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Sample records for active site hydrogen

  1. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-06

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions.

  2. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C.; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F.; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W.; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa. Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  3. Analysis of Hydrogen Tunneling in an Enzyme Active Site using von Neumann Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S.

    2010-01-01

    We build on our earlier quantum wavepacket study of hydrogen transfer in the biological enzyme, soybean lipoxygenase-1, by using von Neumann quantum measurement theory to gain qualitative insights into the transfer event. We treat the enzyme active site as a measurement device which acts on the tunneling hydrogen nucleus via the potential it exerts at each configuration. A series of changing active site geometries during the tunneling process effects a sequential projection of the initial, reactant state onto the final, product state. We study this process using several different kinds of von Neumann measurements and show how a discrete sequence of such measurements not only progressively increases the projection of the hydrogen nuclear wavepacket onto the product side but also favors proton over deuteron transfer. Several qualitative features of the hydrogen tunneling problem found in wavepacket dynamics studies are also recovered here. These include the shift in the “transition state” towards the reactant as a result of nuclear quantization, greater participation of excited states in the case of deuterium, and presence of critical points along the reaction coordinate that facilitate hydrogen and deuterium transfer and coincide with surface crossings. To further “tailor” the dynamics, we construct a perturbation to the sequence of measurements, that is a perturbation to the dynamical sequence of active site geometry evolution, which leads us to insight on the existence of sensitive regions of the reaction profile where subtle changes to the dynamics of the active site can have an effect on the hydrogen and deuterium transfer process. PMID:22933858

  4. All the catalytic active sites of MoS2 for hydrogen evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Du; Qiao, Qiao; ...

    2016-11-29

    MoS2 presents a promising low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), but the understanding about its active sites has remained limited. Here we present an unambiguous study of the catalytic activities of all possible reaction sites of MoS2, including edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries. We demonstrate that, in addition to the well-known catalytically active edge sites, sulfur vacancies provide another major active site for the HER, while the catalytic activity of grain boundaries is much weaker. Here, the intrinsic turnover frequencies (Tafel slopes) of the edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries are estimated to be 7.5more » s–1 (65–75 mV/dec), 3.2 s–1 (65–85 mV/dec), and 0.1 s–1 (120–160 mV/dec), respectively. We also demonstrate that the catalytic activity of sulfur vacancies strongly depends on the density of the vacancies and the local crystalline structure in proximity to the vacancies. Unlike edge sites, whose catalytic activity linearly depends on the length, sulfur vacancies show optimal catalytic activities when the vacancy density is in the range of 7–10%, and the number of sulfur vacancies in high crystalline quality MoS2 is higher than that in low crystalline quality MoS2, which may be related with the proximity of different local crystalline structures to the vacancies.« less

  5. Transfer hydrogenation over sodium-modified ceria: Enrichment of redox sites active for alcohol dehydrogenation

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Nicholas C.; Boote, Brett W.; Naik, Pranjali; ...

    2017-01-17

    Ceria (CeO2) and sodium-modified ceria (Ce-Na) were prepared through combustion synthesis. Palladium was deposited onto the supports (Pd/CeO2 and Pd/Ce-Na) and their activity for the aqueous-phase transfer hydrogenation of phenol using 2-propanol under liquid flow conditions was studied. Pd/Ce-Na showed a marked increase (6×) in transfer hydrogenation activity over Pd/CeO2. Material characterization indicated that water-stable sodium species were not doped into the ceria lattice, but rather existed as subsurface carbonates. Modification of ceria by sodium provided more adsorption and redox active sites (i.e. defects) for 2-propanol dehydrogenation. This effect was an intrinsic property of the Ce-Na support and independent ofmore » Pd. The redox sites active for 2-propanol dehydrogenation were thermodynamically equivalent on both supports/catalysts. At high phenol concentrations, the reaction was limited by 2-propanol adsorption. Furthermore, the difference in catalytic activity was attributed to the different numbers of 2-propanol adsorption and redox active sites on each catalyst.« less

  6. All the catalytic active sites of MoS2 for hydrogen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Du; Qiao, Qiao; Yu, Yifei; Peterson, David; Zafar, Abdullah; Kumar, Raj; Curtarolo, Stefano; Hunte, Frank; Shannon, Steve; Zhu, Yimei; Yang, Weitao; Cao, Linyou

    2016-11-29

    MoS2 presents a promising low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), but the understanding about its active sites has remained limited. Here we present an unambiguous study of the catalytic activities of all possible reaction sites of MoS2, including edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries. We demonstrate that, in addition to the well-known catalytically active edge sites, sulfur vacancies provide another major active site for the HER, while the catalytic activity of grain boundaries is much weaker. Here, the intrinsic turnover frequencies (Tafel slopes) of the edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries are estimated to be 7.5 s–1 (65–75 mV/dec), 3.2 s–1 (65–85 mV/dec), and 0.1 s–1 (120–160 mV/dec), respectively. We also demonstrate that the catalytic activity of sulfur vacancies strongly depends on the density of the vacancies and the local crystalline structure in proximity to the vacancies. Unlike edge sites, whose catalytic activity linearly depends on the length, sulfur vacancies show optimal catalytic activities when the vacancy density is in the range of 7–10%, and the number of sulfur vacancies in high crystalline quality MoS2 is higher than that in low crystalline quality MoS2, which may be related with the proximity of different local crystalline structures to the vacancies.

  7. Hydrogen production by the naked active site of the di-iron hydrogenases in water.

    PubMed

    Zipoli, Federico; Car, Roberto; Cohen, Morrel H; Selloni, Annabella

    2009-10-01

    We explored the reactivity of the active center of the [FeFe]-hydrogenases detached from the enzyme and immersed in acidified water by first-principles Car-Parrinello molecular-dynamics simulations. We focused on the identification of the structures that are stable and metastable in acidified water and on their activity for hydrogen production. Our calculations revealed that the naked active center could be an efficient catalyst provided that electrons are transferred to the cluster. We found that both bridging and terminal isomers are present at equilibrium and that the bridging configuration is essential for efficient hydrogen production. The formation of the hydrogen molecule occurs via sequential protonations of the distal iron and of the N-atom of the S-CH(2)-NH-CH(2)-S chelating group. H(2) desorption does not involve a significant energy barrier, making the process very efficient at room temperature. We established that the bottleneck in the reaction is the direct proton transfer from water to the vacant site of the distal iron. Moreover, we found that even if the terminal isomer is present at the equilibrium, its strong local hydrophobicity prevents poisoning of the cluster.

  8. The effect of methyl-donated hydrogen bonding on active site conformations of hyaluronate lyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migues, Angela N.; Vergenz, Robert A.; Moore, Kevin B.

    2010-03-01

    Geometric evidence shows a val-A252 methyl-donated (MD) hydrogen bond (HB) in hyaluronate lyase (Streptococcus pneumoniae) interacts with nearby NH--O and OH--O HBs, distorting active-site helical structure. Results for model fragment A248-254 are based on experimental heavy atom positions with ab initio hydrogen atoms. The MDHB, with (H-O distance, donor-H-O angle) = (2.3å; 174^o), exhibits more favorable geometry than thr-A253 OH--O HB (1.8å; 170^o) to the same ala-249 C=O. Consequently, thr-253 N-H--O interaction is forced closer to lys-250 C=O than ala-249 C=O(2.6 versus 2.7å). A novel method has been developed to quantify the effects of atomic diplacements on motions of neighboring helices. A coordinate system was established to track the movement of specific residues and to ascertain the effect of such motions on active site conformations.

  9. The hydrogen chemistry of the FeMo-co active site of nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Dance, Ian

    2005-08-10

    The chemical mechanism by which nitrogenase enzymes catalyze the hydrogenation of N(2) (and other multiply bonded substrates) at the N(c)Fe(7)MoS(9)(homocitrate) active site (FeMo-co) is unknown, despite the accumulation of much data on enzyme reactivity and the influences of key amino acids surrounding FeMo-co. The mutual influences of H(2), substrates, and the inhibitor CO on reactivity are key experimental tests for postulated mechanisms. Fundamental to all aspects of mechanism is the accumulation of H atoms (from e(-) + H(+)) on FeMo-co, and the generation and influences of coordinated H(2). Here, I argue that the first introduction of H is via a water chain terminating at water 679 (PDB structure , Azotobacter vinelandii) to one of the mu(3)-S atoms (S3B) of FeMo-co. Next, using validated density functional calculations of a full chemical representation of FeMo-co and its connected residues (alpha-275(Cys), alpha-442(His)), I have characterized more than 80 possibilities for the coordination of up to three H atoms, and H(2), and H + H(2), on the S2A, Fe2, S2B, Fe6, S3B domain of FeMo-co, which is favored by recent targeted mutagenesis results. Included are calculated reaction profiles for movements of H atoms (between S and Fe, and between Fe and Fe), for the generation of Fe-H(2), for association and dissociation of Fe-H(2) at various reduction levels, and for H/H(2) exchange. This is new hydrogen chemistry on an unprecedented coordination frame, with some similarities to established hydrogen coordination chemistry, and with unexpected and unprecedented structures such as Fe(S)(3)(H(2))(2)(H) octahedral coordination. General principles for the hydrogen chemistry of FeMo-co include (1) the stereochemical mobility of H bound to mu(3)-S, (2) the differentiated endo- and exo- positions at Fe for coordination of H and/or H(2), and (3) coordinative allosteric influences in which structural and dynamic aspects of coordination at one Fe atom are affected by

  10. Size Dependence of Atomically Precise Gold Nanoclusters in Chemoselective Hydrogenation and Active Site Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Gao; Jiang, Deen; Kumar, Santosh; Chen, Yuxiang; Jin, Rongchao

    2014-01-01

    We here investigate the catalytic properties of water-soluble Aun(SG)m nanocluster catalysts (H-SG = glutathione) of different sizes, including Au15(SG)13, Au18(SG)14, Au25(SG)18, Au38(SG)24, and captopril-capped Au25(Capt)18 nanoclusters. These Aun(SR)m nanoclusters (-SR represents thiolate generally) are used as homogeneous catalysts (i.e., without supports) in the chemoselective hydrogenation of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde (4-NO2PhCHO) to 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol (4-NO2PhCH2OH) in water with H2 gas (20 bar) as the hydrogen source. These nanocluster catalysts, except Au18(SG)14, remain intact after the catalytic reaction, evidenced by UV-vis spectra which are characteristic of each sized nanoclusters and thus serve as spectroscopic fingerprints . We observe a drastic size-dependence and steric effect of protecting ligands on the gold nanocluster catalysts in the hydrogenation reaction. Density functional theory (DFT) modeling of the 4-nitrobenzaldehyde adsorption shows that both the CHO and NO2 groups are in close interact with the S-Au-S staples on the gold nanocluster surface; the adsorption of the 4-nitrobenzaldehyde molecule on the four different sized Aun(SR)m nanoclusters are moderately strong and similar in strength. The DFT results suggest that the catalytic activity of the Aun(SR)m nanoclusters is primarily determined by the surface area of the Au nanocluster, consistent with the observed trend of the conversion of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde versus the cluster size. Overall, this work offers the molecular insight into the hydrogenation of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and the catalytically active site structure on gold nanocluster catalysts.

  11. Using Unnatural Amino Acids to Probe the Energetics of Oxyanion Hole Hydrogen Bonds in the Ketosteroid Isomerase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds are ubiquitous in enzyme active sites, providing binding interactions and stabilizing charge rearrangements on substrate groups over the course of a reaction. But understanding the origin and magnitude of their catalytic contributions relative to hydrogen bonds made in aqueous solution remains difficult, in part because of complexities encountered in energetic interpretation of traditional site-directed mutagenesis experiments. It has been proposed for ketosteroid isomerase and other enzymes that active site hydrogen bonding groups provide energetic stabilization via “short, strong” or “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds that are formed due to matching of their pKa or proton affinity to that of the transition state. It has also been proposed that the ketosteroid isomerase and other enzyme active sites provide electrostatic environments that result in larger energetic responses (i.e., greater “sensitivity”) to ground-state to transition-state charge rearrangement, relative to aqueous solution, thereby providing catalysis relative to the corresponding reaction in water. To test these models, we substituted tyrosine with fluorotyrosines (F-Tyr’s) in the ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) oxyanion hole to systematically vary the proton affinity of an active site hydrogen bond donor while minimizing steric or structural effects. We found that a 40-fold increase in intrinsic F-Tyr acidity caused no significant change in activity for reactions with three different substrates. F-Tyr substitution did not change the solvent or primary kinetic isotope effect for proton abstraction, consistent with no change in mechanism arising from these substitutions. The observed shallow dependence of activity on the pKa of the substituted Tyr residues suggests that the KSI oxyanion hole does not provide catalysis by forming an energetically exceptional pKa-matched hydrogen bond. In addition, the shallow dependence provides no indication of an active site electrostatic

  12. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 nitrogenase active site to increase photobiological hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Masukawa, Hajime; Inoue, Kazuhito; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Wolk, C Peter; Hausinger, Robert P

    2010-10-01

    Cyanobacteria use sunlight and water to produce hydrogen gas (H₂), which is potentially useful as a clean and renewable biofuel. Photobiological H₂ arises primarily as an inevitable by-product of N₂ fixation by nitrogenase, an oxygen-labile enzyme typically containing an iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) active site. In Anabaena sp. strain 7120, the enzyme is localized to the microaerobic environment of heterocysts, a highly differentiated subset of the filamentous cells. In an effort to increase H₂ production by this strain, six nitrogenase amino acid residues predicted to reside within 5 Å of the FeMo-co were mutated in an attempt to direct electron flow selectively toward proton reduction in the presence of N₂. Most of the 49 variants examined were deficient in N₂-fixing growth and exhibited decreases in their in vivo rates of acetylene reduction. Of greater interest, several variants examined under an N₂ atmosphere significantly increased their in vivo rates of H₂ production, approximating rates equivalent to those under an Ar atmosphere, and accumulated high levels of H₂ compared to the reference strains. These results demonstrate the feasibility of engineering cyanobacterial strains for enhanced photobiological production of H₂ in an aerobic, nitrogen-containing environment.

  13. Hydrogenation of biofuels with formic acid over a palladium-based ternary catalyst with two types of active sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Zhang, Bingsen; Meng, Xiangju; Su, Dang Sheng; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2014-06-01

    A composite catalyst including palladium nanoparticles on titania (TiO2) and on nitrogen-modified porous carbon (Pd/TiO2@N-C) is synthesized from palladium salts, tetrabutyl titanate, and chitosan. N2 sorption isotherms show that the catalyst has a high BET surface area (229 m(2)  g(-1)) and large porosity. XPS and TEM characterization of the catalyst shows that palladium species with different chemical states are well dispersed across the TiO2 and nitrogen-modified porous carbon, respectively. The Pd/TiO2@N-C catalyst is very active and shows excellent stability towards hydrogenation of vanillin to 2-methoxy-4-methylphenol using formic acid as hydrogen source. This activity can be attributed to a synergistic effect between the Pd/TiO2 (a catalyst for dehydrogenation of formic acid) and Pd/N-C (a catalyst for hydrogenation of vanillin) sites.

  14. Electrostatic Fields Near the Active Site of Human Aldose Reductase: 2. New Inhibitors and Complications due to Hydrogen Bonds†

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Cohen, Aina E.; Boxer, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Vibrational Stark effect spectroscopy was used to measure electrostatic fields in the hydrophobic region of the active site of human aldose reductase (hALR2). A new nitrile-containing inhibitor was designed and synthesized, and the x-ray structure of its complex, along with cofactor NADP+, with wild-type hALR2 was determined at 1.3 Å resolution. The nitrile is found to be in close proximity to T113, consistent with a hydrogen bond interaction. Two vibrational absorption peaks were observed at room temperature in the nitrile region when the inhibitor binds to wild-type hALR2, indicating that the nitrile probe experiences two different microenvironments, and these could be empirically separated into a hydrogen bonded and non-hydrogen bonded population by comparison with the mutant T113A, where a hydrogen bond to the nitrile is not present. Classical molecular dynamics simulations based on the structure predict a double-peaked distribution in protein electric fields projected along the nitrile probe. The interpretation of these two peaks as a hydrogen bond formation-dissociation process between the probe nitrile group and a nearby amino acid side chain is used to explain the observation of two IR bands, and the simulations were used to investigate the molecular details of this conformational change. Hydrogen bonding complicates the simplest analysis of vibrational frequency shifts as being due solely to electrostatic interactions through the vibrational Stark effect, and the consequences of this complication are discussed. PMID:21859105

  15. Testing Geometrical Discrimination within an Enzyme Active Site: Constrained Hydrogen Bonding in the Ketosteroid Isomerase Oxyanion Hole

    PubMed Central

    Sigala, Paul A.; Kraut, Daniel A.; Caaveiro, Jose M. M.; Pybus, Brandon; Ruben, Eliza A.; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Enzymes are classically proposed to accelerate reactions by binding substrates within active site environments that are structurally preorganized to optimize binding interactions with reaction transition states rather than ground states. This is a remarkably formidable task considering the limited 0.1 – 1 Å scale of most substrate rearrangements. The flexibility of active site functional groups along the coordinate of substrate rearrangement, the distance scale on which enzymes can distinguish structural rearrangement, and the energetic significance of discrimination on that scale remain open questions that are fundamental to a basic physical understanding of enzyme active sites and catalysis. We bring together high resolution X-ray crystallography, 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy, quantum mechanical calculations, and transition state analog binding measurements to test the distance scale on which non-covalent forces can constrain side chain and ligand relaxation or translation along a specific coordinate and the energetic consequences of such geometric constraints within the active site of bacterial ketosteroid isomerase (KSI). Our results strongly suggest that packing and binding interactions within the KSI active site can constrain local side chain reorientation and prevent hydrogen bond shortening by 0.1 Å or less. Further, this constraint has substantial energetic effects on ligand binding and stabilization of negative charge within the oxyanion hole. These results provide evidence that subtle geometric effects, indistinguishable in most X-ray crystallographic structures, can have significant energetic consequences and highlight the importance of using synergistic experimental approaches to dissect enzyme function. PMID:18808119

  16. Stable isolated metal atoms as active sites for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jun; Chen, Jian Fu; Li, Yu Hang; Yuan, Wen Tao; Zhou, Ying; Zheng, Li Rong; Wang, Hai Feng; Hu, P; Wang, Yun; Zhao, Hui Jun; Wang, Yong; Yang, Hua Gui

    2014-02-17

    The process of using solar energy to split water to produce hydrogen assisted by an inorganic semiconductor is crucial for solving our energy crisis and environmental problems in the future. However, most semiconductor photocatalysts would not exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity without loading suitable co-catalysts. Generally, the noble metals have been widely applied as co-catalysts, but always agglomerate during the loading process or photocatalytic reaction. Therefore, the utilization efficiency of the noble co-catalysts is still very low on a per metal atom basis if no obvious size effect exists, because heterogeneous catalytic reactions occur on the surface active atoms. Here, for the first time, we have synthesized isolated metal atoms (Pt, Pd, Rh, or Ru) stably by anchoring on TiO2 , a model photocatalystic system, by a facile one-step method. The isolated metal atom based photocatalysts show excellent stability for H2 evolution and can lead to a 6-13-fold increase in photocatalytic activity over the metal clusters loaded on TiO2 by the traditional method. Furthermore, the configurations of isolated atoms as well as the originality of their unusual stability were analyzed by a collaborative work from both experiments and theoretical calculations.

  17. Kinetics of Hydrogen Atom Abstraction from Substrate by an Active Site Thiyl Radical in Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides in all organisms. Active E. coli class Ia RNR is an α2β2 complex that undergoes reversible, long-range proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) over a pathway of redox active amino acids (β-Y122 → [β-W48] → β-Y356 → α-Y731 → α-Y730 → α-C439) that spans ∼35 Å. To unmask PCET kinetics from rate-limiting conformational changes, we prepared a photochemical RNR containing a [ReI] photooxidant site-specifically incorporated at position 355 ([Re]-β2), adjacent to PCET pathway residue Y356 in β. [Re]-β2 was further modified by replacing Y356 with 2,3,5-trifluorotyrosine to enable photochemical generation and spectroscopic observation of chemically competent tyrosyl radical(s). Using transient absorption spectroscopy, we compare the kinetics of Y· decay in the presence of substrate and wt-α2, Y731F-α2 ,or C439S-α2, as well as with 3′-[2H]-substrate and wt-α2. We find that only in the presence of wt-α2 and the unlabeled substrate do we observe an enhanced rate of radical decay indicative of forward radical propagation. This observation reveals that cleavage of the 3′-C–H bond of substrate by the transiently formed C439· thiyl radical is rate-limiting in forward PCET through α and has allowed calculation of a lower bound for the rate constant associated with this step of (1.4 ± 0.4) × 104 s–1. Prompting radical propagation with light has enabled observation of PCET events heretofore inaccessible, revealing active site chemistry at the heart of RNR catalysis. PMID:25353063

  18. Counting Active Sites on Titanium Oxide-Silica Catalysts for Hydrogen Peroxide Activation through In Situ Poisoning with Phenylphosphonic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, Todd R.; Boston, Andrew M.; Thompson, Anthony B.; Gray, Kimberly A.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2015-06-04

    Quantifying specific active sites in supported catalysts improves our understanding and assists in rational design. Supported oxides can undergo significant structural changes as surface densities increase from site-isolated cations to monolayers and crystallites, which changes the number of kinetically relevant sites. Herein, TiOx domains are titrated on TiOx–SiO2 selectively with phenylphosphonic acid (PPA). An ex situ method quantifies all fluid-accessible TiOx, whereas an in situ titration during cis-cyclooctene epoxidation provides previously unavailable values for the number of tetrahedral Ti sites on which H2O2 activation occurs. We use this method to determine the active site densities of 22 different catalysts with different synthesis methods, loadings, and characteristic spectra and find a single intrinsic turnover frequency for cis-cyclooctene epoxidation of (40±7) h-1. This simple method gives molecular-level insight into catalyst structure that is otherwise hidden when bulk techniques are used.

  19. Cooperativity between Al Sites Promotes Hydrogen Transfer and Carbon–Carbon Bond Formation upon Dimethyl Ether Activation on Alumina

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The methanol-to-olefin (MTO) process allows the conversion of methanol/dimethyl ether into olefins on acidic zeolites via the so-called hydrocarbon pool mechanism. However, the site and mechanism of formation of the first carbon–carbon bond are still a matter of debate. Here, we show that the Lewis acidic Al sites on the 110 facet of γ-Al2O3 can readily activate dimethyl ether to yield CH4, alkenes, and surface formate species according to spectroscopic studies combined with a computational approach. The carbon–carbon forming step as well as the formation of methane and surface formate involves a transient oxonium ion intermediate, generated by a hydrogen transfer between surface methoxy species and coordinated methanol on adjacent Al sites. These results indicate that extra framework Al centers in acidic zeolites, which are associated with alumina, can play a key role in the formation of the first carbon–carbon bond, the initiation step of the industrial MTO process. PMID:27162986

  20. Spatial distribution of active sites on a ferroelectric PbTiO3 photocatalyst for photocatalytic hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Li, Rengui; Zhao, Yue; Li, Can

    2017-03-07

    The separation of photogenerated charge carries is a challenging issue in artificial photocatalyst systems for solar energy conversion. It has been reported that spatial charge separation can take place between different facets of semiconductor-based crystals with regular morphology and facets, which could be used to rationally deposit cocatalysts on the right facets. However, the spatial separation of photogenerated electrons and holes is still a big challenge for a particulate photocatalyst without regular morphology and specific facets. In this work, we demonstrated that photogenerated electrons and holes can be regularly separated on ferroelectric PbTiO3 photocatalyst even without regular morphology and facets. The reduction cocatalyst and oxidation cocatalyst could be selectively formed on different sites via an in situ photochemical deposition method. It is found that the photoactivity and hydrogen production for PbTiO3 with spatially separated dual-cocatalysts is remarkably enhanced to more than 100 times greater compared to native PbTiO3, which is much higher than that the case of dual-cocatalysts with a random distribution. The intrinsic electric fields and spontaneous electric polarization in the bulk of PbTiO3 are proposed to play important roles in the spatial distribution of active sites on irregular PbTiO3 particles. Our work emphasizes the essential roles of two important factors, efficient charge separation strategy and the location of dual-cocatalysts on the right sites, to construct integrated artificial photocatalyst systems for solar energy conversion.

  1. Beyond the Active Site: The Impact of the Outer Coordination Sphere on Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Dutta, Arnab; Reback, Matthew L.; Linehan, John C.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-08-19

    Hydrogenase enzymes provide inspiration for investigations of molecular catalysts utilizing structural and functional mimics of the active site. However, the resulting active site mimics cannot match the combination of high rates and low overpotentials of the enzyme, suggesting that the rest of the protein scaffold, i.e., the outer coordination sphere, is necessary for the efficiency of hydrogenase. Therefore, inclusion of outer coordination sphere elements onto molecular catalysts may enable us to achieve and ultimately surpass the overall enzymatic efficiency. In an effort to identify and include the missing enzymatic features, there has been recent effort to understand the effect of outer coordination sphere elements on molecular catalysts for hydrogen oxidation and production. Our focus has been to utilize amino acid or peptide based scaffolds on an active functional mimic for hydrogen oxidation and production, [Ni(PR2NR’2)2]2+. This bottom-up approach, i.e, building an outer coordination sphere around a functional molecular catalyst, has allowed us to evaluate individual contributions to catalysis, including enhancing proton movement, concentrating substrate and introducing structural features to control reactivity. Collectively, these studies have resulted in catalysts that can operate faster, can operate at lower overpotentials, have enhanced water solubility, and/or can provide more stability to oxygen or extreme conditions such as strongly acidic or basic conditions than their unmodified parent complexes. Common mechanisms have yet to be defined to predictably control these processes but our growing knowledge in this area is essential for the eventual mimicry of enzymes for developing efficient molecular catalysts for practical use. This account reviews previously published work supported by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Physical Bioscience program, the Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the USDOE, BES, the Center for

  2. The stereochemistry and dynamics of the introduction of hydrogen atoms onto FeMo-co, the active site of nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Dance, Ian

    2013-11-18

    The catalyzed hydrogenations effected at the active site FeMo-co of nitrogenase have been proposed to involve serial supply of the required multiple protons along a proton wire terminating at sulfur atom S3B of FeMo-co. In conjunction with serial electron transfer to FeMo-co, these protons become H atoms, and then are able to migrate from S3B to other Fe and S atoms of FeMo-co, and to transfer to bound substrate and intermediates. This general model, which can account for all reactions of nitrogenase, involves a preparatory stage in which each incoming H atom is required to move from the proton delivery side of S3B to the opposite migration side of S3B. This report examines the mechanism of this reconfiguration of S3B-H, finding four stable configurations in which S3B-H has pyramidal-trigonal coordination, with one elongated Fe-S3B interaction. The transition states and energies for reconfiguration are described. Pseudotetrahedral four coordination and planar-trigonal coordination for S3B-H are less stable than pyramidal-trigonal coordination. Results are presented for FeMo-co with one, two, three, and four H atoms (the E1H1, E2H2, E3H3, and E4H4 Thorneley-Lowe stages), and the general principles are defined, for application in the various chemical mechanisms of nitrogenase.

  3. Probing the importance of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhong-liang; Ye, Mao-qing; Zuo, Zhen-yu; Liu, Zhi-gang; Tai, Keng-chang; Zou, Guo-lin

    2006-05-01

    Hydrogen bonds occurring in the catalytic triad (Asp32, His64 and Ser221) and the oxyanion hole (Asn155) are very important to the catalysis of peptide bond hydrolysis by serine proteases. For the subtilisin NK (nattokinase), a bacterial serine protease, construction and analysis of a three-dimensional structural model suggested that several hydrogen bonds formed by four residues function to stabilize the transition state of the hydrolysis reaction. These four residues are Ser33, Asp60, Ser62 and Thr220. In order to remove the effect of these hydrogen bonds, four mutants (Ser33-->Ala33, Asp60-->Ala60, Ser62-->Ala62, and Thr220-->Ala220) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The results of enzyme kinetics indicated that removal of these hydrogen bonds increases the free-energy of the transition state (DeltaDeltaG(T)). We concluded that these hydrogen bonds are more important for catalysis than for binding the substrate, because removal of these bonds mainly affects the kcat but not the K(m) values. A substrate, SUB1 (succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide), was used during enzyme kinetics experiments. In the present study we have also shown the results of FEP (free-energy perturbation) calculations with regard to the binding and catalysis reactions for these mutant subtilisins. The calculated difference in FEP also suggested that these four residues are more important for catalysis than binding of the substrate, and the simulated values compared well with the experimental values from enzyme kinetics. The results of MD (molecular dynamics) simulations further demonstrated that removal of these hydrogen bonds partially releases Asp32, His64 and Asn155 so that the stability of the transition state decreases. Another substrate, SUB2 (H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-p-nitroanilide), was used for FEP calculations and MD simulations.

  4. Capture of heavy hydrogen isotopes in a metal-organic framework with active Cu(I) sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinrauch, I.; Savchenko, I.; Denysenko, D.; Souliou, S. M.; Kim, H.-H.; Le Tacon, M.; Daemen, L. L.; Cheng, Y.; Mavrandonakis, A.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J.; Volkmer, D.; Schütz, G.; Hirscher, M.; Heine, T.

    2017-03-01

    The production of pure deuterium and the removal of tritium from nuclear waste are the key challenges in separation of light isotopes. Presently, the technological methods are extremely energy- and cost-intensive. Here we report the capture of heavy hydrogen isotopes from hydrogen gas by selective adsorption at Cu(I) sites in a metal-organic framework. At the strongly binding Cu(I) sites (32 kJ mol-1) nuclear quantum effects result in higher adsorption enthalpies of heavier isotopes. The capture mechanism takes place most efficiently at temperatures above 80 K, when an isotope exchange allows the preferential adsorption of heavy isotopologues from the gas phase. Large difference in adsorption enthalpy of 2.5 kJ mol-1 between D2 and H2 results in D2-over-H2 selectivity of 11 at 100 K, to the best of our knowledge the largest value known to date. Combination of thermal desorption spectroscopy, Raman measurements, inelastic neutron scattering and first principles calculations for H2/D2 mixtures allows the prediction of selectivities for tritium-containing isotopologues.

  5. Capture of heavy hydrogen isotopes in a metal-organic framework with active Cu(I) sites

    PubMed Central

    Weinrauch, I.; Savchenko, I.; Denysenko, D.; Souliou, S. M.; Kim, H-H; Le Tacon, M.; Daemen, L. L.; Cheng, Y.; Mavrandonakis, A.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J.; Volkmer, D.; Schütz, G.; Hirscher, M.; Heine, T.

    2017-01-01

    The production of pure deuterium and the removal of tritium from nuclear waste are the key challenges in separation of light isotopes. Presently, the technological methods are extremely energy- and cost-intensive. Here we report the capture of heavy hydrogen isotopes from hydrogen gas by selective adsorption at Cu(I) sites in a metal-organic framework. At the strongly binding Cu(I) sites (32 kJ mol−1) nuclear quantum effects result in higher adsorption enthalpies of heavier isotopes. The capture mechanism takes place most efficiently at temperatures above 80 K, when an isotope exchange allows the preferential adsorption of heavy isotopologues from the gas phase. Large difference in adsorption enthalpy of 2.5 kJ mol−1 between D2 and H2 results in D2-over-H2 selectivity of 11 at 100 K, to the best of our knowledge the largest value known to date. Combination of thermal desorption spectroscopy, Raman measurements, inelastic neutron scattering and first principles calculations for H2/D2 mixtures allows the prediction of selectivities for tritium-containing isotopologues. PMID:28262794

  6. A study of hydrogen bond effects on the oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen electric field gradient tensors in the active site of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulphotransferase: A density-functional theory based treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astani, Elahe; Heshmati, Emran; Chen, Chun-Jung; Hadipour, Nasser L.; Shekarsaraei, Setareh

    2016-06-01

    An investigation of the density functional theory (DFT) was carried out to study the effects of the hydrogen bond (HB) interactions on 2H, 14N, and 17O electric field gradient (EFG) tensors in the active site of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulphotransferase (SULT2A1/DHEA). Natural Bonding Orbital (NBO) analysis was also performed on this active site. The results revealed that the magnitude of the quadrupole coupling constant (QCC) change at each nucleus directly depends on its contribution amount to the HB interaction.

  7. Active Oxygen Vacancy Site for Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation on In2O3(110): A DFT Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Jingyun; Liu, Changjun; Mei, Donghai; Ge, Qingfeng

    2013-06-03

    Methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation on the defective In2O3(110) surface with surface oxygen vacancies has been investigated using periodic density functional theory calculations. The relative stabilities of six possible surface oxygen vacancies numbered from Ov1 to Ov6 on the perfect In2O3(110) surface were examined. The calculated oxygen vacancy formation energies show that the D1 surface with the Ov1 defective site is the most thermodynamically favorable while the D4 surface with the Ov4 defective site is the least stable. Two different methanol synthesis routes from CO2 hydrogenation over both D1 and D4 surfaces were studied and the D4 surface was found to be more favorable for CO2 activation and hydrogenation. On the D4 surface, one of the O atoms of the CO2 molecule fills in the Ov4 site upon adsorption. Hydrogenation of CO2 to HCOO on the D4 surface is both thermodynamically and kinetically favorable. Further hydrogenation of HCOO involves both forming the C-H bond and breaking the C-O bond, resulting in H2CO and hydroxyl. The HCOO hydrogenation is slightly endothermic with an activation barrier of 0.57 eV. A high barrier of 1.14 eV for the hydrogenation of H2CO to H3CO indicates that this step is the rate-limiting step in the methanol synthesis on the defective In2O3(110) surface. We gratefully acknowledge the supports from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (#20990223) and from US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Science program (DE-FG02-05ER46231). D. Mei was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. The computations were performed in part using the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), which is a U.S. Department of Energy national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington. PNNL is a multiprogram national laboratory

  8. A strategy to synergistically increase the number of active edge sites and the conductivity of MoS2 nanosheets for hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hailong; Yu, Xianbo; Chen, Yujin; Zhang, Shen; Gao, Peng; Li, Chunyan

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructured MoS2 is very promising as an electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution due to a greater number of active edge sites. However, a very large resistance between basal planes decreases the overall efficiency of hydrogen evolution, and greatly limits its application in industry. Herein we develop a facile strategy to synergistically increase the number of active edge sites and the conductivity of MoS2. MoS2 nanosheet arrays can be grown vertically on a carbon fiber cloth (CFC) substrates by a facile strategy. On the one hand, ammonium fluoride in the reaction system could effectively etch the inert basal plane of the MoS2 nanosheets, leading to the formation of pits in the inert basal plane of the MoS2 nanosheets. Thereby the number of active edge sites is significantly increased. On the other hand, the vertical growth of MoS2 nanosheet arrays on CFCs can significantly decrease the resistance of MoS2-based electrocatalysts. As a result, the MoS2-based electrocatalysts exhibit excellent catalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reactions, with a small Tafel slope and a large cathodic current density. Moreover, the CFC can be repeatedly utilized as a template to grow ultrathin MoS2 nanosheet arrays for HERs. The excellent activity and recyclable utilization, as well as mass production, indicate that the composite has promising applications in industry.Nanostructured MoS2 is very promising as an electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution due to a greater number of active edge sites. However, a very large resistance between basal planes decreases the overall efficiency of hydrogen evolution, and greatly limits its application in industry. Herein we develop a facile strategy to synergistically increase the number of active edge sites and the conductivity of MoS2. MoS2 nanosheet arrays can be grown vertically on a carbon fiber cloth (CFC) substrates by a facile strategy. On the one hand, ammonium fluoride in the reaction system could effectively etch the inert basal

  9. Active site hydrophobic residues impact hydrogen tunneling differently in a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase at optimal versus nonoptimal temperatures.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Zachary D; Meadows, Corey W; Dong, Ming; Bahnson, Brian J; Klinman, Judith P

    2012-05-22

    A growing body of data suggests that protein motion plays an important role in enzyme catalysis. Two highly conserved hydrophobic active site residues in the cofactor-binding pocket of ht-ADH (Leu176 and V260) have been mutated to a series of hydrophobic side chains of smaller size, as well as one deletion mutant, L176Δ. Mutations decrease k(cat) and increase K(M)(NAD(+)). Most of the observed decreases in effects on k(cat) at pH 7.0 are due to an upward shift in the optimal pH for catalysis; a simple electrostatic model is invoked that relates the change in pK(a) to the distance between the positively charged nicotinamide ring and bound substrate. Structural modeling of the L176Δ and V260A variants indicates the development of a cavity behind the nicotinamide ring without any significant perturbation of the secondary structure of the enzyme relative to that of the wild type. Primary kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are modestly increased for all mutants. Above the dynamical transition at 30 °C for ht-ADH [Kohen, A., et al. (1999) Nature 399, 496], the temperature dependence of the KIE is seen to increase with a decrease in side chain volume at positions 176 and 260. Additionally, the relative trends in the temperature dependence of the KIE above and below 30 °C appear to be reversed for the cofactor-binding pocket mutants in relation to wild-type protein. The aggregate results are interpreted in the context of a full tunneling model of enzymatic hydride transfer that incorporates both protein conformational sampling (preorganization) and active site optimization of tunneling (reorganization). The reduced temperature dependence of the KIE in the mutants below 30 °C indicates that at low temperatures, the enzyme adopts conformations refractory to donor-acceptor distance sampling.

  10. A stable single-site palladium catalyst for hydrogenations.

    PubMed

    Vilé, Gianvito; Albani, Davide; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Chen, Zupeng; Dontsova, Dariya; Antonietti, Markus; López, Núria; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-09-14

    We report the preparation and hydrogenation performance of a single-site palladium catalyst that was obtained by the anchoring of Pd atoms into the cavities of mesoporous polymeric graphitic carbon nitride. The characterization of the material confirmed the atomic dispersion of the palladium phase throughout the sample. The catalyst was applied for three-phase hydrogenations of alkynes and nitroarenes in a continuous-flow reactor, showing its high activity and product selectivity in comparison with benchmark catalysts based on nanoparticles. Density functional theory calculations provided fundamental insights into the material structure and attributed the high catalyst activity and selectivity to the facile hydrogen activation and hydrocarbon adsorption on atomically dispersed Pd sites.

  11. Photo-induced hydrogen production in a helical peptide incorporating a [FeFe] hydrogenase active site mimic.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anindya; Madden, Christopher; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2012-10-11

    There is growing interest in the development of hydrogenase mimics for solar fuel production. Here, we present a bioinspired mimic designed by anchoring a diiron hexacarbonyl cluster to a model helical peptide via an artificial dithiol amino acid. The [FeFe]-peptide complex catalyses photo-induced production of hydrogen in water.

  12. Active Site Dynamical Effects in the Hydrogen Transfer Rate-limiting Step in the Catalysis of Linoleic Acid by Soybean Lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1): Primary and Secondary Isotope Contributions.

    PubMed

    Phatak, Prasad; Venderley, Jordan; Debrota, John; Li, Junjie; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2015-07-30

    Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations that facilitate the treatment of rare events, we probe the active site participation in the rate-determining hydrogen transfer step in the catalytic oxidation of linoleic acid by soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1). The role of two different active site components is probed. (a) On the hydrogen atom acceptor side of the active site, the hydrogen bonding propensity between the acceptor side hydroxyl group, which is bound to the iron cofactor, and the backbone carboxyl group of isoleucine (residue number 839) is studied toward its role in promoting the hydrogen transfer event. Primary and secondary (H/D) isotope effects are also probed and a definite correlation with subtle secondary H/D isotope effects is found. With increasing average nuclear kinetic energy, the increase in transfer probability is enhanced due to the presence of the hydrogen bond between the backbone carbonyl of I839 and the acceptor oxygen. Further increase in average nuclear kinetic energy reduces the strength of this secondary hydrogen bond which leads to a deterioration in hydrogen transfer rates and finally embrances an Arrhenius-like behavior. (b) On the hydrogen atom donor side, the coupling between vibrational modes predominantly localized on the donor-side linoleic acid group and the reactive mode is probed. There appears to be a qualitative difference in the coupling between modes that belong to linoleic acid and the hydrogen transfer mode, for hydrogen and deuterium transfer. For example, the donor side secondary hydrogen atom is much more labile (by nearly a factor of 5) during deuterium transfer as compared to the case for hydrogen transfer. This appears to indicate a greater coupling between the modes belonging to the linoleic acid scaffold and the deuterium transfer mode and also provides a new rationalization for the abnormal (nonclassical) secondary isotope effect results obtained by Knapp, Rickert, and Klinman in J. Am. Chem. Soc

  13. Regional Consumer Hydrogen Demand and Optimal Hydrogen Refueling Station Siting

    SciTech Connect

    Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

    2008-04-01

    Using a GIS approach to spatially analyze key attributes affecting hydrogen market transformation, this study proposes hypothetical hydrogen refueling station locations in select subregions to demonstrate a method for determining station locations based on geographic criteria.

  14. Significant Quantum Effects in Hydrogen Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kyriakou, Georgios; Davidson, Erlend R.; Peng, Guowen; Roling, Luke T.; Singh, Suyash; Boucher, Matthew B.; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2014-03-31

    Dissociation of molecular hydrogen is an important step in a wide variety of chemical, biological, and physical processes. Due to the light mass of hydrogen, it is recognized that quantum effects are often important to its reactivity. However, understanding how quantum effects impact the reactivity of hydrogen is still in its infancy. Here, we examine this issue using a well-defined Pd/Cu(111) alloy that allows the activation of hydrogen and deuterium molecules to be examined at individual Pd atom surface sites over a wide range of temperatures. Experiments comparing the uptake of hydrogen and deuterium as a function of temperature reveal completely different behavior of the two species. The rate of hydrogen activation increases at lower sample temperature, whereas deuterium activation slows as the temperature is lowered. Density functional theory simulations in which quantum nuclear effects are accounted for reveal that tunneling through the dissociation barrier is prevalent for H2 up to 190 K and for D2 up to 140 K. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the effective barrier to H2 dissociation is so low that hydrogen uptake on the surface is limited merely by thermodynamics, whereas the D2 dissociation process is controlled by kinetics. These data illustrate the complexity and inherent quantum nature of this ubiquitous and seemingly simple chemical process. Examining these effects in other systems with a similar range of approaches may uncover temperature regimes where quantum effects can be harnessed, yielding greater control of bond-breaking processes at surfaces and uncovering useful chemistries such as selective bond activation or isotope separation.

  15. Significant Quantum Effects in Hydrogen Activation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Dissociation of molecular hydrogen is an important step in a wide variety of chemical, biological, and physical processes. Due to the light mass of hydrogen, it is recognized that quantum effects are often important to its reactivity. However, understanding how quantum effects impact the reactivity of hydrogen is still in its infancy. Here, we examine this issue using a well-defined Pd/Cu(111) alloy that allows the activation of hydrogen and deuterium molecules to be examined at individual Pd atom surface sites over a wide range of temperatures. Experiments comparing the uptake of hydrogen and deuterium as a function of temperature reveal completely different behavior of the two species. The rate of hydrogen activation increases at lower sample temperature, whereas deuterium activation slows as the temperature is lowered. Density functional theory simulations in which quantum nuclear effects are accounted for reveal that tunneling through the dissociation barrier is prevalent for H2 up to ∼190 K and for D2 up to ∼140 K. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the effective barrier to H2 dissociation is so low that hydrogen uptake on the surface is limited merely by thermodynamics, whereas the D2 dissociation process is controlled by kinetics. These data illustrate the complexity and inherent quantum nature of this ubiquitous and seemingly simple chemical process. Examining these effects in other systems with a similar range of approaches may uncover temperature regimes where quantum effects can be harnessed, yielding greater control of bond-breaking processes at surfaces and uncovering useful chemistries such as selective bond activation or isotope separation. PMID:24684530

  16. List 9 - Active CERCLIS Sites:

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The List 9 displays the sequence of activities undertaken at active CERCLIS sites. An active site is one at which site assessment, removal, remedial, enforcement, cost recovery, or oversight activities are being planned or conducted.

  17. Influence of site occupancy on diffusion of hydrogen in vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooij, Lennard; Huang, Wen; Droulias, Sotirios A.; Johansson, Robert; Hartmann, Ola; Xin, Xiao; Palonen, Heikki; Scheicher, Ralph H.; Wolff, Max; Hjörvarsson, Björgvin

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the effect of site occupancy on the chemical diffusion of hydrogen in strained vanadium. The diffusion rate is found to decrease substantially, when hydrogen is occupying octahedral sites as compared to tetrahedral sites. Profound isotope effects are observed when comparing the diffusion rate of H and D. The changes in the diffusion rate are found to be strongly influenced by the changes in the potential energy landscape, as deduced from first-principles molecular dynamics calculations.

  18. Identification by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of an active-site hydrogen-bond network in human monoacylglycerol lipase (hMGL): implications for hMGL dynamics, pharmacological inhibition, and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Karageorgos, Ioannis; Tyukhtenko, Sergiy; Zvonok, Nikolai; Janero, David R; Sallum, Christine; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2010-08-01

    Intramolecular hydrogen bonding is an important determinant of enzyme structure, catalysis, and inhibitor action. Monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL) modulates cannabinergic signaling as the main enzyme responsible for deactivating 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), a primary endocannabinoid lipid messenger. By enhancing tissue-protective 2-AG tone, targeted MGL inhibitors hold therapeutic promise for managing pain and treating inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. We report study of purified, solubilized human MGL (hMGL) to explore the details of hMGL catalysis by using two known covalent hMGL inhibitors, the carbamoyl tetrazole AM6701 and N-arachidonoylmaleimide (NAM), that act through distinct mechanisms. Using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) with purified wild-type and mutant hMGLs, we have directly observed a strong hydrogen-bond network involving Asp239 and His269 of the catalytic triad and neighboring Leu241 and Cys242 residues. hMGL inhibition by AM6701 alters this hydrogen-bonding pattern through subtle active-site structural rearrangements without influencing hydrogen-bond occupancies. Rapid carbamoylation of hMGL Ser122 by AM6701 and elimination of the leaving group is followed by a slow hydrolysis of the carbamate group, ultimately regenerating catalytically competent hMGL. In contrast, hMGL titration with NAM, which leads to cysteine alkylation, stoichiometrically decreases the population of the active-site hydrogen bonds. NAM prevents reformation of this network, and in this manner inhibits hMGL irreversibly. These data provide detailed molecular insight into the distinctive mechanisms of two covalent hMGL inhibitors and implicate a hydrogen-bond network as a structural feature of hMGL catalytic function.

  19. How absorbed hydrogen affects the catalytic activity of transition metals.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Kozlov, Sergey M; Schauermann, Swetlana; Vayssilov, Georgi N; Neyman, Konstantin M

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is commonly governed by surface active sites. Yet, areas just below the surface can also influence catalytic activity, for instance, when fragmentation products of catalytic feeds penetrate into catalysts. In particular, H absorbed below the surface is required for certain hydrogenation reactions on metals. Herein, we show that a sufficient concentration of subsurface hydrogen, H(sub) , may either significantly increase or decrease the bond energy and the reactivity of the adsorbed hydrogen, H(ad) , depending on the metal. We predict a representative reaction, ethyl hydrogenation, to speed up on Pd and Pt, but to slow down on Ni and Rh in the presence of H(sub) , especially on metal nanoparticles. The identified effects of subsurface H on surface reactivity are indispensable for an atomistic understanding of hydrogenation processes on transition metals and interactions of hydrogen with metals in general.

  20. Electrostatic stabilization and general base catalysis in the active site of the human protein disulfide isomerase a domain monitored by hydrogen exchange.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Griselda; Anderson, Janet S; LeMaster, David M

    2008-03-25

    The nucleophilic Cys36 thiol of the human protein disulfide isomerase a domain is positioned over the N terminus of the alpha(2) helix. Amides in the active site exhibit diffusion-limited, hydroxide-catalyzed exchange, indicating that the local positive electrostatic potential decreases the pK value for peptide anion formation by at least 2 units so as to equal or exceed the acidity of water. In stark contrast to the pH dependence of exchange for simple peptides, the His38 amide in the reduced enzyme exhibits a maximum rate of exchange at pH 5 due to efficient general base catalysis by the neutral imidazole of its own side chain and suppression of its exchange by the ionization of the Cys36 thiol. Ionization of this thiol and deprotonation of the His38 side chain suppress the Cys39 amide hydroxide-catalyzed exchange by a million-fold. The electrostatic potential within the active site monitored by these exchange experiments provides a means of stabilizing the two distinct transition states that lead to substrate reduction and oxidation. Molecular modeling offers a role for the conserved Arg103 in coordinating the oxidative transition-state complex, thus providing further support for mechanisms of disulfide isomerization that utilize enzymatic catalysis at each step of the overall reaction.

  1. Probing the Hydrogen-Bonded Water Network at the Active Site of a Water Oxidation Catalyst: [Ru(bpy)(tpy)(H2O)](2+)·(H2O)(0-4).

    PubMed

    Duffy, Erin M; Marsh, Brett M; Garand, Etienne

    2015-06-18

    The infrared spectra of gas-phase mass-selected [Ru(bpy)(tpy)(H2O)](2+)·(H2O)(0-4) clusters (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; tpy = 2,2':6,2″-terpyridine) in the OH stretching region are reported. These species are formed by bringing the homogeneous water oxidation catalyst [Ru(bpy)(tpy)(H2O](2+) from solution into the gas phase via electrospray ionization (ESI) and reconstructing the water network at the active site by condensing additional water onto the complex in a cryogenic ion trap. Infrared predissociation spectroscopy is used to probe the structure of these clusters via their distinctive OH stretch frequencies, which are sensitive to the shape and strength of the local hydrogen-bonding network. The analysis of the spectra, aided by electronic structure calculations, highlights the formation of strong hydrogen bonds between the aqua ligand and the solvating water molecules in the first solvation shell. These interactions are found to propagate through the subsequent solvation shells and lead to the stabilization of asymmetric solvation motifs. Electronic structure calculations show that these strong hydrogen bonds are promoted by charge transfer from the H atom of the aqua ligand to the Ru-OH2 bond.

  2. [Hydrogen ion activity in the cell].

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Z A

    1976-07-01

    Literature data and results of our experiments evidence for a heterogenous hydrogen distribution in cells. Intracellular pH should be regarded as a mean activity of hydrogen ions which is the sum of activities in different phases of a cell. Intracellular pH value does not depend on the transmembrane action potential difference, and is resistant to respiratory and metabolic disorders of acid-base equilibrium in the body. It also slightly changes with changing the electrolyte composition and pH of the medium and is not influenced by metabolic inhibitors. A low hydrogen activity in the cell has a certain functional significance. The pH stability is ensured by a number of regulatory mechanism: the buffer properties of the protoplasm itself, and the active hydrogen transport into the medium. Hydrogen released from cells is supposed to be connected with functioning of a specific respiratory chain of superficial protoplasmic membranes.

  3. Site-specific hydrogen diffusion rates during clinopyroxene dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferriss, Elizabeth; Plank, Terry; Walker, David

    2016-06-01

    The rate of hydrogen diffusion in clinopyroxene is relevant to interpreting hydrogen ("water") concentrations in xenoliths, phenocrysts, and clinopyroxene-hosted melt inclusions to provide insight into the deep-earth water cycle and volcanic explosivity. Here, we determine bulk and site-specific hydrogen diffusivities in two diopsides and an augite by heating initially homogeneous water-bearing samples in a 1-atm CO/CO2 gas-mixing furnace at 800-1000 °C and oxygen fugacity at the quartz-fayalite-magnetite buffer and observing H-loss profiles. The O-H stretching range between wavenumbers 3000 and 4000 cm-1 in FTIR spectra is resolved into 4-6 peaks, each of which is assumed to represent a distinct defect site for the hydrogen, to determine peak-specific diffusivities using our previously published whole-block method. For the diopside from the Kunlun Mts. in China, Arrhenius relations are reported for peaks at 3645, 3617, 3540, 3443, and 3355 cm-1 based on measurements at 816, 904, and 1000 °C. Bulk and site-specific diffusivities are determined for the same set of peaks at 904 °C for the second diopside (Jaipur). The augite (PMR-53) was a triangular thin slab, and hydrogen diffusivities were determined for bulk hydrogen and peaks at 3620, 3550, 3460, and 3355 cm-1 in the thickness direction at 800 °C. Bulk hydrogen diffusivity in the Jaipur diopside is consistent with previous work, and hydrogen diffusivity in augite PMR-53 is slightly lower than the fast direction diffusivities measured || [100] and [001]* in Jaipur diopside. Both diopsides show 1-2 orders of magnitude differences in the peaks-specific diffusivities, with the fastest diffusivities at 3450 cm-1 and the slowest at 3645 cm-1. However, the hydrogen diffusivities in Jaipur diopside are 2-4 orders of magnitude higher than those in Kunlun diopside for bulk hydrogen and all peaks. Thus, peak-specific differences cannot by themselves adequately explain the 5 orders of magnitude range in hydrogen

  4. Intracrystalline site preference of hydrogen isotopes in borax

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhananga, T.M.; Matsuo, S.

    1985-01-03

    The total hydrogen involved in borax synthesized at 25/sup 0/C in aqueous solution is enriched in deuterium by 5.3% compared with the mother liquor. There is no change in the value of the D/H fractionation factor between the hydrogen in borax and those in the mother liquor with changes in the degree of supersaturation. The fractionation factor changes slightly with a change in the crystallization temperature of borax in the range from 5 to 25/sup 0/C. The D/H ratio in the different sites of borax was estimated by a fractional dehydration technique. The results show that hydrogen atoms of the polyanionic group (B/sub 4/O/sub 5/(OH)/sub 4/) are much more enriched in deuterium than those of the cationic group (Na/sub 2/ x 8H/sub 2/O). The delta D values, referred to the mother liquor from which the borax was crystallized, for the cationic group (site A) and the polyanionic group (site B) are -35 +/- 3 and 167 +/- 13%, respectively based on the fractional dehydration results obtained at -21/sup 0/C. At -21/sup 0/C, isotopic exchange between different sites during dehydration is assumed not to occur. The mechanism for dehydration of borax is discussed. 48 references, 8 figures, 3 tables.

  5. Quantum chemical modelling of ethene epoxidation with hydrogen peroxide: role of catalytic sites.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Angelica; Panas, Itai; Ahlberg, Elisabet

    2007-12-07

    Ethene epoxidation with hydrogen peroxide was studied on hydroxylated binuclear metal sites, using DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory. A decrease of the activation enthalpy of approximately 100 kJ mol(-1) was observed compared to the gas phase reaction between hydrogen peroxide and ethene. It was previously shown that micro-solvation with water reduces the activation enthalpy by approximately 77 kJ mol(-1) and only the additional 24 kJ mol(-1) can be attributed to the binuclear site. Three different metal centres were tested, Ti(iv), Si(iv) and Ge(iv), in order to investigate any specific role of the metal centre on the activation enthalpy. The results clearly show that the activation enthalpy is independent on the nature of the metal centre. This emphasises the role of the hydrogen bonded network provided by the hydroxylated metal sites, on the stabilisation of the transitions state. In ref. 1 (A. Lundin, I. Panas and E. Ahlberg, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2007, 111, 9080) it was demonstrated that, at the transition state and upon micro-solvation, the hydrogen peroxide entity becomes polarized within the hydrogen bonding network, forming a negatively-charged fragment distant from the ethene molecule and a positively-charged fragment directly involved in the oxygen insertion step. The same mechanism was found to hold also for the reaction at the binuclear catalytic site, since the required hydrogen bonding is effectively provided by the hydroxylated metal centres. This mechanism is compared to the two-step pathway which employs a metal peroxide intermediate. Both reaction channels were found to be plausible in confined environments.

  6. Tunable Molecular MoS2 Edge-Site Mimics for Catalytic Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Benjamin R; Polen, Shane M; Click, Kevin A; He, Mingfu; Huang, Zhongjie; Hadad, Christopher M; Wu, Yiying

    2016-04-18

    Molybdenum sulfides represent state-of-the-art, non-platinum electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). According to the Sabatier principle, the hydrogen binding strength to the edge active sites should be neither too strong nor too weak. Therefore, it is of interest to develop a molecular motif that mimics the catalytic sites structurally and possesses tunable electronic properties that influence the hydrogen binding strength. Furthermore, molecular mimics will be important for providing mechanistic insight toward the HER with molybdenum sulfide catalysts. In this work, a modular method to tune the catalytic properties of the S-S bond in MoO(S2)2L2 complexes is described. We studied the homogeneous electrocatalytic hydrogen production performance metrics of three catalysts with different bipyridine substitutions. By varying the electron-donating abilities, we present the first demonstration of using the ligand to tune the catalytic properties of the S-S bond in molecular MoS2 edge-site mimics. This work can shed light on the relationship between the structure and electrocatalytic activity of molecular MoS2 catalysts and thus is of broad importance from catalytic hydrogen production to biological enzyme functions.

  7. Enhanced Reactivity in Hydrogen Atom Transfer from Tertiary Sites of Cyclohexanes and Decalins via Strain Release: Equatorial C-H Activation vs Axial C-H Deactivation.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Ortega, Vanesa B; Bietti, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    Absolute rate constants for hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from cycloalkanes and decalins to the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) were measured by laser flash photolysis. Very similar reactivities were observed for the C-H bonds of cyclopentane and cyclohexane, while the tertiary C-H bond of methylcyclopentane was found to be 6 times more reactive than the tertiary axial C-H bond of methylcyclohexane, pointing toward a certain extent of tertiary axial C-H bond deactivation. Comparison between the cis and trans isomers of 1,2-dimethylcyclohexane, 1,4-dimethylcyclohexane and decalin provides a quantitative evaluation of the role played by strain release in these reactions. kH values for HAT from tertiary equatorial C-H bonds were found to be at least 1 order of magnitude higher than those for HAT from the corresponding tertiary axial C-H bonds (kH(eq)/kH(ax) = 10-14). The higher reactivity of tertiary equatorial C-H bonds was explained in terms of 1,3-diaxial strain release in the HAT transition state. Increase in torsional strain in the HAT transition state accounts instead for tertiary axial C-H bond deactivation. The results are compared with those obtained for the corresponding C-H functionalization reactions by dioxiranes and nonheme metal-oxo species indicating that CumO(•) can represent a convenient model for the reactivity patterns of these oxidants.

