times as short as 3 ps implying photodetection bandwidths as wide as 300 GHz. The fast photodetector response is a result of the short electron–hole and exciton lifetimes in this material. Recombination of photoexcited carriers in most two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides is dominated by nonradiative processes, most notable among which is Auger scattering. The fast response time, and the ease of fabrication of these devices, make them interesting for low-cost ultrafast optical communication links. PMID:26572726

  13. Nuclear Site Security in the Event of Terrorist Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M.L.; Sims, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper, presented as a poster, identifies why ballistic protection should now be considered at nuclear sites to counter terrorist threats. A proven and flexible form of multi purpose protection is described in detail with identification of trial results that show its suitability for this role. (authors)

  14. The central nervous system effects of carbon disulfide in male albino rats utilizing the tritiated 2-deoxyglucose method

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, W.E. III.

    1989-01-01

    The methodology employed was the autoradiographic 2-deoxyglucose method. Due to the coupling between functional activity and energy metabolism, these autoradiographs can be likened to a stain for functional activity under varying physiological and pathological states. Exposure regimes consisted of intraperitoneal injections of: (1) 400 milligrams of carbon disulfide per kilogram body weight five days per week for eight weeks; (2) 600 milligrams of carbon disulfide per kilogram body weight for five consecutive days; (3) 800 milligrams of carbon disulfide per kilogram body weight for only a single injection. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the autoradiograms were employed. Appropriate statistical techniques were then be used to test for significant differences in the optical densities of structures between experimental and control radiographs. The results indicate a significant effect across all levels of analyses for the eight week group and the five day group for the auditory and olfactory central pathways.

  15. Three-dimensional Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Supported Molybdenum Disulfide Nanoparticles as an Advanced Catalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haifeng; Liu, Conghui; Ye, Haitao; Hu, Linping; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Dai, Wenhao; Cao, Yu; Qi, Xueqiang; Lu, Huiting; Zhang, Xueji

    2015-12-07

    An efficient three-dimensional (3D) hybrid material of nitrogen-doped graphene sheets (N-RGO) supporting molybdenum disulfide (MoS(2)) nanoparticles with high-performance electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is fabricated by using a facile hydrothermal route. Comprehensive microscopic and spectroscopic characterizations confirm the resulting hybrid material possesses a 3D crumpled few-layered graphene network structure decorated with MoS(2) nanoparticles. Electrochemical characterization analysis reveals that the resulting hybrid material exhibits efficient electrocatalytic activity toward HER under acidic conditions with a low onset potential of 112 mV and a small Tafel slope of 44 mV per decade. The enhanced mechanism of electrocatalytic activity has been investigated in detail by controlling the elemental composition, electrical conductance and surface morphology of the 3D hybrid as well as Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. This demonstrates that the abundance of exposed active sulfur edge sites in the MoS(2) and nitrogen active functional moieties in N-RGO are synergistically responsible for the catalytic activity, whilst the distinguished and coherent interface in MoS(2)/N-RGO facilitates the electron transfer during electrocatalysis. Our study gives insights into the physical/chemical mechanism of enhanced HER performance in MoS(2)/N-RGO hybrids and illustrates how to design and construct a 3D hybrid to maximize the catalytic efficiency.

  16. Three-dimensional Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Supported Molybdenum Disulfide Nanoparticles as an Advanced Catalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Haifeng; Liu, Conghui; Ye, Haitao; Hu, Linping; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Dai, Wenhao; Cao, Yu; Qi, Xueqiang; Lu, Huiting; Zhang, Xueji

    2015-01-01

    An efficient three-dimensional (3D) hybrid material of nitrogen-doped graphene sheets (N-RGO) supporting molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoparticles with high-performance electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is fabricated by using a facile hydrothermal route. Comprehensive microscopic and spectroscopic characterizations confirm the resulting hybrid material possesses a 3D crumpled few-layered graphene network structure decorated with MoS2 nanoparticles. Electrochemical characterization analysis reveals that the resulting hybrid material exhibits efficient electrocatalytic activity toward HER under acidic conditions with a low onset potential of 112 mV and a small Tafel slope of 44 mV per decade. The enhanced mechanism of electrocatalytic activity has been investigated in detail by controlling the elemental composition, electrical conductance and surface morphology of the 3D hybrid as well as Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. This demonstrates that the abundance of exposed active sulfur edge sites in the MoS2 and nitrogen active functional moieties in N-RGO are synergistically responsible for the catalytic activity, whilst the distinguished and coherent interface in MoS2/N-RGO facilitates the electron transfer during electrocatalysis. Our study gives insights into the physical/chemical mechanism of enhanced HER performance in MoS2/N-RGO hybrids and illustrates how to design and construct a 3D hybrid to maximize the catalytic efficiency. PMID:26639026

  17. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  18. Revealing the nature of the active site on the carbon catalyst for C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, XiaoYing; Li, Bo; Su, Dangsheng

    2014-09-28

    A reactivity descriptor for the C-H bond activation on the nanostructured carbon catalyst is proposed. Furthermore the calculations reveal that the single ketone group can be an active site in ODH reaction.

  19. Cellular Active N-Hydroxyurea FEN1 Inhibitors Block Substrate Entry to the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Exell, Jack C.; Thompson, Mark J.; Finger, L. David; Shaw, Steven J.; Debreczeni, Judit; Ward, Thomas A.; McWhirter, Claire; Siöberg, Catrine L. B.; Martinez Molina, Daniel; Mark Abbott, W.; Jones, Clifford D.; Nissink, J. Willem M.; Durant, Stephen T.; Grasby, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    The structure-specific nuclease human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) plays a key role in DNA replication and repair and may be of interest as an oncology target. We present the first crystal structure of inhibitor-bound hFEN1 and show a cyclic N-hydroxyurea bound in the active site coordinated to two magnesium ions. Three such compounds had similar IC50 values but differed subtly in mode of action. One had comparable affinity for protein and protein–substrate complex and prevented reaction by binding to active site catalytic metal ions, blocking the unpairing of substrate DNA necessary for reaction. Other compounds were more competitive with substrate. Cellular thermal shift data showed engagement of both inhibitor types with hFEN1 in cells with activation of the DNA damage response evident upon treatment. However, cellular EC50s were significantly higher than in vitro inhibition constants and the implications of this for exploitation of hFEN1 as a drug target are discussed. PMID:27526030

  20. Active Layer and Moisture Measurements for Intensive Site 0 and 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-04-17

    These are measurements of Active Layer Thickness collected along several lines beginning in September, 2011 to the present. The data were collected at several time periods along the Site0 L2 Line, the Site1 AB Line, and an ERT Monitoring Line near Area A in Site1.

  1. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  2. Are nest sites actively chosen? Testing a common assumption for three non-resource limited birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, A. E.; Elliot, S. L.; Hart, A. G.

    2009-09-01

    Many widely-accepted ecological concepts are simplified assumptions about complex situations that remain largely untested. One example is the assumption that nest-building species choose nest sites actively when they are not resource limited. This assumption has seen little direct empirical testing: most studies on nest-site selection simply assume that sites are chosen actively (and seek explanations for such behaviour) without considering that sites may be selected randomly. We used 15 years of data from a nestbox scheme in the UK to test the assumption of active nest-site choice in three cavity-nesting bird species that differ in breeding and migratory strategy: blue tit ( Cyanistes caeruleus), great tit ( Parus major) and pied flycatcher ( Ficedula hypoleuca). Nest-site selection was non-random (implying active nest-site choice) for blue and great tits, but not for pied flycatchers. We also considered the relative importance of year-specific and site-specific factors in determining occupation of nest sites. Site-specific factors were more important than year-specific factors for the tit species, while the reverse was true for pied flycatchers. Our results show that nest-site selection, in birds at least, is not always the result of active choice, such that choice should not be assumed automatically in studies of nesting behaviour. We use this example to highlight the need to test key ecological assumptions empirically, and the importance of doing so across taxa rather than for single "model" species.

  3. The multidrug resistance IncA/C transferable plasmid encodes a novel domain-swapped dimeric protein-disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Kurth, Fabian; Neyer, Simon; Schembri, Mark A; Martin, Jennifer L

    2014-01-31

    The multidrug resistance-encoding IncA/C conjugative plasmids disseminate antibiotic resistance genes among clinically relevant enteric bacteria. A plasmid-encoded disulfide isomerase is associated with conjugation. Sequence analysis of several IncA/C plasmids and IncA/C-related integrative and conjugative elements (ICE) from commensal and pathogenic bacteria identified a conserved DsbC/DsbG homolog (DsbP). The crystal structure of DsbP reveals an N-terminal domain, a linker region, and a C-terminal catalytic domain. A DsbP homodimer is formed through domain swapping of two DsbP N-terminal domains. The catalytic domain incorporates a thioredoxin-fold with characteristic CXXC and cis-Pro motifs. Overall, the structure and redox properties of DsbP diverge from the Escherichia coli DsbC and DsbG disulfide isomerases. Specifically, the V-shaped dimer of DsbP is inverted compared with EcDsbC and EcDsbG. In addition, the redox potential of DsbP (-161 mV) is more reducing than EcDsbC (-130 mV) and EcDsbG (-126 mV). Other catalytic properties of DsbP more closely resemble those of EcDsbG than EcDsbC. These catalytic differences are in part a consequence of the unusual active site motif of DsbP (CAVC); substitution to the EcDsbC-like (CGYC) motif converts the catalytic properties to those of EcDsbC. Structural comparison of the 12 independent subunit structures of DsbP that we determined revealed that conformational changes in the linker region contribute to mobility of the catalytic domain, providing mechanistic insight into DsbP function. In summary, our data reveal that the conserved plasmid-encoded DsbP protein is a bona fide disulfide isomerase and suggest that a dedicated oxidative folding enzyme is important for conjugative plasmid transfer.

  4. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  5. Structural characterization of single nucleotide variants at ligand binding sites and enzyme active sites of human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazunori D.; Nishi, Hafumi; Nakata, Junichi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Functional sites on proteins play an important role in various molecular interactions and reactions between proteins and other molecules. Thus, mutations in functional sites can severely affect the overall phenotype. Progress of genome sequencing projects has yielded a wealth of information on single nucleotide variants (SNVs), especially those with less than 1% minor allele frequency (rare variants). To understand the functional influence of genetic variants at a protein level, we investigated the relationship between SNVs and protein functional sites in terms of minor allele frequency and the structural position of variants. As a result, we observed that SNVs were less abundant at ligand binding sites, which is consistent with a previous study on SNVs and protein interaction sites. Additionally, we found that non-rare variants tended to be located slightly apart from enzyme active sites. Examination of non-rare variants revealed that most of the mutations resulted in moderate changes of the physico-chemical properties of amino acids, suggesting the existence of functional constraints. In conclusion, this study shows that the mapping of genetic variants on protein structures could be a powerful approach to evaluate the functional impact of rare genetic variations. PMID:27924270

  6. Cooperative Protein Folding by Two Protein Thiol Disulfide Oxidoreductases and ERO1 in Soybean1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Aya; Masuda, Taro; Koishihara, Katsunori; Mita, Ryuta; Iwasaki, Kensuke; Hara, Kumiko; Naruo, Yurika; Hirose, Akiho; Tsuchi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Most proteins produced in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells fold via disulfide formation (oxidative folding). Oxidative folding is catalyzed by protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and PDI-related ER protein thiol disulfide oxidoreductases (ER oxidoreductases). In yeast and mammals, ER oxidoreductin-1s (Ero1s) supply oxidizing equivalent to the active centers of PDI. In this study, we expressed recombinant soybean Ero1 (GmERO1a) and found that GmERO1a oxidized multiple soybean ER oxidoreductases, in contrast to mammalian Ero1s having a high specificity for PDI. One of these ER oxidoreductases, GmPDIM, associated in vivo and in vitro with GmPDIL-2, was unable to be oxidized by GmERO1a. We therefore pursued the possible cooperative oxidative folding by GmPDIM, GmERO1a, and GmPDIL-2 in vitro and found that GmPDIL-2 synergistically accelerated oxidative refolding. In this process, GmERO1a preferentially oxidized the active center in the a′ domain among the a, a′, and b domains of GmPDIM. A disulfide bond introduced into the active center of the a′ domain of GmPDIM was shown to be transferred to the active center of the a domain of GmPDIM and the a domain of GmPDIM directly oxidized the active centers of both the a or a′ domain of GmPDIL-2. Therefore, we propose that the relay of an oxidizing equivalent from one ER oxidoreductase to another may play an essential role in cooperative oxidative folding by multiple ER oxidoreductases in plants. PMID:26645455

  7. Lamellipodial actin mechanically links myosin activity with adhesion site formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannone, Gregory; Dubin-Thaler, Benjamin; Rossier, Olivier; Cai, Yunfei; Chaga, Oleg; Jiang, Guoying; Beaver, William; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Freund, Yoav; Borisy, Gary; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell motility proceeds by cycles of edge protrusion, adhesion and retraction. Whether these functions are coordinated by biochemical or biomechanical processes is unknown. We find that myosin II pulls the rear of the lamellipodial actin network, causing upward bending, edge retraction and initiation of new adhesion sites. The network then separates from the edge and condenses over the myosin. Protrusion resumes as lamellipodial actin regenerates from the front and extends rearward until it reaches newly assembled myosin, initiating the next cycle. Upward bending, observed by evanescence and electron microscopy, results in ruffle formation when adhesion strength is low. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy shows that the regenerating lamellipodium forms a cohesive, separable layer of actin above the lamellum. Thus, actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process. PMID:17289574

  8. Disulfide bond structure determination and biochemical analysis of glycoprotein C from herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Rux, A H; Moore, W T; Lambris, J D; Abrams, W R; Peng, C; Friedman, H M; Cohen, G H; Eisenberg, R J

    1996-01-01

    A biochemical analysis of glycoprotein C (gC of herpes simplex virus was undertaken to further characterize the structure of the glycoprotein and to determine its disulfide bond arrangement. We used three recombinant forms of gC, gC1(457t), gC1(delta33-123t), and gC2(426t), each truncated prior to the transmembrane region. The proteins were expressed and secreted by using a baculovirus expression system and have been shown to bind to monoclonal antibodies which recognize discontinuous epitopes and to complement component C3b in a dose-dependent manner. We confirmed the N-terminal residues of each mature protein by Edman degradation and confirmed the internal deletion in gC1(delta33-123t). The molecular weight and extent of glycosylation of gC1 (457t), gC1(delta33-123t), and gC2(426t) were determined by treating each protein with endoglycosidases and then subjecting it to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and mass spectrometric analysis. The data indicate that eight to nine of the predicted N-linked oligosaccharide sites on gC1(457t) are occupied by glycans of approximately 1,000 Da. In addition, O-linked oligosaccharides are present on gC1(457t), primarily localized to the N-terminal region (amino acids [aa] 33 to 123) of the protein. gC2(426t) contains N-linked oligosaccharides, but no O-linked oligosaccharides were detected. To determine the disulfide bond arrangement of the eight cysteines of gC1(457t),the protein was cleaved with cyanogen bromide. SDS-PAGE analysis followed by Edman degradation identified three cysteine-containing fragments which are not connected by disulfide linkages. Chemical modification of cysteines combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry identified disulfide bonds between cysteine 1 (aa 127) and cysteine 2 (aa 144) and between cysteine 3 (aa 286) and cysteine 4 (aa 347). Further proteolysis of the cyanogen bromide-generated fragment containing cysteine 5 through

  9. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions.

