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Sample records for active site inhibitors

  1. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  2. Active site - a site of binding of affinity inhibitors in baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Svyato, I.E.; Sklyankina, V.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-03-20

    The interaction of the enzyme-substrate complex with methyl phosphate, O-phosphoethanolamine, O-phosphopropanolamine, N-acetylphosphoserine, and phosphoglyolic acid, as well as pyrophosphatase, modified by monoesters of phosphoric acid, with pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate, was investigated. It was shown that the enzyme containing the substrate in the active site does not react with monophosphates, but modified pyrophosphatase entirely retains the ability to bind polyanions to the regulatory site. It is concluded that the inactivation of baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase by monoesters of phosphoric acid, which are affinity inhibitors of it, is the result of modification of the active site of the enzyme.

  3. Active Site Inhibitors Protect Protein Kinase C from Dephosphorylation and Stabilize Its Mature Form*

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Christine M.; Antal, Corina E.; Reyes, Gloria; Kunkel, Maya T.; Adams, Ryan A.; Ziyar, Ahdad; Riveros, Tania; Newton, Alexandra C.

    2011-01-01

    Conformational changes acutely control protein kinase C (PKC). We have previously shown that the autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate must be removed from the active site in order for 1) PKC to be phosphorylated by its upstream kinase phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK-1), 2) the mature enzyme to bind and phosphorylate substrates, and 3) the mature enzyme to be dephosphorylated by phosphatases. Here we show an additional level of conformational control; binding of active site inhibitors locks PKC in a conformation in which the priming phosphorylation sites are resistant to dephosphorylation. Using homogeneously pure PKC, we show that the active site inhibitor Gö 6983 prevents the dephosphorylation by pure protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) or the hydrophobic motif phosphatase, pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP). Consistent with results using pure proteins, treatment of cells with the competitive inhibitors Gö 6983 or bisindolylmaleimide I, but not the uncompetitive inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide IV, prevents the dephosphorylation and down-regulation of PKC induced by phorbol esters. Pulse-chase analyses reveal that active site inhibitors do not affect the net rate of priming phosphorylations of PKC; rather, they inhibit the dephosphorylation triggered by phorbol esters. These data provide a molecular explanation for the recent studies showing that active site inhibitors stabilize the phosphorylation state of protein kinases B/Akt and C. PMID:21715334

  4. Acylpeptide hydrolase: inhibitors and some active site residues of the human enzyme.

    PubMed

    Scaloni, A; Jones, W M; Barra, D; Pospischil, M; Sassa, S; Popowicz, A; Manning, L R; Schneewind, O; Manning, J M

    1992-02-25

    Acylpeptide hydrolase may be involved in N-terminal deacetylation of nascent polypeptide chains and of bioactive peptides. The activity of this enzyme from human erythrocytes is sensitive to anions such as chloride, nitrate, and fluoride. Furthermore, blocked amino acids act as competitive inhibitors of the enzyme. Acetyl leucine chloromethyl ketone has been employed to identify one active site residue as His-707. Diisopropylfluorophosphate has been used to identify a second active site residue as Ser-587. Chemical modification studies with a water-soluble carbodiimide implicate a carboxyl group in catalytic activity. These results and the sequence around these active site residues, especially near Ser-587, suggest that acylpeptide hydrolase contains a catalytic triad. The presence of a cysteine residue in the vicinity of the active site is suggested by the inactivation of the enzyme by sulfhydryl-modifying agents and also by a low amount of modification by the peptide chloromethyl ketone inhibitor. Ebelactone A, an inhibitor of the formyl aminopeptidase, the bacterial counterpart of eukaryotic acylpeptide hydrolase, was found to be an effective inhibitor of this enzyme. These findings suggest that acylpeptidase hydrolase is a member of a family of enzymes with extremely diverse functions. PMID:1740429

  5. Tricyclic covalent inhibitors selectively target Jak3 through an active site thiol.

    PubMed

    Goedken, Eric R; Argiriadi, Maria A; Banach, David L; Fiamengo, Bryan A; Foley, Sage E; Frank, Kristine E; George, Jonathan S; Harris, Christopher M; Hobson, Adrian D; Ihle, David C; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J; Michalak, Mark E; Murdock, Sara E; Tomlinson, Medha J; Voss, Jeffrey W

    2015-02-20

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. We have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nm) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. These results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:25552479

  6. Tricyclic Covalent Inhibitors Selectively Target Jak3 through an Active Site Thiol*

    PubMed Central

    Goedken, Eric R.; Argiriadi, Maria A.; Banach, David L.; Fiamengo, Bryan A.; Foley, Sage E.; Frank, Kristine E.; George, Jonathan S.; Harris, Christopher M.; Hobson, Adrian D.; Ihle, David C.; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J.; Michalak, Mark E.; Murdock, Sara E.; Tomlinson, Medha J.; Voss, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. We have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nm) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. These results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:25552479

  7. Calorimetric studies of the interactions of metalloenzyme active site mimetics with zinc-binding inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sophia G; Burns, Philip T; Miceli, Amanda M; Grice, Kyle A; Karver, Caitlin E; Jin, Lihua

    2016-07-19

    The binding of drugs to metalloenzymes is an intricate process that involves several interactions, including binding of the drug to the enzyme active site metal, as well as multiple interactions between the drug and the enzyme residues. In order to determine the free energy contribution of Zn(2+) binding by known metalloenzyme inhibitors without the other interactions, valid active site zinc structural mimetics must be formed and binding studies need to be performed in biologically relevant conditions. The potential of each of five ligands to form a structural mimetic with Zn(2+) was investigated in buffer using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). All five ligands formed strong 1 : 1 (ligand : Zn(2+)) binary complexes. The complexes were used in further ITC experiments to study their interaction with 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) and/or acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), two bidentate anionic zinc-chelating enzyme inhibitors. It was found that tetradentate ligands were not suitable for creating zinc structural mimetics for inhibitor binding in solution due to insufficient coordination sites remaining on Zn(2+). A stable binary complex, [Zn(BPA)](2+), which was formed by a tridentate ligand, bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (BPA), was found to bind one AHA in buffer or a methanol : buffer mixture (60 : 40 by volume) at pH 7.25 or one 8-HQ in the methanol : buffer mixture at pH 6.80, making it an effective structural mimetic for the active site of zinc metalloenzymes. These results are consistent with the observation that metalloenzyme active site zinc ions have three residues coordinated to them, leaving one or two sites open for inhibitors to bind. Our findings indicate that Zn(BPA)X2 can be used as an active site structural mimetic for zinc metalloenzymes for estimating the free energy contribution of zinc binding to the overall inhibitor active site interactions. Such use will help aid in the rational design of inhibitors to a variety of zinc metalloenzymes

  8. A comparative structure-function analysis of active-site inhibitors of Vibrio cholerae cholix toxin.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Miguel R; Merrill, A Rod

    2015-09-01

    Cholix toxin from Vibrio cholerae is a novel mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase (mART) toxin that shares structural and functional properties with Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A and Corynebacterium diphtheriae diphtheria toxin. Herein, we have used the high-resolution X-ray structure of full-length cholix toxin in the apo form, NAD(+) bound, and 10 structures of the cholix catalytic domain (C-domain) complexed with several strong inhibitors of toxin enzyme activity (NAP, PJ34, and the P-series) to study the binding mode of the ligands. A pharmacophore model based on the active pose of NAD(+) was compared with the active conformation of the inhibitors, which revealed a cationic feature in the side chain of the inhibitors that may determine the active pose. Moreover, a conformational search was conducted for the missing coordinates of one of the main active-site loops (R-loop). The resulting structural models were used to evaluate the interaction energies and for 3D-QSAR modeling. Implications for a rational drug design approach for mART toxins were derived. PMID:25756608

  9. Active-Site-Directed Inhibitors of Prolyl Oligopeptidase Abolish Its Conformational Dynamics.

    PubMed

    López, Abraham; Herranz-Trillo, Fátima; Kotev, Martin; Gairí, Margarida; Guallar, Víctor; Bernadó, Pau; Millet, Oscar; Tarragó, Teresa; Giralt, Ernest

    2016-05-17

    Deciphering conformational dynamics is crucial for understanding the biological functions of proteins and for designing compounds targeting them. In particular, providing an accurate description of microsecond-millisecond motions opens the opportunity for regulating protein-protein interactions (PPIs) by modulating the dynamics of one interacting partner. Here we analyzed the conformational dynamics of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) and the effects of active-site-directed inhibitors on the dynamics. We used an integrated structural biology approach based on NMR spectroscopy and SAXS experiments complemented by MD simulations. We found that POP is in a slow equilibrium in solution between open and closed conformations, and that inhibitors effectively abolished this equilibrium by stabilizing the enzyme in the closed conformation. PMID:26918396

  10. Discovery and Characterization of Non-ATP Site Inhibitors of the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Comess, Kenneth M.; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R.; Gum, Rebecca J.; Borhani, David W.; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R.; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E.; Haasch, Deanna L.; Smith, Harriet T.; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L.; Cloutier, Timothy E.; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I.; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J.; Calderwood, David J.; Hajduk, Philip J.

    2012-03-02

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38{alpha} (involved in the formation of TNF{alpha} and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38{alpha} both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in

  11. Molecular recognition at the active site of subtilisin BPN': crystallographic studies using genetically engineered proteinaceous inhibitor SSI (Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitor).

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Y; Noguchi, S; Satow, Y; Kojima, S; Kumagai, I; Miura, K; Nakamura, K T; Mitsui, Y

    1991-06-01

    Unlike trypsin-like serine proteases having only one conspicuous binding pocket in the active site, subtilisin BPN' has two such pockets, the S1 and S4 pockets, which accommodate the P1 and P4 residues of ligands (after Schechter and Berger notation) respectively. Using computer graphics, the geometrical nature of the two pockets was carefully examined and strategies for site-directed mutagenesis studies were set up against a protein SSI (Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitor), which is a strong proteinaceous inhibitor (or a substrate analogue) of subtilisin BPN'. It was decided to convert the P1 residue, methionine 73, into lysine (M73K) with or without additional conversion of the P4 residue, methionine 70, into glycine (M70G). The crystal structures of the two complexes of subtilisin BPN', one with the single mutant SSI (M73K) and the other with the double mutant SSI (M73K, M70G) were solved showing that (i) small 'electrostatic induced-fit movement' occurs in the S1 pocket upon introducing the terminal plus charge of the lysine side chain, and (ii) large 'mechanical induced-fit movement' occurs in the S4 pocket upon reducing the size of the P4 side chain from methionine to glycine. In both (i) and (ii), the induced-fit movement occurred in a concerted fashion involving both the enzyme and 'substrate' amino acid residues. The term 'substrate-assisted stabilization' was coined to stress the cooperative nature of the induced-fit movements. PMID:1891457

  12. Mapping the ribonucleolytic active site of bovine seminal ribonuclease. The binding of pyrimidinyl phosphonucleotide inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dossi, Kyriaki; Tsirkone, Vicky G; Hayes, Joseph M; Matousek, Josef; Poucková, Pavla; Soucek, Josef; Zadinova, Marie; Zographos, Spyros E; Leonidas, Demetres D

    2009-11-01

    Bovine seminal ribonuclease (BS-RNase) is a 27kDa homodimeric enzyme and a member of the pancreatic RNase A superfamily. It is the only RNase with a quaternary structure and it is a mixture of two dimeric forms. In the most abundant form the active site is formed by the swapping of the N-terminal segments. BS-RNase is a potent antitumor agent with severe side effects such as aspermatogenicity, and immunosuppression. As a first step towards the design of potent inhibitors of this enzyme we mapped its active site through the study of the binding of uridine 2'-phosphate (U2'p), uridine 3'-phosphate (U3'p), uridine 5'-diphosphate (UDP), cytidine 3'-phosphate (C3'p), and cytidine 5-phosphate (C5'p), by kinetics, and X-ray crystallography. These phosphonucleotides are potent inhibitors with C3'p being the most potent with a K(i) value of 22 microM. Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion pharmacokinetic property predictions reveal U2'p, U3'p, and C5'p as the most promising with respect to oral bioavailability. In vivo studies on the aspermatogenic effect have shown that C3'p and C5'p inhibit significantly this biological action of BS-RNase. PMID:19643512

  13. Acetylene is an active-site-directed, slow-binding, reversible inhibitor of Azotobacter vinelandii hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, M.R.; Arp, D.J.

    1987-10-06

    The inhibition of purified and membrane-bound hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii by dihydrogen-free acetylene was investigated. The inhibition was a time-dependent process which exhibited first-order kinetics. Both H/sub 2/ and CO protected against the inhibition by acetylene. K/sub protect(app)/ values of 0.41 and 24 ..mu..M were derived for these gases, respectively. Both H/sub 2/-oxidizing activity and the tritium exchange capacity of the purified enzyme were inhibited at the same rate by acetylene. Removal of acetylene reversed the inhibition for both the purified and the membrane-associated form of the enzyme. The purified hydrogenases from both Rhizobium japonicum and Alcaligenes eutrophus H16 were also inhibited by acetylene in a time-dependent fashion. These findings suggest that acetylene is an active-site-directed, slow-binding, reversible inhibitor of some membrane-bound hydrogenases from aerobic bacteria.

  14. Structure of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with the Inhibitor -thujaplicinol Bound at the RNase H Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel, D.; Maegley, K; Pauly, T; Bauman, J; Das, K; Dharia, C; Clark, Jr., A; Ryan, K; Hickey, M; et al.

    2009-01-01

    Novel inhibitors are needed to counteract the rapid emergence of drug-resistant HIV variants. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has both DNA polymerase and RNase H (RNH) enzymatic activities, but approved drugs that inhibit RT target the polymerase. Inhibitors that act against new targets, such as RNH, should be effective against all of the current drug-resistant variants. Here, we present 2.80 {angstrom} and 2.04 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures of an RNH inhibitor, {beta}-thujaplicinol, bound at the RNH active site of both HIV-1 RT and an isolated RNH domain. {beta}-thujaplicinol chelates two divalent metal ions at the RNH active site. We provide biochemical evidence that {beta}-thujaplicinol is a slow-binding RNH inhibitor with noncompetitive kinetics and suggest that it forms a tropylium ion that interacts favorably with RT and the RNA:DNA substrate.

  15. On the binding mode of urease active site inhibitors: A density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leopoldini, M.; Marino, T.; Russo, N.; Toscano, M.

    The way with which boric acid, a rapid reversible competitive inhibitor, binds the urease active site was explored at density functional B3LYP level of theory. The catalytic core of the enzyme was simulated by two models of different size. In both cases, amino acid residues belonging to the inner and to the outer coordination spheres of nickel ions were replaced by smaller molecular species. Contrary to the experimental indication that attributes the inhibitory ability of this acid to the lack of a nucleophilic attack by the enzyme to the boron atom, we instead found that another possibility exists based on the presence of a strong covalent sigma bond between boron and urease that we think can be hardly broken to allow any course of the reaction.

  16. Inhibition of Streptomyces griseus metallo-endopeptidase II (SGMPII) by active-site-directed inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kumazaki, T; Ishii, S; Yokosawa, H

    1994-03-01

    Inactivation of Streptomyces griseus metallo-endopeptidase II (SGMPII) by ClCH2CO-DL-(N-OH)Leu-OCH3 and by ClCH2CO-DL-(N-OH)Leu-Ala-Gly-NH2 was studied kinetically. These reagents cause irreversible inhibition of the enzyme in a pseudo-first order reaction, and the inhibition reaction exhibits saturation kinetics. The second-order rate constants for inactivation of SGMPII by ClCH2CO-DL-(N-OH)Leu-OCH3 and by ClCH2CO-DL-(N-OH)Leu-Ala-Gly-NH2 were measured to be 0.12 and 8.9 M-1.s-1, respectively. The order of affinities of metallo-endopeptidases towards these irreversible inhibitors is thermolysin > SGMPII > Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase. A competitive inhibitor of SGMPII, L-Val-L-Trp, protects the enzyme against inactivation by ClCH2CO-DL-(N-OH)Leu-Ala-Gly-NH2 in a competitive manner. Furthermore, the pH profile of the inactivation closely resembles that for the hydrolysis of synthetic peptide substrates by the enzyme. These findings suggest that these reagents bind reversibly and react irreversibly at the active site of the enzyme. PMID:8056768

  17. A Camelid-derived Antibody Fragment Targeting the Active Site of a Serine Protease Balances between Inhibitor and Substrate Behavior.

    PubMed

    Kromann-Hansen, Tobias; Oldenburg, Emil; Yung, Kristen Wing Yu; Ghassabeh, Gholamreza H; Muyldermans, Serge; Declerck, Paul J; Huang, Mingdong; Andreasen, Peter A; Ngo, Jacky Chi Ki

    2016-07-15

    A peptide segment that binds the active site of a serine protease in a substrate-like manner may behave like an inhibitor or a substrate. However, there is sparse information on which factors determine the behavior a particular peptide segment will exhibit. Here, we describe the first x-ray crystal structure of a nanobody in complex with a serine protease. The nanobody displays a new type of interaction between an antibody and a serine protease as it inserts its complementary determining region-H3 loop into the active site of the protease in a substrate-like manner. The unique binding mechanism causes the nanobody to behave as a strong inhibitor as well as a poor substrate. Intriguingly, its substrate behavior is incomplete, as 30-40% of the nanobody remained intact and inhibitory after prolonged incubation with the protease. Biochemical analysis reveals that an intra-loop interaction network within the complementary determining region-H3 of the nanobody balances its inhibitor versus substrate behavior. Collectively, our results unveil molecular factors, which may be a general mechanism to determine the substrate versus inhibitor behavior of other protease inhibitors. PMID:27226628

  18. Influence of protonation on substrate and inhibitor interactions at the active site of human monoamine oxidase-A.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Torres, Gerald; Fierro, Angelica; Miranda-Rojas, Sebastian; Guajardo, Carlos; Saez-Briones, Patricio; Salgado, J Cristian; Celis-Barros, Cristian

    2012-05-25

    Although substrate conversion mediated by human monoaminooxidase (hMAO) has been associated with the deprotonated state of their amine moiety, data regarding the influence of protonation on substrate binding at the active site are scarce. Thus, in order to assess protonation influence, steered molecular dynamics (SMD) runs were carried out. These simulations revealed that the protonated form of the substrate serotonin (5-HT) exhibited stronger interactions at the protein surface compared to the neutral form. The latter displayed stronger interactions in the active site cavity. These observations support the possible role of the deprotonated form in substrate conversion. Multigrid docking studies carried out to rationalize the role of 5-HT protonation in other sites besides the active site indicated two energetically favored docking sites for the protonated form of 5-HT on the enzyme surface. These sites seem to be interconnected with the substrate/inhibitor cavity, as revealed by the tunnels observed by means of CAVER program. pK(a) calculations in the surface loci pointed to Glu³²⁷, Asp³²⁸, His⁴⁸⁸, and Asp¹³² as candidates for a possible in situ deprotonation step. Docking analysis of a group of inhibitors (structurally related to substrates) showed further interactions with the same two docking access sites. Interestingly, the protonated/deprotonated amine moiety of almost all compounds attained different docking poses in the active site, none of them oriented to the flavin moiety, thus producing a more variable and less productive orientations to act as substrates. Our results highlight the role of deprotonation in facilitating substrate conversion and also might reflect the necessity of inhibitor molecules to adopt specific orientations to achieve enzyme inhibition. PMID:22540832

  19. Structures of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain Complexed with Small-Molecule Inhibitors Highlight Active-Site Flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Silvaggi,N.; Boldt, G.; Hixon, M.; Kennedy, J.; Tzipori, S.; Janda, K.; Allen, K.

    2007-01-01

    The potential for the use of Clostridial neurotoxins as bioweapons makes the development of small-molecule inhibitors of these deadly toxins a top priority. Recently, screening of a random hydroxamate library identified a small-molecule inhibitor of C. botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain (BoNT/A-LC), 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate, a derivative of which has been shown to have in vivo efficacy in mice and no toxicity. We describe the X-ray crystal structures of BoNT/A-LC in complexes with two potent small-molecule inhibitors. The structures of the enzyme with 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate or 2,4-dichlorocinnamic hydroxamate bound are compared to the structure of the enzyme complexed with L-arginine hydroxamate, an inhibitor with modest affinity. Taken together, this suite of structures provides surprising insights into the BoNT/A-LC active site, including unexpected conformational flexibility at the S1' site that changes the electrostatic environment of the binding pocket. Information gained from these structures will inform the design and optimization of more effective small-molecule inhibitors of BoNT/A-LC.

  20. Novel human D-amino acid oxidase inhibitors stabilize an active-site lid-open conformation

    PubMed Central

    Terry-Lorenzo, Ryan T.; Chun, Lawrence E.; Brown, Scott P.; Heffernan, Michele L. R.; Fang, Q. Kevin; Orsini, Michael A.; Pollegioni, Loredano; Hardy, Larry W.; Spear, Kerry L.; Large, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    The NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor) is a central regulator of synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. hDAAO (human D-amino acid oxidase) indirectly reduces NMDAR activity by degrading the NMDAR co-agonist D-serine. Since NMDAR hypofunction is thought to be a foundational defect in schizophrenia, hDAAO inhibitors have potential as treatments for schizophrenia and other nervous system disorders. Here, we sought to identify novel chemicals that inhibit hDAAO activity. We used computational tools to design a focused, purchasable library of compounds. After screening this library for hDAAO inhibition, we identified the structurally novel compound, ‘compound 2’ [3-(7-hydroxy-2-oxo-4-phenyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)propanoic acid], which displayed low nM hDAAO inhibitory potency (Ki=7 nM). Although the library was expected to enrich for compounds that were competitive for both D-serine and FAD, compound 2 actually was FAD uncompetitive, much like canonical hDAAO inhibitors such as benzoic acid. Compound 2 and an analog were independently co-crystalized with hDAAO. These compounds stabilized a novel conformation of hDAAO in which the active-site lid was in an open position. These results confirm previous hypotheses regarding active-site lid flexibility of mammalian D-amino acid oxidases and could assist in the design of the next generation of hDAAO inhibitors. PMID:25001371

  1. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of RNase H Activity of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase by RNase H Active Site-Directed Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G. Sridhar; Smith, Robert F.; Daniels, Christopher L.; Abeywickrema, Pravien D.; Reid, John C.; Loughran, H. Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A.; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J.; Williams, Peter D.; Darke, Paul L.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Munshi, Sanjeev

    2010-09-02

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  2. Synthesis of urea-based inhibitors as active site probes of glutamate carboxypeptidase II: efficacy as analgesic agents.

    PubMed

    Kozikowski, Alan P; Zhang, Jiazhong; Nan, Fajun; Petukhov, Pavel A; Grajkowska, Ewa; Wroblewski, Jarda T; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Bzdega, Tomasz; Wroblewska, Barbara; Neale, Joseph H

    2004-03-25

    The neuropeptidase glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) hydrolyzes N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamate (NAAG) to liberate N-acetylaspartate and glutamate. GCPII was originally cloned as PSMA, an M(r) 100,000 type II transmembrane glycoprotein highly expressed in prostate tissues. PSMA/GCPII is located on the short arm of chromosome 11 and functions as both a folate hydrolase and a neuropeptidase. Inhibition of brain GCPII may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of certain disease states arising from pathologically overactivated glutamate receptors. Recently, we reported that certain urea-based structures act as potent inhibitors of GCPII (J. Med. Chem. 2001, 44, 298). However, many of the potent GCPII inhibitors prepared to date are highly polar compounds and therefore do not readily penetrate the blood-brain barrier. Herein, we elaborate on the synthesis of a series of potent, urea-based GCPII inhibitors from the lead compound 3 and provide assay data for these ligands against human GCPII. Moreover, we provide data revealing the ability of one of these compounds, namely, 8d, to reduce the perception of inflammatory pain. Within the present series, the gamma-tetrazole bearing glutamate isostere 7d is the most potent inhibitor with a K(i) of 0.9 nM. The biological evaluation of these compounds revealed that the active site of GCPII likely comprises two regions, namely, the pharmacophore subpocket and the nonpharmacophore subpocket. The pharmacophore subpocket is very sensitive to structural changes, and thus, it appears important to keep one of the glutamic acid moieties intact to maintain the potency of the GCPII inhibitors. The site encompassing the nonpharmacophore subpocket that binds to glutamate's alpha-carboxyl group is sensitive to structural change, as shown by compounds 6b and 7b. However, the other region of the nonpharmacophore subpocket can accommodate both hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups. Thus, an aromatic ring can be introduced to the

  3. Active site characterization and structure based 3D-QSAR studies on non-redox type 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Khan, Naveed; Zafar, Syed Kashif; Moin, Syed Tarique

    2016-06-10

    Structure-based 3D-QSAR study was performed on a class of 5-benzylidene-2-phenylthiazolinones non-redox type 5-LOX inhibitors. In this study, binding pocket of 5-Lipoxygenase (pdb id 3o8y) was identified by manual docking using 15-LOX (pdb id 2p0m) as a reference structure. Additionally, most of the binding site residues were found conserved in both structures. These non-redox inhibitors were then docked into the binding site of 5-LOX. To generate reliable CoMFA and CoMSIA models, atom fit data base alignment method using docked conformation of the most active compound was employed. The q(2)cv and r(2)ncv values for CoMFA model were found to be 0.549 and 0.702, respectively. The q(2)cv and r(2)ncv values for the selected CoMSIA model comprised four descriptors steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic and hydrogen bond donor fields were found to be 0.535 and 0.951, respectively. Obtained results showed that our generated model was statistically reliable. Furthermore, an external test set validates the reliability of the predicted model by calculating r(2)pred i.e.0.787 and 0.571 for CoMFA and CoMSIA model, respectively. 3D contour maps generated from CoMFA and CoMSIA models were utilized to determine the key structural features of ligands responsible for biological activities. The applied protocol will be helpful to design more potent and selective inhibitors of 5-LOX. PMID:27044904

  4. Conversed mutagenesis of an inactive peptide to ASIC3 inhibitor for active sites determination.

    PubMed

    Osmakov, Dmitry I; Koshelev, Sergey G; Andreev, Yaroslav A; Dyachenko, Igor A; Bondarenko, Dmitry A; Murashev, Arkadii N; Grishin, Eugene V; Kozlov, Sergey A

    2016-06-15

    Peptide Ugr9-1 from the venom of sea anemone Urticina grebelnyi selectively inhibits the ASIC3 channel and significantly reverses inflammatory and acid-induced pain in vivo. A close homolog peptide Ugr 9-2 does not have these features. To find the pharmacophore residues and explore structure-activity relationships of Ugr 9-1, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of Ugr 9-2 and replaced several positions by the corresponding residues from Ugr 9-1. Mutant peptides Ugr 9-2 T9F and Ugr 9-2 Y12H were able to inhibit currents of the ASIC3 channels 2.2 times and 1.3 times weaker than Ugr 9-1, respectively. Detailed analysis of the spatial models of Ugr 9-1, Ugr 9-2 and both mutant peptides revealed the presence of the basic-aromatic clusters on opposite sides of the molecule, each of which is responsible for the activity. Additionally, Ugr9-1 mutant with truncated N- and C-termini retained similar with the Ugr9-1 action in vitro and was equally potent in vivo model of thermal hypersensitivity. All together, these results are important for studying the structure-activity relationships of ligand-receptor interaction and for the future development of peptide drugs from animal toxins. PMID:26686983

  5. Implication of crystal water molecules in inhibitor binding at ALR2 active site.

    PubMed

    Hymavati; Kumar, Vivek; Sobhia, M Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Water molecules play a crucial role in mediating the interaction between a ligand and a macromolecule. The solvent environment around such biomolecule controls their structure and plays important role in protein-ligand interactions. An understanding of the nature and role of these water molecules in the active site of a protein could greatly increase the efficiency of rational drug design approaches. We have performed the comparative crystal structure analysis of aldose reductase to understand the role of crystal water in protein-ligand interaction. Molecular dynamics simulation has shown the versatile nature of water molecules in bridge H bonding during interaction. Occupancy and life time of water molecules depend on the type of cocrystallized ligand present in the structure. The information may be useful in rational approach to customize the ligand, and thereby longer occupancy and life time for bridge H-bonding. PMID:22649481

  6. Design, synthesis and antiviral activity of entry inhibitors that target the CD4-binding site of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Curreli, Francesca; Choudhury, Spreeha; Pyatkin, Ilya; Zagorodnikov, Victor P.; Bulay, Anna Khulianova; Altieri, Andrea; Kwon, Young Do; Kwong, Peter D.; Debnath, Asim K.

    2012-01-01

    The CD4 binding site on HIV-1 gp120 has been validated as a drug target to prevent HIV-1 entry to cells. Previously, we identified two small molecule inhibitors consisting of a 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine ring linked by an oxalamide to a p-halide-substituted phenyl group, which target this site, specifically, a cavity termed “Phe43 cavity”. Here we use synthetic chemistry, functional assessment and structure-based analysis to explore variants of each region of these inhibitors for improved antiviral properties. Alterations of the phenyl group and of the oxalamide linker indicated that these regions were close to optimal in the original lead compounds. Design of a series of compounds, where the tetramethylpiperidine ring was replaced with new scaffolds, lead to improved antiviral activity. These new scaffolds provide insight into the surface chemistry at the entrance of the cavity and offer additional opportunities by which to optimize further these potential-next-generation therapeutics and microbicides against HIV-1. PMID:22524483

  7. Probing conformational changes in lipoxygenases upon membrane binding: fine-tuning by the active site inhibitor ETYA.

    PubMed

    Di Venere, Almerinda; Nicolai, Eleonora; Ivanov, Igor; Dainese, Enrico; Adel, Susan; Angelucci, B C; Kuhn, Hartmut; Maccarrone, Mauro; Mei, Giampiero

    2014-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) are lipid-peroxidizing enzymes that are involved in the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Their biological activity includes a membrane binding process whose molecular details are not completely understood. The mechanism of enzyme-membrane interactions is thought to involve conformational changes at the level of the protein tertiary structure, and the extent of such alterations depends on the degree of structural flexibility of the different LOX isoforms. In this study, we have tested the resilience properties of a plant and a mammalian LOX, by using high pressure fluorescence measurements at different temperatures. The binding of LOXs to the lipid bilayer has been characterized using both large and giant unilamellar vesicles and electron transfer particles (inner mitochondrial membranes) as model membranes. The data indicate that the degree of LOXs' flexibility is strictly dependent on the two distinct N- and C-terminal domains that characterize the 3D structure of these enzymes. Furthermore, they demonstrate that increasing the rigidity of protein scaffolding by the presence of an active site ligand impairs the membrane binding ability of LOXs. These findings provide evidence that the amphitropic nature of LOXs is finely tuned by the interaction of the substrate with the residues of the active site, suggesting new strategies for the design of enzyme inhibitors. PMID:24012824

  8. Conformational Lability in Serine Protease Active Sites: Structures of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activator (HGFA) Alone and with the Inhibitory Domain from HGFA Inhibitor-1B

    SciTech Connect

    Shia, Steven; Stamos, Jennifer; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Fan, Bin; Wu, Judy; Corpuz, Raquel T.; Santell, Lydia; Lazarus, Robert A.; Eigenbrot, Charles

    2010-07-20

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) is a serine protease that converts hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) into its active form. When activated HGF binds its cognate receptor Met, cellular signals lead to cell growth, differentiation, and migration, activities which promote tissue regeneration in liver, kidney and skin. Intervention in the conversion of HGF to its active form has the potential to provide therapeutic benefit where HGF/Met activity is associated with tumorigenesis. To help identify ways to moderate HGF/Met effects, we have determined the molecular structure of the protease domain of HGFA. The structure we determined, at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, with no pseudo-substrate or inhibitor bound is characterized by an unconventional conformation of key residues in the enzyme active site. In order to find whether this apparently non-enzymatically competent arrangement would persist in the presence of a strongly-interacting inhibitor, we also have determined, at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution, the X-ray structure of HGFA complexed with the first Kunitz domain (KD1) from the physiological inhibitor hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor 1B (HAI-1B). In this complex we observe a rearranged substrate binding cleft that closely mirrors the cleft of other serine proteases, suggesting an extreme conformational dynamism. We also characterize the inhibition of 16 serine proteases by KD1, finding that the previously reported enzyme specificity of the intact extracellular region of HAI-1B resides in KD1 alone. We find that HGFA, matriptase, hepsin, plasma kallikrein and trypsin are potently inhibited, and use the complex structure to rationalize the structural basis of these results.

  9. X-ray structure at 1.75 resolution of a norovirus 3C protease linked to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Jon; Coates, Leighton; Hussey, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses are recognized universally as the most important cause of human epidemic non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a 3C cysteine protease that cleaves a 200kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional proteins. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the Southampton norovirus 3C protease (SV3CP) bound to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor (MAPI) which has been refined at 1.75 resolution, following initial MAD phasing with a selenomethionine derivative. The inhibitor, acetyl-Glu-Phe-Gln-Leu-Gln-X, based on a 3C protease cleavage recognition sequences in the 200kDa polyprotein substrate, reacts covalently through its propenylethylester group (X) with the active site nucleophile, Cys 139. The 3C protease-inhibitor structure permits, for the first time, the identification of substrate recognition and binding groups and provides important new information for the development of antiviral prophylactics.

  10. Beta-D-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium: Role of Glutamate 186 in Catalysis Revealed by Site-Directed Mutagenesis, Alternate Substrates, and Active-site Inhibitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-D-xylosidase/alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium (SXA) is the most active enzyme known for catalyzing hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-xylooligosaccharides to D xylose. Catalysis and inhibitor binding by the GH43 beta-xylosidase are governed by the protonation states of catalytic ...

  11. Probing the Active Site of Candida Glabrata Dihydrofolate Reductase with High Resolution Crystal Structures and the Synthesis of New Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Bolstad, D; Smith, A; Priestley, N; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2009-01-01

    Candida glabrata, a fungal strain resistant to many commonly administered antifungal agents, has become an emerging threat to human health. In previous work, we validated that the essential enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase, is a drug target in C. glabrata. Using a crystal structure of dihydrofolate reductase from C. glabrata bound to an initial lead compound, we designed a class of biphenyl antifolates that potently and selectively inhibit both the enzyme and the growth of the fungal culture. In this work, we explore the structure-activity relationships of this class of antifolates with four new high resolution crystal structures of enzyme:inhibitor complexes and the synthesis of four new inhibitors. The designed inhibitors are intended to probe key hydrophobic pockets visible in the crystal structure. The crystal structures and an evaluation of the new compounds reveal that methyl groups at the meta and para positions of the distal phenyl ring achieve the greatest number of interactions with the pathogenic enzyme and the greatest degree of selectivity over the human enzyme. Additionally, antifungal activity can be tuned with substitution patterns at the propargyl and para-phenyl positions.

  12. The sirtuin inhibitor sirtinol inhibits hepatitis A virus (HAV) replication by inhibiting HAV internal ribosomal entry site activity.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Tatsuo; Sasaki, Reina; Nakamoto, Shingo; Haga, Yuki; Nakamura, Masato; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-10-23

    Epigenetics plays a role in the regulation of gene expression. Epigenetic changes control gene expression at the transcriptional level. Our previous study suggested that the La protein, which is mainly localized in the nucleus, was associated with hepatitis A virus (HAV) internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation and HAV replication. The aim of this study was to investigate whether epigenetic compounds have effects on HAV IRES-mediated translation and HAV replication. Sirtinol, a sirtuin inhibitor, inhibited HAV IRES-mediated translation in COS7-HAV-IRES cells. Treatment with 10 μM sirtinol resulted in a significant reduction in the intracellular RNA levels of HAV HA11-1299 genotype IIIA in Huh7 cells. Epigenetic treatment with a sirtuin inhibitor may represent a new treatment option for HAV infection. In conclusion, epigenetic control was involved in HAV IRES-dependent translation and HAV replication. Special attention should also be paid to underlying viral diseases in the clinical use of epigenetic treatments for malignancies. PMID:26388050

  13. EPR and 1H-NMR spectroscopic studies on the paramagnetic iron at the active site of phenylalanine hydroxylase and its interaction with substrates and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Martínez, A; Andersson, K K; Haavik, J; Flatmark, T

    1991-06-15

    The paramagnetic iron at the active site of highly purified, catalytically active phenylalanine hydroxylase was studied by EPR at 3.6 K and one-dimensional 1H-NMR spectroscopy at 293 K. The EPR-detectable iron of the bovine enzyme was found to be present as a high-spin form (S = 5/2) in different ligand field symmetries depending on medium conditions (buffer ions) and the presence of ligands known to bind at the active site. At 3.6 K and in phosphate buffer, the paramagnetic iron is coordinated in an environment of rhombic symmetry (g = 4.3), whereas Tris buffer favours an environment of axial ligand field symmetry (g = 6.7, 5.3 and 2.0). The latter axial type of signals resembles those observed at g = 7.0, 5.2 and 1.9 for the enzyme in phosphate buffer when L-noradrenaline is added as an active-site ligand (inhibitor). The same proportion of iron that coordinates to L-noradrenaline seems to be reduced by the pterin cofactor and participate in catalysis. Experimental evidence is presented that Tris inhibits the enzyme by interacting with the enzyme-bound ferric iron and decreases its rate of reduction by the tetrahydropterin cofactor. Preincubation with dithiothreitol also inhibits the enzyme activity and prevents the reduction of its catalytically active ferric iron by pterin cofactors as well as binding of catecholamines to the enzyme. 1H-NMR spectroscopy revealed that the substrate (L-phenylalanine) and L-noradrenaline bind close to the paramagnetic iron, and that the catecholamine displaces the substrate from its binding at the active site. The results support our recently proposed model for the cooperative binding of inhibitor and substrate at the active site [Martínez, A. et al. (1990) Eur. J. Biochem. 193, 211-219]. PMID:1646718

  14. Non-coding nucleotides and amino acids near the active site regulate peptide deformylase expression and inhibitor susceptibility in Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaofeng; Pachikara, Niseema D; Oey, Christopher B; Balakrishnan, Amit; Westblade, Lars F; Tan, Ming; Chase, Theodore; Nickels, Bryce E; Fan, Huizhou

    2011-09-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis, an obligate intracellular bacterium, is a highly prevalent human pathogen. Hydroxamic-acid-based matrix metalloprotease inhibitors can effectively inhibit the pathogen both in vitro and in vivo, and have exhibited therapeutic potential. Here, we provide genome sequencing data indicating that peptide deformylase (PDF) is the sole target of the inhibitors in this organism. We further report molecular mechanisms that control chlamydial PDF (cPDF) expression and inhibition efficiency. In particular, we identify the σ⁶⁶-dependent promoter that controls cPDF gene expression and demonstrate that point mutations in this promoter lead to resistance by increasing cPDF transcription. Furthermore, we show that substitution of two amino acids near the active site of the enzyme alters enzyme kinetics and protein stability. PMID:21719536

  15. A selective, slow binding inhibitor of factor VIIa binds to a nonstandard active site conformation and attenuates thrombus formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Olivero, Alan G; Eigenbrot, Charles; Goldsmith, Richard; Robarge, Kirk; Artis, Dean R; Flygare, John; Rawson, Thomas; Sutherlin, Daniel P; Kadkhodayan, Saloumeh; Beresini, Maureen; Elliott, Linda O; DeGuzman, Geralyn G; Banner, David W; Ultsch, Mark; Marzec, Ulla; Hanson, Stephen R; Refino, Canio; Bunting, Stuart; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2005-03-11

    The serine protease factor VIIa (FVIIa) in complex with its cellular cofactor tissue factor (TF) initiates the blood coagulation reactions. TF.FVIIa is also implicated in thrombosis-related disorders and constitutes an appealing therapeutic target for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. To this end, we generated the FVIIa active site inhibitor G17905, which displayed great potency toward TF.FVIIa (Ki = 0.35 +/- 0.11 nM). G17905 did not appreciably inhibit 12 of the 14 examined trypsin-like serine proteases, consistent with its TF.FVIIa-specific activity in clotting assays. The crystal structure of the FVIIa.G17905 complex provides insight into the molecular basis of the high selectivity. It shows that, compared with other serine proteases, FVIIa is uniquely equipped to accommodate conformational disturbances in the Gln217-Gly219 region caused by the ortho-hydroxy group of the inhibitor's aminobenzamidine moiety located in the S1 recognition pocket. Moreover, the structure revealed a novel, nonstandard conformation of FVIIa active site in the region of the oxyanion hole, a "flipped" Lys192-Gly193 peptide bond. Macromolecular substrate activation assays demonstrated that G17905 is a noncompetitive, slow-binding inhibitor. Nevertheless, G17905 effectively inhibited thrombus formation in a baboon arterio-venous shunt model, reducing platelet and fibrin deposition by approximately 70% at 0.4 mg/kg + 0.1 mg/kg/min infusion. Therefore, the in vitro potency of G17905, characterized by slow binding kinetics, correlated with efficacious antithrombotic activity in vivo. PMID:15632123

  16. Rhodium(II) Proximity-Labeling Identifies a Novel Target Site on STAT3 for Inhibitors with Potent Anti-Leukemia Activity.

    PubMed

    Minus, Matthew B; Liu, Wei; Vohidov, Farrukh; Kasembeli, Moses M; Long, Xin; Krueger, Michael J; Stevens, Alexandra; Kolosov, Mikhail I; Tweardy, David J; Sison, Edward Allan R; Redell, Michele S; Ball, Zachary T

    2015-10-26

    Nearly 40 % of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) suffer relapse arising from chemoresistance, often involving upregulation of the oncoprotein STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3). Herein, rhodium(II)-catalyzed, proximity-driven modification identifies the STAT3 coiled-coil domain (CCD) as a novel ligand-binding site, and we describe a new naphthalene sulfonamide inhibitor that targets the CCD, blocks STAT3 function, and halts its disease-promoting effects in vitro, in tumor growth models, and in a leukemia mouse model, validating this new therapeutic target for resistant AML. PMID:26480340

  17. Targeting the cyclin-binding groove site to inhibit the catalytic activity of CDK2/cyclin A complex using p27(KIP1)-derived peptidomimetic inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Karthiga, Arumugasamy; Tripathi, Sunil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ramasamy; Suryanarayanan, Venkatesan; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Functionally activated cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2)/cyclin A complex has been validated as an interesting therapeutic target to develop the efficient antineoplastic drug based on the cell cycle arrest. Cyclin A binds to CDK2 and activates the kinases as well as recruits the substrate and inhibitors using a hydrophobic cyclin-binding groove (CBG). Blocking the cyclin substrate recruitment on CBG is an alternative approach to override the specificity hurdle of the currently available ATP site targeting CDK2 inhibitors. Greater understanding of the interaction of CDK2/cyclin A complex with p27 (negative regulator) reveals that the Leu-Phe-Gly (LFG) motif region of p27 binds with the CBG site of cyclin A to arrest the malignant cell proliferation that induces apoptosis. In the present study, Replacement with Partial Ligand Alternatives through Computational Enrichment (REPLACE) drug design strategies have been applied to acquire LFG peptide-derived peptidomimetics library. The peptidomimetics function is equivalent with respect to substrate p27 protein fashion but does not act as an ATP antagonist. The combined approach of molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD), and molecular electrostatic potential and ADME/T prediction were carried out to evaluate the peptidomimetics. Resultant interaction and electrostatic potential maps suggested that smaller substituent is desirable at the position of phenyl ring to interact with Trp217, Arg250, and Gln254 residues in the active site. The best docked poses were refined by the MD simulations which resulted in conformational changes. After equilibration, the structure of the peptidomimetic and receptor complex was stable. The results revealed that the various substrate protein-derived peptidomimetics could serve as perfect leads against CDK2 protein. PMID:25584078

  18. Structural and Regulatory Elements of HCV NS5B Polymerase – β-Loop and C-Terminal Tail – Are Required for Activity of Allosteric Thumb Site II Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Sarah E.; Tirunagari, Neeraj; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Perry, Jason; Wong, Melanie; Kan, Elaine; Lagpacan, Leanna; Barauskas, Ona; Hung, Magdeleine; Fenaux, Martijn; Appleby, Todd; Watkins, William J.; Schmitz, Uli; Sakowicz, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation of the mechanism of action of the HCV NS5B polymerase thumb site II inhibitors has presented a challenge. Current opinion holds that these allosteric inhibitors stabilize the closed, inactive enzyme conformation, but how this inhibition is accomplished mechanistically is not well understood. Here, using a panel of NS5B proteins with mutations in key regulatory motifs of NS5B – the C-terminal tail and β-loop – in conjunction with a diverse set of NS5B allosteric inhibitors, we show that thumb site II inhibitors possess a distinct mechanism of action. A combination of enzyme activity studies and direct binding assays reveals that these inhibitors require both regulatory elements to maintain the polymerase inhibitory activity. Removal of either element has little impact on the binding affinity of thumb site II inhibitors, but significantly reduces their potency. NS5B in complex with a thumb site II inhibitor displays a characteristic melting profile that suggests stabilization not only of the thumb domain but also the whole polymerase. Successive truncations of the C-terminal tail and/or removal of the β-loop lead to progressive destabilization of the protein. Furthermore, the thermal unfolding transitions characteristic for thumb site II inhibitor – NS5B complex are absent in the inhibitor – bound constructs in which interactions between C-terminal tail and β-loop are abolished, pointing to the pivotal role of both regulatory elements in communication between domains. Taken together, a comprehensive picture of inhibition by compounds binding to thumb site II emerges: inhibitor binding provides stabilization of the entire polymerase in an inactive, closed conformation, propagated via coupled interactions between the C-terminal tail and β-loop. PMID:24416288

  19. Structural and regulatory elements of HCV NS5B polymerase--β-loop and C-terminal tail--are required for activity of allosteric thumb site II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Sarah E; Tirunagari, Neeraj; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Perry, Jason; Wong, Melanie; Kan, Elaine; Lagpacan, Leanna; Barauskas, Ona; Hung, Magdeleine; Fenaux, Martijn; Appleby, Todd; Watkins, William J; Schmitz, Uli; Sakowicz, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation of the mechanism of action of the HCV NS5B polymerase thumb site II inhibitors has presented a challenge. Current opinion holds that these allosteric inhibitors stabilize the closed, inactive enzyme conformation, but how this inhibition is accomplished mechanistically is not well understood. Here, using a panel of NS5B proteins with mutations in key regulatory motifs of NS5B--the C-terminal tail and β-loop--in conjunction with a diverse set of NS5B allosteric inhibitors, we show that thumb site II inhibitors possess a distinct mechanism of action. A combination of enzyme activity studies and direct binding assays reveals that these inhibitors require both regulatory elements to maintain the polymerase inhibitory activity. Removal of either element has little impact on the binding affinity of thumb site II inhibitors, but significantly reduces their potency. NS5B in complex with a thumb site II inhibitor displays a characteristic melting profile that suggests stabilization not only of the thumb domain but also the whole polymerase. Successive truncations of the C-terminal tail and/or removal of the β-loop lead to progressive destabilization of the protein. Furthermore, the thermal unfolding transitions characteristic for thumb site II inhibitor-NS5B complex are absent in the inhibitor-bound constructs in which interactions between C-terminal tail and β-loop are abolished, pointing to the pivotal role of both regulatory elements in communication between domains. Taken together, a comprehensive picture of inhibition by compounds binding to thumb site II emerges: inhibitor binding provides stabilization of the entire polymerase in an inactive, closed conformation, propagated via coupled interactions between the C-terminal tail and β-loop. PMID:24416288

  20. Crystal Structures of Human Choline Kinase Isoforms in Complex with Hemicholinium-3 Single Amino Acid near the Active Site Influences Inhibitor Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Bum Soo; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Tempel, Wolfram; Finerty, Jr., Patrick J.; MacKenzie, Farrell; Dimov, Svetoslav; Vedadi, Masoud; Park, Hee-Won

    2010-07-06

    Human choline kinase (ChoK) catalyzes the first reaction in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis and exists as ChoK{alpha} ({alpha}1 and {alpha}2) and ChoK{beta} isoforms. Recent studies suggest that ChoK is implicated in tumorigenesis and emerging as an attractive target for anticancer chemotherapy. To extend our understanding of the molecular mechanism of ChoK inhibition, we have determined the high resolution x-ray structures of the ChoK{alpha}1 and ChoK{beta} isoforms in complex with hemicholinium-3 (HC-3), a known inhibitor of ChoK. In both structures, HC-3 bound at the conserved hydrophobic groove on the C-terminal lobe. One of the HC-3 oxazinium rings complexed with ChoK{alpha}1 occupied the choline-binding pocket, providing a structural explanation for its inhibitory action. Interestingly, the HC-3 molecule co-crystallized with ChoK{beta} was phosphorylated in the choline binding site. This phosphorylation, albeit occurring at a very slow rate, was confirmed experimentally by mass spectroscopy and radioactive assays. Detailed kinetic studies revealed that HC-3 is a much more potent inhibitor for ChoK{alpha} isoforms ({alpha}1 and {alpha}2) compared with ChoK{beta}. Mutational studies based on the structures of both inhibitor-bound ChoK complexes demonstrated that Leu-401 of ChoK{alpha}2 (equivalent to Leu-419 of ChoK{alpha}1), or the corresponding residue Phe-352 of ChoK{beta}, which is one of the hydrophobic residues neighboring the active site, influences the plasticity of the HC-3-binding groove, thereby playing a key role in HC-3 sensitivity and phosphorylation.

  1. RGS12 and RGS14 GoLoco motifs are G alpha(i) interaction sites with guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor Activity.

    PubMed

    Kimple, R J; De Vries, L; Tronchère, H; Behe, C I; Morris, R A; Gist Farquhar, M; Siderovski, D P

    2001-08-01

    The regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins accelerate the intrinsic guanosine triphosphatase activity of heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunits and are thus recognized as key modulators of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. RGS12 and RGS14 contain not only the hallmark RGS box responsible for GTPase-accelerating activity but also a single G alpha(i/o)-Loco (GoLoco) motif predicted to represent a second G alpha interaction site. Here, we describe functional characterization of the GoLoco motif regions of RGS12 and RGS14. Both regions interact exclusively with G alpha(i1), G alpha(i2), and G alpha(i3) in their GDP-bound forms. In GTP gamma S binding assays, both regions exhibit guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) activity, inhibiting the rate of exchange of GDP for GTP by G alpha(i1). Both regions also stabilize G alpha(i1) in its GDP-bound form, inhibiting the increase in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence stimulated by AlF(4)(-). Our results indicate that both RGS12 and RGS14 harbor two distinctly different G alpha interaction sites: a previously recognized N-terminal RGS box possessing G alpha(i/o) GAP activity and a C-terminal GoLoco region exhibiting G alpha(i) GDI activity. The presence of two, independent G alpha interaction sites suggests that RGS12 and RGS14 participate in a complex coordination of G-protein signaling beyond simple G alpha GAP activity. PMID:11387333

  2. Human γ-Glutamyl Transpeptidase 1: STRUCTURES OF THE FREE ENZYME, INHIBITOR-BOUND TETRAHEDRAL TRANSITION STATES, AND GLUTAMATE-BOUND ENZYME REVEAL NOVEL MOVEMENT WITHIN THE ACTIVE SITE DURING CATALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Terzyan, Simon S; Burgett, Anthony W G; Heroux, Annie; Smith, Clyde A; Mooers, Blaine H M; Hanigan, Marie H

    2015-07-10

    γ-Glutamyl transpeptidase 1 (GGT1) is a cell surface, N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase that cleaves glutathione and other γ-glutamyl compounds. GGT1 expression is essential in cysteine homeostasis, and its induction has been implicated in the pathology of asthma, reperfusion injury, and cancer. In this study, we report four new crystal structures of human GGT1 (hGGT1) that show conformational changes within the active site as the enzyme progresses from the free enzyme to inhibitor-bound tetrahedral transition states and finally to the glutamate-bound structure prior to the release of this final product of the reaction. The structure of the apoenzyme shows flexibility within the active site. The serine-borate-bound hGGT1 crystal structure demonstrates that serine-borate occupies the active site of the enzyme, resulting in an enzyme-inhibitor complex that replicates the enzyme's tetrahedral intermediate/transition state. The structure of GGsTop-bound hGGT1 reveals its interactions with the enzyme and why neutral phosphonate diesters are more potent inhibitors than monoanionic phosphonates. These structures are the first structures for any eukaryotic GGT that include a molecule in the active site covalently bound to the catalytic Thr-381. The glutamate-bound structure shows the conformation of the enzyme prior to release of the final product and reveals novel information regarding the displacement of the main chain atoms that form the oxyanion hole and movement of the lid loop region when the active site is occupied. These data provide new insights into the mechanism of hGGT1-catalyzed reactions and will be invaluable in the development of new classes of hGGT1 inhibitors for therapeutic use. PMID:26013825

  3. Preclinical activity of the novel B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 inhibitor PTC-209 in acute myeloid leukemia: Implications for leukemia therapy.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Yuki; Maeda, Aya; Chachad, Dhruv; Ishizawa, Jo; Qiu, Yi Hua; Kornblau, Steven M; Kimura, Shinya; Andreeff, Michael; Kojima, Kensuke

    2015-12-01

    Curing patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a therapeutic challenge. The polycomb complex protein B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (BMI-1) is required for the self-renewal and maintenance of leukemia stem cells. We investigated the prognostic significance of BMI-1 in AML and the effects of a novel small molecule selective inhibitor of BMI-1, PTC-209. BMI-1 protein expression was determined in 511 newly diagnosed AML patients together with 207 other proteins using reverse-phase protein array technology. Patients with unfavorable cytogenetics according to Southwest Oncology Group criteria had higher levels of BMI-1 compared to those with favorable (P = 0.0006) or intermediate cytogenetics (P = 0.0061), and patients with higher levels of BMI-1 had worse overall survival (55.3 weeks vs. 42.8 weeks, P = 0.046). Treatment with PTC-209 reduced protein level of BMI-1 and its downstream target mono-ubiquitinated histone H2A and triggered several molecular events consistent with the induction of apoptosis, this is, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-3 cleavage, BAX activation, and phosphatidylserine externalization. PTC-209 induced apoptosis in patient-derived CD34(+)CD38(low/-) AML cells and, less prominently, in CD34(-) differentiated AML cells. BMI-1 reduction by PTC-209 directly correlated with apoptosis induction in CD34(+) primary AML cells (r = 0.71, P = 0.022). However, basal BMI-1 expression was not a determinant of AML sensitivity. BMI-1 inhibition, which targets a primitive AML cell population, might offer a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:26450753

  4. Synthesis of potent and broad genotypically active NS5B HCV non-nucleoside inhibitors binding to the thumb domain allosteric site 2 of the viral polymerase.

    PubMed

    Pierra Rouvière, Claire; Amador, Agnès; Badaroux, Eric; Convard, Thierry; Da Costa, Daniel; Dukhan, David; Griffe, Ludovic; Griffon, Jean-François; LaColla, Massimiliano; Leroy, Frédéric; Liuzzi, Michel; Loi, Anna Giulia; McCarville, Joe; Mascia, Valeria; Milhau, Julien; Onidi, Loredana; Paparin, Jean-Laurent; Rahali, Rachid; Sais, Efisio; Seifer, Maria; Surleraux, Dominique; Standring, David; Dousson, Cyril

    2016-09-15

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) plays a central role in virus replication. NS5B has no functional equivalent in mammalian cells and, as a consequence, is an attractive target for selective inhibition. This Letter describes the discovery of a new family of HCV NS5B non-nucleoside inhibitors, based on the bioisosterism between amide and phosphonamidate functions. As part of this program, SAR in this new series led to the identification of IDX17119, a potent non-nucleoside inhibitor, active on the genotypes 1b, 2a, 3a and 4a. The structure and binding domain of IDX17119 were confirmed by X-ray co-crystallization study. PMID:27520942

  5. Flavopiridol inhibits glycogen phosphorylase by binding at the inhibitor site.

    PubMed

    Oikonomakos, N G; Schnier, J B; Zographos, S E; Skamnaki, V T; Tsitsanou, K E; Johnson, L N

    2000-11-01

    Flavopiridol (L86-8275) ((-)-cis-5, 7-dihydroxy-2-(2-chlorophenyl)-8-[4-(3-hydroxy-1-methyl)-piperidinyl] -4H-benzopyran-4-one), a potential antitumor drug, currently in phase II trials, has been shown to be an inhibitor of muscle glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and to cause glycogen accumulation in A549 non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (Kaiser, A., Nishi, K., Gorin, F.A., Walsh, D.A., Bradbury, E. M., and Schnier, J. B., unpublished data). Kinetic experiments reported here show that flavopiridol inhibits GPb with an IC(50) = 15.5 microm. The inhibition is synergistic with glucose resulting in a reduction of IC(50) for flavopiridol to 2.3 microm and mimics the inhibition of caffeine. In order to elucidate the structural basis of inhibition, we determined the structures of GPb complexed with flavopiridol, GPb complexed with caffeine, and GPa complexed with both glucose and flavopiridol at 1.76-, 2.30-, and 2.23-A resolution, and refined to crystallographic R values of 0.216 (R(free) = 0.247), 0.189 (R(free) = 0.219), and 0.195 (R(free) = 0.252), respectively. The structures provide a rational for flavopiridol potency and synergism with glucose inhibitory action. Flavopiridol binds at the allosteric inhibitor site, situated at the entrance to the catalytic site, the site where caffeine binds. Flavopiridol intercalates between the two aromatic rings of Phe(285) and Tyr(613). Both flavopiridol and glucose promote the less active T-state through localization of the closed position of the 280s loop which blocks access to the catalytic site, thereby explaining their synergistic inhibition. The mode of interactions of flavopiridol with GP is different from that of des-chloro-flavopiridol with CDK2, illustrating how different functional parts of the inhibitor can be used to provide specific and potent binding to two different enzymes. PMID:10924512

  6. Structures of cytochrome P450 2B6 bound to 4-benzylpyridine and 4-(4-nitrobenzyl)pyridine: insight into inhibitor binding and rearrangement of active site side chains.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manish B; Pascual, Jaime; Zhang, Qinghai; Stout, C David; Halpert, James R

    2011-12-01

    The biochemical, biophysical, and structural analysis of the cytochrome P450 2B subfamily of enzymes has provided a wealth of information regarding conformational plasticity and substrate recognition. The recent X-ray crystal structure of the drug-metabolizing P450 2B6 in complex with 4-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazole (4-CPI) yielded the first atomic view of this human enzyme. However, knowledge of the structural basis of P450 2B6 specificity and inhibition has remained limited. In this study, structures of P450 2B6 were determined in complex with the potent inhibitors 4-benzylpyridine (4-BP) and 4-(4-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (4-NBP). Comparison of the present structures with the previous P450 2B6-4-CPI complex showed that reorientation of side chains of the active site residue Phe206 on the F-helix and Phe297 on the I-helix was necessary to accommodate the inhibitors. However, P450 2B6 does not require any major side chain rearrangement to bind 4-NBP compared with 4-BP, and the enzyme provides no hydrogen-bonding partners for the polar nitro group of 4-NBP within the hydrophobic active site. In addition, on the basis of these new structures, substitution of residue 172 with histidine as observed in the single nucleotide polymorphism Q172H and in P450 2B4 may contribute to a hydrogen bonding network connecting the E- and I-helices, thereby stabilizing active site residues on the I-helix. These results provide insight into the role of active site side chains upon inhibitor binding and indicate that the recognition of the benzylpyridines in the closed conformation structure of P450 2B6 is based solely on hydrophobicity, size, and shape. PMID:21875942

  7. 17 beta-(N-tert-butylcarbamoyl)-4-aza-5 alpha-androstan-1-en-3-one is an active site-directed slow time-dependent inhibitor of human steroid 5 alpha-reductase 1.

    PubMed

    Tian, G; Stuart, J D; Moss, M L; Domanico, P L; Bramson, H N; Patel, I R; Kadwell, S H; Overton, L K; Kost, T A; Mook, R A

    1994-03-01

    17 beta-(N-tert-butylcarbamoyl)-4-aza-5 alpha-androstan-1-en-3-one (finasteride), which has been approved for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia, is shown here to be a slow time-dependent inhibitor of human steroid 5 alpha-reductase isozyme 1. This inhibition is characterized by an initial, fast step where the inhibitor binds to the enzyme followed by a slow step that leads to a final enzyme-inhibitor complex (EI*). No recovery of activity from this EI* complex was observed after dialysis for 3 days. The formation of EI* is diminished in the presence of a competitive, reversible inhibitor, indicating that the inhibition is active site-directed. At 37 degrees C and pH 7.0, the rate constant for the second, slow inhibition step, k3, is (1.40 +/- 0.04) x 10(-3) s-1 and the pseudo-bimolecular rate constant, k3/Ki, is (4.0 +/- 0.3) x 10(3) M-1 s-1. This latter rate constant is less than the value of 2.7 x 10(5) M-1 s-1 determined for the inhibition of 5 alpha-reductase 2 by finasteride [Faller, B., Farley, D., & Nick, H. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 5705-5710].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8117686

  8. Biotin-labelled peptidyl diazomethane inhibitors derived from the substrate-like sequence of cystatin: targeting of the active site of cruzipain, the major cysteine proteinase of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Lalmanach, G; Mayer, R; Serveau, C; Scharfstein, J; Gauthier, F

    1996-01-01

    Biotin-labelled peptidyl diazomethane inhibitors of cysteine proteinases, based on the N-terminal substrate-like segment of human cystatin C, a natural inhibitor of cysteine proteinases, were synthesized. These synthetic derivatives were tested as irreversible inhibitors of cruzipain, the major cysteine proteinase of Trypanosoma cruzi, to compare the kinetics of the inhibition of the parasite proteinase with that of the mammalian cathepsins B and L. The accessibility of the active sites of these proteinases to these probes was also investigated. The inhibition of cruzipain by Biot-LVG-CHN2 (where Biot represents biotinyl and L,V and G are single-letter amino acid residue abbreviations) and Biot-Ahx-LVG-CHN2 (where Ahx represents 6-aminohexanoic acid) was similar to that of unlabelled inhibitor. Biotin labelling of the inhibitor slowed the inhibition of both cathepsin B and cathepsin L. Adding a spacer arm (Ahx) between the biotin and the peptide moiety of the derivative increased the inhibition of cathepsin B but not that of cathepsin L. The discrimination provided by this spacer is probably due to differences in the topologies of the binding sites of proteinases, a feature that can be exploited to improve targeting of individual cysteine proteinases. Analysis of the blotted proteinases revealed marked differences in the accessibility of extravidin-peroxidase conjugate to the proteinase-bound biotinylated inhibitor. Cruzipain molecules exposed to Biot-LVG-CHN2 or Biot-Ahx-LVG-CHN2 were readily identified, but the reaction was much stronger when the enzyme was treated with the spacer-containing inhibitor. In contrast with the parasite enzyme, rat cathepsin B and cathepsin L treated with either Biot-LVG-CHN2 or Biot-Ahx-LVG-CHN2 produced no detectable bands. Papain, the archetype of this family of proteinases, was poorly labelled with Biot-LVG-CHN2, but strong staining was obtained with Biot-Ahx-LVG-CHN2. These findings suggest that optimized biotinylated

  9. Isolation and characterization of selective and potent human Fab inhibitors directed to the active-site region of the two-component NS2B-NS3 proteinase of West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Shiryaev, Sergey A; Radichev, Ilian A; Ratnikov, Boris I; Aleshin, Alexander E; Gawlik, Katarzyna; Stec, Boguslaw; Frisch, Christian; Knappik, Achim; Strongin, Alex Y

    2010-05-01

    There is a need to develop inhibitors of mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including WNV (West Nile virus). In the present paper, we describe a novel and efficient recombinant-antibody technology that led us to the isolation of inhibitory high-affinity human antibodies to the active-site region of a viral proteinase. As a proof-of-principal, we have successfully used this technology and the synthetic naive human combinatorial antibody library HuCAL GOLD(R) to isolate selective and potent function-blocking active-site-targeting antibodies to the two-component WNV NS (non-structural protein) 2B-NS3 serine proteinase, the only proteinase encoded by the flaviviral genome. First, we used the wild-type enzyme in antibody screens. Next, the positive antibody clones were counter-screened using an NS2B-NS3 mutant with a single mutation of the catalytically essential active-site histidine residue. The specificity of the antibodies to the active site was confirmed by substrate-cleavage reactions and also by using proteinase mutants with additional single amino-acid substitutions in the active-site region. The selected WNV antibodies did not recognize the structurally similar viral proteinases from Dengue virus type 2 and hepatitis C virus, and human serine proteinases. Because of their high selectivity and affinity, the identified human antibodies are attractive reagents for both further mutagenesis and structure-based optimization and, in addition, for studies of NS2B-NS3 activity. Conceptually, it is likely that the generic technology reported in the present paper will be useful for the generation of active-site-specific antibody probes for multiple enzymes. PMID:20156198

  10. A novel strategy for the development of selective active-site inhibitors of the protein tyrosine phosphatase-like proteins islet-cell antigen 512 (IA-2) and phogrin (IA-2beta).

