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Sample records for active site electronic

  1. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  2. Denaturation studies of active-site labeled papain using electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Z A; Butterfiel, D A

    1991-01-01

    A spin-labeled p-chloromercuribenzoate (SL-PMB) and a fluorescence probe, 6-acryloyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Acrylodan), both of which bind to the single SH group located in the active site of papain, were used to investigate the interaction of papain (EC 3.4.22.2) with two protein denaturants. It was found that the active site of papain was highly stable in urea solution, but underwent a large conformational change in guanidine hydrochloride solution. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence results were in agreement and both paralleled enzymatic activity of papain with respect to both the variation in pH and denaturation. These results strongly suggest that SL-PMB and Acrylodan labels can be used to characterize the physical state of the active site of the enzyme. PMID:1657229

  3. Modulation of Active Site Electronic Structure by the Protein Matrix to Control [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Raugei, Simone; Squier, Thomas C.

    2014-09-30

    Control of the reactivity of the nickel center of the [NiFe] hydrogenase and other metalloproteins commonly involves outer coordination sphere ligands that act to modify the geometry and physical properties of the active site metal centers. We carried out a combined set of classical molecular dynamics and quantum/classical mechanics calculations to provide quantitative estimates of how dynamic fluctuations of the active site within the protein matrix modulate the electronic structure at the catalytic center. Specifically we focused on the dynamics of the inner and outer coordination spheres of the cysteinate-bound Ni–Fe cluster in the catalytically active Ni-C state. There are correlated movements of the cysteinate ligands and the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, which modulate the electron affinity at the active site and the proton affinity of a terminal cysteinate. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesize a coupling between protein dynamics and electron and proton transfer reactions critical to dihydrogen production.

  4. Electronic structure contributions to electron-transfer reactivity in iron-sulfur active sites: 1. Photoelectron spectroscopic determination of electronic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kennepohl, Pierre; Solomon, Edward I

    2003-02-10

    Electronic relaxation, the change in molecular electronic structure as a response to oxidation, is investigated in [FeX(4)](2)(-)(,1)(-) (X = Cl, SR) model complexes. Photoelectron spectroscopy, in conjunction with density functional methods, is used to define and evaluate the core and valence electronic relaxation upon ionization of [FeX(4)](2)(-). The presence of intense yet formally forbidden charge-transfer satellite peaks in the PES data is a direct reflection of electronic relaxation. The phenomenon is evaluated as a function of charge redistribution at the metal center (Deltaq(rlx)) resulting from changes in the electronic structure. This charge redistribution is calculated from experimental core and valence PES data using a valence bond configuration interaction (VBCI) model. It is found that electronic relaxation is very large for both core (Fe 2p) and valence (Fe 3d) ionization processes and that it is greater in [Fe(SR)(4)](2)(-) than in [FeCl(4)](2)(-). Similar results are obtained from DFT calculations. The results suggest that, although the lowest-energy valence ionization (from the redox-active molecular orbital) is metal-based, electronic relaxation causes a dramatic redistribution of electron density ( approximately 0.7ē) from the ligands to the metal center corresponding to a generalized increase in covalency over all M-L bonds. The more covalent tetrathiolate achieves a larger Deltaq(rlx) because the LMCT states responsible for relaxation are significantly lower in energy than those in the tetrachloride. The large observed electronic relaxation can make significant contributions to the thermodynamics and kinetics of electron transfer in inorganic systems.

  5. Electronic Portfolios. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Helen C., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on electronic portfolios from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: (1) "What Is the Perceived Value of Creating Electronic Portfolios to Teacher Credential Candidates?" (Valerie Amber and Brenda Czech); (2) "Development and Use of…

  6. Electronic Portfolios. [SITE 2001 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Dee Anna, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on electronic portfolios from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference: (1) "Portfolios: The Plan, the Purpose, a Preview" (Val Christensen and others); (2) "Electronic Portfolios (EP): A How To Guide" (Jerry P. Galloway); (3)…

  7. Observation of an Unusual Electronically Distorted Semiquinone Radical of PCB Metabolites in the Active Site of Prostaglandin H Synthase-2

    PubMed Central

    Wangpradit, Orarat; Moman, Edelmiro; Nolan, Kevin B.; Buettner, Garry R.; Robertson, Larry W.; Luthe, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    The activation of the metabolites of airborne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) into highly reactive radicals is of fundamental importance. We found that human recombinant prostaglandin H synthase-2 (hPGHS-2) biotransforms dihydroxy-PCBs, such as 4-chlorobiphenyl-2′,5′-hydroquinone (4-CB-2′,5′H2Q), into semiquinone radicals via one-electron oxidation. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, we observed the formation of the symmetric quartet spectrum (1:3:3:1 by area) of 4-chlorobiphenyl-2′,5′-semiquinone radical (4-CB-2′,5′-SQ•−) from 4-CB-2′,5′H2Q. This spectrum changed to an asymmetric spectrum with time: the change can be explained as the overlap of two different semiquinone radical species. Hindered rotation of the 4-CB-2′,5′-SQ•− appears not to be a major factor for the change in lineshape because increasing the viscosity of the medium with glycerol produced no significant change in lineshape. Introduction of a fluorine, which increases the steric hindrance for rotation of the dihydroxy-PCB studied, also produced no significant changes. An in silico molecular docking model of 4-CB-2′,5′H2Q in the peroxidase site of hPGHS-2 together with ab initio quantum mechanical studies indicate that the close proximity of a negatively charged carboxylic acid in the peroxidase active site may be responsible for the observed perturbation in the spectrum. This study provides new insights into the formation of semiquinones from PCB metabolites and underscores the potential role of PGHS-2 in the metabolic activation of PCBs. PMID:20843536

  8. Synergistic Effect of Dual Electron-Cocatalysts for Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity: rGO as Electron-Transfer Mediator and Fe(III) as Oxygen-Reduction Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huogen; Tian, Jing; Chen, Feng; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xuefei

    2015-01-01

    For a high-performance cocatalyst-modified photocatalyst, an effective interfacial separation of photogenerated electron from its corresponding holes and its following reduction reaction at the active sites are highly required. However, it is difficult for a single-component cocatalyst to simultaneously realize the crucial functions. In this study, an effective interfacial transfer of photogenerated electrons and its following rapid oxygen-reduction can be easily realized in a dual electron-cocatalyst modified Fe(III)/rGO-TiO2 photocatalyst, where the rGO nanosheets function as an electron-transfer mediator for the effective transfer of photogenerated electrons from the TiO2 surface while the Fe(III) cocatalyst serves as an electron-reduction active site to promote the following interfacial oxygen reduction. In this case, the rGO nanosheets were firstly loaded on the TiO2 nanoparticle surface by a hydrothermal method and then the Fe(III) cocatalyst was further modified on the rGO nanosheets by an impregnation method to prepare the Fe(III)/rGO-TiO2 photocatalyst. It was found that the dual electron-cocatalyst modified Fe(III)/rGO-TiO2 photocatalyst showed an obviously higher photocatalytic performance than the naked TiO2 and single-cocatalyst modified photocatalysts (such as Fe(III)/TiO2 and rGO-TiO2) owing to the synergistic effect of rGO and Fe(III) bi-cocatalysts. The present work can provide some new insights for the smart design of high-efficiency photocatalytic materials. PMID:26272870

  9. Invited award contribution for ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry. Geometric and electronic structure contributions to function in bioinorganic chemistry: active sites in non-heme iron enzymes.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E I

    2001-07-16

    Spectroscopy has played a major role in the definition of structure/function correlations in bioinorganic chemistry. The importance of spectroscopy combined with electronic structure calculations is clearly demonstrated by the non-heme iron enzymes. Many members of this large class of enzymes activate dioxygen using a ferrous active site that has generally been difficult to study with most spectroscopic methods. A new spectroscopic methodology has been developed utilizing variable temperature, variable field magnetic circular dichroism, which enables one to obtain detailed insight into the geometric and electronic structure of the non-heme ferrous active site and probe its reaction mechanism on a molecular level. This spectroscopic methodology is presented and applied to a number of key mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes leading to a general mechanistic strategy for O2 activation. These studies are then extended to consider the new features present in the binuclear non-heme iron enzymes and applied to understand (1) the mechanism of the two electron/coupled proton transfer to dioxygen binding to a single iron center in hemerythrin and (2) structure/function correlations over the oxygen-activating enzymes stearoyl-ACP Delta9-desaturase, ribonucleotide reductase, and methane monooxygenase. Electronic structure/reactivity correlations for O2 activation by non-heme relative to heme iron enzymes will also be developed.

  10. List 9 - Active CERCLIS Sites:

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The List 9 displays the sequence of activities undertaken at active CERCLIS sites. An active site is one at which site assessment, removal, remedial, enforcement, cost recovery, or oversight activities are being planned or conducted.

  11. Mixed valent sites in biological electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Edward I; Xie, Xiangjin; Dey, Abhishek

    2008-04-01

    Many of the active sites involved in electron transfer (ET) in biology have more than one metal and are mixed valent in at least one redox state. These include Cu(A), and the polynuclear Fe-S clusters which vary in their extent of delocalization. In this tutorial review the relative contributions to delocalization are evaluated using S K-edge X-ray absorption, magnetic circular dichroism and other spectroscopic methods. The role of intra-site delocalization in ET is considered.

  12. Active Site and Electronic Structure Elucidation of Pt Nanoparticles Supported on Phase-Pure Molybdenum Carbide Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shuai; Wang, Lucun; Saha, Shibely; Fushimi, Rebecca R; Li, Dongmei

    2017-03-22

    We recently showed that phase-pure molybdenum carbide nanotubes can be durable supports for platinum (Pt) nanoparticles in hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this paper we further characterize surface properties of the same Pt/β-Mo2C catalyst platform using carbon monoxide (CO)-Pt and CO-Mo2C bond strength of different Pt particle sizes in the <3 nm range. Results from diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and temporal analysis of products (TAP) revealed the existence of different active sites as Pt particle size increases. Correlation between the resultant catalyst activity and deposited Pt particle size was further investigated using water-gas-shift (WGS) as a probe reaction, suggesting that precise control of particle diameter and thickness is needed for optimized catalytic activity.

  13. Identical Location Transmission Electron Microscopy Imaging of Site-Selective Pt Nanocatalysts: Electrochemical Activation and Surface Disordering.

    PubMed

    Arán-Ais, Rosa M; Yu, Yingchao; Hovden, Robert; Solla-Gullón, Jose; Herrero, Enrique; Feliu, Juan M; Abruña, Héctor D

    2015-12-02

    We have employed identical location transmission electron microscopy (IL-TEM) to study changes in the shape and morphology of faceted Pt nanoparticles as a result of electrochemical cycling; a procedure typically employed for activating platinum surfaces. We find that the shape and morphology of the as-prepared hexagonal nanoparticles are rapidly degraded as a result of potential cycling up to +1.3 V. As few as 25 potential cycles are sufficient to cause significant degradation, and after about 500-1000 cycles the particles are dramatically degraded. We also see clear evidence of particle migration during potential cycling. These finding suggest that great care must be exercised in the use and study of shaped Pt nanoparticles (and related systems) as electrocatlysts, especially for the oxygen reduction reaction where high positive potentials are typically employed.

  14. Site-specific bioconjugation of an organometallic electron mediator to an enzyme with retained photocatalytic cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung In; Yoon, Sungho; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2015-04-07

    Photosynthesis consists of a series of reactions catalyzed by redox enzymes to synthesize carbohydrates using solar energy. In order to take the advantage of solar energy, many researchers have investigated artificial photosynthesis systems mimicking the natural photosynthetic enzymatic redox reactions. These redox reactions usually require cofactors, which due to their high cost become a key issue when constructing an artificial photosynthesis system. Combining a photosensitizer and an Rh-based electron mediator (RhM) has been shown to photocatalytically regenerate cofactors. However, maintaining the high concentration of cofactors available for efficient enzymatic reactions requires a high concentration of the expensive RhM; making this process cost prohibitive. We hypothesized that conjugation of an electron mediator to a redox enzyme will reduce the amount of electron mediators necessary for efficient enzymatic reactions. This is due to photocatalytically regenerated NAD(P)H being readily available to a redox enzyme, when the local NAD(P)H concentration near the enzyme becomes higher. However, conventional random conjugation of RhM to a redox enzyme will likely lead to a substantial loss of cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity. In order to avoid this issue, we investigated whether bioconjugation of RhM to a permissive site of a redox enzyme retains cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity. As a model system, a RhM was conjugated to a redox enzyme, formate dehydrogenase obtained from Thiobacillus sp. KNK65MA (TsFDH). A RhM-containing azide group was site-specifically conjugated to p-azidophenylalanine introduced to a permissive site of TsFDH via a bioorthogonal strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition and an appropriate linker. The TsFDH-RhM conjugate exhibited retained cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity.

  15. Implication of site quality on mitochondrial electron transport activity and its interaction with temperature in feral Mya arenaria clams from the Saguenay Fjord.

    PubMed

    Gagné, F; Blaise, C; André, C; Pellerin, J

    2007-02-01

    The advent of global warming has given rise to questions about the impact of temperature/pollution interactions on the integrity of certain benthic organisms like bivalves. This interaction was examined in intertidal Mya arenaria clams from the Saguenay Fjord using the concepts of cellular energy allocation and temperature-dependent mitochondrial electron transport (METT) activity. Clams were collected at low tide from six sites (two clean, four polluted) for determinations of condition factor (weight/shell length), growth index (age-to-length ratio), gonadal lipids and maturation index, gonad MET at various habitat temperatures, METT, gill xanthine oxidase and gill DNA damage. Condition factor was generally lower at the four polluted sites, with growth index being severely affected at two of them. Gonadal maturation was also significantly dampened at two of the four pollution-impacted sites. Gill xanthine oxidase (purine bases salvage pathway) and DNA strand breaks were significantly increased at most of the polluted sites, confirming pollution-mediated damage in clams. Moreover, MET at 20 degrees C, METT and gonad lipids were significantly induced at the polluted sites. Clam condition factor was negatively correlated with most of the biomarkers for cellular energy allocation (gonadal lipids, MET and METT), but not with gonadal maturation. DNA damage and xanthine oxidase were positively correlated with MET at 20 degrees C and METT. This is the first report of electron transport in mitochondria being more sensitive to incremental temperature increases in clams under pollution stress. The gradual warming of clam habitats would likely worsen the impacts of pollution in feral clam populations.

  16. Implication of site quality on mitochondrial electron transport activity and its interaction with temperature in feral Mya arenaria clams from the Saguenay Fjord

    SciTech Connect

    Gagne, F. . E-mail: Francois.Gagne@ec.gc.ca; Blaise, C.; Andre, C.; Pellerin, J.

    2007-02-15

    The advent of global warming has given rise to questions about the impact of temperature/pollution interactions on the integrity of certain benthic organisms like bivalves. This interaction was examined in intertidal Mya arenaria clams from the Saguenay Fjord using the concepts of cellular energy allocation and temperature-dependent mitochondrial electron transport (MET{sub T}) activity. Clams were collected at low tide from six sites (two clean, four polluted) for determinations of condition factor (weight/shell length), growth index (age-to-length ratio), gonadal lipids and maturation index, gonad MET at various habitat temperatures, MET{sub T}, gill xanthine oxidase and gill DNA damage. Condition factor was generally lower at the four polluted sites, with growth index being severely affected at two of them. Gonadal maturation was also significantly dampened at two of the four pollution-impacted sites. Gill xanthine oxidase (purine bases salvage pathway) and DNA strand breaks were significantly increased at most of the polluted sites, confirming pollution-mediated damage in clams. Moreover, MET at 20 deg. C, MET{sub T} and gonad lipids were significantly induced at the polluted sites. Clam condition factor was negatively correlated with most of the biomarkers for cellular energy allocation (gonadal lipids, MET and MET{sub T}), but not with gonadal maturation. DNA damage and xanthine oxidase were positively correlated with MET at 20 deg. C and MET{sub T}. This is the first report of electron transport in mitochondria being more sensitive to incremental temperature increases in clams under pollution stress. The gradual warming of clam habitats would likely worsen the impacts of pollution in feral clam populations.

  17. On the dynamical nature of the active center in a single-site photocatalyst visualized by 4D ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Su, Zixue; Thomas, John Meurig; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the dynamical nature of the catalytic active site embedded in complex systems at the atomic level is critical to developing efficient photocatalytic materials. Here, we report, using 4D ultrafast electron microscopy, the spatiotemporal behaviors of titanium and oxygen in a titanosilicate catalytic material. The observed changes in Bragg diffraction intensity with time at the specific lattice planes, and with a tilted geometry, provide the relaxation pathway: the Ti4+=O2− double bond transformation to a Ti3+−O1− single bond via the individual atomic displacements of the titanium and the apical oxygen. The dilation of the double bond is up to 0.8 Å and occurs on the femtosecond time scale. These findings suggest the direct catalytic involvement of the Ti3+−O1− local structure, the significance of nonthermal processes at the reactive site, and the efficient photo-induced electron transfer that plays a pivotal role in many photocatalytic reactions. PMID:26729878

  18. Spectroscopic and electronic structure studies of the trinuclear Cu cluster active site of the multicopper oxidase laccase: nature of its coordination unsaturation.

    PubMed

    Quintanar, Liliana; Yoon, Jungjoo; Aznar, Constantino P; Palmer, Amy E; Andersson, K Kristoffer; Britt, R David; Solomon, Edward I

    2005-10-12

    Laccase is a multicopper oxidase that contains four Cu ions, one type 1 (T1), one type 2 (T2), and a coupled binuclear type 3 Cu pair (T3). The T2 and T3 centers form a trinuclear Cu cluster that is the active site for O2 reduction to H2O. A combination of spectroscopic and DFT studies on a derivative where the T1 Cu has been replaced by a spectroscopically innocent Hg2+ ion has led to a detailed geometric and electronic structure description of the resting trinuclear Cu cluster, complementing crystallographic results. The nature of the T2 Cu ligation has been elucidated; this site is three-coordinate with two histidines and a hydroxide over its functional pH range (stabilized by a large inductive effect, cluster charge, and a hydrogen-bonding network). Both the T2 and T3 Cu centers have open coordination positions oriented toward the center of the cluster. DFT calculations show that the negative protein pocket (four conserved Asp/Glu residues within 12 A) and the dielectric of the protein play important roles in the electrostatic stability and integrity of the highly charged, coordinatively unsaturated trinuclear cupric cluster. These tune the ligand binding properties of the cluster, leading to its high affinity for fluoride and its coordination unsaturation in aqueous media, which play a key role in its O2 reactivity.

  19. Sulfur K-Edge XAS and DFT Calculations on NitrileHydratase: Geometric and Electronic Structure of the Non-heme Iron Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Abhishek; Chow, Marina; Taniguchi, Kayoko; Lugo-Mas, Priscilla; Davin, Steven; Maeda, Mizuo; Kovacs, Julie A.; Odaka, Masafumi; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-09-28

    The geometric and electronic structure of the active site of the non-heme iron enzyme nitrile hydratase (NHase) is studied using sulfur K-edge XAS and DFT calculations. Using thiolate (RS{sup -})-, sulfenate (RSO{sup -})-, and sulfinate (RSO{sub 2}{sup -})-ligated model complexes to provide benchmark spectral parameters, the results show that the S K-edge XAS is sensitive to the oxidation state of S-containing ligands and that the spectrum of the RSO- species changes upon protonation as the S-O bond is elongated (by {approx}0.1 {angstrom}). These signature features are used to identify the three cysteine residues coordinated to the low-spin Fe{sup III} in the active site of NHase as CysS{sup -}, CysSOH, and CysSO{sub 2}{sup -} both in the NO-bound inactive form and in the photolyzed active form. These results are correlated to geometry-optimized DFT calculations. The pre-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectrum is sensitive to the Z{sub eff} of the Fe and reveals that the Fe in [FeNO]{sup 6} NHase species has a Z{sub eff} very similar to that of its photolyzed Fe{sup III} counterpart. DFT calculations reveal that this results from the strong {pi} back-bonding into the {pi}* antibonding orbital of NO, which shifts significant charge from the formally t{sub 2}{sup 6} low-spin metal to the coordinated NO.

  20. Zirconium-metalloporphyrin frameworks as a three-in-one platform possessing oxygen nanocage, electron media, and bonding site for electrochemiluminescence protein kinase activity assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guang-Yao; Cai, Chang; Cosnier, Serge; Zeng, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Xue-Ji; Shan, Dan

    2016-06-01

    irradiation at 634 nm. Additionally, the surfactant tetraoctylammonium bromide (TOAB) further facilitated dissolved oxygen to interact with the active sites ZnTCPP of MOF-525-Zn. Furthermore, the inorganic Zr-O clusters of MOF-525-Zn were simultaneously served as the recognition sites of phosphate groups. And then, an ultrasensitive ECL sensor was proposed for protein kinase A (PKA) activity detection with a linear range from 0.01 to 20 U mL-1 and a sensitive detection limit of 0.005 U mL-1. This biosensor can also be applied for quantitative kinase inhibitor screening. Finally, it exhibits good performance with high stability and acceptable fabrication reproducibility, which provide a valuable strategy for clinic diagnostics and therapeutics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01206j

  1. Reversible Switching of Redox-Active Molecular Orbitals and Electron Transfer Pathways in Cu(A) Sites of Cytochrome c Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Zitare, Ulises; Alvarez-Paggi, Damián; Morgada, Marcos N; Abriata, Luciano A; Vila, Alejandro J; Murgida, Daniel H

    2015-08-10

    The Cu(A) site of cytochrome c oxidase is a redox hub that participates in rapid electron transfer at low driving forces with two redox cofactors in nearly perpendicular orientations. Spectroscopic and electrochemical characterizations performed on first and second-sphere mutants have allowed us to experimentally detect the reversible switching between two alternative electronic states that confer different directionalities to the redox reaction. Specifically, the M160H variant of a native Cu(A) shows a reversible pH transition that allows to functionally probe both states in the same protein species. Alternation between states exerts a dramatic impact on the kinetic redox parameters, thereby suggesting this effect as the mechanism underlying the efficiency and directionality of Cu(A) electron transfer in vivo. These findings may also prove useful for the development of molecular electronics.

  2. Correlations between the Electronic Properties of Shewanella oneidensis Cytochrome c Nitrite Reductase (ccNiR) and Its Structure: Effects of Heme Oxidation State and Active Site Ligation.

    PubMed

    Stein, Natalia; Love, Daniel; Judd, Evan T; Elliott, Sean J; Bennett, Brian; Pacheco, A Andrew

    2015-06-23

    The electrochemical properties of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR), a homodimer that contains five hemes per protomer, were investigated by UV-visible and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectropotentiometries. Global analysis of the UV-vis spectropotentiometric results yielded highly reproducible values for the heme midpoint potentials. These midpoint potential values were then assigned to specific hemes in each protomer (as defined in previous X-ray diffraction studies) by comparing the EPR and UV-vis spectropotentiometric results, taking advantage of the high sensitivity of EPR spectra to the structural microenvironment of paramagnetic centers. Addition of the strong-field ligand cyanide led to a 70 mV positive shift of the active site's midpoint potential, as the cyanide bound to the initially five-coordinate high-spin heme and triggered a high-spin to low-spin transition. With cyanide present, three of the remaining hemes gave rise to distinctive and readily assignable EPR spectral changes upon reduction, while a fourth was EPR-silent. At high applied potentials, interpretation of the EPR spectra in the absence of cyanide was complicated by a magnetic interaction that appears to involve three of five hemes in each protomer. At lower applied potentials, the spectra recorded in the presence and absence of cyanide were similar, which aided global assignment of the signals. The midpoint potential of the EPR-silent heme could be assigned by default, but the assignment was also confirmed by UV-vis spectropotentiometric analysis of the H268M mutant of ccNiR, in which one of the EPR-silent heme's histidine axial ligands was replaced with a methionine.

  3. Electronic information delivery at the job site

    SciTech Connect

    Schurman, D.L.; Kincaid, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The United States Department of Defense is actively investigating the usefulness of presenting procedural information for operation and maintenance of equipment on small, often hand-held, computers. The basic concept that is being explored is: the presentation of information that is necessary to job performance by means of computers rather than by means of text and drawings printed on paper. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) assisted the US Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences (ARI) in performing a test and evaluation of a prototype device that was an instantiation of the electronic information delivery concept. The prototype device is called the Personal Electronic Aid to Maintenance (PEAM). The device was tested as a substitute for technical manuals when being used by US Army mechanics in the repair of the fire control system of the M1 Abrams tank. This test and evaluation of the PEAM prototype revealed several general problems for the electronic delivery of information in terms of the human-computer interaction involved. It became clear, for example, that formatting and graphical standards that apply to paper manuals will not apply to electronically presented procedures. Another problem that appeared was the problem of losing one's place in a trouleshooting or other branching procedure. These, and other, problems are presented in this paper and suggestions are made for resolution of some, but not all, of these problems. 8 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  6. Site-selective electronic correlation in α-plutonium metal.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian-Xin; Albers, R C; Haule, K; Kotliar, G; Wills, J M

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of the phase diagram of elemental plutonium (Pu) must include both, the effects of the strong directional bonding and the high density of states of the Pu 5f electrons, as well as how that bonding weakens under the influence of strong electronic correlations. Here we present electronic-structure calculations of the full 16-atom per unit cell α-phase structure within the framework of density functional theory together with dynamical mean-field theory. Our calculations demonstrate that Pu atoms sitting on different sites within the α-Pu crystal structure have a strongly varying site dependence of the localization-delocalization correlation effects of their 5f electrons and a corresponding effect on the bonding and electronic properties of this complicated metal. In short, α-Pu has the capacity to simultaneously have multiple degrees of electron localization/delocalization of Pu 5f electrons within a pure single-element material.

  7. Electronic Denitration Savannah River Site Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1995-04-11

    Electrochemical destruction of nitrate in radioactive Savannah River Site Waste has been demonstrated in a bench-scale flow cell reactor. Greater than 99% of the nitrate can be destroyed in either an undivided or a divided cell reactor. The rate of destruction and the overall power consumption is dependent on the cell configuration and electrode materials. The fastest rate was observed using an undivided cell equipped with a nickel cathode and nickel anode. The use of platinized titanium anode increased the energy requirement and costs compared to a nickel anode in both the undivided and divided cell configurations.

  8. UAVSAR Active Electronically Scanned Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory, A.; Chamberlain, Neil F.; Zawadzki, Mark S.; Brown, Kyle M.; Fisher, Charles D.; Figueroa, Harry S.; Hamilton, Gary A.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Vorperian, Vatche; Grando, Maurio B.

    2011-01-01

    The Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is a pod-based, L-band (1.26 GHz), repeatpass, interferometric, synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) used for Earth science applications. Repeat-pass interferometric radar measurements from an airborne platform require an antenna that can be steered to maintain the same angle with respect to the flight track over a wide range of aircraft yaw angles. In order to be able to collect repeat-pass InSAR data over a wide range of wind conditions, UAVSAR employs an active electronically scanned array (AESA). During data collection, the UAVSAR flight software continuously reads the aircraft attitude state measured by the Embedded GPS/INS system (EGI) and electronically steers the beam so that it remains perpendicular to the flight track throughout the data collection

  9. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  10. The K+/site and H+/site stoichiometry of mitochondrial electron transport.

    PubMed

    Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1978-09-25

    Electrode measurements of the average number of H+ ejected and K+ taken up (in the presence of valinomycin) per pair of electrons passing the energy-conserving sites of the respiratory chain of rat liver and rat heart mitochondria have given identical values of the H+/site and 5+/site ratios very close to 4 in the presence of N-ethylmaleimide, an inhibitor of interfering respiration-coupled uptake of H+ + H2PO4-. The K+/site uptake ratio of 4 not only shows that inward movement of K+ provides quantitative charge-compensation for the 4 H+ ejected, but also confirms that 4 charges are separated per pair of electrons per site. When N-ethylmaleimide is omitted, the H+/site ejection ratio is depressed, because of the interfering secondary uptake of H/+ with H2PO4- on the phosphate carrier, but the K+/site uptake ratio remains at 4.0. Addition of phosphate or acetate, which can carry H+ into respiring mitochondria, further depresses the H+/site ratio, but does not affect the K+/site ratio, which remains at 4.0. These and other considerations thus confirm our earlier stoichiometric measurements that the average H+/site ratio is 4.0 and also show that the K+/site uptake ratio can be used as a measure of the intrinsic H+/site ratio, regardless of the presence of phosphate in the medium and without the necessity of adding N-ethylmaleimide or other inhibitors of H+ + H2PO4- transport.

  11. Electron microscopy methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, A. L.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B.

    2016-11-01

    The history of the development and application of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXMA) in studies of cultural heritage sites is considered. In fact, investigations based on these methods began when electron microscopes became a commercial product. Currently, these methods, being developed and improved, help solve many historical enigmas. To date, electron microscopy combined with microanalysis makes it possible to investigate any object, from parchment and wooden articles to pigments, tools, and objects of art. Studies by these methods have revealed that some articles were made by ancient masters using ancient "nanotechnologies"; hence, their comprehensive analysis calls for the latest achievements in the corresponding instrumental methods and sample preparation techniques.

  12. Extension of Hopfield's Electron Transfer Model To Accommodate Site-Site Correlation.

    PubMed

    Newton, Marshall D

    2015-11-19

    Extension of the Förster analogue for the ET rate constant (based on virtual intermediate electron detachment or attachment states) with inclusion of site-site correlation due to coulomb terms associated with solvent reorganization energy and the driving force, has been developed and illustrated for a simple three-state, two-mode model. The model is applicable to charge separation (CS), recombination (CR), and shift (CSh) ET processes, with or without an intervening bridge. The model provides a unified perspective on the role of virtual intermediate states in accounting for the thermal Franck-Condon weighted density of states (FCWD), the gaps controlling superexchange coupling, and mean absolute redox potentials, with full accommodation of site-site coulomb interactions. Two types of correlation have been analyzed: aside from the site-site correlation due to coulomb interactions, we have emphasized the intrinsic "nonorthogonality" which generally pertains to reaction coordinates (RCs) for different ET processes involving multiple electronic states, as may be expressed by suitably defined direction cosines (cos(θ)). A pair of RCs may be nonorthogonal even when the site-site coulomb correlations are absent. While different RCs are linearly independent in the mathematical sense for all θ ≠ 0°, they are independent in the sense of being "uncorrelated" only in the limit of orthogonality (θ = 90°). Application to more than two coordinates is straightforward and may include both discrete and continuum contributions.

  13. Site-directed deep electronic tunneling through a molecular network

    SciTech Connect

    Caspary, Maytal; Peskin, Uri

    2005-10-15

    Electronic tunneling in a complex molecular network of N(>2) donor/acceptor sites, connected by molecular bridges, is analyzed. The 'deep' tunneling dynamics is formulated using a recursive perturbation expansion, yielding a McConnell-type reduced N-level model Hamiltonian. Applications to models of molecular junctions demonstrate that the donor-bridge contact parameters can be tuned in order to control the tunneling dynamics and particularly to direct the tunneling pathway to either one of the various acceptors.

  14. Observations of Slow Electron Holes at a Magnetic Reconnection Site

    SciTech Connect

    Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Vaivads, A.; Andre, M.; Fujimoto, M.; Retino, A.; Owen, C. J.

    2010-10-15

    We report in situ observations of high-frequency electrostatic waves in the vicinity of a reconnection site in the Earth's magnetotail. Two different types of waves are observed inside an ion-scale magnetic flux rope embedded in a reconnecting current sheet. Electron holes (weak double layers) produced by the Buneman instability are observed in the density minimum in the center of the flux rope. Higher frequency broadband electrostatic waves with frequencies extending up to f{sub pe} are driven by the electron beam and are observed in the denser part of the rope. Our observations demonstrate multiscale coupling during the reconnection: Electron-scale physics is induced by the dynamics of an ion-scale flux rope embedded in a yet larger-scale magnetic reconnection process.

  15. Benzene derivatives adsorbed to the Ag(111) surface: Binding sites and electronic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Daniel P.; Tymińska, Nina; Zurek, Eva; Simpson, Scott

    2015-03-14

    Dispersion corrected Density Functional Theory calculations were employed to study the adsorption of benzenes derivatized with functional groups encompassing a large region of the activated/deactivated spectrum to the Ag(111) surface. Benzenes substituted with weak activating or deactivating groups, such as methyl and fluoro, do not have a strong preference for adsorbing to a particular site on the substrate, with the corrugations in the potential energy surface being similar to those of benzene. Strong activating (N(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}) and deactivating (NO{sub 2}) groups, on the other hand, possess a distinct site preference. The nitrogen in the former prefers to lie above a silver atom (top site), but in the latter a hollow hexagonal-closed-packed (H{sub hcp}) site of the Ag(111) surface is favored instead. Benzenes derivatized with classic activating groups donate electron density from their highest occupied molecular orbital to the surface, and those functionalized with deactivating groups withdraw electron density from the surface into orbitals that are unoccupied in the gas phase. For benzenes functionalized with two substituents, the groups that are strongly activating or deactivating control the site preference and the other groups assume sites that are, to a large degree, dictated by their positions on the benzene ring. The relative stabilities of the ortho, meta, and para positional isomers of disubstituted benzenes can, in some cases, be modified by adsorption to the surface.

  16. Site Sensitivity and local electronic symmetries in carboranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fister, T. T.; Seidler, G. T.; Vila, F. D.; Cross, J. O.; Linehan, J. C.

    2007-03-01

    Icosohedral carboranes containing ten boron and two carbon atoms are seeing renewed interest because of their potential use in new cancer and AIDS therapies. These molecules have flexible geometries which allow bonding to three types of carbon sites (e.g. ortho-, para-, and meta- configurations). Using a new multielement spectrometer, we present the first x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) study on each isomer with excited state spectra taken from the both the carbon and boron 1s states. The change in the electronic structure between the isomers is most pronounced in the carbon spectrum, where the position in the edge confirms prior density functional theory calculations. With the boron spectra, we used the unique momentum transfer dependence of XRS to extract the symmetry components of the density of unoccupied states, i.e. the l-DOS. These results give an improved picture of the local electronic properties of the carboranes.

  17. Site-specific labeling of proteins for electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dambacher, Corey M.; Lander, Gabriel C.

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopy is commonly employed to determine the subunit organization of large macromolecular assemblies. However, the field lacks a robust molecular labeling methodology for unambiguous identification of constituent subunits. We present a strategy that exploits the unique properties of an unnatural amino acid in order to enable site-specific attachment of a single, readily identifiable protein label at any solvent-exposed position on the macromolecular surface. Using this method, we show clear labeling of a subunit within the 19S proteasome lid subcomplex that has not been amenable to labeling by traditional approaches. PMID:26409249

  18. Exposure to flame retardants in electronics recycling sites.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Christina; Hämeilä, Mervi; Tornaeus, Jarkko; Säkkinen, Kirsi; Puttonen, Katriina; Korpi, Anne; Kiilunen, Mirja; Linnainmaa, Markku; Hesso, Antti

    2011-07-01

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) contains various hazardous substances such as flame retardants (FRs). Inhalation exposures to many FRs simultaneously among WEEE recycling site workers have been little studied previously. The breathing zone airborne concentrations of five brominated FR compounds tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBP-A), decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE), hexabromocyclododecane, 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane, hexabromobenzene, and one chlorinated FR (Dechlorane Plus®) were measured at four electronics recycling sites in two consecutive years. In addition, concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polybrominated biphenyls were measured. The three most abundant FRs in personal air samples were PBDEs (comprising mostly of deca-BDE), TBBP-A, and DBDPE, with mean concentrations ranging from 21 to 2320 ng m(-)(3), from 8.7 to 430 ng m(-3), and from 3.5 to 360 ng m(-3), respectively. At two of the sites, the emission control actions (such as improvements in ventilation and its maintenance and changes in cleaning habits) proved successful, the mean levels of FRs in personal samples being 10-68 and 14-79% of those from the previous year or alternatively below the limit of quantification. At the two remaining sites, the reductions in FR exposures were less consistent. The concentrations reported may pose a health hazard to the workers, although evaluation of the association between FR exposure and adverse health effects is hampered by lacking occupational exposure limits. Therefore, the exposures should be minimized by adequate control measures and maintaining good occupational hygiene practice.

  19. Corrosion Research And Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  20. Corrosion Research and Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  1. Spectroscopic studies of the active site of galactose oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, P.F.; Brown, R.D. III; Koenig, S.H.

    1995-07-19

    X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopy have been used to probe the copper site structure in galactose oxidase at pH 4.5 and 7.0. the results suggest that there are no major differences in the structure of the tetragonal Cu(II) site at these pH values. Analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicates that four N,O scatterers are present at approximately 2 {Angstrom}; these are presumably the equatorial ligands. In addition, the EXAFS data establish that oxidative activation to produce the active-site tyrosine radical does not cause major changes in the copper coordination environment. Therefore results obtained on the one-electron reduced enzyme, containing Cu(II) but not the tyrosine radical, probably also apply to the catalytically active Cu(II)/tyrosine radical state. Solvent water exchange, inhibitor binding, and substrate binding have been probed via nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) measurements. The NMRD profile of galactose oxidase is quantitatively consistent with the rapid exchange of a single, equatorial water ligand with a Cu(II)-O separation of about 2.4 {Angstrom}. Azide and cyanide displace this coordinated water. The binding of azide and the substrate dihydroxyacetone produce very similar effects on the NMRD profile of galactose oxidase, indicating that substrates also bind to the active site Cu(II) in an equatorial position.

  2. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  3. Biochemical, Histochemical and Electron Microscopic Study of the Subcellular Sites of Mucopolysaccharide Synthesis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    BIOSYNTHESIS, * MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDES , RATS, POLYSACCHARIDES, ENZYMES, SITES, ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, CELLS(BIOLOGY), INTESTINES, METABOLITES, CENTRIFUGE SEPARATION, MUCOUS MEMBRANES, SWINE, FRACTIONATION, SULFATION.

  4. The dynamics of zinc sites in proteins: electronic basis for coordination sphere expansion at structural sites.

    PubMed

    Daniel, A Gerard; Farrell, Nicholas P

    2014-12-01

    The functional role assumed by zinc in proteins is closely tied to the variable dynamics around its coordination sphere arising by virtue of its flexibility in bonding. Modern experimental and computational methods allow the detection and study of previously unknown features of bonding between zinc and its ligands in protein environment. These discoveries are occurring just in time as novel biological functions of zinc, which involve rather unconventional coordination trends, are emerging. In this sense coordination sphere expansion of structural zinc sites, as observed in our previous experiments, is a novel phenomenon. Here we explore the electronic and structural requirements by simulating this phenomenon in structural zinc sites using DFT computations. For this purpose, we have chosen MPW1PW91 and a mixed basis set combination as the DFT method through benchmarking, because it accurately reproduces structural parameters of experimentally characterized zinc compounds. Using appropriate models, we show that the greater ionic character of zinc coordination would allow for coordination sphere expansion if the steric and electrostatic repulsions of the ligands are attenuated properly. Importantly, through the study of electronic and structural aspects of the models used, we arrive at a comprehensive bonding model, explaining the factors that influence coordination of zinc in proteins. The proposed model along with the existing knowledge would enhance our ability to predict zinc binding sites in proteins, which is today of growing importance given the predicted enormity of the zinc proteome.

  5. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  6. [Structural regularities in activated cleavage sites of thrombin receptors].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlik, I V; Verevka, S V

    1999-01-01

    Comparison of thrombin receptors activation splitting sites sequences testifies to their similarity both in activation splitting sites of protein precursors and protein proteinase inhibitors reactive sites. In all these sites corresponded to effectory sites P2'-positions are placed by hydrophobic amino-acids only. The regularity defined conforms with previous thesis about the role of effectory S2'-site in regulation of the processes mediated by serine proteinases.

  7. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Silicate Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts [1-3]. Nevertheless, among those structures K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. In this study, the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars were investigated in closer details. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. We give a potential explanation of the increased ice nucleation activity of K-feldspar. The ice nucleating sites are very much dependent on the alkali ion present by altering the water structure and the feldspar surface. The higher activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to the presence of potassium ions on the surface and surface bilayer. The alkali-ions have different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar. Chaotropic behavior of Calcium and Sodium ions are lowering the ice nucleation potential of the other feldspars, while kosmotropic Potassium has a neutral or even positive effect. Furthermore we investigated the influence of milling onto the ice nucleation of quartz particles. The ice nucleation activity can be increased by mechanical milling, by introducing more molecular, nucleation active defects to the particle surface. This effect is larger than expected by plane surface increase. [1] Atkinson et al. The Importance of Feldspar for Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust in Mixed-Phase Clouds. Nature 2013, 498, 355-358. [2] Yakobi-Hancock et al.. Feldspar Minerals as Efficient Deposition Ice Nuclei. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2013, 13, 11175-11185. [3] Zolles et al. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015 accepted.

  8. Coordination effects on the electronic structure of the CuA site of cytochrome c oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Kenichi; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Okuyama, Orio; Nakamura, Haruki; Takano, Yu

    2012-04-01

    The CuA site is the electron mediator in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), providing an appropriate electronic structure for rapid electron transfer. We have studied the coordinating effects of His, Met, and the peptide carbonyl group of Glu of the CuA site, using the density functional theory. Our computation demonstrates that the His ligation provides strong orbital and electrostatic effects on the electronic structure of the CuA site, while that the Met coordination gives weak orbital and electrostatic effects. A coordination of the peptide carbonyl group affects the electronic structure of the CuA site only electrostatically.

  9. 78 FR 48468 - Delphi Corporation, Electronics and Safety Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... Employment and Training Administration Delphi Corporation, Electronics and Safety Division, Including On-Site... to workers of Delphi Corporation, Electronics and Safety Division, including on-site leased workers... Delphi Corporation, Electronics and Safety Division. The Department has determined that these...

  10. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-04

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases.

  11. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases. PMID:22020126

  12. Electricity/Electronics Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This electricity/electronics guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 35 modules on the following topics: electrical…

  13. Allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a using Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside and its combination.

    PubMed

    Rani, Nidhi; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; P T V, Lakshmi; Arunachalam, Annamalai

    2016-08-01

    Recent crystallographic study revealed the involvement of allosteric site in active site inhibition of penicillin binding protein (PBP2a), where one molecule of Ceftaroline (Cef) binds to the allosteric site of PBP2a and paved way for the other molecule (Cef) to bind at the active site. Though Cef has the potency to inhibit the PBP2a, its adverse side effects are of major concern. Previous studies have reported the antibacterial property of Quercetin derivatives, a group of natural compounds. Hence, the present study aims to evaluate the effect of Quercetin 3-o-rutinoside (Rut) in allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a. The molecular docking studies between allosteric site and ligands (Rut, Que, and Cef) revealed a better binding efficiency (G-score) of Rut (-7.790318) and Cef (-6.194946) with respect to Que (-5.079284). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies showed significant changes at the active site in the presence of ligands (Rut and Cef) at allosteric site. Four different combinations of Rut and Cef were docked and their G-scores ranged between -6.320 and -8.623. MD studies revealed the stability of the key residue (Ser403) with Rut being at both sites, compared to other complexes. Morphological analysis through electron microscopy confirmed that combination of Rut and Cefixime was able to disturb the bacterial cell membrane in a similar fashion to that of Rut and Cefixime alone. The results of this study indicate that the affinity of Rut at both sites were equally good, with further validations Rut could be considered as an alternative for inhibiting MRSA growth.

  14. Four-electron deoxygenative reductive coupling of carbon monoxide at a single metal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, Joshua A.; Agapie, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of the fossil fuels that are both central to modern life and problematic: their use increases atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, and their availability is geopolitically constrained. Using carbon dioxide as a feedstock to produce synthetic fuels might, in principle, alleviate these concerns. Although many homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts convert carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide, further deoxygenative coupling of carbon monoxide to generate useful multicarbon products is challenging. Molybdenum and vanadium nitrogenases are capable of converting carbon monoxide into hydrocarbons under mild conditions, using discrete electron and proton sources. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon monoxide on copper catalysts also uses a combination of electrons and protons, while the industrial Fischer-Tropsch process uses dihydrogen as a combined source of electrons and electrophiles for carbon monoxide coupling at high temperatures and pressures. However, these enzymatic and heterogeneous systems are difficult to probe mechanistically. Molecular catalysts have been studied extensively to investigate the elementary steps by which carbon monoxide is deoxygenated and coupled, but a single metal site that can efficiently induce the required scission of carbon-oxygen bonds and generate carbon-carbon bonds has not yet been documented. Here we describe a molybdenum compound, supported by a terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, that activates and cleaves the strong carbon-oxygen bond of carbon monoxide, enacts carbon-carbon coupling, and spontaneously dissociates the resulting fragment. This complex four-electron transformation is enabled by the terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, which acts as an electron reservoir and exhibits the coordinative flexibility needed to stabilize the different intermediates involved in the overall reaction sequence. We anticipate that these design elements might help in the development of efficient catalysts for

  15. First Principles Computational Study of the Active Site of Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Ivaylo; Klien, Micheal

    2004-01-14

    Ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to investigate the structural features of the active site of the binuclear enzyme rat liver arginase. Special emphasis was placed on the crucial role of the second shell ligand interactions. These interactions were systematically studied by performing calculations on models of varying size. It was determined that a water molecule, and not hydroxide, is the bridging exogenous ligand. The carboxylate ligands facilitate the close approach of the Mn (II) ions by attenuating the metal-metal electrostatic repulsion. Of the two metals, MnA was shown to carry a larger positive charge. Analysis of the electronic properties of the active site revealed that orbitals involving the terminal Asp234 residue, as well as the flexible -1,1 bridging Asp232, lie at high energies, suggesting weaker coordination. This is reflected in certain structural variability present in our models and is also consistent with recent experimental findings. Finally, implications of our findings for the biological function of the enzyme are delineated.

  16. The surface chemistry of heterogeneous catalysis: mechanisms, selectivity, and active sites.

    PubMed

    Zaera, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    The role of chemical kinetics in defining the requirements for the active sites of heterogeneous catalysts is discussed. A personal view is presented, with specific examples from our laboratory to illustrate the role of the chemical composition, structure, and electronic properties of specific surface sites in determining reaction activity and selectivity. Manipulation of catalytic behavior via the addition of chemical modifiers and by tuning of the reaction conditions is also introduced.

  17. Pitch-Angle Distribution for Electrons at Dipolarization Sites: Field Aligned Anisotropy and Isotropization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Lin, C. H.; Hada, T.; Nishimura, T.; Angelopoulos, V.; Lee, W. J.; Lang, Z. R.

    2015-12-01

    Investigation of Earth's radiation environment is important not only because of its geophysical significance but also because it can inform the design of future satellites. The observed dipolarization effects on pitch-angle distributions (PAD) of electrons at the tailside in the inner plasmasheet during geomagnetic activity identified by AL index has been studied via analyzing data from THEMIS mission. We have shown that cigar distributions below about 1keV tend to become isotropized at the fronts at the dipolarization sites whereas isotropic distributions above 1keV tend to become more cigar-shaped (i.e., fluxes peak at pitch-angle of 0o and 180o). We have previously suggested that the ineffectiveness of Fermi acceleration below 1keV could be the factor causing this difference. We examine the dependence of this effect on radial distance from Earth taking place at or near dipolarization sites during times of geomagnetic activity. Because both the field line length and the properties of dipolarizations vary with radial distance. We anticipate significant dependence of this effect on radial distance. Our study contributes to our understanding of the electron environment during dipolarizations in Earth's magnetosphere.

  18. Functional biomimetic models for the active site in the respiratory enzyme cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Collman, James P; Decréau, Richard A

    2008-11-07

    A functional analog of the active site in the respiratory enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) reproduces every feature in CcO's active site: a myoglobin-like heme (heme a3), a distal tridentate imidazole copper complex (Cu(B)), a phenol (Tyr244), and a proximal imidazole. When covalently attached to a liquid-crystalline SAM film on an Au electrode, this functional model continuously catalyzes the selective four-electron reduction of dioxygen at physiological potential and pH, under rate-limiting electron flux (as occurs in CcO).

  19. Multiple elemental exposures amongst workers at the Agbogbloshie electronic waste (e-waste) site in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Srigboh, Roland Kofi; Basu, Niladri; Stephens, Judith; Asampong, Emmanuel; Perkins, Marie; Neitzel, Richard L; Fobil, Julius

    2016-12-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) recycling is growing worldwide and raising a number of environmental health concerns. One of the largest e-waste sites is Agbogbloshie (Ghana). While several toxic elements have been reported in Agbogbloshie's environment, there is limited knowledge of human exposures there. The objectives of this study were to characterize exposures to several essential (copper, iron, manganese, selenium, zinc) and toxic (arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, mercury, nickel, lead) elements in the urine and blood of male workers (n = 58) at Agbogbloshie, as well as females (n = 11) working in activities that serve the site, and to relate these exposures to sociodemographic and occupational characteristics. The median number of years worked at the site was 5, and the average worker indicated being active in 6.8 tasks (of 9 key e-waste job categories). Additionally, we categorized four main e-waste activities (in brackets % of population self-reported main activity): dealing (22.4%), sorting (24.1%), dismantling (50%), and burning (3.4%) e-waste materials. Many blood and urinary elements (including essential ones) were within biomonitoring reference ranges. However, blood cadmium (1.2 μg/L median) and lead (6.4 μg/dl; 67% above U.S. CDC/NIOSH reference level), and urinary arsenic (38.3 μg/L; 39% above U.S. ATSDR value) levels were elevated compared to background populations elsewhere. Workers who burned e-waste tended to have the highest biomarker levels. The findings of this study contribute to a growing body of work at Agbogbloshie (and elsewhere) to document that individuals working within e-waste sites are exposed to a number of toxic elements, some at potentially concerning levels.

  20. Electron Transfer Proteins as Electronic Conductors: Significance of the Metal and Its Binding Site in the Blue Cu Protein, Azurin

    PubMed Central

    Amdursky, Nadav; Sepunaru, Lior; Raichlin, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Electron transfer (ET) proteins are biomolecules with specific functions, selected by evolution. As such they are attractive candidates for use in potential bioelectronic devices. The blue copper protein azurin (Az) is one of the most‐studied ET proteins. Traditional spectroscopic, electrochemical, and kinetic methods employed for studying ET to/from the protein's Cu ion have been complemented more recently by studies of electrical conduction through a monolayer of Az in the solid‐state, sandwiched between electrodes. As the latter type of measurement does not require involvement of a redox process, it also allows monitoring electronic transport (ETp) via redox‐inactive Az‐derivatives. Here, results of macroscopic ETp via redox‐active and ‐inactive Az derivatives, i.e., Cu(II) and Cu(I)‐Az, apo‐Az, Co(II)‐Az, Ni(II)‐Az, and Zn(II)‐Az are reported and compared. It is found that earlier reported temperature independence of ETp via Cu(II)‐Az (from 20 K until denaturation) is unique, as ETp via all other derivatives is thermally activated at temperatures >≈200 K. Conduction via Cu(I)‐Az shows unexpected temperature dependence >≈200 K, with currents decreasing at positive and increasing at negative bias. Taking all the data together we find a clear compensation effect of Az conduction around the Az denaturation temperature. This compensation can be understood by viewing the Az binding site as an electron trap, unless occupied by Cu(II), as in the native protein, with conduction of the native protein setting the upper transport efficiency limit. PMID:27980928

  1. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  2. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  3. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  4. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  5. On the location of the H+-extruding steps in site 2 of the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, A; Galiazzo, F; Lehninger, A L

    1980-11-25

    The location of the H+-translocating reactions within energy-conserving Site 2 of the mitochondrial electron transport chain was evaluated from two sets of data. In the first, the H+/2e- ejection ratios and Ca2+/2e- uptake ratios were compared for electron flow from succinate dehydrogenase, whose active site is on the matrix side of the inner membrane and from glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase, whose active site is on the cytosolic side. In intact rat liver mitochondria both substrates yielded H+/2e- ejection ratios close to 4.0 and Ca2+/2e- uptake ratios close to 1.0 during antimycin-sensitive reduction of ferricyanide. With rat liver mitoplasts and ferricytochrome c as electron acceptor, both substrates again gave the same stoichiometric ratios. The second approach involved determination of the sidedness of H+ formation during electron flow from succinate to ferricyanide via bypass of the antimycin block of the cytochrome b.c1 complex provided by N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD), under conditions in which the TMPD-TMPD+ couple does not act as a membrane-penetrating protonophore. Electron flow in this system was inhibited by 2-then-oyltrifluoroacetone, indicating that TMPD probably accepts electrons from ubiquinol. The 2 H+ formed in this system were not delivered into the matrix but appeared directly in the medium in the absence of a protonophore. To accommodate the available evidence on Site 2 substrates, it is concluded that the substrate hydrogens are first transferred to ubiquinone, 2 H+ per 2e then appear in the medium by protolytic dehydrogenation of a species of ubiquinol or ubiquinol-protein having the appropriate sidedness (designated Site 2A), and the other 2 H+ are translocated from the matrix to the medium on passage of 2e- through the cytochrome b x c1 complex (designated Site 2B).

  6. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Cyanide (CN) is a well-studied toxic principle, known to inhibit heme-enzymes. • Inhibition is supposed to result from CN binding at the active site as a ligand. • Diverse heme enzymes’ CN inhibition profiles challenge prevailing mechanism. • Poor binding efficiency of CN at low enzyme concentrations and ligand pressures. • CN-based diffusible radicals cause ‘non-productive electron transfers’ (inhibition). - Abstract: The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins’ active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  7. Controlled Orientation of Active Sites in a Nanostructured Multienzyme Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Yang, Byungseop; Jung, Younghan; Cha, Jaehyun; Cho, Jinhwan; Choi, Eun-Sil; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-01-01

    Multistep cascade reactions in nature maximize reaction efficiency by co-assembling related enzymes. Such organization facilitates the processing of intermediates by downstream enzymes. Previously, the studies on multienzyme nanocomplexes assembled on DNA scaffolds demonstrated that closer interenzyme distance enhances the overall reaction efficiency. However, it remains unknown how the active site orientation controlled at nanoscale can have an effect on multienzyme reaction. Here, we show that controlled alignment of active sites promotes the multienzyme reaction efficiency. By genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and two compatible bioorthogonal chemistries, we conjugated mannitol dehydrogenase to formate dehydrogenase with the defined active site arrangement with the residue-level accuracy. The study revealed that the multienzyme complex with the active sites directed towards each other exhibits four-fold higher relative efficiency enhancement in the cascade reaction and produces 60% more D-mannitol than the other complex with active sites directed away from each other. PMID:28004799

  8. Active pixel sensor array with electronic shuttering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An active pixel cell includes electronic shuttering capability. The cell can be shuttered to prevent additional charge accumulation. One mode transfers the current charge to a storage node that is blocked against accumulation of optical radiation. The charge is sampled from a floating node. Since the charge is stored, the node can be sampled at the beginning and the end of every cycle. Another aspect allows charge to spill out of the well whenever the charge amount gets higher than some amount, thereby providing anti blooming.

  9. Dynamics and Mechanism of Efficient DNA Repair Reviewed by Active-Site Mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chuang; Liu, Zheyun; Li, Jiang; Guo, Xunmin; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2010-06-01

    Photolyases repair the UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in damage DNA via a photoreaction which includes a series of light-driven electron transfers between the two-electron-reduced flavin cofactor FADH^- and the dimer. We report here our systematic studies of the repair dynamics in E. coli photolyase with mutation of several active-site residues. With femtosecond resolution, we observed the significant change in the forward electron transfer from the excited FADH^- to the dimer and the back electron transfer from the repaired thymines by mutation of E274A, R226A, R342A, N378S and N378C. We also found that the mutation of E274A accelerates the bond-breaking of the thymine dimer. The dynamics changes are consistent with the quantum yield study of these mutants. These results suggest that the active-site residues play a significant role, structurally and chemically, in the DNA repair photocycle.

  10. Perspective: On the active site model in computational catalyst screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Karsten; Plaisance, Craig P.; Oberhofer, Harald; Andersen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    First-principles screening approaches exploiting energy trends in surface adsorption represent an unparalleled success story in recent computational catalysis research. Here we argue that our still limited understanding of the structure of active sites is one of the major bottlenecks towards an ever extended and reliable use of such computational screening for catalyst discovery. For low-index transition metal surfaces, the prevalently chosen high-symmetry (terrace and step) sites offered by the nominal bulk-truncated crystal lattice might be justified. For more complex surfaces and composite catalyst materials, computational screening studies will need to actively embrace a considerable uncertainty with respect to what truly are the active sites. By systematically exploring the space of possible active site motifs, such studies might eventually contribute towards a targeted design of optimized sites in future catalysts.

  11. Diffusional correlations among multiple active sites in a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-04-07

    Simulations of the enzymatic dynamics of a model enzyme containing multiple substrate binding sites indicate the existence of diffusional correlations in the chemical reactivity of the active sites. A coarse-grain, particle-based, mesoscopic description of the system, comprising the enzyme, the substrate, the product and solvent, is constructed to study these effects. The reactive and non-reactive dynamics is followed using a hybrid scheme that combines molecular dynamics for the enzyme, substrate and product molecules with multiparticle collision dynamics for the solvent. It is found that the reactivity of an individual active site in the multiple-active-site enzyme is reduced substantially, and this effect is analyzed and attributed to diffusive competition for the substrate among the different active sites in the enzyme.