  8. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  9. Site Change of Hydrogen in Niobium on Alloying with Oversized Ta Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Eiichi; Yoshii, Motoyasu; Okada, Yoshinori; Matsuba, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Kazuya; Koike, Shigetoshi; Sugawara, Takamasa; Shishido, Toetsu; Ogiwara, Kiyoshi

    2009-06-01

    In order to clarify a difference in hydrogen interaction with oversized solute atoms and with undersized solute atoms in bcc metals in the low solute concentration region, the site occupancy of hydrogen in Nb alloyed with 5 at. % of oversized Ta atoms has been studied at room temperature for hydrogen concentrations of 0.018 and 0.025 at the hydrogen-to-metal-atom ratio (CH=[H]/[M]) by the channelling method utilizing a nuclear reaction 1H(11B,α)αα with a 11B beam of an energy of 2.03 MeV. Clearly different from the result on hydrogen in Nb alloyed with undersized Mo atoms, in both specimens H atoms are distributed over tetrahedral (T) sites and the displaced-T sites (d-T sites) which are displaced from T sites by about 0.25 Å towards their nearest neighbour octahedral (O) sites. The T site is more favourable for hydrogen occupancy, but the number of available T sites is limited, and excess H atoms occupy the d-T sites. Therefore, in contrast to a strong attractive interaction between hydrogen and undersized Mo atoms (trapping), there exists no such a strong attractive interaction between hydrogen and oversized Ta atoms. It is considered that the trapping of hydrogen by undersized solute atoms is effective to the large enhancement of the terminal solubility of hydrogen (TSH) on alloying with undersized solute atoms, at least, in the low solute concentration region.

  10. Hydrogen Deposition on Pt(111) during Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution from a First-Principles Multiadsorption-Site Study

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin-Lin; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2013-10-01

    We study the simultaneous adsorption of H* on Pt(111) for multiple, interacting adsorption sites (i.e., fcc, atop, and hcp) and, over a wide range of electrode potential, examine the equilibrium site coverage during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxidation reaction (HOR). We use a first-principles-based cluster expansion (CE) and Monte Carlo simulations. We predict the adsorption isotherm and cyclic voltammogram for -0.9 V < U < 0.5 V versus the standard hydrogen potential. Although strongly adsorbed H*fcc are the majority species for U > 0, we show that traces of weakly adsorbed H*atop and H*hcp are present, and they are expected to be active in the HER. For U < 0, we predict that H*atop takes over as the majority species ca. U = -0.4 V, where a simultaneous decrease in H*fcc occurs—contradicting the general assumption that H*fcc remains the majority species, even at very negative potential. We identify the favorable HER operating potentials by mapping out the coverage of the kinetically active species H*atop.

  11. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Comparative hydrogen-deuterium exchange for a mesophilic vs thermophilic dihydrofolate reductase at 25 °C: identification of a single active site region with enhanced flexibility in the mesophilic protein.

    PubMed

    Oyeyemi, Olayinka A; Sours, Kevin M; Lee, Thomas; Kohen, Amnon; Resing, Katheryn A; Ahn, Natalie G; Klinman, Judith P

    2011-09-27

    The technique of hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has been applied to a mesophilic (E. coli) dihydrofolate reductase under conditions that allow direct comparison to a thermophilic (B. stearothermophilus) ortholog, Ec-DHFR and Bs-DHFR, respectively. The analysis of hydrogen-deuterium exchange patterns within proteolytically derived peptides allows spatial resolution, while requiring a series of controls to compare orthologous proteins with only ca. 40% sequence identity. These controls include the determination of primary structure effects on intrinsic rate constants for HDX as well as the use of existing 3-dimensional structures to evaluate the distance of each backbone amide hydrogen to the protein surface. Only a single peptide from the Ec-DHFR is found to be substantially more flexible than the Bs-DHFR at 25 °C in a region located within the protein interior at the intersection of the cofactor and substrate-binding sites. The surrounding regions of the enzyme are either unchanged or more flexible in the thermophilic DHFR from B. stearothermophilus. The region with increased flexibility in Ec-DHFR corresponds to one of two regions previously proposed to control the enthalpic barrier for hydride transfer in Bs-DHFR [Oyeyemi et al. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 10074].

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Plasma Renin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming; Liu, Yi-Hong; Goh, Hong Swen; Wang, Josh Jia Xing; Yong, Qian-Chen; Wang, Rui

    2010-01-01

    The development of renovascular hypertension depends on the release of renin from the juxtaglomerular (JG) cells, a process regulated by intracellular cAMP. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) downregulates cAMP production in some cell types by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase, suggesting the possibility that it may modulate renin release. Here, we investigated the effect of H2S on plasma renin activity and BP in rat models of renovascular hypertension. In the two-kidney-one-clip (2K1C) model of renovascular hypertension, the H2S donor NaHS prevented and treated hypertension. Compared with vehicle, NaHS significantly attenuated the elevation in plasma renin activity and angiotensin II levels but did not affect plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme activity. Furthermore, NaHS inhibited the upregulation of renin mRNA and protein levels in the clipped kidneys of 2K1C rats. In primary cultures of renin-rich kidney cells, NaHS markedly suppressed forskolin-stimulated renin activity in the medium and the intracellular increase in cAMP. In contrast, NaHS did not affect BP or plasma renin activity in normal or one-kidney-one-clip (1K1C) rats, both of which had normal plasma renin activity. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that H2S may inhibit renin activity by decreasing the synthesis and release of renin, suggesting its potential therapeutic value for renovascular hypertension. PMID:20360313

  14. Modeling the hydrothermal circulation and the hydrogen production at the Rainbow site with Cast3M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, F.; Mügler, C.; Charlou, J.; Jean-baptiste, P.

    2012-12-01

    On the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the Rainbow venting site is described as an ultramafic-hosted active hydrothermal site and releases high fluxes of methane and hydrogen [1, 2]. This behavior has first been interpreted as the result of serpentinization processes. But geochemical reactions involving olivine and plagioclase assemblages, and leading to chlorite, tremolite, talc and magnetite assemblages, could contribute to the observed characteristics of the exiting fluid [2]. The predominance of one of these geochemical reactions or their coexistence strongly depend on the hydrothermal fluid circulation. We developed and validated a 2D/3D numerical model using a Finite Volume method to simulate heat driven fluid flows in the framework of the Cast3M code [3, 4]. We also developed a numerical model for hydrogen production and transport that is based on experimental studies of the serpentinization processes [5-6]. This geochemical model takes into account the exothermic and water-consuming behavior of the serpentinization reaction and it can be coupled to our thermo-hydrogeological model. Our simulations provide temperatures, mass fluxes and venting surface areas very close to those estimated in-situ [7]. We showed that a single-path model [8] was necessary to simulate high values such as the in-situ measured temperatures and estimated water mass fluxes of the Rainbow site [7]. This single-path model will be used to model the production and transport of hydrogen at the Rainbow hydrothermal site. References [1]Charlou et al. (2010) AGU Monograph series. [2]Seyfried et al. (2011) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 75, 1574-1593. [3]http://www-cast3m.cea.fr. [4]Martin & Fyfe (1970) Chem. Geol. 6, 185-202. [5] Marcaillou et al. (2011) Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett. 303, 281-290. [6]Malvoisin et al. (2012) JGR, 117, B01104. [7]Perez et al. (2012) submited to Computational Geosciences. [8]Lowell & Germanovich (2004) AGU, Washington DC, USA.

  15. Detection of Hydrogen Spillover in Palladium-Modified Activated Carbon Fibers During Hydrogen Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Brown, Craig; Liu, Yun; Bhat, Vinay V; Gallego, Nidia C

    2009-01-01

    Palladium-modified activated carbon fibers (Pd-ACF) are being evaluated for adsorptive hydrogen storage at near-ambient conditions because of their enhanced hydrogen uptake in comparison to Pd-free activated carbon fibers (ACF). The net uptake enhancement (at room temperature and 20 bar) is in excess of the amount corresponding to formation of Pd hydride, and is usually attributed to hydrogen spillover. In this paper, inelastic neutron scattering was used to demonstrate the formation of new C-H bonds in Pd-containing activated carbon fibers after exposure to hydrogen at 20 oC and 1.6 MPa, at the expense of physisorbed H2. This finding is a post-factum proof of the atomic nature of H species formed in presence of a Pd catalyst, and of their subsequent spillover and binding to the carbon support. Chemisorption of hydrogen may explain the reduction in hydrogen uptake from first to second adsorption cycle.

  16. Enhanced catalytic activity in strained chemically exfoliated WS₂ nanosheets for hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Voiry, Damien; Yamaguchi, Hisato; Li, Junwen; Silva, Rafael; Alves, Diego C B; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei; Asefa, Tewodros; Shenoy, Vivek B; Eda, Goki; Chhowalla, Manish

    2013-09-01

    Efficient evolution of hydrogen through electrocatalysis at low overpotentials holds tremendous promise for clean energy. Hydrogen evolution can be easily achieved by electrolysis at large potentials that can be lowered with expensive platinum-based catalysts. Replacement of Pt with inexpensive, earth-abundant electrocatalysts would be significantly beneficial for clean and efficient hydrogen evolution. To this end, promising results have been reported using 2H (trigonal prismatic) XS₂ (where X  =  Mo or W) nanoparticles with a high concentration of metallic edges. The key challenges for XS₂ are increasing the number and catalytic activity of active sites. Here we report monolayered nanosheets of chemically exfoliated WS₂ as efficient catalysts for hydrogen evolution with very low overpotentials. Analyses indicate that the enhanced electrocatalytic activity of WS₂ is associated with the high concentration of the strained metallic 1T (octahedral) phase in the as-exfoliated nanosheets. Our results suggest that chemically exfoliated WS₂ nanosheets are interesting catalysts for hydrogen evolution.

  17. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  18. Heterolytic Activation of Hydrogen Promoted by Ruthenium Nanoparticles immobilized on Basic Supports and Hydrogenation of Aromatic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Minfeng

    Despite the aggressive development and deployment of new renewable and nuclear technologies, petroleum-derived transportation fuels---gasoline, diesel and jet fuels---will continue to dominate the markets for decades. Environmental legislation imposes severe limits on the tolerable proportion of aromatics, sulfur and nitrogen contents in transportation fuels, which is difficult to achieve with current refining technologies. Catalytic hydrogenation plays an important role in the production of cleaner fuels, both as a direct means to reduce the aromatics and as a key step in the hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodesulfurization (HDS) processes. However, conventional catalysts require drastic conditions and/or are easily poisoned by S or N aromatics. Therefore, there is still a need for new efficient catalysts for hydrogenation reactions relevant to the production of cleaner fossil fuels. Our catalyst design involves metallic nanoparticles intimately associated with a basic support, with the aim of creating a nanostructure capable of promoting the heterolytic activation of hydrogen and ionic hydrogenation mechanisms, as a strategy to avoid catalyst poisoning and enhance catalytic activity. We have designed and prepared a new nanostructured catalytic material composed of RuNPs immobilized on the basic polymer P4VPy. We have demonstrated that the Ru/P4VPy catalyst can promote heterolytic hydrogen activation and a unique surface ionic hydrogenation mechanism for the efficient hydrogenation of N-aromatics. This is the first time these ionic hydrogenation pathways have been demonstrated on solid surfaces. For the RuNPs surfaces without basic sites in close proximity, the conventional homolytic H2 splitting is otherwise involved. Using the mechanistic concepts from Ru/P4VPy, we have designed and prepared the Ru/MgO catalyst, with the aim to improve the catalytic efficiency for the hydrogenation of heteroatom aromatics operating by the ionic hydrogenation mechanism. The Ru

  19. Hydrogen bonds and antiviral activity of benzaldehyde derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Belkov, M. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Brinkevich, S. D.; Samovich, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    We have obtained the Fourier transform IR spectra of solutions of benzaldehyde derivatives having different antiviral activities against a herpes virus. We observe a correlation between the presence of hydrogen bonds in the benzaldehyde molecules and the appearance of antiviral properties in the compounds. For compounds having antiviral activity, we have obtained spectral data suggesting the existence of hydrogen bonds of the type C=OṡṡṡH-O and O-HṡṡṡO in the molecules. When the hydrogen atom in the hydroxyl groups are replaced by a methyl group, no intramolecular hydrogen bonds are formed and the compounds lose their antiviral activity.

  20. Availability of hydrogen for lunar base activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bustin, Roberta; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen will be needed on a lunar base to make water for consumables, to provide fuel, and to serve as a reducing agent in the extraction of oxygen from lunar minerals. This study was undertaken in order to learn more about the abundance and distribution of solar-wind-implanted hydrogen. Hydrogen was found in all samples studied, with concentrations, varying widely depending on soil maturity, grain size, and mineral composition. Seven cores returned from the Moon were studied. Although hydrogen was implanted in the upper surface layer of the regolith, it was found throughout the cores due to micrometeorite reworking of the soil.

  1. Availability of hydrogen for lunar base activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bustin, Roberta

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogen will be needed on a lunar base to make water for consumables, to provide fuel, and to serve as reducing agent in the extraction of oxygen from lunar minerals. The abundance and distribution of solar wind implanted hydrogen were studied. Hydrogen was found in all samples studied with concentrations varying widely depending on soil maturity, grain size, and mineral composition. Seven cores returned from the moon were studied. Although hydrogen was implanted in the upper surface layer of the regolith, it was found throughout the cores due to micrometeorite reworking of the soil.

  2. Single-Site Cobalt Catalysts at New Zr 82 -O) 82 -OH) 4 Metal-Organic Framework Nodes for Highly Active Hydrogenation of Alkenes, Imines, Carbonyls, and Heterocycles

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Pengfei; Manna, Kuntal; Lin, Zekai; Urban, Ania; Greene, Francis X.; Lan, Guangxu; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-09-21

    We report here the synthesis of robust and porous metal–organic frameworks (MOFs), M-MTBC (M = Zr or Hf), constructed from the tetrahedral linker methane-tetrakis(p-biphenylcarboxylate) (MTBC) and two types of secondary building units (SBUs): cubic M82-O)82-OH)4 and octahedral M6(μ3-O)43-OH)4. While the M6-SBU is isostructural with the 12-connected octahedral SBUs of UiO-type MOFs, the M8-SBU is composed of eight MIV ions in a cubic fashion linked by eight μ2-oxo and four μ2-OH groups. The metalation of Zr-MTBC SBUs with CoCl2, followed by treatment with NaBEt3H, afforded highly active and reusable solid Zr-MTBC-CoH catalysts for the hydrogenation of alkenes, imines, carbonyls, and heterocycles. Zr-MTBC-CoH was impressively tolerant of a range of functional groups and displayed high activity in the hydrogenation of tri- and tetra-substituted alkenes with TON > 8000 for the hydrogenation of 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene. Our structural and spectroscopic studies show that site isolation of and open environments around the cobalt-hydride catalytic species at Zr8-SBUs are responsible for high catalytic activity in the hydrogenation of a wide range of challenging substrates. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for discovering and studying new single-site base-metal solid catalysts with enormous potential for sustainable chemical synthesis.

  3. Mobile measurement of methane and hydrogen sulfide at natural gas production site fence lines in the Texas Barnett Shale.

    PubMed

    Eapi, Gautam R; Sabnis, Madhu S; Sattler, Melanie L

    2014-08-01

    Production of natural gas from shale formations is bringing drilling and production operations to regions of the United States that have seen little or no similar activity in the past, which has generated considerable interest in potential environmental impacts. This study focused on the Barnett Shale Fort Worth Basin in Texas, which saw the number of gas-producing wells grow from 726 in 2001 to 15,870 in 2011. This study aimed to measure fence line concentrations of methane and hydrogen sulfide at natural gas production sites (wells, liquid storage tanks, and associated equipment) in the four core counties of the Barnett Shale (Denton, Johnson, Tarrant, and Wise). A mobile measurement survey was conducted in the vicinity of 4788 wells near 401 lease sites, representing 35% of gas production volume, 31% of wells, and 38% of condensate production volume in the four-county core area. Methane and hydrogen sulfide concentrations were measured using a Picarro G2204 cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS). Since the research team did not have access to lease site interiors, measurements were made by driving on roads on the exterior of the lease sites. Over 150 hr of data were collected from March to July 2012. During two sets of drive-by measurements, it was found that 66 sites (16.5%) had methane concentrations > 3 parts per million (ppm) just beyond the fence line. Thirty-two lease sites (8.0%) had hydrogen sulfide concentrations > 4.7 parts per billion (ppb) (odor recognition threshold) just beyond the fence line. Measured concentrations generally did not correlate well with site characteristics (natural gas production volume, number of wells, or condensate production). t tests showed that for two counties, methane concentrations for dry sites were higher than those for wet sites. Follow-up study is recommended to provide more information at sites identified with high levels of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Implications: Information regarding air emissions from shale gas

  4. Site dependent hardening of the lanthanum metal lattice by hydrogen absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, A.; Watanuki, T.; Ohmura, A.; Ikeda, T.; Aoki, K.; Nakano, S.; Takemura, K.

    2011-03-01

    The compressibility of lanthanum (La) metal and its hydrides were measured at room temperature by high pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction. La metal pressurized in a hydrogen medium forms a hydride with an fcc metal lattice, which likely contains hydrogen at a concentration close to 3.0 and persists over the measured pressure span up to 21 GPa. Equations of state have been determined by helium compression experiments for LaH 2 with tetrahedral interstitial sites fully occupied with hydrogen atoms and for LaH 2.46 with octahedral interstitial sites partially occupied with hydrogen atoms and tetrahedral sites fully occupied. Both hydrides possess fcc metal lattices. The bulk modulus values B0 are 66.7 ± 1.2 GPa for LaH 2 and 68.4±1.0 GPa for LaH 2.46. These values are three times larger than that of La metal and are very close to each other despite the difference in hydrogen occupation states. The hardening of the metal lattice by hydrogenation is attributed predominantly to hydrogen-metal interactions at the tetrahedral sites and is most pronounced for La, which has the largest ionic radius among rare-earth metals.

  5. Hydrogen adsorption on functionalized nanoporous activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X B; Xiao, B; Fletcher, A J; Thomas, K M

    2005-05-12

    There is considerable interest in hydrogen adsorption on carbon nanotubes and porous carbons as a method of storage for transport and related energy applications. This investigation has involved a systematic investigation of the role of functional groups and porous structure characteristics in determining the hydrogen adsorption characteristics of porous carbons. Suites of carbons were prepared with a wide range of nitrogen and oxygen contents and types of functional groups to investigate their effect on hydrogen adsorption. The porous structures of the carbons were characterized by nitrogen (77 K) and carbon dioxide (273 K) adsorption methods. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were studied at 77 K and pressure up to 100 kPa. All the isotherms were Type I in the IUPAC classification scheme. Hydrogen isobars indicated that the adsorption of hydrogen is very temperature dependent with little or no hydrogen adsorption above 195 K. The isosteric enthalpies of adsorption at zero surface coverage were obtained using a virial equation, while the values at various surface coverages were obtained from the van't Hoff isochore. The values were in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ mol(-1) for the carbons studied. The thermodynamics of the adsorption process are discussed in relation to temperature limitations for hydrogen storage applications. The maximum amounts of hydrogen adsorbed correlated with the micropore volume obtained from extrapolation of the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation for carbon dioxide adsorption. Functional groups have a small detrimental effect on hydrogen adsorption, and this is related to decreased adsorbate-adsorbent and increased adsorbate-adsorbate interactions.

  6. Revisiting the mesosome as a novel site of hydrogen peroxide accumulation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Xin, Li; Lipeng, Yang; Jiaju, Qiao; Hanqing, Feng; Yunhong, Liu; Min, Zhang; Yuxian, Zhang; Hongyu, Li

    2014-10-01

    The major source of endogenous hydrogen peroxide is generally thought to be the respiratory chain of bacteria and mitochondria. In our previous works, mesosome structure was induced in cells during rifampicin effect, and the mesosome formation is always accompanied by excess hydrogen peroxide accumulation in bacterial cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide production and the rationale behind it remain still unknown. Here we report that hydrogen peroxide can specifically accumulate in the mesosome in vitro. Mesosomes were interpreted earlier as artifacts of specific cells under stress through TEM preparation, while, in the current study, mesosomes were shown as intracellular compartments with specific roles and features by using quickly freezing preparation of TEM. Formation of hydrogen peroxide was observed in suspension of mesosomal vesicles by using either a fluorescence-based reporter assay or a histochemical method, respectively. Our investigation provides experimental evidence that mesosomes can be a novel site of hydrogen peroxide accumulation.

  7. Photocatalytic activity of hydrogenated TiO2.

    PubMed

    Leshuk, Tim; Parviz, Roozbeh; Everett, Perry; Krishnakumar, Harish; Varin, Robert A; Gu, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Photocatalysis is a promising advanced water treatment technology, and recently the possibility of using hydrogenation to improve the photocatalytic efficiency of titanium dioxide has generated much research interest. Herein we report that the use of high-temperature hydrogenation to prepare black TiO2 primarily results in the formation of bulk defects in the material without affecting its electronic band structure. The hydrogenated TiO2 exhibited significantly worse photocatalytic activity under simulated sunlight compared to the unhydrogenated control, and thus we propose that high-temperature hydrogenation can be counterproductive to improving the photocatalytic activity of TiO2, because of its propensity to form bulk vacancy defects.

  8. Molecular hydrogen suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yingni; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Misawa, Nobuaki; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Akio; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is effective for many diseases. However, molecular bases of H2 have not been fully elucidated. Cumulative evidence indicates that H2 acts as a gaseous signal modulator. We found that H2 suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by promoting phosphorylation and degradation οf β-catenin. Either complete inhibition of GSK3 or mutations at CK1- and GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin abolished the suppressive effect of H2. H2 did not increase GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, indicating that H2 has no direct effect on GSK3 itself. Knock-down of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin1, which form the β-catenin degradation complex, minimized the suppressive effect of H2 on β-catenin accumulation. Accordingly, the effect of H2 requires CK1/GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin, as well as the β-catenin degradation complex comprised of CK1, GSK3, APC, and Axin1. We additionally found that H2 reduces the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Oral intake of H2 water tended to ameliorate cartilage degradation in a surgery-induced rat osteoarthritis model through attenuating β-catenin accumulation. We first demonstrate that H2 suppresses abnormally activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which accounts for the protective roles of H2 in a fraction of diseases. PMID:27558955

  9. Hydrogen storage on activated carbon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, J.A.

    1994-11-01

    The project studied factors that influence the ability of carbon to store hydrogen and developed techniques to enhance that ability in naturally occurring and factory-produced commercial carbon materials. During testing of enhanced materials, levels of hydrogen storage were achieved that compare well with conventional forms of energy storage, including lead-acid batteries, gasoline, and diesel fuel. Using the best materials, an electric car with a modern fuel cell to convert the hydrogen directly to electricity would have a range of over 1,000 miles. This assumes that the total allowable weight of the fuel cell and carbon/hydrogen storage system is no greater than the present weight of batteries in an existing electric vehicle. By comparison, gasoline cars generally are limited to about a 450-mile range, and battery-electric cars to 40 to 60 miles. The project also developed a new class of carbon materials, based on polymers and other organic compounds, in which the best hydrogen-storing factors discovered earlier were {open_quotes}molecularly engineered{close_quotes} into the new materials. It is believed that these new molecularly engineered materials are likely to exceed the performance of the naturally occurring and manufactured carbons seen earlier with respect to hydrogen storage.

  10. Method of maintaining activity of hydrogen-sensing platinum electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, J. N., III

    1968-01-01

    Three-electrode hydrogen sensor containing a platinum electrode maintained in a highly catalytic state, operates with a minimal response time and maximal sensitivity to the hydrogen gas being sensed. Electronic control and readout circuitry reactivates the working electrode of the sensor to a state of maximal catalytic activity.

  11. Slush hydrogen propellant production, transfer, and expulsion studies at the NASA K-Site Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, Terry L.; Whalen, Margaret V.

    1991-01-01

    Slush hydrogen is currently being considered as a fuel for the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) because it offers the potential for decreased vehicle size and weight. However, no large-scale data was available on the production, transfer, and tank pressure control characteristics required to use the fuel for the NASP. Therefore, experiments were conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center K-Site Facility to improve the slush hydrogen database. Slush hydrogen was produced using the evaporative cooling, or freeze-thaw, technique in batches of about 800 gallons. This slush hydrogen was pressure transferred to a 5 ft diameter spherical test tank following production, and flow characteristics were measured during this transfer process. The slush hydrogen in the test tank was pressurized and expelled using a pressurized expulsion technique to obtain information on tank pressure control for the NASP. Results from the production, transfer, pressurization, and pressurized expulsion tests are described.

  12. Slush hydrogen propellant production, transfer, and expulsion studies at the NASA K-Site Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, Terry L.; Whalen, Margaret V.

    1991-01-01

    Slush hydrogen is currently being considered as a fuel for the National AeroSpace Plane (NASP) because it offers the potential for decreased vehicle size and weight. However, no large scale data was available on the production, transfer, and tank pressure control characteristics required to use the fuel for the NASP. Therefore, experiments were conducted at NASA-Lewis K-Site Facility to improve the slush hydrogen data base. Slush hydrogen was produced using the evaporative cooling, or freeze-thaw, technique in batches for approx. 800 gallons. This slush hydrogen was pressure transferred to a 5 ft diameter spherical test tank following production, and flow characteristics were measured during this transfer process. The slush hydrogen in the test tank was pressurized and expelled using a pressurized expulsion technique to obtain information on tank pressure control for the NASP. Results from the production, transfer, pressurization, and pressurized expulsion tests are described.

  13. In situ hydrogen consumption kinetics as an indicator of subsurface microbial activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, S.H.; Smith, R.L.; Suflita, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    There are few methods available for broadly assessing microbial community metabolism directly within a groundwater environment. In this study, hydrogen consumption rates were estimated from in situ injection/withdrawal tests conducted in two geochemically varying, contaminated aquifers as an approach towards developing such a method. The hydrogen consumption first-order rates varied from 0.002 nM h-1 for an uncontaminated, aerobic site to 2.5 nM h-1 for a contaminated site where sulfate reduction was a predominant process. The method could accommodate the over three orders of magnitude range in rates that existed between subsurface sites. In a denitrifying zone, the hydrogen consumption rate (0.02 nM h-1) was immediately abolished in the presence of air or an antibiotic mixture, suggesting that such measurements may also be sensitive to the effects of environmental perturbations on field microbial activities. Comparable laboratory determinations with sediment slurries exhibited hydrogen consumption kinetics that differed substantially from the field estimates. Because anaerobic degradation of organic matter relies on the rapid consumption of hydrogen and subsequent maintenance at low levels, such in situ measures of hydrogen turnover can serve as a key indicator of the functioning of microbial food webs and may be more reliable than laboratory determinations. ?? 2007 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  14. Screening for potential fermentative hydrogen production from black water and kitchen waste in on-site UASB reactor at 20 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Luostarinen, S; Pakarinen, O; Rintala, J

    2008-06-01

    The potential of black water and a mixture of black water and kitchen waste as substrates for on-site dark fermentative hydrogen production was screened in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors at 20 degrees C. Three different inocula were used with and without heat treatment. With glucose, the highest specific hydrogenogenic activity was 69 ml H2 g volatile solids(-1) d(-1) in batch assays and the highest hydrogen yield 0.44 mol H2 mol glucose(-1) in upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor. The mixture of black water and kitchen waste degraded readily into volatile fatty acids in the reactors, thus showing potential for hydrogen production. In the conditions applied, however, the highest end product was propionate and no hydrogen was produced. Black water alone apparently contained too little readily soluble carbohydrates for hydrogen producing bacteria, and little VFA and no hydrogen was produced.

  15. Experimental and Mechanistic Understanding of Aldehyde Hydrogenation Using Au25 Nanoclusters with Lewis Acids: Unique Sites for Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Gao; Abroshan, Hadi; Chen, Yuxiang; Jin, Rongchao; Kim, Hyung J

    2015-11-18

    The catalytic activity of Au25(SR)18 nanoclusters (R = C2H4Ph) for the aldehyde hydrogenation reaction in the presence of a base, e.g., ammonia or pyridine, and transition-metal ions M(z+), such as Cu(+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Co(2+), as a Lewis acid is studied. The addition of a Lewis acid is found to significantly promote the catalytic activity of Au25(SR)18/CeO2 in the hydrogenation of benzaldehyde and a number of its derivatives. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry in conjunction with UV-vis spectroscopy confirm the generation of new species, Au25-n(SR)18-n (n = 1-4), in the presence of a Lewis acid. The pathways for the speciation of Au24(SR)17 from its parent Au25(SR)18 nanocluster as well as its structure are investigated via the density functional theory (DFT) method. The adsorption of M(z+) onto a thiolate ligand "-SR-" of Au25(SR)18, followed by a stepwise detachment of "-SR-" and a gold atom bonded to "-SR-" (thus an "Au-SR" unit) is found to be the most likely mechanism for the Au24(SR)17 generation. This in turn exposes the Au13-core of Au24(SR)17 to reactants, providing an active site for the catalytic hydrogenation. DFT calculations indicate that M(z+) is also capable of adsorbing onto the Au13-core surface, producing a possible active metal site of a different kind to catalyze the aldehyde hydrogenation reaction. This study suggests, for the first time, that species with an open metal site like adducts [nanoparticle-M]((z-1)+) or fragments Au25-n(SR)18-n function as the catalysts rather than the intact Au25(SR)18.

  16. MERCURY-NITRITE-RHODIUM-RUTHENIUM INTERACTIONS IN NOBLE METAL CATALYZED HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM FORMIC ACID DURING NUCLEAR WASTE PROCESSING AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 136C

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Lambert, D.; Newell, J; Stone, M.

    2009-09-02

    Chemical pre-treatment of radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site is performed to prepare the waste for vitrification into a stable waste glass form. During pre-treatment, compounds in the waste become catalytically active. Mercury, rhodium, and palladium become active for nitrite destruction by formic acid, while rhodium and ruthenium become active for catalytic conversion of formic acid into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Nitrite ion is present during the maximum activity of rhodium, but is consumed prior to the activation of ruthenium. Catalytic hydrogen generation during pre-treatment can exceed radiolytic hydrogen generation by several orders of magnitude. Palladium and mercury impact the maximum catalytic hydrogen generation rates of rhodium and ruthenium by altering the kinetics of nitrite ion decomposition. New data are presented that illustrate the interactions of these various species.

  17. Controlling hydrogenation activity and selectivity of bimetallic surfaces and catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, Luis E.

    Studies of bimetallic systems are of great interest in catalysis due to the novel properties that they often show in comparison with the parent metals. The goals of this dissertation are: (1) to expand the studies of self-hydrogenation and hydrogenation reactions on bimetallic surfaces under ultra high vacuum conditions (UHV) using different hydrocarbon as probe molecules; (2) to attempt to correlate the surface science findings with supported catalyst studies under more realistic conditions; and (3) to investigate the competitive hydrogenation of C=C versus C=O bonds on Pt(111) modified by different 3d transition metals. Hydrogenation studies using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) on Ni/Pt(111) bimetallic surfaces have demonstrated an enhancement in the low temperature hydrogenation activity relative to that of clean Pt(111). This novel hydrogenation pathway can be achieved under UHV conditions by controlling the structures of the bimetallic surfaces. A low temperature hydrogenation activity of 1-hexene and 1-butene has been observed on a Pt-Ni-Pt(111) subsurface structure, where Ni atoms are mainly present on the second layer of the Pt(111) single crystal. These results are in agreement with previous studies of self-hydrogenation and hydrogenation of cyclohexene. However, a much higher dehydrogenation activity is observed in the reaction of cyclohexene to produce benzene, demonstrating that the hydrocarbon structure has an effect on the reaction pathways. On the other hand, self-hydrogenation of 1-butene is not observed on the Pt-Ni-Pt(111) surface, indicating that the chain length (or molecular weight) has a significant effect on the selfhydrogenation activity. The gas phase reaction of cyclohexene on Ni/Pt supported on alumina catalysts has also shown a higher self-hydrogenation activity in comparison with the same reaction performed on supported monometallic catalysts. The effects of metal loading and impregnation sequence of the metal precursors are

  18. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  19. Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES) Activities at NREL; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Eichman, J.

    2015-04-21

    This presentation provides an overview of hydrogen and energy storage, including hydrogen storage pathways and international power-to-gas activities, and summarizes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's hydrogen energy storage activities and results.

  20. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase revealed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Landgraf, Rachelle R.; Goswami, Devrishi; Rajamohan, Francis; Harris, Melissa S.; Calabrese, Matthew; Hoth, Lise R.; Magyar, Rachelle; Pascal, Bruce D.; Chalmers, Michael J.; Busby, Scott A.; Kurumbail, Ravi; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary AMP-Activated protein kinase (AMPK) monitors cellular energy, regulates genes involved in ATP synthesis and consumption, and is allosterically activated by nucleotides and synthetic ligands. Analysis of the intact enzyme by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry reveals conformational perturbations of AMPK in response to binding of nucleotides, cyclodextrin and a synthetic small molecule activator, A769662. Results from this analysis clearly show that binding of AMP leads to conformational changes primarily in the γ subunit of AMPK and subtle changes in the α and β subunits. In contrast, A769662 causes profound conformational changes in the glycogen binding module of the β subunit and in the kinase domain of the α subunit suggesting that the molecular binding site of latter resides between the α and β subunits. The distinct short and long-range perturbations induced upon binding of AMP and A769662 suggest fundamentally different molecular mechanisms for activation of AMPK by these two ligands. PMID:24076403

  1. Highly effective hydrogen isotope separation in nanoporous metal-organic frameworks with open metal sites: direct measurement and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyunchul; Savchenko, Ievgeniia; Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Heine, Thomas; Hirscher, Michael

    2014-01-28

    Separating gaseous mixtures that consist of very similar size is one of the critical issues in modern separation technology. Especially, the separation of the isotopes hydrogen and deuterium requires special efforts, even though these isotopes show a very large mass ratio. Conventionally, H/D separation can be realized through cryogenic distillation of the molecular species or the Girdler-sulfide process, which are among the most energy-intensive separation techniques in the chemical industry. However, costs can be significantly reduced by using highly mass-selective nanoporous sorbents. Here, we describe a hydrogen isotope separation strategy exploiting the strongly attractive open metal sites present in nanoporous metal-organic frameworks of the CPO-27 family (also referred to as MOF-74). A theoretical analysis predicts an outstanding hydrogen isotopologue separation at open metal sites due to isotopal effects, which has been directly observed through cryogenic thermal desorption spectroscopy. For H2/D2 separation of an equimolar mixture at 60 K, the selectivity of 12 is the highest value ever measured, and this methodology shows extremely high separation efficiencies even above 77 K. Our theoretical results imply also a high selectivity for HD/H2 separation at similar temperatures, and together with catalytically active sites, we propose a mechanism to produce D2 from HD/H2 mixtures with natural or enriched deuterium content.

  2. Low Concentrations of Hydrogen Peroxide Activate the Antioxidant Defense System in Human Sperm Cells.

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, V V; Barinova, K V; Turovetskii, V B; Muronetz, V I; Schmalhausen, E V

    2015-09-01

    The effect of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (10-100 µM) on sperm motility and on the activity of the sperm enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDS) was investigated. Incubation of semen samples with 10 and 100 µM hydrogen peroxide increased the content of spermatozoa with progressive motility by 20 and 18%, respectively, and enhanced the activity of GAPDS in the sperm cells by 27 and 20% compared to a semen sample incubated without additions. It was also found that incubation with 10 µM hydrogen peroxide increased the content of reduced glutathione (GSH) in sperm cells by 50% on average compared to that in the control samples. It is supposed that low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide activate the pentose phosphate pathway, resulting in NADPH synthesis and the reduction of the oxidized glutathione by glutathione reductase yielding GSH. The formed GSH reduces the oxidized cysteine residues of the GAPDS active site, increasing the activity of the enzyme, which in turn enhances the content of sperm cells with progressive motility. Thus, the increase in motile spermatozoa in the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide can serve as an indicator of normal functioning of the antioxidant defense system in sperm cells.

  3. Correlating hydrogen oxidation and evolution activity on platinum at different pH with measured hydrogen binding energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, WC; Zhuang, ZB; Gao, MR; Zheng, J; Chen, JGG; Yan, YS

    2015-01-08

    The hydrogen oxidation/evolution reactions are two of the most fundamental reactions in distributed renewable electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems. The identification of the reaction descriptor is therefore of critical importance for the rational catalyst design and development. Here we report the correlation between hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity and experimentally measured hydrogen binding energy for polycrystalline platinum examined in several buffer solutions in a wide range of electrolyte pH from 0 to 13. The hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity obtained using the rotating disk electrode method is found to decrease with the pH, while the hydrogen binding energy, obtained from cyclic voltammograms, linearly increases with the pH. Correlating the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity to the hydrogen binding energy renders a monotonic decreasing hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity with the hydrogen binding energy, strongly supporting the hypothesis that hydrogen binding energy is the sole reaction descriptor for the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity on monometallic platinum.

  4. MEASUREMENT AND PREDICTION OF RADIOLYTIC HYDROGEN PRODUCTION IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING SLURRIES AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, N; John Pareizs, J; Terri Fellinger, T; Cj Bannochie, C

    2007-01-10

    This paper presents results of measurements and predictions of radiolytic hydrogen production rates from two actual process slurries in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS). Hydrogen is a flammable gas and its production in nuclear facilities can be a safety hazard if not mitigated. Measurements were made in the Shielded Cells of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using a sample of Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) currently being processed by the DWPF. Predictions were made using published values for rates of radiolytic reactions producing H{sub 2} in aqueous solutions and the measured radionuclide and chemical compositions of the two slurries. The agreement between measured and predicted results for nine experiments ranged from complete agreement to 24% difference. This agreement indicates that if the composition of the slurry being processed is known, the rate of radiolytic hydrogen production can be reasonably estimated.

  5. Al13H-: hydrogen atom site selectivity and the shell model.

    PubMed

    Grubisic, A; Li, X; Stokes, S T; Vetter, K; Ganteför, G F; Bowen, K H; Jena, P; Kiran, B; Burgert, R; Schnöckel, H

    2009-09-28

    Using a combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations, we explored the influence of the shell model on H atom site selectivity in Al(13)H(-). Photoelectron spectra revealed that Al(13)H(-) has two anionic isomers and for both of them provided vertical detachment energies (VDEs). Theoretical calculations found that the structures of these anionic isomers differ by the position of the hydrogen atom. In one, the hydrogen atom is radially bonded, while in the other, hydrogen caps a triangular face. VDEs for both anionic isomers as well as other energetic relationships were also calculated. Comparison of the measured versus calculated VDE values permitted the structure of each isomer to be confirmed and correlated with its observed photoelectron spectrum. Shell model, electron-counting considerations correctly predicted the relative stabilities of the anionic isomers and identified the stable structure of neutral Al(13)H.

  6. Hydrogen as an activating fuel for a tidal power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlov, A. M.

    Tidal projects, offering a clean, inexhaustible, and fairly predictable energy source, require a system for accumulating energy for off-peak periods. Hydrogen produced by electrolysis during off-peak power plant operation can be used as an activating fuel to furnish the plant during peak load demands. Tidal energy is converted into compressed air energy by special chambers on the ocean bed. This compressed air can be heated by combustion of the stored hydrogen and expanded through high speed gas turbine generators. For off-peak periods, the energy of non-heated compressed air is used for the production of hydrogen fuel. The amount of fuel produced at this time is enough for power plant operation during two peak hours, with three times greater plant capacity. The hydrogen fuel storage method does have energy losses and requires extra capital investment for electrolysis and hydrogen storage equipment. It does not, however, require a gas turbine oil fuel, as does the air compressed storage method, nor a low-speed heavy hydro-turbine, as does the hydro-pumped method. Moreover, the gas turbine can be used for both production and consumption of hydrogen fuel.

  7. Driving electrocatalytic activity by interface electronic structure control in a metalloprotein hybrid catalyst for efficient hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Behera, Sushant Kumar; Deb, Pritam; Ghosh, Arghya

    2016-08-17

    The rational design of metalloprotein hybrid structures and precise calculations for understanding the role of the interfacial electronic structure in regulating the HER activity of water splitting sites and their microscopic effect for obtaining robust hydrogen evolution possess great promise for developing highly efficient nano-bio hybrid HER catalysts. Here, we employ high-accuracy linear-scaling density functional theory calculations using a near-complete basis set and a minimal parameter implicit solvent model within the self-consistent calculations, on silver (Ag) ions assimilated on bacteriorhodopsin (bR) at specific binding sites. Geometry optimization indicates the formation of active sites at the interface of the metalloprotein complex and the density of states reflects the metallic nature of the active sites. The reduced value of the canonical orbital gap indicates the state of dynamic nature after Ag ion assimilation on active sites and smooth electron transfer. These incorporated active protein sites are more efficient in electrolytic splitting of water than pristine sites due to their low value of Gibbs free energy for the HER in terms of hydrogen coverages. Volcano plot analysis and the free energy diagram are compared for understanding the hydrogen evolution efficiency. Moreover, the essential role of the interfacial electronic properties in regulating the HER catalytic activity of water splitting sites and enhancing the efficiency is elucidated.

  8. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; ...

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size.more » From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.« less

  9. Platinum nanoparticle during electrochemical hydrogen evolution: Adsorbate distribution, active reaction species, and size effect

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Teck L.; Wang, Lin -Lin; Zhang, Jia; Johnson, Duane D.; Bai, Kewu

    2015-03-02

    For small Pt nanoparticles (NPs), catalytic activity is, as observed, adversely affected by size in the 1–3 nm range. We elucidate, via first-principles-based thermodynamics, the operation H* distribution and cyclic voltammetry (CV) during the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across the electrochemical potential, including the underpotential region (U ≤ 0) that is difficult to assess in experiment. We consider multiple adsorption sites on a 1 nm Pt NP model and show that the characteristic CV peaks from different H* species correspond well to experiment. We next quantify the activity contribution from each H* species to explain the adverse effect of size. From the resolved CV peaks at the standard hydrogen electrode potential (U = 0), we first deduce that the active species for the HER are the partially covered (100)-facet bridge sites and the (111)-facet hollow sites. Upon evaluation of the reaction barriers at operation H* distribution and microkinetic modeling of the exchange current, we find that the nearest-neighbor (100)-facet bridge site pairs have the lowest activation energy and contribute to ~75% of the NP activity. Edge bridge sites (fully covered by H*) per se are not active; however, they react with neighboring (100)-facet H* to account for ~18% of the activity, whereas (111)-facet hollow sites contribute little. As a result, extrapolating the relative contributions to larger NPs in which the ratio of facet-to-edge sites increases, we show that the adverse size effect of Pt NP HER activity kicks in for sizes below 2 nm.

  10. Active hydrogen excretion and sodium absorption through isolated frog skin.

    PubMed

    Ehrenfeld, J; Garcia-Romeu, F

    1977-07-01

    The in vitro skin of Rana esculenta was studied in open-circuit conditions. It was shown that when the external face is bathed in a 2-meq solution of NaCl, sodium is absorbed at a significantly higher rate than chloride. The ionic balance is maintained by excretion of hydrogen. With a mucosal solution of 2 meq Na2SO4 the equation relating sodium absorption to proton excretion is JnH+ = (-25 +/- 7) - (0.73 +/- 0.04) JnNa+. The correlation between the two variables is highly significant. Hydrogen excretion obeys saturation kinetics in relation to the sodium concentration of the mucosal solution. Maximum excretion occurs at a sodium concentration of 4 meq. When the mucosal solution is a 115-meq solution of Na2SO4 the net flux of sodium is 2.3 times higher than that of hydrogen. The balance is maintained by absorption of SO42-. The effects of various substances on the Na+ext/H+int exchange were studied. With a mucosal solution of 2 meq Na2SO4 and short-circuit conditions it was shown that the hydrogen excretion is active and nearly the same as in open circuit, the short-circuit current is equal (to within 8%) to the sum of the sodium and hydrogen net fluxes, and the correlation between the movements of the two ions is low. A model relating the active proton excretion with the sodium transport mechanism is proposed.

  11. The effects of hydrogen bonds on metal-mediated O2 activation and related processes

    PubMed Central

    Shook, Ryan L.; Borovik, A. S.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds stabilize and direct chemistry performed by metalloenzymes. With inspiration from enzymes, we will utilize an approach that incorporates intramolecular hydrogen bond donors to determine their effects on the stability and reactivity of metal complexes. Our premise is that control of secondary coordination sphere interactions will promote new function in synthetic metal complexes. Multidentate ligands have been developed that create rigid organic structures around metal ions. These ligands place hydrogen bond (H-bond) donors proximal to the metal centers, forming specific microenvironments. One distinguishing attribute of these systems is that site-specific modulations in structure can be readily accomplished, in order to evaluate correlations with reactivity. A focus of this research is consideration of dioxygen binding and activation by metal complexes, including developing structure–function relationships in metal-assisted oxidative catalysis. PMID:19082087

  12. Rationalizing the Hydrogen and Oxygen Evolution Reaction Activity of Two-Dimensional Hydrogenated Silicene and Germanene.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Caroline J; Chakraborty, Sudip; Anversa, Jonas; Baierle, Rogério J; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-01-20

    We have undertaken first-principles electronic structure calculations to show that the chemical functionalization of two-dimensional hydrogenated silicene (silicane) and germanene (germanane) can become a powerful tool to increase the photocatalytic water-splitting activity. Spin-polarized density functional theory within the GGA-PBE and HSE06 types of exchange correlation functionals has been used to obtain the structural, electronic, and optical properties of silicane and germanane functionalized with a series of nonmetals (N, P, and S), alkali metals (Li, Na, and K) and alkaline-earth metals (Mg and Ca). The surface-adsorbate interaction between the functionalized systems with H2 and O2 molecules that leads to envisaged hydrogen and oxygen evolution reaction activity has been determined.

  13. Transition Metal‐Promoted V2CO2 (MXenes): A New and Highly Active Catalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chongyi; Shi, Li; Ouyang, Yixin; Chen, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Developing alternatives to precious Pt for hydrogen production from water splitting is central to the area of renewable energy. This work predicts extremely high catalytic activity of transition metal (Fe, Co, and Ni) promoted two‐dimensional MXenes, fully oxidized vanadium carbides (V2CO2), for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The first‐principle calculations show that the introduction of transition metal can greatly weaken the strong binding between hydrogen and oxygen and engineer the hydrogen adsorption free energy to the optimal value ≈0 eV by choosing the suitable type and coverage of the promoters as well as the active sites. Strain engineering on the performance of transition metal promoted V2CO2 further reveals that the excellent HER activities can maintain well while those poor ones can be modulated to be highly active. This study provides new possibilities for cost‐effective alternatives to Pt in HER and for the application of 2D MXenes. PMID:27980992

  14. Transition Metal-Promoted V2CO2 (MXenes): A New and Highly Active Catalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chongyi; Shi, Li; Ouyang, Yixin; Chen, Qian; Wang, Jinlan

    2016-11-01

    Developing alternatives to precious Pt for hydrogen production from water splitting is central to the area of renewable energy. This work predicts extremely high catalytic activity of transition metal (Fe, Co, and Ni) promoted two-dimensional MXenes, fully oxidized vanadium carbides (V2CO2), for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The first-principle calculations show that the introduction of transition metal can greatly weaken the strong binding between hydrogen and oxygen and engineer the hydrogen adsorption free energy to the optimal value ≈0 eV by choosing the suitable type and coverage of the promoters as well as the active sites. Strain engineering on the performance of transition metal promoted V2CO2 further reveals that the excellent HER activities can maintain well while those poor ones can be modulated to be highly active. This study provides new possibilities for cost-effective alternatives to Pt in HER and for the application of 2D MXenes.

  15. Innovative Strategy on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Utilizing Activated Liquid Water

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Rick, John; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Splitting water for hydrogen production using light, or electrical energy, is the most developed ‘green technique’. For increasing efficiency in hydrogen production, currently, the most exciting and thriving strategies are focused on efficient and inexpensive catalysts. Here, we report an innovative idea for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) utilizing plasmon-activated liquid water with reduced hydrogen-bonded structure by hot electron transfer. This strategy is effective for all HERs in acidic, basic and neutral systems, photocatalytic system with a g-C3N4 (graphite carbon nitride) electrode, as well as in an inert system with an ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode. Compared to deionized water, the efficiency of HER increases by 48% based on activated water ex situ on a Pt electrode. Increase in energy efficiency from activated water is 18% at a specific current yield of −20 mA in situ on a nanoscale-granulated Au electrode. Moreover, the onset potential of −0.023 V vs RHE was very close to the thermodynamic potential of the HER (0 V). The measured current density at the corresponding overpotential for HER in an acidic system was higher than any data previously reported in the literature. This approach establishes a new vista in clean green energy production. PMID:26541371

  16. Innovative Strategy on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Utilizing Activated Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Rick, John; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-11-01

    Splitting water for hydrogen production using light, or electrical energy, is the most developed ‘green technique’. For increasing efficiency in hydrogen production, currently, the most exciting and thriving strategies are focused on efficient and inexpensive catalysts. Here, we report an innovative idea for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) utilizing plasmon-activated liquid water with reduced hydrogen-bonded structure by hot electron transfer. This strategy is effective for all HERs in acidic, basic and neutral systems, photocatalytic system with a g-C3N4 (graphite carbon nitride) electrode, as well as in an inert system with an ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode. Compared to deionized water, the efficiency of HER increases by 48% based on activated water ex situ on a Pt electrode. Increase in energy efficiency from activated water is 18% at a specific current yield of -20 mA in situ on a nanoscale-granulated Au electrode. Moreover, the onset potential of -0.023 V vs RHE was very close to the thermodynamic potential of the HER (0 V). The measured current density at the corresponding overpotential for HER in an acidic system was higher than any data previously reported in the literature. This approach establishes a new vista in clean green energy production.

  17. Restricted dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in activated carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Saha, Dipendu; Gallego, Nidia C; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Bhat, Vinay V

    2012-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering was used for characterization of dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in narrow nanopores of two activated carbon materials: PFAC (derived from polyfurfuryl alcohol) and UMC (ultramicroporous carbon). Fast, but incomplete ortho-para conversion was observed at 10 K, suggesting that scattering originates from the fraction of unconverted ortho isomer which is rotation-hindered because of confinement in nanopores. Hydrogen molecules entrapped in narrow nanopores (<7 ) were immobile below 22-25 K. Mobility increased rapidly with temperature above this threshold, which is 8 K higher than the melting point of bulk hydrogen. Diffusion obeyed fixed-jump length mechanism, indistinguishable between 2D and 3D processes. Thermal activation of diffusion was characterized between ~22 and 37 K, and structure-dependent differences were found between the two carbons. Activation energy of diffusion was higher than that of bulk solid hydrogen. Classical notions of liquid and solid do not longer apply for H2 confined in narrow nanopores.

  18. Corrosion Research And Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  19. Corrosion Research and Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  20. Hydrogen induced optically-active defects in silicon photonic nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Boninelli, S; Franzò, G; Cardile, P; Priolo, F; Lo Savio, R; Galli, M; Shakoor, A; O'Faolain, L; Krauss, T F; Vines, L; Svensson, B G

    2014-04-21

    We demonstrate intense room temperature photoluminescence (PL) from optically active hydrogen- related defects incorporated into crystalline silicon. Hydrogen was incorporated into the device layer of a silicon on insulator (SOI) wafer by two methods: hydrogen plasma treatment and ion implantation. The room temperature PL spectra show two broad PL bands centered at 1300 and 1500 nm wavelengths: the first one relates to implanted defects while the other band mainly relates to the plasma treatment. Structural characterization reveals the presence of nanometric platelets and bubbles and we attribute different features of the emission spectrum to the presence of these different kind of defects. The emission is further enhanced by introducing defects into photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavities. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that the isotropicity of plasma treatment causes the formation of a higher defects density around the whole cavity compared to the ion implantation technique, while ion implantation creates a lower density of defects embedded in the Si layer, resulting in a higher PL enhancement. These results further increase the understanding of the nature of optically active hydrogen defects and their relation with the observed photoluminescence, which will ultimately lead to the development of intense and tunable crystalline silicon light sources at room temperature.

  1. Molecular tectonics: polymorphism and enhancement of network dimensionality by a combination of primary and secondary hydrogen bond sites.

    PubMed

    Dechambenoit, Pierre; Ferlay, Sylvie; Hosseini, Mir Wais; Kyritsakas, Nathalie

    2007-11-28

    A dicationic tecton bearing four NH and two OH groups, as primary and secondary hydrogen bond donor sites, respectively, leads, in the presence of [M(CN)(4)](2-) anions, to the formation of polymorphic 2- and 3-D hydrogen-bonded networks.

  2. Methods and apparatus for the on-site production of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buschmann, Wayne E. (Inventor); James, Patrick I. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods, apparatus, and applications for the on-site production of hydrogen peroxide are described. An embodiment of the apparatus comprises at least one anolyte chamber coupled to at least one anode, at least one catholyte chamber, wherein the at least one catholyte chamber is coupled to at least one cathode, at least one anode membrane and at least one cathode membrane, wherein the anode membrane is adjacent to the at least one anode, wherein the cathode membrane is adjacent to the at least one cathode, at least one central chamber disposed between the at least one anolyte chamber and the at least one catholyte chamber. Hydrogen peroxide is produced by reduction of an oxygen-containing gas at the cathode.

  3. Surface Roughening of Nickel Cobalt Phosphide Nanowire Arrays/Ni Foam for Enhanced Hydrogen Evolution Activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xina; Tong, Rui; Wang, Yi; Tao, Hualong; Zhang, Zhihua; Wang, Hao

    2016-12-21

    Development of earth-abundant, efficient, and stable electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reactions (HER) in alkaline or even neutral pH electrolyte is very important for hydrogen production from water splitting. Construction of bimetal phosphides via tuning the bonding strength to hydrogen and increasing effective active sites through nanostructuring and surface engineering should lead to high HER activity. Here, ternary NiCoP nanowires (NWs) decorated by homogeneous nanoparticles have been obtained on Ni foam for a highly efficient HER property via long-term cyclic voltammetric (CV) sweeping. The electron density transfer between the positively charged Ni and Co and negatively charged P atoms, one-dimensional electron transfer channel of the NWs, and abundant active sites supplied by the nanoparticles and NWs endow the catalyst with low overpotentials of 43 and 118 mV to achieve the respective current densities of 10 and 100 mA cm(-2) together with long durability for at least 33 h in 1 M KOH. A cycled anodic dissolution-redeposition mechanism is disclosed for the formation of the NiCoP nanoparticles during the CV sweeping process. Such a surface roughening method is found to be adaptable to enhance the HER property of other phosphides, including Ni2P nanoplates/NF, NiCoP nanoparticles/NF, and CoP NW/NF.

  4. Thermopower and conductivity activation energies in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Dyalsingh, H.M.; Kakalios, J.

    1996-12-31

    The long range fluctuation model has been widely used to account for the difference in activation energies seen experimentally in dark conductivity and thermopower measurements in hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The authors report on a test of this model using measurements of the conductivity and thermoelectric effects carried out in both open and short circuit configurations. While the thermopower activation energy is less than that of the dark conductivity, the short circuit Seebeck conductivity is found to be nearly identical to the dark conductivity in both activation energy and magnitude, consistent with the long range fluctuation model.

  5. Kinetic effect of Pd additions on the hydrogen uptake of chemically activated, ultramicroporous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C

    2010-01-01

    The effect of mixing chemically-activated ultramicroporous carbon (UMC) with Pd nanopowder is investigated. Results show that Pd addition doubles the rate of hydrogen uptake, but does not enhance the hydrogen capacity or improve desorption kinetics. The effect of Pd on the rate of hydrogen adsorption supports the occurrence of the hydrogen spillover mechanism in the Pd - UMC system.

  6. Atypical Hydrogen Uptake on Chemically Activated, Ultramicroporous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Baker, Frederick S

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption at near-ambient temperatures on ultramicroporous carbon (UMC), derived through secondary chemical activation from a wood-based activated carbon was studied using volumetric and gravimetric methods. The results showed that physisorption is accompanied by a process of different nature that causes slow uptake at high pressures and hysteresis on desorption. In combination, this results in unusually high levels of hydrogen uptake at near-ambient temperatures and pressures (e.g. up to 0.8 wt % at 25 oC and 2 MPa). The heat of adsorption corresponding to the slow process leading to high uptake (17 20 kJ/mol) is higher than usually reported for carbon materials, but the adsorption kinetics is slow, and the isotherms exhibit pronounced hysteresis. These unusual properties were attributed to contributions from polarization-enhanced physisorption caused by traces of alkali metals residual from chemical activation. The results support the hypothesis that polarization-induced physisorption in high surface area carbons modified with traces of alkali metal ions is an alternate route for increasing the hydrogen storage capacity of carbon adsorbents.

  7. Optimizing the deposition of hydrogen evolution sites on suspended semiconductor particles using on-line photocatalytic reforming of aqueous methanol solutions.

    PubMed

    Busser, G Wilma; Mei, Bastian; Muhler, Martin

    2012-11-01

    The deposition of hydrogen evolution sites on photocatalysts is a crucial step in the multistep process of synthesizing a catalyst that is active for overall photocatalytic water splitting. An alternative approach to conventional photodeposition was developed, applying the photocatalytic reforming of aqueous methanol solutions to deposit metal particles on semiconductor materials such as Ga₂O₃ and (Ga₀.₆ Zn₀.₄)(N₀.₆O₀.₄). The method allows optimizing the loading of the co-catalysts based on the stepwise addition of their precursors and the continuous online monitoring of the evolved hydrogen. Moreover, a synergetic effect between different co-catalysts can be directly established.

  8. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF REACTOR VESSELS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Serrato, M.; Langton, C.