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Paul G; Peters, Günther H; Andersen, Henrik Sune; Hendriks, Wiljan; Møller, Niels Peter H

    2003-01-01

    Islet-cell antigen 512 (IA-2) and phogrin (IA-2beta) are atypical members of the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family that are characterized by a lack of activity against conventional PTP substrates. The physiological role(s) of these proteins remain poorly defined, although recent studies indicate that IA-2 may be involved in granule trafficking and exocytosis. To further understand their function, we have embarked upon developing low-molecular-mass inhibitors of IA-2 and IA-2beta. Previously, we have shown that a general PTP inhibitor, 2-(oxalylamino)benzoic acid (OBA), can be developed into highly selective and potent inhibitors of PTP1B. However, since wild-type IA-2 and IA-2beta lack conventional PTP activity, a novel strategy was designed whereby catalytically active species were generated by 'back-mutating' key non-consensus catalytic region residues to those of PTP1B. These mutants were then used as tools with which to test the potency and selectivity of OBA and a variety of its derivatives. Catalytically competent IA-2 and IA-2beta species were generated by 'back-mutation' of only three key residues (equivalent to Tyr(46), Asp(181) and Ala(217) using the human PTP1B numbering) to those of PTP1B. Importantly, enzyme kinetic analyses indicated that the overall fold of both mutant and wild-type IA-2 and IA-2beta was similar to that of classic PTPs. In particular, one derivative of OBA, namely 7-(1,1-dioxo-1 H -benzo[ d ]isothiazol-3-yloxymethyl)-2-(oxalylamino)-4,7-dihydro-5 H -thieno[2,3- c ]pyran-3 -carboxylic acid ('Compound 6 ' shown in the main paper), which inhibited IA-2beta((S762Y/Y898P/D933A)) (IA-2beta in which Ser(762) has been mutated to tyrosine, Tyr(898) to proline, and Asp(933) to alanine) with a K (i) value of approximately 8 microM, appeared ideal for future lead optimization. Thus molecular modelling of this classical, competitive inhibitor in the catalytic site of wild-type IA-2beta identified two residues (Ser(762) and Asp

  11. Selectivity for strand-transfer over 3'-processing and susceptibility to clinical resistance of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors are driven by key enzyme-DNA interactions in the active site.

    PubMed

    Métifiot, Mathieu; Johnson, Barry C; Kiselev, Evgeny; Marler, Laura; Zhao, Xue Zhi; Burke, Terrence R; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H; Pommier, Yves

    2016-08-19

    Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are highly effective against HIV infections. Co-crystal structures of the prototype foamy virus intasome have shown that all three FDA-approved drugs, raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir and dolutegravir (DTG), act as interfacial inhibitors during the strand transfer (ST) integration step. However, these structures give only a partial sense for the limited inhibition of the 3'-processing reaction by INSTIs and how INSTIs can be modified to overcome drug resistance, notably against the G140S-Q148H double mutation. Based on biochemical experiments with modified oligonucleotides, we demonstrate that both the viral DNA +1 and -1 bases, which flank the 3'-processing site, play a critical role for 3'-processing efficiency and inhibition by RAL and DTG. In addition, the G140S-Q148H (SH) mutant integrase, which has a reduced 3'-processing activity, becomes more active and more resistant to inhibition of 3'-processing by RAL and DTG in the absence of the -1 and +1 bases. Molecular modeling of HIV-1 integrase, together with biochemical data, indicate that the conserved residue Q146 in the flexible loop of HIV-1 integrase is critical for productive viral DNA binding through specific contacts with the virus DNA ends in the 3'-processing and ST reactions. The potency of integrase inhibitors against 3'-processing and their ability to overcome resistance is discussed. PMID:27369381

  12. Design of potent and selective human cathepsin K inhibitors that span the active site

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Scott K.; Halbert, Stacie M.; Bossard, Mary J.; Tomaszek, Thaddeus A.; Levy, Mark A.; Zhao, Baoguang; Smith, Ward W.; Abdel-Meguid, Sherin S.; Janson, Cheryl A.; D’Alessio, Karla J.; McQueney, Michael S.; Amegadzie, Bernard Y.; Hanning, Charles R.; DesJarlais, Renee L.; Briand, Jacques; Sarkar, Susanta K.; Huddleston, Michael J.; Ijames, Carl F.; Carr, Steven A.; Garnes, Keith T.; Shu, Art; Heys, J. Richard; Bradbeer, Jeremy; Zembryki, Denise; Lee-Rykaczewski, Liz; James, Ian E.; Lark, Michael W.; Drake, Fred H.; Gowen, Maxine; Gleason, John G.; Veber, Daniel F.

    1997-01-01

    Potent and selective active-site-spanning inhibitors have been designed for cathepsin K, a cysteine protease unique to osteoclasts. They act by mechanisms that involve tight binding intermediates, potentially on a hydrolytic pathway. X-ray crystallographic, MS, NMR spectroscopic, and kinetic studies of the mechanisms of inhibition indicate that different intermediates or transition states are being represented that are dependent on the conditions of measurement and the specific groups flanking the carbonyl in the inhibitor. The species observed crystallographically are most consistent with tetrahedral intermediates that may be close approximations of those that occur during substrate hydrolysis. Initial kinetic studies suggest the possibility of irreversible and reversible active-site modification. Representative inhibitors have demonstrated antiresorptive activity both in vitro and in vivo and therefore are promising leads for therapeutic agents for the treatment of osteoporosis. Expansion of these inhibitor concepts can be envisioned for the many other cysteine proteases implicated for therapeutic intervention. PMID:9405598

  13. Metalloprotein-inhibitor binding: Human carbonic anhydrase II as a model for probing metal-ligand interactions in a metalloprotein active site

    PubMed Central

    Martin, David P.; Hann, Zachary S.; Cohen, Seth M.

    2013-01-01

    An ever increasing number of metalloproteins are being discovered that play essential roles in physiological processes. Inhibitors of these proteins have significant potential for the treatment of human disease, but clinical success of these compounds has been limited. Herein, Zn(II)-dependent metalloprotein inhibitors in clinical use are reviewed, and the potential for using novel metal-binding groups (MBGs) in the design of these inhibitors is discussed. By using human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) as a model system, the nuances of MBG-metal interactions in the context of a protein environment can be probed. Understanding how metal coordination influences inhibitor binding may help in the design new therapeutics targeting metalloproteins. PMID:23706138

  14. The High Affinity Binding Site on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) for the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Is Composed of Four Basic Residues.

    PubMed

    Gettins, Peter G W; Dolmer, Klavs

    2016-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a serpin inhibitor of the plasminogen activators urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator, which binds tightly to the clearance and signaling receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in both proteinase-complexed and uncomplexed forms. Binding sites for PAI-1 within LRP1 have been localized to CR clusters II and IV. Within cluster II, there is a strong preference for the triple CR domain fragment CR456. Previous mutagenesis studies to identify the binding site on PAI-1 for LRP1 have given conflicting results or implied small binding contributions incompatible with the high affinity PAI-1/LRP1 interaction. Using a highly sensitive solution fluorescence assay, we have examined binding of CR456 to arginine and lysine variants of PAI-1 and definitively identified the binding site as composed of four basic residues, Lys-69, Arg-76, Lys-80, and Lys-88. These are highly conserved among mammalian PAI-1s. Individual mutations result in a 13-800-fold increase in Kd values. We present evidence that binding involves engagement of CR4 by Lys-88, CR5 by Arg-76 and Lys-80, and CR6 by Lys-69, with the strongest interactions to CR5 and CR6. Collectively, the individual binding contributions account quantitatively for the overall PAI-1/LRP1 affinity. We propose that the greater efficiency of PAI-1·uPA complex binding and clearance by LRP1, compared with PAI-1 alone, is due solely to simultaneous binding of the uPA moiety in the complex to its receptor, thereby making binding of the PAI-1 moiety to LRP1 a two-dimensional surface-localized association. PMID:26555266

  15. Peptide-based, irreversible inhibitors of gamma-secretase activity.

    PubMed

    Piper, Siân C; Amtul, Zareen; Galiñanes-Garcia, Laura; Howard, Victor G; Ziani-Cherif, Chewki; McLendon, Chris; Rochette, Marjorie J; Fauq, Abdul; Golde, Todd E; Murphy, M Paul

    2003-06-01

    The characterization of the enzymes responsible for amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) production is considered to be a primary goal towards the development of future therapeutics for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Inhibitors of gamma-secretase activity were critical in demonstrating that the presenilins (PSs) likely comprised at least part of the active site of the gamma-secretase enzyme complex, with two highly conserved membrane aspartates presumably acting as catalytic residues. However, whether or not these aspartates are actually the catalytic residues of the enzyme complex or are merely essential for normal PS function and/or maturation is still unknown. In this paper, we report the development of reactive inhibitors of gamma-secretase activity that are functionally irreversible. Since such inhibitors have been shown to bind catalytic residues in other aspartyl proteases (e.g., HIV protease), they might be used to determine if the transmembrane aspartates of PSs are involved directly in substrate cleavage. PMID:12763025

  16. Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase in complex with the feedback inhibitor CoA reveals only one active-site conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Wubben, T.; Mesecar, A.D.

    2014-10-02

    Phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase (PPAT) catalyzes the penultimate step in the coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway, reversibly transferring an adenylyl group from ATP to 4'-phosphopantetheine to form dephosphocoenzyme A (dPCoA). To complement recent biochemical and structural studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPAT (MtPPAT) and to provide further insight into the feedback regulation of MtPPAT by CoA, the X-ray crystal structure of the MtPPAT enzyme in complex with CoA was determined to 2.11 {angstrom} resolution. Unlike previous X-ray crystal structures of PPAT-CoA complexes from other bacteria, which showed two distinct CoA conformations bound to the active site, only one conformation of CoA is observed in the MtPPAT-CoA complex.

  17. Probing the active-site requirements of human intestinal N-terminal maltase glucoamylase: the effect of replacing the sulfate moiety by a methyl ether in ponkoranol, a naturally occurring α-glucosidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Razieh; Jones, Kyra; Rose, David R; Pinto, B Mario

    2010-10-01

    Ponkoranol is a naturally occurring glucosidase inhibitor isolated from the plant Salacia reticulata. The compound comprises a sulfonium ion with an internal sulfate counter ion. We report here an efficient synthetic route to 3'-O-methyl ponkoranol to test the hypothesis that occupation of a hydrophobic pocket by a methyl group instead of the polar sulfate ion within the active site of human N-terminal maltase glucoamylase would be beneficial. The synthetic strategy relies on the nucleophilic attack of 2,3,5-tri-O-benzyl-1,4-anhydro-4-thio-D-arabinitol at the C-6 position of benzyl 6-O-p-toluenesulfonyl β-D-glucopyranoside, followed by deprotection using boron trichloride and reduction with sodium borohydride. The target compound inhibited the N-terminal catalytic domain of intestinal human maltase glucoamylase (ntMGAM) with a K(i) value of 0.50 ± 0.04 μM, higher than those of de-O-sulfonated ponkoranol (K(i)=43 ± 3 nM), or its 5'-stereoisomer (K(i)=15 ± 1 nM). We conclude that the interaction of the methyl group with hydrophobic residues in the active site is not as beneficial to inhibition of ntMGAM as the other interactions of the polyhydroxylated chain with active-site residues. PMID:20801033

  18. Active site fingerprinting and pharmacophore screening strategies for the identification of dual inhibitors of protein kinase C [Formula: see text] and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1).

    PubMed

    Chadha, Navriti; Silakari, Om

    2016-08-01

    Current clinical studies have revealed that diabetic complications are multifactorial disorders that target two or more pathways. The majority of drugs in clinical trial target aldose reductase and protein kinase C ([Formula: see text]), while recent studies disclosed a significant role played by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). In light of this, the current study was aimed to identify novel dual inhibitors of [Formula: see text] and PARP-1 using a pharmaco-informatics methodology. Pharmacophore-based 3D QSAR models for these two targets were generated using HypoGen and used to screen three commercially available chemical databases to identify dual inhibitors of [Formula: see text] and PARP-1. Overall, 18 hits were obtained from the screening process; the hits were filtered based on their drug-like properties and predicted binding affinities (docking analysis). Important amino acid residues were predicted by developing a fingerprint of the active site using alanine-scanning mutagenesis and molecular dynamics. The stability of the complexes (18 hits with both proteins) and their final binding orientations were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Thus, novel hits have been predicted to have good binding affinities for [Formula: see text] and PARP-1 proteins, which could be further investigated for in vitro/in vivo activity. PMID:27216445

  19. Discovery of Novel Nonactive Site Inhibitors of the Prothrombinase Enzyme Complex.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Karan; McGill, Nicole; Peterson, Cynthia B; Meyers, Harold V; Blackburn, Michael N; Baudry, Jerome

    2016-03-28

    The risk of serious bleeding is a major liability of anticoagulant drugs that are active-site competitive inhibitors targeting the Factor Xa (FXa) prothrombin (PT) binding site. The present work identifies several new classes of small molecule anticoagulants that can act as nonactive site inhibitors of the prothrombinase (PTase) complex composed of FXa and Factor Va (FVa). These new classes of anticoagulants were identified, using a novel agnostic computational approach to identify previously unrecognized binding pockets at the FXa-FVa interface. From about three million docking calculations of 281,128 compounds in a conformational ensemble of FXa heavy chains identified by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, 97 compounds and their structural analogues were selected for experimental validation, through a series of inhibition assays. The compound selection was based on their predicted binding affinities to FXa and their ability to successfully bind to multiple protein conformations while showing selectivity for particular binding sites at the FXa/FVa interface. From these, thirty-one (31) compounds were experimentally identified as nonactive site inhibitors. Concentration-based assays further identified 10 compounds represented by four small-molecule families of inhibitors that achieve dose-independent partial inhibition of PTase activity in a nonactive site-dependent and self-limiting mechanism. Several compounds were identified for their ability to bind to protein conformations only seen during MD, highlighting the importance of accounting for protein flexibility in structure-based drug discovery approaches. PMID:26848511

  20. Secreted and transmembrane wnt inhibitors and activators.

    PubMed

    Cruciat, Cristina-Maria; Niehrs, Christof

    2013-03-01

    Signaling by the Wnt family of secreted glycoproteins plays important roles in embryonic development and adult homeostasis. Wnt signaling is modulated by a number of evolutionarily conserved inhibitors and activators. Wnt inhibitors belong to small protein families, including sFRP, Dkk, WIF, Wise/SOST, Cerberus, IGFBP, Shisa, Waif1, APCDD1, and Tiki1. Their common feature is to antagonize Wnt signaling by preventing ligand-receptor interactions or Wnt receptor maturation. Conversely, the Wnt activators, R-spondin and Norrin, promote Wnt signaling by binding to Wnt receptors or releasing a Wnt-inhibitory step. With few exceptions, these antagonists and agonists are not pure Wnt modulators, but also affect additional signaling pathways, such as TGF-β and FGF signaling. Here we discuss their interactions with Wnt ligands and Wnt receptors, their role in developmental processes, as well as their implication in disease. PMID:23085770

  1. Identification of inhibitor binding site in human sirtuin 2 using molecular docking and dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Arooj, Mahreen; Kumar, Manian Rajesh; Eom, Soo Hyun; Lee, Keun Woo

    2013-01-01

    The ability to identify the site of a protein that can bind with high affinity to small, drug-like compounds has been an important goal in drug design. Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2), histone deacetylase protein family, plays a central role in the regulation of various pathways. Hence, identification of drug for SIRT2 has attracted great interest in the drug discovery community. To elucidate the molecular basis of the small molecules interactions to inhibit the SIRT2 function we employed the molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and the molecular mechanism Poisson-Boltzmann/surface area (MM-PBSA) calculations. Five well know inhibitors such as suramin, mol-6, sirtinol, 67, and nf675 were selected to establish the nature of the binding mode of the inhibitors in the SIRT2 active site. The molecular docking and dynamics simulations results revealed that the hydrogen bonds between Arg97 and Gln167 are crucial to inhibit the function of SIRT2. In addition, the MM-PBSA calculations revealed that binding of inhibitors to SIRT2 is mainly driven by van der Waals/non-polar interactions. Although the five inhibitors are very different in structure, shape, and electrostatic potential, they are able to fit in the same binding pocket. These findings from this study provide insights to elucidate the binding pattern of SIRT2 inhibitors and help in the rational structure-based design of novel SIRT2 inhibitors with improved potency and better resistance profile. PMID:23382805

  2. Phosphatase inhibitors activate normal and defective CFTR chloride channels.

    PubMed Central

    Becq, F; Jensen, T J; Chang, X B; Savoia, A; Rommens, J M; Tsui, L C; Buchwald, M; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1994-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation at multiple sites. Although activation by protein kinases has been studied in some detail, the dephosphorylation step has received little attention. This report examines the mechanisms responsible for the dephosphorylation and spontaneous deactivation ("rundown") of CFTR chloride channels excised from transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human airway epithelial cells. We report that the alkaline phosphatase inhibitors bromotetramisole, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, theophylline, and vanadate slow the rundown of CFTR channel activity in excised membrane patches and reduce dephosphorylation of CFTR protein in isolated membranes. It was also found that in unstimulated cells, CFTR channels can be activated by exposure to phosphatase inhibitors alone. Most importantly, exposure of mammalian cells to phosphatase inhibitors alone activates CFTR channels that have disease-causing mutations, provided the mutant channels are present in the plasma membrane (R117H, G551D, and delta F508 after cooling). These results suggest that CFTR dephosphorylation is dynamic and that membrane-associated phosphatase activity may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Images PMID:7522329

  3. Phosphatase inhibitors activate normal and defective CFTR chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Becq, F; Jensen, T J; Chang, X B; Savoia, A; Rommens, J M; Tsui, L C; Buchwald, M; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1994-09-13

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation at multiple sites. Although activation by protein kinases has been studied in some detail, the dephosphorylation step has received little attention. This report examines the mechanisms responsible for the dephosphorylation and spontaneous deactivation ("rundown") of CFTR chloride channels excised from transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human airway epithelial cells. We report that the alkaline phosphatase inhibitors bromotetramisole, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, theophylline, and vanadate slow the rundown of CFTR channel activity in excised membrane patches and reduce dephosphorylation of CFTR protein in isolated membranes. It was also found that in unstimulated cells, CFTR channels can be activated by exposure to phosphatase inhibitors alone. Most importantly, exposure of mammalian cells to phosphatase inhibitors alone activates CFTR channels that have disease-causing mutations, provided the mutant channels are present in the plasma membrane (R117H, G551D, and delta F508 after cooling). These results suggest that CFTR dephosphorylation is dynamic and that membrane-associated phosphatase activity may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. PMID:7522329

  4. Aldose and aldehyde reductases : structure-function studies on the coenzyme and inhibitor-binding sites.

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kabbani, O.; Old, S. E.; Ginell, S. L.; Carper, D. A.; Biosciences Division; Monash Univ.; NIH

    1999-09-03

    PURPOSE: To identify the structural features responsible for the differences in coenzyme and inhibitor specificities of aldose and aldehyde reductases. METHODS: The crystal structure of porcine aldehyde reductase in complex with NADPH and the aldose reductase inhibitor sorbinil was determined. The contribution of each amino acid lining the coenzyme-binding site to the binding of NADPH was calculated using the Discover package. In human aldose reductase, the role of the non-conserved Pro 216 (Ser in aldehyde reductase) in the binding of coenzyme was examined by site-directed mutagenesis. RESULTS: Sorbinil binds to the active site of aldehyde reductase and is hydrogen-bonded to Trp 22, Tyr 50, His 113, and the non-conserved Arg 312. Unlike tolrestat, the binding of sorbinil does not induce a change in the side chain conformation of Arg 312. Mutation of Pro 216 to Ser in aldose reductase makes the binding of coenzyme more similar to that of aldehyde reductase. CONCLUSIONS: The participation of non-conserved active site residues in the binding of inhibitors and the differences in the structural changes required for the binding to occur are responsible for the differences in the potency of inhibition of aldose and aldehyde reductases. We report that the non-conserved Pro 216 in aldose reductase contributes to the tight binding of NADPH.

  5. Low dielectric response in enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Edward L.; Krishtalik, Lev I.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of charge transfer depend crucially on the dielectric reorganization of the medium. In enzymatic reactions that involve charge transfer, atomic dielectric response of the active site and of its surroundings determines the efficiency of the protein as a catalyst. We report direct spectroscopic measurements of the reorganization energy associated with the dielectric response in the active site of α-chymotrypsin. A chromophoric inhibitor of the enzyme is used as a spectroscopic probe. We find that water strongly affects the dielectric reorganization in the active site of the enzyme in solution. The reorganization energy of the protein matrix in the vicinity of the active site is similar to that of low-polarity solvents. Surprisingly, water exhibits an anomalously high dielectric response that cannot be described in terms of the dielectric continuum theory. As a result, sequestering the active site from the aqueous environment inside low-dielectric enzyme body dramatically reduces the dielectric reorganization. This reduction is particularly important for controlling the rate of enzymatic reactions. PMID:10681440

  6. Catalytic site remodelling of the DOT1L methyltransferase by selective inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Wenyu; Chory, Emma J.; Wernimont, Amy K.; Tempel, Wolfram; Scopton, Alex; Federation, Alexander; Marineau, Jason J.; Qi, Jun; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Yi, Joanna; Marcellus, Richard; Iacob, Roxana E.; Engen, John R.; Griffin, Carly; Aman, Ahmed; Wienholds, Erno; Li, Fengling; Pineda, Javier; Estiu, Guillermina; Shatseva, Tatiana; Hajian, Taraneh; Al-awar, Rima; Dick, John E.; Vedadi, Masoud; Brown, Peter J.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Bradner, James E.; Schapira, Matthieu

    2012-12-18

    Selective inhibition of protein methyltransferases is a promising new approach to drug discovery. An attractive strategy towards this goal is the development of compounds that selectively inhibit binding of the cofactor, S-adenosylmethionine, within specific protein methyltransferases. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of the protein methyltransferase DOT1L bound toEPZ004777, the first S-adenosylmethionine-competitive inhibitor of a protein methyltransferase with in vivo efficacy. This structure and those of four new analogues reveal remodelling of the catalytic site. EPZ004777 and a brominated analogue, SGC0946, inhibit DOT1L in vitro and selectively kill mixed lineage leukaemia cells, in which DOT1L is aberrantly localized via interaction with an oncogenic MLL fusion protein. These data provide important new insight into mechanisms of cell-active S-adenosylmethionine-competitive protein methyltransferase inhibitors, and establish a foundation for the further development of drug-like inhibitors of DOT1L for cancer therapy.

  7. Insights into the structure activity relationship of mPGES-1 inhibitors: Hints for better inhibitor design.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashish; Aparoy, Polamarasetty

    2016-07-01

    Microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) is a membrane protein which plays crucial role in arachidonic acid metabolism, in the catalysis of PGH2 to PGE2. It is a potential drug target involved in variety of human cancers and inflammatory disorders. In the present study we made an attempt to identify crucial amino acid residues involved in the effective binding of its inhibitors at the active site. Molecular docking and Structure Activity Relationship (SAR) studies were performed. In the present study 127 inhibitors having significant variability in parent scaffold were considered. The results clearly indicated that in the GSH and PGH2 binding site Arg70, Arg73, Asn74, Glu77, His113, Tyr117, Arg126, Ser127, Tyr130, Thr131 and Ala138 consistently form crucial interactions with inhibitors of different classes/scaffolds. These findings are consistent with that of existing reports on the active site residues pivotal at mPGES-1 active site. Further analysis suggested that out of all important amino acid residues identified; Arg73, Asn74, His113, Tyr117, Arg126, Ser127, Tyr130, Thr131 and Ala138 play a crucial role in hydrogen and π-π interactions. The identified amino acid residues can act as target sites for the design and development of drug candidates against mPGES-1. PMID:27012893

  8. Small Molecule Substrate Phosphorylation Site Inhibitors of Protein Kinases: Approaches and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases are important mediators of cellular communication and attractive drug targets for many diseases. Although success has been achieved with developing ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors, the disadvantages of ATP-competitive inhibitors have led to increased interest in targeting sites outside of the ATP binding pocket. Kinase inhibitors with substrate-competitive, ATP-noncompetitive binding modes are promising due to the possibility of increased selectivity and better agreement between biochemical and in vitro potency. However, the difficulty of identifying these types of inhibitors has resulted in significantly fewer small molecule substrate phosphorylation site inhibitors being reported compared to ATP-competitive inhibitors. This review surveys reported substrate phosphorylation site inhibitors and methods that can be applied to the discovery of such inhibitors, including a discussion of the challenges inherent to these screening methods. PMID:25494294

  9. Selective small molecule inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase reveals an allosteric regulatory site

    PubMed Central

    Kasbekar, Monica; Fischer, Gerhard; Mott, Bryan T.; Yasgar, Adam; Hyvönen, Marko; Boshoff, Helena I. M.; Abell, Chris; Barry, Clifton E.; Thomas, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in essential metabolic pathways are attractive targets for the treatment of bacterial diseases, but in many cases, the presence of homologous human enzymes makes them impractical candidates for drug development. Fumarate hydratase, an essential enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, has been identified as one such potential therapeutic target in tuberculosis. We report the discovery of the first small molecule inhibitor, to our knowledge, of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase. A crystal structure at 2.0-Å resolution of the compound in complex with the protein establishes the existence of a previously unidentified allosteric regulatory site. This allosteric site allows for selective inhibition with respect to the homologous human enzyme. We observe a unique binding mode in which two inhibitor molecules interact within the allosteric site, driving significant conformational changes that preclude simultaneous substrate and inhibitor binding. Our results demonstrate the selective inhibition of a highly conserved metabolic enzyme that contains identical active site residues in both the host and the pathogen. PMID:27325754

  10. Selective small molecule inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase reveals an allosteric regulatory site.

    PubMed

    Kasbekar, Monica; Fischer, Gerhard; Mott, Bryan T; Yasgar, Adam; Hyvönen, Marko; Boshoff, Helena I M; Abell, Chris; Barry, Clifton E; Thomas, Craig J

    2016-07-01

    Enzymes in essential metabolic pathways are attractive targets for the treatment of bacterial diseases, but in many cases, the presence of homologous human enzymes makes them impractical candidates for drug development. Fumarate hydratase, an essential enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, has been identified as one such potential therapeutic target in tuberculosis. We report the discovery of the first small molecule inhibitor, to our knowledge, of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase. A crystal structure at 2.0-Å resolution of the compound in complex with the protein establishes the existence of a previously unidentified allosteric regulatory site. This allosteric site allows for selective inhibition with respect to the homologous human enzyme. We observe a unique binding mode in which two inhibitor molecules interact within the allosteric site, driving significant conformational changes that preclude simultaneous substrate and inhibitor binding. Our results demonstrate the selective inhibition of a highly conserved metabolic enzyme that contains identical active site residues in both the host and the pathogen. PMID:27325754

  11. Discovery of a novel allosteric inhibitor-binding site in ERK5: comparison with the canonical kinase hinge ATP-binding site.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongming; Tucker, Julie; Wang, Xiaotao; Gavine, Paul R; Phillips, Chris; Augustin, Martin A; Schreiner, Patrick; Steinbacher, Stefan; Preston, Marian; Ogg, Derek

    2016-05-01

    MAP kinases act as an integration point for multiple biochemical signals and are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, regulation of transcription and development. As a member of the MAP kinase family, ERK5 (MAPK7) is involved in the downstream signalling pathways of various cell-surface receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. In the current study, five structures of the ERK5 kinase domain co-crystallized with ERK5 inhibitors are reported. Interestingly, three of the compounds bind at a novel allosteric binding site in ERK5, while the other two bind at the typical ATP-binding site. Binding of inhibitors at the allosteric site is accompanied by displacement of the P-loop into the ATP-binding site and is shown to be ATP-competitive in an enzymatic assay of ERK5 kinase activity. Kinase selectivity data show that the most potent allosteric inhibitor exhibits superior kinase selectivity compared with the two inhibitors that bind at the canonical ATP-binding site. An analysis of these structures and comparison with both a previously published ERK5-inhibitor complex structure (PDB entry 4b99) and the structures of three other kinases (CDK2, ITK and MEK) in complex with allosteric inhibitors are presented. PMID:27139631

  12. Discovery of a novel allosteric inhibitor-binding site in ERK5: comparison with the canonical kinase hinge ATP-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongming; Tucker, Julie; Wang, Xiaotao; Gavine, Paul R.; Phillips, Chris; Augustin, Martin A.; Schreiner, Patrick; Steinbacher, Stefan; Preston, Marian; Ogg, Derek

    2016-01-01

    MAP kinases act as an integration point for multiple biochemical signals and are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, regulation of transcription and development. As a member of the MAP kinase family, ERK5 (MAPK7) is involved in the downstream signalling pathways of various cell-surface receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. In the current study, five structures of the ERK5 kinase domain co-crystallized with ERK5 inhibitors are reported. Interestingly, three of the compounds bind at a novel allosteric binding site in ERK5, while the other two bind at the typical ATP-binding site. Binding of inhibitors at the allosteric site is accompanied by displacement of the P-loop into the ATP-binding site and is shown to be ATP-competitive in an enzymatic assay of ERK5 kinase activity. Kinase selectivity data show that the most potent allosteric inhibitor exhibits superior kinase selectivity compared with the two inhibitors that bind at the canonical ATP-binding site. An analysis of these structures and comparison with both a previously published ERK5–inhibitor complex structure (PDB entry 4b99) and the structures of three other kinases (CDK2, ITK and MEK) in complex with allosteric inhibitors are presented. PMID:27139631

  13. Ametoctradin is a potent Qo site inhibitor of the mitochondrial respiration complex III.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Zhang, Mengmeng; Liu, Jingjing; Ge, Jingming; Yang, Guangfu

    2015-04-01

    Ametoctradin is a new Oomycete-specific fungicide under development by BASF. It is a potent inhibitor of the bc1 complex in mitochondrial respiration. However, its detailed action mechanism remains unknown. In the present work, the binding mode of ametoctradin was first uncovered by integrating molecular docking, MD simulations, and MM/PBSA calculations, which showed that ametoctradin should be a Q(o) site inhibitor of bc1 complex. Subsequently, a series of new 1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine derivatives were designed and synthesized to further understand the substituent effects on the 5- and 6-position of 1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine. The calculated binding free energies (ΔG(cal)) of newly synthesized analogues as Qo site inhibitors correlated very well (R(2) = 0.96) with their experimental binding free energies (ΔG(exp)). Two compounds (4a and 4c) with higher inhibitory activity against porcine SQR than ametoctradin were successfully identified. The structural and mechanistic insights obtained from the present study will provide a valuable clue for future designing of a new promising bc1 inhibitor. PMID:25784492

  14. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency. PMID:27432161

  15. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency. PMID:27432161

  16. Identification of a new JNK inhibitor targeting the JNK-JIP interaction site

    PubMed Central

    Stebbins, John L.; De, Surya K.; Machleidt, Thomas; Becattini, Barbara; Vazquez, Jesus; Kuntzen, Christian; Chen, Li-Hsing; Cellitti, Jason F.; Riel-Mehan, Megan; Emdadi, Aras; Solinas, Giovanni; Karin, Michael; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    JNK is a stress-activated protein kinase that modulates pathways implicated in a variety of disease states. JNK-interacting protein-1 (JIP1) is a scaffolding protein that enhances JNK signaling by creating a proximity effect between JNK and upstream kinases. A minimal peptide region derived from JIP1 is able to inhibit JNK activity both in vitro and in cell. We report here a series of small molecules JIP1 mimics that function as substrate competitive inhibitors of JNK. One such compound, BI-78D3, dose-dependently inhibits the phosphorylation of JNK substrates both in vitro and in cell. In animal studies, BI-78D3 not only blocks JNK dependent Con A-induced liver damage but also restores insulin sensitivity in mouse models of type 2 diabetes. Our findings open the way for the development of protein kinase inhibitors targeting substrate specific docking sites, rather than the highly conserved ATP binding sites. In view of its favorable inhibition profile, selectivity, and ability to function in the cellular milieu and in vivo, BI-78D3 represents not only a JNK inhibitor, but also a promising stepping stone toward the development of an innovative class of therapeutics. PMID:18922779

  17. 3-Nitropropionic Acid is a Suicide Inhibitor of MitochondrialRespiration that, Upon Oxidation by Complex II, Forms a Covalent AdductWith a Catalytic Base Arginine in the Active Site of the Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-shar; Sun, Gang; Cobessi, David; Wang, Andy C.; Shen,John T.; Tung, Eric Y.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-12-01

    We report three new structures of mitochondrial respiratory Complex II (succinate ubiquinone oxidoreductase, E.C. 1.3.5.1) at up to 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, with various inhibitors. The structures define the conformation of the bound inhibitors and suggest the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the dicarboxylate site. In particular they support the role of Arg297 as a general base catalyst accepting a proton in the dehydrogenation of succinate. The dicarboxylate ligand in oxaloacetate-containing crystals appears to be the same as that reported for Shewanella flavocytochrome c treated with fumarate. The plant and fungal toxin 3-nitropropionic acid, an irreversible inactivator of succinate dehydrogenase, forms a covalent adduct with the side chain of Arg297. The modification eliminates a trypsin cleavage site in the flavoprotein, and tandem mass spectroscopic analysis of the new fragment shows the mass of Arg 297 to be increased by 83 Da and to have potential of losing 44 Da, consistent with decarboxylation, during fragmentation.

  18. New potent inhibitors of tyrosinase: novel clues to binding of 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2(3H)-thiones, 1,3,4-oxadiazole-2(3H)-thiones, 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5(4H)-thiones, and substituted hydrazides to the dicopper active site.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Usman; Ullah, Nisar

    2010-06-01

    A series of 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2(3H)-thiones, 1,3,4-oxadiazole-2(3H)-thiones, 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole-5(4H)-thiones, and substituted hydrazides were tailored and synthesized as new potent inhibitors of tyrosinase. The rationale for inhibitor design was based on the active site structural evidence from the crystal structures of bacterial tyrosinase and potato catechol oxidase enzymes. Kinetic and active site binding studies suggested mono-dentate binding of thiadiazole, oxadiazole, and triazole rings to the active site dicopper center of tyrosinase including hydrophobicity contributing to the potent inhibition. Kinetic plots showed mixed-type of inhibition by all 25 compounds. Substitutions at C3 of the triazole ring and C5 of the thiadiazole/oxadiazole rings were found to be playing a major role in the high binding affinity to tyrosinase. The current work may help develop new potent tyrosinase inhibitors against hyperpigmentation including potential insecticides. PMID:20452224

  19. Plasmin inhibitors with hydrophobic amino acid-based linker between hydantoin moiety and benzimidazole scaffold enhance inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Teno, Naoki; Gohda, Keigo; Yamashita, Yukiko; Otsubo, Tadamune; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Wanaka, Keiko; Tsuda, Yuko

    2016-05-01

    In this letter we report the design and synthesis of a series of plasmin inhibitors, which share the amino acid-based linker with limited free rotation between the hydantoin moiety and the benzimidazole scaffold. Our studies led to potent plasmin inhibitors and yielded important new insights into their structure-activity relationship for binding to the active site of plasmin. PMID:27009905

  20. Isosorbide-2-benzyl carbamate-5-salicylate, a peripheral anionic site binding subnanomolar selective butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Carolan, Ciaran G; Dillon, Gerald P; Khan, Denise; Ryder, Sheila A; Gaynor, Joanne M; Reidy, Sean; Marquez, Juan F; Jones, Mike; Holland, Valerie; Gilmer, John F

    2010-02-11

    Isosorbide-2-benzyl carbamate-5-benzoate is a highly potent and selective BuChE inhibitor. Meanwhile, isosorbide-2-aspirinate-5-salicylate is a highly effective aspirin prodrug that relies on the salicylate portion to interact productively with human BuChE. By integrating the salicylate group into the carbamate design, we have produced isosorbide-2-benzyl carbamate-5-salicylate, an inhibitor of high potency (150 pM) and selectivity for human BuChE over AChE (666000) and CES2 (23000). Modeling and mutant studies indicate that it achieves its exceptional potency because of an interaction with the polar D70/Y332 cluster in the PAS of BuChE in addition to pseudosubstrate interactions with the active site. PMID:20067290

  1. Identification of the Interaction Sites of Inhibitor-3 for Protein Phosphatase-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lifang; Qi, Zhiqing; Gao, Yan; Lee, Ernest Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    Inhibitor-3 is a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase-1, with an IC50 in the nanomolar range for the inhibition of the dephosphorylation of phosphorylase a. Human Inhibitor-3 possesses a putative protein phosphatase-1 binding motif, 39KKVEW43. We provide direct evidence that this sequence is involved in PP1 interaction by examining the effects of site-directed mutations of Inhibitor-3 on its ability to inhibit protein phosphatase-1. A second interaction site whose deletion led to loss of inhibitory potency was identified between residues 65–77. The existence of two interaction sites is consistent with the high inhibitory potency of Inhibitor-3, and with current models for other inhibitor and targeting proteins that interact with protein phosphatase-1 with high affinity. PMID:18951879

  2. Discovery of dual binding site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors identified by pharmacophore modeling and sequential virtual screening techniques.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shikhar; Fallarero, Adyary; Järvinen, Päivi; Karlsson, Daniela; Johnson, Mark S; Vuorela, Pia M; Mohan, C Gopi

    2011-02-15

    Dual binding site acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are promising for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). They alleviate the cognitive deficits and AD-modifying agents, by inhibiting the β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide aggregation, through binding to both the catalytic and peripheral anionic sites, the so called dual binding site of the AChE enzyme. In this Letter, chemical features based 3D-pharmacophore models were developed based on the eight potent and structurally diverse AChE inhibitors (I-VIII) obtained from high-throughput in vitro screening technique. The best 3D-pharmacophore model, Hypo1, consists of two hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid, one hydrophobe, and two hydrophobic aliphatic features obtained by Catalyst/HIPHOP algorithm adopted in Discovery studio program. Hypo1 was used as a 3D query in sequential virtual screening study to filter three small compound databases. Further, a total of nine compounds were selected and followed on in vitro analysis. Finally, we identified two leads--Specs1 (IC(50)=3.279 μM) and Spec2 (IC(50)=5.986 μM) dual binding site compounds from Specs database, having good AChE enzyme inhibitory activity. PMID:21273074

  3. RAF inhibitors that evade paradoxical MAPK pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Spevak, Wayne; Zhang, Ying; Burton, Elizabeth A; Ma, Yan; Habets, Gaston; Zhang, Jiazhong; Lin, Jack; Ewing, Todd; Matusow, Bernice; Tsang, Garson; Marimuthu, Adhirai; Cho, Hanna; Wu, Guoxian; Wang, Weiru; Fong, Daniel; Nguyen, Hoa; Shi, Songyuan; Womack, Patrick; Nespi, Marika; Shellooe, Rafe; Carias, Heidi; Powell, Ben; Light, Emily; Sanftner, Laura; Walters, Jason; Tsai, James; West, Brian L; Visor, Gary; Rezaei, Hamid; Lin, Paul S; Nolop, Keith; Ibrahim, Prabha N; Hirth, Peter; Bollag, Gideon

    2015-10-22

    Oncogenic activation of BRAF fuels cancer growth by constitutively promoting RAS-independent mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway signalling. Accordingly, RAF inhibitors have brought substantially improved personalized treatment of metastatic melanoma. However, these targeted agents have also revealed an unexpected consequence: stimulated growth of certain cancers. Structurally diverse ATP-competitive RAF inhibitors can either inhibit or paradoxically activate the MAPK pathway, depending whether activation is by BRAF mutation or by an upstream event, such as RAS mutation or receptor tyrosine kinase activation. Here we have identified next-generation RAF inhibitors (dubbed 'paradox breakers') that suppress mutant BRAF cells without activating the MAPK pathway in cells bearing upstream activation. In cells that express the same HRAS mutation prevalent in squamous tumours from patients treated with RAF inhibitors, the first-generation RAF inhibitor vemurafenib stimulated in vitro and in vivo growth and induced expression of MAPK pathway response genes; by contrast the paradox breakers PLX7904 and PLX8394 had no effect. Paradox breakers also overcame several known mechanisms of resistance to first-generation RAF inhibitors. Dissociating MAPK pathway inhibition from paradoxical activation might yield both improved safety and more durable efficacy than first-generation RAF inhibitors, a concept currently undergoing human clinical evaluation with PLX8394. PMID:26466569

  4. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Stable Colchicine Binding Site Tubulin Inhibitors as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To block the metabolically labile sites of novel tubulin inhibitors targeting the colchicine binding site based on SMART, ABI, and PAT templates, we have designed, synthesized, and biologically tested three focused sets of new derivatives with modifications at the carbonyl linker, the para-position in the C ring of SMART template, and modification of A ring of the PAT template. Structure–activity relationships of these compounds led to the identification of new benzimidazole and imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine-fused ring templates, represented by compounds 4 and 7, respectively, which showed enhanced antitumor activity and substantially improved the metabolic stability in liver microsomes compared to SMART. MOM group replaced TMP C ring and generated a potent analogue 15, which showed comparable potency to the parent SMART compound. Further modification of PAT template yielded another potent analogue 33 with 5-indolyl substituent at A ring. PMID:25122533

  5. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  6. MEK1/2 Inhibitors: Molecular Activity and Resistance Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pui-Kei; Park, Jong-In

    2015-12-01

    Aberrant activation of the three-layered protein kinase cascade, Raf/MEK/ERK, is often detected in human cancer, which is mainly attributed to the oncogenic alterations of RAF, or its upstream activators RAS or cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases. Deregulated activity of the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway drives uncontrolled tumor cell proliferation and survival, thus providing a rational therapeutic target for the treatment of many cancers. While Raf, MEK1/2, and ERK1/2 are equally important targets for the design of therapeutic small molecular weight inhibitors, the effort to develop MEK1/2-specific inhibitors has been greatly successful. Particularly, MEK1/2 have been relatively advantageous for the design of highly selective adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-noncompetitive inhibitors. Indeed, a plethora of highly selective and potent MEK1/2 inhibitors are now available and many of those inhibitors have been evaluated for their therapeutic potential. Herein, we review different MEK1/2 inhibitors that have been studied for their inhibitory mechanisms and therapeutic potential in cancer. Some of the key structural features of MEK1/2 that are important for the efficacy of these inhibitors are also discussed. In addition, we discuss current challenges and future prospective in using these advanced MEK1/2 inhibitors for cancer therapy. PMID:26615130

  7. Studies on contact activation: effects of surface and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cameron, C L; Fisslthaler, B; Sherman, A; Reddigari, S; Silverberg, M

    1989-01-01

    Contact activation is initiated when the plasma proteins, Hageman factor (factor XII), prekallikrein and high molecular weight kininogen interact with negatively charged materials. The activation of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation and the production of bradykinin are among the sequelae of contact activation. The kinetics of the activation of the contact system are modified by plasma inhibitors, C1 inhibitor being quantitatively the most important. We propose that the activation of the system requires that the stimulus provided by the surface must be greater than a threshold value to overcome the effects of the inhibitors. We show in this paper that the amount of surface required for activation is much reduced in the absence of C1 inhibitor (Hereditary Angioedema) or in the cold where the inhibitor loses much of its effectiveness. Antithrombin III inhibition of activated Hageman factor is augmented by heparin which is also an activator of Hageman factor. The rate constants for inhibition remain much lower than for C1 inhibitor, however. PMID:2530427

  8. Design, Synthesis, and Structure-Activity Relationship of Substrate Competitive, Selective, and in Vivo Active Triazole and Thiadiazole inhibitors of the c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase

    PubMed Central

    De, Surya K.; Stebbins, John L.; Chen, Li-Hsing; Riel-Mehan, Megan; Machleidt, Thomas; Dahl, Russell; Yuan, Hongbin; Emdadi, Aras; Barile, Elisa; Chen, Vida; Murphy, Ria; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    We report comprehensive structure activity relationship studies on a novel series of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitors. The compounds are substrate competitive inhibitors that bind to the docking site of the kinase. The reported medicinal chemistry and structure-based optimizations studies resulted in the discovery of selective and potent thiadiazole JNK inhibitors that displays promising in vivo activity in mouse models of insulin insensitivity. PMID:19271755

  9. ROS inhibitor N-acetyl-L-cysteine antagonizes the activity of proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Halasi, Marianna; Wang, Ming; Chavan, Tanmay S; Gaponenko, Vadim; Hay, Nissim; Gartel, Andrei L

    2013-09-01

    NAC (N-acetyl-L-cysteine) is commonly used to identify and test ROS (reactive oxygen species) inducers, and to inhibit ROS. In the present study, we identified inhibition of proteasome inhibitors as a novel activity of NAC. Both NAC and catalase, another known scavenger of ROS, similarly inhibited ROS levels and apoptosis associated with H₂O₂. However, only NAC, and not catalase or another ROS scavenger Trolox, was able to prevent effects linked to proteasome inhibition, such as protein stabilization, apoptosis and accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates. These observations suggest that NAC has a dual activity as an inhibitor of ROS and proteasome inhibitors. Recently, NAC was used as a ROS inhibitor to functionally characterize a novel anticancer compound, piperlongumine, leading to its description as a ROS inducer. In contrast, our own experiments showed that this compound depicts features of proteasome inhibitors including suppression of FOXM1 (Forkhead box protein M1), stabilization of cellular proteins, induction of ROS-independent apoptosis and enhanced accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates. In addition, NAC, but not catalase or Trolox, interfered with the activity of piperlongumine, further supporting that piperlongumine is a proteasome inhibitor. Most importantly, we showed that NAC, but not other ROS scavengers, directly binds to proteasome inhibitors. To our knowledge, NAC is the first known compound that directly interacts with and antagonizes the activity of proteasome inhibitors. Taken together, the findings of the present study suggest that, as a result of the dual nature of NAC, data interpretation might not be straightforward when NAC is utilized as an antioxidant to demonstrate ROS involvement in drug-induced apoptosis. PMID:23772801

  10. Hydroxyapatite microparticles as feedback-active reservoirs of corrosion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Snihirova, D; Lamaka, S V; Taryba, M; Salak, A N; Kallip, S; Zheludkevich, M L; Ferreira, M G S; Montemor, M F

    2010-11-01

    This work contributes to the development of new feedback-active anticorrosion systems. Inhibitor-doped hydroxyapatite microparticles (HAP) are used as reservoirs, storing corrosion inhibitor to be released on demand. Release of the entrapped inhibitor is triggered by redox reactions associated with the corrosion process. HAP were used as reservoirs for several inhibiting species: cerium(III), lanthanum(III), salicylaldoxime, and 8-hydroxyquinoline. These species are effective corrosion inhibitors for a 2024 aluminum alloy (AA2024), used here as a model metallic substrate. Dissolution of the microparticles and release of the inhibitor are triggered by local acidification resulting from the anodic half-reaction during corrosion of AA2024. Calculated values and experimentally measured local acidification over the aluminum anode (down to pH = 3.65) are presented. The anticorrosion properties of inhibitor-doped HAP were assessed using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The microparticles impregnated with the corrosion inhibitors were introduced into a hybrid silica-zirconia sol-gel film, acting as a thin protective coating for AA2024, an alloy used for aeronautical applications. The protective properties of the sol-gel films were improved by the addition of HAP, proving their applicability as submicrometer-sized reservoirs of corrosion inhibitors for active anticorrosion coatings. PMID:20942404

  11. Turing pattern formation in fractional activator-inhibitor systems.

    PubMed

    Henry, B I; Langlands, T A M; Wearne, S L

    2005-08-01

    Activator-inhibitor systems of reaction-diffusion equations have been used to describe pattern formation in numerous applications in biology, chemistry, and physics. The rate of diffusion in these applications is manifest in the single parameter of the diffusion constant, and stationary Turing patterns occur above a critical value of d representing the ratio of the diffusion constants of the inhibitor to the activator. Here we consider activator-inhibitor systems in which the diffusion is anomalous subdiffusion; the diffusion rates are manifest in both a diffusion constant and a diffusion exponent. A consideration of this problem in terms of continuous-time random walks with sources and sinks leads to a reaction-diffusion system with fractional order temporal derivatives operating on the spatial Laplacian. We have carried out an algebraic stability analysis of the homogeneous steady-state solution in fractional activator-inhibitor systems, with Gierer-Meinhardt reaction kinetics and with Brusselator reaction kinetics. For each class of reaction kinetics we identify a Turing instability bifurcation curve in the two-dimensional diffusion parameter space. The critical value of d , for Turing instabilities, decreases monotonically with the anomalous diffusion exponent between unity (standard diffusion) and zero (extreme subdiffusion). We have also carried out numerical simulations of the governing fractional activator-inhibitor equations and we show that the Turing instability precipitates the formation of complex spatiotemporal patterns. If the diffusion of the activator and inhibitor have the same anomalous scaling properties, then the surface profiles of these patterns for values of d slightly above the critical value varies from smooth stationary patterns to increasingly rough and nonstationary patterns as the anomalous diffusion exponent varies from unity towards zero. If the diffusion of the activator is anomalous subdiffusion but the diffusion of the inhibitor

  12. Structure-activity relationships and in silico models of P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongming; Ma, Zhiguo; Wu, Baojian

    2013-11-01

    1. The efflux pump p-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1) has received enormous attention in drug (xenobiotic) disposition due to its role in modulation of the drug availability and in protection of sensitive organs. 2. P-gp mediated efflux is one of main mechanisms for multidrug resistance in cancer cells. A main approach to reverse the resistance and restore the drug efficacy is to use specific inhibitors of P-gp that suppress the efflux activity. 3. This review summarizes the binding capabilities of known chemical inhibitors based on the analyses of structure-activity relationships, and computational modeling of the inhibitors as well as the binding site of P-gp protein. 4. The molecular models will facilitate the design of lead inhibitors as drug candidates. Also, it helps scientists in early drug discovery phase to synthesize chemical series with better understanding of their P-gp binding liabilities. PMID:23617855

  13. Cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation by BRAF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Li, Shuoran; Xie, Michael W; Sun, Lu; Hugo, Willy; Huang, Rong Rong; Jiao, Jing; de-Faria, Felipe Meira; Realegeno, Susan; Krystofinski, Paige; Azhdam, Ariel; Komenan, Sara Marie D; Atefi, Mohammad; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Pellegrini, Matteo; Cochran, Alistair J; Modlin, Robert L; Herschman, Harvey R; Lo, Roger S; McBride, William H; Segura, Tatiana; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors are highly effective therapies for the treatment of BRAF(V600)-mutated melanoma, with the main toxicity being a variety of hyperproliferative skin conditions due to paradoxical activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in BRAF wild-type cells. Most of these hyperproliferative skin changes improve when a MEK inhibitor is co-administered, as it blocks paradoxical MAPK activation. Here we show how the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib accelerates skin wound healing by inducing the proliferation and migration of human keratinocytes through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and cell cycle progression. Topical treatment with vemurafenib in two wound-healing mice models accelerates cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation; addition of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor reverses the benefit of vemurafenib-accelerated wound healing. The same dosing regimen of topical BRAF inhibitor does not increase the incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas in mice. Therefore, topical BRAF inhibitors may have clinical applications in accelerating the healing of skin wounds. PMID:27476449

  14. Cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation by BRAF inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Li, Shuoran; Xie, Michael W.; Sun, Lu; Hugo, Willy; Huang, Rong Rong; Jiao, Jing; de-Faria, Felipe Meira; Realegeno, Susan; Krystofinski, Paige; Azhdam, Ariel; Komenan, Sara Marie D.; Atefi, Mohammad; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Pellegrini, Matteo; Cochran, Alistair J.; Modlin, Robert L.; Herschman, Harvey R.; Lo, Roger S.; McBride, William H.; Segura, Tatiana; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors are highly effective therapies for the treatment of BRAFV600-mutated melanoma, with the main toxicity being a variety of hyperproliferative skin conditions due to paradoxical activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in BRAF wild-type cells. Most of these hyperproliferative skin changes improve when a MEK inhibitor is co-administered, as it blocks paradoxical MAPK activation. Here we show how the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib accelerates skin wound healing by inducing the proliferation and migration of human keratinocytes through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and cell cycle progression. Topical treatment with vemurafenib in two wound-healing mice models accelerates cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation; addition of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor reverses the benefit of vemurafenib-accelerated wound healing. The same dosing regimen of topical BRAF inhibitor does not increase the incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas in mice. Therefore, topical BRAF inhibitors may have clinical applications in accelerating the healing of skin wounds. PMID:27476449

  15. Structure of a small-molecule inhibitor complexed with GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae reveals an allosteric binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Mochalkin, Igor; Lightle, Sandra; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Bornemeier, Dirk; Melnick, Michael; VanderRoest, Steven; McDowell, Laura

    2008-04-02

    N-Acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU) is an essential enzyme in aminosugars metabolism and an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. GlmU catalyzes the formation of uridine-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc), an important precursor in the peptidoglycan and lipopolisaccharide biosynthesis in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Here we disclose a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a synthetic small-molecule inhibitor of GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae (hiGlmU). The compound was identified through a high-throughput screening (HTS) configured to detect inhibitors that target the uridyltransferase active site of hiGlmU. The original HTS hit exhibited a modest micromolar potency (IC{sub 50} - 18 {mu}M in a racemic mixture) against hiGlmU and no activity against Staphylococcus aureus GlmU (saGlmU). The determined crystal structure indicated that the inhibitor occupies an allosteric site adjacent to the GlcNAc-1-P substrate-binding region. Analysis of the mechanistic model of the uridyltransferase reaction suggests that the binding of this allosteric inhibitor prevents structural rearrangements that are required for the enzymatic reaction, thus providing a basis for structure-guided design of a new class of mechanism-based inhibitors of GlmU.

  16. Antimalarial Activity of the Anticancer Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor SB939

    PubMed Central

    Sumanadasa, Subathdrage D. M.; Goodman, Christopher D.; Lucke, Andrew J.; Skinner-Adams, Tina; Sahama, Ishani; Haque, Ashraful; Do, Tram Anh; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Fairlie, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes posttranslationally modify lysines on histone and nonhistone proteins and play crucial roles in epigenetic regulation and other important cellular processes. HDAC inhibitors (e.g., suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid [SAHA; also known as vorinostat]) are used clinically to treat some cancers and are under investigation for use against many other diseases. Development of new HDAC inhibitors for noncancer indications has the potential to be accelerated by piggybacking onto cancer studies, as several HDAC inhibitors have undergone or are undergoing clinical trials. One such compound, SB939, is a new orally active hydroxamate-based HDAC inhibitor with an improved pharmacokinetic profile compared to that of SAHA. In this study, the in vitro and in vivo antiplasmodial activities of SB939 were investigated. SB939 was found to be a potent inhibitor of the growth of Plasmodium falciparum asexual-stage parasites in vitro (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 100 to 200 nM), causing hyperacetylation of parasite histone and nonhistone proteins. In combination with the aspartic protease inhibitor lopinavir, SB939 displayed additive activity. SB939 also potently inhibited the in vitro growth of exoerythrocytic-stage Plasmodium parasites in liver cells (IC50, ∼150 nM), suggesting that inhibitor targeting to multiple malaria parasite life cycle stages may be possible. In an experimental in vivo murine model of cerebral malaria, orally administered SB939 significantly inhibited P. berghei ANKA parasite growth, preventing development of cerebral malaria-like symptoms. These results identify SB939 as a potent new antimalarial HDAC inhibitor and underscore the potential of investigating next-generation anticancer HDAC inhibitors as prospective new drug leads for treatment of malaria. PMID:22508312

  17. Structure activity relationships of human galactokinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Tang, Manshu; Walsh, Martin J; Brimacombe, Kyle R; Pragani, Rajan; Tanega, Cordelle; Rohde, Jason M; Baker, Heather L; Fernandez, Elizabeth; Blackman, Burchelle; Bougie, James M; Leister, William H; Auld, Douglas S; Shen, Min; Lai, Kent; Boxer, Matthew B

    2015-02-01

    Classic Galactosemia is a rare inborn error of metabolism that is caused by deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), an enzyme within the Leloir pathway that is responsible for the conversion of galactose-1-phosphate (gal-1-p) and UDP-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate and UDP-galactose. This deficiency results in elevated intracellular concentrations of its substrate, gal-1-p, and this increased concentration is believed to be the major pathogenic mechanism in Classic Galactosemia. Galactokinase (GALK) is an upstream enzyme of GALT in the Leloir pathway and is responsible for conversion of galactose and ATP to gal-1-p and ADP. Therefore, it was hypothesized that the identification of a small-molecule inhibitor of human GALK would act to prevent the accumulation of gal-1-p and offer a novel entry therapy for this disorder. Herein we describe a quantitative high-throughput screening campaign that identified a single chemotype that was optimized and validated as a GALK inhibitor. PMID:25553891

  18. Complete amino acid sequence of the lentil trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor LCI-1.7 and a discussion of atypical binding sites of Bowman-Birk inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Weder, Jürgen K P; Hinkers, Sabine C

    2004-06-30

    The complete primary structure of the lentil (Lens culinaris) trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor LCI-1.7 was determined by conventional methods in order to find relationships between partial sequences and the difference in action against human and bovine chymotrypsin. As other Bowman-Birk type inhibitors, LCI-1.7 contained 68 amino acid residues, seven disulfide bridges, and two reactive sites, Arg16-Ser17 for trypsin and Tyr42-Ser43 for chymotrypsin. Evaluation of sequence homologies showed that it belonged to the group III Bowman-Birk inhibitors. The atypical additional binding site of LCI-1.7 for human chymotrypsin was discussed and compared with such binding sites of two other Bowman-Birk inhibitors, the Bowman-Birk soybean proteinase inhibitor BBI, and the lima bean proteinase inhibitor LBI I, for human and bovine trypsin and chymotrypsin. A concept to reduce the action of these inhibitors against human enzymes by genetic engineering was proposed. PMID:15212472

  19. Antitumoral activity of allosteric inhibitors of protein kinase CK2

    PubMed Central

    Sautel, Céline F.; Teillet, Florence; Barette, Caroline; Lafanechere, Laurence; Receveur-Brechot, Veronique; Cochet, Claude

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Due to its physiological role into promoting cell survival and its dysregulation in most cancer cells, protein kinase CK2 is a relevant physiopathological target for development of chemical inhibitors. We report the discovery of azonaphthalene derivatives, as a new family of highly specific CK2 inhibitors. First, we demonstrated that CK2 inhibition (IC50= 0.4 μM) was highly specific, reversible and non ATP-competitive. Small Angle X-ray Scattering experiments showed that this inhibition was due to large conformational change of CK2α upon binding of these inhibitors. We showed that several compounds of the family were cell-potent CK2 inhibitors promoting cell cycle arrest of human glioblastoma U373 cells. Finally, in vitro and in vivo assays showed that these compounds could decrease U373 cell tumor mass by 83% emphasizing their efficacy against these apoptosis-resistant tumors. In contrast, Azonaphthalene derivatives inactive on CK2 activity showed no effect in colony formation and tumor regression assays. These findings illustrate the emergence of nonclassical CK2 inhibitors and provide exciting opportunities for the development of novel allosteric CK2 inhibitors. Background CK2 is an emerging therapeutic target and ATP-competitive inhibitors have been identified. CK2 is endowed with specific structural features providing alternative strategies for inhibition. Results Azonaphthalene compounds are allosteric CK2 inhibitors showing antitumor activity. Conclusion CK2 may be targeted allosterically. Significance These inhibitors provide a foundation for a new paradigm for specific CK2 inhibition. PMID:22184283

  20. Resynthesis of reactive site peptide bond and temporary inhibition of Streptomyces metalloproteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Seeram, S S; Hiraga, K; Oda, K

    1997-10-01

    Streptomyces metalloproteinase inhibitor (SMPI) is a small proteinaceous inhibitor which inhibits metalloproteinases such as thermolysin (Ki =1.14 x 10(-10) M). When incubated with the enzyme, it is gradually hydrolyzed at the Cys64-Val65 peptide bond, which was identified as the reactive site by mutational analysis. To achieve a further understanding of the inhibition mechanism, we attempted to resynthesize the cleaved reactive site by using the enzyme catalytic action. The native inhibitor was resynthesized from the modified inhibitor (Ki =2.18 x 10(-8) M) by incubation with a catalytic amount of thermolysin under the same conditions as used for hydrolysis (pH 7.5, 25 degrees C), suggesting that SMPI follows the standard mechanism of inhibition of serine proteinase inhibitors. Temporary inhibition was observed when the native inhibitor and thermolysin were incubated at a 1:100 (mol/mol) enzyme-inhibitor ratio at 37 degrees C. SMPI showed temporary inhibition towards all the enzymes it inhibited. The inhibitory spectrum of SMPI was analyzed with various metalloproteinases based on the Ki values and limited proteolysis patterns. Pseudomonas elastase and Streptomyces griseus metalloproteinase II formed more stable complexes and showed much lower Ki values (approximately 2 pM) than thermolysin. In the limited proteolysis experiments weak inhibitors were degraded by the enzymes. SMPI did not inhibit almelysin, Streptomyces caespitosus neutral proteinase or matrix metalloproteinases. SMPI specifically inhibits metalloproteinases which are sensitive to phosphoramidon. PMID:9399583

  1. The natural product dihydrotanshinone I provides a prototype for uncharged inhibitors that bind specifically to the acetylcholinesterase peripheral site with nanomolar affinity.

    PubMed

    Beri, Veena; Wildman, Scott A; Shiomi, Kazuro; Al-Rashid, Ziyad F; Cheung, Jonah; Rosenberry, Terrone L

    2013-10-22

    Cholinergic synaptic transmission often requires extremely rapid hydrolysis of acetylcholine by acetylcholinesterase (AChE). AChE is inactivated by organophosphates (OPs) in chemical warfare nerve agents. The resulting accumulation of acetylcholine disrupts cholinergic synaptic transmission and can lead to death. A potential long-term strategy for preventing AChE inactivation by OPs is based on evidence that OPs must pass through a peripheral site or P-site near the mouth of the AChE active site gorge before reacting with a catalytic serine in an acylation site or A-site at the base of the gorge. An ultimate goal of this strategy is to design compounds that bind tightly at or near the P-site and exclude OPs from the active site while interfering minimally with the passage of acetylcholine. However, to target the AChE P-site with ligands and potential drugs that selectively restrict access, much more information must be gathered about the structure-activity relationships of ligands that bind specifically to the P-site. We apply here an inhibitor competition assay that can correctly determine whether an AChE inhibitor binds to the P-site, the A-site, or both sites. We have used this assay to examine three uncharged, natural product inhibitors of AChE, including aflatoxin B1, dihydrotanshinone I, and territrem B. The first two of these inhibitors are predicted by the competition assay to bind selectively to the P-site, while territrem B is predicted to span both the P- and A-sites. These predictions have recently been confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Dihydrotanshinone I, with an observed binding constant (KI) of 750 nM, provides a good lead compound for the development of high-affinity, uncharged inhibitors with specificity for the P-site. PMID:24040835

  2. Type 1 plaminogen activator inhibitor gene: Functional analysis and glucocorticoid regulation of its promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Van Zonneveld, A.J.; Curriden, S.A.; Loskutoff, D.J. )

    1988-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 is an important component of the fibrinolytic system and its biosynthesis is subject to complex regulation. To study this regulation at the level of transcription, the authors have identified and sequenced the promoter of the human plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene. Nuclease protection experiments were performed by using endothelial cell mRNA and the transcription initiation (cap) site was established. Sequence analysis of the 5{prime} flanking region of the gene revealed a perfect TATA box at position {minus}28 to position {minus}23, the conserved distance from the cap site. Comparative functional studies with the firefly luciferase gene as a reporter gene showed that fragments derived from this 5{prime} flanking region exhibited high promoter activity when transfected into bovine aortic endothelial cells and mouse Ltk{sup {minus}} fibroblasts but were inactive when introduced into HeLa cells. These studies indicate that the fragments contain the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 promoter and that it is expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Although the fragments were also silent in rat FTO2B hepatoma cells, their promoter activity could be induced up to 40-fold with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. Promoter deletion mapping experiments and studies involving the fusion of promoter fragments to a heterologous gene indicated that dexamethasone induction is mediated by a glucocorticoid responsive element with enhancer-like properties located within the region between nucleotides {minus}305 and +75 of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene.