  10. Selective removal of heavy metal ions by disulfide linked polymer networks.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dongah; Lee, Joo Sung; Patel, Hasmukh A; Jakobsen, Mogens H; Hwang, Yuhoon; Yavuz, Cafer T; Hansen, Hans Chr Bruun; Andersen, Henrik R

    2017-03-06

    Heavy metal contaminated surface water is one of the oldest pollution problems, which is critical to ecosystems and human health. We devised disulfide linked polymer networks and employed as a sorbent for removing heavy metal ions from contaminated water. Although the polymer network material has a moderate surface area, it demonstrated cadmium removal efficiency equivalent to highly porous activated carbon while it showed 16 times faster sorption kinetics compared to activated carbon, owing to the high affinity of cadmium towards disulfide and thiol functionality in the polymer network. The metal sorption mechanism on polymer network was studied by sorption kinetics, effect of pH, and metal complexation. We observed that the metal ions-copper, cadmium, and zinc showed high binding affinity in polymer network, even in the presence of competing cations like calcium in water.

  11. Nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms homo-dimers stabilized by disulfide bonds

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Daniel; Sheen, Patricia; Gilman, Robert H.; Bueno, Carlos; Santos, Marco; Pando-Robles, Victoria; Batista, Cesar V.; Zimic, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant wild-pyrazinamidase from H37Rv M. tuberculosis was analyzed by gel electrophoresis under differential reducing conditions to evaluate its quaternary structure. PZAse was fractionated by size exclusion chromatography under non-reducing conditions. PZAse activity was measured and mass spectrometry analysis was performed to determine the identity of proteins by de novo sequencing and to determine the presence of disulfide bonds. This study confirmed that M. tuberculosis wild type PZAse was able to form homo-dimers in vitro. Homo-dimers showed a slightly lower specific PZAse activity compared to monomeric PZAse. PZAse dimers were dissociated into monomers in response to reducing conditions. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the existence of disulfide bonds (C72-C138 and C138-C138) stabilizing the quaternary structure of the PZAse homo-dimer. PMID:25199451

  12. Active-Site Hydration and Water Diffusion in Cytochrome P450cam: A Highly Dynamic Process

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome Y

    2011-01-01

    Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (300 ns) are performed on both the apo- (i.e., camphor-free) and camphor-bound cytochrome P450cam (CYP101). Water diffusion into and out of the protein active site is observed without biased sampling methods. During the course of the molecular dynamics simulation, an average of 6.4 water molecules is observed in the camphor-binding site of the apo form, compared to zero water molecules in the binding site of the substrate-bound form, in agreement with the number of water molecules observed in crystal structures of the same species. However, as many as 12 water molecules can be present at a given time in the camphor-binding region of the active site in the case of apo-P450cam, revealing a highly dynamic process for hydration of the protein active site, with water molecules exchanging rapidly with the bulk solvent. Water molecules are also found to exchange locations frequently inside the active site, preferentially clustering in regions surrounding the water molecules observed in the crystal structure. Potential-of-mean-force calculations identify thermodynamically favored trans-protein pathways for the diffusion of water molecules between the protein active site and the bulk solvent. Binding of camphor in the active site modifies the free-energy landscape of P450cam channels toward favoring the diffusion of water molecules out of the protein active site.

  13. The disulfide relay of the intermembrane space of mitochondria: an oxygen-sensing system?

    PubMed

    Bihlmaier, Karl; Mesecke, Nikola; Kloeppel, Christine; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2008-12-01

    The intermembrane space of mitochondria contains many proteins that lack classical mitochondrial targeting sequences. Instead, these proteins often show characteristic patterns of cysteine residues that are critical for their accumulation in the organelle. Import of these proteins is catalyzed by two essential components, Mia40 and Erv1. Mia40 is a protein in the intermembrane space that directly binds newly imported proteins via disulfide bonds. By reorganization of these bonds, intramolecular disulfide bonds are formed in the imported proteins, which are thereby released from Mia40 into the intermembrane space. Because folded proteins are unable to traverse the import pore of the outer membrane, this leads to a permanent location of these proteins within the mitochondria. During this reaction, Mia40 becomes reduced and needs to be re-oxidized to regain its activity. Oxidation of Mia40 is carried out by Erv1, a conserved flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-binding sulfhydryl oxidase. Erv1 directly interacts with Mia40 and shuttles electrons from reduced Mia40 to oxidized cytochrome c, from whence they flow through cytochrome oxidase to molecular oxygen. The connection of the disulfide relay with the respiratory chain not only significantly increases the efficiency of the oxidase activity, but also prevents the formation of potentially deleterious hydrogen peroxide. The oxidative activity of Erv1 strongly depends on the oxygen concentration in mitochondria. Erv1, therefore, may function as a molecular switch that adapts mitochondrial activities to the oxygen levels in the cell.

  14. Chemical shift and coupling constant analysis of dibenzyloxy disulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoutenburg, Eric G.; Gryn'ova, Ganna; Coote, Michelle L.; Priefer, Ronny

    2015-02-01

    Dialkoxy disulfides have found applications in the realm of organic synthesis as an S2 or alkoxy donor, under thermal and photolytic decompositions conditions, respectively. Spectrally, dibenzyloxy disulfides possess an ABq in the 1H NMR, which can shift by over 1.1 ppm depending on the substituents present on the aromatic ring, as well as the solvent employed. The effect of the said substituents and solvent were analyzed and compared to the center of the ABq, geminal coupling, and the differences in chemical shifts of the individual doublets. Additionally, quantum-chemical calculations demonstrated the intramolecular H-bonding arrangement, found within the dibenzyloxy disulfides.

  15. Radical cations of sulfides and disulfides: An ESR study

    SciTech Connect

    Bonazzola, L.; Michaut, J.P.; Roncin, J.

    1985-09-15

    Exposure of dilute solutions of dimethylsulfide, methanethiol, tetrahydrothiophene, terbutyl and diterbutyl-sulfides, dimethyl-disulfide, and diterbutyldisulfide, in freon at 77 K to /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays gave the corresponding cations. From the reported ESR spectra, g tensors were obtained. It was found that both sulfide and disulfide cations exhibit the same g tensor: (g/sub max/ = 2.034 +- 0.002, g/sub int/ = 2.017 +- 0.001, g/sub min/ = 2.001 +- 0.005). From this result it has been shown that the disulfide cation is planar. This finding was supported by fully optimized geometry ab initio calculations.

  16. A disulfide bond in the TIM23 complex is crucial for voltage gating and mitochondrial protein import

    PubMed Central

    Peleh, Valentina; Martinez-Caballero, Sonia; Sommer, Frederik; van der Laan, Martin; Schroda, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tim17 is a central, membrane-embedded subunit of the mitochondrial protein import machinery. In this study, we show that Tim17 contains a pair of highly conserved cysteine residues that form a structural disulfide bond exposed to the intermembrane space (IMS). This disulfide bond is critical for efficient protein translocation through the TIM23 complex and for dynamic gating of its preprotein-conducting channel. The disulfide bond in Tim17 is formed during insertion of the protein into the inner membrane. Whereas the import of Tim17 depends on the binding to the IMS protein Mia40, the oxidoreductase activity of Mia40 is surprisingly dispensable for Tim17 oxidation. Our observations suggest that Tim17 can be directly oxidized by the sulfhydryl oxidase Erv1. Thus, import and oxidation of Tim17 are mediated by the mitochondrial disulfide relay, though the mechanism by which the disulfide bond in Tim17 is formed differs considerably from that of soluble IMS proteins. PMID:27502485

  17. A disulfide bond in the TIM23 complex is crucial for voltage gating and mitochondrial protein import.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Ajay; Peleh, Valentina; Martinez-Caballero, Sonia; Wollweber, Florian; Sommer, Frederik; van der Laan, Martin; Schroda, Michael; Alexander, R Todd; Campo, María Luisa; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-08-15

    Tim17 is a central, membrane-embedded subunit of the mitochondrial protein import machinery. In this study, we show that Tim17 contains a pair of highly conserved cysteine residues that form a structural disulfide bond exposed to the intermembrane space (IMS). This disulfide bond is critical for efficient protein translocation through the TIM23 complex and for dynamic gating of its preprotein-conducting channel. The disulfide bond in Tim17 is formed during insertion of the protein into the inner membrane. Whereas the import of Tim17 depends on the binding to the IMS protein Mia40, the oxidoreductase activity of Mia40 is surprisingly dispensable for Tim17 oxidation. Our observations suggest that Tim17 can be directly oxidized by the sulfhydryl oxidase Erv1. Thus, import and oxidation of Tim17 are mediated by the mitochondrial disulfide relay, though the mechanism by which the disulfide bond in Tim17 is formed differs considerably from that of soluble IMS proteins.

  18. Antagonistic effect of disulfide-rich peptide aptamers selected by cDNA display on interleukin-6-dependent cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Naoto; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Junichi; Ueno, Shingo; Machida, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Toshikatsu; Sakai, Takafumi

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disulfide-rich peptide aptamer inhibits IL-6-dependent cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disulfide bond of peptide aptamer is essential for its affinity to IL-6R. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibitory effect of peptide depends on number and pattern of its disulfide bonds. -- Abstract: Several engineered protein scaffolds have been developed recently to circumvent particular disadvantages of antibodies such as their large size and complex composition, low stability, and high production costs. We previously identified peptide aptamers containing one or two disulfide-bonds as an alternative ligand to the interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). Peptide aptamers (32 amino acids in length) were screened from a random peptide library by in vitro peptide selection using the evolutionary molecular engineering method 'cDNA display'. In this report, the antagonistic activity of the peptide aptamers were examined by an in vitro competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and an IL-6-dependent cell proliferation assay. The results revealed that a disulfide-rich peptide aptamer inhibited IL-6-dependent cell proliferation with similar efficacy to an anti-IL-6R monoclonal antibody.

  19. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine.

    PubMed

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-11-13

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO(2). We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O(2) and CO(2) bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO(2) defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg(2+) surrounded by three H(2)O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming.

  20. Silver-Coated Nylon Dressing Plus Active DC Microcurrent for Healing of Autogenous Skin Donor Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Silver-Coated Nylon Dressing Plus Active DC Microcurrent for Healing of Autogenous Skin Donor Sites Edward W. Malin, MD, Chaya M. Galin, BSN, RN... microcurrent in comparison to silver-coated dressing with sham microcurrent on wound-closure time for autogenous skin donor sites. Methods: Four...hundred five patients were screened for treatment of their donor sites using a silver-coated nylon dressing with either sham or active microcurrent

  1. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth’s crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts. Here we investigated in closer detail the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. Finally, we give a potential explanation of this effect, finding alkali-metal ions having different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar surfaces. PMID:25584435

  2. 76 FR 30696 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... eligible active uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of the Energy... requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs of...

  3. 76 FR 24871 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... from eligible active uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of...). Title X requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs...

  4. Characterization of an NADH oxidase of the flavin-dependent disulfide reductase family from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii.

    PubMed

    Case, Christopher L; Rodriguez, Jason R; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup

    2009-01-01

    Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, a deeply rooted hyperthermophilic anaerobic methanarchaeon from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent, carries an NADH oxidase (Nox) homologue (MJ0649). According to the characteristics described here, MJ0649 represents an unusual member within group 3 of the flavin-dependent disulfide reductase (FDR) family. This FDR group comprises Nox, NADH peroxidases (Npx) and coenzyme A disulfide reductases (CoADRs); each carries a Cys residue that forms Cys-sulfenic acid during catalysis. A sequence analysis identified MJ0649 as a CoADR homologue. However, recombinant MJ0649 (rMJNox), expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity an 86 kDa homodimer with 0.27 mol FAD (mol subunit)(-1), showed Nox but not CoADR activity. Incubation with FAD increased FAD content to 1 mol (mol subunit)(-1) and improved NADH oxidase activity 3.4-fold. The FAD-incubated enzyme was characterized further. The optimum pH and temperature were > or =10 and > or =95 degrees C, respectively. At pH 7 and 83 degrees C, apparent Km values for NADH and O2 were 3 microM and 1.9 mM, respectively, and the specific activity at 1.4 mM O2 was 60 micromol min(-1) mg(-1); 62 % of NADH-derived reducing equivalents were recovered as H2O2 and the rest probably generated H2O. rMjNox had poor NADPH oxidase, NADH peroxidase and superoxide formation activities. It reduced ferricyanide, plumbagin and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid), but not disulfide coenzyme A and disulfide coenzyme M. Due to a high Km, O2 is not a physiologically relevant substrate for MJ0649; its true substrate remains unknown.