  12. Robotics at Savannah River site: activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.S.

    1984-09-01

    The objectives of the Robotics Technology Group at the Savannah River Laboratory are to employ modern industrial robots and to develop unique automation and robotic systems to enhance process operations at the Savannah River site (SRP and SRL). The incentives are to improve safety, reduce personnel radiation exposure, improve product quality and productivity, and to reduce operating costs. During the past year robotic systems have been installed to fill chemical dilution vials in a SRP laboratory at 772-F and remove radioactive waste materials in the SRL Californium Production Facility at 773-A. A robotic system to lubricate an extrusion press has been developed and demonstrated in the SRL robotics laboratory and is scheduled for installation at the 321-M fuel fabrication area. A mobile robot was employed by SRP for a radiation monitoring task at a waste tank top in H-Area. Several other robots are installed in the SRL robotics laboratories and application development programs are underway. The status of these applications is presented in this report.

  13. Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: why selenoproteins?

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Johansson, Linda; Bauer, Holger; Arscott, L David; Rauch, Susanne; Ballou, David P; Williams, Charles H; Schirmer, R Heiner; Arnér, Elias S J

    2003-10-28

    Selenium, an essential trace element for mammals, is incorporated into a selected class of selenoproteins as selenocysteine. All known isoenzymes of mammalian thioredoxin (Trx) reductases (TrxRs) employ selenium in the C-terminal redox center -Gly-Cys-Sec-Gly-COOH for reduction of Trx and other substrates, whereas the corresponding sequence in Drosophila melanogaster TrxR is -Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser-COOH. Surprisingly, the catalytic competence of these orthologous enzymes is similar, whereas direct Sec-to-Cys substitution of mammalian TrxR, or other selenoenzymes, yields almost inactive enzyme. TrxRs are therefore ideal for studying the biology of selenocysteine by comparative enzymology. Here we show that the serine residues flanking the C-terminal Cys residues of Drosophila TrxRs are responsible for activating the cysteines to match the catalytic efficiency of a selenocysteine-cysteine pair as in mammalian TrxR, obviating the need for selenium. This finding suggests that the occurrence of selenoenzymes, which implies that the organism is selenium-dependent, is not necessarily associated with improved enzyme efficiency. Our data suggest that the selective advantage of selenoenzymes is a broader range of substrates and a broader range of microenvironmental conditions in which enzyme activity is possible.

  14. Community Update on Site Activities, July 19, 2013

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In an effort to engage and inform community members interested in the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site cleanup, EPA will be issuing periodic topic-based fact sheets that will provide background information and updates about ongoing activities.

  15. Electron transfer activation of a second water channel for proton transport in [FeFe]-hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Sode, Olaseni; Voth, Gregory A.

    2014-12-14

    Hydrogenase enzymes are important because they can reversibly catalyze the production of molecular hydrogen. Proton transport mechanisms have been previously studied in residue pathways that lead to the active site of the enzyme via residues Cys299 and Ser319. The importance of this pathway and these residues has been previously exhibited through site-specific mutations, which were shown to interrupt the enzyme activity. It has been shown recently that a separate water channel (WC2) is coupled with electron transport to the active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase. The water-mediated proton transport mechanisms of the enzyme in different electronic states have been studied using the multistate empirical valence bond reactive molecular dynamics method, in order to understand any role WC2 may have in facilitating the residue pathway in bringing an additional proton to the enzyme active site. In a single electronic state A{sup 2−}, a water wire was formed through which protons can be transported with a low free energy barrier. The remaining electronic states were shown, however, to be highly unfavorable to proton transport in WC2. A double amino acid substitution is predicted to obstruct proton transport in electronic state A{sup 2-} by closing a cavity that could otherwise fill with water near the proximal Fe of the active site.

  16. Discovering the electronic circuit diagram of life: structural relationships among transition metal binding sites in oxidoreductases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J. Dongun; Senn, Stefan; Harel, Arye; Jelen, Benjamin I.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidoreductases play a central role in catalysing enzymatic electron-transfer reactions across the tree of life. To first order, the equilibrium thermodynamic properties of these proteins are governed by protein folds associated with specific transition metals and ligands at the active site. A global analysis of holoenzyme structures and functions suggests that there are fewer than approximately 500 fundamental oxidoreductases, which can be further clustered into 35 unique groups. These catalysts evolved in prokaryotes early in the Earth's history and are largely responsible for the emergence of non-equilibrium biogeochemical cycles on the planet's surface. Although the evolutionary history of the amino acid sequences in the oxidoreductases is very difficult to reconstruct due to gene duplication and horizontal gene transfer, the evolution of the folds in the catalytic sites can potentially be used to infer the history of these enzymes. Using a novel, yet simple analysis of the secondary structures associated with the ligands in oxidoreductases, we developed a structural phylogeny of these enzymes. The results of this ‘composome’ analysis suggest an early split from a basal set of a small group of proteins dominated by loop structures into two families of oxidoreductases, one dominated by α-helices and the second by β-sheets. The structural evolutionary patterns in both clades trace redox gradients and increased hydrogen bond energy in the active sites. The overall pattern suggests that the evolution of the oxidoreductases led to decreased entropy in the transition metal folds over approximately 2.5 billion years, allowing the enzymes to use increasingly oxidized substrates with high specificity. PMID:23754810

  17. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2008-08-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes.

  18. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  19. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide.

  20. Lamellipodial actin mechanically links myosin activity with adhesion site formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannone, Gregory; Dubin-Thaler, Benjamin; Rossier, Olivier; Cai, Yunfei; Chaga, Oleg; Jiang, Guoying; Beaver, William; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Freund, Yoav; Borisy, Gary; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell motility proceeds by cycles of edge protrusion, adhesion and retraction. Whether these functions are coordinated by biochemical or biomechanical processes is unknown. We find that myosin II pulls the rear of the lamellipodial actin network, causing upward bending, edge retraction and initiation of new adhesion sites. The network then separates from the edge and condenses over the myosin. Protrusion resumes as lamellipodial actin regenerates from the front and extends rearward until it reaches newly assembled myosin, initiating the next cycle. Upward bending, observed by evanescence and electron microscopy, results in ruffle formation when adhesion strength is low. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy shows that the regenerating lamellipodium forms a cohesive, separable layer of actin above the lamellum. Thus, actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process. PMID:17289574

  1. Measuring the orientation of taurine in the active site of the non-heme Fe(II)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent taurine hydroxylase (TauD) using electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Casey, Thomas M; Grzyska, Piotr K; Hausinger, Robert P; McCracken, John

    2013-09-12

    The position and orientation of taurine near the non-heme Fe(II) center of the α-ketoglutarate (α-KG)-dependent taurine hydroxylase (TauD) was measured using Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy. TauD solutions containing Fe(II), α-KG, and natural abundance taurine or specifically deuterated taurine were prepared anaerobically and treated with nitric oxide (NO) to make an S = 3/2 {FeNO}(7) complex that is suitable for robust analysis with EPR spectroscopy. Using ratios of ESEEM spectra collected for TauD samples having natural abundance taurine or deuterated taurine, (1)H and (14)N modulations were filtered out of the spectra and interactions with specific deuterons on taurine could be studied separately. The Hamiltonian parameters used to calculate the amplitudes and line shapes of frequency spectra containing isolated deuterium ESEEM were obtained with global optimization algorithms. Additional statistical analysis was performed to validate the interpretation of the optimized parameters. The strongest (2)H hyperfine coupling was to a deuteron on the C1 position of taurine and was characterized by an effective dipolar distance of 3.90 ± 0.25 Å from the {FeNO}(7) paramagnetic center. The principal axes of this C1-(2)H hyperfine coupling and nuclear quadrupole interaction tensors were found to make angles of 26 ± 5 and 52 ± 17°, respectively, with the principal axis of the {FeNO}(7) zero-field splitting tensor. These results are discussed within the context of the orientation of substrate taurine prior to the initiation of hydrogen abstraction.

  2. Measuring the Orientation of Taurine in the Active Site of the Non-Heme Fe (II)/α-Ketoglutarate Dependent Taurine Hydroxylase (TauD) using Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Thomas M.; Grzyska, Piotr K.; Hausinger, Robert P.; McCracken, John

    2013-01-01

    The position and orientation of taurine near the non-heme Fe(II) center of the α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) dependent taurine hydroxylase (TauD) was measured using Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy. TauD solutions containing Fe(II), α-KG, and natural abundance taurine or specifically deuterated taurine were prepared anaerobically and treated with nitric oxide (NO) to make an S=3/2 {FeNO}7 complex that is suitable for robust analysis with EPR spectroscopy. Using ratios of ESEEM spectra collected for TauD samples having natural abundance taurine or deuterated taurine, 1H and 14N modulations were filtered out of the spectra and interactions with specific deuterons on taurine could be studied separately. The Hamiltonian parameters used to calculate the amplitudes and line shapes of frequency spectra containing isolated deuterium ESEEM were obtained with global optimization algorithms. Additional statistical analysis was performed to validate the interpretation of the optimized parameters. The strongest 2H hyperfine coupling was to a deuteron on the C1 position of taurine and was characterized by an effective dipolar distance of 3.90 ± 0.25 Å from the {FeNO}7 paramagnetic center. The principal axes of this C1-2H hyperfine coupling and nuclear quadrupole interaction tensors were found to make angles of 26 ± 5° and 52 ± 17°, respectively, with the principal axis of the {FeNO}7 zero-field splitting tensor. These results are discussed within the context of the orientation of substrate taurine prior to the initiation of hydrogen abstraction. PMID:23937570

  3. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  4. Promoter-proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Pia K.; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites on transcription requires promoter proximity, as demonstrated using artificial constructs and supported by a genome-wide data set. Importantly, transcription down-regulation can be recapitulated in a gene context devoid of splice sites by placing a functional bona fide pA site/transcription terminator within ∼500 base pairs of the promoter. In contrast, promoter-proximal positioning of a pA site-independent histone gene terminator supports high transcription levels. We propose that optimal communication between a pA site-dependent gene terminator and its promoter critically depends on gene length and that short RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels. PMID:23028143

  5. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  6. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  7. Active and regulatory sites of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Pesi, Rossana; Allegrini, Simone; Careddu, Maria Giovanna; Filoni, Daniela Nicole; Camici, Marcella; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2010-12-01

    Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II), which acts preferentially on 6-hydroxypurine nucleotides, is essential for the survival of several cell types. cN-II catalyses both the hydrolysis of nucleotides and transfer of their phosphate moiety to a nucleoside acceptor through formation of a covalent phospho-intermediate. Both activities are regulated by a number of phosphorylated compounds, such as diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap₄A), ADP, ATP, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) and phosphate. On the basis of a partial crystal structure of cN-II, we mutated two residues located in the active site, Y55 and T56. We ascertained that the ability to catalyse the transfer of phosphate depends on the presence of a bulky residue in the active site very close to the aspartate residue that forms the covalent phospho-intermediate. The molecular model indicates two possible sites at which adenylic compounds may interact. We mutated three residues that mediate interaction in the first activation site (R144, N154, I152) and three in the second (F127, M436 and H428), and found that Ap₄A and ADP interact with the same site, but the sites for ATP and BPG remain uncertain. The structural model indicates that cN-II is a homotetrameric protein that results from interaction through a specific interface B of two identical dimers that have arisen from interaction of two identical subunits through interface A. Point mutations in the two interfaces and gel-filtration experiments indicated that the dimer is the smallest active oligomerization state. Finally, gel-filtration and light-scattering experiments demonstrated that the native enzyme exists as a tetramer, and no further oligomerization is required for enzyme activation.

  8. Pulsed Electron Spin Resonance Resolves the Coordination Site of Cu2+ Ions in α1-Glycine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ruthstein, Sharon; Stone, Katherine M.; Cunningham, Timothy F.; Ji, Ming; Cascio, Michael; Saxena, Sunil

    2010-01-01

    Herein, we identify the coordination environment of Cu2+ in the human α1-glycine receptor (GlyR). GlyRs are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel superfamily (pLGIC) that mediate fast signaling at synapses. Metal ions like Zn2+ and Cu2+ significantly modulate the activity of pLGICs, and metal ion coordination is essential for proper physiological postsynaptic inhibition by GlyR in vivo. Zn2+ can either potentiate or inhibit GlyR activity depending on its concentration, while Cu2+ is inhibitory. To better understand the molecular basis of the inhibitory effect we have used electron spin resonance to directly examine Cu2+ coordination and stoichiometry. We show that Cu2+ has one binding site per α1 subunit, and that five Cu2+ can be coordinated per GlyR. Cu2+ binds to E192 and H215 in each subunit of GlyR with a 40 μM apparent dissociation constant, consistent with earlier functional measurements. However, the coordination site does not include several residues of the agonist/antagonist binding site that were previously suggested to have roles in Cu2+ coordination by functional measurements. Intriguingly, the E192/H215 site has been proposed as the potentiating Zn2+ site. The opposing modulatory actions of these cations at a shared binding site highlight the sensitive allosteric nature of GlyR. PMID:20959090

  9. BAX Activation is Initiated at a Novel Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Suzuki, Motoshi; Davis, Marguerite L.; Pitter, Kenneth; Bird, Gregory H.; Katz, Samuel G.; Tu, Ho-Chou; Kim, Hyungjin; Cheng, Emily H.-Y.; Tjandra, Nico; Walensky, Loren D.

    2008-01-01

    BAX is a pro-apoptotic protein of the BCL-2 family stationed in the cytosol until activated by a diversity of stress stimuli to induce cell death. Anti-apoptotic proteins such as BCL-2 counteract BAX-mediated cell death. Although an interaction site that confers survival functionality has been defined for anti-apoptotic proteins, an activation site has not been identified for BAX, rendering its explicit trigger mechanism unknown. We previously developed Stabilized Alpha-Helix of BCL-2 domains (SAHBs) that directly initiate BAX-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis. Here we demonstrate by NMR analysis that BIM SAHB binds BAX at an interaction site that is distinct from the canonical binding groove characterized for anti-apoptotic proteins. The specificity of the BIM SAHB-BAX interaction is highlighted by point mutagenesis that abrogates functional activity, confirming that BAX activation is initiated at this novel structural location. Thus, we have now defined a BAX interaction site for direct activation, establishing a new target for therapeutic modulation of apoptosis. PMID:18948948

  10. 75 FR 38127 - Visteon Systems, LLC North Penn Plant Electronics Products Group Including On-Site Leased Workers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... Employment and Training Administration Visteon Systems, LLC North Penn Plant Electronics Products Group Including On-Site Leased Workers From Ryder Integrated Logistics and Including On-Site Workers From Span... Systems, LLC, North Penn Plant, Electronics Products Group, including on-site leased workers from...

  11. 77 FR 3499 - Sony Electronics, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Selectremedy Park Ridge, NJ...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ...] Sony Electronics, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Selectremedy Park Ridge, NJ; Amended... of Sony Electronics, Inc., SEL Headquarters, including on-site leased workers of SelectRemedy, StaffMark, and Payrolling.com , San Diego, California (TA-W-71,501); Sony Electronics, Inc., including...

  12. Involvement of novel autophosphorylation sites in ATM activation.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Graham, Mark E; Peng, Cheng; Chen, Philip; Robinson, Phillip J; Lavin, Martin F

    2006-08-09

    ATM kinase plays a central role in signaling DNA double-strand breaks to cell cycle checkpoints and to the DNA repair machinery. Although the exact mechanism of ATM activation remains unknown, efficient activation requires the Mre11 complex, autophosphorylation on S1981 and the involvement of protein phosphatases and acetylases. We report here the identification of several additional phosphorylation sites on ATM in response to DNA damage, including autophosphorylation on pS367 and pS1893. ATM autophosphorylates all these sites in vitro in response to DNA damage. Antibodies against phosphoserine 1893 revealed rapid and persistent phosphorylation at this site after in vivo activation of ATM kinase by ionizing radiation, paralleling that observed for S1981 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation was dependent on functional ATM and on the Mre11 complex. All three autophosphorylation sites are physiologically important parts of the DNA damage response, as phosphorylation site mutants (S367A, S1893A and S1981A) were each defective in ATM signaling in vivo and each failed to correct radiosensitivity, genome instability and cell cycle checkpoint defects in ataxia-telangiectasia cells. We conclude that there are at least three functionally important radiation-induced autophosphorylation events in ATM.

  13. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  14. Analytical Electron Microscopy examination of uranium contamination at the DOE Fernald operation site

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

    1993-02-01

    Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) has been used to identify uranium-bearing phases present in contaminated soils from the DOE Fernald operation site. A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and AEM was used in isolating and characterizing uranium-rich regions of the contaminated soils. Soil samples were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) by ultramicrotomy using an embedding resin previously employed for aquatic colloids and biological samples. This preparation method allowed direct comparison between SEM and TEM images. At the macroscopic level much of the uranium appears to be associated with clays in the soils; however, electron beam analysis revealed that the uranium is present as discrete phases, including iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite. Only low levels of uranium were actually within the clay minerals. The distribution of uranium phases was inhomogeneous at the submicron level.

  15. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  16. Site-specific ionisation edge fine-structure of Rutile in the electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hetaba, Walid; Löffler, Stefan; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Schuster, Manfred Erwin; Schlögl, Robert; Schattschneider, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Combined Bloch-wave and density functional theory simulations are performed to investigate the effects of different channelling conditions on the fine-structure of electron energy-loss spectra. The simulated spectra compare well with experiments. Furthermore, we demonstrate that using this technique, the site-specific investigation of atomic orbitals is possible. This opens new possibilities for chemical analyses.

  17. Marketing of Academic Library Services through Social Networking Sites: Implications of Electronic Word-of-Mouth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siddike, Md. Abul Kalam; Kiran, K.

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the perceptions of academic librarians towards the marketing of library services through social networking sites (SNSs) and their understanding of using electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) as a marketing tool in academic libraries. This study follows a qualitative data-gathering approach of structured…

  18. Spectral study of suggested Apollo sites. [proposals for financial support and the electronic spectra of pyroxenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccord, T. B.

    1973-01-01

    The spectrophotometry (0.3 to 1.1 microns) of visited and proposed Apollo landing sites is presented along with proposals for financial support of the spectral study. The electronic spectra of pyroxenes is investigated along with an interpretation of telescopic spectral reflectivity curves of the moon. Reprints of published articles related to these studies are included.

  19. Communication: Active space decomposition with multiple sites: Density matrix renormalization group algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Shane M.; Shiozaki, Toru

    2014-12-07

    We extend the active space decomposition method, recently developed by us, to more than two active sites using the density matrix renormalization group algorithm. The fragment wave functions are described by complete or restricted active-space wave functions. Numerical results are shown on a benzene pentamer and a perylene diimide trimer. It is found that the truncation errors in our method decrease almost exponentially with respect to the number of renormalization states M, allowing for numerically exact calculations (to a few μE{sub h} or less) with M = 128 in both cases. This rapid convergence is because the renormalization steps are used only for the interfragment electron correlation.

  20. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  1. Two-Dimensional Halide Perovskites: Tuning Electronic Activities of Defects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyue; Xiao, Hai; Goddard, William A

    2016-05-11

    Two-dimensional (2D) halide perovskites are emerging as promising candidates for nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. To realize their full potential, it is important to understand the role of those defects that can strongly impact material properties. In contrast to other popular 2D semiconductors (e.g., transition metal dichalcogenides MX2) for which defects typically induce harmful traps, we show that the electronic activities of defects in 2D perovskites are significantly tunable. For example, even with a fixed lattice orientation one can change the synthesis conditions to convert a line defect (edge or grain boundary) from electron acceptor to inactive site without deep gap states. We show that this difference originates from the enhanced ionic bonding in these perovskites compared with MX2. The donors tend to have high formation energies and the harmful defects are difficult to form at a low halide chemical potential. Thus, we unveil unique properties of defects in 2D perovskites and suggest practical routes to improve them.

  2. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-06

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions.

  3. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C.; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F.; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W.; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa. Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  4. Probing the promiscuous active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase using synthetic substrates, homology modeling, and active site modification.

    PubMed

    Daniellou, Richard; Zheng, Hongyan; Langill, David M; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2007-06-26

    The active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase (IDH, EC 1.1.1.18) from Bacillus subtilis recognizes a variety of mono- and disaccharides, as well as 1l-4-O-substituted inositol derivatives. It catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the axial alcohol of these substrates with comparable kinetic constants. We have found that 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol does not act as a substrate for IDH, in contrast to structurally similar compounds such as those bearing substituted benzyl substituents in the same position. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol and 4-O-(2-naphthyl)methyl-myo-inositol, which is a substrate for IDH, shows a distinct difference in the preferred conformation of the aryl substituent. Conformational analysis of known substrates of IDH suggests that this conformational difference may account for the difference in reactivity of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol in the presence of IDH. A sequence alignment of IDH with the homologous glucose-fructose oxidoreductase allowed the construction of an homology model of inositol dehydrogenase, to which NADH and 4-O-benzyl-scyllo-inosose were docked and the active site energy minimized. The active site model is consistent with all experimental results and suggests that a conserved tyrosine-glycine-tyrosine motif forms the hydrophobic pocket adjoining the site of inositol recognition. Y233F and Y235F retain activity, while Y233R and Y235R do not. A histidine-aspartate pair, H176 and D172, are proposed to act as a dyad in which H176 is the active site acid/base. The enzyme is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate, and the mutants H176A and D172N show a marked loss of activity. Kinetic isotope effect experiments with D172N indicate that chemistry is rate-determining for this mutant.

  5. The active site structure and mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Arginine specific reagents showed irreversible inhibition of avian liver mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Potent protection against modification was elicited by CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} in the presence of other substrates. Labeling of enzyme with (7-{sup 14}C) phenylglyoxal showed that 1 or 2 arginines are involved in CO{sub 2} binding and activation. Peptide map studies showed this active site arginine residues is located at position 289. Histidine specific reagents showed pseudo first order inhibition of avian mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity. The best protection against modification was elicited by IDP or IDP and Mn{sup +2}. One histidine residue is at or near the phosphoenolpyruvate binding site as demonstrated in the increased absorbance at 240 nm and proton relaxation rate studies. Circular dichroism studies reveal that enzyme structure was perturbed by diethylpyrocarbonate modification. Metal binding studies suggest that this enzyme has only one metal binding site. The putative binding sites from several GTP and phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes are observed in P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase from different species.

  6. Intranuclear sites of Np 237 in mammalian cells: a study using electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Boulahdour, H; Poncy, J L; Berry, J P; Galle, P

    1995-07-01

    Two methods, electron microscopy and wavelength dispersive electron probe microanalysis, were used to determine the intracellular sites and chemical form of concentrations of neptunium nitrate 237 after chronic intoxication by the intraperitoneal route in two organs in the rat known to concentrate this element (kidney, liver). Abnormal intranuclear formations in the form of clusters of dense granules containing neptunium, phosphorus, sulphur, and calcium were found in the nuclei of kidney proximal tubule cells and hepatocytes. These formations had a maximum diameter of the order of 2 microns and were located in the central part of the nucleus, away from the nucleolus and peripheral chromatin. Serious nuclear and cytoplasmic ultrastructural lesions are often associated in cells containing neptunium inclusions. The absorbed doses in the kidney and the liver were very low. A relationship between these abnormal intranuclear structures and the carcinogenic effect of neptunium remains to be clarified. This effect is related more probably to the chemical toxicity of Np 237.

  7. Electronic Cigarette Marketing Online: a Multi-Site, Multi-Product Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Anupreet K; Valente, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    Background Electronic cigarette awareness and use has been increasing rapidly. E-cigarette brands have utilized social networking sites to promote their products, as the growth of the e-cigarette industry has paralleled that of Web 2.0. These online platforms are cost-effective and have unique technological features and user demographics that can be attractive for selective marketing. The popularity of multiple sites also poses a risk of exposure to social networks where e-cigarette brands might not have a presence. Objective To examine the marketing strategies of leading e-cigarette brands on multiple social networking sites, and to identify how affordances of the digital media are used to their advantage. Secondary analyses include determining if any brands are benefitting from site demographics, and exploring cross-site diffusion of marketing content through multi-site users. Methods We collected data from two e-cigarette brands from four social networking sites over approximately 2.5 years. Content analysis is used to search for themes, population targeting, marketing strategies, and cross-site spread of messages. Results Twitter appeared to be the most frequently used social networking site for interacting directly with product users. Facebook supported informational broadcasts, such as announcements regarding political legislation. E-cigarette brands also differed in their approaches to their users, from informal conversations to direct product marketing. Conclusions E-cigarette makers use different strategies to market their product and engage their users. There was no evidence of direct targeting of vulnerable populations, but the affordances of the different sites are exploited to best broadcast context-specific messages. We developed a viable method to study cross-site diffusion, although additional refinement is needed to account for how different types of digital media are used. PMID:27227129

  8. Wigner Crystalization of a two dimensional electron gas in a magnetic field: single electrons versus electron pairs at the lattice sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taut, M. G.

    2001-03-01

    The ground state energy and the lowest excitations of a two dimensional Wigner crystal with one -- and two electrons per cell are investigated. In case of two electrons per lattice site, the interaction of the electrons within each cell is taken into account exactly (including exchange and the full Coulomb correlation effects). The interaction between the cells is in second order (dipole) van der Waals approximation. No further approximations are made, in particular Landau level mixing is accounted for. Therefore, our calculation comprises a supplementary description of the bubble phase in the special case of one and two electrons per bubble, as proposed by Koulakov, Fogler and Shklovskii in Phys.Rev.Lett. 76, 499 (1996) on the basis of a Hartree Fock calculation. The phase diagram shows for which filling factors and densities which phase: single electrons versus singlet or triplet pairs on the Wigner crystal lattice sites, is energetically favored. Comparison with other approximations for the Wigner crystal and with the Laughlin liquid is made as well.

  9. Measurements of particle emission from discharge sites in Teflon irradiated by high energy electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazelton, R. C.; Churchill, R. J.; Yadlowsky, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    Anomalous behavior of synchronous orbit satellites manifested by overall degradation of system performance and reduced operating life is associated with electrical discharges resulting from differential charging of the spacecraft surface by fluxes of high energy electrons. During a laboratory simulation silver-backed Teflon samples have been irradiated by electron beams having energies in the range 16-26 keV. Charged particles emitted from the resultant electrical discharges have been measured with a biased Faraday cup and retarding potential analyser. Measurements indicate the presence of two distinct fluxes of particles, the first being an early pulse (0-600ns) of high energy (about 7keV) electrons, while the second is a late pulse (1-5 microseconds) of low energy electrons (less than 1eV) and ions (70eV) leaving the discharge site as a quasi plasma. Calculations indicate an electrostatic field as the dominant accelerating mechanism for charged particles.

  10. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth’s crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts. Here we investigated in closer detail the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. Finally, we give a potential explanation of this effect, finding alkali-metal ions having different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar surfaces. PMID:25584435

  11. Structural complexities in the active layers of organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephanie S; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2010-01-01

    The field of organic electronics has progressed rapidly in recent years. However, understanding the direct structure-function relationships between the morphology in electrically active layers and the performance of devices composed of these materials has proven difficult. The morphology of active layers in organic electronics is inherently complex, with heterogeneities existing across multiple length scales, from subnanometer to micron and millimeter range. A major challenge still facing the organic electronics community is understanding how the morphology across all of the length scales in active layers collectively determines the device performance of organic electronics. In this review we highlight experiments that have contributed to the elucidation of structure-function relationships in organic electronics and also point to areas in which knowledge of such relationships is still lacking. Such knowledge will lead to the ability to select active materials on the basis of their inherent properties for the fabrication of devices with prespecified characteristics.

  12. Face the Edges: Catalytic Active Sites of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Edges are special sites in nanomaterials. The atoms residing on the edges have different environments compared to those in other parts of a nanomaterial and, therefore, they may have different properties. Here, recent progress in nanomaterial fields is summarized from the viewpoint of the edges. Typically, edge sites in MoS2 or metals, other than surface atoms, can perform as active centers for catalytic reactions, so the method to enhance performance lies in the optimization of the edge structures. The edges of multicomponent interfaces present even more possibilities to enhance the activities of nanomaterials. Nanoframes and ultrathin nanowires have similarities to conventional edges of nanoparticles, the application of which as catalysts can help to reduce the use of costly materials. Looking beyond this, the edge structures of graphene are also essential for their properties. In short, the edge structure can influence many properties of materials. PMID:27980960

  13. Active-Site Monovalent Cations Revealed in a 1.55 Å Resolution Hammerhead Ribozyme Structure

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Michael; Schultz, Eric P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.

    2013-01-01

    We have obtained a 1.55 Å crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme derived from Schistosoma mansoni in conditions that permit detailed observations of Na+ ion binding in the ribozyme's active site. At least two such Na+ ions are observed. The first Na+ ion binds to the N7 of G10.1 and the adjacent A9 phosphate in a manner identical to that previously observed for divalent cations. A second Na+ ion binds to the Hoogsteen face of G12, the general base in the hammerhead cleavage reaction, thereby potentially dissipating the negative charge of the catalytically active enolate form of the nucleotide base. A potential but more ambiguous third site bridges the A9 and scissile phosphates in a manner consistent with previous predictions. Hammerhead ribozymes have been observed to be active in the presence of high concentrations of monovalent cations, including Na+, but the mechanism by which monovalent cations substitute for divalent cations in hammerhead catalysis remains unclear. Our results enable us to suggest that Na+ directly and specifically substitutes for divalent cations in the hammerhead active site. The detailed geometry of the pre-catalytic active site complex is also revealed with a new level of precision, thanks to the quality of the electron density maps obtained from what is currently the highest resolution ribozyme structure in the protein data bank. PMID:23711504

  14. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  15. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  16. Nest predation increases with parental activity: separating nest site and parental activity effects.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T E; Scott, J; Menge, C

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection. PMID:11413645

  17. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  18. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  19. [Mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2012-04-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent for inhibiting arginine-auxotrophic tumors (such as melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas) in phase III clinical trials. In this work, we studied the molecular mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutation sites, A128, H404 and 1410, were introduced into wild-type ADI gene by QuikChange site-directed mutagenesis method, and four ADI mutants M1 (A128T), M2 (H404R), M3 (I410L), and M4 (A128T, H404R) were obtained. The ADI mutants were individually expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the enzymatic properties of the purified mutant proteins were determined. The results show that both A128T and H404R had enhanced optimum pH, higher activity and stability of ADI under physiological condition (pH 7.4), as well as reduced K(m) value. This study provides an insight into the molecular mechanism of the ADI activity, and also the experimental evidence for the rational protein evolution in the future.

  20. Mechanism and Site of Attack for Direct Damage to DNA by Low-Energy Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, X.; Sanche, L.

    2005-05-20

    We report results on the desorption of OH{sup -} induced by 0-19 eV electrons incident on self-assembled monolayer films made of single and double DNA strands of different orientations with respect to a gold substrate. Such measurements make it possible to deduce the mechanism and site of OH{sup -} formation within a biomolecule as complex as DNA. This type of damage is attributed to dissociative electron attachment to the phosphate group of DNA, when it contains the counterion H{sup +}.

  1. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J.; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  2. Evaluation of the H+/site ratio of mitochondrial electron transport from rate measurements.

    PubMed

    Reynafarje, B; Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1976-12-10

    The mitochondrial H+/site ratio (i.e. the number of protons ejected per pair of electrons traversing each of the energy-conserving sites of the respiratory chain) has been evaluated employing a new experimental approach. In this method the rates of oxygen uptake and H+ ejection were measured simultaneously during the initial period of respiration evoked by addition of succinate to aerobic, rotenone-inhibited, de-energized mitochondria. Either K+, in the presence of valinomycin, or Ca2+, was used as mobile cation to dissipate the membrane potential and allow quantitative H+ ejection into the medium. The H+/site ratio observed with this method in the absence of precautions to inhibit the uptake of phosphate was close to 2.0, in agreement with values obtained using the oxygen pulse technique (Mitchell, P. and Moyle, J. (1967) Biochem. J. 105, 1147-1162). However, when phosphate movements were eliminated either by inhibition of the phosphate-hydroxide antiporter with N-ethylamaleimide or by depleting the mitochondria of their endogenous phosphate content, H+/site ratios close to 4.0 were consistently observed. This ratio was independent of the concentration of succinate, of mitochondrial protein, of pH between 6 and 8, and of ionic composition of the medium, provided that sufficient K+ (plus valinomycin) or Ca2+ were present. Specific inhibitors of the hydrolysis of endogenous ATP or transport of other ions (adenine nucleotides, tricarboxylates, HCO3-, etc.) were shown not to affect the observed H+/site ratio. Furthermore, the replacement of succinate by alpha-glycerol phosphate, a substrate which is oxidized on the outer surface of the inner membrane and thus does not need to enter the matrix, gave the same H+/site ratios as did succinate. It is concluded that the H+/site ratio of mitochondrial electron transport, when phosphate movements are eliminated, may be close to 4.0.

  3. MSK1 activity is controlled by multiple phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    McCOY, Claire E.; Campbell, David G.; Deak, Maria; Bloomberg, Graham B.; Arthur, J. Simon C.

    2004-01-01

    MSK1 (mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase) is a kinase activated in cells downstream of both the ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades. In the present study, we show that, in addition to being phosphorylated on Thr-581 and Ser-360 by ERK1/2 or p38, MSK1 can autophosphorylate on at least six sites: Ser-212, Ser-376, Ser-381, Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758. Of these sites, the N-terminal T-loop residue Ser-212 and the ‘hydrophobic motif’ Ser-376 are phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain of MSK1, and their phosphorylation is essential for the catalytic activity of the N-terminal kinase domain of MSK1 and therefore for the phosphorylation of MSK1 substrates in vitro. Ser-381 is also phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain, and mutation of Ser-381 decreases MSK1 activity, probably through the inhibition of Ser-376 phosphorylation. Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758 are phosphorylated by the N-terminal kinase domain; however, their function is not known. The activation of MSK1 in cells therefore requires the activation of the ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK cascades and does not appear to require additional signalling inputs. This is in contrast with the closely related RSK (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase) proteins, whose activity requires phosphorylation by PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1) in addition to phosphorylation by ERK1/2. PMID:15568999

  4. Atomic-scale imaging and electronic structure determination of catalytic sites on Pd/Cu near surface alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, H.L.; Baber, A.E.; Sykes, E.C.H.

    2009-04-15

    Water-gas shift chemistry provides a useful method for producing hydrogen from coal; however, fuel cell applications demand that this hydrogen be free of impurities. Due to their unique properties, Pd/Cu alloys represent an import class of materials used for H purification membranes and also serve as the active metals in many heterogeneous catalysts. Little is known about how Pd and Cu interact electronically in these mixed systems and there is debate in the literature over the direction of charge transfer between the two species. This study used the differential conductance (dI/dV) spectroscopy capabilities of a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to investigate the atomic-scale electronic structure of Pd/Cu surface alloys. dI/dV spectroscopy gives a direct measure of the local density of states of surface sites with subnanometer precision. Results from this work demonstrate that individual, isolated Pd atoms in a Cu lattice are almost electronically identical to their host atoms. Over an energy range that spans 1 eV on either side of the Fermi level, the only significant electronic difference between isolated Pd and their host Cu atoms is that Pd atoms have a very slightly depleted electron density in the region of the Cu surface state maximum.

  5. Deciphering the molecular architecture of membrane contact sites by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Collado, Javier; Fernández-Busnadiego, Rubén

    2017-03-19

    At membrane contact sites (MCS) two cellular membranes form tight appositions that play critical roles in fundamental phenomena such as lipid metabolism or Ca(2+) homeostasis. The interest for these structures has surged in recent years, bringing about the characterization of a plethora of MCS-resident molecules. How those molecules are structurally organized at MCS remains enigmatic, limiting our understanding of MCS function. Whereas such molecular detail is obscured by conventional electron microscopy sample preparation, cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) is uniquely positioned to address this challenge by allowing high resolution imaging of cellular landscapes in close-to-native conditions. Here we briefly review the fundamentals of cryo-ET and how recent developments in this technique are beginning to unveil the molecular architecture of MCS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Contact Sites edited by Christian Ungermann and Benoit Kornmann.

  6. The active site of oxidative phosphorylation and the origin of hyperhomocysteinemia in aging and dementia.

    PubMed

    McCully, Kilmer S

    2015-01-01

    The active site of oxidative phosphorylation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis in mitochondria is proposed to consist of two molecules of thioretinamide bound to cobalamin, forming thioretinaco, complexed with ozone, oxygen, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. and inorganic phosphate, TR2CoO3O2NAD(+)H2PO4(-). Reduction of the pyridinium nitrogen of the nicotinamide group by an electron from electron transport complexes initiates polymerization of phosphate with adenosine diphosphate, yielding nicotinamide riboside and ATP bound to thioretinaco ozonide oxygen. A second electron reduces oxygen to hydroperoxyl radical, releasing ATP from the active site. A proton gradient is created within F1F0 ATPase complexes of mitochondria by reaction of protons with reduced nicotinamide riboside and with hydroperoxyl radical, yielding reduced nicotinamide riboside and hydroperoxide. The hyperhomocysteinemia of aging and dementia is attributed to decreased synthesis of adenosyl methionine by thioretinaco ozonide and ATP, causing decreased allosteric activation of cystathionine synthase and decreased allosteric inhibition of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and resulting in dysregulation of methionine metabolism.

  7. Extension of Hopfield’s Electron Transfer Model To Accommodate Site–Site Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Marshall D.

    2015-10-26

    Extension of the Förster analogue for the ET rate constant (based on virtual intermediate electron detachment or attachment states) with inclusion of site–site correlation due to coulomb terms associated with solvent reorganization energy and the driving force, has been developed and illustrated for a simple three-state, two-mode model. Furthermore, the model is applicable to charge separation (CS), recombination (CR), and shift (CSh) ET processes, with or without an intervening bridge. The model provides a unified perspective on the role of virtual intermediate states in accounting for the thermal Franck–Condon weighted density of states (FCWD), the gaps controlling superexchange coupling, and mean absolute redox potentials, with full accommodation of site–site coulomb interactions. We analyzed two types of correlation: aside from the site–site correlation due to coulomb interactions, we have emphasized the intrinsic “nonorthogonality” which generally pertains to reaction coordinates (RCs) for different ET processes involving multiple electronic states, as may be expressed by suitably defined direction cosines (cos(θ)). A pair of RCs may be nonorthogonal even when the site–site coulomb correlations are absent. While different RCs are linearly independent in the mathematical sense for all θ ≠ 0°, they are independent in the sense of being “uncorrelated” only in the limit of orthogonality (θ = 90°). There is application to more than two coordinates is straightforward and may include both discrete and continuum contributions.

  8. Extension of Hopfield’s Electron Transfer Model To Accommodate Site–Site Correlation

    DOE PAGES

    Newton, Marshall D.

    2015-10-26

    Extension of the Förster analogue for the ET rate constant (based on virtual intermediate electron detachment or attachment states) with inclusion of site–site correlation due to coulomb terms associated with solvent reorganization energy and the driving force, has been developed and illustrated for a simple three-state, two-mode model. Furthermore, the model is applicable to charge separation (CS), recombination (CR), and shift (CSh) ET processes, with or without an intervening bridge. The model provides a unified perspective on the role of virtual intermediate states in accounting for the thermal Franck–Condon weighted density of states (FCWD), the gaps controlling superexchange coupling, andmore » mean absolute redox potentials, with full accommodation of site–site coulomb interactions. We analyzed two types of correlation: aside from the site–site correlation due to coulomb interactions, we have emphasized the intrinsic “nonorthogonality” which generally pertains to reaction coordinates (RCs) for different ET processes involving multiple electronic states, as may be expressed by suitably defined direction cosines (cos(θ)). A pair of RCs may be nonorthogonal even when the site–site coulomb correlations are absent. While different RCs are linearly independent in the mathematical sense for all θ ≠ 0°, they are independent in the sense of being “uncorrelated” only in the limit of orthogonality (θ = 90°). There is application to more than two coordinates is straightforward and may include both discrete and continuum contributions.« less

  9. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  10. Vitamin K epoxide reductase: homology, active site and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P

    2004-06-01

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) recycles reduced vitamin K, which is used subsequently as a co-factor in the gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid residues in blood coagulation enzymes. VKORC1, a subunit of the VKOR complex, has recently been shown to possess this activity. Here, we show that VKORC1 is a member of a large family of predicted enzymes that are present in vertebrates, Drosophila, plants, bacteria and archaea. Four cysteine residues and one residue, which is either serine or threonine, are identified as likely active-site residues. In some plant and bacterial homologues the VKORC1 homologous domain is fused with domains of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. These might reduce disulfide bonds of VKORC1-like enzymes as a prerequisite for their catalytic activities.

  11. Driving electrocatalytic activity by interface electronic structure control in a metalloprotein hybrid catalyst for efficient hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Behera, Sushant Kumar; Deb, Pritam; Ghosh, Arghya

    2016-08-17

    The rational design of metalloprotein hybrid structures and precise calculations for understanding the role of the interfacial electronic structure in regulating the HER activity of water splitting sites and their microscopic effect for obtaining robust hydrogen evolution possess great promise for developing highly efficient nano-bio hybrid HER catalysts. Here, we employ high-accuracy linear-scaling density functional theory calculations using a near-complete basis set and a minimal parameter implicit solvent model within the self-consistent calculations, on silver (Ag) ions assimilated on bacteriorhodopsin (bR) at specific binding sites. Geometry optimization indicates the formation of active sites at the interface of the metalloprotein complex and the density of states reflects the metallic nature of the active sites. The reduced value of the canonical orbital gap indicates the state of dynamic nature after Ag ion assimilation on active sites and smooth electron transfer. These incorporated active protein sites are more efficient in electrolytic splitting of water than pristine sites due to their low value of Gibbs free energy for the HER in terms of hydrogen coverages. Volcano plot analysis and the free energy diagram are compared for understanding the hydrogen evolution efficiency. Moreover, the essential role of the interfacial electronic properties in regulating the HER catalytic activity of water splitting sites and enhancing the efficiency is elucidated.

  12. Cleaning and activation of beryllium-copper electron multiplier dynodes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pongratz, M. B.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a cleaning and activation procedure followed in preparing beryllium-copper dynodes for electron multipliers used in sounding-rocket experiments to detect auroral electrons. The initial degreasing step involved a 5-min bath in trichloroethylene in an ultrasonic cleaner. This was followed by an ultrasonic rinse in methanol and by a two-step acid pickling treatment to remove the oxides. Additional rinsing in water and methanol was followed by activation in a stainless-steel RF induction oven.

  13. Wigner crystallization of a two-dimensional electron gas in a magnetic field: Single electrons versus electron pairs at the lattice sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taut, M.

    2001-10-01

    The ground state energy and the lowest excitations of a two-dimensional Wigner crystal in a perpendicular magnetic field with one and two electrons per cell is investigated. In the case of two electrons per lattice site, the interaction of the electrons within each cell is taken into account exactly (including exchange and correlation effects), and the interaction between the cells is in second order (dipole) van der Waals approximation. No further approximations are made, in particular Landau level mixing and incomplete spin polarization are accounted for. Therefore, our calculation comprises a, roughly speaking, complementary description of the bubble phase (in the special case of one and two electrons per bubble), which was proposed by Koulakov, Fogler, and Shklovskii on the basis of a Hartree Fock calculation. The phase diagram shows that in GaAs the paired phase is energetically more favorable than the single electron phase for, roughly speaking, filling factor f larger than 0.3 and density parameter rs smaller than 19 effective Bohr radii (for a more precise statement see Figs. 3 and 4). If we start within the paired phase and increase magnetic field or decrease density, the pairs first undergo some singlet-triplet transitions before they break.

  14. Site Selection for Ground Based Free Electron Laser Technology Integration Experiment (GBFEL-TIE), Volume 3: Preferred Site Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    established that the GBFEL-TIE could be accomplished at any of the three candidate sites. However, based on differences identified during site investigations...construction and operation of the GBFEL-TIE, including environmental mitigation costs, differed only slightly among the three sites, with the Orogrande site...the differences in the findings that would affect site selection, and established a relative ranking of the three sites under consideration. The

  15. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  16. Magnetic Reconnection Sites Observed by the Cluster Spacecraft: Measurement of Short time scale electron effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, A. M.; Carozzi, T. C.; Gough, M. P.; Chambers, E. C.

    Several events have been observed by the Cluster spacecraft passing close to magnetic reconnection sites in the tail and magnetopause when the fleet configuration is at short spatial scale (spacecraft separation approximately 100 km). These events are studied in the context of corresponding short time scale electron behaviour which contribute to and result from the reconnection process. This is done primarily using Particle Correlator data from the DWP instruments on Cluster in conjunction with other data sets. The particle correlators use captured time series of electron particle counts accumulated in 12 microsecond time bins measured over the energy range of the PEACE HEEA sensor (40 eV to 26 KeV) and on which an auto-correlation is performed. The phenomena studied concerns beam properties, electron acceleration, interaction with waves and any indications of the electron diffusion processes that are occurring. These phenomena are quantified using measures of the strength of particle-particle interactions (general second order statistics on the electrons) and the Index of Dispersion (variance to mean ratio) indicating bunching or scattering processes.

  17. O2 activation by binuclear Cu sites: Noncoupled versus exchange coupled reaction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Solomon, Edward I.

    2004-09-01

    Binuclear Cu proteins play vital roles in O2 binding and activation in biology and can be classified into coupled and noncoupled binuclear sites based on the magnetic interaction between the two Cu centers. Coupled binuclear Cu proteins include hemocyanin, tyrosinase, and catechol oxidase. These proteins have two Cu centers strongly magnetically coupled through direct bridging ligands that provide a mechanism for the 2-electron reduction of O2 to a µ-2:2 side-on peroxide bridged species. This side-on bridged peroxo-CuII2 species is activated for electrophilic attack on the phenolic ring of substrates. Noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins include peptidylglycine -hydroxylating monooxygenase and dopamine -monooxygenase. These proteins have binuclear Cu active sites that are distant, that exhibit no exchange interaction, and that activate O2 at a single Cu center to generate a reactive CuII/O2 species for H-atom abstraction from the C-H bond of substrates. O2 intermediates in the coupled binuclear Cu enzymes can be trapped and studied spectroscopically. Possible intermediates in noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins can be defined through correlation to mononuclear CuII/O2 model complexes. The different intermediates in these two classes of binuclear Cu proteins exhibit different reactivities that correlate with their different electronic structures and exchange coupling interactions between the binuclear Cu centers. These studies provide insight into the role of exchange coupling between the Cu centers in their reaction mechanisms.

  18. Target-classification approach applied to active UXO sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Shamatava, Irma; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study is designed to illustrate the discrimination performance at two UXO active sites (Oklahoma's Fort Sill and the Massachusetts Military Reservation) of a set of advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) inversion/discrimination models which include the orthonormalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS), joint diagonalization (JD), and differential evolution (DE) approaches and whose power and flexibility greatly exceed those of the simple dipole model. The Fort Sill site is highly contaminated by a mix of the following types of munitions: 37-mm target practice tracers, 60-mm illumination mortars, 75-mm and 4.5'' projectiles, 3.5'', 2.36'', and LAAW rockets, antitank mine fuzes with and without hex nuts, practice MK2 and M67 grenades, 2.5'' ballistic windshields, M2A1-mines with/without bases, M19-14 time fuzes, and 40-mm practice grenades with/without cartridges. The site at the MMR site contains targets of yet different sizes. In this work we apply our models to EMI data collected using the MetalMapper (MM) and 2 × 2 TEMTADS sensors. The data for each anomaly are inverted to extract estimates of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters associated with each buried target. (The latter include the total volume magnetic source or NVMS, which relates to size, shape, and material properties; the former includes location, depth, and orientation). The estimated intrinsic parameters are then used for classification performed via library matching and the use of statistical classification algorithms; this process yielded prioritized dig-lists that were submitted to the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) for independent scoring. The models' classification performance is illustrated and assessed based on these independent evaluations.

  19. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Altering Pollen Soluble Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Deborah J; Haque, Tamanna; Tudor, Richard L; Barron, Yoshimi; Zampronio, Cleidiane G; Cotton, Nicholas P J; de Graaf, Barend H J; White, Scott A; Cooper, Helen J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Harper, Jeffery F; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2017-03-01

    Protein phosphorylation regulates numerous cellular processes. Identifying the substrates and protein kinases involved is vital to understand how these important posttranslational modifications modulate biological function in eukaryotic cells. Pyrophosphatases catalyze the hydrolysis of inorganic phosphate (PPi) to inorganic phosphate Pi, driving biosynthetic reactions; they are essential for low cytosolic inorganic phosphate. It was suggested recently that posttranslational regulation of Family I soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (sPPases) may affect their activity. We previously demonstrated that two pollen-expressed sPPases, Pr-p26.1a and Pr-p26.1b, from the flowering plant Papaver rhoeas were inhibited by phosphorylation. Despite the potential significance, there is a paucity of data on sPPase phosphorylation and regulation. Here, we used liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry to map phosphorylation sites to the otherwise divergent amino-terminal extensions on these pollen sPPases. Despite the absence of reports in the literature on mapping phosphorylation sites on sPPases, a database survey of various proteomes identified a number of examples, suggesting that phosphorylation may be a more widely used mechanism to regulate these enzymes. Phosphomimetic mutants of Pr-p26.1a/b significantly and differentially reduced PPase activities by up to 2.5-fold at pH 6.8 and 52% in the presence of Ca(2+) and hydrogen peroxide over unmodified proteins. This indicates that phosphoregulation of key sites can inhibit the catalytic responsiveness of these proteins in concert with key intracellular events. As sPPases are essential for many metabolic pathways in eukaryotic cells, our findings identify the phosphorylation of sPPases as a potential master regulatory mechanism that could be used to attenuate metabolism.

  20. Evidence for segmental mobility in the active site of pepsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, J.; Strop, P.; Senn, H.; Foundling, S.; Kostka, V.

    1986-05-01

    The low hydrolytic activity (k/sub cat/ < 0.001 s/sup -1/) of chicken pepsin (CP) towards tri- and tetrapeptides is enhanced at least 100 times by modification of its single sulfhydryl group of Cys-115, with little effect on K/sub m/-values. Modification thus simulates the effect of secondary substrate binding on pepsin catalysis. The rate of Cys-115 modification is substantially decreased in the presence of some competitive inhibitors, suggesting its active site location. Experiments with CP alkylated at Cys-115 with Acrylodan as a fluorescent probe or with N-iodoacetyl-(4-fluoro)-aniline as a /sup 19/F-nmr probe suggest conformation change around Cys-115 to occur on substrate or substrate analog binding. The difference /sup 1/H-nmr spectra (500 MHz) of unmodified free and inhibitor-complexed CP reveal chemical shifts almost exclusively in the aromatic region. The effects of Cu/sup + +/ on /sup 19/F- and /sup 1/H-nmr spectra have been studied. Examination of a computer graphics model of CP based on E. parasitica pepsin-inhibitor complex X-ray coordinates suggests that Cys-115 is located near the S/sub 3//S/sub 5/ binding site. The results are interpreted in favor of segmental mobility of this region important for pepsin substrate binding and catalysis.

  1. C-H Activation on Co,O Sites: Isolated Surface Sites versus Molecular Analogs.

    PubMed

    Estes, Deven P; Siddiqi, Georges; Allouche, Florian; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Safonova, Olga V; Trigub, Alexander L; Koptyug, Igor V; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-11-16

    The activation and conversion of hydrocarbons is one of the most important challenges in chemistry. Transition-metal ions (V, Cr, Fe, Co, etc.) isolated on silica surfaces are known to catalyze such processes. The mechanisms of these processes are currently unknown but are thought to involve C-H activation as the rate-determining step. Here, we synthesize well-defined Co(II) ions on a silica surface using a metal siloxide precursor followed by thermal treatment under vacuum at 500 °C. We show that these isolated Co(II) sites are catalysts for a number of hydrocarbon conversion reactions, such as the dehydrogenation of propane, the hydrogenation of propene, and the trimerization of terminal alkynes. We then investigate the mechanisms of these processes using kinetics, kinetic isotope effects, isotopic labeling experiments, parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) NMR, and comparison with a molecular analog. The data are consistent with all of these reactions occurring by a common mechanism, involving heterolytic C-H or H-H activation via a 1,2 addition across a Co-O bond.

  2. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  3. Continued geophysical logging near the GMH Electronics National Priorities List Superfund site near Roxboro, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Antolino, Dominick J.; Chapman, Melinda J.

    2017-01-06

    The U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center collected borehole geophysical logs and images and continuous water-level data near the GMH Electronics National Priorities List Superfund site near Roxboro, North Carolina, during December 2012 through July 2015. Previous work by the U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center at the site involved the collection of borehole geophysical log data in 15 wells, in addition to surface geologic mapping and passive diffusion bag sampling. In a continued effort to assist the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in developing a conceptual groundwater model to assess current contaminant distribution and future migration of contaminants, more than 900 subsurface features (primarily fracture orientations) in 10 open borehole wells were delineated and continuous water-level data information from 14 monitoring wells within close proximity of the initially drilled boreholes was collected to observe any induced water-level fluctuations during drilling operations

  4. The Automatic Clinical Trial: Leveraging the Electronic Medical Record in Multi-site Cancer Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Judy; Crowley, John

    2012-01-01

    Submission of data into clinical trial electronic data capture (EDC) systems currently requires redundant entry of data that already exist in the electronic medical record (EMR). Being able to automatically transfer data from the EMR to the EDC would save many hours of arduous effort, especially for multi-site data-intensive oncology trials. Standardization of the way in which data is stored and retrieved in the medical record and techniques for mining data from the unstructured narrative will provide opportunities for transferring data from EMR to EDC. As different EMRs proliferate, other technology in the form of data mining or middle tier applications are certain to provide assistance in this effort. PMID:22907283

  5. Probing Oxygen Activation Sites in Two Flavoprotein Oxidases Using Chloride as an Oxygen Surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Kommoju, Phaneeswara-Rao; Chen, Zhi-wei; Bruckner, Robert C.; Mathews, F. Scott; Jorns, Marilyn Schuman

    2011-08-16

    A single basic residue above the si-face of the flavin ring is the site of oxygen activation in glucose oxidase (GOX) (His516) and monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) (Lys265). Crystal structures of both flavoenzymes exhibit a small pocket at the oxygen activation site that might provide a preorganized binding site for superoxide anion, an obligatory intermediate in the two-electron reduction of oxygen. Chloride binds at these polar oxygen activation sites, as judged by solution and structural studies. First, chloride forms spectrally detectable complexes with GOX and MSOX. The protonated form of His516 is required for tight binding of chloride to oxidized GOX and for rapid reaction of reduced GOX with oxygen. Formation of a binary MSOX-chloride complex requires Lys265 and is not observed with Lys265Met. Binding of chloride to MSOX does not affect the binding of a sarcosine analogue (MTA, methylthioactetate) above the re-face of the flavin ring. Definitive evidence is provided by crystal structures determined for a binary MSOX-chloride complex and a ternary MSOX-chloride-MTA complex. Chloride binds in the small pocket at a position otherwise occupied by a water molecule and forms hydrogen bonds to four ligands that are arranged in approximate tetrahedral geometry: Lys265:NZ, Arg49:NH1, and two water molecules, one of which is hydrogen bonded to FAD:N5. The results show that chloride (i) acts as an oxygen surrogate, (ii) is an effective probe of polar oxygen activation sites, and (iii) provides a valuable complementary tool to the xenon gas method that is used to map nonpolar oxygen-binding cavities.

  6. Cluster analysis for the probability of DSB site induced by electron tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshii, Y.; Sasaki, K.; Matsuya, Y.; Date, H.

    2015-05-01

    To clarify the influence of bio-cells exposed to ionizing radiations, the densely populated pattern of the ionization in the cell nucleus is of importance because it governs the extent of DNA damage which may lead to cell lethality. In this study, we have conducted a cluster analysis of ionization and excitation events to estimate the number of double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by electron tracks. A Monte Carlo simulation for electrons in liquid water was performed to determine the spatial location of the ionization and excitation events. The events were divided into clusters by using the density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise (DBSCAN) algorithm. The algorithm enables us to sort out the events into the groups (clusters) in which a minimum number of neighboring events are contained within a given radius. For evaluating the number of DSBs in the extracted clusters, we have introduced an aggregation index (AI). The computational results show that a sub-keV electron produces DSBs in a dense formation more effectively than higher energy electrons. The root-mean square radius (RMSR) of the cluster size is below 5 nm, which is smaller than the chromatin fiber thickness. It was found that this size of clustering events has a high possibility to cause lesions in DNA within the chromatin fiber site.

  7. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  8. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  9. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  10. An active site water network in the plasminogen activator pla from Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-07-14

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 A. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  11. Foreign Glycoproteins Can Be Actively Recruited to Virus Assembly Sites during Pseudotyping▿

    PubMed Central

    Jorgenson, Rebecca L.; Vogt, Volker M.; Johnson, Marc C.