  3. Site-directed mutagenesis studies of acetylglutamate synthase delineate the site for the arginine inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Fernández-Murga, M Leonor; Rubio, Vicente

    2008-04-01

    N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase (NAGS), the first enzyme of bacterial/plant arginine biosynthesis and an essential activator of the urea cycle in animals, is, respectively, arginine-inhibited and activated. Site-directed mutagenesis of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa NAGS (PaNAGS) delineates the arginine site in the PaNAGS acetylglutamate kinase-like domain, and, by extension, in human NAGS. Key residues for glutamate binding are identified in the acetyltransferase domain. However, the acetylglutamate kinase-like domain may modulate glutamate binding, since one mutation affecting this domain increases the K(m) for glutamate. The effects on PaNAGS of two mutations found in human NAGS deficiency support the similarity of bacterial and human NAGSs despite their low sequence identity. PMID:18319063

  4. Design of multiligand inhibitors for the swine flu H1N1 neuraminidase binding site.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Manoj M; Nair, Chandrasekhar B; Sanjeeva, Shilpa K; Rao, Pv Subba; Pullela, Phani K; Barrow, Colin J

    2013-01-01

    Viral neuraminidase inhibitors such as oseltamivir and zanamivir prevent early virus multiplication by blocking sialic acid cleavage on host cells. These drugs are effective for the treatment of a variety of influenza subtypes, including swine flu (H1N1). The binding site for these drugs is well established and they were designed based on computational docking studies. We show here that some common natural products have moderate inhibitory activity for H1N1 neuraminidase under docking studies. Significantly, docking studies using AutoDock for biligand and triligand forms of these compounds (camphor, menthol, and methyl salicylate linked via methylene bridges) indicate that they may bind in combination with high affinity to the H1N1 neuraminidase active site. These results also indicate that chemically linked biligands and triligands of these natural products could provide a new class of drug leads for the prevention and treatment of influenza. This study also highlights the need for a multiligand docking algorithm to understand better the mode of action of natural products, wherein multiple active ingredients are present. PMID:23983477

  5. Design of multiligand inhibitors for the swine flu H1N1 neuraminidase binding site

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Manoj M; Nair, Chandrasekhar B; Sanjeeva, Shilpa K; Rao, PV Subba; Pullela, Phani K; Barrow, Colin J

    2013-01-01

    Viral neuraminidase inhibitors such as oseltamivir and zanamivir prevent early virus multiplication by blocking sialic acid cleavage on host cells. These drugs are effective for the treatment of a variety of influenza subtypes, including swine flu (H1N1). The binding site for these drugs is well established and they were designed based on computational docking studies. We show here that some common natural products have moderate inhibitory activity for H1N1 neuraminidase under docking studies. Significantly, docking studies using AutoDock for biligand and triligand forms of these compounds (camphor, menthol, and methyl salicylate linked via methylene bridges) indicate that they may bind in combination with high affinity to the H1N1 neuraminidase active site. These results also indicate that chemically linked biligands and triligands of these natural products could provide a new class of drug leads for the prevention and treatment of influenza. This study also highlights the need for a multiligand docking algorithm to understand better the mode of action of natural products, wherein multiple active ingredients are present. PMID:23983477

  6. A small molecule focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor, targeting Y397 site: 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3, 5, 7-triaza-1-azoniatricyclo [3.3.1.1(3,7)]decane; bromide effectively inhibits FAK autophosphorylation activity and decreases cancer cell viability, clonogenicity and tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Golubovskaya, Vita M; Figel, Sheila; Ho, Baotran T; Johnson, Christopher P; Yemma, Michael; Huang, Grace; Zheng, Min; Nyberg, Carl; Magis, Andrew; Ostrov, David A; Gelman, Irwin H; Cance, William G

    2012-05-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a protein tyrosine kinase that is overexpressed in most solid types of tumors and plays an important role in the survival signaling. Recently, we have developed a novel computer modeling combined with a functional assay approach to target the main autophosphorylation site of FAK (Y397). Using these approaches, we identified 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3, 5, 7-triaza-1-azoniatricyclo [3.3.1.1(3,7)]decane; bromide, called Y11, a small molecule inhibitor targeting Y397 site of FAK. Y11 significantly and specifically decreased FAK autophosphorylation, directly bound to the N-terminal domain of FAK. In addition, Y11 decreased Y397-FAK autophosphorylation, inhibited viability and clonogenicity of colon SW620 and breast BT474 cancer cells and increased detachment and apoptosis in vitro. Moreover, Y11 significantly decreased tumor growth in the colon cancer cell mouse xenograft model. Finally, tumors from the Y11-treated mice demonstrated decreased Y397-FAK autophosphorylation and activation of poly (ADP ribose) polymerase and caspase-3. Thus, targeting the major autophosphorylation site of FAK with Y11 inhibitor is critical for development of cancer therapeutics and carcinogenesis field. PMID:22402131

  7. Activity-based kinase profiling of approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Daisuke; Yokota, Koichi; Gouda, Masaki; Narumi, Yugo; Ohmoto, Hiroshi; Nishiwaki, Eiji; Akita, Kensaku; Kirii, Yasuyuki

    2013-02-01

    The specificities of nine approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors (imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, gefitinib, erlotinib, lapatinib, sorafenib, sunitinib, and pazopanib) were determined by activity-based kinase profiling using a large panel of human recombinant active kinases. This panel consisted of 79 tyrosine kinases, 199 serine/threonine kinases, three lipid kinases, and 29 disease-relevant mutant kinases. Many potential targets of each inhibitor were identified by kinase profiling at the K(m) for ATP. In addition, profiling at a physiological ATP concentration (1 mm) was carried out, and the IC(50) values of the inhibitors against each kinase were compared with the estimated plasma-free concentration (calculated from published pharmacokinetic parameters of plasma C(trough) and C(max) values). This analysis revealed that the approved kinase inhibitors were well optimized for their target kinases. This profiling also implicates activity at particular off-target kinases in drug side effects. Thus, large-scale kinase profiling at both K(m) and physiological ATP concentrations could be useful in characterizing the targets and off-targets of kinase inhibitors. PMID:23279183

  8. New orally active proteasome inhibitors in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Alessandro; Alonci, Andrea; Gerace, Demetrio; Russo, Sabina; Innao, Vanessa; Calabrò, Laura; Musolino, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor approved for the therapy of multiple myeloma (MM). Although Bortezomib has renovated the treatment of MM, a considerable proportion of subjects fail to respond to Bortezomib treatment and almost all patients relapse from this drug either alone or when used in combination therapies. However, the good clinical outcome of Bortezomib treatment in MM patients gave impulsion for the development of second generation proteasome inhibitors with the ambition of improving efficacy of proteasome inhibition, enhancing antitumor activity, and decreasing toxicity, as well as providing flexible dosing schedules and patient convenience. This review provides an overview of the role of oral proteasome inhibitors including Marizomib, Oprozomib, Delanzomib, chemical proteasome inhibitors, and cinnabaramides, in the therapy of MM, focusing on developments over the past five years. These emerging drugs with different mechanisms of action have exhibited promising antitumor activity in patients with relapsed/refractory MM, and they are creating chances to target multiple pathways, overcome resistance, and improve clinical outcomes, mainly for those subjects who are refractory to approved agents. Future steps in the clinical development of oral inhibitors include the optimization of the schedule and the definition of their antitumor activity in MM. PMID:24239172

  9. Adenosine kinase inhibitors attenuate opiate withdrawal via adenosine receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Coyle, T S

    1998-11-27

    Previous studies have demonstrated a role for adenosine in mediating opiate effects. This study examines the effects of indirect activation of adenosine receptors, via treatment with adenosine kinase inhibitors, on the expression of opiate withdrawal in mice. Mice receive chronic morphine treatment via implantation of subcutaneous morphine pellets (75 mg) for 72 h. Mice then receive parenteral treatment with adenosine kinase inhibitors, either 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine (2, 5, 20, 40 mg/kg, intraperitoneal or i.p.) or iodotubericidin (1, 2, 5 mg/kg, i.p.), followed by naloxone injection and opiate withdrawal signs are measured over 20 min. Both adenosine kinase inhibitors significantly reduce the following opiate withdrawal signs in a dose-dependent manner compared to vehicle: withdrawal jumps, teeth chattering, forepaw tremors, and forepaw treads. Additionally, 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine significantly reduces withdrawal-induced diarrhea and weight loss. Effects of 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine (40 mg/kg) on opiate withdrawal signs appear to be mediated via adenosine receptor activation as they are reversed by pretreatment by adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine (20 mg, i.p.) but not by selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor Ro 20-1724 (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Adenosine receptor activation via adenosine kinase inhibitor treatment attenuates opiate withdrawal and these agents may be generally useful in the treatment of drug withdrawal syndromes. PMID:9865523

  10. Designed Inhibitors of Insulin-Degrading Enzyme Regulate the Catabolism and Activity of Insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Leissring, Malcolm A.; Malito, Enrico; Hedouin, Sabrine; Reinstatler, Lael; Sahara, Tomoko; Abdul-Hay, Samer O.; Choudhry, Shakeel; Maharvi, Ghulam M.; Fauq, Abdul H.; Huzarska, Malwina; May, Philip S.; Choi, Sungwoon; Logan, Todd P.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tang, Wei-Jen; Stein, Ross L.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    2010-09-20

    Insulin is a vital peptide hormone that is a central regulator of glucose homeostasis, and impairments in insulin signaling cause diabetes mellitus. In principle, it should be possible to enhance the activity of insulin by inhibiting its catabolism, which is mediated primarily by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a structurally and evolutionarily distinctive zinc-metalloprotease. Despite interest in pharmacological inhibition of IDE as an attractive anti-diabetic approach dating to the 1950s, potent and selective inhibitors of IDE have not yet emerged. We used a rational design approach based on analysis of combinatorial peptide mixtures and focused compound libraries to develop novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors of IDE. The resulting compounds are {approx} 10{sup 6} times more potent than existing inhibitors, non-toxic, and surprisingly selective for IDE vis-a-vis conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Crystallographic analysis of an IDE-inhibitor complex reveals a novel mode of inhibition based on stabilization of IDE's 'closed,' inactive conformation. We show further that pharmacological inhibition of IDE potentiates insulin signaling by a mechanism involving reduced catabolism of internalized insulin. Conclusions/Significance: The inhibitors we describe are the first to potently and selectively inhibit IDE or indeed any member of this atypical zinc-metalloprotease superfamily. The distinctive structure of IDE's active site, and the mode of action of our inhibitors, suggests that it may be possible to develop inhibitors that cross-react minimally with conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Significantly, our results reveal that insulin signaling is normally regulated by IDE activity not only extracellularly but also within cells, supporting the longstanding view that IDE inhibitors could hold therapeutic value for the treatment of diabetes.

  11. Determinants of the activity of beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations.

    PubMed

    Livermore, D M

    1993-01-01

    Inhibitor combinations provide one strategy to overcome beta-lactamase-mediated resistance. Their success depends, obviously, on the inhibitor being able to bind and inactivate the beta-lactamase molecules. Clavulanate, sulbactam and tazobactam are irreversible inactivators of many beta-lactamases, forming covalent complexes which resist hydrolysis. 'Suicide' kinetics are seen with some, but not all, enzymes. All three compounds inactivate staphylococcal penicillinase, the chromosomal beta-lactamases of Proteus vulgaris and Bacteroides spp., and the Class IV beta-lactamases present in some klebsiellae. Tazobactam, but not the other compounds, has moderate activity against some Class I (AmpC) chromosomal beta-lactamases, notably that of Morganella morganii, but not that of Enterobacter cloacae. Both clavulanate and tazobactam are strong inhibitors of the widely distributed TEM and SHV plasmid-mediated beta-lactamases; sulbactam is a weaker inhibitor. Other factors, aside from the affinity of the inhibitor for the enzyme, co-determine the success or failure of inhibition. Potentiation is most readily achieved if little enzyme is produced, and if the organism is very permeable to the inhibitor. Thus, resistance to inhibitor combinations is rare in strains of Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria gonorrhoeae that produce TEM-beta-lactamase, but is commoner in enterobacteria that produce this enzyme, since these are less permeable and sometimes manufacture very large amounts of enzyme. The partner beta-lactam agent is also important. Irrespective of the inhibitor used, piperacillin is easier to protect against TEM beta-lactamases and the M. morganii Class I enzyme than are ampicillin, amoxycillin or ticarcillin. This may relate to the lower affinity of piperacillin for these enzymes, or to its greater affinity for the bacterial penicillin-binding proteins. Finally, pH can affect the degree of inhibition achieved with sulphones for some beta-lactamases, notably TEM-1

  12. Therapeutic potential of an orally effective small molecule inhibitor of plasminogen activator inhibitor for asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Eldridge, Stephanie; Watanabe, Nobuo; Deshane, Jessy; Kuo, Hui-Chien; Jiang, Chunsun; Wang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Schwiebert, Lisa; Miyata, Toshio; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-02-15

    Asthma is one of the most common respiratory diseases. Although progress has been made in our understanding of airway pathology and many drugs are available to relieve asthma symptoms, there is no cure for chronic asthma. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a primary inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, has pleiotropic functions besides suppression of fibrinolysis. In this study, we show that administration of TM5275, an orally effective small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitor, 25 days after ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization-challenge, significantly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-induced chronic asthma model. Furthermore, we show that TM5275 administration significantly attenuated OVA-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes), the increase in the levels of OVA-specific IgE and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5), the production of mucin in the airways, and airway subepithelial fibrosis. Together, the results suggest that the PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 may have therapeutic potential for asthma through suppressing eosinophilic allergic response and ameliorating airway remodeling. PMID:26702150

  13. Comparative cleavage sites within the reactive-site loop of native and oxidized alpha1-proteinase inhibitor by selected bacterial proteinases.

    PubMed

    Rapala-Kozik, M; Potempa, J; Nelson, D; Kozik, A; Travis, J

    1999-10-01

    Human alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-PI) is responsible for the tight control of neutrophil elastase activity which, if down regulated, may cause local excessive tissue degradation. Many bacterial proteinases can inactivate alpha1-PI by hydrolytic cleavage within its reactive site, resulting in the down regulation of elastase, and this mechanism is likely to contribute to the connective tissue damage often associated with bacterial infections. Another pathway of the inactivation of alpha1-PI is reversible and involves oxidation of a critical active-site methionine residue that may influence inhibitor susceptibility to proteolytic inactivation. Hence, the aim of this work was to determine whether this oxidation event might affectthe rate and pattern of the cleavage of the alpha1-PI reactive-site loop by selected bacterial proteinases, including thermolysin, aureolysin, serralysin, pseudolysin, Staphylococcus aureus serine proteinase, streptopain, and periodontain. A shift of cleavage specificity was observed after alpha1-PI oxidation, with a preference for the Glu354-Ala355 bond by most of the proteinases tested. Only aureolysin and serralysin cleave the oxidized form of alpha1-PI faster than the native inhibitor, suggesting that bacteria which secrete these metalloproteinases may specifically take advantage of the host defense oxidative mechanism to accelerate elimination of alpha1-PI and, consequently, tissue degradation by neutrophil elastase. PMID:10595584

  14. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Activator Protein 1 (AP-1)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases. PMID:24831826

  15. Rat intestinal trehalase. Studies of the active site.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Guo, W J; Isselbacher, K J

    1987-11-01

    Rat intestinal trehalase was solubilized, purified and reconstituted into proteoliposomes. With octyl glucoside as the solubilizing detergent, the purified protein appeared as a single band on SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis with an apparent molecular mass of 67 kDa. Kinetic studies indicated that the active site of this enzyme can be functionally divided into two adjacent regions, namely a binding site (with pKa 4.8) and a catalytic site (with pKa 7.2). Other findings suggested that the catalytic site contains a functional thiol group, which is sensitive to inhibition by N-ethylmaleimide, Hg2+ and iodoacetate. Substrate protection and iodoacetate labelling of the thiol group demonstrated that only a protein of 67 kDa was labelled. Furthermore, sucrose and phlorizin protected the thiol group, but Tris-like inhibitors did not. Structure-inhibition analysis of Tris-like inhibitors, the pH effect of Tris inhibition and Tris protection of 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodi-imide inactivation permitted characterization and location of a separate site containing a carboxy group for Tris binding, which may also be the binding region. On the basis of these findings, a possible structure for the active site of trehalase is proposed. PMID:3426558

  16. Metabolism of a highly selective gelatinase inhibitor generates active metabolite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mijoon; Villegas-Estrada, Adriel; Celenza, Giuseppe; Boggess, Bill; Toth, Marta; Kreitinger, Gloria; Forbes, Christopher; Fridman, Rafael; Mobashery, Shahriar; Chang, Mayland

    2007-11-01

    (4-Phenoxyphenylsulfonyl)methylthiirane (inhibitor 1) is a highly selective inhibitor of gelatinases (matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9), which is showing considerable promise in animal models for cancer and stroke. Despite demonstrated potent, selective, and effective inhibition of gelatinases both in vitro and in vivo, the compound is rapidly metabolized, implying that the likely activity in vivo is due to a metabolite rather than the compound itself. To this end, metabolism of inhibitor 1 was investigated in in vitro systems. Four metabolites were identified by LC/MS-MS and the structures of three of them were further validated by comparison with authentic synthetic samples. One metabolite, 4-(4-thiiranylmethanesulfonylphenoxy)phenol (compound 21), was generated by hydroxylation of the terminal phenyl group of 1. This compound was investigated in kinetics of inhibition of several matrix metalloproteinases. This metabolite was a more potent slow-binding inhibitor of gelatinases (matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9) than the parent compound 1, but it also served as a slow-binding inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-14, the upstream activator of matrix metalloproteinase-2. PMID:17927722

  17. Novel Furin Inhibitors with Potent Anti-infectious Activity.

    PubMed

    Hardes, Kornelia; Becker, Gero L; Lu, Yinghui; Dahms, Sven O; Köhler, Susanne; Beyer, Wolfgang; Sandvig, Kirsten; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Lindberg, Iris; Walz, Lisa; von Messling, Veronika; Than, Manuel E; Garten, Wolfgang; Steinmetzer, Torsten

    2015-07-01

    New peptidomimetic furin inhibitors with unnatural amino acid residues in the P3 position were synthesized. The most potent compound 4-guanidinomethyl-phenylacteyl-Arg-Tle-Arg-4-amidinobenzylamide (MI-1148) inhibits furin with a Ki value of 5.5 pM. The derivatives also strongly inhibit PC1/3, whereas PC2 is less affected. Selected inhibitors were tested in cell culture for antibacterial and antiviral activity against infectious agents known to be dependent on furin activity. A significant protective effect against anthrax and diphtheria toxin was observed in the presence of the furin inhibitors. Furthermore, the spread of the highly pathogenic H5N1 and H7N1 avian influenza viruses and propagation of canine distemper virus was strongly inhibited. Inhibitor MI-1148 was crystallized in complex with human furin. Its N-terminal guanidinomethyl group in the para position of the P5 phenyl ring occupies the same position as that found previously for a structurally related inhibitor containing this substitution in the meta position, thereby maintaining all of the important P5 interactions. Our results confirm that the inhibition of furin is a promising strategy for a short-term treatment of acute infectious diseases. PMID:25974265

  18. Novel gamma-secretase inhibitors uncover a common nucleotide-binding site in JAK3, SIRT2, and PS1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang; Schweizer, Claude; Rudinskiy, Nikita; Taylor, David M; Kazantsev, Aleksey; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Fraering, Patrick C

    2010-07-01

    Gamma-secretase is an intramembrane-cleaving protease responsible for the final proteolytic event in the production of the amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta) implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Inhibition of gamma-secretase activity is thus an attractive therapeutic strategy to slow down the pathogenesis of AD. Drugs often target more than one biomolecule because of conserved 3-dimensional structures in prospective protein binding sites. We have capitalized on this phenomenon of nature to identify new gamma-secretase inhibitors. Here we show that 2-hydroxy naphthyl derivatives, a previously identified subclass of NAD(+) analog inhibitors of sirtuin 2 (SIRT2), are direct gamma-secretase inhibitors. Subsequent structure-activity relationship studies further showed that 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde is the minimal pharmacophore for gamma-secretase inhibition. In evaluating target protein determinants of inhibition, we identified a common GXG signature nucleotide-binding site (NBS) shared by the gamma-secretase subunit presenilin-1 C-terminal fragment (PS1-CTF), SIRT2, and Janus kinase 3 (JAK3). Because a detailed 3-dimensional structure of gamma-secretase is beyond our knowledge, we took advantage of the known crystal structure of human JAK3 to model the NBS of the PS1-CTF, which includes the catalytic residue D385. Our results suggest that the flexible PS1-CTF (381)LGLG(384) loop comprises a substrate-docking site capable of recognizing specifically different gamma-secretase substrates. PMID:20237298

  19. Discovery of an Allosteric Inhibitor Binding Site in 3-Oxo-acyl-ACP Reductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    3-Oxo-acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (FabG) plays a key role in the bacterial fatty acid synthesis II system in pathogenic microorganisms, which has been recognized as a potential drug target. FabG catalyzes reduction of a 3-oxo-acyl-ACP intermediate during the elongation cycle of fatty acid biosynthesis. Here, we report gene deletion experiments that support the essentiality of this gene in P. aeruginosa and the identification of a number of small molecule FabG inhibitors with IC50 values in the nanomolar to low micromolar range and good physicochemical properties. Structural characterization of 16 FabG-inhibitor complexes by X-ray crystallography revealed that the compounds bind at a novel allosteric site located at the FabG subunit–subunit interface. Inhibitor binding relies primarily on hydrophobic interactions, but specific hydrogen bonds are also observed. Importantly, the binding cavity is formed upon complex formation and therefore would not be recognized by virtual screening approaches. The structure analysis further reveals that the inhibitors act by inducing conformational changes that propagate to the active site, resulting in a displacement of the catalytic triad and the inability to bind NADPH. PMID:24015914

  20. An active-site peptide from pepsin C

    PubMed Central

    Kay, J.; Ryle, A. P.

    1971-01-01

    Porcine pepsin C is inactivated rapidly and irreversibly by diazoacetyl-dl-norleucine methyl ester in the presence of cupric ions at pH values above 4.5. The inactivation is specific in that complete inactivation accompanies the incorporation of 1mol of inhibitor residue/mol of enzyme and evidence has been obtained to suggest that the reaction occurs with an active site residue. The site of reaction is the β-carboxyl group of an aspartic acid residue in the sequence Ile-Val-Asp-Thr. This sequence is identical with the active-site sequence in pepsin and the significance of this in terms of the different activities of the two enzymes is discussed. PMID:4942834

  1. Ensemble-Based Virtual Screening and Experimental Validation of Inhibitors Targeting a Novel Site of Human DNMT1.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Manali; Rajpathak, Shriram N; Narwade, Santosh C; Deobagkar, Deepti

    2016-07-01

    Human DNA methyltransferase1 (hDNMT1) is responsible for preserving DNA methylation patterns that play important regulatory roles in differentiation and development. Misregulation of DNA methylation has thus been linked to many syndromes, life style diseases, and cancers. Developing specific inhibitors of hDNMT1 is an important challenge in the area since the currently targeted cofactor and substrate binding site share structural features with various proteins. In this work, we generated a structural model of the active form of hDNMT1 and identified that the 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) binding site of the hDNMT1 is structurally unique to the protein. This site has been previously demonstrated to be critical for methylation activity. We further performed multiple nanosecond time scale atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the structural model followed by virtual screening of the Asinex database to identify inhibitors targeting the 5-mC site. Two compounds were discovered that inhibited hDNMT1 in vitro, one of which also showed inhibition in vivo corroborating the screening procedure. This study thus identifies and attempts to validate for the first time a unique site of hDNMT1 that could be harnessed for rationally designing highly selective and potent hypomethylating agents. PMID:26850820

  2. Novel Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Inhibitors Prevent Diabetic Kidney Injury in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Hee; Lee, Jung Hwa; Lee, Hi Bahl; Miyata, Toshio; Ha, Hunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide, but no effective therapeutic strategy is available. Because plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is increasingly recognized as a key factor in extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in diabetic nephropathy, this study examined the renoprotective effects of TM5275 and TM5441, two novel orally active PAI-1 inhibitors that do not trigger bleeding episodes, in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. TM5275 (50 mg/kg) and TM5441 (10 mg/kg) were administered orally for 16 weeks to STZ-induced diabetic and age-matched control mice. Relative to the control mice, the diabetic mice showed significantly increased (p < 0.05) plasma glucose and creatinine levels, urinary albumin excretion, kidney-to-bodyweight ratios, glomerular volume, and fractional mesangial area. Markers of fibrosis and inflammation along with PAI-1 were also upregulated in the kidney of diabetic mice, and treatment with TM5275 and TM5441 effectively inhibited albuminuria, mesangial expansion, ECM accumulation, and macrophage infiltration in diabetic kidneys. Furthermore, in mouse proximal tubular epithelial (mProx24) cells, both TM5275 and TM5441 effectively inhibited PAI-1-induced mRNA expression of fibrosis and inflammation markers and also reversed PAI-1-induced inhibition of plasmin activity, which confirmed the efficacy of the TM compounds as PAI-1 inhibitors. These data suggest that TM compounds could be used to prevent diabetic kidney injury. PMID:27258009

  3. CpG mutations in the reactive site of human C1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Skriver, K; Radziejewska, E; Silbermann, J A; Donaldson, V H; Bock, S C

    1989-02-25

    C1 inhibitor plays an important role in the regulation of vascular permeability through its ability to inactivate enzymes which release polypeptide kinins. Dysfunctional C1 inhibitor molecules are present in the plasma of affected members of the Da and Ri hereditary angioneurotic edema kindreds. We constructed genomic libraries from Da and Ri patient DNAs which had been cleaved with BclI to generate a fragment containing 21 kilobases of the C1 inhibitor locus. C1 inhibitor gene-containing recombinants originating from mutant Da and Ri alleles were differentiated from those derived from normal alleles by linkage analysis using the intragenic HgiAI restriction fragment length polymorphism. Nucleotide sequencing of the complete protein-coding regions of the mutant alleles identified two different mutations in a CpG dinucleotide corresponding to the first two bases of arginine codon 444. These single base mutations changed the identity of the functionally critical P1 reactive site residue from arginine to cysteine (Da) or histidine (Ri). The additional cysteine residue in C1 inhibitor Da suggests how it is covalently bound to albumin in plasma. The presence of CpG dinucleotides in the codons specifying the P1 arginines of C1 inhibitor and antithrombin III explains the high incidence of histidine and cysteine substitutions observed among dysfunctional mutants of these serine protease inhibitors. PMID:2563376

  4. Incorporation of Non-natural Amino Acids Improves Cell Permeability and Potency of Specific Inhibitors of Proteasome Trypsin-like Sites

    PubMed Central

    Geurink, Paul P.; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Mirabella, Anne C.; Gallastegui, Nerea; de Bruin, Gerjan; Blom, Annet E. M.; Voges, Mathias J.; Mock, Elliot D.; Florea, Bogdan I.; van der Marel, Gijs A.; Driessen, Christoph; van der Stelt, Mario; Groll, Michael; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Kisselev, Alexei F.

    2013-01-01

    Proteasomes degrade the majority of proteins in mammalian cells by a concerted action of three distinct pairs of active sites. The chymotrypsin-like sites are targets of antimyeloma agents bortezomib and carfilzomib. Inhibitors of the trypsin-like site sensitize multiple myeloma cells to these agents. Here we describe systematic effort to develop inhibitors with improved potency and cell permeability, yielding azido-Phe-Leu-Leu-4-aminomethyl-Phe-methyl vinyl sulfone (4a, LU-102), and a fluorescent activity-based probe for this site. X-ray structures of 4a and related inhibitors complexed with yeast proteasomes revealed the structural basis for specificity. Nontoxic to myeloma cells when used as a single agent, 4a sensitized them to bortezomib and carfilzomib. This sensitizing effect was much stronger than the synergistic effects of histone acetylase inhibitors or additive effects of doxorubicin and dexamethasone, raising the possibility that combinations of inhibitors of the trypsin-like site with bortezomib or carfilzomib would have stronger antineoplastic activity than combinations currently used clinically. PMID:23320547

  5. A Metal-Based Inhibitor of NEDD8-Activating Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Leung, Chung-Hang; Wang, Hui-Min; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2012-01-01

    A cyclometallated rhodium(III) complex [Rh(ppy)2(dppz)]+ (1) (where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine and dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c]phenazine dipyridophenazine) has been prepared and identified as an inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE). The complex inhibited NAE activity in cell-free and cell-based assays, and suppressed the CRL-regulated substrate degradation and NF-κB activation in human cancer cells with potency comparable to known NAE inhibitor MLN4924. Molecular modeling analysis suggested that the overall binding mode of 1 within the binding pocket of the APPBP1/UBA3 heterodimer resembled that for MLN4924. Complex 1 is the first metal complex reported to suppress the NEDDylation pathway via inhibition of the NEDD8-activating enzyme. PMID:23185368

  6. Unraveling the Pivotal Role of Bradykinin in ACE Inhibitor Activity.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Stefano; Bortolotto, L

    2016-10-01

    Historically, the first described effect of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor was an increased activity of bradykinin, one of the substrates of ACE. However, in the subsequent years, molecular models describing the mechanism of action of ACE inhibitors in decreasing blood pressure and cardiovascular risk have focused mostly on the renin-angiotensin system. Nonetheless, over the last 20 years, the importance of bradykinin in regulating vasodilation, natriuresis, oxidative stress, fibrinolysis, inflammation, and apoptosis has become clearer. The affinity of ACE appears to be higher for bradykinin than for angiotensin I, thereby suggesting that ACE inhibitors may be more effective inhibitors of bradykinin degradation than of angiotensin II production. Data describing the effect of ACE inhibition on bradykinin signaling support the hypothesis that the most cardioprotective benefits attributed to ACE inhibition may be due to increased bradykinin signaling rather than to decreased angiotensin II signaling, especially when high dosages of ACE inhibitors are considered. In particular, modulation of bradykinin in the endothelium appears to be a major target of ACE inhibition. These new mechanistic concepts may lead to further development of strategies enhancing the bradykinin signaling. PMID:27260014

  7. Design, Synthesis and Inhibitory Activity of Photoswitchable RET Kinase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Rubén; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Solano, Carlos; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-05-01

    REarranged during Transfection (RET) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase required for normal development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Deregulation of RET and hyperactivity of the RET kinase is intimately connected to several types of human cancers, most notably thyroid cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target for small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Novel approaches, allowing external control of the activity of RET, would be key additions to the signal transduction toolbox. In this work, photoswitchable RET kinase inhibitors based on azo-functionalized pyrazolopyrimidines were developed, enabling photonic control of RET activity. The most promising compound displays excellent switching properties and stability with good inhibitory effect towards RET in cell-free as well as live-cell assays and a significant difference in inhibitory activity between its two photoisomeric forms. As the first reported photoswitchable small-molecule kinase inhibitor, we consider the herein presented effector to be a significant step forward in the development of tools for kinase signal transduction studies with spatiotemporal control over inhibitor concentration in situ.

  8. Design, Synthesis and Inhibitory Activity of Photoswitchable RET Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rubén; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Solano, Carlos; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    REarranged during Transfection (RET) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase required for normal development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Deregulation of RET and hyperactivity of the RET kinase is intimately connected to several types of human cancers, most notably thyroid cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target for small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Novel approaches, allowing external control of the activity of RET, would be key additions to the signal transduction toolbox. In this work, photoswitchable RET kinase inhibitors based on azo-functionalized pyrazolopyrimidines were developed, enabling photonic control of RET activity. The most promising compound displays excellent switching properties and stability with good inhibitory effect towards RET in cell-free as well as live-cell assays and a significant difference in inhibitory activity between its two photoisomeric forms. As the first reported photoswitchable small-molecule kinase inhibitor, we consider the herein presented effector to be a significant step forward in the development of tools for kinase signal transduction studies with spatiotemporal control over inhibitor concentration in situ. PMID:25944708

  9. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Structure with RNase H Inhibitor dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl Hydrazone Bound at a Novel Site

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel,D.; Sarafianos, S.; Dharmasena, S.; Hossain, M.; McCoy-Simandle, K.; Ilina, T.; Clark, A.; Knight, J.; Julias, J.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    The rapid emergence of drug-resistant variants of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1), has limited the efficacy of anti-acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) treatments, and new lead compounds that target novel binding sites are needed. We have determined the 3.15 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) complexed with dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl hydrazone (DHBNH), an HIV-1 RT RNase H (RNH) inhibitor (RNHI). DHBNH is effective against a variety of drug-resistant HIV-1 RT mutants. While DHBNH has little effect on most aspects of RT-catalyzed DNA synthesis, at relatively high concentrations it does inhibit the initiation of RNA-primed DNA synthesis. Although primarily an RNHI, DHBNH binds >50 {angstrom} away from the RNH active site, at a novel site near both the polymerase active site and the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) binding pocket. When DHBNH binds, both Tyr181 and Tyr188 remain in the conformations seen in unliganded HIV-1 RT. DHBNH interacts with conserved residues (Asp186, Trp229) and has substantial interactions with the backbones of several less well-conserved residues. On the basis of this structure, we designed substituted DHBNH derivatives that interact with the NNRTI-binding pocket. These compounds inhibit both the polymerase and RNH activities of RT.

  10. Investigating the Conformational Structure and Potential Site Interactions of SOD Inhibitors on Ec-SOD in Marine Mud Crab Scylla serrata: A Molecular Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Sablok, Gaurav; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Chainy, G B N

    2016-09-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) act as a first line of the enzymatic antioxidant defense system to control cellular superoxide anion toxicity. Previously, several inhibitors have been widely identified and catalogued for inhibition of SOD activity; however, still the information about the mechanism of interaction and points toward the inhibitor interactions in structures of SODs in general and in extracellular (Ec)-SOD in particular is still in naive. In the present research, we present an insight to elucidate the molecular basis of interactions of SOD inhibitors with Ec-SOD in mud crab Scylla serrata using molecular modeling and docking approaches. Different inhibitors of SOD such as hydrogen peroxide [Formula: see text], potassium cyanide, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), [Formula: see text]-mercaptoethanol and dithiocarbamate were screened to understand the potential sites that may act as sites for cleavage or blocking in the protein. SOD-SDS and [Formula: see text] complex interactions indicate residues Pro72 and Asp102 of the predicted crab Ec-SOD as common targets. The GOLD result indicates that Pro72, Asp102 and Thr103 are commonly acting as the site of interaction in Ec-SOD of S. serrata with SOD inhibitors. For the first time, the results of this study provide an insight into the structural properties of Ec-SOD of S. serrata and define the possible involvements between the amino acids present in its active sites, i.e., in the regions from 70 to 84 and from 101 to 103 and different inhibitors. PMID:26286009

  11. Lessons from a BACE1 inhibitor trial: off-site but not off base.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Debomoy K; Maloney, Bryan; Long, Justin M; Greig, Nigel H

    2014-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by formation of neuritic plaque primarily composed of a small filamentous protein called amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). The rate-limiting step in the production of Aβ is the processing of Aβ precursor protein (APP) by β-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1). Hence, BACE1 activity plausibly plays a rate-limiting role in the generation of potentially toxic Aβ within brain and the development of AD, thereby making it an interesting drug target. A phase II trial of the promising LY2886721 inhibitor of BACE1 was suspended in June 2013 by Eli Lilly and Co., due to possible liver toxicity. This outcome was apparently a surprise to the study's team, particularly since BACE1 knockout mice and mice treated with the drug did not show such liver toxicity. Lilly proposed that the problem was not due to LY2886721 anti-BACE1 activity. We offer an alternative hypothesis, whereby anti-BACE1 activity may induce apparent hepatotoxicity through inhibiting BACE1's processing of β-galactoside α-2,6-sialyltransferase I (STGal6 I). In knockout mice, paralogues, such as BACE2 or cathepsin D, could partially compensate. Furthermore, the short duration of animal studies and short lifespan of study animals could mask effects that would require several decades to accumulate in humans. Inhibition of hepatic BACE1 activity in middle-aged humans would produce effects not detectable in mice. We present a testable model to explain the off-target effects of LY2886721 and highlight more broadly that so-called off-target drug effects might actually represent off-site effects that are not necessarily off-target. Consideration of this concept in forthcoming drug design, screening, and testing programs may prevent such failures in the future. PMID:24530026

  12. Diversity-Oriented Synthesis Probe Targets Plasmodium falciparum Cytochrome b Ubiquinone Reduction Site and Synergizes With Oxidation Site Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lukens, Amanda K.; Heidebrecht, Richard W.; Mulrooney, Carol; Beaudoin, Jennifer A.; Comer, Eamon; Duvall, Jeremy R.; Fitzgerald, Mark E.; Masi, Daniela; Galinsky, Kevin; Scherer, Christina A.; Palmer, Michelle; Munoz, Benito; Foley, Michael; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Wiegand, Roger C.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The emergence and spread of drug resistance to current antimalarial therapies remains a pressing concern, escalating the need for compounds that demonstrate novel modes of action. Diversity-Oriented Synthesis (DOS) libraries bridge the gap between conventional small molecule and natural product libraries, allowing the interrogation of more diverse chemical space in efforts to identify probes of novel parasite pathways. Methods. We screened and optimized a probe from a DOS library using whole-cell phenotypic assays. Resistance selection and whole-genome sequencing approaches were employed to identify the cellular target of the compounds. Results. We identified a novel macrocyclic inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum with nanomolar potency and identified the reduction site of cytochrome b as its cellular target. Combination experiments with reduction and oxidation site inhibitors showed synergistic inhibition of the parasite. Conclusions. The cytochrome b oxidation center is a validated antimalarial target. We show that the reduction site of cytochrome b is also a druggable target. Our results demonstrating a synergistic relationship between oxidation and reduction site inhibitors suggests a future strategy for new combination therapies in the treatment of malaria. PMID:25336726

  13. Discovery of Pyrrolopyridine−Pyridone Based Inhibitors of Met Kinase: Synthesis, X-ray Crystallographic Analysis, and Biological Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyoung Soon; Zhang, Liping; Schmidt, Robert; Cai, Zhen-Wei; Wei, Donna; Williams, David K.; Lombardo, Louis J.; Trainor, George L.; Xie, Dianlin; Zhang, Yaquan; An, Yongmi; Sack, John S.; Tokarski, John S.; Darienzo, Celia; Kamath, Amrita; Marathe, Punit; Zhang, Yueping; Lippy, Jonathan; Jeyaseelan, Sr., Robert; Wautlet, Barri; Henley, Benjamin; Gullo-Brown, Johnni; Manne, Veeraswamy; Hunt, John T.; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M.

    2008-10-02

    Conformationally constrained 2-pyridone analogue 2 is a potent Met kinase inhibitor with an IC50 value of 1.8 nM. Further SAR of the 2-pyridone based inhibitors of Met kinase led to potent 4-pyridone and pyridine N-oxide inhibitors such as 3 and 4. The X-ray crystallographic data of the inhibitor 2 bound to the ATP binding site of Met kinase protein provided insight into the binding modes of these inhibitors, and the SAR of this series of analogues was rationalized. Many of these analogues showed potent antiproliferative activities against the Met dependent GTL-16 gastric carcinoma cell line. Compound 2 also inhibited Flt-3 and VEGFR-2 kinases with IC{sub 50} values of 4 and 27 nM, respectively. It possesses a favorable pharmacokinetic profile in mice and demonstrates significant in vivo antitumor activity in the GTL-16 human gastric carcinoma xenograft model.

  14. Synovial sarcoma cell lines showed reduced DNA repair activity and sensitivity to a PARP inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Mamiko; Yamamoto, Yuki; Kondo, Tadashi; Watanabe, Toshiki; Ohta, Tsutomu

    2016-08-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a soft-tissue sarcoma and a rare type of cancer. Unfortunately, effective chemotherapies for synovial sarcomas have not been established. In this report, we show that synovial sarcoma cell lines have reduced repair activity for DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and a topoisomerase II inhibitor (etoposide). We also observed reduced recruitment of RAD51 homologue (S. cerevisiae; RAD51) at sites of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in synovial sarcoma cell lines that had been exposed to IR. These findings showed that synovial sarcoma cell lines are defective in homologous recombination (HR) repair. Furthermore, we found that a poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor (AZD2281; olaparib) effectively reduced the growth of synovial sarcoma cell lines in the presence of an alkylating agent (temozolomide). Our findings offer evidence that treatment combining a PARP inhibitor and an alkylating agent could have therapeutic benefits in the treatment of synovial sarcoma. PMID:27353471

  15. Parathyroid hormone is not an inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase activity.

    PubMed

    Arnadottir, M; Nilsson-Ehle, P

    1994-01-01

    The reduced lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activities in uraemia are reflected by increased serum triglyceride concentrations and reduced HDL cholesterol concentrations. Both hyperparathyroidism and circulating inhibitor(s) of LPL have been associated with the disturbances of lipid metabolism in uraemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if parathyroid hormone (PTH) had an inhibitory effect on LPL activity. Plasma post-heparin LPL activities, plasma LPL inhibitory activities, serum PTHintact and serum PTHC-terminal concentrations were analysed in 20 patients on haemodialysis and 20 healthy controls. The effects of purified, human PTHintact and a carboxyterminal fragment of PTH (PTH39-84) on LPL activities in post-heparin plasma from healthy individuals and on the enzyme activity of purified, bovine milk LPL, activated with apolipoprotein CII, were studied. Patients had significantly higher plasma LPL inhibitory activities than controls, but there was no correlation between plasma LPL inhibitory activities and serum PTH concentrations. Neither PTHintact nor PTH39-84 had a significant effect on LPL activities in vitro. Thus there was no evidence of a direct inhibition of LPL activity by PTH under the present in-vivo or in-vitro conditions. PMID:7870347

  16. Activator-inhibitor systems on heterogeneous ecological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaides, C.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2012-12-01

    The consideration of activator-inhibitor systems as complex networks has broadened our knowledge of non-equilibrium reaction-diffusion processes in heterogeneous systems. For example, the Turing mechanism represents a classical model for the formation of self-organized spatial structures in non-equilibrium activator-inhibitor systems. The study of Turing patterns in networks with heterogeneous connectivity has revealed that, contrary to other models and systems, the segregation process takes place mainly in vertices of low degree. In this paper, we study the formation of vegetation patterns in semiarid ecosystems from the perspective of a heterogeneous interacting ecological network. The structure of ecological networks yields fundamental insight into the ecosystem self-organization. Using simple rules for the short-range activation and global inhibition, we reconstruct the observed power-law distribution of vegetation patch size that has been observed in semiarid ecosystems like the Kalahari transect.

  17. Structure based activity prediction of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Marc R; Koymans, Lucien M H; Vinkers, H Maarten; Daeyaert, Frits F D; Heeres, Jan; Lewi, Paul J; Janssen, Paul A J

    2005-03-24

    We have developed a fast and robust computational method for prediction of antiviral activity in automated de novo design of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. This is a structure-based approach that uses a linear relation between activity and interaction energy with discrete orientation sampling and with localized interaction energy terms. The localization allows for the analysis of mutations of the protein target and for the separation of inhibition and a specific binding to the enzyme. We apply the method to the prediction of pIC(50) of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The model predicts the activity of an arbitrary compound with a q(2) of 0.681 and an average absolute error of 0.66 log value, and it is fast enough to be used in high-throughput computational applications. PMID:15771460

  18. Antimalarial activity of HIV-1 protease inhibitor in chromone series.

    PubMed

    Lerdsirisuk, Pradith; Maicheen, Chirattikan; Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn

    2014-12-01

    Increasing parasite resistance to nearly all available antimalarial drugs becomes a serious problem to human health and necessitates the need to continue the search for new effective drugs. Recent studies have shown that clinically utilized HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) inhibitors can inhibit the in vitro and in vivo growth of Plasmodium falciparum. In this study, a series of chromone derivatives possessing HIV-1 PR inhibitory activity has been tested for antimalarial activity against P. falciparum (K1 multi-drug resistant strain). Chromone 15, the potent HIV-1 PR inhibitor (IC50=0.65μM), was found to be the most potent antimalarial compound with IC50=0.95μM while primaquine and tafenoquine showed IC50=2.41 and 1.95μM, respectively. Molecular docking study of chromone compounds against plasmepsin II, an aspartic protease enzyme important in hemoglobin degradation, revealed that chromone 15 exhibited the higher binding affinity (binding energy=-13.24kcal/mol) than the known PM II inhibitors. Thus, HIV-1 PR inhibitor in chromone series has the potential to be a new class of antimalarial agent. PMID:25462990

  19. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. - Highlights: • COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, could enhance radiosensitization. • Radiation induced PTEN inactivation (phosphorylation) and AKT activation. • COX-2 inhibitor induced PTEN expression and activation, and inactivated AKT. • COX-2 inhibitor enhanced radiosensitization through activating PTEN.

  20. Characterization of novel MPS1 inhibitors with preclinical anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Jemaà, M; Galluzzi, L; Kepp, O; Senovilla, L; Brands, M; Boemer, U; Koppitz, M; Lienau, P; Prechtl, S; Schulze, V; Siemeister, G; Wengner, A M; Mumberg, D; Ziegelbauer, K; Abrieu, A; Castedo, M; Vitale, I; Kroemer, G

    2013-11-01

    Monopolar spindle 1 (MPS1), a mitotic kinase that is overexpressed in several human cancers, contributes to the alignment of chromosomes to the metaphase plate as well as to the execution of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of three novel inhibitors of MPS1 of two independent structural classes, N-(4-{2-[(2-cyanophenyl)amino][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyridin-6-yl}phenyl)-2-phenylacetamide (Mps-BAY1) (a triazolopyridine), N-cyclopropyl-4-{8-[(2-methylpropyl)amino]-6-(quinolin-5-yl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazin-3-yl}benzamide (Mps-BAY2a) and N-cyclopropyl-4-{8-(isobutylamino)imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazin-3-yl}benzamide (Mps-BAY2b) (two imidazopyrazines). By selectively inactivating MPS1, these small inhibitors can arrest the proliferation of cancer cells, causing their polyploidization and/or their demise. Cancer cells treated with Mps-BAY1 or Mps-BAY2a manifested multiple signs of mitotic perturbation including inefficient chromosomal congression during metaphase, unscheduled SAC inactivation and severe anaphase defects. Videomicroscopic cell fate profiling of histone 2B-green fluorescent protein-expressing cells revealed the capacity of MPS1 inhibitors to subvert the correct timing of mitosis as they induce a premature anaphase entry in the context of misaligned metaphase plates. Hence, in the presence of MPS1 inhibitors, cells either divided in a bipolar (but often asymmetric) manner or entered one or more rounds of abortive mitoses, generating gross aneuploidy and polyploidy, respectively. In both cases, cells ultimately succumbed to the mitotic catastrophe-induced activation of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Of note, low doses of MPS1 inhibitors and paclitaxel (a microtubular poison) synergized at increasing the frequency of chromosome misalignments and missegregations in the context of SAC inactivation. This resulted in massive polyploidization followed by the activation of mitotic catastrophe. A

  1. Issues in interpreting the in vivo activity of Aurora-A inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shagisultanova, Elena; Dunbrack, Roland L.; Golemis, Erica A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Based on its role as a mitotic regulatory kinase, overexpressed and associated with aneuploidy in cancer, small molecule inhibitors have been developed for Aurora-A (AURKA) kinase. In preclinical and clinical assessments, these agents have shown efficacy in inducing stable disease or therapeutic response. In optimizing the use of Aurora-A inhibitors, it is critical to have robust capacity to measure the kinase activity of Aurora-A in tumors. Areas covered we provide an overview of molecular mechanisms of mitotic and non-mitotic activation of Aurora-A kinase, and interaction of Aurora-A with its regulatory partners. Typically, Aurora-A activity is measured by use of phospho-antibodies targeting an auto-phosphorylated T288 epitope. However, recent studies have identified alternative means of Aurora-A activation control, including allosteric regulation by partners, phosphorylation on alternative activating residues (S51, S98), dephosphorylation on inhibitory sites (S342), and T288 phosphorylation by alternative kinases such as Pak enzymes. Additional work has shown that the relative abundance of Aurora-A partners can affect the activity of Aurora-A inhibitors, and that Aurora-A activation also occurs in interphase cells. Expert opinion Taken together, this work suggests the need for comprehensive analysis of Aurora-A activity and expression of Aurora-A partners in order to stratify patients for likely therapeutic response. PMID:25384454

  2. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1990-10-01

    DOE Order 5820.2A requires that low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites active on or after September 1988 and all transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites be monitored periodically to assure that radioactive contamination does not escape from the waste sites and pose a threat to the public or to the environment. This plan describes such a monitoring program for the active LLW disposal sites in SWSA 6 and the TRU waste storage sites in SWSA 5 North. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Evidence for segmental mobility in the active site of pepsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, J.; Strop, P.; Senn, H.; Foundling, S.; Kostka, V.

    1986-05-01

    The low hydrolytic activity (k/sub cat/ < 0.001 s/sup -1/) of chicken pepsin (CP) towards tri- and tetrapeptides is enhanced at least 100 times by modification of its single sulfhydryl group of Cys-115, with little effect on K/sub m/-values. Modification thus simulates the effect of secondary substrate binding on pepsin catalysis. The rate of Cys-115 modification is substantially decreased in the presence of some competitive inhibitors, suggesting its active site location. Experiments with CP alkylated at Cys-115 with Acrylodan as a fluorescent probe or with N-iodoacetyl-(4-fluoro)-aniline as a /sup 19/F-nmr probe suggest conformation change around Cys-115 to occur on substrate or substrate analog binding. The difference /sup 1/H-nmr spectra (500 MHz) of unmodified free and inhibitor-complexed CP reveal chemical shifts almost exclusively in the aromatic region. The effects of Cu/sup + +/ on /sup 19/F- and /sup 1/H-nmr spectra have been studied. Examination of a computer graphics model of CP based on E. parasitica pepsin-inhibitor complex X-ray coordinates suggests that Cys-115 is located near the S/sub 3//S/sub 5/ binding site. The results are interpreted in favor of segmental mobility of this region important for pepsin substrate binding and catalysis.

  4. NEW RENIN-INHIBITORS--STABILITY AND ACTIVITY DETERMINATION. PART III.

    PubMed

    Marszałek, Dorota; Goldnik, Anna; Winiecka, Iwona; Jaworski, Paweł; Mazurek, Aleksander P

    2016-01-01

    A series of new four potential renin inhibitors containing pseudodipeptides were synthesized. Stability for all compounds (1-4) in homogenates of liver, kidney, lung and in serum, gastric, intestinal juice and in the presence of α-chymotrypsin was determined. Compound 1 was unstable, compounds 2, 3 were stable, compound 4 was partly unstable, (liver and kidney homogenates, (α-chymotrypsin solution). Inhibitory activity of the compounds was measured in vitro by HPLC determination of lowering concentration of substrate (angiotensinogen) in the presence of renin and the potential renin inhibitor (compounds 1-4). Compound 1, 2, 3 and 4 showed inhibitory activity (1.7 x 10(-6), 9.6 x 10(-7), 1.05 x 10(-9) and 1.31 x 10(-7)M, respectively). PMID:27180425

  5. Insecticidal heterolignans--tubuline polymerization inhibitors with activity against chewing pests.

    PubMed

    Frackenpohl, Jens; Adelt, Isabelle; Antonicek, Horst; Arnold, Christian; Behrmann, Patricia; Blaha, Nicole; Böhmer, Jutta; Gutbrod, Oliver; Hanke, Roman; Hohmann, Sabine; van Houtdreve, Marc; Lösel, Peter; Malsam, Olga; Melchers, Martin; Neufert, Valentina; Peschel, Elisabeth; Reckmann, Udo; Schenke, Thomas; Thiesen, Hans-Peter; Velten, Robert; Vogelsang, Kathrin; Weiss, Hans-Christoph

    2009-06-15

    Starting from natural product podophyllotoxin 1 substituted heterolignans were identified with promising insecticidal in vivo activity. The impact of substitution in each segment of the core structure was investigated in a detailed SAR study, and variation of substituents in both aromatic moieties afforded derivatives 5 and 43 with broad insecticidal activity against lepidopteran and coleopteran species. In vitro measurements supported by modeling studies indicate that heterolignans 3-134 act as tubuline polymerization inhibitors interacting with the colchicine-binding site. Insect specific structure-activity effects were observed showing that the insecticidal SAR described herein differs from reported cytotoxicity studies. PMID:19223182

  6. Different modes of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (CD26) inhibition by oligopeptides derived from the N-terminus of HIV-1 Tat indicate at least two inhibitor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lorey, Susan; Stöckel-Maschek, Angela; Faust, Jürgen; Brandt, Wolfgang; Stiebitz, Beate; Gorrell, Mark D; Kähne, Thilo; Mrestani-Klaus, Carmen; Wrenger, Sabine; Reinhold, Dirk; Ansorge, Siegfried; Neubert, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DP IV, CD26) plays an essential role in the activation and proliferation of lymphocytes, which is shown by the immunosuppressive effects of synthetic DP IV inhibitors. Similarly, both human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) Tat protein and the N-terminal peptide Tat(1-9) inhibit DP IV activity and T cell proliferation. Therefore, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of HIV-1 Tat is important for the inhibition of DP IV. Recently, we characterized the thromboxane A2 receptor peptide TXA2-R(1-9), bearing the N-terminal MWP sequence motif, as a potent DP IV inhibitor possibly playing a functional role during antigen presentation by inhibiting T cell-expressed DP IV [Wrenger, S., Faust, J., Mrestani-Klaus, C., Fengler, A., Stöckel-Maschek, A., Lorey, S., Kähne, T., Brandt, W., Neubert, K., Ansorge, S. & Reinhold, D. (2000) J. Biol. Chem.275, 22180-22186]. Here, we demonstrate that amino acid substitutions at different positions of Tat(1-9) can result in a change of the inhibition type. Certain Tat(1-9)-related peptides are found to be competitive, and others linear mixed-type or parabolic mixed-type inhibitors indicating different inhibitor binding sites on DP IV, at the active site and out of the active site. The parabolic mixed-type mechanism, attributed to both non-mutually exclusive inhibitor binding sites of the enzyme, is described in detail. From the kinetic investigations and molecular modeling experiments, possible interactions of the oligopeptides with specified amino acids of DP IV are suggested. These findings give new insights for the development of more potent and specific peptide-based DP IV inhibitors. Such inhibitors could be useful for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:12752434

  7. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  8. Novel benzimidazole inhibitors bind to a unique site in the kinesin spindle protein motor domain.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Payal R; Shipps, Gerald W; Seghezzi, Wolfgang; Smith, Catherine K; Chuang, Cheng-Chi; Sanden, David; Basso, Andrea D; Vilenchik, Lev; Gray, Kimberly; Annis, D Allen; Nickbarg, Elliott; Ma, Yao; Lahue, Brian; Herbst, Ronald; Le, Hung V

    2010-09-28

    Affinity selection-mass spectrometry (AS-MS) screening of kinesin spindle protein (KSP) followed by enzyme inhibition studies and temperature-dependent circular dichroism (TdCD) characterization was utilized to identify a series of benzimidazole compounds. This series also binds in the presence of Ispinesib, a known anticancer KSP inhibitor in phase I/II clinical trials for breast cancer. TdCD and AS-MS analyses support simultaneous binding implying existence of a novel non-Ispinesib binding pocket within KSP. Additional TdCD analyses demonstrate direct binding of these compounds to Ispinesib-resistant mutants (D130V, A133D, and A133D + D130V double mutant), further strengthening the hypothesis that the compounds bind to a distinct binding pocket. Also importantly, binding to this pocket causes uncompetitive inhibition of KSP ATPase activity. The uncompetitive inhibition with respect to ATP is also confirmed by the requirement of nucleotide for binding of the compounds. After preliminary affinity optimization, the benzimidazole series exhibited distinctive antimitotic activity as evidenced by blockade of bipolar spindle formation and appearance of monoasters. Cancer cell growth inhibition was also demonstrated either as a single agent or in combination with Ispinesib. The combination was additive as predicted by the binding studies using TdCD and AS-MS analyses. The available data support the existence of a KSP inhibitory site hitherto unknown in the literature. The data also suggest that targeting this novel site could be a productive strategy for eluding Ispinesib-resistant tumors. Finally, AS-MS and TdCD techniques are general in scope and may enable screening other targets in the presence of known drugs, clinical candidates, or tool compounds that bind to the protein of interest in an effort to identify potency-enhancing small molecules that increase efficacy and impede resistance in combination therapy. PMID:20718440

  9. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of SETD8 with Cellular Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SETD8/SET8/Pr-SET7/KMT5A is the sole protein lysine methyltransferase (PKMT) known to monomethylate lysine 20 of histone H4 in vivo. SETD8’s methyltransferase activity has been implicated in many essential cellular processes including DNA replication, DNA damage response, transcription modulation, and cell cycle regulation. Developing SETD8 inhibitors with cellular activity is a key step toward elucidating the diverse roles of SETD8 via convenient pharmacological perturbation. From the hits of a prior high throughput screen (HTS), SPS8I1–3 (NSC663284, BVT948, and ryuvidine) were validated as potent SETD8 inhibitors. These compounds contain different structural motifs and inhibit SETD8 via distinct modes. More importantly, these compounds show cellular activity by suppressing the H4K20me1 mark of SETD8 and recapitulate characteristic S/G2/M-phase cell cycle defects as observed for RNAi-mediated SETD8 knockdown. The commonality of SPS8I1–3 against SETD8, together with their distinct structures and mechanisms for SETD8 inhibition, argues for the collective application of these compounds as SETD8 inhibitors. PMID:25137013

  10. Molecular Imprint of Enzyme Active Site by Camel Nanobodies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiang-Wei; Xia, Lijie; Su, Youhong; Liu, Hongchun; Xia, Xueqing; Lu, Qinxia; Yang, Chunjin; Reheman, Kalbinur

    2012-01-01

    Screening of inhibitory Ab1 antibodies is a critical step for producing catalytic antibodies in the anti-idiotypic approach. However, the incompatible surface of the active site of the enzyme and the antigen-binding site of heterotetrameric conventional antibodies become the limiting step. Because camelid-derived nanobodies possess the potential to preferentially bind to the active site of enzymes due to their small size and long CDR3, we have developed a novel approach to produce antibodies with alliinase activities by exploiting the molecular mimicry of camel nanobodies. By screening the camelid-derived variable region of the heavy chain cDNA phage display library with alliinase, we obtained an inhibitory nanobody VHHA4 that recognizes the active site. Further screening with VHHA4 from the same variable domain of the heavy chain of a heavy-chain antibody library led to a higher incidence of anti-idiotypic Ab2 abzymes with alliinase activities. One of the abzymes, VHHC10, showed the highest activity that can be inhibited by Ab1 VHHA4 and alliinase competitive inhibitor penicillamine and significantly suppressed the B16 tumor cell growth in the presence of alliin in vitro. The results highlight the feasibility of producing abzymes via anti-idiotypic nanobody approach. PMID:22374998

  11. Preclinical Characterization of GS-9669, a Thumb Site II Inhibitor of the Hepatitis C Virus NS5B Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Fenaux, Martijn; Eng, Stacey; Leavitt, Stephanie A.; Lee, Yu-Jen; Mabery, Eric M.; Tian, Yang; Byun, Daniel; Canales, Eda; Clarke, Michael O.; Doerffler, Edward; Lazerwith, Scott E.; Lew, Willard; Liu, Qi; Mertzman, Michael; Morganelli, Philip; Xu, Lianhong; Ye, Hong; Zhang, Jennifer; Matles, Mike; Murray, Bernard P.; Mwangi, Judy; Zhang, Jingyu; Hashash, Ahmad; Krawczyk, Steve H.; Bidgood, Alison M.; Appleby, Todd C.

    2013-01-01

    GS-9669 is a highly optimized thumb site II nonnucleoside inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA polymerase, with a binding affinity of 1.35 nM for the genotype (GT) 1b protein. It is a selective inhibitor of HCV RNA replication, with a mean 50% effective concentration (EC50) of ≤11 nM in genotype 1 and 5 replicon assays, but lacks useful activity against genotypes 2 to 4. The M423T mutation is readily generated clinically upon monotherapy with the thumb site II inhibitors filibuvir and lomibuvir, and it is notable that GS-9669 exhibited only a 3-fold loss in potency against this variant in the genotype 1b replicon. Rather than M423T, resistance predominantly tracks to residues R422K and L419M and residue I482L in GT 1b and 1a replicons, respectively. GS-9669 exhibited at least additive activity in combination with agents encompassing four other direct modes of action (NS3 protease, NS5A, NS5B via an alternative allosteric binding site, and NS5B nucleotide) as well as with alpha interferon or ribavirin in replicon assays. It exhibited high metabolic stability in in vitro human liver microsomal assays, which, in combination with its pharmacokinetic profiles in rat, dog, and two monkey species, is predictive of good human pharmacokinetics. GS-9669 is well suited for combination with other orally active, direct-acting antiviral agents in the treatment of genotype 1 chronic HCV infection. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT01431898.) PMID:23183437

  12. Mapping the Binding Site of the Inhibitor Tariquidar That Stabilizes the First Transmembrane Domain of P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Loo, Tip W; Clarke, David M

    2015-12-01

    ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters are clinically important because drug pumps like P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) confer multidrug resistance and mutant ABC proteins are responsible for many protein-folding diseases such as cystic fibrosis. Identification of the tariquidar-binding site has been the subject of intensive molecular modeling studies because it is the most potent inhibitor and corrector of P-gp. Tariquidar is a unique P-gp inhibitor because it locks the pump in a conformation that blocks drug efflux but activates ATPase activity. In silico docking studies have identified several potential tariquidar-binding sites. Here, we show through cross-linking studies that tariquidar most likely binds to sites within the transmembrane (TM) segments located in one wing or at the interface between the two wings (12 TM segments form 2 divergent wings). We then introduced arginine residues at all positions in the 12 TM segments (223 mutants) of P-gp. The rationale was that a charged residue in the drug-binding pocket would disrupt hydrophobic interaction with tariquidar and inhibit its ability to rescue processing mutants or stimulate ATPase activity. Arginines introduced at 30 positions significantly inhibited tariquidar rescue of a processing mutant and activation of ATPase activity. The results suggest that tariquidar binds to a site within the drug-binding pocket at the interface between the TM segments of both structural wings. Tariquidar differed from other drug substrates, however, as it stabilized the first TM domain. Stabilization of the first TM domain appears to be a key mechanism for high efficiency rescue of ABC processing mutants that cause disease. PMID:26507655

  13. Mapping the Binding Site of the Inhibitor Tariquidar That Stabilizes the First Transmembrane Domain of P-glycoprotein*

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Tip W.; Clarke, David M.