    2010-11-10

    The R- and P-reactor vessels at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of physically isolating and stabilizing the reactor vessel by filling it with a grout material. The reactor vessels contain aluminum alloy materials, which pose a concern in that aluminum corrodes rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout. A product of the corrosion reaction is hydrogen gas and therefore potential flammability issues were assessed. A model was developed to calculate the hydrogen generation rate as the reactor is being filled with the grout material. Three options existed for the type of grout material for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options included ceramicrete (pH 6-8), a calcium aluminate sulfate (CAS) based cement (pH 10), or Portland cement grout (pH 12.4). Corrosion data for aluminum in concrete were utilized as input for the model. The calculations considered such factors as the surface area of the aluminum components, the open cross-sectional area of the reactor vessel, the rate at which the grout is added to the reactor vessel, and temperature. Given the hydrogen generation rate, the hydrogen concentration in the vapor space of the reactor vessel above the grout was calculated. This concentration was compared to the lower flammability limit for hydrogen. The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the CAS grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters did not provide a margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. Therefore, it was recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. On the other hand, the R-reactor vessel

  9. Wobble Pairs of the HDV Ribozyme Play Specific Roles in Stabilization of Active Site Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sripathi, Kamali N.; Banáš, Pavel; Reblova, Kamila; Šponer, Jiři; Otyepka, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is the only known human pathogen whose genome contains a catalytic RNA motif (ribozyme). The overall architecture of the HDV ribozyme is that of a double-nested pseudoknot, with two GU pairs flanking the active site. Although extensive studies have shown that mutation of either wobble results in decreased catalytic activity, little work has focused on linking these mutations to specific structural effects on catalytic fitness. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations based on an activated structure to probe the active site dynamics as a result of wobble pair mutations. In both wild-type and mutant ribozymes, the in-line fitness of the active site (as a measure of catalytic proficiency) strongly depends on the presence of a C75(N3H3+)N1(O5′) hydrogen bond, which positions C75 as the general acid for the reaction. Our mutational analyses show that each GU wobble supports catalytically fit conformations in distinct ways; the reverse G25U20 wobble promotes high in-line fitness, high occupancy of the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) general-acid hydrogen bond and stabilization of the G1U37 wobble, while the G1U37 wobble acts more locally by stabilizing high in-line fitness and the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) hydrogen bond. We also find that stable type I A-minor and P1.1 hydrogen bonding above and below the active site, respectively, prevent local structural disorder from spreading and disrupting global conformation. Taken together, our results define specific, often redundant architectural roles for several structural motifs of the HDV ribozyme active site, expanding the known roles of these motifs within all HDV-like ribozymes and other structured RNAs. PMID:25631765

  10. Hydrogen site energetics in LaNi5Hn and LaCo5Hn: Toward predicting hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, J. F.; Hector, L. G.

    2004-10-01

    We have investigated the energetics of hydrogen site occupation in LaNi5Hn (hexagonal P63mc structure) and LaCo5Hn (orthorhombic Cmmm structure) via calculation of the site-dependent enthalpies of hydride formation ΔH. For each structure ΔH was determined for a broad variety of hydrogen configurations. In LaNi5Hnwidth="0.3em"/>(LaCo5Hn) we find that the minimum ΔH occurs for hydrogen filling of the 2b6c16c2(4e4h ) sites, precisely those identified by neutron diffraction. Hydrogen-richer hydrides are predicted for both structures, in qualitative agreement with experiments performed at higher pressures.

  11. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  12. C-H Activation on Co,O Sites: Isolated Surface Sites versus Molecular Analogs.

    PubMed

    Estes, Deven P; Siddiqi, Georges; Allouche, Florian; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Safonova, Olga V; Trigub, Alexander L; Koptyug, Igor V; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-11-16

    The activation and conversion of hydrocarbons is one of the most important challenges in chemistry. Transition-metal ions (V, Cr, Fe, Co, etc.) isolated on silica surfaces are known to catalyze such processes. The mechanisms of these processes are currently unknown but are thought to involve C-H activation as the rate-determining step. Here, we synthesize well-defined Co(II) ions on a silica surface using a metal siloxide precursor followed by thermal treatment under vacuum at 500 °C. We show that these isolated Co(II) sites are catalysts for a number of hydrocarbon conversion reactions, such as the dehydrogenation of propane, the hydrogenation of propene, and the trimerization of terminal alkynes. We then investigate the mechanisms of these processes using kinetics, kinetic isotope effects, isotopic labeling experiments, parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) NMR, and comparison with a molecular analog. The data are consistent with all of these reactions occurring by a common mechanism, involving heterolytic C-H or H-H activation via a 1,2 addition across a Co-O bond.

  13. RADIOLYTIC HYDROGEN GENERATION INSAVANNAH RIVER SITE (SRS) HIGH LEVEL WASTETANKS COMPARISON OF SRS AND HANFORDMODELING PREDICTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C; Ned Bibler, N

    2009-04-15

    In the high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS), hydrogen is produced continuously by interaction of the radiation in the tank with water in the waste. Consequently, the vapor spaces of the tanks are purged to prevent the accumulation of H{sub 2} and possible formation of a flammable mixture in a tank. Personnel at SRS have developed an empirical model to predict the rate of H{sub 2} formation in a tank. The basis of this model is the prediction of the G value for H{sub 2} production. This G value is the number of H{sub 2} molecules produced per 100 eV of radiolytic energy absorbed by the waste. Based on experimental studies it was found that the G value for H{sub 2} production from beta radiation and from gamma radiation were essentially equal. The G value for H{sub 2} production from alpha radiation was somewhat higher. Thus, the model has two equations, one for beta/gamma radiation and one for alpha radiation. Experimental studies have also indicated that both G values are decreased by the presence of nitrate and nitrite ions in the waste. These are the main scavengers for the precursors of H{sub 2} in the waste; thus the equations that were developed predict G values for hydrogen production as a function of the concentrations of these two ions in waste. Knowing the beta/gamma and alpha heat loads in the waste allows one to predict the total generation rate for hydrogen in a tank. With this prediction a ventilation rate can be established for each tank to ensure that a flammable mixture is not formed in the vapor space in a tank. Recently personnel at Hanford have developed a slightly different model for predicting hydrogen G values. Their model includes the same precursor for H{sub 2} as the SRS model but also includes an additional precursor not in the SRS model. Including the second precursor for H{sub 2} leads to different empirical equations for predicting the G values for H{sub 2} as a function of the nitrate and nitrite concentrations in

  14. Pathways of H2 toward the Active Site of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Vitor H.; Baptista, António M.; Soares, Cláudio M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2), but little is known about the diffusion of H2 toward the active site. Here we analyze pathways for H2 permeation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent. Various MD simulation replicates were done, to improve the sampling of the system states. H2 easily permeates hydrogenase in every simulation and it moves preferentially in channels. All H2 molecules that reach the active site made their approach from the side of the Ni ion. H2 is able to reach distances of <4 Å from the active site, although after 6 Å permeation is difficult. In this region we mutated Val-67 into alanine and perform new MD simulations. These simulations show an increase of H2 inside the protein and at lower distances from the active site. This valine can be a control point in the H2 access to the active center. PMID:16731562

  15. Atomic hydrogen maser active oscillator cavity and bulb design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Washburn, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance characteristics and reliability of the active oscillator atomic hydrogen maser depend upon oscillation parameters which characterize the interaction region of the maser, the resonant cavity and atom storage bulb assembly. With particular attention to use of the cavity frequency switching servo (1) to reduce cavity pulling, it is important to maintain high oscillation level, high atomic beam flux utilization efficiency, small spin exchange parameter and high cavity quality factor. It is also desirable to have a small and rigid cavity and bulb structure and to minimize the cavity temperature sensitivity. Curves for a novel hydrogen maser cavity configuration which is partially loaded with a quartz dielectric cylinder and show the relationships between cavity length, cavity diameter, bulb size, dielectric thickness, cavity quality factor, filling factor and cavity frequency temperature coefficient are presented. The results are discussed in terms of improvement in maser performance resulting from particular design choices.

  16. [Structural regularities in activated cleavage sites of thrombin receptors].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlik, I V; Verevka, S V

    1999-01-01

    Comparison of thrombin receptors activation splitting sites sequences testifies to their similarity both in activation splitting sites of protein precursors and protein proteinase inhibitors reactive sites. In all these sites corresponded to effectory sites P2'-positions are placed by hydrophobic amino-acids only. The regularity defined conforms with previous thesis about the role of effectory S2'-site in regulation of the processes mediated by serine proteinases.

  17. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Altering Pollen Soluble Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Deborah J; Haque, Tamanna; Tudor, Richard L; Barron, Yoshimi; Zampronio, Cleidiane G; Cotton, Nicholas P J; de Graaf, Barend H J; White, Scott A; Cooper, Helen J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Harper, Jeffery F; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2017-03-01

    Protein phosphorylation regulates numerous cellular processes. Identifying the substrates and protein kinases involved is vital to understand how these important posttranslational modifications modulate biological function in eukaryotic cells. Pyrophosphatases catalyze the hydrolysis of inorganic phosphate (PPi) to inorganic phosphate Pi, driving biosynthetic reactions; they are essential for low cytosolic inorganic phosphate. It was suggested recently that posttranslational regulation of Family I soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (sPPases) may affect their activity. We previously demonstrated that two pollen-expressed sPPases, Pr-p26.1a and Pr-p26.1b, from the flowering plant Papaver rhoeas were inhibited by phosphorylation. Despite the potential significance, there is a paucity of data on sPPase phosphorylation and regulation. Here, we used liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry to map phosphorylation sites to the otherwise divergent amino-terminal extensions on these pollen sPPases. Despite the absence of reports in the literature on mapping phosphorylation sites on sPPases, a database survey of various proteomes identified a number of examples, suggesting that phosphorylation may be a more widely used mechanism to regulate these enzymes. Phosphomimetic mutants of Pr-p26.1a/b significantly and differentially reduced PPase activities by up to 2.5-fold at pH 6.8 and 52% in the presence of Ca(2+) and hydrogen peroxide over unmodified proteins. This indicates that phosphoregulation of key sites can inhibit the catalytic responsiveness of these proteins in concert with key intracellular events. As sPPases are essential for many metabolic pathways in eukaryotic cells, our findings identify the phosphorylation of sPPases as a potential master regulatory mechanism that could be used to attenuate metabolism.

  18. Hollow Structured Micro/Nano MoS₂ Spheres for High Electrocatalytic Activity Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bangjun; Yu, Ke; Li, Honglin; Song, Haili; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Lei, Xiang; Fu, Hao; Tan, Yinghua; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2016-03-02

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted extensive attention as a non-noble metal electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Controlling the skeleton structure at the nanoscale is paramount to increase the number of active sites at the surface. However, hydrothermal synthesis favors the presence of the basal plane, limiting the efficiency of catalytic reaction. In this work, perfect hollow MoS2 microspheres capped by hollow MoS2 nanospheres (hH-MoS2) were obtained for the first time, which creates an opportunity for improving the HER electrocatalytic performance. Benefiting from the controllable hollow skeleton structure and large exposed edge sites, high-efficiency HER activity was obtained for stacked MoS2 thin shells with a mild degree of disorder, proving the presence of rich active sites and the validity of the combined structure. In general, the obtained hollow micro/nano MoS2 nanomaterial exhibits optimized electrocatalytic activity for HER with onset overpotential as low as 112 mV, low Tafel slope of 74 mV decade(-1), high current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at η = 214 mV, and high TOF of 0.11 H2 s(-1) per active site at η = 200 mV.

  19. Dynamically achieved active site precision in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes' enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme-substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C-H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed.

  20. Importance of surface carbide formation on the activity and selectivity of Pd surfaces in the selective hydrogenation of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Burch, Robbie; Hardacre, Christopher; Hu, P.; Hughes, Philip

    2016-04-01

    A recent experimental investigation (Kim et al. J. Catal. 306 (2013) 146-154) on the selective hydrogenation of acetylene over Pd nanoparticles with different shapes concluded that Pd(100) showed higher activity and selectivity than Pd(111) for acetylene hydrogenation. However, our recent density functional calculations (Yang et al. J. Catal. 305 (2013) 264-276) observed that the clean Pd(111) surface should result in higher activity and ethylene selectivity compared with the clean Pd(100) surface for acetylene hydrogenation. In the current work, using density functional theory calculations, we find that Pd(100) in the carbide form gives rise to higher activity and selectivity than Pd(111) carbide. These results indicate that the catalyst surface is most likely in the carbide form under the experimental reaction conditions. Furthermore, the adsorption energies of hydrogen atoms as a function of the hydrogen coverage at the surface and subsurface sites over Pd(100) are compared with those over Pd(111), and it is found that the adsorption of hydrogen atoms is always less favoured on Pd(100) over the whole coverage range. This suggests that the Pd(100) hydride surface will be less stable than the Pd(111) hydride surface, which is also in accordance with the experimental results reported.

  1. Physiological and genomic features of highly alkaliphilic hydrogen-utilizing Betaproteobacteria from a continental serpentinizing site

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shino; Kuenen, J. Gijs; Schipper, Kira; van der Velde, Suzanne; Ishii, Shun’ichi; Wu, Angela; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Tenney, Aaron; Meng, XianYing; Morrill, Penny L.; Kamagata, Yoichi; Muyzer, Gerard; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    Serpentinization, or the aqueous alteration of ultramafic rocks, results in challenging environments for life in continental sites due to the combination of extremely high pH, low salinity and lack of obvious electron acceptors and carbon sources. Nevertheless, certain Betaproteobacteria have been frequently observed in such environments. Here we describe physiological and genomic features of three related Betaproteobacterial strains isolated from highly alkaline (pH 11.6) serpentinizing springs at The Cedars, California. All three strains are obligate alkaliphiles with an optimum for growth at pH 11 and are capable of autotrophic growth with hydrogen, calcium carbonate and oxygen. The three strains exhibit differences, however, regarding the utilization of organic carbon and electron acceptors. Their global distribution and physiological, genomic and transcriptomic characteristics indicate that the strains are adapted to the alkaline and calcium-rich environments represented by the terrestrial serpentinizing ecosystems. We propose placing these strains in a new genus ‘Serpentinomonas’. PMID:24845058

  2. Production of activated carbon and its catalytic application for oxidation of hydrogen sulphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azargohar, Ramin

    coal-based and biomass-based catalysts to 115 and 141 minutes, respectively. The average amounts of sulphur dioxide produced during the reaction time were 0.14 and 0.03% (as % of hydrogen sulphide fed to the reactor) for modified activated carbons prepared from biochar and luscar char, respectively. The effects of porous structure, surface chemistry, and ash content on the performances of these activated carbon catalysts were investigated for the direct oxidation reaction of hydrogen sulphide. The acid-treatment followed by thermal desorption of activated carbons developed the porosity which produced more surface area for active sites and in addition, provided more space for sulphur product storage resulting in higher life time for catalyst. Boehm titration and temperature program desorption showed that the modification method increased basic character of carbon surface after thermal desorption in comparison to acid-treated sample. In addition, the effects of impregnating agents (potassium iodide and manganese nitrate) and two solvents for impregnation process were studied on the performance of the activated carbon catalysts for the direct oxidation of H2S to sulphur. Sulphur L-edge X-ray near edge structure (XANES) showed that the elemental sulphur was the dominant sulphur species in the product. The kinetic study for oxidation reaction of H2S over LusAC-O-D(650) was performed for temperature range of 160-190°C, oxygen to hydrogen sulphide molar ratio of 1-3, and H2S concentration of 6000-10000 ppm at 200 kPa. The values of activation energy were 26.6 and 29.3 kJ.gmol-1 for Eley-Rideal and Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanisms, respectively.

  3. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  4. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-04

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases.

  5. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases. PMID:22020126

  6. Cleavage of hydrogen by activation at a single non-metal centre - towards new hydrogen storage materials.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Sławomir J

    2015-05-28

    Molecular surfaces of non-metal species are often characterized by both positive and negative regions of electrostatic potential (EP) at a non-metal centre. This centre may activate molecular hydrogen which further leads to the addition reaction. The positive EP regions at the non-metal centres correspond to σ-holes; the latter sites are enhanced by electronegative substituents. This is why the following simple moieties; PFH2, SFH, AsFH2, SeFH, BrF3, PF(CH3)2 and AsF(CH3)2, were chosen here to analyze the H2 activation and its subsequent splitting at the P, As, S, Se and Br centres. Also the reverse H-H bond reforming process is analyzed. MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ calculations were performed for systems corresponding to different stages of these processes. The sulphur centre in the SFH moiety is analyzed in detail since the potential barrier height for the addition reaction for this species is the lowest of the moieties analyzed here. The results of calculations show that the SFH + H2 → SFH3 reaction in the gas phase is endothermic but it is exothermic in polar solvents.

  7. The pepsin residue glycine-76 contributes to active-site loop flexibility and participates in catalysis.

    PubMed Central

    Okoniewska, M; Tanaka, T; Yada, R Y

    2000-01-01

    Glycine residues are known to contribute to conformational flexibility of polypeptide chains, and have been found to contribute to flexibility of some loops associated with enzymic catalysis. A comparison of porcine pepsin in zymogen, mature and inhibited forms revealed that a loop (a flap), consisting of residues 71--80, located near the active site changed its position upon substrate binding. The loop residue, glycine-76, has been implicated in the catalytic process and thought to participate in a hydrogen-bond network aligning the substrate. This study investigated the role of glycine-76 using site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutants, G76A, G76V and G76S, were constructed to increase conformational restriction of a polypeptide chain. In addition, the serine mutant introduced a hydrogen-bonding potential at position 76 similar to that observed in human renin. All the mutants, regardless of amino acid size and polarity, had lower catalytic efficiency and activated more slowly than the wild-type enzyme. The slower activation process was associated directly with altered proteolytic activity. Consequently, it was proposed that a proteolytic cleavage represents a limiting step of the activation process. Lower catalytic efficiency of the mutants was explained as a decrease in the flap flexibility and, therefore, a different pattern of hydrogen bonds responsible for substrate alignment and flap conformation. The results demonstrated that flap flexibility is essential for efficient catalytic and activation processes. PMID:10861225

  8. Characterization of Active Site Residues of Nitroalkane Oxidase†

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Michael P.; Fenny, Nana S.; Ali, Shah R.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of primary and secondary nitrolkanes to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones plus nitrite. The structure of the enzyme shows that Serl71 forms a hydrogen bond to the flavin N5, suggesting that it plays a role in catalysis. Cys397 and Tyr398 were previously identified by chemical modification as potential active site residues. To more directly probe the roles of these residues, the S171A, S171V, S171T, C397S, and Y398F enzymes have been characterized with nitroethane as substrate. The C397S and Y398 enzymes were less stable than the wild-type enzyme, and the C397S enzyme routinely contained a substoichiometric amount of FAD. Analysis of the steady-state kinetic parameters for the mutant enzymes, including deuterium isotope effects, establishes that all of the mutations result in decreases in the rate constants for removal of the substrate proton by ~5-fold and decreases in the rate constant for product release of ~2-fold. Only the S171V and S171T mutations alter the rate constant for flavin oxidation. These results establish that these residues are not involved in catalysis, but rather are required for maintaining the protein structure. PMID:20056514

  9. Fine Control over Site and Substrate Selectivity in Hydrogen Atom Transfer-Based Functionalization of Aliphatic C-H Bonds.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Carboni, Giulia; Bietti, Massimo

    2016-10-07

    The selective functionalization of unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds over intrinsically more reactive ones represents an ongoing challenge of synthetic chemistry. Here we show that in hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the aliphatic C-H bonds of alkane, ether, alcohol, amide, and amine substrates to the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) fine control over site and substrate selectivity is achieved by means of acid-base interactions. Protonation of the amines and metal ion binding to amines and amides strongly deactivates the C-H bonds of these substrates toward HAT to CumO(•), providing a powerful method for selective functionalization of unactivated or intrinsically less reactive C-H bonds. With 5-amino-1-pentanol, site-selectivity has been drastically changed through protonation of the strongly activating NH2 group, with HAT that shifts to the C-H bonds that are adjacent to the OH group. In the intermolecular selectivity studies, trifluoroacetic acid, Mg(ClO4)2, and LiClO4 have been employed in a orthogonal fashion for selective functionalization of alkane, ether, alcohol, and amide (or amine) substrates in the presence of an amine (or amide) one. Ca(ClO4)2, that promotes deactivation of amines and amides by Ca(2+) binding, offers, moreover, the opportunity to selectively functionalize the C-H bonds of alkane, ether, and alcohol substrates in the presence of both amines and amides.

  10. Metal and Precursor Effect during 1-Heptyne Selective Hydrogenation Using an Activated Carbon as Support

    PubMed Central

    Lederhos, Cecilia R.; Badano, Juan M.; Carrara, Nicolas; Coloma-Pascual, Fernando; Almansa, M. Cristina; Liprandi, Domingo; Quiroga, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    Palladium, platinum, and ruthenium supported on activated carbon were used as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, a terminal alkyne. All catalysts were characterized by temperature programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. TPR and XPS suggest that the metal in all catalysts is reduced after the pretreatment with H2 at 673 K. The TPR trace of the PdNRX catalyst shows that the support surface groups are greatly modified as a consequence of the use of HNO3 during the catalyst preparation. During the hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, both palladium catalysts were more active and selective than the platinum and ruthenium catalysts. The activity order of the catalysts is as follows: PdClRX > PdNRX > PtClRX ≫ RuClRX. This superior performance of PdClRX was attributed in part to the total occupancy of the d electronic levels of the Pd metal that is supposed to promote the rupture of the H2 bond during the hydrogenation reaction. The activity differences between PdClRX and PdNRX catalysts could be attributed to a better accessibility of the substrate to the active sites, as a consequence of steric and electronic effects of the superficial support groups. The order for the selectivity to 1-heptene is as follows: PdClRX = PdNRX > RuClRX > PtClRX, and it can be mainly attributed to thermodynamic effects. PMID:24348168

  11. Slush hydrogen transfer studies at the NASA K-Site Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, Terry L.; Whalen, Margaret V.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental study was performed as part of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) effort to determine slush hydrogen production and transfer characteristics. Flow rate and pressure drop characteristics were determined for slush hydrogen flow through a vacuum-jacketed transfer system. These characteristics were compared to similar tests using normal boiling point and triple point hydrogen. In addition, experimental flow characteristic data was compared with predictions from the FLUSH analytical model. Slush hydrogen density loss during the transfer process was also examined.

  12. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N.; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  13. Evolution of anatase surface active sites probed by in situ sum-frequency phonon spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yue; Chen, Shiyou; Li, Yadong; Gao, Yi; Yang, Deheng; Shen, Yuen Ron; Liu, Wei-Tao

    2016-09-01

    Surface active sites of crystals often govern their relevant surface chemistry, yet to monitor them in situ in real atmosphere remains a challenge. Using surface-specific sum-frequency spectroscopy, we identified the surface phonon mode associated with the active sites of undercoordinated titanium ions and conjoint oxygen vacancies, and used it to monitor them on anatase (TiO2) (101) under ambient conditions. In conjunction with theory, we determined related surface structure around the active sites and tracked the evolution of oxygen vacancies under ultraviolet irradiation. We further found that unlike in vacuum, the surface oxygen vacancies, which dominate the surface reactivity, are strongly regulated by ambient gas molecules, including methanol and water, as well as weakly associated species, such as nitrogen and hydrogen. The result revealed a rich interplay between prevailing ambient species and surface reactivity, which can be omnipresent in environmental and catalytic applications of titanium dioxides.

  14. Evolution of anatase surface active sites probed by in situ sum-frequency phonon spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Chen, Shiyou; Li, Yadong; Gao, Yi; Yang, Deheng; Shen, Yuen Ron; Liu, Wei-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Surface active sites of crystals often govern their relevant surface chemistry, yet to monitor them in situ in real atmosphere remains a challenge. Using surface-specific sum-frequency spectroscopy, we identified the surface phonon mode associated with the active sites of undercoordinated titanium ions and conjoint oxygen vacancies, and used it to monitor them on anatase (TiO2) (101) under ambient conditions. In conjunction with theory, we determined related surface structure around the active sites and tracked the evolution of oxygen vacancies under ultraviolet irradiation. We further found that unlike in vacuum, the surface oxygen vacancies, which dominate the surface reactivity, are strongly regulated by ambient gas molecules, including methanol and water, as well as weakly associated species, such as nitrogen and hydrogen. The result revealed a rich interplay between prevailing ambient species and surface reactivity, which can be omnipresent in environmental and catalytic applications of titanium dioxides. PMID:27704049

  15. Dynamics of the Active Sites of Dimeric Seryl tRNA Synthetase from Methanopyrus kandleri.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Saheb; Nandi, Nilashis

    2015-08-27

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) carry out the first step of protein biosynthesis. Several aaRSs are multimeric, and coordination between the dynamics of active sites present in each monomer is a prerequisite for the fast and accurate aminoacylation. However, important lacunae of understanding exist concerning the conformational dynamics of multimeric aaRSs. Questions remained unanswered pertaining to the dynamics of the active site. Little is known concerning the conformational dynamics of the active sites in response to the substrate binding, reorganization of the catalytic residues around reactants, time-dependent changes at the reaction center, which are essential for facilitating the nucleophilic attack, and interactions at the interface of neighboring monomers. In the present work, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of dimeric (mk)SerRS from Methanopyrus kandleri bound with tRNA using an explicit solvent system. Two dimeric states of seryl tRNA synthetase (open, substrate bound, and adenylate bound) and two monomeric states (open and substrate bound) are simulated with bound tRNA. The aim is to understand the conformational dynamics of (mk)SerRS during its reaction cycle. While the present results provide a clear dynamical perspective of the active sites of (mk)SerRS, they corroborate with the results from the time-averaged experimental data such as crystallographic and mutation analysis of methanogenic SerRS from M. kandleri and M. barkeri. It is observed from the present simulation that the motif 2 loop gates the active site and its Glu351 and Arg360 stabilizes ATP in a bent state favorable for nucleophilic attack. The flexibility of the walls of the active site gradually reduces near reaction center, which is a more organized region compared to the lid region. The motif 2 loop anchors Ser and ATP using Arg349 in a hydrogen bonded geometry crucial for nucleophilic attack and favorably influences the electrostatic potential at the

  16. Activating and optimizing MoS2 basal planes for hydrogen evolution through the formation of strained sulphur vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Tsai, Charlie; Koh, Ai Leen; Cai, Lili; Contryman, Alex W.; Fragapane, Alex H.; Zhao, Jiheng; Han, Hyun Soon; Manoharan, Hari C.; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Nørskov, Jens K.; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    As a promising non-precious catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER; refs ,,,,), molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) is known to contain active edge sites and an inert basal plane. Activating the MoS2 basal plane could further enhance its HER activity but is not often a strategy for doing so. Herein, we report the first activation and optimization of the basal plane of monolayer 2H-MoS2 for HER by introducing sulphur (S) vacancies and strain. Our theoretical and experimental results show that the S-vacancies are new catalytic sites in the basal plane, where gap states around the Fermi level allow hydrogen to bind directly to exposed Mo atoms. The hydrogen adsorption free energy (ΔGH) can be further manipulated by straining the surface with S-vacancies, which fine-tunes the catalytic activity. Proper combinations of S-vacancy and strain yield the optimal ΔGH = 0 eV, which allows us to achieve the highest intrinsic HER activity among molybdenum-sulphide-based catalysts.

  17. Activating and optimizing MoS2 basal planes for hydrogen evolution through the formation of strained sulphur vacancies.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Tsai, Charlie; Koh, Ai Leen; Cai, Lili; Contryman, Alex W; Fragapane, Alex H; Zhao, Jiheng; Han, Hyun Soon; Manoharan, Hari C; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Nørskov, Jens K; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    As a promising non-precious catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER; refs ,,,,), molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) is known to contain active edge sites and an inert basal plane. Activating the MoS2 basal plane could further enhance its HER activity but is not often a strategy for doing so. Herein, we report the first activation and optimization of the basal plane of monolayer 2H-MoS2 for HER by introducing sulphur (S) vacancies and strain. Our theoretical and experimental results show that the S-vacancies are new catalytic sites in the basal plane, where gap states around the Fermi level allow hydrogen to bind directly to exposed Mo atoms. The hydrogen adsorption free energy (ΔGH) can be further manipulated by straining the surface with S-vacancies, which fine-tunes the catalytic activity. Proper combinations of S-vacancy and strain yield the optimal ΔGH = 0 eV, which allows us to achieve the highest intrinsic HER activity among molybdenum-sulphide-based catalysts.

  18. Lunar prospector epithermal neutrons from impact craters and landing sites: Implications for surface maturity and hydrogen distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Feldman, W.C.; Lawrence, D.J.; Maurice, S.; Swindle, T.D.; Lucey, P.G.

    2002-01-01

    Initial studies of neutron spectrometer data returned by Lunar Prospector concentrated on the discovery of enhanced hydrogen abundances near both lunar poles. However, the nonpolar data exhibit intriguing patterns that appear spatially correlated with surface features such as young impact craters (e.g., Tycho). Such immature crater materials may have low hydrogen contents because of their relative lack of exposure to solar wind-implanted volatiles. We tested this hypothesis by comparing epithermal* neutron counts (i.e., epithermal -0.057 ?? thermal neutrons) for Copernican-age craters classified as relatively young, intermediate, and old (as determined by previous studies of Clementine optical maturity variations). The epithermal* counts of the crater and continuous ejecta regions suggest that the youngest impact materials are relatively devoid of hydrogen in the upper 1 m of regolith. We also show that the mean hydrogen contents measured in Apollo and Luna landing site samples are only moderately well correlated to the epithermal* neutron counts at the landing sites, likely owing to the effects of rare earth elements. These results suggest that further work is required to define better how hydrogen distribution can be revealed by epithermal neutrons in order to understand more fully the nature and sources (e.g., solar wind, meteorite impacts) of volatiles in the lunar regolith.

  19. Decontamination of adsorbed chemical warfare agents on activated carbon using hydrogen peroxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Osovsky, Ruth; Kaplan, Doron; Nir, Ido; Rotter, Hadar; Elisha, Shmuel; Columbus, Ishay

    2014-09-16

    Mild treatment with hydrogen peroxide solutions (3-30%) efficiently decomposes adsorbed chemical warfare agents (CWAs) on microporous activated carbons used in protective garments and air filters. Better than 95% decomposition of adsorbed sulfur mustard (HD), sarin, and VX was achieved at ambient temperatures within 1-24 h, depending on the H2O2 concentration. HD was oxidized to the nontoxic HD-sulfoxide. The nerve agents were perhydrolyzed to the respective nontoxic methylphosphonic acids. The relative rapidity of the oxidation and perhydrolysis under these conditions is attributed to the microenvironment of the micropores. Apparently, the reactions are favored due to basic sites on the carbon surface. Our findings suggest a potential environmentally friendly route for decontamination of adsorbed CWAs, using H2O2 without the need of cosolvents or activators.

  20. Effect of edge structure on the activity for hydrogen evolution reaction in MoS2 nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lili; Li, Xiuyan; Xu, Li-Chun; Liu, Ruiping; Yang, Zhi

    2017-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) was carried out to investigate the effect of edge structure on the catalytic activity and electronic properties of MoS2 nanoribbons for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). There are two stable configurations of MoS2 nanoribbons, MoS2NR-L and MoS2NR-R, with an energy barrier of 0.035 eV. Four hydrogen adsorbed configurations are obtained by adsorbing the hydrogen atom at the different adsorption sites of two configurations. By calculating the Gibbs free energy and exchange current densities, it is found that these four adsorbed configurations have varied catalytic activity for HER, which demonstrates that location of edge atoms has significantly effect on the catalytic activity for HER. The optimization in HER activities originates from the suitable binding between hydrogen atom and S atom, corresponding to that Gibbs free energy is close to zero. Our results signify that the edge structures play a key role on the HER activity in MoS2 nanoribbons.

  1. Characterization of the surface changes during the activation of erbium/erbium oxide for hydrogen storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Snow, Clark Sheldon; Brumbach, Michael Todd

    2010-09-01

    Erbium is known to effectively load with hydrogen when held at high temperature in a hydrogen atmosphere. To make the storage of hydrogen kinetically feasible, a thermal activation step is required. Activation is a routine practice, but very little is known about the physical, chemical, and/or electronic processes that occur during Activation. This work presents in situ characterization of erbium Activation using variable energy photoelectron spectroscopy at various stages of the Activation process. Modification of the passive surface oxide plays a significant role in Activation. The chemical and electronic changes observed from core-level and valence band spectra will be discussed along with corroborating ion scattering spectroscopy measurements.

  2. Ultrafine Metal Phosphide Nanocrystals in Situ Decorated on Highly Porous Heteroatom-Doped Carbons for Active Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun-Pei; Xu, Xueyan; Su, Huan; Liu, Yu-Ping; Chen, Tiehong; Yuan, Zhong-Yong

    2015-12-30

    In spite of being technologically feasible, electrochemical water reduction to facilitate hydrogen production is confronted with issues mainly due to the lack of affordable and efficient catalysts for the water reduction half reaction. Reported herein is the fabrication of metal phosphides nanocrystals uniformly loaded on highly porous heteroatom-modified carbons through one-step carbonization-phosphization methodology. Remarkably, the well-structured porosity and the increased electrochemically accessible active sites ensure the high catalytic efficiency for electrochemical hydrogen evolution in acidic medium in terms of small onset potentials (33 mV) and large cathodic current density (0.481 mA cm(-2)), even comparable to the state-of-the-art Pt/C benchmark. The easily prepared composite catalysts of structural and textural peculiarities may serve as promising non-noble metal catalysts for realistic hydrogen evolution.

  3. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  4. The maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures: definition and determination

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yang; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; He, Chuan-Shu; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Wang, Yi; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production from wastes has many advantages compared to various chemical methods. Methodology for characterizing the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures is essential for monitoring reactor operation in fermentative hydrogen production, however there is lack of such kind of standardized methodologies. In the present study, a new index, i.e., the maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity (SHAm) of anaerobic mixed cultures, was proposed, and consequently a reliable and simple method, named SHAm test, was developed to determine it. Furthermore, the influences of various parameters on the SHAm value determination of anaerobic mixed cultures were evaluated. Additionally, this SHAm assay was tested for different types of substrates and bacterial inocula. Our results demonstrate that this novel SHAm assay was a rapid, accurate and simple methodology for determining the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures. Thus, application of this approach is beneficial to establishing a stable anaerobic hydrogen-producing system. PMID:24912488

  5. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  6. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  7. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide inhalation ameliorates allergen induced airway hypereactivity by modulating mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Bertolino, Antonio; Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Terlizzi, Michela; Matteis, Maria; Calderone, Vincenzo; Mattera, Valentina; Martelli, Alma; Spaziano, Giuseppe; Pinto, Aldo; D'Agostino, Bruno; Cirino, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that hydrogen sulfide represents an important gaseous transmitter in the mammalian respiratory system. In the present study, we have evaluated the role of mast cells in hydrogen sulfide-induced effects on airways in a mouse model of asthma. Mice were sensitized to ovalbumin and received aerosol of a hydrogen sulfide donor (NaHS; 100 ppm) starting at day 7 after ovalbumin challenge. Exposure to hydrogen sulfide abrogated ovalbumin-induced bronchial hypereactivity as well as the increase in lung resistance. Concomitantly, hydrogen sulfide prevented mast cell activity as well as FGF-2 and IL-13 upregulation. Conversely, pulmonary inflammation and the increase in plasmatic IgE levels were not affected by hydrogen sulfide. A lack of hydrogen sulfide effects in mast cell deficient mice occurred. Primary fibroblasts harvested from ovalbumin-sensitized mice showed an increased proliferation rate that was inhibited by hydrogen sulfide aerosol. Furthermore, ovalbumin-induced transdifferentiation of pulmonary fibroblasts into myofibroblasts was reversed. Finally, hydrogen sulfide did abrogate in vitro the degranulation of the mast cell-like RBL-2H3 cell line. Similarly to the in vivo experiments the inhibitory effect was present only when the cells were activated by antigen exposure. In conclusion, inhaled hydrogen sulfide improves lung function and inhibits bronchial hyper-reactivity by modulating mast cells and in turn fibroblast activation.

  9. Hydrogen activation by unsaturated mixed-metal cluster complexes: new directions.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard D; Captain, Burjor

    2008-01-01

    There has been a renewed interest in the chemistry of hydrogen as a result of the ever-increasing global demands for energy. Recent studies have revealed new electronically unsaturated polynuclear metal complexes containing bulky ligands that exhibit a variety of reactions with hydrogen, including facile addition and elimination under mild conditions. Materials and molecules that can reversibly absorb large quantities of hydrogen are very attractive for hydrogen storage and hydrogenation catalysis. This Minireview summarizes recent studies of reactions of hydrogen with unsaturated mixed-metal cluster complexes containing platinum and bulky phosphine ligands. Some related studies on bimetallic cooperativity and the synthesis of trimetallic nanoparticles on mesoporous supports that exhibit high activity and selectivity for catalytic hydrogenations are also discussed.

  10. Controlled Orientation of Active Sites in a Nanostructured Multienzyme Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Yang, Byungseop; Jung, Younghan; Cha, Jaehyun; Cho, Jinhwan; Choi, Eun-Sil; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-01-01

    Multistep cascade reactions in nature maximize reaction efficiency by co-assembling related enzymes. Such organization facilitates the processing of intermediates by downstream enzymes. Previously, the studies on multienzyme nanocomplexes assembled on DNA scaffolds demonstrated that closer interenzyme distance enhances the overall reaction efficiency. However, it remains unknown how the active site orientation controlled at nanoscale can have an effect on multienzyme reaction. Here, we show that controlled alignment of active sites promotes the multienzyme reaction efficiency. By genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and two compatible bioorthogonal chemistries, we conjugated mannitol dehydrogenase to formate dehydrogenase with the defined active site arrangement with the residue-level accuracy. The study revealed that the multienzyme complex with the active sites directed towards each other exhibits four-fold higher relative efficiency enhancement in the cascade reaction and produces 60% more D-mannitol than the other complex with active sites directed away from each other. PMID:28004799

  11. Elucidating the mechanism and active site of the cyclohexanol dehydrogenation on copper-based catalysts: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziyun; Liu, Xinyi; Rooney, D. W.; Hu, P.

    2015-10-01

    The dehydrogenation of cyclohexanol to cyclohexanone is very important in the manufacture of nylon. Copper-based catalysts are the most popular catalysts for this reaction, and on these catalysts the reaction mechanism and active site are in debate. In order to elucidate the mechanism and active site of the cyclohexanol dehydrogenation on copper-based catalysts, density functional theory with dispersion corrections were performed on up to six facets of copper in two different oxidation states: monovalent copper and metallic copper. By calculating the surface energies of these facets, Cu(111) and Cu2O(111) were found to be the most stable facets for metallic copper and for monovalent copper, respectively. On these two facets, all the possible elementary steps in the dehydrogenation pathway of cyclohexanol were calculated, including the adsorption, dehydrogenation, hydrogen coupling and desorption. Two different reaction pathways for dehydrogenation were considered on both surfaces. It was revealed that the dehydrogenation mechanisms are different on these two surfaces: on Cu(111) the hydrogen belonging to the hydroxyl is removed first, then the hydrogen belonging to the carbon is subtracted, while on Cu2O(111) the hydrogen belonging to the carbon is removed followed by the subtraction of the hydrogen in the hydroxyl group. Furthermore, by comparing the energy profiles of these two surfaces, Cu2O(111) was found to be more active for cyclohexanol dehydrogenation than Cu(111). In addition, we found that the coordinatively unsaturated copper sites on Cu2O(111) are the reaction sites for all the steps. Therefore, the coordinatively unsaturated copper site on Cu2O(111) is likely to be the active site for cyclohexanol dehydrogenation on the copper-based catalysts.

  12. Structural analysis of peroxide-soaked MnSOD crystals reveals side-on binding of peroxide to active-site manganese.

    PubMed

    Porta, Jason; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Borgstahl, Gloria E O

    2010-06-11

    The superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes are important antioxidant agents that protect cells from reactive oxygen species. The SOD family is responsible for catalyzing the disproportionation of superoxide radical to oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. Manganese- and iron-containing SOD exhibit product inhibition whereas Cu/ZnSOD does not. Here, we report the crystal structure of Escherichia coli MnSOD with hydrogen peroxide cryotrapped in the active site. Crystallographic refinement to 1.55 A and close inspection revealed electron density for hydrogen peroxide in three of the four active sites in the asymmetric unit. The hydrogen peroxide molecules are in the position opposite His26 that is normally assumed by water in the trigonal bipyramidal resting state of the enzyme. Hydrogen peroxide is present in active sites B, C, and D and is side-on coordinated to the active-site manganese. In chains B and D, the peroxide is oriented in the plane formed by manganese and ligands Asp167 and His26. In chain C, the peroxide is bound, making a 70 degrees angle to the plane. Comparison of the peroxide-bound active site with the hydroxide-bound octahedral form shows a shifting of residue Tyr34 towards the active site when peroxide is bound. Comparison with peroxide-soaked Cu/ZnSOD indicates end-on binding of peroxide when the SOD does not exhibit inhibition by peroxide and side-on binding of peroxide in the product-inhibited state of MnSOD.

  13. Transition metal activation and functionalization of carbon-hydrogen bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.D.

    1992-06-01

    We are investigating the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic factors that influence carbon-hydrogen bond activation at homogeneous transition metal centers and the conversion of hydrocarbons into functionalized products of potential use to the chemical industry. Advances have been made in both understanding the interactions of hydrocarbons with metals and in the functionalization of hydrocarbons. We have found that RhCl(PR{sub 3}){sub 2}(CNR) complexes can catalyze the insertion of isonitriles into the C-H bonds or arenes upon photolysis. The mechanism of these reactions was found to proceed by way of initial phosphine dissociation, followed by C-H activation and isonitrile insertion. We have also examined reactions of a series of arenes with (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Rh(PMe{sub 3})PhH and begun to map out the kinetic and thermodynamic preferences for arene coordination. The effects of resonance, specifically the differences in the Hueckel energies of the bound vs free ligand, are now believed to fully control the C-H activation/{eta}{sup 2}-coordination equilibria. We have begun to examine the reactions of rhodium isonitrile pyrazolylborates for alkane and arene C-H bond activation. A new, labile, carbodiimide precursor has been developed for these studies. We have completed studies of the reactions of (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Rh(PMe{sub 3})H{sub 2} with D{sub 2} and PMe{sub 3} that indicate that both {eta}{sup 5} {yields} {eta}{sup 3} ring slippage and metal to ring hydride migration occur more facilely than thermal reductive elimination of H{sub 2}. We have examined the reactions of heterocycles with (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Rh(PMe{sub 3})PhH and found that pyrrole and furan undergo C-H or N-H activation. Thiophene, however, undergoes C-S bond oxidative addition, and the mechanism of activation has been shown to proceed through sulfur coordination prior to C-S insertion.

  14. Regulatory effect of hydrogen on nitrogenase activity of the blue-green alga (cyanobacterium) Nostoc muscorum.

    PubMed

    Scherer, S; Kerfin, W; Böger, P

    1980-03-01

    Preincubation of the blue-green alga (cyanobacterium) Nostoc muscorum under an atmosphere of argon plus acetylene in the light led to a greater than fourfold increase of light-induced hydrogen evolution and to a 50% increase of acetylene reduction, as compared to cells that had not been preconditioned. The basic and the increased hydrogen evolution were both due to nitrogenase activity. Furthermore, after preincubation the hydrogen uptake, usually observed with unconditional cells, was abolished. Nostoc preincubated under acetylene evolved hydrogen in the light even in the presence of nitrogen for at least 2 h, with a 15-fold increase as compared to the unconditioned cells. These acetylene effects could be completely abolished by the presence of hydrogen during acetylene preincubation. These findings indicate that the hydrogen concentration in N. muscorum cells plays a role in regulation of nitrogenase activity.

  15. Perspective: On the active site model in computational catalyst screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Karsten; Plaisance, Craig P.; Oberhofer, Harald; Andersen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    First-principles screening approaches exploiting energy trends in surface adsorption represent an unparalleled success story in recent computational catalysis research. Here we argue that our still limited understanding of the structure of active sites is one of the major bottlenecks towards an ever extended and reliable use of such computational screening for catalyst discovery. For low-index transition metal surfaces, the prevalently chosen high-symmetry (terrace and step) sites offered by the nominal bulk-truncated crystal lattice might be justified. For more complex surfaces and composite catalyst materials, computational screening studies will need to actively embrace a considerable uncertainty with respect to what truly are the active sites. By systematically exploring the space of possible active site motifs, such studies might eventually contribute towards a targeted design of optimized sites in future catalysts.

  16. Diffusional correlations among multiple active sites in a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-04-07

    Simulations of the enzymatic dynamics of a model enzyme containing multiple substrate binding sites indicate the existence of diffusional correlations in the chemical reactivity of the active sites. A coarse-grain, particle-based, mesoscopic description of the system, comprising the enzyme, the substrate, the product and solvent, is constructed to study these effects. The reactive and non-reactive dynamics is followed using a hybrid scheme that combines molecular dynamics for the enzyme, substrate and product molecules with multiparticle collision dynamics for the solvent. It is found that the reactivity of an individual active site in the multiple-active-site enzyme is reduced substantially, and this effect is analyzed and attributed to diffusive competition for the substrate among the different active sites in the enzyme.

  17. Selective synthesis and characterization of single-site HY zeolite-supported rhodium complexes and their use as catalysts for ethylene hydrogenation and dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khivantsev, Konstantin

    Single-site Rh(CO)2, Rh(C2H4)2 and Rh(NO)2 complexes anchored on various dealuminated HY zeolites can be used as precursors for the selective surface mediated synthesis of well-defined site-isolated Rh(CO)(H)x complexes. DFT calculations and D 2 isotope exchange experiments provide strong evidence for the formation of a family of site isolated mononuclear rhodium carbonyl hydride complexes (including the first examples of RhH complexes with undissociated H2 ligands): Rh(CO)(H2), Rh(CO)(H)2, and Rh(CO)(H). The fraction of each individual complex formed varies significantly with the Si/Al ratio of the zeolite and the nature of the precursor used. HY zeolite-supported mononuclear Rh(CO)2 complexes are very active in ethylene hydrogenation and ethylene dimerization under ambient conditions. There is strong evidence for the cooperation mechanism between mononuclear rhodium complexes and Bronsted acid sites of the zeolite support in C-C bond formation process, as well as ethane formation. Finally, it is shown that the dimerization pathway selectivity can be progressively tuned (and completely switched off) by modifying the number of Bronsted acid sites on the zeolite surface. HY zeolite-supported mononuclear Rh(NO)2 complexes can be selectively formed upon exposure of Rh(CO)2/HY to the gas phase NO/He. They are structurally similar to Rh(CO)2/HY with Rh(I) retaining square planar geometry and nitrosyl ligands adopting a linear configuration. Rh(NO)2/HY30 is active in ethylene hydrogenation and ethylene dimerization under ambient conditions. This is the first unprecedented example of a supported transition-metal nitrosyl complex capable of performing a catalytic reaction. Moreover, this is the first example of a site-isolated Rh complex with ligands other than ethylene or carbonyl, which can catalyze both ethylene hydrogenation and dimerization. Unlike its dicarbonyl counterpart, dinitrosyl rhodium complex has a uniquely different reactivity towards ethylene and hydrogen

  18. Robotics at Savannah River site: activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.S.

    1984-09-01

    The objectives of the Robotics Technology Group at the Savannah River Laboratory are to employ modern industrial robots and to develop unique automation and robotic systems to enhance process operations at the Savannah River site (SRP and SRL). The incentives are to improve safety, reduce personnel radiation exposure, improve product quality and productivity, and to reduce operating costs. During the past year robotic systems have been installed to fill chemical dilution vials in a SRP laboratory at 772-F and remove radioactive waste materials in the SRL Californium Production Facility at 773-A. A robotic system to lubricate an extrusion press has been developed and demonstrated in the SRL robotics laboratory and is scheduled for installation at the 321-M fuel fabrication area. A mobile robot was employed by SRP for a radiation monitoring task at a waste tank top in H-Area. Several other robots are installed in the SRL robotics laboratories and application development programs are underway. The status of these applications is presented in this report.

  19. Final Report: Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Dixon; Anthony J. Arduengo, III

    2010-09-30

    Replacing combustion of carbon-based fuels with alternative energy sources that have minimal environmental impact is one of the grand scientific and technological challenges of the early 21st century. Not only is it critical to capture energy from new, renewable sources, it is also necessary to store the captured energy efficiently and effectively for use at the point of service when and where it is needed, which may not be collocated with the collection site. There are many potential storage media but we focus on the storage of energy in chemical bonds. It is more efficient to store energy on a per weight basis in chemical bonds. This is because it is hard to pack electrons into small volumes with low weight without the use of chemical bonds. The focus of the project was the development of new chemistries to enable DOE to meet its technical objectives for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen storage systems. We provided computational chemistry support in terms of thermodynamics, kinetics, and properties prediction in support of the experimental efforts of the DOE Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage. The goal of the Center is to store energy in chemical bonds involving hydrogen atoms. Once the hydrogen is stored in a set of X-H/Y-H bonds, the hydrogen has to be easily released and the depleted fuel regenerated very efficiently. This differs substantially from our current use of fossil fuel energy sources where the reactant is converted to energy plus CO2 (coal) or CO2 and H2O (gasoline, natural gas), which are released into the atmosphere. In future energy storage scenarios, the spent fuel will be captured and the energy storage medium regenerated. This places substantial additional constraints on the chemistry. The goal of the computational chemistry work was to reduce the time to design new materials and develop materials that meet the 2010 and 2015 DOE objectives in terms of weight percent, volume, release time, and regeneration ability. This

  20. Benzene-Induced Uncoupling of Naphthalene Dioxygenase Activity and Enzyme Inactivation by Production of Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung

    1999-01-01

    Naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) is a multicomponent enzyme system that oxidizes naphthalene to (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene with consumption of O2 and two electrons from NAD(P)H. In the presence of benzene, NADH oxidation and O2 utilization were partially uncoupled from substrate oxidation. Approximately 40 to 50% of the consumed O2 was detected as hydrogen peroxide. The rate of benzene-dependent O2 consumption decreased with time, but it was partially increased by the addition of catalase in the course of the O2 consumption by NDO. Detailed experiments showed that the total amount of O2 consumed and the rate of benzene-induced O2 consumption increased in the presence of hydrogen peroxide-scavenging agents, and further addition of the terminal oxygenase component (ISPNAP) of NDO. Kinetic studies showed that ISPNAP was irreversibly inactivated in the reaction that contained benzene, but the inactivation was relieved to a high degree in the presence of catalase and partially relieved in the presence of 0.1 mM ferrous ion. Benzene- and naphthalene-reacted ISPNAP gave almost identical visible absorption spectra. In addition, hydrogen peroxide added at a range of 0.1 to 0.6 mM to the reaction mixtures inactivated the reduced ISPNAP containing mononuclear iron. These results show that hydrogen peroxide released during the uncoupling reaction acts both as an inhibitor of benzene-dependent O2 consumption and as an inactivator of ISPNAP. It is proposed that the irreversible inactivation of ISPNAP occurs by a Fenton-type reaction which forms a strong oxidizing agent, hydroxyl radicals (·OH), from the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with ferrous mononuclear iron at the active site. Furthermore, when [14C]benzene was used as the substrate, cis-benzene 1,2-dihydrodiol formed by NDO was detected. This result shows that NDO also couples a trace amount of benzene to both O2 consumption and NADH oxidation. PMID:10217759

  1. A mutational analysis of the active site of human type II inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Futer, Olga; Sintchak, Michael D; Caron, Paul R; Nimmesgern, Elmar; DeCenzo, Maureen T; Livingston, David J; Raybuck, Scott A

    2002-01-31

    The oxidation of IMP to XMP is the rate-limiting step in the de novo synthesis of guanine ribonucleotides. This NAD-dependent reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). Based upon the recent structural determination of IMPDH complexed to oxidized IMP (XMP*) and the potent uncompetitive inhibitor mycophenolic acid (MPA), we have selected active site residues and prepared mutants of human type II IMPDH. The catalytic parameters of these mutants were determined. Mutations G326A, D364A, and the active site nucleophile C331A all abolish enzyme activity to less than 0.1% of wild type. These residues line the IMP binding pocket and are necessary for correct positioning of the substrate, Asp364 serving to anchor the ribose ring of the nucleotide. In the MPA/NAD binding site, significant loss of activity was seen by mutation of any residue of the triad Arg322, Asn303, Asp274 which form a hydrogen bonding network lining one side of this pocket. From a model of NAD bound to the active site consistent with the mutational data, we propose that these resides are important in binding the ribose ring of the nicotinamide substrate. Additionally, mutations in the pair Thr333, Gln441, which lies close to the xanthine ring, cause a significant drop in the catalytic activity of IMPDH. It is proposed that these residues serve to deliver the catalytic water molecule required for hydrolysis of the cysteine-bound XMP* intermediate formed after oxidation by NAD.

  2. Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: why selenoproteins?

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Johansson, Linda; Bauer, Holger; Arscott, L David; Rauch, Susanne; Ballou, David P; Williams, Charles H; Schirmer, R Heiner; Arnér, Elias S J

    2003-10-28

    Selenium, an essential trace element for mammals, is incorporated into a selected class of selenoproteins as selenocysteine. All known isoenzymes of mammalian thioredoxin (Trx) reductases (TrxRs) employ selenium in the C-terminal redox center -Gly-Cys-Sec-Gly-COOH for reduction of Trx and other substrates, whereas the corresponding sequence in Drosophila melanogaster TrxR is -Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser-COOH. Surprisingly, the catalytic competence of these orthologous enzymes is similar, whereas direct Sec-to-Cys substitution of mammalian TrxR, or other selenoenzymes, yields almost inactive enzyme. TrxRs are therefore ideal for studying the biology of selenocysteine by comparative enzymology. Here we show that the serine residues flanking the C-terminal Cys residues of Drosophila TrxRs are responsible for activating the cysteines to match the catalytic efficiency of a selenocysteine-cysteine pair as in mammalian TrxR, obviating the need for selenium. This finding suggests that the occurrence of selenoenzymes, which implies that the organism is selenium-dependent, is not necessarily associated with improved enzyme efficiency. Our data suggest that the selective advantage of selenoenzymes is a broader range of substrates and a broader range of microenvironmental conditions in which enzyme activity is possible.

  3. Probing Oxygen Activation Sites in Two Flavoprotein Oxidases Using Chloride as an Oxygen Surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Kommoju, Phaneeswara-Rao; Chen, Zhi-wei; Bruckner, Robert C.; Mathews, F. Scott; Jorns, Marilyn Schuman

    2011-08-16

    A single basic residue above the si-face of the flavin ring is the site of oxygen activation in glucose oxidase (GOX) (His516) and monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) (Lys265). Crystal structures of both flavoenzymes exhibit a small pocket at the oxygen activation site that might provide a preorganized binding site for superoxide anion, an obligatory intermediate in the two-electron reduction of oxygen. Chloride binds at these polar oxygen activation sites, as judged by solution and structural studies. First, chloride forms spectrally detectable complexes with GOX and MSOX. The protonated form of His516 is required for tight binding of chloride to oxidized GOX and for rapid reaction of reduced GOX with oxygen. Formation of a binary MSOX-chloride complex requires Lys265 and is not observed with Lys265Met. Binding of chloride to MSOX does not affect the binding of a sarcosine analogue (MTA, methylthioactetate) above the re-face of the flavin ring. Definitive evidence is provided by crystal structures determined for a binary MSOX-chloride complex and a ternary MSOX-chloride-MTA complex. Chloride binds in the small pocket at a position otherwise occupied by a water molecule and forms hydrogen bonds to four ligands that are arranged in approximate tetrahedral geometry: Lys265:NZ, Arg49:NH1, and two water molecules, one of which is hydrogen bonded to FAD:N5. The results show that chloride (i) acts as an oxygen surrogate, (ii) is an effective probe of polar oxygen activation sites, and (iii) provides a valuable complementary tool to the xenon gas method that is used to map nonpolar oxygen-binding cavities.

  4. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-06-21

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed constant current behaviors at near neutral pH reflect the intrinsic electrocatalytic reactivity of the metal electrodes for water reduction.

  5. Chemical Kinetics of Hydrogen Atom Abstraction from Allylic Sites by (3)O2; Implications for Combustion Modeling and Simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Simmie, John M; Somers, Kieran P; Goldsmith, C Franklin; Curran, Henry J

    2017-03-09

    Hydrogen atom abstraction from allylic C-H bonds by molecular oxygen plays a very important role in determining the reactivity of fuel molecules having allylic hydrogen atoms. Rate constants for hydrogen atom abstraction by molecular oxygen from molecules with allylic sites have been calculated. A series of molecules with primary, secondary, tertiary, and super secondary allylic hydrogen atoms of alkene, furan, and alkylbenzene families are taken into consideration. Those molecules include propene, 2-butene, isobutene, 2-methylfuran, and toluene containing the primary allylic hydrogen atom; 1-butene, 1-pentene, 2-ethylfuran, ethylbenzene, and n-propylbenzene containing the secondary allylic hydrogen atom; 3-methyl-1-butene, 2-isopropylfuran, and isopropylbenzene containing tertiary allylic hydrogen atom; and 1-4-pentadiene containing super allylic secondary hydrogen atoms. The M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory was used to optimize the geometries of all of the reactants, transition states, products and also the hinder rotation treatments for lower frequency modes. The G4 level of theory was used to calculate the electronic single point energies for those species to determine the 0 K barriers to reaction. Conventional transition state theory with Eckart tunnelling corrections was used to calculate the rate constants. The comparison between our calculated rate constants with the available experimental results from the literature shows good agreement for the reactions of propene and isobutene with molecular oxygen. The rate constant for toluene with O2 is about an order magnitude slower than that experimentally derived from a comprehensive model proposed by Oehlschlaeger and coauthors. The results clearly indicate the need for a more detailed investigation of the combustion kinetics of toluene oxidation and its key pyrolysis and oxidation intermediates. Despite this, our computed barriers and rate constants retain an important internal consistency. Rate constants

  6. Community Update on Site Activities, July 19, 2013

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In an effort to engage and inform community members interested in the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site cleanup, EPA will be issuing periodic topic-based fact sheets that will provide background information and updates about ongoing activities.

  7. THE IMPACT OF OZONE ON THE LOWER FLAMMABLE LIMIT OF HYDROGEN IN VESSELS CONTAINING SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Sherburne, Carol; Osterberg, Paul; Johnson, Tom; Frawely, Thomas

    2013-01-23

    The Savannah River Site, in conjunction with AREVA Federal services, has designed a process to treat dissolved radioactive waste solids with ozone. It is known that in this radioactive waste process, radionuclides radiolytically break down water into gaseous hydrogen and oxygen, which presents a well defined flammability hazard. Flammability limits have been established for both ozone and hydrogen separately; however, there is little information on mixtures of hydrogen and ozone. Therefore, testing was designed to provide critical flammability information necessary to support safety related considerations for the development of ozone treatment and potential scale-up to the commercial level. Since information was lacking on flammability issues at low levels of hydrogen and ozone, a testing program was developed to focus on filling this portion of the information gap. A 2-L vessel was used to conduct flammability tests at atmospheric pressure and temperature using a fuse wire ignition source at 1 percent ozone intervals spanning from no ozone to the Lower Flammable Limit (LFL) of ozone in the vessel, determined as 8.4%(v/v) ozone. An ozone generator and ozone detector were used to generate and measure the ozone concentration within the vessel in situ, since ozone decomposes rapidly on standing. The lower flammability limit of hydrogen in an ozone-oxygen mixture was found to decrease from the LFL of hydrogen in air, determined as 4.2 % (v/v) in this vessel. From the results of this testing, Savannah River was able to develop safety procedures and operating parameters to effectively minimize the formation of a flammable atmosphere.