  5. A thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase of the Gram-positive pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae is essential for viability, pilus assembly, toxin production and virulence.

    PubMed

    Reardon-Robinson, Melissa E; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Jooya, Neda; Chang, Chungyu; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2015-12-01

    The Gram-positive pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae exports through the Sec apparatus many extracellular proteins that include the key virulence factors diphtheria toxin and the adhesive pili. How these proteins attain their native conformations after translocation as unfolded precursors remains elusive. The fact that the majority of these exported proteins contain multiple cysteine residues and that several membrane-bound oxidoreductases are encoded in the corynebacterial genome suggests the existence of an oxidative protein-folding pathway in this organism. Here we show that the shaft pilin SpaA harbors a disulfide bond in vivo and alanine substitution of these cysteines abrogates SpaA polymerization and leads to the secretion of degraded SpaA peptides. We then identified a thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase (MdbA), whose structure exhibits a conserved thioredoxin-like domain with a CPHC active site. Remarkably, deletion of mdbA results in a severe temperature-sensitive cell division phenotype. This mutant also fails to assemble pilus structures and is greatly defective in toxin production. Consistent with these defects, the ΔmdbA mutant is attenuated in a guinea pig model of diphtheritic toxemia. Given its diverse cellular functions in cell division, pilus assembly and toxin production, we propose that MdbA is a component of the general oxidative folding machine in C. diphtheriae.

  6. 21 CFR 520.1802a - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension... § 520.1802a Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce of suspension contains 7.5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. The piperazine-carbon disulfide...

  7. 21 CFR 520.1802a - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension... § 520.1802a Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce of suspension contains 7.5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. The piperazine-carbon disulfide...

  8. 21 CFR 520.1802a - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension... § 520.1802a Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce of suspension contains 7.5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. The piperazine-carbon disulfide...

  9. 21 CFR 520.1802a - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension... § 520.1802a Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce of suspension contains 7.5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. The piperazine-carbon disulfide...

  10. 21 CFR 520.1802a - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension... § 520.1802a Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex suspension. (a) Specifications. Each fluid ounce of suspension contains 7.5 grams of piperazine-carbon disulfide complex. The piperazine-carbon disulfide...

  11. A model of the rabies virus glycoprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Rustici, M; Bracci, L; Lozzi, L; Neri, P; Santucci, A; Soldani, P; Spreafico, A; Niccolai, N

    1993-06-01

    The glycoprotein from the neurotropic rabies virus shows a significant homology with the alpha neurotoxin that binds to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The crystal structure of the alpha neurotoxins suggests that the Arg 37 guanidinium group and the Asp 31 side-chain carboxylate of the erabutoxin have stereochemical features resembling those of acetylcholine. Conformational studies on the Asn194-Ser195-Arg196-Gly197 tetrapeptide, an essential part of the binding site of the rabies virus glycoprotein, indicate that the side chains of Asn and Arg could also mimic the acetylcholine structure. This observation is consistent with the recently proposed mechanism of the viral infection.

  12. Active Site Hydrophobicity and the Convergent Evolution of Paraoxonase Activity in Structurally Divergent Enzymes: The Case of Serum Paraoxonase 1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a native lactonase capable of promiscuously hydrolyzing a broad range of substrates, including organophosphates, esters, and carbonates. Structurally, PON1 is a six-bladed β-propeller with a flexible loop (residues 70–81) covering the active site. This loop contains a functionally critical Tyr at position 71. We have performed detailed experimental and computational analyses of the role of selected Y71 variants in the active site stability and catalytic activity in order to probe the role of Y71 in PON1’s lactonase and organophosphatase activities. We demonstrate that the impact of Y71 substitutions on PON1’s lactonase activity is minimal, whereas the kcat for the paraoxonase activity is negatively perturbed by up to 100-fold, suggesting greater mutational robustness of the native activity. Additionally, while these substitutions modulate PON1’s active site shape, volume, and loop flexibility, their largest effect is in altering the solvent accessibility of the active site by expanding the active site volume, allowing additional water molecules to enter. This effect is markedly more pronounced in the organophosphatase activity than the lactonase activity. Finally, a detailed comparison of PON1 to other organophosphatases demonstrates that either a similar “gating loop” or a highly buried solvent-excluding active site is a common feature of these enzymes. We therefore posit that modulating the active site hydrophobicity is a key element in facilitating the evolution of organophosphatase activity. This provides a concrete feature that can be utilized in the rational design of next-generation organophosphate hydrolases that are capable of selecting a specific reaction from a pool of viable substrates. PMID:28026940

  13. Proteome-wide analysis of nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations in active sites of human proteins.

    PubMed

    Dingerdissen, Hayley; Motwani, Mona; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2013-03-01

    An enzyme's active site is essential to normal protein activity such that any disruptions at this site may lead to dysfunction and disease. Nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations (nsSNVs), which alter the amino acid sequence, are one type of disruption that can alter the active site. When this occurs, it is assumed that enzyme activity will vary because of the criticality of the site to normal protein function. We integrate nsSNV data and active site annotations from curated resources to identify all active-site-impacting nsSNVs in the human genome and search for all pathways observed to be associated with this data set to assess the likely consequences. We find that there are 934 unique nsSNVs that occur at the active sites of 559 proteins. Analysis of the nsSNV data shows an over-representation of arginine and an under-representation of cysteine, phenylalanine and tyrosine when comparing the list of nsSNV-impacted active site residues with the list of all possible proteomic active site residues, implying a potential bias for or against variation of these residues at the active site. Clustering analysis shows an abundance of hydrolases and transferases. Pathway and functional analysis shows several pathways over- or under-represented in the data set, with the most significantly affected pathways involved in carbohydrate metabolism. We provide a table of 32 variation-substrate/product pairs that can be used in targeted metabolomics experiments to assay the effects of specific variations. In addition, we report the significant prevalence of aspartic acid to histidine variation in eight proteins associated with nine diseases including glycogen storage diseases, lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital syndrome, Parkinson's disease and several cancers.

  14. Improved molybdenum disulfide-silver motor brushes have extended life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, J. C.; King, H. M.

    1964-01-01

    Motor brushes of proper quantities of molybdenum disulfide and copper or silver are manufactured by sintering techniques. Graphite molds are used. These brushes operate satisfactorily for long periods in normal atmosphere or in a high-vacuum environment.

  15. 46 CFR 151.50-41 - Carbon disulfide (carbon bisulfide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... disulfide (carbon bisulfide). (a) All openings shall be in the top of the tank. (b) Loading lines shall... extending from the tank top to a point near the tank bottom. A blanket of water shall be formed in this...

  16. A Potent, Versatile Disulfide-Reducing Agent from Aspartic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dithiothreitol (DTT) is the standard reagent for reducing disulfide bonds between and within biological molecules. At neutral pH, however, >99% of DTT thiol groups are protonated and thus unreactive. Herein, we report on (2S)-2-amino-1,4-dimercaptobutane (dithiobutylamine or DTBA), a dithiol that can be synthesized from l-aspartic acid in a few high-yielding steps that are amenable to a large-scale process. DTBA has thiol pKa values that are ∼1 unit lower than those of DTT and forms a disulfide with a similar E°′ value. DTBA reduces disulfide bonds in both small molecules and proteins faster than does DTT. The amino group of DTBA enables its isolation by cation-exchange and facilitates its conjugation. These attributes indicate that DTBA is a superior reagent for reducing disulfide bonds in aqueous solution. PMID:22353145

  17. Association of thiol disulfide homeostasis with slow coronary flow.

    PubMed

    Kundi, Harun; Gok, Murat; Cetin, Mustafa; Kiziltunç, Emrullah; Topcuoglu, Canan; Neşelioğlu, Salim; Erel, Ozcan; Ulusoy, Feridun Vasfi

    2016-08-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the role of thiol disulfide homeostasis in the presence of slow coronary flow. Material and methods In this cross-sectional study, a total of 110 patients who admitted to our hospital between March 2014 and December 2015 were included in the study. There were 65 patients in the slow coronary flow, and 45 patients in the normal flow groups. Results We found significant differences between slow coronary flow and the normal flow groups for thiol disulfide homeostasis, and the results of our study indicated that hsCRP, and thiol disulfide ratio were independently associated with slow coronary flow. Conclusion Our study showed that thiol disulfide homeostasis was significantly and independently related to the presence of slow coronary flow.

  18. Assessment of activation products in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.

    1996-07-01

    This document assesses the impact of radioactive activation products released from SRS facilities since the first reactor became operational late in 1953. The isotopes reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS: {sup 32}P, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 60}C, and {sup 65}Zn. Release pathways, emission control features, and annual releases to the aqueous and atmospheric environments are discussed. No single incident has resulted in a major acute release of activation products to the environment. The releases were the result of normal operations of the reactors and separations facilities. Releases declined over the years as better controls were established and production was reduced. The overall radiological impact of SRS activation product atmospheric releases from 1954 through 1994 on the offsite maximally exposed individual can be characterized by a total dose of 0.76 mrem. During the same period, such an individual received a total dose of 14,400 mrem from non-SRS sources of ionizing radiation present in the environment. SRS activation product aqueous releases between 1954 and 1994 resulted in a total dose of 54 mrem to the offsite maximally exposed individual. The impact of SRS activation product releases on offsite populations also has been evaluated.

  19. Soluble expression of disulfide bond containing proteins FGF15 and FGF19 in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kong, Bo; Guo, Grace L

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is the human ortholog of mouse FGF15, and both proteins function as an endocrine signal to regulate various liver functions. FGF15/FGF19 protein contains two disulfide bonds. It is unfavorable to form disulfide bonds in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cytoplasm because of the bacterial cytoplasmic reducing environment. Modification of the cytoplasmic reducing environment and/or co-expression of protein chaperones are common strategies to express disulfide bond containing proteins in E. coli. In the current study, we report a method to produce soluble FGF15/FGF19 protein in cytoplasm of E. coli. Several commercial available strains with the disruption of thiol-redox pathways, and/or co-expression of redoxase or refolding chaperones were used to develop this novel method for expression of FGF15/FGF19 in E. coli. Mutation of the thiol-disulfide bond reducing pathway in E. coli or N-terminal fusion of thioredox (TRX) alone is not enough to support disulfide bond formation in FGF15/19 proteins. However, TRX fusion protein improved FGF19 solubility in strains of thiol-redox system mutants. In addition, DsbC co-expressed in thiol-redox system mutants alone improved and further enhanced FGF19 solubility with combination of TRX fusion tag. The soluble FGF19 proteins were easily purified through Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and anion exchange chromatography, and the purified protein maintained its biological activities, confirmed by suppressing hepatic Cyp7a1 gene transcription in mice and by activating ERK1/2 signaling pathway in HepG2 cells. In contrast, soluble FGF15 protein in cytoplasm remained very low using these strategies. In summary, we have successfully developed a method to express functional FGF19 protein in prokaryotic cells, and this strategy may be adapted for the expression of other disulfide-containing proteins.

  20. All the catalytic active sites of MoS2 for hydrogen evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Du; Qiao, Qiao; ...

    2016-11-29

    MoS2 presents a promising low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), but the understanding about its active sites has remained limited. Here we present an unambiguous study of the catalytic activities of all possible reaction sites of MoS2, including edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries. We demonstrate that, in addition to the well-known catalytically active edge sites, sulfur vacancies provide another major active site for the HER, while the catalytic activity of grain boundaries is much weaker. Here, the intrinsic turnover frequencies (Tafel slopes) of the edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries are estimated to be 7.5more » s–1 (65–75 mV/dec), 3.2 s–1 (65–85 mV/dec), and 0.1 s–1 (120–160 mV/dec), respectively. We also demonstrate that the catalytic activity of sulfur vacancies strongly depends on the density of the vacancies and the local crystalline structure in proximity to the vacancies. Unlike edge sites, whose catalytic activity linearly depends on the length, sulfur vacancies show optimal catalytic activities when the vacancy density is in the range of 7–10%, and the number of sulfur vacancies in high crystalline quality MoS2 is higher than that in low crystalline quality MoS2, which may be related with the proximity of different local crystalline structures to the vacancies.« less

  1. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  2. Protein disulfide isomerase-P5, down-regulated in the final stage of boar epididymal sperm maturation, catalyzes disulfide formation to inhibit protein function in oxidative refolding of reduced denatured lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Akama, Kuniko; Horikoshi, Tomoe; Sugiyama, Atsushi; Nakahata, Satoko; Akitsu, Aoi; Niwa, Nobuyoshi; Intoh, Atsushi; Kakui, Yasutaka; Sugaya, Michiko; Takei, Kazuo; Imaizumi, Noriaki; Sato, Takaya; Matsumoto, Rena; Iwahashi, Hitoshi; Kashiwabara, Shin-ichi; Baba, Tadashi; Nakamura, Megumi; Toda, Tosifusa

    2010-06-01

    In mammalian spermiogenesis, sperm mature during epididymal transit to get fertility. The pig sharing many physiological similarities with humans is considered a promising animal model in medicine. We examined the expression profiles of proteins from boar epididymal caput, corpus, and cauda sperm by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting. Our results indicated that protein disulfide isomerase-P5 (PDI-P5) human homolog was down-regulated from the epididymal corpus to cauda sperm, in contrast to the constant expression of protein disulfide isomerase A3 (PDIA3) human homolog. To examine the functions of PDIA3 and PDI-P5, we cloned and sequenced cDNAs of pig PDIA3 and PDI-P5 protein precursors. Each recombinant pig mature PDIA3 and PDI-P5 expressed in Escherichia coli showed thiol-dependent disulfide reductase activities in insulin turbidity assay. Although PDIA3 showed chaperone activity to promote oxidative refolding of reduced denatured lysozyme, PDI-P5 exhibited anti-chaperone activity to inhibit oxidative refolding of lysozyme at an equimolar ratio. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis suggested that disulfide cross-linked and non-productively folded lysozyme was responsible for the anti-chaperone activity of PDI-P5. These results provide a molecular basis and insights into the physiological roles of PDIA3 and PDI-P5 in sperm maturation and fertilization.