    2009-01-01

    Retroviruses like human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), as well as many other enveloped viruses, can efficiently produce infectious virus in the absence of their own surface glycoprotein if a suitable glycoprotein from a foreign virus is expressed in the same cell. This process of complementation, known as pseudotyping, often can occur even when the glycoprotein is from an unrelated virus. Although pseudotyping is widely used for engineering chimeric viruses, it has remained unknown whether a virus can actively recruit foreign glycoproteins to budding sites or, alternatively, if a virus obtains the glycoproteins through a passive mechanism. We have studied the specificity of glycoprotein recruitment by immunogold labeling viral glycoproteins and imaging their distribution on the host plasma membrane using scanning electron microscopy. Expressed alone, all tested viral glycoproteins were relatively randomly distributed on the plasma membrane. However, in the presence of budding HIV-1 or Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) particles, some glycoproteins, such as those encoded by murine leukemia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, were dramatically redistributed to viral budding sites. In contrast, the RSV Env glycoprotein was robustly recruited only to the homologous RSV budding sites. These data demonstrate that viral glycoproteins are not in preformed membrane patches prior to viral assembly but rather that glycoproteins are actively recruited to certain viral assembly sites. PMID:19224995

  12. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  13. Characterization of the active site of ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munshi, C; Thiel, D J; Mathews, I I; Aarhus, R; Walseth, T F; Lee, H C

    1999-10-22

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase synthesizes two Ca(2+) messengers by cyclizing NAD to produce cyclic ADP-ribose and exchanging nicotinic acid with the nicotinamide group of NADP to produce nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Recombinant Aplysia cyclase was expressed in yeast and co-crystallized with a substrate, nicotinamide. x-ray crystallography showed that the nicotinamide was bound in a pocket formed in part by a conserved segment and was near the central cleft of the cyclase. Glu(98), Asn(107) and Trp(140) were within 3.5 A of the bound nicotinamide and appeared to coordinate it. Substituting Glu(98) with either Gln, Gly, Leu, or Asn reduced the cyclase activity by 16-222-fold, depending on the substitution. The mutant N107G exhibited only a 2-fold decrease in activity, while the activity of W140G was essentially eliminated. The base exchange activity of all mutants followed a similar pattern of reduction, suggesting that both reactions occur at the same active site. In addition to NAD, the wild-type cyclase also cyclizes nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide to cyclic GDP-ribose. All mutant enzymes had at least half of the GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity of the wild type, some even 2-3-fold higher, indicating that the three coordinating amino acids are responsible for positioning of the substrate but not absolutely critical for catalysis. To search for the catalytic residues, other amino acids in the binding pocket were mutagenized. E179G was totally devoid of GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity, and both its ADP-ribosyl cyclase and the base exchange activities were reduced by 10,000- and 18,000-fold, respectively. Substituting Glu(179) with either Asn, Leu, Asp, or Gln produced similar inactive enzymes, and so was the conversion of Trp(77) to Gly. However, both E179G and the double mutant E179G/W77G retained NAD-binding ability as shown by photoaffinity labeling with [(32)P]8-azido-NAD. These results indicate that both Glu(179) and Trp(77) are crucial for catalysis and

  14. Integral Equation Calculation of Solvent Activation Free Energies for Electron and Proton Transfer Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-04

    6. AUTHOR(S) P.P. Schmidt Indrani Bhattacharya- Kodali and Gregory Voth 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND AODRESS(ES) 8. PERIORMING ORGANIZATION...13. ABSTRACT (Maimum 200 words) The extended reference interaction site method (RISM) integral equation theory is applied to calculate the solvent...Integral Equation Calculation of Solvent Activation Free Energies for Electron and Proton Transfer Reactions Indrani Bhattacharya- Kodali and Gregory A. Voth

  15. Mutations inducing an active-site aperture in Rhizobium sp. sucrose isomerase confer hydrolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Alexandra; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Robert, Xavier; Rhimi, Moez; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Aghajari, Nushin

    2013-02-01

    Sucrose isomerase is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of sucrose isomers of high biotechnological and pharmaceutical interest. Owing to the complexity of the chemical synthesis of these isomers, isomaltulose and trehalulose, enzymatic conversion remains the preferred method for obtaining these products. Depending on the microbial source, the ratio of the sucrose-isomer products varies significantly. In studies aimed at understanding and explaining the underlying molecular mechanisms of these reactions, mutations obtained using a random-mutagenesis approach displayed a major hydrolytic activity. Two of these variants, R284C and F164L, of sucrose isomerase from Rhizobium sp. were therefore crystallized and their crystal structures were determined. The three-dimensional structures of these mutants allowed the identification of the molecular determinants that favour hydrolytic activity compared with transferase activity. Substantial conformational changes resulting in an active-site opening were observed, as were changes in the pattern of water molecules bordering the active-site region.

  16. Evidence for the participation of Cys sub 558 and Cys sub 559 at the active site of mercuric reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.M.; Moore, M.J.; Massey, V.; Williams, C.H. Jr.; Distefano, M.D.; Ballou, D.P.; Walsh, C.T. )

    1989-02-07

    Mercuric reductase, with FAD and a reducible disulfide at the active site, catalyzes the two-electron reduction of Hg(II) by NADPH. Addition of reducing equivalents rapidly produces a spectrally distinct EH{sub 2} form of the enzyme containing oxidized FAD and reduced active site thiols. Formation of EH{sub 2} has previously been reported to require only 2 electrons for reduction of the active site disulfide. The authors present results of anaerobic titrations of mercuric reductase with NADPH and dithionite showing that the equilibrium conversion of oxidized enzyme to EH{sub 2} actually requires 2 equiv of reducing agent or 4 electrons. Kinetic studies conducted both at 4{degree}C and at 25{degree}C indicate that reduction of the active site occurs rapidly, as previously reported; this is followed by a slower reduction of another redox group via reaction with the active site. ({sup 14}C)Iodoacetamide labeling experiments demonstrate that the C-terminal residues, Cys{sub 558} and Cys{sub 559}, are involved in this disulfide. The fluorescence, but not the absorbance, of the enzyme-bound FAD was found to be highly dependent on the redox state of the C-terminal thiols. Thus, E{sub ox} with Cys{sub 558} and Cys{sub 559} as thiols exhibits less than 50% of the fluorescence of E{sub ox} where these residues are present as a disulfide, indicating that the thiols remain intimately associated with the active site. Initial velocity measurements show that the auxiliary disulfide must be reduced before catalytic Hg(II) reduction can occur, consistent with the report of a preactivation phenomenon with NADPH or cysteine. A modified minimal catalytic mechanism is proposed as well as several chemical mechanisms for the Hg(II) reduction step.

  17. Electron Densities in Solar Flare Loops, Chromospheric Evaporation Upflows, and Acceleration Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1996-01-01

    We compare electron densities measured at three different locations in solar flares: (1) in Soft X-Ray (SXR) loops, determined from SXR emission measures and loop diameters from Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope maps (n(sub e, sup SXR) = (0.2-2.5) x 10(exp 11)/ cu cm); (2) in chromospheric evaporation upflows, inferred from plasma frequency cutoffs of decimetric radio bursts detected with the 0.1-3 GHz spectrometer Phoenix of ETH Zuerich (n(sub e, sup upflow) = (0.3-11) x 10(exp 10)/cu cm; and (3) in acceleration sites, inferred from the plasma frequency at the separatrix between upward-accelerated (type III bursts) and downward-accelerated (reverse-drift bursts) electron beams [n(sub e, sup acc) = (0.6-10) x 10(exp 9)/cu cm]. The comparison of these density measurements, obtained from 44 flare episodes (during 14 different flares), demonstrates the compatibility of flare plasma density diagnostics with SXR and radio methods. The density in the upflowing plasma is found to be somewhat lower than in the filled loops, having ratios in a range n(sub e, sup upflow)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.02-1.3, and a factor of 3.6 higher behind the upflow front. The acceleration sites are found to have a much lower density than the SXR-bright flare loops, i.e., n(sub e, sup acc)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.005- 0.13, and thus must be physically displaced from the SXR-bright flare loops. The scaling law between electron time-of-flight distances l' and loop half-lengths s, l'/s = 1.4 +/- 0.3, recently established by Aschwanden et al. suggests that the centroid of the acceleration region is located above the SXR-bright flare loop, as envisioned in cusp geometries (e.g., in magnetic reconnection models).

  18. The active site of hen egg-white lysozyme: flexibility and chemical bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Held, Jeanette Smaalen, Sander van

    2014-04-01

    Chemical bonding at the active site of lysozyme is analyzed on the basis of a multipole model employing transferable multipole parameters from a database. Large B factors at low temperatures reflect frozen-in disorder, but therefore prevent a meaningful free refinement of multipole parameters. Chemical bonding at the active site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) is analyzed on the basis of Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules [QTAIM; Bader (1994 ▶), Atoms in Molecules: A Quantum Theory. Oxford University Press] applied to electron-density maps derived from a multipole model. The observation is made that the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) of HEWL at a temperature of 100 K are larger than ADPs in crystals of small biological molecules at 298 K. This feature shows that the ADPs in the cold crystals of HEWL reflect frozen-in disorder rather than thermal vibrations of the atoms. Directly generalizing the results of multipole studies on small-molecule crystals, the important consequence for electron-density analysis of protein crystals is that multipole parameters cannot be independently varied in a meaningful way in structure refinements. Instead, a multipole model for HEWL has been developed by refinement of atomic coordinates and ADPs against the X-ray diffraction data of Wang and coworkers [Wang et al. (2007), Acta Cryst. D63, 1254–1268], while multipole parameters were fixed to the values for transferable multipole parameters from the ELMAM2 database [Domagala et al. (2012), Acta Cryst. A68, 337–351] . Static and dynamic electron densities based on this multipole model are presented. Analysis of their topological properties according to the QTAIM shows that the covalent bonds possess similar properties to the covalent bonds of small molecules. Hydrogen bonds of intermediate strength are identified for the Glu35 and Asp52 residues, which are considered to be essential parts of the active site of HEWL. Furthermore, a series of weak C

  19. On-site electronic observational assessment tool for discomfort and pain.

    PubMed

    Schiepers, Pieter; Bonroy, Bert; Leysens, Greet; Miljkovic, Dragana; De Maesschalck, Lieven; Quanten, Stijn; Vanrumste, Bart; Berckmans, Daniel

    2010-07-01

    Over the recent years pen-paper observational assessment scales have proven to be useful to monitor behaviour and responses of humans and animals. Observational assessment tools are typically applied for subjects who are not able to communicate directly. For on-site observational assessment however it is hard to record and evaluate timing patterns of observed events using pen-paper scales. Although timing information is in many cases assumed highly valuable, only (videotaped) laboratory scales are able to benefit from this knowledge. In the work described in this paper we digitize pen-paper assessment scales resulting in new functionalities capable to improve assessment scores. A study of on-site pain and discomfort assessment of severely demented elderly is presented. The resulting system is a mobile electronic device with a graphical user interface (GUI) on a touch screen. Moreover digital information is stored in a database improving administration, providing immediate feedback and allowing applications like: visualisation, statistical analysis and scientific research like data mining. The device allows easily registering and automatically interpreting complex timing patterns of behaviours and responses, on-site. This feature could be employed in the development of new more accurate observational assessment instruments.

  20. Site-specific PEGylation of lidamycin and its antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Shang, Boyang; Hu, Lei; Shao, Rongguang; Zhen, Yongsu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, N-terminal site-specific mono-PEGylation of the recombinant lidamycin apoprotein (rLDP) of lidamycin (LDM) was prepared using a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) derivative (Mw 20 kDa) through a reactive terminal aldehyde group under weak acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The biochemical properties of mPEG-rLDP-AE, an enediyne-integrated conjugate, were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of mPEG-rLDP-AE was evaluated by MTT assays and in xenograft model. The results indicated that mPEG-rLDP-AE showed significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. After PEGylation, mPEG-rLDP still retained the binding capability to the enediyne AE and presented the physicochemical characteristics similar to that of native LDP. It is of interest that the PEGylation did not diminish the antitumor efficacy of LDM, implying the possibility that this derivative may function as a payload to deliver novel tumor-targeted drugs. PMID:26579455

  1. Subcellular distribution of ( sup 3 H)-dexamethasone mesylate binding sites in Leydig cells using electron microscope radioautography

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.; Hermo, L.; Antakly, T. )

    1991-01-01

    The present view is that glucocorticoid hormones bind to their cytoplasmic receptors before reaching their nuclear target sites, which include specific DNA sequences. Although it is believed that cytoplasmic sequestration of steroid receptors and other transcription factors (such as NFKB) may regulate the overall activity of these factors, there is little information on the exact subcellular sites of steroid receptors or even of any other transcription factors. Tritiated (3H)-dexamethasone 21-mesylate (DM) is an affinity label that binds covalently to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), thereby allowing morphological localization of the receptor at the light and electron microscope levels as well as for quantitative radioautographic (RAG) analysis. After injection of 3H-DM into the testis, a specific radioautographic signal was observed in Leydig cells, which correlated with a high level of immunocytochemically demonstrable GR in these cells at the light-microscope level. To localize the 3H-DM binding sites at the electron microscope (EM) level, the testes of 5 experimental and 3 control adrenalectomized rats were injected directly with 20 microCi 3H-DM; control rats received simultaneously a 25-fold excess of unlabeled dexamethasone; 15 min later, rats were fixed with glutaraldehyde and the tissue was processed for EM RAG analysis combined with quantitative morphometry. The radioautographs showed that the cytosol, nucleus, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER), and mitochondria were labeled. Since the cytosol was always adjacent to tubules of the sER, the term sER-rich cytosol was used to represent label over sER networks, which may also represent cytosol labeling due to the limited resolution of the radioautographic technique. Labeling was highest in sER-rich cytosol and mitochondria, at 53% and 31% of the total, respectively.

  2. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site

    PubMed Central

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called ‘catalytic residues’ are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06181.001 PMID:25902402

  3. Ligand reorganization and activation energies in nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianjun; Wang, Jianji; Stell, George

    2006-10-01

    The activation energy and ligand reorganization energy for nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions in chemical and biological systems are investigated in this paper. The free energy surfaces and the activation energy are derived exactly in the general case in which the ligand vibration frequencies are not equal. The activation energy is derived by free energy minimization at the transition state. Our formulation leads to the Marcus-Hush [J. Chem. Phys. 24, 979 (1956); 98, 7170 (1994); 28, 962 (1958)] results in the equal-frequency limit and also generalizes the Marcus-Sumi [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] model in the context of studying the solvent dynamic effect on electron transfer reactions. It is found that when the ligand vibration frequencies are different, the activation energy derived from the Marcus-Hush formula deviates by 5%-10% from the exact value. If the reduced reorganization energy approximation is introduced in the Marcus-Hush formula, the result is almost exact.

  4. A split active site couples cap recognition by Dcp2 to activation

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N.; Jones, Brittnee N.; Hernandez, Gail A.; Gross, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Decapping by Dcp2 is an essential step in 5′-3′ mRNA decay. In yeast, decapping requires an open-to-closed transition in Dcp2, though the link between closure and catalysis remains elusive. Here we show using NMR that cap binds conserved residues on both the catalytic and regulatory domains of Dcp2. Lesions in the cap-binding site on the regulatory domain reduce the catalytic step two orders of magnitude and block formation of the closed state whereas Dcp1 enhances the catalytic step by a factor of ten and promotes closure. We conclude that closure occurs during the rate-limiting catalytic step of decapping, juxtaposing the cap-binding region of each domain to form a composite active site. This work suggests a model for regulation of decapping, where coactivators trigger decapping by stabilizing a labile composite active site. PMID:20711189

  5. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 nitrogenase active site to increase photobiological hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Masukawa, Hajime; Inoue, Kazuhito; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Wolk, C Peter; Hausinger, Robert P

    2010-10-01

    Cyanobacteria use sunlight and water to produce hydrogen gas (H₂), which is potentially useful as a clean and renewable biofuel. Photobiological H₂ arises primarily as an inevitable by-product of N₂ fixation by nitrogenase, an oxygen-labile enzyme typically containing an iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) active site. In Anabaena sp. strain 7120, the enzyme is localized to the microaerobic environment of heterocysts, a highly differentiated subset of the filamentous cells. In an effort to increase H₂ production by this strain, six nitrogenase amino acid residues predicted to reside within 5 Å of the FeMo-co were mutated in an attempt to direct electron flow selectively toward proton reduction in the presence of N₂. Most of the 49 variants examined were deficient in N₂-fixing growth and exhibited decreases in their in vivo rates of acetylene reduction. Of greater interest, several variants examined under an N₂ atmosphere significantly increased their in vivo rates of H₂ production, approximating rates equivalent to those under an Ar atmosphere, and accumulated high levels of H₂ compared to the reference strains. These results demonstrate the feasibility of engineering cyanobacterial strains for enhanced photobiological production of H₂ in an aerobic, nitrogen-containing environment.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of Zika virus NS3 helicase: Insights into RNA binding site activity.

    PubMed

    Mottin, Melina; Braga, Rodolpho C; da Silva, Roosevelt A; Silva, Joao H Martins da; Perryman, Alexander L; Ekins, Sean; Andrade, Carolina Horta

    2017-03-21

    America is still suffering with the outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection. Congenital ZIKV syndrome has already caused a public health emergency of international concern. However, there are still no vaccines to prevent or drugs to treat the infection caused by ZIKV. The ZIKV NS3 helicase (NS3h) protein is a promising target for drug discovery due to its essential role in viral genome replication. NS3h unwinds the viral RNA to enable the replication of the viral genome by the NS5 protein. NS3h contains two important binding sites: the NTPase binding site and the RNA binding site. Here, we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the molecular behavior of ZIKV NS3h in the presence and absence of ssRNA and the potential implications for NS3h activity and inhibition. Although there is conformational variability and poor electron densities of the RNA binding loop in various apo flaviviruses NS3h crystallographic structures, the MD trajectories of NS3h-ssRNA demonstrated that the RNA binding loop becomes more stable when NS3h is occupied by RNA. Our results suggest that the presence of RNA generates important interactions with the RNA binding loop, and these interactions stabilize the loop sufficiently that it remains in a closed conformation. This closed conformation likely keeps the ssRNA bound to the protein for a sufficient duration to enable the unwinding/replication activities of NS3h to occur. In addition, conformational changes of this RNA binding loop can change the nature and location of the optimal ligand binding site, according to ligand binding site prediction results. These are important findings to help guide the design and discovery of new inhibitors of NS3h as promising compounds to treat the ZIKV infection.

  7. Three-dimensional representations of salt-dome margins at four active strategic petroleum reserve sites.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Stein, Joshua S.

    2003-01-01

    Existing paper-based site characterization models of salt domes at the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been converted to digital format and visualized using modern computer software. The four sites are the Bayou Choctaw dome in Iberville Parish, Louisiana; the Big Hill dome in Jefferson County, Texas; the Bryan Mound dome in Brazoria County, Texas; and the West Hackberry dome in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. A new modeling algorithm has been developed to overcome limitations of many standard geological modeling software packages in order to deal with structurally overhanging salt margins that are typical of many salt domes. This algorithm, and the implementing computer program, make use of the existing interpretive modeling conducted manually using professional geological judgement and presented in two dimensions in the original site characterization reports as structure contour maps on the top of salt. The algorithm makes use of concepts of finite-element meshes of general engineering usage. Although the specific implementation of the algorithm described in this report and the resulting output files are tailored to the modeling and visualization software used to construct the figures contained herein, the algorithm itself is generic and other implementations and output formats are possible. The graphical visualizations of the salt domes at the four Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites are believed to be major improvements over the previously available two-dimensional representations of the domes via conventional geologic drawings (cross sections and contour maps). Additionally, the numerical mesh files produced by this modeling activity are available for import into and display by other software routines. The mesh data are not explicitly tabulated in this report; however an electronic version in simple ASCII format is included on a PC-based compact disk.

  8. Electron transfer dissociation versus collisionally activated dissociation of cationized biodegradable polyesters.

    PubMed

    Scionti, Vincenzo; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2012-11-01

    Biodegradable polyesters were ionized by electrospray ionization and characterized by tandem mass spectrometry using collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) as activation methods. The compounds studied include one homopolymer, polylactide and two copolymers, poly(ethylene adipate) and poly(butylene adipate). CAD of [M+2Na](2+) ions from these polyesters proceeds via charge-remote 1,5-H rearrangements over the ester groups, leading to cleavages at the (CO)O-alkyl bonds. ETD of the same precursor ions creates a radical anion at the site of electron attachment, which fragments by radical-induced cleavage of the (CO)O-alkyl bonds and by intramolecular nucleophilic substitution at the (CO)-O bonds. In contrast to CAD, ETD produces fragments in one charge state only and does not cause consecutive fragmentations, which simplifies spectral interpretation and permits conclusive identification of the correct end groups. The radical-site reactions occurring during ETD are very similar with those reported for ETD of protonated peptides. Unlike multiply protonated species, multiply sodiated precursors form ion pairs (salt bridges) after electron transfer, thereby promoting dissociations via nucleophilic displacement in addition to the radical-site dissociations typical in ETD.

  9. Importance of the conserved lysine 83 residue of Zea mays cytochrome b(561) for ascorbate-specific transmembrane electron transfer as revealed by site-directed mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Nobuyuki; Rahman, Motiur Md; Sakamoto, Yoichi; Takigami, Tadakazu; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Hori, Hiroshi; Hase, Toshiharu; Park, Sam-Yong; Tsubaki, Motonari

    2009-11-10

    Cytochromes b(561), a novel class of transmembrane electron transport proteins residing in a large variety of eukaryotic cells, have a number of common structural features including six hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helices and two heme ligation sites. We found that recombinant Zea mays cytochrome b(561) obtained by a heterologous expression system using yeast Pichia pastoris cells could utilize the ascorbate/mondehydroascorbate radical as a physiological electron donor/acceptor. We found further that a concerted proton/electron transfer mechanism might be operative in Z. mays cytochrome b(561) as well upon the electron acceptance from ascorbate to the cytosolic heme center. The well-conserved Lys(83) residue in a cytosolic loop was found to have a very important role(s) for the binding of ascorbate and the succeeding electron transfer via electrostatic interactions based on the analyses of three site-specific mutants, K83A, K83E, and K83D. Further, unusual behavior of the K83A mutant in pulse radiolysis experiments indicated that Lys(83) might also be responsible for the intramolecular electron transfer to the intravesicular heme. On the other hand, pulse radiolysis experiments on two site-specific mutants, S118A and W122A, for the well-conserved residues in the putative monodehydroascorbate radical binding site showed that their electron transfer activities to the monodehydroascorbate radical were very similar to those of the wild-type protein, indicating that Ser(118) and Trp(122) do not have major roles for the redox events on the intravesicular side.

  10. Global transcriptional start site mapping in Geobacter sulfurreducens during growth with two different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    González, Getzabeth; Labastida, Aurora; Jímenez-Jacinto, Verónica; Vega-Alvarado, Leticia; Olvera, Maricela; Morett, Enrique; Juárez, Katy

    2016-09-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is an anaerobic soil bacterium that is involved in biogeochemical cycles of elements such as Fe and Mn. Although significant progress has been made in the understanding of the electron transfer processes in G. sulfurreducens, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms involved in their control. To expand the study of gene regulation in G. sulfurreducens, we carried out a genome-wide identification of transcription start sites (TSS) by 5'RACE and by deep RNA sequencing of primary mRNAs in two growth conditions. TSSs were identified along G. sulfurreducens genome and over 50% of them were located in the upstream region of the associated gene, and in some cases we detected genes with more than one TSS. Our global mapping of TSSs contributes with valuable information, which is needed for the study of transcript structure and transcription regulation signals and can ultimately contribute to the understanding of transcription initiation phenomena in G. sulfurreducens.

  11. Nature of Catalytic Active Sites Present on the Surface of Advanced Bulk Tantalum Mixed Oxide Photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Phivilay, Somphonh; Puretzky, Alexander A; Domen, Kazunari Domen; Wachs, Israel

    2013-01-01

    The most active photocatalyst system for water splitting under UV irradiation (270 nm) is the promoted 0.2%NiO/NaTaO3:2%La photocatalyst with optimized photonic efficiency (P.E.) of 56%, but fundamental issues about the nature of the surface catalytic active sites and their involvement in the photocatalytic process still need to be clarified. This is the first study to apply cutting edge surface spectroscopic analyses to determine the surface nature of tantalum mixed oxide photocatalysts. Surface analysis with HR-XPS (1-3nm) and HS-LEIS (0.3nm) spectroscopy indicates that the NiO and La2O3 promoters are concentrated in the surface region of the bulk NaTaO3 phase. The La2O3 is concentrated on the NaTaO3 outermost surface layers while NiO is distributed throughout the NaTaO3 surface region (1-3nm). Raman and UV-vis spectroscopy revealed that the bulk molecular and electronic structures, respectively, of NaTaO3 were not modified by the addition of the La2O3 and NiO promoters, with La2O3 resulting in a slightly more ordered structure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy reveals that the addition of La2O3 and NiO produces a greater number of electron traps resulting in the suppression of the recombination of excited electrons/holes. In contrast to earlier reports, the La2O3 is only a textural promoter (increasing the BET surface area ~7x by stabilizing smaller NaTaO3 particles), but causes a ~3x decrease in the specific photocatalytic TORs ( mol H2/m2/h) rate because surface La2O3 blocks exposed catalytic active NaTaO3 sites. The NiO promoter was found to be a potent electronic promoter that enhances the NaTaO3 surface normalized TORs by a factor of ~10-50 and TOF by a factor of ~10. The level of NiO promotion is the same in the absence and presence of La2O3 demonstrating that there is no promotional synergistic interaction between the NiO and La2O3 promoters. This study demonstrates the important contributions of the photocatalyst surface properties to the fundamental

  12. Characterization of Active Site Residues of Nitroalkane Oxidase†

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Michael P.; Fenny, Nana S.; Ali, Shah R.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of primary and secondary nitrolkanes to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones plus nitrite. The structure of the enzyme shows that Serl71 forms a hydrogen bond to the flavin N5, suggesting that it plays a role in catalysis. Cys397 and Tyr398 were previously identified by chemical modification as potential active site residues. To more directly probe the roles of these residues, the S171A, S171V, S171T, C397S, and Y398F enzymes have been characterized with nitroethane as substrate. The C397S and Y398 enzymes were less stable than the wild-type enzyme, and the C397S enzyme routinely contained a substoichiometric amount of FAD. Analysis of the steady-state kinetic parameters for the mutant enzymes, including deuterium isotope effects, establishes that all of the mutations result in decreases in the rate constants for removal of the substrate proton by ~5-fold and decreases in the rate constant for product release of ~2-fold. Only the S171V and S171T mutations alter the rate constant for flavin oxidation. These results establish that these residues are not involved in catalysis, but rather are required for maintaining the protein structure. PMID:20056514

  13. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  14. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems.

  15. Radio Diagnostics of Electron Acceleration Sites During the Eruption of a Flux Rope in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carley, Eoin P.; Vilmer, Nicole; Gallagher, Peter T.

    2016-12-01

    Electron acceleration in the solar corona is often associated with flares and the eruption of twisted magnetic structures known as flux ropes. However, the locations and mechanisms of such particle acceleration during the flare and eruption are still subject to much investigation. Observing the exact sites of particle acceleration can help confirm how the flare and eruption are initiated and how they evolve. Here we use the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly to analyze a flare and erupting flux rope on 2014 April 18, while observations from the Nançay Radio Astronomy Facility allow us to diagnose the sites of electron acceleration during the eruption. Our analysis shows evidence of a pre-formed flux rope that slowly rises and becomes destabilized at the time of a C-class flare, plasma jet, and the escape of ≳75 keV electrons from the rope center into the corona. As the eruption proceeds, continued acceleration of electrons with energies of ˜5 keV occurs above the flux rope for a period over 5 minutes. At the flare peak, one site of electron acceleration is located close to the flare site, while another is driven by the erupting flux rope into the corona at speeds of up to 400 km s-1. Energetic electrons then fill the erupting volume, eventually allowing the flux rope legs to be clearly imaged from radio sources at 150-445 MHz. Following the analysis of Joshi et al. (2015), we conclude that the sites of energetic electrons are consistent with flux rope eruption via a tether cutting or flux cancellation scenario inside a magnetic fan-spine structure. In total, our radio observations allow us to better understand the evolution of a flux rope eruption and its associated electron acceleration sites, from eruption initiation to propagation into the corona.

  16. Structural analysis of the active site geometry of N5-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M; Firestine, Steven M

    2008-12-16

    N(5)-Carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase (N(5)-CAIR synthetase) converts 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR), MgATP, and bicarbonate into N(5)-CAIR, MgADP, and P(i). The enzyme is required for de novo purine biosynthesis in microbes yet is not found in humans suggesting that it represents an ideal and unexplored target for antimicrobial drug design. Here we report the X-ray structures of N(5)-CAIR synthetase from Escherichia coli with either MgATP or MgADP/P(i) bound in the active site cleft. These structures, determined to 1.6-A resolution, provide detailed information regarding the active site geometry before and after ATP hydrolysis. In both structures, two magnesium ions are observed. Each of these is octahedrally coordinated, and the carboxylate side chain of Glu238 bridges them. For the structure of the MgADP/P(i) complex, crystals were grown in the presence of AIR and MgATP. No electron density was observed for AIR, and the electron density corresponding to the nucleotide clearly revealed the presence of ADP and P(i) rather than ATP. The bound P(i) shifts by approximately 3 A relative to the gamma-phosphoryl group of ATP and forms electrostatic interactions with the side chains of Arg242 and His244. Since the reaction mechanism of N(5)-CAIR synthetase is believed to proceed via a carboxyphosphate intermediate, we propose that the location of the inorganic phosphate represents the binding site for stabilization of this reactive species. Using the information derived from the two structures reported here, coupled with molecular modeling, we propose a catalytic mechanism for N(5)-CAIR synthetase.

  17. Vibrational optical activity of chiral carbon nanoclusters treated by a generalized π-electron method

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Péter R.; Surján, Péter R.; Szabados, Ágnes

    2014-01-28

    Cross sections of inelastic light scattering accompanied by vibronic excitation in large conjugated carbon structures is assessed at the π-electron level. Intensities of Raman and vibrational Raman optical activity (VROA) spectra of fullerenes are computed, relying on a single electron per atom. When considering only first neighbor terms in the Hamiltonian (a tight-binding (TB) type or Hückel-model), Raman intensities are captured remarkably well, based on comparison with frequency-dependent linear response of the self-consistent field (SCF) method. Resorting to π-electron levels when computing spectral intensities brings a beneficial reduction in computational cost as compared to linear response SCF. At difference with total intensities, the first neighbor TB model is found inadequate for giving the left and right circularly polarized components of the scattered light, especially when the molecular surface is highly curved. To step beyond first neighbor approximation, an effective π-electron Hamiltonian, including interaction of all sites is derived from the all-electron Fockian, in the spirit of the Bloch-equation. Chiroptical cross-sections computed by this novel π-electron method improve upon first-neighbor TB considerably, with no increase in computational cost. Computed VROA spectra of chiral fullerenes, such as C{sub 76} and C{sub 28}, are reported for the first time, both by conventional linear response SCF and effective π-electron models.

  18. Continued Geophysical Logging in the vicinity of the GMH Electronics Superfund Site near Roxboro, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Antolino, Dominick J.; Chapman, Melinda J.

    2016-01-01

    The collection of borehole geophysical logs and images and continuous water-level data was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center in the vicinity of the GMH Electronics Superfund site near Roxboro, North Carolina, during December 2012 through July 2015. The study purpose was part of a continued effort to assist the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the development of a conceptual groundwater model for the assessment of current contaminant distribution and future migration of contaminants. Previous work by the U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center at the site involved similar data collection, in addition to surface geologic mapping and passive diffusion bag sampling within monitoring wells (Chapman and others, 2013). The continued data compilation efforts included the delineation of more than 900 subsurface features (primarily fracture orientations) in 10 open borehole wells. Geophysical logs, borehole imagery, pumping data, and heat-pulse flow measurements were collected and are presented within this data release.

  19. Estimated PBDE and PBB Congeners in soil from an electronics waste disposal site.

    PubMed

    Wang, H-M; Yu, Y-J; Han, M; Yang, S-W; Li, Q; Yang, Y

    2009-12-01

    This study estimated PBDE and PBB congener emissions into the environment from three different e-waste disposal sites that consisted of rude broilers (RB), acid baths (AB) and end-up dumps (ED). Different PBDE and PBB congener profiles were analyzed, and some of their emission sources were discussed. For the examined sites, the levels of SigmaPBB and SigmaPBDE were highest at ED (SigmaPBB 1943.86 ng/g, dw; SigmaPBDE 990.87 ng/g, dw), followed by RB (SigmaPBB 704.58 ng/g, dw; SigmaPBDE 799.27 ng/g, dw) and finally AB (SigmaPBB 108.78 ng/g, dw; SigmaPBDE 171.18 ng/g, dw). PBE-209 (AB 48.67 ng/g, 28.43%; RB 160.23 ng/g, 20.05%; ED 234.12 ng/g, 23.63%) and PBE-203 (AB 51.23 ng/g, 29.93%; RB 130.34 ng/g, 16.31%; ED 93.41 ng/g, 9.43%) exhibited the highest concentrations when compared to the other congeners. Furthermore, high levels of deca-BDE (BDE-209) were observed in AB (48.67 ng/g, 28.43%) and RB sites (160.23 ng/g, 20.05%), which was in accordance with the large amount of these materials in electronics products in China.

  20. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  1. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  2. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  3. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  4. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  5. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  6. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  7. Robotics and Automation Activities at the Savannah River Site: A Site Report for SUBWOG 39F

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.

    1995-09-28

    The Savannah River Site has successfully used robots, teleoperators, and remote video to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, improve worker safety, and improve the quality of operations. Previous reports have described the use of mobile teleoperators in coping with a high level liquid waste spill, the removal of highly contaminated equipment, and the inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. This report will cover recent applications at the Savannah River, as well as systems which SRS has delivered to other DOE site customers.

  8. GAS HYDRATES AT TWO SITES OF AN ACTIVE CONTINENTAL MARGIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart on the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m.

  9. A theoretical study of CO and NO interaction with Cu sites in ZSM-5: Electronic structure and vibrational spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ramprasad, R.; Hass, K.C.; Schneider, W.F.

    1996-10-01

    The interaction of CO and NO with various Cu sites in zeolites were studied theoretically within the framework of density functional theory. Our models of the active sites are simple charged clusters, with Cu ions coordinated to a certain number of water ligands and in some cases to a hydroxyl ligand in addition to water ligands. We have studied the electronic and geometric structure of monocarbonyl, mono- and dinitrosyl complexes. We find that in all mono- and dinitrosyl complexes that we considered, the Cu preferred to be in its 1+ oxidation state, irrespective of the overall cluster charge or the degree of coordination resulting in three different binding modes. We have also performed vibrational frequency calculations for the optimal monocarbonyl, mono- and dinitrosyl geometries. Of all the complexes that we considered, our results for low coordinated Cu(I) (coordinated to about 2 water ligands) and hydroxyl ligand coordinated Cu(II) are consistent with experimentally observed CO and NO stretch frequencies in Cu-ZSM-5.

  10. Heavy metal contamination of surface soil in electronic waste dismantling area: site investigation and source-apportionment analysis.

    PubMed

    Jinhui Li; Huabo Duan; Pixing Shi

    2011-07-01

    The dismantling and disposal of electronic waste (e-waste) in developing countries is causing increasing concern because of its impacts on the environment and risks to human health. Heavy-metal concentrations in the surface soils of Guiyu (Guangdong Province, China) were monitored to determine the status of heavy-metal contamination on e-waste dismantling area with a more than 20 years history. Two metalloids and nine metals were selected for investigation. This paper also attempts to compare the data among a variety of e-waste dismantling areas, after reviewing a number of heavy-metal contamination-related studies in such areas in China over the past decade. In addition, source apportionment of heavy metal in the surface soil of these areas has been analysed. Both the MSW open-burning sites probably contained invaluable e-waste and abandoned sites formerly involved in informal recycling activities are the new sources of soil-based environmental pollution in Guiyu. Although printed circuit board waste is thought to be the main source of heavy-metal emissions during e-waste processing, requirement is necessary to soundly manage the plastic separated from e-waste, which mostly contains heavy metals and other toxic substances.

  11. Lidar research activities and observations at NARL site, Gadanki, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellapragada, Bhavani Kumar

    2016-05-01

    The National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), a unit of Department of Space (DOS), located at Gadanki village (13.5°N, 79.2°E, 370 m AMSL) in India, is involved in the development of lidar remote sensing technologies for atmospheric research. Several advanced lidar technologies employing micropulse, polarization, Raman and scanning have been developed at this site and demonstrated for atmospheric studies during the period between 2008 and 2015. The technology of micropulse lidar, operates at 532 nm wavelength, was successfully transferred to an industry and the commercial version has been identified for Indian Lidar network (I-LINK) programme. Under this lidar network activity, several lidar units were installed at different locations in India to study tropospheric aerosols and clouds. The polarization sensitive lidar technology was realized using a set of mini photomultiplier tube (PMT) units and has the capability to operate during day and night without a pause. The lidar technology uses a compact flashlamp pumped Qswitched laser and employs biaxial configuration between the transmitter and receiver units. The lidar technology has been utilized for understanding the polarization characteristics of boundary layer aerosols during the mixed layer development. The demonstrated Raman lidar technology, uses the third harmonic wavelength of Nd:YAG laser, provides the altitude profiles of aerosol backscattering, extinction and water vapor covering the boundary layer range and allows operation during nocturnal periods. The Raman lidar derived height profiles of aerosol backscattering and extinction coefficient, lidar ratio, and watervapor mixing ratio inform the tropical boundary layer aerosol characteristics. The scanning lidar technology uses a near infrared laser wavelength for probing the lower atmosphere and has been utilized for high resolution cloud profiling during convective periods. The lidar technology is also used for rain rate measurement during

  12. Dynamically achieved active site precision in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes' enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme-substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C-H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed.

  13. Active-site zinc ligands and activated H2O of zinc enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Vallee, B L; Auld, D S

    1990-01-01

    The x-ray crystallographic structures of 12 zinc enzymes have been chosen as standards of reference to identify the ligands to the catalytic and structural zinc atoms of other members of their respective enzyme families. Universally, H2O is a ligand and critical component of the catalytically active zinc sites. In addition, three protein side chains bind to the catalytic zinc atom, whereas four protein ligands bind to the structural zinc atom. The geometry and coordination number of zinc can vary greatly to accommodate particular ligands. Zinc forms complexes with nitrogen and oxygen just as readily as with sulfur, and this is reflected in catalytic zinc sites having a binding frequency of His much greater than Glu greater than Asp = Cys, three of which bind to the metal atom. The systematic spacing between the ligands is striking. For all catalytic zinc sites except the coenzyme-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase, the first two ligands are separated by a "short-spacer" consisting of 1 to 3 amino acids. These ligands are separated from the third ligand by a "long spacer" of approximately 20 to approximately 120 amino acids. The spacer enables formation of a primary bidentate zinc complex, whereas the long spacer contributes flexibility to the coordination sphere, which can poise the zinc for catalysis as well as bring other catalytic and substrate binding groups into apposition with the active site. The H2O is activated by ionization, polarization, or poised for displacement. Collectively, the data imply that the preferred mechanistic pathway for activating the water--e.g., zinc hydroxide or Lewis acid catalysis--will be determined by the identity of the other three ligands and their spacing. Images PMID:2104979

  14. Controlling epileptiform activity with organic electronic ion pumps.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Adam; Rivnay, Jonathan; Kergoat, Loïg; Jonsson, Amanda; Inal, Sahika; Uguz, Ilke; Ferro, Marc; Ivanov, Anton; Sjöström, Theresia Arbring; Simon, Daniel T; Berggren, Magnus; Malliaras, George G; Bernard, Christophe

    2015-05-27

    In treating epilepsy, the ideal solution is to act at a seizure's onset, but only in the affected regions of the brain. Here, an organic electronic ion pump is demonstrated, which directly delivers on-demand pure molecules to specific brain regions. State-of-the-art organic devices and classical pharmacology are combined to control pathological activity in vitro, and the results are verified with electrophysiological recordings.

  15. Active and Passive Supplier Assessment Program (ASAP & PSAP) WWW Sites http://nepp.nasa.gov/imd/asap http://nepp.nasa.gov/imd/psap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brusse, Jay

    2000-01-01

    The Active and Passive Supplier Assessment Programs (ASAP and PSAP) WWW Sites provide general information to the electronic parts community regarding the availability of electronic parts. They also provide information to NASA regarding modifications to commonly used procurement specifications and test methods. The ASAP and PSAP www sites are ongoing resources produced by Code 562 in support of the NASA HQ funded NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program. These WWW sites do not provide information pertaining to patented or proprietary information. All of the information contained in these www sites is available through various other public domain resources such as US Military Qualified Producers Listings (QPLs) and Qualified Manufacturer Listings (QMLs) and industry working groups such as the Electronics Industry Alliance (EIA) and the Space Parts Working Group (SPWG).

  16. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  17. The yeast regulator of transcription protein Rtr1 lacks an active site and phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kehui; Manley, James L; Tong, Liang

    2012-07-10

    The activity of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is controlled in part by the phosphorylation state of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Recent reports have suggested that yeast regulator of transcription protein, Rtr1, and its human homologue RPAP2, possess Pol II CTD Ser5 phosphatase activity. Here we report the crystal structure of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1, which reveals a new type of zinc finger protein and does not have any close structural homologues. Importantly, the structure does not show evidence of an active site, and extensive experiments to demonstrate its CTD phosphatase activity have been unsuccessful, suggesting that Rtr1 has a non-catalytic role in CTD dephosphorylation.

  18. Phthalate esters contamination in soil and plants on agricultural land near an electronic waste recycling site.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ting Ting; Christie, Peter; Luo, Yong Ming; Teng, Ying

    2013-08-01

    The accumulation of phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in soil and plants in agricultural land near an electronic waste recycling site in east China has become a great threat to the neighboring environmental quality and human health. Soil and plant samples collected from land under different utilization, including fallow plots, vegetable plots, plots with alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) as green manure, fallow plots under long-term flooding and fallow plots under alternating wet and dry periods, together with plant samples from relative plots were analyzed for six PAE compounds nominated as prior pollutants by USEPA. In the determined samples, the concentrations of six target PAE pollutants ranged from 0.31-2.39 mg/kg in soil to 1.81-5.77 mg/kg in various plants (dry weight/DW), and their bioconcentration factors (BCFs) ranged from 5.8 to 17.9. Health risk assessments were conducted on target PAEs, known as typical environmental estrogen analogs, based on their accumulation in the edible parts of vegetables. Preliminary risk assessment to human health from soil and daily vegetable intake indicated that DEHP may present a high-exposure risk on all ages of the population in the area by soil ingestion or vegetable consumption. The potential damage that the target PAE compounds may pose to human health should be taken into account in further comprehensive risk assessments in e-waste recycling sites areas. Moreover, alfalfa removed substantial amounts of PAEs from the soil, and its use can be considered a good strategy for in situ remediation of PAEs.

  19. Rapidly Alternating Transmission Mode Electron Transfer Dissociation and Collisional Activation for the Characterization of Polypeptide Ions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hongling; Xia, Yu; Yang, Min; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    Cation transmission/electron transfer reagent anion storage mode electron transfer ion/ion reactions and beam-type collisional activation of the polypeptide ions are performed in rapid succession in the high pressure collision cell (Q2) of a quadrupole/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometer (QqTOF), where the electron transfer reagent anions are accumulated. Duty cycles for both electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments are improved relative to ion trapping approaches since there are no discrete ion storage and reaction steps for ETD experiments and no discrete ion storage step and frequency tuning for CID experiments. For this technique, moderately high resolution and mass accuracy are also obtained due to mass analysis via the TOF analyzer. This relatively simple approach has been demonstrated with a triply charged tryptic peptide, a triply charged tryptic phosphopeptide, and a triply charged tryptic N-linked glycopeptide. For the tryptic peptide, the sequence is identified with more certainty than would be available from a single method alone due to the complementary information provided by these two dissociation methods. Because of the complementary information derived from both ETD and CID dissociation methods, peptide sequence and post-translational modification (PTM) sites for the phosphopeptide are identified. This combined ETD and CID approach is particularly useful for characterizing glycopeptides because ETD generates information about both peptide sequence and locations of the glycosylation sites while CID provides information about the glycan structure. PMID:18396915

  20. Atomistic characterization of the active-site solvation dynamics of a model photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel, Tim B.; Kjær, Kasper S.; Hartsock, Robert W.; Dohn, Asmus O.; Harlang, Tobias; Chollet, Matthieu; Christensen, Morten; Gawelda, Wojciech; Henriksen, Niels E.; Kim, Jong Goo; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Kim, Jeongho; Lemke, Henrik; Sun, Zheng; Sundström, Villy; Zhang, Wenkai; Zhu, Diling; Møller, Klaus B.; Nielsen, Martin M.; Gaffney, Kelly J.

    2016-11-01

    The interactions between the reactive excited state of molecular photocatalysts and surrounding solvent dictate reaction mechanisms and pathways, but are not readily accessible to conventional optical spectroscopic techniques. Here we report an investigation of the structural and solvation dynamics following excitation of a model photocatalytic molecular system [Ir2(dimen)4]2+, where dimen is para-diisocyanomenthane. The time-dependent structural changes in this model photocatalyst, as well as the changes in the solvation shell structure, have been measured with ultrafast diffuse X-ray scattering and simulated with Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics. Both methods provide direct access to the solute-solvent pair distribution function, enabling the solvation dynamics around the catalytically active iridium sites to be robustly characterized. Our results provide evidence for the coordination of the iridium atoms by the acetonitrile solvent and demonstrate the viability of using diffuse X-ray scattering at free-electron laser sources for studying the dynamics of photocatalysis.

  1. Molybdenum and tungsten oxygen transferases--and functional diversity within a common active site motif.

    PubMed

    Pushie, M Jake; Cotelesage, Julien J; George, Graham N

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum and tungsten are the only second and third-row transition elements with a known function in living organisms. The molybdenum and tungsten enzymes show common structural features, with the metal being bound by a pyranopterin-dithiolene cofactor called molybdopterin. They catalyze a variety of oxygen transferase reactions coupled with two-electron redox chemistry in which the metal cycles between the +6 and +4 oxidation states usually with water, either product or substrate, providing the oxygen. The functional roles filled by the molybdenum and tungsten enzymes are diverse; for example, they play essential roles in microbial respiration, in the uptake of nitrogen in green plants, and in human health. Together, the enzymes form a superfamily which is among the most prevalent known, being found in all kingdoms of life. This review discusses what is known of the active site structures and the mechanisms, together with some recent insights into the evolution of these important enzyme systems.

  2. Active sites in heterogeneous ice nucleation—the example of K-rich feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, Alexei; Bachmann, Felix; Pedevilla, Philipp; Cox, Stephen J.; Michaelides, Angelos; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Leisner, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Ice formation on aerosol particles is a process of crucial importance to Earth’s climate and the environmental sciences, but it is not understood at the molecular level. This is partly because the nature of active sites, local surface features where ice growth commences, is still unclear. Here we report direct electron-microscopic observations of deposition growth of aligned ice crystals on feldspar, an atmospherically important component of mineral dust. Our molecular-scale computer simulations indicate that this alignment arises from the preferential nucleation of prismatic crystal planes of ice on high-energy (100) surface planes of feldspar. The microscopic patches of (100) surface, exposed at surface defects such as steps, cracks, and cavities, are thought to be responsible for the high ice nucleation efficacy of potassium (K)–feldspar particles.

  3. Temporal Characteristics of Impulsive Electron Precipitation Associated with Thunderstorm Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M.; Smith, D. M.; Bowers, G. S.; Millan, R. M.; Holzworth, R. H.

    2013-12-01

    The precipitation of energetic electrons from the magnetosphere through interactions with VLF radiation, launched by lightning discharges, has been studied both directly, using electron instruments on spacecraft, and indirectly, through consequent modification of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. This work addresses the question of the time profile of lightning-induced electron precipitation (LEP). While satellite motion combines spatial and temporal effects into precipitation observations, and RF methods convolve ionospheric response processes with precipitation time scales, balloon observations of bremsstrahlung x-rays from LEP provide a clean measurement of the precipitation time profile. We report on observations of impulsive energetic electron precipitation, identified as LEP, made from a balloon platform over Antarctica during the BARREL campaign of 2013, and compare with earlier observations. Because thunderstorm activity is a strong and ever-present source of VLF power into the magnetosphere, it is believed that LEP processes play an important role in adjusting radiation belt fluxes. An accurate description of LEP's time development is important because this information constrains theories and parameters of the causative processes for LEP.

  4. Using the Novel Method of Nonthermal Plasma To Add Cl Active Sites on Activated Carbon for Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bi; Zeng, Xiaobo; Xu, Ping; Chen, Juan; Xu, Yang; Luo, Guangqian; Xu, Minghou; Yao, Hong

    2016-11-01

    A new method using nonthermal plasma to add Cl active sites on activated carbon was proposed to improve the efficiency of activated carbon (AC) for removal of mercury from flue gas. The experiments were conducted via a lab-scale dielectric barrier discharge nonthermal plasma system and a vertical adsorption reactor. The results showed that the nonthermal plasma treatment with a small amount of Cl2 successfully added Cl active sites on AC and greatly increased the mercury removal efficiency of AC by chemisorption in a very short treatment time. The increase in Cl2 concentration for AC treatment promoted the efficiency of AC. The capacity of mercury adsorption positively correlated with the content of Cl2 for AC treatment, which depends on the number of Cl active sites on activated carbon. The treated AC maintained a high mercury removal efficiency within a temperature range of 30-210 °C. SO2 and H2O in flue gas inhibited the removal of mercury by AC, while HCl had a promotional effect. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated the chemisorption of mercury was attributed to the C-Cl groups generated on AC surfaces during Cl2 nonthermal plasma treatment. The C-Cl groups as active sites had strong adsorption energy for mercury, which converted elemental mercury to HgCl2.

  5. Influence of weak vibrational-electronic couplings on 2D electronic spectra and inter-site coherence in weakly coupled photosynthetic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, Daniele M.; Whaley-Mayda, Lukas; Ishizaki, Akihito; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-08-01

    Coherence oscillations measured in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of pigment-protein complexes may have electronic, vibrational, or mixed-character vibronic origins, which depend on the degree of electronic-vibrational mixing. Oscillations from intrapigment vibrations can obscure the inter-site coherence lifetime of interest in elucidating the mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting. Huang-Rhys factors (S) for low-frequency vibrations in Chlorophyll and Bacteriochlorophyll are quite small (S ≤ 0.05), so it is often assumed that these vibrations influence neither 2D spectra nor inter-site coherence dynamics. In this work, we explore the influence of S within this range on the oscillatory signatures in simulated 2D spectra of a pigment heterodimer. To visualize the inter-site coherence dynamics underlying the 2D spectra, we introduce a formalism which we call the "site-probe response." By comparing the calculated 2D spectra with the site-probe response, we show that an on-resonance vibration with Huang-Rhys factor as small as S = 0.005 and the most strongly coupled off-resonance vibrations (S = 0.05) give rise to long-lived, purely vibrational coherences at 77 K. We moreover calculate the correlation between optical pump interactions and subsequent entanglement between sites, as measured by the concurrence. At 77 K, greater long-lived inter-site coherence and entanglement appear with increasing S. This dependence all but vanishes at physiological temperature, as environmentally induced fluctuations destroy the vibronic mixing.

  6. Influence of weak vibrational-electronic couplings on 2D electronic spectra and inter-site coherence in weakly coupled photosynthetic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Daniele M.; Whaley-Mayda, Lukas; Fleming, Graham R.; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-08-14

    Coherence oscillations measured in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of pigment-protein complexes may have electronic, vibrational, or mixed-character vibronic origins, which depend on the degree of electronic-vibrational mixing. Oscillations from intrapigment vibrations can obscure the inter-site coherence lifetime of interest in elucidating the mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting. Huang-Rhys factors (S) for low-frequency vibrations in Chlorophyll and Bacteriochlorophyll are quite small (S ≤ 0.05), so it is often assumed that these vibrations influence neither 2D spectra nor inter-site coherence dynamics. In this work, we explore the influence of S within this range on the oscillatory signatures in simulated 2D spectra of a pigment heterodimer. To visualize the inter-site coherence dynamics underlying the 2D spectra, we introduce a formalism which we call the “site-probe response.” By comparing the calculated 2D spectra with the site-probe response, we show that an on-resonance vibration with Huang-Rhys factor as small as S = 0.005 and the most strongly coupled off-resonance vibrations (S = 0.05) give rise to long-lived, purely vibrational coherences at 77 K. We moreover calculate the correlation between optical pump interactions and subsequent entanglement between sites, as measured by the concurrence. At 77 K, greater long-lived inter-site coherence and entanglement appear with increasing S. This dependence all but vanishes at physiological temperature, as environmentally induced fluctuations destroy the vibronic mixing.

  7. A method for the direct measurement of electronic site populations in a molecular aggregate using two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Dong, Hui; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-09-01

    Two dimensional electronic spectroscopy has proved to be a valuable experimental technique to reveal electronic excitation dynamics in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, nanoscale semiconductors, organic photovoltaic materials, and many other types of systems. It does not, however, provide direct information concerning the spatial structure and dynamics of excitons. 2D infrared spectroscopy has become a widely used tool for studying structural dynamics but is incapable of directly providing information concerning electronic excited states. 2D electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy provides a link between these domains, directly connecting the electronic excitation with the vibrational structure of the system under study. In this work, we derive response functions for the 2DEV spectrum of a molecular dimer and propose a method by which 2DEV spectra could be used to directly measure the electronic site populations as a function of time following the initial electronic excitation. We present results from the response function simulations which show that our proposed approach is substantially valid. This method provides, to our knowledge, the first direct experimental method for measuring the electronic excited state dynamics in the spatial domain, on the molecular scale.

  8. A method for the direct measurement of electronic site populations in a molecular aggregate using two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Dong, Hui; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-09-28

    Two dimensional electronic spectroscopy has proved to be a valuable experimental technique to reveal electronic excitation dynamics in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, nanoscale semiconductors, organic photovoltaic materials, and many other types of systems. It does not, however, provide direct information concerning the spatial structure and dynamics of excitons. 2D infrared spectroscopy has become a widely used tool for studying structural dynamics but is incapable of directly providing information concerning electronic excited states. 2D electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy provides a link between these domains, directly connecting the electronic excitation with the vibrational structure of the system under study. In this work, we derive response functions for the 2DEV spectrum of a molecular dimer and propose a method by which 2DEV spectra could be used to directly measure the electronic site populations as a function of time following the initial electronic excitation. We present results from the response function simulations which show that our proposed approach is substantially valid. This method provides, to our knowledge, the first direct experimental method for measuring the electronic excited state dynamics in the spatial domain, on the molecular scale.

  9. Visible-light photochromism of triarylamine- or ferrocene-bound diethynylethenes that switches electronic communication between redox sites and luminescence.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ryota; Kume, Shoko; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Redox-active ferrocene- and triarylamine-terminated diethynylethene derivatives have been synthesized and their photochromic properties and switching behavior based on through-bond electronic communication between the two redox sites, as well as their emissions, have been examined. Both bis(ferrocenylethynyl)ethene 1 and bis(triarylaminoethynyl)ethene 2 show visible-light photochromism induced by donor-acceptor charge-transfer (CT) transitions from the ferrocene or triarylamine to the diethynylethene moieties. The reversibility and quantum yields of the photochromism of 2 (Phi(E-->Z)=6.1 x 10(-2), Phi(Z-->E)=1.4 x 10(-2)) are far higher than those of 1 (Phi(E-->Z)=8.6 x 10(-6), Phi(Z-->E)=2.5 x 10(-6)). The higher efficiency in 2 may be attributed to the absence of the heavy atom effect and of a low-lying (3)LF state, which are characteristic of ferrocenyl compounds. This proposition is further supported by the fact that bis(ferrocenylbuta-1,3-diynyl)ethene 3, which, unlike 1, is free from steric interference between the two ferrocenyl groups in the Z form, does not show a significant improvement in its photoisomerization quantum yields (Phi(E-->Z)=6.2x10(-5), Phi(Z-->E)=3.4 x 10(-5)). The visible-light photochromism of 1 and 2 is accompanied by a switch in the strength of the electronic communication between the two redox sites in their mixed-valence states (DeltaE(0)' values are 70 and 48 mV for (E)-1 and (Z)-1, and 74 and 63 mV for (E)-2 and (Z)-2). In the case of 2, further evaluations were carried out through intervalence charge-transfer (IVCT) band analyses and DFT calculations. We have also demonstrated that steric repulsion between the methyl ester moieties in the Z form is implicated in the reduction in the through-bond electronic communication. Compound 2 exhibits photoluminescence, which is more efficient in the E form than in the Z form, whereas 1 and 3 show no photoluminescence.

  10. Nitrate as electron acceptor in in situ abandoned refinery site bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Battermann, G.; Meier-Loehr, M.

    1995-12-31

    The aquifer beneath an abandoned refinery site is highly polluted with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). After removal of the free phase by hydraulic measures until 1986, the immobile residual concentration located 6 to 10 m beneath the surface is still present and causes hydrocarbon concentrations from 10 to 100 mg/L in the groundwater. Laboratory tests proved the biodegradability of the hydrocarbon compounds under denitrifying conditions. Based on the results of the pilot study, large-scale bioremediation covering an area of about 20 ha was initiated. About 500 m{sup 3}/h of groundwater were extracted, and 400 m{sup 3}/h were recharged. The large-scale plant has been operating since 1991. Nitrate as an electron acceptor has been used since 1992. About 300 metric tons (MT) of hydrocarbons have been removed to date. The area of groundwater pollution is diminished by a factor of about two. More than 60% of all groundwater observation wells are now free of dissolved hydrocarbons. In addition, the decrease of biological nitrate consumption gives evidence of advanced bioremediation of the soil.