  8. Control of Substrate Specificity by Active-Site Residues in Nitrobenzene Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Kou-San; Parales, Rebecca E.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrobenzene 1,2-dioxygenase from Comamonas sp. strain JS765 catalyzes the initial reaction in nitrobenzene degradation, forming catechol and nitrite. The enzyme also oxidizes the aromatic rings of mono- and dinitrotoluenes at the nitro-substituted carbon, but the basis for this specificity is not understood. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis was used to modify the active site of nitrobenzene dioxygenase, and the contribution of specific residues in controlling substrate specificity and enzyme performance was evaluated. The activities of six mutant enzymes indicated that the residues at positions 258, 293, and 350 in the α subunit are important for determining regiospecificity with nitroarene substrates and enantiospecificity with naphthalene. The results provide an explanation for the characteristic specificity with nitroarene substrates. Based on the structure of nitrobenzene dioxygenase, substitution of valine for the asparagine at position 258 should eliminate a hydrogen bond between the substrate nitro group and the amino group of asparagine. Up to 99% of the mononitrotoluene oxidation products formed by the N258V mutant were nitrobenzyl alcohols rather than catechols, supporting the importance of this hydrogen bond in positioning substrates in the active site for ring oxidation. Similar results were obtained with an I350F mutant, where the formation of the hydrogen bond appeared to be prevented by steric interference. The specificity of enzymes with substitutions at position 293 varied depending on the residue present. Compared to the wild type, the F293Q mutant was 2.5 times faster at oxidizing 2,6-dinitrotoluene while retaining a similar Km for the substrate based on product formation rates and whole-cell kinetics. PMID:16517627

  9. Molecular mimicry of substrate oxygen atoms by water molecules in the beta-amylase active site.

    PubMed

    Pujadas, G; Palau, J

    2001-08-01

    Soybean beta-amylase (EC 3.2.1.2) has been crystallized both free and complexed with a variety of ligands. Four water molecules in the free-enzyme catalytic cleft form a multihydrogen-bond network with eight strategic residues involved in enzyme-ligand hydrogen bonds. We show here that the positions of these four water molecules are coincident with the positions of four potential oxygen atoms of the ligands within the complex. Some of these waters are displaced from the active site when the ligands bind to the enzyme. How many are displaced depends on the shape of the ligand. This means that when one of the four positions is not occupied by a ligand oxygen atom, the corresponding water remains. We studied the functional/structural role of these four waters and conclude that their presence means that the conformation of the eight side chains is fixed in all situations (free or complexed enzyme) and preserved from unwanted or forbidden conformational changes that could hamper the catalytic mechanism. The water structure at the active pocket of beta-amylase is therefore essential for providing the ligand recognition process with plasticity. It does not affect the protein active-site geometry and preserves the overall hydrogen-bonding network, irrespective of which ligand is bound to the enzyme. We also investigated whether other enzymes showed a similar role for water. Finally, we discuss the potential use of these results for predicting whether water molecules can mimic ligand atoms in the active center.

  10. Probing the active site tryptophan of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin with an analog

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Markus; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Wang, Yane-Shih; Eiler, Daniel; Söll, Dieter; Guo, Li-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded non-canonical amino acids are powerful tools of protein research and engineering; in particular they allow substitution of individual chemical groups or atoms in a protein of interest. One such amino acid is the tryptophan (Trp) analog 3-benzothienyl-l-alanine (Bta) with an imino-to-sulfur substitution in the five-membered ring. Unlike Trp, Bta is not capable of forming a hydrogen bond, but preserves other properties of a Trp residue. Here we present a pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase-derived, engineered enzyme BtaRS that enables efficient and site-specific Bta incorporation into proteins of interest in vivo. Furthermore, we report a 2.1 Å-resolution crystal structure of a BtaRS•Bta complex to show how BtaRS discriminates Bta from canonical amino acids, including Trp. To show utility in protein mutagenesis, we used BtaRS to introduce Bta to replace the Trp28 residue in the active site of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin. This experiment showed that not the hydrogen bond between residues Trp28 and Asp58, but the bulky aromatic side chain of Trp28 is important for active site maintenance. Collectively, our study provides a new and robust tool for checking the function of Trp in proteins. PMID:26582921

  11. Two step novel hydrogen system using additives to enhance hydrogen release from the hydrolysis of alane and activated aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Motyka, Theodore

    2015-12-01

    A system for the generation of hydrogen for use in portable power systems is set forth utilizing a two-step process that involves the thermal decomposition of AlH.sub.3 (10 wt % H.sub.2) followed by the hydrolysis of the activated aluminum (Al*) byproduct to release additional H.sub.2. Additionally, a process in which water is added directly without prior history to the AlH.sub.3:PA composite is also disclosed.

  12. Hydrogen Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A unit for producing hydrogen on site is used by a New Jersey Electric Company. The hydrogen is used as a coolant for the station's large generator; on-site production eliminates the need for weekly hydrogen deliveries. High purity hydrogen is generated by water electrolysis. The electrolyte is solid plastic and the control system is electronic. The technology was originally developed for the Gemini spacecraft.

  13. Electrochemical Dealloying of PdCu3 Nanoparticles to Achieve Pt-like Activity for the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Jana, Rajkumar; Bhim, Anupam; Bothra, Pallavi; Pati, Swapan K; Peter, Sebastian C

    2016-10-20

    Manipulating the d-band center of the metal surface and hence optimizing the free energy of hydrogen adsorption (ΔGH ) close to the optimal adsorption energy (ΔGH =0) for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), is an efficient strategy to enhance the activity for HER. Herein, we report a oleylamine-mediated (acting as the solvent, stabilizer, and reducing agent) strategy to synthesize intermetallic PdCu3 nanoparticles (NPs) without using any external reducing agent. Upon electrochemical cycling, PdCu3 transforms into Pd-rich PdCu (ΔGH =0.05 eV), exhibiting remarkably enhanced activity (with a current density of 25 mA cm(-2) at ∼69 mV overpotential) as an alternative to Pt for HER. The first-principle calculation suggests that formation of low coordination number Pd active sites alters the d-band center and hence optimal adsorption of hydrogen, leading to enhanced activity. This finding may provide guidelines towards the design and development of Pt-free highly active and robust electrocatalysts.

  14. Analysis of near-term production and market opportunities for hydrogen and related activities

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, R.; Leach, S.

    1995-09-01

    This paper summarizes current and planned activities in the areas of hydrogen production and use, near-term venture opportunities, and codes and standards. The rationale for these efforts is to assess industry interest and engage in activities that move hydrogen technologies down the path to commercialization. Some of the work presented in this document is a condensed, preliminary version of reports being prepared under the DOE/NREL contract. In addition, the NHA work funded by Westinghouse Savannah River Corporation (WSRC) to explore the opportunities and industry interest in a Hydrogen Research Center is briefly described. Finally, the planned support of and industry input to the Hydrogen Technical Advisory Panel (HTAP) on hydrogen demonstration projects is discussed.

  15. Hydrogen Evolution and Sludge Suspension During the Preparation of the First Batch of Sludge at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.S.; Lee, E.D.

    1995-03-01

    The first batch of High Level Radioactive Sludge for the Defense Waste Processing Facility is being prepared in two 4.9 million liter waste tanks. The preparation involves removing water soluble salts by washing (water addition, sludge suspension, settling and decantation). Sludge suspension is accomplished using long shafted slurry pumps that are mounted on rotating turntables. During the sludge suspension runs in 1993 and 1994, the slurry pumps` cleaning radius was determined to be less than that expected from previous determinations using synthetic sludge in a full size waste tank mockup. Hydrogen concentrations in the tanks` vapor space were monitored during the sludge suspension activities. As expected, the initial agitation of the sludge increased the hydrogen concentration, however, with the controls in place the hydrogen concentration was maintained below seven percent of the lower flammability limit

  16. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  17. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 2. Assessing Charge Site Location and Isotope Scrambling.

    PubMed

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Donohoe, Gregory C; Valentine, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS) has been used for structural investigation of anions produced by electrospraying a sample containing a synthetic peptide having the sequence KKDDDDDIIKIIK. In these experiments the potential of the analytical method for locating charge sites on ions as well as for utilizing collision-induced dissociation (CID) to reveal the degree of deuterium uptake within specific amino acid residues has been assessed. For diffuse (i.e., more elongated) [M - 2H](2-) ions, decreased deuterium content along with MDS data suggest that the D4 and D6 residues are charge sites, whereas for the more diffuse [M - 3H](3-) ions, the data suggest that the D4, D7, and the C-terminus are deprotonated. Fragmentation of mobility-selected, diffuse [M - 2H](2-) ions to determine deuterium uptake at individual amino acid residues reveals a degree of deuterium retention at incorporation sites. Although the diffuse [M - 3H](3-) ions may show more HD scrambling, it is not possible to clearly distinguish HD scrambling from the expected deuterium uptake based on a hydrogen accessibility model. The capability of the IMS-HDX-MS/MS approach to provide relevant details about ion structure is discussed. Additionally, the ability to extend the approach for locating protonation sites on positively-charged ions is presented.

  18. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 2. Assessing Charge Site Location and Isotope Scrambling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS) has been used for structural investigation of anions produced by electrospraying a sample containing a synthetic peptide having the sequence KKDDDDDIIKIIK. In these experiments the potential of the analytical method for locating charge sites on ions as well as for utilizing collision-induced dissociation (CID) to reveal the degree of deuterium uptake within specific amino acid residues has been assessed. For diffuse (i.e., more elongated) [M - 2H]2- ions, decreased deuterium content along with MDS data suggest that the D4 and D6 residues are charge sites, whereas for the more diffuse [M - 3H]3- ions, the data suggest that the D4, D7, and the C-terminus are deprotonated. Fragmentation of mobility-selected, diffuse [M - 2H]2- ions to determine deuterium uptake at individual amino acid residues reveals a degree of deuterium retention at incorporation sites. Although the diffuse [M - 3H]3- ions may show more HD scrambling, it is not possible to clearly distinguish HD scrambling from the expected deuterium uptake based on a hydrogen accessibility model. The capability of the IMS-HDX-MS/MS approach to provide relevant details about ion structure is discussed. Additionally, the ability to extend the approach for locating protonation sites on positively-charged ions is presented.

  19. Substitution of Tyr254 with Phe at the active site of flavocytochrome b2: consequences on catalysis of lactate dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, J.; Chapman, S.K.; Mathews, F.S.; Reid, G.A.; Lederer, F. )

    1990-07-10

    A role for Tyr254 in L-lactate dehydrogenation catalyzed by flavocytochrome b2 has recently been proposed on the basis of the known active-site structure and of studies that had suggested a mechanism involving the initial formation of a lactate carbanion. This role is now examined after replacement of Tyr254 with phenylalanine. The kcat is decreased about 40-fold, Km for lactate appears unchanged, and the mainly rate-limiting step is still alpha-hydrogen abstraction, as judged from the steady-state deuterium isotope effect. Modeling studies with lactate introduced into the active site indicate two possible substrate conformations with different hydrogen-bonding partners for the substrate hydroxyl. If the hydrogen bond is formed with Tyr254, as was initially postulated, the mechanism must involve removal by His373 of the C2 hydrogen, with carbanion formation. If, in the absence of the Tyr254 phenol group, the hydrogen bond is formed with His373 N3, the substrate is positioned in such a way that the reaction must proceed by hydride transfer. Therefore the mechanism of the Y254F enzyme was investigated so as to distinguish between the two mechanistic possibilities. 2-Hydroxy-3-butynoate behaves with the mutant as a suicide reagent, as with the wild-type enzyme. Similarly, the mutant protein also catalyzes the reduction and the dehydrohalogenation of bromopyruvate under transhydrogenation conditions.

  20. Mechanistic Insights on C-O and C-C Bond Activation and Hydrogen Insertion during Acetic Acid Hydrogenation Catalyzed by Ruthenium Clusters in Aqueous Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Shangguan, Junnan; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Chin, Ya-Huei

    2016-06-07

    Catalytic pathways for acetic acid (CH3COOH) and hydrogen (H2) reactions on dispersed Ru clusters in the aqueous medium and the associated kinetic requirements for C-O and C-C bond cleavages and hydrogen insertion are established from rate and isotopic assessments. CH3COOH reacts with H2 in steps that either retain its carbon backbone and lead to ethanol, ethyl acetate, and ethane (47-95 %, 1-23 %, and 2-17 % carbon selectivities, respectively) or break its C-C bond and form methane (1-43 % carbon selectivities) at moderate temperatures (413-523 K) and H2 pressures (10-60 bar, 298 K). Initial CH3COOH activation is the kinetically relevant step, during which CH3C(O)-OH bond cleaves on a metal site pair at Ru cluster surfaces nearly saturated with adsorbed hydroxyl (OH*) and acetate (CH3COO*) intermediates, forming an adsorbed acetyl (CH3CO*) and hydroxyl (OH*) species. Acetic acid turnover rates increase proportionally with both H2 (10-60 bar) and CH3COOH concentrations at low CH3COOH concentrations (<0.83 M), but decrease from first to zero order as the CH3COOH concentration and the CH3COO* coverages increase and the vacant Ru sites concomitantly decrease. Beyond the initial CH3C(O)-OH bond activation, sequential H-insertions on the surface acetyl species (CH3CO*) lead to C2 products and their derivative (ethanol, ethane, and ethyl acetate) and the competitive C-C bond cleavage of CH3CO* causes the eventual methane formation. The instantaneous carbon selectivities towards C2 species (ethanol, ethane, and ethyl acetate) increase linearly with the concentration of proton-type Hδ+ (derived from carboxylic acid dissociation) and chemisorbed H*. The selectivities towards C2 products decrease with increasing temperature, because of higher observed barriers for C-C bond cleavage than H-insertion. This study offers an interpretation of mechanism and energetics and provides kinetic evidence of carboxylic acid assisted proton-type hydrogen (Hδ+) shuffling during H

  1. Hydrogen peroxide induces La cytoplasmic shuttling and increases hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site-dependent translation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Shiu-Wan

    2016-09-01

    We have previously shown that physio/pathological levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) stimulate translation from the hepatitis C virus (HCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element in tissue-cultured cells. Here, using in vitro translation, we further show that H2O2 upregulates HCV IRES-dependent mRNA translation and correlates with an increase in intracellular oxidant level. Using Western blotting, immunocytochemistry, microscopy and affinity pulldown, we show that H2O2 stimulates HCV IRES-dependent translation and correlates with nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of the La autoantigen, resulting in enhanced binding of cytoplasmic La to HCV IRES RNA. The role of the La protein in H2O2-stimulated IRES-dependent translation is further confirmed by the ability of an anti-La antibody to suppress H2O2-activated IRES-dependent translation in vitro. This is further supported by the ability of an ectopically expressed dominant, negative La mutant protein to suppress H2O2-inducible IRES-mediated translation in Huh7 cells, transiently transfected with a bicistronic reporter and in a sub-genomic replicon cell line resembling a persistent infection. On the other hand, translation from the encephalomyocarditis virus IRES is diminished in the presence of H2O2, suggesting that H2O2 translational responsiveness is a specific property of the HCV IRES and is not a general phenomenon for all viral IRESs. Altogether, these results suggest that HCV adapts to physio/pathological oxidative stress in the host cell by mediating La cytoplasmic shuttling to enhance its IRES-dependent translation.

  2. Correlating the hydrogen evolution reaction activity in alkaline electrolytes with the hydrogen binding energy on monometallic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, WC; Myint, M; Chen, JGG; Yan, YS

    2013-05-01

    The slow reaction kinetics of the hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions (HER/HOR) on platinum in alkaline electrolytes hinders the development of alkaline electrolysers, solar hydrogen cells and alkaline fuel cells. A fundamental understanding of the exchange current density of the HER/HOR in alkaline media is critical for the search and design of highly active electrocatalysts. By studying the HER on a series of monometallic surfaces, we demonstrate that the HER exchange current density in alkaline solutions can be correlated with the calculated hydrogen binding energy (HBE) on the metal surfaces via a volcano type of relationship. The HER activity varies by several orders of magnitude from Pt at the peak of the plot to W and Au located on the bottom of each side of the plot, similar to the observation in acids. Such a correlation suggests that the HBE can be used as a descriptor for identifying electrocatalysts for HER/HOR in alkaline media, and that the HER exchange current density can be tuned by modifying the surface chemical properties.

  3. Effect of Organic Capping Layers over Monodisperse Platinum Nanoparticles upon Activity for Ethylene Hydrogenation and Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, John N.; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2009-03-24

    The influence of oleylamine (OA), trimethyl tetradecyl ammonium bromide (TTAB), and polyvinlypyrrolidone (PVP) capping agents upon the catalytic properties of Pt/silica catalysts was evaluated. Pt nanoparticles that were 1.5 nm in size were synthesized by the same procedure (ethylene glycol reduction under basic conditions) with the various capping agents added afterward for stabilization. Before examining catalytic properties for ethylene hydrogenation and CO oxidation, the Pt NPs were deposited onto mesoporous silica (SBA-15) supports and characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), H{sub 2} chemisorption, and elemental analysis (ICP-MS). PVP- and TTAB-capped Pt yielded mass-normalized reaction rates that decreased with increasing pretreatment temperature, and this trend was attributed to the partial coverage of the Pt surface with decomposition products from the organic capping agent. Once normalized to the Pt surface area, similar intrinsic activities were obtained regardless of the pretreatment temperature, which indicated no influence on the nature of the active sites. Consequently, a chemical probe technique using intrinsic activity for ethylene hydrogenation was demonstrated as an acceptable method for estimating the metallic surface areas of Pt. Amine (OA) capping exhibited a detrimental influence on the catalytic properties as severe deactivation and low activity were observed for ethylene hydrogenation and CO oxidation, respectively. These results were consistent with amine groups being strong poisons for Pt surfaces, and revealed the need to consider the effects of capping agents on the catalytic properties.

  4. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2008-08-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes.

  5. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  6. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide.

  7. Influence of CO{sub 2} activation on hydrogen storage behaviors of platinum-loaded activated carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seul-Yi; Park, Soo-Jin

    2010-12-15

    In this work, platinum (Pt) metal loaded activated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were prepared with different structural characteristics for hydrogen storage applications. The process was conducted by a gas phase CO{sub 2} activation method at 1200 {sup o}C as a function of the CO{sub 2} flow time. Pt-loaded activated MWNTs were also formulated to investigate the hydrogen storage characteristics. The microstructures of the Pt-loaded activated MWNTs were characterized by XRD and TEM measurements. The textural properties of the samples were analyzed using N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms at 77 K. The BET, D-R, and BJH equations were used to observe the specific surface areas and the micropore and mesopore structures. The hydrogen storage capacity of the Pt-loaded activated MWNTs was measured at 298 K at a pressure of 100 bar. The hydrogen storage capacity was increased with CO{sub 2} flow time. It was found that the micropore volume of the activated MWNTs plays a key role in the hydrogen storage capacity. -- Graphical abstract: The hydrogen storage capacities of the Pt-loaded activated MWNTs as a function of CO{sub 2} flow time are described. Display Omitted

  8. Probing the Watson-Crick, wobble, and sugar-edge hydrogen bond sites of uracil and thymine.

    PubMed

    Müller, Andreas; Frey, Jann A; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2005-06-16

    The nucleobases uracil (U) and thymine (T) offer three hydrogen-bonding sites for double H-bond formation via neighboring N-H and C=O groups, giving rise to the Watson-Crick, wobble and sugar-edge hydrogen bond isomers. We probe the hydrogen bond properties of all three sites by forming hydrogen bonded dimers of U, 1-methyluracil (1MU), 3-methyluracil (3MU), and T with 2-pyridone (2PY). The mass- and isomer-specific S1 <-- S0 vibronic spectra of 2PY.U, 2PY.3MU, 2PY.1MU, and 2PY.T were measured using UV laser resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI). The spectra of the Watson-Crick and wobble isomers of 2PY.1MU were separated using UV-UV spectral hole-burning. We identify the different isomers by combining three different diagnostic tools: (1) Selective methylation of the uracil N3-H group, which allows formation of the sugar-edge isomer only, and methylation of the N1-H group, which leads to formation of the Watson-Crick and wobble isomers. (2) The experimental S1 <-- S0 origins exhibit large spectral blue shifts relative to the 2PY monomer. Ab initio CIS calculations of the spectral shifts of the different hydrogen-bonded dimers show a linear correlation with experiment. This correlation allows us to identify the R2PI spectra of the weakly populated Watson-Crick and wobble isomers of both 2PY.U and 2PY.T. (3) PW91 density functional calculation of the ground-state binding and dissociation energies De and D0 are in agreement with the assignment of the dominant hydrogen bond isomers of 2PY.U, 2PY.3MU and 2PY.T as the sugar-edge form. For 2PY.U, 2PY.T and 2PY.1MU the measured wobble:Watson-Crick:sugar-edge isomer ratios are in good agreement with the calculated ratios, based on the ab initio dissociation energies and gas-phase statistical mechanics. The Watson-Crick and wobble isomers are thereby determined to be several kcal/mol less strongly bound than the sugar-edge isomers. The 36 observed intermolecular frequencies of the nine different H-bonded isomers give

  9. Gamma irradiation induced disintegration of waste activated sludge for biological hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yanan; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, gamma irradiation was applied for the disintegration and dissolution of waste activated sludge produced during the biological wastewater treatment, and the solubilized sludge was used as substrate for bio-hydrogen production. The experimental results showed that the solubilization of waste activated sludge was 53.7% at 20 kGy and pH=12, and the SCOD, polysaccharides, protein, TN and TP contents in the irradiated sludge solutions was 3789.6 mg/L, 268.3 mg/L, 1881.5 mg/L, 132.3 mg/L and 80.4 mg/L, respectively. The irradiated sludge was used for fermentative hydrogen production, and the hydrogen yield was 10.5±0.7 mL/g SCODconsumed. It can be concluded that the irradiated waste activated sludge could be used as a low-cost substrate for fermentative hydrogen production.

  10. [Electrochemically active microorganisms and electrolytically assisted fermentative hydrogen production--a review].

    PubMed

    Li, Jianchang; Zhang, Wudi; Yin, Fang; Xu, Rui; Chen, Yubao

    2009-06-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production can be improved by electrolysis and electrochemically active microorganisms which are capable of using an electrode as an electron acceptor for the oxidation of organic matter, in particular, volatile acids produced after fermentation. Firstly volatile acids can be completely converted into CO2, electrons and protons on the surface of anode. Then the electrons flow to cathode through anode and wires, and at the same time the protons move to cathode through cation membrane between anode chamber and cathode chamber. Finally the electrons and the protons combine into hydrogen when they meet at the surface of cathode. In such a process, the fermentation barrier and the product inhibition can be avoided to improve the conversion of hydrogen. 8-9 mol H2/mol glucose of hydrogen potential can be obtained when glucose is used as substrate. This technology is very likely to be applied to produce hydrogen high efficiently from any energy crops, organic waste and wastewater.

  11. Reactivity and Catalytic Activity of Hydrogen Atom Chemisorbed Silver Clusters.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Dar; Pal, Sourav

    2015-06-18

    Metal clusters of silver have attracted recent interest of researchers as a result of their potential in different catalytic applications and low cost. However, due to the completely filled d orbital and very high first ionization potential of the silver atom, the silver-based catalysts interact very weakly with the reacting molecules. In the current work, density functional theory calculations were carried out to investigate the effect of hydrogen atom chemisorption on the reactivity and catalytic properties of inert silver clusters. Our results affirm that the hydrogen atom chemisorption leads to enhancement in the binding energy of the adsorbed O2 molecule on the inert silver clusters. The increase in the binding energy is also characterized by the decrease in the Ag-O and increase in the O-O bond lengths in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Pertinent to the increase in the O-O bond length, a significant red shift in the O-O stretching frequency is also noted in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Moreover, the hydrogen atom chemisorbed silver clusters show low reaction barriers and high heat of formation of the final products for the environmentally important CO oxidation reaction as compared to the parent catalytically inactive clusters. The obtained results were compared with those of the corresponding gold and hydrogen atom chemisorbed gold clusters obtained at the same level of theory. It is expected the current computational study will provide key insights for future advances in the design of efficient nanosilver-based catalysts through the adsorption of a small atom or a ligand.

  12. Conformational Change in the Active Site of Streptococcal Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase Through Site-Directed Mutagenesis at Asp-115.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Yusuke; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (UGL) degrades unsaturated disaccharides generated from mammalian extracellular matrices, glycosaminoglycans, by polysaccharide lyases. Two Asp residues, Asp-115 and Asp-175 of Streptococcus agalactiae UGL (SagUGL), are completely conserved in other bacterial UGLs, one of which (Asp-175 of SagUGL) acts as a general acid and base catalyst. The other Asp (Asp-115 of SagUGL) also affects the enzyme activity, although its role in the enzyme reaction has not been well understood. Here, we show substitution of Asp-115 in SagUGL with Asn caused a conformational change in the active site. Tertiary structures of SagUGL mutants D115N and D115N/K370S with negligible enzyme activity were determined at 2.00 and 1.79 Å resolution, respectively, by X-ray crystallography. The side chain of Asn-115 is drastically shifted in both mutants owing to the interaction with several residues, including Asp-175, by formation of hydrogen bonds. This interaction between Asn-115 and Asp-175 probably prevents the mutants from triggering the enzyme reaction using Asp-175 as an acid catalyst.

  13. Noncovalent intermolecular interactions between dehydroepiandrosterone and the active site of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulphotransferase: A density functional theory based treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astani, Elahe; Heshmati, Emran; Chen, Chun-Jung; Hadipour, Nasser L.; Shekarsaraei, Setareh

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical study was performed to characterize noncovalent intermolecular interactions, especially hydrogen bond (HB), in the active site of enzyme human dehydroepiandrosterone sulphotransferase (SULT2A1/DHEA) using the local (M06-L) and hybrid (M06, M06-2X) meta-GGA functionals of density functional theory (DFT). Results revealed that DHEA is able to form HBs with residues His99, Tyr231, Met137 and Met16 in the active site of the SULT2A1/DHEA. It was found that DHEA interacts with the other residues through electrostatic and Van der Waals interactions.

  14. Use of an Improved Matching Algorithm to Select Scaffolds for Enzyme Design Based on a Complex Active Site Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoqiang; Xue, Jing; Lin, Min; Zhu, Yushan

    2016-01-01

    Active site preorganization helps native enzymes electrostatically stabilize the transition state better than the ground state for their primary substrates and achieve significant rate enhancement. In this report, we hypothesize that a complex active site model for active site preorganization modeling should help to create preorganized active site design and afford higher starting activities towards target reactions. Our matching algorithm ProdaMatch was improved by invoking effective pruning strategies and the native active sites for ten scaffolds in a benchmark test set were reproduced. The root-mean squared deviations between the matched transition states and those in the crystal structures were < 1.0 Å for the ten scaffolds, and the repacking calculation results showed that 91% of the hydrogen bonds within the active sites are recovered, indicating that the active sites can be preorganized based on the predicted positions of transition states. The application of the complex active site model for de novo enzyme design was evaluated by scaffold selection using a classic catalytic triad motif for the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate. Eighty scaffolds were identified from a scaffold library with 1,491 proteins and four scaffolds were native esterase. Furthermore, enzyme design for complicated substrates was investigated for the hydrolysis of cephalexin using scaffold selection based on two different catalytic motifs. Only three scaffolds were identified from the scaffold library by virtue of the classic catalytic triad-based motif. In contrast, 40 scaffolds were identified using a more flexible, but still preorganized catalytic motif, where one scaffold corresponded to the α-amino acid ester hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis and synthesis of cephalexin. Thus, the complex active site modeling approach for de novo enzyme design with the aid of the improved ProdaMatch program is a promising approach for the creation of active sites with high catalytic

  15. Promoter-proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Pia K.; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites on transcription requires promoter proximity, as demonstrated using artificial constructs and supported by a genome-wide data set. Importantly, transcription down-regulation can be recapitulated in a gene context devoid of splice sites by placing a functional bona fide pA site/transcription terminator within ∼500 base pairs of the promoter. In contrast, promoter-proximal positioning of a pA site-independent histone gene terminator supports high transcription levels. We propose that optimal communication between a pA site-dependent gene terminator and its promoter critically depends on gene length and that short RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels. PMID:23028143

  16. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  17. Ford/BASF/UM Activities in Support of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence

    SciTech Connect

    Veenstra, Mike; Purewal, Justin; Xu, Chunchuan; Yang, Jun; Blaser, Rachel; Sudik, Andrea; Siegel, Don; Ming, Yang; Liu, Dong'an; Chi, Hang; Gaab, Manuela; Arnold, Lena; Muller, Ulrich

    2015-06-30

    revealed cost gaps and opportunities that identified a storage system that was lower cost than a 700 bar compressed system. Finally, we led the HSECoE efforts devoted to characterizing and enhancing metal organic framework (MOF) storage materials. This report serves as a final documentation of the Ford-UM-BASF project contributions to the HSECoE during the 6-year timeframe of the Center. The activities of the HSECoE have impacted the broader goals of the DOE-EERE and USDRIVE, leading to improved understanding in the engineering of materials-based hydrogen storage systems. This knowledge is a prerequisite to the development of a commercially-viable hydrogen storage system.

  18. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  19. Active and regulatory sites of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Pesi, Rossana; Allegrini, Simone; Careddu, Maria Giovanna; Filoni, Daniela Nicole; Camici, Marcella; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2010-12-01

    Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II), which acts preferentially on 6-hydroxypurine nucleotides, is essential for the survival of several cell types. cN-II catalyses both the hydrolysis of nucleotides and transfer of their phosphate moiety to a nucleoside acceptor through formation of a covalent phospho-intermediate. Both activities are regulated by a number of phosphorylated compounds, such as diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap₄A), ADP, ATP, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) and phosphate. On the basis of a partial crystal structure of cN-II, we mutated two residues located in the active site, Y55 and T56. We ascertained that the ability to catalyse the transfer of phosphate depends on the presence of a bulky residue in the active site very close to the aspartate residue that forms the covalent phospho-intermediate. The molecular model indicates two possible sites at which adenylic compounds may interact. We mutated three residues that mediate interaction in the first activation site (R144, N154, I152) and three in the second (F127, M436 and H428), and found that Ap₄A and ADP interact with the same site, but the sites for ATP and BPG remain uncertain. The structural model indicates that cN-II is a homotetrameric protein that results from interaction through a specific interface B of two identical dimers that have arisen from interaction of two identical subunits through interface A. Point mutations in the two interfaces and gel-filtration experiments indicated that the dimer is the smallest active oligomerization state. Finally, gel-filtration and light-scattering experiments demonstrated that the native enzyme exists as a tetramer, and no further oligomerization is required for enzyme activation.

  20. Synthesis of Active Hexafluoroisopropyl Benzoates through a Hydrogen-Bond-Enabled Palladium(II)-Catalyzed C-H Alkoxycarbonylation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Gevorgyan, Vladimir

    2017-03-13

    A Pd(II) -catalyzed ortho C-H alkoxycarbonylation reaction of aryl silanes toward active hexafluoroisopropyl (HFIP) benzoate esters has been developed. This efficient reaction features high selectivity and good functional-group tolerance. Notably, given the general nature of the silyl-tethered directing group, this method delivers products bearing two independently modifiable sites. NMR studies reveal the presence of hydrogen bonding between HFIP and a pyrimidine nitrogen atom of the directing group, and it is thought to be crucial for the success of this alkoxycarbonylation reaction.

  1. Overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxins: balancing toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Puerto-Galán, Leonor; Pérez-Ruiz, Juan M; Ferrández, Julia; Cano, Beatriz; Naranjo, Belén; Nájera, Victoria A; González, Maricruz; Lindahl, Anna M; Cejudo, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthesis, the primary source of biomass and oxygen into the biosphere, involves the transport of electrons in the presence of oxygen and, therefore, chloroplasts constitute an important source of reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide. If accumulated at high level, hydrogen peroxide may exert a toxic effect; however, it is as well an important second messenger. In order to balance the toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide its level has to be tightly controlled. To this end, chloroplasts are equipped with different antioxidant systems such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs), thiol-based peroxidases able to reduce hydrogen and organic peroxides. At high peroxide concentrations the peroxidase function of 2-Cys Prxs may become inactivated through a process of overoxidation. This inactivation has been proposed to explain the signaling function of hydrogen peroxide in eukaryotes, whereas in prokaryotes, the 2-Cys Prxs of which were considered to be insensitive to overoxidation, the signaling activity of hydrogen peroxide is less relevant. Here we discuss the current knowledge about the mechanisms controlling 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in chloroplasts, organelles with an important signaling function in plants. Given the prokaryotic origin of chloroplasts, we discuss the occurrence of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in cyanobacteria with the aim of identifying similarities between chloroplasts and their ancestors regarding their response to hydrogen peroxide.

  2. An investigation of hydrogen bonding between HCl and vinylacetylene: A molecule with two different π-acceptor sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiel, Z.; Fowler, P. W.; Legon, A. C.; Devanne, D.; Dixneuf, P.

    1990-11-01

    The ground state rotational spectrum of a hydrogen-bonded dimer formed by vinylacetylene and hydrogen chloride has been detected by the pulsed-nozzle, Fourier-transform microwave technique. Vinylacetylene has been chosen as a prototype acceptor molecule containing two different π-acceptor sites. Rotational constants A0, B0, C0, centrifugal distortion constants ΔJ, ΔJK, δJ, δK, and three components χaa, χbb-χcc, and χab of the Cl nuclear quadrupole coupling tensor have been determined for each of the three isotopomers CH2CHCCHṡṡṡ H35Cl, CH2CHCCHṡṡṡH37Cl, and CH2CHCCHṡṡṡD35Cl. These spectroscopic constants have been interpreted in terms of a dimer in which the HCl subunit forms a hydrogen bond to the C 3/4 C triple bond in a T-shape configuration, but is displaced from the center of the triple bond by d=0.04 Å towards the inner C atom, and makes an angle φ=34° with the vinylacetylene plane. The experimental angular geometry is in excellent agreement with that predicted by the Buckingham-Fowler electrostatic model which gives φ=27°.

  3. The controlled relay of multiple protons required at the active site of nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Dance, Ian

    2012-07-07

    The enzyme nitrogenase, when reducing natural and unnatural substrates, requires large numbers of protons per chemical catalytic cycle. The active face of the catalytic site (the FeMo-cofactor, FeMo-co) is situated in a protein domain which is largely hydrophobic and anhydrous, and incapable of serial provision of multiple protons. Through detailed analysis of the high quality protein crystal structures available the characteristics of a chain of water molecules leading from the protein surface to a key sulfur atom (S3B) of FeMo-co are described. The first half of the water chain from the surface inwards is branched, slightly variable, and able to accommodate exogenous small molecules: this is dubbed the proton bay. The second half, from the proton bay to S3B, is comprised of a single chain of eight hydrogen bonded water molecules. This section is strictly conserved, and is intimately involved in hydrogen bonds with homocitrate, an essential component that chelates Mo. This is the proton wire, and a detailed Grotthuss mechanism for serial translocation of protons through this proton wire to S3B is proposed. This controlled serial proton relay from the protein surface to S3B is an essential component of the intramolecular hydrogenation paradigm for the complete chemical mechanisms of nitrogenase. Each proton reaching S3B, instigated by electron transfer to FeMo-co, becomes a hydrogen atom that migrates to other components of the active face of FeMo-co and to bound substrates and intermediates, allowing subsequent multiple proton transfers along the proton wire. Experiments to test the proposed mechanism of proton supply are suggested. The water chain in nitrogenase is comparable with the purported proton pumping pathway of cytochrome c oxidase.

  4. Metal-organic frameworks for the storage and delivery of biologically active hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, Phoebe K; Wheatley, Paul S; Aldous, David; Mohideen, M Infas; Tang, Chiu; Hriljac, Joseph A; Megson, Ian L; Chapman, Karena W; De Weireld, Guy; Vaesen, Sebastian; Morris, Russell E

    2012-04-02

    Hydrogen sulfide is an extremely toxic gas that is also of great interest for biological applications when delivered in the correct amount and at the desired rate. Here we show that the highly porous metal-organic frameworks with the CPO-27 structure can bind the hydrogen sulfide relatively strongly, allowing the storage of the gas for at least several months. Delivered gas is biologically active in preliminary vasodilation studies of porcine arteries, and the structure of the hydrogen sulfide molecules inside the framework has been elucidated using a combination of powder X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function analysis.

  5. BAX Activation is Initiated at a Novel Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Suzuki, Motoshi; Davis, Marguerite L.; Pitter, Kenneth; Bird, Gregory H.; Katz, Samuel G.; Tu, Ho-Chou; Kim, Hyungjin; Cheng, Emily H.-Y.; Tjandra, Nico; Walensky, Loren D.

    2008-01-01

    BAX is a pro-apoptotic protein of the BCL-2 family stationed in the cytosol until activated by a diversity of stress stimuli to induce cell death. Anti-apoptotic proteins such as BCL-2 counteract BAX-mediated cell death. Although an interaction site that confers survival functionality has been defined for anti-apoptotic proteins, an activation site has not been identified for BAX, rendering its explicit trigger mechanism unknown. We previously developed Stabilized Alpha-Helix of BCL-2 domains (SAHBs) that directly initiate BAX-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis. Here we demonstrate by NMR analysis that BIM SAHB binds BAX at an interaction site that is distinct from the canonical binding groove characterized for anti-apoptotic proteins. The specificity of the BIM SAHB-BAX interaction is highlighted by point mutagenesis that abrogates functional activity, confirming that BAX activation is initiated at this novel structural location. Thus, we have now defined a BAX interaction site for direct activation, establishing a new target for therapeutic modulation of apoptosis. PMID:18948948

  6. Hydrogen Oxidation-Selective Electrocatalysis by Fine Tuning of Pt Ensemble Sites to Enhance the Durability of Automotive Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Yun, Su-Won; Park, Shin-Ae; Kim, Tae-June; Kim, Jun-Hyuk; Pak, Gi-Woong; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2017-02-08

    A simple, inexpensive approach is proposed for enhancing the durability of automotive proton exchange membrane fuel cells by selective promotion of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and suppression of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the anode in startup/shutdown events. Dodecanethiol forms a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on the surface of Pt particles, thus decreasing the number of Pt ensemble sites. Interestingly, by controlling the dodecanethiol concentration during SAM formation, the number of ensemble sites can be precisely optimized such that it is sufficient for the HOR but insufficient for the ORR. Thus, a Pt surface with an SAM of dodecanethiol clearly effects HOR-selective electrocatalysis. Clear HOR selectivity is demonstrated in unit cell tests with the actual membrane electrode assembly, as well as in an electrochemical three-electrode setup with a thin-film rotating disk electrode configuration.

  7. Hydrogen bonding and spin density distribution in the Qb semiquinone of bacterial reaction centers and comparison with the Qa site.

    PubMed

    Martin, Erik; Samoilova, Rimma I; Narasimhulu, Kupala V; Lin, Tzu-Jen; O'Malley, Patrick J; Wraight, Colin A; Dikanov, Sergei A

    2011-04-13

    In the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, the primary (Q(A)) and secondary (Q(B)) electron acceptors are both ubiquinone-10, but with very different properties and functions. To investigate the protein environment that imparts these functional differences, we have applied X-band HYSCORE, a 2D pulsed EPR technique, to characterize the exchangeable protons around the semiquinone (SQ) in the Q(A) and Q(B) sites, using samples of (15)N-labeled reaction centers, with the native high spin Fe(2+) exchanged for diamagnetic Zn(2+), prepared in (1)H(2)O and (2)H(2)O solvent. The powder HYSCORE method is first validated against the orientation-selected Q-band ENDOR study of the Q(A) SQ by Flores et al. (Biophys. J.2007, 92, 671-682), with good agreement for two exchangeable protons with anisotropic hyperfine tensor components, T, both in the range 4.6-5.4 MHz. HYSCORE was then applied to the Q(B) SQ where we found proton lines corresponding to T ≈ 5.2, 3.7 MHz and T ≈ 1.9 MHz. Density functional-based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, employing a model of the Q(B) site, were used to assign the observed couplings to specific hydrogen bonding interactions with the Q(B) SQ. These calculations allow us to assign the T = 5.2 MHz proton to the His-L190 N(δ)H···O(4) (carbonyl) hydrogen bonding interaction. The T = 3.7 MHz spectral feature most likely results from hydrogen bonding interactions of O1 (carbonyl) with both Gly-L225 peptide NH and Ser-L223 hydroxyl OH, which possess calculated couplings very close to this value. The smaller 1.9 MHz coupling is assigned to a weakly bound peptide NH proton of Ile-L224. The calculations performed with this structural model of the Q(B) site show less asymmetric distribution of unpaired spin density over the SQ than seen for the Q(A) site, consistent with available experimental data for (13)C and (17)O carbonyl hyperfine couplings. The implications of these interactions for Q

  8. Contribution of active-site glutamine to rate enhancement in ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Boudreaux, David; Chaney, Joseph; Maiti, Tushar K.; Das, Chittaranjan

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases (UCHs) are cysteine proteases featuring a classical cysteine-histidine-aspartate catalytic triad, also a highly conserved glutamine thought to be a part of the oxyanion hole. However, the contribution of this side chain to the catalysis by UCH enzymes is not known. Herein, we demonstrate that the glutamine side chain contributes to rate enhancement in UCHL1, UCHL3 and UCHL5. Mutation of the glutamine to alanine in these enzymes impairs the catalytic efficiency mainly due to a 16 to 30-fold reduction in kcat, which is consistent with a loss of approximately 2 kcal/mol in transition-state stabilization. However, the contribution to transition-state stabilization observed here is rather modest for the side chain’s role in oxyanion stabilization. Interestingly, we discovered that the carbonyl oxygen of this side chain is engaged in a C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding contact with the CεH group of the catalytic histidine. Upon further analysis, we found that this interaction is a common active-site structural feature in most cysteine proteases, including papain, belonging to families with the QCH(N/D) type of active-site configuration. It is possible that removal of the glutamine side chain might have abolished the C—H•••O interaction, which typically accounts for 2 kcal/mol of stabilization, leading to the effect on catalysis observed here. Additional studies performed on UCHL3 by mutating the glutamine to glutamate (strong C—H•••O acceptor but oxyanion destabilizer) and to lysine (strong oxyanion stabilizer but lacking C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding property) suggest that the C—H•••O hydrogen bond could contribute to catalysis. PMID:22284438

  9. Involvement of novel autophosphorylation sites in ATM activation.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Graham, Mark E; Peng, Cheng; Chen, Philip; Robinson, Phillip J; Lavin, Martin F

    2006-08-09

    ATM kinase plays a central role in signaling DNA double-strand breaks to cell cycle checkpoints and to the DNA repair machinery. Although the exact mechanism of ATM activation remains unknown, efficient activation requires the Mre11 complex, autophosphorylation on S1981 and the involvement of protein phosphatases and acetylases. We report here the identification of several additional phosphorylation sites on ATM in response to DNA damage, including autophosphorylation on pS367 and pS1893. ATM autophosphorylates all these sites in vitro in response to DNA damage. Antibodies against phosphoserine 1893 revealed rapid and persistent phosphorylation at this site after in vivo activation of ATM kinase by ionizing radiation, paralleling that observed for S1981 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation was dependent on functional ATM and on the Mre11 complex. All three autophosphorylation sites are physiologically important parts of the DNA damage response, as phosphorylation site mutants (S367A, S1893A and S1981A) were each defective in ATM signaling in vivo and each failed to correct radiosensitivity, genome instability and cell cycle checkpoint defects in ataxia-telangiectasia cells. We conclude that there are at least three functionally important radiation-induced autophosphorylation events in ATM.

  10. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  11. Effect of polyhydroxyalkanoates on dark fermentative hydrogen production from waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongbo; Zeng, Guangming; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Xiaoming

    2015-04-15

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA), an intracellular energy and carbon storage polymer, can be accumulated in activated sludge in substantial quantities under wastewater dynamic treatment (i.e., substrate feast-famine) conditions. However, its influence on hydrogen production has never been investigated before. This study therefore evaluated the influences of PHA level and composition in waste activated sludge (WAS) on hydrogen production. The results showed that with the increase of sludge PHA content from 25 to 178 mg per gram volatile suspended solids (VSS) hydrogen production from WAS alkaline anaerobic fermentation increased from 26.5 to 58.7 mL/g VSS. The composition of PHA was also found to affect hydrogen production. When the dominant composition shifted from polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) to polyhydroxyvalerate (PHV), the amount of generated hydrogen decreased from 51.2 to 41.1 mL/g VSS even under the same PHA level (around 130 mg/g VSS). The mechanism studies exhibited that the increased PHA content accelerated both the cell solubilization and the hydrolysis process of solubilized substrates. Compared with the PHB-dominant sludge, the increased PHV fraction not only slowed the hydrolysis process but also caused more propionic acid production, with less theoretical hydrogen generation in this fermentation type. It was also found that the increased PHA content enhanced the soluble protein conversion of non-PHA biomass. Further investigations with enzyme analyses showed that both the key hydrolytic enzyme activities and hydrogen-forming enzyme activities were in the sequence of the PHB-dominant sludge > the PHV-dominant sludge > the low PHA sludge, which was in accord with the observed order of hydrogen yield.

  12. Evaluation of the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero coverage for hydrogen on activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnke, E.; Beckner, M.; Romanos, J.; Olsen, R.; Wexler, C.; Pfeifer, P.

    2011-03-01

    Activated carbons made from corn cob show promise as materials for high-capacity hydrogen storage. As part of our characterization of these materials, we are interested in learning how different production methods affect the adsorption energies. In this talk, we will show how hydrogen adsorption isotherms may be used to calculate these adsorption energies at zero coverage using Henry's law. We will additionally discuss differences between the binding energy and the isosteric heat of adsorption by applying this analysis at different temperatures.

  13. Modulation of Active Site Electronic Structure by the Protein Matrix to Control [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Raugei, Simone; Squier, Thomas C.

    2014-09-30

    Control of the reactivity of the nickel center of the [NiFe] hydrogenase and other metalloproteins commonly involves outer coordination sphere ligands that act to modify the geometry and physical properties of the active site metal centers. We carried out a combined set of classical molecular dynamics and quantum/classical mechanics calculations to provide quantitative estimates of how dynamic fluctuations of the active site within the protein matrix modulate the electronic structure at the catalytic center. Specifically we focused on the dynamics of the inner and outer coordination spheres of the cysteinate-bound Ni–Fe cluster in the catalytically active Ni-C state. There are correlated movements of the cysteinate ligands and the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, which modulate the electron affinity at the active site and the proton affinity of a terminal cysteinate. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesize a coupling between protein dynamics and electron and proton transfer reactions critical to dihydrogen production.

  14. Determination of hydrogen in niobium by cold neutron prompt gamma ray activation analysis and neutron incoherent scattering

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Paul; H.H. Cheu-Maya; G.R. Myneni

    2002-11-01

    The presence of trace amounts of hydrogen in niobium is believed to have a detrimental effect on the mechanical and superconducting properties. Unfortunately, few techniques are capable of measuring hydrogen at these levels. We have developed two techniques for measuring hydrogen in materials. Cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) has proven useful for the determination of hydrogen and other elements in a wide variety of materials. Neutron incoherent scattering (NIS), a complementary tool to PGAA, has been used to measure trace hydrogen in titanium. Both techniques were used to study the effects of vacuum heating and chemical polishing on the hydrogen content of superconducting niobium.

  15. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  16. Spectroscopic studies of the active site of galactose oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, P.F.; Brown, R.D. III; Koenig, S.H.

    1995-07-19

    X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopy have been used to probe the copper site structure in galactose oxidase at pH 4.5 and 7.0. the results suggest that there are no major differences in the structure of the tetragonal Cu(II) site at these pH values. Analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicates that four N,O scatterers are present at approximately 2 {Angstrom}; these are presumably the equatorial ligands. In addition, the EXAFS data establish that oxidative activation to produce the active-site tyrosine radical does not cause major changes in the copper coordination environment. Therefore results obtained on the one-electron reduced enzyme, containing Cu(II) but not the tyrosine radical, probably also apply to the catalytically active Cu(II)/tyrosine radical state. Solvent water exchange, inhibitor binding, and substrate binding have been probed via nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) measurements. The NMRD profile of galactose oxidase is quantitatively consistent with the rapid exchange of a single, equatorial water ligand with a Cu(II)-O separation of about 2.4 {Angstrom}. Azide and cyanide displace this coordinated water. The binding of azide and the substrate dihydroxyacetone produce very similar effects on the NMRD profile of galactose oxidase, indicating that substrates also bind to the active site Cu(II) in an equatorial position.

  17. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  18. Tuning the hydrogen evolution activity of β-Mo2C nanoparticles via control of their growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Timothy T; Saidi, Wissam A

    2017-03-02

    The use of water electrocatalysis for hydrogen production is a promising, sustainable and greenhouse-gas-free process to develop disruptive renewable energy technologies. Transition metal carbides, in particular β-phase Mo2C, are garnering increased attention as hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts due to their favourable synthesis conditions, stability and high catalytic efficiency. We use a thermodynamic approach in conjunction with density functional theory and a kinetic model of exchange current density to systematically study the HER activity of β-Mo2C under different experimental conditions. We show that the (011) surface has the highest HER activity, which is rationalized by its lack of strong Mo-based hydrogen adsorption sites. Thus, the HER efficiency of β-Mo2C can be tuned using nanoparticles (NPs) that expose larger fractions of this termination. We give definite maps between NP morphologies and experimental synthesis conditions, and show that the control of the carbon chemical potential during synthesis can expose up to 90% of the (011) surface, while ambient H2 has little effect on the NP morphology. The "volcano" plot shows that under these optimum conditions, the NP exchange current density is ∼10(-5) A cm(-2), that is only slightly smaller than that of Pt (111).

  19. Hydrogen Isotopic Composition of Hornblendes From Active Volcanoes of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Y.; Kusakabe, M.; Valdez, G.; Mora, J. C.

    2002-12-01

    Horblendes (Hb) crystallize in water-rich magmas in magma chambers or in deeper zones. Isotopic composition of hydrogen in OH-groups of Hb represents the water isotopic composition of magmatic fluid or dissolved magmatic volatiles and therefore, is an isotopic characteristics of magmatic water. At lower vapor pressure in conduits and shallower magma chambers, Hb can decompose and loose water with significant isotopic effects. We measured hydrogen isotopic composition of hornblendes from modern lavas and pyroclastics of El Chichon, Colima and Popocatepetl volcanoes. Hornblendes from the last and previous pyroclastic flows of El Chichon are the more abundant mineral phases (after plagioclase), showing pleochroism from green to brown. They are relatively uniform in composition (close to magnesian hastingsite hornblende), without chemical variations between cores and rims. Using the Johnson and Rutherford (1989) calibration of the Al-in-hornblende geobarometer, the hornblendes show equilibrium with the melt at pressure of 4 kb that correspond to 12 km of depth. These pressure conditions likely represent the location of the magma chamber below El Chichon volcano, however, these pressure estimates need to be confirmed. The water content of all analyzed Hbs is 1.5-1.8 wt%, but may be higher due to a minor amount of impurities of pyroxenes which sometimes are difficult to separate from Hb. Hydrogen isotopic composition in 10 samples of Hb from El Chichon of different age and facies (pumice, lithic fragments in pyroclastics) was in a narrow range -40 to -37 permil V-SMOW. Such isotopic signature corresponds to so-called "andesitic" waters, i.e. waters from subduction-related magmas, The origin of these waters is suggested to be the recycled water from subducted oceanic sediments. The data for El Chichon volcano are in the range of the already known values for subduction-related magmas though the tectonic setting of El Chichon is more complicated. The measured isotopic

  20. Activated Carbon Catalysts for the Production of Hydrogen for the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Harry W. Rollins; Kyle C Burch; Cristina Deiana; Hugo S. Silva; Maria F. Sardella; Dolly Granados

    2009-05-01

    Seven activated carbon catalysts obtained from a variety of raw material sources and preparation methods were examined for their catalytic activity to decompose hydroiodic acid (HI) to produce hydrogen; a key reaction in the sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical water splitting cycle. Activity was examined under a temperature ramp from 473 to 773 K. Within the group of ligno-cellulosic steam-activated carbon catalysts, activity increased with surface area. However, both a mineral-based steam-activated carbon and a ligno-cellulosic chemically-activated carbon displayed activities lower than expected based on their higher surface areas. In general, ash content was detrimental to catalytic activity while total acid sites, as determined by Bohem’s titrations, seemed to favor higher catalytic activity within the group of steam-activated carbons. These results suggest, one more time, that activated carbon raw materials and preparation methods may have played a significant role in the development of surface characteristics that eventually dictated catalyst activity and stability as well.

  1. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  2. Substrate-binding specificity of chitinase and chitosanase as revealed by active-site architecture analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shijia; Shao, Shangjin; Li, Linlin; Cheng, Zhi; Tian, Li; Gao, Peiji; Wang, Lushan

    2015-12-11

    Chitinases and chitosanases, referred to as chitinolytic enzymes, are two important categories of glycoside hydrolases (GH) that play a key role in degrading chitin and chitosan, two naturally abundant polysaccharides. Here, we investigate the active site architecture of the major chitosanase (GH8, GH46) and chitinase families (GH18, GH19). Both charged (Glu, His, Arg, Asp) and aromatic amino acids (Tyr, Trp, Phe) are observed with higher frequency within chitinolytic active sites as compared to elsewhere in the enzyme structure, indicating significant roles related to enzyme function. Hydrogen bonds between chitinolytic enzymes and the substrate C2 functional groups, i.e. amino groups and N-acetyl groups, drive substrate recognition, while non-specific CH-π interactions between aromatic residues and substrate mainly contribute to tighter binding and enhanced processivity evident in GH8 and GH18 enzymes. For different families of chitinolytic enzymes, the number, type, and position of substrate atoms bound in the active site vary, resulting in different substrate-binding specificities. The data presented here explain the synergistic action of multiple enzyme families at a molecular level and provide a more reasonable method for functional annotation, which can be further applied toward the practical engineering of chitinases and chitosanases.

  3. A Relaxed Active Site After Exon Ligation by the Group I Intron

    SciTech Connect

    Lipchock,S.; Strobel, S.

    2008-01-01

    During RNA maturation, the group I intron promotes two sequential phosphorotransfer reactions resulting in exon ligation and intron release. Here, we report the crystal structure of the intron in complex with spliced exons and two additional structures that examine the role of active-site metal ions during the second step of RNA splicing. These structures reveal a relaxed active site, in which direct metal coordination by the exons is lost after ligation, while other tertiary interactions are retained between the exon and the intron. Consistent with these structural observations, kinetic and thermodynamic measurements show that the scissile phosphate makes direct contact with metals in the ground state before exon ligation and in the transition state, but not after exon ligation. Despite no direct exonic interactions and even in the absence of the scissile phosphate, two metal ions remain bound within the active site. Together, these data suggest that release of the ligated exons from the intron is preceded by a change in substrate-metal coordination before tertiary hydrogen bonding contacts to the exons are broken.

  4. Hydrogen Gas Emissions from Active Faults and Identification of Flow Pathway in a Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, T.; Niwa, M.; Kurosawa, H.; Shimada, K.

    2010-12-01

    It has been observed that hydrogen gas emissions from the subsurface along active faults exceed atmospheric concentrations (e.g. Sugisaki et. al., 1983). Experimental studies have shown that hydrogen gas is generated in a radical reaction of water with fractured silicate minerals due to rock fracturing caused by fault movement (e.g. Kita et al., 1982). Based on such research, we are studying an investigation method for an assessment of fault activity using hydrogen gas emissions from fracture zones. To start, we have devised portable equipment for rapid and simple in situ measurement of hydrogen gas emissions (Shimada et al., 2008). The key component of this equipment is a commercially available and compact hydrogen gas sensor with an integral data logger operable at atmospheric pressure. In the field, we have drilled shallow boreholes into incohesive fault rocks to depths ranging from 15 to 45 cm using a hand-operated drill with a 9mm drill-bit. Then, we have measured the hydrogen gas concentrations in emissions from active faults such as: the western part of the Atotsugawa fault zone, the Atera fault zone and the Neodani fault in central Japan; the Yamasaki fault zone in southwest Japan; and the Yamagata fault zone in northeast Japan. In addition, we have investigated the hydrogen gas concentrations in emissions from other major geological features such as tectonic lines: the Butsuzo Tectonic Line in the eastern Kii Peninsula and the Atokura Nappe in the Northeastern Kanto Mountains. As a result of the investigations, hydrogen gas concentration in emissions from the active faults was measured to be in the approximate range from 6,000 ppm to 26,000 ppm in two to three hours after drilling. A tendency for high concentrations of hydrogen gas in active faults was recognized, in contrast with low concentrations in emissions from tectonic lines that were observed to be in the range from 730 ppm to 2,000 ppm. It is inferred that the hydrogen gas migrates to ground

  5. Role of hydrogen ions in standard and activation heap leaching of gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubtsov, YuI

    2017-02-01

    The role of hydrogen ions in activation heap leaching of gold from rebellious ore has been studied, which has allowed enhancing gold recovery. The author puts forward a gold leaching circuit with the use of activated oxygen-saturated solutions acidified to pH = 6–9.

  6. Catalytic activity of in situ synthesized MoWNi sulfides in hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolyuk, Yu. A.; Maksimov, A. L.; Kolyagin, Yu. G.

    2017-02-01

    MoWNi-sulfide catalysts were obtained in situ by thermal decomposition of metal-polymer precursors based on the copolymers of polymaleic anhydride in a hydrocarbon raw material. The activity of the synthesized catalysts in hydrogenation of bicyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was studied, and the composition and structure of active phase nanoparticles were determined.

  7. Probing the promiscuous active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase using synthetic substrates, homology modeling, and active site modification.

    PubMed

    Daniellou, Richard; Zheng, Hongyan; Langill, David M; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2007-06-26

    The active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase (IDH, EC 1.1.1.18) from Bacillus subtilis recognizes a variety of mono- and disaccharides, as well as 1l-4-O-substituted inositol derivatives. It catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the axial alcohol of these substrates with comparable kinetic constants. We have found that 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol does not act as a substrate for IDH, in contrast to structurally similar compounds such as those bearing substituted benzyl substituents in the same position. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol and 4-O-(2-naphthyl)methyl-myo-inositol, which is a substrate for IDH, shows a distinct difference in the preferred conformation of the aryl substituent. Conformational analysis of known substrates of IDH suggests that this conformational difference may account for the difference in reactivity of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol in the presence of IDH. A sequence alignment of IDH with the homologous glucose-fructose oxidoreductase allowed the construction of an homology model of inositol dehydrogenase, to which NADH and 4-O-benzyl-scyllo-inosose were docked and the active site energy minimized. The active site model is consistent with all experimental results and suggests that a conserved tyrosine-glycine-tyrosine motif forms the hydrophobic pocket adjoining the site of inositol recognition. Y233F and Y235F retain activity, while Y233R and Y235R do not. A histidine-aspartate pair, H176 and D172, are proposed to act as a dyad in which H176 is the active site acid/base. The enzyme is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate, and the mutants H176A and D172N show a marked loss of activity. Kinetic isotope effect experiments with D172N indicate that chemistry is rate-determining for this mutant.