  3. Marine Biology Field Trip Sites. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  4. An active site mutation increases the polymerase activity of the guinea pig-lethal Marburg virus.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Alexander; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Becker, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) causes severe, often fatal, disease in humans and transient illness in rodents. Sequential passaging of MARV in guinea pigs resulted in selection of a lethal virus containing 4 aa changes. A D184N mutation in VP40 (VP40D184N), which leads to a species-specific gain of viral fitness, and three mutations in the active site of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase L, which were investigated in the present study for functional significance in human and guinea pig cells. The transcription/replication activity of L mutants was strongly enhanced by a substitution at position 741 (S741C), and inhibited by other substitutions (D758A and A759D) in both species. The polymerase activity of L carrying the S741C substitution was eightfold higher in guinea pig cells than in human cells upon co-expression with VP40D184N, suggesting that the additive effect of the two mutations provides MARV a replicative advantage in the new host.

  5. Encroachment of Human Activity on Sea Turtle Nesting Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziskin, D.; Aubrecht, C.; Elvidge, C.; Tuttle, B.; Baugh, K.; Ghosh, T.

    2008-12-01

    The encroachment of anthropogenic lighting on sea turtle nesting sites poses a serious threat to the survival of these animals [Nicholas, 2001]. This danger is quantified by combining two established data sets. The first is the Nighttime Lights data produced by the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center [Elvidge et al., 1997]. The second is the Marine Turtle Database produced by the World Conservation Monitoring Centre (WCMC). The technique used to quantify the threat of encroachment is an adaptation of the method described in Aubrecht et al. [2008], which analyzes the stress on coral reef systems by proximity to nighttime lights near the shore. Nighttime lights near beaches have both a direct impact on turtle reproductive success since they disorient hatchlings when they mistake land-based lights for the sky-lit surf [Lorne and Salmon, 2007] and the lights are also a proxy for other anthropogenic threats. The identification of turtle nesting sites with high rates of encroachment will hopefully steer conservation efforts to mitigate their effects [Witherington, 1999]. Aubrecht, C, CD Elvidge, T Longcore, C Rich, J Safran, A Strong, M Eakin, KE Baugh, BT Tuttle, AT Howard, EH Erwin, 2008, A global inventory of coral reef stressors based on satellite observed nighttime lights, Geocarto International, London, England: Taylor and Francis. In press. Elvidge, CD, KE Baugh, EA Kihn, HW Kroehl, ER Davis, 1997, Mapping City Lights with Nighttime Data from the DMSP Operational Linescan System, Photogrammatic Engineering and Remote Sensing, 63:6, pp. 727-734. Lorne, JK, M Salmon, 2007, Effects of exposure to artificial lighting on orientation of hatchling sea turtles on the beach and in the ocean, Endangered Species Research, Vol. 3: 23-30. Nicholas, M, 2001, Light Pollution and Marine Turtle Hatchlings: The Straw that Breaks the Camel's Back?, George Wright Forum, 18:4, p77-82. Witherington, BE, 1999, Reducing Threats To Nesting Habitat, Research and Management Techniques for

  6. Protein disulfide isomerase secretion following vascular injury initiates a regulatory pathway for thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Bowley, Sheryl R.; Fang, Chao; Merrill-Skoloff, Glenn; Furie, Barbara C.; Furie, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), secreted by platelets and endothelial cells on vascular injury, is required for thrombus formation. Using PDI variants that form mixed disulfide complexes with their substrates, we identify by kinetic trapping multiple substrate proteins, including vitronectin. Plasma vitronectin does not bind to αvβ3 or αIIbβ3 integrins on endothelial cells and platelets. The released PDI reduces disulfide bonds on plasma vitronectin, enabling vitronectin to bind to αVβ3 and αIIbβ3. In vivo studies of thrombus generation in mice demonstrate that vitronectin rapidly accumulates on the endothelium and the platelet thrombus following injury. This process requires PDI activity and promotes platelet accumulation and fibrin generation. We hypothesize that under physiologic conditions in the absence of secreted PDI, thrombus formation is suppressed and maintains a quiescent, patent vasculature. The release of PDI during vascular injury may serve as a regulatory switch that allows activation of proteins, among them vitronectin, critical for thrombus formation. PMID:28218242

  7. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  8. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  9. Barium ions selectively activate BK channels via the Ca2+-bowl site.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Zeng, Xu-Hui; Lingle, Christopher J

    2012-07-10

    Activation of Ca(2+)-dependent BK channels is increased via binding of micromolar Ca(2+) to two distinct high-affinity sites per BK α-subunit. One site, termed the Ca(2+) bowl, is embedded within the second RCK domain (RCK2; regulator of conductance for potassium) of each α-subunit, while oxygen-containing residues in the first RCK domain (RCK1) have been linked to a separate Ca(2+) ligation site. Although both sites are activated by Ca(2+) and Sr(2+), Cd(2+) selectively favors activation via the RCK1 site. Divalent cations of larger ionic radius than Sr(2+) are thought to be ineffective at activating BK channels. Here we show that Ba(2+), better known as a blocker of K(+) channels, activates BK channels and that this effect arises exclusively from binding at the Ca(2+)-bowl site. Compared with previous estimates for Ca(2+) bowl-mediated activation by Ca(2+), the affinity of Ba(2+) to the Ca(2+) bowl is reduced about fivefold, and coupling of binding to activation is reduced from ∼3.6 for Ca(2+) to about ∼2.8 for Ba(2+). These results support the idea that ionic radius is an important determinant of selectivity differences among different divalent cations observed for each Ca(2+)-binding site.

  10. Activation of brown adipose tissue mitochondrial GDP binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Swick, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    The primary function of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is heat production. This ability is attributed to the existence of a unique inner mitochondrial membrane protein termed the uncoupling protein or thermogenin. This protein is permeable to H+ and thus allows respiration (and therefore thermogenesis) to proceed at a rapid rate, independent of ADP phosphorylation. Proton conductance can be inhibited by the binding of purine nucleotides to the uncoupling protein. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-GDP to BAT mitochondria is frequently used as a measure of BAT thermogenic activity. Rats fed a diet that was low but adequate in protein exhibited a decrease in feed efficiency. In addition, BAT thermogenesis was activated as indicated by an elevation in the level of GDP binding to BAT mitochondria. This phenomena occurred in older rats and persisted over time.

  11. Engineering a disulfide bond in the lid hinge region of Rhizopus chinensis lipase: increased thermostability and altered acyl chain length specificity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Wei; Tan, Nian-Jiang; Xiao, Rong; Xu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The key to enzyme function is the maintenance of an appropriate balance between molecular stability and structural flexibility. The lid domain which is very important for "interfacial activation" is the most flexible part in the lipase structure. In this work, rational design was applied to explore the relationship between lid rigidity and lipase activity by introducing a disulfide bond in the hinge region of the lid, in the hope of improving the thermostability of R. chinensis lipase through stabilization of the lid domain without interfering with its catalytic performance. A disulfide bridge between F95C and F214C was introduced into the lipase from R. chinensis in the hinge region of the lid according to the prediction of the "Disulfide by Design" algorithm. The disulfide variant showed substantially improved thermostability with an eleven-fold increase in the t(1/2) value at 60°C and a 7°C increase of T(m) compared with the parent enzyme, probably contributed by the stabilization of the geometric structure of the lid region. The additional disulfide bond did not interfere with the catalytic rate (k(cat)) and the catalytic efficiency towards the short-chain fatty acid substrate, however, the catalytic efficiency of the disulfide variant towards pNPP decreased by 1.5-fold probably due to the block of the hydrophobic substrate channel by the disulfide bond. Furthermore, in the synthesis of fatty acid methyl esters, the maximum conversion rate by RCLCYS reached 95% which was 9% higher than that by RCL. This is the first report on improving the thermostability of the lipase from R. chinensis by introduction of a disulfide bond in the lid hinge region without compromising the catalytic rate.

  12. Structure and Reactivity of the Phosphotriesterase Active Site

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    characterize different catalytic conformations for chorismate mutase . Preliminary evidence for water binding in phosphotriesterase suggests that activity in...MD/QM study of the chorismate mutase catalyzed Claisen rearrangement reaction. 2001.subm. J.Phys.Chem.B 22.Day, P.N.J., J.H.; Gordon,M.S.; Webb,S.P...Claisen rearrangement of an unusual substrate in chorismate mutase . 2001.subm. J.Phys.Chem.B 38.Stevens, W.J., Basch,H., Krauss,M., Compact effective

  13. Kinetic analysis of enhanced thermal stability of an alkaline protease with engineered twin disulfide bridges and calcium-dependent stability.

    PubMed

    Ikegaya, Kazuo; Sugio, Shigetoshi; Murakami, Kohji; Yamanouchi, Kouichi

    2003-01-20

    The thermal stability of a cysteine-free alkaline protease (Alp) secreted by the eukaryote Aspergillus oryzae was improved both by the introduction of engineered twin disulfide bridges (Cys-69/Cys-101 and Cys-169/Cys-200), newly constructed as part of this study, and by the addition of calcium ions. We performed an extensive kinetic analysis of the increased thermal stability of the mutants as well as the role of calcium dependence. The thermodynamic activation parameters for irreversible thermal inactivation, the activation free energy (deltaG), the activation enthalpy (deltaH), and the activation entropy (deltaS) were determined from absolute reaction rate theory. The values of deltaH and deltaS were significantly and concomitantly increased as a result of introducing the twin disulfide bridges, for which the increase in the value of deltaH outweighed that of deltaS, resulting in significant increases in the value of deltaG. The enhancement of the thermal stability obtained by introducing the twin disulfide bridges is an example of the so-called low-temperature stabilization of enzymes. The stabilizing effect of calcium ions on wild-type Alp is similar to the results we obtained by introducing the engineered twin disulfide bridges.

  14. Effects of CO2 dissolution on phase distribution and degradation of dimethyl disulfide in soils under grape production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) is a fumigant recently registered in parts of U.S. The fumigant has high pesticidal activity, but lower volatility compared to other fumigants, leading to less soil dispersion. This study assessed the use of CO2 as a propellant to improve soil dispersion and dif...

  15. Tension-Enhanced Hydrogen Evolution Reaction on Vanadium Disulfide Monolayer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hui

    2016-12-01

    Water electrolysis is an efficient way for hydrogen production. Finding efficient, cheap, and eco-friendly electrocatalysts is essential to the development of this technology. In the work, we present a first-principles study on the effects of tension on the hydrogen evolution reaction of a novel electrocatalyst, vanadium disulfide (VS2) monolayer. Two electrocatalytic processes, individual and collective processes, are investigated. We show that the catalytic ability of VS2 monolayer at higher hydrogen coverage can be efficiently improved by escalating tension. We find that the individual process is easier to occur in a wide range of hydrogen coverage and the collective process is possible at a certain hydrogen coverage under the same tension. The best hydrogen evolution reaction with near-zero Gibbs free energy can be achieved by tuning tension. We further show that the change of catalytic activity with tension and hydrogen coverage is induced by the change of free carrier density around the Fermi level, that is, higher carrier density, better catalytic performance. It is expected that tension can be a simple way to improve the catalytic activity, leading to the design of novel electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen production from water electrolysis.

  16. Tension-Enhanced Hydrogen Evolution Reaction on Vanadium Disulfide Monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Water electrolysis is an efficient way for hydrogen production. Finding efficient, cheap, and eco-friendly electrocatalysts is essential to the development of this technology. In the work, we present a first-principles study on the effects of tension on the hydrogen evolution reaction of a novel electrocatalyst, vanadium disulfide (VS2) monolayer. Two electrocatalytic processes, individual and collective processes, are investigated. We show that the catalytic ability of VS2 monolayer at higher hydrogen coverage can be efficiently improved by escalating tension. We find that the individual process is easier to occur in a wide range of hydrogen coverage and the collective process is possible at a certain hydrogen coverage under the same tension. The best hydrogen evolution reaction with near-zero Gibbs free energy can be achieved by tuning tension. We further show that the change of catalytic activity with tension and hydrogen coverage is induced by the change of free carrier density around the Fermi level, that is, higher carrier density, better catalytic performance. It is expected that tension can be a simple way to improve the catalytic activity, leading to the design of novel electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen production from water electrolysis.

  17. Recovering value from the Avtex Fibers Superfund site: A case history

    SciTech Connect

    Blasko, M.J.; DeTemple, M.I.

    1994-12-31

    The Avtex Superfund site is located in Front Royal, Virginia. Some recent activities at Avtex have followed an innovative path. This innovative path provides some hope that government regulators and entrepreneurs can coexist in mutually beneficial relationships at potentially valuable Superfund sites. Manufacturing operations at the Avtex site began in 1940. The site produced viscose rayon from wood pulp. Contaminants at the site include sodium hydroxide, carbon disulfide, viscose, sulfuric acid, sodium sulfate, and zinc sulfate. Other contaminants identified at the site include asbestos, PCBs, and hydrogen sulfide. Recognizing the health and safety hazards at the site, the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) developed and issued a Consent Order that governs asset removal activities at the site. The Consent Order requires individuals planning to remove assets to develop a Work Plan for asset removal, as well as cleanup.

  18. Ion mobility mass spectrometry as a potential tool to assign disulfide bonds arrangements in peptides with multiple disulfide bridges.