  11. Redox linked flavin sites in extracellular decaheme proteins involved in microbe-mineral electron transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Norman, Michael; Tome-Fernandez, Alice; Ainsworth, Emma; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular microbe-mineral electron transfer is a major driving force for the oxidation of organic carbon in many subsurface environments. Extracellular multi-heme cytochromes of the Shewenella genus play a major role in this process but the mechanism of electron exchange at the interface between cytochrome and acceptor is widely debated. The 1.8 Å x-ray crystal structure of the decaheme MtrC revealed a highly conserved CX₈C disulfide that, when substituted for AX₈A, severely compromised the ability of S. oneidensis to grow under aerobic conditions. Reductive cleavage of the disulfide in the presence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) resulted in the reversible formation of a stable flavocytochrome. Similar results were also observed with other decaheme cytochromes, OmcA, MtrF and UndA. The data suggest that these decaheme cytochromes can transition between highly reactive flavocytochromes or less reactive cytochromes, and that this transition is controlled by a redox active disulfide that responds to the presence of oxygen.

  12. Redox linked flavin sites in extracellular decaheme proteins involved in microbe-mineral electron transfer.

    DOE PAGES

    Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Norman, Michael; ...

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular microbe-mineral electron transfer is a major driving force for the oxidation of organic carbon in many subsurface environments. Extracellular multi-heme cytochromes of the Shewenella genus play a major role in this process but the mechanism of electron exchange at the interface between cytochrome and acceptor is widely debated. The 1.8 Å x-ray crystal structure of the decaheme MtrC revealed a highly conserved CX₈C disulfide that, when substituted for AX₈A, severely compromised the ability of S. oneidensis to grow under aerobic conditions. Reductive cleavage of the disulfide in the presence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) resulted in the reversible formation ofmore » a stable flavocytochrome. Similar results were also observed with other decaheme cytochromes, OmcA, MtrF and UndA. The data suggest that these decaheme cytochromes can transition between highly reactive flavocytochromes or less reactive cytochromes, and that this transition is controlled by a redox active disulfide that responds to the presence of oxygen.« less

  13. Single-molecule catalysis mapping quantifies site-specific activity and uncovers radial activity gradient on single 2D nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Andoy, Nesha May; Zhou, Xiaochun; Choudhary, Eric; Shen, Hao; Liu, Guokun; Chen, Peng

    2013-02-06

    Shape-controlled metal nanocrystals are a new generation of nanoscale catalysts. Depending on their shapes, these nanocrystals exhibit various surface facets, and the assignments of their surface facets have routinely been used to rationalize or predict their catalytic activity in a variety of chemical transformations. Recently we discovered that for 1-dimensional (1D) nanocrystals (Au nanorods), the catalytic activity is not constant along the same side facets of single nanorods but rather differs significantly and further shows a gradient along its length, which we attributed to an underlying gradient of surface defect density resulting from their linear decay in growth rate during synthesis (Nat. Nanotechnol.2012, 7, 237-241). Here we report that this behavior also extends to 2D nanocrystals, even for a different catalytic reaction. By using super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to map out the locations of catalytic events within individual triangular and hexagonal Au nanoplates in correlation with scanning electron microscopy, we find that the catalytic activity within the flat {111} surface facet of a Au nanoplate exhibits a 2D radial gradient from the center toward the edges. We propose that this activity gradient results from a growth-dependent surface defect distribution. We also quantify the site-specific activity at different regions within a nanoplate: The corner regions have the highest activity, followed by the edge regions and then the flat surface facets. These discoveries highlight the spatial complexity of catalytic activity at the nanoscale as well as the interplay amid nanocrystal growth, morphology, and surface defects in determining nanocatalyst properties.

  14. Effect of H2 binding on the nonadiabatic transition probability between singlet and triplet states of the [NiFe]-hydrogenase active site.

    PubMed

    Kaliakin, Danil S; Zaari, Ryan R; Varganov, Sergey A

    2015-02-12

    We investigate the effect of H2 binding on the spin-forbidden nonadiabatic transition probability between the lowest energy singlet and triplet electronic states of [NiFe]-hydrogenase active site model, using a velocity averaged Landau-Zener theory. Density functional and multireference perturbation theories were used to provide parameters for the Landau-Zener calculations. It was found that variation of the torsion angle between the terminal thiolate ligands around the Ni center induces an intersystem crossing between the lowest energy singlet and triplet electronic states in the bare active site and in the active site with bound H2. Potential energy curves between the singlet and triplet minima along the torsion angle and H2 binding energies to the two spin states were calculated. Upon H2 binding to the active site, there is a decrease in the torsion angle at the minimum energy crossing point between the singlet and triplet states. The probability of nonadiabatic transitions at temperatures between 270 and 370 K ranges from 35% to 32% for the active site with bound H2 and from 42% to 38% for the bare active site, thus indicating the importance of spin-forbidden nonadiabatic pathways for H2 binding on the [NiFe]-hydrogenase active site.

  15. Electron microscopic mapping of wheat germ RNA polymerase II binding sites on cloned CaMV DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Grellet, F; Cooke, R; Teissere, M; Delseny, M; Xech, J; Penon, P

    1981-01-01

    The binding sites of wheat germ RNA polymerase II were mapped on the cloned CaMV genome by observation of enzyme-linear DNA complexes by electron microscopy. Twelve sites are observed. Three of them are relatively stable in the presence of heparin and are found at positions 8-9, 21-23, and 41-44 map units on the physical map of the genome. These positions correspond to AT-rich regions of the viral genome which contain potential promoter sites. These results are discussed with reference to current information on the structure and expression of the CaMV genome. Images PMID:7301575

  16. Electron-nuclear-nuclear triple resonance of cis-rich polyacetylene —Evidence for negative spin sites of soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, S.; Shirakawa, H.

    1991-03-01

    Electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron-nuclear-nuclear triple resonance (TRIPLE) spectra of stretch-oriented cis-rich polyacetylene at low temperatures show clear spectral turning points when the external magnetic field is parallel to the stretch direction. The difference between ENDOR and TRIPLE spectra, depending on the pumping frequency of the latter, provide direct evidence that the turning points are associated with the negative spin sites of the soliton, arising from electron correlation effect, as predicted from our previous ENDOR analysis.

  17. The effect of the distance between acidic site and basic site immobilized on mesoporous solid on the activity in catalyzing aldol condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Xiaofang; Yu Xiaobo; Wu Shujie; Liu Bo; Liu Heng; Guan Jingqi; Kan Qiubin

    2011-02-15

    Acid-base bifunctional heterogeneous catalysts containing carboxylic and amine groups, which were immobilized at defined distance from one another on the mesoporous solid were synthesized by immobilizing lysine onto carboxyl-SBA-15. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron micrographs (SEM), transmission electron micrographs (TEM), elemental analysis, and back titration. Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance was more active than maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance in aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes. It appears that the distance between acidic site and basic site immobilized on mesoporous solid should be an essential factor for catalysis optimization. -- Graphical abstract: Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance and maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance were synthesized by immobilizing lysine onto carboxyl-SBA-15. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance. {yields} Maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance. {yields} Compared to maximum-C-A-SBA-15, proximal-C-A-SBA-15 was more active toward aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes.

  18. Purification, enzymatic properties, and active site environment of a novel manganese(III)-containing acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Y; Kawabe, H; Tanaka, H; Fujimoto, S; Ohara, A

    1981-10-25

    A new manganese-containing acid phosphatase has been isolated and crystallized from sweet potato tubers. The pure enzyme contains one atom of manganese per Mr = 110,000 polypeptide and shows phosphatase activity toward various phosphate substrates. The pH optimum of the enzyme was 5.8 and the enzyme activity was inhibited by Cu2+, Zn2+, Hg2+, AsO43-, and MoO42-. This stable metalloenzyme is red-violet in color with an intense absorption band at 515 nm (epsilon - 2460). Our electronic, circular dichroism, and electron spin resonance findings strongly indicate that the Mn-valence state of the native enzyme is trivalent. When the Mn-enzyme is excited by the 5145 A line of Ar+ laser, prominent Raman lines at 1230, 1298, 1508, and 1620 cm-1 were detected. This Raman spectrum can probably be interpreted in terms of internal vibration of a coordinated tyrosine phenolate anion. The tryptophan-modified enzyme showed a positive Raman band at 370 cm-1, which is preferentially assigned to a Mn(III)-S streching mode. The modification of the Mn-enzyme by N-bromosuccinimide led to a large decrease in the fluorescence intensity of 335 nm which was dominated by its tryptophan residues within a considerable hydrophobic environment. The acid phosphatase activity was significantly decreased by the tryptophan modification. With respect to the active site donor sets, the Mn(III)-containing acid phosphatase is distinctly different from the Zn(II)-containing alkaline phosphatase. Of interest is also the appreciable similarity of some enzymatic and spectroscopic properties between the present enzyme and uteroferrin.

  19. Nuclear Site Security in the Event of Terrorist Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M.L.; Sims, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper, presented as a poster, identifies why ballistic protection should now be considered at nuclear sites to counter terrorist threats. A proven and flexible form of multi purpose protection is described in detail with identification of trial results that show its suitability for this role. (authors)

  20. Photosystem I cyclic electron transport: Measurement of ferredoxin-plastoquinone reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Cleland, R E; Bendall, D S

    1992-12-01

    Absorbance changes of ferredoxin measured at 463 nm in isolated thylakoids were shown to arise from the activity of the enzyme ferredoxin-plastoquinone reductase (FQR) in cyclic electron transport. Under anaerobic conditions in the presence of DCMU and an appropriate concentration of reduced ferredoxin, a light-induced absorbance decrease due to further reduction of Fd was assigned to the oxidation of the other components in the cyclic pathway, primarily plastoquinone. When the light was turned off, Fd was reoxidised and this gave a direct quantitative measurement of the rate of cyclic electron transport due to the activity of FQR. This activity was sensitive to the classical inhibitor of cyclic electron transport, antimycin, and also to J820 and DBMIB. Antimycin had no effect on Fd reduction although this was inhibited by stigmatellin. This provides further evidence that there is a quinone reduction site outside the cytochrome bf complex. The effect of inhibitors of ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase and experiments involving the modification of ferredoxin suggest that there may be some role for the reductase as a component of FQR. Contrary to expectations, NADPH2 inhibited FQR activity; ATP and ADP had no effect.

  1. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  2. A 1-MHz, 5-Kb/s wireless command receiver for electronic site selection in multichannel neural biopotential recording.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, Pedram; Najafi, Khalil

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a battery-powered telemetric command receiver for electronic site selection in multichannel neural recording applications. The receiver selects seven recording sites from a total of 28 available sites, according to four pre-defined site-selection patterns, via a 1-MHz, 5-Kb/s, amplitude-shift-keyed (ASK) link. The seven selected sites can then be wirelessly monitored via a 100-MHz frequency-modulated (FM) link. The receiver also performs power management to increase battery service lifetime. A bidirectional wireless recording microsystem incorporating this receiver is fabricated on a 4.6times4.6-mm(2) chip using the AMI 1.5 microm 2P2M n-well CMOS process. Design methodology and architecture of the receiver together with measurement results from its wireless analog front-end are presented.

  3. Revealing the nature of the active site on the carbon catalyst for C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, XiaoYing; Li, Bo; Su, Dangsheng

    2014-09-28

    A reactivity descriptor for the C-H bond activation on the nanostructured carbon catalyst is proposed. Furthermore the calculations reveal that the single ketone group can be an active site in ODH reaction.

  4. Cellular Active N-Hydroxyurea FEN1 Inhibitors Block Substrate Entry to the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Exell, Jack C.; Thompson, Mark J.; Finger, L. David; Shaw, Steven J.; Debreczeni, Judit; Ward, Thomas A.; McWhirter, Claire; Siöberg, Catrine L. B.; Martinez Molina, Daniel; Mark Abbott, W.; Jones, Clifford D.; Nissink, J. Willem M.; Durant, Stephen T.; Grasby, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    The structure-specific nuclease human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) plays a key role in DNA replication and repair and may be of interest as an oncology target. We present the first crystal structure of inhibitor-bound hFEN1 and show a cyclic N-hydroxyurea bound in the active site coordinated to two magnesium ions. Three such compounds had similar IC50 values but differed subtly in mode of action. One had comparable affinity for protein and protein–substrate complex and prevented reaction by binding to active site catalytic metal ions, blocking the unpairing of substrate DNA necessary for reaction. Other compounds were more competitive with substrate. Cellular thermal shift data showed engagement of both inhibitor types with hFEN1 in cells with activation of the DNA damage response evident upon treatment. However, cellular EC50s were significantly higher than in vitro inhibition constants and the implications of this for exploitation of hFEN1 as a drug target are discussed. PMID:27526030

  5. Active Layer and Moisture Measurements for Intensive Site 0 and 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-04-17

    These are measurements of Active Layer Thickness collected along several lines beginning in September, 2011 to the present. The data were collected at several time periods along the Site0 L2 Line, the Site1 AB Line, and an ERT Monitoring Line near Area A in Site1.

  6. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  7. Are nest sites actively chosen? Testing a common assumption for three non-resource limited birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, A. E.; Elliot, S. L.; Hart, A. G.

    2009-09-01

    Many widely-accepted ecological concepts are simplified assumptions about complex situations that remain largely untested. One example is the assumption that nest-building species choose nest sites actively when they are not resource limited. This assumption has seen little direct empirical testing: most studies on nest-site selection simply assume that sites are chosen actively (and seek explanations for such behaviour) without considering that sites may be selected randomly. We used 15 years of data from a nestbox scheme in the UK to test the assumption of active nest-site choice in three cavity-nesting bird species that differ in breeding and migratory strategy: blue tit ( Cyanistes caeruleus), great tit ( Parus major) and pied flycatcher ( Ficedula hypoleuca). Nest-site selection was non-random (implying active nest-site choice) for blue and great tits, but not for pied flycatchers. We also considered the relative importance of year-specific and site-specific factors in determining occupation of nest sites. Site-specific factors were more important than year-specific factors for the tit species, while the reverse was true for pied flycatchers. Our results show that nest-site selection, in birds at least, is not always the result of active choice, such that choice should not be assumed automatically in studies of nesting behaviour. We use this example to highlight the need to test key ecological assumptions empirically, and the importance of doing so across taxa rather than for single "model" species.

  8. Perturbations to the geometric and electronic structure of the CuA site: factors that influence delocalization and their contributions to electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiangjin; Gorelsky, Serge I; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Garner, Dewain K; Hwang, Hee Jung; Hodgson, Keith O; Hedman, Britt; Lu, Yi; Solomon, Edward I

    2008-04-16

    Using a combination of electronic spectroscopies and DFT calculations, the effect of pH perturbation on the geometric and electronic structure of the CuA site has been defined. Descriptions are developed for high pH (pH = 7) and low pH (pH = 4) forms of CuA azurin and its H120A mutant which address the discrepancies concerning the extent of delocalization indicated by multifrequency EPR and ENDOR data (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 7274; Biophys. J. 2002, 82, 2758). Our resonance Raman and MCD spectra demonstrate that the low pH and H120A mutant forms are essentially identical and are the perturbed forms of the completely delocalized high pH CuA site. However, in going from high pH to low pH, a seven-line hyperfine coupling pattern associated with complete delocalization of the electron (S = 1/2) over two Cu coppers (I(Cu) = 3/2) changes into a four-line pattern reflecting apparent localization. DFT calculations show that the unpaired electron is delocalized in the low pH form and reveal that its four-line hyperfine pattern results from the large EPR spectral effects of approximately 1% 4s orbital contribution of one Cu to the ground-state spin wave function upon protonative loss of its His ligand. The contribution of the Cu-Cu interaction to electron delocalization in this low symmetry protein site is evaluated, and the possible functional significance of the pH-dependent transition in regulating proton-coupled electron transfer in cytochrome c oxidase is discussed.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of a Tetrabromobisphenol A–Degrading Strain, Ochrobactrum sp. T, Isolated from an Electronic Waste Recycling Site

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhishu; Li, Guiying; Zhang, Guoxia; Das, Ranjit

    2016-01-01

    Ochrobactrum sp. T was previously isolated from a sludge sample collected from an electronic waste recycling site and characterized as a unique tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA)–degrading bacterium. Here, the draft genome sequence (3.9 Mb) of Ochrobactrum sp. T is reported to provide insights into its diversity and its TBBPA biodegradation mechanism in polluted environments. PMID:27445374

  10. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  11. Structural characterization of single nucleotide variants at ligand binding sites and enzyme active sites of human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazunori D.; Nishi, Hafumi; Nakata, Junichi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Functional sites on proteins play an important role in various molecular interactions and reactions between proteins and other molecules. Thus, mutations in functional sites can severely affect the overall phenotype. Progress of genome sequencing projects has yielded a wealth of information on single nucleotide variants (SNVs), especially those with less than 1% minor allele frequency (rare variants). To understand the functional influence of genetic variants at a protein level, we investigated the relationship between SNVs and protein functional sites in terms of minor allele frequency and the structural position of variants. As a result, we observed that SNVs were less abundant at ligand binding sites, which is consistent with a previous study on SNVs and protein interaction sites. Additionally, we found that non-rare variants tended to be located slightly apart from enzyme active sites. Examination of non-rare variants revealed that most of the mutations resulted in moderate changes of the physico-chemical properties of amino acids, suggesting the existence of functional constraints. In conclusion, this study shows that the mapping of genetic variants on protein structures could be a powerful approach to evaluate the functional impact of rare genetic variations. PMID:27924270

  12. Water adsorption onto Y and V sites at the surface of the YVO4 photocatalyst and related electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshikiri, Mitsutake; Boero, Mauro; Matsushita, Akiyuki; Ye, Jinhua

    2009-07-01

    The dynamics of water molecules and the adsorption properties at the V and Y sites on the surface of the photocatalyst YVO4 have been investigated by first principles molecular dynamics. This system has shown an excellent performance in the production of both hydrogen and oxygen in the ultraviolet region. Yet, its catalytic properties, related to the electronic structure, are poorly understood. Here we show that imperfectly oxygen coordinated V sites (i.e., not fourfold oxygen coordinated vanadium but threefold oxygen coordinated vanadium) exposed on the catalyst surface play a central role in the dissociation of water molecules. By simulating the H2O adsorption process and by performing an analysis of the electronic structure of the unoccupied orbitals corresponding to the lowest unoccupied energy level of the system, we can infer that the dissociation of water at these imperfectly oxygen coordinated V sites can promote the proton reduction and is expected to trigger the H2 generation.

  13. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions.

  14. Active-Site Hydration and Water Diffusion in Cytochrome P450cam: A Highly Dynamic Process

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome Y

    2011-01-01

    Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (300 ns) are performed on both the apo- (i.e., camphor-free) and camphor-bound cytochrome P450cam (CYP101). Water diffusion into and out of the protein active site is observed without biased sampling methods. During the course of the molecular dynamics simulation, an average of 6.4 water molecules is observed in the camphor-binding site of the apo form, compared to zero water molecules in the binding site of the substrate-bound form, in agreement with the number of water molecules observed in crystal structures of the same species. However, as many as 12 water molecules can be present at a given time in the camphor-binding region of the active site in the case of apo-P450cam, revealing a highly dynamic process for hydration of the protein active site, with water molecules exchanging rapidly with the bulk solvent. Water molecules are also found to exchange locations frequently inside the active site, preferentially clustering in regions surrounding the water molecules observed in the crystal structure. Potential-of-mean-force calculations identify thermodynamically favored trans-protein pathways for the diffusion of water molecules between the protein active site and the bulk solvent. Binding of camphor in the active site modifies the free-energy landscape of P450cam channels toward favoring the diffusion of water molecules out of the protein active site.

  15. Identification of the site where the electron transfer chain of plant mitochondria is stimulated by electrostatic charge screening.

    PubMed

    Krab, K; Wagner, M J; Wagner, A M; Moller, I M

    2000-02-01

    Modular kinetic analysis was used to determine the sites in plant mitochondria where charge-screening stimulates the rate of electron transfer from external NAD(P)H to oxygen. In mitochondria isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber callus, stimulation of the rate of oxygen uptake was accompanied by a decrease in the steady-state reduction level of coenzyme Q, and by a small decrease in the steady-state reduction level of cytochrome c. Modular kinetic analysis around coenzyme Q revealed that stimulation of the rate was due to stimulation of quinol oxidation via the cytochrome pathway (cytochrome bc1, cytochrome c and cytochrome c oxidase). It was not a consequence of any effect on quinone reduction (by external NADH or NADPH dehydrogenase). This explains the salt-induced decrease in the steady-state reduction level of coenzyme Q. Analysis around cytochrome c revealed that stimulation by salts was due to a dual effect on the respiratory chain. The kinetic curves for the oxidation and reduction pathways of cytochrome c revealed that they were both activated by salt, the simultaneity explaining the small variation observed in the steady-state reduction level of cytochrome c. A simple kinetic core model is used to show that changes in the rate of dissociation of cytochrome c from the membrane can explain the observed kinetic changes in both cytochrome c reduction and cytochrome c oxidation. The stimulation is proposed to be the result of an increase in the rate constant of cytochrome c dissociation from the membrane induced by cation screening. We conclude that this type of modular kinetic analysis is a powerful tool to identify and quantitatively characterize multiple-site effects on the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  16. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine.

    PubMed

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-11-13

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO(2). We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O(2) and CO(2) bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO(2) defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg(2+) surrounded by three H(2)O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming.

  17. RADICAL SITES IN M. TUBERCULOSIS KATG IDENTIFIED USING EPR SPECTROSCOPY, THE 3-D CRYSTAL STRUCTURE AND ELECTRON-TRANSFER COUPLINGS†

    PubMed Central

    Ranguelova, Kalina; Girotto, Stefania; Gerfen, Gary J.; Yu, Shengwei; Suarez, Javier; Metlitsky, Leonid; Magliozzo, Richard S.

    2007-01-01

    Catalase-peroxidase (KatG) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a Class I peroxidase, exhibits high catalase activity and peroxidase activity with various substrates, and is responsible for activation of the commonly used antitubercular drug, isoniazid (INH). KatG readily forms amino acid based radicals during turnover with alkyl peroxides and this work focuses on extending the identification and characterization of radicals forming on the millisecond to seconds time scale. Rapid freeze- quench electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (RFQ-EPR) reveals a change in the structure of the initially formed radical in the presence of INH. Heme-pocket binding of the drug, and knowledge that KatG[Y229F] lacks this signal provides evidence for radical formation on residue Y229. High-field RFQ-EPR spectroscopy confirmed a tryptophanyl radical signal and new analyses of X-band RFQ-EPR spectra also established its presence. High-field EPR spectroscopy also confirmed that the majority radical species is a tyrosyl radical. Site-directed mutagenesis, along with simulations of EPR spectra based on X-ray structural data for particular tyrosine and tryptophan residues enabled assignments based on predicted hyperfine coupling parameters. KatG mutants W107F, Y229F and the double mutant W107F/Y229F showed alteration in type and yield of radical species. Results are consistent with formation of a tyrosyl radical reasonably assigned to residue Y229 within the first few milliseconds of turnover. This is followed by a mixture of tyrosyl and tryptophanyl radical species, and finally to only a tyrosyl radical on residue Y353, which lies more distant from the heme. Radical processing of enzyme lacking the Trp107-Tyr229-Met255 adduct, found as a unique structural feature of catalase-peroxidases, is suggested to be a reasonable assignment of the phenomena. PMID:17204474

  18. Hydrogen production by the naked active site of the di-iron hydrogenases in water.

    PubMed

    Zipoli, Federico; Car, Roberto; Cohen, Morrel H; Selloni, Annabella

    2009-10-01

    We explored the reactivity of the active center of the [FeFe]-hydrogenases detached from the enzyme and immersed in acidified water by first-principles Car-Parrinello molecular-dynamics simulations. We focused on the identification of the structures that are stable and metastable in acidified water and on their activity for hydrogen production. Our calculations revealed that the naked active center could be an efficient catalyst provided that electrons are transferred to the cluster. We found that both bridging and terminal isomers are present at equilibrium and that the bridging configuration is essential for efficient hydrogen production. The formation of the hydrogen molecule occurs via sequential protonations of the distal iron and of the N-atom of the S-CH(2)-NH-CH(2)-S chelating group. H(2) desorption does not involve a significant energy barrier, making the process very efficient at room temperature. We established that the bottleneck in the reaction is the direct proton transfer from water to the vacant site of the distal iron. Moreover, we found that even if the terminal isomer is present at the equilibrium, its strong local hydrophobicity prevents poisoning of the cluster.

  19. Beyond Electronic Brochures: An Analysis of Singapore Primary School Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Chun; Soong, Andrew Kheng Fah

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to investigate how Singapore primary schools use their web sites, what kind of information is contained in the web sites, and how the information is presented. Based on an analysis of 176 primary school web sites, which represent all but one of the country's primary schools, findings indicate that most of Singapore's primary school…

  20. Soft Active Materials for Actuation, Sensing, and Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Rebecca Krone

    Future generations of robots, electronics, and assistive medical devices will include systems that are soft and elastically deformable, allowing them to adapt their morphology in unstructured environments. This will require soft active materials for actuation, circuitry, and sensing of deformation and contact pressure. The emerging field of soft robotics utilizes these soft active materials to mimic the inherent compliance of natural soft-bodied systems. As the elasticity of robot components increases, the challenges for functionality revert to basic questions of fabrication, materials, and design - whereas such aspects are far more developed for traditional rigid-bodied systems. This thesis will highlight preliminary materials and designs that address the need for soft actuators and sensors, as well as emerging fabrication techniques for manufacturing stretchable circuits and devices based on liquid-embedded elastomers.

  1. Chemosynthetic microbial activity at Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vent sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirsen, Carl O.; Jannasch, Holger W.; Molyneaux, Stephen J.

    1993-06-01

    Chemosynthetic production of microbial biomass, determined by 14CO2 fixation and enzymatic (RuBisCo) activity, at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) 23° and 26°N vent sites was found in various niches: warm water emissions, loosely rock-attached flocculent material, dense morphologically diverse bacterial mats covering the surfaces of polymetal sulfide deposits, and filamentous microbes on the carapaces of shrimp (Rimicaris exoculata). The bacterial mats on polymetal sulfide surfaces contained unicellular and filamentous bacteria which appeared to use as their chemolithotrophic electron or energy source either dissolved reduced minerals from vent emissions, mainly sulfur compounds, or solid metal sulfide deposits, mainly pyrite. Moderately thermophilic Chemosynthetic activity was observed in carbon dioxide fixation experiments and in enrichments, but no thermophilic aerobic sulfur oxidizers could be isolated. Both obligate and facultative chemoautotrophs growing at mesophilic temperatures were isolated from all chemosynthetically active surface scrapings. The obligate autotrophs could oxidize sterilized MAR natural sulfide deposits as well as technical pyrite at near neutral pH, in addition to dissolved reduced sulfur compounds. While the grazing by shrimp on the surface mats of MAR metal sulfide deposits was observed and deemed important, the animals' primary occurrence in dense swarms near vent emissions suggests that they were feeding at these sites, where conditions for Chemosynthetic growth of their filamentous microbial epiflora were optimal. The data show that the transformation of geothermal energy at the massive polymetal sulfide deposits of the MAR is based on the lithoautotrophic oxidation of soluble sulfides and pyrites into microbial biomass.

  2. Kinetics of Hydrogen Atom Abstraction from Substrate by an Active Site Thiyl Radical in Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides in all organisms. Active E. coli class Ia RNR is an α2β2 complex that undergoes reversible, long-range proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) over a pathway of redox active amino acids (β-Y122 → [β-W48] → β-Y356 → α-Y731 → α-Y730 → α-C439) that spans ∼35 Å. To unmask PCET kinetics from rate-limiting conformational changes, we prepared a photochemical RNR containing a [ReI] photooxidant site-specifically incorporated at position 355 ([Re]-β2), adjacent to PCET pathway residue Y356 in β. [Re]-β2 was further modified by replacing Y356 with 2,3,5-trifluorotyrosine to enable photochemical generation and spectroscopic observation of chemically competent tyrosyl radical(s). Using transient absorption spectroscopy, we compare the kinetics of Y· decay in the presence of substrate and wt-α2, Y731F-α2 ,or C439S-α2, as well as with 3′-[2H]-substrate and wt-α2. We find that only in the presence of wt-α2 and the unlabeled substrate do we observe an enhanced rate of radical decay indicative of forward radical propagation. This observation reveals that cleavage of the 3′-C–H bond of substrate by the transiently formed C439· thiyl radical is rate-limiting in forward PCET through α and has allowed calculation of a lower bound for the rate constant associated with this step of (1.4 ± 0.4) × 104 s–1. Prompting radical propagation with light has enabled observation of PCET events heretofore inaccessible, revealing active site chemistry at the heart of RNR catalysis. PMID:25353063

  3. Manganese oxide-induced strategy to high-performance iron/nitrogen/carbon electrocatalysts with highly exposed active sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Wu, Qiang; Zhuo, Ou; Jiang, Yufei; Bu, Yongfeng; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Xizhang; Hu, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    Iron/nitrogen/carbon (Fe/N/C) catalyst is so far the most promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic medium, whose performance depends closely on the synthesis chemistry. Herein, we report a MnOx-induced strategy to construct the Fe/N/C with highly exposed Fe-Nx active sites, which involves the uniform spreading of polyaniline on hierarchical N-doped carbon nanocages by a reactive-template polymerization, followed by the successive iron incorporation and polyaniline pyrolysis. The resulting Fe/N/C demonstrates an excellent ORR performance, including an onset potential of 0.92 V (vs. RHE), four electron selectivity, superb stability and immunity to methanol crossover. The excellent performance is well correlated with the greatly enhanced surface active sites of the catalyst stemming from the unique MnOx-induced strategy. This study provides an efficient approach for exploring the advanced ORR electrocatalysts by increasing the exposed active sites.Iron/nitrogen/carbon (Fe/N/C) catalyst is so far the most promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic medium, whose performance depends closely on the synthesis chemistry. Herein, we report a MnOx-induced strategy to construct the Fe/N/C with highly exposed Fe-Nx active sites, which involves the uniform spreading of polyaniline on hierarchical N-doped carbon nanocages by a reactive-template polymerization, followed by the successive iron incorporation and polyaniline pyrolysis. The resulting Fe/N/C demonstrates an excellent ORR performance, including an onset potential of 0.92 V (vs. RHE), four electron selectivity, superb stability and immunity to methanol crossover. The excellent performance is well correlated with the greatly enhanced surface active sites of the catalyst stemming from the unique MnOx-induced strategy. This study provides an efficient approach for exploring the advanced ORR electrocatalysts by increasing the

  4. Silver-Coated Nylon Dressing Plus Active DC Microcurrent for Healing of Autogenous Skin Donor Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Silver-Coated Nylon Dressing Plus Active DC Microcurrent for Healing of Autogenous Skin Donor Sites Edward W. Malin, MD, Chaya M. Galin, BSN, RN... microcurrent in comparison to silver-coated dressing with sham microcurrent on wound-closure time for autogenous skin donor sites. Methods: Four...hundred five patients were screened for treatment of their donor sites using a silver-coated nylon dressing with either sham or active microcurrent

  5. 76 FR 30696 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... eligible active uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of the Energy... requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs of...

  6. 76 FR 24871 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... from eligible active uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of...). Title X requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs...

  7. Robust activation method for negative electron affinity photocathodes

    DOEpatents

    Mulhollan, Gregory A.; Bierman, John C.

    2011-09-13

    A method by which photocathodes(201), single crystal, amorphous, or otherwise ordered, can be surface modified to a robust state of lowered and in best cases negative, electron affinity has been discovered. Conventional methods employ the use of Cs(203) and an oxidizing agent(207), typically carried by diatomic oxygen or by more complex molecules, for example nitrogen trifluoride, to achieve a lowered electron affinity(404). In the improved activation method, a second alkali, other than Cs(205), is introduced onto the surface during the activation process, either by co-deposition, yo-yo, or sporadic or intermittent application. Best effect for GaAs photocathodes has been found through the use of Li(402) as the second alkali, though nearly the same effect can be found by employing Na(406). Suitable photocathodes are those which are grown, cut from boules, implanted, rolled, deposited or otherwise fabricated in a fashion and shape desired for test or manufacture independently supported or atop a support structure or within a framework or otherwise affixed or suspended in the place and position required for use.

  8. Activity-stability relationships revisited in blue oxidases catalyzing electron transfer at extreme temperatures.

    PubMed

    Roulling, Frédéric; Godin, Amandine; Cipolla, Alexandre; Collins, Tony; Miyazaki, Kentaro; Feller, Georges

    2016-09-01

    Cuproxidases are a subset of the blue multicopper oxidases that catalyze the oxidation of toxic Cu(I) ions into less harmful Cu(II) in the bacterial periplasm. Cuproxidases from psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic bacteria display the canonical features of temperature adaptation, such as increases in structural stability and apparent optimal temperature for activity with environmental temperature as well as increases in the binding affinity for catalytic and substrate copper ions. In contrast, the oxidative activities at 25 °C for both the psychrophilic and thermophilic enzymes are similar, suggesting that the nearly temperature-independent electron transfer rate does not require peculiar adjustments. Furthermore, the structural flexibilities of both the psychrophilic and thermophilic enzymes are also similar, indicating that the firm and precise bindings of the four catalytic copper ions are essential for the oxidase function. These results show that the requirements for enzymatic electron transfer, in the absence of the selective pressure of temperature on electron transfer rates, produce a specific adaptive pattern, which is distinct from that observed in enzymes possessing a well-defined active site and relying on conformational changes such as for the induced fit mechanism.

  9. Type III radio burst productivity of solar flares. I - Release of energetic electrons out of the flare site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poquerusse, M.; McIntosh, P. S.

    1990-12-01

    The statistical relationship between type III radio bursts and optical flares, using the comprehensive flare data base at the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center (Boulder, Colorado), and the radio observations obtained with the ARTEMIS multichannel spectrograph in Nancay (France), operating at 500-100 MHz are presented. At variance with previous results, it is seen that type III probability of occurrence depends only weakly upon the spatial extension of the flare observed in H-alpha, but strongly upon its brightness. It is confirmed that the type III probability increases with proximity to sunspots and with mass motions (surges and prominence activity); in addition, statistical data are consistent with both relations holding at fixed flare brightness. Thus, some of the conditions favorable to type III occurrence are characteristic of compact flares, while others are characteristic of large and long-duration flares, which are often related to mass ejections. This apparent paradox suggests that particle acceleration and magnetic expansion are at work simultaneously in the ejection of electron streams out of faring sites.

  10. A model of the rabies virus glycoprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Rustici, M; Bracci, L; Lozzi, L; Neri, P; Santucci, A; Soldani, P; Spreafico, A; Niccolai, N

    1993-06-01

    The glycoprotein from the neurotropic rabies virus shows a significant homology with the alpha neurotoxin that binds to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The crystal structure of the alpha neurotoxins suggests that the Arg 37 guanidinium group and the Asp 31 side-chain carboxylate of the erabutoxin have stereochemical features resembling those of acetylcholine. Conformational studies on the Asn194-Ser195-Arg196-Gly197 tetrapeptide, an essential part of the binding site of the rabies virus glycoprotein, indicate that the side chains of Asn and Arg could also mimic the acetylcholine structure. This observation is consistent with the recently proposed mechanism of the viral infection.

  11. The concept of electron activity and its relation to redox potentials in aqueous geochemical systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorstenson, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    The definition of a formal thermodynamic activity of electrons in redox reactions appears in the literature of the 1920's. The concept of pe as -log (electron activity) was introduced by Jorgensen in 1945 and popularized in the geochemical literature by Sillen, who considered pe and pH as master variables in geochemical reactions. The physical significance of the concept of electron activity was challenged as early as 1928. However, only in the last two decades have sufficient thermodynamic data become available to examine this question quantitatively. The chemical nature of hydrated electrons differs greatly from that of hydrated protons, and thermodynamic data show that hydrated electrons cannot exist at physically meaningful equilibrium concentrations under natural conditions. This has important consequences for the understanding of redox processes in natural waters. These are: (1) the analogy between pe and pH as master variables is generally carried much further than is justified; (2) a thermodynamically meaningful value of redox potential cannot be assigned to disequilibrium systems; (3) the most useful approach to the study of redox characteristics is the analysis and study of multiple redox couples in the system; and (4) for all practical purposes, thermodynamically defined redox potentials do not exist (and thus cannot be measured) in natural waters. The overall implication for natural systems is that, in terms of redox reactions, each case must be considered on an individual and detailed basis. Field studies would appear to be a mandatory part of any site-specific study; conclusions regarding redox processes cannot be based solely on electrode measurements or thermodynamic stability calculations. (USGS)

  12. Stress Activation and Propagation of Electronic Charge Carriers in Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, J.; Freund, F. T.

    2007-12-01

    Igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks in the Earth's crust generate electric currents when subjected to deviatoric stresses. The reason is that these rocks contain dormant electronic charge carriers in the form of peroxy links. Peroxy links are sites in the crystal structures of the constituent minerals where oxygen anions have converted from their common 2- valence state to the 1- valence state, O3X-OO-XO3 with X=Si4+, Al3+ etc. As rocks are stressed and dislocations sweep through the mineral grains, the peroxy links break up, activating electrons and pholes ("phole" is an abbreviation for "positive hole", a defect electron on the oxygen sublattice, chemically O- in a matrix of O2-). The pholes are mobile electronic charge carriers that can spread out of the stressed rock into the surrounding unstressed rock. They travel via energy levels at the upper edge of the valence bands, cross grain boundaries and achieve a phase velocity on the order of 200±50 m/sec, consistent with phonon-assisted electron hopping. Due to mutual repulsion inside the rock volume the pholes spread to the surface, where they build up a positive surface charge. The surface charge can be measured with a non-contact capacitive sensor. If a Cu contact is applied to the surface of the rock, electrons are injected from ground into the rock in response to the evolving positive charge on the rock surface. We modeled surface potentials and burst-like electron injections following low and medium velocity impact experiments, 100 m/sec and 1.5 km/sec respectively.

  13. Elucidating Oxygen Reduction Active Sites in Pyrolyzed Metal–Nitrogen Coordinated Non-Precious-Metal Electrocatalyst Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Detailed understanding of the nature of the active centers in non-precious-metal-based electrocatalyst, and their role in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanistic pathways will have a profound effect on successful commercialization of emission-free energy devices such as fuel cells. Recently, using pyrolyzed model structures of iron porphyrins, we have demonstrated that a covalent integration of the Fe–Nx sites into π-conjugated carbon basal plane modifies electron donating/withdrawing capability of the carbonaceous ligand, consequently improving ORR activity. Here, we employ a combination of in situ X-ray spectroscopy and electrochemical methods to identify the various structural and functional forms of the active centers in non-heme Fe/N/C catalysts. Both methods corroboratively confirm the single site 2e– × 2e– mechanism in alkaline media on the primary Fe2+–N4 centers and the dual-site 2e– × 2e– mechanism in acid media with the significant role of the surface bound coexisting Fe/FexOy nanoparticles (NPs) as the secondary active sites. PMID:24817921

  14. Elucidating Oxygen Reduction Active Sites in Pyrolyzed Metal-Nitrogen Coordinated Non-Precious-Metal Electrocatalyst Systems.

    PubMed

    Tylus, Urszula; Jia, Qingying; Strickland, Kara; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Serov, Alexey; Atanassov, Plamen; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    Detailed understanding of the nature of the active centers in non-precious-metal-based electrocatalyst, and their role in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanistic pathways will have a profound effect on successful commercialization of emission-free energy devices such as fuel cells. Recently, using pyrolyzed model structures of iron porphyrins, we have demonstrated that a covalent integration of the Fe-N x sites into π-conjugated carbon basal plane modifies electron donating/withdrawing capability of the carbonaceous ligand, consequently improving ORR activity. Here, we employ a combination of in situ X-ray spectroscopy and electrochemical methods to identify the various structural and functional forms of the active centers in non-heme Fe/N/C catalysts. Both methods corroboratively confirm the single site 2e(-) × 2e(-) mechanism in alkaline media on the primary Fe(2+)-N4 centers and the dual-site 2e(-) × 2e(-) mechanism in acid media with the significant role of the surface bound coexisting Fe/Fe x O y nanoparticles (NPs) as the secondary active sites.

  15. Mutational and structural analyses of Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5B reveal novel active site residues for family 5 glycoside hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Takuji; Schmitz, George E; Dodd, Dylan; Han, Yejun; Burnett, Alanna; Nagasawa, Naoko; Mackie, Roderick I; Nakamura, Haruki; Morikawa, Kosuke; Cann, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    CpMan5B is a glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 5 enzyme exhibiting both β-1,4-mannosidic and β-1,4-glucosidic cleavage activities. To provide insight into the amino acid residues that contribute to catalysis and substrate specificity, we solved the structure of CpMan5B at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure revealed several active site residues (Y12, N92 and R196) in CpMan5B that are not present in the active sites of other structurally resolved GH5 enzymes. Residue R196 in GH5 enzymes is thought to be strictly conserved as a histidine that participates in an electron relay network with the catalytic glutamates, but we show that an arginine fulfills a functionally equivalent role and is found at this position in every enzyme in subfamily GH5_36, which includes CpMan5B. Residue N92 is required for full enzymatic activity and forms a novel bridge over the active site that is absent in other family 5 structures. Our data also reveal a role of Y12 in establishing the substrate preference for CpMan5B. Using these molecular determinants as a probe allowed us to identify Man5D from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii as a mannanase with minor endo-glucanase activity.

  16. Mutational and Structural Analyses of Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5B Reveal Novel Active Site Residues for Family 5 Glycoside Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yejun; Burnett, Alanna; Nagasawa, Naoko; Mackie, Roderick I.; Nakamura, Haruki; Morikawa, Kosuke; Cann, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    CpMan5B is a glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 5 enzyme exhibiting both β-1,4-mannosidic and β-1,4-glucosidic cleavage activities. To provide insight into the amino acid residues that contribute to catalysis and substrate specificity, we solved the structure of CpMan5B at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure revealed several active site residues (Y12, N92 and R196) in CpMan5B that are not present in the active sites of other structurally resolved GH5 enzymes. Residue R196 in GH5 enzymes is thought to be strictly conserved as a histidine that participates in an electron relay network with the catalytic glutamates, but we show that an arginine fulfills a functionally equivalent role and is found at this position in every enzyme in subfamily GH5_36, which includes CpMan5B. Residue N92 is required for full enzymatic activity and forms a novel bridge over the active site that is absent in other family 5 structures. Our data also reveal a role of Y12 in establishing the substrate preference for CpMan5B. Using these molecular determinants as a probe allowed us to identify Man5D from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii as a mannanase with minor endo-glucanase activity. PMID:24278284

  17. Active Site Hydrophobicity and the Convergent Evolution of Paraoxonase Activity in Structurally Divergent Enzymes: The Case of Serum Paraoxonase 1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a native lactonase capable of promiscuously hydrolyzing a broad range of substrates, including organophosphates, esters, and carbonates. Structurally, PON1 is a six-bladed β-propeller with a flexible loop (residues 70–81) covering the active site. This loop contains a functionally critical Tyr at position 71. We have performed detailed experimental and computational analyses of the role of selected Y71 variants in the active site stability and catalytic activity in order to probe the role of Y71 in PON1’s lactonase and organophosphatase activities. We demonstrate that the impact of Y71 substitutions on PON1’s lactonase activity is minimal, whereas the kcat for the paraoxonase activity is negatively perturbed by up to 100-fold, suggesting greater mutational robustness of the native activity. Additionally, while these substitutions modulate PON1’s active site shape, volume, and loop flexibility, their largest effect is in altering the solvent accessibility of the active site by expanding the active site volume, allowing additional water molecules to enter. This effect is markedly more pronounced in the organophosphatase activity than the lactonase activity. Finally, a detailed comparison of PON1 to other organophosphatases demonstrates that either a similar “gating loop” or a highly buried solvent-excluding active site is a common feature of these enzymes. We therefore posit that modulating the active site hydrophobicity is a key element in facilitating the evolution of organophosphatase activity. This provides a concrete feature that can be utilized in the rational design of next-generation organophosphate hydrolases that are capable of selecting a specific reaction from a pool of viable substrates. PMID:28026940

  18. Aluminum coordination and active sites on aluminas, Y zeolites and pillared layered silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Fripiat, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    Our work has been deployed in four directions, namely, (1) Study of the distribution of aluminum within three possible kinds of coordination shells: four-fold (IV), five-fold (V), and six-fold (VI), in aluminas and dealuminated zeolites by high-resolution solid state NMR or magic angle NMR. Besides the classical one pulse spectra, nutation spectra have been studied. (2) Study of the electron deficient sites by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of probe molecules on aluminas and decationated zeolites. Electron deficient sites are considered as Lewis sites. (3) Study of the model isomerization reaction 1 butene {yields} 2 cis or trans butene on the aluminas characterized in 1 and 2. (4) Synthesis of a silicate lattice in which silicon has been partially replaced by aluminum. The chosen silicate is that of the zeolite (fibrous) sepiolite. It has been characterized as indicated in 1 and 2.

  19. Proteome-wide analysis of nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations in active sites of human proteins.

    PubMed

    Dingerdissen, Hayley; Motwani, Mona; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2013-03-01

    An enzyme's active site is essential to normal protein activity such that any disruptions at this site may lead to dysfunction and disease. Nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations (nsSNVs), which alter the amino acid sequence, are one type of disruption that can alter the active site. When this occurs, it is assumed that enzyme activity will vary because of the criticality of the site to normal protein function. We integrate nsSNV data and active site annotations from curated resources to identify all active-site-impacting nsSNVs in the human genome and search for all pathways observed to be associated with this data set to assess the likely consequences. We find that there are 934 unique nsSNVs that occur at the active sites of 559 proteins. Analysis of the nsSNV data shows an over-representation of arginine and an under-representation of cysteine, phenylalanine and tyrosine when comparing the list of nsSNV-impacted active site residues with the list of all possible proteomic active site residues, implying a potential bias for or against variation of these residues at the active site. Clustering analysis shows an abundance of hydrolases and transferases. Pathway and functional analysis shows several pathways over- or under-represented in the data set, with the most significantly affected pathways involved in carbohydrate metabolism. We provide a table of 32 variation-substrate/product pairs that can be used in targeted metabolomics experiments to assay the effects of specific variations. In addition, we report the significant prevalence of aspartic acid to histidine variation in eight proteins associated with nine diseases including glycogen storage diseases, lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital syndrome, Parkinson's disease and several cancers.

  20. Activation of surface oxygen sites on an iridium-based model catalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaud, Alexis; Demortiere, Arnaud; Saubanere, Matthieu; Dachraoui, Walid; Duchamp, Martial; Doublet, Marie-Liesse; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is of prime importance in multiple energy storage devices; however, deeper mechanistic understanding is required to design enhanced electrocatalysts for the reaction. Current understanding of the OER mechanism based on oxygen adsorption on a metallic surface site fails to fully explain the activity of iridium and ruthenium oxide surfaces, and the drastic surface reconstruction observed for the most active OER catalysts. Here we demonstrate, using La2LiIrO6 as a model catalyst, that the exceptionally high activity found for Ir-based catalysts arises from the formation of active surface oxygen atoms that act as electrophilic centres for water to react. Moreover, with the help of transmission electron microscopy, we observe drastic surface reconstruction and iridium migration from the bulk to the surface. Therefore, we establish a correlation between surface activity and surface stability for OER catalysts that is rooted in the formation of surface reactive oxygen.

  1. Antimicrobial Activity and Stability of Electron Beam Irradiated Dental Irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Geethashri, A; Palaksha, K.J.; Sridhar, K. R.; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The electron beam (e-beam) radiation is considered as an effective means of sterilization of healthcare products as well as to induce the structural changes in the pharmaceutical agents/drug molecules. In addition to structural changes of pharmaceutical it also induces the formation of low molecular weight compounds with altered microbiological, physicochemical and toxicological properties. Among the several known medicaments, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) are used as irrigants in dentistry to kill the pathogenic microorganisms like Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans inhabiting the oral cavity. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and stability of e-beam irradiated dental irrigants, NaOCl and CHX. Materials and Methods: Two dental irrigants NaOCl (1.25% and 2.5%) and CHX (1% and 2%) were exposed to various doses of e-beam radiation. The antimicrobial activities of e-beam irradiated irrigants were compared with the non-irradiated (control) irrigants against E. faecalis, S. aureus, S. mutans and C. albicans by disc diffusion method. Following the storage, physico-chemical properties of the irrigants were recorded and the cytotoxic effect was evaluated on human gingival fibroblast cells. Result: The irrigants, 1.25% NaOCl and 1% CHX showed significantly increased antimicrobial activity against both E. faecalis, (16+0.0) and S. aureus (25+0.0) after irradiation with 1 kGy e-beam. Whereas, 2.5% NaOCl and 2% CHX showed slightly increased antimicrobial activity only against S. aureus (28+0.0). The significant difference was noticed in the antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity of irradiated and non-irradiated irrigants following the storage for 180 d at 40C. Conclusion: The e-beam irradiation increased the antimicrobial activity of irrigants without altering the biocompatibility. PMID:25584220

  2. Roles of key active-site residues in flavocytochrome P450 BM3.

    PubMed Central

    Noble, M A; Miles, C S; Chapman, S K; Lysek, D A; MacKay, A C; Reid, G A; Hanzlik, R P; Munro, A W

    1999-01-01

    The effects of mutation of key active-site residues (Arg-47, Tyr-51, Phe-42 and Phe-87) in Bacillus megaterium flavocytochrome P450 BM3 were investigated. Kinetic studies on the oxidation of laurate and arachidonate showed that the side chain of Arg-47 contributes more significantly to stabilization of the fatty acid carboxylate than does that of Tyr-51 (kinetic parameters for oxidation of laurate: R47A mutant, Km 859 microM, kcat 3960 min-1; Y51F mutant, Km 432 microM, kcat 6140 min-1; wild-type, Km 288 microM, kcat 5140 min-1). A slightly increased kcat for the Y51F-catalysed oxidation of laurate is probably due to decreased activation energy (DeltaG) resulting from a smaller DeltaG of substrate binding. The side chain of Phe-42 acts as a phenyl 'cap' over the mouth of the substrate-binding channel. With mutant F42A, Km is massively increased and kcat is decreased for oxidation of both laurate (Km 2. 08 mM, kcat 2450 min-1) and arachidonate (Km 34.9 microM, kcat 14620 min-1; compared with values of 4.7 microM and 17100 min-1 respectively for wild-type). Amino acid Phe-87 is critical for efficient catalysis. Mutants F87G and F87Y not only exhibit increased Km and decreased kcat values for fatty acid oxidation, but also undergo an irreversible conversion process from a 'fast' to a 'slow' rate of substrate turnover [for F87G (F87Y)-catalysed laurate oxidation: kcat 'fast', 760 (1620) min-1; kcat 'slow', 48.0 (44.6) min-1; kconv (rate of conversion from fast to slow form), 4.9 (23.8) min-1]. All mutants showed less than 10% uncoupling of NADPH oxidation from fatty acid oxidation. The rate of FMN-to-haem electron transfer was shown to become rate-limiting in all mutants analysed. For wild-type P450 BM3, the rate of FMN-to-haem electron transfer (8340 min-1) is twice the steady-state rate of oxidation (4100 min-1), indicating that other steps contribute to rate limitation. Active-site structures of the mutants were probed with the inhibitors 12-(imidazolyl

  3. Bidentate ligation of heme analogues; novel biomimetics of peroxidase active site.

    PubMed

    Ashkenasy, Gonen; Margulies, David; Felder, Clifford E; Shanzer, Abraham; Powers, Linda S

    2002-09-02

    The multifunctional nature of proteins that have iron-heme cofactors with noncovalent histidine linkage to the protein is controlled by the heme environment. Previous studies of these active-site structures show that the primary difference is the length of the iron-proximal histidine bond, which can be controlled by the degree of H-bonding to this histidine. Great efforts to mimic these functions with synthetic analogues have been made for more than two decades. The peroxidase models resulted in several catalytic systems capable of a large range of oxidative transformations. Most of these model systems modified the porphyrin ring covalently by directly binding auxiliary elements that control and facilitate reactivity; for example, electron-donating or -withdrawing substituents. A biomimetic approach to enzyme mimicking would have taken a different route, by attempting to keep the porphyrin ring system unaltered, as close as possible to its native form, and introducing all modifications at or close to the axial coordination sites. Such a model system would be less demanding synthetically, would make it easy to study the effect of a single structural modification, and might even provide a way to probe effects resulting from porphyrin exchange. We introduce here an alternative model system based on these principles. It consists of a two component system: a bis-imidazolyl ligand and an iron-porphyrin (readily substituted by a hemin). All modifications were introduced only to the ligand that engulfs the porphyrin and binds to the iron's fifth and sixth coordination sites. We describe the design, synthesis, and characterization of nine different model compounds with increased complexity. The primary tool for characterizing the environment of each complex Fe(III) center was the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurements, supported by UV/Vis, IR, and NMR spectroscopy and by molecular modeling. Introduction of asymmetry, by attaching different imidazoles

  4. Assessment of activation products in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.

    1996-07-01

    This document assesses the impact of radioactive activation products released from SRS facilities since the first reactor became operational late in 1953. The isotopes reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS: {sup 32}P, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 60}C, and {sup 65}Zn. Release pathways, emission control features, and annual releases to the aqueous and atmospheric environments are discussed. No single incident has resulted in a major acute release of activation products to the environment. The releases were the result of normal operations of the reactors and separations facilities. Releases declined over the years as better controls were established and production was reduced. The overall radiological impact of SRS activation product atmospheric releases from 1954 through 1994 on the offsite maximally exposed individual can be characterized by a total dose of 0.76 mrem. During the same period, such an individual received a total dose of 14,400 mrem from non-SRS sources of ionizing radiation present in the environment. SRS activation product aqueous releases between 1954 and 1994 resulted in a total dose of 54 mrem to the offsite maximally exposed individual. The impact of SRS activation product releases on offsite populations also has been evaluated.

  5. Improving Effectiveness of Bioremediation at DNAPL Source Zone Sites by Applying Partitioning Electron Donors (PEDs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    effort would require capital cost expenditures; and • Site characteristics – sites lacking suitable microorganisms to ferment the PED and/or sites...promoted in the subsurface. The goal was to demonstrate that the PED (nBA) can be utilized by the native dechlorinating microorganisms and had the...concentrations of dechlorination breakdown products and increases in the population of microorganisms capable of dechlorination (See figure 14

  6. All the catalytic active sites of MoS2 for hydrogen evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Du; Qiao, Qiao; ...

    2016-11-29

    MoS2 presents a promising low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), but the understanding about its active sites has remained limited. Here we present an unambiguous study of the catalytic activities of all possible reaction sites of MoS2, including edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries. We demonstrate that, in addition to the well-known catalytically active edge sites, sulfur vacancies provide another major active site for the HER, while the catalytic activity of grain boundaries is much weaker. Here, the intrinsic turnover frequencies (Tafel slopes) of the edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries are estimated to be 7.5more » s–1 (65–75 mV/dec), 3.2 s–1 (65–85 mV/dec), and 0.1 s–1 (120–160 mV/dec), respectively. We also demonstrate that the catalytic activity of sulfur vacancies strongly depends on the density of the vacancies and the local crystalline structure in proximity to the vacancies. Unlike edge sites, whose catalytic activity linearly depends on the length, sulfur vacancies show optimal catalytic activities when the vacancy density is in the range of 7–10%, and the number of sulfur vacancies in high crystalline quality MoS2 is higher than that in low crystalline quality MoS2, which may be related with the proximity of different local crystalline structures to the vacancies.« less

  7. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  8. Defects at nitrogen site in electron-irradiated AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Son, N. T.; Janzen, E.; Gali, A.; Szabo, A.; Bickermann, M.; Ohshima, T.; Isoya, J.

    2011-06-13

    In high resistance AlN irradiated with 2 MeV electrons, an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum, labeled EI-1, with an electron spin S=1/2 and a clear hyperfine (hf) structure was observed. The hf structure was shown to be due the interaction between the electron spin and the nuclear spins of four {sup 27}A nuclei with the hf splitting varying between {approx}6.0 and {approx}7.2 mT. Comparing the hf data obtained from EPR and ab initio supercell calculations we suggest the EI-1 defect to be the best candidate for the neutral nitrogen vacancy in AlN.

  9. Chondroitinase ABC I from Proteus vulgaris: cloning, recombinant expression and active site identification.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Vikas; Capila, Ishan; Bosques, Carlos J; Pojasek, Kevin; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2005-02-15

    GalAGs (galactosaminoglycans) are one subset of the GAG (glycosaminoglycan) family of chemically heterogeneous polysaccharides that are involved in a wide range of biological processes. These complex biomacromolecules are believed to be responsible for the inhibition of nerve regeneration following injury to the central nervous system. The enzymic degradation of GAG chains in damaged nervous tissue by cABC I (chondroitinase ABC I), a broad-specificity lyase that degrades GalAGs, promotes neural recovery. In the present paper, we report the subcloning of cABC I from Proteus vulgaris, and discuss a simple methodology for the recombinant expression and purification of this enzyme. The originally expressed cABC I clone resulted in an enzyme with negligible activity against a variety of GalAG substrates. Sequencing of the cABC I clone revealed four point mutations at issue with the electron-density data of the cABC I crystal structure. Site-directed mutagenesis produced a clone with restored GalAG-degrading function. We have characterized this enzyme biochemically, including an analysis of its substrate specificity. By coupling structural inspections of cABC I and an evaluation of sequence homology against other GAG-degrading lyases, a set of amino acids was chosen for further study. Mutagenesis studies of these residues resulted in the first experimental evidence of cABC I's active site. This work will facilitate the structure-function characterization of biomedically relevant GalAGs and further the development of therapeutics for nerve regeneration.