  8. The active site structure and mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Arginine specific reagents showed irreversible inhibition of avian liver mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Potent protection against modification was elicited by CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} in the presence of other substrates. Labeling of enzyme with (7-{sup 14}C) phenylglyoxal showed that 1 or 2 arginines are involved in CO{sub 2} binding and activation. Peptide map studies showed this active site arginine residues is located at position 289. Histidine specific reagents showed pseudo first order inhibition of avian mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity. The best protection against modification was elicited by IDP or IDP and Mn{sup +2}. One histidine residue is at or near the phosphoenolpyruvate binding site as demonstrated in the increased absorbance at 240 nm and proton relaxation rate studies. Circular dichroism studies reveal that enzyme structure was perturbed by diethylpyrocarbonate modification. Metal binding studies suggest that this enzyme has only one metal binding site. The putative binding sites from several GTP and phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes are observed in P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase from different species.

  9. A coupled, pore-scale model for methanogenic microbial activity in underground hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebigbo, Anozie; Golfier, Fabrice; Quintard, Michel

    2013-11-01

    Underground hydrogen storage (UHS) as a means of energy storage is an efficient way of compensating for seasonal fluctuations in the availability of energy. One important factor which influences this technology is the activity of methanogenic microorganisms capable of utilising hydrogen and carbon dioxide for metabolism and leading to a change in the stored gas composition. A coupled, pore-scale model is presented which aids in the investigation of the mechanisms that govern the conversion of hydrogen to methane, i.e. advective hydrogen flow, its diffusion into microbial biofilms of multiple species, and its consumption within these biofilms. The model assumes that spherical grains are coated by a film of residual water and treats the biofilm development within each film in a quasi one-dimensional manner. A sample simulation using the presented model illustrates the biofilm growth process in these films as well as the competition between three different microbial species: methanogens, acetogens, and acetotrophs.

  10. Pilot Study to Evaluate Hydrogen Injection for Stimulating Reduction and Immobilization of Uranium in Groundwater at an ISR Mining Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, L. W.; Cabezas, J.; Gamboa, Y.; Fernandez, W.

    2011-12-01

    State and federal regulations require that groundwater at in-situ recovery (ISR) uranium mining operations be restored to pre-mining conditions. Reverse osmosis (RO) filtration of several pore volumes of the post-leached groundwater and reinjection of the clean permeate is the most common technology currently used for restoring groundwater at uranium ISR sites. However, this approach does not revert the formation back to its initial reducing conditions, which can potentially impede timely groundwater restoration. In-situ biostimulation of indigenous iron- and sulfate reducing bacteria by injection of organic electron donors (e.g., ethanol, acetate, and lactate) to promote soluble uranium reduction and immobilization has been the subject of previous studies. However, injection of organic substrates has been observed to cause aquifer clogging near the injection point. In addition, U(VI) solubility may be enhanced through complexation with carbonate generated by organic carbon oxidation. An alternative approach that may overcome these problems involves the use of hydrogen as a reductant to promote microbial reduction and immobilization of U(VI) in situ. To test this approach, approximately 100,000 scf of compressed hydrogen gas was injected into a leached unconsolidated sand zone over two months at an ISR mining site. During this time groundwater was recirculated between injection and extraction wells (separated by 130 ft) at a rate of about 40 gpm and bromide was coinjected as a conservative tracer. A well monitoring program has been executed since June 2009 to evaluate the performance of the hydrogen injection. Current results show that U(VI) has been reduced from 4.2 to 0.05 ppm in the area surrounding the injection well and to 2.0 ± 0.3 ppm in the area surrounding the extraction well and two intermediate monitoring wells. Other water quality changes near the injection well include significant decreases in concentrations of Mo, sulfate, Fe, Mn, bicarbonate, Ca

  11. Designing Photocatalysts for Hydrogen Evolution: Are Complex Preparation Strategies Necessary to Produce Active Catalysts?

    PubMed

    Grewe, Tobias; Tüysüz, Harun

    2015-09-21

    A facile synthetic route for the preparation of highly active photocatalysts was developed. The protocol involves the preparation of a photocatalyst through the direct injection of metal alkoxide precursors into solutions in a photoreactor. As a proof of concept, a tantalum oxide based photocatalyst was chosen as a model system. Tantalum ethoxide [Ta(OEt)5 ] was injected rapidly into a photoreactor filled with a water/methanol mixture, and a TaOx (OH)y composite formed and was able to produce hydrogen under light illumination. Compared to commercial and mesostructured Ta2 O5 and NaTaO3 materials, TaOx (OH)y produced by direct injection shows superior hydrogen production activity. Notably, the samples prepared by direct injection are amorphous; however, their photocatalytic performance is much higher than those of their crystalline equivalents. If Ta(OEt)5 was dispersed in methanol before injection, an amorphous framework with higher surface area and larger pore volume was formed, and the hydrogen production rate increased further. The addition of a sodium precursor during the injection further boosted the photocatalytic activity. Furthermore, this concept has also been applied to a titanium-based photocatalyst, and a much better hydrogen production rate has been obtained in comparison with that of commercial TiO2 (P25-Degussa); therefore, the direct-injection synthesis is a flexible method that opens the door to the facile preparation of highly active nanostructured photocatalysts for hydrogen production.

  12. Nanoscale nickel oxide/nickel heterostructures for active hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ming; Zhou, Wu; Tsai, Mon-Che; Zhou, Jigang; Guan, Mingyun; Lin, Meng-Chang; Zhang, Bo; Hu, Yongfeng; Wang, Di-Yan; Yang, Jiang; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Dai, Hongjie

    2014-08-01

    Active, stable and cost-effective electrocatalysts are a key to water splitting for hydrogen production through electrolysis or photoelectrochemistry. Here we report nanoscale nickel oxide/nickel heterostructures formed on carbon nanotube sidewalls as highly effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction with activity similar to platinum. Partially reduced nickel interfaced with nickel oxide results from thermal decomposition of nickel hydroxide precursors bonded to carbon nanotube sidewalls. The metal ion-carbon nanotube interactions impede complete reduction and Ostwald ripening of nickel species into the less hydrogen evolution reaction active pure nickel phase. A water electrolyzer that achieves ~20 mA cm-2 at a voltage of 1.5 V, and which may be operated by a single-cell alkaline battery, is fabricated using cheap, non-precious metal-based electrocatalysts.

  13. Hydrogen program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gronich, S.

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  14. Active hydrogen species on TiO2 for photocatalytic H2 production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zongfang; Zhang, Wenhua; Xiong, Feng; Yuan, Qing; Jin, Yuekang; Yang, Jinlong; Huang, Weixin

    2014-04-21

    Photocatalytic H2 production over TiO2 has attracted tremendous attention and achieved great progress, but the active hydrogen species is still unknown. Employing a rutile TiO2(110) surface as a model catalyst we report here for the first time the direct observation of photocatalytic H2 production under ultrahigh vacuum conditions during UV-light irradiation at 115 K and the identification of negatively-charged hydride-type H-Ti species as the corresponding photoactive surface species by means of thermal desorption spectroscopy, photon-stimulated desorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and DFT calculations. The formation and stability of H-Ti species are closely related to available surplus electrons on the rutile TiO2(110) surface that can be created by the formation of surface BBO vacancies or by the formation of surface hydroxyls via the adsorption of atomic H or molecular H2 on O sites. The photocatalytic H2 production from H-Ti species is hole-mediated and co-existing water exerts a negative effect on this process.

  15. Cobalt-doped graphitic carbon nitride photocatalysts with high activity for hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pei-Wen; Li, Kui; Yu, Yu-Xiang; Zhang, Wei-De

    2017-01-01

    Cobalt-doped graphitic carbon nitride (Cosbnd CN) was synthesized by one-step thermal polycondensation using cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) and melamine as precursors. The π-π interaction between melamine and CoPc promotes cobalt doping into the framework of g-C3N4. The prepared samples were carefully characterized and the results demonstrated that Co-doped graphitic carbon nitride inhibited the crystal growth of graphitic carbon nitride (CN), leading to larger specific surface area (33.1 m2 g-1) and abundant Co-Nx active sites, narrower band gap energy and more efficient separation of photogenerated electrons and holes. 0.46% Cosbnd CN exhibited higher hydrogen evolution rate (28.0 μmol h-1) under visible light irradiation, which is about 3.0 times of that over the pure CN and about 2.2 times of that over cobalt-doped CN using CoCl2 • 6H2O as a cobalt source. This study provides a valuable strategy to modify CN with enhanced photocatalytic performance.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide activates cell death and defense gene expression in birch.

    PubMed

    Pellinen, Riikka I; Korhonen, Minna-Sisko; Tauriainen, Airi A; Palva, E Tapio; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2002-10-01

    The function of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as a signal molecule regulating gene expression and cell death induced by external stresses was studied in birch (Betula pendula). Ozone (O(3)), Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae (Pss), and wounding all induced cell death of various extents in birch leaves. This was temporally preceded and closely accompanied by H(2)O(2) accumulation at, and especially surrounding, the lesion sites. O(3) and Pss, along with an artificial H(2)O(2) producing system glucose (Glc)/Glc oxidase, elicited elevated mRNA levels corresponding to genes encoding reactive oxygen species detoxifying enzymes, Pal, Ypr10, and mitochondrial phosphate translocator 1. In addition to the regulation of gene expression, Glc/Glc oxidase also induced endogenous H(2)O(2) production in birch leaves, accompanied by cell death that resembled O(3) and Pss damage. Wound-induced gene expression differed from that induced by O(3) and Pss. Thus, it appears that at least two separate defense pathways can be activated in birch leaves by stress factors, even though the early H(2)O(2) accumulation response is common among them all.

  17. Metallic Iron-Nickel Sulfide Ultrathin Nanosheets As a Highly Active Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Acidic Media.

    PubMed

    Long, Xia; Li, Guixia; Wang, Zilong; Zhu, HouYu; Zhang, Teng; Xiao, Shuang; Guo, Wenyue; Yang, Shihe

    2015-09-23

    We report on the synthesis of iron-nickel sulfide (INS) ultrathin nanosheets by topotactic conversion from a hydroxide precursor. The INS nanosheets exhibit excellent activity and stability in strong acidic solutions as a hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalyst, lending an attractive alternative to the Pt catalyst. The metallic α-INS nanosheets show an even lower overpotential of 105 mV at 10 mA/cm(2) and a smaller Tafel slope of 40 mV/dec. With the help of DFT calculations, the high specific surface area, facile ion transport and charge transfer, abundant electrochemical active sites, suitable H(+) adsorption, and H2 formation kinetics and energetics are proposed to contribute to the high activity of the INS ultrathin nanosheets toward HER.

  18. Shape-dependent photocatalytic hydrogen evolution activity over a Pt nanoparticle coupled g-C3N4 photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shaowen; Jiang, Jing; Zhu, Bicheng; Yu, Jiaguo

    2016-07-28

    Cubic, octahedral and spherical platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (NPs) ex situ supported on a graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) substrate are synthesized using a colloidal adsorption-deposition method for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution reactions. These Pt NPs of different shapes have similar sizes of around 10 nm but have different facets exposed. It is found that the visible-light-driven photocatalytic activities for the Pt/g-C3N4 hybrid photocatalysts follow the order as: cubic Pt/g-C3N4 < octahedral Pt/g-C3N4 < spherical Pt/g-C3N4, revealing the significant cocatalyst shape-sensitive photocatalytic activity in the Pt/g-C3N4 hybrids. This is mainly due to the different surface atomic structures of different exposed facets of Pt NPs, which lead to the disparity of active sites and adsorption energies in photocatalytic reactions.

  19. Site-directed mutagenesis of an alkaline phytase: influencing specificity, activity and stability in acidic milieu.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thuy T; Mamo, Gashaw; Búxo, Laura; Le, Nhi N; Gaber, Yasser; Mattiasson, Bo; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2011-07-10

    Site-directed mutagenesis of a thermostable alkaline phytase from Bacillus sp. MD2 was performed with an aim to increase its specific activity and activity and stability in an acidic environment. The mutation sites are distributed on the catalytic surface of the enzyme (P257R, E180N, E229V and S283R) and in the active site (K77R, K179R and E227S). Selection of the residues was based on the idea that acid active phytases are more positively charged around their catalytic surfaces. Thus, a decrease in the content of negatively charged residues or an increase in the positive charges in the catalytic region of an alkaline phytase was assumed to influence the enzyme activity and stability at low pH. Moreover, widening of the substrate-binding pocket is expected to improve the hydrolysis of substrates that are not efficiently hydrolysed by wild type alkaline phytase. Analysis of the phytase variants revealed that E229V and S283R mutants increased the specific activity by about 19% and 13%, respectively. Mutation of the active site residues K77R and K179R led to severe reduction in the specific activity of the enzyme. Analysis of the phytase mutant-phytate complexes revealed increase in hydrogen bonding between the enzyme and the substrate, which might retard the release of the product, resulting in decreased activity. On the other hand, the double mutant (K77R-K179R) phytase showed higher stability at low pH (pH 2.6-3.0). The E227S variant was optimally active at pH 5.5 (in contrast to the wild type enzyme that had an optimum pH of 6) and it exhibited higher stability in acidic condition. This mutant phytase, displayed over 80% of its initial activity after 3h incubation at pH 2.6 while the wild type phytase retained only about 40% of its original activity. Moreover, the relative activity of this mutant phytase on calcium phytate, sodium pyrophosphate and p-nitro phenyl phosphate was higher than that of the wild type phytase.

  20. Key Role of Active-Site Water Molecules in Bacteriorhodopsin Proton-Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, A.N.; Baudry, Jerome Y; Suhai, Sandor; Fischer, S.; Smith, Jeremy C

    2008-10-01

    The functional mechanism of the light-driven proton pump protein bacteriorhodopsin depends on the location of water molecules in the active site at various stages of the photocycle and on their roles in the proton-transfer steps. Here, free energy computations indicate that electrostatic interactions favor the presence of a cytoplasmic-side water molecule hydrogen bonding to the retinal Schiff base in the state preceding proton transfer from the retinal Schiff base to Asp85. However, the nonequilibrium nature of the pumping process means that the probability of occupancy of a water molecule in a given site depends both on the free energies of insertion of the water molecule in this and other sites during the preceding photocycle steps and on the kinetic accessibility of these sites on the time scale of the reaction steps. The presence of the cytoplasmic-side water molecule has a dramatic effect on the mechanism of proton transfer: the proton is channeled on the Thr89 side of the retinal, whereas the transfer on the Asp212 side is hindered. Reaction-path simulations and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the presence of the cytoplasmic-side water molecule permits a low-energy bacteriorhodopsin conformer in which the water molecule bridges the twisted retinal Schiff base and the proton acceptor Asp85. From this low-energy conformer, proton transfer occurs via a concerted mechanism in which the water molecule participates as an intermediate proton carrier.

  1. Mapping of the Allosteric Site in Cholesterol Hydroxylase CYP46A1 for Efavirenz, a Drug That Stimulates Enzyme Activity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kyle W; Mast, Natalia; Hudgens, Jeffrey W; Lin, Joseph B; Turko, Illarion V; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2016-05-27

    Cytochrome P450 46A1 (CYP46A1) is a microsomal enzyme and cholesterol 24-hydroxylase that controls cholesterol elimination from the brain. This P450 is also a potential target for Alzheimer disease because it can be activated pharmacologically by some marketed drugs, as exemplified by efavirenz, the anti-HIV medication. Previously, we suggested that pharmaceuticals activate CYP46A1 allosterically through binding to a site on the cytosolic protein surface, which is different from the enzyme active site facing the membrane. Here we identified this allosteric site for efavirenz on CYP46A1 by using a combination of hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to MS, computational modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, and analysis of the CYP46A1 crystal structure. We also mapped the binding region for the CYP46A1 redox partner oxidoreductase and found that the allosteric and redox partner binding sites share a common border. On the basis of the data obtained, we propose the mechanism of CYP46A1 allostery and the pathway for the signal transmission from the P450 allosteric site to the active site.

  2. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity of MoS(x) on TCNQ-treated electrode for hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yung-Huang; Nikam, Revannath D; Lin, Cheng-Te; Huang, Jing-Kai; Tseng, Chien-Chih; Hsu, Chang-Lung; Cheng, Chia-Chin; Su, Ching-Yuan; Li, Lain-Jong; Chua, Daniel H C

    2014-10-22

    Molybdenum sulfide has recently attracted much attention because of its low cost and excellent catalytical effects in the application of hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). To improve the HER efficiency, many researchers have extensively explored various avenues such as material modification, forming hybrid structures or modifying geometric morphology. In this work, we reported a significant enhancement in the electrocatalytic activity of the MoSx via growing on Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) treated carbon cloth, where the MoSx was synthesized by thermolysis from the ammonium tetrathiomolybdate ((NH4)2MoS4) precursor at 170 °C. The pyridinic N- and graphitic N-like species on the surface of carbon cloth arising from the TCNQ treatment facilitate the formation of Mo(5+) and S2(2-) species in the MoSx, especially with S2(2-) serving as an active site for HER. In addition, the smaller particle size of the MoSx grown on TCNQ-treated carbon cloth reveals a high ratio of edge sites relative to basal plane sites, indicating the richer effective reaction sites and superior electrocatalytic characteristics. Hence, we reported a high hydrogen evolution rate for MoSx on TCNQ-treated carbon cloth of 6408 mL g(-1) cm(-2) h(-1) (286 mmol g(-1) cm(-2) h(-1)) at an overpotential of V = 0.2 V. This study provides the fundamental concepts useful in the design and preparation of transition metal dichalcogenide catalysts, beneficial in the development in clean energy.

  3. Hydrogen sites in A/sub 2/BH/sub y/ (A = Ca, Sr, Eu; B = Ir, Rh, Ru)

    SciTech Connect

    Westlake, D.G.

    1984-06-01

    A geometric model has been applied to the A/sub 2/BH/sub y/ hydrides (deuterides), Eu/sub 2/IrD/sub 5/, Ca/sub 2/IrH/sub 5/, Sr/sub 2/IrD/sub 5/, Ca/sub 2/RhH/sub 5/, Sr/sub 2/RhH/sub 5/, Ca/sub 2/RuH/sub 6/ and Sr/sub 2/RuD/sub 6/, none of which can be synthesized directly by reaction of hydrogen (deuterium) gas with an A/sub 2/B compound. Hole radii and intersite distances were calculated for the two types of interstices in each compound. Ther are two very large cubical interstices per formula unit. These are coordinated by eight atoms of type A, but they must remain unoccupied in A/sub 2/BH/sub y/ with y = 5 (or 6), because of their proximity to the square pyramidal interstices, of which there are six per formula unit. The geometric model allows rationalization of the occupation of these pyramidal sites. Despite the very significant chemical differences between the compounds considered here and those for which the model was initially developed, the present results showed no inconsistency with geometric criteria requiring that occupied interstices in stable hydrides have minimum hole radii of 0.40 Angstrom and minimum hydrogen-hydrogen distances of 2.10 Angstrom. Published results indicate that the seemingly related compound Mg/sub 2/NiD/sub 4/ does not conform to these empirical rules, and this case is discussed.

  4. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Silicate Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts [1-3]. Nevertheless, among those structures K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. In this study, the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars were investigated in closer details. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. We give a potential explanation of the increased ice nucleation activity of K-feldspar. The ice nucleating sites are very much dependent on the alkali ion present by altering the water structure and the feldspar surface. The higher activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to the presence of potassium ions on the surface and surface bilayer. The alkali-ions have different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar. Chaotropic behavior of Calcium and Sodium ions are lowering the ice nucleation potential of the other feldspars, while kosmotropic Potassium has a neutral or even positive effect. Furthermore we investigated the influence of milling onto the ice nucleation of quartz particles. The ice nucleation activity can be increased by mechanical milling, by introducing more molecular, nucleation active defects to the particle surface. This effect is larger than expected by plane surface increase. [1] Atkinson et al. The Importance of Feldspar for Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust in Mixed-Phase Clouds. Nature 2013, 498, 355-358. [2] Yakobi-Hancock et al.. Feldspar Minerals as Efficient Deposition Ice Nuclei. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2013, 13, 11175-11185. [3] Zolles et al. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015 accepted.

  5. Catalase activity of cytochrome C oxidase assayed with hydrogen peroxide-sensitive electrode microsensor.

    PubMed

    Bolshakov, I A; Vygodina, T V; Gennis, R; Karyakin, A A; Konstantinov, A A

    2010-11-01

    An iron-hexacyanide-covered microelectrode sensor has been used to continuously monitor the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition catalyzed by oxidized cytochrome oxidase. At cytochrome oxidase concentration ~1 µM, the catalase activity behaves as a first order process with respect to peroxide at concentrations up to ~300-400 µM and is fully blocked by heat inactivation of the enzyme. The catalase (or, rather, pseudocatalase) activity of bovine cytochrome oxidase is characterized by a second order rate constant of ~2·10(2) M(-1)·sec(-1) at pH 7.0 and room temperature, which, when divided by the number of H2O2 molecules disappearing in one catalytic turnover (between 2 and 3), agrees reasonably well with the second order rate constant for H2O2-dependent conversion of the oxidase intermediate F(I)-607 to F(II)-580. Accordingly, the catalase activity of bovine oxidase may be explained by H2O2 procession in the oxygen-reducing center of the enzyme yielding superoxide radicals. Much higher specific rates of H2O2 decomposition are observed with preparations of the bacterial cytochrome c oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The observed second order rate constants (up to ~3000 M(-1)·sec(-1)) exceed the rate constant of peroxide binding with the oxygen-reducing center of the oxidized enzyme (~500 M(-1)·sec(-1)) several-fold and therefore cannot be explained by catalytic reaction in the a(3)/Cu(B) site of the enzyme. It is proposed that in the bacterial oxidase, H2O2 can be decomposed by reacting with the adventitious transition metal ions bound by the polyhistidine-tag present in the enzyme, or by virtue of reaction with the tightly-bound Mn2+, which in the bacterial enzyme substitutes for Mg2+ present in the mitochondrial oxidase.

  6. Face the Edges: Catalytic Active Sites of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Edges are special sites in nanomaterials. The atoms residing on the edges have different environments compared to those in other parts of a nanomaterial and, therefore, they may have different properties. Here, recent progress in nanomaterial fields is summarized from the viewpoint of the edges. Typically, edge sites in MoS2 or metals, other than surface atoms, can perform as active centers for catalytic reactions, so the method to enhance performance lies in the optimization of the edge structures. The edges of multicomponent interfaces present even more possibilities to enhance the activities of nanomaterials. Nanoframes and ultrathin nanowires have similarities to conventional edges of nanoparticles, the application of which as catalysts can help to reduce the use of costly materials. Looking beyond this, the edge structures of graphene are also essential for their properties. In short, the edge structure can influence many properties of materials. PMID:27980960

  7. A rhodium/silicon co-electrocatalyst design concept to surpass platinum hydrogen evolution activity at high overpotentials

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lili; Lin, Haiping; Li, Youyong; Liao, Fan; Lifshitz, Yeshayahu; Sheng, Minqi; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Shao, Mingwang

    2016-01-01

    Currently, platinum-based electrocatalysts show the best performance for hydrogen evolution. All hydrogen evolution reaction catalysts should however obey Sabatier's principle, that is, the adsorption energy of hydrogen to the catalyst surface should be neither too high nor too low to balance between hydrogen adsorption and desorption. To overcome the limitation of this principle, here we choose a composite (rhodium/silicon nanowire) catalyst, in which hydrogen adsorption occurs on rhodium with a large adsorption energy while hydrogen evolution occurs on silicon with a small adsorption energy. We show that the composite is stable with better hydrogen evolution activity than rhodium nanoparticles and even exceeding those of commercial platinum/carbon at high overpotentials. The results reveal that silicon plays a key role in the electrocatalysis. This work may thus open the door for the design and fabrication of electrocatalysts for high-efficiency electric energy to hydrogen energy conversion. PMID:27447292

  8. Determining the Effect of Growth Rate on Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation of Algal Lipids in Two North Pacific Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfshorndl, M.; Sachs, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical hydrologic changes have a large effect on global climate, but there does not yet exist a good indicator of rainfall variation in the tropics. Understanding past natural variability of such features as the Intertropical Convergence Zone and El Niño Southern Oscillation provides information about the extent of anthropogenic climate change today. The hydrogen isotopic composition (D/H ratio) of algal lipids has been shown to track the isotopic composition of source water in which the organism grew, providing information about precipitation variability over time. However, culture work has revealed that environmental factors such as salinity, temperature, growth rate, and irradiance also influence algal lipid D/H ratios. Here I present work determining the effect of growth rate and irradiance on the hydrogen isotope composition of alkenone-producing algae in the water column in two North Pacific locations, off the coast of Oregon and near the Hawaii Ocean Time Series site. This work corroborates empirical relationships observed in culture studies and indicates that the effects of growth rate and irradiance should be taken into account when applying the D/H isotope ratio rainfall proxy to reconstruct past climates.

  9. Iron corrosion activity of anaerobic hydrogen-consuming microorganisms isolated from oil facilities.

    PubMed

    Mori, Koji; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that anaerobic hydrogen-consuming microorganisms generally promote iron corrosion. We isolated 26 hydrogen-consuming microorganisms (acetogens, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and methanogens) from oil facilities in Japan using hydrogen as an electron donor. The iron corrosion activities of these microorganisms were examined using iron (Fe0) granules as the sole electron donor. Almost all the isolates consumed hydrogen that was chemically generated from iron granules but did not induce significant iron corrosion. The amount of corroded iron in the cultures of these organisms was less than 2-fold that in an abiotic chemical corrosion reaction. These results indicated that hydrogen consumption did not strongly stimulate iron corrosion. On the other hand, one isolate, namely, Methanococcus maripaludis Mic1c10, considerably corroded iron: this phenomenon was not accompanied by hydrogen consumption, methane formation, or cell growth. This finding also provided strong evidence that M. maripaludis Mic1c10 produced some material that caused iron to corrode.

  10. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  11. Micro-grid for on-site wind-and-hydrogen powered generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suskis, P.; Andreiciks, A.; Steiks, I.; Krievs, O.; Kleperis, J.

    2014-02-01

    The authors propose a micro-grid for autonomous wind-and-hydrogen power generation thus replacing such traditional fossil-fuelled equipment as domestic diesel generators, gas micro-turbines, etc. In the proposed microgrid the excess of electrical energy from a wind turbine is spent on electrolytic production of hydrogen which is then stored under low-pressure in absorbing composite material. The electrolyser has a non-traditional feeding unit and electrode coatings. The proposed DC/DC conversion topologies for different micro-grid nodes are shown to be well-designed. The prototypes elaborated for the converters and hydrogen storage media were tested and have demonstrated a good performance. Rakstā piedāvātā mikrotīkla izpēte ir veikta ar mērķi izstrādāt autonomu, uz vēja un ūdeņraža enerģiju balstītu elektroapgādes sistēmu, kas varētu aizvietot tradicionālās fosilā kurināmā sistēmas, piemēram, mājsaimniecību dīzeļa ģeneratorus, gāzes mikroturbīnas u.c. Mikrotīkla elektroapgādes sistēmā vēja agregāta saražotā elektroenerģija tiek pārveidota atbilstoši standarta maiņsprieguma elektroapgādes parametriem un piegādāta slodzei. Pārpalikusī enerģija tiek pārveidota un uzkrāta ūdeņraža formā, izmantojot elektrolīzes iekārtu un kompozītmateriālu uzkrājēju. Ja pieejamā vēja enerģija nenosedz slodzes enerģijas patēriņu, elektroenerģijas padeves funkciju ar atbilstoša energoelektronikas pārveidotāja palīdzību pārņem ūdeņraža degvielas elements. Ja, savukārt, slodzei nav nepieciešama enerģija, no vēja saražoto enerģiju izmanto elektrolīzes iekārta un tā tiek uzkrāta ūdeņraža formā, atbilstoši uzkrājēja ietilpībai. Piedāvātajā mikrotīklā ir izmantota elektrolīzes iekārta ar netradicionāliem elektrodu pārklājumiem un barošanas bloku, kā arī zemspiediena kompozītmateriālu ūdeņraža uzkrājējs. Galvenie mikrotīkla elektriskās enerģijas pārveidošanas mezgli ir

  12. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  13. Nest predation increases with parental activity: separating nest site and parental activity effects.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T E; Scott, J; Menge, C

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection. PMID:11413645

  14. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  15. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  16. [Mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2012-04-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent for inhibiting arginine-auxotrophic tumors (such as melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas) in phase III clinical trials. In this work, we studied the molecular mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutation sites, A128, H404 and 1410, were introduced into wild-type ADI gene by QuikChange site-directed mutagenesis method, and four ADI mutants M1 (A128T), M2 (H404R), M3 (I410L), and M4 (A128T, H404R) were obtained. The ADI mutants were individually expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the enzymatic properties of the purified mutant proteins were determined. The results show that both A128T and H404R had enhanced optimum pH, higher activity and stability of ADI under physiological condition (pH 7.4), as well as reduced K(m) value. This study provides an insight into the molecular mechanism of the ADI activity, and also the experimental evidence for the rational protein evolution in the future.

  17. Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Terrence J.; Horwitz, Colin

    2004-11-12

    A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline

  18. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J.; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  19. Hydrogen Bonds between Nitrogen Donors and the Semiquinone in the Qi-site of the bc1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Dikanov, Sergei A.; Holland, J. Todd; Endeward, Burkhard; Kolling, Derrick R. J.; Samoilova, Rimma I.; Prisner, Thomas F.; Antony R., Crofts

    2011-01-01

    The ubisemiquinone stabilized at the Qi-site of the bc1 complex of Rhodobacter sphaeroides forms a hydrogen bond with a nitrogen from the local protein environment, tentatively identified as ring N from His-217. The interactions of 14N and 15N have been studied by X-band (~9.7 GHz) and S-band (3.4 GHz) pulsed EPR spectroscopy. The application of S-band spectroscopy has allowed us to determine the complete nuclear quadrupole tensor of the 14N involved in H-bond formation and to assign it unambiguously to the Nε of His-217. This tensor has distinct characteristics in comparison with H-bonds between semiquinones and Nδ in other quinone-processing sites. The experiments with 15N showed that the Nε of His-217 was the only nitrogen carrying any considerable unpaired spin density in the ubiquinone environment, and allowed calculation of the isotropic and anisotropic couplings with the Nε of His-217. From these data, we could estimate the unpaired spin density transferred onto 2s and 2p orbitals of nitrogen and the distance from the nitrogen to the carbonyl oxygen of 2.38 ± 0.13Å. The hyperfine coupling of other protein nitrogens with semiquinone is <0.1 MHz. This did not exclude the nitrogen of the Asn-221 as a possible hydrogen bond donor to the methoxy oxygen of the semiquinone. A mechanistic role for this residue is supported by kinetic experiments with mutant strains N221T, N221H, N221I, N221S, N221P, and N221D, all of which showed some inhibition but retained partial turnover. PMID:17616531

  20. Kinetics studies of d-glucose hydrogenation over activated charcoal supported platinum catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Muthanna J.

    2012-02-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic hydrogenation of d-glucose to produce d-sorbitol was studied in a three-phase laboratory scale reactor. The hydrogenation reactions were performed on activated charcoal supported platinum catalyst in the temperature range 25-65°C and in a constant pressure of 1 atm. The kinetic data were modeled by zero, first and second-order reaction equations. In the operating regimes studied, the results show that the hydrogenation reaction was of a first order with respect to d-glucose concentration. Also the activation energy of the reaction was determined, and found to be 12.33 kJ mole-1. A set of experiment was carried out to test the deactivation of the catalyst, and the results show that the deactivation is slow with the ability of using the catalyst for several times with a small decrease in product yield.

  1. Nanoconfinement in activated mesoporous carbon of calcium borohydride for improved reversible hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Comănescu, Cezar; Capurso, Giovanni; Maddalena, Amedeo

    2012-09-28

    Mesoporous carbon frameworks were synthesized using the soft-template method. Ca(BH(4))(2) was incorporated into activated mesoporous carbon by the incipient wetness method. The activation of mesoporous carbon was necessary to optimize the surface area and pore size. Thermal programmed absorption measurements showed that the confinement of this borohydride into carbon nanoscaffolds improved its reversible capacity (relative to the reactive portion) and performance of hydrogen storage compared to unsupported borohydride. Hydrogen release from the supported hydride started at a temperature as low as 100 °C and the dehydrogenation rate was fast compared to the bulk borohydride. In addition, the hydrogen pressure necessary to regenerate the borohydride from the dehydrogenation products was reduced.

  2. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on antioxidant enzyme activities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is strain-specific.

    PubMed

    Bayliak, M; Semchyshyn, H; Lushchak, V

    2006-09-01

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the survival and activity of antioxidant and associated enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been studied. A difference found in the response of wild-type yeast strains treated with hydrogen peroxide was probably related to the different protective effects of antioxidant enzymes in these strains. Exposure of wild-type YPH250 cells to 0.25 mM H(2)O(2) for 30 min increased activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) by 3.4- and 2-fold, respectively. However, no activation of catalase in the EG103 strain, as well as of SOD in the YPH98 and EG103 wild strains was detected, which was in parallel to lower survival of these strains under oxidative stress. There is a strong positive correlation (R(2) = 0.95) between activities of catalase and SOD in YPH250 cells treated with different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. It is conceivable that catalase would protect SOD against inactivation caused by oxidative stress and vice versa. Finally, yeast cell treatment with hydrogen peroxide can lead to either a H(2)O(2)-induced increase in activities of antioxidant and associated enzymes or their decrease depending on the H(2)O(20 concentration used or the yeast strain specificity.

  3. Coral-Shaped MoS2 Decorated with Graphene Quantum Dots Performing as a Highly Active Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bangjun; Yu, Ke; Li, Honglin; Qi, Ruijuan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Song, Haili; Tang, Zheng; Zhu, Ziqiang; Chen, Mingwei

    2017-02-01

    We report a new CVD method to prepare coral-shaped monolayer MoS2 with a large amount of exposed edge sites for catalyzing hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrocatalytic activities of the coral-shaped MoS2 can be further enhanced by electronic band engineering via decorated with graphene quantum dot (GQD) decoration. Generally, GQDs improve the electrical conductivity of the MoS2 electrocatalyst. First-principles calculations suggest that the coral MoS2@GQD is a zero-gap material. The high electric conductivity and pronounced catalytically active sites give the hybrid catalyst outstanding electrocatalytic performance with a small onset overpotential of 95 mV and a low Tafel slope of 40 mV/dec as well as excellent long-term electrocatalytic stability. The present work provides a potential way to design two-dimensional hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts through controlling the shape and modulating the electric conductivity.

  4. MSK1 activity is controlled by multiple phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    McCOY, Claire E.; Campbell, David G.; Deak, Maria; Bloomberg, Graham B.; Arthur, J. Simon C.

    2004-01-01

    MSK1 (mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase) is a kinase activated in cells downstream of both the ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades. In the present study, we show that, in addition to being phosphorylated on Thr-581 and Ser-360 by ERK1/2 or p38, MSK1 can autophosphorylate on at least six sites: Ser-212, Ser-376, Ser-381, Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758. Of these sites, the N-terminal T-loop residue Ser-212 and the ‘hydrophobic motif’ Ser-376 are phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain of MSK1, and their phosphorylation is essential for the catalytic activity of the N-terminal kinase domain of MSK1 and therefore for the phosphorylation of MSK1 substrates in vitro. Ser-381 is also phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain, and mutation of Ser-381 decreases MSK1 activity, probably through the inhibition of Ser-376 phosphorylation. Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758 are phosphorylated by the N-terminal kinase domain; however, their function is not known. The activation of MSK1 in cells therefore requires the activation of the ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK cascades and does not appear to require additional signalling inputs. This is in contrast with the closely related RSK (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase) proteins, whose activity requires phosphorylation by PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1) in addition to phosphorylation by ERK1/2. PMID:15568999

  5. Crystallographic Analysis of Active Site Contributions to Regiospecificity in the Diiron Enzyme Toluene 4-Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Lucas J.; Acheson, Justin F.; McCoy, Jason G.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Fox, Brian G.

    2014-10-02

    Crystal structures of toluene 4-monooxygenase hydroxylase in complex with reaction products and effector protein reveal active site interactions leading to regiospecificity. Complexes with phenolic products yield an asymmetric {mu}-phenoxo-bridged diiron center and a shift of diiron ligand E231 into a hydrogen bonding position with conserved T201. In contrast, complexes with inhibitors p-NH{sub 2}-benzoate and p-Br-benzoate showed a {mu}-1,1 coordination of carboxylate oxygen between the iron atoms and only a partial shift in the position of E231. Among active site residues, F176 trapped the aromatic ring of products against a surface of the active site cavity formed by G103, E104 and A107, while F196 positioned the aromatic ring against this surface via a {pi}-stacking interaction. The proximity of G103 and F176 to the para substituent of the substrate aromatic ring and the structure of G103L T4moHD suggest how changes in regiospecificity arise from mutations at G103. Although effector protein binding produced significant shifts in the positions of residues along the outer portion of the active site (T201, N202, and Q228) and in some iron ligands (E231 and E197), surprisingly minor shifts (<1 {angstrom}) were produced in F176, F196, and other interior residues of the active site. Likewise, products bound to the diiron center in either the presence or absence of effector protein did not significantly shift the position of the interior residues, suggesting that positioning of the cognate substrates will not be strongly influenced by effector protein binding. Thus, changes in product distributions in the absence of the effector protein are proposed to arise from differences in rates of chemical steps of the reaction relative to motion of substrates within the active site channel of the uncomplexed, less efficient enzyme, while structural changes in diiron ligand geometry associated with cycling between diferrous and diferric states are discussed for their potential

  6. Enhanced hydrogenation activity and diastereomeric interactions of methyl pyruvate co-adsorbed with R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine on Pd(111)

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Mausumi; Burkholder, Luke; Garvey, Michael; Bai, Yun; Saldin, Dilano K.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2016-01-01

    Unmodified racemic sites on heterogeneous chiral catalysts reduce their overall enantioselectivity, but this effect is mitigated in the Orito reaction (methyl pyruvate (MP) hydrogenation to methyl lactate) by an increased hydrogenation reactivity. Here, this effect is explored on a R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine (NEA)-modified Pd(111) model catalyst where temperature-programmed desorption experiments reveal that NEA accelerates the rates of both MP hydrogenation and H/D exchange. NEA+MP docking complexes are imaged using scanning tunnelling microscopy supplemented by density functional theory calculations to allow the most stable docking complexes to be identified. The results show that diastereomeric interactions between NEA and MP occur predominantly by binding of the C=C of the enol tautomer of MP to the surface, while simultaneously optimizing C=O····H2N hydrogen-bonding interactions. The combination of chiral-NEA driven diastereomeric docking with a tautomeric preference enhances the hydrogenation activity since C=C bonds hydrogenate more easily than C=O bonds thus providing a rationale for the catalytic observations. PMID:27488075

  7. Enhanced hydrogenation activity and diastereomeric interactions of methyl pyruvate co-adsorbed with R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine on Pd(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Mahapatra, Mausumi; Burkholder, Luke; Garvey, Michael; Bai, Yun; Saldin, Dilano K.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2016-08-04

    Unmodified racemic sites on heterogeneous chiral catalysts reduce their overall enantioselectivity, but this effect is mitigated in the Orito reaction (methyl pyruvate (MP) hydrogenation to methyl lactate) by an increased hydrogenation reactivity. Here, this effect is explored on a R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine (NEA)-modified Pd(111) model catalyst where temperature-programmed desorption experiments reveal that NEA accelerates the rates of both MP hydrogenation and H/D exchange. NEAþMP docking complexes are imaged using scanning tunneling microscopy supplemented by density functional theory calculations to allow the most stable docking complexes to be identified. The results show that diastereomeric interactions between NEA and MP occur predominantly by binding of the C=C of the enol tautomer of MP to the surface, while simultaneously optimizing C=O...H2N hydrogen-bonding interactions. In conclusion, the combination of chiral-NEA driven diastereomeric docking with a tautomeric preference enhances the hydrogenation activity since C=C bonds hydrogenate more easily than C=O bonds thus providing a rationale for the catalytic observations.

  8. Enhanced hydrogenation activity and diastereomeric interactions of methyl pyruvate co-adsorbed with R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine on Pd(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahapatra, Mausumi; Burkholder, Luke; Garvey, Michael; Bai, Yun; Saldin, Dilano K.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2016-08-01

    Unmodified racemic sites on heterogeneous chiral catalysts reduce their overall enantioselectivity, but this effect is mitigated in the Orito reaction (methyl pyruvate (MP) hydrogenation to methyl lactate) by an increased hydrogenation reactivity. Here, this effect is explored on a R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine (NEA)-modified Pd(111) model catalyst where temperature-programmed desorption experiments reveal that NEA accelerates the rates of both MP hydrogenation and H/D exchange. NEA+MP docking complexes are imaged using scanning tunnelling microscopy supplemented by density functional theory calculations to allow the most stable docking complexes to be identified. The results show that diastereomeric interactions between NEA and MP occur predominantly by binding of the C=C of the enol tautomer of MP to the surface, while simultaneously optimizing C=O....H2N hydrogen-bonding interactions. The combination of chiral-NEA driven diastereomeric docking with a tautomeric preference enhances the hydrogenation activity since C=C bonds hydrogenate more easily than C=O bonds thus providing a rationale for the catalytic observations.

  9. Enhanced hydrogenation activity and diastereomeric interactions of methyl pyruvate co-adsorbed with R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine on Pd(111)

    DOE PAGES

    Mahapatra, Mausumi; Burkholder, Luke; Garvey, Michael; ...

    2016-08-04

    Unmodified racemic sites on heterogeneous chiral catalysts reduce their overall enantioselectivity, but this effect is mitigated in the Orito reaction (methyl pyruvate (MP) hydrogenation to methyl lactate) by an increased hydrogenation reactivity. Here, this effect is explored on a R-1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine (NEA)-modified Pd(111) model catalyst where temperature-programmed desorption experiments reveal that NEA accelerates the rates of both MP hydrogenation and H/D exchange. NEAþMP docking complexes are imaged using scanning tunneling microscopy supplemented by density functional theory calculations to allow the most stable docking complexes to be identified. The results show that diastereomeric interactions between NEA and MP occur predominantly by bindingmore » of the C=C of the enol tautomer of MP to the surface, while simultaneously optimizing C=O...H2N hydrogen-bonding interactions. In conclusion, the combination of chiral-NEA driven diastereomeric docking with a tautomeric preference enhances the hydrogenation activity since C=C bonds hydrogenate more easily than C=O bonds thus providing a rationale for the catalytic observations.« less

  10. Highly Active Carbon Supported Pd-Ag Nanofacets Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from HCOOH.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhui; He, Ting; Liu, Xuehua; He, Weina; Cong, Hengjiang; Shen, Yangbin; Yan, Liuming; Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jinping; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2016-08-17

    Hydrogen is regarded as a future sustainable and clean energy carrier. Formic acid is a safe and sustainable hydrogen storage medium with many advantages, including high hydrogen content, nontoxicity, and low cost. In this work, a series of highly active catalysts for hydrogen production from formic acid are successfully synthesized by controllably depositing Pd onto Ag nanoplates with different Ag nanofacets, such as Ag{111}, Ag{100}, and the nanofacet on hexagonal close packing Ag crystal (Ag{hcp}). Then, the Pd-Ag nanoplate catalysts are supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black to prevent the aggregation of the catalysts. The research reveals that the high activity is attributed to the formation of Pd-Ag alloy nanofacets, such as Pd-Ag{111}, Pd-Ag{100}, and Pd-Ag{hcp}. The activity order of these Pd-decorated Ag nanofacets is Pd-Ag{hcp} > Pd-Ag{111} > Pd-Ag{100}. Particularly, the activity of Pd-Ag{hcp} is up to an extremely high value, i.e., TOF{hcp} = 19 000 ± 1630 h(-1) at 90 °C (lower limit value), which is more than 800 times higher than our previous quasi-spherical Pd-Ag alloy nanocatalyst. The initial activity of Pd-Ag{hcp} even reaches (3.13 ± 0.19) × 10(6) h(-1) at 90 °C. This research not only presents highly active catalysts for hydrogen generation but also shows that the facet on the hcp Ag crystal can act as a potentially highly active catalyst.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motility of WB-F344 cells. •LPA{sub 3} is induced by hydrogen peroxide in WB-F344 cells. •Cell motility by hydrogen peroxide is inhibited in LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells. •LPA signaling is involved in cell migration by hydrogen peroxide. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA{sub 3} on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 3} may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  12. Biological Activity Predictions and Hydrogen Bonding Analysis in Quinolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Palvi; Kamni

    The paper has been designed to make a comprehensive review of a particular series of organic molecular assembly in the form of compendium. An overview of general description of fifteen quinoline derivatives has been given. The biological activity spectra of quinoline derivatives have been correlated on structure activity relationships base which provides the different Pa (possibility of activity) and Pi (possibility of inactivity) values. Expositions of the role of intermolecular interactions in the identified derivatives have been discussed with the standard distance and angle cut-off criteria criteria as proposed by Desiraju and Steiner (1999) in an International monogram on crystallography. Distance-angle scatter plots for intermolecular interactions are presented for a better understanding of the packing interactions which exist in quinoline derivatives.

  13. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, D.T.; Robinson, H.; Kim, S.-K.; Reddy, P. T.

    2011-01-21

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV)-two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  14. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    D Gallagher; S Kim; H Robinson; P Reddy

    2011-12-31

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV) - two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  15. Wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation of phenol with FeAC (iron-embedded activated carbon) catalysts.

    PubMed

    Liou, Rey-May; Chen, Shih-Hsiung; Huang, Cheng-Hsien; Hung, Mu-Ya; Chang, Jing-Song; Lai, Cheng-Lee

    2010-01-01

    This investigation aims at exploring the catalytic oxidation activity of iron-embedded activated carbon (FeAC) and the application for the degradation of phenol in the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO). FeAC catalysts were prepared by pre-impregnating iron in coconut shell with various iron loadings in the range of 27.5 to 46.5% before they were activated. The FeAC catalysts were characterised by measuring their surface area, pore distribution, functional groups on the surface, and X-ray diffraction patterns. The effects of iron loading strongly inhibited the pore development of the catalyst but benefited the oxidation activity in WHPCO. It was found that the complete conversion of phenol was observed with all FeAC catalysts in oxidation. High level of chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement can be achieved within the first 30 minutes of oxidation. The iron embedded in the activated carbon showed good performance in the degradation and mineralisation of phenol during the oxidation due to the active sites as iron oxides formed on the surface of the activated carbon. It was found that the embedding irons were presented in gamma-Fe(2)O(3), alpha-Fe(2)O(3), and alpha-FeCOOH forms on the activated carbon. The aging tests on FeAC catalysts showed less activity loss, and less iron leaching was found after four oxidation runs.

  16. Development of high catalytic activity disordered hydrogen-storage alloys for electrochemical application in nickel-metal hydride batterie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovshinsky, S. R.; Fetcenko, M. A.

    2001-04-01

    Multi-element, multiphase disordered metal hydride alloys have enabled the widespread commercialization of nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) batteries by allowing high capacity and good kinetics while overcoming the crucial barrier of unstable oxidation/corrosion behavior to obtain long cycle life. Alloy-formula optimization and advanced materials processing have been used to promote a high concentration of active hydrogen-storage sites vital for raising NiMH specific energy. New commercial applications demand fundamentally higher specific power and discharge-rate kinetics. Disorder at the metal/electrolyte interface has enabled a surface oxide with less than 70 Å metallic nickel alloy inclusions suspended within the oxide, which provide exceptional catalytic activity to the metal hydride electrode surface.

  17. Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology. A Summary Report of Activities Completed at the National Center for Hydrogen Technology - Year 6

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Michael

    2012-08-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology (NCHT) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research on hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT's inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding for hydrogen-related projects ($24 million for projects in the NCHT, which includes federal and corporate partner development funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT Program's nine activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan that refers to realistic testing of technologies at adequate scale, process intensification, and contaminant control. A number of projects have been completed that range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in Year 6 of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  18. Development of a national center for hydrogen technology. A summary report of activities completed at the national center hydrogen technology from 2005 to 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Michael J.

    2011-06-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research of hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT's inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding of hydrogen-related projects ($20 million for the NCHT project which includes federal and corporate development partner funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT project's 19 activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan. A number of projects have been completed which range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified to transportation-grade quality in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in the first 5 years of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  19. Single crystalline tantalum oxychloride microcubes: controllable synthesis, formation mechanism and enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen production activity.

    PubMed

    Tu, Hao; Xu, Leilei; Mou, Fangzhi; Guan, Jianguo

    2015-08-11

    Single crystalline microcubes of a new tantalum compound, tantalum oxychloride (TaO2.18Cl0.64), have been fabricated hydrothermally in a concentrated aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid and acetic acid. They contain a superstructure and exhibit remarkably enhanced photocatalytic activities for hydrogen production due to the improved light harvest and facilitated charge transport.

  20. NREL Develops Accelerated Sample Activation Process for Hydrogen Storage Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in developing a new sample activation process that reduces the time to prepare samples for measurement of hydrogen storage from several days to five minutes and provides more uniform samples. Work was performed by NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center.

  1. Photogeneration of active formate decomposition catalysts to produce hydrogen from formate and water

    DOEpatents

    King, Jr., Allen D.; King, Robert B.; Sailers, III, Earl L.

    1983-02-08

    A process for producing hydrogen from formate and water by photogenerating an active formate decomposition catalyst from transition metal carbonyl precursor catalysts at relatively low temperatures and otherwise mild conditions is disclosed. Additionally, this process may be expanded to include the generation of formate from carbon monoxide and hydroxide such that the result is the water gas shift reaction.

  2. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-12

    Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA3 on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA3 may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  3. Characterization of the surface changes during the activation process of erbium/erbium oxide for hydrogen storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Snow, Clark Sheldon; Ohlhausen, James Anthony; Brumbach, Michael Todd

    2010-10-01

    Erbium is known to effectively load with hydrogen when held at high temperature in a hydrogen atmosphere. To make the storage of hydrogen kinetically feasible, a thermal activation step is required. Activation is a routine practice, but very little is known about the physical, chemical, and/or electronic processes that occur during Activation. This work presents in situ characterization of erbium Activation using variable energy photoelectron spectroscopy at various stages of the Activation process. Modification of the passive surface oxide plays a significant role in Activation. The chemical and electronic changes observed from core-level and valence band spectra will be discussed along with corroborating ion scattering spectroscopy measurements.

  4. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  5. Vitamin K epoxide reductase: homology, active site and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P

    2004-06-01

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) recycles reduced vitamin K, which is used subsequently as a co-factor in the gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid residues in blood coagulation enzymes. VKORC1, a subunit of the VKOR complex, has recently been shown to possess this activity. Here, we show that VKORC1 is a member of a large family of predicted enzymes that are present in vertebrates, Drosophila, plants, bacteria and archaea. Four cysteine residues and one residue, which is either serine or threonine, are identified as likely active-site residues. In some plant and bacterial homologues the VKORC1 homologous domain is fused with domains of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. These might reduce disulfide bonds of VKORC1-like enzymes as a prerequisite for their catalytic activities.

  6. Acoustic emission monitoring of activation behavior of LaNi5 hydrogen storage alloy

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Igor Maria; Dell'Era, Alessandro; Pasquali, Mauro; Santulli, Carlo; Sarasini, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The acoustic emission technique is proposed for assessing the irreversible phenomena occurring during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling in LaNi5. In particular, we have studied, through a parametric analysis of in situ detected signals, the correlation between acoustic emission (AE) parameters and the processes occurring during the activation of an intermetallic compound. Decreases in the number and amplitude of AE signals suggest that pulverization due to hydrogen loading involves progressively smaller volumes of material as the number of cycles increases. This conclusion is confirmed by electron microscopy observations and particle size distribution measurements. PMID:27877423

  7. Hydrogen-bond-assisted activation of allylic alcohols for palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Gumrukcu, Yasemin; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost N H

    2014-03-01

    We report direct activation of allylic alcohols using a hydrogen-bond-assisted palladium catalyst and use this for alkylation and amination reactions. The novel catalyst comprises a palladium complex based on a functionalized monodentate phosphoramidite ligand in combination with urea additives and affords linear alkylated and aminated allylic products selectively. Detailed kinetic analysis show that oxidative addition of the allyl alcohol is the rate-determining step, which is facilitated by hydrogen bonds between the alcohol, the ligand functional group, and the additional urea additive.

  8. Evidence for separate substrate binding sites for hydrogen peroxide and cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) in the oxidation of ethanol by catalase

    SciTech Connect

    DeMaster, E.G.; Nagasawa,ss H.T.

    1986-03-01

    The oxidation of ethanol by purified bovine liver catalase (Sigma, C-40) can be supported by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or by CHP. The time course of the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ supported reaction (using glucose/glucose oxidase as the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ source) was linear for at least one hr, whereas the rate of acetaldehyde formation in the CHP (4.2 mM) supported reaction decreased with time. When catalase was exposed o CHP for 5 min before the addition of ethanol, the rate of CHP supported ethanol oxidation was reduced by more than 90% compared to incubations where the addition of ethanol preceded that of CHP. In the CHP inhibited state, the peroxidative activity of catalase was not restored by further addition of CHP or ethanol; however, addition of fresh catalase yielded its expected activity. Significantly, the CHP inhibited enzyme was equally effective as the untreated enzyme in catalyzing (a) the oxidation of ethanol in the presence H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ supported peroxidative activity as well as catalytic activity by CHP inhibited catalase points to separate binding sites for H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and CHP in this reaction. Alternatively, CHP may bind adjacent to a common peroxide active site, thereby sterically impeding the binding of CHP - but not of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ - to this active site.

  9. Sulfide-Binding Hemoglobins: Effects of Mutations on Active-Site Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Alberti, S.; Bacelo, D. E.; Binning, R. C.; Echave, J.; Chergui, M.; Lopez-Garriga, J.

    2006-01-01

    The dynamics of Hemoglobin I (HbI) from the clam Lucina pectinata, from wild-type sperm whale (SW) myoglobin, and from the L29F/H64Q/V68F triple mutant of SW, both unligated and bound to hydrogen sulfide (H2S), have been studied in molecular dynamics simulations. Features that account for differences in H2S affinity among the three have been examined. Our results verify the existence of an unusual heme rocking motion in unligated HbI that can promote the entrance of large ligands such as H2S. The FQF-mutant partially reproduces the amplitude and relative orientation of the motion of HbI's heme group. Therefore, besides introducing favorable electrostatic interactions with H2S, the three mutations in the distal pocket change the dynamic properties of the heme group. The active-site residues Gln-64(E7), Phe-43(CD1), and His-93(F8) are also shown to be more flexible in unligated HbI than in FQF-mutant and SW. Further contributions to H2S affinity come from differences in hydrogen bonding between the heme propionate groups and nearby amino acid residues. PMID:16782787

  10. A Threonine on the Active Site Loop Controls Transition State Formation in Escherichia Coli Respiratory Complex II

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasiak, T.M.; Maklashina, E.; Cecchini, G.; Iverson, T.M.

    2009-05-26

    In Escherichia coli, the complex II superfamily members succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (SQR) and quinol:fumarate reductase (QFR) participate in aerobic and anaerobic respiration, respectively. Complex II enzymes catalyze succinate and fumarate interconversion at the interface of two domains of the soluble flavoprotein subunit, the FAD binding domain and the capping domain. An 11-amino acid loop in the capping domain (Thr-A234 to Thr-A244 in quinol:fumarate reductase) begins at the interdomain hinge and covers the active site. Amino acids of this loop interact with both the substrate and a proton shuttle, potentially coordinating substrate binding and the proton shuttle protonation state. To assess the loop's role in catalysis, two threonine residues were mutated to alanine: QFR Thr-A244 (act-T; Thr-A254 in SQR), which hydrogen-bonds to the substrate at the active site, and QFR Thr-A234 (hinge-T; Thr-A244 in SQR), which is located at the hinge and hydrogen-bonds the proton shuttle. Both mutations impair catalysis and decrease substrate binding. The crystal structure of the hinge-T mutation reveals a reorientation between the FAD-binding and capping domains that accompanies proton shuttle alteration. Taken together, hydrogen bonding from act-T to substrate may coordinate with interdomain motions to twist the double bond of fumarate and introduce the strain important for attaining the transition state.

  11. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  12. Design Strategies for Redox Active Metalloenzymes: Applications in Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Alcala-Torano, R; Sommer, D J; Bahrami Dizicheh, Z; Ghirlanda, G

    2016-01-01

    The last decades have seen an increased interest in finding alternative means to produce renewable fuels in order to satisfy the growing energy demands and to minimize environmental impact. Nature can serve as an inspiration for development of these methodologies, as enzymes are able to carry out a wide variety of redox processes at high efficiency, employing a wide array of earth-abundant transition metals to do so. While it is well recognized that the protein environment plays an important role in tuning the properties of the different metal centers, the structure/function relationships between amino acids and catalytic centers are not well resolved. One specific approach to study the role of proteins in both electron and proton transfer is the biomimetic design of redox active peptides, binding organometallic clusters in well-understood protein environments. Here we discuss different strategies for the design of peptides incorporating redox active FeS clusters, [FeFe]-hydrogenase organometallic mimics, and porphyrin centers into different peptide and protein environments in order to understand natural redox enzymes.