    PubMed

    Echterbille, Julien; Quinton, Loïc; Gilles, Nicolas; De Pauw, Edwin

    2013-05-07

    Disulfide bridges play a major role in defining the structural properties of peptides and proteins. However, the determination of the cysteine pairing is still challenging. Peptide sequences are usually achieved using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectra of the totally reduced unfolded species, but the cysteine pairing information is lost. On the other hand, MS/MS experiments performed on native folded species show complex spectra composed of nonclassical ions. MS/MS alone does not allow either the cysteine pairing or the full sequence of an unknown peptide to be determined. The major goal of this work is to set up a strategy for the full structural characterization of peptides including disulfide bridges annotation in the sequence. This strategy was developed by combining ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). It is assumed that the opening of one S-S bridge in a peptide leads to a structural evolution which results in a modification of IMS drift time. In the presence of multiple S-S bridges, the shift in arrival time will depend on which disulfide(s) has (have) been reduced and on the shape adopted by the generated species. Due to specific fragmentations observed for each species, CID experiments performed after the mobility separation could provide not only information on peptide sequence but also on the localization of the disulfide bridges. To achieve this goal, synthetic peptides containing two disulfides were studied. The openings of the bridges were carried out following different experimental conditions such as reduction, reduction/alkylation, or oxidation. Due to disulfide scrambling highlighted with the reduction approaches, oxidation of S-S bonds into cysteic acids appeared to be the best strategy. Cysteine connectivity was then unambiguously determined for the two peptides, without any disulfide scrambling interference.

  19. Active site proton delivery and the lyase activity of human CYP17A1

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Yogan; Gregory, Michael C.; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2014-01-03

    equivalents and protons are funneled into non-productive pathways. This is similar to previous work with other P450 catalyzed hydroxylation. However, catalysis of carbon–carbon bond scission by the T306A mutant was largely unimpeded by disruption of the CYP17A1 acid-alcohol pair. The unique response of CYP17A1 lyase activity to mutation of Thr306 is consistent with a reactive intermediate formed independently of proton delivery in the active site, and supports involvement of a nucleophilic peroxo-anion rather than the traditional Compound I in catalysis.

  20. Pathways of H2 toward the Active Site of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Vitor H.; Baptista, António M.; Soares, Cláudio M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2), but little is known about the diffusion of H2 toward the active site. Here we analyze pathways for H2 permeation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent. Various MD simulation replicates were done, to improve the sampling of the system states. H2 easily permeates hydrogenase in every simulation and it moves preferentially in channels. All H2 molecules that reach the active site made their approach from the side of the Ni ion. H2 is able to reach distances of <4 Å from the active site, although after 6 Å permeation is difficult. In this region we mutated Val-67 into alanine and perform new MD simulations. These simulations show an increase of H2 inside the protein and at lower distances from the active site. This valine can be a control point in the H2 access to the active center. PMID:16731562

  1. Maintenance of plastid RNA editing activities independently of their target sites.

    PubMed

    Tillich, Michael; Poltnigg, Peter; Kushnir, Sergei; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian

    2006-03-01

    RNA editing in plant organelles is mediated by site-specific, nuclear-encoded factors. Previous data suggested that the maintenance of these factors depends on the presence of their rapidly evolving cognate sites. The surprising ability of allotetraploid Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) to edit a foreign site in the chloroplast ndhA messenger RNA was thought to be inherited from its diploid male ancestor, Nicotiana tomentosiformis. Here, we show that the same ndhA editing activity is also present in Nicotiana sylvestris, which is the female diploid progenitor of tobacco and which lacks the ndhA site. Hence, heterologous editing is not simply a result of tobacco's allopolyploid genome organization. Analyses of other editing sites after sexual or somatic transfer between land plants showed that heterologous editing occurs at a surprisingly high frequency. This suggests that the corresponding editing activities are conserved despite the absence of their target sites, potentially because they serve other functions in the plant cell.

  2. A Processive Carbohydrate Polymerase That Mediates Bifunctional Catalysis Using a Single Active Site

    PubMed Central

    May, John F.; Levengood, Matthew R.; Splain, Rebecca A.; Brown, Christopher D.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    Even in the absence of a template, glycosyltransferases can catalyze the synthesis of carbohydrate polymers of specific sequence. The paradigm has been that one enzyme catalyzes the formation of one type of glycosidic linkage, yet certain glycosyltransferases generate polysaccharide sequences composed of two distinct linkage types. In principle, bifunctional glycosyltransferases can possess separate active sites for each catalytic activity or one active site with dual activities. We encountered the fundamental question of one or two distinct active sites in our investigation of the galactosyltransferase GlfT2. GlfT2 catalyzes the formation of mycobacterial galactan, a critical cell-wall polymer composed of galactofuranose residues connected with alternating, regioisomeric linkages. We found that GlfT2 mediates galactan polymerization using only one active site that manifests dual regioselectivity. Structural modeling of the bifunctional glycosyltransferases hyaluronan synthase and cellulose synthase suggests that these enzymes also generate multiple glycosidic linkages using a single active site. These results highlight the versatility of glycosyltransferases for generating polysaccharides of specific sequence. We postulate that a hallmark of processive elongation of a carbohydrate polymer by a bifunctional enzyme is that one active site can give rise to two separate types of glycosidic bonds. PMID:22217153

  3. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Kenny, Paul J.; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets. PMID:25869137

  4. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  5. 75 FR 71677 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of the Energy Policy Act of... requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs of...

  6. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...). (e) For all asbestos-containing waste material received, the owner or operator of the active waste... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an...

  7. Unmasking tandem site interaction in human acetylcholinesterase. Substrate activation with a cationic acetanilide substrate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joseph L; Cusack, Bernadette; Davies, Matthew P; Fauq, Abdul; Rosenberry, Terrone L

    2003-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) contains a narrow and deep active site gorge with two sites of ligand binding, an acylation site (or A-site) at the base of the gorge, and a peripheral site (or P-site) near the gorge entrance. The P-site contributes to catalytic efficiency by transiently binding substrates on their way to the acylation site, where a short-lived acyl enzyme intermediate is produced. A conformational interaction between the A- and P-sites has recently been found to modulate ligand affinities. We now demonstrate that this interaction is of functional importance by showing that the acetylation rate constant of a substrate bound to the A-site is increased by a factor a when a second molecule of substrate binds to the P-site. This demonstration became feasible through the introduction of a new acetanilide substrate analogue of acetylcholine, 3-(acetamido)-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium (ATMA), for which a = 4. This substrate has a low acetylation rate constant and equilibrates with the catalytic site, allowing a tractable algebraic solution to the rate equation for substrate hydrolysis. ATMA affinities for the A- and P-sites deduced from the kinetic analysis were confirmed by fluorescence titration with thioflavin T as a reporter ligand. Values of a >1 give rise to a hydrolysis profile called substrate activation, and the AChE site-specific mutant W86F, and to a lesser extent wild-type human AChE itself, showed substrate activation with acetylthiocholine as the substrate. Substrate activation was incorporated into a previous catalytic scheme for AChE in which a bound P-site ligand can also block product dissociation from the A-site, and two additional features of the AChE catalytic pathway were revealed. First, the ability of a bound P-site ligand to increase the substrate acetylation rate constant varied with the structure of the ligand: thioflavin T accelerated ATMA acetylation by a factor a(2) of 1.3, while propidium failed to accelerate. Second, catalytic rate

  8. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2006-10-17

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  9. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  10. Structure and nuclearity of active sites in Fe-zeolites: comparison with iron sites in enzymes and homogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zecchina, Adriano; Rivallan, Mickaël; Berlier, Gloria; Lamberti, Carlo; Ricchiardi, Gabriele

    2007-07-21

    Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite zeolites efficiently catalyse several oxidation reactions which find close analogues in the oxidation reactions catalyzed by homogeneous and enzymatic compounds. The iron centres are highly dispersed in the crystalline matrix and on highly diluted samples, mononuclear and dinuclear structures are expected to become predominant. The crystalline and robust character of the MFI framework has allowed to hypothesize that the catalytic sites are located in well defined crystallographic positions. For this reason these catalysts have been considered as the closest and best defined heterogeneous counterparts of heme and non heme iron complexes and of Fenton type Fe(2+) homogeneous counterparts. On this basis, an analogy with the methane monooxygenase has been advanced several times. In this review we have examined the abundant literature on the subject and summarized the most widely accepted views on the structure, nuclearity and catalytic activity of the iron species. By comparing the results obtained with the various characterization techniques, we conclude that Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite are not the ideal samples conceived before and that many types of species are present, some active and some other silent from adsorptive and catalytic point of view. The relative concentration of these species changes with thermal treatments, preparation procedures and loading. Only at lowest loadings the catalytically active species become the dominant fraction of the iron species. On the basis of the spectroscopic titration of the active sites by using NO as a probe, we conclude that the active species on very diluted samples are isolated and highly coordinatively unsaturated Fe(2+) grafted to the crystalline matrix. Indication of the constant presence of a smaller fraction of Fe(2+) presumably located on small clusters is also obtained. The nitrosyl species formed upon dosing NO from the gas phase on activated Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite, have been analyzed

  11. Monocopper active site for partial methane oxidation in Cu-exchanged 8MR zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Ambarish R.; Zhao, Zhi -Jian; Siahrostami, Samira; Nørskov, Jens K.; Studt, Felix

    2016-08-17

    Direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen is experiencing renewed interest owing to the availability of new natural gas resources. Copper-exchanged zeolites such as mordenite and ZSM-5 have shown encouraging results, and di- and tri-copper species have been suggested as active sites. Recently, small eight-membered ring (8MR) zeolites including SSZ-13, -16, and -39 have been shown to be active for methane oxidation, but the active sites and reaction mechanisms in these 8MR zeolites are not known. In this work, we use density functional theory (DFT) calculations to systematically evaluate monocopper species as active sites for the partial methane oxidation reaction in Cu-exchanged SSZ-13. On the basis of kinetic and thermodynamic arguments, we suggest that [CuIIOH]+ species in the 8MR are responsible for the experimentally observed activity. Furthermore, our results successfully explain the available spectroscopic data and experimental observations including (i) the necessity of water for methanol extraction and (ii) the effect of Si/Al ratio on the catalyst activity. Monocopper species have not yet been suggested as an active site for the partial methane oxidation reaction, and our results suggest that [CuIIOH]+ active site may provide complementary routes for methane activation in zeolites in addition to the known [Cu–O–Cu]2+ and Cu3O3 motifs.

  12. Monocopper active site for partial methane oxidation in Cu-exchanged 8MR zeolites

    DOE PAGES

    Kulkarni, Ambarish R.; Zhao, Zhi -Jian; Siahrostami, Samira; ...

    2016-08-17

    Direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen is experiencing renewed interest owing to the availability of new natural gas resources. Copper-exchanged zeolites such as mordenite and ZSM-5 have shown encouraging results, and di- and tri-copper species have been suggested as active sites. Recently, small eight-membered ring (8MR) zeolites including SSZ-13, -16, and -39 have been shown to be active for methane oxidation, but the active sites and reaction mechanisms in these 8MR zeolites are not known. In this work, we use density functional theory (DFT) calculations to systematically evaluate monocopper species as active sites for the partial methane oxidationmore » reaction in Cu-exchanged SSZ-13. On the basis of kinetic and thermodynamic arguments, we suggest that [CuIIOH]+ species in the 8MR are responsible for the experimentally observed activity. Furthermore, our results successfully explain the available spectroscopic data and experimental observations including (i) the necessity of water for methanol extraction and (ii) the effect of Si/Al ratio on the catalyst activity. Monocopper species have not yet been suggested as an active site for the partial methane oxidation reaction, and our results suggest that [CuIIOH]+ active site may provide complementary routes for methane activation in zeolites in addition to the known [Cu–O–Cu]2+ and Cu3O3 motifs.« less

  13. INACTIVATION OF SEXUAL AGGLUTINATION IN HANSENULA WINGEI AND SACCHAROMYCES KLUYVERI BY DISULFIDE-CLEAVING AGENTS.

    PubMed

    TAYLOR, N W

    1964-10-01

    Taylor, Neil W. (Northern Regional Research Laboratory, Peoria, Ill.). Inactivation of sexual agglutination in Hansenula wingei and Saccharomyces kluyveri by disulfide-cleaving agents. J. Bacteriol. 88:929-936. 1964.-Mating types of both Hansenula wingei and Saccharomyces kluyveri can be activated to produce uniformly strong sexual agglutination by treatments with various solvents, such as 8 m LiBr. The strongly agglutinative mating-type preparations were irreversibly inactivated for sexual agglutination by various chemical treatments. Type 5 of H. wingei was inactivated by disulfide-cleaving reagents, but type 21 of H. wingei was not. Type 3 of S. kluyveri was more sensitive than type 26 of S. kluyveri to inactivation by disulfide-cleaving reagents. Comparison of sensitivities to these and other treatments, plus a moderately strong cross-agglutination between type 3 and type 21, indicated that the sexually agglutinative elements on type 3 are similar to type 5, and those of type 21 are similar to those of type 26. Inactivation-rate experiments showed a loss of agglutinative ability according to a sigmoid decrement with time for both types 5 and 21. The apparent extent of inactivation depended markedly on agglutination test conditions. Results of these experiments were interpreted to indicate tentatively, first, that the agglutinative elements of both types of a species are proteins and, second, that several agglutinating linkages are formed between any two cells in sexual agglutination.

  14. Disulfide isomers of alpha-neurotoxins from King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom.

    PubMed

    Lin, S R; Chang, L S; Chang, C C

    1999-01-08

    Two novel alpha-neurotoxins, Oh-6A and Oh-6B, isolated from the king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom, consist of 70 amino acid residues with 10 cysteine residues and share the same amino acid sequences as determined by Edman degradation on the peptide fragments generated from the proteolytic hydrolysates. Their sequences share 46-53% homology with Oh-4, Oh-5, Toxin a, and Toxin b from the same venom. The finding that Oh-6A and Oh-6B had different retention times in the reversed-phase column suggested that the two toxin molecules should not have the same conformation. Selective reduction on the disulfide bond, Cys26--Cys30, at the tip of their loop II structures resulted in the production of the partially reduced derivatives eluted at the same position. Under redox conditions, the partially reduced Oh-6A and 6B exclusively converted into native Oh-6A as evidenced by HPLC analyses. This suggests that Oh-6A and Oh-6B are disulfide isomers which probably arise from cis-trans isomerization of the Cys26--Cys30 disulfide bond. Alternatively, the two toxins exhibited binding activity toward nAChR and lethal toxicity equally. It reflects that the diversity around the extra loop at the loop II structure does not exert a significant effect on the manifestation of the neurotoxicity of Oh-6A and Oh-6B.