    2015-01-01

    ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters are clinically important because drug pumps like P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) confer multidrug resistance and mutant ABC proteins are responsible for many protein-folding diseases such as cystic fibrosis. Identification of the tariquidar-binding site has been the subject of intensive molecular modeling studies because it is the most potent inhibitor and corrector of P-gp. Tariquidar is a unique P-gp inhibitor because it locks the pump in a conformation that blocks drug efflux but activates ATPase activity. In silico docking studies have identified several potential tariquidar-binding sites. Here, we show through cross-linking studies that tariquidar most likely binds to sites within the transmembrane (TM) segments located in one wing or at the interface between the two wings (12 TM segments form 2 divergent wings). We then introduced arginine residues at all positions in the 12 TM segments (223 mutants) of P-gp. The rationale was that a charged residue in the drug-binding pocket would disrupt hydrophobic interaction with tariquidar and inhibit its ability to rescue processing mutants or stimulate ATPase activity. Arginines introduced at 30 positions significantly inhibited tariquidar rescue of a processing mutant and activation of ATPase activity. The results suggest that tariquidar binds to a site within the drug-binding pocket at the interface between the TM segments of both structural wings. Tariquidar differed from other drug substrates, however, as it stabilized the first TM domain. Stabilization of the first TM domain appears to be a key mechanism for high efficiency rescue of ABC processing mutants that cause disease. PMID:26507655

  14. Nanoscale liposomal formulation of a SYK P-site inhibitor against B-precursor leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Sanjive; Cely, Ingrid; Sahin, Kazim; Shahidzadeh, Anoush; Ozercan, Ibrahim; Yin, Qian; Gaynon, Paul; Termuhlen, Amanda; Cheng, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    We report preclinical proof of principle for effective treatment of B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) by targeting the spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK)–dependent antiapoptotic blast cell survival machinery with a unique nanoscale pharmaceutical composition. This nanoscale liposomal formulation (NLF) contains the pentapeptide mimic 1,4-Bis (9-O dihydroquinidinyl) phthalazine/hydroquinidine 1,4-phathalazinediyl diether (C61) as the first and only selective inhibitor of the substrate binding P-site of SYK. The C61 NLF exhibited a very favorable pharmacokinetic and safety profile in mice, induced apoptosis in primary B-precursor ALL blast cells taken directly from patients as well as in vivo clonogenic ALL xenograft cells, destroyed the in vivo clonogenic fraction of ALL blast cells, and, at nontoxic dose levels, exhibited potent in vivo antileukemic activity against patient-derived ALL cells in xenograft models of aggressive B-precursor ALL. Our findings establish SYK as an attractive molecular target for therapy of B-precursor ALL. Further development of the C61 NLF may provide the foundation for therapeutic innovation against therapy-refractory B-precursor ALL. PMID:23568490

  15. Novel cinnoline-based inhibitors of LRRK2 kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Albert W; Adler, Marc; Aubele, Danielle L; Bowers, Simeon; Franzini, Maurizio; Goldbach, Erich; Lorentzen, Colin; Neitz, R Jeffrey; Probst, Gary D; Quinn, Kevin P; Santiago, Pam; Sham, Hing L; Tam, Danny; Truong, Anh P; Ye, Xiaocong M; Ren, Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity is a therapeutic approach that may lead to new treatments for PD. Herein we report the discovery of a series of cinnoline-3-carboxamides that are potent against both wild-type and mutant LRRK2 kinase activity in biochemical assays. These compounds are also shown to be potent inhibitors in a cellular assay and to have good to excellent CNS penetration. PMID:23219325

  16. Quantitative structure-activity studies on monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C L

    1976-05-01

    Quantitative structure-activity studies were carried out on a series of N-isopropylaryl hydrazides which inhibits monoamine oxidase (MAO). The inhibitory potencies of these compounds of MAO were found to correlate with the electron-withdrawing capacity of the aryl ring substituents as estimated by both empirical Hammet sigma constants and electronic indices from molecular orbital calculations. Based on these correlations and previously published data on other classes of MAO inhibitors, a general model for the inhibitor pharmacophore is proposed: potent MAO of an aromatic ring; electron-withdrawing groups on the aromatic ring or replacing the phenyl ring with certain types of heterocyclic rings will tend to increase the potency. PMID:1271400

  17. Inhibitors of ROS production by the ubiquinone-binding site of mitochondrial complex I identified by chemical screening.

    PubMed

    Orr, Adam L; Ashok, Deepthi; Sarantos, Melissa R; Shi, Tong; Hughes, Robert E; Brand, Martin D

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species is often considered an unavoidable consequence of aerobic metabolism and currently cannot be manipulated without perturbing oxidative phosphorylation. Antioxidants are widely used to suppress effects of reactive oxygen species after formation, but they can never fully prevent immediate effects at the sites of production. To identify site-selective inhibitors of mitochondrial superoxide/H2O2 production that do not interfere with mitochondrial energy metabolism, we developed a robust small-molecule screen and secondary profiling strategy. We describe the discovery and characterization of a compound (N-cyclohexyl-4-(4-nitrophenoxy)benzenesulfonamide; CN-POBS) that selectively inhibits superoxide/H2O2 production from the ubiquinone-binding site of complex I (site I(Q)) with no effects on superoxide/H2O2 production from other sites or on oxidative phosphorylation. Structure/activity studies identified a core structure that is important for potency and selectivity for site I(Q). By employing CN-POBS in mitochondria respiring on NADH-generating substrates, we show that site I(Q) does not produce significant amounts of superoxide/H2O2 during forward electron transport on glutamate plus malate. Our screening platform promises to facilitate further discovery of direct modulators of mitochondrially derived oxidative damage and advance our ability to understand and manipulate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production under both normal and pathological conditions. PMID:23994103

  18. Structure-activity relationships of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, D V; Shukla, K; Tsukamoto, T

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII, EC 3.4.17.21) is a zinc metallopeptidase that hydrolyzes N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) into N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and glutamate in the nervous system. Inhibition of GCPII has the potential to reduce extracellular glutamate and represents an opportune target for treating neurological disorders in which excess glutamate is considered pathogenic. Furthermore, GCPII was found to be identical to a tumor marker, prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), and has drawn significant interest as a diagnostic and/or therapeutic target in oncology. Over the past 15 years, tremendous efforts have been made in the discovery of potent GCPII inhibitors, particularly those with phosphorus-, urea- and thiol-based zinc binding groups. In addition, significant progress has been made in understanding the three-dimensional structural characteristics of GCPII in complex with various ligands. The purpose of this review article is to analyze the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of GCPII inhibitors reported to date, which are classified on the basis of their zinc-binding group. SAR and crystallographic data are evaluated in detail for each of these series to highlight the future challenges and opportunities to identify clinically viable GCPII inhibitors. PMID:22304717

  19. Methylene bisphosphonates as the inhibitors of HIV RT phosphorolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yanvarev, D V; Korovina, A N; Usanov, N N; Khomich, O A; Vepsäläinen, J; Puljula, E; Kukhanova, M K; Kochetkov, S N

    2016-08-01

    The structure-function analysis of 36 methylenebisphosphonates (BPs) as inhibitors of the phosphorolytic activity of native and drug-resistant forms of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) was performed. It was shown that with the increase of the inhibitory potential of BPs towards the phosphorolytic activity raises their ability to inhibit the RT-catalyzed DNA elongation. Herein, we report the impact of the thymidine analog mutations (TAM) on the activity of bisphosphonates, as well as some structural features of the BPs, allowing them to maintain the inhibitory activity on the enzyme resistant to nucleoside analog therapy. We estimated the Mg(2+)-coordinating group structure, the linker and the aromatic pharmacophore influence on the inhibitory potential of the BPs. Based on the 31 BPs SAR, several BPs with improved inhibitory properties were designed and synthesized. PMID:27230835

  20. Educational Activity Sites for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troutner, Joanne

    2005-01-01

    Finding quality Internet resources for high school students is a continuing challenge. Several high-quality web sites are presented for educators and students. These sites offer activities to learn how an art conservator looks at paintings, create a newspaper, research and develop an end product, build geometry and physics skills, explore science…

  1. Mechanisms of conversion of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 from a suicide inhibitor to a substrate by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Komissarov, Andrey A; Declerck, Paul J; Shore, Joseph D

    2002-11-15

    We have delineated two different reaction mechanisms of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), MA-8H9D4 and either MA-55F4C12 or MA-33H1F7, that convert plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) to a substrate for tissue (tPA)- and urokinase plasminogen activators. MA-8H9D4 almost completely (98-99%) shifts the reaction to the substrate pathway by preventing disordering of the proteinase active site. MA-8H9D4 does not affect the rate-limiting constants (k(lim)) for the insertion of the reactive center loop cleaved by tPA (3.5 s(-1)) but decreases k(lim) for urokinase plasminogen activator from 25 to 4.0 s(-1). MA-8H9D4 does not cause deacylation of preformed PAI-1/proteinase complexes and probably acts prior to the formation of the final inhibitory complex, interfering with displacement of the acylated serine from the proteinase active site. MA-55F4C12 and MA-33H1F7 (50-80% substrate reaction) do not interfere with initial PAI-1/proteinase complex formation but retard the inhibitory pathway by decreasing k(lim) (>10-fold for tPA). Interaction of two mAbs with the same molecule of PAI-1 has been directly demonstrated for pairs MA-8H9D4/MA-55F4C12 and MA-8H9D4/MA-33H1F7 but not for MA-55F4C12/MA-33H1F7. The strong functional additivity observed for MA-8H9D4 and MA-55F4C12 demonstrates that these mAbs interact independently and affect different steps of the PAI-1 reaction mechanism. PMID:12223472

  2. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Elicit Anti-Tumorigenic and Anti-Angiogenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Placencio, Veronica R.; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Miyata, Toshio; DeClerck, Yves A.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown a paradoxical positive correlation between elevated levels of plasminogen activator inhibitior-1 (PAI-1) in tumors and blood of cancer patients with poor clinical outcome, suggesting that PAI-1 could be a therapeutic target. Here we tested two orally bioavailable small molecule inhibitors of PAI-1 (TM5275 and TM5441) for their efficacy in pre-clinical models of cancer. We demonstrated that these inhibitors decreased cell viability in several human cancer cell lines with an IC50 in the 9.7 to 60.3 μM range and induced intrinsic apoptosis at concentrations of 50 μM. In vivo, oral administration of TM5441 (20 mg/kg daily) to HT1080 and HCT116 xenotransplanted mice increased tumor cell apoptosis and had a significant disruptive effect on the tumor vasculature that was associated with a decrease in tumor growth and an increase in survival that, however, were not statistically significant. Pharmacokinetics studies indicated an average peak plasma concentration of 11.4 μM one hour after oral administration and undetectable levels 23 hours after administration. The effect on tumor vasculature in vivo was further examined in endothelial cells (EC) in vitro and this analysis indicated that both TM5275 and TM5441 inhibited EC branching in a 3D Matrigel assay at concentrations where they had little effect on EC apoptosis. These studies bring novel insight on the activity of PAI-1 inhibitors and provide important information for the future design of inhibitors targeting PAI-1 as therapeutic agents in cancer. PMID:26207899

  3. A Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Inhibitor Reduces Airway Remodeling in a Murine Model of Chronic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun H.; Eren, Mesut; Vaughan, Douglas E.; Schleimer, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 deficiency prevents collagen deposition in the airways of ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged mice. In this study, we explored the therapeutic utility of blocking PAI-1 in preventing airway remodeling, using a specific PAI-1 inhibitor, tiplaxtinin. C57BL/6J mice were immunized with intraperitoneal injections of OVA on Days 0, 3, and 6. Starting on Day 11, mice were challenged with phosphate-buffered saline or OVA by nebulization three times per week for 4 weeks. Tiplaxtinin was mixed with chow and administered orally from 1 day before the phosphate-buffered saline or OVA challenge. Lung tissues were harvested after challenge and characterized histologically for infiltrating inflammatory cells, mucus-secreting goblet cells, and collagen deposition. Airway hyperresponsiveness was measured using whole-body plethysmography. Tiplaxtinin treatment significantly decreased levels of PAI-1 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, which indicates successful blockage of PAI-1 activity in the airways. The number of infiltrated inflammatory cells was reduced by tiplaxtinin treatment in the lungs of the OVA-challenged mice. Furthermore, oral administration of tiplaxtinin significantly attenuated the degree of goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition in the airways of the OVA-challenged mice, and methacholine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness was effectively reduced by tiplaxtinin in these animals. This study supports our previous findings that PAI-1 promotes airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma, and suggests that PAI-1 may be a novel target of treatment of airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:22323366

  4. A plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 inhibitor reduces airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun H; Eren, Mesut; Vaughan, Douglas E; Schleimer, Robert P; Cho, Seong H

    2012-06-01

    We previously reported that plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 deficiency prevents collagen deposition in the airways of ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged mice. In this study, we explored the therapeutic utility of blocking PAI-1 in preventing airway remodeling, using a specific PAI-1 inhibitor, tiplaxtinin. C57BL/6J mice were immunized with intraperitoneal injections of OVA on Days 0, 3, and 6. Starting on Day 11, mice were challenged with phosphate-buffered saline or OVA by nebulization three times per week for 4 weeks. Tiplaxtinin was mixed with chow and administered orally from 1 day before the phosphate-buffered saline or OVA challenge. Lung tissues were harvested after challenge and characterized histologically for infiltrating inflammatory cells, mucus-secreting goblet cells, and collagen deposition. Airway hyperresponsiveness was measured using whole-body plethysmography. Tiplaxtinin treatment significantly decreased levels of PAI-1 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, which indicates successful blockage of PAI-1 activity in the airways. The number of infiltrated inflammatory cells was reduced by tiplaxtinin treatment in the lungs of the OVA-challenged mice. Furthermore, oral administration of tiplaxtinin significantly attenuated the degree of goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition in the airways of the OVA-challenged mice, and methacholine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness was effectively reduced by tiplaxtinin in these animals. This study supports our previous findings that PAI-1 promotes airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma, and suggests that PAI-1 may be a novel target of treatment of airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:22323366

  5. Biochemical and behavioral effects of PDE10A inhibitors: Relationship to target site occupancy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Wen; Seager, Matthew A; Wojcik, Trevor; Heman, Karen; Molski, Thaddeus F; Fernandes, Alda; Langdon, Shaun; Pendri, Annapurna; Gerritz, Samuel; Tian, Yuan; Hong, Yang; Gallagher, Lizbeth; Merritt, James R; Zhang, Chongwu; Westphal, Ryan; Zaczek, Robert; Macor, John E; Bronson, Joanne J; Lodge, Nicholas J

    2016-03-01

    Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) inhibitors increase the functionality of striatal medium spiny neurons and produce antipsychotic-like effects in rodents by blocking PDE10A mediated hydrolysis of cAMP and/or cGMP. In the current study, we characterized a radiolabeled PDE10A inhibitor, [(3)H]BMS-843496, and developed an ex vivo PDE10 binding autoradiographic assay to explore the relationship between PDE10 binding site occupancy and the observed biochemical and behavioral effects of PDE10 inhibitors in mice. [(3)H]BMS-843496 is a potent PDE10A inhibitor with a binding affinity (KD) of 0.15 nM and a functional selectivity of >100-fold over other PDE subtypes tested. Specific [(3)H]BMS-843496 binding sites were dominant in the basal ganglia, especially the striatum, with low to moderate binding in the cortical and hippocampal areas, of the mouse and monkey brain. Systemic administration of PDE10 inhibitors produced a dose- and plasma/brain concentration-dependent increase in PDE10A occupancy measured in the striatum. PDE10A occupancy was positively correlated with striatal pCREB expression levels. PDE10A occupancy was also correlated with antipsychotic-like effects measured using the conditioned avoidance response model; a minimum of ∼40% occupancy was typically required to achieve efficacy. In contrast, a clear relationship between PDE10A occupancy and catalepsy scores, a potential extrapyramidal symptom readout in rodent, was not evident. PMID:26522433

  6. Formation of Tankyrase Inhibitor-Induced Degradasomes Requires Proteasome Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Nina Marie; Thorvaldsen, Tor Espen; Schultz, Sebastian Wolfgang; Wenzel, Eva Maria; Stenmark, Harald

    2016-01-01

    In canonical Wnt signaling, the protein levels of the key signaling mediator β-catenin are under tight regulation by the multimeric destruction complex that mediates proteasomal degradation of β-catenin. In colorectal cancer, destruction complex activity is often compromised due to mutations in the multifunctional scaffolding protein Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC), leading to a stabilization of β-catenin. Recently, tankyrase inhibitors (TNKSi), a novel class of small molecule inhibitors, were shown to re-establish a functional destruction complex in APC-mutant cancer cell lines by stabilizing AXIN1/2, whose protein levels are usually kept low via poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by the tankyrase enzymes (TNKS1/2). Surprisingly, we found that for the formation of the morphological correlates of destruction complexes, called degradasomes, functional proteasomes are required. In addition we found that AXIN2 is strongly upregulated after 6 h of TNKS inhibition. The proteasome inhibitor MG132 counteracted TNKSi-induced degradasome formation and AXIN2 stabilization, and this was accompanied by reduced transcription of AXIN2. Mechanistically we could implicate the transcription factor FoxM1 in this process, which was recently shown to be a transcriptional activator of AXIN2. We observed a substantial reduction in TNKSi-induced stabilization of AXIN2 after siRNA-mediated depletion of FoxM1 and found that proteasome inhibition reduced the active (phosphorylated) fraction of FoxM1. This can explain the decreased protein levels of AXIN2 after MG132 treatment. Our findings have implications for the design of in vitro studies on the destruction complex and for clinical applications of TNKSi. PMID:27482906

  7. Anti-diabetic activity of insulin-degrading enzyme inhibitors mediated by multiple hormones.

    PubMed

    Maianti, Juan Pablo; McFedries, Amanda; Foda, Zachariah H; Kleiner, Ralph E; Du, Xiu Quan; Leissring, Malcolm A; Tang, Wei-Jen; Charron, Maureen J; Seeliger, Markus A; Saghatelian, Alan; Liu, David R

    2014-07-01

    Despite decades of speculation that inhibiting endogenous insulin degradation might treat type-2 diabetes, and the identification of IDE (insulin-degrading enzyme) as a diabetes susceptibility gene, the relationship between the activity of the zinc metalloprotein IDE and glucose homeostasis remains unclear. Although Ide(-/-) mice have elevated insulin levels, they exhibit impaired, rather than improved, glucose tolerance that may arise from compensatory insulin signalling dysfunction. IDE inhibitors that are active in vivo are therefore needed to elucidate IDE's physiological roles and to determine its potential to serve as a target for the treatment of diabetes. Here we report the discovery of a physiologically active IDE inhibitor identified from a DNA-templated macrocycle library. An X-ray structure of the macrocycle bound to IDE reveals that it engages a binding pocket away from the catalytic site, which explains its remarkable selectivity. Treatment of lean and obese mice with this inhibitor shows that IDE regulates the abundance and signalling of glucagon and amylin, in addition to that of insulin. Under physiological conditions that augment insulin and amylin levels, such as oral glucose administration, acute IDE inhibition leads to substantially improved glucose tolerance and slower gastric emptying. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of modulating IDE activity as a new therapeutic strategy to treat type-2 diabetes and expand our understanding of the roles of IDE in glucose and hormone regulation. PMID:24847884

  8. Anti-diabetic activity of insulin-degrading enzyme inhibitors mediated by multiple hormones

    PubMed Central

    Maianti, Juan Pablo; McFedries, Amanda; Foda, Zachariah H.; Kleiner, Ralph E.; Du, Xiu Quan; Leissring, Malcolm A.; Tang, Wei-Jen; Charron, Maureen J.; Seeliger, Markus A.; Saghatelian, Alan; Liu, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of speculation that inhibiting endogenous insulin degradation might treat type-2 diabetes1, 2, and the identification of IDE (insulin-degrading enzyme) as a diabetes susceptibility gene3, 4, the relationship between the activity of the zinc metalloprotein IDE and glucose homeostasis remains unclear. Although Ide−/− mice have elevated insulin levels, they exhibit impaired, rather than improved, glucose tolerance that may arise from compensatory insulin signalling dysfunction5, 6. IDE inhibitors that are active in vivo are therefore needed to elucidate IDE’s physiological roles and to determine its potential to serve as a target for the treatment of diabetes. Here we report the discovery of a physiologically active IDE inhibitor identified from a DNA-templated macrocycle library. An X-ray structure of the macrocycle bound to IDE reveals that it engages a binding pocket away from the catalytic site, which explains its remarkable selectivity. Treatment of lean and obese mice with this inhibitor shows that IDE regulates the abundance and signalling of glucagon and amylin, in addition to that of insulin. Under physiological conditions that augment insulin and amylin levels, such as oral glucose administration, acute IDE inhibition leads to substantially improved glucose tolerance and slower gastric emptying. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of modulating IDE activity as a new therapeutic strategy to treat type-2 diabetes and expand our understanding of the roles of IDE in glucose and hormone regulation. PMID:24847884

  9. A new water soluble MAPK activator exerts antitumor activity in melanoma cells resistant to the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib.

    PubMed

    Graziani, Grazia; Artuso, Simona; De Luca, Anastasia; Muzi, Alessia; Rotili, Dante; Scimeca, Manuel; Atzori, Maria Grazia; Ceci, Claudia; Mai, Antonello; Leonetti, Carlo; Levati, Lauretta; Bonanno, Elena; Tentori, Lucio; Caccuri, Anna Maria

    2015-05-01

    Recovery of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) or activation of alternative pathways, such as the PI3K/AKT/mTOR, are involved in acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors which represent the first-line treatment of BRAF-mutated metastatic melanoma. We recently demonstrated that 6-((7-nitrobenzo[c][1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)thio)hexan-1-ol (NBDHEX) and its water soluble analog 2-(2-(2-((7-nitrobenzo[c][1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)thio)ethoxy)ethoxy)ethanol (MC3181) trigger apoptosis in BRAF V600E mutated melanoma cells through activation of the MAPK c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Herein, we investigated whether NBDHEX and MC3181 might exert antitumor activity against BRAF V600E mutated human melanoma cells rendered resistant to the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib. To this aim we generated a subline of A375 melanoma resistant in vitro and in vivo to vemurafenib (A375-VR8) and characterized by NRAS G13R mutation, high basal levels of CRAF protein and phospho-activation of AKT. In these cells ERK phosphorylation was not significantly down-modulated by vemurafenib concentrations capable of abrogating ERK phosphorylation in sensitive A375 cells. Both NBDHEX and MC3181 induced marked antiproliferative and apoptotic effects in A375-VR8 cells and, at equitoxic concentrations, caused a strong phosphorylation of JNK, p38, and of the downstream mediators of apoptosis ATF2 and p53. Drug treatment further increased ERK phosphorylation, which was required for the cellular response to the NBD derivatives, as apoptosis was antagonized by the ERK inhibitor FR180204. Finally, in vivo administration of MC3181 provoked JNK activation at the tumor site and markedly reduced A375-VR8 growth. These evidences strongly suggest that the activation of multiple pro-apoptotic MAPK pathways by MC3181 might represent a new strategy for the treatment of melanoma resistant to BRAF inhibitors. PMID:25795251

  10. An Overview of Tubulin Inhibitors That Interact with the Colchicine Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Chen, Jianjun; Xiao, Min; Li, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Tubulin dynamics is a promising target for new chemotherapeutic agents. The colchicine binding site is one of the most important pockets for potential tubulin polymerization destabilizers. Colchicine binding site inhibitors (CBSI) exert their biological effects by inhibiting tubulin assembly and suppressing microtubule formation. A large number of molecules interacting with the colchicine binding site have been designed and synthesized with significant structural diversity. CBSIs have been modified as to chemical structure as well as pharmacokinetic properties, and tested in order to find a highly potent, low toxicity agent for treatment of cancers. CBSIs are believed to act by a common mechanism via binding to the colchicine site on tubulin. The present review is a synopsis of compounds that have been reported in the past decade that have provided an increase in our understanding of the actions of CBSIs. PMID:22814904

  11. Use of mouse models to study plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Declerck, Paul J; Gils, Ann; De Taeye, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is the main inhibitor of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) and therefore plays an important role in the plasminogen/plasmin system. PAI-1 is involved in a variety of cardiovascular diseases (mainly through inhibition of t-PA) as well as in cell migration and tumor development (mainly through inhibition of u-PA and interaction with vitronectin). PAI-1 is a unique member of the serpin superfamily, exhibiting particular unique conformational and functional properties. Since its involvement in various biological and pathophysiological processes PAI-1 has been the subject of many in vivo studies in mouse models. We briefly discuss structural and physiological differences between human and mouse PAI-1 that should be taken into account prior to extrapolation of data obtained in mouse models to the human situation. The current review provides an overview of the various models, with a focus on cardiovascular disease and cancer, using wild-type mice or genetically modified mice, either deficient in PAI-1 or overexpressing different variants of PAI-1. PMID:21683250

  12. Structural interactions between inhibitor and substrate docking sites give insight into mechanisms of human PS1 complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Lu, Stephen Hsueh-Jeng; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Bohm, Christopher; Qamar, Seema; Dodd, Roger B; Meadows, William; Jeon, Amy; McLeod, Adam; Chen, Fusheng; Arimon, Muriel; Berezovska, Oksana; Hyman, Bradley T; Tomita, Taisuke; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Johnson, Christopher M; Farrer, Lindsay A; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold; Fraser, Paul E; St George-Hyslop, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    Presenilin-mediated endoproteolysis of transmembrane proteins plays a key role in physiological signaling and in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease and some cancers. Numerous inhibitors have been found via library screens, but their structural mechanisms remain unknown. We used several biophysical techniques to investigate the structure of human presenilin complexes and the effects of peptidomimetic γ-secretase inhibitors. The complexes are bilobed. The head contains nicastrin ectodomain. The membrane-embedded base has a central channel and a lateral cleft, which may represent the initial substrate docking site. Inhibitor binding induces widespread structural changes, including rotation of the head and closure of the lateral cleft. These changes block substrate access to the catalytic pocket and inhibit the enzyme. Intriguingly, peptide substrate docking has reciprocal effects on the inhibitor binding site. Similar reciprocal shifts may underlie the mechanisms of other inhibitors and of the "lateral gate" through which substrates access to the catalytic site. PMID:24210759

  13. Structural Interactions between Inhibitor and Substrate Docking Sites Give Insight into Mechanisms of Human PS1 Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Lu, Stephen Hsueh-Jeng; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Bohm, Christopher; Qamar, Seema; Dodd, Roger B.; Meadows, William; Jeon, Amy; McLeod, Adam; Chen, Fusheng; Arimon, Muriel; Berezovska, Oksana; Hyman, Bradley T.; Tomita, Taisuke; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Johnson, Christopher M.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold; Fraser, Paul E.; St George-Hyslop, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Presenilin-mediated endoproteolysis of transmembrane proteins plays a key role in physiological signaling and in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease and some cancers. Numerous inhibitors have been found via library screens, but their structural mechanisms remain unknown. We used several biophysical techniques to investigate the structure of human presenilin complexes and the effects of peptidomimetic γ-secretase inhibitors. The complexes are bilobed. The head contains nicastrin ectodomain. The membrane-embedded base has a central channel and a lateral cleft, which may represent the initial substrate docking site. Inhibitor binding induces widespread structural changes, including rotation of the head and closure of the lateral cleft. These changes block substrate access to the catalytic pocket and inhibit the enzyme. Intriguingly, peptide substrate docking has reciprocal effects on the inhibitor binding site. Similar reciprocal shifts may underlie the mechanisms of other inhibitors and of the “lateral gate” through which substrates access to the catalytic site. PMID:24210759

  14. Lumican: a new inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-14 activity.

    PubMed

    Pietraszek, Katarzyna; Chatron-Colliet, Aurore; Brézillon, Stéphane; Perreau, Corinne; Jakubiak-Augustyn, Anna; Krotkiewski, Hubert; Maquart, François-Xavier; Wegrowski, Yanusz

    2014-11-28

    We previously showed that lumican regulates MMP-14 expression. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of lumican and decorin on MMP-14 activity. In contrast to decorin, the glycosylated form of lumican was able to significantly decrease MMP-14 activity in B16F1 melanoma cells. Our results suggest that a direct interaction occurs between lumican and MMP-14. Lumican behaves as a competitive inhibitor which leads to a complete blocking of the activity of MMP-14. It binds to the catalytic domain of MMP-14 with moderate affinity (KD∼275 nM). Lumican may protect collagen against MMP-14 proteolysis, thus influencing cell-matrix interaction in tumor progression. PMID:25304424

  15. Computational discovery of picomolar Q(o) site inhibitors of cytochrome bc1 complex.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ge-Fei; Wang, Fu; Li, Hui; Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Wen-Chao; Huang, Li-Shar; Wu, Jia-Wei; Berry, Edward A; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2012-07-11

    A critical challenge to the fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) is its low-throughput nature due to the necessity of biophysical method-based fragment screening. Herein, a method of pharmacophore-linked fragment virtual screening (PFVS) was successfully developed. Its application yielded the first picomolar-range Q(o) site inhibitors of the cytochrome bc(1) complex, an important membrane protein for drug and fungicide discovery. Compared with the original hit compound 4 (K(i) = 881.80 nM, porcine bc(1)), the most potent compound 4f displayed 20 507-fold improved binding affinity (K(i) = 43.00 pM). Compound 4f was proved to be a noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate cytochrome c, but a competitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate ubiquinol. Additionally, we determined the crystal structure of compound 4e (K(i) = 83.00 pM) bound to the chicken bc(1) at 2.70 Å resolution, providing a molecular basis for understanding its ultrapotency. To our knowledge, this study is the first application of the FBDD method in the discovery of picomolar inhibitors of a membrane protein. This work demonstrates that the novel PFVS approach is a high-throughput drug discovery method, independent of biophysical screening techniques. PMID:22690928

  16. Effects of kinase inhibitors and potassium phosphate (KPi) on site-specific phosphorylation of branched chain. cap alpha. -ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH)

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntz, M.J.; Shimomura, Y.; Ozawa, T.; Harris, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    BCKDH is phosphorylated by a copurifying kinase at two serine residues on the El..cap alpha.. subunit. Phosphorylation of both sites occurs at about the same rate initially, but inactivation is believed associated only with site 1 phosphorylation. The effects of KPi and known inhibitors of BCKDH kinase, ..cap alpha..-chloroisocaproate (CIC) and branched chain ..cap alpha..-ketoacids (BCKA), on the phosphorylation of purified rat liver BCKDH were studied. Site-specific phosphorylation was quantitated by thin-layer electrophoresis of tryptic peptides followed by densitometric scanning of autoradiograms. Addition of 5 mM KPi was found necessary to stabilize the BCKDH activity at 37/sup 0/C. Increasing the KPi to 50 mM dramatically increased the CIC and BCKA inhibition of site 1 and site 2 phosphorylation. The finding of enhanced sensitivity of inhibitors with 50 mM KPi may facilitate identification of physiologically important kinase effectors. Regardless of the KPi concentration, CIC and the BCKA showed much more effective inhibition of site 2 than site 1 phosphorylation. Although site 1 is the primary inactivating site, predominant inhibition of site 2 phosphorylation may provide a means of modulating kinase/phosphatase control of BCKDH activity under steady state conditions.

  17. Bioisosterism of urea-based GCPII inhibitors. Synthesis and structure activity relationship studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haofan; Byun, Youngjoo; Barinka, Cyril; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Bhang, Hyo-eun C; Fox, James J; Lubkowski, Jacek; Mease, Ronnie C; Pomper, Martin G

    2010-10-28

    We report a strategy based on bioisosterism to improve the physicochemical properties of existing hydrophilic, urea-based GCPII inhibitors. Comprehensive structure-activity relationship studies of the P1prime site of ZJ-43- and DCIBzL-based compounds identified several glutamate-free inhibitors with Ki values below 20 nM. Among them, compound 32d (Ki = 11 nM) exhibited selective uptake in GCPII-expressing tumors by SPECT-CT imaging in mice. A novel conformational change of amino acids in the S1prime pharmacophore pocket was observed in the X-ray crystal structure of GCPII complexed with 32d.

  18. A novel dipyridodiazepinone inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase acts through a nonsubstrate binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.C.; Warren, T.C.; Adams, J.; Proudfoot, J.; Skiles, J.; Raghavan, P.; Perry, C.; Potocki, I.; Farina, P.R.; Grob, P.M. )

    1991-02-26

    A novel dipyridodiazepinone, 6,11-dihydro-11-cyclopropyl-4-methyldipyrido(2,3-b:2{prime},3{prime}-e)-(1,4)diazepin-6-one (BI-RG-587), is a selective noncompetitive inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT-1). An azido photoaffinity analogue of BI-RG-587 was synthesized and found to irreversibly inhibit the enzyme upon UV irradiation. BI-RG-587 and close structural analogues competitively protected RT-1 from inactivation by the photoaffinity label. A thiobenzimidazolone (TIBO) derivative, a nonnucleoside inhibitor of RT-1, also protected the enzyme from photoinactivation, which suggests a common binding site for these compounds. Substrates dGTP, template-primer, and tRNA afforded no protection from enzyme inactivation. A tritiated photoaffinity probe was found to stoichiometrically and selectively label p66 such that 1 mol of probe inactivates 1 mol of RT-1.

  19. Activated factor XI increases the procoagulant activity of the extrinsic pathway by inactivating tissue factor pathway inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Erik I.; Matafonov, Anton; Cheng, Qiufang; Zientek, Keith D.; Gailani, Dave; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of coagulation factor XI (FXI) may play a role in hemostasis. The primary substrate of activated FXI (FXIa) is FIX, leading to FX activation (FXa) and thrombin generation. However, recent studies suggest the hemostatic role of FXI may not be restricted to the activation of FIX. We explored whether FXI could interact with and inhibit the activity of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI). TFPI is an essential reversible inhibitor of activated factor X (FXa) and also inhibits the FVIIa-TF complex. We found that FXIa neutralized both endothelium- and platelet-derived TFPI by cleaving the protein between the Kunitz (K) 1 and K2 domains (Lys86/Thr87) and at the active sites of the K2 (Arg107/Gly108) and K3 (Arg199/Ala200) domains. Addition of FXIa to plasma was able to reverse the ability of TFPI to prolong TF-initiated clotting times in FXI- or FIX-deficient plasma, as well as FXa-initiated clotting times in FX-deficient plasma. Treatment of cultured endothelial cells with FXIa increased the generation of FXa and promoted TF-dependent fibrin formation in recalcified plasma. Together, these results suggest that the hemostatic role of FXIa may be attributed not only to activation of FIX but also to promoting the extrinsic pathway of thrombin generation through inactivation of TFPI. PMID:25587039

  20. Activated factor XI increases the procoagulant activity of the extrinsic pathway by inactivating tissue factor pathway inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Puy, Cristina; Tucker, Erik I; Matafonov, Anton; Cheng, Qiufang; Zientek, Keith D; Gailani, Dave; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J T

    2015-02-26

    Activation of coagulation factor XI (FXI) may play a role in hemostasis. The primary substrate of activated FXI (FXIa) is FIX, leading to FX activation (FXa) and thrombin generation. However, recent studies suggest the hemostatic role of FXI may not be restricted to the activation of FIX. We explored whether FXI could interact with and inhibit the activity of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI). TFPI is an essential reversible inhibitor of activated factor X (FXa) and also inhibits the FVIIa-TF complex. We found that FXIa neutralized both endothelium- and platelet-derived TFPI by cleaving the protein between the Kunitz (K) 1 and K2 domains (Lys86/Thr87) and at the active sites of the K2 (Arg107/Gly108) and K3 (Arg199/Ala200) domains. Addition of FXIa to plasma was able to reverse the ability of TFPI to prolong TF-initiated clotting times in FXI- or FIX-deficient plasma, as well as FXa-initiated clotting times in FX-deficient plasma. Treatment of cultured endothelial cells with FXIa increased the generation of FXa and promoted TF-dependent fibrin formation in recalcified plasma. Together, these results suggest that the hemostatic role of FXIa may be attributed not only to activation of FIX but also to promoting the extrinsic pathway of thrombin generation through inactivation of TFPI. PMID:25587039

  1. RASA3 is a critical inhibitor of RAP1-dependent platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Stefanini, Lucia; Paul, David S.; Robledo, Raymond F.; Chan, E. Ricky; Getz, Todd M.; Campbell, Robert A.; Kechele, Daniel O.; Casari, Caterina; Piatt, Raymond; Caron, Kathleen M.; Mackman, Nigel; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Parrott, Matthew C.; Boulaftali, Yacine; Adams, Mark D.; Peters, Luanne L.; Bergmeier, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase RAP1 is critical for platelet activation and thrombus formation. RAP1 activity in platelets is controlled by the GEF CalDAG-GEFI and an unknown regulator that operates downstream of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor, P2Y12, a target of antithrombotic therapy. Here, we provide evidence that the GAP, RASA3, inhibits platelet activation and provides a link between P2Y12 and activation of the RAP1 signaling pathway. In mice, reduced expression of RASA3 led to premature platelet activation and markedly reduced the life span of circulating platelets. The increased platelet turnover and the resulting thrombocytopenia were reversed by concomitant deletion of the gene encoding CalDAG-GEFI. Rasa3 mutant platelets were hyperresponsive to agonist stimulation, both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, activation of Rasa3 mutant platelets occurred independently of ADP feedback signaling and was insensitive to inhibitors of P2Y12 or PI3 kinase. Together, our results indicate that RASA3 ensures that circulating platelets remain quiescent by restraining CalDAG-GEFI/RAP1 signaling and suggest that P2Y12 signaling is required to inhibit RASA3 and enable sustained RAP1-dependent platelet activation and thrombus formation at sites of vascular injury. These findings provide insight into the antithrombotic effect of P2Y12 inhibitors and may lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of platelet-related disorders. PMID:25705885

  2. Shp2 protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor activity of estramustine phosphate and its triterpenoid analogs

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Latanya M.; Chen, Liwei; Daniel, Kenyon G.; Brooks, Wesley H.; Guida, Wayne C.; Lawrence, Harshani R.; Sebti, Said M.; Lawrence, Nicholas J.; Wu, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Shp2 protein tyrosine phosphate (PTP) is a novel target for anticancer drug discovery. We identified estramustine phosphate as a Shp2 PTP inhibitor from the National Cancer Institute Approved Oncology Drug set. A focused structure-activity relationship study indicated that the 17- phosphate group is required for the Shp2 PTP inhibitor activity of estramustine phosphate. A search for estramustine phosphate analogs led to identification of two triperpenoids, enoxolone and celastrol, having Shp2 PTP inhibitor activity. With the previously reported PTP1B inhibitor trodusquemine, our study reveals steroids and triterpenoids with negatively charged phosphate, carboxylate, or sulfonate groups as novel pharmacophores of selective PTP inhibitors. PMID:21193311

  3. Antitumor activity of LSD1 inhibitors in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Helai P; Kruger, Ryan G

    2016-03-01

    Epigenetic machinery have become a major focus for new targeted cancer therapies. Our previous report described the discovery and biological activity of a potent, selective, orally bioavailable, irreversible inhibitor of Lysine Demethylase 1 (LSD1), GSK2879552. A proliferation screen of cell lines representing a number of tumor types indicated that small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) was sensitive to LSD1 inhibition. The SCLC lines that undergo growth inhibition in response to GSK2879552 exhibit DNA hypomethylation of a signature set of probes suggesting this may be used as a predictive biomarker of activity. This targeted mechanism coupled with a novel predictive biomarker make LSD1 inhibition an exciting potential therapy for SCLC. PMID:27308632

  4. Discovery and structure-activity relationships of modified salicylanilides as cell permeable inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG)

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Jamin D.; Coyle, Donna L.; Damodaran, Komath; Beroza, Paul; Jacobson, Myron K.

    2011-01-01

    The metabolism of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) in response to DNA strand breaks, which involves the concerted activities of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) and poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), modulates cell recovery or cell death depending upon the level of DNA damage. While PARP inhibitors show high promise in clinical trials due to their low toxicity and selectivity for BRCA related cancers, evaluation of the therapeutic potential of PARG is limited by the lack of well-validated cell permeable inhibitors. In this study, Target-related Affinity Profiling (TRAP), an alternative to high-throughput screening, was used to identify a number of drug-like compounds from several chemical classes that demonstrated PARG inhibition in the low-micromolar range. A number of analogs of one of the most active chemotypes were synthesized to explore structure-activity relationship (SAR) for that series. This led to the discovery of a putative pharmacophore for PARG inhibition that contains a modified salicylanilide structure. Interestingly, these compounds also inhibit PARP-1, indicating strong homology in the active sites of PARG and PARP-1, and raising a new challenge for development of PARG specific inhibitors. The cellular activity of a lead inhibitor was demonstrated by the inhibition of both PARP and PARG activity in squamous cell carcinoma cells, although preferential inhibition of PARG relative to PARP was observed. The ability of inhibitors to modulate PAR metabolism via simultaneous effects on PARPs and PARG may represent a new approach for therapeutic development. PMID:21692479

  5. Protoporphyrinogen oxidase: high affinity tetrahydrophthalimide radioligand for the inhibitor/herbicide-binding site in mouse liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Birchfield, N B; Casida, J E

    1996-01-01

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (protox), the last common enzyme in heme and chlorophyll biosynthesis, is the target of several classes of herbicides acting as inhibitors in both plants and mammals. N-(4-Chloro-2-fluoro-5-(propargyloxy)phenyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro phthalimide (a potent protox inhibitor referred to as THP) was synthesized as a candidate radioligand ([3H]-THP) by selective catalytic reduction of 3,6-dihydrophthalic anhydride (DHPA) with tritium gas followed by condensation in 45% yield with 4-chloro-2-fluoro-5-(propargyloxy)aniline. Insertion of tritium at the 3 and 6 carbons of DHPA as well as the expected 4 and 5 carbons resulted in high specific activity [3H]THP (92 Ci/mmol). This radioligand undergoes rapid, specific, saturable, and reversible binding to the inhibitor/herbicide binding site of the protox component of cholate-solubilized mouse liver mitochondria with an apparent Kd of 0.41 nM and Bmax of 0.40 pmol/mg of protein. In the standard assay, mouse preparation (150 micrograms of protein) and [3H]THP (0.5 nM) are incubated in 500 microL of phosphate buffer at pH 7.2 for 15 min at 25 degrees C followed by addition of ammonium sulfate and filtration with glass fiber filters. The potencies of five nitrodiphenyl ethers and two other herbicides as inhibitors of [3H]THP binding correlate well with those for inhibition of protox activity (r2 = 0.97, n = 7), thus validating the binding assay as relevant to enzyme inhibition. It is also suitable to determine in vivo block as illustrated by an approximately 50% decrease in [3H]THP binding in liver mitochondria from mice treated ip with oxyfluorfen at 4 mg/kg. This is the first report of a binding assay for protox in mammals. The high affinity and specific activity of [3H]THP facilitate quantitation of protox and therefore research on a sensitive inhibition site for porphyrin biosynthesis. PMID:8902268

  6. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  7. NMR reveals the allosteric opening and closing of Abelson tyrosine kinase by ATP-site and myristoyl pocket inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Skora, Lukasz; Mestan, Jürgen; Fabbro, Doriano; Jahnke, Wolfgang; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Successful treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia is based on inhibitors binding to the ATP site of the deregulated breakpoint cluster region (Bcr)–Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl) fusion protein. Recently, a new type of allosteric inhibitors targeting the Abl myristoyl pocket was shown in preclinical studies to overcome ATP-site inhibitor resistance arising in some patients. Using NMR and small-angle X-ray scattering, we have analyzed the solution conformations of apo Abelson tyrosine kinase (c-Abl) and c-Abl complexes with ATP-site and allosteric inhibitors. Binding of the ATP-site inhibitor imatinib leads to an unexpected open conformation of the multidomain SH3-SH2-kinase c-Abl core, whose relevance is confirmed by cellular assays on Bcr-Abl. The combination of imatinib with the allosteric inhibitor GNF-5 restores the closed, inactivated state. Our data provide detailed insights on the poorly understood combined effect of the two inhibitor types, which is able to overcome drug resistance. PMID:24191057

  8. Grassypeptolides As Natural Inhibitors of Dipeptidyl Peptidase 8 and T-Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Jason C.; Liu, Yanxia; Ratnayake, Ranjala; Hatano, Ryo; Kuribara, Akiko; Morimoto, Chiko; Ohnuma, Kei; Paul, Valerie J.; Ye, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Natural products made by marine cyanobacteria are often highly modified peptides and depsipeptides that have the potential to act as inhibitors for proteases. In the interest of finding novel protease inhibition activity and selectivity grassypeptolide A (1) was screened against a panel of proteases and found to selectively inhibit DPP8 over DPP4. Grassypeptolides were also found to inhibit IL-2 production and proliferation in activated T-cells, consistent with a putative role of DPP8 in the immune system. These effects were also observed in Jurkat cells, and DPP activity in Jurkat cell cytosol was shown to be inhibited by grassypeptolides. In silico docking suggests two possible binding modes of grassypeptolides – both at the active site of DPP8 and at one of the entrances to the internal cavity. Collectively these results suggest that grassypeptolides may be useful tool compounds in the study of DPP8 function. PMID:24591193

  9. Creating Novel Activated Factor XI Inhibitors through Fragment Based Lead Generation and Structure Aided Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Fjellström, Ola; Akkaya, Sibel; Beisel, Hans-Georg; Eriksson, Per-Olof; Erixon, Karl; Gustafsson, David; Jurva, Ulrik; Kang, Daiwu; Karis, David; Knecht, Wolfgang; Nerme, Viveca; Nilsson, Ingemar; Olsson, Thomas; Redzic, Alma; Roth, Robert; Sandmark, Jenny; Tigerström, Anna; Öster, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Activated factor XI (FXIa) inhibitors are anticipated to combine anticoagulant and profibrinolytic effects with a low bleeding risk. This motivated a structure aided fragment based lead generation campaign to create novel FXIa inhibitor leads. A virtual screen, based on docking experiments, was performed to generate a FXIa targeted fragment library for an NMR screen that resulted in the identification of fragments binding in the FXIa S1 binding pocket. The neutral 6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-1H-quinolin-2-one and the weakly basic quinolin-2-amine structures are novel FXIa P1 fragments. The expansion of these fragments towards the FXIa prime side binding sites was aided by solving the X-ray structures of reported FXIa inhibitors that we found to bind in the S1-S1’-S2’ FXIa binding pockets. Combining the X-ray structure information from the identified S1 binding 6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-1H-quinolin-2-one fragment and the S1-S1’-S2’ binding reference compounds enabled structure guided linking and expansion work to achieve one of the most potent and selective FXIa inhibitors reported to date, compound 13, with a FXIa IC50 of 1.0 nM. The hydrophilicity and large polar surface area of the potent S1-S1’-S2’ binding FXIa inhibitors compromised permeability. Initial work to expand the 6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-1H-quinolin-2-one fragment towards the prime side to yield molecules with less hydrophilicity shows promise to afford potent, selective and orally bioavailable compounds. PMID:25629509

  10. Increase of anti-HIV activity of C-peptide fusion inhibitors using a bivalent drug design approach.

    PubMed

    Ling, Yanbo; Xue, Huifang; Jiang, Xifeng; Cai, Lifeng; Liu, Keliang

    2013-09-01

    We reported the design of fusion inhibitors with improved activity using a multivalent inhibitor design strategy. First, we chose C29 as the template sequence, which is a 29-mer peptide derived from HIV-1 gp41 CHR domain and has anti-HIV activity of IC50 118 nM in a cell-cell fusion assay. We optimized the crosslink sites and linkers of the template peptide. We found that N-terminal crosslink caused activity improvement based on the multivalent co-operative effect. Especially, the IC50 of peptide (CAcaC29)2 was improved from 49.02 (monomeric form) to 5.71 nM. Compared with long peptides, short peptides may be more suitable to analyze the co-operative effect. So we selected a shorter peptide C22 to synthesize the bivalent inhibitors. Due its weak helicity, no co-operative effect appeared. Therefore, we chose SC22EK, which were introduced salt bridges to consolidate the helicity based on the natural sequence C22. The cross-linked (CAcaSC22EK)2 was four times more potent than the monomer SC22EK in anti-HIV activity, with an IC50 value of 4.92 nM close to the high active peptide fusion inhibitor C34. The strategy used in this study may be used to design new fusion inhibitors to interfere similar processes. PMID:23906421

  11. Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Identifies 8-Hydroxyquinolines as Cell-Active Histone Demethylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Akane; Rose, Nathan R.; Ng, Stanley S.; Quinn, Amy M.; Rai, Ganesha; Mott, Bryan T.; Beswick, Paul; Klose, Robert J.; Oppermann, Udo; Jadhav, Ajit; Heightman, Tom D.; Maloney, David J.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Simeonov, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Background Small molecule modulators of epigenetic processes are currently sought as basic probes for biochemical mechanisms, and as starting points for development of therapeutic agents. Nε-Methylation of lysine residues on histone tails is one of a number of post-translational modifications that together enable transcriptional regulation. Histone lysine demethylases antagonize the action of histone methyltransferases in a site- and methylation state-specific manner. Nε-Methyllysine demethylases that use 2-oxoglutarate as co-factor are associated with diverse human diseases, including cancer, inflammation and X-linked mental retardation; they are proposed as targets for the therapeutic modulation of transcription. There are few reports on the identification of templates that are amenable to development as potent inhibitors in vivo and large diverse collections have yet to be exploited for the discovery of demethylase inhibitors. Principal Findings High-throughput screening of a ∼236,000-member collection of diverse molecules arrayed as dilution series was used to identify inhibitors of the JMJD2 (KDM4) family of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent histone demethylases. Initial screening hits were prioritized by a combination of cheminformatics, counterscreening using a coupled assay enzyme, and orthogonal confirmatory detection of inhibition by mass spectrometric assays. Follow-up studies were carried out on one of the series identified, 8-hydroxyquinolines, which were shown by crystallographic analyses to inhibit by binding to the active site Fe(II) and to modulate demethylation at the H3K9 locus in a cell-based assay. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that diverse compound screening can yield novel inhibitors of 2OG dependent histone demethylases and provide starting points for the development of potent and selective agents to interrogate epigenetic regulation. PMID:21124847

  12. Carbohydrate scaffolds as glycosyltransferase inhibitors with in vivo antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Zuegg, Johannes; Muldoon, Craig; Adamson, George; McKeveney, Declan; Le Thanh, Giang; Premraj, Rajaratnam; Becker, Bernd; Cheng, Mu; Elliott, Alysha G.; Huang, Johnny X.; Butler, Mark S.; Bajaj, Megha; Seifert, Joachim; Singh, Latika; Galley, Nicola F.; Roper, David I.; Lloyd, Adrian J.; Dowson, Christopher G.; Cheng, Ting-Jen; Cheng, Wei-Chieh; Demon, Dieter; Meyer, Evelyne; Meutermans, Wim; Cooper, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of multi-drug-resistant bacteria is a global healthcare crisis, and new antibiotics are urgently required, especially those with modes of action that have low-resistance potential. One promising lead is the liposaccharide antibiotic moenomycin that inhibits bacterial glycosyltransferases, which are essential for peptidoglycan polymerization, while displaying a low rate of resistance. Unfortunately, the lipophilicity of moenomycin leads to unfavourable pharmacokinetic properties that render it unsuitable for systemic administration. In this study, we show that using moenomycin and other glycosyltransferase inhibitors as templates, we were able to synthesize compound libraries based on novel pyranose scaffold chemistry, with moenomycin-like activity, but with improved drug-like properties. The novel compounds exhibit in vitro inhibition comparable to moenomycin, with low toxicity and good efficacy in several in vivo models of infection. This approach based on non-planar carbohydrate scaffolds provides a new opportunity to develop new antibiotics with low propensity for resistance induction. PMID:26194781

  13. Multidrug Pump Inhibitors Uncover Remarkable Activity of Plant Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Tegos, George; Stermitz, Frank R.; Lomovskaya, Olga; Lewis, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Plant antimicrobials are not used as systemic antibiotics at present. The main reason for this is their low level of activity, especially against gram-negative bacteria. The reported MIC is often in the range of 100 to 1,000 μg/ml, orders of magnitude higher than those of common broad-spectrum antibiotics from bacteria or fungi. Major plant pathogens belong to the gram-negative bacteria, which makes the low level of activity of plant antimicrobials against this group of microorganisms puzzling. Gram-negative bacteria have an effective permeability barrier, comprised of the outer membrane, which restricts the penetration of amphipathic compounds, and multidrug resistance pumps (MDRs), which extrude toxins across this barrier. It is possible that the apparent ineffectiveness of plant antimicrobials is largely due to the permeability barrier. We tested this hypothesis in the present study by applying a combination of MDR mutants and MDR inhibitors. A panel of plant antimicrobials was tested by using a set of bacteria representing the main groups of plant pathogens. The human pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium were also tested. The results show that the activities of the majority of plant antimicrobials were considerably greater against the gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus megaterium and that disabling of the MDRs in gram-negative species leads to a striking increase in antimicrobial activity. Thus, the activity of rhein, the principal antimicrobial from rhubarb, was potentiated 100- to 2,000-fold (depending on the bacterial species) by disabling the MDRs. Comparable potentiation of activity was observed with plumbagin, resveratrol, gossypol, coumestrol, and berberine. Direct measurement of the uptake of berberine, a model plant antimicrobial, confirmed that disabling of the MDRs strongly increases the level of penetration of berberine into the cells of gram-negative bacteria. These

  14. Ciprofloxacin-Induced Antibacterial Activity Is Attenuated by Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Masadeh, Majed M.; Alzoubi, Karem H.; Khabour, Omar F.; Al-Azzam, Sayer I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Ciprofloxacin is a commonly used antibiotic for urinary tract infection that interacts with bacterial topoisomerases leading to oxidative radicals generation and bacterial cell death. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDEis), on the other hand, are commonly used drugs for the management of erectile dysfunction. The group includes agents such as sildenafil, vardenafil, and tadalafil. Objectives We investigated whether PDEi could interfere with the antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin. Methods PDEis were tested in several reference bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Acinetobacter baumannii, Proteus mirabilis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae utilizing a standard disc diffusion method and measuring both zones of inhibition and MIC. Results Results from both assays indicated that ciprofloxacin demonstrates potent activity against the tested reference bacteria. Additionally, when bacteria were treated with a combination of ciprofloxacin and sildenafil, tadalafil, or vardenafil, the zones of the combination inhibition were significantly reduced, whereas the MIC values were significantly greater than those of ciprofloxacin alone for all tested bacterial strains. In an attempt to examine the mechanism by which PDEis interfere with the action of ciprofloxacin, we utilized the in vitro E coli DNA gyrase cleavage assay. The results showed that PDEi drugs had no effect on ciprofloxacin’s inhibition of E coli gyrase activity. Conclusions Pretreatment of various reference bacterial cells with PDEis largely inhibited the antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin. PMID:26649077

  15. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. PMID:25770423

  16. Idarubicin is a broad-spectrum enterovirus replication inhibitor that selectively targets the virus internal ribosomal entry site.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hsin-Yu; Lu, Wen-Wen; Wu, Kuan-Yin; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Kung, Szu-Hao

    2016-05-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes life-threatening diseases with neurological manifestations in young children. However, the treatment of EV71 infections remains an unmet medical need. Idarubicin (IDR) is an anthracycline compound that is used therapeutically for certain types of tumour. In this study, we identified IDR as an EV71 inhibitor, which displayed antiviral potency in the submicromolar range and substantially protected cells from the cytopathic effects and cell death caused by EV71 infections. The antiviral effects extended to several other enterovirus (EV) species, and these effects were independent of cytotoxicity or topoisomerase inhibition. Structure-activity relationship studies indicated the importance of the anthracycline scaffold for anti-EV potency. IDR effectively blocked the synthesis of viral protein and RNA, but not the viral proteolysis processes. Moreover, anthracyclines were demonstrated to suppress EV internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation; conversely, the cellular p53 IRES activity was not sensitive to IDR action. Inhibition of IRES-mediated translation by IDR correlated with the affinity of binding between IDR and the particular IRES. Moreover, IDR impaired binding between the EV71 IRES RNA and hnRNP A1, a known host IRES trans-acting factor. In sum, we have identified a USA FDA-approved anticancer drug with the new indication as a selective EV IRES binder and inhibitor. The finding may also provide leads for the development of novel antiviral therapies directed at the EV IRES RNA. PMID:26879094

  17. Comparison of covalent with reversible inhibitor binding sites of the gastric H,K-ATPase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, N; Munson, K; Vagin, O; Sachs, G

    2000-02-11

    The gastric H,K-ATPase is covalently inhibited by substituted pyridyl-methylsulfinyl-benzimidazoles, such as omeprazole, that convert to thiophilic probes of luminally accessible cysteines in the acid space. The K(+) competitive inhibitor, SCH28080, prevented inhibition of acid transport by omeprazole. In stably expressing HEK293 cells, the benzimidazole-reactive cysteines, Cys-321 (transmembrane helix (TM) 3), Cys-813 and Cys-822 (TM5/6), and Cys-892 (TM7/8) were mutated to the amino acids found in the SCH28080-resistant Na,K-ATPase and kinetic parameters of H,K-ATPase activity analyzed. Mutations of Cys-822 and Cys-892 had insignificant effects on the K(i(app)), K(m(app)) or V(max), but mutations of Cys-813 to threonine and Cys-321 to alanine decreased the affinity for SCH28080. Mutation of Cys-321 to alanine produced mixed kinetics of inhibition, still with higher affinity for the cation-free form of phosphoenzyme. Since the phenylmethoxy ring of the imidazo-pyridine inhibitors binds to TM1/2, as shown by earlier photoaffinity studies, and the mutations in TM6 (Cys-813 --> Thr) as well as the end of TM3 (Cys-321 --> Ala) decrease the affinity for SCH28080, the TM1/2, TM3, and TM6 helices lie within approximately 16 A of each other based on the size of the active, extended conformation of SCH28080. PMID:10660561

  18. Potassium channel receptor site for the inactivation gate and quaternary amine inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ming; Morais-Cabral, João H.; Mann, Sabine; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2001-06-01

    Many voltage-dependent K+ channels open when the membrane is depolarized and then rapidly close by a process called inactivation. Neurons use inactivating K+ channels to modulate their firing frequency. In Shaker-type K+ channels, the inactivation gate, which is responsible for the closing of the channel, is formed by the channel's cytoplasmic amino terminus. Here we show that the central cavity and inner pore of the K+ channel form the receptor site for both the inactivation gate and small-molecule inhibitors. We propose that inactivation occurs by a sequential reaction in which the gate binds initially to the cytoplasmic channel surface and then enters the pore as an extended peptide. This mechanism accounts for the functional properties of K+ channel inactivation and indicates that the cavity may be the site of action for certain drugs that alter cation channel function.

  19. Discovery of Cyclic Acylguanidines as Highly Potent and Selective β-Site Amyloid Cleaving Enzyme (BACE) Inhibitors: Part I–Inhibitor Design and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zhaoning; Sun, Zhong-Yue; Ye, Yuanzan; Voigt, Johannes; Strickland, Corey; Smith, Elizabeth M.; Cumming, Jared; Wang, Lingyan; Wong, Jesse; Wang, Yu-Sen; Wyss, Daniel F.; Chen, Xia; Kuvelkar, Reshma; Kennedy, Matthew E.; Favreau, Leonard; Parker, Eric; McKittrick, Brian A.; Stamford, Andrew; Czarniecki, Michael; Greenlee, William; Hunter, John C.

    2013-11-20

    A number of novel amidine containing heterocycles were designed to reproduce the unique interaction pattern, revealed by X-ray crystallography, between the BACE-1 catalytic diad and a weak NMR screening hit, with special attention paid to maintaining the appropriate basicity and limiting the number of H-bonding donors of these scaffolds. The iminohydantoin cores were examined first and found to interact with the catalytic diad in one of two binding modes (A and B), each with the iminohydantoin core flipped 180° in relation to the other. The amidine structural motif within each core forms a bidentate interaction with a different aspartic acid of the catalytic diad. Both modes reproduced a highly conserved interaction pattern between the inhibitors and the catalytic aspartates. Potent iminohydantoin BACE-1 inhibitors have been obtained, validating the molecular design as aspartyl protease catalytic site inhibitors. Brain penetrant small molecule BACE inhibitors with high ligand efficiencies have been discovered, enabling multiple strategies for further development of these inhibitors into highly potent, selective and in vivo efficacious BACE inhibitors.

  20. Discovery of Cyclic Acylguanidines as Highly Potent and Selective β-Site Amyloid Cleaving Enzyme (BACE) Inhibitors: Part I-Inhibitor Design and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zhaoning; Sun, Zhong-Yue; Ye, Yuanzan; Voigt, Johannes; Strickland, Corey; Smith, Elizabeth M; Cumming, Jared; Wang, Lingyan; Wong, Jesse; Wang, Yu-Sen; Wyss, Daniel F; Chen, Xia; Kuvelkar, Reshma; Kennedy, Matthew E; Favreau, Leonard; Parker, Eric; McKittrick, Brian A; Stamford, Andrew; Czarniecki, Michael; Greenlee, William; Hunter, John C

    2010-10-18

    A number of novel amidine containing heterocycles were designed to reproduce the unique interaction pattern, revealed by X-ray crystallography, between the BACE-1 catalytic diad and a weak NMR screening hit (3), with special attention paid to maintaining the appropriate basicity and limiting the number of H-bonding donors of these scaffolds. The iminohydantoin cores (10 and 23) were examined first and found to interact with the catalytic diad in one of two binding modes (A and B), each with the iminohydantoin core flipped 180º in relation to the other. The amidine structural motif within each core forms a bidentate interaction with a different aspartic acid of the catalytic diad. Both modes reproduced a highly conserved interaction pattern between the inhibitors and the catalytic aspartates, as revealed by 3. Potent iminohydantoin BACE-1 inhibitors have been obtained, validating the molecular design as aspartyl protease catalytic site inhibitors. Brain penetrant small molecule BACE inhibitors with high ligand efficiencies have been discovered, enabling multiple strategies for further development of these inhibitors into highly potent, selective and in vivo efficacious BACE inhibitors.

  1. Benzimidazole-Based Quinazolines: In Vitro Evaluation, Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship, and Molecular Modeling as Aurora Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alka; Luxami, Vijay; Saxena, Sanjai; Paul, Kamaldeep

    2016-03-01

    A series of benzimidazole-based quinazoline derivatives with different substitutions of primary and secondary amines at the C2 position (1-12) were evaluated for their Aurora kinase inhibitory activities. All compounds except for 3 and 6 showed good activity against Aurora kinase inhibitors, with IC50 values in the range of 0.035-0.532 μM. The ligand efficiency (LE) of the compounds with Aurora A kinase was also determined. The structure-activity relationship and the quantitative structure-activity relationship revealed that the Aurora inhibitory activities of these derivatives primarily depend on the different substitutions of the amine present at the C2 position of the quinazoline core. Molecular docking studies in the active binding site also provided theoretical support for the experimental biological data acquired. The current study identifies a novel class of Aurora kinase inhibitors, which can further be used for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26773437

  2. Study on SSAO enzyme activity and anti-inflammatory effect of SSAO inhibitors in animal model of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tábi, Tamás; Szökő, Eva; Mérey, Anita; Tóth, Veronika; Mátyus, Péter; Gyires, Klára

    2013-06-01

    SSAO/VAP-1 participates in the accumulation of leukocytes at the site of inflammation. A new SSAO inhibitor, SzV-1287 was demonstrated to inhibit both acute and chronic inflammation in rats more effectively than the known enzyme inhibitor, LJP-1207. Surprisingly, the SSAO activity was not increased, but decreased both in acute and chronic inflammation. Though experiments are in progress to clarify these findings, the enzyme might play a role in the very early phase of inflammation and be inactivated during leukocyte extravasation. PMID:23263543

  3. Antiangiogenic and antimetastatic activity of JAK inhibitor AZD1480.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hong; Herrmann, Andreas; Reckamp, Karen; Zhang, Wang; Pal, Sumanta; Hedvat, Michael; Zhang, Chunyan; Liang, Wei; Scuto, Anna; Weng, Shaobu; Morosini, Deborah; Cao, Zhu A; Zinda, Michael; Figlin, Robert; Huszar, Dennis; Jove, Richard; Yu, Hua

    2011-11-01

    STAT3 has important functions in both tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment to facilitate cancer progression. The STAT regulatory kinase Janus-activated kinase (JAK) has been strongly implicated in promoting oncogenesis of various solid tumors, including the use of JAK kinase inhibitors such as AZD1480. However, direct evidence that JAK drives STAT3 function and cancer pathogenesis at the level of the tumor microenvironment is yet to be established clearly. In this study, we show that AZD1480 inhibits STAT3 in tumor-associated myeloid cells, reducing their number and inhibiting tumor metastasis. Myeloid cell-mediated angiogenesis was also diminished by AZD1480, with additional direct inhibition of endothelial cell function in vitro and in vivo. AZD1480 blocked lung infiltration of myeloid cells and formation of pulmonary metastases in both mouse syngeneic experimental and spontaneous metastatic models. Furthermore, AZD1480 reduced angiogenesis and metastasis in a human xenograft tumor model. Although the effects of AZD1480 on the tumor microenvironment were important for the observed antiangiogenic activity, constitutive activation of STAT3 in tumor cells themselves could block these antiangiogenic effects, showing the complexity of the JAK/STAT signaling network in tumor progression. Together, our results indicated that AZD1480 can effectively inhibit tumor angiogenesis and metastasis mediated by STAT3 in stromal cells as well as tumor cells. PMID:21920898

  4. Turing patterns in network-organized activator-inhibitor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Hiroya; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2010-07-01

    Turing instability in activator-inhibitor systems provides a paradigm of non-equilibrium self-organization; it has been extensively investigated for biological and chemical processes. Turing instability should also be possible in networks, and general mathematical methods for its treatment have been formulated previously. However, only examples of regular lattices and small networks were explicitly considered. Here we study Turing patterns in large random networks, which reveal striking differences from the classical behaviour. The initial linear instability leads to spontaneous differentiation of the network nodes into activator-rich and activator-poor groups. The emerging Turing patterns become furthermore strongly reshaped at the subsequent nonlinear stage. Multiple coexisting stationary states and hysteresis effects are observed. This peculiar behaviour can be understood in the framework of a mean-field theory. Our results offer a new perspective on self-organization phenomena in systems organized as complex networks. Potential applications include ecological metapopulations, synthetic ecosystems, cellular networks of early biological morphogenesis, and networks of coupled chemical nanoreactors.