  13. The active site of hen egg-white lysozyme: flexibility and chemical bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Held, Jeanette Smaalen, Sander van

    2014-04-01

    Chemical bonding at the active site of lysozyme is analyzed on the basis of a multipole model employing transferable multipole parameters from a database. Large B factors at low temperatures reflect frozen-in disorder, but therefore prevent a meaningful free refinement of multipole parameters. Chemical bonding at the active site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) is analyzed on the basis of Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules [QTAIM; Bader (1994 ▶), Atoms in Molecules: A Quantum Theory. Oxford University Press] applied to electron-density maps derived from a multipole model. The observation is made that the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) of HEWL at a temperature of 100 K are larger than ADPs in crystals of small biological molecules at 298 K. This feature shows that the ADPs in the cold crystals of HEWL reflect frozen-in disorder rather than thermal vibrations of the atoms. Directly generalizing the results of multipole studies on small-molecule crystals, the important consequence for electron-density analysis of protein crystals is that multipole parameters cannot be independently varied in a meaningful way in structure refinements. Instead, a multipole model for HEWL has been developed by refinement of atomic coordinates and ADPs against the X-ray diffraction data of Wang and coworkers [Wang et al. (2007), Acta Cryst. D63, 1254–1268], while multipole parameters were fixed to the values for transferable multipole parameters from the ELMAM2 database [Domagala et al. (2012), Acta Cryst. A68, 337–351] . Static and dynamic electron densities based on this multipole model are presented. Analysis of their topological properties according to the QTAIM shows that the covalent bonds possess similar properties to the covalent bonds of small molecules. Hydrogen bonds of intermediate strength are identified for the Glu35 and Asp52 residues, which are considered to be essential parts of the active site of HEWL. Furthermore, a series of weak C

  14. Catalytic and Structural Role of a Conserved Active Site Histidine in Berberine Bridge Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Berberine bridge enzyme (BBE) is a paradigm for the class of bicovalently flavinylated oxidases, which catalyzes the oxidative cyclization of (S)-reticuline to (S)-scoulerine. His174 was identified as an important active site residue because of its role in the stabilization of the reduced state of the flavin cofactor. It is also strictly conserved in the family of BBE-like oxidases. Here, we present a detailed biochemical and structural characterization of a His174Ala variant supporting its importance during catalysis and for the structural organization of the active site. Substantial changes in all kinetic parameters and a decrease in midpoint potential were observed for the BBE His174Ala variant protein. Moreover, the crystal structure of the BBE His174Ala variant showed significant structural rearrangements compared to wild-type enzyme. On the basis of our findings, we propose that His174 is part of a hydrogen bonding network that stabilizes the negative charge at the N1–C2=O locus via interaction with the hydroxyl group at C2′ of the ribityl side chain of the flavin cofactor. Hence, replacement of this residue with alanine reduces the stabilizing effect for the transiently formed negative charge and results in drastically decreased kinetic parameters as well as a lower midpoint redox potential. PMID:22757961

  15. QM/MM Analysis of Cellulase Active Sites and Actions of the Enzymes on Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Saharay, Moumita; Guo, Hao-Bo; Smith, Jeremy C; Guo, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradation of cellulosic biomass requires the actions of three types of secreted enzymes; endoglucanase (EC 3.2.1.4), cellobiohydrolase or exoglucanase (EC 3.2.1.91), and -glucosidase (EC 4.2.1.21). These enzymes act synergistically to hydrolyse the -1,4 bonds of cellulose and converts it into simple sugar. Hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond can occur either by net retention or by inversion of anomeric configuration at the anomeric center. QM/MM simulations are useful tools to study the energetics of the reactions and analyze the active-site structures at different states of the catalysis, including the formation of unstable transition states. Here, a brief description of previous work on glycoside hydrolases is first given. The results of the QM/MM potential energy and free energy simulations corresponding to glycosylation and deglycosylation processes are then provided for two retaining endoglucanases, Cel12A and Cel5A. The active-site structural features are analyzed based on the QM/MM results. The role of different residues and hydrogen bonding interactions during the catalysis and the importance of the sugar ring distortion are discussed for these two enzymes.

  16. Multiple, Ligand-Dependent Routes from the Active Site of Cytochrome P450 2C9

    SciTech Connect

    Cojocaru, Vlad; Winn, Peter J.; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-02-13

    The active site of liver-specific, drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenases is deeply buried in the protein and is connected to the protein surface through multiple tunnels, many of which were found open in different CYP crystal structures. It has been shown that different tunnels could serve as ligand passage routes in different CYPs. However, it is not understood whether one CYP uses multiple routes for substrate access and product release and whether these routes depend on ligand properties. From 300 ns of molecular dynamics simulations of CYP2C9, the second most abundant CYP in the human liver we found four main ligand exit routes, the occurrence of each depending on the ligand type and the conformation of the F-G loop, which is likely to be affected by the CYP-membrane interaction. A non-helical F-G loop favored exit towards the putative membrane-embedded region. Important protein features that direct ligand exit include aromatic residues that divide the active site and whose motions control access to two pathways. The ligands interacted with positively charged residues on the protein surface through hydrogen bonds that appear to select for acidic substrates. The observation of multiple, ligand-dependent routes in a CYP aids understanding of how CYP mutations affect drug metabolism and provides new possibilities for CYP inhibition.

  17. Target-classification approach applied to active UXO sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Shamatava, Irma; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study is designed to illustrate the discrimination performance at two UXO active sites (Oklahoma's Fort Sill and the Massachusetts Military Reservation) of a set of advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) inversion/discrimination models which include the orthonormalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS), joint diagonalization (JD), and differential evolution (DE) approaches and whose power and flexibility greatly exceed those of the simple dipole model. The Fort Sill site is highly contaminated by a mix of the following types of munitions: 37-mm target practice tracers, 60-mm illumination mortars, 75-mm and 4.5'' projectiles, 3.5'', 2.36'', and LAAW rockets, antitank mine fuzes with and without hex nuts, practice MK2 and M67 grenades, 2.5'' ballistic windshields, M2A1-mines with/without bases, M19-14 time fuzes, and 40-mm practice grenades with/without cartridges. The site at the MMR site contains targets of yet different sizes. In this work we apply our models to EMI data collected using the MetalMapper (MM) and 2 × 2 TEMTADS sensors. The data for each anomaly are inverted to extract estimates of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters associated with each buried target. (The latter include the total volume magnetic source or NVMS, which relates to size, shape, and material properties; the former includes location, depth, and orientation). The estimated intrinsic parameters are then used for classification performed via library matching and the use of statistical classification algorithms; this process yielded prioritized dig-lists that were submitted to the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) for independent scoring. The models' classification performance is illustrated and assessed based on these independent evaluations.

  18. Mechanochemical activation and synthesis of nanomaterials for hydrogen storage and conversion in electrochemical power sources.

    PubMed

    Wronski, Zbigniew S; Varin, Robert A; Czujko, Tom

    2009-07-01

    In this study we discuss a process of mechanical activation employed in place of chemical or thermal activation to improve the mobility and reactivity of hydrogen atoms and ions in nanomaterials for energy applications: rechargeable batteries and hydrogen storage for fuel cell systems. Two materials are discussed. Both are used or intended for use in power sources. One is nickel hydroxide, Ni(OH)2, which converts to oxyhydroxide in the positive Ni electrode of rechargeable metal hydride batteries. The other is a complex hydride, Mg(AIH4)2, intended for use in reversible, solid-state hydrogen storage for fuel cells. The feature shared by these unlikely materials (hydroxide and hydride) is a sheet-like hexagonal crystal structure. The mechanical activation was conducted in high-energy ball mills. We discuss and demonstrate that the mechanical excitation of atoms and ions imparted on these powders stems from the same class of phenomena. These are (i) proliferation of structural defects, in particular stacking faults in a sheet-like structure of hexagonal crystals, and (ii) possible fragmentation of a faulted structure into a mosaic of layered nanocrystals. The hydrogen atoms bonded in such nanocrystals may be inserted and abstracted more easily from OH- hydroxyl group in Ni(OH)2 and AlH4- hydride complex in Mg(AlH4)2 during hydrogen charge and discharge reactions. However, the effects of mechanical excitation imparted on these powders are different. While the Ni(OH)2 powder is greatly activated for cycling in batteries, the Mg(AlH4)2 complex hydride phase is greatly destabilized for use in reversible hydrogen storage. Such a "synchronic" view of the structure-property relationship in respect to materials involved in hydrogen energy storage and conversion is supported in experiments employing X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and direct imaging of the structure with a high-resolution transmission-electron microscope (HREM), as well as in

  19. Evidence for segmental mobility in the active site of pepsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, J.; Strop, P.; Senn, H.; Foundling, S.; Kostka, V.

    1986-05-01

    The low hydrolytic activity (k/sub cat/ < 0.001 s/sup -1/) of chicken pepsin (CP) towards tri- and tetrapeptides is enhanced at least 100 times by modification of its single sulfhydryl group of Cys-115, with little effect on K/sub m/-values. Modification thus simulates the effect of secondary substrate binding on pepsin catalysis. The rate of Cys-115 modification is substantially decreased in the presence of some competitive inhibitors, suggesting its active site location. Experiments with CP alkylated at Cys-115 with Acrylodan as a fluorescent probe or with N-iodoacetyl-(4-fluoro)-aniline as a /sup 19/F-nmr probe suggest conformation change around Cys-115 to occur on substrate or substrate analog binding. The difference /sup 1/H-nmr spectra (500 MHz) of unmodified free and inhibitor-complexed CP reveal chemical shifts almost exclusively in the aromatic region. The effects of Cu/sup + +/ on /sup 19/F- and /sup 1/H-nmr spectra have been studied. Examination of a computer graphics model of CP based on E. parasitica pepsin-inhibitor complex X-ray coordinates suggests that Cys-115 is located near the S/sub 3//S/sub 5/ binding site. The results are interpreted in favor of segmental mobility of this region important for pepsin substrate binding and catalysis.

  20. First Principles Computational Study of the Active Site of Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Ivaylo; Klien, Micheal

    2004-01-14

    Ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to investigate the structural features of the active site of the binuclear enzyme rat liver arginase. Special emphasis was placed on the crucial role of the second shell ligand interactions. These interactions were systematically studied by performing calculations on models of varying size. It was determined that a water molecule, and not hydroxide, is the bridging exogenous ligand. The carboxylate ligands facilitate the close approach of the Mn (II) ions by attenuating the metal-metal electrostatic repulsion. Of the two metals, MnA was shown to carry a larger positive charge. Analysis of the electronic properties of the active site revealed that orbitals involving the terminal Asp234 residue, as well as the flexible -1,1 bridging Asp232, lie at high energies, suggesting weaker coordination. This is reflected in certain structural variability present in our models and is also consistent with recent experimental findings. Finally, implications of our findings for the biological function of the enzyme are delineated.

  1. Analyzing the catalytic role of active site residues in the Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Salette; Wu, Rui; Krzywda, Karoline; Opalka, Veronika; Chan, Hei; Liu, Dali; Holz, Richard C

    2015-07-01

    A strictly conserved active site arginine residue (αR157) and two histidine residues (αH80 and αH81) located near the active site of the Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1 (CtNHase), were mutated. These mutant enzymes were examined for their ability to bind iron and hydrate acrylonitrile. For the αR157A mutant, the residual activity (k cat = 10 ± 2 s(-1)) accounts for less than 1% of the wild-type activity (k cat = 1100 ± 30 s(-1)) while the K m value is nearly unchanged at 205 ± 10 mM. On the other hand, mutation of the active site pocket αH80 and αH81 residues to alanine resulted in enzymes with k cat values of 220 ± 40 and 77 ± 13 s(-1), respectively, and K m values of 187 ± 11 and 179 ± 18 mM. The double mutant (αH80A/αH81A) was also prepared and provided an enzyme with a k cat value of 132 ± 3 s(-1) and a K m value of 213 ± 61 mM. These data indicate that all three residues are catalytically important, but not essential. X-ray crystal structures of the αH80A/αH81A, αH80W/αH81W, and αR157A mutant CtNHase enzymes were solved to 2.0, 2.8, and 2.5 Å resolutions, respectively. In each mutant enzyme, hydrogen-bonding interactions crucial for the catalytic function of the αCys(104)-SOH ligand are disrupted. Disruption of these hydrogen bonding interactions likely alters the nucleophilicity of the sulfenic acid oxygen and the Lewis acidity of the active site Fe(III) ion.

  2. Successive hydrogen-elimination reactions with low activation energies in the a-Si:H formation process: An ab initio molecular-orbital study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kota; Sugiyama, Yoko; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Iwabuchi, Susumu; Hirano, Tsuneo; Koinuma, Hideomi

    1992-07-01

    Successive hydrogen elimination reactions with low activation energies during the formation of a-Si:H by silane plasma chemical vapor deposition are proposed on the basis of an ab initio molecular-orbital method. The activation energy of the first step, the reaction of a dangling-bond site with an adjacent tetrahedrally coordinated silicon atom, was found to be 25.2 kcal/mol at 0 K when the zero-point vibrational energy was taken into account. The subsequent step was an exothermic process with a lower activation energy. The total process was thermodynamically much more favorable than the molecular processes by which a hydrogen atom or molecule is eliminated.

  3. The activity of nanocrystalline Fe-based alloys as electrode materials for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Christian Immanuel; Sellschopp, Kai; Tegel, Marcus; Rauscher, Thomas; Kieback, Bernd; Röntzsch, Lars

    2016-02-01

    In view of alkaline water electrolysis, the activities for the hydrogen evolution reaction of nanocrystalline Fe-based electrode materials were investigated and compared with the activities of polycrystalline Fe and Ni. Electrochemical methods were used to elucidate the overpotential value, the charge transfer resistance and the double layer capacity. Structural properties of the electrode surface were determined with SEM, XRD and XPS analyses. Thus, a correlation between electrochemical and structural parameters was found. In this context, we report on a cyclic voltammetric activation procedure which causes a significant increase of the surface area of Fe-based electrodes leading to a boost in effective activity of the activated electrodes. It was found that the intrinsic activity of activated Fe-based electrodes is very high due to the formation of a nanocrystalline surface layer. In contrast, the activation procedure influences only the intrinsic activity of the Ni electrodes without the formation of a porous surface layer.

  4. An important base triple anchors the substrate helix recognition surface within the Tetrahymena ribozyme active site.

    PubMed

    Szewczak, A A; Ortoleva-Donnelly, L; Zivarts, M V; Oyelere, A K; Kazantsev, A V; Strobel, S A

    1999-09-28

    Key to understanding the structural biology of catalytic RNA is determining the underlying networks of interactions that stabilize RNA folding, substrate binding, and catalysis. Here we demonstrate the existence and functional importance of a Hoogsteen base triple (U300.A97-U277), which anchors the substrate helix recognition surface within the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme active site. Nucleotide analog interference suppression analysis of the interacting functional groups shows that the U300.A97-U277 triple forms part of a network of hydrogen bonds that connect the P3 helix, the J8/7 strand, and the P1 substrate helix. Product binding and substrate cleavage kinetics experiments performed on mutant ribozymes that lack this base triple (C A-U, U G-C) or replace it with the isomorphous C(+).G-C triple show that the A97 Hoogsteen triple contributes to the stabilization of both substrate helix docking and the conformation of the ribozyme's active site. The U300. A97-U277 base triple is not formed in the recently reported crystallographic model of a portion of the group I intron, despite the presence of J8/7 and P3 in the RNA construct [Golden, B. L., Gooding, A. R., Podell, E. R. & Cech, T. R. (1998) Science 282, 259-264]. This, along with other biochemical evidence, suggests that the active site in the crystallized form of the ribozyme is not fully preorganized and that substantial rearrangement may be required for substrate helix docking and catalysis.

  5. Polarographic study of hydrogen peroxide anodic current and its application to antioxidant activity determination.

    PubMed

    Sužnjević, Desanka Ž; Pastor, Ferenc T; Gorjanović, Stanislava Ž

    2011-09-15

    Behavior of hydrogen peroxide in alkaline medium has been studied by direct current (DC) polarography with dropping mercury electrode (DME) aiming to apply it in antioxidant (AO) activity determination. Development of a peroxide anodic current having form of a peak, instead of common polarographic wave, has been investigated. As a base for this investigation the interaction of H(2)O(2) with anodically dissolved mercury was followed. Formation of mercury complex [Hg(O(2)H)(OH)] has been confirmed. The relevant experimental conditions, such as temperature, concentration and pH dependence, as well as time stability of hydrogen peroxide anodic current, have been assessed. Development of an AO assay based on decrease of anodic current of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of antioxidants (AOs) has been described. Under optimized working conditions, a series of benzoic acids along with corresponding cinnamate analogues have been tested for hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity. In addition, the assay versatility has been confirmed on various complex samples.

  6. Single Pd atoms in activated carbon fibers and their contribution to hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; van Benthem, Klaus; Li, Sa; Bonifacio, Cecile S; Pennycook, Stephen J; Jena, Puru; Gallego, Nidia C

    2011-01-01

    Palladium-modified activated carbon fibers (Pd-ACF) were synthesized by meltspinning, carbonization and activation of an isotropic pitch carbon precursor premixed with an organometallic Pd compound. The hydrogen uptake at 25 oC and 20 bar on Pd- ACF exceeded the expected capacity based solely on Pd hydride formation and hydrogen physisorption on the microporous carbon support. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with sub- ngstrom spatial resolution provided unambiguous identification of isolated Pd atoms occurring in the carbon matrix that coexist with larger Pd particles. First principles calculations revealed that each single Pd atom can form Kubas-type complexes by binding up to three H2 molecules in the pressure range of adsorption measurements. Based on Pd atom concentration determined from STEM images, the contribution of various mechanisms to the excess hydrogen uptake measured experimentally was evaluated. With consideration of Kubas binding as a viable mechanism (along with hydride formation and physisorption to carbon support) the role of hydrogen spillover in this system may be smaller than previously thought.

  7. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  8. Biological activity predictions, crystallographic comparison and hydrogen bonding analysis of cholane derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rajnikant; Dinesh; Chand, Bhavnaish

    2007-12-01

    A total of eighteen molecules of cholane derivatives (I-XVIII) (a series of steroids) have been included to predict their pharmacological effects, specific mechanisms of action, known toxicities, drug-likeness, etc, by using the statistics of multilevel neighbourhoods of atoms (MNA) descriptors for active and inactive fragments. The biological activity spectra for substances have been correlated on SAR base (structure-activity relationships data and knowledge base), which provides the different P(a) (possibility of activity) and P(i) (possibility of inactivity). Most of the probable activities have been characterized by P(a) and P(i) values, which depict that all the molecules have high value of teratogen activity. The Lipinski's thumb rule predicts that all the cholane derivatives have stronger preponderance for "cancer-like-drug" molecules and some of their related analogous have entered in the ANCI (American National Cancer Institute) database. Some selected bond distances and bond angles of interest have been taken into account and deviation of bond distances/bond angles, vis-a-vis the substitutional group and X-H...A intra/intermolecular hydrogen bonds has been discussed in detail. X-H...A intra and intermolecular hydrogen bonds in the molecules have been described with the standard distance and angle cut-off criteria. D-theta and d-theta. scatter plots for intra- and intermolecular interactions are presented for better understanding of packing interactions existing among these derivatives. There exists only one C-H...O intramolecular bifurcated hydrogen bond. while high tendency of intermolecular bifurcated hydrogen bonds based on a defined O-H...O has been observed, in which O atom acts as a prototype donor as well as acceptor. The frequency of occurrence of C-H...O hydrogen bonds is predominant (i.e. 85.7%) in intramolecular interactions, whereas in intermolecular interactions, frequency of occurrence for O-H...O interactions is 62.9%. Solvent

  9. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  10. A Highly Active and Robust Copper-Based Electrocatalyst toward Hydrogen Evolution Reaction with Low Overpotential in Neutral Solution.

    PubMed

    Du, Jialei; Wang, Jianying; Ji, Lvlv; Xu, Xiaoxiang; Chen, Zuofeng

    2016-11-09

    Although significant progress has been made recently, copper-based materials have long been considered to be ineffective catalysts toward the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), in most cases, requiring high overpotentials more than 300 mV. We report here that a Cu(0)-based nanoparticle film electrodeposited in situ from a Cu(II) oxime complex can act as a highly active and robust HER electrocatalyst in neutral phosphate buffer solution. The as-prepared nanoparticle film is of poor crystallization, which incorporates significant amounts of oxime ligand residues and buffer anions PO4(3-). The proposed mechanism suggests that the Cu(0)-based nanoparticle film is activated with incorporated or adsorbed PO4(3-) anions and the PO4(3-) anions-anchored sites might serve as the actual catalytic active sites with efficient proton transport mediators. Catalysis occurs with a low onset overpotential (η) of 65 mV, and a current density of 1 mA/cm(2) can be achieved with η = 120 mV. The nanoparticle film shows an excellent catalytic durability with slightly rising current density during electrolysis, presumably due to further incorporation or adsorption of PO4(3-) anions in the process. This electrocatalyst not only forms in situ from earth-abundant materials but also operates in neutral water with low overpotential and high stability.

  11. Fractionation factors and activation energies for exchange of the low barrier hydrogen bonding proton in peptidyl trifluoromethyl ketone complexes of chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Westler, W M; Cleland, W W; Markley, J L; Frey, P A

    1998-12-08

    NMR investigations have been carried out of complexes between bovine chymotrypsin Aalpha and a series of four peptidyl trifluoromethyl ketones, listed here in order of increasing affinity for chymotrypsin: N-Acetyl-L-Phe-CF3, N-Acetyl-Gly-L-Phe-CF3, N-Acetyl-L-Val-L-Phe-CF3, and N-Acetyl-L-Leu-L-Phe-CF3. The D/H fractionation factors (phi) for the hydrogen in the H-bond between His 57 and Asp 102 (His 57-Hdelta1) in these four complexes at 5 degreesC were in the range phi = 0.32-0.43, expected for a low-barrier hydrogen bond. For this series of complexes, measurements also were made of the chemical shifts of His 57-Hepsilon1 (delta2,2-dimethylsilapentane-5-sulfonic acid 8.97-9. 18), the exchange rate of the His 57-Hdelta1 proton with bulk water protons (284-12.4 s-1), and the activation enthalpies for this hydrogen exchange (14.7-19.4 kcal.mol-1). It was found that the previously noted correlations between the inhibition constants (Ki 170-1.2 microM) and the chemical shifts of His 57-Hdelta1 (delta2, 2-dimethylsilapentane-5-sulfonic acid 18.61-18.95) for this series of peptidyl trifluoromethyl ketones with chymotrypsin [Lin, J., Cassidy, C. S. & Frey, P. A. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 11940-11948] could be extended to include the fractionation factors, hydrogen exchange rates, and hydrogen exchange activation enthalpies. The results support the proposal of low barrier hydrogen bond-facilitated general base catalysis in the addition of Ser 195 to the peptidyl carbonyl group of substrates in the mechanism of chymotrypsin-catalyzed peptide hydrolysis. Trends in the enthalpies for hydrogen exchange and the fractionation factors are consistent with a strong, double-minimum or single-well potential hydrogen bond in the strongest complexes. The lifetimes of His 57-Hdelta1, which is solvent shielded in these complexes, track the strength of the hydrogen bond. Because these lifetimes are orders of magnitude shorter than those of the complexes themselves, the enzyme must have a

  12. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  13. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  14. Geochemical and microbiological evidence for a hydrogen-based, hyperthermophilic subsurface lithoautotrophic microbial ecosystem (HyperSLiME) beneath an active deep-sea hydrothermal field.

    PubMed

    Takai, Ken; Gamo, Toshitaka; Tsunogai, Urumu; Nakayama, Noriko; Hirayama, Hisako; Nealson, Kenneth H; Horikoshi, Koki

    2004-08-01

    Subsurface microbial communities supported by geologically and abiologically derived hydrogen and carbon dioxide from the Earth's interior are of great interest, not only with regard to the nature of primitive life on Earth, but as potential analogs for extraterrestrial life. Here, for the first time, we present geochemical and microbiological evidence pointing to the existence of hyperthermophilic subsurface lithoautotrophic microbial ecosystem (HyperSLiME) dominated by hyperthermophilic methanogens beneath an active deep-sea hydrothermal field in the Central Indian Ridge. Geochemical and isotopic analyses of gaseous components in the hydrothermal fluids revealed heterogeneity of both concentration and carbon isotopic compositions of methane between the main hydrothermal vent (0.08 mM and -13.8 per thousand PDB, respectively) and the adjacent divergent vent site (0.2 mM and -18.5 per thousand PDB, respectively), representing potential subsurface microbial methanogenesis, at least in the divergent vent emitting more 13C-depleted methane. Extremely high abundance of magmatic energy sources such as hydrogen (2.5 mM) in the fluids also encourages a hydrogen-based, lithoautotrophic microbial activity. Both cultivation and cultivation-independent molecular analyses suggested the predominance of Methanococcales members in the superheated hydrothermal emissions and chimney interiors along with the other major microbial components of Thermococcales members. These results imply that a HyperSLiME, consisting of methanogens and fermenters, occurs in this tectonically active subsurface zone, strongly supporting the existence of hydrogen-driven subsurface microbial communities.

  15. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  16. An active site water network in the plasminogen activator pla from Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-07-14

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 A. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  17. A highly-active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; ...

    2016-02-19

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superiormore » activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm–2 and 100 mA cm–2 at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Lastly, phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation.« less

  18. A highly-active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Yingjie; Weng, Zhe; Li, Min; Fan, Qi; Yu, Xiqian; Altman, Eric I.; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-02-19

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superior activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm–2 and 100 mA cm–2 at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Lastly, phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation.

  19. A highly active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Yingjie; Weng, Zhe; Li, Min; Fan, Qi; Yu, Xiqian; Altman, Eric I.; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-01-01

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superior activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm−2 and 100 mA cm−2 at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation. PMID:26892437

  20. Hydrogen bonds between nitrogen donors and the semiquinone in the Q(B) site of bacterial reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Martin, Erik; Samoilova, Rimma I; Narasimhulu, Kupala V; Wraight, Colin A; Dikanov, Sergei A

    2010-08-25

    Photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides have identical ubiquinone-10 molecules functioning as primary (Q(A)) and secondary (Q(B)) electron acceptors. X-band 2D pulsed EPR spectroscopy, called HYSCORE, was applied to study the interaction of the Q(B) site semiquinone with nitrogens from the local protein environment in natural and (15)N uniformly labeled reactions centers. (14)N and (15)N HYSCORE spectra of the Q(B) semiquinone show the interaction with two nitrogens carrying transferred unpaired spin density. Quadrupole coupling constants estimated from (14)N HYSCORE spectra indicate them to be a protonated nitrogen of an imidazole residue and amide nitrogen of a peptide group. (15)N HYSCORE spectra allowed estimation of the isotropic and anisotropic couplings with these nitrogens. From these data, we calculated the unpaired spin density transferred onto 2s and 2p orbitals of nitrogen and analyzed the contribution of different factors to the anisotropic hyperfine tensors. The hyperfine coupling of other protein nitrogens with the semiquinone is weak (<0.1 MHz). These results clearly indicate that the Q(B) semiquinone forms hydrogen bonds with two nitrogens and provide quantitative characteristics of the hyperfine couplings with these nitrogens, which can be used in theoretical modeling of the Q(B) site. On the basis of the quadrupole coupling constant, one nitrogen can only be assigned to N(delta) of His-L190, consistent with all existing structures. However, we cannot specify between two candidates the residue corresponding to the second nitrogen. Further work employing multifrequency spectroscopic approaches or selective isotope labeling would be desirable for unambiguous assignment of this nitrogen.

  1. In site bioimaging of hydrogen sulfide uncovers its pivotal role in regulating nitric oxide-induced lateral root formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Jun; Chen, Jian; Xian, Ming; Zhou, Li-Gang; Han, Fengxiang X; Gan, Li-Jun; Shi, Zhi-Qi

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gasotransmitter in mammals. Despite physiological changes induced by exogenous H2S donor NaHS to plants, whether and how H2S works as a true cellular signal in plants need to be examined. A self-developed specific fluorescent probe (WSP-1) was applied to track endogenous H2S in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) roots in site. Bioimaging combined with pharmacological and biochemical approaches were used to investigate the cross-talk among H2S, nitric oxide (NO), and Ca(2+) in regulating lateral root formation. Endogenous H2S accumulation was clearly associated with primordium initiation and lateral root emergence. NO donor SNP stimulated the generation of endogenous H2S and the expression of the gene coding for the enzyme responsible for endogenous H2S synthesis. Scavenging H2S or inhibiting H2S synthesis partially blocked SNP-induced lateral root formation and the expression of lateral root-related genes. The stimulatory effect of SNP on Ca(2+) accumulation and CaM1 (calmodulin 1) expression could be abolished by inhibiting H2S synthesis. Ca(2+) chelator or Ca(2+) channel blocker attenuated NaHS-induced lateral root formation. Our study confirmed the role of H2S as a cellular signal in plants being a mediator between NO and Ca(2+) in regulating lateral root formation.

  2. Spontaneous activation of [FeFe]-hydrogenases by an inorganic [2Fe] active site mimic

    PubMed Central

    Esselborn, Julian; Berggren, Gustav; Noth, Jens; Siebel, Judith; Hemschemeier, Anja; Artero, Vincent; Reijerse, Edward; Fontecave, Marc; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Happe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the formation of hydrogen. The cofactor (H-cluster) of [FeFe]-hydrogenases consists of a [4Fe-4S]-cluster bridged to a unique [2Fe]-subcluster whose biosynthesis in vivo requires hydrogenase-specific maturases. Here we show that a chemical mimic of the [2Fe]-subcluster can reconstitute apo-hydrogenase to full activity, independent of helper proteins. The assembled H-cluster is virtually indistinguishable from the native cofactor. This procedure will be a powerful tool for developing novel artificial H2-producing catalysts. PMID:23934246

  3. Activating and tuning basal planes of MoO₂, MoS₂, and MoSe₂ for hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Hsin; Kuo, Jer-Lai

    2015-11-21

    We investigated the defected two-dimensional materials MoX2 (X = O, S, Se) for hydrogen evolution reaction by first principles calculations. While the basal plane is inert for pristine MoX2, we found that the defected MoX2 can adsorb hydrogen atoms at defect sites, with appropriate adsorption energies for hydrogen evolution. By analyzing density of states and charge density, we showed that a dangling bond state slightly below the Fermi energy emerges when a defect is created. We proposed that this state is responsible for hybridizing with the hydrogen atom 1s state and hence the adsorption. Knowing the mechanism, we further considered tuning the reaction using adatoms (several first-row transition metals, B, C, N, O). We found that C and O adatoms can make defected MoX2 ideal for hydrogen evolution at higher defect levels (H coverage).

  4. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-01-01

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry. PMID:26286479

  5. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-08-01

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry.

  6. Intrinsic catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles with respect to hydrogen peroxide decomposition and superoxide scavenging.

    PubMed

    He, Weiwei; Zhou, Yu-Ting; Wamer, Wayne G; Hu, Xiaona; Wu, Xiaochun; Zheng, Zhi; Boudreau, Mary D; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have received a great deal of interest due to their unique optical and catalytic properties and biomedical applications. Developing applications as well as assessing associated risks requires an understanding of the interactions between Au nanoparticles (NPs) and biologically active substances. In this paper, electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) was used to investigate the catalytic activity of Au NPs in biologically relevant reactions. We report here that Au NPs can catalyze the rapid decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is accompanied by the formation of hydroxyl radicals at lower pH and oxygen at higher pH. In addition, we found that, mimicking SOD, Au NPs efficiently catalyze the decomposition of superoxide. These results demonstrate that Au NPs can act as SOD and catalase mimetics. Since reactive oxygen species are biologically relevant products being continuously generated in cells, these results obtained under conditions resembling different biological microenvironments may provide insights for evaluating risks associated with Au NPs.

  7. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-08-19

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry.

  8. Insights into a highly conserved network of hydrogen bonds in the agonist binding site of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a structural and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Alexandre; Graton, Jérôme; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2014-10-01

    Structural and theoretical studies on the geometrical features of a hydrogen-bond network occurring in the binding site of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and composed of interconnected WxPD (Trp-x-Pro-Asp) and SWyz (Ser-Trp-yz) sequences from loops A and B, respectively, have been carried out. Multiple sequence alignments using as template the sequence of the apoform of Aplysia californica acetylcholine binding protein (Ac-AChBP) show the strict conservation of serine and tryptophan residues of the loop B SWyz sequence. Considering a sample of 19 high resolution AChBP structures, the strong conformational preferences of the key tryptophan residue has been pointing out, whatever the form, free or bounded, of AChBP. The geometry of the motif hydrogen-bond network has been characterized through the analyses of seven distances. The robustness of the various hydrogen-bond interactions is pointed out, the one involving the aspartate carboxylate group and the serine residue being the shortest of the network. The role of a cooperative effect involving a NH(His145)…OH (Ser142) hydrogen bond is highlighted. Density functional theory calculations on several simplified models based on the motif hydrogen-bond network allow probing the importance of the various hydrogen-bond interactions. The removal of the Ser142 hydroxyl group induces strong structural rearrangements, in agreement with the structural observations. Molecular electrostatic potential calculations on model systems highlight the importance of a cooperative effect in the whole hydrogen-bond network. More precisely, the key role of the Ser142 hydroxyl group, involved in several hydrogen bonds, is underlined.

  9. Catalase evolved to concentrate H2O2 at its active site.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Laura; Sosa-Peinado, Alejandro; Hansberg, Wilhelm

    2010-08-01

    Catalase is a homo-tetrameric enzyme that has its heme active site deeply buried inside the protein. Its only substrate, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), reaches the heme through a 45 A-long channel. Large-subunit catalases, but not small-subunit catalases, have a loop (gate loop) that interrupts the major channel. Two accesses lead to a gate that opens the final section of the channel to the heme; gates from the R-related subunits are interconnected. Using molecular dynamic simulations of the Neurospora crassa catalase-1 tetramer in a box of water (48,600 molecules) or 6M H2O2, it is shown that the number of H2O2 molecules augments at the surface of the protein and in the accesses to the gate and the final section of the channel. Increase in H2O2 is due to the prevalence and distribution of amino acids that have an increased residency for H2O2 (mainly histidine, proline and charged residues), which are localized at the protein surface and the accesses to the gate. In the section of the channel from the heme to the gate, turnover rate of water molecules was faster than for H2O2 and increased residence sites for water and H2O2 were determined. In the presence of H2O2, the exclusion of water molecules from a specific site suggests a mechanism that could contend with the competing activity of water, allowing for catalase high kinetic efficiency.

  10. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  11. Efficient Method for the Determination of the Activation Energy of the Iodide-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, William; Lee, James; Abid, Nauman; DeMeo, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    An experiment is described that determines the activation energy (E[subscript a]) of the iodide-catalyzed decomposition reaction of hydrogen peroxide in a much more efficient manner than previously reported in the literature. Hydrogen peroxide, spontaneously or with a catalyst, decomposes to oxygen and water. Because the decomposition reaction is…

  12. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Randy B.

    1992-01-01

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation).

  13. Esterase Activated Carbonyl Sulfide/Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) Donors.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Preeti; Bora, Prerona; Ravikumar, Govindan; Jos, Swetha; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2017-01-06

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a mediator of a number of cellular processes, and modulating cellular levels of this gas has emerged as an important therapeutic area. Localized generation of H2S is thus very useful but highly challenging. Here, we report pivaloyloxymethyl-based carbonothioates and carbamothioates that are activated by the enzyme, esterase, to generate carbonyl sulfide (COS), which is hydrolyzed to H2S.

  14. Characterization of the active site of ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munshi, C; Thiel, D J; Mathews, I I; Aarhus, R; Walseth, T F; Lee, H C

    1999-10-22

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase synthesizes two Ca(2+) messengers by cyclizing NAD to produce cyclic ADP-ribose and exchanging nicotinic acid with the nicotinamide group of NADP to produce nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Recombinant Aplysia cyclase was expressed in yeast and co-crystallized with a substrate, nicotinamide. x-ray crystallography showed that the nicotinamide was bound in a pocket formed in part by a conserved segment and was near the central cleft of the cyclase. Glu(98), Asn(107) and Trp(140) were within 3.5 A of the bound nicotinamide and appeared to coordinate it. Substituting Glu(98) with either Gln, Gly, Leu, or Asn reduced the cyclase activity by 16-222-fold, depending on the substitution. The mutant N107G exhibited only a 2-fold decrease in activity, while the activity of W140G was essentially eliminated. The base exchange activity of all mutants followed a similar pattern of reduction, suggesting that both reactions occur at the same active site. In addition to NAD, the wild-type cyclase also cyclizes nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide to cyclic GDP-ribose. All mutant enzymes had at least half of the GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity of the wild type, some even 2-3-fold higher, indicating that the three coordinating amino acids are responsible for positioning of the substrate but not absolutely critical for catalysis. To search for the catalytic residues, other amino acids in the binding pocket were mutagenized. E179G was totally devoid of GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity, and both its ADP-ribosyl cyclase and the base exchange activities were reduced by 10,000- and 18,000-fold, respectively. Substituting Glu(179) with either Asn, Leu, Asp, or Gln produced similar inactive enzymes, and so was the conversion of Trp(77) to Gly. However, both E179G and the double mutant E179G/W77G retained NAD-binding ability as shown by photoaffinity labeling with [(32)P]8-azido-NAD. These results indicate that both Glu(179) and Trp(77) are crucial for catalysis and

  15. Role of a cysteine residue in the active site of ERK and the MAPKK family

    SciTech Connect

    Ohori, Makoto; Kinoshita, Takayoshi; Yoshimura, Seiji; Warizaya, Masaichi; Nakajima, Hidenori . E-mail: hidenori.nakajima@jp.astellas.com; Miyake, Hiroshi

    2007-02-16

    Kinases of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, including extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), represent likely targets for pharmacological intervention in proliferative diseases. Here, we report that FR148083 inhibits ERK2 enzyme activity and TGF{beta}-induced AP-1-dependent luciferase expression with respective IC{sub 50} values of 0.08 and 0.05 {mu}M. FR265083 (1'-2' dihydro form) and FR263574 (1'-2' and 7'-8' tetrahydro form) exhibited 5.5-fold less and no activity, respectively, indicating that both the {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated ketone and the conformation of the lactone ring contribute to this inhibitory activity. The X-ray crystal structure of the ERK2/FR148083 complex revealed that the compound binds to the ATP binding site of ERK2, involving a covalent bond to S{gamma} of ERK2 Cys166, hydrogen bonds with the backbone NH of Met108, N{zeta} of Lys114, backbone C=O of Ser153, N{delta}2 of Asn154, and hydrophobic interactions with the side chains of Ile31, Val39, Ala52, and Leu156. The covalent bond motif in the ERK2/FR148083 complex assures that the inhibitor has high activity for ERK2 and no activity for other MAPKs such as JNK1 and p38MAPK{alpha}/{beta}/{gamma}/{delta} which have leucine residues at the site corresponding to Cys166 in ERK2. On the other hand, MEK1 and MKK7, kinases of the MAPKK family which also can be inhibited by FR148083, contain a cysteine residue corresponding to Cys166 of ERK2. The covalent binding to the common cysteine residue in the ATP-binding site is therefore likely to play a crucial role in the inhibitory activity for these MAP kinases. These findings on the molecular recognition mechanisms of FR148083 for kinases with Cys166 should provide a novel strategy for the pharmacological intervention of MAPK cascades.

  16. Subnanometer Molybdenum Sulfide on Carbon Nanotubes as a Highly Active and Stable Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Yang, Zhi; Shen, Juanxia; Nie, Huagui; Cai, Qiran; Li, Luhua; Ge, Mengzhan; Gu, Cancan; Chen, Xi'an; Yang, Keqin; Zhang, Lijie; Chen, Ying; Huang, Shaoming

    2016-02-10

    Electrochemically splitting water for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has been viewed as a promising approach to produce renewable and clean hydrogen energy. However, searching for cheap and efficient HER electrocatalysts to replace the currently used Pt-based catalysts remains an urgent task. Herein, we develop a one-step carbon nanotube (CNT) assisted synthesis strategy with CNTs' strong adsorbability to mediate the growth of subnanometer-sized MoS(x) on CNTs. The subnanometer MoS(x)-CNT hybrids achieve a low overpotential of 106 mV at 10 mA cm(-2), a small Tafel slope of 37 mV per decade, and an unprecedentedly high turnover frequency value of 18.84 s(-1) at η = 200 mV among all reported non-Pt catalysts in acidic conditions. The superior performance of the hybrid catalysts benefits from the presence of a higher number of active sites and the abundant exposure of unsaturated S atoms rooted in the subnanometer structure, demonstrating a new class of subnanometer-scale catalysts.

  17. Antioxidant activities of nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water assessed by ESR and 2,2'-bipyridyl methods.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shinya; Matsuoka, Daigo; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2015-08-01

    We prepared nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water (nano-H water) which contained hydrogen nano-bubbles of <717-nm diameter for 54% of total bubbles. In the DMPO-spin trap electron spin resonance (ESR) method, the DMPO-OH:MnO ratio, being attributed to amounts of hydroxyl radicals (OH), was 2.78 for pure water (dissolved hydrogen [DH]≤0.01 ppm, oxidation-reduction potential [ORP]=+324 mV), 2.73 for tap water (0.01 ppm, +286 mV), 2.93 for commercially available hydrogen water (0.075 ppm, +49 mV), and 2.66 for manufactured hydrogen water (0.788 ppm, -614 mV), whereas the nano-H water (0.678 ppm, -644 mV) exhibited 2.05, showing the superiority of nano-H water to other types of hydrogen water in terms of OH-scavenging activity. Then, the reduction activity of nano-H water was assessed spectrophotometrically by the 2,2'-bipyridyl method. Differential absorbance at 530 nm was in the order: 0.018 for pure water, 0.055 for tap water, 0.079 for nano-H water, 0.085 for commercially available hydrogen water, and 0.090 for manufactured hydrogen water, indicating a prominent reduction activity of hydrogen water and nano-H water against oxidation in ascorbate-coupled ferric ion-bipyridyl reaction. Thus, nano-H water has an improved antioxidant activity as compared to hydrogen water of similar DH-level, indicating the more marked importance of nano-bubbles rather than the concentration of hydrogen in terms of OH-scavenging.

  18. Mutations inducing an active-site aperture in Rhizobium sp. sucrose isomerase confer hydrolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Alexandra; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Robert, Xavier; Rhimi, Moez; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Aghajari, Nushin

    2013-02-01

    Sucrose isomerase is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of sucrose isomers of high biotechnological and pharmaceutical interest. Owing to the complexity of the chemical synthesis of these isomers, isomaltulose and trehalulose, enzymatic conversion remains the preferred method for obtaining these products. Depending on the microbial source, the ratio of the sucrose-isomer products varies significantly. In studies aimed at understanding and explaining the underlying molecular mechanisms of these reactions, mutations obtained using a random-mutagenesis approach displayed a major hydrolytic activity. Two of these variants, R284C and F164L, of sucrose isomerase from Rhizobium sp. were therefore crystallized and their crystal structures were determined. The three-dimensional structures of these mutants allowed the identification of the molecular determinants that favour hydrolytic activity compared with transferase activity. Substantial conformational changes resulting in an active-site opening were observed, as were changes in the pattern of water molecules bordering the active-site region.

  19. Effect of surface characteristics of wood-based activated carbons on adsorption of hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Adib, F.; Bagreev, A.; Bandosz, T.J.

    1999-06-15

    Three wood-based commercial activated carbons supplied by Westvaco were studied as adsorbents of hydrogen sulfide. The initial materials were characterized using sorption of nitrogen, Boehm titration, potentiometric titration, water sorption, thermal analysis, and temperature-programmed desorption. The breakthrough tests were done at low concentrations of H{sub 2}S in the input gas to simulate conditions in water pollution control plants where carbon beds are used as odor adsorbents. In spite of apparent general similarities in the origin of the materials, method of activation, surface chemistry, and porosity, significant differences in their performance as hydrogen sulfide adsorbents were observed. Results show that the combined effect of the presence of pores large enough to accommodate surface functional groups and small enough to have the film of water at relatively low pressure contributes to oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. Moreover, there are features of activated carbon surfaces such as local environment of acidic/basic groups along with the presence of alkali metals which are important to the oxidation process.

  20. IMPACT OF NOBLE METALS AND MERCURY ON HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING HIGH LEVEL WASTE PRETREATMENT AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M; Tommy Edwards, T; David Koopman, D

    2009-03-03

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides (primarily iron, aluminum, calcium, magnesium, manganese, and uranium) and soluble sodium salts (carbonate, hydroxide, nitrite, nitrate, and sulfate). The pretreatment process in the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) consists of two process tanks, the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) as well as a melter feed tank. During SRAT processing, nitric and formic acids are added to the sludge to lower pH, destroy nitrite and carbonate ions, and reduce mercury and manganese. During the SME cycle, glass formers are added, and the batch is concentrated to the final solids target prior to vitrification. During these processes, hydrogen can be produced by catalytic decomposition of excess formic acid. The waste contains silver, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, and mercury, but silver and palladium have been shown to be insignificant factors in catalytic hydrogen generation during the DWPF process. A full factorial experimental design was developed to ensure that the existence of statistically significant two-way interactions could be determined without confounding of the main effects with the two-way interaction effects. Rh ranged from 0.0026-0.013% and Ru ranged from 0.010-0.050% in the dried sludge solids, while initial Hg ranged from 0.5-2.5 wt%, as shown in Table 1. The nominal matrix design consisted of twelve SRAT cycles. Testing included: a three factor (Rh, Ru, and Hg) study at two levels per factor (eight runs), three duplicate midpoint runs, and one additional replicate run to assess reproducibility away from the midpoint. Midpoint testing was used to identify potential quadratic effects from the three factors. A single sludge

  1. [Removal of fluorescent whitening agent by hydrogen peroxide oxidation catalyzed by activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Long; Zhang, Zhong-Min; Zhao, Xia; Jiao, Ru-Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Degradation of fluorescent whitening agent VBL in the processes of activated carbon (AC) and activated carbon modified (ACM) adsorptions, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) oxidation, and hydrogen peroxide oxidation catalyzed by activated carbon were studied. Mechanism of the above catalytic oxidation was also investigated by adding tert-Butyl alcohol (TBA), the free radical scavenger, and detecting the released gases. The results showed that: the activated carbon modified by Fe (NO3)3 (ACM)exhibited better adsorption removal than AC. Catalytic oxidation showed efficient removal of VBL, and the catalytic removal of AC (up to 95%) was significantly higher than that of ACM (58% only). Catalytic oxidation was inhibited by TBA, which indicates that the above reaction involved *OH radicals and atom oxygen generated by hydrogen peroxide with the presence of AC. The results of H2O2 decomposition and released gases detection involved in the process showed that activated carbon enhanced the decomposition of H2O2 which released oxygen and heat. More O2 was produced and higher temperature of the reactor was achieved, which indicated that H2O2 decomposition catalyzed by ACM was significantly faster than that of AC. Combining the results of VBL removal, it could be concluded that the rate of active intermediates (*OH radicals and atom oxygen) production by ACM catalytic reaction was faster than that of AC. These intermediates consumed themselves and produced O2 instead of degrading VBL. It seemed that the improper mutual matching of the forming rate of activating intermediates and the supply rate of reactants was an important reason for the lower efficiency of ACM catalytic reaction comparing with AC.

  2. Synthesis of Zn-MOF incorporating titanium-hydrides as active sites binding H2 molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongsik; Ok Kim, Dong; Wook Kim, Dong; Sagong, Kil

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the synthetic effort for a Zn-MOF imparting Ti-H as a preferential binding site potentially capturing H2 molecules via Kubas-type interaction. The formation mechanism of Ti-H innate to the final material was potentially demonstrated to follow a radical dissociation rather than a β-hydrogen elimination and a C-H reductive elimination.

  3. Molecular dynamics studies unravel role of conserved residues responsible for movement of ions into active site of DHBPS

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Ranajit Nivrutti; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Singh, Balvinder

    2017-01-01

    3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase (DHBPS) catalyzes the conversion of D-ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru5P) to L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate in the presence of Mg2+. Although crystal structures of DHBPS in complex with Ru5P and non-catalytic metal ions have been reported, structure with Ru5P along with Mg2+ is still elusive. Therefore, mechanistic role played by Mg2+ in the structure of DHBPS is poorly understood. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations of DHBPS-Ru5P complex along with Mg2+ have shown entry of Mg2+ from bulk solvent into active site. Presence of Mg2+ in active site has constrained conformations of Ru5P and has reduced flexibility of loop-2. Formation of hydrogen bonds among Thr-108 and residues - Gly-109, Val-110, Ser-111, and Asp-114 are found to be critical for entry of Mg2+ into active site. Subsequent in silico mutations of residues, Thr-108 and Asp-114 have substantiated the importance of these interactions. Loop-4 of one monomer is being proposed to act as a “lid” covering the active site of other monomer. Further, the conserved nature of residues taking part in the transfer of Mg2+ suggests the same mechanism being present in DHBPS of other microorganisms. Thus, this study provides insights into the functioning of DHBPS that can be used for the designing of inhibitors. PMID:28079168

  4. Molecular dynamics studies unravel role of conserved residues responsible for movement of ions into active site of DHBPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Ranajit Nivrutti; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Singh, Balvinder

    2017-01-01

    3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase (DHBPS) catalyzes the conversion of D-ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru5P) to L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate in the presence of Mg2+. Although crystal structures of DHBPS in complex with Ru5P and non-catalytic metal ions have been reported, structure with Ru5P along with Mg2+ is still elusive. Therefore, mechanistic role played by Mg2+ in the structure of DHBPS is poorly understood. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations of DHBPS-Ru5P complex along with Mg2+ have shown entry of Mg2+ from bulk solvent into active site. Presence of Mg2+ in active site has constrained conformations of Ru5P and has reduced flexibility of loop-2. Formation of hydrogen bonds among Thr-108 and residues - Gly-109, Val-110, Ser-111, and Asp-114 are found to be critical for entry of Mg2+ into active site. Subsequent in silico mutations of residues, Thr-108 and Asp-114 have substantiated the importance of these interactions. Loop-4 of one monomer is being proposed to act as a “lid” covering the active site of other monomer. Further, the conserved nature of residues taking part in the transfer of Mg2+ suggests the same mechanism being present in DHBPS of other microorganisms. Thus, this study provides insights into the functioning of DHBPS that can be used for the designing of inhibitors.

  5. Experimental and computational investigation of acetic acid deoxygenation over oxophilic molybdenum carbide: Surface chemistry and active site identity

    SciTech Connect

    Schaidle, Joshua A.; Blackburn, Jeffrey; Farberow, Carrie A.; Nash, Connor; Steirer, K. Xerxes; Clark, Jared; Robichaud, David J.; Ruddy, Daniel A.

    2016-01-21

    Ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) is a promising route for producing fungible biofuels; however, this process requires bifunctional catalysts that favor C–O bond cleavage, activate hydrogen at near atmospheric pressure and high temperature (350–500 °C), and are stable under high-steam, low hydrogen-to-carbon environments. Recently, early transition-metal carbides have been reported to selectively cleave C–O bonds of alcohols, aldehydes, and oxygenated aromatics, yet there is limited understanding of the metal carbide surface chemistry under reaction conditions and the identity of the active sites for deoxygenation. In this study, we evaluated molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) for the deoxygenation of acetic acid, an abundant component of biomass pyrolysis vapors, under ex situ CFP conditions, and we probed the Mo2C surface chemistry, identity of the active sites, and deoxygenation pathways using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  6. Experimental and computational investigation of acetic acid deoxygenation over oxophilic molybdenum carbide: Surface chemistry and active site identity

    DOE PAGES

    Schaidle, Joshua A.; Blackburn, Jeffrey; Farberow, Carrie A.; ...

    2016-01-21

    Ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) is a promising route for producing fungible biofuels; however, this process requires bifunctional catalysts that favor C–O bond cleavage, activate hydrogen at near atmospheric pressure and high temperature (350–500 °C), and are stable under high-steam, low hydrogen-to-carbon environments. Recently, early transition-metal carbides have been reported to selectively cleave C–O bonds of alcohols, aldehydes, and oxygenated aromatics, yet there is limited understanding of the metal carbide surface chemistry under reaction conditions and the identity of the active sites for deoxygenation. In this study, we evaluated molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) for the deoxygenation of acetic acid, anmore » abundant component of biomass pyrolysis vapors, under ex situ CFP conditions, and we probed the Mo2C surface chemistry, identity of the active sites, and deoxygenation pathways using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations.« less

  7. Site-specific PEGylation of lidamycin and its antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Shang, Boyang; Hu, Lei; Shao, Rongguang; Zhen, Yongsu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, N-terminal site-specific mono-PEGylation of the recombinant lidamycin apoprotein (rLDP) of lidamycin (LDM) was prepared using a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) derivative (Mw 20 kDa) through a reactive terminal aldehyde group under weak acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The biochemical properties of mPEG-rLDP-AE, an enediyne-integrated conjugate, were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of mPEG-rLDP-AE was evaluated by MTT assays and in xenograft model. The results indicated that mPEG-rLDP-AE showed significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. After PEGylation, mPEG-rLDP still retained the binding capability to the enediyne AE and presented the physicochemical characteristics similar to that of native LDP. It is of interest that the PEGylation did not diminish the antitumor efficacy of LDM, implying the possibility that this derivative may function as a payload to deliver novel tumor-targeted drugs. PMID:26579455

  8. The roles of active site residues in the catalytic mechanism of methylaspartate ammonia-lyase.

    PubMed

    Raj, Hans; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2013-01-01

    Methylaspartate ammonia-lyase (MAL; EC 4.3.1.2) catalyzes the reversible addition of ammonia to mesaconate to yield l-threo-(2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate and l-erythro-(2S,3R)-3-methylaspartate as products. In the proposed minimal mechanism for MAL of Clostridium tetanomorphum, Lys-331 acts as the (S)-specific base catalyst and abstracts the 3S-proton from l-threo-3-methylaspartate, resulting in an enolate anion intermediate. This enolic intermediate is stabilized by coordination to the essential active site Mg(2+) ion and hydrogen bonding to the Gln-329 residue. Collapse of this intermediate results in the release of ammonia and the formation of mesaconate. His-194 likely acts as the (R)-specific base catalyst and abstracts the 3R-proton from the l-erythro isomer of 3-methylaspartate, yielding the enolic intermediate. In the present study, we have investigated the importance of the residues Gln-73, Phe-170, Gln-172, Tyr-356, Thr-360, Cys-361 and Leu-384 for the catalytic activity of C. tetanomorphum MAL. These residues, which are part of the enzyme surface lining the substrate binding pocket, were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis and the mutant enzymes were characterized for their structural integrity, ability to catalyze the amination of mesaconate, and regio- and diastereoselectivity. Based on the observed properties of the mutant enzymes, combined with previous structural studies and protein engineering work, we propose a detailed catalytic mechanism for the MAL-catalyzed reaction, in which the side chains of Gln-73, Gln-172, Tyr-356, Thr-360, and Leu-384 provide favorable interactions with the substrate, which are important for substrate binding and activation. This detailed knowledge of the catalytic mechanism of MAL can serve as a guide for future protein engineering experiments.

  9. Protein engineering of the transcriptional activator FhlA To enhance hydrogen production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Torres, Viviana; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2009-09-01

    Escherichia coli produces H(2) from formate via the formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) complex during mixed acid fermentation; the FHL complex consists of formate dehydrogenase H (encoded by fdhF) for forming 2H(+), 2e(-), and CO(2) from formate and hydrogenase 3 (encoded by hycGE) for synthesizing H(2) from 2H(+) and 2e(-). FHL protein production is activated by the sigma(54) transcriptional activator FhlA, which activates transcription of fdhF and the hyc, hyp, and hydN-hypF operons. Here, through random mutagenesis using error-prone PCR over the whole gene, as well as over the fhlA region encoding the first 388 amino acids of the 692-amino-acid protein, we evolved FhlA to increase H(2) production. The amino acid replacements in FhlA133 (Q11H, L14V, Y177F, K245R, M288K, and I342F) increased hydrogen production ninefold, and the replacements in FhlA1157 (M6T, S35T, L113P, S146C, and E363K) increased hydrogen production fourfold. Saturation mutagenesis at the codons corresponding to the amino acid replacements in FhlA133 and at position E363 identified the importance of position L14 and of E363 for the increased activity; FhlA with replacements L14G and E363G increased hydrogen production (fourfold and sixfold, respectively) compared to FhlA. Whole-transcriptome and promoter reporter constructs revealed that the mechanism by which the FhlA133 changes increase hydrogen production is by increasing transcription of all of the genes activated by FhlA (the FHL complex). With FhlA133, transcription of P(fdhF) and P(hyc) is less sensitive to formate regulation, and with FhlA363 (E363G), P(hyc) transcription increases but P(hyp) transcription decreases and hydrogen production is less affected by the repressor HycA.

  10. Allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a using Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside and its combination.

    PubMed

    Rani, Nidhi; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; P T V, Lakshmi; Arunachalam, Annamalai

    2016-08-01

    Recent crystallographic study revealed the involvement of allosteric site in active site inhibition of penicillin binding protein (PBP2a), where one molecule of Ceftaroline (Cef) binds to the allosteric site of PBP2a and paved way for the other molecule (Cef) to bind at the active site. Though Cef has the potency to inhibit the PBP2a, its adverse side effects are of major concern. Previous studies have reported the antibacterial property of Quercetin derivatives, a group of natural compounds. Hence, the present study aims to evaluate the effect of Quercetin 3-o-rutinoside (Rut) in allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a. The molecular docking studies between allosteric site and ligands (Rut, Que, and Cef) revealed a better binding efficiency (G-score) of Rut (-7.790318) and Cef (-6.194946) with respect to Que (-5.079284). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies showed significant changes at the active site in the presence of ligands (Rut and Cef) at allosteric site. Four different combinations of Rut and Cef were docked and their G-scores ranged between -6.320 and -8.623. MD studies revealed the stability of the key residue (Ser403) with Rut being at both sites, compared to other complexes. Morphological analysis through electron microscopy confirmed that combination of Rut and Cefixime was able to disturb the bacterial cell membrane in a similar fashion to that of Rut and Cefixime alone. The results of this study indicate that the affinity of Rut at both sites were equally good, with further validations Rut could be considered as an alternative for inhibiting MRSA growth.

  11. Influence of Catalase Activity on Resistance of Coagulase-positive Staphylococci to Hydrogen Peroxide1

    PubMed Central

    Amin, V. M.; Olson, N. F.

    1968-01-01

    Catalase activities of intact cells and cell-free extracts of coagulase-positive staphylococcal cultures 105B and 558D isolated from milk, culture 25042 from a clinical source, and Staphylococcus aureus 196E were determined at 32.2 C. Cultures were treated with 0.025 and 0.05% hydrogen peroxide at 37.8 and 54.4 C and without hydrogen peroxide at 54.4 C to determine the relationship between catalase activity and resistance to these treatments. The relationship held true for cultures 105B and 196E; culture 105B had the lowest catalase activity and lowest resistance to H2O2 at 37.8 C, whereas S. aureus 196E possessed a high catalase activity and was most resistant at 37.8 C. Catalase activities of cell-free extracts of cultures 25042, 558, and 196E were similar, but resistance to H2O2 at 37.8 C was greater for culture 196E. The lower resistance of culture 25042 was related to low catalase activities of whole cells of this culture, which were only one-third that of whole cells of culture 196E. Culture 558 was least resistant to heat treatment at 54.4 C and showed the greatest sensitivity to added H2O2 at this temperature. PMID:5645413

  12. ON-SITE APPLICABILITY OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE PRODUCING MICROBIAL ELECTROCHEMICAL CELLS COUPLED WITH UV IN WASTEWATER DISINFECTION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an increased interest in the application of microbial electrochemical cell (MEC) for the recovery of value-added products such as hydrogen gas and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) from wastewater. H2O2 has strong oxidation capability and produces hydroxyl radicals when coupled w...