  10. Terminal redox-site effect on the long-range electron conduction of Fe(tpy)2 oligomer wires on a gold electrode.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Shunsuke; Sakamoto, Ryota; Maeda, Hiroaki; Nishimori, Yoshihiko; Kurita, Tomochika; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2013-04-15

    This article completes our comprehensive understanding of the electron transport properties of our original π-conjugated redox-active molecular wires comprising Fe bridged by p-phenylene linkers (tpy=2,2':6',2''-terpyridine). The Fe(tpy)2 oligomer wires comprise three types of tpy ligands: the anchor tpy ligand (A series) makes a junction between the wire and electrode, the bridging bis-tpy ligand (L series) connects the Fe(tpy)2 units, and the terminal tpy ligand (T series) possesses a redox site as a probe for the long-range electron transport ability. Taking advantage of the precise tunability of the composition of the Fe(tpy)2 oligomer wires, thus far we investigated how A and L impacted on the electron-transport ability. The excellent long-range electron transport ability with ultrasmall attenuation constants (β(d), 0.002 Å(-1) as the minimum) depends on L significantly [Chem. Asian J. 2009, 4, 1361], whereas A is unrelated to the β(d) value, but influences the zero-distance electron-transfer rate constant, k(et)(0) [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 4524]. Herein we study the influence of terminal ligand T(x) (x=1-3). β(d) is independent of T, however, T(3), with a cyclometallated Ru complex as the redox site, gives rise to a k(et)(0) value greater than T(1) and T(2) with ferrocene. This series of simple but definitive conclusions indicates that we have reached the stage of being able to precisely design molecular wires to attain desirable single-molecule electron conduction.

  11. Indium phosphide negative electron affinity photocathodes: Surface cleaning and activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yun

    InP(100) is a very important semi-conductor for many applications. When activated by Cs and oxygen, the InP surface achieves the state of Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) making the Cs+O/InP system a very efficient electron source. Despite many years of study, the chemical cleaning and activation of InP are still not well understood. In our work, we have established an understanding of the basic physics and chemistry for the chemical cleaning and activation of the InP(100) surface. Synchrotron Radiation Photoelectron Spectroscopy is the main technique used in this study because of its high surface sensitivity and ability to identify chemical species present on the surface at each stage of our process. A clean, stoichiometric InP(100) surface is crucial for obtaining high performance of NEA photocathodes. Therefore, the first part of our study focused on the chemical cleaning of InP(100). We found that hydrogen peroxide based solutions alone, originally developed to clean GaAs(100) surfaces and widely used for InP(100), do not result in clean InP(I00) surfaces because oxide is left on the surface. A second cleaning step, which uses acid solutions like HCl or H2SO4, can remove all the oxide and leave a 0.4 ML protective layer of elemental phosphorous on the surface. The elemental phosphorous can be removed by annealing at 330°C and a clean InP(100) surface can be obtained. Cs deposition on InP(100) surface shows clear charge transfer from the Cs ad-atoms to the substrate. When the Cs/InP(100) surface is dosed with oxygen, the charge transfer from the Cs to substrate is reduced and substrate is oxidized. The activation of InP as a NEA photocathode is carried out by an alternating series of steps consisting of Cs deposition and Cs+O co-deposition. Two types of oxygen are found after activation. The first is dissociated oxygen and the other is a di-oxygen species (peroxide or superoxide). The decay of quantum-yield with time and with annealing is studied and changes in

  12. Marine Biology Field Trip Sites. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  13. Influence of Humic Acid Complexation with Metal Ions on Extracellular Electron Transfer Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Lu, Qin

    2015-11-01

    Humic acids (HAs) can act as electron shuttles and mediate biogeochemical cycles, thereby influencing the transformation of nutrients and environmental pollutants. HAs commonly complex with metals in the environment, but few studies have focused on how these metals affect the roles of HAs in extracellular electron transfer (EET). In this study, HA-metal (HA-M) complexes (HA-Fe, HA-Cu, and HA-Al) were prepared and characterized. The electron shuttle capacities of HA-M complexes were experimentally evaluated through microbial Fe(III) reduction, biocurrent generation, and microbial azoreduction. The results show that the electron shuttle capacities of HAs were enhanced after complexation with Fe but were weakened when using Cu or Al. Density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the structural geometry of the HA-M complexes and revealed the best binding sites of the HAs to metals and the varied charge transfer rate constants (k). The EET activity of the HA-M complexes were in the order HA-Fe > HA-Cu > HA-Al. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical redox processes given the ubiquitous nature of both HAs and various metals in the environment.

  14. An active site mutation increases the polymerase activity of the guinea pig-lethal Marburg virus.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Alexander; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Becker, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) causes severe, often fatal, disease in humans and transient illness in rodents. Sequential passaging of MARV in guinea pigs resulted in selection of a lethal virus containing 4 aa changes. A D184N mutation in VP40 (VP40D184N), which leads to a species-specific gain of viral fitness, and three mutations in the active site of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase L, which were investigated in the present study for functional significance in human and guinea pig cells. The transcription/replication activity of L mutants was strongly enhanced by a substitution at position 741 (S741C), and inhibited by other substitutions (D758A and A759D) in both species. The polymerase activity of L carrying the S741C substitution was eightfold higher in guinea pig cells than in human cells upon co-expression with VP40D184N, suggesting that the additive effect of the two mutations provides MARV a replicative advantage in the new host.

  15. Single-Molecule Electronic Monitoring of DNA Polymerase Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marushchak, Denys O.; Pugliese, Kaitlin M.; Turvey, Mackenzie W.; Choi, Yongki; Gul, O. Tolga; Olsen, Tivoli J.; Rajapakse, Arith J.; Weiss, Gregory A.; Collins, Philip G.

    Single-molecule techniques can reveal new spatial and kinetic details of the conformational changes occurring during enzymatic catalysis. Here, we investigate the activity of DNA polymerases using an electronic single-molecule technique based on carbon nanotube transistors. Single molecules of the Klenow fragment (KF) of polymerase I were conjugated to the transistors and then monitored via fluctuations in electrical conductance. Continuous, long-term monitoring recorded single KF molecules incorporating up to 10,000 new bases into single-stranded DNA templates. The duration of individual incorporation events was invariant across all analog and native nucleotides, indicating that the precise structure of different base pairs has no impact on the timing of incorporation. Despite similar timings, however, the signal magnitudes generated by certain analogs reveal alternate conformational states that do not occur with native nucleotides. The differences induced by these analogs suggest that the electronic technique is sensing KF's O-helix as it tests the stability of nascent base pairs.

  16. An active electron polarized scintillating GSO target for neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiboussinov, B.; Braggio, C.; Cardini, A.; Carugno, G.; Congiu, F.; Gain, S.; Galeazzi, G.; Lai, A.; Lehman, A.; Mocci, P.; Mura, A.; Quochi, F.; Saba, M.; Saitta, B.; Sartori, G.

    2012-12-01

    The feasibility of an electron-polarized, active target to be used as detector in neutrino scattering experiments, suggested by several theoretical papers, has been investigated. We report on the properties of the paramagnetic crystal Gd2SiO5 (GSO), in which 7.7% of the total number of electrons present can be polarized by lowering the temperature and applying an intense external magnetic field. The material magnetic susceptibility has been measured down to cryogenic temperatures showing that for H=5 T and T=4 K about 80% of the maximum allowed magnetization can be attained. Also the spectral and time response of the crystal have been characterized and the scintillation process has been studied using a photomultiplier to measure the response to gamma rays irradiation and cosmic rays operating the GSO crystal at 13.5 K. An avalanche photodiode (APD) readout of the scintillation signal from the GSO crystal has also been performed, since the magnetic field-independent response of this device allows it to be placed close to the crystal in the cryogenic environment.

  17. Electronic Activation of a DNA Nanodevice Using a Multilayer Nanofilm.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyejoong; Ranallo, Simona; Rossetti, Marianna; Heo, Jiwoong; Shin, Jooseok; Park, Kwangyong; Ricci, Francesco; Hong, Jinkee

    2016-10-01

    A method to control activation of a DNA nanodevice by supplying a complementary DNA (cDNA) strand from an electro-responsive nanoplatform is reported. To develop functional nanoplatform, hexalayer nanofilm is precisely designed by layer-by-layer assembly technique based on electrostatic interaction with four kinds of materials: Hydrolyzed poly(β-amino ester) can help cDNA release from the film. A cDNA is used as a key building block to activate DNA nanodevice. Reduced graphene oxides (rGOs) and the conductive polymer provide conductivity. In particular, rGOs efficiently incorporate a cDNA in the film via several interactions and act as a barrier. Depending on the types of applied electronic stimuli (reductive and oxidative potentials), a cDNA released from the electrode can quantitatively control the activation of DNA nanodevice. From this report, a new system is successfully demonstrated to precisely control DNA release on demand. By applying more advanced form of DNA-based nanodevices into multilayer system, the electro-responsive nanoplatform will expand the availability of DNA nanotechnology allowing its improved application in areas such as diagnosis, biosensing, bioimaging, and drug delivery.

  18. Metronidazole activation and isolation of Clostridium acetobutylicum electron transport genes.

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, J D; Jones, D T; Woods, D R

    1991-01-01

    An Escherichia coli F19 recA, nitrate reductase-deficient mutant was constructed by transposon mutagenesis and shown to be resistant to metronidazole. This mutant was a most suitable host for the isolation of Clostridium acetobutylicum genes on recombinant plasmids, which activated metronidazole and rendered the E. coli F19 strain sensitive to metronidazole. Twenty-five E. coli F19 clones containing different recombinant plasmids were isolated and classified into five groups on the basis of their sensitivity to metronidazole. The clones were tested for nitrate reductase, pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and hydrogenase activities. DNA hybridization and restriction endonuclease mapping revealed that four of the C. acetobutylicum insert DNA fragments on recombinant plasmids were linked in an 11.1-kb chromosomal fragment. DNA sequencing and amino acid homology studies indicated that this DNA fragment contained a flavodoxin gene which encoded a protein of 160 amino acids that activated metronidazole and made the E. coli F19 mutant very sensitive to metronidazole. The flavodoxin and hydrogenase genes which are involved in electron transfer systems were linked on the 11.1-kb DNA fragment from C. acetobutylicum. Images PMID:1991710

  19. Encroachment of Human Activity on Sea Turtle Nesting Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziskin, D.; Aubrecht, C.; Elvidge, C.; Tuttle, B.; Baugh, K.; Ghosh, T.

    2008-12-01

    The encroachment of anthropogenic lighting on sea turtle nesting sites poses a serious threat to the survival of these animals [Nicholas, 2001]. This danger is quantified by combining two established data sets. The first is the Nighttime Lights data produced by the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center [Elvidge et al., 1997]. The second is the Marine Turtle Database produced by the World Conservation Monitoring Centre (WCMC). The technique used to quantify the threat of encroachment is an adaptation of the method described in Aubrecht et al. [2008], which analyzes the stress on coral reef systems by proximity to nighttime lights near the shore. Nighttime lights near beaches have both a direct impact on turtle reproductive success since they disorient hatchlings when they mistake land-based lights for the sky-lit surf [Lorne and Salmon, 2007] and the lights are also a proxy for other anthropogenic threats. The identification of turtle nesting sites with high rates of encroachment will hopefully steer conservation efforts to mitigate their effects [Witherington, 1999]. Aubrecht, C, CD Elvidge, T Longcore, C Rich, J Safran, A Strong, M Eakin, KE Baugh, BT Tuttle, AT Howard, EH Erwin, 2008, A global inventory of coral reef stressors based on satellite observed nighttime lights, Geocarto International, London, England: Taylor and Francis. In press. Elvidge, CD, KE Baugh, EA Kihn, HW Kroehl, ER Davis, 1997, Mapping City Lights with Nighttime Data from the DMSP Operational Linescan System, Photogrammatic Engineering and Remote Sensing, 63:6, pp. 727-734. Lorne, JK, M Salmon, 2007, Effects of exposure to artificial lighting on orientation of hatchling sea turtles on the beach and in the ocean, Endangered Species Research, Vol. 3: 23-30. Nicholas, M, 2001, Light Pollution and Marine Turtle Hatchlings: The Straw that Breaks the Camel's Back?, George Wright Forum, 18:4, p77-82. Witherington, BE, 1999, Reducing Threats To Nesting Habitat, Research and Management Techniques for

  20. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  1. The Electronic Welcome Mat: The Academic Library Web Site as a Marketing and Public Relations Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Jeanie M.

    2005-01-01

    This article explores the potential and reality of using the academic library Web site to market library resources and services, for fundraising, and to market special events. It explores such issues as the placement of a link to academic libraries from institutional home pages and the use of a library Web site to include links to news, exhibits,…

  2. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  3. Barium ions selectively activate BK channels via the Ca2+-bowl site.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Zeng, Xu-Hui; Lingle, Christopher J

    2012-07-10

    Activation of Ca(2+)-dependent BK channels is increased via binding of micromolar Ca(2+) to two distinct high-affinity sites per BK α-subunit. One site, termed the Ca(2+) bowl, is embedded within the second RCK domain (RCK2; regulator of conductance for potassium) of each α-subunit, while oxygen-containing residues in the first RCK domain (RCK1) have been linked to a separate Ca(2+) ligation site. Although both sites are activated by Ca(2+) and Sr(2+), Cd(2+) selectively favors activation via the RCK1 site. Divalent cations of larger ionic radius than Sr(2+) are thought to be ineffective at activating BK channels. Here we show that Ba(2+), better known as a blocker of K(+) channels, activates BK channels and that this effect arises exclusively from binding at the Ca(2+)-bowl site. Compared with previous estimates for Ca(2+) bowl-mediated activation by Ca(2+), the affinity of Ba(2+) to the Ca(2+) bowl is reduced about fivefold, and coupling of binding to activation is reduced from ∼3.6 for Ca(2+) to about ∼2.8 for Ba(2+). These results support the idea that ionic radius is an important determinant of selectivity differences among different divalent cations observed for each Ca(2+)-binding site.

  4. Activation of brown adipose tissue mitochondrial GDP binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Swick, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    The primary function of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is heat production. This ability is attributed to the existence of a unique inner mitochondrial membrane protein termed the uncoupling protein or thermogenin. This protein is permeable to H+ and thus allows respiration (and therefore thermogenesis) to proceed at a rapid rate, independent of ADP phosphorylation. Proton conductance can be inhibited by the binding of purine nucleotides to the uncoupling protein. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-GDP to BAT mitochondria is frequently used as a measure of BAT thermogenic activity. Rats fed a diet that was low but adequate in protein exhibited a decrease in feed efficiency. In addition, BAT thermogenesis was activated as indicated by an elevation in the level of GDP binding to BAT mitochondria. This phenomena occurred in older rats and persisted over time.

  5. Structure and Reactivity of the Phosphotriesterase Active Site

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    characterize different catalytic conformations for chorismate mutase . Preliminary evidence for water binding in phosphotriesterase suggests that activity in...MD/QM study of the chorismate mutase catalyzed Claisen rearrangement reaction. 2001.subm. J.Phys.Chem.B 22.Day, P.N.J., J.H.; Gordon,M.S.; Webb,S.P...Claisen rearrangement of an unusual substrate in chorismate mutase . 2001.subm. J.Phys.Chem.B 38.Stevens, W.J., Basch,H., Krauss,M., Compact effective

  6. Thermally Activated Site Exchange and Quantum Exchange Coupling Processes in Unsymmetrical Trihydride Osmium Compounds.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Amaya; Barea, Guada; Esteruelas, Miguel A.; Lahoz, Fernando J.; LLedós, Agustí; Maseras, Feliu; Modrego, Javier; Oñate, Enrique; Oro, Luis A.; Ruiz, Natividad; Sola, Eduardo

    1999-04-19

    Reaction of the hexahydride complex OsH(6)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (1) with pyridine-2-thiol leads to the trihydride derivative OsH(3){kappa-N,kappa-S-(2-Spy)}(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (2). The structure of 2 has been determined by X-ray diffraction. The geometry around the osmium atom can be described as a distorted pentagonal bipyramid with the phosphine ligands occupying axial positions. The equatorial plane contains the pyridine-2-thiolato group, attached through a bite angle of 65.7(1) degrees, and the three hydride ligands. The theoretical structure determination of the model complex OsH(3){kappa-N,kappa-S-(2-Spy)}(PH(3))(2) (2a) reveals that the hydride ligands form a triangle with sides of 1.623, 1.714, and 2.873 Å, respectively. A topological analysis of the electron density of 2a indicates that there is no significant electron density connecting the hydrogen atoms of the OsH(3) unit. In solution, the hydride ligands of 2 undergo two different thermally activated site exchange processes, which involve the central hydride with each hydride ligand situated close to the donor atoms of the chelate group. The activation barriers of both processes are similar. Theoretical calculations suggest that the transition states have a cis-hydride-dihydrogen nature. In addition to the thermally activated exchange processes, complex 2 shows quantum exchange coupling between the central hydride and the one situated close to the sulfur atom of the pyridine-2-thiolato group. The reactions of 1 with L-valine and 2-hydroxypyridine afford OsH(3){kappa-N,kappa-O-OC(O)CH[CH(CH(3))(2)]NH(2)}(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (3) and OsH(3){kappa-N,kappa-O-(2-Opy)}(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (4) respectively, which according to their spectroscopic data have a similar structure to that of 2. In solution, the hydride ligands of 3 and 4 also undergo two different thermally activated site exchange processes. However, they do not show quantum exchange coupling. The tetranuclear complexes [(P(i)Pr(3))(2)H(3)Os(&mgr;-biim)M(TFB)](2) [M = Rh

  7. Active site proton delivery and the lyase activity of human CYP17A1

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Yogan; Gregory, Michael C.; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2014-01-03

    equivalents and protons are funneled into non-productive pathways. This is similar to previous work with other P450 catalyzed hydroxylation. However, catalysis of carbon–carbon bond scission by the T306A mutant was largely unimpeded by disruption of the CYP17A1 acid-alcohol pair. The unique response of CYP17A1 lyase activity to mutation of Thr306 is consistent with a reactive intermediate formed independently of proton delivery in the active site, and supports involvement of a nucleophilic peroxo-anion rather than the traditional Compound I in catalysis.

  8. Pathways of H2 toward the Active Site of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Vitor H.; Baptista, António M.; Soares, Cláudio M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2), but little is known about the diffusion of H2 toward the active site. Here we analyze pathways for H2 permeation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent. Various MD simulation replicates were done, to improve the sampling of the system states. H2 easily permeates hydrogenase in every simulation and it moves preferentially in channels. All H2 molecules that reach the active site made their approach from the side of the Ni ion. H2 is able to reach distances of <4 Å from the active site, although after 6 Å permeation is difficult. In this region we mutated Val-67 into alanine and perform new MD simulations. These simulations show an increase of H2 inside the protein and at lower distances from the active site. This valine can be a control point in the H2 access to the active center. PMID:16731562

  9. Maintenance of plastid RNA editing activities independently of their target sites.

    PubMed

    Tillich, Michael; Poltnigg, Peter; Kushnir, Sergei; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian

    2006-03-01

    RNA editing in plant organelles is mediated by site-specific, nuclear-encoded factors. Previous data suggested that the maintenance of these factors depends on the presence of their rapidly evolving cognate sites. The surprising ability of allotetraploid Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) to edit a foreign site in the chloroplast ndhA messenger RNA was thought to be inherited from its diploid male ancestor, Nicotiana tomentosiformis. Here, we show that the same ndhA editing activity is also present in Nicotiana sylvestris, which is the female diploid progenitor of tobacco and which lacks the ndhA site. Hence, heterologous editing is not simply a result of tobacco's allopolyploid genome organization. Analyses of other editing sites after sexual or somatic transfer between land plants showed that heterologous editing occurs at a surprisingly high frequency. This suggests that the corresponding editing activities are conserved despite the absence of their target sites, potentially because they serve other functions in the plant cell.

  10. A Processive Carbohydrate Polymerase That Mediates Bifunctional Catalysis Using a Single Active Site

    PubMed Central

    May, John F.; Levengood, Matthew R.; Splain, Rebecca A.; Brown, Christopher D.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    Even in the absence of a template, glycosyltransferases can catalyze the synthesis of carbohydrate polymers of specific sequence. The paradigm has been that one enzyme catalyzes the formation of one type of glycosidic linkage, yet certain glycosyltransferases generate polysaccharide sequences composed of two distinct linkage types. In principle, bifunctional glycosyltransferases can possess separate active sites for each catalytic activity or one active site with dual activities. We encountered the fundamental question of one or two distinct active sites in our investigation of the galactosyltransferase GlfT2. GlfT2 catalyzes the formation of mycobacterial galactan, a critical cell-wall polymer composed of galactofuranose residues connected with alternating, regioisomeric linkages. We found that GlfT2 mediates galactan polymerization using only one active site that manifests dual regioselectivity. Structural modeling of the bifunctional glycosyltransferases hyaluronan synthase and cellulose synthase suggests that these enzymes also generate multiple glycosidic linkages using a single active site. These results highlight the versatility of glycosyltransferases for generating polysaccharides of specific sequence. We postulate that a hallmark of processive elongation of a carbohydrate polymer by a bifunctional enzyme is that one active site can give rise to two separate types of glycosidic bonds. PMID:22217153

  11. Analytical electron microscopy characterization of uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Site, FY1993 report

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E.C.; Cunnane, J.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.

    1994-10-01

    A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) is being used to determine the nature of uranium in soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project. The information gained from these studies is being used to develop and test remediation technologies. Investigations using SEM have shown that uranium is contained within particles that are typically 1 to 100 {mu}m in diameter. Further analysis with AEM has shown that these uranium-rich regions are made up of discrete uranium-bearing phases. The distribution of these uranium phases was found to be inhomogeneous at the microscopic level.

  12. Dual sites of solvation for electrons produced by photoionisation in aqueous micellar solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, H. N.; Palit, D. K.; Sapre, A. V.; Rama, K. V. S.; Rao; Mittal, J. P.

    1993-02-01

    Laser flash photolysis of either aqueous micellar solutions of triton X-165 at 248 nm or of a probe phenothiazine (PTH) in triton X-165 or brij-35 micelles at 351 nm gives transient absorption peaks at 630 and 720 nm which are attributed to electrons solvated in the palisade region of the nonionic micelle and to electrons hydrated in bulk water. Picosecond studies show that, at the end of a 35 ps pulse, the electrons are already solvated, a major fraction of which undergo geminate recombination with the sibling cations. After 10 ns, both the 630 and 720 nm peaks are clearly seen.

  13. N-site de-methylation in pyrimidine bases as studied by low energy electrons and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Almeida, D; Kinzel, D; Ferreira da Silva, F; Puschnigg, B; Gschliesser, D; Scheier, P; Denifl, S; García, G; González, L; Limão-Vieira, P

    2013-07-21

    Electron transfer and dissociative electron attachment to 3-methyluracil (3meU) and 1-methylthymine (1meT) yielding anion formation have been investigated in atom-molecule collision and electron attachment experiments, respectively. The former has been studied in the collision energy range 14-100 eV whereas the latter in the 0-15 eV incident electron energy range. In the present studies, emphasis is given to the reaction channel resulting in the loss of the methyl group from the N-sites with the extra charge located on the pyrimidine ring. This particular reaction channel has neither been approached in the context of dissociative electron attachment nor in atom-molecule collisions yet. Quantum chemical calculations have been performed in order to provide some insight into the dissociation mechanism involved along the N-CH3 bond reaction coordinate. The calculations provide support to the threshold value derived from the electron transfer measurements, allowing for a better understanding of the role of the potassium cation as a stabilising agent in the collision complex. The present comparative study gives insight into the dynamics of the decaying transient anion and more precisely into the competition between dissociation and auto-detachment.

  14. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Kenny, Paul J.; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets. PMID:25869137

  15. Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlynn, Shawn E.; Chadwick, Grayson L.; Kempes, Christopher P.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2015-10-01

    Multicellular assemblages of microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and the proximity afforded by aggregation is thought to permit intercellular metabolic coupling that can accommodate otherwise unfavourable reactions. Consortia of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria are a well-known environmental example of microbial co-aggregation; however, the coupling mechanisms between these paired organisms is not well understood, despite the attention given them because of the global significance of anaerobic methane oxidation. Here we examined the influence of interspecies spatial positioning as it relates to biosynthetic activity within structurally diverse uncultured methane-oxidizing consortia by measuring stable isotope incorporation for individual archaeal and bacterial cells to constrain their potential metabolic interactions. In contrast to conventional models of syntrophy based on the passage of molecular intermediates, cellular activities were found to be independent of both species intermixing and distance between syntrophic partners within consortia. A generalized model of electric conductivity between co-associated archaea and bacteria best fit the empirical data. Combined with the detection of large multi-haem cytochromes in the genomes of methanotrophic archaea and the demonstration of redox-dependent staining of the matrix between cells in consortia, these results provide evidence for syntrophic coupling through direct electron transfer.

  16. Re-evaluation of the H+/site ratio of mitochondrial electron transport with the oxygen pulse technique.

    PubMed

    Brand, M D; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1976-09-25

    The number of protons ejected per pair of electrons passing each energy-conserving site in the electron transport chain (the H+/site ratio) has been investigated in rat liver mitochondria by means of the oxygen pulse technique introduced by Mitchell and Moyle (1967) (Biochem. J. 105, 1147-1162). The usual H+/site values of 2.0 observed by this method were found to be substantially underestimated as a result of the influx of phosphate into the mitochondria. This was shown by three different kinds of experiments. 1. Addition of N-ethylmaleimide or mersalyl, inhibitors of mitochondrial phosphate transport, increased the H+/site ratio from 2.0 to 3.0. The dependence of this effect on the concentration of either inhibitor was identical with that for inhibition of phosphate transport. Added phosphate diminished the H+/site ratio to values below 2.0 in the absence of N-ethylmaleimide. N-Ethylmaleimide protected the elevated H+/site ratio of 3.0 against the deleterious effect of added phosphate, but did not prevent a lowering effect of weak acid anions such as 3-hydroxybutyrate. 2. Prior washing of mitochondria to remove the endogenous phosphate that leaks out during the anaerobic preincubation led to H+/site ratios near 3.0, which were not increased by N-ethylmaleimide. Addition of low concentrations of phosphate to such phosphate-depleted mitochondria decreased the H+/site ratio to 2.0; addition of N-ethylmaleimide returned the ratio to 3.0. 3. Lowering the temperature to 5 degrees, which slows down phosphate transport, led to H+/site values of 3.0 even in the absence of N-ethylmaleimide. The H+/site ratio of 3.0 observed in the absence of phosphate movements was not dependent on any narrowly limited set of experimental conditions. It occurred with either Ca2+ or K+ (in the presence of valinomycin) as mobile permeant cation. It was independent of the concentration of succinate, oxygen, mitochondria, or rotenone, additions of Ca2+, Li+, or Na+ and was independent of

  17. Determining the Binding Sites of β-Cyclodextrin and Peptides by Electron-Capture Dissociation High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yulin; Geib, Timon; Volmer, Dietrich A.

    2015-07-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are a group of cyclic oligosaccharides, which readily form inclusion complexes with hydrophobic compounds to increase bioavailability, thus making CDs ideal drug excipients. Recent studies have also shown that CDs exhibit a wide range of protective effects, preventing proteins from aggregation, degradation, and folding. These effects strongly depend on the binding sites on the protein surface. CDs only exhibit weak interactions with amino acids, however; conventional analytical techniques therefore usually fail to reveal the exact location of the binding sites. Moreover, some studies even suggest that CD inclusion complexes are merely electrostatic adducts. Here, electron capture dissociation (ECD) was applied in this proof-of-concept study to examine the exact nature of the CD/peptide complexes, and CD binding sites were unambiguously located for the first time via Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) tandem mass spectrometry.

  18. Determining the Binding Sites of β-Cyclodextrin and Peptides by Electron-Capture Dissociation High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yulin; Geib, Timon; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2015-07-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are a group of cyclic oligosaccharides, which readily form inclusion complexes with hydrophobic compounds to increase bioavailability, thus making CDs ideal drug excipients. Recent studies have also shown that CDs exhibit a wide range of protective effects, preventing proteins from aggregation, degradation, and folding. These effects strongly depend on the binding sites on the protein surface. CDs only exhibit weak interactions with amino acids, however; conventional analytical techniques therefore usually fail to reveal the exact location of the binding sites. Moreover, some studies even suggest that CD inclusion complexes are merely electrostatic adducts. Here, electron capture dissociation (ECD) was applied in this proof-of-concept study to examine the exact nature of the CD/peptide complexes, and CD binding sites were unambiguously located for the first time via Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) tandem mass spectrometry.

  19. Excited state potential energy surfaces and their interactions in Fe(IV)=O active sites.

    PubMed

    Srnec, Martin; Wong, Shaun D; Solomon, Edward I

    2014-12-21

    The non-heme ferryl active sites are of significant interest for their application in biomedical and green catalysis. These sites have been shown to have an S = 1 or S = 2 ground spin state; the latter is functional in biology. Low-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (LT MCD) spectroscopy probes the nature of the excited states in these species including ligand-field (LF) states that are otherwise difficult to study by other spectroscopies. In particular, the temperature dependences of MCD features enable their unambiguous assignment and thus determination of the low-lying excited states in two prototypical S = 1 and S = 2 NHFe(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O complexes. Furthermore, some MCD bands exhibit vibronic structures that allow mapping of excited-state interactions and their effects on the potential energy surfaces (PESs). For the S = 2 species, there is also an unusual spectral feature in both near-infrared absorption and MCD spectra - Fano antiresonance (dip in Abs) and Fano resonance (sharp peak in MCD) that indicates the weak spin-orbit coupling of an S = 1 state with the S = 2 LF state. These experimental data are correlated with quantum-chemical calculations that are further extended to analyze the low-lying electronic states and the evolution of their multiconfigurational characters along the Fe-O PESs. These investigations show that the lowest-energy states develop oxyl Fe(III) character at distances that are relevant to the transition state (TS) for H-atom abstraction and define the frontier molecular orbitals that participate in the reactivity of S = 1 vs. S = 2 non-heme Fe(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O active sites. The S = 1 species has only one available channel that requires the C-H bond of a substrate to approach perpendicular to the Fe-oxo bond (the π channel). In contrast, there are three channels (one σ and two π) available for the S = 2 non-heme Fe(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O system allowing C-H substrate approach

  20. On the Site-Decomposition of Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy Energy Using Ome-Electron Eigenstates

    SciTech Connect

    Aberg, Daniel; Sadigh, Babak; Benedict, Lorin X.

    2015-10-26

    We discuss two di erent schemes for decomposing the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy into atomic site-speci c contributions, and show that one of these, which uses projected single-particle states, is inherently ill-de ned in practical applications. We therefore argue that the other decomposition scheme, involving ground state matrix elements of the spin-orbit operator, is preferable for the numerical prediction of one-site contributions to the anisotropy.

  1. Protonation of the binuclear active site in cytochrome c oxidase decreases the reduction potential of CuB.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Margareta R A; Siegbahn, Per E M

    2015-10-01

    One of the remaining mysteries regarding the respiratory enzyme cytochrome c oxidase is how proton pumping can occur in all reduction steps in spite of the low reduction potentials observed in equilibrium titration experiments for two of the active site cofactors, CuB(II) and Fea3(III). It has been speculated that, at least the copper cofactor can acquire two different states, one metastable activated state occurring during enzyme turnover, and one relaxed state with lower energy, reached only when the supply of electrons stops. The activated state should have a transiently increased CuB(II) reduction potential, allowing proton pumping. The relaxed state should have a lower reduction potential, as measured in the titration experiments. However, the structures of these two states are not known. Quantum mechanical calculations show that the proton coupled reduction potential for CuB is inherently high in the active site as it appears after reaction with oxygen, which explains the observed proton pumping. It is suggested here that, when the flow of electrons ceases, a relaxed resting state is formed by the uptake of one extra proton, on top of the charge compensating protons delivered in each reduction step. The extra proton in the active site decreases the proton coupled reduction potential for CuB by almost half a volt, leading to agreement with titration experiments. Furthermore, the structure for the resting state with an extra proton is found to have a hydroxo-bridge between CuB(II) and Fea3(III), yielding a magnetic coupling that can explain the experimentally observed EPR silence.

  2. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  3. 75 FR 71677 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of the Energy Policy Act of... requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs of...

  4. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...). (e) For all asbestos-containing waste material received, the owner or operator of the active waste... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an...

  5. Problem list completeness in electronic health records: a multi-site study and assessment of success factors

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; McCoy, Allison B.; Hickman, Thu-Trang T.; St Hilaire, Daniel; Borbolla, Damian; Bowes, Len; Dixon, William G.; Dorr, David A.; Krall, Michael; Malholtra, Sameer; Bates, David W.; Sittig, Dean F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess problem list completeness using an objective measure across a range of sites, and to identify success factors for problem list completeness. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of electronic health record data and interviews at ten healthcare organizations within the United States, United Kingdom, and Argentina who use a variety of electronic health record systems: four self-developed and six commercial. At each site, we assessed the proportion of patients who have diabetes recorded on their problem list out of all patients with a hemoglobin A1c elevation >= 7.0%, which is diagnostic of diabetes. We then conducted interviews with informatics leaders at the four highest performing sites to determine factors associated with success. Finally, we surveyed all the sites about common practices implemented at the top performing sites to determine whether there was an association between problem list management practices and problem list completeness. Results Problem list completeness across the ten sites ranged from 60.2% to 99.4%, with a mean of 78.2%. Financial incentives, problem-oriented charting, gap reporting, shared responsibility, links to billing codes, and organizational culture were identified as success factors at the four hospitals with problem list completeness at or near 90.0%. Discussion Incomplete problem lists represent a global data integrity problem that could compromise quality of care and put patients at risk. There was a wide range of problem list completeness across the healthcare facilities. Nevertheless, some facilities have achieved high levels of problem list completeness, and it is important to better understand the factors that contribute to success to improve patient safety. Conclusion Problem list completeness varies substantially across healthcare facilities. In our review of EHR systems at ten healthcare facilities, we identified six success factors which may be useful for healthcare organizations seeking to

  6. Unmasking tandem site interaction in human acetylcholinesterase. Substrate activation with a cationic acetanilide substrate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joseph L; Cusack, Bernadette; Davies, Matthew P; Fauq, Abdul; Rosenberry, Terrone L

    2003-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) contains a narrow and deep active site gorge with two sites of ligand binding, an acylation site (or A-site) at the base of the gorge, and a peripheral site (or P-site) near the gorge entrance. The P-site contributes to catalytic efficiency by transiently binding substrates on their way to the acylation site, where a short-lived acyl enzyme intermediate is produced. A conformational interaction between the A- and P-sites has recently been found to modulate ligand affinities. We now demonstrate that this interaction is of functional importance by showing that the acetylation rate constant of a substrate bound to the A-site is increased by a factor a when a second molecule of substrate binds to the P-site. This demonstration became feasible through the introduction of a new acetanilide substrate analogue of acetylcholine, 3-(acetamido)-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium (ATMA), for which a = 4. This substrate has a low acetylation rate constant and equilibrates with the catalytic site, allowing a tractable algebraic solution to the rate equation for substrate hydrolysis. ATMA affinities for the A- and P-sites deduced from the kinetic analysis were confirmed by fluorescence titration with thioflavin T as a reporter ligand. Values of a >1 give rise to a hydrolysis profile called substrate activation, and the AChE site-specific mutant W86F, and to a lesser extent wild-type human AChE itself, showed substrate activation with acetylthiocholine as the substrate. Substrate activation was incorporated into a previous catalytic scheme for AChE in which a bound P-site ligand can also block product dissociation from the A-site, and two additional features of the AChE catalytic pathway were revealed. First, the ability of a bound P-site ligand to increase the substrate acetylation rate constant varied with the structure of the ligand: thioflavin T accelerated ATMA acetylation by a factor a(2) of 1.3, while propidium failed to accelerate. Second, catalytic rate

  7. Structure and nuclearity of active sites in Fe-zeolites: comparison with iron sites in enzymes and homogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zecchina, Adriano; Rivallan, Mickaël; Berlier, Gloria; Lamberti, Carlo; Ricchiardi, Gabriele

    2007-07-21

    Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite zeolites efficiently catalyse several oxidation reactions which find close analogues in the oxidation reactions catalyzed by homogeneous and enzymatic compounds. The iron centres are highly dispersed in the crystalline matrix and on highly diluted samples, mononuclear and dinuclear structures are expected to become predominant. The crystalline and robust character of the MFI framework has allowed to hypothesize that the catalytic sites are located in well defined crystallographic positions. For this reason these catalysts have been considered as the closest and best defined heterogeneous counterparts of heme and non heme iron complexes and of Fenton type Fe(2+) homogeneous counterparts. On this basis, an analogy with the methane monooxygenase has been advanced several times. In this review we have examined the abundant literature on the subject and summarized the most widely accepted views on the structure, nuclearity and catalytic activity of the iron species. By comparing the results obtained with the various characterization techniques, we conclude that Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite are not the ideal samples conceived before and that many types of species are present, some active and some other silent from adsorptive and catalytic point of view. The relative concentration of these species changes with thermal treatments, preparation procedures and loading. Only at lowest loadings the catalytically active species become the dominant fraction of the iron species. On the basis of the spectroscopic titration of the active sites by using NO as a probe, we conclude that the active species on very diluted samples are isolated and highly coordinatively unsaturated Fe(2+) grafted to the crystalline matrix. Indication of the constant presence of a smaller fraction of Fe(2+) presumably located on small clusters is also obtained. The nitrosyl species formed upon dosing NO from the gas phase on activated Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite, have been analyzed

  8. Activation of the human neutrophil NADPH oxidase results in coupling of electron carrier function between ubiquinone-10 and cytochrome b559.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G; Lefker, B A

    1985-04-10

    The enzymatic activity underlying the respiratory burst in human neutrophils was examined in a subcellular fraction with high specific activity and shown to be a membrane-associated complex of a flavoprotein, ubiquinone-10, and cytochrome b559 in an approximate 1.3:1:2 molar ratio. Study of the redox poise of these electron carriers indicated that electron flow in the intact complex from unstimulated cells proceeded: NADPH----E-FAD----ubiquinone-10. Similar studies on the complex prepared from stimulated neutrophils indicated that electron flow proceeded: NADPH----E-FAD----ubiquinone-10----cytochrome b559----oxygen. The active enzyme complex was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate. Inhibition persisted after removal of excess inhibitor, was reversed by dithiothreitol, and could be blocked by prior addition of substrate (NADPH). Inhibition of the active oxidase complex by p-chloromercuribenzoate also inhibited electron flow from NADPH to all purported electron carriers in the chain (i.e. E-FAD, ubiquinone-10, and cytochrome b559). We conclude that activation of the oxidase enzyme complex in the intact neutrophil resulted in linkage of electron carrier function between endogenous ubiquinone-10 and cytochrome b559 and was without demonstrable effect on proximal electron flow. The p-chloromercuribenzoate sensitive site(s) proximal to the initial electron acceptor (E-FAD) did not appear to be altered by the cellular activation process.

  9. Monocopper active site for partial methane oxidation in Cu-exchanged 8MR zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Ambarish R.; Zhao, Zhi -Jian; Siahrostami, Samira; Nørskov, Jens K.; Studt, Felix

    2016-08-17

    Direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen is experiencing renewed interest owing to the availability of new natural gas resources. Copper-exchanged zeolites such as mordenite and ZSM-5 have shown encouraging results, and di- and tri-copper species have been suggested as active sites. Recently, small eight-membered ring (8MR) zeolites including SSZ-13, -16, and -39 have been shown to be active for methane oxidation, but the active sites and reaction mechanisms in these 8MR zeolites are not known. In this work, we use density functional theory (DFT) calculations to systematically evaluate monocopper species as active sites for the partial methane oxidation reaction in Cu-exchanged SSZ-13. On the basis of kinetic and thermodynamic arguments, we suggest that [CuIIOH]+ species in the 8MR are responsible for the experimentally observed activity. Furthermore, our results successfully explain the available spectroscopic data and experimental observations including (i) the necessity of water for methanol extraction and (ii) the effect of Si/Al ratio on the catalyst activity. Monocopper species have not yet been suggested as an active site for the partial methane oxidation reaction, and our results suggest that [CuIIOH]+ active site may provide complementary routes for methane activation in zeolites in addition to the known [Cu–O–Cu]2+ and Cu3O3 motifs.

  10. Monocopper active site for partial methane oxidation in Cu-exchanged 8MR zeolites

    DOE PAGES

    Kulkarni, Ambarish R.; Zhao, Zhi -Jian; Siahrostami, Samira; ...

    2016-08-17

    Direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen is experiencing renewed interest owing to the availability of new natural gas resources. Copper-exchanged zeolites such as mordenite and ZSM-5 have shown encouraging results, and di- and tri-copper species have been suggested as active sites. Recently, small eight-membered ring (8MR) zeolites including SSZ-13, -16, and -39 have been shown to be active for methane oxidation, but the active sites and reaction mechanisms in these 8MR zeolites are not known. In this work, we use density functional theory (DFT) calculations to systematically evaluate monocopper species as active sites for the partial methane oxidationmore » reaction in Cu-exchanged SSZ-13. On the basis of kinetic and thermodynamic arguments, we suggest that [CuIIOH]+ species in the 8MR are responsible for the experimentally observed activity. Furthermore, our results successfully explain the available spectroscopic data and experimental observations including (i) the necessity of water for methanol extraction and (ii) the effect of Si/Al ratio on the catalyst activity. Monocopper species have not yet been suggested as an active site for the partial methane oxidation reaction, and our results suggest that [CuIIOH]+ active site may provide complementary routes for methane activation in zeolites in addition to the known [Cu–O–Cu]2+ and Cu3O3 motifs.« less

  11. 1993 annual report of hazardous waste activities for the Oak Ridge K-25 site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report is a detailed listing of all of the Hazardous Waste activities occurring at Martin Marietta`s K-25 site. Contained herein are hazardous waste notification forms, waste stream reports, generator fee forms and various TSDR reports.

  12. Photocatalytic Properties of TiO2: Evidence of the Key Role of Surface Active Sites in Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bak, Tadeusz; Li, Wenxian; Nowotny, Janusz; Atanacio, Armand J; Davis, Joel

    2015-09-10

    Photocatalytic activity of oxide semiconductors is commonly considered in terms of the effect of the band gap on the light-induced performance. The present work considers a combined effect of several key performance-related properties (KPPs) on photocatalytic activity of TiO2 (rutile), including the chemical potential of electrons (Fermi level), the concentration of surface active sites, and charge transport, in addition to the band gap. The KPPs have been modified using defect engineering. This approach led to imposition of different defect disorders and the associated KPPs, which are defect-related. This work shows, for the first time, a competitive influence of different KPPs on photocatalytic activity that was tested using oxidation of methylene blue (MB). It is shown that the increase of oxygen activity in the TiO2 lattice from 10(-12) Pa to 10(5) Pa results in (i) increase in the band gap from 2.42 to 2.91 eV (direct transitions) or 2.88 to 3 eV (indirect transitions), (ii) increase in the population of surface active sites, (iii) decrease of the Fermi level, and (iv) decrease of the charge transport. It is shown that the observed changes in the photocatalytic activity are determined by two dominant KPPs: the concentration of active surface sites and the Fermi level, while the band gap and charge transport have a minor effect on the photocatalytic performance. The effect of the defect-related properties on photoreactivity of TiO2 with water is considered in terms of a theoretical model offering molecular-level insight into the process.

  13. Nuclear waste: Status of DOE`s nuclear waste site characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    1987-12-31

    Three potential nuclear waste repository sites have been selected to carry out characterization activities-the detailed geological testing to determine the suitability of each site as a repository. The sites are Hanford in south-central Washington State, Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada, and Deaf Smith in the Texas Panhandle. Two key issues affecting the total program are the estimations of the site characterization completion data and costs and DOE`s relationship with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission which has been limited and its relations with affected states and Indian tribes which continue to be difficult.

  14. The transient catalytically competent coenzyme allocation into the active site of Anabaena ferredoxin NADP+ -reductase.

    PubMed

    Peregrina, José Ramón; Lans, Isaías; Medina, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) catalyses the electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP(+) via its flavin FAD cofactor. A molecular dynamics theoretical approach is applied here to visualise the transient catalytically competent interaction of Anabaena FNR with its coenzyme, NADP(+). The particular role of some of the residues identified as key in binding and accommodating the 2'P-AMP moiety of the coenzyme is confirmed in molecular terms. Simulations also indicate that the architecture of the active site precisely contributes to the orientation of the N5 of the FAD isoalloxazine ring and the C4 of the coenzyme nicotinamide ring in the conformation of the catalytically competent hydride transfer complex and, therefore, contributes to the efficiency of the process. In particular, the side chain of the C-terminal Y303 in Anabaena FNR appears key to providing the optimum geometry by reducing the stacking probability between the isoalloxazine and nicotinamide rings, thus providing the required co-linearity and distance among the N5 of the flavin cofactor, the C4 of the coenzyme nicotinamide and the hydride that has to be transferred between them. All these factors are highly related to the reaction efficiency, mechanism and reversibility of the process.

  15. The Active Sites of a Rod-Shaped Hollandite DeNOx Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pingping; Schuster, Manfred Erwin; Huang, Zhiwei; Xu, Fei; Jin, Shifeng; Chen, Yaxin; Hua, Weiming; Su, Dang Sheng; Tang, Xingfu

    2015-06-26

    The identification of catalytically active sites (CASs) in heterogeneous catalysis is of vital importance to design and develop improved catalysts, but remains a great challenge. The CASs have been identified in the low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides by ammonia (SCR) over a hollandite manganese oxide (HMO) catalyst with a rod-shaped morphology and one-dimensional tunnels. Electron microscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction determine the surface and crystal structures of the one-dimensional HMO rods closed by {100} side facets and {001} top facets. A combination of X-ray absorption spectra, molecular probes with potassium and nitric oxide, and catalytic tests reveals that the CASs are located on the {100} side facets of the HMO rods rather than on the top facets or in the tunnels, and hence semi-tunnel structural motifs on the {100} facets are evidenced to be the CASs of the SCR reaction. This work paves the way to further investigate the intrinsic mechanisms of SCR reactions.

  16. Atomistic characterization of the active-site solvation dynamics of a model photocatalyst

    DOE PAGES

    van Driel, Tim B.; Kjær, Kasper S.; Hartsock, Robert W.; ...

    2016-11-28

    The interactions between the reactive excited state of molecular photocatalysts and surrounding solvent dictate reaction mechanisms and pathways, but are not readily accessible to conventional optical spectroscopic techniques. Here we report an investigation of the structural and solvation dynamics following excitation of a model photocatalytic molecular system [Ir2(dimen)4]2+, where dimen is para-diisocyanomenthane. The time-dependent structural changes in this model photocatalyst, as well as the changes in the solvation shell structure, have been measured with ultrafast diffuse X-ray scattering and simulated with Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics. Both methods provide direct access to the solute–solvent pair distribution function, enabling the solvation dynamics aroundmore » the catalytically active iridium sites to be robustly characterized. Our results provide evidence for the coordination of the iridium atoms by the acetonitrile solvent and demonstrate the viability of using diffuse X-ray scattering at free-electron laser sources for studying the dynamics of photocatalysis.« less

  17. Atomistic characterization of the active-site solvation dynamics of a model photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect

    van Driel, Tim B.; Kjær, Kasper S.; Hartsock, Robert W.; Dohn, Asmus O.; Harlang, Tobias; Chollet, Matthieu; Christensen, Morten; Gawelda, Wojciech; Henriksen, Niels E.; Kim, Jong Goo; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Kim, Jeongho; Lemke, Henrik; Sun, Zheng; Sundström, Villy; Zhang, Wenkai; Zhu, Diling; Møller, Klaus B.; Nielsen, Martin M.; Gaffney, Kelly J.

    2016-11-28

    The interactions between the reactive excited state of molecular photocatalysts and surrounding solvent dictate reaction mechanisms and pathways, but are not readily accessible to conventional optical spectroscopic techniques. Here we report an investigation of the structural and solvation dynamics following excitation of a model photocatalytic molecular system [Ir2(dimen)4]2+, where dimen is para-diisocyanomenthane. The time-dependent structural changes in this model photocatalyst, as well as the changes in the solvation shell structure, have been measured with ultrafast diffuse X-ray scattering and simulated with Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics. Both methods provide direct access to the solute–solvent pair distribution function, enabling the solvation dynamics around the catalytically active iridium sites to be robustly characterized. Our results provide evidence for the coordination of the iridium atoms by the acetonitrile solvent and demonstrate the viability of using diffuse X-ray scattering at free-electron laser sources for studying the dynamics of photocatalysis.

  18. Active site of bimetallic heterogeneous catalyst by atomic resolution aberration-corrected STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Chien-Nan; Lin, Chun-Ting

    2015-11-01

    The localized defect of Au-Pd bimetallic heterogeneous nanoparticles catalyst was investigated using HRTEM and aberration-corrected HRSTEM. The phase plates were calculated from the aberration coefficients of the measured probe tableau for various outer tilt angle of the optical axis and the accuracy required for the compensation of the various residual aberration coefficients in order to achieve sub-angstrom resolution with the electron optics system was evaluated up to the fifth order aberrations. It is found that the interplanar spacing of the Au-Pd nanoparticle (1 1 1) planes observed along the [1 1 0] zone axis was approximately 0.24 nm measured by HRTEM. In addition, the HRSTEM HAADF image demonstrated that the twin boundaries on the surfaces of heterogeneous nanoparticles catalysts at atomic scale. These defects might be introduced during the growth to alleviate the internal stress caused by the 4.6% lattice mismatch of Au-Pd bimetallic system. Current research could be applied to the study of active sites in nanocatalysts.

  19. Atomistic characterization of the active-site solvation dynamics of a model photocatalyst

    PubMed Central

    van Driel, Tim B.; Kjær, Kasper S.; Hartsock, Robert W.; Dohn, Asmus O.; Harlang, Tobias; Chollet, Matthieu; Christensen, Morten; Gawelda, Wojciech; Henriksen, Niels E.; Kim, Jong Goo; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Kim, Jeongho; Lemke, Henrik; Sun, Zheng; Sundström, Villy; Zhang, Wenkai; Zhu, Diling; Møller, Klaus B.; Nielsen, Martin M.; Gaffney, Kelly J.

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between the reactive excited state of molecular photocatalysts and surrounding solvent dictate reaction mechanisms and pathways, but are not readily accessible to conventional optical spectroscopic techniques. Here we report an investigation of the structural and solvation dynamics following excitation of a model photocatalytic molecular system [Ir2(dimen)4]2+, where dimen is para-diisocyanomenthane. The time-dependent structural changes in this model photocatalyst, as well as the changes in the solvation shell structure, have been measured with ultrafast diffuse X-ray scattering and simulated with Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics. Both methods provide direct access to the solute–solvent pair distribution function, enabling the solvation dynamics around the catalytically active iridium sites to be robustly characterized. Our results provide evidence for the coordination of the iridium atoms by the acetonitrile solvent and demonstrate the viability of using diffuse X-ray scattering at free-electron laser sources for studying the dynamics of photocatalysis. PMID:27892472

  20. YOUNG SUPERNOVAE AS EXPERIMENTAL SITES FOR STUDYING THE ELECTRON ACCELERATION MECHANISM

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Keiichi

    2013-01-10

    Radio emissions from young supernovae ({approx}<1 year after the explosion) show a peculiar feature in the relativistic electron population at a shock wave, where their energy distribution is steeper than typically found in supernova remnants and than that predicted from the standard diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) mechanism. This has been especially established for the case for a class of stripped envelope supernovae (SNe IIb/Ib/Ic), where a combination of high shock velocity and low circumstellar material density makes it easier to derive the intrinsic energy distribution than in other classes of SNe. We suggest that this apparent discrepancy reflects a situation where the low energy electrons, before being accelerated by the DSA-like mechanism, are responsible for the radio synchrotron emission from young SNe, and that studying young SNe sheds light on the still-unresolved electron injection problem in the acceleration theory of cosmic rays. We suggest that the electron's energy distribution could be flattened toward high energy, most likely around 100 MeV, which marks a transition from inefficient to efficient acceleration. Identifying this feature will be a major advance in understanding the electron acceleration mechanism. We suggest two further probes: (1) millimeter/submillimeter observations in the first year after the explosion and (2) X-ray observations at about one year and thereafter. We show that these are reachable by ALMA and Chandra for nearby SNe.

  1. Electron Energy Distributions at Relativistic Shock Sites: Observational Constraints from the Cygnus A Hotspots

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, C.C.Teddy; Stawarz, L.; Harris, D.E.; Ostrowski, M.

    2007-10-15

    We report new detections of the hotspots in Cygnus A at 4.5 and 8.0 microns with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Together with detailed published radio observations and synchrotron self-Compton modeling of previous X-ray detections, we reconstruct the underlying electron energy spectra of the two brightest hotspots (A and D). The low-energy portion of the electron distributions have flat power-law slopes (s {approx} 1.5) up to the break energy which corresponds almost exactly to the mass ratio between protons and electrons; we argue that these features are most likely intrinsic rather than due to absorption effects. Beyond the break, the electron spectra continue to higher energies with very steep slopes s>3. Thus, there is no evidence for the 'canonical' s=2 slope expected in 1st order Fermi-type shocks within the whole observable electron energy range. We discuss the significance of these observations and the insight offered into high-energy particle acceleration processes in mildly relativistic shocks.

  2. Elucidating the design principles of photosynthetic electron-transfer proteins by site-directed spin labeling EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ishara Silva, K; Jagannathan, Bharat; Golbeck, John H; Lakshmi, K V

    2016-05-01

    Site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool to determine solvent accessibility, side-chain dynamics, and inter-spin distances at specific sites in biological macromolecules. This information provides important insights into the structure and dynamics of both natural and designed proteins and protein complexes. Here, we discuss the application of SDSL EPR spectroscopy in probing the charge-transfer cofactors in photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) such as photosystem I (PSI) and the bacterial reaction center (bRC). Photosynthetic RCs are large multi-subunit proteins (molecular weight≥300 kDa) that perform light-driven charge transfer reactions in photosynthesis. These reactions are carried out by cofactors that are paramagnetic in one of their oxidation states. This renders the RCs unsuitable for conventional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy investigations. However, the presence of native paramagnetic centers and the ability to covalently attach site-directed spin labels in RCs makes them ideally suited for the application of SDSL EPR spectroscopy. The paramagnetic centers serve as probes of conformational changes, dynamics of subunit assembly, and the relative motion of cofactors and peptide subunits. In this review, we describe novel applications of SDSL EPR spectroscopy for elucidating the effects of local structure and dynamics on the electron-transfer cofactors of photosynthetic RCs. Because SDSL EPR Spectroscopy is uniquely suited to provide dynamic information on protein motion, it is a particularly useful method in the engineering and analysis of designed electron transfer proteins and protein networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  3. Number and locations of agonist binding sites required to activate homomeric Cys-loop receptors.

    PubMed

    Rayes, Diego; De Rosa, María José; Sine, Steven M; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2009-05-06

    Homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors contain five identical agonist binding sites, each formed at a subunit interface. To determine the number and locations of binding sites required to generate a stable active state, we constructed a receptor subunit with a mutation that disables the agonist binding site and a reporter mutation that alters unitary conductance and coexpressed mutant and nonmutant subunits. Although receptors with a range of different subunit compositions are produced, patch-clamp recordings reveal that the amplitude of each single-channel opening event reports the number and, for certain subunit combinations, the locations of subunits with intact binding sites. We find that receptors with three binding sites at nonconsecutive subunit interfaces exhibit maximal mean channel open time, receptors with binding sites at three consecutive or two nonconsecutive interfaces exhibit intermediate open time, and receptors with binding sites at two consecutive or one interface exhibit brief open time. Macroscopic recordings after rapid application of agonist reveal that channel activation slows and the extent of desensitization decreases as the number of binding sites per receptor decreases. The overall results provide a framework for defining mechanisms of activation and drug modulation for homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors.

  4. Imaging individual lanthanum atoms in zeolite Y by scanning transmission electron microscopy: evidence of lanthanum pair sites

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Pinghong; Lu, Jing; Aydin, C.; Debefve, Louise M.; Browning, Nigel D.; Chen, Cong-Yan; Gates, Bruce C.

    2015-09-01

    Images of La-exchanged NaY zeolite obtained with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) show that about 80% of the La cations were present as site-isolated species, with the remainder in pair sites. The distance between La cations in the pair sites ranged from 1.44 to 3.84 Å, consistent with the presence of pairs of cations tilted at various angles with respect to the support surface. The actual distance between La cations in the pair sites is inferred to be approximately 3.84 Å, which is shorter than the distance between the nearest Al sites in the zeolite (4.31 Å). The results therefore suggest the presence of dimeric structures of La cations bridged with OH groups, and the presence of such species has been inferred previously on the basis of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (W. Grünert, U. Sauerlandt, R. Schlögl, H.G. Karge, J. Phys. Chem., 97 (1993) 1413).

  5. Site selective substitution Pt for Ti in KTiOPO{sub 4}:Ga crystals revealed by electron paramagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Grachev, V.; Meyer, M.; Jorgensen, J.; Malovichko, G.; Hunt, A. W.