  5. Novel inhibitors for PRMT1 discovered by high-throughput screening using activity-based fluorescence polarization.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Myles B C; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Brown, Steven J; Finn, M G; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Mowen, Kerri A

    2012-07-20

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) catalyze the posttranslational methylation of arginine using S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) as a methyl-donor. The PRMT family is widely expressed and has been implicated in biological functions such as RNA splicing, transcriptional control, signal transduction, and DNA repair. Therefore, specific inhibitors of individual PRMTs have potentially significant research and therapeutic value. In particular, PRMT1 is responsible for >85% of arginine methyltransferase activity, but currently available inhibitors of PRMT1 lack specificity, efficacy, and bioavailability. To address this limitation, we developed a high-throughput screening assay for PRMT1 that utilizes a hyper-reactive cysteine within the active site, which is lacking in almost all other PRMTs. This assay, which monitors the kinetics of the fluorescence polarization signal increase upon PRMT1 labeling by a rhodamine-containing cysteine-reactive probe, successfully identified two novel inhibitors selective for PRMT1 over other SAM-dependent methyltransferases. PMID:22506763

  6. A caspase active site probe reveals high fractional inhibition needed to block DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Méthot, Nathalie; Vaillancourt, John P; Huang, JingQi; Colucci, John; Han, Yongxin; Ménard, Stéphane; Zamboni, Robert; Toulmond, Sylvie; Nicholson, Donald W; Roy, Sophie

    2004-07-01

    Apoptotic markers consist of either caspase substrate cleavage products or phenotypic changes that manifest themselves as a consequence of caspase-mediated substrate cleavage. We have shown recently that pharmacological inhibitors of caspase activity prevent the appearance of two such apoptotic manifestations, alphaII-spectrin cleavage and DNA fragmentation, but that blockade of the latter required a significantly higher concentration of inhibitor. We investigated this phenomenon through the use of a novel radiolabeled caspase inhibitor, [(125)I]M808, which acts as a caspase active site probe. [(125)I]M808 bound to active caspases irreversibly and with high sensitivity in apoptotic cell extracts, in tissue extracts from several commonly used animal models of cellular injury, and in living cells. Moreover, [(125)I]M808 detected active caspases in septic mice when injected intravenously. Using this caspase probe, an active site occupancy assay was developed and used to measure the fractional inhibition required to block apoptosis-induced DNA fragmentation. In thymocytes, occupancy of up to 40% of caspase active sites had no effect on DNA fragmentation, whereas inhibition of half of the DNA cleaving activity required between 65 and 75% of active site occupancy. These results suggest that a high and persistent fractional inhibition will be required for successful caspase inhibition-based therapies. PMID:15067000

  7. Active site specificity of plasmepsin II.

    PubMed Central

    Westling, J.; Cipullo, P.; Hung, S. H.; Saft, H.; Dame, J. B.; Dunn, B. M.

    1999-01-01

    Members of the aspartic proteinase family of enzymes have very similar three-dimensional structures and catalytic mechanisms. Each, however, has unique substrate specificity. These distinctions arise from variations in amino acid residues that line the active site subsites and interact with the side chains of the amino acids of the peptides that bind to the active site. To understand the unique binding preferences of plasmepsin II, an enzyme of the aspartic proteinase class from the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, chromogenic octapeptides having systematic substitutions at various positions in the sequence were analyzed. This enabled the design of new, improved substrates for this enzyme (Lys-Pro-Ile-Leu-Phe*Nph-Ala/Glu-Leu-Lys, where * indicates the cleavage point). Additionally, the crystal structure of plasmepsin II was analyzed to explain the binding characteristics. Specific amino acids (Met13, Ser77, and Ile287) that were suspected of contributing to active site binding and specificity were chosen for site-directed mutagenesis experiments. The Met13Glu and Ile287Glu single mutants and the Met13Glu/Ile287Glu double mutant gain the ability to cleave substrates containing Lys residues. PMID:10548045

  8. Discovery of novel STAT3 small molecule inhibitors via in silico site-directed fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenying; Xiao, Hui; Lin, Jiayuh; Li, Chenglong

    2013-06-13

    Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been validated as an attractive therapeutic target for cancer therapy. To stop both STAT3 activation and dimerization, a viable strategy is to design inhibitors blocking its SH2 domain phosphotyrosine binding site that is responsible for both actions. A new fragment-based drug design (FBDD) strategy, in silico site-directed FBDD, was applied in this study. A designed novel compound, 5,8-dioxo-6-(pyridin-3-ylamino)-5,8-dihydronaphthalene-1-sulfonamide (LY5), was confirmed to bind to STAT3 SH2 by fluorescence polarization assay. In addition, four out of the five chosen compounds have IC50 values lower than 5 μM for the U2OS cancer cells. 8 (LY5) has an IC50 range in 0.5-1.4 μM in various cancer cell lines. 8 also suppresses tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model. This study has demonstrated the utility of this approach and could be used to other drug targets in general. PMID:23651330

  9. Synthesis and structure–activity relationships of tyrosine-based inhibitors of autotaxin (ATX)

    PubMed Central

    East, James E.; Kennedy, Andrew J.; Tomsig, Jose L.; De Leon, Alexandra R.; Lynch, Kevin R.; Macdonald, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted soluble enzyme that generates lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) through its lysophospholipase D activity. Because of LPA’s role in neoplastic diseases, ATX is an attractive therapeutic target due to its involvement in LPA biosynthesis. Here we describe the SAR of ATX inhibitor, VPC8a202, and apply this SAR knowledge towards developing a high potency inhibitor. We found that electron density in the pyridine region greatly influences activity of our inhibitors at ATX. PMID:20951039

  10. Direct inhibitors of InhA active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Manjunatha, Ujjini H.; Rao, Srinivasa P. S.; Kondreddi, Ravinder Reddy; Noble, Christian G.; Camacho, Luis R.; Tan, Bee H.; Ng, Seow H.; Ng, Pearly Shuyi; Ma, N. L.; Lakshminarayana, Suresh B.; Herve, Maxime; Barnes, S. Whitney; Yu, Weixuan; Kuhen, Kelli; Blasco, Francesca; Beer, David; Walker, John R.; Tonge, Peter J.; Glynne, Richard; Smith, Paul W.; Diagana, Thierry T.

    2015-01-01

    New chemotherapeutic agents are urgently required to combat the global spread of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The mycobacterial enoyl reductase, InhA, is one of the few clinically-validated targets in tuberculosis drug discovery. Here, we report the identification of a new class of direct InhA inhibitors, the 4-hydroxy-2-pyridones, using phenotypic high-throughput whole-cell screening. This class of orally-active compounds showed potent bactericidal activity against common isoniazid-resistant TB clinical isolates. Biophysical studies revealed that 4-hydroxy-2-pyridones bound specifically to InhA in an NADH-dependent manner and blocked the enoyl-substrate binding pocket. The lead compound NITD-916 directly blocked InhA in a dose-dependent manner and showed in vivo efficacy in acute and established mouse models of infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Collectively, our structural and biochemical data open up new avenues for rational structure-guided optimization of the 4-hydroxy-2-pyridone class of compounds for the treatment of MDR-TB. PMID:25568071

  11. Physalis alkekengi Carotenoidic Extract Inhibitor of Soybean Lipoxygenase-1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chedea, Veronica Sanda; Pintea, Adela; Bunea, Andrea; Braicu, Cornelia; Stanila, Andreea; Socaciu, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the carotenoidic saponified extract of Physalis alkekengi sepals (PA) towards the lipoxygenase (LOX) oxidation of linoleic acid. Lipoxygenase activity in the presence of carotenoids, standard and from extract, was followed by its kinetic behaviour determining the changes in absorption at 234 nm. The standard carotenoids used were β-carotene (β-car), lutein (Lut), and zeaxanthin (Zea). The calculated enzymatic specific activity (ESA) after 600 s of reaction proves that PA carotenoidic extract has inhibitory effect on LOX oxidation of linoleic acid. A longer polyenic chain of carotenoid structure gives a higher ESA during the first reaction seconds. This situation is not available after 600 s of reaction and may be due to a destruction of this structure by cooxidation of carotenoids, besides the classical LOX reaction. The PA carotenoidic extract inhibiting the LOX-1 reaction can be considered a source of lipoxygenase inhibitors. PMID:24511537

  12. Structure-activity analysis of vinylogous urea inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus-encoded ribonuclease H.

    PubMed

    Chung, Suhman; Wendeler, Michaela; Rausch, Jason W; Beilhartz, Greg; Gotte, Matthias; O'Keefe, Barry R; Bermingham, Alun; Beutler, John A; Liu, Shixin; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Le Grice, Stuart F J

    2010-09-01

    Vinylogous ureas 2-amino-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-cyclohepta[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide and N-[3-(aminocarbonyl)-4,5-dimethyl-2-thienyl]-2-furancarboxamide (compounds 1 and 2, respectively) were recently identified to be modestly potent inhibitors of the RNase H activity of HIV-1 and HIV-2 reverse transcriptase (RT). Both compounds shared a 3-CONH(2)-substituted thiophene ring but were otherwise structurally unrelated, which prevented a precise definition of the pharmacophore. We have therefore examined a larger series of vinylogous ureas carrying amide, amine, and cycloalkane modifications of the thiophene ring of compound 1. While cycloheptane- and cyclohexane-substituted derivatives retained potency, cyclopentane and cyclooctane substitutions eliminated activity. In the presence of a cycloheptane ring, modifying the 2-NH(2) or 3-CONH(2) functions decreased the potency. With respect to compound 2, vinylogous ureas whose dimethylthiophene ring contained modifications of the 2-NH(2) and 3-CONH(2) functions were investigated. 2-NH(2)-modified analogs displayed potency equivalent to or enhanced over that of compound 2, the most active of which, compound 16, reflected intramolecular cyclization of the 2-NH(2) and 3-CONH(2) groups. Molecular modeling was used to define an inhibitor binding site in the p51 thumb subdomain, suggesting that an interaction with the catalytically conserved His539 of the p66 RNase H domain could underlie inhibition of RNase H activity. Collectively, our data indicate that multiple functional groups of vinylogous ureas contribute to their potencies as RNase H inhibitors. Finally, single-molecule spectroscopy indicates that vinylogous ureas have the property of altering the reverse transcriptase orientation on a model RNA-DNA hybrid mimicking initiation plus-strand DNA synthesis. PMID:20547794

  13. Identifying New Drug Targets for Potent Phospholipase D Inhibitors: Combining Sequence Alignment, Molecular Docking, and Enzyme Activity/Binding Assays.

    PubMed

    Djakpa, Helene; Kulkarni, Aditya; Barrows-Murphy, Scheneque; Miller, Greg; Zhou, Weihong; Cho, Hyejin; Török, Béla; Stieglitz, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipase D enzymes cleave phospholipid substrates generating choline and phosphatidic acid. Phospholipase D from Streptomyces chromofuscus is a non-HKD (histidine, lysine, and aspartic acid) phospholipase D as the enzyme is more similar to members of the diverse family of metallo-phosphodiesterase/phosphatase enzymes than phospholipase D enzymes with active site HKD repeats. A highly efficient library of phospholipase D inhibitors based on 1,3-disubstituted-4-amino-pyrazolopyrimidine core structure was utilized to evaluate the inhibition of purified S. chromofuscus phospholipase D. The molecules exhibited inhibition of phospholipase D activity (IC50 ) in the nanomolar range with monomeric substrate diC4 PC and micromolar range with phospholipid micelles and vesicles. Binding studies with vesicle substrate and phospholipase D strongly indicate that these inhibitors directly block enzyme vesicle binding. Following these compelling results as a starting point, sequence searches and alignments with S. chromofuscus phospholipase D have identified potential new drug targets. Using AutoDock, inhibitors were docked into the enzymes selected from sequence searches and alignments (when 3D co-ordinates were available) and results analyzed to develop next-generation inhibitors for new targets. In vitro enzyme activity assays with several human phosphatases demonstrated that the predictive protocol was accurate. The strategy of combining sequence comparison, docking, and high-throughput screening assays has helped to identify new drug targets and provided some insight into how to make potential inhibitors more specific to desired targets. PMID:26691755

  14. Corrosion Research And Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  15. Corrosion Research and Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  16. Identification of selective covalent inhibitors of platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase 1B2 from the screening of an oxadiazolone-capped peptoid-azapeptoid hybrid library.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Bani Kanta; Liu, Xiaodan; Kodadek, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A potent and selective inhibitor of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase 1B2 (PAFAH1B2) is described. The compound was derived by improvement of a modest affinity primary hit isolated from the screening of a bead-displayed peptoid-azapeptoid hybrid library tethered to an oxadiazolone 'warhead'. The oxadiazolone moiety of the inhibitors was found to react covalently with the active site serine residue of PAFAH1B2. This screening strategy may be useful for the identification of many selective, covalent inhibitors of serine hydrolases. PMID:27160052

  17. Development of cell-active N6-methyladenosine RNA demethylase FTO inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baoen; Ye, Fei; Yu, Lu; Jia, Guifang; Huang, Xiaotian; Zhang, Xueju; Peng, Shuying; Chen, Kai; Wang, Meining; Gong, Shouze; Zhang, Ruihan; Yin, Jinya; Li, Haiyan; Yang, Yiming; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Jiwen; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Ao; Jiang, Hualiang; Luo, Cheng; Yang, Cai-Guang

    2012-10-31

    The direct nucleic acid repair dioxygenase FTO is an enzyme that demethylates N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) residues in mRNA in vitro and inside cells. FTO is the first RNA demethylase discovered that also serves a major regulatory function in mammals. Together with structure-based virtual screening and biochemical analyses, we report the first identification of several small-molecule inhibitors of human FTO demethylase. The most potent compound, the natural product rhein, which is neither a structural mimic of 2-oxoglutarate nor a chelator of metal ion, competitively binds to the FTO active site in vitro. Rhein also exhibits good inhibitory activity on m(6)A demethylation inside cells. These studies shed light on the development of powerful probes and new therapies for use in RNA biology and drug discovery. PMID:23045983

  18. Oximes: Inhibitors of Human Recombinant Acetylcholinesterase. A Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) Study

    PubMed Central

    Sepsova, Vendula; Karasova, Jana Zdarova; Korabecny, Jan; Dolezal, Rafael; Zemek, Filip; Bennion, Brian J.; Kuca, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) reactivators were developed for the treatment of organophosphate intoxication. Standard care involves the use of anticonvulsants (e.g., diazepam), parasympatolytics (e.g., atropine) and oximes that restore AChE activity. However, oximes also bind to the active site of AChE, simultaneously acting as reversible inhibitors. The goal of the present study is to determine how oxime structure influences the inhibition of human recombinant AChE (hrAChE). Therefore, 24 structurally different oximes were tested and the results compared to the previous eel AChE (EeAChE) experiments. Structural factors that were tested included the number of pyridinium rings, the length and structural features of the linker, and the number and position of the oxime group on the pyridinium ring. PMID:23959117

  19. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Si-Huei; Lee, Shih-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Shou-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerous epidemiological data suggest that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) can improve the clinical outcomes of pneumonia. Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacteria like pneumonia, and we aimed to find out whether the use of ACEis can decrease the risk of active TB. We conducted a nested case–control analysis by using a 1 million longitudinally followed cohort, from Taiwan national health insurance research database. The rate ratios (RRs) for TB were estimated by conditional logistic regression, and adjusted using a TB-specific disease risk score (DRS) with 71 TB-related covariates. From January, 1997 to December, 2011, a total of 75,536 users of ACEis, and 7720 cases of new active TB were identified. Current use (DRS adjusted RR, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.78–0.97]), but not recent and past use of ACEis, was associated with a decrease in risk of active TB. Interestingly, it was found that chronic use (>90 days) of ACEis was associated with a further decrease in the risk of TB (aRR, 0.74, [95% CI, 0.66–0.83]). There was also a duration response effect, correlating decrease in TB risk with longer duration of ACEis use. The decrease in TB risk was also consistent across all patient subgroups (age, sex, heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases, myocardial infraction, renal diseases, and diabetes) and patients receiving other cardiovascular medicine. In this large population-based study, we found that subjects with recent and chronic use of ACEis were associated with decrease in TB risk. PMID:27175655

  20. Biphenyl-4-yl-acrylohydroxamic acids: Identification of a novel indolyl-substituted HDAC inhibitor with antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Cincinelli, Raffaella; Zwick, Vincent; Musso, Loana; Zuco, Valentina; De Cesare, Michelandrea; Zunino, Franco; Simoes-Pires, Claudia; Nurisso, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Cuendet, Muriel; Dallavalle, Sabrina

    2016-04-13

    Modification of the cap group of biphenylacrylohydroxamic acid-based HDAC inhibitors led to the identification of a new derivative (3) characterized by an indolyl-substituted 4-phenylcinnamic skeleton. Molecular docking was used to predict the optimal conformation in the class I HDACs active site. Compound 3 showed HDAC inhibitory activity and antiproliferative activity against a panel of tumor cell lines, in the low μM range. The compound was further tested in vitro for acetylation of histone H4 and other non-histone proteins, and in vivo in a colon carcinoma model, showing significant proapoptotic and antitumor activities. PMID:26890116

  1. Inhibitors of Urokinase Type Plasminogen Activator and Cytostatic Activity from Crude Plants Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Xueqiang; Diaz, Ricardo; Franco, Jose Javier Rosado; Sanchez, Veronica Forbes; Fasoli, Ezio; Barletta, Gabriel; Carvajal, Augusto; Bansal, Vibha

    2014-01-01

    In view of the clear evidence that urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays an important role in the processes of tumor cell metastasis, aortic aneurysm, and multiple sclerosis, it has become a target of choice for pharmacological intervention. The goal of this study was thus to determine the presence of inhibitors of uPA in plants known traditionally for their anti-tumor properties. Crude methanol extracts were prepared from the leaves of plants (14) collected from the subtropical dry forest (Guanica, Puerto Rico), and tested for the presence of inhibitors of uPA using the fibrin plate assay. The extracts that tested positive (6) were then partitioned with petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol, in a sequential manner. The resulting fractions were then tested again using the fibrin plate assay. Extracts from leaves of Croton lucidus (C. lucidus) showed the presence of a strong uPA inhibitory activity. Serial dilutions of these C. lucidus partitions were performed to determine the uPA inhibition IC50 values. The chloroform extract showed the lowest IC50 value (3.52 μg/mL) and hence contained the most potent uPA inhibitor. Further investigations revealed that the crude methanol extract and its chloroform and n-butanol partitions did not significantly inhibit closely related proteases such as the tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasmin, indicating their selectivity for uPA, and hence superior potential for medicinal use with fewer side effects. In a further evaluation of their therapeutic potential for prevention of cancer metastasis, the C. lucidus extracts displayed cytostatic activity against human pancreatic carcinoma (PaCa-2) cells, as determined through an MTS assay. The cytostatic activities recorded for each of the partitions correlated with their relative uPA inhibitory activities. There are no existing reports of uPA inhibitors being present in any of the plants reported in this study. PMID:23896619

  2. Preclinical Profile of BI 224436, a Novel HIV-1 Non-Catalytic-Site Integrase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Amad, Ma'an; Bailey, Murray D.; Bethell, Richard; Bös, Michael; Bonneau, Pierre; Cordingley, Michael; Coulombe, René; Duan, Jianmin; Edwards, Paul; Faucher, Anne-Marie; Garneau, Michel; Jakalian, Araz; Kawai, Stephen; Lamorte, Louie; LaPlante, Steven; Luo, Laibin; Mason, Steve; Poupart, Marc-André; Rioux, Nathalie; Schroeder, Patricia; Simoneau, Bruno; Tremblay, Sonia; Tsantrizos, Youla; Witvrouw, Myriam; Yoakim, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    BI 224436 is an HIV-1 integrase inhibitor with effective antiviral activity that acts through a mechanism that is distinct from that of integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). This 3-quinolineacetic acid derivative series was identified using an enzymatic integrase long terminal repeat (LTR) DNA 3′-processing assay. A combination of medicinal chemistry, parallel synthesis, and structure-guided drug design led to the identification of BI 224436 as a candidate for preclinical profiling. It has antiviral 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of <15 nM against different HIV-1 laboratory strains and cellular cytotoxicity of >90 μM. BI 224436 also has a low, ∼2.1-fold decrease in antiviral potency in the presence of 50% human serum and, by virtue of a steep dose-response curve slope, exhibits serum-shifted EC95 values ranging between 22 and 75 nM. Passage of virus in the presence of inhibitor selected for either A128T, A128N, or L102F primary resistance substitutions, all mapping to a conserved allosteric pocket on the catalytic core of integrase. BI 224436 also retains full antiviral activity against recombinant viruses encoding INSTI resistance substitutions N155S, Q148H, and E92Q. In drug combination studies performed in cellular antiviral assays, BI 224436 displays an additive effect in combination with most approved antiretrovirals, including INSTIs. BI 224436 has drug-like in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties, including Caco-2 cell permeability, solubility, and low cytochrome P450 inhibition. It exhibited excellent pharmacokinetic profiles in rat (clearance as a percentage of hepatic flow [CL], 0.7%; bioavailability [F], 54%), monkey (CL, 23%; F, 82%), and dog (CL, 8%; F, 81%). Based on the excellent biological and pharmacokinetic profile, BI 224436 was advanced into phase 1 clinical trials. PMID:24663024

  3. Naturally occurring pentacyclic triterpenes as inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase: synthesis, structure-activity relationships, and X-ray crystallographic studies.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaoan; Sun, Hongbin; Liu, Jun; Cheng, Keguang; Zhang, Pu; Zhang, Liying; Hao, Jia; Zhang, Luyong; Ni, Peizhou; Zographos, Spyros E; Leonidas, Demetres D; Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Gimisis, Thanasis; Hayes, Joseph M; Oikonomakos, Nikos G

    2008-06-26

    Twenty-five naturally occurring pentacyclic triterpenes, 15 of which were synthesized in this study, were biologically evaluated as inhibitors of rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase a (GPa). From SAR studies, the presence of a sugar moiety in triterpene saponins resulted in a markedly decreased activity ( 7, 18- 20) or no activity ( 21, 22). These saponins, however, might find their value as potential natural prodrugs which are much more water-soluble than their corresponding aglycones. To elucidate the mechanism of GP inhibition, we have determined the crystal structures of the GPb-asiatic acid and GPb-maslinic acid complexes. The X-ray analysis indicates that the inhibitors bind at the allosteric activator site, where the physiological activator AMP binds. Pentacyclic triterpenes represent a promising class of multiple-target antidiabetic agents that exert hypoglycemic effects, at least in part, through GP inhibition. PMID:18517260

  4. Synergistic Activity of Combined NS5A Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    O'Boyle, Donald R; Nower, Peter T; Gao, Min; Fridell, Robert; Wang, Chunfu; Hewawasam, Piyasena; Lopez, Omar; Tu, Yong; Meanwell, Nicholas A; Belema, Makonen; Roberts, Susan B; Cockett, Mark; Sun, Jin-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Daclatasvir (DCV) is a first-in-class hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural 5A replication complex inhibitor (NS5A RCI) that is clinically effective in interferon-free combinations with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) targeting alternate HCV proteins. Recently, we reported NS5A RCI combinations that enhance HCV inhibitory potential in vitro, defining a new class of HCV inhibitors termed NS5A synergists (J. Sun, D. R. O'Boyle II, R. A. Fridell, D. R. Langley, C. Wang, S. Roberts, P. Nower, B. M. Johnson F. Moulin, M. J. Nophsker, Y. Wang, M. Liu, K. Rigat, Y. Tu, P. Hewawasam, J. Kadow, N. A. Meanwell, M. Cockett, J. A. Lemm, M. Kramer, M. Belema, and M. Gao, Nature 527:245-248, 2015, doi:10.1038/nature15711). To extend the characterization of NS5A synergists, we tested new combinations of DCV and NS5A synergists against genotype (gt) 1 to 6 replicons and gt 1a, 2a, and 3a viruses. The kinetics of inhibition in HCV-infected cells treated with DCV, an NS5A synergist (NS5A-Syn), or a combination of DCV and NS5A-Syn were distinctive. Similar to activity observed clinically, DCV caused a multilog drop in HCV, followed by rebound due to the emergence of resistance. DCV-NS5A-Syn combinations were highly efficient at clearing cells of viruses, in line with the trend seen in replicon studies. The retreatment of resistant viruses that emerged using DCV monotherapy with DCV-NS5A-Syn resulted in a multilog drop and rebound in HCV similar to the initial decline and rebound observed with DCV alone on wild-type (WT) virus. A triple combination of DCV, NS5A-Syn, and a DAA targeting the NS3 or NS5B protein cleared the cells of viruses that are highly resistant to DCV. Our data support the observation that the cooperative interaction of DCV and NS5A-Syn potentiates both the genotype coverage and resistance barrier of DCV, offering an additional DAA option for combination therapy and tools for explorations of NS5A function. PMID:26711745

  5. A unique inhibitor binding site in ERK1/2 is associated with slow binding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Chaikuad, Apirat; Tacconi, Eliana; Zimmer, Jutta; Liang, Yanke; Gray, Nathanael S.; Tarsounas, Madalena; Knapp, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the ERK pathway is a hallmark of cancer and targeting of upstream signalling partners led to the development of approved drugs. Recently SCH772984 has been shown to be a selective and potent ERK1/2 inhibitor. Here we report the structural mechanism for its remarkable selectivity. In ERK1/2, SCH772984 induced a so far unknown binding pocket that accommodated the piperazine-phenyl-pyrimidine decoration. This novel binding pocket was created by an inactive conformation of the phosphate binding loop and an outward tilt of helix αC. In contrast, structure determination of SCH772984 with the off-target haspin and JNK1 revealed canonical but two distinct type-I binding modes. Intriguingly, the novel binding mode with ERK1/2 was associated with slow binding kinetics in vitro as well as in cell based assay systems. The described binding mode of SCH772984 with ERK1/2 enables the design of a new type of specific kinase inhibitors with prolonged on-target activity. PMID:25195011

  6. trans-3,4-Disubstituted pyrrolidines as inhibitors of the human aspartyl protease renin. Part II: prime site exploration using an oxygen linker.

    PubMed

    Sellner, Holger; Cottens, Sylvain; Cumin, Frédéric; Ehrhardt, Claus; Kosaka, Takatoshi; Lorthiois, Edwige; Ostermann, Nils; Webb, Randy L; Rigel, Dean F; Wagner, Trixie; Maibaum, Jürgen

    2015-04-15

    Inhibition of the aspartyl protease renin is considered as an efficient approach for treating hypertension. Lately, we described the discovery of a novel class of direct renin inhibitors which comprised a pyrrolidine scaffold (e.g., 2). Based on the X-ray structure of the lead compound 2 bound to renin we predicted that optimization of binding interactions to the prime site could offer an opportunity to further expand the scope of this chemotype. Pyrrolidine-based inhibitors were synthesized in which the prime site moieties are linked to the pyrrolidine core through an oxygen atom, resulting in an ether or a carbamate linker subseries. Especially the carbamate derivatives showed a pronounced increase in in vitro potency compared to 2. Here we report the structure-activity relationship of both subclasses and demonstrate blood pressure lowering effects for an advanced prototype in a hypertensive double-transgenic rat model after oral dosing. PMID:25754490

  7. Kinetic analysis of the interaction between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed Central

    Masson, C; Angles-Cano, E

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics of inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) by the fast-acting plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) was investigated in homogeneous (plasma) and heterogeneous (solid-phase fibrin) systems by using radioisotopic and spectrophotometric analysis. It is demonstrated that fibrin-bound t-PA is protected from inhibition by PAI-1, whereas t-PA in soluble phase is rapidly inhibited (K1 = 10(7) M-1.s-1) even in the presence of 2 microM-plasminogen. The inhibitor interferes with the binding of t-PA to fibrin in a competitive manner. As a consequence the Kd of t-PA for fibrin (1.2 +/- 0.4 nM) increases and the maximal velocity of plasminogen activation by fibrin-bound t-PA is not modified. From the plot of the apparent Kd versus the concentration of PAI-1 a Ki value of 1.3 +/- 0.3 nM was calculated. The quasi-similar values for the dissociation constants between fibrin and t-PA (Kd) and between PAI-1 and t-PA (Ki), as well as the competitive type of inhibition observed, indicate that the fibrinolytic activity of human plasma may be the result of an equilibrium distribution of t-PA between both the amount of fibrin generated and the concentration of circulating inhibitor. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3146972

  8. Factor eight inhibitor bypass activity (FEIBA) in the management of bleeds in hemophilia patients with high-titer inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tjønnfjord, Geir E; Andre Holme, Pål

    2007-01-01

    The development of high-titer inhibitors to FVIII and less often to other coagulation factors are the most serious complication of hemophilia therapy and makes treatment of bleeds very challenging. At present, bypassing agents, such as factor eight inhibitor bypass activity (FEIBA) and activated recombinant factor VII (rFVIIa) are the only coagulation factor concentrates available for the treatment of bleeds in inhibitor patients. Both products are effective and safe, and their efficacy has been found to be comparable (approximately 80%) in a recent prospective study. A significant number of patients report a better effect of one or the other of the products, and in a minority of the patients none of the products are particularly effective. The hemostatic efficacy of bypassing agents is not considered equal to that of coagulation factor replacement in patients without inhibitors by most physicians. An improvement in hemostatic efficacy may be achieved by optimizing the dosing of by passing agents. However, the lack of standardized and validated laboratory assays reflecting the hemostatic efficacy of the bypassing agents is an obstacle to this achievement. PMID:17969383

  9. Mapping Inhibitor Binding Modes on an Active Cysteine Protease via NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gregory M.; Balouch, Eaman; Goetz, David H.; Lazic, Ana; McKerrow, James H.; Craik, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    Cruzain is a member of the papain/cathepsin-L family of cysteine proteases, and the major cysteine protease of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas’ disease. We report an auto-induction methodology that provides soluble-cruzain at high yields (> 30 mg per liter in minimal media). These increased yields provide sufficient quantities of active enzyme for use in NMR-based ligand mapping. Using CD and NMR spectroscopy, we also examined the solution-state structural dynamics of the enzyme in complex with a covalently bound vinyl sulfone inhibitor (K777). We report the backbone amide and side chain carbon chemical shift assignments of cruzain in complex with K777. These resonance assignments were used to identify and map residues located in the substrate binding pocket, including the catalytic Cys25 and His162. Selective 15N-Cys, 15N-His, and 13C-Met labeling was performed to quickly assess cruzain-ligand interactions for a set of eight low molecular weight compounds exhibiting micromolar binding or inhibition. Chemical shift perturbation mapping verifies that six of the eight compounds bind to cruzain at the active site. Three different binding modes were delineated for the compounds, namely covalent, non-covalent, and non-interacting. These results provide examples of how NMR spectroscopy can be used to screen compounds for fast evaluation of enzyme-inhibitor interactions in order to facilitate lead compound identification and subsequent structural studies. PMID:23181936

  10. Urokinase and type I plasminogen activator inhibitor production by normal human hepatocytes: modulation by inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Busso, N; Nicodeme, E; Chesne, C; Guillouzo, A; Belin, D; Hyafil, F

    1994-07-01

    We examined the effects of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and transforming growth factor-beta) on the plasminogen activator system (urokinase, tissue-type plasminogen activator, type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor) in primary cultures of human hepatocytes. We show that interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha increase urokinase-type plasminogen activator production, reinforcing the concept that increased urokinase production is associated with inflammatory processes. By contrast, the same agents (i.e., interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) do not stimulate plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 production. This latter observation rules out hepatocytes as a major cellular source of plasmatic plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 during acute-phase-related responses. Among the inflammatory agents used, transforming growth factor-beta was found to be the most effective modulator of both urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, inducing severalfold increases of activity of urokinase-type plasminogen activator, antigen and the corresponding mRNA and increasing plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 antigen and mRNA levels. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 modulation by transforming growth factor-beta may play a critical role in hepatic pathophysiology. PMID:8020888

  11. Diarylsulfonamides and their bioisosteres as dual inhibitors of alkaline phosphatase and carbonic anhydrase: Structure activity relationship and molecular modelling studies.

    PubMed

    Al-Rashida, Mariya; Ejaz, Syeda Abida; Ali, Sharafat; Shaukat, Aisha; Hamayoun, Mehwish; Ahmed, Maqsood; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2015-05-15

    The effect of bioisosteric replacement of carboxamide linking group with sulfonamide linking group, on alkaline phosphatase (AP) and carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibition activity of aromatic benzenesulfonamides was investigated. A series of carboxamide linked aromatic benzenesulfonamides 1a-1c, 2a-2d and their sulfonamide linked bioisosteres 3a-3d, 4a-4d was synthesized and evaluated for inhibitory activity against bovine tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) and bCA II. A significant increase in CA inhibition activity was observed upon bioisosteric replacement of carboxamide linking group with a sulfonamide group. Some of these compounds were identified as highly potent and selective AP inhibitors. Compounds 1b, 2b, 3d, 4d 5b and 5c were found to be selective bTNAP inhibitors, whereas compounds 1a, 1c, 2a, 2c, 2d, 3a, 3c, 4a, 4b, 4c, 5a were found to be selective bIAP inhibitors. For most active AP inhibitor 3b, detailed kinetic studies indicated a competitive mode of inhibition against tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) and non-competitive mode of inhibition against intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP). Molecular docking studies were carried out to rationalize important binding site interactions. PMID:25865133

  12. Long-range enhancer activity determines Myc sensitivity to Notch inhibitors in T cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yashiro-Ohtani, Yumi; Wang, Hongfang; Zang, Chongzhi; Arnett, Kelly L.; Bailis, Will; Ho, Yugong; Knoechel, Birgit; Lanauze, Claudia; Louis, Lumena; Forsyth, Katherine S.; Chen, Sujun; Chung, Yoonjie; Schug, Jonathan; Blobel, Gerd A.; Liebhaber, Stephen A.; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Blacklow, Stephen C.; Liu, Xiaole Shirley; Aster, Jon C.; Pear, Warren S.

    2014-01-01

    Notch is needed for T-cell development and is a common oncogenic driver in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The protooncogene c-Myc (Myc) is a critical target of Notch in normal and malignant pre-T cells, but how Notch regulates Myc is unknown. Here, we identify a distal enhancer located >1 Mb 3′ of human and murine Myc that binds Notch transcription complexes and physically interacts with the Myc proximal promoter. The Notch1 binding element in this region activates reporter genes in a Notch-dependent, cell-context–specific fashion that requires a conserved Notch complex binding site. Acute changes in Notch activation produce rapid changes in H3K27 acetylation across the entire enhancer (a region spanning >600 kb) that correlate with Myc expression. This broad Notch-influenced region comprises an enhancer region containing multiple domains, recognizable as discrete H3K27 acetylation peaks. Leukemia cells selected for resistance to Notch inhibitors express Myc despite epigenetic silencing of enhancer domains near the Notch transcription complex binding sites. Notch-independent expression of Myc in resistant cells is highly sensitive to inhibitors of bromodomain containing 4 (Brd4), a change in drug sensitivity that is accompanied by preferential association of the Myc promoter with more 3′ enhancer domains that are strongly dependent on Brd4 for function. These findings indicate that altered long-range enhancer activity can mediate resistance to targeted therapies and provide a mechanistic rationale for combined targeting of Notch and Brd4 in leukemia. PMID:25369933

  13. Site-Specific Glycan Microheterogeneity of Inter-Alpha-Trypsin Inhibitor Heavy Chain H4

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITIH4) is a 120 kDa acute-phase glycoprotein produced primarily in the liver, secreted into the blood, and identified in serum. ITIH4 is involved in liver development and stabilization of the extracellular matrix (ECM), and its expression is altered in liver disease. In this study, we aimed to characterize glycosylation of recombinant and serum-derived ITIH4 using analytical mass spectrometry. Recombinant ITIH4 was analyzed to optimize glycopeptide analyses, followed by serum-derived ITIH4. First, we confirmed that the four ITIH4 N-X-S/T sequons (N81, N207, N517, and N577) were glycosylated by treating ITIH4 tryptic/GluC glycopeptides with PNGaseF in the presence of 18O water. Next, we performed glycosidase-assisted LC–MS/MS analysis of ITIH4 trypsin-GluC glycopeptides enriched via hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography to characterize ITIH4 N-glycoforms. While microheterogeneity of N-glycoforms differed between ITIH4 protein expressed in HEK293 cells and protein isolated from serum, occupancy of N-glycosylation sites did not differ. A fifth N-glycosylation site was discovered at N274 with the rare nonconsensus NVV motif. Site N274 contained high-mannose N-linked glycans in both serum and recombinant ITIH4. We also identified isoform-specific ITIH4 O-glycoforms and documented that utilization of O-glycosylation sites on ITIH4 differed between the cell line and serum. PMID:24884609

  14. Effects of inhibitors of tumoricidal activity upon schistosomulum killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    James, S L; Glaven, J A

    1987-12-01

    Larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni are efficiently killed in vitro by lymphokine-activated macrophages, leading to the hypothesis that these cells may participate in the effector mechanism of protective immunity against schistosomiasis. Larvacidal activity has also been demonstrated in the IC-21 macrophage cell line in the absence of a demonstrable respiratory burst, indicating that macrophages possess nonoxidative mechanisms of schistosomulum killing. In this study, we demonstrated that IC-21 larval killing was most effective when contact was allowed between cells and target. Nonoxidative larvacidal activity was prevented by protein synthesis inhibitors, by the inhibition of microtubule polymerization, and by tosyllysylchloromethylketone but not by other inhibitors or substrates of tryptic or chymotryptic protease activity. The addition of excess iron to the culture also prevented IC-21-mediated larval killing, suggesting that the production of an iron-binding molecule may be involved. In contrast, the addition of excess thymidine or arginine did not reverse macrophage larvacidal activity, nor did lysosomotropic agents that depress the activity of acid hydrolases. Under appropriate conditions of activation and surface membrane stimulation, IC-21 cells could be induced to release soluble cytotoxic factors retaining larvacidal activity. These observations provide insight into the mechanism of macrophage-mediated schistosome killing, in comparison to the cytotoxic mechanisms described in the better-studied tumoricidal models, and supply a basis for further biochemical investigation of macrophage function against a multicellular target. PMID:3119500

  15. Effects of inhibitors of tumoricidal activity upon schistosomulum killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    James, S L; Glaven, J A

    1987-01-01

    Larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni are efficiently killed in vitro by lymphokine-activated macrophages, leading to the hypothesis that these cells may participate in the effector mechanism of protective immunity against schistosomiasis. Larvacidal activity has also been demonstrated in the IC-21 macrophage cell line in the absence of a demonstrable respiratory burst, indicating that macrophages possess nonoxidative mechanisms of schistosomulum killing. In this study, we demonstrated that IC-21 larval killing was most effective when contact was allowed between cells and target. Nonoxidative larvacidal activity was prevented by protein synthesis inhibitors, by the inhibition of microtubule polymerization, and by tosyllysylchloromethylketone but not by other inhibitors or substrates of tryptic or chymotryptic protease activity. The addition of excess iron to the culture also prevented IC-21-mediated larval killing, suggesting that the production of an iron-binding molecule may be involved. In contrast, the addition of excess thymidine or arginine did not reverse macrophage larvacidal activity, nor did lysosomotropic agents that depress the activity of acid hydrolases. Under appropriate conditions of activation and surface membrane stimulation, IC-21 cells could be induced to release soluble cytotoxic factors retaining larvacidal activity. These observations provide insight into the mechanism of macrophage-mediated schistosome killing, in comparison to the cytotoxic mechanisms described in the better-studied tumoricidal models, and supply a basis for further biochemical investigation of macrophage function against a multicellular target. PMID:3119500

  16. A modified HSP70 inhibitor shows broad activity as an anticancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Balaburski, Gregor M.; Leu, Julia I-Ju; Beeharry, Neil; Hayik, Seth; Andrake, Mark D.; Zhang, Gao; Herlyn, Meenhard; Villanueva, Jessie; Dunbrack, Roland L.; Yen, Tim; George, Donna L.; Murphy, Maureen E.

    2013-01-01

    The stress-induced heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone that plays a key role in refolding misfolded proteins and promoting cell survival following stress. HSP70 is marginally expressed in non-transformed cells, but is greatly overexpressed in tumor cells. Silencing HSP70 is uniformly cytotoxic to tumor but not normal cells; therefore, there has been great interest in the development of HSP70 inhibitors for cancer therapy. Here we report that the HSP70 inhibitor 2-phenylethynesulfonamide (PES) binds to the substrate-binding domain of HSP70, and requires the C-terminal helical ‘lid’ of this protein (amino acids 573-616) in order to bind. Using molecular modeling and in silico docking, we have identified a candidate binding site for PES in this region of HSP70, and we identify point mutants that fail to interact with PES. A preliminary structure-activity relationship analysis has revealed a derivative of PES, 2-(3-chlorophenyl) ethynesulfonamide (PES-Cl), which shows increased cytotoxicity and ability to inhibit autophagy, along with significantly improved ability to extend the life of mice with pre-B cell lymphoma, compared to the parent compound (p=0.015). Interestingly, we also show that these HSP70 inhibitors impair the activity of the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) in cell-free extracts, and induce G2/M arrest and genomic instability in cancer cells. PES-Cl is thus a promising new anti-cancer compound with several notable mechanisms of action. PMID:23303345

  17. Thiolactomycin inhibits D-aspartate oxidase: a novel approach to probing the active site environment.

    PubMed

    Katane, Masumi; Saitoh, Yasuaki; Hanai, Toshihiko; Sekine, Masae; Furuchi, Takemitsu; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Nakagome, Izumi; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Hirono, Shuichi; Homma, Hiroshi

    2010-10-01

    D-Aspartate oxidase (DDO) and D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) are flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-containing flavoproteins that catalyze the oxidative deamination of D-amino acids. While several functionally and structurally important amino acid residues have been identified in the DAO protein, little is known about the structure-function relationships of DDO. In the search for a potent DDO inhibitor as a novel tool for investigating its structure-function relationships, a large number of biologically active compounds of microbial origin were screened for their ability to inhibit the enzymatic activity of mouse DDO. We discovered several compounds that inhibited the activity of mouse DDO, and one of the compounds identified, thiolactomycin (TLM), was then characterized and evaluated as a novel DDO inhibitor. TLM reversibly inhibited the activity of mouse DDO with a mixed type of inhibition more efficiently than meso-tartrate and malonate, known competitive inhibitors of mammalian DDOs. The selectivity of TLM was investigated using various DDOs and DAOs, and it was found that TLM inhibits not only DDO, but also DAO. Further experiments with apoenzymes of DDO and DAO revealed that TLM is most likely to inhibit the activities of DDO and DAO by competition with both the substrate and the coenzyme, FAD. Structural models of mouse DDO/TLM complexes supported this finding. The binding mode of TLM to DDO was validated further by site-directed mutagenesis of an active site residue, Arg-237. Collectively, our findings show that TLM is a novel, active site-directed DDO inhibitor that will be useful for elucidating the molecular details of the active site environment of DDO. PMID:20603179

  18. Non-target-site resistance to ALS inhibitors in waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A waterhemp population (MCR) previously characterized as resistant to 4-hyroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) and photosystem II (PSII) inhibitors was found to have two different resistance responses to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors. Plants from the MCR population exhibiting high resistan...

  19. Thumb Site 2 Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Viral RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase Allosterically Block the Transition from Initiation to Elongation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiawen; Johnson, Kenneth A

    2016-05-01

    Replication of the hepatitis C viral genome is catalyzed by the NS5B (nonstructural protein 5B) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, which is a major target of antiviral drugs currently in the clinic. Prior studies established that initiation of RNA replication could be facilitated by starting with a dinucleotide (pGG). Here we establish conditions for efficient initiation from GTP to form the dinucleotide and subsequent intermediates leading to highly processive elongation, and we examined the effects of four classes of nonnucleoside inhibitors on each step of the reaction. We show that palm site inhibitors block initiation starting from GTP but not when starting from pGG. In addition we show that nonnucleoside inhibitors binding to thumb site-2 (NNI2) lead to the accumulation of abortive intermediates three-five nucleotides in length. Our kinetic analysis shows that NNI2 do not significantly block initiation or elongation of RNA synthesis; rather, they block the transition from initiation to elongation, which is thought to proceed with significant structural rearrangement of the enzyme-RNA complex including displacement of the β-loop from the active site. Direct measurement in single turnover kinetic studies show that pyrophosphate release is faster than the chemistry step, which appears to be rate-limiting during processive synthesis. These results reveal important new details to define the steps involved in initiation and elongation during viral RNA replication, establish the allosteric mechanisms by which NNI2 inhibitors act, and point the way to the design of more effective allosteric inhibitors that exploit this new information. PMID:26851276

  20. New Pyrazolobenzothiazine Derivatives as Hepatitis C Virus NS5B Polymerase Palm Site I Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have previously identified the pyrazolobenzothiazine scaffold as a promising chemotype against hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase, a validated and promising anti-HCV target. Herein we describe the design, synthesis, enzymatic, and cellular characterization of new pyrazolobenzothiazines as anti-HCV inhibitors. The binding site for a representative derivative was mapped to NS5B palm site I employing a mutant counterscreen assay, thus validating our previous in silico predictions. Derivative 2b proved to be the best selective anti-HCV derivative within the new series, exhibiting a IC50 of 7.9 μM against NS5B polymerase and antiviral effect (EC50 = 8.1 μM; EC90 = 23.3 μM) coupled with the absence of any antimetabolic effect (CC50 > 224 μM; SI > 28) in a cell based HCV replicon system assay. Significantly, microscopic analysis showed that, unlike the parent compounds, derivative 2b did not show any significant cell morphological alterations. Furthermore, since most of the pyrazolobenzothiazines tested altered cell morphology, this undesired aspect was further investigated by exploring possible perturbation of lipid metabolism during compound treatment. PMID:24654886

  1. HIV Protease Inhibitors Act as Competitive Inhibitors of the Cytoplasmic Glucose Binding Site of GLUTs with Differing Affinities for GLUT1 and GLUT4

    PubMed Central

    Hresko, Richard C.; Hruz, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical use of several first generation HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) is associated with the development of insulin resistance. Indinavir has been shown to act as a potent reversible noncompetitive inhibitor of zero-trans glucose influx via direct interaction with the insulin responsive facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4. Newer drugs within this class have differing effects on insulin sensitivity in treated patients. GLUTs are known to contain two distinct glucose-binding sites that are located on opposite sides of the lipid bilayer. To determine whether interference with the cytoplasmic glucose binding site is responsible for differential effects of PIs on glucose transport, intact intracellular membrane vesicles containing GLUT1 and GLUT4, which have an inverted transporter orientation relative to the plasma membrane, were isolated from 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The binding of biotinylated ATB-BMPA, a membrane impermeable bis-mannose containing photolabel, was determined in the presence of indinavir, ritonavir, atazanavir, tipranavir, and cytochalasin b. Zero-trans 2-deoxyglucose transport was measured in both 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and primary rat adipocytes acutely exposed to these compounds. PI inhibition of glucose transport correlated strongly with the PI inhibition of ATB-BMPA/transporter binding. At therapeutically relevant concentrations, ritonavir was not selective for GLUT4 over GLUT1. Indinavir was found to act as a competitive inhibitor of the cytoplasmic glucose binding site of GLUT4 with a KI of 8.2 µM. These data establish biotinylated ATB-BMPA as an effective probe to quantify accessibility of the endofacial glucose-binding site in GLUTs and reveal that the ability of PIs to block this site differs among drugs within this class. This provides mechanistic insight into the basis for the clinical variation in drug-related metabolic toxicity. PMID:21966466

  2. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  3. Non-catalytic site HIV-1 integrase inhibitors disrupt core maturation and induce a reverse transcription block in target cells.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Mini; Yant, Stephen R; Tsai, Luong; O'Sullivan, Christopher; Bam, Rujuta A; Tsai, Angela; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Stray, Kirsten M; Sakowicz, Roman; Cihlar, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is the target for two classes of antiretrovirals: i) the integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) and ii) the non-catalytic site integrase inhibitors (NCINIs). NCINIs bind at the IN dimer interface and are thought to interfere primarily with viral DNA (vDNA) integration in the target cell by blocking IN-vDNA assembly as well as the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction. Herein we show that treatment of virus-producing cells, but not of mature virions or target cells, drives NCINI antiviral potency. NCINIs target an essential late-stage event in HIV replication that is insensitive to LEDGF levels in the producer cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of NCINIs displayed normal Gag-Pol processing and endogenous reverse transcriptase activity, but were defective at initiating vDNA synthesis following entry into the target cell. NCINI-resistant virus carrying a T174I mutation in the IN dimer interface was less sensitive to the compound-induced late-stage effects, including the reverse transcription block. Wild-type, but not T174I virus, produced in the presence of NCINIs exhibited striking defects in core morphology and an increased level of IN oligomers that was not observed upon treatment of mature cell-free particles. Collectively, these results reveal that NCINIs act through a novel mechanism that is unrelated to the previously observed inhibition of IN activity or IN-LEDGF interaction, and instead involves the disruption of an IN function during HIV-1 core maturation and assembly. PMID:24040198

  4. Non-Catalytic Site HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors Disrupt Core Maturation and Induce a Reverse Transcription Block in Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Luong; O’Sullivan, Christopher; Bam, Rujuta A.; Tsai, Angela; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Stray, Kirsten M.; Sakowicz, Roman; Cihlar, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is the target for two classes of antiretrovirals: i) the integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) and ii) the non-catalytic site integrase inhibitors (NCINIs). NCINIs bind at the IN dimer interface and are thought to interfere primarily with viral DNA (vDNA) integration in the target cell by blocking IN-vDNA assembly as well as the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction. Herein we show that treatment of virus-producing cells, but not of mature virions or target cells, drives NCINI antiviral potency. NCINIs target an essential late-stage event in HIV replication that is insensitive to LEDGF levels in the producer cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of NCINIs displayed normal Gag-Pol processing and endogenous reverse transcriptase activity, but were defective at initiating vDNA synthesis following entry into the target cell. NCINI-resistant virus carrying a T174I mutation in the IN dimer interface was less sensitive to the compound-induced late-stage effects, including the reverse transcription block. Wild-type, but not T174I virus, produced in the presence of NCINIs exhibited striking defects in core morphology and an increased level of IN oligomers that was not observed upon treatment of mature cell-free particles. Collectively, these results reveal that NCINIs act through a novel mechanism that is unrelated to the previously observed inhibition of IN activity or IN-LEDGF interaction, and instead involves the disruption of an IN function during HIV-1 core maturation and assembly. PMID:24040198

  5. Design and prediction of new acetylcholinesterase inhibitor via quantitative structure activity relationship of huprines derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuqun; Hou, Bo; Yang, Huaiyu; Zuo, Zhili

    2016-05-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an important enzyme in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Comparative quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses on some huprines inhibitors against AChE were carried out using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA), and hologram QSAR (HQSAR) methods. Three highly predictive QSAR models were constructed successfully based on the training set. The CoMFA, CoMSIA, and HQSAR models have values of r (2) = 0.988, q (2) = 0.757, ONC = 6; r (2) = 0.966, q (2) = 0.645, ONC = 5; and r (2) = 0.957, q (2) = 0.736, ONC = 6. The predictabilities were validated using an external test sets, and the predictive r (2) values obtained by the three models were 0.984, 0.973, and 0.783, respectively. The analysis was performed by combining the CoMFA and CoMSIA field distributions with the active sites of the AChE to further understand the vital interactions between huprines and the protease. On the basis of the QSAR study, 14 new potent molecules have been designed and six of them are predicted to be more active than the best active compound 24 described in the literature. The final QSAR models could be helpful in design and development of novel active AChE inhibitors. PMID:26832327

  6. A thermostable trypsin inhibitor with antiproliferative activity from small pinto beans.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Zhang, Yanbo; Sze, Stephen Cho Wing; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-08-01

    Small pinto bean is a cultivar of Phaseolus vulgaris. It produces a 16-kDa trypsin inhibitor that could be purified using anion exchange and size chromatography. Q-Sepharose, Mono Q and Superdex 75 columns were employed for the isolation process. Small pinto bean trypsin inhibitor demonstrated moderate pH stability (pH 2-10) and marked heat stability, with its trypsin inhibitory activity largely retained after exposure to 100 °C for half an hour. The activity was abolished in the presence of dithiothreitol, in a dose-dependent manner, implying that disulfide bonds in small pinto bean trypsin inhibitor are crucial for the activity. The trypsin inhibitor showed a blocked N-terminus. The trypsin inhibitor only slightly inhibited the viability of breast cancer MCF7 and hepatoma HepG2 cells at 125 μM. PMID:23859150

  7. Xenopus polo-like kinase Plx1 regulates XErp1, a novel inhibitor of APC/C activity

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Andreas; Duncan, Peter I.; Rauh, Nadine R.; Sauer, Guido; Fry, Andrew M.; Nigg, Erich A.; Mayer, Thomas U.

    2005-01-01

    Metaphase-to-anaphase transition is a fundamental step in cell cycle progression where duplicated sister-chromatids segregate to the future daughter cells. The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a highly regulated ubiquitin-ligase that triggers anaphase onset and mitotic exit by targeting securin and mitotic cyclins for destruction. It was previously shown that the Xenopus polo-like kinase Plx1 is essential to activate APC/C upon release from cytostatic factor (CSF) arrest in Xenopus egg extract. Although the mechanism by which Plx1 regulates APC/C activation remained unclear, the existence of a putative APC/C inhibitor was postulated whose activity would be neutralized by Plx1 upon CSF release. Here we identify XErp1, a novel Plx1-regulated inhibitor of APC/C activity, and we demonstrate that XErp1 is required to prevent anaphase onset in CSF-arrested Xenopus egg extract. Inactivation of XErp1 leads to premature APC/C activation. Conversely, addition of excess XErp1 to Xenopus egg extract prevents APC/C activation. Plx1 phosphorylates XErp1 in vitro at a site that targets XErp1 for degradation upon CSF release. Thus, our data lead to a model of APC/C activation in Xenopus egg extract in which Plx1 targets the APC/C inhibitor XErp1 for degradation. PMID:15713843

  8. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Cancer: Rationale and Insight for Future Therapeutic Testing.

    PubMed

    Placencio, Veronica R; DeClerck, Yves A

    2015-08-01

    Despite its function as an inhibitor of urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator (PA), PA inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) has a paradoxical protumorigenic role in cancer, promoting angiogenesis and tumor cell survival. In this review, we summarize preclinical evidence in support of the protumorigenic function of PAI-1 that has led to the testing of small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitors, initially developed as antithrombotic agents, in animal models of cancer. The review discusses the challenges and the opportunities that lay ahead to the development of efficacious and nontoxic PAI-1 inhibitors as anticancer agents. PMID:26180080

  9. Cytochrome P450 Family 1 Inhibitors and Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiawang; Sridhar, Jayalakshmi; Foroozesh, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    With the widespread use of O-alkoxyresorufin dealkylation assays since the 1990’s, thousands of inhibitors of cytochrome P450 family 1 enzymes (P450s 1A1, 1A2, and 1B1) have been identified and studied. Generally, planar polycyclic molecules such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, stilbenoids, and flavonoids are considered to potentially be effective inhibitors of these enzymes. However, the details of structure-activity relationships and selectivity of these inhibitors are still ambiguous. In this review, we thoroughly discuss the selectivity of many representative P450 family 1 inhibitors reported in the past 20 years through a meta-analysis. PMID:24287985

  10. Active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Stringer, C.D.; Milanez, S.; Lee, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Previous affinity labeling studies and comparative sequence analyses have identified two different lysines at the active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and have suggested their essentiality to function. The essential lysines occupy positions 166 and 329 in the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and positions 175 and 334 in the spinach enzyme. Based on the pH-dependencies of inactivations of the two enzymes by trinitrobenzene sulfonate, Lys-166 (R. rubrum enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 7.9 and Lys-334 (spinach enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 9.0. These low pK/sub a/ values as well as the enhanced nucleophilicities of the lysyl residues argue that both are important to catalysis rather than to substrate binding. Lys-166 may correspond to the essential base that initiates catalysis and that displays a pK/sub a/ of 7.5 in the pH-curve for V/sub max//K/sub m/. Cross-linking experiments with 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonate stilbene demonstrate that the two active-site lysines are within 12 A. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Antiviral activity of a Rac GEF inhibitor characterized with a sensitive HIV/SIV fusion assay

    SciTech Connect

    Pontow, Suzanne; Harmon, Brooke; Campbell, Nancy; Ratner, Lee

    2007-11-10

    A virus-dependent fusion assay was utilized to examine the activity of a panel of HIV-1, -2, and SIV isolates of distinct coreceptor phenotypes. This assay allowed identification of entry inhibitors, and characterization of an antagonist of a Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor, as an inhibitor of HIV-mediated fusion.

  12. Complexes between tissue-type plasminogen activator and proteinase inhibitors in human plasma, identified with an immunoradiometric assay

    SciTech Connect

    Rijken, D.C.; Juhan-Vague, I.; Collen, D.

    1983-02-01

    Extrinsic (tissue-type) plasminogen activator antigen in human plasma, as measured by a two-site immunoradiometric assay, is composed of a fibrin-adsorbable and a nonadsorbable fraction. Gel filtration on Ultrogel AcA 44 in 1.6M KSCN of the fibrin-adsorbable fraction showed a peak with M/sub r/ approx. =70,000, which contained plasminogen activator activity and was assumed to represent free extrinsic plasminogen activator. The nonadsorbable fraction showed a broad peak with M/sub r/ approx. =140,000 without plasminogen activator activity. Overnight incubation at 37/sup 0/C of postexercise plasma revealed a shift of the M/sub r/ approx. =70,000 peak to the M/sub r/ approx. =140,000 position, suggesting that the M/sub r/ approx. =140,000 peak consists of extrinsic plasminogen activator-protease inhibitor complex(es). ..cap alpha../sub 2/-Antiplasmin is the main inhibitor of extrinsic plasminogen activator in plasma and is probably responsible for the generation of the M/sub r/ approx. =140,000 component. A possible involvement of other plasma proteinase inhibitors was explored by incubation of /sup 125/I-labeled extrinsic plasminogen activator in ..cap alpha../sub 2/-antiplasmin-depleted plasma. A complex was formed with a t1/2 of about 1 hr, which was identified by immunoprecipitation as extrinsic plasminogen activator-..cap alpha../sub 2/-antiplasmin complex. Additional evidence for the presence of extrinsic plasminogen activator complexes with ..cap alpha../sub 2/-antiplasmin and ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin in plasma was obtained from two-site immunoradiometric assays. It was concluded that plasma contains both free extrinsic plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator complexes with ..cap alpha../sub 2/-antiplasmin and ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin. These complexes are also present in plasma collected on the active site inhibitor, D-Phe-Pro-Arg-CH/sub 2/Cl, at rest and after exercise and are therefore assumed to circulate in vivo. (JMT)

  13. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  14. The ACE inhibitor ( sup 3 H)SQ29,852 identifies a high affinity recognition site located in the human temporal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, N.M.; Costall, B.; Egli, P.; Horovitz, Z.P.; Ironside, J.W.; Naylor, R.J.; Williams, T.J. )

    1990-07-01

    The angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 identified a single high affinity recognition site (defined by 10.0 microM captopril) in the human temporal cortex (pKD 8.62 +/- 0.03; Bmax 248 +/- 24 fmol mg-1 protein, mean +/- S.E.M., n = 4). ACE inhibitors and thiorphan competed to a similar level for the ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 binding site in the human temporal cortex with a rank order of affinity (pKi values mean +/- S.E.M., n = 3), lisinopril (9.49 +/- 0.02), captopril (9.16 +/- 0.08), SQ29,852 (8.58 +/- 0.04), epicaptopril (7.09 +/- 0.08), fosinopril (7.08 +/- 0.05) and thiorphan (6.40 +/- 0.04). Since this rank order of affinity is similar to the affinity of these compounds to inhibit brain ACE activity it is concluded that ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 selectively labels the inhibitor recognition site of ACE in the human temporal cortex.

  15. Discovery and Characterization of a Biologically Active Non-ATP-Competitive p38 MAP Kinase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brice A P; Alam, Muhammad S; Guszczynski, Tad; Jakob, Michal; Shenoy, Shilpa R; Mitchell, Carter A; Goncharova, Ekaterina I; Evans, Jason R; Wipf, Peter; Liu, Gang; Ashwell, Jonathan D; O'Keefe, Barry R

    2016-03-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 is part of a broad and ubiquitously expressed family of MAPKs whose activity is responsible for mediating an intracellular response to extracellular stimuli through a phosphorylation cascade. p38 is central to this signaling node and is activated by upstream kinases while being responsible for activating downstream kinases and transcription factors via phosphorylation. Dysregulated p38 activity is associated with numerous autoimmune disorders and has been implicated in the progression of several types of cancer. A number of p38 inhibitors have been tested in clinical trials, with none receiving regulatory approval. One characteristic shared by all of the compounds that failed clinical trials is that they are all adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-competitive p38 inhibitors. Seeing this lack of mechanistic diversity as an opportunity, we screened ~32,000 substances in search of novel p38 inhibitors. Among the inhibitors discovered is a compound that is both non-ATP competitive and biologically active in cell-based models for p38 activity. This is the first reported discovery of a non-ATP-competitive p38 inhibitor that is active in cells and, as such, may enable new pharmacophore designs for both therapeutic and basic research to better understand and exploit non-ATP-competitive inhibitors of p38 activity. PMID:26538432

  16. Adenosine kinase inhibitors. 1. Synthesis, enzyme inhibition, and antiseizure activity of 5-iodotubercidin analogues.