  13. On-site applicability of hydrogen peroxide producing microbial electrochemical cells (MECs) coupled with UV in wastewater disinfection study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: There is an increased interest in the application of microbial electrochemical cell (MEC) for the recovery of value-added products such as hydrogen gas and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) from wastewater. H2O2 has strong oxidation capability and produces hydroxyl radicals wh...

  14. Enhancement of Ag-Based Plasmonic Photocatalysis in Hydrogen Production from Ammonia Borane by the Assistance of Single-Site Ti-Oxide Moieties within a Silica Framework.

    PubMed

    Verma, Priyanka; Kuwahara, Yasutaka; Mori, Kohsuke; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2017-03-13

    Ag nanoparticles (NPs) have gained great attention owing to their interesting plasmonic properties and efficient catalysis under visible-light irradiation. In this study, an Ag-based plasmonic catalyst supported on mesoporous silica with isolated and tetrahedrally coordinated single-site Ti-oxide moieties, namely, Ag/Ti-SBA-15, was designed with the purpose of utilizing the broad spectral range of solar energy. The Ti-SBA-15 support allows the deposition of small Ag NPs with a narrow size distribution. The chemical structure, morphology, and optical properties of the prepared catalyst were characterized by techniques such as UV/Vis, FT extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, field-emission SEM, TEM, and N2 physisorption studies. The catalytic activity of Ag/Ti-SBA-15 in hydrogen production from ammonia borane by hydrolysis was significantly enhanced in comparison with Ag/SBA-15 without Ti-oxide moieties and Ag/TiO2 /SBA-15 involving agglomerated TiO2 , both in the dark and under light irradiation. Improved electron transfer under light irradiation caused by the creation of heterojunctions between Ag NPs and Ti-oxide moieties explains the results obtained in the present study.

  15. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site

    PubMed Central

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called ‘catalytic residues’ are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06181.001 PMID:25902402

  16. A split active site couples cap recognition by Dcp2 to activation

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N.; Jones, Brittnee N.; Hernandez, Gail A.; Gross, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Decapping by Dcp2 is an essential step in 5′-3′ mRNA decay. In yeast, decapping requires an open-to-closed transition in Dcp2, though the link between closure and catalysis remains elusive. Here we show using NMR that cap binds conserved residues on both the catalytic and regulatory domains of Dcp2. Lesions in the cap-binding site on the regulatory domain reduce the catalytic step two orders of magnitude and block formation of the closed state whereas Dcp1 enhances the catalytic step by a factor of ten and promotes closure. We conclude that closure occurs during the rate-limiting catalytic step of decapping, juxtaposing the cap-binding region of each domain to form a composite active site. This work suggests a model for regulation of decapping, where coactivators trigger decapping by stabilizing a labile composite active site. PMID:20711189

  17. Hydrogen Peroxide Scavenging Activity of Novel Coumarins Synthesized Using Different Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Al-Amiery, Ahmed A.; Al-Majedy, Yasameen K.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2015-01-01

    New derivatives of 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin were synthesized using a chemical method and a microwave-assisted method to compare the feasibility, reaction times, and yields of the product. The newly synthesized coumarins were characterized by different spectroscopic techniques (FT-IR and NMR) and micro-elemental analysis (CHNS). In vitro antioxidant activities of these compounds were evaluated against hydrogen peroxide and were compared with standard natural antioxidant, vitamin C. Our results reveal that these compounds exhibit excellent radical scavenging activities. PMID:26147722

  18. Ultrathin platinum nanowires grown on single-layered nickel hydroxide with high hydrogen evolution activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Huajie; Zhao, Shenlong; Zhao, Kun; Muqsit, Abdul; Tang, Hongjie; Chang, Lin; Zhao, Huijun; Gao, Yan; Tang, Zhiyong

    2015-03-01

    Design and synthesis of effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline environments is critical to reduce energy losses in alkaline water electrolysis. Here we report a hybrid nanomaterial comprising of one-dimensional ultrathin platinum nanowires grown on two-dimensional single-layered nickel hydroxide. Judicious surface chemistry to generate the fully exfoliated nickel hydroxide single layers is explored to be the key for controllable growth of ultrathin platinum nanowires with diameters of about 1.8 nm. Impressively, this hybrid nanomaterial exhibits superior electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline solution, which outperforms currently reported catalysts, and the obviously improved catalytic stability. We believe that this work may lead towards the development of single-layered metal hydroxide-based hybrid materials for applications in catalysis and energy conversion.

  19. Assessing site-specific spatio-temporal variations in hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes of human drinking water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, C. D.; Bowen, G. J.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Stable isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen (δ2H and δ18O) are environmental forensic tracers that can be used to constrain the origin and movement of animals, people, and products. The fundamental assumption underlying this method is that water resources at different geographic locations have distinct and characteristic isotopic signatures that are assimilated into organic tissues. Although much is known about regional-scale spatio-temporal variability in δ2H and δ18O of water, few studies have addressed the question of how distinct these geographic and seasonal patterns are for any given site. To address this question, a 2-year survey of δ2H and δ18O in tap water from across the contiguous U.S. and Canada was conducted. The data show that seasonal variability in δ2H and δ18O of tap water is generally low (<10 ‰ for δ2H), and those with the highest variability can be classified as: a) cities or towns in areas of high climate seasonality, or b) large cities in arid or seasonally arid regions which access and switch among multiple water sources throughout the year. The data suggest that inter-annual variation in tap water isotope ratios is typically low, with a median difference for month-month pairs during the 2 sampling years of 2.7 (δ2H). The results from this study confirm the existence of temporal variability in δ2H and δ18O of tap water, but suggest that this variability in human-managed systems is highly damped and may be amenable to classification, modeling, and prediction. In all, the data provide the foundation for incorporating temporal variation in predictive models of water and organic δ2H and δ18O, leading to more robust and statistically defensible tests of geographic origin.

  20. Investigating antimicrobial activity in Rheinheimera sp. due to hydrogen peroxide generated by l-lysine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen Ming; Lin, Chang Yi; Sheu, Shih Yi

    2010-05-05

    A greenish yellow pigmented bacterial strain, designated GR5, was recently isolated from a freshwater culture pond for a soft-shell turtle. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicate that strain GR5 belongs to the genus Rheinheimera and its only closest neighbor is the type strain of Rheinheimera texasensis (98.2%). Based on the antibiogram assay, strain GR5 possesses a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeast, algae, and strain GR5 itself. Strain GR5 can synthesize a macromolecule with antimicrobial activity due to the generation of hydrogen peroxide and this antimicrobial effect can be inhibited by catalase. This antimicrobial activity is active only in complex culture media or chemically defined culture media containing l-lysine. This antimicrobial macromolecule in strain GR5 is shown to be a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 71kDa and isoelectric point of approximately 3.68. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses reveal close similarity of a 19-amino acid fragment derived from this protein to the antibacterial protein, AlpP from the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas tunicata D2, and to the antibacterial protein, marinocine, from the marine bacterium Marinomonas mediterranea. This study explores the nature of antimicrobial macromolecule such as l-lysine oxidase. This is the first report on a freshwater bacterium producing antimicrobial activity by generating hydrogen peroxide through its enzymatic activity of l-lysine oxidase.

  1. Hydrogen elimination from a hydroxycyclopentadienyl ruthenium(II) hydride: study of hydrogen activation in a ligand-metal bifunctional hydrogenation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Casey, Charles P; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Singer, Steven W; Cui, Qiang

    2005-03-09

    At high temperatures in toluene, [2,5-Ph(2)-3,4-Tol(2)(eta(5)-C(4)COH)]Ru(CO)(2)H (3) undergoes hydrogen elimination in the presence of PPh(3) to produce the ruthenium phosphine complex [2,5-Ph(2)-3,4-Tol(2)-(eta(4)-C(4)CO)]Ru(PPh(3))(CO)(2) (6). In the absence of alcohols, the lack of RuH/OD exchange, a rate law first order in Ru and zero order in phosphine, and kinetic deuterium isotope effects all point to a mechanism involving irreversible formation of a transient dihydrogen ruthenium complex B, loss of H(2) to give unsaturated ruthenium complex A, and trapping by PPh(3) to give 6. DFT calculations showed that a mechanism involving direct transfer of a hydrogen from the CpOH group to form B had too high a barrier to be considered. DFT calculations also indicated that an alcohol or the CpOH group of 3 could provide a low energy pathway for formation of B. PGSE NMR measurements established that 3 is a hydrogen-bonded dimer in toluene, and the first-order kinetics indicate that two molecules of 3 are also involved in the transition state for hydrogen transfer to form B, which is the rate-limiting step. In the presence of ethanol, hydrogen loss from 3 is accelerated and RuD/OH exchange occurs 250 times faster than in its absence. Calculations indicate that the transition state for dihydrogen complex formation involves an ethanol bridge between the acidic CpOH and hydridic RuH of 3; the alcohol facilitates proton transfer and accelerates the reversible formation of dihydrogen complex B. In the presence of EtOH, the rate-limiting step shifts to the loss of hydrogen from B.

  2. Radioassay for Hydrogenase Activity in Viable Cells and Documentation of Aerobic Hydrogen-Consuming Bacteria Living in Extreme Environments

    PubMed Central

    Schink, Bernhard; Lupton, F. S.; Zeikus, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    An isotopic tracer assay based on the hydrogenase-dependent formation of tritiated water from tritium gas was developed for in life analysis of microbial hydrogen transformation. This method allowed detection of bacterial hydrogen metabolism in pure cultures or in natural samples obtained from aquatic ecosystems. A differentiation between chemical-biological and aerobic-anaerobic hydrogen metabolism was established by variation of the experimental incubation temperature or by addition of selective inhibitors. Hydrogenase activity was shown to be proportional to the consumption or production of hydrogen by cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Clostridium pasteurianum, and Methanosarcina barkeri. This method was applied, in connection with measurements of free hydrogen and most-probable-number enumerations, in aerobic natural source waters to establish the activity and document the ecology of hydrogen-consuming bacteria in extreme acid, thermal, or saline environments. The utility of the assay is based in part on the ability to quantify bacterial hydrogen transformation at natural hydrogen partial pressures, without the use of artificial electron acceptors. PMID:16346288

  3. Remote site-selective C–H activation directed by a catalytic bifunctional template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhipeng; Tanaka, Keita; Yu, Jin-Quan

    2017-03-01

    In chemical syntheses, the activation of carbon–hydrogen (C–H) bonds converts them directly into carbon–carbon or carbon–heteroatom bonds without requiring any prior functionalization. C–H activation can thus substantially reduce the number of steps involved in a synthesis. A single specific C–H bond in a substrate can be activated by using a ‘directing’ (usually a functional) group to obtain the desired product selectively. The applicability of such a C–H activation reaction can be severely curtailed by the distance of the C–H bond in question from the directing group, and by the shape of the substrate, but several approaches have been developed to overcome these limitations. In one such approach, an understanding of the distal and geometric relationships between the functional groups and C–H bonds of a substrate has been exploited to achieve meta-selective C–H activation by using a covalently attached, U-shaped template. However, stoichiometric installation of this template has not been feasible in the absence of an appropriate functional group on which to attach it. Here we report the design of a catalytic, bifunctional nitrile template that binds a heterocyclic substrate via a reversible coordination instead of a covalent linkage. The two metal centres coordinated to this template have different roles: one reversibly anchors substrates near the catalyst, and the other cleaves remote C–H bonds. Using this strategy, we demonstrate remote, site-selective C–H olefination of heterocyclic substrates that do not have the necessary functional groups for covalently attaching templates.

  4. Bond Activation and Hydrogen Evolution from Water through Reactions with M3S4 (M = Mo, W) and W3S3 Anionic Clusters.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Corrine A; Saha, Arjun; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2017-03-02

    Transition metal sulfides (TMS) are being investigated with increased frequency because of their ability to efficiently catalyze the hydrogen evolution reaction. We have studied the trimetallic TMS cluster ions, Mo3S4(-), W3S4(-), and W3S3(-), and probed their efficiency for bond activation and hydrogen evolution from water. These clusters have geometries that are related to the edge sites on bulk MoS2 surfaces that are known to play a role in hydrogen evolution. Using density functional theory, the electronic structures of these clusters and their chemical reactivity with water have been investigated. The reaction mechanism involves the initial formation of hydroxyl and thiol groups, hydrogen migration to form an intermediate with a metal hydride bond, and finally, combination of a hydride and a proton to eliminate H2. Using this mechanism, free energy profiles of the reactions of the three metal clusters with water have been constructed. Unlike previous reactivity studies of other related cluster systems, there is no overall energy barrier in the reactions involving the M3S4 systems. The energy required for the rate-determining step of the reaction (the initial addition of the cluster by water) is lower than the separated reactants (-0.8 kcal/mol for Mo and -5.1 kcal/mol for W). They confirm the M3S4(-) cluster's ability to efficiently activate the chemical bonds in water to release H2. Though the W3S3(-) cluster is not as efficient at bond activation, it provides insights into the factors that contribute to the success of the M3S4 anionic systems in hydrogen evolution.

  5. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  6. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems.

  7. Elucidation of the binding sites of sodium dodecyl sulfate to β-lactoglobulin using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry combined with docking simulation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenbing; Liu, Jianan; Luo, Qun; Han, Yumiao; Wu, Kui; Lv, Shuang; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Wang, Fuyi

    2011-05-30

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (H/DX MS) has become a powerful tool to investigate protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, but it is still challenging to localize the interaction regions/sites of ligands with pepsin-resistant proteins such as lipocalins. β-Lactoglobulin (BLG), a member of the lipocalin family, can bind a variety of small hydrophobic molecules including retinols, retinoic acids, and long linear fatty acids. However, whether the binding site of linear molecules locates in the external groove or internal cavity of BLG is controversial. In this study we used H/DX MS combined with docking simulation to localize the interaction sites of a tested ligand, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), binding to BLG. H/DX MS results indicated that SDS can bind to both the external and the internal sites in BLG. However, neither of the sites is saturated with SDS, allowing a dynamic ligand exchange to occur between the sites at equilibrium state. Docking studies revealed that SDS forms H-bonds with Lys69 in the internal site and Lys138 and Lys141 in the external site in BLG via the sulfate group, and interacts with the hydrophobic residues valine, leucine, isoleucine and methionine within both of the sites via its hydrocarbon tail, stabilizing the BLG-SDS complex.

  8. On the origin of reversible hydrogen activation by phosphine-boranes.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Ramanan; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2009-11-23

    Mechanistic insights into the factors responsible for the reversible hydrogen-activation ability exhibited by an aryl phosphine-borane system ((CH(3))(2)P-C(6)F(4)-B(CF(3))(2)) are presented. A detailed evaluation of the energies of various intermediates, generated by the addition of molecular hydrogen, and their interconverting barriers have been carried out using ab initio and DFT methods. Several rearrangement possibilities of the H(2)-phosphino-borane adduct have been investigated so as to unravel the lower energy pathways that convert the initial adduct to a series of other intermediates. The initial adduct formed by the heterolytic addition of a molecular hydrogen across the C-B bond is identified to undergo a series of rearrangement reactions until it terminates at the C-P end of the molecule. Among the possible 1,n-migrations (for which n=1-5), 1,2-proton migrations are found to possess lower energy transition states, whereas 1,2-hydride (in a zwitterionic intermediate) and 1,4-proton-coupled electron transfers exhibited much higher energy transition states. The minimum energy pathway for the transfer of a proton and hydride from the C-B bond to the C-P bond is found to involve a cascade of 1,2-proton transfers followed by a 1,2-hydride migration and finally a 1,4-proton-coupled electron transfer. The higher energy pathways identified for the hydride transfer suggest the possibility of a cascade of reversible proton migrations from a thermodynamically stable intermediate (M(a)). Possible uptake of two hydrogen molecules by the phosphine-borane system is additionally considered in the present study, in which relatively higher barriers than those with one molecule of hydrogen are observed. The computed thermodynamic parameters are found to be in accordance with the experimental observations, in which the uptake and storage of molecular hydrogen are carried out at lower temperatures whereas the liberation demands elevated temperatures.

  9. Energetics of Ortho-7 (oxime drug) translocation through the active-site gorge of tabun conjugated acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Vivek; Ganguly, Bishwajit; Bandyopadhyay, Tusar

    2012-01-01

    Oxime drugs translocate through the 20 Å active-site gorge of acetylcholinesterase in order to liberate the enzyme from organophosphorus compounds' (such as tabun) conjugation. Here we report bidirectional steered molecular dynamics simulations of oxime drug (Ortho-7) translocation through the gorge of tabun intoxicated enzyme, in which time dependent external forces accelerate the translocation event. The simulations reveal the participation of drug-enzyme hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interactions and water bridges between them. Employing nonequilibrium theorems that recovers the free energy from irreversible work done, we reconstruct potential of mean force along the translocation pathway such that the desired quantity represents an unperturbed system. The potential locates the binding sites and barriers for the drug to translocate inside the gorge. Configurational entropic contribution of the protein-drug binding entity and the role of solvent translational mobility in the binding energetics is further assessed.

  10. Active Site and Electronic Structure Elucidation of Pt Nanoparticles Supported on Phase-Pure Molybdenum Carbide Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shuai; Wang, Lucun; Saha, Shibely; Fushimi, Rebecca R; Li, Dongmei

    2017-03-22

    We recently showed that phase-pure molybdenum carbide nanotubes can be durable supports for platinum (Pt) nanoparticles in hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this paper we further characterize surface properties of the same Pt/β-Mo2C catalyst platform using carbon monoxide (CO)-Pt and CO-Mo2C bond strength of different Pt particle sizes in the <3 nm range. Results from diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and temporal analysis of products (TAP) revealed the existence of different active sites as Pt particle size increases. Correlation between the resultant catalyst activity and deposited Pt particle size was further investigated using water-gas-shift (WGS) as a probe reaction, suggesting that precise control of particle diameter and thickness is needed for optimized catalytic activity.

  11. Cell death activation during cavitation of embryoid bodies is mediated by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Hernández-García, David; Castro-Obregón, Susana; Gómez-López, Sandra; Valencia, Concepción; Covarrubias, Luis

    2008-06-10

    The formation of the proamniotic cavity is the first indication of programmed cell death associated to a morphogenetic process in mammals. Although some growth factors have been implicated in proamniotic cavitation, very little is known about the intracellular mechanisms that control the cell death process itself. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are potent activators of cell death, thus, in the present work we evaluated the role of ROS during the cavitation of embryoid bodies (EBs), a common model to study proamniotic cavitation. During cavitation, ROS concentration increases in the inner cells of EBs, and this ROS accumulation appears to be associated with the mitochondrial respiratory activity. In agreement with a role of ROS in cavitation, EBs derived from ES cells that overproduce catalase, an enzyme that specifically degrades hydrogen peroxide, do not cavitate, and caspase activation and cell death is markedly decreased. Notably, cell death, but not the rise in ROS, during EB cavitation is caspase-dependent. The apoptosis-inducing factor (Aif) is released from the mitochondria during cavitation, but EBs derived from Aif(-/y) ES cells cavitate and ROS levels in the inner cells remain high. We conclude that hydrogen peroxide is a cell death activating signal essential for EB cavitation, suggesting that cell death during proamniotic cavitation is mediated by ROS.

  12. Water-containing hydrogen-bonding network in the active center of channelrhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shota; Kato, Hideaki E; Taniguchi, Reiya; Iwata, Tatsuya; Nureki, Osamu; Kandori, Hideki

    2014-03-05

    Channelrhodopsin (ChR) functions as a light-gated ion channel in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Passive transport of cations by ChR is fundamentally different from the active transport by light-driven ion pumps such as archaerhodopsin, bacteriorhodopsin, and halorhodopsin. These microbial rhodopsins are important tools for optogenetics, where ChR is used to activate neurons by light, while the ion pumps are used for neural silencing. Ion-transport functions by these rhodopsins strongly depend on the specific hydrogen-bonding networks containing water near the retinal chromophore. In this work, we measured protein-bound water molecules in a chimeric ChR protein of ChR1 (helices A to E) and ChR2 (helices F and G) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using low-temperature FTIR spectroscopy at 77 K. We found that the active center of ChR possesses more water molecules (9 water vibrations) than those of other microbial (2-6 water vibrations) and animal (6-8 water vibrations) rhodopsins. We conclude that the protonated retinal Schiff base interacts with the counterion (Glu162) directly, without the intervening water molecule found in proton-pumping microbial rhodopsins. The present FTIR results and the recent X-ray structure of ChR reveal a unique hydrogen-bonding network around the active center of this light-gated ion channel.

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide Induced Carbon Dioxide Activation by Metal-Free Dual Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S

    2016-03-18

    The role of metal free dual catalysis in the hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-induced activation of carbon dioxide (CO2) and subsequent decomposition of resulting monothiolcarbonic acid in the gas phase has been explored. The results suggest that substituted amines and monocarboxylic type organic or inorganic acids via dual activation mechanisms promote both activation and decomposition reactions, implying that the judicious selection of a dual catalyst is crucial to the efficient C-S bond formation via CO2 activation. Considering that our results also suggest a new mechanism for the formation of carbonyl sulfide from CO2 and H2S, these new insights may help in better understanding the coupling between the carbon and sulfur cycles in the atmospheres of Earth and Venus.

  14. Molybdenum phosphosulfide: an active, acid-stable, earth-abundant catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Kibsgaard, Jakob; Jaramillo, Thomas F

    2014-12-22

    Introducing sulfur into the surface of molybdenum phosphide (MoP) produces a molybdenum phosphosulfide (MoP|S) catalyst with superb activity and stability for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in acidic environments. The MoP|S catalyst reported herein exhibits one of the highest HER activities of any non-noble-metal electrocatalyst investigated in strong acid, while remaining perfectly stable in accelerated durability testing. Whereas mixed-metal alloy catalysts are well-known, MoP|S represents a more uncommon mixed-anion catalyst where synergistic effects between sulfur and phosphorus produce a high-surface-area electrode that is more active than those based on either the pure sulfide or the pure phosphide. The extraordinarily high activity and stability of this catalyst open up avenues to replace platinum in technologies relevant to renewable energies, such as proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzers and solar photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting cells.

  15. Glycerophosphate-dependent hydrogen peroxide production by brown adipose tissue mitochondria and its activation by ferricyanide.

    PubMed

    Drahota, Zdenek; Chowdhury, Subir K R; Floryk, Daniel; Mrácek, Tomás; Wilhelm, Jirí; Rauchová, Hana; Lenaz, Giorgio; Houstek, Josef

    2002-04-01

    Oxidation of glycerophosphate (GP) by brown adipose tissue mitochondria in the presence of antimycin A was found to be accompanied by significant production of hydrogen peroxide. GP-dependent hydrogen peroxide production could be detected by p-hydroxyphenylacetate fluorescence changes or as an antimycin A-insensitive oxygen consumption. One-electron acceptor, potassium ferricyanide, highly stimulated the rate of GP-dependent antimycin A-insensitive oxygen uptake, which was prevented by inhibitors of mitochondrial GP dehydrogenase (mGPDH) or by coenzyme Q (CoQ). GP-dependent ferricyanide-induced peroxide production was also determined luminometrically, using mitochondria or partially purified mGPDH. Ferricyanide-induced peroxide production was negligible, when succinate or NADH was used as a substrate. These results indicate that hydrogen peroxide is produced directly by mGPDH and reflect the differences in the transport of reducing equivalents from mGPDH and succinate dehydrogenase to the CoQ pool. The data suggest that more intensive production of reactive oxygen species may be present in mammalian cells with active mGPDH.

  16. Locking covalent organic frameworks with hydrogen bonds: general and remarkable effects on crystalline structure, physical properties, and photochemical activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiong; Addicoat, Matthew; Jin, Enquan; Zhai, Lipeng; Xu, Hong; Huang, Ning; Guo, Zhaoqi; Liu, Lili; Irle, Stephan; Jiang, Donglin

    2015-03-11

    A series of two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks (2D COFs) locked with intralayer hydrogen-bonding (H-bonding) interactions were synthesized. The H-bonding interaction sites were located on the edge units of the imine-linked tetragonal porphyrin COFs, and the contents of the H-bonding sites in the COFs were synthetically tuned using a three-component condensation system. The intralayer H-bonding interactions suppress the torsion of the edge units and lock the tetragonal sheets in a planar conformation. This planarization enhances the interlayer interactions and triggers extended π-cloud delocalization over the 2D sheets. Upon AA stacking, the resulting COFs with layered 2D sheets amplify these effects and strongly affect the physical properties of the material, including improving their crystallinity, enhancing their porosity, increasing their light-harvesting capability, reducing their band gap, and enhancing their photocatalytic activity toward the generation of singlet oxygen. These remarkable effects on the structure and properties of the material were observed for both freebase and metalloporphyin COFs. These results imply that exploration of supramolecular ensembles would open a new approach to the structural and functional design of COFs.

  17. Simulation of the effect of hydrogen bonds on water activity of glucose and dextran using the Veytsman model.

    PubMed

    De Vito, Francesca; Veytsman, Boris; Painter, Paul; Kokini, Jozef L

    2015-03-06

    Carbohydrates exhibit either van der Waals and ionic interactions or strong hydrogen bonding interactions. The prominence and large number of hydrogen bonds results in major contributions to phase behavior. A thermodynamic framework that accounts for hydrogen bonding interactions is therefore necessary. We have developed an extension of the thermodynamic model based on the Veytsman association theory to predict the contribution of hydrogen bonds to the behavior of glucose-water and dextran-water systems and we have calculated the free energy of mixing and its derivative leading to chemical potential and water activity. We compared our calculations with experimental data of water activity for glucose and dextran and found excellent agreement far superior to the Flory-Huggins theory. The validation of our calculations using experimental data demonstrated the validity of the Veytsman model in properly accounting for the hydrogen bonding interactions and successfully predicting water activity of glucose and dextran. Our calculations of the concentration of hydrogen bonds using the Veytsman model were instrumental in our ability to explain the difference between glucose and dextran and the role that hydrogen bonds play in contributing to these differences. The miscibility predictions showed that the Veytsman model is also able to correctly describe the phase behavior of glucose and dextran.

  18. Spectroscopic insights into the nature of active sites in iron–nitrogen–carbon electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction in acid

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Qingying; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Tylus, Urszula; Strickland, Kara; Li, Jingkun; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Anibal, Jacob; Gumeci, Cenk; Barton, Scott Calabrese; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frederic; Halevi, Barr; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2016-11-01

    of the site-blocking effect. Moreover, a highly active MOF-based catalyst without Fe–N moieties was developed, and the active sites were identified as nitrogen-doped carbon fibers with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. The high ORR activity and durability of catalysts involving this second site, as demonstrated in fuel cell, are attributed to the high density of active sites and the elimination or reduction of Fenton-type processes. The latter are initiated by hydrogen peroxide but are known to be accelerated by iron ions exposed to the surface, resulting in the formation of damaging free-radicals.

  19. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  20. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  1. Mechanistic Insights into the Bifunctional Non-Heme Iron Oxygenase Carbapenem Synthase by Active Site Saturation Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Ryan M.; Townsend, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    The carbapenem class of β-lactam antibiotics is known for its remarkable potency, antibacterial spectrum and resistance to β-lactamase-mediated inactivation. While the biosynthesis of structurally “complex” carbapenems, such as thienamycin, share initial biochemical steps with carbapenem-3-carboxylate (“simple” carbapenem), the requisite inversion at C5 and formation of the characteristic α,β-unsaturated carboxylate are different in origin between the two groups. Here we consider carbapenem synthase, a mechanistically distinct bifunctional non-heme iron α-ketoglutarate-dependent enzyme responsible for the terminal reactions, C5 epimerization and desaturation, in simple carbapenem production. Interestingly, this enzyme accepts two stereoisomeric substrates and transforms each to a common active antibiotic. Owing both to enzyme and product instability, resort to saturation mutagenesis of active site and selected second-sphere residues gave clearly differing profiles of CarC tolerance to structural modification. Guided by a crystal structure and the mutational data, in silico docking was used to suggest the positioning of each disastereomeric substrate in the active site. The two orientations relative to the reactive iron-oxo center are manifest in the two distinct reactions, C5-epimerization and C2/3-desaturation. These observations favor a two-step reaction scheme involving two complete oxidative cycles as opposed to a single catalytic cycle in which an active site tyrosine, Tyr67, after hydrogen donation to achieve bicyclic ring inversion, is further hypothesized to serve as a radical carrier. PMID:23611403

  2. Hydrogen Adsorption on Activated Carbon an Carbon Nanotubes Using Volumetric Differential Pressure Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanip, S. M.; Saidin, M. A. R.; Aziz, M.; Ismail, A. F.

    2010-03-01

    A simple hydrogen adsorption measurement system utilizing the volumetri differential pressure technique has been designed, fabricated and calibrated. Hydroge adsorption measurements have been carried out at temperatures 298 K and 77 K on activate carbon and carbon nanotubes with different surface areas. The adsorption data obtained will b helpful in understanding the adsorption property of the studied carbon materials using th fundamentals of adsorption theory. The principle of the system follows the Sievert-type metho The system measures a change in pressure between the reference cell, R1 and the sample cell S1, S2, S3 over a certain temperature range. R1, S1, S2, and S3 having known fixed volume The sample temperatures will be monitored by thermocouple TC while the pressures in R1 an S1, S2, S3 will be measured using a digital pressure transducer. The maximum operatin pressure of the pressure transducer is 20 bar and calibrated with an accuracy of ±0.01 bar. Hig purity hydrogen is being used in the system and the amount of samples for the study is betwee 1.0-2.0 grams. The system was calibrated using helium gas without any samples in S1, S2 an S3. This will provide a correction factor during the adsorption process providing an adsorption free reference point when using hydrogen gas resulting in a more accurate reading of th adsorption process by eliminating the errors caused by temperature expansion effects and oth non-adsorption related phenomena. The ideal gas equation of state is applied to calculate th hydrogen adsorption capacity based on the differential pressure measurements. Activated carbo with a surface area of 644.87 m2/g showed a larger amount of adsorption as compared to multiwalled nanotubes (commercial) with a surface area of 119.68 m2/g. This study als indicated that there is a direct correlation between the amounts of hydrogen adsorbed an surface area of the carbon materials under the conditions studied and that the adsorption significant at 77

  3. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  4. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  5. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  6. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  7. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  8. Robotics and Automation Activities at the Savannah River Site: A Site Report for SUBWOG 39F

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.

    1995-09-28

    The Savannah River Site has successfully used robots, teleoperators, and remote video to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, improve worker safety, and improve the quality of operations. Previous reports have described the use of mobile teleoperators in coping with a high level liquid waste spill, the removal of highly contaminated equipment, and the inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. This report will cover recent applications at the Savannah River, as well as systems which SRS has delivered to other DOE site customers.

  9. Sites of Superoxide and Hydrogen Peroxide Production by Muscle Mitochondria Assessed ex Vivo under Conditions Mimicking Rest and Exercise*

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Renata L. S.; Quinlan, Casey L.; Perevoshchikova, Irina V.; Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Brand, Martin D.

    2015-01-01

    The sites and rates of mitochondrial production of superoxide and H2O2 in vivo are not yet defined. At least 10 different mitochondrial sites can generate these species. Each site has a different maximum capacity (e.g. the outer quinol site in complex III (site IIIQo) has a very high capacity in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria, whereas the flavin site in complex I (site IF) has a very low capacity). The maximum capacities can greatly exceed the actual rates observed in the absence of electron transport chain inhibitors, so maximum capacities are a poor guide to actual rates. Here, we use new approaches to measure the rates at which different mitochondrial sites produce superoxide/H2O2 using isolated muscle mitochondria incubated in media mimicking the cytoplasmic substrate and effector mix of skeletal muscle during rest and exercise. We find that four or five sites dominate during rest in this ex vivo system. Remarkably, the quinol site in complex I (site IQ) and the flavin site in complex II (site IIF) each account for about a quarter of the total measured rate of H2O2 production. Site IF, site IIIQo, and perhaps site EF in the β-oxidation pathway account for most of the remainder. Under conditions mimicking mild and intense aerobic exercise, total production is much less, and the low capacity site IF dominates. These results give novel insights into which mitochondrial sites may produce superoxide/H2O2 in vivo. PMID:25389297

  10. GAS HYDRATES AT TWO SITES OF AN ACTIVE CONTINENTAL MARGIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart on the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m.

  11. Final Report for the DOE-BES Program Mechanistic Studies of Activated Hydrogen Release from Amine-Boranes

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Sneddon; R. Thomas Baker

    2013-01-13

    Effective storage of hydrogen presents one of the most significant technical gaps to successful implementation of the hydrogen economy, particularly for transportation applications. Amine boranes, such as ammonia borane H3NBH3 and ammonia triborane H3NB3H7, have been identified as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage media containing potentially readily released protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens. At the outset of our studies, dehydrogenation of ammonia borane had been studied primarily in the solid state, but our DOE sponsored work clearly demonstrated that ionic liquids, base-initiators and/or metal-catalysts can each significantly increase both the rate and extent of hydrogen release from amine boranes under moderate conditions. Our studies also showed that depending upon the activation method, hydrogen release from amine boranes can occur by very different mechanistic steps and yield different types of spent-fuel materials. The fundamental understanding that was developed during this grant of the pathways and controlling factors for each of these hydrogen-release mechanisms is now enabling continuing discovery and optimization of new chemical-hydride based hydrogen storage systems.

  12. Room-Temperature Activation of Hydrogen by Semi-immobilized Frustrated Lewis Pairs in Microporous Polymer Networks.

    PubMed

    Trunk, Matthias; Teichert, Johannes F; Thomas, Arne

    2017-03-15

    Porous polymer networks based on sterically encumbered triphenylphosphine motifs, mimicking the basic sites employed in frustrated Lewis pair (FLP) chemistry, were synthesized via Yamamoto polymerization and their interactions with the strong Lewis acid B(C6F5)3 probed. The combinations yield semi-immobilized FLPs, which are able to cleave dihydrogen heterolytically at ambient temperature and low hydrogen pressure.

  13. Hydrogen carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Teng; Pachfule, Pradip; Wu, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen has the potential to be a major energy vector in a renewable and sustainable future energy mix. The efficient production, storage and delivery of hydrogen are key technical issues that require improvement before its potential can be realized. In this Review, we focus on recent advances in materials development for on-board hydrogen storage. We highlight the strategic design and optimization of hydrides of light-weight elements (for example, boron, nitrogen and carbon) and physisorbents (for example, metal-organic and covalent organic frameworks). Furthermore, hydrogen carriers (for example, NH3, CH3OH-H2O and cycloalkanes) for large-scale distribution and for on-site hydrogen generation are discussed with an emphasis on dehydrogenation catalysts.

  14. Pharmacological investigation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) contractile activity in rat detrusor muscle.

    PubMed

    Patacchini, Riccardo; Santicioli, Paolo; Giuliani, Sandro; Maggi, Carlo Alberto

    2005-02-21

    We have investigated the mechanism through which hydrogen sulfide (H2S) stimulates capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent neurons in the rat isolated urinary bladder. Sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS), a donor of H2S, produced concentration-dependent contractile responses (pEC50=3.5+/-0.1) that were unaffected by the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) antagonist capsazepine (30 microM) and SB 366791 (10 microM) and by the N-type Ca2+ channel blocker omega-conotoxin GVIA (omega-CTX; 100 nM). In contrast, the unselective transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels blocker ruthenium red (30 microM) almost abolished NaHS-induced contractions. Ruthenium red (30 microM) greatly reduced capsaicin-induced contractions, whereas it did not attenuate the contractile response to neurokinin A. The putative TRPV1 receptor antagonist iodo-resiniferatoxin, from 100 nM upward, produced agonist responses per se, and could not be tested against NaHS. We conclude that H2S either acts at TRPV1 receptorial sites unblocked by capsazepine or SB 366791, or stimulates a still unidentified transient receptor potential-like channel co-expressed with TRPV1 on sensory neurons.

  15. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Zhu, Yihan; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Fudong; Huang, Jianfeng; Meng, Xiangju; Basset, Jean-Marie; Han, Yu; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-04-01

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold-gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen.

  16. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Zhu, Yihan; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Fudong; Huang, Jianfeng; Meng, Xiangju; Basset, Jean-Marie; Han, Yu; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold–gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen. PMID:25902034

  17. Hydrous RuO2 nanoparticles as highly active electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jooyoung; Sher Shah, Selim Arif; Yoo, Pil J.; Lim, Byungkwon

    2017-04-01

    This letter describes an aqueous-phase synthetic route to hydrous ruthenium oxide (RuO2) nanoparticles and their conversion into crystalline ones via a thermal annealing process. Electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to characterize hydrous and crystalline RuO2 nanoparticles. The hydrous RuO2 nanoparticles exhibited higher activity for hydrogen evolution reaction than commercial Pt catalyst, while the crystalline RuO2 nanoparticles showed better performance for oxygen evolution reaction than IrO2 catalyst. With these hydrous and crystalline RuO2 catalysts, we were able to achieve highly efficient overall electrochemical water splitting.

  18. Design of active and stable Co-Mo-Sx chalcogels as pH-universal catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Staszak-Jirkovský, Jakub; Malliakas, Christos D; Lopes, Pietro P; Danilovic, Nemanja; Kota, Subrahmanyam S; Chang, Kee-Chul; Genorio, Bostjan; Strmcnik, Dusan; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Markovic, Nenad M

    2016-02-01

    Three of the fundamental catalytic limitations that have plagued the electrochemical production of hydrogen for decades still remain: low efficiency, short lifetime of catalysts and a lack of low-cost materials. Here, we address these three challenges by establishing and exploring an intimate functional link between the reactivity and stability of crystalline (CoS2 and MoS2) and amorphous (CoSx and MoSx) hydrogen evolution catalysts. We propose that Co(2+) and Mo(4+) centres promote the initial discharge of water (alkaline solutions) or hydronium ions (acid solutions). We establish that although CoSx materials are more active than MoSx they are also less stable, suggesting that the active sites are defects formed after dissolution of Co and Mo cations. By combining the higher activity of CoSx building blocks with the higher stability of MoSx units into a compact and robust CoMoSx chalcogel structure, we are able to design a low-cost alternative to noble metal catalysts for efficient electrocatalytic production of hydrogen in both alkaline and acidic environments.

  19. Design of active and stable Co-Mo-Sx chalcogels as pH-universal catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Staszak-Jirkovsky, Jakub; Malliakas, Christos D.; Lopes, Pietro P.; Danilovic, Nemanja; Kota, Subrahmanyam S.; Chang, Kee-Chul; Genorio, Bostjan; Strmcnik, Dusan; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Markovic, Nenad M.

    2016-02-01

    Three of the fundamental catalytic limitations that have plagued the electrochemical production of hydrogen for decades still remain: low efficiency, short lifetime of catalysts and a lack of low-cost materials. Here, we address these three challenges by establishing and exploring an intimate functional link between the reactivity and stability of crystalline (CoS2 and MoS2) and amorphous (CoSx and MoSx) hydrogen evolution catalysts. We propose that Co2+ and Mo4+ centers promote the initial discharge of water (alkaline solutions) or hydronium ions (acid solutions). We establish that although CoSx materials are more active than MoSx they are also less stable, suggesting that the active sites are defects formed after dissolution of Co and Mo cations. By combining the higher activity of CoSx building blocks with the higher stability of MoSx units into a compact and robust CoMoSx structure, we are able to design a low-cost alternative to noble metal catalysts for efficient electrocatalytic production of hydrogen in both alkaline and acidic environments.

  20. Towards highly active Pd/CeO2 for alkene hydrogenation by tuning Pd dispersion and surface properties of the catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sai; Li, Jing; Xia, Zhaoming; Wu, Chao; Zhang, Zhiyun; Ma, Yuanyuan; Qu, Yongquan

    2017-03-02

    Extensive applications of noble metals as heterogeneous catalysts are limited by their global reserve scarcity and exorbitant price. Identifying the intrinsic active nature of a catalyst benefits the designing of catalysts with trace amounts of noble metals; these catalysts display better or comparable overall catalytic efficiency than their heavily loaded counterparts. Herein, systematic studies on Pd dispersion and surface properties of a series of Pd/CeO2 catalysts for styrene hydrogenation showed that high Pd dispersion and surface abundant defects of the catalysts are essential to realize superior activity. Highly dispersed subnanometric Pd clusters on porous nanorods of ceria with a large surface Ce(3+) fraction of 27.4%, high Pd dispersion of 73.6%, and low Pd loading of 0.081 wt% delivered a very large turnover frequency of 103 233 h(-1) based on each exposed Pd atom for styrene hydrogenation at 1.0 MPa H2 and 30 °C. Experimental data, kinetic analysis, and density functional theory calculations revealed that the highly dispersed Pd shows a low affinity for styrene and provides more exposed Pd sites for hydrogen activation. The surface abundant defects (oxygen vacancy) of Pd/CeO2 catalysts can enrich the electron density of Pd, improve its capability for H2 dissociation and lower the affinity of styrene for Pd.

  1. Lidar research activities and observations at NARL site, Gadanki, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellapragada, Bhavani Kumar

    2016-05-01

    The National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), a unit of Department of Space (DOS), located at Gadanki village (13.5°N, 79.2°E, 370 m AMSL) in India, is involved in the development of lidar remote sensing technologies for atmospheric research. Several advanced lidar technologies employing micropulse, polarization, Raman and scanning have been developed at this site and demonstrated for atmospheric studies during the period between 2008 and 2015. The technology of micropulse lidar, operates at 532 nm wavelength, was successfully transferred to an industry and the commercial version has been identified for Indian Lidar network (I-LINK) programme. Under this lidar network activity, several lidar units were installed at different locations in India to study tropospheric aerosols and clouds. The polarization sensitive lidar technology was realized using a set of mini photomultiplier tube (PMT) units and has the capability to operate during day and night without a pause. The lidar technology uses a compact flashlamp pumped Qswitched laser and employs biaxial configuration between the transmitter and receiver units. The lidar technology has been utilized for understanding the polarization characteristics of boundary layer aerosols during the mixed layer development. The demonstrated Raman lidar technology, uses the third harmonic wavelength of Nd:YAG laser, provides the altitude profiles of aerosol backscattering, extinction and water vapor covering the boundary layer range and allows operation during nocturnal periods. The Raman lidar derived height profiles of aerosol backscattering and extinction coefficient, lidar ratio, and watervapor mixing ratio inform the tropical boundary layer aerosol characteristics. The scanning lidar technology uses a near infrared laser wavelength for probing the lower atmosphere and has been utilized for high resolution cloud profiling during convective periods. The lidar technology is also used for rain rate measurement during

  2. Conserved active site residues limit inhibition of a copper-containing nitrite reductase by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Tocheva, Elitza I; Eltis, Lindsay D; Murphy, Michael E P

    2008-04-15

    The interaction of copper-containing dissimilatory nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 ( AfNiR) with each of five small molecules was studied using crystallography and steady-state kinetics. Structural studies revealed that each small molecule interacted with the oxidized catalytic type 2 copper of AfNiR. Three small molecules (formate, acetate and nitrate) mimic the substrate by having at least two oxygen atoms for bidentate coordination to the type 2 copper atom. These three anions bound to the copper ion in the same asymmetric, bidentate manner as nitrite. Consistent with their weak inhibition of the enzyme ( K i >50 mM), the Cu-O distances in these AfNiR-inhibitor complexes were approximately 0.15 A longer than that observed in the AfNiR-nitrite complex. The binding mode of each inhibitor is determined in part by steric interactions with the side chain of active site residue Ile257. Moreover, the side chain of Asp98, a conserved residue that hydrogen bonds to type 2 copper-bound nitrite and nitric oxide, was either disordered or pointed away from the inhibitors. Acetate and formate inhibited AfNiR in a mixed fashion, consistent with the occurrence of second acetate binding site in the AfNiR-acetate complex that occludes access to the type 2 copper. A fourth small molecule, nitrous oxide, bound to the oxidized metal in a side-on fashion reminiscent of nitric oxide to the reduced copper. Nevertheless, nitrous oxide bound at a farther distance from the metal. The fifth small molecule, azide, inhibited the reduction of nitrite by AfNiR most strongly ( K ic = 2.0 +/- 0.1 mM). This ligand bound to the type 2 copper center end-on with a Cu-N c distance of approximately 2 A, and was the only inhibitor to form a hydrogen bond with Asp98. Overall, the data substantiate the roles of Asp98 and Ile257 in discriminating substrate from other small anions.

  3. Conserved Active Site Residues Limit Inhibition of a Copper-Containing Nitrite By Small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tocheva, E.I.; Eltis, L.D.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-05-26

    The interaction of copper-containing dissimilatory nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 ( AfNiR) with each of five small molecules was studied using crystallography and steady-state kinetics. Structural studies revealed that each small molecule interacted with the oxidized catalytic type 2 copper of AfNiR. Three small molecules (formate, acetate and nitrate) mimic the substrate by having at least two oxygen atoms for bidentate coordination to the type 2 copper atom. These three anions bound to the copper ion in the same asymmetric, bidentate manner as nitrite. Consistent with their weak inhibition of the enzyme ( K i >50 mM), the Cu-O distances in these AfNiR-inhibitor complexes were approximately 0.15 A longer than that observed in the AfNiR-nitrite complex. The binding mode of each inhibitor is determined in part by steric interactions with the side chain of active site residue Ile257. Moreover, the side chain of Asp98, a conserved residue that hydrogen bonds to type 2 copper-bound nitrite and nitric oxide, was either disordered or pointed away from the inhibitors. Acetate and formate inhibited AfNiR in a mixed fashion, consistent with the occurrence of second acetate binding site in the AfNiR-acetate complex that occludes access to the type 2 copper. A fourth small molecule, nitrous oxide, bound to the oxidized metal in a side-on fashion reminiscent of nitric oxide to the reduced copper. Nevertheless, nitrous oxide bound at a farther distance from the metal. The fifth small molecule, azide, inhibited the reduction of nitrite by AfNiR most strongly ( K ic = 2.0 +/- 0.1 mM). This ligand bound to the type 2 copper center end-on with a Cu-N c distance of approximately 2 A, and was the only inhibitor to form a hydrogen bond with Asp98. Overall, the data substantiate the roles of Asp98 and Ile257 in discriminating substrate from other small anions.

  4. Activity origin and catalyst design principles for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution on heteroatom-doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yan; Zheng, Yao; Davey, Kenneth; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2016-10-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is a fundamental process in electrocatalysis and plays an important role in energy conversion through water splitting to produce hydrogen. Effective candidates for HER are often based on noble metals or transition metal dichalcogenides, while carbon-based metal-free electrocatalysts generally demonstrate poorer activity. Here we report evaluation of a series of heteroatom-doped graphene materials as efficient HER electrocatalysts by combining spectroscopic characterization, electrochemical measurements, and density functional theory calculations. Results of theoretical computations are shown to be in good agreement with experimental observations regarding the intrinsic electrocatalytic activity and the HER reaction mechanism. As a result, we establish a HER activity trend for graphene-based materials, and explore their reactivity origin to guide the design of more efficient electrocatalysts. We predict that by rationally modifying particular experimentally achievable physicochemical characteristics, a practically realizable graphene-based material will have the potential to exceed the performance of the metal-based benchmark for HER.

  5. Non-precious metal electrocatalysts with high activity for hydrogen oxidation reaction in alkaline electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, WC; Bivens, AP; Myint, M; Zhuang, ZB; Forest, RV; Fang, QR; Chen, JG; Yan, YS

    2014-05-01

    A ternary metallic CoNiMo catalyst is electrochemically deposited on a polycrystalline gold (Au) disk electrode using pulse voltammetry, and characterized for hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) activity by temperature-controlled rotating disk electrode measurements in 0.1 M potassium hydroxide (KOH). The catalyst exhibits the highest HOR activity among all non-precious metal catalysts (e.g., 20 fold higher than Ni). At a sufficient loading, the CoNiMo catalyst is expected to outperform Pt and thus provides a promising low cost pathway for alkaline or alkaline membrane fuel cells. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and parallel H-2-temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments on structurally much simpler model alloy systems show a trend that CoNiMo has a hydrogen binding energy (HBE) similar to Pt and much lower than Ni, suggesting that the formation of multi-metallic bonds modifies the HBE of Ni and is likely a significant contributing factor for the enhanced HOR activity.

  6. On the catalytic activity of NiMoFe composite surface coatings for the hydrogen cathodes in the industrial electrochemical production of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arul Raj, I.

    Nickel-based composite surface coatings were assessed for their utility as catalytic hydrogen evolving cathodes in alkaline water electrolysers, chlor-alkali cells, chlorate cells, etc. Transition-metal-based hydrogen cathodes from metals, namely Ni, Mo, Cu, Fe, W, Co and Cr, obtained as thin electrolytic surface coatings on mild steel substrates were investigated in this laboratory. NiMoFe electrolytic ternary surface coatings had exhibited acceptable catalytic activity for the cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction (h.e.r.). The reduction in the hydrogen overpotential value (ν H2) that could be practically realised by replacing the mild steel cathodes which are in use by convention, with the present NiMoFe coated cathodes, amounts to 0.3 V minimum at typical industrial operation conditions, namely 300 mA cm -2 and 353 K. A critical assessment of the catalytic application of NiMoFe composite for the h.e.r. had been carried out. The results of the range of examined conditions such as the ease of preparation of the NiMoFe surface coatings through electrolytic codeposition technique, the microstructural features of the coatings, the X-ray diffraction data, the influence of chloride on the polarisation characteristics, the effect of synthetic seawater treatment, the susceptibility to thermochemical reactions with oxygen and the welting agent in the PTFE binder at temperatures above 623 K and the effect of simulated application of asbestos separator on the catalytic activity of NiMoFe composite are presented. It is proposed that this new catalytic material does meet out the stability requirements. A laboratory size unit electrolytic cell assembled with catalytic electrodes working at 1.8 V, 300 mA cm -2 in 6M KOH is described. A discussion on the possible energy saving by employing the proposed NiMoFe catalyst for cathodes in the industrial production of hydrogen is also included.

  7. Active-site zinc ligands and activated H2O of zinc enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Vallee, B L; Auld, D S

    1990-01-01

    The x-ray crystallographic structures of 12 zinc enzymes have been chosen as standards of reference to identify the ligands to the catalytic and structural zinc atoms of other members of their respective enzyme families. Universally, H2O is a ligand and critical component of the catalytically active zinc sites. In addition, three protein side chains bind to the catalytic zinc atom, whereas four protein ligands bind to the structural zinc atom. The geometry and coordination number of zinc can vary greatly to accommodate particular ligands. Zinc forms complexes with nitrogen and oxygen just as readily as with sulfur, and this is reflected in catalytic zinc sites having a binding frequency of His much greater than Glu greater than Asp = Cys, three of which bind to the metal atom. The systematic spacing between the ligands is striking. For all catalytic zinc sites except the coenzyme-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase, the first two ligands are separated by a "short-spacer" consisting of 1 to 3 amino acids. These ligands are separated from the third ligand by a "long spacer" of approximately 20 to approximately 120 amino acids. The spacer enables formation of a primary bidentate zinc complex, whereas the long spacer contributes flexibility to the coordination sphere, which can poise the zinc for catalysis as well as bring other catalytic and substrate binding groups into apposition with the active site. The H2O is activated by ionization, polarization, or poised for displacement. Collectively, the data imply that the preferred mechanistic pathway for activating the water--e.g., zinc hydroxide or Lewis acid catalysis--will be determined by the identity of the other three ligands and their spacing. Images PMID:2104979

  8. Unique activity of Pd monomers: hydrogen evolution at AuPd(111) surface alloys.

    PubMed

    Pluntke, Y; Kibler, L A; Kolb, D M

    2008-07-07

    Well-defined Au/Pd(111) alloy films have been prepared on a Ru(0001) substrate by electrochemical metal deposition and subsequent heating up to 700 degrees C. The electrochemical behaviour of the 20 monolayers thick epitaxially-grown films is in excellent agreement with both equilibrium surface composition and distribution for Au/Pd alloys on Mo(110) as previously reported (D. W. Goodman et al., J. Phys. Chem., 2005, B109, 18535). The electrocatalytic activity of the AuPd(111) surface alloys was studied for the hydrogen evolution in 0.1 M H(2)SO(4) as a function of surface composition. Maximum activities were found for Pd fractions of 0.2 +/- 0.1, where the population of Pd atoms surrounded by Au has its maximum. These Pd monomers are found to be about 20 times more active than Pd atoms in the Pd overlayer.

  9. Effects of a hydrogen sulfide donor on spontaneous contractile activity of rat stomach and jejunum.

    PubMed

    Shafigullin, M Y; Zefirov, R A; Sabirullina, G I; Zefirov, A L; Sitdikova, G F

    2014-07-01

    We studied the effect of sodium hydrosulfite (NaHS), a donor of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), on spontaneous contractive activity of isolated preparations of rat stomach and jejunum under isometric conditions. NaHS in concentrations of 10-200 μM reduced the amplitude, tonic tension, and frequency of contractions of the preparations. Blockade of K(+) channels with a non-specific antagonist tetraethylammonium (10 mM) increased contraction amplitude in the stomach strip and jejunum segment. The effects of NaHS on all parameters of contractile activity of the stomach and jejunum were fully preserved against the background of tetraethylammonium application. These data suggest that H2S in physiologically relevant concentrations inhibited spontaneous contractile activity of smooth muscle cells in rat stomach and jejunum by reducing the amplitude and frequency of contractions and decreased tonic tension without affecting the function of voltage- and calcium-dependent K(+) channels.

  10. Hydrogen Technology Research at SRNL

    SciTech Connect

    Danko, E.

    2011-02-13

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation, and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation using hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies, including membrane filters for H2 separation, doped carbon nanotubes

  11. Iron- and Cobalt-Catalyzed Alkene Hydrogenation: Catalysis with Both Redox-Active and Strong Field Ligands.

    PubMed

    Chirik, Paul J

    2015-06-16

    The hydrogenation of alkenes is one of the most impactful reactions catalyzed by homogeneous transition metal complexes finding application in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and commodity chemical industries. For decades, catalyst technology has relied on precious metal catalysts supported by strong field ligands to enable highly predictable two-electron redox chemistry that constitutes key bond breaking and forming steps during turnover. Alternative catalysts based on earth abundant transition metals such as iron and cobalt not only offer potential environmental and economic advantages but also provide an opportunity to explore catalysis in a new chemical space. The kinetically and thermodynamically accessible oxidation and spin states may enable new mechanistic pathways, unique substrate scope, or altogether new reactivity. This Account describes my group's efforts over the past decade to develop iron and cobalt catalysts for alkene hydrogenation. Particular emphasis is devoted to the interplay of the electronic structure of the base metal compounds and their catalytic performance. First generation, aryl-substituted pyridine(diimine) iron dinitrogen catalysts exhibited high turnover frequencies at low catalyst loadings and hydrogen pressures for the hydrogenation of unactivated terminal and disubstituted alkenes. Exploration of structure-reactivity relationships established smaller aryl substituents and more electron donating ligands resulted in improved performance. Second generation iron and cobalt catalysts where the imine donors were replaced by N-heterocyclic carbenes resulted in dramatically improved activity and enabled hydrogenation of more challenging unactivated, tri- and tetrasubstituted alkenes. Optimized cobalt catalysts have been discovered that are among the most active homogeneous hydrogenation catalysts known. Synthesis of enantiopure, C1 symmetric pyridine(diimine) cobalt complexes have enabled rare examples of highly enantioselective

  12. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER TECHNOLOGY: Xenon and hydrogen gas mixtures as laser active media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuev, V. S.; Kanaev, A. V.; Mikheev, L. D.

    1988-08-01

    It is suggested that gaseous mixtures of xenon and molecular hydrogen may be used as active media of Xe2 (172 nm) and XeH ( ~ 250 nm) photochemical lasers. By adding more than 3 Torr of hydrogen to xenon, amplification can be achieved in the 172 nm range as a result of quenching of the 1u/0u- absorbing state under optical pumping conditions. The hydrogen atoms produced by the quenching process can be utilized to populate XeH* by three-body recombination with Xe* ( 3P1/2) atoms.

  13. Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in surface water and ground water at selected sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ott, D.S.; Cecil, L.D.; Knobel, L.L.

    1994-01-01

    Relative stable isotopic ratios for hydrogen and oxygen compared to standard mean ocean water are presented for water from 4 surface-water sites and 38 ground-water sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The surface-water samples were collected monthly from March 1991 through April 1992 and after a storm event on June 18, 1992. The ground-water samples either were collected during 1991 or 1992. These data were collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's continuing hydrogeological investigations at the INEL. The relative isotopic ratios of hydrogen and oxygen are reported as delta H-2 and as delta 0-18, respectively. The values in water from the four surface-water sites ranged from -143.0 to -122 and from -18.75 to -15.55, respec- tively. The values in water from the 38 ground- water sites ranged from -141.0 to -120.0 and from -18.55 to -14.95, respectively.

  14. Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in surface water and ground water at selected sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, D.S.; Cecil, L.D.; Knobel, L.L.

    1994-11-01

    Relative stable isotopic ratios for hydrogen and oxygen compared to standard mean ocean water are presented for water from 4 surface-water sites and 38 ground-water sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The surface-water samples were collected monthly from March 1991 through April 1992 and after a storm event on June 18, 1992. The ground-water samples either were collected during 1991 or 1992. These data were collected as part of the US Geological Survey`s continuing hydrogeological investigations at the INEL. The relative isotopic ratios of hydrogen and oxygen are reported as delta {sup 2}H ({delta}{sup 2}H) and as delta {sup 18}O ({delta}{sup 18}O), respectively. The values of {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O in water from the four surface-water sites ranged from -143.0 to -122 and from -18.75 to -15.55, respectively. The values of {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O in water from the 38 ground-water sites ranged from -141.0 to -120.0 and from -18.55 to -14.95, respectively.