  15. Engineering de novo disulfide bond in bacterial α-type carbonic anhydrase for thermostable carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Byung Hoon; Park, Tae Yoon; Park, Hyun June; Yeon, Young Joo; Yoo, Young Je; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-07-01

    Exploiting carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that rapidly catalyzes carbon dioxide hydration, is an attractive biomimetic route for carbon sequestration due to its environmental compatibility and potential economic viability. However, the industrial applications of CA are strongly hampered by the unstable nature of enzymes. In this work, we introduced in silico designed, de novo disulfide bond in a bacterial α-type CA to enhance thermostability. Three variants were selected and expressed in Escherichia coli with an additional disulfide bridge. One of the variants showed great enhancement in terms of both kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities. This improvement could be attributed to the loss of conformational entropy of the unfolded state, showing increased rigidity. The variant showed an upward-shifted optimal temperature and appeared to be thermoactivated, which compensated for the lowered activity at 25 °C. Collectively, the variant constructed by the rapid and effective de novo disulfide engineering can be used as an efficient biocatalyst for carbon sequestration under high temperature conditions.

  16. Engineering de novo disulfide bond in bacterial α-type carbonic anhydrase for thermostable carbon sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Byung Hoon; Park, Tae Yoon; Park, Hyun June; Yeon, Young Joo; Yoo, Young Je; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that rapidly catalyzes carbon dioxide hydration, is an attractive biomimetic route for carbon sequestration due to its environmental compatibility and potential economic viability. However, the industrial applications of CA are strongly hampered by the unstable nature of enzymes. In this work, we introduced in silico designed, de novo disulfide bond in a bacterial α-type CA to enhance thermostability. Three variants were selected and expressed in Escherichia coli with an additional disulfide bridge. One of the variants showed great enhancement in terms of both kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities. This improvement could be attributed to the loss of conformational entropy of the unfolded state, showing increased rigidity. The variant showed an upward-shifted optimal temperature and appeared to be thermoactivated, which compensated for the lowered activity at 25 °C. Collectively, the variant constructed by the rapid and effective de novo disulfide engineering can be used as an efficient biocatalyst for carbon sequestration under high temperature conditions. PMID:27385052

  17. 1993 annual report of hazardous waste activities for the Oak Ridge K-25 site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report is a detailed listing of all of the Hazardous Waste activities occurring at Martin Marietta`s K-25 site. Contained herein are hazardous waste notification forms, waste stream reports, generator fee forms and various TSDR reports.

  18. Preclinical pharmacokinetic analysis of NOV-002, a glutathione disulfide mimetic.

    PubMed

    Uys, J D; Manevich, Y; Devane, L C; He, L; Garret, T E; Pazoles, C J; Tew, K D; Townsend, D M

    2010-09-01

    NOV-002 is a glutathione disulfide (GSSG) mimetic that is the subject of clinical investigation in oncology indications. GSSG is reduced by glutathione reductase (GR) to form glutathione (GSH), thereby maintaining redox homeostasis. The purpose of the study was to report the pharmacokinetic properties of NOV-002 and evaluate the effect that NOV-002 elicits in redox homeostasis. The pharmacokinetic analysis and tissue distribution of NOV-002 and GSH was evaluated in mice following a dose of 250 mg/kg, i.p. The redox potential and total protein thiol status was calculated. Here we show that NOV-002 is a substrate for GR and that GSH is a primary metabolite. Non-linear pharmacokinetic modeling predicted that the estimated absorption and elimination rate constants correspond to a half-life of approximately 13 min with an AUC of 1.18 μgh/mL, a C(max) of 2.16 μg/ml and a volume of distribution of 42.61 L/kg. In addition, measurement of the redox potential and total protein thiol status indicated the generation of a transient oxidative signal in the plasma compartment after administration of NOV-002. These results indicate that NOV-002 exerts kinetic and dynamic effects in mice consistent with the GSSG component as the active pharmacological constituent of the drug. A longer-lasting decrease in total plasma free thiol content was also seen, suggesting that the oxidative effect of the GSSG from NOV-002 was impacting redox homeostasis.

  19. Cardiovascular effects in viscose rayon workers exposed to carbon disulfide.

    PubMed

    Kotseva, K; Braeckman, L; De Bacquer, D; Bulat, P; Vanhoorne, M

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the cardiovascular effects in workers currently exposed to carbon disulfide (CS2) below the threshold limit value (TLV) of 31 mg/m3 and to determine the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) after long-term exposure. 172 men (91 workers exposed to CS2 in a viscose rayon factory and 81 referent workers) were examined using a medical and job history questionnaire, Rose's questionnaire, and electrocardiography at rest, and by measuring blood pressure and serum lipids and lipoproteins. Personal exposures were monitored simultaneously with active sampling and findings were analyzed according to the NIOSH 1600 method. As a result of technical and organizational improvements, personal CS2 exposures were well below the TLV (5.4-13.02 mg/m3). No significant effect of CS2 on blood pressure or lipids (total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and apolipoproteins AI and B) was found, even after allowance for confounding factors. The prevalence of CHD (ECG abnormalities and chest pain) was higher in the viscose rayon workers than in the workers with no exposure but reached statistical significance for men with exposure histories often years and more only (cumulative CS9 index > or = 150 mg/m3, the most highly exposed group). The findings suggest that the coronary risk is increased in workers previously exposed to high CS2 concentrations but not in those exposed to CS2 levels below the current TLV.

  20. Expression and Localization of Plant Protein Disulfide Isomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Shorrosh, B. S.; Subramaniam, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Dixon, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a putative protein disulfide isomerase (PDI, EC 5.3.4.1) from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) was expressed in Escherichia coli cells, and an antiserum was raised against the expressed PDI-active protein. The antiserum recognized a protein of approximately 60 kD in extracts from alfalfa, soybean, and tobacco roots and stems. Levels of this protein remained relatively constant on exposure of alfalfa cell suspension cultures to the protein glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin, whereas a slightly lower molecular mass form, also detected by the antiserum, was induced by this treatment. A lower molecular mass form of PDI was also observed in roots of alfalfa seedlings during the first 5 weeks after germination. PDI levels increased in developing soybean seeds up to 17 d after fertilization and then declined. Tissue print immunoblots revealed highest levels of PDI protein in the cambial tissues of soybean stems and petioles and in epidermal, subepidermal, cortical, and pith tissues of stems of alfalfa and tobacco. Immunogold electron microscopy confirmed the localization of PDI to the endoplasmic reticulum in soybean root nodules. PMID:12231974

  1. The surface chemistry of heterogeneous catalysis: mechanisms, selectivity, and active sites.

    PubMed

    Zaera, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    The role of chemical kinetics in defining the requirements for the active sites of heterogeneous catalysts is discussed. A personal view is presented, with specific examples from our laboratory to illustrate the role of the chemical composition, structure, and electronic properties of specific surface sites in determining reaction activity and selectivity. Manipulation of catalytic behavior via the addition of chemical modifiers and by tuning of the reaction conditions is also introduced.

  2. Nuclear waste: Status of DOE`s nuclear waste site characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    1987-12-31

    Three potential nuclear waste repository sites have been selected to carry out characterization activities-the detailed geological testing to determine the suitability of each site as a repository. The sites are Hanford in south-central Washington State, Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada, and Deaf Smith in the Texas Panhandle. Two key issues affecting the total program are the estimations of the site characterization completion data and costs and DOE`s relationship with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission which has been limited and its relations with affected states and Indian tribes which continue to be difficult.

  3. Assessment of disulfide and hinge modifications in monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Bernd; Stracke, Jan Olaf

    2016-12-16

    During the last years there was a substantial increase in the use of antibodies and related proteins as therapeutics. The emphasis of the pharmaceutical industry is on IgG1, IgG2, and IgG4 antibodies, which are therefore in the focus of this article. In order to ensure appropriate quality control of such biopharmaceuticals, deep understanding of their chemical degradation pathways and the resulting impact on potency, pharmacokinetics, and safety is required. Criticality of modifications may be specific for individual antibodies and has to be assessed for each molecule. However, some modifications of conserved structure elements occur in all or at least most IgGs. In these cases, criticality assessment may be applicable to related molecules or molecule formats. The relatively low dissociation energy of disulfide bonds and the high flexibility of the hinge region frequently lead to modifications and cleavages. Therefore, the hinge region and disulfide bonds require specific consideration during quality assessment of mAbs. In this review, available literature knowledge on underlying chemical reaction pathways of modifications, analytical methods for quantification and criticality are discussed. The hinge region is prone to cleavage and is involved in pathways that lead to thioether bond formation, cysteine racemization, and iso-Asp (Asp, aspartic acid) formation. Disulfide or sulfhydryl groups were found to be prone to reductive cleavage, trisulfide formation, cysteinylation, glutathionylation, disulfide bridging to further light chains, and disulfide scrambling. With regard to potency, disulfide cleavage, hinge cleavage, disulfide bridging to further light chains, and cysteinylation were found to influence antigen binding and fragment crystallizable (Fc) effector functionalities. Renal clearance of small fragments may be faster, whereas clearance of larger fragments appears to depend on their neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) functionality, which in turn may be impeded by

  4. Number and locations of agonist binding sites required to activate homomeric Cys-loop receptors.

    PubMed

    Rayes, Diego; De Rosa, María José; Sine, Steven M; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2009-05-06

    Homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors contain five identical agonist binding sites, each formed at a subunit interface. To determine the number and locations of binding sites required to generate a stable active state, we constructed a receptor subunit with a mutation that disables the agonist binding site and a reporter mutation that alters unitary conductance and coexpressed mutant and nonmutant subunits. Although receptors with a range of different subunit compositions are produced, patch-clamp recordings reveal that the amplitude of each single-channel opening event reports the number and, for certain subunit combinations, the locations of subunits with intact binding sites. We find that receptors with three binding sites at nonconsecutive subunit interfaces exhibit maximal mean channel open time, receptors with binding sites at three consecutive or two nonconsecutive interfaces exhibit intermediate open time, and receptors with binding sites at two consecutive or one interface exhibit brief open time. Macroscopic recordings after rapid application of agonist reveal that channel activation slows and the extent of desensitization decreases as the number of binding sites per receptor decreases. The overall results provide a framework for defining mechanisms of activation and drug modulation for homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors.

  5. A dielectric barrier discharge terminally inactivates RNase A by oxidizing sulfur-containing amino acids and breaking structural disulfide bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackmann, J.-W.; Baldus, S.; Steinborn, E.; Edengeiser, E.; Kogelheide, F.; Langklotz, S.; Schneider, S.; Leichert, L. I. O.; Benedikt, J.; Awakowicz, P.; Bandow, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    RNases are among the most stable proteins in nature. They even refold spontaneously after heat inactivation, regaining full activity. Due to their stability and universal presence, they often pose a problem when experimenting with RNA. We investigated the capabilities of nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas to inactivate RNase A and studied the inactivation mechanism on a molecular level. While prolonged heating above 90 °C is required for heat inactivating RNase A, direct plasma treatment with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) source caused permanent inactivation within minutes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that DBD-treated RNase A unfolds rapidly. Raman spectroscopy indicated methionine modifications and formation of sulfonic acid. A mass spectrometry-based analysis of the protein modifications that occur during plasma treatment over time revealed that methionine sulfoxide formation coincides with protein inactivation. Chemical reduction of methionine sulfoxides partially restored RNase A activity confirming that sulfoxidation is causal and sufficient for RNase A inactivation. Continued plasma exposure led to over-oxidation of structural disulfide bonds. Using antibodies, disulfide bond over-oxidation was shown to be a general protein inactivation mechanism of the DBD. The antibody’s heavy and light chains linked by disulfide bonds dissociated after plasma exposure. Based on their ability to inactivate proteins by oxidation of sulfur-containing amino acids and over-oxidation of disulfide bonds, DBD devices present a viable option for inactivating undesired or hazardous proteins on heat or solvent-sensitive surfaces.

  6. Topological plasticity of enzymes involved in disulfide bond formation allows catalysis in either the periplasm or the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Hatahet, Feras; Ruddock, Lloyd W

    2013-09-23

    The transmembrane enzymes disulfide bond forming enzyme B (DsbB) and vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) are central to oxidative protein folding in the periplasm of prokaryotes. Catalyzed formation of structural disulfide bonds in proteins also occurs in the cytoplasm of some hyperthermophilic prokaryotes through currently, poorly defined mechanisms. We aimed to determine whether DsbB and VKOR can be inverted in the membrane with retention of activity. By rational design of inversion of membrane topology, we engineered DsbB mutants that catalyze disulfide bond formation in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli. This represents the first engineered inversion of a transmembrane protein with demonstrated conservation of activity and substrate specificity. This successful designed engineering led us to identify two naturally occurring and oppositely oriented VKOR homologues from the hyperthermophile Aeropyrum pernix that promote oxidative protein folding in the periplasm or cytoplasm, respectively, and hence defines the probable route for disulfide bond formation in the cytoplasm of hyperthermophiles. Our findings demonstrate how knowledge on the determinants of membrane protein topology can be used to de novo engineer a metabolic pathway and to unravel an intriguingly simple evolutionary scenario where a new "adaptive" cellular process is constructed by means of membrane protein topology inversion.

  7. Disulfide Bridges: Bringing Together Frustrated Structure in a Bioactive Peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Schulten, Klaus; Gruebele, Martin; Bansal, Paramjit S; Wilson, David; Daly, Norelle L

    2016-04-26

    Disulfide bridges are commonly found covalent bonds that are usually believed to maintain structural stability of proteins. Here, we investigate the influence of disulfide bridges on protein dynamics through molecular dynamics simulations on the cysteine-rich trypsin inhibitor MCoTI-II with three disulfide bridges. Correlation analysis of the reduced cyclic peptide shows that two of the three disulfide distances (Cys(11)-Cys(23) and Cys(17)-Cys(29)) are anticorrelated within ∼1 μs of bridge formation or dissolution: when the peptide is in nativelike structures and one of the distances shortens to allow bond formation, the other tends to lengthen. Simulations over longer timescales, when the denatured state is less structured, do not show the anticorrelation. We propose that the native state contains structural elements that frustrate one another's folding, and that the two bridges are critical for snapping the frustrated native structure into place. In contrast, the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge is predicted to form together with either of the other two bridges. Indeed, experimental chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance data show that an engineered peptide with the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge deleted can still fold into its near-native structure even in its noncyclic form, confirming the lesser role of the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge. The results highlight the importance of disulfide bridges in a small bioactive peptide to bring together frustrated structure in addition to maintaining protein structural stability.