    2014-07-28

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance at low temperatures has been used to characterize potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO{sub 4}) single crystals grown by different techniques. Irradiation with 20 MeV electrons performed at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature caused an appearance of electrons and holes. Platinum impurities act as electron traps in KTiOPO{sub 4} creating Pt{sup 3+} centers. Two different Pt{sup 3+} centers were observed, Pt(A) and Pt(D). The Pt(A) centers are dominant in undoped samples, whereas Pt(D)—in Ga-doped KTP crystals. Superhyperfine structure registered for Pt(D) centers was attributed to interactions of platinum electrons with {sup 39}K and two {sup 31}P nuclei in their surroundings. In both Pt(A) and Pt(D) centers, Pt{sup 3+} ions substitute for Ti{sup 4+} ions, but with a preference to one of two electrically distinct crystallographic positions. The site selective substitution can be controlled by the Ga-doping.

  6. 75 FR 17832 - Proposed Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: VA Loan Electronic Reporting...

  7. 75 FR 33898 - Agency Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity.... 2900-0021.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI)...

  8. 78 FR 36642 - Proposed Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (VA Loan Electronic Reporting Interface (VALERI) System) Activity... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: VA Loan Electronic Reporting...

  9. Supramolecular modeling of mono-copper enzyme active sites with calix[6]arene-based funnel complexes.

    PubMed

    Le Poul, Nicolas; Le Mest, Yves; Jabin, Ivan; Reinaud, Olivia

    2015-07-21

    Supramolecular bioinorganic chemistry is a natural evolution in biomimetic metallic systems since it constitutes a further degree of complexity in modeling. The traditional approach consisting of mimicking the first coordination sphere of metal sites proved to be very efficient, because valuable data are extracted from these examples to gain insight in natural systems mechanisms. But it does not reproduce several specific aspects of enzymes that can be mimicked by the implementation of a cavity embedding the labile active site and thus controlling the properties of the metal ion by noncovalent interactions. This Account reports on a strategy aimed at reproducing some supramolecular aspects encountered in the natural systems. The cavity complexes described herein display a coordination site constructed on a macrocycle. Thanks to a careful design of the cavity-based ligands, complexes orienting their labile site specifically toward the inside of the macrocycle were obtained. The supramolecular systems are based on the flexible calix[6]arene core that surrounds the metal ion labile site, thereby constraining exogenous molecules to pass through the conic funnel to reach the metal center. Such an architecture confers to the metal ion very unusual properties and behaviors, which in many aspects are biologically relevant. Three generations of calix[6]-based ligands are presented and discussed in the context of modeling the monocopper sites encountered in some enzymes. A wide range of phenomena are highlighted such as the impact that the size and shape of the access channel to the metal center have on the selectivity and rate of the binding process, the possible remote control of the electronics through small modifications operated on the cavity edges, induced-fit behavior associated with host-guest association (shoe-tree effect) that affects the redox properties of the metal ion and the electron exchange pathway, consequences of forbidden associative ligand exchange

  10. Discharge Chamber Primary Electron Modeling Activities in Three-Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steuber, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Designing discharge chambers for ion thrusters involves many geometric configuration decisions. Various decisions will impact discharge chamber performance with respect to propellant utilization efficiency, ion production costs, and grid lifetime. These hardware design decisions can benefit from the assistance of computational modeling. Computational modeling for discharge chambers has been limited to two-dimensional codes that leveraged symmetry for interpretation into three-dimensional analysis. This paper presents model development activities towards a three-dimensional discharge chamber simulation to aid discharge chamber design decisions. Specifically, of the many geometric configuration decisions toward attainment of a worthy discharge chamber, this paper focuses on addressing magnetic circuit considerations with a three-dimensional discharge chamber simulation as a tool. With this tool, candidate discharge chamber magnetic circuit designs can be analyzed computationally to gain insight into factors that may influence discharge chamber performance such as: primary electron loss width in magnetic cusps, cathode tip position with respect to the low magnetic field volume, definition of a low magnetic field region, and maintenance of a low magnetic field region across the grid span. Corroborating experimental data will be obtained from mockup hardware tests. Initially, simulated candidate magnetic circuit designs will resemble previous successful thruster designs. To provide opportunity to improve beyond previous performance benchmarks, off-design modifications will be simulated and experimentally tested.

  11. Electronic and geometric structure of doped rare-gas clusters: surface, site and size effects studied with luminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Pietrowski, R.; von Haeften, K.; Laarmann, T.; Möller, T.; Museur, L.; Kanaev, A. V.

    2006-05-01

    The electronic and geometric structure of rare gas clusters doped with rare-gas atoms Rg = Xe, Kr or Ar is investigated with fluorescence excitation spectroscopy in the VUV spectral range. Several absorption bands are observed in the region of the first electronic excitations of the impurity atoms, which are related to the lowest spin-orbit split atomic 3P1 and 1P1 states. Due to influence of surrounding atoms of the cluster, the atomic lines are shifted to the blue and broadened (“electronical cage effect”). From the known interaction potentials and the measured spectral shifts the coordination of the impurity atom in ArN, KrN, NeN and HeN could be studied in great detail. In the interior of KrN and ArN the Xe atoms are located in substitutional sites with 12 nearest neighbours and internuclear distances comparable to that of the host matrix. In NeN and HeN the cluster atoms (18 and 22, respectively) arrange themselves around the Xe impurity with a bondlength comparable to that of the heteronuclear dimer. The results confirm that He clusters are liquid while Ne clusters are solid for N≥ 300. Smaller Ne clusters exhibit a liquid like behaviour. When doping is strong, small Rgm-clusters (Rg = Xe, Kr, Ar, m≤10 2) are formed in the interior sites of the host cluster made of Ne or He. Specific electronically excited states, assigned to interface excitons are observed. Their absorption bands appear and shift towards lower energy when the cluster size m increases, according to the Frenkel exciton model. The characteristic bulk excitons appear in the spectra, only when the cluster radius exceeds the penetration depth of the interface exciton, which can be considerably larger than that in free Rgm clusters. This effect is sensitive to electron affinities of the guest and the host cluster.

  12. N2O reduction by the mu4-sulfide-bridged tetranuclear CuZ cluster active site.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Gorelsky, Serge I; Ghosh, Somdatta; Solomon, Edward I

    2004-08-13

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) reduction is a chemical challenge both in the selective oxidation of organic substrates by N2O and in the removal of N2O as a green-house gas. The reduction of N2O is thermodynamically favorable but kinetically inert, and requires activating transition-metal centers. In biological systems, N2O reduction is the last step in the denitrification process of the bacterial nitrogen cycle and is accomplished by the enzyme nitrous oxide reductase, whose active site consists of a micro4-sulfide-bridged tetranuclear CuZ cluster which has many unusual spectroscopic features. Recent studies have developed a detailed electronic-structure description of the resting CuZ cluster, determined its catalytically relevant state, and provided insight into the role of this tetranuclear copper cluster in N2O activation and reduction.

  13. Molecular dynamics explorations of active site structure in designed and evolved enzymes.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Sílvia; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Noey, Elizabeth L; Houk, K N

    2015-04-21

    This Account describes the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reveal how mutations alter the structure and organization of enzyme active sites. As proposed by Pauling about 70 years ago and elaborated by many others since then, biocatalysis is efficient when functional groups in the active site of an enzyme are in optimal positions for transition state stabilization. Changes in mechanism and covalent interactions are often critical parts of enzyme catalysis. We describe our explorations of the dynamical preorganization of active sites using MD, studying the fluctuations between active and inactive conformations normally concealed to static crystallography. MD shows how the various arrangements of active site residues influence the free energy of the transition state and relates the populations of the catalytic conformational ensemble to the enzyme activity. This Account is organized around three case studies from our laboratory. We first describe the importance of dynamics in evaluating a series of computationally designed and experimentally evolved enzymes for the Kemp elimination, a popular subject in the enzyme design field. We find that the dynamics of the active site is influenced not only by the original sequence design and subsequent mutations but also by the nature of the ligand present in the active site. In the second example, we show how microsecond MD has been used to uncover the role of remote mutations in the active site dynamics and catalysis of a transesterase, LovD. This enzyme was evolved by Tang at UCLA and Codexis, Inc., and is a useful commercial catalyst for the production of the drug simvastatin. X-ray analysis of inactive and active mutants did not reveal differences in the active sites, but relatively long time scale MD in solution showed that the active site of the wild-type enzyme preorganizes only upon binding of the acyl carrier protein (ACP) that delivers the natural acyl group to the active site. In the absence of bound ACP

  14. Spatial distribution of active sites on a ferroelectric PbTiO3 photocatalyst for photocatalytic hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Li, Rengui; Zhao, Yue; Li, Can

    2017-03-07

    The separation of photogenerated charge carries is a challenging issue in artificial photocatalyst systems for solar energy conversion. It has been reported that spatial charge separation can take place between different facets of semiconductor-based crystals with regular morphology and facets, which could be used to rationally deposit cocatalysts on the right facets. However, the spatial separation of photogenerated electrons and holes is still a big challenge for a particulate photocatalyst without regular morphology and specific facets. In this work, we demonstrated that photogenerated electrons and holes can be regularly separated on ferroelectric PbTiO3 photocatalyst even without regular morphology and facets. The reduction cocatalyst and oxidation cocatalyst could be selectively formed on different sites via an in situ photochemical deposition method. It is found that the photoactivity and hydrogen production for PbTiO3 with spatially separated dual-cocatalysts is remarkably enhanced to more than 100 times greater compared to native PbTiO3, which is much higher than that the case of dual-cocatalysts with a random distribution. The intrinsic electric fields and spontaneous electric polarization in the bulk of PbTiO3 are proposed to play important roles in the spatial distribution of active sites on irregular PbTiO3 particles. Our work emphasizes the essential roles of two important factors, efficient charge separation strategy and the location of dual-cocatalysts on the right sites, to construct integrated artificial photocatalyst systems for solar energy conversion.

  15. The anti-angiogenic agent fumagillin covalently modifies a conserved active-site histidine in the Escherichia coli methionine aminopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Lowther, W. Todd; McMillen, Debra A.; Orville, Allen M.; Matthews, Brian W.

    1998-01-01

    Methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP) exists in two forms (type I and type II), both of which remove the N-terminal methionine from proteins. It previously has been shown that the type II enzyme is the molecular target of fumagillin and ovalicin, two epoxide-containing natural products that inhibit angiogenesis and suppress tumor growth. By using mass spectrometry, N-terminal sequence analysis, and electronic absorption spectroscopy we show that fumagillin and ovalicin covalently modify a conserved histidine residue in the active site of the MetAP from Escherichia coli, a type I enzyme. Because all of the key active site residues are conserved, it is likely that a similar modification occurs in the type II enzymes. This modification, by occluding the active site, may prevent the action of MetAP on proteins or peptides involved in angiogenesis. In addition, the results suggest that these compounds may be effective pharmacological agents against pathogenic and resistant forms of E. coli and other microorganisms. PMID:9770455

  16. Correlated structural kinetics and retarded solvent dynamics at the metalloprotease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Moran; Born, Benjamin; Heyden, Matthias; Tworowski, Dmitry; Fields, Gregg B.; Sagi, Irit; Havenith, Martina

    2011-09-18

    Solvent dynamics can play a major role in enzyme activity, but obtaining an accurate, quantitative picture of solvent activity during catalysis is quite challenging. Here, we combine terahertz spectroscopy and X-ray absorption analyses to measure changes in the coupled water-protein motions during peptide hydrolysis by a zinc-dependent human metalloprotease. These changes were tightly correlated with rearrangements at the active site during the formation of productive enzyme-substrate intermediates and were different from those in an enzyme–inhibitor complex. Molecular dynamics simulations showed a steep gradient of fast-to-slow coupled protein-water motions around the protein, active site and substrate. Our results show that water retardation occurs before formation of the functional Michaelis complex. We propose that the observed gradient of coupled protein-water motions may assist enzyme-substrate interactions through water-polarizing mechanisms that are remotely mediated by the catalytic metal ion and the enzyme active site.

  17. Characterization of calcium-binding sites in the kidney stone inhibitor glycoprotein nephrocalcin with vanadyl ions: electron paramagnetic resonance and electron nuclear double resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Mustafi, D; Nakagawa, Y

    1994-01-01

    Nephrocalcin (NC) is a calcium-binding glycoprotein of 14,000 molecular weight. It inhibits the growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals in renal tubules. The NC used in this study was isolated from bovine kidney tissue and purified with the use of DEAE-cellulose chromatography into four isoforms, designated as fractions A-D. They differ primarily according to the content of phosphate and gamma-carboxy-glutamic acid. Fractions A and B are strong inhibitors of the growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal, whereas fractions C and D inhibit crystal growth weakly. Fraction A, with the highest Ca(2+)-binding affinity, was characterized with respect to its metal-binding sites by using the vanadyl ion (VO2+) as a paramagnetic probe in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopic studies. By EPR spectrometric titration, it was shown that fraction A of NC bound VO2+ with a stoichiometry of metal:protein binding of 4:1. Also, the binding of VO2+ to NC was shown to be competitive with Ca2+. Only protein residues were detected by proton ENDOR as ligands, and these ligands bound with complete exclusion of solvent from the inner coordination sphere of the metal ion. This type of metal-binding environment, as derived from VO(2+)-reconstituted NC, differs significantly from the binding sites in other Ca(2+)-binding proteins. PMID:7972057

  18. Two interacting binding sites for quinacrine derivatives in the active site of trypanothione reductase – a template for drug design

    PubMed Central

    Saravanamuthu, Ahilan; Vickers, Tim J.; Bond, Charles S.; Peterson, Mark R.; Hunter, William N.; Fairlamb, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Trypanothione reductase is a key enzyme in the trypanothione-based redox metabolism of pathogenic trypanosomes. Since this system is absent in humans, being replaced with glutathione and glutathione reductase, it offers a target for selective inhibition. The rational design of potent inhibitors requires accurate structures of enzyme-inhibitor complexes, but this is lacking for trypanothione reductase. We therefore used quinacrine mustard, an alkylating derivative of the competitive inhibitor quinacrine, to probe the active site of this dimeric flavoprotein. Quinacrine mustard irreversibly inactivates Trypanosoma cruzi trypanothione reductase, but not human glutathione reductase, in a time-dependent manner with a stoichiometry of two inhibitors bound per monomer. The rate of inactivation is dependent upon the oxidation state of trypanothione reductase, with the NADPH-reduced form being inactivated significantly faster than the oxidised form. Inactivation is slowed by clomipramine and a melarsen oxide-trypanothione adduct (both are competitive inhibitors) but accelerated by quinacrine. The structure of the trypanothione reductase-quinacrine mustard adduct was determined to 2.7 Å, revealing two molecules of inhibitor bound in the trypanothione-binding site. The acridine moieties interact with each other through π-stacking effects, and one acridine interacts in a similar fashion with a tryptophan residue. These interactions provide a molecular explanation for the differing effects of clomipramine and quinacrine on inactivation by quinacrine mustard. Synergism with quinacrine occurs as a result of these planar acridines being able to stack together in the active site cleft, thereby gaining an increased number of binding interactions, whereas antagonism occurs with non-planar molecules, such as clomipramine, where stacking is not possible. PMID:15102853

  19. The three Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85 isoforms have unique substrates and activities determined by non-active site regions.

    PubMed

    Backus, Keriann M; Dolan, Michael A; Barry, Conor S; Joe, Maju; McPhie, Peter; Boshoff, Helena I M; Lowary, Todd L; Davis, Benjamin G; Barry, Clifton E

    2014-09-05

    The three isoforms of antigen 85 (A, B, and C) are the most abundant secreted mycobacterial proteins and catalyze transesterification reactions that synthesize mycolated arabinogalactan, trehalose monomycolate (TMM), and trehalose dimycolate (TDM), important constituents of the outermost layer of the cellular envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These three enzymes are nearly identical at the active site and have therefore been postulated to exist to evade host immunity. Distal to the active site is a second putative carbohydrate-binding site of lower homology. Mutagenesis of the three isoforms at this second site affected both substrate selectivity and overall catalytic activity in vitro. Using synthetic and natural substrates, we show that these three enzymes exhibit unique selectivity; antigen 85A more efficiently mycolates TMM to form TDM, whereas C (and to a lesser extent B) has a higher rate of activity using free trehalose to form TMM. This difference in substrate selectivity extends to the hexasaccharide fragment of cell wall arabinan. Mutation of secondary site residues from the most active isoform (C) into those present in A or B partially interconverts this substrate selectivity. These experiments in combination with molecular dynamics simulations reveal that differences in the N-terminal helix α9, the adjacent Pro(216)-Phe(228) loop, and helix α5 are the likely cause of changes in activity and substrate selectivity. These differences explain the existence of three isoforms and will allow for future work in developing inhibitors.

  20. Electronic Resources for Youth Services: A Print Bibliography and Web Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amey, Larry; Segal, Erez

    1996-01-01

    This article evaluates 57 World Wide Web sites related to children's literature and youth-oriented library services, in categories including award-winning books; book reviews; reading and storytelling; writing resources; online children's literature; educational entertainment; and authors, publishers, and booksellers. Also included is information…

  1. Fragment-based identification of determinants of conformational and spectroscopic change at the ricin active site

    SciTech Connect

    Carra,J.; McHugh, C.; Mulligan, S.; Machiesky, L.; Soares, A.; Millard, C.

    2007-01-01

    We found that amide ligands can bind weakly but specifically to the ricin active site, producing significant shifts in positions of the critical active site residues Arg180 and Tyr80. These results indicate that fragment-based drug discovery methods are capable of identifying minimal bonding determinants of active-site side-chain rearrangements and the mechanistic origins of spectroscopic shifts. Our results suggest that tryptophan fluorescence provides a sensitive probe for the geometric relationship of arginine-tryptophan pairs, which often have significant roles in protein function. Using the unusual characteristics of the RTA system, we measured the still controversial thermodynamic changes of site-specific urea binding to a protein, results that are relevant to understanding the physical mechanisms of protein denaturation.

  2. The Electronic Behavior of Zinc-Finger Protein Binding Sites in the Context of the DNA Extended Ladder Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oiwa, Nestor; Cordeiro, Claudette; Heermann, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    Instead of ATCG letter alignments, typically used in bioinformatics, we propose a new alignment method using the probability distribution function of the bottom of the occupied molecular orbital (BOMO), highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied orbital (LUMO). We apply the technique to transcription factors with Cys2His2 zinc fingers. These transcription factors search for binding sites, probing for the electronic patterns at the minor and major DNA groves. The eukaryotic Cys2His2 zinc finger proteins bind to DNA ubiquitously at highly conserved domains. They are responsible for gene regulation and the spatial organization of DNA. To study and understand these zinc finger DNA-protein interactions, we use the extended ladder in the DNA model proposed by Zhu, Rasmussen, Balatsky & Bishop (2007) te{Zhu-2007}. Considering one single spinless electron in each nucleotide π-orbital along a double DNA chain (dDNA), we find a typical pattern for the bottom of BOMO, HOMO and LUMO along the binding sites. We specifically looked at two members of zinc finger protein family: specificity protein 1 (SP1) and early grown response 1 transcription factors (EGR1). When the valence band is filled, we find electrons in the purines along the nucleotide sequence, compatible with the electric charges of the binding amino acids in SP1 and EGR1 zinc finger.

  3. All the catalytic active sites of MoS2 for hydrogen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Du; Qiao, Qiao; Yu, Yifei; Peterson, David; Zafar, Abdullah; Kumar, Raj; Curtarolo, Stefano; Hunte, Frank; Shannon, Steve; Zhu, Yimei; Yang, Weitao; Cao, Linyou

    2016-11-29

    MoS2 presents a promising low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), but the understanding about its active sites has remained limited. Here we present an unambiguous study of the catalytic activities of all possible reaction sites of MoS2, including edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries. We demonstrate that, in addition to the well-known catalytically active edge sites, sulfur vacancies provide another major active site for the HER, while the catalytic activity of grain boundaries is much weaker. Here, the intrinsic turnover frequencies (Tafel slopes) of the edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries are estimated to be 7.5 s–1 (65–75 mV/dec), 3.2 s–1 (65–85 mV/dec), and 0.1 s–1 (120–160 mV/dec), respectively. We also demonstrate that the catalytic activity of sulfur vacancies strongly depends on the density of the vacancies and the local crystalline structure in proximity to the vacancies. Unlike edge sites, whose catalytic activity linearly depends on the length, sulfur vacancies show optimal catalytic activities when the vacancy density is in the range of 7–10%, and the number of sulfur vacancies in high crystalline quality MoS2 is higher than that in low crystalline quality MoS2, which may be related with the proximity of different local crystalline structures to the vacancies.

  4. The controlled relay of multiple protons required at the active site of nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Dance, Ian

    2012-07-07

    The enzyme nitrogenase, when reducing natural and unnatural substrates, requires large numbers of protons per chemical catalytic cycle. The active face of the catalytic site (the FeMo-cofactor, FeMo-co) is situated in a protein domain which is largely hydrophobic and anhydrous, and incapable of serial provision of multiple protons. Through detailed analysis of the high quality protein crystal structures available the characteristics of a chain of water molecules leading from the protein surface to a key sulfur atom (S3B) of FeMo-co are described. The first half of the water chain from the surface inwards is branched, slightly variable, and able to accommodate exogenous small molecules: this is dubbed the proton bay. The second half, from the proton bay to S3B, is comprised of a single chain of eight hydrogen bonded water molecules. This section is strictly conserved, and is intimately involved in hydrogen bonds with homocitrate, an essential component that chelates Mo. This is the proton wire, and a detailed Grotthuss mechanism for serial translocation of protons through this proton wire to S3B is proposed. This controlled serial proton relay from the protein surface to S3B is an essential component of the intramolecular hydrogenation paradigm for the complete chemical mechanisms of nitrogenase. Each proton reaching S3B, instigated by electron transfer to FeMo-co, becomes a hydrogen atom that migrates to other components of the active face of FeMo-co and to bound substrates and intermediates, allowing subsequent multiple proton transfers along the proton wire. Experiments to test the proposed mechanism of proton supply are suggested. The water chain in nitrogenase is comparable with the purported proton pumping pathway of cytochrome c oxidase.

  5. Head and rod 1 interactions in vimentin: identification of contact sites, structure, and changes with phosphorylation using site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Atya; Hess, John F; Budamagunta, Madhu S; FitzGerald, Paul G; Voss, John C

    2009-03-13

    We have used site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to identify residues 17 and 137 as sites of interaction between the head domain and rod domain 1A of the intermediate filament protein vimentin. This interaction was maximal when compared with the spin labels placed at up- and downstream positions in both head and rod regions, indicating that residues 17 and 137 were the closest point of interaction in this region. SDSL EPR characterization of residues 120-145, which includes the site of head contact with rod 1A, reveals that this region exhibits the heptad repeat pattern indicative of alpha-helical coiled-coil structure, but that this heptad repeat pattern begins to decay near residue 139, suggesting a transition out of coiled-coil structure. By monitoring the spectra of spin labels placed at the 17 and 137 residues during in vitro assembly, we show that 17-137 interaction occurs early in the assembly process. We also explored the effect of phosphorylation on the 17-137 interaction and found that phosphorylation-induced changes affected the head-head interaction (17-17) in the dimer, without significantly influencing the rod-rod (137-137) and head-rod (17-137) interactions in the dimer. These data provide the first direct evidence for, and location of, head-rod interactions in assembled intermediate filaments, as well as direct evidence of coiled-coil structure in rod 1A. Finally, the data identify changes in the structure in this region following in vitro phosphorylation.

  6. 12 CFR 7.5003 - Composite authority to engage in electronic activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Composite authority to engage in electronic activities. 7.5003 Section 7.5003 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Electronic Activities § 7.5003 Composite authority to engage...

  7. 12 CFR 7.5003 - Composite authority to engage in electronic activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Composite authority to engage in electronic activities. 7.5003 Section 7.5003 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Electronic Activities § 7.5003 Composite authority to engage...

  8. 12 CFR 7.5003 - Composite authority to engage in electronic activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Composite authority to engage in electronic activities. 7.5003 Section 7.5003 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Electronic Activities § 7.5003 Composite authority to engage...

  9. 12 CFR 7.5003 - Composite authority to engage in electronic activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Composite authority to engage in electronic activities. 7.5003 Section 7.5003 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Electronic Activities § 7.5003 Composite authority to engage...

  10. 12 CFR 7.5003 - Composite authority to engage in electronic activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Composite authority to engage in electronic activities. 7.5003 Section 7.5003 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Electronic Activities § 7.5003 Composite authority to engage...

  11. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  12. Effectiveness of Electronic Textbooks with Embedded Activities on Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Paula L.

    2010-01-01

    Current versions of electronic textbooks mimic the format and structure of printed textbooks; however, the electronic capabilities of these new versions of textbooks offer the potential of embedding interactive features of web-based learning within the context of a textbook. This dissertation research study was conducted to determine if student…

  13. Plant uptake and dissipation of PBDEs in the soils of electronic waste recycling sites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Honglin; Zhang, Shuzhen; Christie, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Plant uptake and dissipation of weathered PBDEs in the soils of e-waste recycling sites were investigated in a greenhouse study. Eighteen PBDE congeners (tri- through deca-) were detected in the plant tissues. The proportion of lower brominated PBDEs (mono- through hexa-) in plant roots was higher than that in the soils. A concentration gradient was observed of PBDEs in plants with the highest concentrations in the roots followed by the stems and lowest in the leaves. Reduction rates of the total PBDEs in the soils ranged from 13.3 to 21.7% after plant harvest and lower brominated PBDEs were associated with a higher tendency to dissipate than the higher brominated PBDEs. This study provides the first evidence for plant uptake of weathered PBDEs in the soils of e-waste recycling sites and planting contributes to the removal of PBDEs in e-waste contaminated soils.

  14. Structural analysis of peroxide-soaked MnSOD crystals reveals side-on binding of peroxide to active-site manganese.

    PubMed

    Porta, Jason; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Borgstahl, Gloria E O

    2010-06-11

    The superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes are important antioxidant agents that protect cells from reactive oxygen species. The SOD family is responsible for catalyzing the disproportionation of superoxide radical to oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. Manganese- and iron-containing SOD exhibit product inhibition whereas Cu/ZnSOD does not. Here, we report the crystal structure of Escherichia coli MnSOD with hydrogen peroxide cryotrapped in the active site. Crystallographic refinement to 1.55 A and close inspection revealed electron density for hydrogen peroxide in three of the four active sites in the asymmetric unit. The hydrogen peroxide molecules are in the position opposite His26 that is normally assumed by water in the trigonal bipyramidal resting state of the enzyme. Hydrogen peroxide is present in active sites B, C, and D and is side-on coordinated to the active-site manganese. In chains B and D, the peroxide is oriented in the plane formed by manganese and ligands Asp167 and His26. In chain C, the peroxide is bound, making a 70 degrees angle to the plane. Comparison of the peroxide-bound active site with the hydroxide-bound octahedral form shows a shifting of residue Tyr34 towards the active site when peroxide is bound. Comparison with peroxide-soaked Cu/ZnSOD indicates end-on binding of peroxide when the SOD does not exhibit inhibition by peroxide and side-on binding of peroxide in the product-inhibited state of MnSOD.

  15. Auger electron spectroscopy for the determination of sex and age related Ca/P ratio at different bone sites

    SciTech Connect

    Balatsoukas, Ioannis; Kourkoumelis, Nikolaos; Tzaphlidou, Margaret

    2010-10-15

    The Ca/P ratio of normal cortical and trabecular rat bone was measured by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Semiquantitative analysis was carried out using ratio techniques to draw conclusions on how age, sex and bone site affect the relative composition of calcium and phosphorus. Results show that Ca/P ratio is not sex dependent; quite the opposite, bone sites exhibit variations in elemental stoichiometry where femoral sections demonstrate higher Ca/P ratio than rear and front tibias. Age-related changes are more distinct for cortical bone in comparison with the trabecular bone. The latter's Ca/P ratio remains unaffected from all the parameters under study. This study confirms that AES is able to successfully quantify bone mineral main elements when certain critical points, related to the experimental conditions, are addressed effectively.

  16. Synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups on the hydrolysis of cellulose over activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, Guo Shiou; Sievers, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    The chemical oxidation of activated carbon by H2 O2 and H2 SO4 is investigated, structural and chemical modifications are characterized, and the materials are used as catalysts for the hydrolysis of cellulose. Treatment with H2 O2 enlarges the pore size and imparts functional groups such as phenols, lactones, and carboxylic acids. H2 SO4 treatment targets the edges of carbon sheets primarily, and this effect is more pronounced with a higher temperature. Adsorption isotherms demonstrate that the adsorption of oligomers on functionalized carbon is dominated by van der Waals forces. The materials treated chemically are active for the hydrolysis of cellulose despite the relative weakness of most of their acid sites. It is proposed that a synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups enhances the activity by inducing a conformational change in the glucan chains if they are adsorbed at defect sites. This activates the glycosidic bonds for hydrolysis by in-plane functional groups.

  17. 9-fluorenemethanol: an internal electron donor to fine tune olefin polymerization activity.

    PubMed

    Gnanakumar, Edwin S; Rao Chokkapu, Eswara; Kunjir, Shrikant; Ajithkumar, T G; Rajamohanan, P R; Chakraborty, Debashis; Gopinath, Chinnakonda S

    2014-06-28

    A new MgCl2 based molecular adduct has been synthesized with 9-fluorenemethanol (9FM) as a novel internal electron donor (IED), along with ethanol (EtOH) (MgCl2·n9FM·xEtOH). The above molecular adduct has been subjected to a variety of structural, spectroscopic and morphological characterization techniques. The results of the solid state (13)C CPMAS NMR technique suggests the coordination of 9FM to MgCl2. Observation of a low angle diffraction peak at 2θ = 5.7° (d = 15.5 Å) underscores the coordination of 9FM along the z-axis, and ethanol in the molecular adduct. Active Ziegler-Natta catalysts were prepared by two different synthesis methods; the conventional method to obtain a high surface area active catalyst, and other one with 9FM as an integral part of the active catalyst in order to study the influence of 9FM as an IED over the active sites. The active catalysts were also characterized thoroughly with different analytical tools. The XRD results show (003) facets of δ-MgCl2 (α-MgCl2) for the conventional (non-conventional) titanated catalyst. Results of the ethylene polymerization activity study reveals that the conventionally prepared highly porous active catalyst shows 1.7-2.5 times higher activity than the non-conventional prepared catalyst; however, the latter shows a low molecular weight distribution and confirms the role of the Lewis base as an IED.

  18. Enhancement of Polymerase Activity of the Large Fragment in DNA Polymerase I from Geobacillus stearothermophilus by Site-Directed Mutagenesis at the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Zhang, Beilei; Wang, Meng; Ou, Yanghui

    2016-01-01

    The large fragment of DNA polymerase I from Geobacillus stearothermophilus GIM1.543 (Bst DNA polymerase) with 5′-3′ DNA polymerase activity while in absence of 5′-3′ exonuclease activity possesses high thermal stability and polymerase activity. Bst DNA polymerase was employed in isothermal multiple self-matching initiated amplification (IMSA) which amplified the interest sequence with high selectivity and was widely applied in the rapid detection of human epidemic diseases. However, the detailed information of commercial Bst DNA polymerase is unpublished and well protected by patents, which makes the high price of commercial kits. In this study, wild-type Bst DNA polymerase (WT) and substitution mutations for improving the efficiency of DNA polymerization were expressed and purified in E. coli. Site-directed substitutions of four conserved residues (Gly310, Arg412, Lys416, and Asp540) in the activity site of Bst DNA polymerase influenced efficiency of polymerizing dNTPs. The substitution of residue Gly310 by alanine or leucine and residue Asp540 by glutamic acid increased the efficiency of polymerase activity. All mutants with higher polymerizing efficiency were employed to complete the rapid detection of EV71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) by IMSA approach with relatively shorter period which is suitable for the primary diagnostics setting in rural and underdeveloped areas. PMID:27981047

  19. Electronic couplings and on-site energies for hole transfer in DNA: Systematic quantum mechanical/molecular dynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2008-03-01

    The electron hole transfer (HT) properties of DNA are substantially affected by thermal fluctuations of the π stack structure. Depending on the mutual position of neighboring nucleobases, electronic coupling V may change by several orders of magnitude. In the present paper, we report the results of systematic QM/molecular dynamic (MD) calculations of the electronic couplings and on-site energies for the hole transfer. Based on 15ns MD trajectories for several DNA oligomers, we calculate the average coupling squares ⟨V2⟩ and the energies of basepair triplets XG +Y and XA +Y, where X, Y =G, A, T, and C. For each of the 32 systems, 15 000 conformations separated by 1ps are considered. The three-state generalized Mulliken-Hush method is used to derive electronic couplings for HT between neighboring basepairs. The adiabatic energies and dipole moment matrix elements are computed within the INDO/S method. We compare the rms values of V with the couplings estimated for the idealized B-DNA structure and show that in several important cases the couplings calculated for the idealized B-DNA structure are considerably underestimated. The rms values for intrastrand couplings G-G, A-A, G-A, and A-G are found to be similar, ˜0.07eV, while the interstrand couplings are quite different. The energies of hole states G+ and A+ in the stack depend on the nature of the neighboring pairs. The XG +Y are by 0.5eV more stable than XA +Y. The thermal fluctuations of the DNA structure facilitate the HT process from guanine to adenine. The tabulated couplings and on-site energies can be used as reference parameters in theoretical and computational studies of HT processes in DNA.

  20. Electronic couplings and on-site energies for hole transfer in DNA: systematic quantum mechanical/molecular dynamic study.

    PubMed

    Voityuk, Alexander A

    2008-03-21

    The electron hole transfer (HT) properties of DNA are substantially affected by thermal fluctuations of the pi stack structure. Depending on the mutual position of neighboring nucleobases, electronic coupling V may change by several orders of magnitude. In the present paper, we report the results of systematic QM/molecular dynamic (MD) calculations of the electronic couplings and on-site energies for the hole transfer. Based on 15 ns MD trajectories for several DNA oligomers, we calculate the average coupling squares V(2) and the energies of basepair triplets XG(+)Y and XA(+)Y, where X, Y=G, A, T, and C. For each of the 32 systems, 15,000 conformations separated by 1 ps are considered. The three-state generalized Mulliken-Hush method is used to derive electronic couplings for HT between neighboring basepairs. The adiabatic energies and dipole moment matrix elements are computed within the INDO/S method. We compare the rms values of V with the couplings estimated for the idealized B-DNA structure and show that in several important cases the couplings calculated for the idealized B-DNA structure are considerably underestimated. The rms values for intrastrand couplings G-G, A-A, G-A, and A-G are found to be similar, approximately 0.07 eV, while the interstrand couplings are quite different. The energies of hole states G(+) and A(+) in the stack depend on the nature of the neighboring pairs. The XG(+)Y are by 0.5 eV more stable than XA(+)Y. The thermal fluctuations of the DNA structure facilitate the HT process from guanine to adenine. The tabulated couplings and on-site energies can be used as reference parameters in theoretical and computational studies of HT processes in DNA.

  1. Electronic bypass of spinal lesions: activation of lower motor neurons directly driven by cortical neural signals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lower motor neurons in the spinal cord lose supraspinal inputs after complete spinal cord injury, leading to a loss of volitional control below the injury site. Extensive locomotor training with spinal cord stimulation can restore locomotion function after spinal cord injury in humans and animals. However, this locomotion is non-voluntary, meaning that subjects cannot control stimulation via their natural “intent”. A recent study demonstrated an advanced system that triggers a stimulator using forelimb stepping electromyographic patterns to restore quadrupedal walking in rats with spinal cord transection. However, this indirect source of “intent” may mean that other non-stepping forelimb activities may false-trigger the spinal stimulator and thus produce unwanted hindlimb movements. Methods We hypothesized that there are distinguishable neural activities in the primary motor cortex during treadmill walking, even after low-thoracic spinal transection in adult guinea pigs. We developed an electronic spinal bridge, called “Motolink”, which detects these neural patterns and triggers a “spinal” stimulator for hindlimb movement. This hardware can be head-mounted or carried in a backpack. Neural data were processed in real-time and transmitted to a computer for analysis by an embedded processor. Off-line neural spike analysis was conducted to calculate and preset the spike threshold for “Motolink” hardware. Results We identified correlated activities of primary motor cortex neurons during treadmill walking of guinea pigs with spinal cord transection. These neural activities were used to predict the kinematic states of the animals. The appropriate selection of spike threshold value enabled the “Motolink” system to detect the neural “intent” of walking, which triggered electrical stimulation of the spinal cord and induced stepping-like hindlimb movements. Conclusion We present a direct cortical “intent”-driven electronic spinal

  2. In silico analysis of Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase active site with toxic industrial dyes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nirmal K; Vindal, Vaibhav; Narayana, Siva Lakshmi; Ramakrishna, V; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan; Srinivas, M

    2012-05-01

    Laccases belong to multicopper oxidases, a widespread class of enzymes implicated in many oxidative functions in various industrial oxidative processes like production of fine chemicals to bioremediation of contaminated soil and water. In order to understand the mechanisms of substrate binding and interaction between substrates and Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase, a homology model was generated. The resulted model was further validated and used for docking studies with toxic industrial dyes- acid blue 74, reactive black 5 and reactive blue 19. Interactions of chemical mediators with the laccase was also examined. The docking analysis showed that the active site always cannot accommodate the dye molecules, due to constricted nature of the active site pocket and steric hindrance of the residues whereas mediators are relatively small and can easily be accommodated into the active site pocket, which, thereafter leads to the productive binding. The binding properties of these compounds along with identification of critical active site residues can be used for further site-directed mutagenesis experiments in order to identify their role in activity and substrate specificity, ultimately leading to improved mutants for degradation of these toxic compounds.

  3. Conformational Change in the Active Site of Streptococcal Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase Through Site-Directed Mutagenesis at Asp-115.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Yusuke; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (UGL) degrades unsaturated disaccharides generated from mammalian extracellular matrices, glycosaminoglycans, by polysaccharide lyases. Two Asp residues, Asp-115 and Asp-175 of Streptococcus agalactiae UGL (SagUGL), are completely conserved in other bacterial UGLs, one of which (Asp-175 of SagUGL) acts as a general acid and base catalyst. The other Asp (Asp-115 of SagUGL) also affects the enzyme activity, although its role in the enzyme reaction has not been well understood. Here, we show substitution of Asp-115 in SagUGL with Asn caused a conformational change in the active site. Tertiary structures of SagUGL mutants D115N and D115N/K370S with negligible enzyme activity were determined at 2.00 and 1.79 Å resolution, respectively, by X-ray crystallography. The side chain of Asn-115 is drastically shifted in both mutants owing to the interaction with several residues, including Asp-175, by formation of hydrogen bonds. This interaction between Asn-115 and Asp-175 probably prevents the mutants from triggering the enzyme reaction using Asp-175 as an acid catalyst.

  4. Substrate shuttling between active sites of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase is not required to generate coproporphyrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, John D.; Warby, Christy A.; Whitby, Frank G.; Kushner, James P.; Hill, Christopher P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase (URO-D; EC 4.1.1.37), the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is required for the production of heme, vitamin B12, siroheme, and chlorophyll precursors. URO-D catalyzes the sequential decarboxylation of the four acetate side chains on the pyrrole groups of uroporphyrinogen to produce coproporphyrinogen. URO-D is a stable homodimer with the active site clefts of the two subunits adjacent to each other. It has been hypothesized that the two catalytic centers interact functionally, perhaps by shuttling of reaction intermediates between subunits. We tested this hypothesis by construction of a single chain protein (scURO-D) in which the two subunits were connected by a flexible linker. The crystal structure of this protein was shown to be superimposible with wild-type activity and have comparable catalytic activity. Mutations that impaired one or the other of the two active sites of scURO-D resulted in approximately half of wild-type activity. The distribution of reaction intermediates was the same for mutant and wild-type sequences, and was unaltered in a competition experiment using the I and III isomer substrates. These observations indicate that communication between active sites is not required for enzyme function, and suggest that the dimeric structure of URO-D is required to achieve conformational stability and create a large active site cleft. PMID:19362562

  5. Substrate Shuttling Between Active Sites of Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase in Not Required to Generate Coproporphyrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.; Warby, C; Whitby, F; Kushner, J; Hill, C

    2009-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D; EC 4.1.1.37), the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is required for the production of heme, vitamin B12, siroheme, and chlorophyll precursors. URO-D catalyzes the sequential decarboxylation of four acetate side chains in the pyrrole groups of uroporphyrinogen to produce coproporphyrinogen. URO-D is a stable homodimer, with the active-site clefts of the two subunits adjacent to each other. It has been hypothesized that the two catalytic centers interact functionally, perhaps by shuttling of reaction intermediates between subunits. We tested this hypothesis by construction of a single-chain protein (single-chain URO-D) in which the two subunits were connected by a flexible linker. The crystal structure of this protein was shown to be superimposable with wild-type activity and to have comparable catalytic activity. Mutations that impaired one or the other of the two active sites of single-chain URO-D resulted in approximately half of wild-type activity. The distributions of reaction intermediates were the same for mutant and wild-type sequences and were unaltered in a competition experiment using I and III isomer substrates. These observations indicate that communication between active sites is not required for enzyme function and suggest that the dimeric structure of URO-D is required to achieve conformational stability and to create a large active-site cleft.

  6. Crystal structure of an avian influenza polymerase PA[subscript N] reveals an endonuclease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Puwei; Bartlam, Mark; Lou, Zhiyong; Chen, Shoudeng; Zhou, Jie; He, Xiaojing; Lv, Zongyang; Ge, Ruowen; Li, Xuemei; Deng, Tao; Fodor, Ervin; Rao, Zihe; Liu, Yingfang

    2009-11-10

    The heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase, containing the PA, PB1 and PB2 proteins, catalyses viral RNA replication and transcription in the nucleus of infected cells. PB1 holds the polymerase active site and reportedly harbours endonuclease activity, whereas PB2 is responsible for cap binding. The PA amino terminus is understood to be the major functional part of the PA protein and has been implicated in several roles, including endonuclease and protease activities as well as viral RNA/complementary RNA promoter binding. Here we report the 2.2 angstrom (A) crystal structure of the N-terminal 197 residues of PA, termed PA(N), from an avian influenza H5N1 virus. The PA(N) structure has an alpha/beta architecture and reveals a bound magnesium ion coordinated by a motif similar to the (P)DX(N)(D/E)XK motif characteristic of many endonucleases. Structural comparisons and mutagenesis analysis of the motif identified in PA(N) provide further evidence that PA(N) holds an endonuclease active site. Furthermore, functional analysis with in vivo ribonucleoprotein reconstitution and direct in vitro endonuclease assays strongly suggest that PA(N) holds the endonuclease active site and has critical roles in endonuclease activity of the influenza virus polymerase, rather than PB1. The high conservation of this endonuclease active site among influenza strains indicates that PA(N) is an important target for the design of new anti-influenza therapeutics.

  7. Transcriptional activation by LR1 at the Eµ enhancer and switch region sites

    PubMed Central

    Hanakahi, L. A.; Maizels, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    LR1 is a B cell-specific, sequence-specific duplex DNA binding activity which is induced in B cells carrying out class switch recombination. Here we identify several properties of LR1 which enable it to function in transcriptional regulation. We show that LR1 contributes to transcriptional activation by the Eµ immunoglobulin heavy chain intron enhancer by binding to a site within the enhancer core. We further show that LR1 bends DNA upon binding. In addition, we show that LR1 is itself a bona fide transcriptional activator, as multimerized LR1 sites produce an element which can enhance transcription from a minimal promoter. In order for class switch recombination to occur, an activating signal must be transmitted via the Eµ core, and both S regions targeted for recombination must be actively transcribed. The properties of LR1 that we have identified suggest distinct potential functions of LR1 duplex DNA binding activity in class switch recombination. First, LR1 may contribute to recombinational activation by the Eµ core. Second, there are multiple potential LR1 duplex binding sites in each of the G-rich switch regions, and LR1 bound at contiguous sites may enhance recombination by stimulating transcription of the S regions. PMID:10908319

  8. Regulation of Dpp activity by tissue-specific cleavage of an upstream site within the prodomain

    PubMed Central

    Sopory, Shailaja; Kwon, Sunjong; Wehrli, Marcel; Christian, Jan L.

    2010-01-01

    BMP4 is synthesized as an inactive precursor that is cleaved at two sites during maturation: initially at a site (S1) adjacent to the ligand domain, and then at an upstream site (S2) within the prodomain. Cleavage at the second site regulates the stability of mature BMP4 and this in turn influences its signaling intensity and range of action. The Drosophila ortholog of BMP4, Dpp, functions as a long- or short-range signaling molecule in the wing disc or embryonic midgut, respectively but mechanisms that differentially regulate its bioactivity in these tissues have not been explored. In the current studies we demonstrate, by dpp mutant rescue, that cleavage at the S2 site of proDpp is required for development of the wing and leg imaginal discs, whereas cleavage at the S1 site is sufficient to rescue Dpp function in the midgut. Both the S1 and S2 site of proDpp are cleaved in the wing disc, and S2-cleavage is essential to generate sufficient ligand to exceed the threshold for pMAD activation at both short- and long-range in most cells. By contrast, proDpp is cleaved at the S1 site alone in the embryonic mesoderm and this generates sufficient ligand to activate physiological target genes in neighboring cells. These studies provide the first biochemical and genetic evidence that that selective cleavage of the S2 site of proDPP provides a tissue-specific mechanism for regulating Dpp activity, and that differential cleavage can contribute to, but is not an absolute determinant of signaling range. PMID:20659445

  9. Multiple active site residues are important for photochemical efficiency in the light-activated enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR).

    PubMed

    Menon, Binuraj R K; Hardman, Samantha J O; Scrutton, Nigel S; Heyes, Derren J

    2016-08-01

    Protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) catalyzes the light-driven reduction of protochlorophyllide (Pchlide), an essential, regulatory step in chlorophyll biosynthesis. The unique requirement of the enzyme for light has provided the opportunity to investigate how light energy can be harnessed to power biological catalysis and enzyme dynamics. Excited state interactions between the Pchlide molecule and the protein are known to drive the subsequent reaction chemistry. However, the structural features of POR and active site residues that are important for photochemistry and catalysis are currently unknown, because there is no crystal structure for POR. Here, we have used static and time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of a number of active site variants to study the role of a number of residues, which are located in the proposed NADPH/Pchlide binding site based on previous homology models, in the reaction mechanism of POR. Our findings, which are interpreted in the context of a new improved structural model, have identified several residues that are predicted to interact with the coenzyme or substrate. Several of the POR variants have a profound effect on the photochemistry, suggesting that multiple residues are important in stabilizing the excited state required for catalysis. Our work offers insight into how the POR active site geometry is finely tuned by multiple active site residues to support enzyme-mediated photochemistry and reduction of Pchlide, both of which are crucial to the existence of life on Earth.

  10. On the non-thermal electron-to-proton ratio at cosmic ray acceleration sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, Lukas; Becker Tjus, Julia; Eichmann, Björn; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    The luminosity ratio of electrons to protons as it is produced in stochastic acceleration processes in cosmic ray sources is an important quantity relevant for several aspects of the modeling of the sources themselves. It is usually assumed to be around 1: 100 in the case of Galactic sources, while a value of 1: 10 is typically assumed when describing extragalactic sources. It is supported by observations that the average ratios should be close to these values. At this point, however, there is no possibility to investigate how each individual source behaves. When looking at the physics aspects, a 1: 100 ratio is well supported in theory when making the following assumptions: (1) the total number of electrons and protons that is accelerated are the same; (2) the spectral index of both populations after acceleration is αe =αp ≈ 2.2 . In this paper, we reinvestigate these assumptions. In particular, assumption (2) is not supported by observational data of the sources and PIC simulation yield different spectral indices as well. We present the detailed calculation of the electron-to-proton ratio, dropping the assumption of equal spectral indices. We distinguish between the ratio of luminosities and the ratio of the differential spectral behavior, which becomes necessary for cases where the spectral indices of the two particle populations are not the same. We discuss the possible range of values when allowing for different spectral indices concerning the spectral behavior of electrons and protons. Additionally, it is shown that the minimum energy of the accelerated population can have a large influence on the results. We find, in the case of the classical minimum energy of T0 , e =T0 , p = 10 keV, that when allowing for a difference in the spectral indices of up to 0.1 with absolute spectral indices varying between 2.0 < α < 2.3, the luminosity ratio varies between 0.008 < Kep < 0.12. The differential particle number ratio is in the range 0.008

  11. An Electromagnetic Interference Study of Potential Transmitter Sites for the HF Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-19

    heating . The measurements described in this report were conducted at a number of candidate HAARP transmitter sites in the vicinity of Fairbanks...employ the High Power Auroral Stimulation (HIPAS) RF heating facility [1], located in the Chena River valley area near Fairbanks. HAARP will be an...Potential Transmitter Sites for the HF Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) JOSEP11 A. GOLDSTEIN EDWARD 1. KENNEDY ADRIAN S. ELEY 4 IMICHlAEL A. RuPAR C

  12. Probing the catalytic mechanism of bovine CD38/NAD+ glycohydrolase by site directed mutagenesis of key active site residues.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Isabelle; Kellenberger, Esther; Cakir-Kiefer, Céline; Muller-Steffner, Hélène; Schuber, Francis

    2014-07-01

    Bovine CD38/NAD(+) glycohydrolase catalyzes the hydrolysis of NAD(+) to nicotinamide and ADP-ribose and the formation of cyclic ADP-ribose via a stepwise reaction mechanism. Our recent crystallographic study of its Michaelis complex and covalently-trapped intermediates provided insights into the modalities of substrate binding and the molecular mechanism of bCD38. The aim of the present work was to determine the precise role of key conserved active site residues (Trp118, Glu138, Asp147, Trp181 and Glu218) by focusing mainly on the cleavage of the nicotinamide-ribosyl bond. We analyzed the kinetic parameters of mutants of these residues which reside within the bCD38 subdomain in the vicinity of the scissile bond of bound NAD(+). To address the reaction mechanism we also performed chemical rescue experiments with neutral (methanol) and ionic (azide, formate) nucleophiles. The crucial role of Glu218, which orients the substrate for cleavage by interacting with the N-ribosyl 2'-OH group of NAD(+), was highlighted. This contribution to catalysis accounts for almost half of the reaction energy barrier. Other contributions can be ascribed notably to Glu138 and Asp147 via ground-state destabilization and desolvation in the vicinity of the scissile bond. Key interactions with Trp118 and Trp181 were also proven to stabilize the ribooxocarbenium ion-like transition state. Altogether we propose that, as an alternative to a covalent acylal reaction intermediate with Glu218, catalysis by bCD38 proceeds through the formation of a discrete and transient ribooxocarbenium intermediate which is stabilized within the active site mostly by electrostatic interactions.

  13. Electronic security systems and active implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Irnich, Werner

    2002-08-01

    How do active implantable medical devices react in the presence of strong magnetic fields in the frequency range between extremely low frequency (ELF) to radiofrequency (RF) as they are emitted by electronic security systems (ESS)? There are three different sorts of ESSs: electronic article surveillance (EAS) devices, metal detector (MDS) devices, and radiofrequency identification (RFID) systems. Common to all is the production of magnetic fields. There is an abundance of literature concerning interference by ESS gates with respect to if there is an influence possible and if such an influence can bear a risk for the AIMD wearers. However, there has been no attempt to study the physical mechanism nor to develop a model of how and under which conditions magnetic fields can influence pacemakers and defibrillators and how they could be disarmed by technological means. It is too often assumed that interference of AIMD with ESS is inevitable. Exogenous signals of similar intensity and rhythm to heart signals can be misinterpreted and, thus, confuse the implant. Important for the interference coupling mechanism is the differentiation between a "unipolar" and a "bipolar" system. With respect to magnetic fields, the left side implanted pacemaker is the most unfavorable case as the lead forms approximately a semicircular area of maximum 225 cm2 into which a voltage can be induced. This assumption yields an interference coupling model that can be expressed by simple mathematics. The worst-case conditions for induced interference voltages are a coupling area of 225 cm2 that is representative for a large human, a homogeneous magnetic field perpendicular to the area formed by the lead, and a unipolar ventricular pacemaker system that is implanted on the left side of the thorax and has the highest interference sensitivity. In bipolar systems the fields must be 17 times larger when compared to a unipolar system to have the same effect. The magnetic field for interfering with ICDs

  14. 76 FR 56503 - Agency Information Collection Activity (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Under OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activity (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Under OMB... INFORMATION: Title: VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records, VA Form 10- 0400. OMB Control Number: 2900... recorded in VHA electronic health records system. An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is......

  15. Probing and comparing electron doping and miss-site effects in Re-based double perovskites.

    PubMed

    Blasco, J; Sesé, J; Rodríguez-Velamazán, J A; Ritter, C; Herrero-Martín, J

    2009-05-27

    We have studied the Sr(2-x)La(x)Fe(1+x/2)Re(1-x/2)O(6) series in order to check how the increase in the number of Fe-O-Fe superexchange interactions affects the magnetic properties of this family of double perovskites. In these compounds the addition of La(3+) can be compensated by an increase of the Fe(3+) ratio leading to a non-electron-doped system. The unit cell of these samples expands on replacing Sr by La and the cationic ordering disappears for x>1 samples. Spontaneous magnetization at 5 K is observed in a wide range of concentrations but the magnetization at 5 T decreases as the La content increases. This result may be explained in terms of a ferrimagnetic ground state of the double perovskite. The magnetic ordering temperature increases with increasing the La and Fe content in agreement with an increase in the number of Fe-O-Fe interactions. The comparison to the electron-doped samples suggests that this effect is not enough to explain on its own the stronger T(C)-rise in Sr(2-x)La(x)FeReO(6) compounds.

  16. Active Site Loop Dynamics of a Class IIa Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pegan, Scott D.; Rukseree, Kamolchanok; Capodagli, Glenn C.; Baker, Erica A.; Krasnykh, Olga; Franzblau, Scott G.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2013-01-08

    The class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs, EC 4.1.2.13) comprises one of two families of aldolases. Instead of forming a Schiff base intermediate using an ε-amino group of a lysine side chain, class II FBAs utilize Zn(II) to stabilize a proposed hydroxyenolate intermediate (HEI) in the reversible cleavage of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, forming glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP). As class II FBAs have been shown to be essential in pathogenic bacteria, focus has been placed on these enzymes as potential antibacterial targets. Although structural studies of class II FBAs from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtFBA), other bacteria, and protozoa have been reported, the structure of the active site loop responsible for catalyzing the protonation–deprotonation steps of the reaction for class II FBAs has not yet been observed. We therefore utilized the potent class II FBA inhibitor phosphoglycolohydroxamate (PGH) as a mimic of the HEI- and DHAP-bound form of the enzyme and determined the X-ray structure of the MtFBA–PGH complex to 1.58 Å. Remarkably, we are able to observe well-defined electron density for the previously elusive active site loop of MtFBA trapped in a catalytically competent orientation. Utilization of this structural information and site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic studies conducted on a series of residues within the active site loop revealed that E169 facilitates a water-mediated deprotonation–protonation step of the MtFBA reaction mechanism. Furthermore, solvent isotope effects on MtFBA and catalytically relevant mutants were used to probe the effect of loop flexibility on catalytic efficiency. Additionally, we also reveal the structure of MtFBA in its holoenzyme form.

  17. Correlation between Electron Transport and Shear Alfven Activity in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stutman, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Tritz, K.; Gorelenkov, N.; Fredrickson, E.; Kaye, S.; Mazzucato, E.

    2009-03-20

    We report the observation of a correlation between shear Alfven eigenmode activity and electron transport in plasma regimes where the electron temperature gradient is flat, and thus the drive for temperature gradient microinstabilities is absent. Plasmas having rapid central electron transport show intense, broadband global Alfven eigenmode (GAE) activity in the 0.5-1.1 MHz range, while plasmas with low transport are essentially GAE-free. The first theoretical assessment of a GAE-electron transport connection indicates that overlapping modes can resonantly couple to the bulk thermal electrons and induce their stochastic diffusion.

  18. Evolution of anatase surface active sites probed by in situ sum-frequency phonon spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yue; Chen, Shiyou; Li, Yadong; Gao, Yi; Yang, Deheng; Shen, Yuen Ron; Liu, Wei-Tao

    2016-09-01

    Surface active sites of crystals often govern their relevant surface chemistry, yet to monitor them in situ in real atmosphere remains a challenge. Using surface-specific sum-frequency spectroscopy, we identified the surface phonon mode associated with the active sites of undercoordinated titanium ions and conjoint oxygen vacancies, and used it to monitor them on anatase (TiO2) (101) under ambient conditions. In conjunction with theory, we determined related surface structure around the active sites and tracked the evolution of oxygen vacancies under ultraviolet irradiation. We further found that unlike in vacuum, the surface oxygen vacancies, which dominate the surface reactivity, are strongly regulated by ambient gas molecules, including methanol and water, as well as weakly associated species, such as nitrogen and hydrogen. The result revealed a rich interplay between prevailing ambient species and surface reactivity, which can be omnipresent in environmental and catalytic applications of titanium dioxides.

  19. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  20. Kinetics of nucleotide entry into RNA polymerase active site provides mechanism for efficiency and fidelity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Sexton, Rachel E; Feig, Michael

    2017-04-01

    During transcription, RNA polymerase II elongates RNA by adding nucleotide triphosphates (NTPs) complementary to a DNA template. Structural studies have suggested that NTPs enter and exit the active site via the narrow secondary pore but details have remained unclear. A kinetic model is presented that integrates molecular dynamics simulations with experimental data. Previous simulations of trigger loop dynamics and the dynamics of matched and mismatched NTPs in and near the active site were combined with new simulations describing NTP exit from the active site via the secondary pore. Markov state analysis was applied to identify major states and estimate kinetic rates for transitions between those states. The kinetic model predicts elongation and misincorporation rates in close agreement with experiment and provides mechanistic hypotheses for how NTP entry and exit via the secondary pore is feasible and a key feature for achieving high elongation and low misincorporation rates during RNA elongation.