    PubMed

    Ugarkar, B G; DaRe, J M; Kopcho, J J; Browne, C E; Schanzer, J M; Wiesner, J B; Erion, M D

    2000-07-27

    Adenosine receptor agonists produce a wide variety of therapeutically useful pharmacologies. However, to date they have failed to undergo successful clinical development due to dose-limiting side effects. Adenosine kinase inhibitors (AKIs) represent an alternative strategy, since AKIs may raise local adenosine levels in a more site- and event-specific manner and thereby elicit the desired pharmacology with a greater therapeutic window. Starting with 5-iodotubercidin (IC50 = 0.026 microM) and 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine (IC50 = 0.17 microM) as lead inhibitors of the isolated human AK, a variety of pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine nucleoside analogues were designed and prepared by coupling 5-substituted-4-chloropyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine bases with ribose analogues using the sodium salt-mediated glycosylation procedure. 5'-Amino-5'-deoxy analogues of 5-bromo- and 5-iodotubercidins were found to be the most potent AKIs reported to date (IC50S < 0.001 microM). Several potent AKIs were shown to exhibit anticonvulsant activity in the rat maximal electric shock (MES) induced seizure assay. PMID:10956196

  17. Identification and Structure-Activity Relationships of Diarylhydrazides as Novel Potent and Selective Human Enterovirus Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Han, Xin; Sun, Ningyuan; Wu, Haoming; Guo, Deyin; Tien, Po; Dong, Chune; Wu, Shuwen; Zhou, Hai-Bing

    2016-03-10

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) plays an important role in hand-foot-and-mouth disease. In this study, a series of diarylhydrazide analogues was synthesized, and the systematic exploration of SAR led to potent enterovirus inhibitors, of which compound 15 exhibits significant improvements in inhibition potency with an EC50 value of 0.02 μM against EV71. It is very interesting that this class of diarylhydrazides exhibits activities against a series of human enteroviruses at the picomolar level, including EV71 and Coxsackieviruses B1 (CVB1), CVB2, CVB3, CVB4, CVB5, and CVB6 (EC50 as low as 0.5 nM). Compared with the reference antienterovirus drug 1 (enviroxime) and known inhibitor 5 (WIN 51711), the four highly selective compounds 15, 27, 41 and 47 inhibited EV71 replication with EC50 values of 0.17-0.02 μM and SI values in a range of 978.4-12338. A preliminary mechanistic study indicated that VP1 might be the target site for this type of compound. PMID:26885567

  18. Activation of the binuclear metal center through formation of phosphotriesterase-inhibitor complexes.

    PubMed

    Samples, Cynthia R; Raushel, Frank M; DeRose, Victoria J

    2007-03-20

    Phosphotriesterase (PTE) from Pseudomonas diminuta is a binuclear metalloenzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of organophosphate nerve agents at rates approaching the diffusion-controlled limit. The proposed catalytic mechanism postulates the interaction of the substrate with the metal center and subsequent nucleophilic attack by the bridging hydroxide. X-band EPR spectroscopy was utilized to monitor the active site of Mn/Mn-substituted PTE upon addition of two inhibitors, diisopropyl methyl phosphonate and triethyl phosphate, and the product of hydrolysis, diethyl phosphate. The effects of inhibitor and product binding on the magnetic properties of the metal center and the hydroxyl bridge were evaluated by measuring changes in the features of the EPR spectra. The EPR spectra support the proposal that the binding of substrate analogues to the binuclear metal center diminishes the population of hydroxide-bridged species. These results, in conjunction with previously published kinetic and crystallographic data, suggest that substrate binding via the phosphoryl oxygen at the beta-metal weakens the coordination of the hydroxide bridge to the beta-metal. The weakened coordination to the beta-metal ion increases the nucleophilic character of the hydroxide and is coupled to the increase in the electrophilic character of the substrate. PMID:17315951

  19. A Potent, Selective, and Cell-Active Inhibitor of Human Type I Protein Arginine Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Eram, Mohammad S; Shen, Yudao; Szewczyk, Magdalena M; Wu, Hong; Senisterra, Guillermo; Li, Fengling; Butler, Kyle V; Kaniskan, H Ümit; Speed, Brandon A; dela Seña, Carlo; Dong, Aiping; Zeng, Hong; Schapira, Matthieu; Brown, Peter J; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Liu, Jing; Vedadi, Masoud; Jin, Jian

    2016-03-18

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) play a crucial role in a variety of biological processes. Overexpression of PRMTs has been implicated in various human diseases including cancer. Consequently, selective small-molecule inhibitors of PRMTs have been pursued by both academia and the pharmaceutical industry as chemical tools for testing biological and therapeutic hypotheses. PRMTs are divided into three categories: type I PRMTs which catalyze mono- and asymmetric dimethylation of arginine residues, type II PRMTs which catalyze mono- and symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues, and type III PRMT which catalyzes only monomethylation of arginine residues. Here, we report the discovery of a potent, selective, and cell-active inhibitor of human type I PRMTs, MS023, and characterization of this inhibitor in a battery of biochemical, biophysical, and cellular assays. MS023 displayed high potency for type I PRMTs including PRMT1, -3, -4, -6, and -8 but was completely inactive against type II and type III PRMTs, protein lysine methyltransferases and DNA methyltransferases. A crystal structure of PRMT6 in complex with MS023 revealed that MS023 binds the substrate binding site. MS023 potently decreased cellular levels of histone arginine asymmetric dimethylation. It also reduced global levels of arginine asymmetric dimethylation and concurrently increased levels of arginine monomethylation and symmetric dimethylation in cells. We also developed MS094, a close analog of MS023, which was inactive in biochemical and cellular assays, as a negative control for chemical biology studies. MS023 and MS094 are useful chemical tools for investigating the role of type I PRMTs in health and disease. PMID:26598975

  20. A nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor active on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates resistant to related inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, M E; O'Brien, J A; Ruffing, T L; Schleif, W A; Sardana, V V; Byrnes, V W; Condra, J H; Hoffman, J M; Emini, E A

    1993-01-01

    Pyridinone derivatives are potent and specific inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) and HIV-1 replication in cell culture. However, the potential clinical usefulness of these compounds as monotherapeutic agents may be limited by the selection of inhibitor-resistant viral variants. Resistance in cell culture is due primarily to mutational alterations at RT amino acid residues 103 and 181. A recombinant HIV-1 RT containing both of these mutations was used to screen a panel of pyridinone analogs for inhibitory activity. L-696,229 and L-697,661, pyridinones currently undergoing clinical evaluation, were more than 4,000-fold weaker against the mutant enzyme than against the wild-type enzyme. In contrast, one derivative of L-696,229, L-702,019 (3-[2-(4,7-dichlorobenzoxazol-2-yl)ethyl]-5-ethyl-6-methylpyrid in-2(1H)-thione), showed only three-fold different potencies against the two enzymes. L-702,019 was also a potent inhibitor of the replication of mutant HIV-1 containing the individual mutations at amino acid 103 or 181 as well as of clinical isolates resistant to L-697,661 and L-696,229. Isolation and analysis of resistant viral variants in cell culture showed that significant resistance to L-702,019 could be engendered only by multiple amino acid substitutions in RT. Accordingly, these studies demonstrated the potential of identifying second-generation specific HIV-1 RT inhibitors that can overcome the viral resistance selected by the first generation of inhibitors. PMID:7685996

  1. Kinetic model of ethopropazine interaction with horse serum butyrylcholinesterase and its docking into the active site.

    PubMed

    Golicnik, Marko; Sinko, Goran; Simeon-Rudolf, Vera; Grubic, Zoran; Stojan, Jure

    2002-02-01

    The action of a potent tricyclic cholinesterase inhibitor ethopropazine on the hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine and butyrylthiocholine by purified horse serum butyrylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.8) was investigated at 25 and 37 degrees C. The enzyme activities were measured on a stopped-flow apparatus and the analysis of experimental data was done by applying a six-parameter model for substrate hydrolysis. The model, which was introduced to explain the kinetics of Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase [Stojan et al. (1998) FEBS Lett. 440, 85-88], is defined with two dissociation constants and four rate constants and can describe both cooperative phenomena, apparent activation at low substrate concentrations and substrate inhibition by excess of substrate. For the analysis of the data in the presence of ethopropazine at two temperatures, we have enlarged the reaction scheme to allow primarily its competition with the substrate at the peripheral site, but the competition at the acylation site was not excluded. The proposed reaction scheme revealed, upon analysis, competitive effects of ethopropazine at both sites; at 25 degrees C, three enzyme-inhibitor dissociation constants could be evaluated; at 37 degrees C, only two constants could be evaluated. Although the model considers both cooperative phenomena, it appears that decreased enzyme sensitivity at higher temperature, predominantly for the ligands at the peripheral binding site, makes the determination of some expected enzyme substrate and/or inhibitor complexes technically impossible. The same reason might also account for one of the paradoxes in cholinesterases: activities at 25 degrees C at low substrate concentrations are higher than at 37 degrees C. Positioning of ethopropazine in the active-site gorge by molecular dynamics simulations shows that A328, W82, D70, and Y332 amino acid residues stabilize binding of the inhibitor. PMID:11811945

  2. Docking and quantitative structure-activity relationship of oxadiazole derivates as inhibitors of GSK3β.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Romero, Luisa; Caballero, Julio

    2014-02-01

    The binding modes of 42 oxadiazole derivates inside glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β were determined using docking experiments; thus, the preferred active conformations of these inhibitors are proposed. We found that these compounds adopt a scorpion-shaped conformation and they accept a hydrogen bond (HB) from the residue Val135 of the GSK3β ATP-binding site hinge region. In addition, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models were constructed to explain the trend of the GSK3β inhibitory activities for the studied compounds. In a first approach, three-dimensional (3D) vectors were calculated using docking conformations and, by using multiple-linear regression, we assessed that GETAWAY vectors were able to describe the reported biological activities. In other QSAR approach, SMILES-based optimal descriptors were calculated. The best model included three-SMILES elements SSSβ leading to the identification of key molecular features that contribute to a high GSK3β inhibitory activity. PMID:24081608

  3. Flavonoids as CDK1 Inhibitors: Insights in Their Binding Orientations and Structure-Activity Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Retamal, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, the interactions of flavonoids with protein kinases (PKs) have been described by using crystallographic experiments. Interestingly, different orientations have been found for one flavonoid inside different PKs and different chemical substitutions lead to different orientations of the flavonoid scaffold inside one PK. Accordingly, orientation predictions of novel analogues could help to the design of flavonoids with high PK inhibitory activities. With this in mind, we studied the binding modes of 37 flavonoids (flavones and chalcones) inside the cyclin-dependent PK CDK1 using docking experiments. We found that the compounds under study adopted two different orientations into the active site of CDK1 (orientations I and II in the manuscript). In addition, quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) models using CoMFA and CoMSIA methodologies were constructed to explain the trend of the CDK1 inhibitory activities for the studied flavonoids. Template-based and docking-based alignments were used. Models developed starting from docking-based alignment were applied for describing the whole dataset and compounds with orientation I. Adequate R2 and Q2 values were obtained by each method; interestingly, only hydrophobic and hydrogen bond donor fields describe the differential potency of the flavonoids as CDK1 inhibitors for both defined alignments and subsets. Our current application of docking and QSAR together reveals important elements to be drawn for the design of novel flavonoids with increased PK inhibitory activities. PMID:27517610

  4. Apixaban, an oral, direct inhibitor of activated Factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Shantsila, Eduard; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2008-09-01

    Apixaban is an oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor that is being developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb Co and Pfizer Inc. Apixaban is currently undergoing phase III clinical trials for cerebrovascular ischemia, deep vein thrombosis and lung embolism, and phase II clinical trials for coronary artery disease. PMID:18729009

  5. The Rational Design of Specific Peptide Inhibitor against p38α MAPK at Allosteric-Site: A Therapeutic Modality for HNSCC

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Kamaldeep; Nigam, Lokesh; Singh, Ratnakar; Kumar, Suresh; Subbarao, Naidu; Chauhan, Shyam Singh; Dey, Sharmistha

    2014-01-01

    p38α is a significant target for drug designing against cancer. The overproduction of p38α MAPK promotes tumorigenesis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The ATP binding and an allosteric site referred as DFG are the key sites of the p38α mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) exploited for the design of inhibitors. This study demonstrated design of peptide inhibitor on the basis of allosteric site using Glide molecular docking software and the biochemical analysis of the best modeled peptide. The best fitted tetrapeptide (FWCS) in the allosteric site inhibited the pure recombinant and serum p38α of HNSCC patients by 74 and 72%, respectively. The potency of the peptide was demonstrated by its IC50 (4.6 nM) and KD (3.41×10−10 M) values, determined by ELISA and by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology, respectively. The cell viability of oral cancer i.e. KB cell line was reduced in dose dependent manner by 60 and 97% by the treatment of peptide and the IC50 was 600 and 210 µM after 24 and 72 h incubation, respectively. Our result provides an insight for the development of a proficient small peptide as a promising anticancer agent targeting DFG site of p38α kinase. PMID:24983631

  6. Correlated structural kinetics and retarded solvent dynamics at the metalloprotease active site

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Moran; Born, Benjamin; Heyden, Matthias; Tworowski, Dmitry; Fields, Gregg B; Sagi, Irit; Havenith, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Solvent dynamics can play a major role in enzyme activity, but obtaining an accurate, quantitative picture of solvent activity during catalysis is quite challenging. Here, we combine terahertz spectroscopy and X-ray absorption analyses to measure changes in the coupled water-protein motions during peptide hydrolysis by a zinc-dependent human metalloprotease. These changes were tightly correlated with rearrangements at the active site during the formation of productive enzyme-substrate intermediates and were different from those in an enzyme–inhibitor complex. Molecular dynamics simulations showed a steep gradient of fast-to-slow coupled protein-water motions around the protein, active site and substrate. Our results show that water retardation occurs before formation of the functional Michaelis complex. We propose that the observed gradient of coupled protein-water motions may assist enzyme-substrate interactions through water-polarizing mechanisms that are remotely mediated by the catalytic metal ion and the enzyme active site. PMID:21926991

  7. Correlated structural kinetics and retarded solvent dynamics at the metalloprotease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Moran; Born, Benjamin; Heyden, Matthias; Tworowski, Dmitry; Fields, Gregg B.; Sagi, Irit; Havenith, Martina

    2011-09-18

    Solvent dynamics can play a major role in enzyme activity, but obtaining an accurate, quantitative picture of solvent activity during catalysis is quite challenging. Here, we combine terahertz spectroscopy and X-ray absorption analyses to measure changes in the coupled water-protein motions during peptide hydrolysis by a zinc-dependent human metalloprotease. These changes were tightly correlated with rearrangements at the active site during the formation of productive enzyme-substrate intermediates and were different from those in an enzyme–inhibitor complex. Molecular dynamics simulations showed a steep gradient of fast-to-slow coupled protein-water motions around the protein, active site and substrate. Our results show that water retardation occurs before formation of the functional Michaelis complex. We propose that the observed gradient of coupled protein-water motions may assist enzyme-substrate interactions through water-polarizing mechanisms that are remotely mediated by the catalytic metal ion and the enzyme active site.

  8. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in sputum and nasal fluids increases in asthmatics during common colds

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seong H.; Hong, Seung J.; Chen, Haimei; Habib, Ali; Cho, David; Lee, Sun H.; Kang, Joseph; Ward, Theresa; Boushey, Homer A.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Avila, Pedro C.

    2014-01-01

    Capsule Summary This study showed that sputum and nasal lavage levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) rise during a common cold in asthmatic patients. This rise may contribute to the progression of airway remodeling. PMID:24373352

  9. 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of some steroidal cyanopyridinone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Abdalla, Mohamed M; Amr, Abdel-Galil E

    2012-01-01

    We herein report the 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of some synthesized heterocyclic cyanopyridone and cyanothiopyridone derivatives fused with steroidal structure. Initially the acute toxicity of the compounds was assayed via the determination of their LD(50). All the compounds, except 3b, were interestingly less toxic than the reference drug (Prednisolone(®)). Seventeen heterocyclic derivatives containing a cyanopyridone or cyanothiopyridone rings fused to a steroidal moiety were synthesized and screened for their 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities comparable to that of Anastrozole, Bicalutamide, Efavirenz, Capravirine, Ribavirin, Oseltamivir and Amantadine as the reference drugs. Some of the compounds exhibited better 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities than the reference drugs. The detailed 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of the synthesized compounds were reported. PMID:22057085

  10. Tumor-Targeting of EGFR Inhibitors by Hypoxia-Mediated Activation**

    PubMed Central

    Kryeziu, Kushtrim; Pichler, Verena; Roller, Alexander; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra; Kowol, Christian R.

    2015-01-01

    The development of receptor tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) was a major step forward in cancer treatment. However, the therapy with TKIs is limited by strong side effects and drug resistance. The aim of this study was the design of novel epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors that are specifically activated in malignant tissue. Thus, a CoIII-based prodrug strategy for the targeted release of an EGFR inhibitor triggered by hypoxia in the solid tumor was used. New inhibitors with chelating moieties were prepared and tested for their EGFR-inhibitory potential. The most promising candidate was coupled to CoIII and the biological activity tested in cell culture. Indeed, hypoxic activation and subsequent EGFR inhibition was proven. Finally, the compound was tested in vivo, also revealing potent anticancer activity. PMID:25079700

  11. Synthesis and activity of a novel inhibitor of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Gotham, Victoria J B; Hobbs, Melanie C; Burgin, Ryan; Turton, David; Smythe, Carl; Coldham, Iain

    2016-01-27

    During efforts to prepare the known compound , a new tetracyclic compound, called , was prepared in six steps. This compound was found to have good activity as an inhibitor of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. PMID:26740124

  12. Structural Basis for the Active Site Inhibition Mechanism of Human Kidney-Type Glutaminase (KGA)

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K.; Chong, Qing Yun; Low, Boon Chuan; Sivaraman, J.

    2014-01-01

    Glutaminase is a metabolic enzyme responsible for glutaminolysis, a process harnessed by cancer cells to feed their accelerated growth and proliferation. Among the glutaminase isoforms, human kidney-type glutaminase (KGA) is often upregulated in cancer and is thus touted as an attractive drug target. Here we report the active site inhibition mechanism of KGA through the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of KGA (cKGA) in complex with 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON), a substrate analogue of glutamine. DON covalently binds with the active site Ser286 and interacts with residues such as Tyr249, Asn335, Glu381, Asn388, Tyr414, Tyr466 and Val484. The nucleophilic attack of Ser286 sidechain on DON releases the diazo group (N2) from the inhibitor and results in the formation of an enzyme-inhibitor complex. Mutational studies confirmed the key role of these residues in the activity of KGA. This study will be important in the development of KGA active site inhibitors for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24451979

  13. Tubulin colchicine binding site inhibitors as vascular disrupting agents in clinical developments.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ya-Ting; Liu, Yan-Na; Liu, Zhao-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Tumor vasculature is an important target in cancer treatment. Two distinct vasculartargeting therapeutic strategies are applied to attack cancer cells indirectly. The antiangiogenic approach intervenes in the neovascularization processes and blocks the formation of new blood vessels, while th e antivascular approach targets the established tumor blood vessels, making vascular shutdown and resulting in rapid haemorrhagic necrosis and tumor cell death. A number of compounds with diverse structural scaffolds have been designed to target tumor vasculature and they are called vascular disrupting agents (VDAs). The biological or ligand-directed VDAs utilize antibodies, peptides or growth factors to deliver toxins or pro-coagulants or proapoptotic affectors to tumor-related blood vessels, while the small-molecule VDAs selectively target tumor blood vessels and have little effects on the normal endothelium. Among the small-molecule VDAs, the tubulin colchicine binding site inhibitors have been extensively studied and many of them have entered the clinical trials, including CA-4P, CA-1P, AVE8062, OXi4503, CKD-516, BNC105P, ABT-751, CYT- 997, ZD6126, NPI-2358, MN-029 and EPC2407. This review makes a summary of the small-molecule VDAs in clinical developments and highlights some potential VDA leads or candidates for the treatment of tumors. PMID:25620094

  14. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of 7H-thiazolo-[3,2-b]-1,2,4-triazin-7-one derivatives as dual binding site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sijie; Shang, Ruofeng; Shi, Lanxiang; Zhou, Ran; He, Jingyu; Wan, David Chi-Cheong

    2014-08-01

    New dual binding site acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors have been designed and synthesized as a new drug candidate for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) through the binding to both catalytic and peripheral sites of the enzyme. Therefore, a series of 7H-thiazolo[3,2-b]-1,2,4-triazin-7-one derivatives 6a-j were synthesized and investigated for their ability to inhibit the activity of human AChE (hAChE) in comparison with huperzine-A. All the compounds were found to inhibit AChE activity, especially compounds 6c and 6i with the inhibition value of 76.10% and 77.82%, respectively. The molecular docking study indicated that they were nicely accommodated by AChE. The molecular docking study revealed that 6c and 6i possessed a more optimal binding conformation than 6a and can perfectly fit into the active and peripheral site of hAChE, and consequently exhibited highly improved inhibitor potency to hAChE. PMID:24890706

  15. Clinical activity and safety of the dual pathway inhibitor rigosertib for higher risk myelodysplastic syndromes following DNA methyltransferase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Lewis R; Greenberg, Peter; Raza, Azra; Olnes, Matthew J; Holland, James F; Reddy, Premkumar; Maniar, Manoj; Wilhelm, Francois

    2015-06-01

    Rigosertib (ON 01910.Na) is an inhibitor of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase and polo-like kinase pathways that induces mitotic arrest and apoptosis in neoplastic cells, while sparing normal cells. Our purpose is to summarize the clinical activity and safety of intravenous (IV) rigosertib delivered by an external ambulatory infusion pump in patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts-1, -2, or, -t myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) following prior treatment with DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors. A total of 39 patients with MDS who fulfilled these criteria were enrolled in four phase 1-2 clinical trials of IV rigosertib. Thirty five (88%) had higher risk disease according to the Revised International Prognostic Scoring System. Median overall survival for this group of 39 patients was 35 weeks. Of 30 evaluable patients with follow-up bone marrow biopsies, 12 (40%) achieved complete (n = 5) or partial (n = 7) bone marrow blast responses. In addition, 15 patients achieved stabilization of bone marrow blasts. One patient with a complete bone marrow response also achieved a complete cytogenetic response. A second patient with stable bone marrow blasts achieved a partial cytogenetic response. Two of the responding patients and three patients with stable disease had hematological improvements. Rigosertib-induced bone marrow blast decreases and stability appeared to be predictive of prolonged survival. IV rigosertib had a favorable safety profile without significant myelosuppression. Most common drug-related toxicities included fatigue, diarrhea, nausea, dysuria, and hematuria. In summary, IV rigosertib is well tolerated and has clinical activity in patients with higher risk MDS following DNMT inhibitor treatment. A multinational pivotal phase 3 randomized clinical trial of rigosertib versus best supportive care for patients with MDS with excess blasts following prior treatment with DNMT inhibitors (ONTIME: ON 01910.Na Trial In Myelodysplastic SyndromE) has recently

  16. Combined Rational Design and a High Throughput Screening Platform for Identifying Chemical Inhibitors of a Ras-activating Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Biesiada, Jacek; Duan, Xin; Tang, Hong; Shang, Xun; Papoian, Ruben; Seibel, William L.; Nelson, Sandra; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The Ras family small GTPases regulate multiple cellular processes, including cell growth, survival, movement, and gene expression, and are intimately involved in cancer pathogenesis. Activation of these small GTPases is catalyzed by a special class of enzymes, termed guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Herein, we developed a small molecule screening platform for identifying lead hits targeting a Ras GEF enzyme, SOS1. We employed an ensemble structure-based virtual screening approach in combination with a multiple tier high throughput experimental screen utilizing two complementary fluorescent guanine nucleotide exchange assays to identify small molecule inhibitors of GEF catalytic activity toward Ras. From a library of 350,000 compounds, we selected a set of 418 candidate compounds predicted to disrupt the GEF-Ras interaction, of which dual wavelength GDP dissociation and GTP-loading experimental screening identified two chemically distinct small molecule inhibitors. Subsequent biochemical validations indicate that they are capable of dose-dependently inhibiting GEF catalytic activity, binding to SOS1 with micromolar affinity, and disrupting GEF-Ras interaction. Mutagenesis studies in conjunction with structure-activity relationship studies mapped both compounds to different sites in the catalytic pocket, and both inhibited Ras signaling in cells. The unique screening platform established here for targeting Ras GEF enzymes could be broadly useful for identifying lead inhibitors for a variety of small GTPase-activating GEF reactions. PMID:25825487

  17. A High-Throughput Screen Reveals New Small-Molecule Activators and Inhibitors of Pantothenate Kinases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase (PanK) is a regulatory enzyme that controls coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. The association of PanK with neurodegeneration and diabetes suggests that chemical modifiers of PanK activity may be useful therapeutics. We performed a high throughput screen of >520000 compounds from the St. Jude compound library and identified new potent PanK inhibitors and activators with chemically tractable scaffolds. The HTS identified PanK inhibitors exemplified by the detailed characterization of a tricyclic compound (7) and a preliminary SAR. Biophysical studies reveal that the PanK inhibitor acts by binding to the ATP–enzyme complex. PMID:25569308

  18. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel biarylamine-based Met kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, David K; Chen, Xiao-Tao; Tarby, Christine; Kaltenbach, Robert; Cai, Zhen-Wei; Tokarski, John S; An, Yongmi; Sack, John S; Wautlet, Barri; Gullo-Brown, Johnni; Henley, Benjamin J; Jeyaseelan, Robert; Kellar, Kristen; Manne, Veeraswamy; Trainor, George L; Lombardo, Louis J; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M

    2010-09-03

    Biarylamine-based inhibitors of Met kinase have been identified. Lead compounds demonstrate nanomolar potency in Met kinase biochemical assays and significant activity in the Met-driven GTL-16 human gastric carcinoma cell line. X-ray crystallography revealed that these compounds adopt a bioactive conformation, in the kinase domain, consistent with that previously seen with 2-pyridone-based Met kinase inhibitors. Compound 9b demonstrated potent in vivo antitumor activity in the GTL-16 human tumor xenograft model.

  19. Synthesis and Structure–Activity Relationships of Pteridine Dione and Trione Monocarboxylate Transporter 1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Novel substituted pteridine-derived inhibitors of monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1), an emerging target for cancer therapy, are reported. The activity of these compounds as inhibitors of lactate transport was confirmed using a 14C-lactate transport assay, and their potency against MCT1-expressing human tumor cells was established using MTT assays. The four most potent compounds showed substantial anticancer activity (EC50 37–150 nM) vs MCT1-expressing human Raji lymphoma cells. PMID:25068893

  20. Detection and partial characterization of an inhibitor of plasminogen activator in human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, L A; Ginsberg, M H; Loskutoff, D J

    1984-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the presence of a previously undescribed fibrinolytic inhibitor in human serum. It has an apparent molecular weight of 50,000 and is not detected in serum derived from platelet-poor plasma, suggesting that it originates from platelets. This conclusion is supported by a number of observations. For example, extracts of washed, gel-filtered human platelets contain an inhibitor of similar activity and size, and physiological concentrations of thrombin induce its release from the platelets. Moreover, the kinetics and dose dependency of this release are similar to those observed for the release of platelet factor 4, and the release of both molecules is blocked by pretreating the platelets with prostaglandin E1 and theophylline. Mixing experiments, which were devised to investigate the specificity of the inhibitor, showed that the fibrinolytic activity initiated by both urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator was blocked by platelet releasate in a dose-dependent manner. In both cases, the amount of inhibition increased when the releasates were preincubated with the purified activators, indicating a direct interaction between the activators and an inhibitor(s). The inhibitory activity was removed by preincubating the releasates with antiserum prepared against an antiactivator purified from cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. These results indicate that platelets contain an inhibitor which is released by thrombin, inhibits both urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator, and is immunologically similar to an inhibitor produced by endothelial cells. This molecule may represent a new class of inhibitors, the antiactivators, which function together with alpha 2-antiplasmin to regulate the fibrinolytic system of the blood. Its release from platelets by thrombin may protect the growing thrombus against premature dissolution initiated by plasminogen activators released by the endothelium. Images PMID:6434594

  1. The Clinically Tested Gardos Channel Inhibitor Senicapoc Exhibits Antimalarial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tubman, Venée N.; Mejia, Pedro; Shmukler, Boris E.; Bei, Amy K.; Alper, Seth L.; Mitchell, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Senicapoc, a Gardos channel inhibitor, prevented erythrocyte dehydration in clinical trials of patients with sickle cell disease. We tested the hypothesis that senicapoc-induced blockade of the Gardos channel inhibits Plasmodium growth. Senicapoc inhibited in vitro growth of human and primate plasmodia during the clinical blood stage. Senicapoc treatment suppressed P. yoelii parasitemia in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. The reassuring safety and biochemical profile of senicapoc encourage its use in antimalarial development. PMID:26459896

  2. Isolation, Co-Crystallization and Structure-Based Characterization of Anabaenopeptins as Highly Potent Inhibitors of Activated Thrombin Activatable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor (TAFIa)

    PubMed Central

    Schreuder, Herman; Liesum, Alexander; Lönze, Petra; Stump, Heike; Hoffmann, Holger; Schiell, Matthias; Kurz, Michael; Toti, Luigi; Bauer, Armin; Kallus, Christopher; Klemke-Jahn, Christine; Czech, Jörg; Kramer, Dan; Enke, Heike; Niedermeyer, Timo H. J.; Morrison, Vincent; Kumar, Vasant; Brönstrup, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Mature thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa) is a carboxypeptidase that stabilizes fibrin clots by removing C-terminal arginines and lysines from partially degraded fibrin. Inhibition of TAFIa stimulates the degradation of fibrin clots and may help to prevent thrombosis. Applying a lead finding approach based on literature-mining, we discovered that anabaenopeptins, cyclic peptides produced by cyanobacteria, were potent inhibitors of TAFIa with IC50 values as low as 1.5 nM. We describe the isolation and structure elucidation of 20 anabaenopeptins, including 13 novel congeners, as well as their pronounced structure-activity relationships (SAR) with respect to inhibition of TAFIa. Crystal structures of the anabaenopeptins B, C and F bound to the surrogate protease carboxypeptidase B revealed the binding modes of these large (~850 Da) compounds in detail and explained the observed SAR, i.e. the strong dependence of the potency on a basic (Arg, Lys) exocyclic residue that addressed the S1’ binding pocket, and a broad tolerance towards substitutions in the pentacyclic ring that acted as a plug of the active site. PMID:27604544

  3. Isolation, Co-Crystallization and Structure-Based Characterization of Anabaenopeptins as Highly Potent Inhibitors of Activated Thrombin Activatable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor (TAFIa).

    PubMed

    Schreuder, Herman; Liesum, Alexander; Lönze, Petra; Stump, Heike; Hoffmann, Holger; Schiell, Matthias; Kurz, Michael; Toti, Luigi; Bauer, Armin; Kallus, Christopher; Klemke-Jahn, Christine; Czech, Jörg; Kramer, Dan; Enke, Heike; Niedermeyer, Timo H J; Morrison, Vincent; Kumar, Vasant; Brönstrup, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Mature thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa) is a carboxypeptidase that stabilizes fibrin clots by removing C-terminal arginines and lysines from partially degraded fibrin. Inhibition of TAFIa stimulates the degradation of fibrin clots and may help to prevent thrombosis. Applying a lead finding approach based on literature-mining, we discovered that anabaenopeptins, cyclic peptides produced by cyanobacteria, were potent inhibitors of TAFIa with IC50 values as low as 1.5 nM. We describe the isolation and structure elucidation of 20 anabaenopeptins, including 13 novel congeners, as well as their pronounced structure-activity relationships (SAR) with respect to inhibition of TAFIa. Crystal structures of the anabaenopeptins B, C and F bound to the surrogate protease carboxypeptidase B revealed the binding modes of these large (~850 Da) compounds in detail and explained the observed SAR, i.e. the strong dependence of the potency on a basic (Arg, Lys) exocyclic residue that addressed the S1' binding pocket, and a broad tolerance towards substitutions in the pentacyclic ring that acted as a plug of the active site. PMID:27604544

  4. Immunomodulatory activity of a chymotrypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis seeds.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Alex Yuen-Kam; Ng, Tzi-Bun; Fong, Wing-Ping

    2006-09-01

    Serine protease inhibitors are widely distributed in the plant kingdom. Many of them have been purified and characterized from different species. While the physicochemical properties of these protease inhibitors have been extensively investigated, their biological effects, e.g. immunomodulatory effect, remain relatively unexplored. Recently, we isolated a chymotrypsin-specific inhibitor (MCoCI) from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis (Lour) Spreng (Family Cucurbitaceae), the traditional Chinese medicine known as Mubiezhi, which has been used as an antiinflammatory agent. In the present study, the effects of MCoCI on different types of cells of the immune system, including splenocytes, splenic lymphocytes, neutrophils, bone marrow cells and macrophages, were investigated. MCoCI was shown to possess immuno-enhancing and antiinflammatory effects. MCoCI could stimulate the proliferation of different cells of the immune system, e.g. splenocytes, splenic lymphocytes and bone marrow cells, in a manner comparable to that of Concanavalin A. Moreover, MCoCI could also suppress the formation of hydrogen peroxide in neutrophils and macrophages. These immunomodulatory effects may explain some of the therapeutic actions of Mubiezhi. PMID:16733830

  5. Metavanadate at the active site of the phosphatase VHZ.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav I; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Hengge, Alvan C

    2012-09-01

    Vanadate is a potent modulator of a number of biological processes and has been shown by crystal structures and NMR spectroscopy to interact with numerous enzymes. Although these effects often occur under conditions where oligomeric forms dominate, the crystal structures and NMR data suggest that the inhibitory form is usually monomeric orthovanadate, a particularly good inhibitor of phosphatases because of its ability to form stable trigonal-bipyramidal complexes. We performed a computational analysis of a 1.14 Å structure of the phosphatase VHZ in complex with an unusual metavanadate species and compared it with two classical trigonal-bipyramidal vanadate-phosphatase complexes. The results support extensive delocalized bonding to the apical ligands in the classical structures. In contrast, in the VHZ metavanadate complex, the central, planar VO(3)(-) moiety has only one apical ligand, the nucleophilic Cys95, and a gap in electron density between V and S. A computational analysis showed that the V-S interaction is primarily ionic. A mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of metavanadate in the active site from a dimeric vanadate species that previous crystallographic evidence has shown to be able to bind to the active sites of phosphatases related to VHZ. Together, the results show that the interaction of vanadate with biological systems is not solely reliant upon the prior formation of a particular inhibitory form in solution. The catalytic properties of an enzyme may act upon the oligomeric forms primarily present in solution to generate species such as the metavanadate ion observed in the VHZ structure. PMID:22876963

  6. Confirming target engagement for reversible inhibitors in vivo by kinetically tuned activity-based probes.

    PubMed

    Adibekian, Alexander; Martin, Brent R; Chang, Jae Won; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Tsuboi, Katsunori; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Speers, Anna E; Brown, Steven J; Spicer, Timothy; Fernandez-Vega, Virneliz; Ferguson, Jill; Hodder, Peter S; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2012-06-27

    The development of small-molecule inhibitors for perturbing enzyme function requires assays to confirm that the inhibitors interact with their enzymatic targets in vivo. Determining target engagement in vivo can be particularly challenging for poorly characterized enzymes that lack known biomarkers (e.g., endogenous substrates and products) to report on their inhibition. Here, we describe a competitive activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) method for measuring the binding of reversible inhibitors to enzymes in animal models. Key to the success of this approach is the use of activity-based probes that show tempered rates of reactivity with enzymes, such that competition for target engagement with reversible inhibitors can be measured in vivo. We apply the competitive ABPP strategy to evaluate a newly described class of piperazine amide reversible inhibitors for the serine hydrolases LYPLA1 and LYPLA2, two enzymes for which selective, in vivo active inhibitors are lacking. Competitive ABPP identified individual piperazine amides that selectively inhibit LYPLA1 or LYPLA2 in mice. In summary, competitive ABPP adapted to operate with moderately reactive probes can assess the target engagement of reversible inhibitors in animal models to facilitate the discovery of small-molecule probes for characterizing enzyme function in vivo. PMID:22690931

  7. Confirming Target Engagement for Reversible Inhibitors In Vivo by Kinetically Tuned Activity-Based Probes

    PubMed Central

    Adibekian, Alexander; Martin, Brent R.; Chang, Jae Won; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Tsuboi, Katsunori; Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Speers, Anna E.; Brown, Steven J.; Spicer, Timothy; Fernandez-Vega, Virneliz; Ferguson, Jill; Hodder, Peter S.; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2012-01-01

    The development of small-molecule inhibitors for perturbing enzyme function requires assays to confirm that the inhibitors interact with their enzymatic targets in vivo. Determining target engagement in vivo can be particularly challenging for poorly characterized enzymes that lack known biomarkers (e.g., endogenous substrates and products) to report on their inhibition. Here, we describe a competitive activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) method for measuring the binding of reversible inhibitors to enzymes in animal models. Key to the success of this approach is the use of activity-based probes that show tempered rates of reactivity with enzymes, such that competition for target engagement with reversible inhibitors can be measured in vivo. We apply the competitive ABPP strategy to evaluate a newly described class of piperazine amide reversible inhibitors for the serine hydrolases LYPAL1 and LYPLA2, two enzymes for which selective, in vivo-active inhibitors are lacking. Competitive ABPP identified individual piperazine amides that selectively inhibit LYPLA1 or LYPLA2 in mice. In summary, competitive ABPP adapted to operate with moderately reactive probes can assess the target engagement of reversible inhibitors in animal models to facilitate the discovery of small-molecule probes for characterizing enzyme function in vivo. PMID:22690931

  8. Protease inhibitor in scorpion (Mesobuthus eupeus) venom prolongs the biological activities of the crude venom.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hakim; Xiao-Peng, Tang; Yang, Shi-Long; Lu, Qiu-Min; Lai, Ren

    2016-08-01

    It is hypothesized that protease inhibitors play an essential role in survival of venomous animals through protecting peptide/protein toxins from degradation by proteases in their prey or predators. However, the biological function of protease inhibitors in scorpion venoms remains unknown. In the present study, a trypsin inhibitor was purified and characterized from the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus, which enhanced the biological activities of crude venom components in mice when injected in combination with crude venom. This protease inhibitor, named MeKTT-1, belonged to Kunitz-type toxins subfamily. Native MeKTT-1 selectively inhibited trypsin with a Kivalue of 130 nmol·L(-1). Furthermore, MeKTT-1 was shown to be a thermo-stable peptide. In animal behavioral tests, MeKTT-1 prolonged the pain behavior induced by scorpion crude venom, suggesting that protease inhibitors in scorpion venom inhibited proteases and protect the functionally important peptide/protein toxins from degradation, consequently keeping them active longer. In conclusion, this was the first experimental evidence about the natural existence of serine protease inhibitor in the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus, which preserved the activity of venom components, suggests that scorpions may use protease inhibitors for survival. PMID:27608950

  9. Site-directed mutagenesis and high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of the active site of porphobilinogen deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.I.; Roessner, C.A.; Stolowich, N.J.; Karuso, P.; Williams, H.J.; Grant, S.K.; Gonzalez, M.D.; Hoshino, T. )

    1988-10-18

    The active site of porphobilinogen (PBG){sup 1} deaminase from Escherichia coli has been found to contain an unusual dipyrromethane derived from four molecules of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) covalently linked to Cys-242, one of the two cysteine residues conserved in E. coli and human deaminase. By use of a hemA{sup {minus}} strain of E. coli the enzyme was enriched from (5-{sup 13}C)ALA and examined by {sup 1}H-detected multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy, which revealed all of the salient features of a dipyrromethane composed of two PBG units linked heat to tail and terminating in a CH{sub 2}-S bond to a cysteine residue. Site-specific mutagenesis of Cys-99 and Cys-242, respectively, has shown that substitution of Ser for Cys-99 does not affect the enzymatic activity, whereas substitution of Ser for Cys-242 removes essentially all of the catalytic activity as measured by the conversion of the substrate PBG to uro'gen I. The NMR spectrum of the covalent complex of deaminase with the suicide inhibitor 2-bromo-(2,11-{sup 13}C{sub 2})PBG reveals that the aminomethyl terminus of the inhibitor reacts with the enzyme's cofactor at the {alpha}-free pyrrole. NMR spectroscopy of the ES{sub 2} complex confirmed a PBG-derived head-to-tail dipyrromethane attached to the {alpha}-free pyrrole position of the enzyme. A mechanistic rationale for deaminase is presented.

  10. Application of Site-Specific Spin Labeling for NMR Detecting Inhibitor-Induced Conformational Change of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Seetaha, Supaporn; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Yamaguchi, Takumi; Ishii, Kentaro; Hannongbua, Supa; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Kato, Koichi

    2016-02-17

    Paramagnetism-assisted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques can provide long-range structural information complemented with local information derived from chemical-shift perturbation and nuclear Overhauser effect data. Here, we address the application of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) to detect inhibitor-induced conformational change of a drug target protein using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) as a model protein. Using a site-specific spin-labeled HIV-1 RT mutant with selective (13) C labeling, conformation-dependent PREs were successfully observed reflecting the stabilization of an open conformation of this enzyme caused by inhibitor binding. This study demonstrates that the paramagnetism-assisted NMR approach offers an alternative strategy in protein-based drug screening to identify allosteric inhibitors of a target protein. PMID:26804978

  11. Study on the active mechanism of β-secretase inhibitors by molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yue Li; Lv, Min; Li, Jiao Jiao; Xu, Tao; Zhai, Hong Lin; Zhang, Xiao Yun

    2015-08-30

    The proteolytic enzyme β-secretase (BACE-1) is one of potential drug targets for treating Alzheimers's disease. First, the reliable and accurate models of three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship for the BACE-1 inhibitors were established, and the several important structural factors that mainly influence the inhibitory activity were obtained. Second, the results of molecular docking presented the binding mode between BACE-1 and its inhibitors, and molecular dynamic simulations provided the details of the receptor-ligand interactions. Furthermore, several new derivatives were designed and validated based on these theoretical analyses. Our studies revealed the binding mechanism between BACE-1 and its inhibitors, and provide some insights into the further structural modification and the design of new inhibitors with higher activity. PMID:25965961

  12. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the LEDGF/p75 Binding Site of Integrase Block HIV Replication and Modulate Integrase Multimerization

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Frauke; Shaw, Stephen; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Desimmie, Belete A.; Marchand, Arnaud; Butler, Scott; Smets, Wim; Chaltin, Patrick; Westby, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Targeting the HIV integrase (HIV IN) is a clinically validated approach for designing novel anti-HIV therapies. We have previously described the discovery of a novel class of integration inhibitors, 2-(quinolin-3-yl)acetic acid derivatives, blocking HIV replication at a low micromolar concentration through binding in the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket of HIV integrase, hence referred to as LEDGINs. Here we report the detailed characterization of their mode of action. The design of novel and more potent analogues with nanomolar activity enabled full virological evaluation and a profound mechanistic study. As allosteric inhibitors, LEDGINs bind to the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket in integrase, thereby blocking the interaction with LEDGF/p75 and interfering indirectly with the catalytic activity of integrase. Detailed mechanism-of-action studies reveal that the allosteric mode of inhibition is likely caused by an effect on HIV-1 integrase oligomerization. The multimodal inhibition by LEDGINs results in a block in HIV integration and in a replication deficiency of progeny virus. The allosteric nature of LEDGINs leads to synergy in combination with the clinically approved active site HIV IN strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) raltegravir, and cross-resistance profiling proves the distinct mode of action of LEDGINs and INSTIs. The allosteric nature of inhibition and compatibility with INSTIs underline an interest in further (clinical) development of LEDGINs. PMID:22664975

  13. Discovery of an orally active small-molecule irreversible inhibitor of protein disulfide isomerase for ovarian cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shili; Butkevich, Alexey N.; Yamada, Roppei; Zhou, Yu; Debnath, Bikash; Duncan, Roger; Zandi, Ebrahim; Petasis, Nicos A.; Neamati, Nouri

    2012-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone protein, catalyzes disulfide bond breakage, formation, and rearrangement. The effect of PDI inhibition on ovarian cancer progression is not yet clear, and there is a need for potent, selective, and safe small-molecule inhibitors of PDI. Here, we report a class of propynoic acid carbamoyl methyl amides (PACMAs) that are active against a panel of human ovarian cancer cell lines. Using fluorescent derivatives, 2D gel electrophoresis, and MS, we established that PACMA 31, one of the most active analogs, acts as an irreversible small-molecule inhibitor of PDI, forming a covalent bond with the active site cysteines of PDI. We also showed that PDI activity is essential for the survival and proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells. In vivo, PACMA 31 showed tumor targeting ability and significantly suppressed ovarian tumor growth without causing toxicity to normal tissues. These irreversible small-molecule PDI inhibitors represent an important approach for the development of targeted anticancer agents for ovarian cancer therapy, and they can also serve as useful probes for investigating the biology of PDI-implicated pathways. PMID:22988091

  14. VARIABLE ACTIVE SITE LOOP CONFORMATIONS ACCOMMODATE THE BINDING OF MACROCYCLIC LARGAZOLE ANALOGUES TO HDAC8

    PubMed Central

    Decroos, Christophe; Clausen, Dane J.; Haines, Brandon E.; Wiest, Olaf; Williams, Robert M.; Christianson, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The macrocyclic depsipeptide Largazole is a potent inhibitor of metal-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs), some of which are drug targets for cancer chemotherapy. Indeed, Largazole partially resembles Romidepsin (FK228), a macrocyclic depsipeptide already approved for clinical use. Each inhibitor contains a pendant side chain thiol that coordinates to the active site Zn2+ ion, as observed in the X-ray crystal structure of the HDAC8–Largazole complex [Cole, K. E.; Dowling, D. P.; Boone, M. A.; Phillips, A. J.; Christianson, D. W. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011, 133, 12474]. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of HDAC8 complexed with three synthetic analogues of Largazole in which the depsipeptide ester is replaced with a rigid amide linkage. In two of these analogues, a 6-membered pyridine ring is also substituted (with two different orientations) for the 5-membered thiazole ring in the macrocycle skeleton. The side chain thiol group of each analogue coordinates to the active site Zn2+ ion with nearly ideal geometry, thereby preserving the hallmark structural feature of inhibition by Largazole. Surprisingly, in comparison with the binding of Largazole, these analogues trigger alternative conformational changes in the L1 and L2 loops flanking the active site. However, despite these structural differences, inhibitory potency is generally comparable to, or just moderately less than, the inhibitory potency of Largazole. Thus, this study reveals important new structure-affinity relationships for the binding of macrocyclic inhibitors to HDAC8. PMID:25793284

  15. Novel peptide inhibitors of Leishmania gp63 based on the cleavage site of MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate)-related protein.

    PubMed Central

    Corradin, Sally; Ransijn, Adriana; Corradin, Giampietro; Bouvier, Jacques; Delgado, Maria Belen; Fernandez-Carneado, Jimena; Mottram, Jeremy C; Vergères, Guy; Mauël, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    The zinc metalloprotease gp63 (leishmanolysin; promastigote surface protease) is expressed at high density at the surface of Leishmania promastigotes. Efficient non-toxic inhibitors of gp63 do not exist, and its precise role in parasite physiology remains unknown. MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate) and MARCKS-related protein (MRP; MacMARCKS) are protein kinase C substrates in various cells, including macrophages. We reported previously that MRP is an excellent substrate for gp63. A major cleavage site was identified within the MRP effector domain (ED), a highly basic 24-amino-acid sequence, and the synthetic ED peptide (MRP(ED)) was shown to inhibit MRP hydrolysis. In the present study, MRP cleavage was used as an assay to measure the capacity of various MRP or MARCKS ED peptides to block gp63 activity. On a molar basis, MRP(ED) inhibited gp63 to a greater extent than two previously described gp63 inhibitors, o -phenanthroline and benzyloxycarbonyl-Tyr-Leu-NHOH. MARCKS(ED) analogues containing modifications in the gp63 consensus cleavage site showed significant differences in inhibitory capacity. As phosphorylation of ED serine residues prevented gp63-mediated MRP degradation, we synthesized a pseudophosphorylated peptide in which serine residues were substituted by aspartate (3DMRP(ED)). 3DMRP(ED) was a highly effective inhibitor of both soluble and parasite-associated gp63. Finally, MRP ED peptides were synthesized together with an N-terminal HIV-1 Tat transduction domain (TD) to obtain cell-permeant peptide constructs. Such peptides retained gp63 inhibitory activity and efficiently entered both macrophages and parasites in a Tat TD-dependent manner. These studies may provide the basis for developing potent cell-permeant inhibitors of gp63. PMID:12137567

  16. Demethylase Inhibitor Fungicide Resistance in Pyrenophora teres f. sp. teres Associated with Target Site Modification and Inducible Overexpression of Cyp51

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Wesley J.; Deng, Weiwei; Mullins, Jonathan G. L.; West, Samuel; Wang, Penghao; Besharat, Naghmeh; Ellwood, Simon R.; Oliver, Richard P.; Lopez-Ruiz, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Pyrenophora teres f. sp. teres is the cause of net form of net blotch (NFNB), an economically important foliar disease in barley (Hordeum vulgare). Net and spot forms of net blotch are widely controlled using site-specific systemic fungicides. Although resistance to succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors and quinone outside inhibitors has been addressed before in net blotches, mechanisms controlling demethylation inhibitor resistance have not yet been reported at the molecular level. Here we report the isolation of strains of NFNB in Australia since 2013 resistant to a range of demethylase inhibitor fungicides. Cyp51A:KO103-A1, an allele with the mutation F489L, corresponding to the archetype F495I in Aspergillus fumigatus, was only present in resistant strains and was correlated with resistance factors to various demethylase inhibitors ranging from 1.1 for epoxiconazole to 31.7 for prochloraz. Structural in silico modeling of the sensitive and resistant CYP51A proteins docked with different demethylase inhibitor fungicides showed how the interaction of F489L within the heme cavity produced a localized constriction of the region adjacent to the docking site that is predicted to result in lower binding affinities. Resistant strains also displayed enhanced induced expression of the two Cyp51A paralogs and of Cyp51B genes. While Cyp51B was found to be constitutively expressed in the absence of fungicide, Cyp51A was only detected at extremely low levels. Under fungicide induction, expression of Cyp51B, Cyp51A2, and Cyp51A1 was shown to be 1.6-, 3,- and 5.3-fold higher, respectively in the resistant isolate compared to the wild type. These increased levels of expression were not supported by changes in the promoters of any of the three genes. The implications of these findings on demethylase inhibitor activity will require current net blotch management strategies to be reconsidered in order to avoid the development of further resistance and preserve the lifespan of

  17. Demethylase Inhibitor Fungicide Resistance in Pyrenophora teres f. sp. teres Associated with Target Site Modification and Inducible Overexpression of Cyp51.

    PubMed

    Mair, Wesley J; Deng, Weiwei; Mullins, Jonathan G L; West, Samuel; Wang, Penghao; Besharat, Naghmeh; Ellwood, Simon R; Oliver, Richard P; Lopez-Ruiz, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Pyrenophora teres f. sp. teres is the cause of net form of net blotch (NFNB), an economically important foliar disease in barley (Hordeum vulgare). Net and spot forms of net blotch are widely controlled using site-specific systemic fungicides. Although resistance to succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors and quinone outside inhibitors has been addressed before in net blotches, mechanisms controlling demethylation inhibitor resistance have not yet been reported at the molecular level. Here we report the isolation of strains of NFNB in Australia since 2013 resistant to a range of demethylase inhibitor fungicides. Cyp51A:KO103-A1, an allele with the mutation F489L, corresponding to the archetype F495I in Aspergillus fumigatus, was only present in resistant strains and was correlated with resistance factors to various demethylase inhibitors ranging from 1.1 for epoxiconazole to 31.7 for prochloraz. Structural in silico modeling of the sensitive and resistant CYP51A proteins docked with different demethylase inhibitor fungicides showed how the interaction of F489L within the heme cavity produced a localized constriction of the region adjacent to the docking site that is predicted to result in lower binding affinities. Resistant strains also displayed enhanced induced expression of the two Cyp51A paralogs and of Cyp51B genes. While Cyp51B was found to be constitutively expressed in the absence of fungicide, Cyp51A was only detected at extremely low levels. Under fungicide induction, expression of Cyp51B, Cyp51A2, and Cyp51A1 was shown to be 1.6-, 3,- and 5.3-fold higher, respectively in the resistant isolate compared to the wild type. These increased levels of expression were not supported by changes in the promoters of any of the three genes. The implications of these findings on demethylase inhibitor activity will require current net blotch management strategies to be reconsidered in order to avoid the development of further resistance and preserve the lifespan of

  18. Suppressive Effects of the Site 1 Protease (S1P) Inhibitor, PF-429242, on Dengue Virus Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Leo; Urata, Shuzo; Ulanday, Gianne Eduard L.; Takamatsu, Yuki; Yasuda, Jiro; Morita, Kouichi; Hayasaka, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes one of the most widespread mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Despite the great need, effective vaccines and practical antiviral therapies are still under development. Intracellular lipid levels are regulated by sterol regulatory elements-binding proteins (SREBPs), which are activated by serine protease, site 1 protease (S1P). Small compound PF-429242 is known as a S1P inhibitor and the antivirus effects have been reported in some viruses. In this study, we examined the anti-DENV effects of PF-429242 using all four serotypes of DENV by several primate-derived cell lines. Moreover, emergence of drug-resistant DENV mutants was assessed by sequential passages with the drug. DENV dependency on intracellular lipids during their infection was also evaluated by adding extracellular lipids. The addition of PF-429242 showed suppression of viral propagation in all DENV serotypes. We showed that drug-resistant DENV mutants are unlikely to emerge after five times sequential passages through treatment with PF-429242. Although the levels of intracellular cholesterol and lipid droplets were reduced by PF-429242, viral propagations were not recovered by addition of exogenous cholesterol or fatty acids, indicating that the reduction of LD and cholesterol caused by PF-429242 treatment is not related to its mechanism of action against DENV propagation. Our results suggest that PF-429242 is a promising candidate for an anti-DENV agent. PMID:26875984

  19. Suppressive Effects of the Site 1 Protease (S1P) Inhibitor, PF-429242, on Dengue Virus Propagation.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Leo; Urata, Shuzo; Ulanday, Gianne Eduard L; Takamatsu, Yuki; Yasuda, Jiro; Morita, Kouichi; Hayasaka, Daisuke

    2016-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes one of the most widespread mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Despite the great need, effective vaccines and practical antiviral therapies are still under development. Intracellular lipid levels are regulated by sterol regulatory elements-binding proteins (SREBPs), which are activated by serine protease, site 1 protease (S1P). Small compound PF-429242 is known as a S1P inhibitor and the antivirus effects have been reported in some viruses. In this study, we examined the anti-DENV effects of PF-429242 using all four serotypes of DENV by several primate-derived cell lines. Moreover, emergence of drug-resistant DENV mutants was assessed by sequential passages with the drug. DENV dependency on intracellular lipids during their infection was also evaluated by adding extracellular lipids. The addition of PF-429242 showed suppression of viral propagation in all DENV serotypes. We showed that drug-resistant DENV mutants are unlikely to emerge after five times sequential passages through treatment with PF-429242. Although the levels of intracellular cholesterol and lipid droplets were reduced by PF-429242, viral propagations were not recovered by addition of exogenous cholesterol or fatty acids, indicating that the reduction of LD and cholesterol caused by PF-429242 treatment is not related to its mechanism of action against DENV propagation. Our results suggest that PF-429242 is a promising candidate for an anti-DENV agent. PMID:26875984

  20. Molecular modeling study of binding to the catalytic site of PDE4 enzymes by a novel class of inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrenz, Morgan E.; Salter, E. A.; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Thompson, W. J.

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) comprise a superfamily of enzymes that hydrolyze the second messengers adenosine and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP and cGMP) to their noncyclic nucleotides (5'-AMP and 5'-GMP). Selective inhibitors of all 11 gene families of PDEs are being sought based on the different biochemical properties of the different isoforms, including their substrate specificities. The PDE4 gene family consists of cAMP-specific isoforms; selective PDE4 inhibitors such as rolipram have been developed, and related agents are used clinically as anti-inflammatory agents for asthma and COPD. The known crystal structures of PDE4 bound with rolipram and IBMX have allowed us to define plausible binding orientations for a novel class of benzylpyridazinone-based PDE4 inhibitors represented by EMD 94360 and EMD 95832 that are structurally distinct from rolipram. Molecular mechanics modeling with autodocking is used to explore energetically favorable binding orientations within the PDE4 catalytic site. We present two putative orientations for EMD 94360/95832 inhibitor binding. Our estimated interaction energies for rolipram, IBMX, EMD 94360, and EMD 95832 are consistent with the experimental data for their IC50 values. Key binding residues and interactions in these orientations are identified and compared with known binding motifs proposed for rolipram. The experimentally observed improved strength of inhibition exhibited by this novel class of PDE4 inhibitors is explained by the molecular modeling reported here.

  1. PTP1B inhibitor promotes endothelial cell motility by activating the DOCK180/Rac1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Yan, Feng; Ye, Qing; Wu, Xiao; Jiang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Promoting endothelial cell (EC) migration is important not only for therapeutic angiogenesis, but also for accelerating re-endothelialization after vessel injury. Several recent studies have shown that inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) may promote EC migration and angiogenesis by enhancing the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) signalling. In the present study, we demonstrated that PTP1B inhibitor could promote EC adhesion, spreading and migration, which were abolished by the inhibitor of Rac1 but not RhoA GTPase. PTP1B inhibitor significantly increased phosphorylation of p130Cas, and the interactions among p130Cas, Crk and DOCK180; whereas the phosphorylation levels of focal adhesion kinase, Src, paxillin, or Vav2 were unchanged. Gene silencing of DOCK180, but not Vav2, abrogated the effects of PTP1B inhibitor on EC motility. The effects of PTP1B inhibitor on EC motility and p130Cas/DOCK180 activation persisted in the presence of the VEGFR2 antagonist. In conclusion, we suggest that stimulation of the DOCK180 pathway represents an alternative mechanism of PTP1B inhibitor-stimulated EC motility, which does not require concomitant VEGFR2 activation as a prerequisite. Therefore, PTP1B inhibitor may be a useful therapeutic strategy for promoting EC migration in cardiovascular patients in which the VEGF/VEGFR functions are compromised. PMID:27052191

  2. The Effect of Clade-Specific Sequence Polymorphisms on HIV-1 Protease Activity and Inhibitor Resistance Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaranayake, Rajintha M.; Kolli, Madhavi; King, Nancy M.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Heroux, Annie; Kakizawa, Junko; Sugiura, Wataru; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2010-09-08

    The majority of HIV-1 infections around the world result from non-B clade HIV-1 strains. The CRF01{_}AE (AE) strain is seen principally in Southeast Asia. AE protease differs by {approx}10% in amino acid sequence from clade B protease and carries several naturally occurring polymorphisms that are associated with drug resistance in clade B. AE protease has been observed to develop resistance through a nonactive-site N88S mutation in response to nelfinavir (NFV) therapy, whereas clade B protease develops both the active-site mutation D30N and the nonactive-site mutation N88D. Structural and biochemical studies were carried out with wild-type and NFV-resistant clade B and AE protease variants. The relationship between clade-specific sequence variations and pathways to inhibitor resistance was also assessed. AE protease has a lower catalytic turnover rate than clade B protease, and it also has weaker affinity for both NFV and darunavir (DRV). This weaker affinity may lead to the nonactive-site N88S variant in AE, which exhibits significantly decreased affinity for both NFV and DRV. The D30N/N88D mutations in clade B resulted in a significant loss of affinity for NFV and, to a lesser extent, for DRV. A comparison of crystal structures of AE protease shows significant structural rearrangement in the flap hinge region compared with those of clade B protease and suggests insights into the alternative pathways to NFV resistance. In combination, our studies show that sequence polymorphisms within clades can alter protease activity and inhibitor binding and are capable of altering the pathway to inhibitor resistance.