  15. Influence of Concentration and Activation on Hydrogen Peroxide Diffusion through Dental Tissues In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Carlos R. G.; Souza, Cristiane S.; Borges, Alessandra B.; Huhtala, Maria Filomena R. L.; Caneppele, Taciana M. F.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of physical and chemical activation on the diffusion time of different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching agents through enamel and dentin. One hundred and twenty bovine cylindrical specimens were divided into six groups (n = 20): 20% HP; 20% HP with light activation; 20% HP with manganese gluconate; 35% HP; 35% HP with light activation; and 35% HP with manganese gluconate. The specimens were fixed over transparent epoxy wells with internal cavities to simulate a pulpal chamber. This chamber was filled with an enzymatic reagent to simulate pulpal fluid. The bleaching gels were applied on enamel surface and the image of the pulpal fluid was captured by a video camera to monitor the time of peroxide penetration in each specimen. ANOVA analysis showed that concentration and type of activation of bleaching gel significantly influenced the diffusion time of HP (P < 0.05). 35% HP showed the lowest diffusion times compared to the groups with 20% HP gel. The light activation of HP decreased significantly the diffusion time compared to chemical activation. The highest diffusion time was obtained with 20% HP chemically activated. The diffusion time of HP was dependent on activation and concentration of HP. The higher concentration of HP diffused through dental tissues more quickly. PMID:24163616

  16. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  17. Experimental and computational active site mapping as a starting point to fragment-based lead discovery.

    PubMed

    Behnen, Jürgen; Köster, Helene; Neudert, Gerd; Craan, Tobias; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard

    2012-02-06

    Small highly soluble probe molecules such as aniline, urea, N-methylurea, 2-bromoacetate, 1,2-propanediol, nitrous oxide, benzamidine, and phenol were soaked into crystals of various proteins to map their binding pockets and to detect hot spots of binding with respect to hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties. The selected probe molecules were first tested at the zinc protease thermolysin. They were then applied to a wider range of proteins such as protein kinase A, D-xylose isomerase, 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol synthase, endothiapepsin, and secreted aspartic protease 2. The crystal structures obtained clearly show that the probe molecules populate the protein binding pockets in an ordered fashion. The thus characterized, experimentally observed hot spots of binding were subjected to computational active site mapping using HotspotsX. This approach uses knowledge-based pair potentials to detect favorable binding positions for various atom types. Good agreement between the in silico hot spot predictions and the experimentally observed positions of the polar hydrogen bond forming functional groups and hydrophobic portions was obtained. Finally, we compared the observed poses of the small-molecule probes with those of much larger structurally related ligands. They coincide remarkably well with the larger ligands, considering their spatial orientation and the experienced interaction patterns. This observation confirms the fundamental hypothesis of fragment-based lead discovery: that binding poses, even of very small molecular probes, do not significantly deviate or move once a ligand is grown further into the binding site. This underscores the fact that these probes populate given hot spots and can be regarded as relevant seeds for further design.

  18. The yeast regulator of transcription protein Rtr1 lacks an active site and phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kehui; Manley, James L; Tong, Liang

    2012-07-10

    The activity of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is controlled in part by the phosphorylation state of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Recent reports have suggested that yeast regulator of transcription protein, Rtr1, and its human homologue RPAP2, possess Pol II CTD Ser5 phosphatase activity. Here we report the crystal structure of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1, which reveals a new type of zinc finger protein and does not have any close structural homologues. Importantly, the structure does not show evidence of an active site, and extensive experiments to demonstrate its CTD phosphatase activity have been unsuccessful, suggesting that Rtr1 has a non-catalytic role in CTD dephosphorylation.

  19. Universal dependence of hydrogen oxidation and evolution reaction activity of platinum-group metals on pH and hydrogen binding energy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2016-03-01

    Understanding how pH affects the activity of hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is key to developing active, stable, and affordable HOR/HER catalysts for hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers. A common linear correlation between hydrogen binding energy (HBE) and pH is observed for four supported platinum-group metal catalysts (Pt/C, Ir/C, Pd/C, and Rh/C) over a broad pH range (0 to 13), suggesting that the pH dependence of HBE is metal-independent. A universal correlation between exchange current density and HBE is also observed on the four metals, indicating that they may share the same elementary steps and rate-determining steps and that the HBE is the dominant descriptor for HOR/HER activities. The onset potential of CO stripping on the four metals decreases with pH, indicating a stronger OH adsorption, which provides evidence against the promoting effect of adsorbed OH on HOR/HER.

  20. Universal dependence of hydrogen oxidation and evolution reaction activity of platinum-group metals on pH and hydrogen binding energy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how pH affects the activity of hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is key to developing active, stable, and affordable HOR/HER catalysts for hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers. A common linear correlation between hydrogen binding energy (HBE) and pH is observed for four supported platinum-group metal catalysts (Pt/C, Ir/C, Pd/C, and Rh/C) over a broad pH range (0 to 13), suggesting that the pH dependence of HBE is metal-independent. A universal correlation between exchange current density and HBE is also observed on the four metals, indicating that they may share the same elementary steps and rate-determining steps and that the HBE is the dominant descriptor for HOR/HER activities. The onset potential of CO stripping on the four metals decreases with pH, indicating a stronger OH adsorption, which provides evidence against the promoting effect of adsorbed OH on HOR/HER. PMID:27034988

  1. Automated docking of {alpha}-(1,4)- and {alpha}-(1,6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides in the glucoamylase active site

    SciTech Connect

    Countinho, P.M.; Reilly, P.J.; Dowd, M.K.

    1998-06-01

    Low-energy conformers of five {alpha}-(1,4)- and {alpha}-(1,6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides were flexibly docked into the glucoamylase active site using AutoDock 2.2. To ensure that all significant conformational space was searched, the starting trisaccharide conformers for docking were all possible combinations of the corresponding disaccharide low-energy conformers. All docked trisaccharides occupied subsites {minus}1 and +1 in very similar modes to those of corresponding nonreducing-end disaccharides. For linear substrates, full binding at subsite +2 occurred only when the substrate reducing end was {alpha}-(1,4)-linked, with hydrogen-bonding with the hydroxy-methyl group being the only polar interaction there. Given the absence of other important interactions at this subsite, multiple substrate conformations are allowed. For the one docked branched substrate, steric hindrance in the {alpha}-(1,6)-glycosidic oxygen suggests that the active-site residues have to change position for hydrolysis to occur. Subsite +1 of the glucoamylase active site allows flexibility in binding but, at least in Aspergillus glucoamylases, subsite +2 selectively binds substrates {alpha}-(1,4)-linked between subsites +1 and +2. Enzyme engineering to limit substrate flexibility at subsite +2 could improve glucoamylase industrial properties.

  2. Evidence for the Role of Active Site Residues in the Hairpin Ribozyme from Molecular Simulations along the Reaction Path

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hairpin ribozyme accelerates a phosphoryl transfer reaction without catalytic participation of divalent metal ions. Residues A38 and G8 have been implicated as playing roles in general acid and base catalysis, respectively. Here we explore the structure and dynamics of key active site residues using more than 1 μs of molecular dynamics simulations of the hairpin ribozyme at different stages along the catalytic pathway. Analysis of results indicates hydrogen bond interactions between the nucleophile and proR nonbridging oxygen are correlated with active inline attack conformations. Further, the simulation results suggest a possible alternative role for G8 to promote inline fitness and facilitate activation of the nucleophile by hydrogen bonding, although this does not necessarily exclude an additional role as a general base. Finally, we suggest that substitution of G8 with N7- or N3-deazaguanosine which have elevated pKa values, both with and without thio modifications at the 5′ leaving group position, would provide valuable insight into the specific role of G8 in catalysis. PMID:24842535

  3. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, R.B.

    1992-01-14

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation). 23 figs.

  4. Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by hydrogen peroxide transcriptionally inhibits NaV1.5 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Huo, Rong; Cai, Benzhi; Lu, Yan; Ye, Bo; Li, Xiang; Li, Faqian; Xu, Haodong

    2016-07-01

    Oxidants and canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling have been shown to decrease cardiac Na(+) channel activity by suppressing NaV1.5 expression. Our aims are to determine if hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), one oxidant of reactive oxygen species (ROS), activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling and promotes β-catenin nuclear activity, leading to suppression of NaV1.5 expression and if this suppression requires the interaction of β-catenin with its nuclear partner, TCF4 (also called TCF7L2) to decrease SCN5a promoter activity. The results demonstrated that H2O2 increased β-catenin, but not TCF4 nuclear localization determined by immunofluorescence without affecting total β-catenin protein level. Furthermore, H2O2 exerted a dose- and time-dependent suppressive effect on NaV1.5 expression. RT-PCR and/or Western blot analyses revealed that overexpressing active form of β-catenin or stabilizing β-catenin by GSK-3β inhibitors, LiCl and Bio, suppressed NaV1.5 expression in HL-1 cells. In contrast, destabilization of β-catenin by a constitutively active GSK-3β mutant (S9A) upregulated NaV1.5 expression. Whole-cell recording showed that LiCl significantly inhibited Na(+) channel activity in these cells. Using immunoprecipitation (IP), we showed that β-catenin interacted with TCF4 indicating that β-catenin as a co-transfactor, regulates NaV1.5 expression through TCF4. Analyses of the SCN5a promoter sequences among different species by using VISTA tools indicated that SCN5a promoter harbors TCF4 binding sites. Chromatin IP assays demonstrated that both β-catenin and TCF4 were recruited in the SCN5a promoter, and regulated its activity. Luciferase promoter assays exhibited that β-catenin inhibited the SCN5a promoter activity at a dose-dependent manner and this inhibition required TCF4. Small interfering (Si) RNA targeting β-catenin significantly increased SCN5a promoter activity, leading to enhanced NaV1.5 expression. As expected, β-catenin SiRNA prevents H2O2 suppressive effects

  5. Reversible Storage of Hydrogen and Natural Gas in Nanospace-Engineered Activated Carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Beckner, Matt; Rash, Tyler; Yu, Ping; Suppes, Galen; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    An overview is given of the development of advanced nanoporous carbons as storage materials for natural gas (methane) and molecular hydrogen in on-board fuel tanks for next-generation clean automobiles. High specific surface areas, porosities, and sub-nm/supra-nm pore volumes are quantitatively selected by controlling the degree of carbon consumption and metallic potassium intercalation into the carbon lattice during the activation process. Tunable bimodal pore-size distributions of sub-nm and supra-nm pores are established by subcritical nitrogen adsorption. Optimal pore structures for gravimetric and volumetric gas storage, respectively, are presented. Methane and hydrogen adsorption isotherms up to 250 bar on monolithic and powdered activated carbons are reported and validated, using several gravimetric and volumetric instruments. Current best gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities are: 256 g CH4/kg carbon and 132 g CH4/liter carbon at 293 K and 35 bar; 26, 44, and 107 g H2/kg carbon at 303, 194, and 77 K respectively and 100 bar. Adsorbed film density, specific surface area, and binding energy are analyzed separately using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, Langmuir model, and lattice gas models.

  6. Preparation and electrocatalytic activity of nanocrystalline Ni-Mo-Co alloy electrode for hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijian; Du, Jingjing; Chen, Baizhen

    2013-03-01

    Ni-Mo-Co alloy electrodes were prepared by electrodeposition technique with citric acid as a complexing agent. The influence of the main technical parameters such as the concentration of CoSO4 7H2O, the current density and the bath temperature on the component content in the Ni-Mo-Co alloy electrode were investigated by electron dispersive spectrometer (EDS), the microstructure and surface morphology of Ni-Mo-Co alloy electrodes were characterized by employing X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the electrocatalytic activity of Ni-Mo-Co alloy electrode for hydrogen evolution was investigated by the method of the cathode polarization curves. The results showed that the excellent Ni-Mo-Co alloy electrode with 41.39 wt% Ni, 53.82 wt% Mo and 4.79 wt% Co was obtained when the concentration of CoSO4 x 7H2O was 8 g/L, the current density was 12 A/dm2 and the bath temperature was 25 degrees C. The mircostructure of the Ni-Mo-Co alloy was nanocrystalline and the average grain size was about 25 nm by calculating using Scherrer Equation. The electrocatalytic activity of Ni-Mo-Co alloy electrode for hydrogen evolution was better than that of Ni-Mo alloy electrode.

  7. Active Hydrogen Bond Network (AHBN) and Applications for Improvement of Thermal Stability and pH-Sensitivity of Pullulanase from Bacillus naganoensis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Qi-Shi; Qin, Yan; Li, Jian-Xiu; Meng, Jian-Zong; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2017-01-01

    A method, so called “active hydrogen bond network” (AHBN), is proposed for site-directed mutations of hydrolytic enzymes. In an enzyme the AHBN consists of the active residues, functional residues, and conservative water molecules, which are connected by hydrogen bonds, forming a three dimensional network. In the catalysis hydrolytic reactions of hydrolytic enzymes AHBN is responsible for the transportation of protons and water molecules, and maintaining the active and dynamic structures of enzymes. The AHBN of pullulanase BNPulA324 from Bacillus naganoensis was constructed based on a homologous model structure using Swiss Model Protein-modeling Server according to the template structure of pullulanase BAPulA (2WAN). The pullulanase BNPulA324 are mutated at the mutation sites selected by means of the AHBN method. Both thermal stability and pH-sensitivity of pullulanase BNPulA324 were successfully improved. The mutations at the residues located at the out edge of AHBN may yield positive effects. On the other hand the mutations at the residues inside the AHBN may deprive the bioactivity of enzymes. The AHBN method, proposed in this study, may provide an assistant and alternate tool for protein rational design and protein engineering. PMID:28103251

  8. Active Hydrogen Bond Network (AHBN) and Applications for Improvement of Thermal Stability and pH-Sensitivity of Pullulanase from Bacillus naganoensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Yan; Xie, Neng-Zhong; Du, Qi-Shi; Qin, Yan; Li, Jian-Xiu; Meng, Jian-Zong; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2017-01-01

    A method, so called "active hydrogen bond network" (AHBN), is proposed for site-directed mutations of hydrolytic enzymes. In an enzyme the AHBN consists of the active residues, functional residues, and conservative water molecules, which are connected by hydrogen bonds, forming a three dimensional network. In the catalysis hydrolytic reactions of hydrolytic enzymes AHBN is responsible for the transportation of protons and water molecules, and maintaining the active and dynamic structures of enzymes. The AHBN of pullulanase BNPulA324 from Bacillus naganoensis was constructed based on a homologous model structure using Swiss Model Protein-modeling Server according to the template structure of pullulanase BAPulA (2WAN). The pullulanase BNPulA324 are mutated at the mutation sites selected by means of the AHBN method. Both thermal stability and pH-sensitivity of pullulanase BNPulA324 were successfully improved. The mutations at the residues located at the out edge of AHBN may yield positive effects. On the other hand the mutations at the residues inside the AHBN may deprive the bioactivity of enzymes. The AHBN method, proposed in this study, may provide an assistant and alternate tool for protein rational design and protein engineering.

  9. The pathway for serial proton supply to the active site of nitrogenase: enhanced density functional modeling of the Grotthuss mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dance, Ian

    2015-11-07

    Nitrogenase contains a well defined and conserved chain of water molecules leading to the FeMo cofactor (FeMo-co, an [Fe7MoCS9] cluster with bidentate chelation of Mo by homocitrate) that is the active site where N2 and other substrates are sequentially hydrogenated using multiple protons and electrons. The function of this chain is proposed to be a proton wire, serially translocating protons to triply-bridging S3B of FeMo-co, where, concomitant with electron transfer to FeMo-co, an H atom is generated on S3B. Density functional simulations of this proton translocation mechanism are reported here, using a large 269-atom model that includes all residues hydrogen bonded to and surrounding the water chain, and likely to influence proton transfer: three carboxylate O atoms of obligatory homocitrate are essential. The mechanism involves the standard two components of the Grotthuss mechanism, namely H atom slides that shift H3O(+) from one water site to the next, and HOH molecular rotations that convert backward (posterior) OH bonds in the water chain to forward (anterior) OH bonds. The topography of the potential energy surface for each of these steps has been mapped. H atom slides pass through very short (ca. 2.5 Å) O-H-O hydrogen bonds, while HOH rotations involve the breaking of O-HO hydrogen bonds, and the occurrence of long (up to 3.6 Å) separations between contiguous water molecules. Both steps involve low potential energy barriers, <7 kcal mol(-1). During operation of the Grotthuss mechanism in nitrogenase there are substantial displacements of water molecules along the chain, occurring as ripples. These characteristics of the 'Grotthuss two-step', coupled with a buffering ability of two carboxylate O atoms of homocitrate, and combined with density functional characterisation of the final proton slide from the ultimate water molecule to S3B (including electron addition), have been choreographed into a complete mechanism for serial hydrogenation of FeMo-co. The

  10. Exploring the activity of a novel Au/TiC(001) model catalyst towards CO and CO2 hydrogenation

    DOE PAGES

    Asara, Gian Giacomo; Ricart, Josep M.; Rodriguez, Jose A.; ...

    2015-02-02

    Small metallic nanoparticles supported on transition metal carbides exhibit an unexpected high activity towards a series of chemical reactions. In particular, the Au/TiC system has proven to be an excellent catalyst for SO2 decomposition, thiophene hydrodesulfurization, O2 and H2 dissociation and the water gas shift reaction. Recent studies have shown that Au/TiC is a very good catalyst for the reverse water–gas shift (CO2 + H2 → CO + H2O) and CO2 hydrogenation to methanol. The present work further expands the range of applicability of this novel type of systems by exploring the catalytic activity of Au/TiC towards the hydrogenation ofmore » CO or CO2 with periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations on model systems. Hydrogen dissociates easily on Au/TiC but direct hydrogenation of CO to methanol is hindered by very high activation barriers implying that, on this model catalyst, methanol production from CO2 involves the hydrogenation of a HOCO-like intermediate. Thus, when dealing with mixtures of syngas (CO/CO2/H2/H2O), CO could be transformed into CO2 through the water gas shift reaction with subsequent hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol.« less

  11. Exploring the activity of a novel Au/TiC(001) model catalyst towards CO and CO2 hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asara, Gian Giacomo; Ricart, Josep M.; Rodriguez, Jose A.; Illas, Francesc

    2015-10-01

    Small metallic nanoparticles supported on transition metal carbides exhibit an unexpected high activity towards a series of chemical reactions. In particular, the Au/TiC system has proven to be an excellent catalyst for SO2 decomposition, thiophene hydrodesulfurization, O2 and H2 dissociation and the water gas shift reaction. Recent studies have shown that Au/TiC is a very good catalyst for the reverse water-gas shift (CO2 + H2 → CO + H2O) and CO2 hydrogenation to methanol. The present work further expands the range of applicability of this novel type of systems by exploring the catalytic activity of Au/TiC towards the hydrogenation of CO or CO2 with periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations on model systems. Hydrogen dissociates easily on Au/TiC but direct hydrogenation of CO to methanol is hindered by very high activation barriers implying that, on this model catalyst, methanol production from CO2 involves the hydrogenation of a HOCO-like intermediate. When dealing with mixtures of syngas (CO/CO2/H2/H2O), CO could be transformed into CO2 through the water gas shift reaction with subsequent hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol.

  12. A facile lyophilization synthesis of MoS2 QDs@graphene as a highly active electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenzhu; Li, Feng; Wang, Xiang; Tang, Yu; Yang, Yuanyuan; Gao, Wenbin; Li, Rong

    2017-04-01

    The development of robust, active and nonprecious electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction is quite urgent but still challenging. Here MoS2 QDs@Graphene is prepared via a facile lyophilization method, which leads to a better dispersion of MoS2 QDs on the graphene and optimizes the electronic mobility between the MoS2 layers. Impressively, the electrocatalyst MoS2 QDs@Graphene demonstrates the remarkable activity for HER in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution, with a current density of 10 mA cm-2 at a low overpotential of 140 mV and strong stability in acid condition. The achieved excellent performance is attributed to its morphology with large amount of active sites fabricated by the lyophilization method. This new method opens new pathway for the fabrication of non-precious metal electrocatalysts achieving high activity.

  13. Catalytic activity of Pd-doped Cu nanoparticles for hydrogenation as a single-atom-alloy catalyst.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinrui; Fu, Qiang; Luo, Yi

    2014-05-14

    The single atom alloy of extended surfaces is known to provide remarkably enhanced catalytic performance toward heterogeneous hydrogenation. Here we demonstrate from first principles calculations that this approach can be extended to nanostructures, such as bimetallic nanoparticles. The catalytic properties of the single-Pd-doped Cu55 nanoparticles have been systemically examined for H2 dissociation as well as H atom adsorption and diffusion, following the concept of single atom alloy. It is found that doping a single Pd atom at the edge site of the Cu55 shell can considerably reduce the activation energy of H2 dissociation, while the single Pd atom doped at the top site or in the inner layers is much less effective. The H atom adsorption on Cu55 is slightly stronger than that on the Cu(111) surface; however, a larger nanoparticle that contains 147 atoms could effectively recover the weak binding of the H atoms. We have also investigated the H atom diffusion on the 55-atom nanoparticle and found that spillover of the produced H atoms could be a feasible process due to the low diffusion barriers. Our results have demonstrated that facile H2 dissociation and weak H atom adsorption could be combined at the nanoscale. Moreover, the effects of doping one more Pd atom on the H2 dissociation and H atom adsorption have also been investigated. We have found that both the doping Pd atoms in the most stable configuration could independently exhibit their catalytic activity, behaving as two single-atom-alloy catalysts.

  14. Fail-safe system for activity cooled supersonic and hypersonic aircraft. [using liquid hydrogen fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. A.; Braswell, D. O.; Richie, C. B.

    1975-01-01

    A fail-safe-system concept was studied as an alternative to a redundant active cooling system for supersonic and hypersonic aircraft which use the heat sink of liquid-hydrogen fuel for cooling the aircraft structure. This concept consists of an abort maneuver by the aircraft and a passive thermal protection system (TPS) for the aircraft skin. The abort manuever provides a low-heat-load descent from normal cruise speed to a lower speed at which cooling is unnecessary, and the passive TPS allows the aircraft skin to absorb the abort heat load without exceeding critical skin temperature. On the basis of results obtained, it appears that this fail-safe-system concept warrants further consideration, inasmuch as a fail-safe system could possibly replace a redundant active cooling system with no increase in weight and would offer other potential advantages.

  15. Electrochemically reduced water exerts superior reactive oxygen species scavenging activity in HT1080 cells than the equivalent level of hydrogen-dissolved water

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Takeki; Harada, Gakuro; Nakamichi, Noboru; Kabayama, Shigeru; Teruya, Kiichiro; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Gong, Wei; Sakata, Ichiro; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemically reduced water (ERW) is produced near a cathode during electrolysis and exhibits an alkaline pH, contains richly dissolved hydrogen, and contains a small amount of platinum nanoparticles. ERW has reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging activity and recent studies demonstrated that hydrogen-dissolved water exhibits ROS-scavenging activity. Thus, the antioxidative capacity of ERW is postulated to be dependent on the presence of hydrogen levels; however, there is no report verifying the role of dissolved hydrogen in ERW. In this report, we clarify whether the responsive factor for antioxidative activity in ERW is dissolved hydrogen. The intracellular ROS scavenging activity of ERW and hydrogen-dissolved water was tested by both fluorescent stain method and immuno spin trapping assay. We confirm that ERW possessed electrolysis intensity-dependent intracellular ROS-scavenging activity, and ERW exerts significantly superior ROS-scavenging activity in HT1080 cells than the equivalent level of hydrogen-dissolved water. ERW retained its ROS-scavenging activity after removal of dissolved hydrogen, but lost its activity when autoclaved. An oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay, the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay and chemiluminescence assay could not detect radical-scavenging activity in both ERW and hydrogen-dissolved water. These results indicate that ERW contains electrolysis-dependent hydrogen and an additional antioxidative factor predicted to be platinum nanoparticles. PMID:28182635

  16. Electrochemically reduced water exerts superior reactive oxygen species scavenging activity in HT1080 cells than the equivalent level of hydrogen-dissolved water.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Takeki; Harada, Gakuro; Nakamichi, Noboru; Kabayama, Shigeru; Teruya, Kiichiro; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Gong, Wei; Sakata, Ichiro; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemically reduced water (ERW) is produced near a cathode during electrolysis and exhibits an alkaline pH, contains richly dissolved hydrogen, and contains a small amount of platinum nanoparticles. ERW has reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging activity and recent studies demonstrated that hydrogen-dissolved water exhibits ROS-scavenging activity. Thus, the antioxidative capacity of ERW is postulated to be dependent on the presence of hydrogen levels; however, there is no report verifying the role of dissolved hydrogen in ERW. In this report, we clarify whether the responsive factor for antioxidative activity in ERW is dissolved hydrogen. The intracellular ROS scavenging activity of ERW and hydrogen-dissolved water was tested by both fluorescent stain method and immuno spin trapping assay. We confirm that ERW possessed electrolysis intensity-dependent intracellular ROS-scavenging activity, and ERW exerts significantly superior ROS-scavenging activity in HT1080 cells than the equivalent level of hydrogen-dissolved water. ERW retained its ROS-scavenging activity after removal of dissolved hydrogen, but lost its activity when autoclaved. An oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay, the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay and chemiluminescence assay could not detect radical-scavenging activity in both ERW and hydrogen-dissolved water. These results indicate that ERW contains electrolysis-dependent hydrogen and an additional antioxidative factor predicted to be platinum nanoparticles.

  17. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide production by gene silencing attenuates inflammatory activity of LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Badiei, Alireza; Rivers-Auty, Jack; Ang, Abel Damien; Bhatia, Madhav

    2013-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an inflammatory mediator and is produced by the activity of the enzyme cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) in macrophages. Previously, pharmacological inhibition of CSE has been reported to have conflicting results, and this may be due to the lack of specificity of the pharmacological agents. Therefore, this study used a very specific approach of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to inhibit the production of the CSE in an in vitro setting. We found that the activation of macrophages by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulted in higher levels of CSE mRNA and protein as well as the increased production of proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO). We successfully used siRNA to specifically reduce the levels of CSE mRNA and protein in activated macrophages. Furthermore, the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in LPS-activated macrophages were significantly lower in siRNA-transfected cells compared to those in untransfected controls. However, the production levels of NO by the transfected cells were higher, suggesting that CSE activity has an inhibitory effect on NO production. These findings suggest that the CSE enzyme has a crucial role in the activation of macrophages, and its activity has an inhibitory effect on NO production by these cells.

  18. Differences and similarities in binding of pyruvate and L-lactate in the active site of M4 and H4 isoforms of human lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Swiderek, Katarzyna; Paneth, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We present QM/MM calculations that show differences in geometries of active sites of M(4) and H(4) isoforms of human LDH ligated with oxamate, pyruvate or L-lactate. As the consequence of these differences, binding isotope effects of the methyl hydrogen atoms of pyruvate and l-lactate may be used to experimentally distinguish these isoforms. Based on the FEP calculations we argue that L-lactate is a better candidate for the experimental studies. Our calculations of energies of interactions of ligands with the active site residues provide explanation for the observed experimentally sensitivity to inhibition of the M(4) isoenzyme isoform and pinpoint the differences to interactions of the ligand with the histidine residue. We conclude that pyruvate interacts much stronger in the active site of H(4) than M(4) isoform and that the latter interactions are weaker than with water molecules in the aqueous solution.

  19. Microbial resistance in relation to catalase activity to oxidative stress induced by photolysis of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Kanno, Taro; Mokudai, Takayuki; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Niwano, Yoshimi; Kohno, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the mechanism of microbial resistance to oxidative stress induced by photolysis of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in relation to microbial catalase activity. In microbicidal tests, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans were killed and this was accompanied by production of hydroxyl radicals. C. albicans was more resistant to hydroxyl radicals generated by photolysis of H(2)O(2) than was S. aureus. A catalase activity assay demonstrated that C. albicans had stronger catalase activity; accordingly, catalase activity could be one of the reasons for the resistance of the fungus to photolysis of H(2)O(2). Indeed, it was demonstrated that C. albicans with strong catalase activity was more resistant to photolysis of H(2)O(2) than that with weak catalase activity. Kinetic analysis using a modified Lineweaver-Burk plot also demonstrated that the microorganisms reacted directly with hydroxyl radicals and that this was accompanied by decomposition of H(2)O(2). The results of the present study suggest that the microbicidal effects of hydroxyl radicals generated by photolysis of H(2)O(2) can be alleviated by decomposition of H(2)O(2) by catalase in microorganisms.

  20. Dissection of the HOG pathway activated by hydrogen peroxide in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Mi; Kim, Eunjung; An, Jieun; Lee, Yeji; Choi, Eunyong; Choi, Wonja; Moon, Eunpyo; Kim, Wankee

    2017-02-01

    Cells usually cope with oxidative stress by activating signal transduction pathways. In the budding yeast Sacchromyces cerevisiae, the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway has long been implicated in transducing the oxidative stress-induced signal, but the underlying mechanisms are not well defined. Based on phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Hog1, we reveal that the signal from hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) flows through Ssk1, the response regulator of the two-component system of the HOG pathway. Downstream signal transduction into the HOG MAPK cascade requires the MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) Ssk2 but not its paralog Ssk22 or another MAP3K Ste11 of the pathway, culminating in Hog1 phosphorylation via the MAP2K Pbs2. When overexpressed, Ssk2 is also activated in an Ssk1-independent manner. Unlike in mammals, H2 O2 does not cause endoplasmic reticulum stress, which can activate Hog1 through the conventional unfolded protein response. Hog1 activated by H2 O2 is retained in the cytoplasm, but is still able to activate the cAMP- or stress-responsive elements by unknown mechanisms.

  1. Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC®) Barrier Application At The North Of Basin F Site, Rocky Mountain Arsenal; Innovative Technology Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Innovative Technology Evaluation Report documents the results of a demonstration of the hydrogen release compound (HRC®) barrier technology developed by Regenesis Bioremediation Products, Inc., of San Clemente, California. HRC® is a proprietary, food-q...

  2. Antibacterial Properties and Mechanism of Activity of a Novel Silver-Stabilized Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Nancy L.; Bass, Paul; Liss, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Huwa-San peroxide (hydrogen peroxide; HSP) is a NSF Standard 60 (maximum 8mg/L-1) new generation peroxide stabilized with ionic silver suitable for continuous disinfection of potable water. Experiments were undertaken to examine the mechanism of HSP against planktonic and biofilm cultures of indicator bacterial strains. Contact/kill time (CT) relationships that achieve effective control were explored to determine the potential utility in primary disinfection. Inhibitory assays were conducted using both nutrient rich media and a medium based on synthetic wastewater. Assays were compared for exposures to three disinfectants (HSP, laboratory grade hydrogen peroxide (HP) and sodium hypochlorite) at concentrations of 20 ppm (therefore at 2.5 and 5 times the NSF limit for HP and sodium hypochlorite, respectively) and at pH 7.0 and 8.5 in dechlorinated tap water. HSP was found to be more or equally effective as hypochlorite or HP. Results from CT assays comparing HSP and HP at different bacterial concentrations with neutralization of residual peroxide with catalase suggested that at a high bacterial concentration HSP, but not HP, was protected from catalase degradation possibly through sequestration by bacterial cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, at a low bacterial cell density residual HSP was more effectively neutralized as less HSP was associated with bacteria and therefore accessible to catalase. Silver in HSP may facilitate this association through electrostatic interactions at the cell surface. This was supported by experiments where the addition of mono (K+) and divalent (Ca+2) cations (0.005-0.05M) reduced the killing efficacy of HSP but not HP. Experiments designed to distinguish any inhibitory effect of silver from that of peroxide in HSP were carried out by monitoring the metabolic activity of established P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. Concentrations of 70-500 ppm HSP had a pronounced effect on metabolic activity while the equivalent concentrations of ionic

  3. Nuclear Site Security in the Event of Terrorist Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M.L.; Sims, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper, presented as a poster, identifies why ballistic protection should now be considered at nuclear sites to counter terrorist threats. A proven and flexible form of multi purpose protection is described in detail with identification of trial results that show its suitability for this role. (authors)

  4. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  5. Revealing the nature of the active site on the carbon catalyst for C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, XiaoYing; Li, Bo; Su, Dangsheng

    2014-09-28

    A reactivity descriptor for the C-H bond activation on the nanostructured carbon catalyst is proposed. Furthermore the calculations reveal that the single ketone group can be an active site in ODH reaction.

  6. Cellular Active N-Hydroxyurea FEN1 Inhibitors Block Substrate Entry to the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Exell, Jack C.; Thompson, Mark J.; Finger, L. David; Shaw, Steven J.; Debreczeni, Judit; Ward, Thomas A.; McWhirter, Claire; Siöberg, Catrine L. B.; Martinez Molina, Daniel; Mark Abbott, W.; Jones, Clifford D.; Nissink, J. Willem M.; Durant, Stephen T.; Grasby, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    The structure-specific nuclease human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) plays a key role in DNA replication and repair and may be of interest as an oncology target. We present the first crystal structure of inhibitor-bound hFEN1 and show a cyclic N-hydroxyurea bound in the active site coordinated to two magnesium ions. Three such compounds had similar IC50 values but differed subtly in mode of action. One had comparable affinity for protein and protein–substrate complex and prevented reaction by binding to active site catalytic metal ions, blocking the unpairing of substrate DNA necessary for reaction. Other compounds were more competitive with substrate. Cellular thermal shift data showed engagement of both inhibitor types with hFEN1 in cells with activation of the DNA damage response evident upon treatment. However, cellular EC50s were significantly higher than in vitro inhibition constants and the implications of this for exploitation of hFEN1 as a drug target are discussed. PMID:27526030

  7. Active Layer and Moisture Measurements for Intensive Site 0 and 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-04-17

    These are measurements of Active Layer Thickness collected along several lines beginning in September, 2011 to the present. The data were collected at several time periods along the Site0 L2 Line, the Site1 AB Line, and an ERT Monitoring Line near Area A in Site1.

  8. Highly Active Supported Pt Nanocatalysts Synthesized by Alcohol Reduction towards Hydrogenation of Cinnamaldehyde: Synergy of Metal Valence and Hydroxyl Groups.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyan; He, Wanhong; Wang, Liren; Yang, Junjiao; Xiang, Xu; Zhang, Bing; Li, Feng

    2015-07-01

    The hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes to allylic alcohols or saturated aldehydes provides a typical example to study the catalytic effect on structure-sensitive reactions. In this work, supported platinum nanocatalysts over hydrotalcite were synthesized by an alcohol reduction method. The Pt catalyst prepared by the reduction with a polyol (ethylene glycol) outperforms those prepared with ethanol and methanol in the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde. The selectivity towards the C=O bond is the highest over the former, although its mean size of Pt particles is the smallest. The hydroxyl groups on hydrotalcite could act as an internally accessible promoter to enhance the selectivity towards the C=O bond. The optimal Pt catalyst showed a high activity with an initial turnover frequency (TOF) of 2.314 s(-1). This work unveils the synergic effect of metal valence and in situ promoter on the chemoselective hydrogenation, which could open up a new direction in designing hydrogenation catalysts.

  9. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  10. Characterization of reduced natural garnierite and its catalytic activity for carbon monoxide hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, P.A.; Nijs, H.H.; Poncelet, G.

    1980-08-01

    Natural garnierite, a nickel-containing mineral from New Caledonia, was reduced in hydrogen. The mineral and its reduced forms were characterized by x-ray diffraction electron microscopy, and microprobe analysis. The reduction was followed volumetrically and the Ni/sup 0/ phase characterized by H/sub 2/ chemisorption. The catalytic activity of this mineral was determined in the hydrogenation reaction of carbon monoxide. Experiments were done in typical methanation and so-called Fischer-Tropsch conditions. The mineral consists of a mixture of a 10-A phase (talc-like fluffy particles) and a 7-A serpentine-like phase (fibers). The major amount of nickel is associated with the talc phase. Minor amounts are in the serpentine fibers and possibly substituted in the lattice of the minerals. Qualitative evidence for a redispersion of Ni in the serpentine fibers is advanced. At the moment this occurs, the turnover numbers of CO disappearance are optimum. Compared to other supports, they are considerably lower. The product distribution is within C/sub 1/-C/sub 4/ and follows closely a Schulz-Flory distribution.

  11. Adsorption/oxidation of hydrogen sulfide on nitrogen-containing activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Adib, F.; Bagreev, A.; Bandosz, T.J.

    2000-02-22

    Wood-based activated carbon was modified by impregnation with urea and heat treatment at 450 and 950 C. The chemical and physical properties of materials were determined using acid/base titration, FTIR, thermal analysis, IGC, and sorption of nitrogen. The surface features were compared to those of a commercial urea-modified carbon. Then, the H{sub 2}S breakthrough capacity tests were carried out, and the sorption capacity was evaluated. The results showed that urea-modified sorbents have a capacity similar to that of the received material; however, the conversion of hydrogen sulfide to a water-soluble species is significantly higher. It happens due to a high dispersion of basic nitrogen compounds in the small pores of carbons, where oxidation of hydrogen sulfide ions to sulfur radicals followed by the creation of sulfur oxides and sulfuric acid occurs. It is proposed that the process proceeds gradually, from small pores to larger, and that the degree of microporosity is an important factor.

  12. Active Hydrogenation Catalyst with a Structured, Peptide-Based Outer-Coordination Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Avijita; Buchko, Garry W.; Reback, Matthew L.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Linehan, John C.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2012-10-05

    The synthesis, catalytic activity, and structural features of a rhodium-based hydrogenation catalyst containing a phosphine ligand coupled to a 14-residue peptide are reported. Both CD and NMR spectroscopy show that the peptide adopts a helical structure in 1:1:1 TFE/MeCN/H2O that is maintained when the peptide is attached to the ligand and when the ligand is attached to the metal complex. The metal complex hydrogenates aqueous solutions of 3-butenol to 1-butanol at 360 ± 50 turnovers/Rh/h at 294 K. This peptide- based catalyst represents a starting point for developing and characterizing a peptide-based outer-coordination sphere that can be used to introduce enzyme-like features into molecular catalysts. This work was funded by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geoscience and Biosciences Division (AJ, JCL and WJS), the Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (GWB, MLR and WJS). Part of the research was conducted at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Biolog-ical and Environmental Research (BER) program located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Are nest sites actively chosen? Testing a common assumption for three non-resource limited birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, A. E.; Elliot, S. L.; Hart, A. G.

    2009-09-01

    Many widely-accepted ecological concepts are simplified assumptions about complex situations that remain largely untested. One example is the assumption that nest-building species choose nest sites actively when they are not resource limited. This assumption has seen little direct empirical testing: most studies on nest-site selection simply assume that sites are chosen actively (and seek explanations for such behaviour) without considering that sites may be selected randomly. We used 15 years of data from a nestbox scheme in the UK to test the assumption of active nest-site choice in three cavity-nesting bird species that differ in breeding and migratory strategy: blue tit ( Cyanistes caeruleus), great tit ( Parus major) and pied flycatcher ( Ficedula hypoleuca). Nest-site selection was non-random (implying active nest-site choice) for blue and great tits, but not for pied flycatchers. We also considered the relative importance of year-specific and site-specific factors in determining occupation of nest sites. Site-specific factors were more important than year-specific factors for the tit species, while the reverse was true for pied flycatchers. Our results show that nest-site selection, in birds at least, is not always the result of active choice, such that choice should not be assumed automatically in studies of nesting behaviour. We use this example to highlight the need to test key ecological assumptions empirically, and the importance of doing so across taxa rather than for single "model" species.

  14. Structural definition of the active site and catalytic mechanism of 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Liao, Der-Ing; Zheng, Ya-Jun; Viitanen, Paul V; Jordan, Douglas B

    2002-02-12

    X-ray crystal structures of L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase from Magnaporthe grisea are reported for the E-SO(4)(2-), E-SO(4)(2-)-Mg(2+), E-SO(4)(2)(-)-Mn(2+), E-SO(4)(2)(-)-Mn(2+)-glycerol, and E-SO(4)(2)(-)-Zn(2+) complexes with resolutions that extend to 1.55, 0.98, 1.60, 1.16, and 1.00 A, respectively. Active-site residues of the homodimer are fully defined. The structures were used to model the substrate ribulose 5-phosphate in the active site with the phosphate group anchored at the sulfate site and the placement of the ribulose group guided by the glycerol site. The model includes two Mg(2+) cations that bind to the oxygen substituents of the C2, C3, C4, and phosphate groups of the substrate, the side chains of Glu37 and His153, and water molecules. The position of the metal cofactors and the substrate's phosphate group are further stabilized by an extensive hydrogen-bond and salt-bridge network. On the basis of their proximity to the substrate's reaction participants, the imidazole of an Asp99-His136 dyad from one subunit, the side chains of the Asp41, Cys66, and Glu174 residues from the other subunit, and Mg(2+)-activated water molecules are proposed to serve specific roles in the catalytic cycle as general acid-base functionalities. The model suggests that during the 1,2-shift step of the reaction, the substrate's C3 and C4 hydroxyl groups are cis to each other. A cis transition state is calculated to have an activation barrier that is 2 kcal/mol greater than that of the trans transition state in the absence of the enzyme.

  15. Structural definition of the active site and catalytic mechanism of 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone 4-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, D.-I.; Zheng, Y.-J.; Viitanen, P.V.; Jordan, D.B.

    2010-03-08

    X-ray crystal structures of L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase from Magnaporthe grisea are reported for the E-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, E-{sub 4}{sup 2-}-Mg{sup 2+}, E-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}-Mn{sup 2+}, E-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}-Mn{sup 2+}-glycerol, and E-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}-Zn{sup 2+} complexes with resolutions that extend to 1.55, 0.98, 1.60, 1.16, and 1.00 {angstrom}, respectively. Active-site residues of the homodimer are fully defined. The structures were used to model the substrate ribulose 5-phosphate in the active site with the phosphate group anchored at the sulfate site and the placement of the ribulose group guided by the glycerol site. The model includes two Mg{sup 2+} cations that bind to the oxygen substituents of the C2, C3, C4, and phosphate groups of the substrate, the side chains of Glu37 and His153, and water molecules. The position of the metal cofactors and the substrate's phosphate group are further stabilized by an extensive hydrogen-bond and salt-bridge network. On the basis of their proximity to the substrate's reaction participants, the imidazole of an Asp99-His136 dyad from one subunit, the side chains of the Asp41, Cys66, and Glu174 residues from the other subunit, and Mg{sup 2+}-activated water molecules are proposed to serve specific roles in the catalytic cycle as general acid-base functionalities. The model suggests that during the 1,2-shift step of the reaction, the substrate's C3 and C4 hydroxyl groups are cis to each other. A cis transition state is calculated to have an activation barrier that is 2 kcal/mol greater than that of the trans transition state in the absence of the enzyme.

  16. Investigation on the two-stage active magnetic regenerative refrigerator for liquefaction of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Inmyong; Park, Jiho; Jeong, Sangkwon; Kim, Youngkwon

    2014-01-29

    An active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) is expected to be useful for hydrogen liquefaction due to its inherent high thermodynamic efficiency. Because the temperature of the cold end of the refrigerator has to be approximately liquid temperature, a large temperature span of the active magnetic regenerator (AMR) is indispensable when the heat sink temperature is liquid nitrogen temperature or higher. Since magnetic refrigerants are only effective in the vicinity of their own transition temperatures, which limit the temperature span of the AMR, an innovative structure is needed to increase the temperature span. The AMR must be a layered structure and the thermophysical matching of magnetic field and flow convection effects is very important. In order to design an AMR for liquefaction of hydrogen, the implementation of multi-layered AMR with different magnetic refrigerants is explored with multi-staging. In this paper, the performance of the multi-layered AMR using four rare-earth compounds (GdNi{sub 2}, Gd{sub 0.1}Dy{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 2}, Dy{sub 0.85}Er{sub 0.15}Al{sub 2}, Dy{sub 0.5}Er{sub 0.5}Al{sub 2}) is investigated. The experimental apparatus includes two-stage active magnetic regenerator containing two different magnetic refrigerants each. A liquid nitrogen reservoir connected to the warm end of the AMR maintains the temperature of the warm end around 77 K. High-pressure helium gas is employed as a heat transfer fluid in the AMR and the maximum magnetic field of 4 T is supplied by the low temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet. The temperature span with the variation of parameters such as phase difference between magnetic field and mass flow rate of magnetic refrigerants in AMR is investigated. The maximum temperature span in the experiment is recorded as 50 K and several performance issues have been discussed in this paper.

  17. Hydrogen production using thermocatalytic decomposition of methane on Ni30/activated carbon and Ni30/carbon black.

    PubMed

    Srilatha, K; Viditha, V; Srinivasulu, D; Ramakrishna, S U B; Himabindu, V

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen is an energy carrier of the future need. It could be produced from different sources and used for power generation or as a transport fuel which mainly in association with fuel cells. The primary challenge for hydrogen production is reducing the cost of production technologies to make the resulting hydrogen cost competitive with conventional fuels. Thermocatalytic decomposition (TCD) of methane is one of the most advantageous processes, which will meet the future demand, hence an attractive route for COx free environment. The present study deals with the production of hydrogen with 30 wt% of Ni impregnated in commercially available activated carbon and carbon black catalysts (samples coded as Ni30/AC and Ni30/CB, respectively). These combined catalysts were not attempted by previous studies. Pure form of hydrogen is produced at 850 °C and volume hourly space velocity (VHSV) of 1.62 L/h g on the activity of both the catalysts. The analysis (X-ray diffraction (XRD)) of the catalysts reveals moderately crystalline peaks of Ni, which might be responsible for the increase in catalytic life along with formation of carbon fibers. The activity of carbon black is sustainable for a longer time compared to that of activated carbon which has been confirmed by life time studies (850 °C and 54 sccm of methane).

  18. Synthesis and characteristics of (Hydrogenated) ferulic acid derivatives as potential antiviral agents with insecticidal activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant viruses cause many serious plant diseases and are currently suppressed with the simultaneous use of virucides and insecticides. The use of such materials, however, increases the amounts of pollutants in the environment. To reduce environmental contaminants, virucides with insecticidal activity is an attractive option. Results A series of substituted ferulic acid amide derivatives 7 and the corresponding hydrogenated ferulic acid amide derivatives 13 were synthesized and evaluated for their antiviral and insecticidal activities. The majority of the synthesized compounds exhibited good levels of antiviral activity against the tobacco mosaic virus (TMW), with compounds 7a, 7b and 7d in particular providing higher levels of protective and curative activities against TMV at 500 μg/mL than the control compound ribavirin. Furthermore, these compounds displayed good insecticidal activities against insects with piercing-sucking mouthparts, which can spread plant viruses between and within crops. Conclusions Two series of ferulic acid derivatives have been synthesized efficiently. The bioassay showed title compounds not only inhibit the plant viral infection, but also prevented the spread of plant virus by insect vectors. These findings therefore demonstrate that the ferulic acid amides represent a new template for future antiviral studies. PMID:23409923

  19. Activation of the Lck tyrosine protein kinase by hydrogen peroxide requires the phosphorylation of Tyr-394.

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, J S; Sefton, B M

    1995-01-01

    Exposure of cells to H2O2 mimics many of the effects of treatment of cells with extracellular ligands. Among these is the stimulation of tyrosine phosphorylation. In this study, we show that exposure of cells to H2O2 increases the catalytic activity of the lymphocyte-specific tyrosine protein kinase p56lck (Lck) and induces tyrosine phosphorylation of Lck at Tyr-394, the autophosphorylation site. Using mutant forms of Lck, we found that Tyr-394 is required for H2O2-induced activation of Lck, suggesting that phosphorylation of this site may activate Lck. In addition, H2O2 treatment induced phosphorylation at Tyr-394 in a catalytically inactive mutant of Lck in cells that do not express endogenous Lck. This demonstrates that a kinase other than Lck itself is capable of phosphorylating Lck at the so-called autophosphorylation site and raises the possibility that this as yet unidentified tyrosine protein kinase functions as an activator of Lck. Such an activating enzyme could play an important role in signal transduction in T cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7538674

  20. Controlling hydrogen scrambling in multiply charged protein ions during collisional activation: implications for top-down hydrogen/deuterium exchange MS utilizing collisional activation in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Abzalimov, Rinat R; Kaltashov, Igor A

    2010-02-01

    Hydrogen exchange in solution combined with ion fragmentation in the gas phase followed by MS detection emerged in recent years as a powerful tool to study higher order protein structure and dynamics. However, a certain type of ion chemistry in the gas phase, namely, internal rearrangement of labile hydrogen atoms (the so-called hydrogen scrambling), is often cited as a factor limiting the utility of this experimental technique. Although several studies have been carried out to elucidate the roles played by various factors in the occurrence and the extent of hydrogen scrambling, there is still no consensus as to what experimental protocol should be followed to avoid or minimize it. In this study we employ fragmentation of mass-selected subpopulations of protein ions to assess the extent of internal proton mobility prior to dissociation. A unique advantage of tandem MS is that it not only provides a means to map the deuterium content of protein ions whose overall levels of isotope incorporation can be precisely defined by controlling the mass selection window, but also correlates this spatial isotope distribution with such global characteristic as the protein ion charge state. Hydrogen scrambling does not occur when the charge state of the precursor protein ions selected for fragmentation is high. Fragment ions derived from both N- and C-terminal parts of the protein are equally unaffected by scrambling. However, spatial distribution of deuterium atoms obtained by fragmenting low-charge-density protein ions is consistent with a very high degree of scrambling prior to the dissociation events. The extent of hydrogen scrambling is also high when multistage fragmentation is used to probe deuterium incorporation locally. Taken together, the experimental results provide a coherent picture of intramolecular processes occurring prior to the dissociation event and provide guidance for the design of experiments whose outcome is unaffected by hydrogen scrambling.

  1. Synthetic Antibodies Inhibit Bcl-2-associated X Protein (BAX) through Blockade of the N-terminal Activation Site*

    PubMed Central

    Uchime, Onyinyechukwu; Dai, Zhou; Biris, Nikolaos; Lee, David; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Li, Sheng; Lai, Jonathan R.; Gavathiotis, Evripidis

    2016-01-01

    The BCL-2 protein family plays a critical role in regulating cellular commitment to mitochondrial apoptosis. Pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX) is an executioner protein of the BCL-2 family that represents the gateway to mitochondrial apoptosis. Following cellular stresses that induce apoptosis, cytosolic BAX is activated and translocates to the mitochondria, where it inserts into the mitochondrial outer membrane to form a toxic pore. How the BAX activation pathway proceeds and how this may be inhibited is not yet completely understood. Here we describe synthetic antibody fragments (Fabs) as structural and biochemical probes to investigate the potential mechanisms of BAX regulation. These synthetic Fabs bind with high affinity to BAX and inhibit its activation by the BH3-only protein tBID (truncated Bcl2 interacting protein) in assays using liposomal membranes. Inhibition of BAX by a representative Fab, 3G11, prevented mitochondrial translocation of BAX and BAX-mediated cytochrome c release. Using NMR and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, we showed that 3G11 forms a stoichiometric and stable complex without inducing a significant conformational change on monomeric and inactive BAX. We identified that the Fab-binding site on BAX involves residues of helices α1/α6 and the α1-α2 loop. Therefore, the inhibitory binding surface of 3G11 overlaps with the N-terminal activation site of BAX, suggesting a novel mechanism of BAX inhibition through direct binding to the BAX N-terminal activation site. The synthetic Fabs reported here reveal, as probes, novel mechanistic insights into BAX inhibition and provide a blueprint for developing inhibitors of BAX activation. PMID:26565029

  2. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  3. Structural characterization of single nucleotide variants at ligand binding sites and enzyme active sites of human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazunori D.; Nishi, Hafumi; Nakata, Junichi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Functional sites on proteins play an important role in various molecular interactions and reactions between proteins and other molecules. Thus, mutations in functional sites can severely affect the overall phenotype. Progress of genome sequencing projects has yielded a wealth of information on single nucleotide variants (SNVs), especially those with less than 1% minor allele frequency (rare variants). To understand the functional influence of genetic variants at a protein level, we investigated the relationship between SNVs and protein functional sites in terms of minor allele frequency and the structural position of variants. As a result, we observed that SNVs were less abundant at ligand binding sites, which is consistent with a previous study on SNVs and protein interaction sites. Additionally, we found that non-rare variants tended to be located slightly apart from enzyme active sites. Examination of non-rare variants revealed that most of the mutations resulted in moderate changes of the physico-chemical properties of amino acids, suggesting the existence of functional constraints. In conclusion, this study shows that the mapping of genetic variants on protein structures could be a powerful approach to evaluate the functional impact of rare genetic variations. PMID:27924270

  4. Low pressure CO₂ hydrogenation to methanol over gold nanoparticles activated on a CeOx/TiO₂ interface

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Xiaofang; Boscoboinik, J. Anibal; Kattel, Shyam; ...

    2015-07-28

    Capture and recycling of CO₂ into valuable chemicals such as alcohols could help mitigate its emissions into the atmosphere. Due to its inert nature, the activation of CO₂ is a critical step in improving the overall reaction kinetics during its chemical conversion. Although pure gold is an inert noble metal and cannot catalyze hydrogenation reactions, it can be activated when deposited as nanoparticles on the appropriate oxide support. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, it is shown that an electronic polarization at the metal–oxide interface of Au nanoparticles anchored and stabilized on a CeOx/TiO₂ substrate generates active centers formore » CO₂ adsorption and its low pressure hydrogenation, leading to a higher selectivity toward methanol. In conclusion, this study illustrates the importance of localized electronic properties and structure in catalysis for achieving higher alcohol selectivity from CO₂ hydrogenation.« less

  5. Lamellipodial actin mechanically links myosin activity with adhesion site formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannone, Gregory; Dubin-Thaler, Benjamin; Rossier, Olivier; Cai, Yunfei; Chaga, Oleg; Jiang, Guoying; Beaver, William; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Freund, Yoav; Borisy, Gary; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell motility proceeds by cycles of edge protrusion, adhesion and retraction. Whether these functions are coordinated by biochemical or biomechanical processes is unknown. We find that myosin II pulls the rear of the lamellipodial actin network, causing upward bending, edge retraction and initiation of new adhesion sites. The network then separates from the edge and condenses over the myosin. Protrusion resumes as lamellipodial actin regenerates from the front and extends rearward until it reaches newly assembled myosin, initiating the next cycle. Upward bending, observed by evanescence and electron microscopy, results in ruffle formation when adhesion strength is low. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy shows that the regenerating lamellipodium forms a cohesive, separable layer of actin above the lamellum. Thus, actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process. PMID:17289574

  6. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions.

  7. Active-Site Hydration and Water Diffusion in Cytochrome P450cam: A Highly Dynamic Process

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome Y

    2011-01-01

    Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (300 ns) are performed on both the apo- (i.e., camphor-free) and camphor-bound cytochrome P450cam (CYP101). Water diffusion into and out of the protein active site is observed without biased sampling methods. During the course of the molecular dynamics simulation, an average of 6.4 water molecules is observed in the camphor-binding site of the apo form, compared to zero water molecules in the binding site of the substrate-bound form, in agreement with the number of water molecules observed in crystal structures of the same species. However, as many as 12 water molecules can be present at a given time in the camphor-binding region of the active site in the case of apo-P450cam, revealing a highly dynamic process for hydration of the protein active site, with water molecules exchanging rapidly with the bulk solvent. Water molecules are also found to exchange locations frequently inside the active site, preferentially clustering in regions surrounding the water molecules observed in the crystal structure. Potential-of-mean-force calculations identify thermodynamically favored trans-protein pathways for the diffusion of water molecules between the protein active site and the bulk solvent. Binding of camphor in the active site modifies the free-energy landscape of P450cam channels toward favoring the diffusion of water molecules out of the protein active site.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates proliferation and migration of human prostate cancer cells through activation of activator protein-1 and up-regulation of the heparin affin regulatory peptide gene.

    PubMed

    Polytarchou, Christos; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Papadimitriou, Evangelia

    2005-12-09

    It is becoming increasingly recognized that hydrogen peroxide (HP) plays a role in cell proliferation and migration. In the present study we found that exogenous HP significantly induced human prostate cancer LNCaP cell proliferation and migration. Heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP) seems to be involved in the stimulatory effect of HP, because the latter had no effect on stably transfected LNCaP cells that did not express HARP. Moreover, HP significantly increased HARP mRNA and protein amounts in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Curcumin and activator protein-1 (AP-1) decoy oligonucleotides abrogated both HP-induced HARP expression and LNCaP cell proliferation and migration. HP increased luciferase activity of the 5'-flanking region of the HARP gene introduced in a reporter gene vector, an effect that was abolished when even one of the two putative AP-1 binding sites of the HARP promoter was mutated. The effect of HP seems to be due to the binding of Fra-1, JunD, and phospho-c-Jun to the HARP promoter. These results support the notion that HARP is important for human prostate cancer cell proliferation and migration, establish the role of AP-1 in the up-regulation of HARP expression by low concentrations of HP, and characterize the AP-1 dimers involved.

  9. Superoxide Dismutase Activity, Hydrogen Peroxide Steady-State Concentration, and Bactericidal and Phagocytic Activities Against Moraxella bovis, in Neutrophils Isolated from Copper-Deficient Bovines.

    PubMed

    Cintia, Postma Gabriela; Leonardo, Minatel; Israel, Olivares Roberto Walter; Andrea, Schapira; Beatriz, Valdez Laura; Elena, Dallorso Maria

    2016-05-01

    Copper (Cu) deficiency increases occurrence of certain infectious diseases in animals, including infectious keratoconjunctivitis in bovines, a bacterial ocular inflammation caused by Moraxella bovis. Neutrophil leukocytes constitute the first phagocytic cells to arrive at infection sites for bacterial neutralization. The objective of this work was to evaluate whether the functionality of neutrophils against M. bovis is impaired in experimentally induced Cu deficiency in bovines using high molybdenum and sulfur levels in the diet. The Cu tissue values and the periocular achromotrichia observed in +Mo animals showed that the clinic phase of Cu deficiency was reached in this group. Instead, +Cu animals have not evidenced clinical signs or biochemical parameters of hypocuprosis. On the basis of our observations, we concluded that Cu deficiency has no effect on phagocytic and bactericidal activities of neutrophils against M. bovis. However, superoxide dismutase activity and peroxide hydrogen generation were significantly different between groups. Therefore, additional research to explain these results is merited to fully characterize the consequences of Cu status on the risk for infections under field conditions.

  10. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine.

    PubMed

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-11-13

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO(2). We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O(2) and CO(2) bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO(2) defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg(2+) surrounded by three H(2)O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming.

  11. Gold catalysts for pure hydrogen production in the water-gas shift reaction: activity, structure and reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Burch, Robbie

    2006-12-21

    The production of hydrogen containing very low levels of carbon monoxide for use in polymer electrolyte fuel cells requires the development of catalysts that show very high activity at low temperatures where the equilibrium for the removal of carbon monoxide using the water-gas shift reaction is favourable. It has been claimed that oxide-supported gold catalysts have the required high activity but there is considerable uncertainty in the literature about the feasibility of using these catalysts under real conditions. By