  1. Evolution of anatase surface active sites probed by in situ sum-frequency phonon spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Chen, Shiyou; Li, Yadong; Gao, Yi; Yang, Deheng; Shen, Yuen Ron; Liu, Wei-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Surface active sites of crystals often govern their relevant surface chemistry, yet to monitor them in situ in real atmosphere remains a challenge. Using surface-specific sum-frequency spectroscopy, we identified the surface phonon mode associated with the active sites of undercoordinated titanium ions and conjoint oxygen vacancies, and used it to monitor them on anatase (TiO2) (101) under ambient conditions. In conjunction with theory, we determined related surface structure around the active sites and tracked the evolution of oxygen vacancies under ultraviolet irradiation. We further found that unlike in vacuum, the surface oxygen vacancies, which dominate the surface reactivity, are strongly regulated by ambient gas molecules, including methanol and water, as well as weakly associated species, such as nitrogen and hydrogen. The result revealed a rich interplay between prevailing ambient species and surface reactivity, which can be omnipresent in environmental and catalytic applications of titanium dioxides. PMID:27704049

  2. Gamma exposure rates due to neutron activation of soil: site of Hood detonation, Operation Plumbbob

    SciTech Connect

    Auxier, J.A.; Ohnesorge, W.F.

    1980-06-01

    This paper is the result of some recent discussions of exposure rates within the first few hours of the Hood detonation of the Plumbbob series due to neutron activation of soil. We estimated the exposure rates from 1/2 to 3 h after the detonation from ground zero to 1000 yards from ground zero. The area was assumed to be uncontaminated by fallout. Soil samples from the area of the Nevada Test Site at which the Hood device was detonated were sent to ORNL by Dr. John Malik of Los Alamos and by Mr. Gordon Jacks of the Nevada Test Site. These samples were irradiated at the DOSAR facility and the resulting activity analyzed. Calculations of exposure rates were then made based on the analyzed activity and the measured thermal neutron fluences at DOSAR and at the Hood Site.

  3. Systematic mutagenesis of the active site omega loop of TEM-1 beta-lactamase.

    PubMed Central

    Petrosino, J F; Palzkill, T

    1996-01-01

    Beta-Lactamase is a bacterial protein that provides resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. TEM-1 beta-lactamase is the most prevalent plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase in gram-negative bacteria. Normally, this enzyme has high levels of hydrolytic activity for penicillins, but mutant beta-lactamases have evolved with activity toward a variety of beta-lactam antibiotics. It has been shown that active site substitutions are responsible for changes in the substrate specificity. Since mutant beta-lactamases pose a serious threat to antimicrobial therapy, the mechanisms by which mutations can alter the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase are of interest. Previously, screens of random libraries encompassing 31 of 55 active site amino acid positions enabled the identification of the residues responsible for maintaining the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase. In addition to substitutions found in clinical isolates, many other specificity-altering mutations were also identified. Interestingly, many nonspecific substitutions in the N-terminal half of the active site omega loop were found to increase ceftazidime hydrolytic activity and decrease ampicillin hydrolytic activity. To complete the active sight study, eight additional random libraries were constructed and screened for specificity-altering mutations. All additional substitutions found to alter the substrate specificity were located in the C-terminal half of the active site loop. These mutants, much like the N-terminal omega loop mutants, appear to be less stable than the wild-type enzyme. Further analysis of a 165-YYG-167 triple mutant, selected for high levels of ceftazidime hydrolytic activity, provides an example of the correlation which exists between enzyme instability and increased ceftazidime hydrolytic activity in the ceftazidime-selected omega loop mutants. PMID:8606154

  4. Improving the neutral phytase activity from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Wang, Zupeng; Yan, Xiuhua

    2015-03-01

    Neutral phytase is used as a feed additive for degradation of anti-nutritional phytate in aquatic feed industry. Site-directed mutagenesis of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 phytase was performed with an aim to increase its activity. Mutation residues were chosen based on multiple sequence alignments and structure analysis of neutral phytsaes from different microorganisms. The mutation sites on surface (D148E, S197E and N156E) and around the active site (D52E) of phytase were selected. Analysis of the phytase variants showed that the specific activities of mutants D148E and S197E remarkably increased by about 35 and 13% over a temperature range of 40-75 °C at pH 7.0, respectively. The k cat of mutants D148E and S197E were 1.50 and 1.25 times than that of the wild-type phytase, respectively. Both D148E and S197E showed much higher thermostability than that of the wild-type phytase. However, mutants N156E and D52E led to significant loss of specific activity of the enzyme. Structural analysis revealed that these mutations may affect conformation of the active site of phytase. The present mutant phytases D148E and S197E with increased activities and thermostabilities have application potential as additives in aquaculture feed.

  5. A mutational analysis of the active site of human type II inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Futer, Olga; Sintchak, Michael D; Caron, Paul R; Nimmesgern, Elmar; DeCenzo, Maureen T; Livingston, David J; Raybuck, Scott A

    2002-01-31

    The oxidation of IMP to XMP is the rate-limiting step in the de novo synthesis of guanine ribonucleotides. This NAD-dependent reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). Based upon the recent structural determination of IMPDH complexed to oxidized IMP (XMP*) and the potent uncompetitive inhibitor mycophenolic acid (MPA), we have selected active site residues and prepared mutants of human type II IMPDH. The catalytic parameters of these mutants were determined. Mutations G326A, D364A, and the active site nucleophile C331A all abolish enzyme activity to less than 0.1% of wild type. These residues line the IMP binding pocket and are necessary for correct positioning of the substrate, Asp364 serving to anchor the ribose ring of the nucleotide. In the MPA/NAD binding site, significant loss of activity was seen by mutation of any residue of the triad Arg322, Asn303, Asp274 which form a hydrogen bonding network lining one side of this pocket. From a model of NAD bound to the active site consistent with the mutational data, we propose that these resides are important in binding the ribose ring of the nicotinamide substrate. Additionally, mutations in the pair Thr333, Gln441, which lies close to the xanthine ring, cause a significant drop in the catalytic activity of IMPDH. It is proposed that these residues serve to deliver the catalytic water molecule required for hydrolysis of the cysteine-bound XMP* intermediate formed after oxidation by NAD.

  6. Two active-electron classical trajectory Monte Carlo methods for ion-He collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, F.; Errea, L. F.; Pons, B.

    2009-10-15

    We introduce two active-electron classical trajectory Monte Carlo models for ion-He collisions, in which the electron-electron force is smoothed using a Gaussian kernel approximation for the pointwise classical particles. A first model uses independent pairs of Gaussian electrons, while a second one employs time-dependent mean-field theory to define an averaged electron-electron repulsion force. These models are implemented for prototypical p+He collisions and the results are compared to available experimental and theoretical data.

  7. Iron Acyl Thiolato Carbonyls: Structural Models for the Active Site of the [Fe]-Hydrogenase (Hmd)

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Aaron M.; Salomone-Stagni, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Phosphine-modified thioester derivatives are shown to serve as efficient precursors to phosphine-stabilized ferrous acyl thiolato carbonyls via the reaction of phosphine thioesters and sources of Fe(0). The reaction generates both Fe(SPh)(Ph2PC6H4CO)(CO)3 (1) and the diferrous diacyl Fe2(SPh)2(CO)3(Ph2PC6H4CO)2, which carbonylates to give 1. For the extremely bulky arylthioester Ph2PC6H4C(O)SC6H4-2,6-(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)2, oxidative addition is arrested and the Fe(0) adduct of the phosphine is obtained. Complex 1 reacts with cyanide to give Et4N[Fe(SPh)(Ph2PC6H4CO)(CN)(CO)2] (Et4N[2]). 13C and 31P NMR spectra indicate that substitution is stereospecific and cis to P. The IR spectrum of [2]− in CH2Cl2 solution very closely matches that for HmdCN. XANES and EXAFS measurements also indicate close structural and electronic similarity of Et4N[2] to the active site of wild-type Hmd. Complex 1 also stereospecifically forms a derivative with TsCH2NC, but the adduct is more labile than Et4N[2]. Tricarbonyl 1 was found to reversibly protonate to give a thermally labile derivative, IR measurements of which indicate that the acyl and thiolate ligands are probably not protonated in Hmd. PMID:21062066

  8. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzner, R.E.; Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  9. Testing the applicability of rapid on-site enzymatic activity detection for surface water monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Philipp; Vogl, Wolfgang; Juri, Koschelnik; Markus, Epp; Maximilian, Lackner; Markus, Oismüller; Monika, Kumpan; Peter, Strauss; Regina, Sommer; Gabriela, Ryzinska-Paier; Farnleitner Andreas, H.; Matthias, Zessner

    2015-04-01

    On-site detection of enzymatic activities has been suggested as a rapid surrogate for microbiological pollution monitoring of water resources (e.g. using glucuronidases, galactosidases, esterases). Due to the possible short measuring intervals enzymatic methods have high potential as near-real time water quality monitoring tools. This presentation describes results from a long termed field test. For twelve months, two ColiMinder devices (Vienna Water Monitoring, Austria) for on-site determination of enzymatic activity were tested for stream water monitoring at the experimental catchment HOAL (Hydrological Open Air Laboratory, Center for Water Resource Systems, Vienna University of Technology). The devices were overall able to follow and reflect the diverse hydrological and microbiological conditions of the monitored stream during the test period. Continuous data in high temporal resolution captured the course of enzymatic activity in stream water during diverse rainfall events. The method also proofed sensitive enough to determine diurnal fluctuations of enzymatic activity in stream water during dry periods. The method was able to capture a seasonal trend of enzymatic activity in stream water that matches the results gained from Colilert18 analysis for E. coli and coliform bacteria of monthly grab samples. Furthermore the comparison of ColiMinder data with measurements gained at the same test site with devices using the same method but having different construction design (BACTcontrol, microLAN) showed consistent measuring results. Comparative analysis showed significant differences between measured enzymatic activity (modified fishman units and pmol/min/100ml) and cultivation based analyses (most probable number, colony forming unit). Methods of enzymatic activity measures are capable to detect ideally the enzymatic activity caused by all active target bacteria members, including VBNC (viable but nonculturable) while cultivation based methods cannot detect VBNC

  10. Structural Analysis of the Active Site Geometry of N[superscript 5]-Carboxyaminoimidazole Ribonucleotide Synthetase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Thoden, James B.; Holden, Hazel M.; Firestine, Steven M.

    2009-09-11

    N{sub 5}-Carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase (N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase) converts 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR), MgATP, and bicarbonate into N{sub 5}-CAIR, MgADP, and P{sub i}. The enzyme is required for de novo purine biosynthesis in microbes yet is not found in humans suggesting that it represents an ideal and unexplored target for antimicrobial drug design. Here we report the X-ray structures of N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase from Escherichia coli with either MgATP or MgADP/P{sub i} bound in the active site cleft. These structures, determined to 1.6-{angstrom} resolution, provide detailed information regarding the active site geometry before and after ATP hydrolysis. In both structures, two magnesium ions are observed. Each of these is octahedrally coordinated, and the carboxylate side chain of Glu238 bridges them. For the structure of the MgADP/P{sub i} complex, crystals were grown in the presence of AIR and MgATP. No electron density was observed for AIR, and the electron density corresponding to the nucleotide clearly revealed the presence of ADP and P{sub i} rather than ATP. The bound P{sub i} shifts by approximately 3 {angstrom} relative to the {gamma}-phosphoryl group of ATP and forms electrostatic interactions with the side chains of Arg242 and His244. Since the reaction mechanism of N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase is believed to proceed via a carboxyphosphate intermediate, we propose that the location of the inorganic phosphate represents the binding site for stabilization of this reactive species. Using the information derived from the two structures reported here, coupled with molecular modeling, we propose a catalytic mechanism for N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase.

  11. A Variable Active Site Residue Influences the Kinetics of Response Regulator Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Immormino, Robert M; Silversmith, Ruth E; Bourret, Robert B

    2016-10-04

    Two-component regulatory systems, minimally composed of a sensor kinase and a response regulator protein, are common mediators of signal transduction in microorganisms. All response regulators contain a receiver domain with conserved active site residues that catalyze the signal activating and deactivating phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions. We explored the impact of variable active site position T+1 (one residue C-terminal to the conserved Thr/Ser) on reaction kinetics and signaling fidelity, using wild type and mutant Escherichia coli CheY, CheB, and NarL to represent the three major sequence classes observed across response regulators: Ala/Gly, Ser/Thr, and Val/Ile/Met, respectively, at T+1. Biochemical and structural data together suggested that different amino acids at T+1 impacted reaction kinetics by altering access to the active site while not perturbing overall protein structure. A given amino acid at position T+1 had similar effects on autodephosphorylation in each protein background tested, likely by modulating access of the attacking water molecule to the active site. Similarly, rate constants for CheY autophosphorylation with three different small molecule phosphodonors were consistent with the steric constraints on access to the phosphorylation site arising from combination of specific phosphodonors with particular amino acids at T+1. Because other variable active site residues also influence response regulator phosphorylation biochemistry, we began to explore how context (here, the amino acid at T+2) affected the influence of position T+1 on CheY autocatalytic reactions. Finally, position T+1 affected the fidelity and kinetics of phosphotransfer between sensor kinases and response regulators but was not a primary determinant of their interaction.

  12. The active site of low-temperature methane hydroxylation in iron-containing zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Benjamin E. R.; Vanelderen, Pieter; Bols, Max L.; Hallaert, Simon D.; Böttger, Lars H.; Ungur, Liviu; Pierloot, Kristine; Schoonheydt, Robert A.; Sels, Bert F.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2016-08-01

    An efficient catalytic process for converting methane into methanol could have far-reaching economic implications. Iron-containing zeolites (microporous aluminosilicate minerals) are noteworthy in this regard, having an outstanding ability to hydroxylate methane rapidly at room temperature to form methanol. Reactivity occurs at an extra-lattice active site called α-Fe(II), which is activated by nitrous oxide to form the reactive intermediate α-O; however, despite nearly three decades of research, the nature of the active site and the factors determining its exceptional reactivity are unclear. The main difficulty is that the reactive species—α-Fe(II) and α-O—are challenging to probe spectroscopically: data from bulk techniques such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility are complicated by contributions from inactive ‘spectator’ iron. Here we show that a site-selective spectroscopic method regularly used in bioinorganic chemistry can overcome this problem. Magnetic circular dichroism reveals α-Fe(II) to be a mononuclear, high-spin, square planar Fe(II) site, while the reactive intermediate, α-O, is a mononuclear, high-spin Fe(IV)=O species, whose exceptional reactivity derives from a constrained coordination geometry enforced by the zeolite lattice. These findings illustrate the value of our approach to exploring active sites in heterogeneous systems. The results also suggest that using matrix constraints to activate metal sites for function—producing what is known in the context of metalloenzymes as an ‘entatic’ state—might be a useful way to tune the activity of heterogeneous catalysts.

  13. Applications of the Electronic Cone Penetration Test for the Geotechnical Site Investigation of Florida Soils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-30

    SITE + + + ALFa X X X ALFb ** FMYER OOO C1 SCNOO 0 0 0 SGAR AA A SGARb # SGARc Figure 3-2. Cone Resistance Data for Local Variability Study ~ 300 0...Garage ( SGAR ) CO06A CO06B 1.4 West Palm Beach (WPBa) C015A C015C 8.4 West Palm Beach (WPBb) C015B C015C 11.2 West Palm Beach (WPBc) C017B CO17A 7.9... SGAR # # WPBa YYY WPBb ZZZ WPBc Figure 6-1. Cone Resistance Data for Size Comparability Study 600 CU -500- 5 400 V 300 #~Z Z z 200 Z Z Y Z 0- CD

  14. Heparin binding sites on Ross River virus revealed by electron cryo-microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Wei; Heil, Marintha; Kuhn, Richard J.; Baker, Timothy S. . E-mail: tsb@chem.ucsd.edu

    2005-02-20

    Cell surface glycosaminoglycans play important roles in cell adhesion and viral entry. Laboratory strains of two alphaviruses, Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus, have been shown to utilize heparan sulfate as an attachment receptor, whereas Ross River virus (RRV) does not significantly interact with it. However, a single amino acid substitution at residue 218 in the RRV E2 glycoprotein adapts the virus to heparan sulfate binding and expands the host range of the virus into chicken embryo fibroblasts. Structures of the RRV mutant, E2 N218R, and its complex with heparin were determined through the use of electron cryo-microscopy and image reconstruction methods. Heparin was found to bind at the distal end of the RRV spikes, in a region of the E2 glycoprotein that has been previously implicated in cell-receptor recognition and antibody binding.

  15. Dynamics of the Active Sites of Dimeric Seryl tRNA Synthetase from Methanopyrus kandleri.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Saheb; Nandi, Nilashis

    2015-08-27

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) carry out the first step of protein biosynthesis. Several aaRSs are multimeric, and coordination between the dynamics of active sites present in each monomer is a prerequisite for the fast and accurate aminoacylation. However, important lacunae of understanding exist concerning the conformational dynamics of multimeric aaRSs. Questions remained unanswered pertaining to the dynamics of the active site. Little is known concerning the conformational dynamics of the active sites in response to the substrate binding, reorganization of the catalytic residues around reactants, time-dependent changes at the reaction center, which are essential for facilitating the nucleophilic attack, and interactions at the interface of neighboring monomers. In the present work, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of dimeric (mk)SerRS from Methanopyrus kandleri bound with tRNA using an explicit solvent system. Two dimeric states of seryl tRNA synthetase (open, substrate bound, and adenylate bound) and two monomeric states (open and substrate bound) are simulated with bound tRNA. The aim is to understand the conformational dynamics of (mk)SerRS during its reaction cycle. While the present results provide a clear dynamical perspective of the active sites of (mk)SerRS, they corroborate with the results from the time-averaged experimental data such as crystallographic and mutation analysis of methanogenic SerRS from M. kandleri and M. barkeri. It is observed from the present simulation that the motif 2 loop gates the active site and its Glu351 and Arg360 stabilizes ATP in a bent state favorable for nucleophilic attack. The flexibility of the walls of the active site gradually reduces near reaction center, which is a more organized region compared to the lid region. The motif 2 loop anchors Ser and ATP using Arg349 in a hydrogen bonded geometry crucial for nucleophilic attack and favorably influences the electrostatic potential at the

  16. Counting Active Sites on Titanium Oxide-Silica Catalysts for Hydrogen Peroxide Activation through In Situ Poisoning with Phenylphosphonic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, Todd R.; Boston, Andrew M.; Thompson, Anthony B.; Gray, Kimberly A.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2015-06-04

    Quantifying specific active sites in supported catalysts improves our understanding and assists in rational design. Supported oxides can undergo significant structural changes as surface densities increase from site-isolated cations to monolayers and crystallites, which changes the number of kinetically relevant sites. Herein, TiOx domains are titrated on TiOx–SiO2 selectively with phenylphosphonic acid (PPA). An ex situ method quantifies all fluid-accessible TiOx, whereas an in situ titration during cis-cyclooctene epoxidation provides previously unavailable values for the number of tetrahedral Ti sites on which H2O2 activation occurs. We use this method to determine the active site densities of 22 different catalysts with different synthesis methods, loadings, and characteristic spectra and find a single intrinsic turnover frequency for cis-cyclooctene epoxidation of (40±7) h-1. This simple method gives molecular-level insight into catalyst structure that is otherwise hidden when bulk techniques are used.

  17. New active site oriented glyoxyl-agarose derivatives of Escherichia coli penicillin G acylase

    PubMed Central

    Cecchini, Davide A; Serra, Immacolata; Ubiali, Daniela; Terreni, Marco; Albertini, Alessandra M

    2007-01-01

    Background Immobilized Penicillin G Acylase (PGA) derivatives are biocatalysts that are industrially used for the hydrolysis of Penicillin G by fermentation and for the kinetically controlled synthesis of semi-synthetic β-lactam antibiotics. One of the most used supports for immobilization is glyoxyl-activated agarose, which binds the protein by reacting through its superficial Lys residues. Since in E. coli PGA Lys are also present near the active site, an immobilization that occurs through these residues may negatively affect the performance of the biocatalyst due to the difficult diffusion of the substrate into the active site. A preferential orientation of the enzyme with the active site far from the support surface would be desirable to avoid this problem. Results Here we report how it is possible to induce a preferential orientation of the protein during the binding process on aldehyde activated supports. A superficial region of PGA, which is located on the opposite side of the active site, is enriched in its Lys content. The binding of the enzyme onto the support is consequently forced through the Lys rich region, thus leaving the active site fully accessible to the substrate. Different mutants with an increasing number of Lys have been designed and, when active, immobilized onto glyoxyl agarose. The synthetic performances of these new catalysts were compared with those of the immobilized wild-type (wt) PGA. Our results show that, while the synthetic performance of the wt PGA sensitively decreases after immobilization, the Lys enriched mutants have similar performances to the free enzyme even after immobilization. We also report the observations made with other mutants which were unable to undergo a successful maturation process for the production of active enzymes or which resulted toxic for the host cell. Conclusion The desired orientation of immobilized PGA with the active site freely accessible can be obtained by increasing the density of Lys residues

  18. Reactive oxygen species alteration of immune cells in local residents at an electronic waste recycling site in northern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Yang, Qiaoyun; Qiu, Xinghua; Li, Keqiu; Li, Guang; Zhu, Ping; Zhu, Tong

    2013-04-02

    The health effects of exposure to pollutants from electronic waste (e-waste) pose an important issue. In this study, we explored the association between oxidative stress and blood levels of e-waste-related pollutants. Blood samples were collected from individuals living in the proximity of an e-waste recycling site located in northern China, and pollutants, as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS), were measured in comparison to a reference population. The geometric mean concentrations of PCBs, dechlorane plus, and 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl in plasma from the exposure group were 60.4, 9.0, and 0.55 ng g(-1) lipid, respectively, which were 2.2, 3.2, and 2.2 times higher than the corresponding measurement in the reference group. Correspondingly, ROS levels in white blood cells, including in neutrophil granulocytes, from the exposure group were significantly higher than in those from the reference group, suggesting potential ROS related health effects for residents at the e-waste site. In contrast, fewer ROS were generated in the respiratory burst of neutrophil granulocytes for the exposure group, indicating a depressed innate immune function for the individuals living at the e-waste site. These findings suggest a potential linkage between exposure to pollutants from e-waste recycling and both elevated oxidative stress and altered immune function.

  19. Identifying site-dependent effects of an extra Co atom on electronic states of single Co-phthalocyanine molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jingcheng; Wang, Yu; Li, Bin E-mail: bwang@ustc.edu.cn; Zhao, Aidi; Wang, Bing E-mail: bwang@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-07-21

    We investigate the modification of electronic properties of single cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) molecule by an extra Co atom co-adsorbed on Au (111) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), joint with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. By manipulating CoPc molecules using the STM tip to contact individually adsorbed Co atom, two types of relatively stable complexes can be formed, denoted as CoPc-Co(I) and CoPc-Co(II). In CoPc-Co(I), the Co atom is at an intramolecular site close to aza-N atom of CoPc, which induces significant modifications of the electronic states of CoPc, such as energy shifts and splitting of nonlocal molecular orbitals. However, in CoPc-Co(II) where the Co atom is underneath a benzene lobe of CoPc, it only slightly modifies the electronic states of CoPc, and mainly local characteristics of specific molecular orbitals are affected, even though CoPc-Co(II) is more stable than CoPc-Co(I). Our DFT calculations give consistent results with the experiments, and related analyses based on the molecular orbital theory reveal mechanism behind the experimental observations.

  20. Identifying site-dependent effects of an extra Co atom on electronic states of single Co-phthalocyanine molecule.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingcheng; Li, Bin; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Aidi; Wang, Bing

    2015-07-21

    We investigate the modification of electronic properties of single cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) molecule by an extra Co atom co-adsorbed on Au (111) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), joint with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. By manipulating CoPc molecules using the STM tip to contact individually adsorbed Co atom, two types of relatively stable complexes can be formed, denoted as CoPc-Co(I) and CoPc-Co(II). In CoPc-Co(I), the Co atom is at an intramolecular site close to aza-N atom of CoPc, which induces significant modifications of the electronic states of CoPc, such as energy shifts and splitting of nonlocal molecular orbitals. However, in CoPc-Co(II) where the Co atom is underneath a benzene lobe of CoPc, it only slightly modifies the electronic states of CoPc, and mainly local characteristics of specific molecular orbitals are affected, even though CoPc-Co(II) is more stable than CoPc-Co(I). Our DFT calculations give consistent results with the experiments, and related analyses based on the molecular orbital theory reveal mechanism behind the experimental observations.

  1. Low operational stability of enzymes in dry organic solvents: changes in the active site might affect catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Vibha; Delgado, Yamixa; Legault, Marc; Barletta, Gabriel

    2012-02-14

    The potential of enzyme catalysis in organic solvents for synthetic applications has been overshadowed by the fact that their catalytic properties are affected by organic solvents. In addition, it has recently been shown that an enzyme's initial activity diminishes considerably after prolonged exposure to organic media. Studies geared towards understanding this last drawback have yielded unclear results. In the present work we decided to use electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) to study the motion of an active site spin label (a nitroxide free radical) during 96 h of exposure of the serine protease subtilisin Carlsberg to four different organic solvents. Our EPR data shows a typical two component spectra that was quantified by the ratio of the anisotropic and isotropic signals. The isotropic component, associated with a mobile nitroxide free radical, increases during prolonged exposure to all solvents used in the study. The maximum increase (of 43%) was observed in 1,4-dioxane. Based on these and previous studies we suggest that prolonged exposure of the enzyme to these solvents provokes a cascade of events that could induce substrates to adopt different binding conformations. This is the first EPR study of the motion of an active-site spin label during prolonged exposure of an enzyme to organic solvents ever reported.

  2. Wobble Pairs of the HDV Ribozyme Play Specific Roles in Stabilization of Active Site Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sripathi, Kamali N.; Banáš, Pavel; Reblova, Kamila; Šponer, Jiři; Otyepka, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is the only known human pathogen whose genome contains a catalytic RNA motif (ribozyme). The overall architecture of the HDV ribozyme is that of a double-nested pseudoknot, with two GU pairs flanking the active site. Although extensive studies have shown that mutation of either wobble results in decreased catalytic activity, little work has focused on linking these mutations to specific structural effects on catalytic fitness. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations based on an activated structure to probe the active site dynamics as a result of wobble pair mutations. In both wild-type and mutant ribozymes, the in-line fitness of the active site (as a measure of catalytic proficiency) strongly depends on the presence of a C75(N3H3+)N1(O5′) hydrogen bond, which positions C75 as the general acid for the reaction. Our mutational analyses show that each GU wobble supports catalytically fit conformations in distinct ways; the reverse G25U20 wobble promotes high in-line fitness, high occupancy of the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) general-acid hydrogen bond and stabilization of the G1U37 wobble, while the G1U37 wobble acts more locally by stabilizing high in-line fitness and the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) hydrogen bond. We also find that stable type I A-minor and P1.1 hydrogen bonding above and below the active site, respectively, prevent local structural disorder from spreading and disrupting global conformation. Taken together, our results define specific, often redundant architectural roles for several structural motifs of the HDV ribozyme active site, expanding the known roles of these motifs within all HDV-like ribozymes and other structured RNAs. PMID:25631765

  3. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-01-01

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser696 and Ser698 in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser886 and/or Ser893 in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser717 in the JM, and at Ser733, Thr752, Ser783, Ser864, Ser911, Ser958 and Thr998 in the kinase domain. The LC–ESI–MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr890, Ser893 and Thr894) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr890, Ser893, Thr894 and Thr899, differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response. PMID:26472115

  4. Human activities in Natura 2000 sites: a highly diversified conservation network.

    PubMed

    Tsiafouli, Maria A; Apostolopoulou, Evangelia; Mazaris, Antonios D; Kallimanis, Athanasios S; Drakou, Evangelia G; Pantis, John D

    2013-05-01

    The Natura 2000 network was established across the European Union's (EU) Member States with the aim to conserve biodiversity, while ensuring the sustainability of human activities. However, to what kind and to what extent Natura 2000 sites are subject to human activities and how this varies across Member States remains unspecified. Here, we analyzed 111,269 human activity records from 14,727 protected sites in 20 Member States. The frequency of occurrence of activities differs among countries, with more than 86 % of all sites being subjected to agriculture or forestry. Activities like hunting, fishing, urbanization, transportation, and tourism are more frequently recorded in south European sites than in northern or eastern ones. The observed variations indicate that Natura 2000 networks are highly heterogeneous among EU Member States. Our analysis highlights the importance of agriculture in European landscapes and indicates possible targets for policy interventions at national, European, or "sub-European" level. The strong human presence in the Natura 2000 network throughout Member States, shows that conservation initiatives could succeed only by combining social and ecological sustainability and by ensuring the integration of policies affecting biodiversity.

  5. Kv3 channel assembly, trafficking and activity are regulated by zinc through different binding sites.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuanzheng; Barry, Joshua; Gu, Chen

    2013-05-15

    Zinc, a divalent heavy metal ion and an essential mineral for life, regulates synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability via ion channels. However, its binding sites and regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we report that Kv3 channel assembly, localization and activity are regulated by zinc through different binding sites. Local perfusion of zinc reversibly reduced spiking frequency of cultured neurons most likely by suppressing Kv3 channels. Indeed, zinc inhibited Kv3.1 channel activity and slowed activation kinetics, independent of its site in the N-terminal T1 domain. Biochemical assays surprisingly identified a novel zinc-binding site in the Kv3.1 C-terminus, critical for channel activity and axonal targeting, but not for the zinc inhibition. Finally, mutagenesis revealed an important role of the junction between the first transmembrane (TM) segment and the first extracellular loop in sensing zinc. Its mutant enabled fast spiking with relative resistance to the zinc inhibition. Therefore, our studies provide novel mechanistic insights into the multifaceted regulation of Kv3 channel activity and localization by divalent heavy metal ions.

  6. Tuned by metals: the TET peptidase activity is controlled by 3 metal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Matteo; Girard, Eric; Franzetti, Bruno

    2016-02-08

    TET aminopeptidases are dodecameric particles shared in the three life domains involved in various biological processes, from carbon source provider in archaea to eye-pressure regulation in humans. Each subunit contains a dinuclear metal site (M1 and M2) responsible for the enzyme catalytic activity. However, the role of each metal ion is still uncharacterized. Noteworthy, while mesophilic TETs are activated by Mn(2+), hyperthermophilic TETs prefers Co(2+). Here, by means of anomalous x-ray crystallography and enzyme kinetics measurements of the TET3 aminopeptidase from the hyperthermophilic organism Pyrococcus furiosus (PfTET3), we show that M2 hosts the catalytic activity of the enzyme, while M1 stabilizes the TET3 quaternary structure and controls the active site flexibility in a temperature dependent manner. A new third metal site (M3) was found in the substrate binding pocket, modulating the PfTET3 substrate preferences. These data show that TET activity is tuned by the molecular interplay among three metal sites.

  7. A [Cu2O]2+ core in Cu-ZSM-5, the active site in the oxidation of methane to methanol

    PubMed Central

    Woertink, Julia S.; Smeets, Pieter J.; Groothaert, Marijke H.; Vance, Michael A.; Sels, Bert F.; Schoonheydt, Robert A.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2009-01-01

    Driven by the depletion of crude oil, the direct oxidation of methane to methanol has been of considerable interest. Promising low-temperature activity of an oxygen-activated zeolite, Cu-ZSM-5, has recently been reported in this selective oxidation and the active site in this reaction correlates with an absorption feature at 22,700 cm−1. In the present study, this absorption band is used to selectively resonance enhance Raman vibrations of this active site. 18O2 labeling experiments allow definitive assignment of the observed vibrations and exclude all previously characterized copper-oxygen species for the active site. In combination with DFT and normal coordinate analysis calculations, the oxygen activated Cu core is uniquely defined as a bent mono-(μ-oxo)dicupric site. Spectroscopically validated electronic structure calculations show polarization of the low-lying singly-occupied molecular orbital of the [Cu2O]2+ core, which is directed into the zeolite channel, upon approach of CH4. This induces significant oxyl character into the bridging O atom leading to a low transition state energy consistent with experiment and explains why the bent mono-(μ-oxo)dicupric core is highly activated for H atom abstraction from CH4. The oxygen intermediate of Cu-ZSM-5 is now the most well defined species active in the methane monooxygenase reaction. PMID:19864626

  8. Use of Electronic Hand-held Devices for Collection of Savannah River Site Environmental Data - 13329

    SciTech Connect

    Marberry, Hugh; Moore, Winston

    2013-07-01

    Savannah River Nuclear Solutions has begun using Xplore Tablet PC's to collect data in the field for soil samples, groundwater samples, air samples and round sheets at the Savannah River Site (SRS). EPA guidelines for groundwater sampling are incorporated into the application to ensure the sample technician follows the proper protocol. The sample technician is guided through the process for sampling and round sheet data collection by a series of menus and input boxes. Field measurements and well stabilization information are entered into the tablet for uploading into Environmental Restoration Data Management System (ERDMS). The process helps to eliminate input errors and provides data integrity. A soil sample technician has the ability to collect information about location of sample, field parameter, describe the soil sample, print bottle labels, and print chain of custody for the sample that they have collected. An air sample technician has the ability to provide flow, pressure, hours of operation, print bottle labels and chain of custody for samples they collect. Round sheets are collected using the information provided in the various procedures. The data are collected and uploaded into ERDMS. The equipment used is weather proof and hardened for the field use. Global Positioning System (GPS) capabilities are integrated into the applications to provide the location where samples were collected and to help sample technicians locate wells that are not visited often. (authors)

  9. Exploring intrinsically disordered proteins using site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Le Breton, Nolwenn; Martinho, Marlène; Mileo, Elisabetta; Etienne, Emilien; Gerbaud, Guillaume; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Belle, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are highly variable biological systems, not only in their structures but also in their dynamics. The most extreme example of dynamics is encountered within the family of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs), which are proteins lacking a well-defined 3D structure under physiological conditions. Among the biophysical techniques well-suited to study such highly flexible proteins, Site-Directed Spin Labeling combined with EPR spectroscopy (SDSL-EPR) is one of the most powerful, being able to reveal, at the residue level, structural transitions such as folding events. SDSL-EPR is based on selective grafting of a paramagnetic label on the protein under study and is limited neither by the size nor by the complexity of the system. The objective of this mini-review is to describe the basic strategy of SDSL-EPR and to illustrate how it can be successfully applied to characterize the structural behavior of IDPs. Recent developments aimed at enlarging the panoply of SDSL-EPR approaches are presented in particular newly synthesized spin labels that allow the limitations of the classical ones to be overcome. The potentialities of these new spin labels will be demonstrated on different examples of IDPs. PMID:26042221

  10. Site-specific electronic structure of the RBa2Cu3O7-y family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, M.; Gerhold, S.; Nücker, N.; Kuntscher, C. A.; Burbulla, B.; Schweiss, P.; Schuppler, S.; Chakarian, V.; Freeland, J.; Idzerda, Y. U.; Kläser, M.; Müller-Vogt, G.; Wolf, Th.

    1999-10-01

    With polarization-dependent O 1s near-edge x-ray-absorption spectroscopy on detwinned RBa2Cu3O7-y (R=Y, La, Pr, Nd) and twinned Pr1-zBa2+zCu3O7-y single crystals, the unoccupied electronic structure of the CuO2 planes and CuO3 chains has been investigated. The data underline the exceptional role of Pr among the rare-earth atoms, which leads to the stabilization of the Pr 4f-O 2pπ states, and therefore to the suppression of superconductivity. Estimates of the out-of-plane fraction for these hybrids are discussed. Moreover, upon substitution of Pr by Ba in Pr1-zBa2+zCu3O7-y a shift of the Pr 4f-O 2pπ band to below the Fermi level is indicated, concurrent with a transfer of doped holes back to the Zhang-Rice singlets.

  11. Docking and molecular dynamics studies at trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase active sites.

    PubMed

    Iribarne, Federico; Paulino, Margot; Aguilera, Sara; Murphy, Miguel; Tapia, Orlando

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical docking study on the active sites of trypanothione reductase (TR) and glutathione reductase (GR) with the corresponding natural substrates, trypanothione disulfide (T[S]2) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), is reported. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to check the robustness of the docking results. The energetic results are in agreement with previous experimental findings and show the crossed complexes have lower stabilization energies than the natural ones. To test DOCK3.5, four nitro furanic compounds, previously designed as potentially active anti-chagasic molecules, were docked at the GR and TR active sites with the DOCK3.5 procedure. A good correlation was found between differential inhibitory activity and relative interaction energy (affinity). The results provide a validation test for the use of DOCK3.5 in connection with the design of anti-chagasic drugs.

  12. Operando atomic structure and active sites of TiO2(110)-supported gold nanoparticles during carbon monoxide oxidation.

    PubMed

    Saint-Lager, Marie-Claire; Laoufi, Issam; Bailly, Aude

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that gold nanoparticles supported on TiO2 act as a catalyst for CO oxidation, even below room temperature. Despite extensive studies, the origin of this catalytic activity remains under debate. Indeed, when the particle size decreases, many changes may occur; thus modifying the nanoparticles' electronic properties and consequently their catalytic performances. Thanks to a state-of-the-art home-developed setup, model catalysts can be prepared in ultra-high vacuum and their morphology then studied in operando conditions by Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-ray Scattering, as well as their atomic structure by Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction as a function of their catalytic activity. We previously reported on the existence of a catalytic activity maximum observed for three-dimensional gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 2-3 nm and a height of 6-7 atomic planes. In the present work we correlate this size dependence of the catalytic activity to the nanoparticles' atomic structure. We show that even when their size decreases below the optimum diameter, the gold nanoparticles keep the face-centered cubic structure characteristic of bulk gold. Nevertheless, for these smallest nanoparticles, the lattice parameter presents anisotropic strains with a larger contraction in the direction perpendicular to the surface. Moreover a careful analysis of the atomic-scale morphology around the catalytic activity maximum tends to evidence the role of sites with a specific geometry at the interface between the nanoparticles and the substrate. This argues for models where atoms at the interface periphery act as catalytically active sites for carbon monoxide oxidation.

  13. Active layer dynamics in three sites with contrasted topography in the Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, Marc; Ruiz-Fernández, Jesús; Vieira, Gonçalo

    2015-04-01

    Topography exerts a key role on permafrost distribution in areas where mean annual temperatures are slightly negative. This is the case of low-altitude environments in Maritime Antarctica, namely in the South Shetland Islands, where permafrost is marginal to discontinuous until elevations of 20-40 m asl turning to continuous at higher areas. Consequently, the active layer dynamics is also strongly conditioned by the geomorphological setting. In January 2014 we installed three sites for monitoring the active layer dynamics across the Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands) in different geomorphological environments at elevations between 60 and 100 m. The purpose was to examine the role of the topography and microclimatic conditions on the active layer dynamics. At each site a set of loggers was set up to monitor: air temperatures, snow thickness, ground temperatures until 80 cm together with the coupling atmosphere-ground temperatures. During the first year of monitoring the mean annual air temperatures show similar values in the three sites, in all cases slightly below freezing. The snowy conditions during this year in this archipelago have resulted in a late melting of snow, which has also conditioned the duration of frozen conditions in the uppermost soil layers. Topography has a strong influence on snow cover duration, which in turn affects frozen ground conditions. The Domo site is located in a higher position with respect to the central plateau of Byers; here, the wind is stronger and snow cover thinner, which has conditioned a longer thawing season than in the other two sites (Cerro Negro, Escondido). These two sites are located in topographically protected areas favouring snow accumulation. The longer persistence of snow conditions a longer duration of negative temperatures in the active layer of the permafrost. This research was financially supported by the HOLOANTAR project (Portuguese Science Foundation) and the AXA Research Fund.

  14. 78 FR 8190 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic... Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment (EA) for Commercial Wind Leasing and...

  15. Organized Agents: Canadian Teacher Unions as Alternative Sites for Social Justice Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rottmann, Cindy

    2008-01-01

    Historically teachers' federations have been some of the major organizational sites for social justice leadership in K-12 public education. Despite this history of activism, social justice teacher unionism remains a relatively underdeveloped concept. This article merges four philosophical conceptions of social justice in education: liberal…

  16. Penicillin Use in Meningococcal Disease Management: Active Bacterial Core Surveillance Sites, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Blain, Amy E.; Mandal, Sema; Wu, Henry; MacNeil, Jessica R.; Harrison, Lee H.; Farley, Monica M.; Lynfield, Ruth; Miller, Lisa; Nichols, Megin; Petit, Sue; Reingold, Arthur; Schaffner, William; Thomas, Ann; Zansky, Shelley M.; Anderson, Raydel; Harcourt, Brian H.; Mayer, Leonard W.; Clark, Thomas A.; Cohn, Amanda C.

    2016-01-01

    In 2009, in the Active Bacterial Core surveillance sites, penicillin was not commonly used to treat meningococcal disease. This is likely because of inconsistent availability of antimicrobial susceptibility testing and ease of use of third-generation cephalosporins. Consideration of current practices may inform future meningococcal disease management guidelines. PMID:27704009

  17. 77 FR 5830 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic... of involving Federal agencies, states, tribes, local governments, offshore wind energy developers, and the public in the Department of the Interior's (DOI) ``Smart from the Start'' wind...

  18. Penicillin Use in Meningococcal Disease Management: Active Bacterial Core Surveillance Sites, 2009.

    PubMed

    Blain, Amy E; Mandal, Sema; Wu, Henry; MacNeil, Jessica R; Harrison, Lee H; Farley, Monica M; Lynfield, Ruth; Miller, Lisa; Nichols, Megin; Petit, Sue; Reingold, Arthur; Schaffner, William; Thomas, Ann; Zansky, Shelley M; Anderson, Raydel; Harcourt, Brian H; Mayer, Leonard W; Clark, Thomas A; Cohn, Amanda C

    2016-09-01

    In 2009, in the Active Bacterial Core surveillance sites, penicillin was not commonly used to treat meningococcal disease. This is likely because of inconsistent availability of antimicrobial susceptibility testing and ease of use of third-generation cephalosporins. Consideration of current practices may inform future meningococcal disease management guidelines.

  19. The active site of cytochrome P-450 nifedipine oxidase: a model-building study.

    PubMed

    Ferenczy, G G; Morris, G M

    1989-12-01

    A model of the active site of cytochrome P-450 nifedipine oxidase is built on the basis of sequence homology with cytochrome P-450CAM. Substrates are docked into the binding pocket, and molecular mechanical energy minimization is performed to analyze the forces between the substrates and the enzyme.

  20. 77 FR 74218 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... identified in the document entitled, Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic... agencies, states, tribes, local governments, offshore wind energy developers, and the public in...

  1. Archaeological Activity Report: Post-Review Discoveries Within 45BN431 at Solid Waste Site 128-F-2

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Marceau; J. J. Sharpe

    2006-12-21

    During monitoring of remedial activities at Solid Waste Site 128-F-2 on August 19, 2005, a concentration of mussel shell was discovered in the west wall of a trench in the northen section of the waste site.

  2. Molecular protein adaptor with genetically encoded interaction sites guiding the hierarchical assembly of plasmonically active nanoparticle architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Andreas; Huber, Matthias C.; Cölfen, Helmut; Schiller, Stefan M.

    2015-03-01

    The control over the defined assembly of nano-objects with nm-precision is important to create systems and materials with enhanced properties, for example, metamaterials. In nature, the precise assembly of inorganic nano-objects with unique features, for example, magnetosomes, is accomplished by efficient and reliable recognition schemes involving protein effectors. Here we present a molecular approach using protein-based ‘adaptors/connectors’ with genetically encoded interaction sites to guide the assembly and functionality of different plasmonically active gold nanoparticle architectures (AuNP). The interaction of the defined geometricaly shaped protein adaptors with the AuNP induces the self-assembly of nanoarchitectures ranging from AuNP encapsulation to one-dimensional chain-like structures, complex networks and stars. Synthetic biology and bionanotechnology are applied to co-translationally encode unnatural amino acids as additional site-specific modification sites to generate functionalized biohybrid nanoarchitectures. This protein adaptor-based nano-object assembly approach might be expanded to other inorganic nano-objects creating biohybrid materials with unique electronic, photonic, plasmonic and magnetic properties.

  3. A facile reflux procedure to increase active surface sites form highly active and durable supported palladium@platinum bimetallic nanodendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Li, Yingjun; Liu, Baocang; Xu, Guangran; Zhang, Geng; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    A series of well-dispersed bimetallic Pd@Pt nanodendrites uniformly supported on XC-72 carbon black are fabricated by using different capping agents. These capping agents are essential for the branched morphology control. However, the surfactant adsorbed on the nanodendrites surface blocks the access of reactant molecules to the active surface sites, and the catalytic activities of these bimetallic nanodendrites are significantly restricted. Herein, a facile reflux procedure to effectively remove the capping agent molecules without significantly affecting their sizes is reported for activating supported nanocatalysts. More significantly, the structure and morphology of the nanodendrites can also be retained, enhancing the numbers of active surface sites, catalytic activity and stability toward methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation reactions. The as-obtained hot water reflux-treated Pd@Pt/C catalyst manifests superior catalytic activity and stability both in terms of surface and mass specific activities, as compared to the untreated catalysts and the commercial Pt/C and Pd/C catalysts. We anticipate that this effective and facile removal method has more general applicability to highly active nanocatalysts prepared with various surfactants, and should lead to improvements in environmental protection and energy production.

  4. A ligand field chemistry of oxygen generation by the oxygen-evolving complex and synthetic active sites.

    PubMed

    Betley, Theodore A; Surendranath, Yogesh; Childress, Montana V; Alliger, Glen E; Fu, Ross; Cummins, Christopher C; Nocera, Daniel G

    2008-03-27

    Oxygen-oxygen bond formation and O2 generation occur from the S4 state of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Several mechanistic possibilities have been proposed for water oxidation, depending on the formal oxidation state of the Mn atoms. All fall under two general classifications: the AB mechanism in which nucleophilic oxygen (base, B) attacks electrophilic oxygen (acid, A) of the Mn4Ca cluster or the RC mechanism in which radical-like oxygen species couple within OEC. The critical intermediate in either mechanism involves a metal oxo, though the nature of this oxo for AB and RC mechanisms is disparate. In the case of the AB mechanism, assembly of an even-electron count, high-valent metal-oxo proximate to a hydroxide is needed whereas, in an RC mechanism, two odd-electron count, high-valent metal oxos are required. Thus the two mechanisms give rise to very different design criteria for functional models of the OEC active site. This discussion presents the electron counts and ligand geometries that support metal oxos for AB and RC O-O bond-forming reactions. The construction of architectures that bring two oxygen functionalities together under the purview of the AB and RC scenarios are described.

  5. Kinetic and Spectroscopic Studies of Bicupin Oxalate Oxidase and Putative Active Site Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Moomaw, Ellen W.; Hoffer, Eric; Moussatche, Patricia; Salerno, John C.; Grant, Morgan; Immelman, Bridget; Uberto, Richard; Ozarowski, Andrew; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Ceriporiopsis subvermispora oxalate oxidase (CsOxOx) is the first bicupin enzyme identified that catalyzes manganese-dependent oxidation of oxalate. In previous work, we have shown that the dominant contribution to catalysis comes from the monoprotonated form of oxalate binding to a form of the enzyme in which an active site carboxylic acid residue must be unprotonated. CsOxOx shares greatest sequence homology with bicupin microbial oxalate decarboxylases (OxDC) and the 241-244DASN region of the N-terminal Mn binding domain of CsOxOx is analogous to the lid region of OxDC that has been shown to determine reaction specificity. We have prepared a series of CsOxOx mutants to probe this region and to identify the carboxylate residue implicated in catalysis. The pH profile of the D241A CsOxOx mutant suggests that the protonation state of aspartic acid 241 is mechanistically significant and that catalysis takes place at the N-terminal Mn binding site. The observation that the D241S CsOxOx mutation eliminates Mn binding to both the N- and C- terminal Mn binding sites suggests that both sites must be intact for Mn incorporation into either site. The introduction of a proton donor into the N-terminal Mn binding site (CsOxOx A242E mutant) does not affect reaction specificity. Mutation of conserved arginine residues further support that catalysis takes place at the N-terminal Mn binding site and that both sites must be intact for Mn incorporation into either site. PMID:23469254

  6. Transfer hydrogenation over sodium-modified ceria: Enrichment of redox sites active for alcohol dehydrogenation

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Nicholas C.; Boote, Brett W.; Naik, Pranjali; ...

    2017-01-17

    Ceria (CeO2) and sodium-modified ceria (Ce-Na) were prepared through combustion synthesis. Palladium was deposited onto the supports (Pd/CeO2 and Pd/Ce-Na) and their activity for the aqueous-phase transfer hydrogenation of phenol using 2-propanol under liquid flow conditions was studied. Pd/Ce-Na showed a marked increase (6×) in transfer hydrogenation activity over Pd/CeO2. Material characterization indicated that water-stable sodium species were not doped into the ceria lattice, but rather existed as subsurface carbonates. Modification of ceria by sodium provided more adsorption and redox active sites (i.e. defects) for 2-propanol dehydrogenation. This effect was an intrinsic property of the Ce-Na support and independent ofmore » Pd. The redox sites active for 2-propanol dehydrogenation were thermodynamically equivalent on both supports/catalysts. At high phenol concentrations, the reaction was limited by 2-propanol adsorption. Furthermore, the difference in catalytic activity was attributed to the different numbers of 2-propanol adsorption and redox active sites on each catalyst.« less

  7. Electron-beam activated thermal sputtering of thermoelectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jinsong; Dravid, Vinayak P.; He Jiaqing; Han, Mi-Kyung; Sootsman, Joseph R.; Girard, Steven; Arachchige, Indika U.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2011-08-15

    Thermoelectricity and Seebeck effect have long been observed and validated in bulk materials. With the development of advanced tools of materials characterization, here we report the first observation of such an effect in the nanometer scale: in situ directional sputtering of several thermoelectric materials inside electron microscopes. The temperature gradient introduced by the electron beam creates a voltage-drop across the samples, which enhances spontaneous sputtering of specimen ions. The sputtering occurs along a preferential direction determined by the direction of the temperature gradient. A large number of nanoparticles form and accumulate away from the beam location as a result. The sputtering and re-crystallization are found to occur at temperatures far below the melting points of bulk materials. The sputtering occurs even when a liquid nitrogen cooling holder is used to keep the overall temperature at -170 deg. C. This unique phenomenon that occurred in the nanometer scale may provide useful clues to understanding the mechanism of thermoelectric effect.

  8. Electron-beam activated thermal sputtering of thermoelectric materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; He, J.; Han, M-K.; Sootsman, J. R.; Girard, S.; Arachchige, I. U.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Dravid, V. P.

    2011-08-01

    Thermoelectricity and Seebeck effect have long been observed and validated in bulk materials. With the development of advanced tools of materials characterization, here we report the first observation of such an effect in the nanometer scale: in situ directional sputtering of several thermoelectric materials inside electron microscopes. The temperature gradient introduced by the electron beam creates a voltage-drop across the samples, which enhances spontaneous sputtering of specimen ions. The sputtering occurs along a preferential direction determined by the direction of the temperature gradient. A large number of nanoparticles form and accumulate away from the beam location as a result. The sputtering and re-crystallization are found to occur at temperatures far below the melting points of bulk materials. The sputtering occurs even when a liquid nitrogen cooling holder is used to keep the overall temperature at -170 C. This unique phenomenon that occurred in the nanometer scale may provide useful clues to understanding the mechanism of thermoelectric effect.

  9. Site-specific profiles of estrogenic activity in agricultural areas of California's inland waters.

    PubMed

    Lavado, Ramon; Loyo-Rosales, Jorge E; Floyd, Emily; Kolodziej, Edward P; Snyder, Shane A; Sedlak, David L; Schlenk, Daniel

    2009-12-15

    To evaluate the occurrence and sources of compounds capable of feminizing fish in agriculturally impacted waterways of the Central Valley of California, water samples were extracted and subjected to chemical analyses as well as in vitro and in vivo measurements of vitellogenin in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Among the 16 sites sampled, 6 locations frequently exhibited elevated concentrations of estrogenic substances with 17beta-estradiol equivalents up to 242 ng/L in vitro and 12 microg/kg in vivo. The patterns of activity varied among sites, with two sites showing elevated activity only in vitro, two showing elevated activity only in vivo, and two showing elevated activity in both assays. Sequential elution of solid-phase extraction (SPE) disks followed by bioassay-guided fractionation was used to characterize water samples from the two locations where activity was observed in both bioassays. The highest estrogenic activity was observed in the most nonpolar fractions (80-100% methanol eluent) from the Napa River, while most of the activity in the Sacramento River Delta eluted in the 60% methanol eluent. Quantitative analyses of SPE extracts and additional HPLC fractionation of the SPE extracts by GC-MS/MS and LC-MS/MS indicated concentrations of steroid hormones, alkylphenol polyethoxylates, and herbicides that were at least 1-3 orders of magnitude below bioassay 17beta-estradiol equivalent calculations. Given the different patterns of activity and chemical properties of the estrogenic compounds, it appears that estrogenic activity in these agriculturally impacted surface waters is attributable to multiple compounds. Further investigation is needed to identify the compounds causing the estrogenic activity and to determine the potential impacts of these compounds on feral fish.

  10. Strategies for handling missing clinical data for automated surgical site infection detection from the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhen; Melton, Genevieve B; Arsoniadis, Elliot G; Wang, Yan; Kwaan, Mary R; Simon, Gyorgy J

    2017-03-16

    Proper handling of missing data is important for many secondary uses of electronic health record (EHR) data. Data imputation methods can be used to handle missing data, but their use for analyzing EHR data is limited and specific efficacy for postoperative complication detection is unclear. Several data imputation methods were used to develop data models for automated detection of three types (i.e., superficial, deep, and organ space) of surgical site infection (SSI) and overall SSI using American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (NSQIP) Registry 30-day SSI occurrence data as a reference standard. Overall, models with missing data imputation almost always outperformed reference models without imputation that included only cases with complete data for detection of SSI overall achieving very good average area under the curve values. Missing data imputation appears to be an effective means for improving postoperative SSI detection using EHR clinical data.

  11. Geophysical logging and geologic mapping data in the vicinity of the GMH Electronics Superfund site near Roxboro, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, Melinda J.; Clark, Timothy W.; Williams, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Geologic mapping, the collection of borehole geophysical logs and images, and passive diffusion bag sampling were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey North Carolina Water Science Center in the vicinity of the GMH Electronics Superfund site near Roxboro, North Carolina, during March through October 2011. The study purpose was to assist the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the development of a conceptual groundwater model for the assessment of current contaminant distribution and future migration of contaminants. Data compilation efforts included geologic mapping of more than 250 features, including rock type and secondary joints, delineation of more than 1,300 subsurface features (primarily fracture orientations) in 15 open borehole wells, and the collection of passive diffusion-bag samples from 42 fracture zones at various depths in the 15 wells.

  12. Direct electron transfer to a metagenome-derived laccase fused to affinity tags near the electroactive copper site.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Seiya; Asahi, Masafumi; Goda-Tsutsumi, Maiko; Shirai, Osamu; Kano, Kenji; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2013-12-21

    We demonstrate the efficient direct electron transfer (DET) from an electrode to an engineered laccase isolated from a metagenome. The enzyme has a unique homotrimeric architecture with a two-domain-type laccase subunit. The recombinant laccase-modified mesoporous carbon electrode exhibits an effective catalytic current for oxygen reduction, which depends on the affinity tags attached near the electroactive Cu site of the enzyme. We also investigated the effect of the affinity tags on the orientation of the enzyme on functional thiol-modified Au electrodes. The results suggest that a poly-histidine tag (His-tag) functions as an anchor to control the orientation of the enzyme to enhance the current density of the DET-type bioelectrocatalysis.

  13. When electron transfer meets electron transport in redox-active molecular nanojunctions.

    PubMed

    Janin, Marion; Ghilane, Jalal; Lacroix, Jean-Christophe

    2013-02-13

    A scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) was used to arrange two microelectrodes face-to-face separated by a micrometric gap. Polyaniline (PANI) was deposited electrochemically from the SECM tip side until it bridged the two electrodes. The junctions obtained were characterized by following the current through the PANI as a function of its electrochemical potential measured versus a reference electrode acting as a gate electrode in a solid-state transistor. PANI nanojunctions showed conductances below 100 nS in the oxidized state, indicating control of the charge transport within the whole micrometric gap by a limited number of PANI wires. The SECM configuration makes it possible to observe in the same experiment and in the same current range the electron-transfer and electron-transport processes. These two phenomena are distinguished here and characterized by following the variation of the current with the bias voltage and the scan rate. The electron-transfer current changes with the scan rate, while the charge-transport current varies with the bias voltage. Finally, despite the initially micrometric gap, a junction where the conductance is controlled by a single oligoaniline strand is achieved.