  8. Molecular dynamics explorations of active site structure in designed and evolved enzymes.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Sílvia; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Noey, Elizabeth L; Houk, K N

    2015-04-21

    This Account describes the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reveal how mutations alter the structure and organization of enzyme active sites. As proposed by Pauling about 70 years ago and elaborated by many others since then, biocatalysis is efficient when functional groups in the active site of an enzyme are in optimal positions for transition state stabilization. Changes in mechanism and covalent interactions are often critical parts of enzyme catalysis. We describe our explorations of the dynamical preorganization of active sites using MD, studying the fluctuations between active and inactive conformations normally concealed to static crystallography. MD shows how the various arrangements of active site residues influence the free energy of the transition state and relates the populations of the catalytic conformational ensemble to the enzyme activity. This Account is organized around three case studies from our laboratory. We first describe the importance of dynamics in evaluating a series of computationally designed and experimentally evolved enzymes for the Kemp elimination, a popular subject in the enzyme design field. We find that the dynamics of the active site is influenced not only by the original sequence design and subsequent mutations but also by the nature of the ligand present in the active site. In the second example, we show how microsecond MD has been used to uncover the role of remote mutations in the active site dynamics and catalysis of a transesterase, LovD. This enzyme was evolved by Tang at UCLA and Codexis, Inc., and is a useful commercial catalyst for the production of the drug simvastatin. X-ray analysis of inactive and active mutants did not reveal differences in the active sites, but relatively long time scale MD in solution showed that the active site of the wild-type enzyme preorganizes only upon binding of the acyl carrier protein (ACP) that delivers the natural acyl group to the active site. In the absence of bound ACP

  9. Correlated structural kinetics and retarded solvent dynamics at the metalloprotease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Moran; Born, Benjamin; Heyden, Matthias; Tworowski, Dmitry; Fields, Gregg B.; Sagi, Irit; Havenith, Martina

    2011-09-18

    Solvent dynamics can play a major role in enzyme activity, but obtaining an accurate, quantitative picture of solvent activity during catalysis is quite challenging. Here, we combine terahertz spectroscopy and X-ray absorption analyses to measure changes in the coupled water-protein motions during peptide hydrolysis by a zinc-dependent human metalloprotease. These changes were tightly correlated with rearrangements at the active site during the formation of productive enzyme-substrate intermediates and were different from those in an enzyme–inhibitor complex. Molecular dynamics simulations showed a steep gradient of fast-to-slow coupled protein-water motions around the protein, active site and substrate. Our results show that water retardation occurs before formation of the functional Michaelis complex. We propose that the observed gradient of coupled protein-water motions may assist enzyme-substrate interactions through water-polarizing mechanisms that are remotely mediated by the catalytic metal ion and the enzyme active site.

  10. Two interacting binding sites for quinacrine derivatives in the active site of trypanothione reductase – a template for drug design

    PubMed Central

    Saravanamuthu, Ahilan; Vickers, Tim J.; Bond, Charles S.; Peterson, Mark R.; Hunter, William N.; Fairlamb, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Trypanothione reductase is a key enzyme in the trypanothione-based redox metabolism of pathogenic trypanosomes. Since this system is absent in humans, being replaced with glutathione and glutathione reductase, it offers a target for selective inhibition. The rational design of potent inhibitors requires accurate structures of enzyme-inhibitor complexes, but this is lacking for trypanothione reductase. We therefore used quinacrine mustard, an alkylating derivative of the competitive inhibitor quinacrine, to probe the active site of this dimeric flavoprotein. Quinacrine mustard irreversibly inactivates Trypanosoma cruzi trypanothione reductase, but not human glutathione reductase, in a time-dependent manner with a stoichiometry of two inhibitors bound per monomer. The rate of inactivation is dependent upon the oxidation state of trypanothione reductase, with the NADPH-reduced form being inactivated significantly faster than the oxidised form. Inactivation is slowed by clomipramine and a melarsen oxide-trypanothione adduct (both are competitive inhibitors) but accelerated by quinacrine. The structure of the trypanothione reductase-quinacrine mustard adduct was determined to 2.7 Å, revealing two molecules of inhibitor bound in the trypanothione-binding site. The acridine moieties interact with each other through π-stacking effects, and one acridine interacts in a similar fashion with a tryptophan residue. These interactions provide a molecular explanation for the differing effects of clomipramine and quinacrine on inactivation by quinacrine mustard. Synergism with quinacrine occurs as a result of these planar acridines being able to stack together in the active site cleft, thereby gaining an increased number of binding interactions, whereas antagonism occurs with non-planar molecules, such as clomipramine, where stacking is not possible. PMID:15102853

  11. The three Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85 isoforms have unique substrates and activities determined by non-active site regions.

    PubMed

    Backus, Keriann M; Dolan, Michael A; Barry, Conor S; Joe, Maju; McPhie, Peter; Boshoff, Helena I M; Lowary, Todd L; Davis, Benjamin G; Barry, Clifton E

    2014-09-05

    The three isoforms of antigen 85 (A, B, and C) are the most abundant secreted mycobacterial proteins and catalyze transesterification reactions that synthesize mycolated arabinogalactan, trehalose monomycolate (TMM), and trehalose dimycolate (TDM), important constituents of the outermost layer of the cellular envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These three enzymes are nearly identical at the active site and have therefore been postulated to exist to evade host immunity. Distal to the active site is a second putative carbohydrate-binding site of lower homology. Mutagenesis of the three isoforms at this second site affected both substrate selectivity and overall catalytic activity in vitro. Using synthetic and natural substrates, we show that these three enzymes exhibit unique selectivity; antigen 85A more efficiently mycolates TMM to form TDM, whereas C (and to a lesser extent B) has a higher rate of activity using free trehalose to form TMM. This difference in substrate selectivity extends to the hexasaccharide fragment of cell wall arabinan. Mutation of secondary site residues from the most active isoform (C) into those present in A or B partially interconverts this substrate selectivity. These experiments in combination with molecular dynamics simulations reveal that differences in the N-terminal helix α9, the adjacent Pro(216)-Phe(228) loop, and helix α5 are the likely cause of changes in activity and substrate selectivity. These differences explain the existence of three isoforms and will allow for future work in developing inhibitors.

  12. Fragment-based identification of determinants of conformational and spectroscopic change at the ricin active site

    SciTech Connect

    Carra,J.; McHugh, C.; Mulligan, S.; Machiesky, L.; Soares, A.; Millard, C.

    2007-01-01

    We found that amide ligands can bind weakly but specifically to the ricin active site, producing significant shifts in positions of the critical active site residues Arg180 and Tyr80. These results indicate that fragment-based drug discovery methods are capable of identifying minimal bonding determinants of active-site side-chain rearrangements and the mechanistic origins of spectroscopic shifts. Our results suggest that tryptophan fluorescence provides a sensitive probe for the geometric relationship of arginine-tryptophan pairs, which often have significant roles in protein function. Using the unusual characteristics of the RTA system, we measured the still controversial thermodynamic changes of site-specific urea binding to a protein, results that are relevant to understanding the physical mechanisms of protein denaturation.

  13. Metal-catalyzed oxidation of phenylalanine-sensitive 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase from Escherichia coli: inactivation and destabilization by oxidation of active-site cysteines.

    PubMed

    Park, O K; Bauerle, R

    1999-03-01

    The in vitro instability of the phenylalanine-sensitive 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase [DAHPS(Phe)] from Escherichia coli has been found to be due to a metal-catalyzed oxidation mechanism. DAHPS(Phe) is one of three differentially feedback-regulated isoforms of the enzyme which catalyzes the first step of aromatic biosynthesis, the formation of DAHP from phosphoenolpyruvate and D-erythrose-4-phosphate. The activity of the apoenzyme decayed exponentially, with a half-life of about 1 day at room temperature, and the heterotetramer slowly dissociated to the monomeric state. The enzyme was stabilized by the presence of phosphoenolpyruvate or EDTA, indicating that in the absence of substrate, a trace metal(s) was the inactivating agent. Cu2+ and Fe2+, but none of the other divalent metals that activate the enzyme, greatly accelerated the rate of inactivation and subunit dissociation. Both anaerobiosis and the addition of catalase significantly reduced Cu2+-catalyzed inactivation. In the spontaneously inactivated enzyme, there was a net loss of two of the seven thiols per subunit; this value increased with increasing concentrations of added Cu2+. Dithiothreitol completely restored the enzymatic activity and the two lost thiols in the spontaneously inactivated enzyme but was only partially effective in reactivation of the Cu2+-inactivated enzyme. Mutant enzymes with conservative replacements at either of the two active-site cysteines, Cys61 or Cys328, were insensitive to the metal attack. Peptide mapping of the Cu2+-inactivated enzyme revealed a disulfide linkage between these two cysteine residues. All results indicate that DAHPS(Phe) is a metal-catalyzed oxidation system wherein bound substrate protects active-site residues from oxidative attack catalyzed by bound redox metal cofactor. A mechanism of inactivation of DAHPS is proposed that features a metal redox cycle that requires the sequential oxidation of its two active-site cysteines.

  14. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  15. All the catalytic active sites of MoS2 for hydrogen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Du; Qiao, Qiao; Yu, Yifei; Peterson, David; Zafar, Abdullah; Kumar, Raj; Curtarolo, Stefano; Hunte, Frank; Shannon, Steve; Zhu, Yimei; Yang, Weitao; Cao, Linyou

    2016-11-29

    MoS2 presents a promising low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), but the understanding about its active sites has remained limited. Here we present an unambiguous study of the catalytic activities of all possible reaction sites of MoS2, including edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries. We demonstrate that, in addition to the well-known catalytically active edge sites, sulfur vacancies provide another major active site for the HER, while the catalytic activity of grain boundaries is much weaker. Here, the intrinsic turnover frequencies (Tafel slopes) of the edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries are estimated to be 7.5 s–1 (65–75 mV/dec), 3.2 s–1 (65–85 mV/dec), and 0.1 s–1 (120–160 mV/dec), respectively. We also demonstrate that the catalytic activity of sulfur vacancies strongly depends on the density of the vacancies and the local crystalline structure in proximity to the vacancies. Unlike edge sites, whose catalytic activity linearly depends on the length, sulfur vacancies show optimal catalytic activities when the vacancy density is in the range of 7–10%, and the number of sulfur vacancies in high crystalline quality MoS2 is higher than that in low crystalline quality MoS2, which may be related with the proximity of different local crystalline structures to the vacancies.

  16. Simple, Automated, High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Method to Determine the Disulfide Bond and Glycosylation Patterns of a Complex Protein

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Gennett M.; Madden, Benjamin J.; Melder, Deborah C.; Charlesworth, M. Cristine; Federspiel, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Enveloped viruses must fuse the viral and cellular membranes to enter the cell. Understanding how viral fusion proteins mediate entry will provide valuable information for antiviral intervention to combat associated disease. The avian sarcoma and leukosis virus envelope glycoproteins, trimers composed of surface (SU) and transmembrane heterodimers, break the fusion process into several steps. First, interactions between SU and a cell surface receptor at neutral pH trigger an initial conformational change in the viral glycoprotein trimer followed by exposure to low pH enabling additional conformational changes to complete the fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. Here, we describe the structural characterization of the extracellular region of the subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis viruses envelope glycoproteins, SUATM129 produced in chicken DF-1 cells. We developed a simple, automated method for acquiring high resolution mass spectrometry data using electron capture dissociation conditions that preferentially cleave the disulfide bond more readily than the peptide backbone amide bonds that enabled the identification of disulfide-linked peptides. Seven of nine disulfide bonds were definitively assigned; the remaining two bonds were assigned to an adjacent pair of cysteine residues. The first cysteine of surface and the last cysteine of the transmembrane form a disulfide bond linking the heterodimer. The surface glycoprotein contains a free cysteine at residue 38 previously reported to be critical for virus entry. Eleven of 13 possible SUATM129 N-linked glycosylation sites were modified with carbohydrate. This study demonstrates the utility of this simple yet powerful method for assigning disulfide bonds in a complex glycoprotein. PMID:21454567

  17. A molybdenum disulfide/carbon nanotube heterogeneous complementary inverter.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Busnaina, Ahmed

    2012-08-24

    We report a simple, bottom-up/top-down approach for integrating drastically different nanoscale building blocks to form a heterogeneous complementary inverter circuit based on layered molybdenum disulfide and carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles. The fabricated CNT/MoS(2) inverter is composed of n-type molybdenum disulfide (MOS(2)) and p-type CNT transistors, with a high voltage gain of 1.3. The CNT channels are fabricated using directed assembly while the layered molybdenum disulfide channels are fabricated by mechanical exfoliation. This bottom-up fabrication approach for integrating various nanoscale elements with unique characteristics provides an alternative cost-effective methodology to complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors, laying the foundation for the realization of high performance logic circuits.