  3. Targeting the RAS pathway by mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Michael K; Rogler, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Targeting of oncogenic driver mutations with small-molecule inhibitors resulted in powerful treatment options for cancer patients in recent years. The RAS (rat sarcoma) pathway is among the most frequently mutated pathways in human cancer. Whereas targeting mutant Kirsten RAS (KRAS) remains difficult, mutant B rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma (BRAF) kinase is an established drug target in cancer. Now data show that neuroblastoma RAS (NRAS) and even Harvey RAS (HRAS) mutations could be predictive markers for treatment with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) inhibitors. This review discusses recent preclinical and clinical studies of MEK inhibitors in BRAF and RAS mutant cancer. PMID:26691679

  4. Feedback Activation of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor Limits Response to Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hanlin; Qu, Jia; Jin, Nan; Xu, Jun; Lin, Chenchu; Chen, Yi; Yang, Xinying; He, Xiang; Tang, Shuai; Lan, Xiaojing; Yang, Xiaotong; Chen, Ziqi; Huang, Min; Ding, Jian; Geng, Meiyu

    2016-09-12

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have demonstrated clinical benefits in subtypes of hematological malignancies. However, the efficacy of HDAC inhibitors in solid tumors remains uncertain. This study takes breast cancer as a model to understand mechanisms accounting for limited response of HDAC inhibitors in solid tumors and to seek combination solutions. We discover that feedback activation of leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) signaling in breast cancer limits the response to HDAC inhibition. Mechanistically, HDAC inhibition increases histone acetylation at the LIFR gene promoter, which recruits bromodomain protein BRD4, upregulates LIFR expression, and activates JAK1-STAT3 signaling. Importantly, JAK1 or BRD4 inhibition sensitizes breast cancer to HDAC inhibitors, implicating combination inhibition of HDAC with JAK1 or BRD4 as potential therapies for breast cancer. PMID:27622335

  5. Crystal Structure of a Two-domain Fragment of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activator Inhibitor-1: FUNCTIONAL INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE KUNITZ-TYPE INHIBITOR DOMAIN-1 AND THE NEIGHBORING POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE-LIKE DOMAIN.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zebin; De Meulemeester, Laura; Jacobi, Annemarie; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Morth, J Preben; Andreasen, Peter A; Jensen, Jan K

    2016-07-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-1 (HAI-1) is a type I transmembrane protein and inhibitor of several serine proteases, including hepatocyte growth factor activator and matriptase. The protein is essential for development as knock-out mice die in utero due to placental defects caused by misregulated extracellular proteolysis. HAI-1 contains two Kunitz-type inhibitor domains (Kunitz), which are generally thought of as a functionally self-contained protease inhibitor unit. This is not the case for HAI-1, where our results reveal how interdomain interactions have evolved to stimulate the inhibitory activity of an integrated Kunitz. Here we present an x-ray crystal structure of an HAI-1 fragment covering the internal domain and Kunitz-1. The structure reveals not only that the previously uncharacterized internal domain is a member of the polycystic kidney disease domain family but also how the two domains engage in interdomain interactions. Supported by solution small angle x-ray scattering and a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and functional assays, we show that interdomain interactions not only stabilize the fold of the internal domain but also stimulate the inhibitory activity of Kunitz-1. By completing our structural characterization of the previously unknown N-terminal region of HAI-1, we provide new insight into the interplay between tertiary structure and the inhibitory activity of a multidomain protease inhibitor. We propose a previously unseen mechanism by which the association of an auxiliary domain stimulates the inhibitory activity of a Kunitz-type inhibitor (i.e. the first structure of an intramolecular interaction between a Kunitz and another domain). PMID:27189939

  6. THE BTK INHIBITOR PCI-32765 SYNERGISTICALLY INCREASES PROTEASOME INHIBITOR ACTIVITY IN DLBCL AND MCL CELLS SENSITIVE OR RESISTANT TO BORTEZOMIB

    PubMed Central

    Dasmahapatra, Girija; Patel, Hiral; Dent, Paul; Fisher, Richard I.; Friedberg, Jonathan; Grant, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Summary Interactions between the Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor PCI-32765 and the proteasome inhibitor (bortezomib) were examined in diffuse large-B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells, including those highly resistant to bortezomib. Co-administration of PCI-32765/bortezomib synergistically increased mitochondrial injury and apoptosis in germinal centre- or activated B-cell-like-DLBCL cells and in MCL cells. These events were accompanied by marked AKT and nuclear factor (NF)-κB (NFKB1) inactivation, down-regulation of Mcl-1 (MCL1), Bcl-xL (BCL2L1), and XIAP, and enhanced DNA damage (e.g., γH2A.X formation) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Similar interactions were observed in highly bortezomib-resistant DLBCL and MCL cells, and in primary DLBCL cells. In contrast, PCI-32765/bortezomib regimens displayed minimal toxicity toward normal CD34+ bone marrow cells. Transfection of DLBCL cells with a constitutively active AKT construct attenuated AKT inactivation and significantly diminished cell death, whereas expression of an NF-κB “super-repressor” (IκBαser34/36) increased both PCI-32765 and bortezomib lethality. Moreover, cells in which the ER stress response was disabled by a dominant-negative eIF2α construct were resistant to this regimen. Finally, combined exposure to PCI-32765 and bortezomib resulted in more pronounced and sustained reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and ROS scavengers significantly diminished lethality. Given promising early clinical results for PCI-32765 in DLBCL and MCL, a strategy combining BTK/ proteasome inhibitor warrants attention in these malignancies. PMID:23360303

  7. Modulation of activation-loop phosphorylation by JAK inhibitors is binding mode dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bonenfant, Débora; Rubert, Joëlle; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Scheufler, Clemens; Marque, Fanny; Régnier, Catherine H.; De Pover, Alain; Ryckelynck, Hugues; Bhagwat, Neha; Koppikar, Priya; Goel, Aviva; Wyder, Lorenza; Tavares, Gisele; Baffert, Fabienne; Pissot-Soldermann, Carole; Manley, Paul W.; Gaul, Christoph; Voshol, Hans; Levine, Ross L.; Sellers, William R.; Hofmann, Francesco; Radimerski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    JAK inhibitors are being developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, myeloproliferative neoplasms and leukemias. Most of these drugs target the ATP-binding pocket and stabilize the active conformation of the JAK kinases. This type-I binding mode leads to an increase in JAK activation-loop phosphorylation, despite blockade of kinase function. Here we report that stabilizing the inactive state via type-II inhibition acts in the opposite manner, leading to a loss of activation-loop phosphorylation. We used X-ray crystallography to corroborate the binding mode and report for the first time the crystal structure of the JAK2 kinase domain in an inactive conformation. Importantly, JAK inhibitor-induced activation-loop phosphorylation requires receptor interaction, as well as intact kinase and pseudokinase domains. Hence, depending on the respective conformation stabilized by a JAK inhibitor, hyperphosphorylation of the activation-loop may or may not be elicited. PMID:22684457

  8. Study of the Differential Activity of Thrombin Inhibitors Using Docking, QSAR, Molecular Dynamics, and MM-GBSA

    PubMed Central

    Mena-Ulecia, Karel; Tiznado, William; Caballero, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Non-peptidic thrombin inhibitors (TIs; 177 compounds) with diverse groups at motifs P1 (such as oxyguanidine, amidinohydrazone, amidine, amidinopiperidine), P2 (such as cyanofluorophenylacetamide, 2-(2-chloro-6-fluorophenyl)acetamide), and P3 (such as phenylethyl, arylsulfonate groups) were studied using molecular modeling to analyze their interactions with S1, S2, and S3 subsites of the thrombin binding site. Firstly, a protocol combining docking and three dimensional quantitative structure–activity relationship was performed. We described the orientations and preferred active conformations of the studied inhibitors, and derived a predictive CoMSIA model including steric, donor hydrogen bond, and acceptor hydrogen bond fields. Secondly, the dynamic behaviors of some selected TIs (compounds 26, 133, 147, 149, 162, and 177 in this manuscript) that contain different molecular features and different activities were analyzed by creating the solvated models and using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We used the conformational structures derived from MD to accomplish binding free energetic calculations using MM-GBSA. With this analysis, we theorized about the effect of van der Waals contacts, electrostatic interactions and solvation in the potency of TIs. In general, the contents reported in this article help to understand the physical and chemical characteristics of thrombin-inhibitor complexes. PMID:26599107

  9. Study of the Differential Activity of Thrombin Inhibitors Using Docking, QSAR, Molecular Dynamics, and MM-GBSA.

    PubMed

    Mena-Ulecia, Karel; Tiznado, William; Caballero, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Non-peptidic thrombin inhibitors (TIs; 177 compounds) with diverse groups at motifs P1 (such as oxyguanidine, amidinohydrazone, amidine, amidinopiperidine), P2 (such as cyanofluorophenylacetamide, 2-(2-chloro-6-fluorophenyl)acetamide), and P3 (such as phenylethyl, arylsulfonate groups) were studied using molecular modeling to analyze their interactions with S1, S2, and S3 subsites of the thrombin binding site. Firstly, a protocol combining docking and three dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship was performed. We described the orientations and preferred active conformations of the studied inhibitors, and derived a predictive CoMSIA model including steric, donor hydrogen bond, and acceptor hydrogen bond fields. Secondly, the dynamic behaviors of some selected TIs (compounds 26, 133, 147, 149, 162, and 177 in this manuscript) that contain different molecular features and different activities were analyzed by creating the solvated models and using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We used the conformational structures derived from MD to accomplish binding free energetic calculations using MM-GBSA. With this analysis, we theorized about the effect of van der Waals contacts, electrostatic interactions and solvation in the potency of TIs. In general, the contents reported in this article help to understand the physical and chemical characteristics of thrombin-inhibitor complexes. PMID:26599107

  10. Rationally Designed Interfacial Peptides Are Efficient In Vitro Inhibitors of HIV-1 Capsid Assembly with Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bocanegra, Rebeca; Nevot, María; Doménech, Rosa; López, Inmaculada; Abián, Olga; Rodríguez-Huete, Alicia; Cavasotto, Claudio N.; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Gómez, Javier; Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Neira, José Luis; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2011-01-01

    Virus capsid assembly constitutes an attractive target for the development of antiviral therapies; a few experimental inhibitors of this process for HIV-1 and other viruses have been identified by screening compounds or by selection from chemical libraries. As a different, novel approach we have undertaken the rational design of peptides that could act as competitive assembly inhibitors by mimicking capsid structural elements involved in intersubunit interfaces. Several discrete interfaces involved in formation of the mature HIV-1 capsid through polymerization of the capsid protein CA were targeted. We had previously designed a peptide, CAC1, that represents CA helix 9 (a major part of the dimerization interface) and binds the CA C-terminal domain in solution. Here we have mapped the binding site of CAC1, and shown that it substantially overlaps with the CA dimerization interface. We have also rationally modified CAC1 to increase its solubility and CA-binding affinity, and designed four additional peptides that represent CA helical segments involved in other CA interfaces. We found that peptides CAC1, its derivative CAC1M, and H8 (representing CA helix 8) were able to efficiently inhibit the in vitro assembly of the mature HIV-1 capsid. Cocktails of several peptides, including CAC1 or CAC1M plus H8 or CAI (a previously discovered inhibitor of CA polymerization), or CAC1M+H8+CAI, also abolished capsid assembly, even when every peptide was used at lower, sub-inhibitory doses. To provide a preliminary proof that these designed capsid assembly inhibitors could eventually serve as lead compounds for development of anti-HIV-1 agents, they were transported into cultured cells using a cell-penetrating peptide, and tested for antiviral activity. Peptide cocktails that drastically inhibited capsid assembly in vitro were also able to efficiently inhibit HIV-1 infection ex vivo. This study validates a novel, entirely rational approach for the design of capsid assembly

  11. Antiatherogenic activity of fungal beauveriolides, inhibitors of lipid droplet accumulation in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Namatame, Ichiji; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Shun; Ōmura, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    Beauveriolides I and III, isolated from the culture broth of fungal Beauveria sp. FO-6979, showed potent inhibitory activity of lipid droplet accumulation in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages. The cellular molecular target of this inhibitory activity was studied in macrophages. Beauveriolides I and III strongly inhibited the cholesteryl ester (CE) synthesis with IC50 values of 0.78 and 0.41 μM, respectively, without showing significant effects on the triacylglycerol and phospholipid synthesis. Furthermore, lysosomal cholesterol metabolism to CE in macrophages was inhibited by the compounds, indicating that the inhibition site lies within steps between cholesterol departure from the lysosome and CE synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse macrophages was studied, resulting in a dose-dependent inhibition by beauveriolides I and III with IC50 values of 6.0 and 5.5 μM, respectively. Thus, we showed that the beauveriolides inhibit macrophage ACAT activity specifically, resulting in blockage of the CE synthesis, leading to a reduction of lipid droplets in macrophages. ACAT activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse liver and Caco-2 cells was also inhibited, indicating that the beauveriolides block both ACAT-1 and -2. Moreover, beauveriolides I and III exert antiatherogenic activity in both low-density lipoprotein receptor- and apolipoprotein E-knockout mice without any side effects such as diarrhea or cytotoxicity to adrenal tissues as observed for many synthetic ACAT inhibitors. Beauveriolides I and III are the first microbial cyclodepsipeptides having an in vivo antiatherosclerotic effect and show promise as potential lead compounds for antiatherosclerotic agents. PMID:14718664

  12. Antiatherogenic activity of fungal beauveriolides, inhibitors of lipid droplet accumulation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Namatame, Ichiji; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Shun; Omura, Satoshi

    2004-01-20

    Beauveriolides I and III, isolated from the culture broth of fungal Beauveria sp. FO-6979, showed potent inhibitory activity of lipid droplet accumulation in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages. The cellular molecular target of this inhibitory activity was studied in macrophages. Beauveriolides I and III strongly inhibited the cholesteryl ester (CE) synthesis with IC(50) values of 0.78 and 0.41 microM, respectively, without showing significant effects on the triacylglycerol and phospholipid synthesis. Furthermore, lysosomal cholesterol metabolism to CE in macrophages was inhibited by the compounds, indicating that the inhibition site lies within steps between cholesterol departure from the lysosome and CE synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse macrophages was studied, resulting in a dose-dependent inhibition by beauveriolides I and III with IC(50) values of 6.0 and 5.5 microM, respectively. Thus, we showed that the beauveriolides inhibit macrophage ACAT activity specifically, resulting in blockage of the CE synthesis, leading to a reduction of lipid droplets in macrophages. ACAT activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse liver and Caco-2 cells was also inhibited, indicating that the beauveriolides block both ACAT-1 and -2. Moreover, beauveriolides I and III exert antiatherogenic activity in both low-density lipoprotein receptor- and apolipoprotein E-knockout mice without any side effects such as diarrhea or cytotoxicity to adrenal tissues as observed for many synthetic ACAT inhibitors. Beauveriolides I and III are the first microbial cyclodepsipeptides having an in vivo antiatherosclerotic effect and show promise as potential lead compounds for antiatherosclerotic agents. PMID:14718664

  13. Antiangiogenic Activity of Alofanib, an Allosteric Inhibitor of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Khochenkov, D A; Solomko, E Sch; Peretolchina, N M; Ryabaya, O O; Stepanova, E V

    2015-11-01

    Alofanib is a potential allosteric inhibitor of FGFR2 used in oncology. The inhibitor blocks the extracellular part of the receptor and prevents its binding with the ligand. Alofanib suppressed proliferation of endothelial cells, their migration activity, and ability to form vessellike structures in vitro and significantly decreased the number of microvessels in Matrigel implant and in ovarian cancer (SKOV-3) xenograft in vivo. The results indicate that Alofanib can inhibit angiogenesis. PMID:26597690

  14. Low-volume multiplexed proteolytic activity assay and inhibitor analysis through a pico-injector array.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ee Xien; Miller, Miles A; Jing, Tengyang; Lauffenburger, Doug A; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2015-02-21

    Secreted active proteases, from families of enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinases), participate in diverse pathological processes. To simultaneously measure multiple specific protease activities, a series of parallel enzyme reactions combined with a series of inhibitor analyses for proteolytic activity matrix analysis (PrAMA) are essential but limited due to the sample quantity requirements and the complexity of performing multiple reactions. To address these issues, we developed a pico-injector array to generate 72 different reactions in picoliter-volume droplets by controlling the sequence of combinational injections, which allowed simultaneous recording of a wide range of multiple enzyme reactions and measurement of inhibitor effects using small sample volumes (~10 μL). Multiple MMP activities were simultaneously determined by 9 different substrates and 2 inhibitors using injections from a pico-injector array. Due to the advantages of inhibitor analysis, the MMP/ADAM activities of MDA-MB-231, a breast cancer cell line, were characterized with high MMP-2, MMP-3 and ADAM-10 activity. This platform could be customized for a wide range of applications that also require multiple reactions with inhibitor analysis to enhance the sensitivity by encapsulating different chemical sensors. PMID:25553996

  15. Allosteric inhibition of Epac: computational modeling and experimental validation to identify allosteric sites and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brown, Loren M; Rogers, Kathleen E; Aroonsakool, Nakon; McCammon, J Andrew; Insel, Paul A

    2014-10-17

    Epac, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the low molecular weight G protein Rap, is an effector of cAMP signaling and has been implicated to have roles in numerous diseases, including diabetes mellitus, heart failure, and cancer. We used a computational molecular modeling approach to predict potential binding sites for allosteric modulators of Epac and to identify molecules that might bind to these regions. This approach revealed that the conserved hinge region of the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of Epac1 is a potentially druggable region of the protein. Using a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay (CAMYEL, cAMP sensor using YFP-Epac-Rluc), we assessed the predicted compounds for their ability to bind Epac and modulate its activity. We identified a thiobarbituric acid derivative, 5376753, that allosterically inhibits Epac activity and used Swiss 3T3 and HEK293 cells to test the ability of this compound to modulate the activity of Epac and PKA, as determined by Rap1 activity and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation, respectively. Compound 5376753 selectively inhibited Epac in biochemical and cell migration studies. These results document the utility of a computational approach to identify a domain for allosteric regulation of Epac and a novel compound that prevents the activation of Epac1 by cAMP. PMID:25183009

  16. Selective COX-2 Inhibitors: A Review of Their Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Zarghi, Afshin; Arfaei, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the competitive inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX), the enzyme which mediates the bioconversion of arachidonic acid to inflammatory prostaglandins (PGs). Their use is associated with the side effects such as gastrointestinal and renal toxicity. The therapeutic anti-inflammatory action of NSAIDs is produced by the inhibition of COX-2, while the undesired side effects arise from inhibition of COX-1 activity. Thus, it was though that more selective COX-2 inhibitors would have reduced side effects. Based upon a number of selective COX-2 inhibitors (rofecoxib, celecoxib, valdecoxibetc.) were developed as safer NSAIDs with improved gastric safety profile. However, the recent market removal of some COXIBs such as rofecoxib due to its adverse cardiovascular side effects clearly encourages the researchers to explore and evaluate alternative templates with COX-2 inhibitory activity. Recognition of new avenues for selective COX-2 inhibitors in cancer chemotherapy and neurological diseases such as Parkinson and Alzheimer’s diseases still continues to attract investigations on the development of COX-2 inhibitors. This review highlights the various structural classes of selective COX-2 inhibitors with special emphasis on their structure-activity relationships. PMID:24250402

  17. 'Unconventional' coordination chemistry by metal chelating fragments in a metalloprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Martin, David P; Blachly, Patrick G; Marts, Amy R; Woodruff, Tessa M; de Oliveira, César A F; McCammon, J Andrew; Tierney, David L; Cohen, Seth M

    2014-04-01

    The binding of three closely related chelators: 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-thione (allothiomaltol, ATM), 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-thione (thiomaltol, TM), and 3-hydroxy-4H-pyran-4-thione (thiopyromeconic acid, TPMA) to the active site of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) has been investigated. Two of these ligands display a monodentate mode of coordination to the active site Zn(2+) ion in hCAII that is not recapitulated in model complexes of the enzyme active site. This unprecedented binding mode in the hCAII-thiomaltol complex has been characterized by both X-ray crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy. In addition, the steric restrictions of the active site force the ligands into a 'flattened' mode of coordination compared with inorganic model complexes. This change in geometry has been shown by density functional computations to significantly decrease the strength of the metal-ligand binding. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the mode of binding by small metal-binding groups can be significantly influenced by the protein active site. Diminishing the strength of the metal-ligand bond results in unconventional modes of metal coordination not found in typical coordination compounds or even carefully engineered active site models, and understanding these effects is critical to the rational design of inhibitors that target clinically relevant metalloproteins. PMID:24635441

  18. Identification of Bacillus anthracis PurE inhibitors with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Anna; Wolf, Nina M; Zhu, Tian; Johnson, Michael E; Deng, Jiangping; Cook, James L; Fung, Leslie W-M

    2015-04-01

    N(5)-carboxy-amino-imidazole ribonucleotide (N(5)-CAIR) mutase (PurE), a bacterial enzyme in the de novo purine biosynthetic pathway, has been suggested to be a target for antimicrobial agent development. We have optimized a thermal shift method for high-throughput screening of compounds binding to Bacillus anthracis PurE. We used a low ionic strength buffer condition to accentuate the thermal shift stabilization induced by compound binding to Bacillus anthracis PurE. The compounds identified were then subjected to computational docking to the active site to further select compounds likely to be inhibitors. A UV-based enzymatic activity assay was then used to select inhibitory compounds. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were subsequently obtained for the inhibitory compounds against Bacillus anthracis (ΔANR strain), Escherichia coli (BW25113 strain, wild-type and ΔTolC), Francisella tularensis, Staphylococcus aureus (both methicillin susceptible and methicillin-resistant strains) and Yersinia pestis. Several compounds exhibited excellent (0.05-0.15μg/mL) MIC values against Bacillus anthracis. A common core structure was identified for the compounds exhibiting low MIC values. The difference in concentrations for inhibition and MIC suggest that another enzyme(s) is also targeted by the compounds that we identified. PMID:25737087

  19. Statins Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Gene Transcription through a Pregnane X Receptor Regulated Element

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Frederick M.; Linder, Kathryn M.; Cardozo, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a multifunctional protein that has important roles in inflammation and wound healing. Its aberrant regulation may contribute to many disease processes such as heart disease. The PAI-1 promoter is responsive to multiple inputs including cytokines, growth factors, steroids and oxidative stress. The statin drugs, atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin, increased basal and stimulated expression of the PAI-1 promoter 3-fold. A statin-responsive, nuclear hormone response element was previously identified in the PAI-1 promoter, but it was incompletely characterized. We characterized this direct repeat (DR) of AGGTCA with a 3-nucleotide spacer at -269/-255 using deletion and directed mutagenesis. Deletion or mutation of this element increased basal transcription from the promoter suggesting that it repressed PAI-1 transcription in the unliganded state. The half-site spacing and the ligand specificity suggested that this might be a pregnane X receptor (PXR) responsive element. Computational molecular docking showed that atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin were structurally compatible with the PXR ligand-binding pocket in its agonist conformation. Experiments with Gal4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins showed that Gal4-PXR was activated by statins while other DR + 3 binding nuclear receptor fusions were not. Overexpression of PXR further enhanced PAI-1 transcription in response to statins. Finally, ChIP experiments using Halo-tagged PXR and RXR demonstrated that both components of the PXR-RXR heterodimer bound to this region of the PAI-1 promoter. PMID:26379245

  20. KDR activating mutations in human angiosarcomas are sensitive to specific kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Antonescu, Cristina R; Yoshida, Akihiko; Guo, Tianhuo; Chang, Ning-En; Zhang, Lei; Agaram, Narasimhan P; Qin, Li-Xuan; Brennan, Murray F; Singer, Samuel; Maki, Robert G

    2009-09-15

    Angiosarcomas (AS) represent a heterogeneous group of malignant vascular tumors occurring not only in different anatomic locations but also in distinct clinical settings, such as radiation or associated chronic lymphedema. Although representing only 1% to 2% of soft tissue sarcomas, vascular sarcomas provide unique insight into the general process of tumor angiogenesis. However, no molecular candidates have been identified to guide a specific therapeutic intervention. By expression profiling, AS show distinct up-regulation of vascular-specific receptor tyrosine kinases, including TIE1, KDR, SNRK, TEK, and FLT1. Full sequencing of these five candidate genes identified 10% of patients harboring KDR mutations. A KDR-positive genotype was associated with strong KDR protein expression and was restricted to the breast anatomic site with or without prior exposure to radiation. Transient transfection of KDR mutants into COS-7 cells showed ligand-independent activation of the kinase, which was inhibited by specific KDR inhibitors. These data provide a basis for the activity of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-directed therapy in the treatment of primary and radiation-induced AS. PMID:19723655

  1. Microglial activation decreases retention of the protease inhibitor saquinavir: implications for HIV treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Active HIV infection within the central nervous system (CNS) is confined primarily to microglia. The glial cell compartment acts as a viral reservoir behind the blood-brain barrier. It provides an additional roadblock to effective pharmacological treatment via expression of multiple drug efflux transporters, including P-glycoprotein. HIV/AIDS patients frequently suffer bacterial and viral co-infections, leading to deregulation of glial cell function and release of pro-inflammatory mediators including cytokines, chemokines, and nitric oxide. Methods To better define the role of inflammation in decreased HIV drug accumulation into CNS targets, accumulation of the antiretroviral saquinavir was examined in purified cultures of rodent microglia exposed to the prototypical inflammatory mediator lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Results [3H]-Saquinavir accumulation by microglia was rapid, and was increased up to two-fold in the presence of the specific P-glycoprotein inhibitor, PSC833. After six or 24 hours of exposure to 10 ng/ml LPS, saquinavir accumulation was decreased by up to 45%. LPS did not directly inhibit saquinavir transport, and did not affect P-glycoprotein protein expression. LPS exposure did not alter RNA and/or protein expression of other transporters including multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 and several solute carrier uptake transporters. Conclusions The decrease in saquinavir accumulation in microglia following treatment with LPS is likely multi-factorial, since drug accumulation was attenuated by inhibitors of NF-κβ and the MEK1/2 pathway in the microglia cell line HAPI, and in primary microglia cultures from toll-like receptor 4 deficient mice. These data provide new pharmacological insights into why microglia act as a difficult-to-treat viral sanctuary site. PMID:23642074

  2. Effect of mimetic CDK9 inhibitors on HIV-1 activated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Van Duyne, Rachel; Guendel, Irene; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Sampey, Gavin; Klase, Zachary; Chen, Hao; Zeng, Chen; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; el Kouni, Mahmoud H.; Lepene, Benjamin; Patanarut, Alexis; Nekhai, Sergei; Price, David H.; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2013-01-01

    Potent antiretroviral therapy (ART) has transformed HIV-1 infection into a chronic manageable disease; however drug resistance remains a common problem that limits the effectiveness and clinical benefits of this type of treatment. The discovery of viral reservoirs in the body, in which HIV-1 may persist, has helped to explain why therapeutic eradication of HIV-1 has proved so difficult. In the current study we utilized a combination of structure based analysis of Cyclin/CDK complexes with our previously published Tat peptide derivatives. We modeled the Tat peptide inhibitors with CDKs and found a particular pocket which showed the most stable binding site (Cavity 1) using in silico analysis. Furthermore, we were able to find peptide mimetics that bound to similar regions using in silico searches of a chemical library, followed by cell based biological assays. Using these methods we obtained the first generation mimetic drugs and tested these compounds on HIV-1 LTR activated transcription. Using biological assays followed by similar in silico analysis to find a 2nd generation drugs resembling the original mimetic, we found the new targets of Cavity 1 and Cavity 2 regions on CDK9. We examined the 2nd generation mimetic against various viral isolates, and observed a generalized suppression of most HIV-1 isolates. Finally, the drug inhibited viral replication in humanized mouse models of Rag2-/-γc-/- with no toxicity to the animals at tested concentrations. Our results suggest that it may be possible to model peptide inhibitors into available crystal structures and further find drug mimetics using in silico analysis. PMID:23247501

  3. Tissue Plasminogen Activator and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Levels in Patients with Acute Paraquat Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Su-Jin; Kim, Su-Ji; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) plasma levels, and their possible implications on clinical outcome, we measured tPA and PAI-1 levels in 101 patients with acute paraquat (PQ) intoxication. The control group consisted of patients who ingested non-PQ pesticides during the same period. tPA and PAI-1 levels were higher in the PQ group than in the controls. PQ levels were significantly correlated with ingested amount, timelag to hospital, tPA level, and hospitalization duration. tPA levels were correlated with PAI-1, fibrin degradation product (FDP), and D-dimer. D-dimer levels were lower in the PQ group than in the controls. Univariate analysis indicated the following significant determinants of death: age, ingested amount, PQ level, timelag to hospital, serum creatinine, lipase, pH, pCO2, HCO3-, WBC, FDP, PAI-1, and tPA. However, multivariate analysis indicated that only PQ level was significant independent factor predicting death. In conclusion, tPA and PAI-1 levels were higher, while D-dimer levels were lower in the PQ group than in the controls, implying that ROS stimulate tPA and PAI-1, but PAI-1 activity overrides tPA activity in this setting. Decreased fibrinolytic activity appears to be one of the clinical characteristics of acute PQ intoxication. PMID:21468253

  4. Benzoxazolone Carboxamides as Potent Acid Ceramidase Inhibitors: Synthesis and Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) Studies.

    PubMed

    Bach, Anders; Pizzirani, Daniela; Realini, Natalia; Vozella, Valentina; Russo, Debora; Penna, Ilaria; Melzig, Laurin; Scarpelli, Rita; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-12-10

    Ceramides are lipid-derived intracellular messengers involved in the control of senescence, inflammation, and apoptosis. The cysteine amidase, acid ceramidase (AC), hydrolyzes these substances into sphingosine and fatty acid and, by doing so, regulates their signaling activity. AC inhibitors may be useful in the treatment of pathological conditions, such as cancer, in which ceramide levels are abnormally reduced. Here, we present a systematic SAR investigation of the benzoxazolone carboxamides, a recently described class of AC inhibitors that display high potency and systemic activity in mice. We examined a diverse series of substitutions on both benzoxazolone ring and carboxamide side chain. Several modifications enhanced potency and stability, and one key compound with a balanced activity-stability profile (14) was found to inhibit AC activity in mouse lungs and cerebral cortex after systemic administration. The results expand our arsenal of AC inhibitors, thereby facilitating the use of these compounds as pharmacological tools and their potential development as drug leads. PMID:26560855

  5. Turing pattern dynamics in an activator-inhibitor system with superdiffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lai; Tian, Canrong

    2014-12-01

    The fractional operator is introduced to an activator-inhibitor system to describe species anomalous superdiffusion. The effects of the superdiffusive exponent on pattern formation and pattern selection are studied. Our linear stability analysis shows that the wave number of the Turing pattern increases with the superdiffusive exponent. A weakly nonlinear analysis yields a system of amplitude equations and the analysis of these amplitude equations predicts parameter regimes where hexagons, stripes, and their coexistence are expected. Numerical simulations of the activator-inhibitor model near the stability boundaries confirm our analytical results. Since diffusion rate manifests in both diffusion constant and diffusion exponent, we numerically explore their interactions on the emergence of Turing patterns. When the activator and inhibitor have different superdiffusive exponents, we find that the critical ratio of the diffusion rate of the inhibitor to the activator, required for the formation of the Turing pattern, increases monotonically with the superdiffusive exponent. We conclude that small ratio (than unity) of anomalous diffusion exponent between the inhibitor and activator is more likely to promote the emergence of the Turing pattern, relative to the normal diffusion.

  6. 4-Acyl Pyrrole Derivatives Yield Novel Vectors for Designing Inhibitors of the Acetyl-Lysine Recognition Site of BRD4(1).

    PubMed

    Hügle, Martin; Lucas, Xavier; Weitzel, Gerhard; Ostrovskyi, Dmytro; Breit, Bernhard; Gerhardt, Stefan; Einsle, Oliver; Günther, Stefan; Wohlwend, Daniel

    2016-02-25

    Several human diseases, including cancer, show altered signaling pathways resulting from changes in the activity levels of epigenetic modulators. In the past few years, small-molecule inhibitors against specific modulators, including the bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) bromodomain family of acetylation readers, have shown early promise in the treatment of the genetically defined midline carcinoma and hematopoietic malignancies. We have recently developed a novel potent inhibitor of BET proteins, 1 (XD14[ Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2013, 52, 14055]), which exerts a strong inhibitory potential on the proliferation of specific leukemia cell lines. In the study presented here, we designed analogues of 1 to study the potential of substitutions on the 4-acyl pyrrole backbone to occupy additional sites within the substrate recognition site of BRD4(1). The compounds were profiled using ITC, DSF, and X-ray crystallography. We could introduce several substitutions that address previously untargeted areas of the substrate recognition site. This work may substantially contribute to the development of therapeutics with increased target specificity against BRD4-related malignancies. PMID:26731611

  7. The Three Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigen 85 Isoforms Have Unique Substrates and Activities Determined by Non-active Site Regions*

    PubMed Central

    Backus, Keriann M.; Dolan, Michael A.; Barry, Conor S.; Joe, Maju; McPhie, Peter; Boshoff, Helena I. M.; Lowary, Todd L.; Davis, Benjamin G.; Barry, Clifton E.

    2014-01-01

    The three isoforms of antigen 85 (A, B, and C) are the most abundant secreted mycobacterial proteins and catalyze transesterification reactions that synthesize mycolated arabinogalactan, trehalose monomycolate (TMM), and trehalose dimycolate (TDM), important constituents of the outermost layer of the cellular envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These three enzymes are nearly identical at the active site and have therefore been postulated to exist to evade host immunity. Distal to the active site is a second putative carbohydrate-binding site of lower homology. Mutagenesis of the three isoforms at this second site affected both substrate selectivity and overall catalytic activity in vitro. Using synthetic and natural substrates, we show that these three enzymes exhibit unique selectivity; antigen 85A more efficiently mycolates TMM to form TDM, whereas C (and to a lesser extent B) has a higher rate of activity using free trehalose to form TMM. This difference in substrate selectivity extends to the hexasaccharide fragment of cell wall arabinan. Mutation of secondary site residues from the most active isoform (C) into those present in A or B partially interconverts this substrate selectivity. These experiments in combination with molecular dynamics simulations reveal that differences in the N-terminal helix α9, the adjacent Pro216–Phe228 loop, and helix α5 are the likely cause of changes in activity and substrate selectivity. These differences explain the existence of three isoforms and will allow for future work in developing inhibitors. PMID:25028517

  8. Aminoalcohols as Probes of the Two-subsite Active Site of Beta-D-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catalysis and inhibitor binding by the GH43 beta-xylosidase are governed by the protonation state of catalytic base (D14, pKa 5.0) and catalytic acid (E186, pKa 7.2) which reside in subsite -1 of the two-subsite active site. Cationic aminoalcohols are shown to bind exclusively to subsite -1 of the ...

  9. Dissecting the active site of a photoreceptor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Wouter; Hara, Miwa; Ren, Jie; Moghadam, Farzaneh; Xie, Aihua; Kumauchi, Masato

    While enzymes are quite large molecules, functionally important chemical events are often limited to a small region of the protein: the active site. The physical and chemical properties of residues at such active sites are often strongly altered compared to the same groups dissolved in water. Understanding such effects is important for unraveling the mechanisms underlying protein function and for protein engineering, but has proven challenging. Here we report on our ongoing efforts on using photoactive yellow protein (PYP), a bacterial photoreceptor, as a model system for such effects. We will report on the following questions: How many residues affect active site properties? Are these residues in direct physical contact with the active site? Can functionally important residues be recognized in the crystal structure of a protein? What structural resolution is needed to understand active sites? What spectroscopic techniques are most informative? Which weak interactions dominate active site properties?

  10. Discovery of orally active pyrrolopyridine- and aminopyridine-based Met kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zhen-Wei; Wei, Donna; Schroeder, Gretchen M.; Cornelius, Lyndon A.M.; Kim, Kyoung; Chen, Xiao-Tao; Schmidt, Robert J.; Williams, David K.; Tokarski, John S.; An, Yongmi; Sack, John S.; Manne, Veeraswamy; Kamath, Amrita; Zhang, Yueping; Marathe, Punit; Hunt, John T.; Lombardo, Louis J.; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M.

    2008-09-10

    A series of acylurea analogs derived from pyrrolopyridine and aminopyridine scaffolds were identified as potent inhibitors of Met kinase activity. The SAR at various positions of the two kinase scaffolds was investigated. These studies led to the discovery of compounds 3b and 20b, which demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic properties in mice and significant antitumor activity in a human gastric carcinoma xenograft model.

  11. Acylprolinamides: a new class of peptide deformylase inhibitors with in vivo antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Axten, Jeffrey M; Medina, Jesús R; Blackledge, Charles W; Duquenne, Céline; Grant, Seth W; Bobko, Mark A; Peng, Tony; Miller, William H; Pinckney, Theresa; Gallagher, Timothy F; Kulkarni, Swarupa; Lewandowski, Thomas; Van Aller, Glenn S; Zonis, Rimma; Ward, Paris; Campobasso, Nino

    2012-06-15

    A new class of PDF inhibitor with potent, broad spectrum antibacterial activity is described. Optimization of blood stability and potency provided compounds with improved pharmacokinetics that were suitable for in vivo experiments. Compound 5c, which has robust antibacterial activity, demonstrated efficacy in two respiratory tract infection models. PMID:22579486

  12. Proteinaceous protease inhibitor from Lawsonia inermis: purification, characterization and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Dabhade, Arvind; Patel, Priti; Pati, Ulhas

    2013-10-01

    A thermo-stable, proteinaceous protease inhibitor (LPI) from Lawsonia inermis is reported. The LPI was purified from Lawsonia inermis seeds by subsequent ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange chromatography (DEAE-Cellulose) and gel permeation chromatography (Sephadex-50). The purified protease inhibitor is effective against a wide range of proteases viz. papain, trypsin, pepsin and metallo-protease. The apparent molecular weight of the protease inhibitor is 19 kDa, determined by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. The protease inhibitor was found to be stable at 70 degrees C for 30 min. It was also examined for antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 7926 and Staphylococcus aureus NCIM 2079; the IC50 values of the purified LPI were 11.4 microg/mL and 16.6 microg/mL respectively. PMID:24354203

  13. Selective Inhibitors of Fibroblast Activation Protein (FAP) with a (4-Quinolinoyl)-glycyl-2-cyanopyrrolidine Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Koen; Heirbaut, Leen; Cheng, Jonathan D; Joossens, Jurgen; Ryabtsova, Oxana; Cos, Paul; Maes, Louis; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; De Meester, Ingrid; Augustyns, Koen; Van der Veken, Pieter

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a serine protease that is generally accepted to play an important role in tumor growth and other diseases involving tissue remodeling. Currently there are no FAP inhibitors with reported selectivity toward both the closely related dipeptidyl peptidases (DPPs) and prolyl oligopeptidase (PREP). We present the discovery of a new class of FAP inhibitors with a N-(4-quinolinoyl)-Gly-(2-cyanopyrrolidine) scaffold. We have explored the effects of substituting the quinoline ring and varying the position of its sp(2) hybridized nitrogen atom. The most promising inhibitors combined low nanomolar FAP inhibition and high selectivity indices (>10(3)) with respect to both the DPPs and PREP. Preliminary experiments on a representative inhibitor demonstrate that plasma stability, kinetic solubility, and log D of this class of compounds can be expected to be satisfactory. PMID:24900696

  14. Identification of selective inhibitors of uncharacterized enzymes by high-throughput screening with fluorescent activity-based probes.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, Daniel A; Brown, Steven J; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2009-04-01

    High-throughput screening to discover small-molecule modulators of enzymes typically relies on highly tailored substrate assays, which are not available for poorly characterized enzymes. Here we report a general, substrate-free method for identifying inhibitors of uncharacterized enzymes. The assay measures changes in the kinetics of covalent active-site labeling with broad-spectrum, fluorescent probes in the presence of inhibitors by monitoring the fluorescence polarization signal. We show that this technology is applicable to enzymes from at least two mechanistic classes, regardless of their degree of functional annotation, and can be coupled with secondary proteomic assays that use competitive activity-based profiling to rapidly determine the specificity of screening hits. Using this method, we identify the bioactive alkaloid emetine as a selective inhibitor of the uncharacterized cancer-associated hydrolase RBBP9. Furthermore, we show that the detoxification enzyme GSTO1, also implicated in cancer, is inhibited by several electrophilic compounds found in public libraries, some of which display high selectivity for this protein. PMID:19329999

  15. Introduction of {alpha}-hydroxymethyamino acid residues in substrate specificity P1 position of trypsin inhibitor SFTI-1 from sunflower seeds retains its activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zablotna, Ewa; Kret, Agnieszka; Jaskiewicz, Anna; Olma, Aleksandra; Leplawy, Miroslaw T.; Rolka, Krzysztof . E-mail: krzys@chem.univ.gda.pl

    2006-02-17

    In many complexes formed by serine proteinases and their inhibitors, the hydroxyl group provided by water molecule or by the inhibitor Ser residue is located close to the inhibitor P{sub 1}-P{sub 1}{sup '} reactive site. In order to investigate the role of this group, we synthesized analogues of trypsin inhibitor SFTI-1 isolated from the seeds of sunflower modified in P{sub 1} by {alpha}-hydroxymethylserine (HmSer) and both enantiomers of {alpha}-hydroxymethylvaline (HmVal). All the synthesized analogues inhibited bovine {beta}-trypsin and human leukocyte elastase. SFTI-1 analogues with HmVal and HmSer appear to be potent inhibitors of bovine {beta}-trypsin, whereas [Val{sup 5}]SFTI-1 is practically inactive. Also trypsin inhibitory activity of [Ser{sup 5}]SFTI-1 is significantly lower. Since the electrostatic interaction between protonated {epsilon}-NH{sub 2} group of the inhibitor P{sub 1} position and {beta}-carboxylate of trypsin Asp{sup 189} is the main driving force for interaction of both molecules, the results obtained are very interesting. We believe that these SFTI-1 analogues belong to a novel class of serine proteinase inhibitors.

  16. Inactivation of factor XII active fragment in normal plasma. Predominant role of C-1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    de Agostini, A; Lijnen, H R; Pixley, R A; Colman, R W; Schapira, M

    1984-06-01

    To define the factors responsible for the inactivation of the active fragment derived from Factor XII (Factor XIIf ) in plasma, we studied the inactivation kinetics of Factor XIIf in various purified and plasma mixtures. We also analyzed the formation of 125I-Factor XIIf -inhibitor complexes by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In purified systems, the bimolecular rate constants for the reactions of Factor XIIf with C-1-inhibitor, alpha 2-antiplasmin, and antithrombin III were 18.5, 0.91, and 0.32 X 10(4) M-1 min-1, respectively. Furthermore, SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that 1:1 stoichiometric complexes were formed between 125I-Factor XIIf and each of these three inhibitors. In contrast, kinetic and SDS-PAGE studies indicated that Factor XIIf did not react with alpha 1-antitrypsin or alpha 2-macroglobulin. The inactivation rate constant of Factor XIIf by prekallikrein-deficient plasma was 14.4 X 10(-2) min-1, a value that was essentially identical to the value predicted from the studies in purified systems (15.5 X 10(-2) min-1). This constant was reduced to 1.8 X 10(-2) min-1 when Factor XIIf was inactivated by prekallikrein-deficient plasma that had been immunodepleted (less than 5%) of C-1-inhibitor. In addition, after inactivation in normal plasma, 74% of the active 125I-Factor XIIf was found to form a complex with C-1-inhibitor, whereas 26% of the enzyme formed complexes with alpha 2-antiplasmin and antithrombin III. Furthermore, 42% of the labeled enzyme was still complexed with C-1-inhibitor when 125I-Factor XII was inactivated in hereditary angioedema plasma that contained 32% of functional C-1-inhibitor. This study quantitatively demonstrates the dominant role of C-1-inhibitor in the inactivation of Factor XIIf in the plasma milieu. PMID:6725552

  17. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 stimulates macrophage activation through Toll-like Receptor-4.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kamlesh K; Xu, Zhi; Castellino, Francis J; Ploplis, Victoria A

    2016-08-26

    While inflammation is often associated with increased Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), the functional consequences of PAI-1 in inflammation have yet to be fully determined. The aim of this study was to establish the in vivo relevance of PAI-1 in inflammation. A mouse model of systemic inflammation was employed in wild-type (WT) and PAI-1 deficient (PAI-1(-/-)) mice. Mice survival, macrophage infiltration into the lungs, and plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were assessed after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion. In vitro experiments were conducted to examine changes in LPS-induced inflammatory responses after PAI-1 exposure. PAI-1 was shown to regulate inflammation, in vivo, and affect macrophage infiltration into lungs. Further, PAI-1 activated macrophages, and increased pro-inflammatory cytokines at both the mRNA and protein levels in these cells. The effect of PAI-1 on macrophage activation was dose-dependent and LPS-independent. Proteolytic inhibitory activity and Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP) and vitronectin (VN) binding functions, were not involved in PAI-1-mediated activation of macrophages. However, the effect of PAI-1 on macrophage activation was partially blocked by a TLR4 neutralizing antibody. Furthermore, PAI-1-induced Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-2 (MIP-2) expression was reduced in TLR4(-/-) macrophages compared to WT macrophages. These results demonstrate that PAI-1 is involved in the regulation of host inflammatory responses through Toll-like Receptor-4 (TLR4)-mediated macrophage activation. PMID:27317488

  18. Highly improved antiparasitic activity after introduction of an N-benzylimidazole moiety on protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bosc, Damien; Mouray, Elisabeth; Cojean, Sandrine; Franco, Caio Haddad; Loiseau, Philippe M; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H; Moraes, Carolina Borsoi; Grellier, Philippe; Dubois, Joëlle

    2016-02-15

    In our search for new protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors with improved antiparasitic activities, we modified our previously developed 3-arylthiophene series of inhibitors by replacing the thioisopropyl group by different substituted imidazolylmethanamino moieties. Twenty four new derivatives were synthesized and evaluated against human and parasite farnesyltransferases, and their anti-parasitic activity was determined against Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania donovani. Introduction of a N-p-substituted-benzylimidazole led to significantly increase the inhibition of parasite proliferation in the submicromolar range. The structure of the best inhibitors was parasite dependent. Three compounds possess IC50 values at the same range as the reference miltefosine against L. donovani proliferation and other new derivatives display high level of anti-trypanosomal activity against T. cruzi, higher or in the same order of magnitude as the reference compounds benznidazole and nifurtimox. PMID:26774924

  19. Synthesis, evaluation and structure-activity relationship of new 3-carboxamide coumarins as FXIIa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bouckaert, Charlotte; Serra, Silvia; Rondelet, Grégoire; Dolušić, Eduard; Wouters, Johan; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Frédérick, Raphaël; Pochet, Lionel

    2016-03-01

    Inhibitors of the coagulation factor XIIa (FXIIa) are attractive to detail the roles of this protease in hemostasis and thrombosis, to suppress artifact due to contact pathway activation in blood coagulation assays, and they are promising as antithrombotic therapy. The 3-carboxamide coumarins have been previously described as small-molecular-weight FXIIa inhibitors. In this study, we report a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study around this scaffold with the aim to discover new selective FXIIa inhibitors with an improved physico-chemical profile. To better understand these SAR, docking experiments were undertaken. For this purpose, we built an original hybrid model of FXIIa. This model has the advantage to gather the best features from the recently published crystal structure of FXIIa in its zymogen form and a more classical homology model. Results with the hybrid model are encouraging as they help understanding the activity and selectivity of our best compounds. PMID:26827162

  20. PHOTOREGULATION OF BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY BY PHOTOCROMIC REAGENTS, II. INHIBITORS OF ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE*†

    PubMed Central

    Bieth, Joseph; Vratsanos, Spyros M.; Wassermann, Norbert; Erlanger, Bernard F.

    1969-01-01

    The enzymic activity of acetylcholinesterase can be photoregulated through the mediation of photochromic inhibitors of the enzyme. N-p-phenylazophenyl-N-phenylcarbamyl fluoride, an irreversible inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, exists as two geometric isomers which are interconvertible through the action of light. The cis isomer, which predominates after exposure to light of 320 nm, is more active than the trans isomer, which results from exposure to light of 420 nm. It was possible, therefore, to use light energy to regulate the inactivation of the enzyme. Similarly, levels of acetylcholinesterase activity could be photo-regulated in a completely reversible manner by means of the photochromic reversible inhibitor p-phenylazophenyltrimethylammonium chloride. These experiments can serve as models for similar phenomena observed in nature, particularly in photoperiodic rhythms of higher animals. Images PMID:5264140

  1. The effects of ripasudil (K-115), a Rho kinase inhibitor, on activation of human conjunctival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Futakuchi, Akiko; Inoue, Toshihiro; Fujimoto, Tomokazu; Inoue-Mochita, Miyuki; Kawai, Motofumi; Tanihara, Hidenobu

    2016-08-01

    The most common cause of glaucoma surgery failure is scar formation induced by activation of wound-healing responses and resultant fibrosis at the surgical site. We investigated the effects of ripasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor, on activation of human conjunctival fibroblasts (HConF). HConF were pretreated with different concentrations of ripasudil for 1 h before addition of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2, followed by incubation for 48 h. TGF-β2-treated fibroblasts exhibited a significant increase in expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), a marker of fibroblast-to-myofibroblast differentiation, and this increase was significantly suppressed, in a dose-dependent manner, by pretreatment with ripasudil. Ripasudil pretreatment also significantly attenuated TGF-β2-induced fibronectin production and collagen gel contraction. TGF-β2 increased both the number of viable cells and the number of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle; these effects were attenuated by pretreatment with ripasudil. In addition, we explored the effects of ripasudil on stimulation of HConF by activated macrophages. Human monocytic cell line THP-1 cells were differentiated into M1 or M2 macrophage-like cells, and HConF were treated with conditioned media derived from these macrophages in the presence or absence of ripasudil. Conditioned medium from M2 macrophage-like cells induced a significant increase in α-SMA expression, viable cell numbers, and gel contraction, all of which were significantly suppressed by ripasudil. Thus, overall, ripasudil attenuated activation of human conjunctival fibroblasts. Ripasudil may be of therapeutic utility, preventing excessive scarring after glaucoma filtration surgery. PMID:27394186

  2. Antiinflammatory Activity of a Novel Folic Acid Targeted Conjugate of the mTOR Inhibitor Everolimus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingjuan; Parker, Nikki; Kleindl, Paul J; Cross, Vicky A; Wollak, Kristin; Westrick, Elaine; Stinnette, Torian W; Gehrke, Mark A; Wang, Kevin; Santhapuram, Hari Krishna R; You, Fei; Hahn, Spencer J; Vaughn, Jeremy F; Klein, Patrick J; Vlahov, Iontcho R; Low, Philip S; Leamon, Christopher P

    2015-01-01

    Folate receptor (FR)-β has been identified as a promising target for antimacrophage and antiinflammatory therapies. In the present study, we investigated EC0565, a folic acid-derivative of everolimus, as a FR-specific inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Because of its amphiphilic nature, EC0565 was first evaluated for water solubility, critical micelle formation, stability in culture and FR-binding specificity. Using FR-expressing macrophages, the effect of EC0565 on mTOR signaling and cellular proliferation was studied. The pharmacokinetics, metabolism and bioavailability of EC0565 were studied in normal rats. The in vivo activity of EC0565 was assessed in rats with adjuvant arthritis, a "macrophage-rich" model with close resemblance to rheumatoid arthritis. EC0565 forms micellar aggregates in physiological buffers and demonstrates good water solubility as well as strong multivalent FR-binding capacity. EC0565 inhibited mTOR signaling in rat macrophages at nanomolar concentrations and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in serum-starved RAW264.7 cells. Subcutaneously administered EC0565 in rats displayed good bioavailability and a relatively long half-life (~12 h). When given at 250 nmol/kg, EC0565 selectively inhibited proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in thioglycollate-stimulated rat peritoneal cells. With limited dosing regimens, the antiarthritic activity of EC0565 was found superior to that of etanercept, everolimus and a nontargeted everolimus analog. The in vivo activity of EC0565 was also comparable to that of a folate-targeted aminopterin. Folate-targeted mTOR inhibition may be an effective way of suppressing activated macrophages in sites of inflammation, especially in nutrient-deprived conditions, such as in the arthritic joints. Further investigation and improvement upon the physical and biochemical properties of EC0565 are warranted. PMID:26181632

  3. Novel Protein Disulfide Isomerase Inhibitor with Anticancer Activity in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Vatolin, Sergei; Phillips, James G; Jha, Babal K; Govindgari, Shravya; Hu, Jennifer; Grabowski, Dale; Parker, Yvonne; Lindner, Daniel J; Zhong, Fei; Distelhorst, Clark W; Smith, Mitchell R; Cotta, Claudiu; Xu, Yan; Chilakala, Sujatha; Kuang, Rebecca R; Tall, Samantha; Reu, Frederic J

    2016-06-01

    Multiple myeloma cells secrete more disulfide bond-rich proteins than any other mammalian cell. Thus, inhibition of protein disulfide isomerases (PDI) required for protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) should increase ER stress beyond repair in this incurable cancer. Here, we report the mechanistically unbiased discovery of a novel PDI-inhibiting compound with antimyeloma activity. We screened a 30,355 small-molecule library using a multilayered multiple myeloma cell-based cytotoxicity assay that modeled disease niche, normal liver, kidney, and bone marrow. CCF642, a bone marrow-sparing compound, exhibited a submicromolar IC50 in 10 of 10 multiple myeloma cell lines. An active biotinylated analog of CCF642 defined binding to the PDI isoenzymes A1, A3, and A4 in MM cells. In vitro, CCF642 inhibited PDI reductase activity about 100-fold more potently than the structurally distinct established inhibitors PACMA 31 and LOC14. Computational modeling suggested a novel covalent binding mode in active-site CGHCK motifs. Remarkably, without any further chemistry optimization, CCF642 displayed potent efficacy in an aggressive syngeneic mouse model of multiple myeloma and prolonged the lifespan of C57BL/KaLwRij mice engrafted with 5TGM1-luc myeloma, an effect comparable to the first-line multiple myeloma therapeutic bortezomib. Consistent with PDI inhibition, CCF642 caused acute ER stress in multiple myeloma cells accompanied by apoptosis-inducing calcium release. Overall, our results provide an illustration of the utility of simple in vivo simulations as part of a drug discovery effort, along with a sound preclinical rationale to develop a new small-molecule therapeutic to treat multiple myeloma. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3340-50. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197150

  4. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program --now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human Exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines be opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  5. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program -- now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history. The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines the opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  6. Identification of ponatinib and other known kinase inhibitors with potent MEKK2 inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Syed; Johnson, Gary L; Scott, John E

    2015-08-01

    The kinase MEKK2 (MAP3K2) may play an important role in tumor growth and metastasis for several cancer types. Thus, targeting MEKK2 may represent a novel strategy for developing more effective therapies for cancer. In order to identify small molecules with MEKK2 inhibitory activity, we screened a collection of known kinase inhibitors using a high throughput MEKK2 intrinsic ATPase enzyme assay and confirmed activity of the most potent hits with this primary assay. We also confirmed activities of these known kinase inhibitors with an MEKK2 transphosphorylation slot blot assay using MKK6 as a substrate. We observed a good correlation in potencies between the two orthogonal MEKK2 kinase activity assay formats for this set of inhibitors. We report that ponatinib, AT9283, AZD7762, JNJ-7706621, PP121 and hesperadin had potent MEKK2 enzyme inhibitory activities ranging from 4.7 to 60 nM IC50. Ponatinib is an FDA-approved drug that potently inhibited MEKK2 enzyme activity with IC50 values of 10-16 nM. AT9283 is currently in clinical trials and produced MEKK2 IC50 values of 4.7-18 nM. This set of known kinase inhibitors represents some of the most potent in vitro MEKK2 inhibitors reported to date and may be useful as research tools. Although these compounds are not selective for MEKK2, the structures of these compounds give insight into pharmacophores that potently inhibit MEKK2 and could be used as initial leads to design highly selective inhibitors of MEKK2. PMID:26056008

  7. Active-site motions and polarity enhance catalytic turnover of hydrated subtilisin dissolved in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Elton P; Eppler, Ross K; Beaudoin, Julianne M; Dordick, Jonathan S; Reimer, Jeffrey A; Clark, Douglas S

    2009-04-01

    The enzyme subtilisin Carlsberg was surfactant-solubilized into two organic solvents, isooctane and tetrahydrofuran, and hydrated through stepwise changes in the thermodynamic water activity, a(w). The apparent turnover number k(cat)(app) in these systems ranged from 0.2 to 80 s(-1) and increased 11-fold in isooctane and up to 50-fold in tetrahydrofuran with increasing a(w). (19)F NMR relaxation experiments employing an active-site inhibitor were used to assess the dependence of active-site motions on a(w). The rates of NMR-derived fast (k > 10(7) s(-1)) and slow (k < 10(4) s(-1)) active-site motions increased in both solvents upon hydration, but only the slow motions correlated with k(cat). The (19)F chemical shift was a sensitive probe of the local electronic environment and provided an empirical measure of the active-site dielectric constant epsilon(as), which increased with hydration to epsilon(as) approximately 13 in each solvent. In both solvents, the transition state free energy data and epsilon(as) followed Kirkwood's model for the continuum solvation of a dipole, indicating that water also enhanced catalysis by altering the active-site's electronic environment and increasing its polarity to better stabilize the transition state. These results reveal that favorable dynamic and electrostatic effects both contribute to accelerated catalysis by solubilized subtilisin Carlsberg upon hydration in organic solvents. PMID:19317505

  8. The bifunctional active site of s-adenosylmethionine synthetase. Roles of the active site aspartates.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J C; Markham, G D

    1999-11-12

    S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzes the biosynthesis of AdoMet in a unique enzymatic reaction. Initially the sulfur of methionine displaces the intact tripolyphosphate chain (PPP(i)) from ATP, and subsequently PPP(i) is hydrolyzed to PP(i) and P(i) before product release. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli AdoMet synthetase shows that the active site contains four aspartate residues. Aspartate residues Asp-16* and Asp-271 individually provide the sole protein ligand to one of the two required Mg(2+) ions (* denotes a residue from a second subunit); aspartates Asp-118 and Asp-238* are proposed to interact with methionine. Each aspartate has been changed to an uncharged asparagine, and the metal binding residues were also changed to alanine, to assess the roles of charge and ligation ability on catalytic efficiency. The resultant enzyme variants all structurally resemble the wild type enzyme as indicated by circular dichroism spectra and are tetramers. However, all have k(cat) reductions of approximately 10(3)-fold in AdoMet synthesis, whereas the MgATP and methionine K(m) values change by less than 3- and 8-fold, respectively. In the partial reaction of PPP(i) hydrolysis, mutants of the Mg(2+) binding residues have >700-fold reduced catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)), whereas the D118N and D238*N mutants are impaired less than 35-fold. The catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by Mg(2+) site mutants is improved by AdoMet, like the wild type enzyme. In contrast AdoMet reduces the catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by the D118N and D238*N mutants, indicating that the events involved in AdoMet activation are hindered in these methionyl binding site mutants. Ca(2+) uniquely activates the D271A mutant enzyme to 15% of the level of Mg(2+), in contrast to the approximately 1% Ca(2+) activation of the wild type enzyme. This indicates that the Asp-271 side chain size is a discriminator between the activating ability of Ca(2+) and the

  9. Improved antitumor activity of immunotherapy with BRAF and MEK inhibitors in BRAFV600E melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Mok, Stephen; Moreno, Blanca Homet; Tsoi, Jennifer; Faja, Lidia Robert; Goedert, Lucas; Pinheiro, Elaine M.; Koya, Richard C.; Graeber, Thomas; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Combining immunotherapy and BRAF targeted therapy may result in improved antitumor activity with the high response rates of targeted therapy and the durability of responses with immunotherapy. However, the first clinical trial testing the combination of the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib and the CTLA-4 antibody ipilimumab was terminated early due to substantial liver toxicities. MEK inhibitors can potentiate the MAPK inhibition in BRAF mutant cells, while potentially alleviating the unwanted paradoxical MAPK activation in BRAF wild type cells that lead to side effects when using BRAF inhibitors alone. However, there is the concern of MEK inhibitors being detrimental to T cell functionality. Using a mouse model of syngeneic BRAFV600E driven melanoma, we tested whether addition of the MEK inhibitor trametinib would enhance the antitumor activity of combined immunotherapy with the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib. Combination of dabrafenib and trametinib with pmel-1 adoptive cell transfer (ACT) showed complete tumor regression, increased T cell infiltration into tumors and improved in vivo cytotoxicity. Single agent dabrafenib increased tumor-associated macrophages and T regulatory cells (Tregs) in tumors, which decreased with the addition of trametinib. The triple combination therapy resulted in increased melanosomal antigen and MHC expression, and global immune-related gene up-regulation. Given the up-regulation of PD-L1 seen with dabrafenib and/or trametinib combined with antigen-specific ACT, we tested combination of dabrafenib, trametinib with anti-PD1 therapy in SM1 tumors, and observed superior anti-tumor effect. Our findings support the testing of triple combination therapy of BRAF and MEK inhibitors with immunotherapy in patients with BRAFV600E mutant metastatic melanoma. PMID:25787767

  10. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity by high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Franková, Lenka; Defries, Andrew; Cutler, Sean R; Fry, Stephen C

    2015-09-01

    Small molecules (xenobiotics) that inhibit cell-wall-localised enzymes are valuable for elucidating the enzymes' biological roles. We applied a high-throughput fluorescent dot-blot screen to search for inhibitors of Petroselinum xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity in vitro. Of 4216 xenobiotics tested, with cellulose-bound xyloglucan as donor-substrate, 18 inhibited XET activity and 18 promoted it (especially anthraquinones and flavonoids). No compounds promoted XET in quantitative assays with (cellulose-free) soluble xyloglucan as substrate, suggesting that promotion was dependent on enzyme-cellulose interactions. With cellulose-free xyloglucan as substrate, we found 22 XET-inhibitors - especially compounds that generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) e.g., riboflavin (IC50 29 μM), retinoic acid, eosin (IC50 27 μM) and erythrosin (IC50 36 μM). The riboflavin effect was light-dependent, supporting (1)O2 involvement. Other inhibitors included tannins, sulphydryl reagents and triphenylmethanes. Some inhibitors (vulpinic acid and brilliant blue G) were relatively specific to XET, affecting only two or three, respectively, of nine other wall-enzyme activities tested; others [e.g. (-)-epigallocatechin gallate and riboflavin] were non-specific. In vivo, out of eight XET-inhibitors bioassayed, erythrosin (1 μM) inhibited cell expansion in Rosa and Zea cell-suspension cultures, and 40 μM mycophenolic acid and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate inhibited Zea culture growth. Our work showcases a general high-throughput strategy for discovering wall-enzyme inhibitors, some being plant growth inhibitors potentially valuable as physiological tools or herbicide leads. PMID:26093490

  11. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity by high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Chormova, Dimitra; Franková, Lenka; Defries, Andrew; Cutler, Sean R.; Fry, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Small molecules (xenobiotics) that inhibit cell-wall-localised enzymes are valuable for elucidating the enzymes’ biological roles. We applied a high-throughput fluorescent dot-blot screen to search for inhibitors of Petroselinum xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity in vitro. Of 4216 xenobiotics tested, with cellulose-bound xyloglucan as donor-substrate, 18 inhibited XET activity and 18 promoted it (especially anthraquinones and flavonoids). No compounds promoted XET in quantitative assays with (cellulose-free) soluble xyloglucan as substrate, suggesting that promotion was dependent on enzyme–cellulose interactions. With cellulose-free xyloglucan as substrate, we found 22 XET-inhibitors – especially compounds that generate singlet oxygen (1O2) e.g., riboflavin (IC50 29 μM), retinoic acid, eosin (IC50 27 μM) and erythrosin (IC50 36 μM). The riboflavin effect was light-dependent, supporting 1O2 involvement. Other inhibitors included tannins, sulphydryl reagents and triphenylmethanes. Some inhibitors (vulpinic acid and brilliant blue G) were relatively specific to XET, affecting only two or three, respectively, of nine other wall-enzyme activities tested; others [e.g. (−)-epigallocatechin gallate and riboflavin] were non-specific. In vivo, out of eight XET-inhibitors bioassayed, erythrosin (1 μM) inhibited cell expansion in Rosa and Zea cell-suspension cultures, and 40 μM mycophenolic acid and (−)-epigallocatechin gallate inhibited Zea culture growth. Our work showcases a general high-throughput strategy for discovering wall-enzyme inhibitors, some being plant growth inhibitors potentially valuable as physiological tools or herbicide leads. PMID:26093490

  12. Histone deacetylase inhibitors increase glucocerebrosidase activity in Gaucher disease by modulation of molecular chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunzhang; Rahimpour, Shervin; Lu, Jie; Pacak, Karel; Ikejiri, Barbara; Brady, Roscoe O.; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by mutations of the GBA gene that encodes the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase). GBA mutations often result in protein misfolding and premature degradation, but usually exert less effect on catalytic activity. In this study, we identified the molecular mechanism by which histone deacetylase inhibitors increase the quantity and activity of GCase. Specifically, these inhibitors limit the deacetylation of heat shock protein 90, resulting in less recognition of the mutant peptide and GCase degradation. These findings provide insight into a possible therapeutic strategy for Gaucher disease and other genetic disorders by modifying molecular chaperone and protein degradation pathways. PMID:23277556

  13. Highly potent HCV NS4B inhibitors with activity against multiple genotypes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Barton; Cai, Ruby; Delaney, William; Du, Zhimin; Ji, Mingzhe; Jin, Haolun; Lee, Johnny; Li, Jiayao; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Mish, Michael; Pyun, Hyung-Jung; Saugier, Joe; Tirunagari, Neeraj; Wang, Jianhong; Yang, Huiling; Wu, Qiaoyin; Sheng, Chris; Zonte, Catalin

    2014-03-13

    The exploration of novel inhibitors of the HCV NS4B protein that are based on a 2-oxadiazoloquinoline scaffold is described. Optimization to incorporate activity across genotypes led to a potent new series with broad activity, of which inhibitor 1 displayed the following EC50 values: 1a, 0.08 nM; 1b, 0.10 nM; 2a, 3 nM; 2b, 0.6 nM, 3a, 3.7 nM; 4a, 0.9 nM; 6a, 3.1 nM. PMID:24512292

  14. A Trypsin Inhibitor from Clitoria fairchildiana Cotyledons is Active Against Digestive Enzymes of Aedes aegypti Larvae.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Lucilene O; Fernandes, Kátia V S; Pádua, Dayanni de Souza; Carvalho, André de O; Lemos, Francisco J A; Gomes, Valdirene M; Oliveira, Antônia E A; Ferreira, André T da Silva; Perales, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Aedes aegypti, the principal mosquito vector of yellow fever, dengue fever and chikungunya fever virus-transmitted diseases, is an insect closely associated with humans and their housing habitats. As there is no commercially available vaccine, prevention is the most suggested form of avoiding disease spreading and a number of studies are being developed in order to give support to vector control operations. The present study reports on the identification of a trypsin inhibitor isolated from cotyledons of the Clitoria fairchildiana amazonic tree seeds, which was able to reduce by 87.93 % the activity of digestive enzymes of fourth instar A. aegypti larva. A partial amino acid sequence showed strong similarity with sequences from several trypsin inhibitors already reported in the literature. The 13,000 Da isolated inhibitor was seen to be active solely against trypsin-like enzymes, neither acting on papain, α-amylase nor on other serine proteases, such as elastase, chymotrypsin or subtilisin. At least six from seven active digestive proteases from A. aegypti larvae, visualized by zymography, were severely affected soon after exposed to the inhibitor. The strong and specific action of the isolated inhibitor against trypsin digestive enzymes of this insect vector led us to believe that this protein may be a good candidate for a prospective alternative biocontrol method. PMID:26156641

  15. Polycomb repressive complex 2 structure with inhibitor reveals a mechanism of activation and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Brooun, Alexei; Gajiwala, Ketan S.; Deng, Ya-Li; Liu, Wei; Bolaños, Ben; Bingham, Patrick; He, You-Ai; Diehl, Wade; Grable, Nicole; Kung, Pei-Pei; Sutton, Scott; Maegley, Karen A.; Yu, Xiu; Stewart, Al E.