  14. MoS2 atomic layers with artificial active edge sites as transparent counter electrodes for improved performance of dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Najmaei, Sina; Lin, Hong; Lou, Jun

    2014-05-21

    A novel MoS2 transparent counter electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells is reported. In order to enhance the catalytic activity of the electrode, active edge sites are created artificially by patterning holes on MoS2 atomic layers. Electrochemical analysis shows that the electrochemical activity is significantly improved after the patterning of holes. The photon-to-electron efficiency of the dye-sensitized solar cells based on MoS2 atomic layer counter electrodes is increased remarkably from 2% to 5.8% after the hole patterning.

  15. Light-Activated Protein Inhibition through Photoinduced Electron Transfer of a Ruthenium(II)–Cobalt(III) Bimetallic Complex

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Robert J.; Weinberg, David J.; Peterson, Mark D.; Weiss, Emily A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a mechanism of light activation that initiates protein inhibitory action of a biologically inert Co(III) Schiff base (Co(III)-sb) complex. Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) occurs from a Ru(II) bipyridal complex to a covalently attached Co(III) complex and is gated by conformational changes that occur in tens of nanoseconds. Reduction of the Co(III)-sb by PET initiates displacement of the inert axial imidazole ligands, promoting coordination to active site histidines of α-thrombin. Upon exposure to 455 nm light, the rate of ligand exchange with 4-methylimidazole, a histidine mimic, increases by approximately 5-fold, as observed by NMR spectroscopy. Similarly, the rate of α-thrombin inhibition increases over 5-fold upon irradiation. These results convey a strategy for light activation of inorganic therapeutic agents through PET utilizing redox-active metal centers. PMID:25671465

  16. Light-activated protein inhibition through photoinduced electron transfer of a ruthenium(II)–cobalt(III) bimetallic complex

    DOE PAGES

    Holbrook, Robert J.; Weinberg, David J.; Peterson, Mark D.; ...

    2015-02-11

    In this paper, we describe a mechanism of light activation that initiates protein inhibitory action of a biologically inert Co(III) Schiff base (Co(III)-sb) complex. Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) occurs from a Ru(II) bipyridal complex to a covalently attached Co(III) complex and is gated by conformational changes that occur in tens of nanoseconds. Reduction of the Co(III)-sb by PET initiates displacement of the inert axial imidazole ligands, promoting coordination to active site histidines of α-thrombin. Upon exposure to 455 nm light, the rate of ligand exchange with 4-methylimidazole, a histidine mimic, increases by approximately 5-fold, as observed by NMR spectroscopy. Similarly,more » the rate of α-thrombin inhibition increases over 5-fold upon irradiation. Finally, these results convey a strategy for light activation of inorganic therapeutic agents through PET utilizing redox-active metal centers.« less

  17. Light-activated protein inhibition through photoinduced electron transfer of a ruthenium(II)–cobalt(III) bimetallic complex

    SciTech Connect

    Holbrook, Robert J.; Weinberg, David J.; Peterson, Mark D.; Weiss, Emily A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2015-02-11

    In this paper, we describe a mechanism of light activation that initiates protein inhibitory action of a biologically inert Co(III) Schiff base (Co(III)-sb) complex. Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) occurs from a Ru(II) bipyridal complex to a covalently attached Co(III) complex and is gated by conformational changes that occur in tens of nanoseconds. Reduction of the Co(III)-sb by PET initiates displacement of the inert axial imidazole ligands, promoting coordination to active site histidines of α-thrombin. Upon exposure to 455 nm light, the rate of ligand exchange with 4-methylimidazole, a histidine mimic, increases by approximately 5-fold, as observed by NMR spectroscopy. Similarly, the rate of α-thrombin inhibition increases over 5-fold upon irradiation. Finally, these results convey a strategy for light activation of inorganic therapeutic agents through PET utilizing redox-active metal centers.

  18. Site-directed mutagenesis of an alkaline phytase: influencing specificity, activity and stability in acidic milieu.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thuy T; Mamo, Gashaw; Búxo, Laura; Le, Nhi N; Gaber, Yasser; Mattiasson, Bo; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2011-07-10

    Site-directed mutagenesis of a thermostable alkaline phytase from Bacillus sp. MD2 was performed with an aim to increase its specific activity and activity and stability in an acidic environment. The mutation sites are distributed on the catalytic surface of the enzyme (P257R, E180N, E229V and S283R) and in the active site (K77R, K179R and E227S). Selection of the residues was based on the idea that acid active phytases are more positively charged around their catalytic surfaces. Thus, a decrease in the content of negatively charged residues or an increase in the positive charges in the catalytic region of an alkaline phytase was assumed to influence the enzyme activity and stability at low pH. Moreover, widening of the substrate-binding pocket is expected to improve the hydrolysis of substrates that are not efficiently hydrolysed by wild type alkaline phytase. Analysis of the phytase variants revealed that E229V and S283R mutants increased the specific activity by about 19% and 13%, respectively. Mutation of the active site residues K77R and K179R led to severe reduction in the specific activity of the enzyme. Analysis of the phytase mutant-phytate complexes revealed increase in hydrogen bonding between the enzyme and the substrate, which might retard the release of the product, resulting in decreased activity. On the other hand, the double mutant (K77R-K179R) phytase showed higher stability at low pH (pH 2.6-3.0). The E227S variant was optimally active at pH 5.5 (in contrast to the wild type enzyme that had an optimum pH of 6) and it exhibited higher stability in acidic condition. This mutant phytase, displayed over 80% of its initial activity after 3h incubation at pH 2.6 while the wild type phytase retained only about 40% of its original activity. Moreover, the relative activity of this mutant phytase on calcium phytate, sodium pyrophosphate and p-nitro phenyl phosphate was higher than that of the wild type phytase.

  19. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites. PMID:26893379

  20. Multiple DNA binding activities of the novel site-specific recombinase, Piv, from Moraxella lacunata.

    PubMed

    Tobiason, D M; Lenich, A G; Glasgow, A C

    1999-04-02

    The recombinase, Piv, is essential for site-specific DNA inversion of the type IV pilin DNA segment in Moraxella lacunata and Moraxella bovis. Piv shows significant homology with the transposases of the IS110/IS492 family of insertion elements, but, surprisingly, Piv contains none of the conserved amino acid motifs of the lambda Int or Hin/Res families of site-specific recombinases. Therefore, Piv may mediate site-specific recombination by a novel mechanism. To begin to determine how Piv may assemble a synaptic nucleoprotein structure for DNA cleavage and strand exchange, we have characterized the interaction of Piv with the DNA inversion region of M. lacunata. Gel shift and nuclease/chemical protection assays, competition and dissociation rate analyses, and cooperativity studies indicate that Piv binds two distinct recognition sequences. One recognition sequence, found at multiple sites within and outside of the invertible segment, is bound by Piv protomers with high affinity. The second recognition sequence is located at the recombination cross-over sites at the ends of the invertible element; Piv interacts with this sequence as an oligomer with apparent low affinity. A model is proposed for the role of the different Piv binding sites of the M. lacunata inversion region in the formation of an active synaptosome.

  1. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kalamajski, Sebastian; Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W

    2016-04-08

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites.

  2. Locomotor activity influences muscle architecture and bone growth but not muscle attachment site morphology

    PubMed Central

    Rabey, Karyne N.; Green, David J.; Taylor, Andrea B.; Begun, David R.; Richmond, Brian G.; McFarlin, Shannon C.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to make behavioural inferences from skeletal remains is critical to understanding the lifestyles and activities of past human populations and extinct animals. Muscle attachment site (enthesis) morphology has long been assumed to reflect muscle strength and activity during life, but little experimental evidence exists to directly link activity patterns with muscle development and the morphology of their attachments to the skeleton. We used a mouse model to experimentally test how the level and type of activity influences forelimb muscle architecture of spinodeltoideus, acromiodeltoideus, and superficial pectoralis, bone growth rate and gross morphology of their insertion sites. Over an 11-week period, we collected data on activity levels in one control group and two experimental activity groups (running, climbing) of female wild-type mice. Our results show that both activity type and level increased bone growth rates influenced muscle architecture, including differences in potential muscular excursion (fibre length) and potential force production (physiological cross-sectional area). However, despite significant influences on muscle architecture and bone development, activity had no observable effect on enthesis morphology. These results suggest that the gross morphology of entheses is less reliable than internal bone structure for making inferences about an individual’s past behaviour. PMID:25467113

  3. Roles of s3 site residues of nattokinase on its activity and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuming; Feng, Chi; Zhong, Jin; Huan, Liandong

    2007-09-01

    Nattokinase (Subtilisin NAT, NK) is a bacterial serine protease with high fibrinolytic activity. To probe their roles on protease activity and substrate specificity, three residues of S3 site (Gly(100), Ser(101) and Leu(126)) were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis. Kinetics parameters of 20 mutants were measured using tetrapeptides as substrates, and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. Results of mutation analysis showed that Gly(100) and Ser(101) had reverse steric and electrostatic effects. Residues with bulky or positively charged side chains at position 100 decreased the substrate binding and catalytic activity drastically, while residues with the same characters at position 101 could obviously enhance protease and fibrinolytic activity of NK. Mutation of Leu(126) might impair the structure of the active cleft and drastically decreased the activity of NK. Kinetics studies of the mutants showed that S3 residues were crucial to keep protease activity while they moderately affected substrate specificity of NK. The present study provided some original insight into the P3-S3 interaction in NK and other subtilisins, as well as showed successful protein engineering cases to improve NK as a potential therapeutic agent.

  4. Locomotor activity influences muscle architecture and bone growth but not muscle attachment site morphology.

    PubMed

    Rabey, Karyne N; Green, David J; Taylor, Andrea B; Begun, David R; Richmond, Brian G; McFarlin, Shannon C

    2015-01-01

    The ability to make behavioural inferences from skeletal remains is critical to understanding the lifestyles and activities of past human populations and extinct animals. Muscle attachment site (enthesis) morphology has long been assumed to reflect muscle strength and activity during life, but little experimental evidence exists to directly link activity patterns with muscle development and the morphology of their attachments to the skeleton. We used a mouse model to experimentally test how the level and type of activity influences forelimb muscle architecture of spinodeltoideus, acromiodeltoideus, and superficial pectoralis, bone growth rate and gross morphology of their insertion sites. Over an 11-week period, we collected data on activity levels in one control group and two experimental activity groups (running, climbing) of female wild-type mice. Our results show that both activity type and level increased bone growth rates influenced muscle architecture, including differences in potential muscular excursion (fibre length) and potential force production (physiological cross-sectional area). However, despite significant influences on muscle architecture and bone development, activity had no observable effect on enthesis morphology. These results suggest that the gross morphology of entheses is less reliable than internal bone structure for making inferences about an individual's past behaviour.

  5. Active parallel redundancy for electronic integrator-type control circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    Circuit extends concept of redundant feedback control from type-0 to type-1 control systems. Inactive channels are slaves to the active channel, if latter fails, it is rejected and slave channel is activated. High reliability and elimination of single-component catastrophic failure are important in closed-loop control systems.

  6. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the active sites of nickel- and copper-containing metalloproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, G.O.

    1993-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a useful tool for obtaining structural and chemical information about the active sites of metalloproteins and metalloenzymes. Information may be obtained from both the edge region and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) or post-edge region of the K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum of a metal center in a compound. The edge contains information about the valence electronic structure of the atom that absorbs the X-rays. It is possible in some systems to infer the redox state of the metal atom in question, as well as the geometry and nature of ligands connected to it, from the features in the edge in a straightforward manner. The EXAFS modulations, being produced by the backscattering of the ejected photoelectron from the atoms surrounding the metal atom, provide, when analyzed, information about the number and type of neighbouring atoms, and the distances at which they occur. In this thesis, analysis of both the edge and EXAFS regions has been used to gain information about the active sites of various metalloproteins. The metalloproteins studied were plastocyanin (Pc), laccase and nickel carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (Ni CODH). Studies of Cu(I)-imidazole compounds, related to the protein hemocyanin, are also reported here.

  7. Trypanosoma brucei 20 S Editosomes Have One RNA Substrate-binding Site and Execute RNA Unwinding Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Cordula; Katari, Venkata Subbaraju; Brecht, Michael; Göringer, H. Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Editing of mitochondrial pre-mRNAs in African trypanosomes generates full-length transcripts by the site-specific insertion and deletion of uridylate nucleotides. The reaction is catalyzed by a 0.8 MDa multienzyme complex, the editosome. Although the binding of substrate pre-edited mRNAs and cognate guide RNAs (gRNAs) represents the first step in the reaction cycle, the biochemical and biophysical details of the editosome/RNA interaction are not understood. Here we show that editosomes bind full-length substrate mRNAs with nanomolar affinity in a nonselective fashion. The complexes do not discriminate–neither kinetically nor thermodynamically–between different mitochondrial pre-mRNAs or between edited and unedited versions of the same transcript. They also bind gRNAs and gRNA/pre-mRNA hybrid RNAs with similar affinities and association rate constants. Gold labeling of editosome-bound RNA in combination with transmission electron microscopy identified a single RNA-binding site per editosome. However, atomic force microscopy of individual pre-mRNA-editosome complexes revealed that multiple editosomes can interact with one pre-mRNA. Lastly, we demonstrate a so far unknown activity of the editing machinery: editosome-bound RNA becomes unfolded by a chaperone-type RNA unwinding activity. PMID:22661715

  8. Interaction of aspartic acid-104 and proline-287 with the active site of m-calpain.

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, J S; Elce, J S

    1996-01-01

    In an ongoing study of the mechanisms of calpain catalysis and Ca(2+)-induced activation, the effects of Asp-104-->Ser and Pro-287-->Ser large subunit mutations on m-calpain activity, the pH-activity profile, Ca(2+)-sensitivity, and autolysis were measured. The importance of these positions was suggested by sequence comparisons between the calpain and papain families of cysteine proteinases. Asp-104 is adjacent to the active-site Cys-105, and Pro-287 is adjacent to the active-site Asn-286 and probably to the active-site His-262; both Asp-104 and Pro-287 are absolutely conserved in the known calpains, but are replaced by highly conserved serine residues in the papains. The single mutants had approx. 10-15% of wild-type activity, due mainly to a decrease in kcat, since Km was only slightly increased. The Pro-287-->Ser mutation appeared to cause a local perturbation of the catalytic Cys-105/His-262 catalytic ion pair, reducing its efficiency without major effect on the conformation and stability of the enzyme. The Asp-104-->Ser mutation caused a marked narrowing of the pH-activity curve, a 9-fold increase in Ca2+ requirement, and an acceleration of autolysis, when compared with the wild-type enzyme. The results indicated that Asp-104 alters the nature of its interaction with the catalytic ion pair during Ca(2+)-induced conformational change in calpain. This interaction may be direct or indirect, but is important in activation of the enzyme. PMID:8912692

  9. Structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 reveals an active site for an atypical phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Irani, Seema; Yogesha, S D; Mayfield, Joshua; Zhang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yong; Matthews, Wendy L; Nie, Grace; Prescott, Nicholas A; Zhang, Yan Jessie

    2016-03-01

    Changes in the phosphorylation status of the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) correlate with the process of eukaryotic transcription. The yeast protein regulator of transcription 1 (Rtr1) and the human homolog RNAPII-associated protein 2 (RPAP2) may function as CTD phosphatases; however, crystal structures of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1 lack a consensus active site. We identified a phosphoryl transfer domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 by obtaining and characterizing a 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure. We identified a putative substrate-binding pocket in a deep groove between the zinc finger domain and a pair of helices that contained a trapped sulfate ion. Because sulfate mimics the chemistry of a phosphate group, this structural data suggested that this groove represents the phosphoryl transfer active site. Mutagenesis of the residues lining this groove disrupted catalytic activity of the enzyme assayed in vitro with a fluorescent chemical substrate, and expression of the mutated Rtr1 failed to rescue growth of yeast lacking Rtr1. Characterization of the phosphatase activity of RPAP2 and a mutant of the conserved putative catalytic site in the same chemical assay indicated a conserved reaction mechanism. Our data indicated that the structure of the phosphoryl transfer domain and reaction mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer activity of Rtr1 is distinct from those of other phosphatase families.

  10. Mutational analysis of the lac regulatory region: second-site changes that activate mutant promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Rothmel, R K; LeClerc, J E

    1989-01-01

    Second-site mutations that restored activity to severe lacP1 down-promoter mutants were isolated. This was accomplished by using a bacteriophage f1 vector containing a fusion of the mutant E. coli lac promoters with the structural gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), so that a system was provided for selecting phage revertants (or pseudorevertants) that conferred resistance of phage-infected cells to chloramphenicol. Among the second-site changes that relieved defects in mutant lac promoters, the only one that restored lacP1 activity was a T----G substitution at position -14, a weakly conserved site in E. coli promoters. Three other sequence changes, G----A at -2, A----T at +1, and C----A at +10, activated nascent promoters in the lac regulatory region. The nascent promoters conformed to the consensus rule, that activity is gained by sequence changes toward homology with consensus sequences at the -35 and -10 regions of the promoter. However, the relative activities of some promoters cannot be explained solely by consideration of their conserved sequence elements. Images PMID:2660105

  11. Structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 reveals an active site for an atypical phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, Joshua; Zhang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yong; Matthews, Wendy L.; Nie, Grace; Prescott, Nicholas A.; Zhang, Yan Jessie

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the phosphorylation status of the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) correlate with the process of eukaryotic transcription. The yeast protein regulator of transcription 1 (Rtr1) and the human homolog RNAPII-associated protein 2 (RPAP2) may function as CTD phosphatases; however, crystal structures of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1 lack a consensus active site. We identified a phosphoryl transfer domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 by obtaining and characterizing a 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure. We identified a putative substrate-binding pocket in a deep groove between the zinc finger domain and a pair of helices that contained a trapped sulfate ion. Because sulfate mimics the chemistry of a phosphate group, this structural data suggested that this groove represents the phosphoryl transfer active site. Mutagenesis of the residues lining this groove disrupted catalytic activity of the enzyme assayed in vitro with a fluorescent chemical substrate, and expression of the mutated Rtr1 failed to rescue growth of yeast lacking Rtr1. Characterization of the phosphatase activity of RPAP2 and a mutant of the conserved putative catalytic site in the same chemical assay indicated a conserved reaction mechanism. Our data indicated that the structure of the phosphoryl transfer domain and reaction mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer activity of Rtr1 is distinct from those of other phosphatase families. PMID:26933063

  12. Sequences flanking the core-binding site modulate glucocorticoid receptor structure and activity

    PubMed Central

    Schöne, Stefanie; Jurk, Marcel; Helabad, Mahdi Bagherpoor; Dror, Iris; Lebars, Isabelle; Kieffer, Bruno; Imhof, Petra; Rohs, Remo; Vingron, Martin; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H.

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds as a homodimer to genomic response elements, which have particular sequence and shape characteristics. Here we show that the nucleotides directly flanking the core-binding site, differ depending on the strength of GR-dependent activation of nearby genes. Our study indicates that these flanking nucleotides change the three-dimensional structure of the DNA-binding site, the DNA-binding domain of GR and the quaternary structure of the dimeric complex. Functional studies in a defined genomic context show that sequence-induced changes in GR activity cannot be explained by differences in GR occupancy. Rather, mutating the dimerization interface mitigates DNA-induced changes in both activity and structure, arguing for a role of DNA-induced structural changes in modulating GR activity. Together, our study shows that DNA sequence identity of genomic binding sites modulates GR activity downstream of binding, which may play a role in achieving regulatory specificity towards individual target genes. PMID:27581526

  13. B-branch electron transfer in reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides assessed with site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Arjo L; Neerken, Sieglinde; de Wijn, Rik; Permentier, Hjalmar P; Gast, Peter; Vijgenboom, Erik; Hoff, Arnold J

    2002-01-01

    Mutants of Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides are described which were designed to study electron transfer along the so-called B-branch of reaction center (RC) cofactors. Combining the mutation L(M214)H, which results in the incorporation of a bacteriochlorophyll, beta, for H(A) [Kirmaier et al. (1991) Science 251: 922-927] with two mutations, G(M203)D and Y(M210)W, near B(A), we have created a double and a triple mutant with long lifetimes of the excited state P(*) of the primary donor P, viz. 80 and 160 ps at room temperature, respectively. The yield of P(+)Q(A) (-) formation in these mutants is reduced to 50 and 30%, respectively, of that in wildtype RCs. For both mutants, the quantum yield of P(+)H(B) (-) formation was less than 10%, in contrast to the 15% B-branch electron transfer demonstrated in RCs of a similar mutant of Rba. capsulatus with a P(*) lifetime of 15 ps [Heller et al. (1995) Science 269: 940-945]. We conclude that the lifetime of P(*) is not a governing factor in switching to B-branch electron transfer. The direct photoreduction of the secondary quinone, Q(B), was studied with a triple mutant combining the G(M203)D, L(M214)H and A(M260)W mutations. In this triple mutant Q(A) does not bind to the reaction center [Ridge et al. (1999) Photosynth Res 59: 9-26]. It is shown that B-branch electron transfer leading to P(+)Q(B) (-) formation occurs to a minor extent at both room temperature and at cryogenic temperatures (about 3% following a saturating laser flash at 20 K). In contrast, in wildtype RCs P(+)Q(B) (-) formation involves the A-branch and does not occur at all at cryogenic temperatures. Attempts to accumulate the P(+)Q(B) (-) state under continuous illumination were not successful. Charge recombination of P(+)Q(B) (-) formed by B-branch electron transfer in the new mutant is much faster (seconds) than has been previously reported for charge recombination of P(+)Q(B) (-) trapped in wildtype RCs (10(5) s) [Kleinfeld et al. (1984b) Biochemistry 23

  14. Selective targeting of the conserved active site cysteine of Mycobacterium tuberculosis methionine aminopeptidase with electrophilic reagents.

    PubMed

    Reddi, Ravikumar; Arya, Tarun; Kishor, Chandan; Gumpena, Rajesh; Ganji, Roopa J; Bhukya, Supriya; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs) cleave initiator methionine from ~ 70% of the newly synthesized proteins in every living cell, and specific inhibition or knockdown of this function is detrimental. MetAPs are metalloenzymes, and are broadly classified into two subtypes, type I and type II. Bacteria contain only type I MetAPs, and the active site of these enzymes contains a conserved cysteine. By contrast, in type II enzymes the analogous position is occupied by a conserved glycine. Here, we report the reactivity of the active site cysteine in a type I MetAP, MetAP1c, of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtMetAP1c) towards highly selective cysteine-specific reagents. The authenticity of selective modification of Cys105 of MtMetAP1c was established by using site-directed mutagenesis and crystal structure determination of covalent and noncovalent complexes. On the basis of these observations, we propose that metal ions in the active site assist in the covalent modification of Cys105 by orienting the reagents appropriately for a successful reaction. These studies establish, for the first time, that the conserved cysteine of type I MetAPs can be targeted for selective inhibition, and we believe that this chemistry can be exploited for further drug discovery efforts regarding microbial MetAPs.

  15. The Ribotoxin Restrictocin Recognizes Its RNA Substrate by Selective Engagement of Active Site Residues

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Restrictocin and related fungal endoribonucleases from the α-sarcin family site-specifically cleave the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) on the ribosome to inhibit translation and ultimately trigger cell death. Previous studies showed that the SRL folds into a bulged-G motif and tetraloop, with restrictocin achieving a specificity of ∼1000-fold by recognizing both motifs only after the initial binding step. Here, we identify contacts within the protein−RNA interface and determine the extent to which each one contributes to enzyme specificity by examining the effect of protein mutations on the cleavage of the SRL substrate compared to a variety of other RNA substrates. As with other biomolecular interfaces, only a subset of contacts contributes to specificity. One contact of this subset is critical, with the H49A mutation resulting in quantitative loss of specificity. Maximum catalytic activity occurs when both motifs of the SRL are present, with the major contribution involving the bulged-G motif recognized by three lysine residues located adjacent to the active site: K110, K111, and K113. Our findings support a kinetic proofreading mechanism in which the active site residues H49 and, to a lesser extent, Y47 make greater catalytic contributions to SRL cleavage than to suboptimal substrates. This systematic and quantitative analysis begins to elucidate the principles governing RNA recognition by a site-specific endonuclease and may thus serve as a mechanistic model for investigating other RNA modifying enzymes. PMID:21417210

  16. Computational approaches to find the active binding sites of biological targets against busulfan.

    PubMed

    Karthick, T; Tandon, Poonam

    2016-06-01

    Determination of electrophilic and nucleophilic sites of a molecule is the primary task to find the active sites of the lead molecule. In the present study, the active sites of busulfan have been predicted by molecular electrostatic potential surface and Fukui function analysis with the help of dispersion corrected density functional theory. Similarly, the identification of active binding sites of the proteins against lead compound plays a vital role in the field of drug discovery. Rigid and flexible molecular docking approaches are used for this purpose. For rigid docking, Hex 8.0.0 software employing fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm has been used. The partial flexible blind docking simulations have been performed with AutoDock 4.2 software; where a Lamarckian genetic algorithm is employed. The results showed that the most electrophilic atoms of busulfan bind with the targets. It is clear from the docking studies that busulfan has inhibition capability toward the targets 12CA and 1BZM. Graphical Abstract Docking of ligand and protein.

  17. A Frontier Molecular Orbital determination of the active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on a dispersed metal catalysts. The basis for these calculations is the reported finding that a large number of catalyzed reactions take place on single atom active sites on the metal surface. Thus, these sites can be considered as surface complexes made up of the central active atom surrounded by near-neighbor metal atom ``ligands`` with localized surface orbitals perturbed only by these ``ligands``. These ``complexes`` are based on a twelve coordinate species with the ``ligands`` attached to the t{sub 2g} orbitals and the coordinate axes coincident with the direction of the e{sub g} orbitals on the central atom. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  18. A Frontier Molecular Orbital determination of the active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on a dispersed metal catalysts. The basis for these calculations is the reported finding that a large number of catalyzed reactions take place on single atom active sites on the metal surface. Thus, these sites can be considered as surface complexes made up of the central active atom surrounded by near-neighbor metal atom ligands'' with localized surface orbitals perturbed only by these ligands''. These complexes'' are based on a twelve coordinate species with the ligands'' attached to the t{sub 2g} orbitals and the coordinate axes coincident with the direction of the e{sub g} orbitals on the central atom. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  19. Lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells can be focused at sites of tumor growth by products of macrophage activation

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, R.J.; Gruber, S.A.; Sawyer, M.D.; Hoffman, R.; Ochoa, A.; Bach, F.H.; Simmons, R.L.

    1987-08-01

    Successful adoptive cancer immunotherapy presumably depends on the accumulation of tumoricidal leukocytes at the sites of tumor growth. Large numbers of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells can be generated in vitro by growth in high concentrations of interleukin-2 (IL-2), but relatively few arrive at the tumor site after intravenous injection. We hypothesize that the delivery of LAK cells to tumor sites may be augmented by previously demonstrated lymphocyte-recruiting factors, including activated macrophage products such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor. /sup 111/Indium-labeled LAK cells were injected intravenously into syngeneic mice bearing the macrophage activator endotoxin (LPS) in one hind footpad, and saline solution was injected into the contralateral footpad. Significantly more activity was recovered from the LPS-bearing footpad at all times during a 96-hour period. Recombinant IL-1 also attracted more LAK cells after injection into tumor-free hind footpads. Furthermore, LAK cells preferentially homed to hind footpads that were bearing 3-day established sarcomas after intralesional injections of LPS, IL-1, or tumor necrosis factor when compared with contralateral tumor-bearing footpads injected with saline solution alone. In preliminary experiments, mice with hind-footpad tumors appeared to survive longer after combined systemic IL-2 and LAK therapy if intralesional LPS was administered. These studies demonstrate that macrophage activation factors that have been shown capable of attracting circulating normal lymphocytes can also effectively attract LAK cells from the circulation. By the stimulation of macrophages at the sites of tumor growth, more LAK cells can be attracted. It is hoped that by focusing the migration of LAK cells to tumors, LAK cells and IL-2 would effect tumor regression more efficiently and with less toxicity.

  20. Technical basis for classification of low-activity waste fraction from Hanford site tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, C.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-17

    The overall objective of this report is to provide a technical basis to support a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission determination to classify the low-activity waste from the Hanford Site single-shell and double-shell tanks as `incidental` wastes after removal of additional radionuclides and immobilization.The proposed processing method, in addition to the previous radionuclide removal efforts, will remove the largest practical amount of total site radioactivity, attributable to high-level wastes, for disposal in a deep geologic repository. The remainder of the waste would be considered `incidental` waste and could be disposed onsite.

  1. Technical basis for classification of low-activity waste fraction from Hanford site tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, C.A.

    1996-09-20

    The overall objective of this report is to provide a technical basis to support a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission determination to classify the low-activity waste from the Hanford Site single-shell and double-shell tanks as `incidental` wastes after removal of additional radionuclides and immobilization.The proposed processing method, in addition to the previous radionuclide removal efforts, will remove the largest practical amount of total site radioactivity, attributable to high-level waste, for disposal is a deep geologic repository. The remainder of the waste would be considered `incidental` waste and could be disposed onsite.

  2. Particle Size Distribution Data From Existing Boreholes at the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Site

    SciTech Connect

    Valenta, Michelle M.; Martin, Maria B.; Moreno, Jorge R.; Ferri, Rosalie M.; Horton, Duane G.; Reidel, Stephen P.

    2000-09-25

    This report provides particle size distribution data for samples near the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) Site that were archived in the Hanford Geotechnical Sample Library. Seventy-nine sediment samples were analyzed from four boreholes. Samples were collected from every ten feet in the boreholes. Eightly percent of the samples were classified as slightly gravelly sand. Fifteen percent were classified as gravelly sand, gravelly silty sand, or sandy gravels. These data indicate that the particle size of the sediment is consistent across the ILAW site and is dominated by sand in the upper part of the Hanford formation with more gravel rich units in the lower part.

  3. A new active solder for joining electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH,RONALD W.; VIANCO,PAUL T.; HERNANDEZ,CYNTHIA L.; LUGSCHEIDER,E.; RASS,I.; HILLEN,F.

    2000-05-11

    Electronic components and micro-sensors utilize ceramic substrates, copper and aluminum interconnect and silicon. The joining of these combinations require pre-metallization such that solders with fluxes can wet such combinations of metals and ceramics. The paper will present a new solder alloy that can bond metals, ceramics and composites. The alloy directly wets and bonds in air without the use flux or premetallized layers. The paper will present typical processing steps and joint microstructures in copper, aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, and silicon joints.

  4. ETMB-RBF: Discrimination of Metal-Binding Sites in Electron Transporters Based on RBF Networks with PSSM Profiles and Significant Amino Acid Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Yu-Yen; Chen, Shu-An; Wu, Sheng-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Background Cellular respiration is the process by which cells obtain energy from glucose and is a very important biological process in living cell. As cells do cellular respiration, they need a pathway to store and transport electrons, the electron transport chain. The function of the electron transport chain is to produce a trans-membrane proton electrochemical gradient as a result of oxidation–reduction reactions. In these oxidation–reduction reactions in electron transport chains, metal ions play very important role as electron donor and acceptor. For example, Fe ions are in complex I and complex II, and Cu ions are in complex IV. Therefore, to identify metal-binding sites in electron transporters is an important issue in helping biologists better understand the workings of the electron transport chain. Methods We propose a method based on Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) profiles and significant amino acid pairs to identify metal-binding residues in electron transport proteins. Results We have selected a non-redundant set of 55 metal-binding electron transport proteins as our dataset. The proposed method can predict metal-binding sites in electron transport proteins with an average 10-fold cross-validation accuracy of 93.2% and 93.1% for metal-binding cysteine and histidine, respectively. Compared with the general metal-binding predictor from A. Passerini et al., the proposed method can improve over 9% of sensitivity, and 14% specificity on the independent dataset in identifying metal-binding cysteines. The proposed method can also improve almost 76% sensitivity with same specificity in metal-binding histidine, and MCC is also improved from 0.28 to 0.88. Conclusions We have developed a novel approach based on PSSM profiles and significant amino acid pairs for identifying metal-binding sites from electron transport proteins. The proposed approach achieved a significant improvement with independent test set of metal-binding electron transport proteins

  5. Controlling activation site density by low-energy far-field stimulation in cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Hörning, Marcel; Takagi, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-06-01

    Tachycardia and fibrillation are potentially fatal arrhythmias associated with the formation of rotating spiral waves in the heart. Presently, the termination of these types of arrhythmia is achieved by use of antitachycardia pacing or cardioversion. However, these techniques have serious drawbacks, in that they either have limited application or produce undesirable side effects. Low-energy far-field stimulation has recently been proposed as a superior therapy. This proposed therapeutic method would exploit the phenomenon in which the application of low-energy far-field shocks induces a large number of activation sites ("virtual electrodes") in tissue. It has been found that the formation of such sites can lead to the termination of undesired states in the heart and the restoration of normal beating. In this study we investigate a particular aspect of this method. Here we seek to determine how the activation site density depends on the applied electric field through in vitro experiments carried out on neonatal rat cardiac tissue cultures. The results indicate that the activation site density increases exponentially as a function of the intracellular conductivity and the level of cell isotropy. Additionally, we report numerical results obtained from bidomain simulations of the Beeler-Reuter model that are quantitatively consistent with our experimental results. Also, we derive an intuitive analytical framework that describes the activation site density and provides useful information for determining the ratio of longitudinal to transverse conductivity in a cardiac tissue culture. The results obtained here should be useful in the development of an actual therapeutic method based on low-energy far-field pacing. In addition, they provide a deeper understanding of the intrinsic properties of cardiac cells.

  6. Human 15-LOX-1 active site mutations alter inhibitor binding and decrease potency.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Michelle; van Hoorebeke, Christopher; Horn, Thomas; Deschamps, Joshua; Freedman, J Cody; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Jacobson, Matthew P; Holman, Theodore

    2016-11-01

    Human 15-lipoxygenase-1 (h15-LOX-1 or h12/15-LOX) reacts with polyunsaturated fatty acids and produces bioactive lipid derivatives that are implicated in many important human diseases. One such disease is stroke, which is the fifth leading cause of death and the first leading cause of disability in America. The discovery of h15-LOX-1 inhibitors could potentially lead to novel therapeutics in the treatment of stroke, however, little is known about the inhibitor/active site interaction. This study utilizes site-directed mutagenesis, guided in part by molecular modeling, to gain a better structural understanding of inhibitor interactions within the active site. We have generated eight mutants (R402L, R404L, F414I, F414W, E356Q, Q547L, L407A, I417A) of h15-LOX-1 to determine whether these active site residues interact with two h15-LOX-1 inhibitors, ML351 and an ML094 derivative, compound 18. IC50 values and steady-state inhibition kinetics were determined for the eight mutants, with four of the mutants affecting inhibitor potency relative to wild type h15-LOX-1 (F414I, F414W, E356Q and L407A). The data indicate that ML351 and compound 18, bind in a similar manner in the active site to an aromatic pocket close to F414 but have subtle differences in their specific binding modes. This information establishes the binding mode for ML094 and ML351 and will be leveraged to develop next-generation inhibitors.

  7. Controlling activation site density by low-energy far-field stimulation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörning, Marcel; Takagi, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-06-01

    Tachycardia and fibrillation are potentially fatal arrhythmias associated with the formation of rotating spiral waves in the heart. Presently, the termination of these types of arrhythmia is achieved by use of antitachycardia pacing or cardioversion. However, these techniques have serious drawbacks, in that they either have limited application or produce undesirable side effects. Low-energy far-field stimulation has recently been proposed as a superior therapy. This proposed therapeutic method would exploit the phenomenon in which the application of low-energy far-field shocks induces a large number of activation sites (“virtual electrodes”) in tissue. It has been found that the formation of such sites can lead to the termination of undesired states in the heart and the restoration of normal beating. In this study we investigate a particular aspect of this method. Here we seek to determine how the activation site density depends on the applied electric field through in vitro experiments carried out on neonatal rat cardiac tissue cultures. The results indicate that the activation site density increases exponentially as a function of the intracellular conductivity and the level of cell isotropy. Additionally, we report numerical results obtained from bidomain simulations of the Beeler-Reuter model that are quantitatively consistent with our experimental results. Also, we derive an intuitive analytical framework that describes the activation site density and provides useful information for determining the ratio of longitudinal to transverse conductivity in a cardiac tissue culture. The results obtained here should be useful in the development of an actual therapeutic method based on low-energy far-field pacing. In addition, they provide a deeper understanding of the intrinsic properties of cardiac cells.

  8. Threshold occupancy and specific cation binding modes in the hammerhead ribozyme active site are required for active conformation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Giambaşu, George M.; Sosa, Carlos P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.; York, Darrin M.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between formation of active in-line attack conformations and monovalent (Na+) and divalent (Mg2+) metal ion binding in the hammerhead ribozyme has been explored with molecular dynamics simulations. To stabilize repulsions between negatively charged groups, different requirements of threshold occupancy of metal ions were observed in the reactant and activated precursor states both in the presence or absence of a Mg2+ in the active site. Specific bridging coordination patterns of the ions are correlated with the formation of active in-line attack conformations and can be accommodated in both cases. Furthermore, simulation results suggest that the hammerhead ribozyme folds to form an electronegative recruiting pocket that attracts high local concentrations of positive charge. The present simulations help to reconcile experiments that probe the metal ion sensitivity of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis and support the supposition that Mg2+, in addition to stabilizing active conformations, plays a specific chemical role in catalysis. PMID:19265710

  9. Low temperature syntheses and reactivity of Cu2O2 active-site models.

    PubMed

    Citek, Cooper; Herres-Pawlis, Sonja; Stack, T Daniel P

    2015-08-18

    Nature's facility with dioxygen outmatches modern chemistry in the oxidation and oxygenation of materials and substrates for biosynthesis and cellular metabolism. The Earth's most abundant naturally occurring oxidant is-frankly-poorly understood and controlled, and thus underused. Copper-based enzyme metallocofactors are ubiquitous to the efficient consumption of dioxygen by all domains of life. Over the last several decades, we have joined many research groups in the study of copper- and dioxygen-dependent enzymes through close investigation of synthetically derived, small-molecule active-site analogs. Simple copper-dioxygen clusters bearing structural and spectroscopic similarity to dioxygen-activating enzymes can be probed for their fundamental geometrical, electronic, and reactive properties using the tools available to inorganic and synthetic chemistry. Our exploration of the copper-dioxygen arena has sustained product evaluation of the key dynamics and reactivity of binuclear Cu2O2 compounds. Almost exclusively operating at low temperatures, from -78 °C to solution characterization even at -125 °C, we have identified numerous compounds supported by simple and easily accessed, low molecular weight ligands-chiefly families of bidentate diamine chelates. We have found that by stripping away complexity in comparison to extended protein tertiary structures or sophisticated, multinucleating architectures, we can experimentally manipulate activated compounds and open pathways of reactivity toward exogenous substrates that both inform on and extend fundamental mechanisms of oxygenase enzymes. Our recent successes have advanced understanding of the tyrosinase enzyme, and related hemocyanin and NspF, and the copper membrane monooxygenases, specifically particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) and ammonia monooxygenase (AMO). Tyrosinase, ubiquitously distributed throughout life, is fundamental to the copper-based oxidation of phenols and the production of chromophores

  10. Localization of the active site of an enzyme, bacterial luciferase, using two-quantum affinity modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benimetskaya, L. Z.; Gitelzon, I. I.; Kozionov, Andrew L.; Novozhilov, S. Y.; Petushkov, V. N.; Rodionova, N. S.; Stockman, Mark I.

    1991-11-01

    For the first time the method of two-quantum affinity modification has been employed to probe the structure of an enzyme, bacterial luciferase. Position of the flavin-binding site of this enzyme, which was previously unknown, has been established. The obtained data indicate that the flavin site is positioned on the (alpha) -subunit. The closest contact of the protein chain of the enzyme with the chromophoric group of the flavin takes place near 80 +/- 10 and 120 +/- 10 amino acid residues; the regions 50 +/- 10 and 215 +/- 10 are also close to the flavin. The established localization does not contradict suggestions on positions of the flavin and phosphate sites of the bacterial luciferase, which had earlier been made from the data on evolutionary stability of various luciferases. The present method can, in principle, be applied to a great number of enzymes, including all flavin-dependent enzymes. Enzymatic catalysis has high speed and specificity. Creation of a method of determination of the elements of the primary structure of a protein, making up the active site (in which substratum conversion occurs), could be a significant advance in clearing up mechanisms of enzymatic catalysis. It was proposed to localize active sites of the enzymes, whose substrata are chromophores, using this method of two-quantum affinity modification. An enzyme- substratum complex is irradiated with laser light of sufficiently long wavelength ((lambda) 300 nm) which is not directly absorbed by the enzyme. Two-quantum quasiresonant excitation of the substratum activates it to the state with energy 5-7 eV, which is then radiativelessly transferred to neighboring protein groups. This energy exceeds the energy of activation of peptide bond breakage. Therefore, the enzyme will be disrupted in the vicinity of its active site. In the present paper the above approach has been implemented for the first time. Information has been obtained about the position of the flavin-binding site of bacterial

  11. Site energies of active and inactive pheophytins in the reaction center of Photosystem II from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Acharya, K; Neupane, B; Zazubovich, V; Sayre, R T; Picorel, R; Seibert, M; Jankowiak, R

    2012-03-29

    It is widely accepted that the primary electron acceptor in various Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) preparations is pheophytin a (Pheo a) within the D1 protein (Pheo(D1)), while Pheo(D2) (within the D2 protein) is photochemically inactive. The Pheo site energies, however, have remained elusive, due to inherent spectral congestion. While most researchers over the past two decades placed the Q(y)-states of Pheo(D1) and Pheo(D2) bands near 678-684 and 668-672 nm, respectively, recent modeling [Raszewski et al. Biophys. J. 2005, 88, 986 - 998; Cox et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 12364 - 12374] of the electronic structure of the PSII RC reversed the assignment of the active and inactive Pheos, suggesting that the mean site energy of Pheo(D1) is near 672 nm, whereas Pheo(D2) (~677.5 nm) and Chl(D1) (~680 nm) have the lowest energies (i.e., the Pheo(D2)-dominated exciton is the lowest excited state). In contrast, chemical pigment exchange experiments on isolated RCs suggested that both pheophytins have their Q(y) absorption maxima at 676-680 nm [Germano et al. Biochemistry 2001, 40, 11472 - 11482; Germano et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 86, 1664 - 1672]. To provide more insight into the site energies of both Pheo(D1) and Pheo(D2) (including the corresponding Q(x) transitions, which are often claimed to be degenerate at 543 nm) and to attest that the above two assignments are most likely incorrect, we studied a large number of isolated RC preparations from spinach and wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (at different levels of intactness) as well as the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (D2-L209H), in which the active branch Pheo(D1) is genetically replaced with chlorophyll a (Chl a). We show that the Q(x)-/Q(y)-region site energies of Pheo(D1) and Pheo(D2) are ~545/680 nm and ~541.5/670 nm, respectively, in good agreement with our previous assignment [Jankowiak et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2002, 106, 8803 - 8814]. The latter values should be used to model excitonic

  12. Site Energies of Active and Inactive Pheophytins in the Reaction Center of Photosystem II from Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, K.; Neupane, B.; Zazubovich, V.; Sayre, R. T.; Picorel, R.; Seibert, M.; Jankowiak, R.

    2012-03-29

    It is widely accepted that the primary electron acceptor in various Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) preparations is pheophytin {alpha} (Pheo {alpha}) within the D1 protein (Pheo{sub D1}), while Pheo{sub D2} (within the D2 protein) is photochemically inactive. The Pheo site energies, however, have remained elusive, due to inherent spectral congestion. While most researchers over the past two decades placed the Q{sub y}-states of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} bands near 678-684 and 668-672 nm, respectively, recent modeling [Raszewski et al. Biophys. J. 2005, 88, 986-998; Cox et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 12364-12374] of the electronic structure of the PSII RC reversed the assignment of the active and inactive Pheos, suggesting that the mean site energy of Pheo{sub D1} is near 672 nm, whereas Pheo{sub D2} ({approx}677.5 nm) and Chl{sub D1} ({approx}680 nm) have the lowest energies (i.e., the Pheo{sub D2}-dominated exciton is the lowest excited state). In contrast, chemical pigment exchange experiments on isolated RCs suggested that both pheophytins have their Q{sub y} absorption maxima at 676-680 nm [Germano et al. Biochemistry 2001, 40, 11472-11482; Germano et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 86, 1664-1672]. To provide more insight into the site energies of both Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} (including the corresponding Q{sub x} transitions, which are often claimed to be degenerate at 543 nm) and to attest that the above two assignments are most likely incorrect, we studied a large number of isolated RC preparations from spinach and wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (at different levels of intactness) as well as the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (D2-L209H), in which the active branch Pheo{sub D1} is genetically replaced with chlorophyll {alpha} (Chl {alpha}). We show that the Q{sub x}-/Q{sub y}-region site energies of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} are {approx}545/680 nm and {approx}541.5/670 nm, respectively, in good agreement with our previous assignment

  13. Stable aqueous dispersions of optically and electronically active phosphorene

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joohoon; Wells, Spencer A.; Wood, Joshua D.; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Liu, Xiaolong; Ryder, Christopher R.; Zhu, Jian; Guest, Jeffrey R.; Husko, Chad A.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and exploiting the remarkable optical and electronic properties of phosphorene require mass production methods that avoid chemical degradation. Although solution-based strategies have been developed for scalable exfoliation of black phosphorus, these techniques have thus far used anhydrous organic solvents in an effort to minimize exposure to known oxidants, but at the cost of limited exfoliation yield and flake size distribution. Here, we present an alternative phosphorene production method based on surfactant-assisted exfoliation and postprocessing of black phosphorus in deoxygenated water. From comprehensive microscopic and spectroscopic analysis, this approach is shown to yield phosphorene dispersions that are stable, highly concentrated, and comparable to micromechanically exfoliated phosphorene in structure and chemistry. Due to the high exfoliation efficiency of this process, the resulting phosphorene flakes are thinner than anhydrous organic solvent dispersions, thus allowing the observation of layer-dependent photoluminescence down to the monolayer limit. Furthermore, to demonstrate preservation of electronic properties following solution processing, the aqueous-exfoliated phosphorene flakes are used in field-effect transistors with high drive currents and current modulation ratios. Overall, this method enables the isolation and mass production of few-layer phosphorene, which will accelerate ongoing efforts to realize a diverse range of phosphorene-based applications. PMID:27092006

  14. Impact of single-site axonal GABAergic synaptic events on cerebellar interneuron activity

    PubMed Central

    Zorrilla de San Martin, Javier; Jalil, Abdelali

    2015-01-01

    Axonal ionotropic receptors are present in a variety of neuronal types, and their function has largely been associated with the modulation of axonal activity and synaptic release. It is usually assumed that activation of axonal GABAARs comes from spillover, but in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs) the GABA source is different: in these cells, GABA release activates presynaptic GABAA autoreceptors (autoRs) together with postsynaptic targets, producing an autoR-mediated synaptic event. The frequency of presynaptic, autoR-mediated miniature currents is twice that of their somatodendritic counterparts, suggesting that autoR-mediated responses have an important effect on interneuron activity. Here, we used local Ca2+ photolysis in MLI axons of juvenile rats to evoke GABA release from individual varicosities to study the activation of axonal autoRs in single release sites. Our data show that single-site autoR conductances are similar to postsynaptic dendritic conductances. In conditions of high [Cl−]i, autoR-mediated conductances range from 1 to 5 nS; this corresponds to ∼30–150 GABAA channels per presynaptic varicosity, a value close to the number of channels in postsynaptic densities. Voltage responses produced by the activation of autoRs in single varicosities are amplified by a Nav-dependent mechanism and propagate along the axon with a length constant of 91 µm. Immunolabeling determination of synapse location shows that on average, one third of the synapses produce autoR-mediated signals that are large enough to reach the axon initial segment. Finally, we show that single-site activation of presynaptic GABAA autoRs leads to an increase in MLI excitability and thus conveys a strong feedback signal that contributes to spiking activity. PMID:26621773

  15. Impact of single-site axonal GABAergic synaptic events on cerebellar interneuron activity.

    PubMed

    de San Martin, Javier Zorrilla; Jalil, Abdelali; Trigo, Federico F

    2015-12-01

    Axonal ionotropic receptors are present in a variety of neuronal types, and their function has largely been associated with the modulation of axonal activity and synaptic release. It is usually assumed that activation of axonal GABA(A)Rs comes from spillover, but in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs) the GABA source is different: in these cells, GABA release activates presynaptic GABA(A) autoreceptors (autoRs) together with postsynaptic targets, producing an autoR-mediated synaptic event. The frequency of presynaptic, autoR-mediated miniature currents is twice that of their somatodendritic counterparts, suggesting that autoR-mediated responses have an important effect on interneuron activity. Here, we used local Ca(2+) photolysis in MLI axons of juvenile rats to evoke GABA release from individual varicosities to study the activation of axonal autoRs in single release sites. Our data show that single-site autoR conductances are similar to postsynaptic dendritic conductances. In conditions of high [Cl(-)](i), autoR-mediated conductances range from 1 to 5 nS; this corresponds to ∼30-150 GABA(A) channels per presynaptic varicosity, a value close to the number of channels in postsynaptic densities. Voltage responses produced by the activation of autoRs in single varicosities are amplified by a Na(v)-dependent mechanism and propagate along the axon with a length constant of 91 µm. Immunolabeling determination of synapse location shows that on average, one third of the synapses produce autoR-mediated signals that are large enough to reach the axon initial segment. Finally, we show that single-site activation of presynaptic GABA(A) autoRs leads to an increase in MLI excitability and thus conveys a strong feedback signal that contributes to spiking activity.

  16. Active-site iron dynamics in heme proteins and model compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Kristl L.

    Active-site iron dynamics in heme proteins and model compounds are studied via nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) and compared with other experimental vibrational probes and theoretical calculations, yielding new insight into the vibrational dynamics of biologically significant proteins. NRVS is a novel technique that selectively probes only 57Fe; experiments provide quantitative information on the amplitude and frequency of all normal modes having significant iron vibrational motion. Data from other vibrational probes including traditional Mossbauer, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and inelastic neutron scattering provide complementary information on the vibrational dynamics of the heme-protein system as a whole. Specific iron participation is identified in resonance Raman and inelastic neutron modes when these spectroscopic modes are seen at the same frequency as NRVS vibrations. NRVS data is examined for 57Fe-containing myoglobin, cytochrome f, hemoglobin, and several heme model compounds. A template of heme normal modes is obtained from analyses of several model compound systems: phenyl-like modes or modes associated with the protein peak at very low-energies ˜30--60 cm-1, out-of-plane modes in the ˜70--130 cm-1 region, imidazole or histidine modes near 220 cm-1, in-plane modes from ˜200--500 cm-1, and ligand modes at the highest frequencies ˜460--600 cm-1. A qualitative understanding of the more complicated heme-protein dynamics is obtained by applying this template to the protein vibrational density of states (VDOS). Differences in heme-to-protein binding configurations in myoglobin and cytochrome f are reflected in the iron VDOS, suggesting a structural and dynamical correlation with their different biological functions (i.e. ligand binding versus electron transport). Hemoglobin hybrids containing 57Fe and 56Fe have been prepared for the first time and NRVS measurements show data for the selected alpha or beta subunits within a relatively

  17. Crystallographic Analysis of Active Site Contributions to Regiospecificity in the Diiron Enzyme Toluene 4-Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Lucas J.; Acheson, Justin F.; McCoy, Jason G.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Fox, Brian G.

    2014-10-02

    Crystal structures of toluene 4-monooxygenase hydroxylase in complex with reaction products and effector protein reveal active site interactions leading to regiospecificity. Complexes with phenolic products yield an asymmetric {mu}-phenoxo-bridged diiron center and a shift of diiron ligand E231 into a hydrogen bonding position with conserved T201. In contrast, complexes with inhibitors p-NH{sub 2}-benzoate and p-Br-benzoate showed a {mu}-1,1 coordination of carboxylate oxygen between the iron atoms and only a partial shift in the position of E231. Among active site residues, F176 trapped the aromatic ring of products against a surface of the active site cavity formed by G103, E104 and A107, while F196 positioned the aromatic ring against this surface via a {pi}-stacking interaction. The proximity of G103 and F176 to the para substituent of the substrate aromatic ring and the structure of G103L T4moHD suggest how changes in regiospecificity arise from mutations at G103. Although effector protein binding produced significant shifts in the positions of residues along the outer portion of the active site (T201, N202, and Q228) and in some iron ligands (E231 and E197), surprisingly minor shifts (<1 {angstrom}) were produced in F176, F196, and other interior residues of the active site. Likewise, products bound to the diiron center in either the presence or absence of effector protein did not significantly shift the position of the interior residues, suggesting that positioning of the cognate substrates will not be strongly influenced by effector protein binding. Thus, changes in product distributions in the absence of the effector protein are proposed to arise from differences in rates of chemical steps of the reaction relative to motion of substrates within the active site channel of the uncomplexed, less efficient enzyme, while structural changes in diiron ligand geometry associated with cycling between diferrous and diferric states are discussed for their potential

  18. Active-site modifications of adenylation domains lead to hydrolysis of upstream nonribosomal peptidyl thioester intermediates.

    PubMed

    Uguru, Gabriel C; Milne, Claire; Borg, Matthew; Flett, Fiona; Smith, Colin P; Micklefield, Jason

    2004-04-28

    Site-directed mutagenesis of nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) adenylation (A) domains was investigated as a means to engineer new calcium-dependent antibiotics (CDA) in Streptomyces coelicolor. Single- and double-point mutants of the CDA NRPS module 7, A-domain were generated, which were predicted to alter the specificity of this domain from Asp to Asn. The double-point mutant produced a new peptide CDA2a-7N containing Asn at position 7 as expected. However, in both the single- and the double-point mutants, significant hydrolysis of the CDA-6mer intermediate was evident. One explanation for this is that the mutant module 7 A-domain activates Asn instead of Asp; however, the Asn-thioester intermediate is only weakly recognized by the upstream C-domain acceptor site (a), allowing a water molecule to intercept the hexapeptidyl intermediate in the donor site (d).

  19. Novel active comb-shaped dry electrode for EEG measurement in hairy site.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Wu, Chung-Yu; Wong, Alice May-Kuen; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is an important biopotential, and has been widely applied in clinical applications. The conventional EEG electrode with conductive gels is usually used for measuring EEG. However, the use of conductive gel also encounters with the issue of drying and hardening. Recently, many dry EEG electrodes based on different conductive materials and techniques were proposed to solve the previous issue. However, measuring EEG in the hairy site is still a difficult challenge. In this study, a novel active comb-shaped dry electrode was proposed to measure EEG in hairy site. Different form other comb-shaped or spike-shaped dry electrodes, it can provide more excellent performance of avoiding the signal attenuation, phase distortion, and the reduction of common mode rejection ratio. Even under walking motion, it can effectively acquire EEG in hairy site. Finally, the experiments for alpha rhythm and steady-state visually evoked potential were also tested to validate the proposed electrode.

  20. X-ray imaging of chemically active valence electrons during a pericyclic reaction

    PubMed Central

    Bredtmann, Timm; Ivanov, Misha; Dixit, Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved imaging of chemically active valence electron densities is a long-sought goal, as these electrons dictate the course of chemical reactions. However, X-ray scattering is always dominated by the core and inert valence electrons, making time-resolved X-ray imaging of chemically active valence electron densities extremely challenging. Here we demonstrate an effective and robust method, which emphasizes the information encoded in weakly scattered photons, to image chemically active valence electron densities. The degenerate Cope rearrangement of semibullvalene, a pericyclic reaction, is used as an example to visually illustrate our approach. Our work also provides experimental access to the long-standing problem of synchronous versus asynchronous bond formation and breaking during pericyclic reactions. PMID:25424639

  1. Structural role of the active-site metal in the conformation of Trypanosoma brucei phosphoglycerate mutase.

    PubMed

    Mercaldi, Gustavo F; Pereira, Humberto M; Cordeiro, Artur T; Michels, Paul A M; Thiemann, Otavio H

    2012-06-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutases (PGAMs) participate in both the glycolytic and the gluconeogenic pathways in reversible isomerization of 3-phosphoglycerate and 2-phosphoglycerate. PGAMs are members of two distinct protein families: enzymes that are dependent on or independent of the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate cofactor. We determined the X-ray structure of the monomeric Trypanosoma brucei independent PGAM (TbiPGAM) in its apoenzyme form, and confirmed this observation by small angle X-ray scattering data. Comparing the TbiPGAM structure with the Leishmania mexicana independent PGAM structure, previously reported with a phosphoglycerate molecule bound to the active site, revealed the domain movement resulting from active site occupation. The structure reported here shows the interaction between Asp319 and the metal bound to the active site, and its contribution to the domain movement. Substitution of the metal-binding residue Asp319 by Ala resulted in complete loss of independent PGAM activity, and showed for the first time its involvement in the enzyme's function. As TbiPGAM is an attractive molecular target for drug development, the apoenzyme conformation described here provides opportunities for its use in structure-based drug design approaches. Database Structural data for the Trypanosoma brucei 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-independent phosphoglycerate mutase (iPGAM) has been deposited with the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) Protein Data Bank under code 3NVL.

  2. Substrate conformational transitions in the active site of chorismate mutase: their role in the catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Cui, Q; Lipscomb, W N; Karplus, M

    2001-07-31

    Chorismate mutase acts at the first branch-point of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis and catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to prephenate. The results of molecular dynamics simulations of the substrate in solution and in the active site of chorismate mutase are reported. Two nonreactive conformers of chorismate are found to be more stable than the reactive pseudodiaxial chair conformer in solution. It is shown by QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations, which