  18. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  19. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Cyanide (CN) is a well-studied toxic principle, known to inhibit heme-enzymes. • Inhibition is supposed to result from CN binding at the active site as a ligand. • Diverse heme enzymes’ CN inhibition profiles challenge prevailing mechanism. • Poor binding efficiency of CN at low enzyme concentrations and ligand pressures. • CN-based diffusible radicals cause ‘non-productive electron transfers’ (inhibition). - Abstract: The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins’ active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  20. Synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups on the hydrolysis of cellulose over activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, Guo Shiou; Sievers, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    The chemical oxidation of activated carbon by H2 O2 and H2 SO4 is investigated, structural and chemical modifications are characterized, and the materials are used as catalysts for the hydrolysis of cellulose. Treatment with H2 O2 enlarges the pore size and imparts functional groups such as phenols, lactones, and carboxylic acids. H2 SO4 treatment targets the edges of carbon sheets primarily, and this effect is more pronounced with a higher temperature. Adsorption isotherms demonstrate that the adsorption of oligomers on functionalized carbon is dominated by van der Waals forces. The materials treated chemically are active for the hydrolysis of cellulose despite the relative weakness of most of their acid sites. It is proposed that a synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups enhances the activity by inducing a conformational change in the glucan chains if they are adsorbed at defect sites. This activates the glycosidic bonds for hydrolysis by in-plane functional groups.

  1. Denaturation studies of active-site labeled papain using electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Z A; Butterfiel, D A

    1991-01-01

    A spin-labeled p-chloromercuribenzoate (SL-PMB) and a fluorescence probe, 6-acryloyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Acrylodan), both of which bind to the single SH group located in the active site of papain, were used to investigate the interaction of papain (EC 3.4.22.2) with two protein denaturants. It was found that the active site of papain was highly stable in urea solution, but underwent a large conformational change in guanidine hydrochloride solution. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence results were in agreement and both paralleled enzymatic activity of papain with respect to both the variation in pH and denaturation. These results strongly suggest that SL-PMB and Acrylodan labels can be used to characterize the physical state of the active site of the enzyme. PMID:1657229

  2. Novel processing and localization of catA, ccdA associated thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase, in protein hyper-producing bacterium Brevibacillus choshinensis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryoichi; Mizukami, Makoto; Tokunaga, Masao

    2005-01-01

    Previously, we have cloned ccdA and its associated thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase gene, catA, in Brevibacillus choshinensis. CcdA is known to be an integral membrane protein and its associated oxidoreductase homologues are believed to be membrane anchoring proteins, both providing reducing equivalents across the membrane to control correct disulfide bond formation. Here, we found that CatA is first localized as a membrane bound form and then slowly released into the cellular periphery and culture medium with cleavage at a novel processing site.

  3. Hydrogen peroxide removal and glutathione mixed disulfide formation during metabolic inhibition in mesencephalic cultures.

    PubMed

    Ehrhart, J; Zeevalk, G D

    2001-06-01

    Compromised mitochondrial energy metabolism and oxidative stress have been associated with the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. Our previous experiments exemplified the importance of GSH in the protection of neurons exposed to malonate, a reversible inhibitor of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase/complex II. This study further defines the role of oxidative stress during energy inhibition and begins to unravel the mechanisms by which GSH and other antioxidants may contribute to cell survival. Treatment of mesencephalic cultures with 10 microM buthionine sulfoximine for 24 h depleted total GSH by 60%, whereas 3 h exposure to 5 mM 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole irreversibly inactivated catalase activity by 90%. Treatment of GSH-depleted cells with malonate (40 mM) for 6, 12 or 24 h both potentiated and accelerated the time course of malonate toxicity, however, inhibition of catalase had no effect. In contrast, concomitant treatment with buthionine sulfoximine plus 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole in the presence of malonate significantly potentiated toxicity over that observed with malonate plus either inhibitor alone. Consistent with these findings, GSH depletion enhanced malonate-induced reactive oxygen species generation prior to the onset of toxicity. These findings demonstrate that early generation of reactive oxygen species during mitochondrial inhibition contributes to cell damage and that GSH serves as a first line of defense in its removal. Pre-treatment of cultures with 400 microM ascorbate protected completely against malonate toxicity (50 mM, 12 h), whereas treatment with 1 mM Trolox provided partial protection. Protein-GSH mixed disulfide formation during oxidative stress has been suggested to either protect vulnerable protein thiols or conversely to contribute to toxicity. Malonate exposure (50 mM) for 12 h resulted in a modest increase in mixed disulfide formation. However, exposure to the protective combination of ascorbate plus malonate increased membrane

  4. Collision-induced dissociation fragmentation inside disulfide C-terminal loops of natural non-tryptic peptides.

    PubMed

    Samgina, Tatiana Y; Vorontsov, Egor A; Gorshkov, Vladimir A; Artemenko, Konstantin A; Zubarev, Roman A; Ytterberg, Jimmy A; Lebedev, Albert T

    2013-07-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra of long non-tryptic peptides are usually quite complicated and rather difficult to interpret. Disulfide bond formed by two cysteine residues at C-terminus of frog skin peptides precludes one to determine sequence inside the forming loop. Thereby, chemical modification of S-S bonds is often used in "bottom up" sequencing approach. However, low-energy CID spectra of natural non-tryptic peptides with C-terminal disulfide cycle demonstrate an unusual fragmentation route, which may be used to elucidate the "hidden" C-terminal sequence. Low charge state protonated molecules experience peptide bond cleavage at the N-terminus of C-terminal cysteine. The forming isomeric acyclic ions serve as precursors for a series of b-type ions revealing sequence inside former disulfide cycle. The reaction is preferable for peptides with basic lysine residues inside the cycle. It may also be activated by acidic protons of Asp and Glu residues neighboring the loop. The observed cleavages may be quite competitive, revealing the sequence inside disulfide cycle, although S-S bond rupture does not occur in this case.

  5. Disulfide-rich macrocyclic peptides as templates in drug design.

    PubMed

    Northfield, Susan E; Wang, Conan K; Schroeder, Christina I; Durek, Thomas; Kan, Meng-Wei; Swedberg, Joakim E; Craik, David J

    2014-04-22

    Recently disulfide-rich head-to-tail cyclic peptides have attracted the interest of medicinal chemists owing to their exceptional thermal, chemical and enzymatic stability brought about by their constrained structures. Here we review current trends in the field of peptide-based pharmaceuticals and describe naturally occurring cyclic disulfide-rich peptide scaffolds, discussing their pharmaceutically attractive properties and benefits. We describe how we can utilise these stable frameworks to graft and/or engineer pharmaceutically interesting epitopes to increase their selectivity and bioactivity, opening up new possibilities for addressing 'difficult' pharmaceutical targets.

  6. Synthesis of Neoglycoconjugates by the Desulfurative Rearrangement of Allylic Disulfides

    PubMed Central

    Crich, David; Yang, Fan

    2009-01-01

    Two series of neoglucosyl donors are prepared based on connection of the allylic disulfide motif to the anomeric center via either a simple O-glycosyl linkage or N-glycosyl amide unit. Conjugation of both sets of donors to cysteine in peptides is demonstrated through classical disulfide exchange followed by the phosphine-mediated desulfurative allylic rearrangement resulting in neoglycopeptides characterized by a simple thioether spacer. The conjugation reaction functions in the absence of protecting groups on both the neoglycosyl donor and peptide in aqueous media at room temperature. PMID:18729514

  7. Enhancement of Polymerase Activity of the Large Fragment in DNA Polymerase I from Geobacillus stearothermophilus by Site-Directed Mutagenesis at the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Zhang, Beilei; Wang, Meng; Ou, Yanghui

    2016-01-01

    The large fragment of DNA polymerase I from Geobacillus stearothermophilus GIM1.543 (Bst DNA polymerase) with 5′-3′ DNA polymerase activity while in absence of 5′-3′ exonuclease activity possesses high thermal stability and polymerase activity. Bst DNA polymerase was employed in isothermal multiple self-matching initiated amplification (IMSA) which amplified the interest sequence with high selectivity and was widely applied in the rapid detection of human epidemic diseases. However, the detailed information of commercial Bst DNA polymerase is unpublished and well protected by patents, which makes the high price of commercial kits. In this study, wild-type Bst DNA polymerase (WT) and substitution mutations for improving the efficiency of DNA polymerization were expressed and purified in E. coli. Site-directed substitutions of four conserved residues (Gly310, Arg412, Lys416, and Asp540) in the activity site of Bst DNA polymerase influenced efficiency of polymerizing dNTPs. The substitution of residue Gly310 by alanine or leucine and residue Asp540 by glutamic acid increased the efficiency of polymerase activity. All mutants with higher polymerizing efficiency were employed to complete the rapid detection of EV71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) by IMSA approach with relatively shorter period which is suitable for the primary diagnostics setting in rural and underdeveloped areas. PMID:27981047

  8. An antiviral disulfide compound blocks interaction between arenavirus Z protein and cellular promyelocytic leukemia protein

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, C.C.; Topisirovic, I.; Djavani, M.; Borden, K.L.B.; Damonte, E.B.; Salvato, M.S.

    2010-03-19

    The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) forms nuclear bodies (NB) that can be redistributed by virus infection. In particular, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) influences disruption of PML NB through the interaction of PML with the arenaviral Z protein. In a previous report, we have shown that the disulfide compound NSC20625 has antiviral and virucidal properties against arenaviruses, inducing unfolding and oligomerization of Z without affecting cellular RING-containing proteins such as the PML. Here, we further studied the effect of the zinc-finger-reactive disulfide NSC20625 on PML-Z interaction. In HepG2 cells infected with LCMV or transiently transfected with Z protein constructs, treatment with NSC20625 restored PML distribution from a diffuse-cytoplasmic pattern to punctate, discrete NB which appeared identical to NB found in control, uninfected cells. Similar results were obtained in cells transfected with a construct expressing a Z mutant in zinc-binding site 2 of the RING domain, confirming that this Z-PML interaction requires the integrity of only one zinc-binding site. Altogether, these results show that the compound NSC20625 suppressed Z-mediated PML NB disruption and may be used as a tool for designing novel antiviral strategies against arenavirus infection.

  9. Mapping of domains on HIV envelope protein mediating association with calnexin and protein-disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Papandréou, Marie-Jeanne; Barbouche, Rym; Guieu, Régis; Rivera, Santiago; Fantini, Jacques; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Jones, Ian M; Fenouillet, Emmanuel

    2010-04-30

    The cell catalysts calnexin (CNX) and protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) cooperate in establishing the disulfide bonding of the HIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein. Following HIV binding to lymphocytes, cell-surface PDI also reduces Env to induce the fusogenic conformation. We sought to define the contact points between Env and these catalysts to illustrate their potential as therapeutic targets. In lysates of Env-expressing cells, 15% of the gp160 precursor, but not gp120, coprecipitated with CNX, whereas only 0.25% of gp160 and gp120 coprecipitated with PDI. Under in vitro conditions, which mimic the Env/PDI interaction during virus/cell contact, PDI readily associated with Env. The domains of Env interacting in cellulo with CNX or in vitro with PDI were then determined using anti-Env antibodies whose binding site was occluded by CNX or PDI. Antibodies against domains V1/V2, C2, and the C terminus of V3 did not bind CNX-associated Env, whereas those against C1, V1/V2, and the CD4-binding domain did not react with PDI-associated Env. In addition, a mixture of the latter antibodies interfered with PDI-mediated Env reduction. Thus, Env interacts with intracellular CNX and extracellular PDI via discrete, largely nonoverlapping, regions. The sites of interaction explain the mode of action of compounds that target these two catalysts and may enable the design of further new competitive agents.

  10. Mapping of Domains on HIV Envelope Protein Mediating Association with Calnexin and Protein-disulfide Isomerase*

    PubMed Central

    Papandréou, Marie-Jeanne; Barbouche, Rym; Guieu, Régis; Rivera, Santiago; Fantini, Jacques; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Jones, Ian M.; Fenouillet, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    The cell catalysts calnexin (CNX) and protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) cooperate in establishing the disulfide bonding of the HIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein. Following HIV binding to lymphocytes, cell-surface PDI also reduces Env to induce the fusogenic conformation. We sought to define the contact points between Env and these catalysts to illustrate their potential as therapeutic targets. In lysates of Env-expressing cells, 15% of the gp160 precursor, but not gp120, coprecipitated with CNX, whereas only 0.25% of gp160 and gp120 coprecipitated with PDI. Under in vitro conditions, which mimic the Env/PDI interaction during virus/cell contact, PDI readily associated with Env. The domains of Env interacting in cellulo with CNX or in vitro with PDI were then determined using anti-Env antibodies whose binding site was occluded by CNX or PDI. Antibodies against domains V1/V2, C2, and the C terminus of V3 did not bind CNX-associated Env, whereas those against C1, V1/V2, and the CD4-binding domain did not react with PDI-associated Env. In addition, a mixture of the latter antibodies interfered with PDI-mediated Env reduction. Thus, Env interacts with intracellular CNX and extracellular PDI via discrete, largely nonoverlapping, regions. The sites of interaction explain the mode of action of compounds that target these two catalysts and may enable the design of further new competitive agents. PMID:20202930

  11. Carbon Disulfide Mediates Socially-Acquired Nicotine Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tengfei; Chen, Hao

    2014-01-01

    The social environment plays a critical role in smoking initiation as well as relapse. We previously reported that rats acquired nicotine self-administration with an olfactogustatory cue only when another rat consuming the same cue was present during self-administration. Because carbon disulfide (CS2) mediates social learning of food preference in rodents, we hypothesized that socially acquired nicotine self-administration is also mediated by CS2. We tested this hypothesis by placing female adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats in operant chambers equipped with two lickometers. Licking on the active spout meeting a fixed-ratio 10 schedule triggered the concurrent delivery of an i.v. infusion (saline, or 30 µg/kg nicotine, free base) and an appetitive olfactogustatory cue containing CS2 (0–500 ppm). Rats that self-administered nicotine with the olfactogustatory cue alone licked less on the active spout than on the inactive spout. Adding CS2 to the olfactogustatory cue reversed the preference for the spouts. The group that received 500 ppm CS2 and the olfactogustatory cue obtained a significantly greater number of nicotine infusions than other groups. After extinction training, the original self-administration context reinstated nicotine-seeking behavior in all nicotine groups. In addition, in rats that received the olfactogustatory cue and 500 ppm CS2 during SA, a social environment where the nicotine-associated olfactory cue is present, induced much stronger drug-seeking behavior compared to a social environment lacking the olfactogustatory cue. These data established