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) mediates gene silencing through chromatin reorganization by methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27). Overexpression of the complex and point mutations in the individual subunits of PRC2 have been shown to contribute to tumorigenesis. Several inhibitors of the PRC2 activity have shown efficacy in EZH2-mutated lymphomas and are currently in clinical development, although the molecular basis of inhibitor recognition remains unknown. Here we report the crystal structures of the inhibitor-bound wild-type and Y641N PRC2. The structures illuminate an important role played by a stretch of 17 residues in the N-terminal region of EZH2, we call the activation loop, in the stimulation of the enzyme activity, inhibitor recognition and the potential development of the mutation-mediated drug resistance. The work presented here provides new avenues for the design and development of next-generation PRC2 inhibitors through establishment of a structure-based drug design platform. PMID:27122193

  16. Methods for measuring myeloperoxidase activity toward assessing inhibitor efficacy in living systems.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiansheng; Milton, Amber; Arnold, Robert D; Huang, Hui; Smith, Forrest; Panizzi, Jennifer R; Panizzi, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Myeloperoxidase aids in clearance of microbes by generation of peroxidase-mediated oxidants that kill leukocyte-engulfed pathogens. In this review, we will examine 1) strategies for in vitro evaluation of myeloperoxidase function and its inhibition, 2) ways to monitor generation of certain oxidant species during inflammation, and 3) how these methods can be used to approximate the total polymorphonuclear neutrophil chemotaxis following insult. Several optical imaging probes are designed to target reactive oxygen and nitrogen species during polymorphonuclear neutrophil inflammatory burst following injury. Here, we review the following 1) the broad effect of myeloperoxidase on normal physiology, 2) the difference between myeloperoxidase and other peroxidases, 3) the current optical probes available for use as surrogates for direct measures of myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants, and 4) the range of preclinical options for imaging myeloperoxidase accumulation at sites of inflammation in mice. We also stress the advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods, the pharmacokinetic considerations that may limit probe use to strictly cell cultures for some reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, rather than in vivo utility as indicators of myeloperoxidase function. Taken together, our review should shed light on the fundamental rational behind these techniques for measuring myeloperoxidase activity and polymorphonuclear neutrophil response after injury toward developing safe myeloperoxidase inhibitors as potential therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26884610

  17. Catalysis-dependent selenium incorporation and migration in the nitrogenase active site iron-molybdenum cofactor

    PubMed Central

    Spatzal, Thomas; Perez, Kathryn A; Howard, James B; Rees, Douglas C

    2015-01-01

    Dinitrogen reduction in the biological nitrogen cycle is catalyzed by nitrogenase, a two-component metalloenzyme. Understanding of the transformation of the inert resting state of the active site FeMo-cofactor into an activated state capable of reducing dinitrogen remains elusive. Here we report the catalysis dependent, site-selective incorporation of selenium into the FeMo-cofactor from selenocyanate as a newly identified substrate and inhibitor. The 1.60 Å resolution structure reveals selenium occupying the S2B site of FeMo-cofactor in the Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe-protein, a position that was recently identified as the CO-binding site. The Se2B-labeled enzyme retains substrate reduction activity and marks the starting point for a crystallographic pulse-chase experiment of the active site during turnover. Through a series of crystal structures obtained at resolutions of 1.32–1.66 Å, including the CO-inhibited form of Av1-Se2B, the exchangeability of all three belt-sulfur sites is demonstrated, providing direct insights into unforeseen rearrangements of the metal center during catalysis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11620.001 PMID:26673079

  18. Identification of selective and potent inhibitors of fibroblast activation protein and prolyl oligopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Poplawski, Sarah E; Lai, Jack H; Li, Youhua; Jin, Zhiping; Liu, Yuxin; Wu, Wengen; Wu, Yong; Zhou, Yuhong; Sudmeier, James L; Sanford, David G; Bachovchin, William W

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a serine protease selectively expressed on reactive stromal fibroblasts of epithelial carcinomas. It is widely believed to play a role in tumor invasion and metastasis and therefore to represent a potential new drug target for cancer. Investigation into its biological function, however, has been hampered by the current unavailability of selective inhibitors. The challenge has been in identifying inhibitors that are selective for FAP over both the dipeptidyl peptidases (DPPs), with which it shares exopeptidase specificity, and prolyl oligopeptidase (PREP), with which it shares endopeptidase specificity. Here, we report the first potent FAP inhibitor with selectivity over both the DPPs and PREP, N-(pyridine-4-carbonyl)-d-Ala-boroPro (ARI-3099, 6). We also report a similarly potent and selective PREP inhibitor, N-(pyridine-3-carbonyl)-Val-boroPro (ARI-3531, 22). Both are boronic acid based inhibitors, demonstrating that high selectivity can be achieved using this electrophile. The inhibitors are stable, easy to synthesize, and should prove to be useful in helping to elucidate the biological functions of these two unique and interesting enzymes, as well as their potential as drug targets. PMID:23594271

  19. Identification of Selective and Potent Inhibitors of Fibroblast Activation Protein and Prolyl Oligopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Poplawski, Sarah E.; Lai, Jack H.; Li, Youhua; Jin, Zhiping; Liu, Yuxin; Wu, Wengen; Wu, Yong; Zhou, Yuhong; Sudmeier, James L.; Sanford, David G.; Bachovchin, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a serine protease selectively expressed on reactive stromal fibroblasts of epithelial carcinomas. It is widely believed to play a role in tumor invasion and metastasis and therefore to represent a potential new drug target for cancer. Investigation into its biological function, however, has been hampered by the current unavailability of selective inhibitors. The challenge has been in identifying inhibitors that are selective for FAP over both the dipeptidyl peptidases (DPPs), with which it shares exopeptidase specificity, and prolyl oligopeptidase (PREP), with which it shares endopeptidase specificity. Here, we report the first potent FAP inhibitor with selectivity over both the DPPs and PREP, N-(pyridine-4-carbonyl)-d-Ala-boroPro (ARI-3099, 6). We also report a similarly potent and selective PREP inhibitor, N-(pyridine-3-carbonyl)-Val-boroPro (ARI-3531, 22). Both are boronic acid based inhibitors, demonstrating that high selectivity can be achieved using this electrophile. The inhibitors are stable, easy to synthesize, and should prove to be useful in helping to elucidate the biological functions of these two unique and interesting enzymes, as well as their potential as drug targets. PMID:23594271

  20. Structure–Activity Relationships of α-Keto Oxazole Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Hardouin, Christophe; Kelso, Michael J.; Romero, F. Anthony; Rayl, Thomas J.; Leung, Donmienne; Hwang, Inkyu; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Boger, Dale L.

    2008-01-01

    A systematic study of the structure–activity relationships (SAR) of 2b (OL-135), a potent inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), is detailed targeting the C2 acyl side chain. A series of aryl replacements or substituents for the terminal phenyl group provided effective inhibitors (e.g., 5c, aryl = 1-napthyl, Ki = 2.6 nM) with 5hh (aryl = 3-Cl-Ph, Ki = 900 pM) being 5-fold more potent than 2b. Conformationally-restricted C2 side chains were examined and many provided exceptionally potent inhibitors of which 11j (ethylbiphenyl side chain) was established to be a 750 pM inhibitor. A systematic series of heteroatoms (O, NMe, S), electron-withdrawing groups (SO, SO2), and amides positioned within and hydroxyl substitutions on the linking side chain were investigated which typically led to a loss in potency. The most tolerant positions provided effective inhibitors (12p, 6-position S, Ki = 3 nM or 13d, 2-position OH, Ki = 8 nM) comparable in potency to 2b. Proteomic-wide screening of selected inhibitors from the systematic series of >100 candidates prepared revealed that they are selective for FAAH over all other mammalian serine proteases. PMID:17559203

  1. SHARPIN is an endogenous inhibitor of beta1-integrin activation

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, Juha K.; Pouwels, Jeroen; Pellinen, Teijo; Veltel, Stefan; Laasola, Petra; Potter, Christopher S.; Duffy, Ted; Sundberg, John P.; Kallioniemi, Olli; Askari, Janet A.; Humphries, Martin; Parsons, Maddy; Salmi, Marko; Ivaska, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    Regulated activation of integrins is critical for cell adhesion, motility and tissue homeostasis. Talin and Kindlins activate β1-integrins, but the counteracting inhibiting mechanisms are poorly defined. Here we identified SHARPIN as an important inactivator of β1-integrins in an RNAi-screen. SHARPIN inhibited β1-integrin functions in human cancer cells and primary leukocytes. Fibroblasts, leukocytes and keratinocytes from SHARPIN-deficient mice exhibited increased β1-integrin activity which was fully rescued by re-expression of SHARPIN. SHARPIN directly bound to a conserved cytoplasmic region of integrin α-subunits and inhibited recruitment of Talin and Kindlin to the integrin. Therefore, SHARPIN inhibits the critical switching of β1-integrins from inactive to active conformations. PMID:21947080

  2. Combinatorial active-site variants confer sustained clavulanate resistance in BlaC β-lactamase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Egesborg, Philippe; Carlettini, Hélène; Volpato, Jordan P; Doucet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to β-lactam antibiotics is a global issue threatening the success of infectious disease treatments worldwide. Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been particularly resilient to β-lactam treatment, primarily due to the chromosomally encoded BlaC β-lactamase, a broad-spectrum hydrolase that renders ineffective the vast majority of relevant β-lactam compounds currently in use. Recent laboratory and clinical studies have nevertheless shown that specific β-lactam–BlaC inhibitor combinations can be used to inhibit the growth of extensively drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis, effectively offering new tools for combined treatment regimens against resistant strains. In the present work, we performed combinatorial active-site replacements in BlaC to demonstrate that specific inhibitor-resistant (IRT) substitutions at positions 69, 130, 220, and/or 234 can act synergistically to yield active-site variants with several thousand fold greater in vitro resistance to clavulanate, the most common clinical β-lactamase inhibitor. While most single and double variants remain sensitive to clavulanate, double mutants R220S-K234R and S130G-K234R are substantially less affected by time-dependent clavulanate inactivation, showing residual β-lactam hydrolytic activities of 46% and 83% after 24 h incubation with a clinically relevant inhibitor concentration (5 μg/ml, 25 µM). These results demonstrate that active-site alterations in BlaC yield resistant variants that remain active and stable over prolonged bacterial generation times compatible with mycobacterial proliferation. These results also emphasize the formidable adaptive potential of inhibitor-resistant substitutions in β-lactamases, potentially casting a shadow on specific β-lactam–BlaC inhibitor combination treatments against M. tuberculosis. PMID:25492589

  3. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  4. A sucrose-binding site provides a lead towards an isoform-specific inhibitor of the cancer-associated enzyme carbonic anhydrase IX.

    PubMed

    Pinard, Melissa A; Aggarwal, Mayank; Mahon, Brian P; Tu, Chingkuang; McKenna, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) isoform IX (CA IX) is an extracellular zinc metalloenzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3(-), thereby playing a role in pH regulation. The majority of normal functioning cells exhibit low-level expression of CA IX. However, in cancer cells CA IX is upregulated as a consequence of a metabolic transition known as the Warburg effect. The upregulation of CA IX for cancer progression has drawn interest in it being a potential therapeutic target. CA IX is a transmembrane protein, and its purification, yield and crystallization have proven challenging to structure-based drug design, whereas the closely related cytosolic soluble isoform CA II can be expressed and crystallized with ease. Therefore, we have utilized structural alignments and site-directed mutagenesis to engineer a CA II that mimics the active site of CA IX. In this paper, the X-ray crystal structure of this CA IX mimic in complex with sucrose is presented and has been refined to a resolution of 1.5 Å, an Rcryst of 18.0% and an Rfree of 21.2%. The binding of sucrose at the entrance to the active site of the CA IX mimic, and not CA II, in a non-inhibitory mechanism provides a novel carbohydrate moiety binding site that could be further exploited to design isoform-specific inhibitors of CA IX. PMID:26457530

  5. The Crystal Structure of Thrombin-activable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor (TAFI) Provides the Structural Basis for Its Intrinsic Activity and the Short Half-life of TAFIa*♦

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Kanchan; Pallares, Irantzu; Valnickova, Zuzana; Christensen, Trine; Vendrell, Josep; Wendt, K. Ulrich; Schreuder, Herman A.; Enghild, Jan J.; Avilés, Francesc X.

    2008-01-01

    Mature thrombin-activable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa) is a highly unstable metallocarboxypeptidase that stabilizes blood clots by clipping C-terminal lysine residues from partially degraded fibrin. In accordance with its in vitro antifibrinolytic activity, animal studies have reported that inhibition of mature TAFI aids in the prevention of thrombosis. The level of TAFI activity is stringently regulated through (i) controlled proteolytic truncation of the zymogen (TAFI), generating the mature enzyme, TAFIa, and (ii) the short half-life of TAFIa. TAFI itself exhibits an intrinsic enzymatic activity, which is likely required to provide a baseline level of antifibrinolytic activity. The novel crystal structure presented here reveals that the active site of TAFI is accessible, providing the structural explanation for the its intrinsic activity. It also supports the notion that an “instability region” exists, in agreement with site-directed mutagenesis studies. Sulfate ions, bound to this region, point toward a potential heparin-binding site and could explain how heparin stabilizes TAFIa. PMID:18669641

  6. Activity-based chemical proteomics accelerates inhibitor development for deubiquitylating enzymes.

    PubMed

    Altun, Mikael; Kramer, Holger B; Willems, Lianne I; McDermott, Jeffrey L; Leach, Craig A; Goldenberg, Seth J; Kumar, K G Suresh; Konietzny, Rebecca; Fischer, Roman; Kogan, Edward; Mackeen, Mukram M; McGouran, Joanna; Khoronenkova, Svetlana V; Parsons, Jason L; Dianov, Grigory L; Nicholson, Benjamin; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2011-11-23

    Converting lead compounds into drug candidates is a crucial step in drug development, requiring early assessment of potency, selectivity, and off-target effects. We have utilized activity-based chemical proteomics to determine the potency and selectivity of deubiquitylating enzyme (DUB) inhibitors in cell culture models. Importantly, we characterized the small molecule PR-619 as a broad-range DUB inhibitor, and P22077 as a USP7 inhibitor with potential for further development as a chemotherapeutic agent in cancer therapy. A striking accumulation of polyubiquitylated proteins was observed after both selective and general inhibition of cellular DUB activity without direct impairment of proteasomal proteolysis. The repertoire of ubiquitylated substrates was analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry, identifying distinct subsets for general or specific inhibition of DUBs. This enabled identification of previously unknown functional links between USP7 and enzymes involved in DNA repair. PMID:22118674

  7. Molecular Design, Synthesis and Trypanocidal Activity of Dipeptidyl Nitriles as Cruzain Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Avelar, Leandro A. A.; Camilo, Cristian D.; de Albuquerque, Sérgio; Fernandes, William B.; Gonçalez, Cristiana; Kenny, Peter W.; Leitão, Andrei; McKerrow, James H.; Montanari, Carlos A.; Orozco, Erika V. Meñaca; Ribeiro, Jean F. R.; Rocha, Josmar R.; Rosini, Fabiana; Saidel, Marta E.

    2015-01-01

    A series of compounds based on the dipeptidyl nitrile scaffold were synthesized and assayed for their inhibitory activity against the T. cruzi cysteine protease cruzain. Structure activity relationships (SARs) were established using three, eleven and twelve variations respectively at the P1, P2 and P3 positions. A Ki value of 16 nM was observed for the most potent of these inhibitors which reflects a degree of non-additivity in the SAR. An X-ray crystal structure was determined for the ligand-protein complex for the structural prototype for the series. Twenty three inhibitors were also evaluated for their anti-trypanosomal effects and an EC50 value of 28 μM was observed for the most potent of these. Although there remains scope for further optimization, the knowledge gained from this study is also transferable to the design of cruzain inhibitors based on warheads other than nitrile as well as alternative scaffolds. PMID:26173110

  8. A study on the flexibility of enzyme active sites

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A common assumption about enzyme active sites is that their structures are highly conserved to specifically distinguish between closely similar compounds. However, with the discovery of distinct enzymes with similar reaction chemistries, more and more studies discussing the structural flexibility of the active site have been conducted. Results Most of the existing works on the flexibility of active sites focuses on a set of pre-selected active sites that were already known to be flexible. This study, on the other hand, proposes an analysis framework composed of a new data collecting strategy, a local structure alignment tool and several physicochemical measures derived from the alignments. The method proposed to identify flexible active sites is highly automated and robust so that more extensive studies will be feasible in the future. The experimental results show the proposed method is (a) consistent with previous works based on manually identified flexible active sites and (b) capable of identifying potentially new flexible active sites. Conclusions This proposed analysis framework and the former analyses on flexibility have their own advantages and disadvantage, depending on the cause of the flexibility. In this regard, this study proposes an alternative that complements previous studies and helps to construct a more comprehensive view of the flexibility of enzyme active sites. PMID:21342563

  9. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  10. 2-Phenylbenzofuran derivatives as butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors: Synthesis, biological activity and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Delogu, Giovanna L; Matos, Maria J; Fanti, Maura; Era, Benedetta; Medda, Rosaria; Pieroni, Enrico; Fais, Antonella; Kumar, Amit; Pintus, Francesca

    2016-05-01

    A series of 2-phenylbenzofurans compounds was designed, synthesized and evaluated as cholinesterase inhibitors. The biological assay experiments showed that most of the compounds displayed a clearly selective inhibition for butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), while a weak or no effect towards acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was detected. Among these benzofuran derivatives, compound 16 exhibited the highest BChE inhibition with an IC50 value of 30.3μM. This compound was found to be a mixed-type inhibitor as determined by kinetic analysis. Moreover, molecular dynamics simulations revealed that compound 16 binds to both the catalytic anionic site (CAS) and peripheral anionic site (PAS) of BChE and it displayed the best interaction energy value, in agreement with our experimental data. PMID:26995529

  11. Molecular evidence for an activator-inhibitor mechanism in development of embryonic feather branching.

    PubMed

    Harris, Matthew P; Williamson, Scott; Fallon, John F; Meinhardt, Hans; Prum, Richard O

    2005-08-16

    The developmental basis of morphological complexity remains a central question in developmental and evolutionary biology. Feathers provide a unique system to analyze the development of complex morphological novelties. Here, we describe the interactions between Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Bmp2) signaling during feather barb ridge morphogenesis. We demonstrate that activator-inhibitor models of Shh and Bmp2 signaling in the tubular feather epithelium are sufficient to explain the initial formation of a meristic pattern of barb ridges and the observed variation in barb morphogenesis in chick natal down feathers. Empirical tests support the assumptions of the model that, within the feather ectoderm, Shh (activator) up-regulates its own transcription and that of Bmp2 (inhibitor), whereas Bmp2 signaling down-regulates Shh expression. More complex models incorporating a second activator and dorsal/ventral polarized modification of activator signaling can produce all of the barb morphogenesis patterns observed during the growth of more complex branched pennaceous feathers: new barb ridge formation, helical growth, and barb ridge fusion. An integrated model of feather morphogenesis and evolution suggests that plumulaceous feather structure evolved by the establishment of activator-inhibitor interactions between Shh and Bmp2 signaling in the basal epithelium of the feather germ. Subsequently, pennaceous feather structure evolved through the integration of barb ridge morphogenesis with a second, local inhibitor and a dorsal/ventral signal gradient within the feather. The model is congruent with paleontological evidence that plumulaceous feathers are primitive to pennaceous feathers. PMID:16087884

  12. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  13. Bioreductively Activated Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Generators as MRSA Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Khodade, Vinayak S; Sharath Chandra, Mallojjala; Banerjee, Ankita; Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulipeta, Mallikarjuna; Rangarajan, Radha; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2014-07-10

    The number of cases of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections is on the rise globally and new strategies to identify drug candidates with novel mechanisms of action are in urgent need. Here, we report the synthesis and evaluation of a series of benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-triones, which were designed based on redox-active natural products. We find that the in vitro inhibitory activity of 6-(prop-2-ynyl)benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-trione (1f) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including a panel of patient-derived strains, is comparable or better than vancomycin. We show that the lead compound generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cell, contributing to its antibacterial activity. PMID:25050164

  14. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  15. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Interacts with α3 Subunit of Proteasome and Modulates Its Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Boncela, Joanna; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Papiewska-Pajak, Izabela; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Osinska, Magdalena; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S.

    2011-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), a multifunctional protein, is an important physiological regulator of fibrinolysis, extracellular matrix homeostasis, and cell motility. Recent observations show that PAI-1 may also be implicated in maintaining integrity of cells, especially with respect to cellular proliferation or apoptosis. In the present study we provide evidence that PAI-1 interacts with proteasome and affects its activity. First, by using the yeast two-hybrid system, we found that the α3 subunit of proteasome directly interacts with PAI-1. Then, to ensure that the PAI-1-proteasome complex is formed in vivo, both proteins were coimmunoprecipitated from endothelial cells and identified with specific antibodies. The specificity of this interaction was evidenced after transfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and coimmunoprecipitation of both proteins with anti-PAI-1 antibodies. Subsequently, cellular distribution of the PAI-1-proteasome complexes was established by immunogold staining and electron microscopy analyses. Both proteins appeared in a diffuse cytosolic pattern but also could be found in a dense perinuclear and nuclear location. Furthermore, PAI-1 induced formation of aggresomes freely located in endothelial cytoplasm. Increased PAI-1 expression abrogated degradation of degron analyzed after cotransfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and pd2EGFP-N1 and prevented degradation of p53 as well as IκBα, as evidenced both by confocal microscopy and Western immunoblotting. PMID:21135093

  16. Circadian fluctuations of tissue plasminogen activator antigen and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigens in vasospastic angina.

    PubMed

    Sakata, K; Hoshino, T; Yoshida, H; Ono, N; Ohtani, S; Yokoyama, S; Mori, N; Kaburagi, T; Kurata, C; Urano, T

    1992-10-01

    To elucidate the circadian variation of fibrinolytic components in vasospastic angina, plasma levels of tissue plasminogen activator antigen (t-PA), free plasminogen activator inhibitor antigen (free PAI-1), t-PA/PAI-1 complex, and total PAI-1 were measured in venous plasma samples. Samples were taken every 6 hours (6:00 AM, noon, 6:00 PM, and midnight) for 24 hours in 14 patients with vasospastic angina, in 9 patients with exertional angina, and in 19 normal subjects. Twenty-four-hour Holter monitoring (Holter monitor, Del Mar Avionics, Irvine, Calif.) was also carried out in all subjects. All of the fibrinolytic components showed circadian variation, with a peak level at 6:00 AM in every study group except for the t-PA/PAI-1 complex in the group of patients with exertional angina. The values for all or the fibrinolytic components at each sampling time were higher in patients with coronary artery disease than in normal subjects. In particular, the mean value of free PAI-1 at 6:00 AM in patients with vasospastic angina was significantly higher than that in normal subjects and that in patients with exertional angina. This value of free PAI-1 in patients with vasospastic angina was closely associated with the duration of ischemic attacks. These results suggested that the circadian fluctuation of fibrinolytic components may be an important factor that leads to coronary thrombosis at the time of coronary spasm, especially in the early morning. PMID:1529901

  17. Protein C Inhibitor (PCI) Binds to Phosphatidylserine Exposing Cells with Implications in the Phagocytosis of Apoptotic Cells and Activated Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Daniela; Assinger, Alice; Einfinger, Katrin; Sokolikova, Barbora; Geiger, Margarethe

    2014-01-01

    Protein C Inhibitor (PCI) is a secreted serine protease inhibitor, belonging to the family of serpins. In addition to activated protein C PCI inactivates several other proteases of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, suggesting a regulatory role in hemostasis. Glycosaminoglycans and certain negatively charged phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, bind to PCI and modulate its activity. Phosphatidylerine (PS) is exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells and known as a phagocytosis marker. We hypothesized that PCI might bind to PS exposed on apoptotic cells and thereby influence their removal by phagocytosis. Using Jurkat T-lymphocytes and U937 myeloid cells, we show here that PCI binds to apoptotic cells to a similar extent at the same sites as Annexin V, but in a different manner as compared to live cells (defined spots on ∼10–30% of cells). PCI dose dependently decreased phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by U937 macrophages. Moreover, the phagocytosis of PS exposing, activated platelets by human blood derived monocytes declined in the presence of PCI. In U937 cells the expression of PCI as well as the surface binding of PCI increased with time of phorbol ester treatment/macrophage differentiation. The results of this study suggest a role of PCI not only for the function and/or maturation of macrophages, but also as a negative regulator of apoptotic cell and activated platelets removal. PMID:25000564

  18. Epirubicin, Identified Using a Novel Luciferase Reporter Assay for Foxp3 Inhibitors, Inhibits Regulatory T Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Hajime; Momose, Fumiyasu; Umehara, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Nao; Ogo, Naohisa; Muraoka, Daisuke; Shiku, Hiroshi; Harada, Naozumi; Asai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box protein p3 (Foxp3) is crucial to the development and suppressor function of regulatory T cells (Tregs) that have a significant role in tumor-associated immune suppression. Development of small molecule inhibitors of Foxp3 function is therefore considered a promising strategy to enhance anti-tumor immunity. In this study, we developed a novel cell-based assay system in which the NF-κB luciferase reporter signal is suppressed by the co-expressed Foxp3 protein. Using this system, we screened our chemical library consisting of approximately 2,100 compounds and discovered that a cancer chemotherapeutic drug epirubicin restored the Foxp3-inhibited NF-κB activity in a concentration-dependent manner without influencing cell viability. Using immunoprecipitation assay in a Treg-like cell line Karpas-299, we found that epirubicin inhibited the interaction between Foxp3 and p65. In addition, epirubicin inhibited the suppressor function of murine Tregs and thereby improved effector T cell stimulation in vitro. Administration of low dose epirubicin into tumor-bearing mice modulated the function of immune cells at the tumor site and promoted their IFN-γ production without direct cytotoxicity. In summary, we identified the novel action of epirubicin as a Foxp3 inhibitor using a newly established luciferase-based cellular screen. Our work also demonstrated our screen system is useful in accelerating discovery of Foxp3 inhibitors. PMID:27284967

  19. Antiplasmodial Activity and Mechanism of Action of RSM-932A, a Promising Synergistic Inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum Choline Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Tahl; Moneriz, Carlos; Diez, Amalia; Bautista, José Manuel; Gómez del Pulgar, Teresa; Cebrián, Arancha

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism of action of inhibition of the choline kinase of P. falciparum (p.f.-ChoK) by two inhibitors of the human ChoKα, MN58b and RSM-932A, which have previously been shown to be potent antitumoral agents. The efficacy of these inhibitors against p.f.-ChoK is investigated using enzymatic and in vitro assays. While MN58b may enter the choline/phosphocholine binding site, RSM-932A appears to have an altogether novel mechanism of inhibition and is synergistic with respect to both choline and ATP. A model of inhibition for RSM-932A in which this inhibitor traps p.f.-ChoK in a phosphorylated intermediate state blocking phosphate transfer to choline is presented. Importantly, MN58b and RSM-932A have in vitro inhibitory activity in the low nanomolar range and are equally effective against chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains. RSM-932A and MN58b significantly reduced parasitemia and induced the accumulation of trophozoites and schizonts, blocking intraerythrocytic development and interfering with parasite egress or invasion, suggesting a delay of the parasite maturation stage. The present data provide two new potent structures for the development of antimalarial compounds and validate p.f.-ChoK as an accessible drug target against the parasite. PMID:24041883

  20. Fluorescence properties and sequestration of peripheral anionic site specific ligands in bile acid hosts: Effect on acetylcholinesterase inhibition activity.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mullah Muhaiminul; Aguan, Kripamoy; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2016-05-01

    The increase in fluorescence intensity of model acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors like propidium iodide (PI) and ethidium bromide (EB) is due to sequestration of the probes in primary micellar aggregates of bile acid (BA) host medium with moderate binding affinity of ca. 10(2)-10(3)M(-1). Multiple regression analysis of solvent dependent fluorescence behavior of PI indicates the decrease in total nonradiative decay rate due to partial shielding of the probe from hydrogen bond donation ability of the aqueous medium in bile acid bound fraction. Both PI and EB affects AChE activity through mixed inhibition and consistent with one site binding model; however, PI (IC50=20±1μM) shows greater inhibition in comparison with EB (IC50=40±3μM) possibly due to stronger interaction with enzyme active site. The potency of AChE inhibition for both the compounds is drastically reduced in the presence of bile acid due to the formation of BA-inhibitor complex and subsequent reduction of active inhibitor fraction in the medium. Although the inhibition mechanism still remains the same, the course of catalytic reaction critically depends on equilibrium binding among several species present in the solution; particularly at low inhibitor concentration. All the kinetic parameters for enzyme inhibition reaction are nicely correlated with the association constant for BA-inhibitor complex formation. PMID:26974580

  1. Proteolytic and Trypsin Inhibitor Activity in Germinating Jojoba Seeds (Simmondsia chinensis) 1

    PubMed Central

    Samac, Deborah; Storey, Richard

    1981-01-01

    Changes in proteolytic activity (aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase, endopeptidase) were followed during germination (imbibition through seedling development) in extracts from cotyledons of jojoba seeds (Simmondsia chinensis). After imbibition, the cotyledons contained high levels of sulfhydryl aminopeptidase activity (APA) but low levels of serine carboxypeptidase activity (CPA). CPA increased with germination through the apparent loss of a CPA inhibitor substance in the seed. Curves showing changes in endopeptidase activity (EPA) assayed at pH 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 during germination were distinctly different. EPA at pH 4, 5, 6, and 7 showed characteristics of sulfhydryl enzymes while activity at pH 8 was probably due to a serine type enzyme. EPA at pH 6 was inhibited early in germination by one or more substances in the seed. Activities at pH 5 and later at pH 6 were the highest of all EPA throughout germination and increases in these activities were associated with a rapid loss of protein from the cotyledons of the developing seedling. Jojoba cotyledonary extracts were found to inhibit the enzymic activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, and pepsin but not the protease from Aspergillus saotoi. The heat-labile trypsin inhibitor substance(s) was found in commercially processed jojoba seed meal and the albumin fraction of seed proteins. Trypsin inhibitor activity decreased with germination. PMID:16662104

  2. Molecular orbital studies on the structure-activity relationships of catechol O-methyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Y

    1992-02-01

    Quantum chemical studies were applied to analyze the activities of catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors. Molecular orbital calculations of inhibitor molecules were made by semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations, CNDO/2 (complete neglect of differential overlap) methods. Regression analysis among theoretical reaction indices based on the frontier electron theory and COMT inhibitory activities were carried out. The COMT inhibitory actions of two series of inhibitors, a series of 1,5-substituted 3,4-dihydroxy benzenes and a series of substituted 3-hydroxy-4-methoxy benzenes, were investigated. The resulting regression equations contain two common reaction indices as regression variables: the electron density on the oxygen atom of the hydroxyl group and the super-delocalizability on the 5th carbon atom of the benzene ring. These two atomic positions are considered to play an important role in the interaction of these inhibitors with COMT. The hydroxyl of atomic position 3 is probably indispensable to the COMT inhibitory action by these inhibitors. PMID:1507526

  3. HSP90 inhibitors decrease AID levels and activity in mice and in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Montamat-Sicotte, Damien; Liztler, Ludivine C; Abreu, Cecilia; Safavi, Shiva; Zahn, Astrid; Orthwein, Alexandre; Muschen, Markus; Oppezzo, Pablo; Muñoz, Denise P; Di Noia, Javier M

    2015-01-01

    Activation induced deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the Ig genes in antigen-activated B cells, underpinning antibody affinity maturation and isotype switching. AID can also be pathogenic by contributing to autoimmune diseases and oncogenic mutations. Moreover, AID can exert non-canonical functions when aberrantly expressed in epithelial cells. The lack of specific inhibitors prevents therapeutic applications to modulate AID functions. Here, we have exploited our previous finding that the HSP90 molecular chaperoning pathway stabilizes AID in B cells, to test whether HSP90 inhibitors could target AID in vivo. We demonstrate that chronic administration of HSP90 inhibitors decreases AID protein levels and isotype switching in immunized mice. HSP90 inhibitors also reduce disease severity in a mouse model of acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia in which AID accelerates disease progression. We further show that human AID protein levels are sensitive to HSP90 inhibition in normal and leukemic B cells, and that HSP90 inhibition prevents AID-dependent epithelial to mesenchymal transition in a human breast cancer cell line in vitro. Thus, we provide proof-of-concept that HSP90 inhibitors indirectly target AID in vivo and that endogenous human AID is widely sensitive to them, which could have therapeutic applications. PMID:25912253

  4. Inhibitors of SRC kinases impair antitumor activity of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Winiarska, Magdalena; Bojarczuk, Kamil; Pyrzynska, Beata; Bil, Jacek; Siernicka, Marta; Dwojak, Michal; Bobrowicz, Malgorzata; Miazek, Nina; Zapala, Piotr; Zagozdzon, Agnieszka; Krol, Magdalena; Syta, Aleksandra; Podszywalow-Bartnicka, Paulina; Pilch, Zofia; Dabrowska-Iwanicka, Anna; Juszczynski, Przemyslaw; Efremov, Dimitar G; Slabicki, Mikolaj; Zenz, Thorsten; Roy, Aude Le; Olive, Daniel; Rygiel, Tomasz P; Leusen, Jeanette HW; Golab, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials with SRC family kinases (SFKs) inhibitors used alone or in a combination with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently underway in the treatment of B-cell tumors. However, molecular interactions between these therapeutics have not been studied so far. A transcriptional profiling of tumor cells incubated with SFKs inhibitors revealed strong downregulation of MS4A1 gene encoding CD20 antigen. In a panel of primary and established B-cell tumors we observed that SFKs inhibitors strongly affect CD20 expression at the transcriptional level, leading to inhibition of anti-CD20 mAbs binding and increased resistance of tumor cells to complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Activation of the AKT signaling pathway significantly protected cells from dasatinib-triggered CD20 downregulation. Additionally, SFKs inhibitors suppressed antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity by direct inhibition of natural killer cells. Abrogation of antitumor activity of rituximab was also observed in vivo in a mouse model. Noteworthy, the effects of SFKs inhibitors on NK cell function are largely reversible. The results of our studies indicate that development of optimal combinations of novel treatment modalities with anti-CD20 mAbs should be preceded by detailed preclinical evaluation of their effects on target cells. PMID:25517315

  5. Herbacetin Is a Novel Allosteric Inhibitor of Ornithine Decarboxylase with Antitumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Joon; Roh, Eunmiri; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Oi, Naomi; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Myoung Ok; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Pugliese, Angelo; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Chen, Hanyong; Cho, Eun Jin; Kim, Jong-Eun; Kang, Sun Chul; Paul, Souren; Kang, Hee Eun; Jung, Ji Won; Lee, Sung-Young; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Reddy, Kanamata; Yeom, Young Il; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2016-03-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the first step of polyamine biosynthesis that is associated with cell growth and tumor formation. Existing catalytic inhibitors of ODC have lacked efficacy in clinical testing or displayed unacceptable toxicity. In this study, we report the identification of an effective and nontoxic allosteric inhibitor of ODC. Using computer docking simulation and an in vitro ODC enzyme assay, we identified herbacetin, a natural compound found in flax and other plants, as a novel ODC inhibitor. Mechanistic investigations defined aspartate 44 in ODC as critical for binding. Herbacetin exhibited potent anticancer activity in colon cancer cell lines expressing high levels of ODC. Intraperitoneal or oral administration of herbacetin effectively suppressed HCT116 xenograft tumor growth and also reduced the number and size of polyps in a mouse model of APC-driven colon cancer (ApcMin/+). Unlike the well-established ODC inhibitor DFMO, herbacetin treatment was not associated with hearing loss. Taken together, our findings defined the natural product herbacetin as an allosteric inhibitor of ODC with chemopreventive and antitumor activity in preclinical models of colon cancer, prompting its further investigation in clinical trials. PMID:26676750

  6. HSP90 inhibitors decrease AID levels and activity in mice and in human cells.

    PubMed

    Montamat-Sicotte, Damien; Litzler, Ludivine C; Abreu, Cecilia; Safavi, Shiva; Zahn, Astrid; Orthwein, Alexandre; Müschen, Markus; Oppezzo, Pablo; Muñoz, Denise P; Di Noia, Javier M

    2015-08-01

    Activation induced deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the Ig genes in antigen-activated B cells, underpinning antibody affinity maturation and isotype switching. AID can also be pathogenic by contributing to autoimmune diseases and oncogenic mutations. Moreover, AID can exert noncanonical functions when aberrantly expressed in epithelial cells. The lack of specific inhibitors prevents therapeutic applications to modulate AID functions. Here, we have exploited our previous finding that the HSP90 molecular chaperoning pathway stabilizes AID in B cells, to test whether HSP90 inhibitors could target AID in vivo. We demonstrate that chronic administration of HSP90 inhibitors decreases AID protein levels and isotype switching in immunized mice. HSP90 inhibitors also reduce disease severity in a mouse model of acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia in which AID accelerates disease progression. We further show that human AID protein levels are sensitive to HSP90 inhibition in normal and leukemic B cells, and that HSP90 inhibition prevents AID-dependent epithelial to mesenchymal transition in a human breast cancer cell line in vitro. Thus, we provide proof-of-concept that HSP90 inhibitors indirectly target AID in vivo and that endogenous human AID is widely sensitive to them, which could have therapeutic applications. PMID:25912253

  7. An isoform-selective, small-molecule inhibitor targets the autoregulatory mechanism of p21-activated kinase

    PubMed Central

    Deacon, Sean W.; Beeser, Alexander; Fukui, Jami A.; Rennefahrt, Ulrike E. E.; Myers, Cynthia; Chernoff, Jonathan; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Autoregulatory domains found within kinases may provide more unique targets for chemical inhibitors than the conserved ATP-binding pocket targeted by most inhibitors. The kinase Pak1 contains an autoinhibitory domain that suppresses the catalytic activity of its kinase domain. Pak1 activators relieve this autoinhibition and initiate conformational rearrangements and autophosphorylation events leading to kinase activation. We developed a screen for allosteric inhibitors targeting Pak1 activation and identified the inhibitor IPA-3. Remarkably, pre-activated Pak1 is resistant to IPA-3. IPA-3 also inhibits activation of related Pak isoforms regulated by autoinhibition, but not more distantly related Paks, nor >200 other kinases tested. Pak1 inhibition by IPA-3 in live cells supports a critical role for Pak in PDGF-stimulated Erk activation. These studies illustrate a novel strategy for kinase inhibition and introduce a highly selective, cell-permeable chemical inhibitor of Pak. PMID:18420139

  8. Effect of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin on plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tani, Shigemasa; Takahashi, Atsuhiko; Nagao, Ken; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2015-02-15

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors may affect the serum levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) associated with triglyceride (TG) metabolism, which is a prognostic factor for cardiovascular disease, in diabetic patients. We conducted an 8-week, prospective, randomized study in which we assigned type 2 diabetic patients who were inadequately controlled with antidiabetic therapy to the vildagliptin group (50 mg bid, n = 49) or the control group (n = 49). The primary efficacy parameter was the change in the serum level of PAI-1, and the secondary end point was the change in the serum levels of TG-rich lipoproteins. In the vildagliptin group, significant decrease of the serum PAI-1 level by 16.3% (p <0.0001) and significant decreases of the serum TG, remnant-like particle cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B levels by 12.1% (p = 0.002), 13.9% (p = 0.003), and 9.5% (p <0.0001), respectively, were observed. No such changes were observed in the control group. Multivariate regression analyses identified the absolute change from the baseline (Δ) of the PAI-1, but not that of the fasting blood glucose or hemoglobin A1c, as independent predictors of the ΔTG, Δ remnant-like particle cholesterol, and Δ apolipoprotein B. In conclusion, treatment of type 2 diabetes with vildagliptin might prevent the progression of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients by decreasing the serum PAI-1 levels and improving TG metabolism. PMID:25637323

  9. Upstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway inhibition: MEK inhibitor followed by a BRAF inhibitor in advanced melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Goldinger, Simone M; Zimmer, Lisa; Schulz, Carsten; Ugurel, Selma; Hoeller, Christoph; Kaehler, Katharina C; Schadendorf, Dirk; Hassel, Jessica C; Becker, Juergen; Hauschild, Axel; Dummer, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    BRAF-mutant melanoma can be successfully treated by BRAF kinase inhibitors (BRAFi) and MEK kinase inhibitors (MEKi). However, the administration of BRAFi followed by MEKi did not generate promising response rate (RR). The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the time to progression (TTP) with a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway upstream inhibition strategy in BRAF mutated melanoma patients. BRAF mutation positive metastatic melanoma patients were identified within the Dermatology Cooperative Oncology Group (DeCOG) network and were treated first with a MEKi and upon progression with a selective BRAFi. A total of 23 melanoma patients (six females, 17 males, aged 47-80 years) were retrospectively analysed for TTP. The total median TTP was 8.9 months. The median TTP for MEKi was 4.8 (1.2-23.2) and subsequent for BRAFi 4.5 (1.2-15.7) months, respectively. A higher RR for MEKi (39%, nine partial responses and 0 complete responses) than previously reported was observed. Our analysis suggests that the reversed inhibition of the MAPK pathway is feasible in BRAF mutated melanoma. The median TTP (8.9 months) is close to the promising BRAF- and MEKi combination therapy (median progression-free survival (PFS) 9.4 months). The total treatment duration of the MAPK inhibition when a MEKi is administered first is similar compared to the reversed sequence, but TTP shifts in favour to the MEKi. This approach is feasible with reasonable tolerability. This clinical investigation encourages further studies in prospective clinical trials to define the optimal treatment schedule for the MAPK pathway inhibition and should be accompanied by molecular monitoring using repeated biopsies. PMID:24183461

  10. Ionizable Side Chains at Catalytic Active Sites of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic active sites of enzymes of known structure can be well defined by a modern program of computational geometry. The CASTp program was used to define and measure the volume of the catalytic active sites of 573 enzymes in the Catalytic Site Atlas database. The active sites are identified as catalytic because the amino acids they contain are known to participate in the chemical reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Acid and base side chains are reliable markers of catalytic active sites. The catalytic active sites have 4 acid and 5 base side chains, in an average volume of 1072 Å3. The number density of acid side chains is 8.3 M (in chemical units); the number density of basic side chains is 10.6 M. The catalytic active site of these enzymes is an unusual electrostatic and steric environment in which side chains and reactants are crowded together in a mixture more like an ionic liquid than an ideal infinitely dilute solution. The electrostatics and crowding of reactants and side chains seems likely to be important for catalytic function. In three types of analogous ion channels, simulation of crowded charges accounts for the main properties of selectivity measured in a wide range of solutions and concentrations. It seems wise to use mathematics designed to study interacting complex fluids when making models of the catalytic active sites of enzymes. PMID:22484856

  11. Preclinical Characterization of the Antiviral Activity of SCH 900518 (Narlaprevir), a Novel Mechanism-Based Inhibitor of Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Protease▿

    PubMed Central

    Tong, X.; Arasappan, A.; Bennett, F.; Chase, R.; Feld, B.; Guo, Z.; Hart, A.; Madison, V.; Malcolm, B.; Pichardo, J.; Prongay, A.; Ralston, R.; Skelton, A.; Xia, E.; Zhang, R.; Njoroge, F. G.

    2010-01-01

    Small-molecule hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease inhibitors such as boceprevir (SCH 503034) have been shown to have antiviral activity when they are used as monotherapy and in combination with pegylated alpha interferon and ribavirin in clinical trials. Improvements in inhibitor potency and pharmacokinetic properties offer opportunities to increase drug exposure and to further increase the sustained virological response. Exploration of the structure-activity relationships of ketoamide inhibitors related to boceprevir has led to the discovery of SCH 900518, a novel ketoamide protease inhibitor which forms a reversible covalent bond with the active-site serine. It has an overall inhibition constant (K*i) of 7 nM and a dissociation half-life of 1 to 2 h. SCH 900518 inhibited replicon RNA at a 90% effective concentration (EC90) of 40 nM. In biochemical assays, SCH 900518 was active against proteases of genotypes 1 to 3. A 2-week treatment with 5× EC90 of the inhibitor reduced the replicon RNA level by 3 log units. Selection of replicon cells with SCH 900518 resulted in the outgrowth of several resistant mutants (with the T54A/S and A156S/T/V mutations). Cross-resistance studies demonstrated that the majority of mutations for resistance to boceprevir and telaprevir caused similar fold losses of activity against all three inhibitors; however, SCH 900518 retained more activity against these mutants due to its higher intrinsic potency. Combination treatment with alpha interferon enhanced the inhibition of replicon RNA and suppressed the emergence of resistant replicon colonies, supporting the use of SCH 900518-pegylated alpha interferon combination therapy in the clinic. In summary, the results of the preclinical characterization of the antiviral activity of SCH 900518 support its evaluation in clinical studies. PMID:20308381

  12. Preclinical characterization of the antiviral activity of SCH 900518 (narlaprevir), a novel mechanism-based inhibitor of hepatitis C virus NS3 protease.

    PubMed

    Tong, X; Arasappan, A; Bennett, F; Chase, R; Feld, B; Guo, Z; Hart, A; Madison, V; Malcolm, B; Pichardo, J; Prongay, A; Ralston, R; Skelton, A; Xia, E; Zhang, R; Njoroge, F G

    2010-06-01

    Small-molecule hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease inhibitors such as boceprevir (SCH 503034) have been shown to have antiviral activity when they are used as monotherapy and in combination with pegylated alpha interferon and ribavirin in clinical trials. Improvements in inhibitor potency and pharmacokinetic properties offer opportunities to increase drug exposure and to further increase the sustained virological response. Exploration of the structure-activity relationships of ketoamide inhibitors related to boceprevir has led to the discovery of SCH 900518, a novel ketoamide protease inhibitor which forms a reversible covalent bond with the active-site serine. It has an overall inhibition constant (K*(i)) of 7 nM and a dissociation half-life of 1 to 2 h. SCH 900518 inhibited replicon RNA at a 90% effective concentration (EC(90)) of 40 nM. In biochemical assays, SCH 900518 was active against proteases of genotypes 1 to 3. A 2-week treatment with 5x EC(90) of the inhibitor reduced the replicon RNA level by 3 log units. Selection of replicon cells with SCH 900518 resulted in the outgrowth of several resistant mutants (with the T54A/S and A156S/T/V mutations). Cross-resistance studies demonstrated that the majority of mutations for resistance to boceprevir and telaprevir caused similar fold losses of activity against all three inhibitors; however, SCH 900518 retained more activity against these mutants due to its higher intrinsic potency. Combination treatment with alpha interferon enhanced the inhibition of replicon RNA and suppressed the emergence of resistant replicon colonies, supporting the use of SCH 900518-pegylated alpha interferon combination therapy in the clinic. In summary, the results of the preclinical characterization of the antiviral activity of SCH 900518 support its evaluation in clinical studies. PMID:20308381

  13. A direct thrombin inhibitor suppresses protein C activation and factor Va degradation in human plasma: Possible mechanisms of paradoxical enhancement of thrombin generation.

    PubMed

    Kamisato, Chikako; Furugohri, Taketoshi; Morishima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    We have demonstrated that antithrombin (AT)-independent thrombin inhibitors paradoxically increase thrombin generation (TG) in human plasma in a thrombomodulin (TM)- and protein C (PC)-dependent manner. We determined the effects of AT-independent thrombin inhibitors on the negative-feedback system, activation of PC and production and degradation of factor Va (FVa), as possible mechanisms underlying the paradoxical enhancement of TG. TG in human plasma containing 10nM TM was assayed by means of the calibrated automated thrombography. As an index of PC activation, plasma concentration of activated PC-PC inhibitor complex (aPC-PCI) was measured. The amounts of FVa heavy chain and its degradation product (FVa(307-506)) were examined by western blotting. AT-independent thrombin inhibitors, melagatran and dabigatran (both at 25-600nM) and 3-30μg/ml active site-blocked thrombin (IIai), increased peak levels of TG. Melagatran, dabigatran and IIai significantly decreased plasma concentration of aPC-PCI complex at 25nM or more, 75nM or more, and 10 and 30μg/ml, respectively. Melagatran (300nM) significantly increased FVa and decreased FVa(307-506). In contrast, a direct factor Xa inhibitor edoxaban preferentially inhibited thrombin generation (≥25nM), and higher concentrations were required to inhibit PC activation (≥150nM) and FVa degradation (300nM). The present study suggests that the inhibitions of protein C activation and subsequent degradation of FVa and increase in FVa by antithrombin-independent thrombin inhibitors may contribute to the paradoxical TG enhancement, and edoxaban may inhibit PC activation and FVa degradation as a result of TG suppression. PMID:26974491

  14. Recombinant activated factor VII in the treatment of bleeds and for the prevention of surgery-related bleeding in congenital haemophilia with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Santagostino, Elena; Escobar, Miguel; Ozelo, Margareth; Solimeno, Luigi; Arkhammar, Per; Lee, Hye Youn; Rosu, Gabriela; Giangrande, Paul

    2015-06-01

    The availability of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa, eptacog alfa activated) has greatly advanced the care of patients with haemophilia A or B who have developed inhibitors against the infused replacement factor. Recombinant FVIIa is licensed for the on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes and the prevention of bleeding in surgery or invasive procedures in patients with congenital haemophilia with inhibitors. This article attempts to review in detail the extensive evidence of rFVIIa in congenital haemophilia patients with inhibitors. Patients with acute bleeding episodes are best treated on demand at home, to achieve the short- and long-term benefits of rapid bleed control. Key prospective studies have shown that rFVIIa achieves consistently high efficacy rates in the management of acute (including joint) bleeds in inhibitor patients in the home treatment setting. Substantial post-approval data from key registries also support the on-demand efficacy profile of rFVIIa established by the prospective clinical trials. The availability of rFVIIa has allowed major surgery to become a reality for inhibitor patients. Studies in key surgery, including orthopaedic procedures, have found that rFVIIa provides consistently high efficacy rates. Importantly, the wealth of data does not raise any unexpected safety concerns surrounding rFVIIa use; this is likely because rFVIIa is a recombinant product with a localised mechanism of action at the site of vascular injury. In summary, rFVIIa is established as an effective and well-tolerated first-line treatment for on-demand bleeding control and bleed prevention during minor and major (including elective orthopaedic) surgery in inhibitor patients. Use of rFVIIa has been a major step towards narrowing the gap in outcomes between inhibitor patients and non-inhibitor patients. PMID:26073369

  15. The biological activity of a-mangostin, a larvicidal botanic mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 inhibitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alpha-mangostin derived from mangosteen was identified as a mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 inhibitor via high throughput insecticide screening. Alpha-mangostin was tested for its larvicidal activity against 3rd instar larvae of six mosquito species and the LC50 values range from 0.84 to 2.90 ppm....

  16. Metabolic factors, adipose tissue, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels in Type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) production by adipose tissue is increased in obesity, and its circulating levels are high in type 2 diabetes. PAI-1 increases cardiovascular risk by favoring clot stability, interfering with vascular remodeling, or both. We investigated in obese diabetic per...

  17. In Vitro Antimalarial Activity of Different Inhibitors of the Plasmodial Isoprenoid Synthesis Pathway.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcia F; Saito, Alexandre Y; Peres, Valnice J; Oliveira, Antonio C; Katzin, Alejandro M

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that fosmidomycin, risedronate, and nerolidol exert antimalarial activity in vitro. We included squalestatin, an inhibitor of the isoprenoid metabolism in Erwinia uredovora, and found that combinations of compounds which act on different targets of the plasmodial isoprenoid pathway possess important supra-additivity effects. PMID:26055383

  18. In Vitro Antimalarial Activity of Different Inhibitors of the Plasmodial Isoprenoid Synthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Marcia F.; Saito, Alexandre Y.; Peres, Valnice J.; Oliveira, Antonio C.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that fosmidomycin, risedronate, and nerolidol exert antimalarial activity in vitro. We included squalestatin, an inhibitor of the isoprenoid metabolism in Erwinia uredovora, and found that combinations of compounds which act on different targets of the plasmodial isoprenoid pathway possess important supra-additivity effects. PMID:26055383

  19. Response of early active rheumatoid arthritis to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors: evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Wataru; Nishikawa, Kenichiro; Hirose, Masuko; Nanki, Toshihiro; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory changes (synovitis and bone marrow edema) and destructive changes (bone erosion) were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and their relations with disease activity were assessed during treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. Ten patients with early active RA underwent MRI at 0 and 16 weeks of TNF-inhibitor treatment. The carpal bones of the dominant hand were evaluated by the outcome measures in rheumatology clinical trials MRI score for RA. After 16 weeks, the mean disease activity score (DAS 28) decreased significantly from 5.54 to 2.70, while the number of tender joints, number of swollen joints, and inflammatory parameters were also significantly improved. The mean synovitis and marrow edema scores determined by MRI showed a significant decrease from 6.1 to 2.2 and 12.8 to 6.2, respectively, while the annual bone-erosion progression score decreased from 12.6 to 2.0. Although synovitis persisted in some patients, imaging remission was achieved in two patients. In conclusion, TNF-inhibitor therapy achieved an early decrease of disease activity and MRI revealed amelioration of joint destruction. The MRI score for RA is useful for assessing the early response to TNF inhibitors. PMID:18762862

  20. Structure-Activity Analysis of Vinylogous Urea Inhibitors of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Encoded Ribonuclease H ▿

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Suhman; Wendeler, Michaela; Rausch, Jason W.; Beilhartz, Greg; Gotte, Matthias; O'Keefe, Barry R.; Bermingham, Alun; Beutler, John A.; Liu, Shixin; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.

    2010-01-01

    Vinylogous ureas 2-amino-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-cyclohepta[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide and N-[3-(aminocarbonyl)-4,5-dimethyl-2-thienyl]-2-furancarboxamide (compounds 1 and 2, respectively) were recently identified to be modestly potent inhibitors of the RNase H activity of HIV-1 and HIV-2 reverse transcriptase (RT). Both compounds shared a 3-CONH2-substituted thiophene ring but were otherwise structurally unrelated, which prevented a precise definition of the pharmacophore. We have therefore examined a larger series of vinylogous ureas carrying amide, amine, and cycloalkane modifications of the thiophene ring of compound 1. While cycloheptane- and cyclohexane-substituted derivatives retained potency, cyclopentane and cyclooctane substitutions eliminated activity. In the presence of a cycloheptane ring, modifying the 2-NH2 or 3-CONH2 functions decreased the potency. With respect to compound 2, vinylogous ureas whose dimethylthiophene ring contained modifications of the 2-NH2 and 3-CONH2 functions were investigated. 2-NH2-modified analogs displayed potency equivalent to or enhanced over that of compound 2, the most active of which, compound 16, reflected intramolecular cyclization of the 2-NH2 and 3-CONH2 groups. Molecular modeling was used to define an inhibitor binding site in the p51 thumb subdomain, suggesting that an interaction with the catalytically conserved His539 of the p66 RNase H domain could underlie inhibition of RNase H activity. Collectively, our data indicate that multiple functional groups of vinylogous ureas contribute to their potencies as RNase H inhibitors. Finally, single-molecule spectroscopy indicates that vinylogous ureas have the property of altering the reverse transcriptase orientation on a model RNA-DNA hybrid mimicking initiation plus-strand DNA synthesis. PMID:20547794

  1. Active-site motions and polarity enhance catalytic turnover of hydrated subtilisin dissolved in organic solvents

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Elton P; Eppler, Ross K; Beaudoin, Julianne M; Dordick, Jonathan S; Reimer, Jeffrey A; Clark, Douglas S

    2009-01-01

    The enzyme subtilisin Carlsberg was surfactant-solubilized into two organic solvents, isooctane and tetrahydrofuran, and hydrated through stepwise changes in the thermodynamic water activity, aw. The apparent turnover number kcatapp in these systems ranged from 0.2 to 80 s−1 and increased 11-fold in isooctane and up to 50-fold in tetrahydrofuran with increasing aw. 19F-NMR relaxation experiments employing an active-site inhibitor were used to assess the dependence of active-site motions on aw. The rates of NMR-derived fast (k > 107 s−1) and slow (k < 104 s−1) active-site motions increased in both solvents upon hydration, but only the slow motions correlated with kcat. The 19F chemical shift was a sensitive probe of the local electronic environment and provided an empirical measure of the active-site dielectric constant εas, which increased with hydration to εas ≈ 13 in each solvent. In both solvents the transition state free energy data and εas followed Kirkwood’s model for the continuum solvation of a dipole, indicating that water also enhanced catalysis by altering the active-site’s electronic environment and increasing its polarity to better stabilize the transition state. These results reveal that favorable dynamic and electrostatic effects both contribute to accelerated catalysis by solubilized subtilisin Carlsberg upon hydration in organic solvents. PMID:19317505

  2. Evaluation of trypanocidal activity of combinations of anti-sleeping sickness drugs with cysteine protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Steverding, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is unsatisfactory because only a few drugs, with serious side effects and poor efficacy, are available. As drug combination regimes often achieve greater therapeutic efficacy than monotherapies, here the trypanocidal activity of the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777 in combination with current anti-HAT drugs using bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei was investigated. Isobolographic analysis was used to determine the interaction between cysteine protease inhibitors (K11777, CA-074Me and CAA0225) and anti-HAT drugs (suramin, pentamidine, melarsoprol and eflornithine). Bloodstream forms of T. brucei were incubated in culture medium containing cysteine protease inhibitors or anti-HAT drugs alone or in combination at a 1:1 fixed-dose ratio. After 48 h incubation, live cells were counted, the 50% growth inhibition values determined and combination indices calculated. The general cytotoxicity of drug combinations was evaluated with human leukaemia HL-60 cells. Combinations of K11777 with suramin, pentamidine and melarsoprol showed antagonistic effects while with eflornithine a synergistic effect was observed. Whereas eflornithine antagonises with CA-074Me, an inhibitor inactivating the targeted TbCATL only under reducing conditions, it synergises with CAA0255, an inhibitor structurally related to CA-074Me which inactivates TbCATL independently of thiols. These findings indicate an essential role of thiols for the synergistic interaction between K11777 and eflornithine. Encouragingly, the K11777/eflornithine combination displayed higher trypanocidal than cytotoxic activity. The results of this study suggest that the combination of the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777 and eflornithine display promising synergistic trypanocidal activity that warrants further investigation of the drug combination as possible alternative treatment of HAT. PMID:25662707

  3. Design, validation and efficacy of bisubstrate inhibitors specifically affecting ecto-CK2 kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Cozza, Giorgio; Zanin, Sofia; Sarno, Stefania; Costa, Elena; Girardi, Cristina; Ribaudo, Giovanni; Salvi, Mauro; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Ruzzene, Maria; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2015-11-01

    By derivatizing the purely competitive CK2 inhibitor N1-(4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-propane-1,3-diamine (K137) at its 3-amino position with a peptidic fragment composed of three or four glutamic or aspartic acid residues, a new family of bisubstrate inhibitors has been generated whose ability to simultaneously interact with both the ATP and the phosphoacceptor substrate-binding sites has been probed by running mixed competition kinetics and by mutational mapping of the kinase residues implicated in substrate recognition. The most effective bisubstrate inhibitor, K137-E4, interacts with three functional regions of the kinase: the hydrophobic pocket close to the ATP-binding site, the basic residues of the p+1 loop that recognizes the acidic determinant at position n+1 and the basic residues of α-helixC that recognize the acidic determinant at position n+3. Compared with the parent inhibitor (K137), K137-E4 is severalfold more potent (IC50 25 compared with 130 nM) and more selective, failing to inhibit any other kinase as drastically as CK2 out of 140 enzymes, whereas 35 kinases are inhibited more potently than CK2 by K137. K137-E4 is unable to penetrate the cell and to inhibit endogenous CK2, its pro-apoptotic efficacy being negligible compared with cell-permeant inhibitors; however, it readily inhibits ecto-CK2 on the outer cell surface, reducing the phosphorylation of several external phosphoproteins. Inhibition of ecto-CK2 by K137-E4 is accompanied by a slower migration of cancer cells as judged by wound healing assays. On the basis of the cellular responses to K137-E4, we conclude that ecto-CK2 is implicated in cell motility, whereas its contribution to the pro-survival role of CK2 is negligible. PMID:26349539

  4. Inhibitor focusing: direct selection of drug targets from proteomes using activity-based probes.

    PubMed

    Nomanbhoy, Tyzoon K; Rosenblum, Jonathan; Aban, Arwin; Burbaum, Jonathan J

    2003-02-01

    In the latter stages of drug discovery and development, assays that establish drug selectivity and toxicity are important when side effects, which are often due to lack of specificity, determine drug candidate viability. There has been no comprehensive or systematic methodology to measure these factors outside of whole-animal assays, and such phenomenological assays generally fail to establish the additional targets of a given small molecule, or the molecular origin of toxicity. Consequently, small-molecule development programs destined for failure often reach advanced stages of testing, and the money and time invested in such programs could be saved if information on selectivity were available early in the process. Here, we present a methodology that utilizes chemical ABPs in combination with small-molecule inhibitors to selectively label small-molecule binding sites in whole proteomic samples. In principle, the ABP and small molecule will compete for similar binding sites, such that the small molecule will protect against modification by the ABP. Thus, after removal of the small molecule, the binding site for the ABP will be revealed, and a second probe can then be used to label the small-molecule binding sites selectively. To demonstrate this experimentally, we mapped the binding sites of the DPP4 inhibitor, IT, in a number of different tissue types. PMID:15090140

  5. A novel synthetic quinolinone inhibitor presents proteolytic and hemorrhagic inhibitory activities against snake venom metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Baraldi, Patrícia T; Magro, Angelo J; Matioli, Fábio F; Marcussi, Silvana; Lemke, Ney; Calderon, Leonardo A; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Soares, Andreimar M; Correa, Arlene G; Fontes, Marcos R M

    2016-02-01

    Metalloproteases play a fundamental role in snake venom envenomation inducing hemorrhagic, fibrigen(ogen)olytic and myotoxic effects in their victims. Several snake venoms, such as those from the Bothrops genus, present important local effects which are not efficiently neutralized by conventional serum therapy. Consequently, these accidents may result in permanent sequelae and disability, creating economic and social problems, especially in developing countries, leading the attention of the World Health Organization that considered ophidic envenomations a neglected tropical disease. Aiming to produce an efficient inhibitor against bothropic venoms, we synthesized different molecules classified as quinolinones - a group of low-toxic chemical compounds widely used as antibacterial and antimycobacterial drugs - and tested their inhibitory properties against hemorrhage caused by bothropic venoms. The results from this initial screening indicated the molecule 2-hydroxymethyl-6-methoxy-1,4-dihydro-4-quinolinone (Q8) was the most effective antihemorrhagic compound among all of the assayed synthetic quinolinones. Other in vitro and in vivo experiments showed this novel compound was able to inhibit significantly the hemorrhagic and/or proteolytic activities of bothropic crude venoms and isolated snake venom metalloproteases (SVMPs) even at lower concentrations. Docking and molecular dynamic simulations were also performed to get insights into the structural basis of Q8 inhibitory mechanism against proteolytic and hemorrhagic SVMPs. These structural studies demonstrated that Q8 may form a stable complex with SVMPs, impairing the access of substrates to the active sites of these toxins. Therefore, both experimental and structural data indicate that Q8 compound is an interesting candidate for antiophidic therapy, particularly for the treatment of the hemorrhagic and necrotic effects induced by bothropic venoms. PMID:26700145

  6. Alkyl Amine Bevirimat Derivatives Are Potent and Broadly Active HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Emiko; Ablan, Sherimay D.; Mandt, Rebecca; Pauly, Gary T.; Sigano, Dina M.; Schneider, Joel P.; Martin, David E.; Nitz, Theodore J.; Wild, Carl T.

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant with the release of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particles from the infected cell, the viral protease cleaves the Gag polyprotein precursor at a number of sites to trigger virus maturation. We previously reported that a betulinic acid-derived compound, bevirimat (BVM), blocks HIV-1 maturation by disrupting a late step in protease-mediated Gag processing: the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) intermediate to mature CA. BVM was shown in multiple clinical trials to be safe and effective in reducing viral loads in HIV-1-infected patients. However, naturally occurring polymorphisms in the SP1 region of Gag (e.g., SP1-V7A) led to a variable response in some BVM-treated patients. The reduced susceptibility of SP1-polymorphic HIV-1 to BVM resulted in the discontinuation of its clinical development. To overcome the loss of BVM activity induced by polymorphisms in SP1, we carried out an extensive medicinal chemistry campaign to develop novel maturation inhibitors. In this study, we focused on alkyl amine derivatives modified at the C-28 position of the BVM scaffold. We identified a set of derivatives that are markedly more potent than BVM against an HIV-1 clade B clone (NL4-3) and show robust antiviral activity against a variant of NL4-3 containing the V7A polymorphism in SP1. One of the most potent of these compounds also strongly inhibited a multiclade panel of primary HIV-1 isolates. These data demonstrate that C-28 alkyl amine derivatives of BVM can, to a large extent, overcome the loss of susceptibility imposed by polymorphisms in SP1. PMID:26482309

  7. Discovery of fused tricyclic core containing HCV NS5A inhibitors with pan-genotype activity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wensheng; Coburn, Craig A; Yang, De-Yi; Meinke, Peter T; Wong, Michael; Rosenblum, Stuart B; Chen, Kevin X; Njoroge, George F; Chen, Lei; Dwyer, Michael P; Jiang, Yueheng; Nair, Anilkumar G; Selyutin, Oleg; Tong, Ling; Zeng, Qingbei; Zhong, Bin; Ji, Tao; Hu, Bin; Agrawal, Sony; Xia, Ellen; Zhai, Ying; Liu, Rong; Kong, Rong; Ingravallo, Paul; Asante-Appiah, Ernest; Nomeir, Amin; Fells, James; Kozlowski, Joseph A

    2016-07-01

    HCV NS5A inhibitors have demonstrated impressive in vitro potency profiles in HCV replicon assays and robust HCV RNA titer reduction in the clinic making them attractive components for inclusion in an all oral fixed dose combination regimen for the treatment of HCV infection. Herein, we describe research efforts that led to the discovery of a series of fused tricyclic core containing HCV NS5A inhibitors such as 24, 39, 40, 43, and 44 which have pan-genotype activity and are orally bioavailable in the rat. PMID:27180013

  8. ATP-site binding inhibitor effectively targets mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Neil, Jayson; Shannon, Craig; Mohan, Avinash; Laurent, Dimitri; Murali, Raj; Jhanwar-Uniyal, Meena

    2016-03-01

    The PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling axis is central to the transformed phenotype of glioblastoma (GBM) cells, due to frequent loss of tumor suppressor PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10). The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is present in two cellular multi-protein complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, which have distinct subunit composition, substrates and mechanisms of action. Targeting the mTOR protein is a promising strategy for GBM therapy. However, neither of these complexes is fully inhibited by the allosteric inhibitor of mTOR, rapamycin or its analogs. Herein, we provide evidence that the combined inhibition of mTORC1/2, using the ATP-competitive binding inhibitor PP242, would effectively suppress GBM growth and dissemination as compared to an allosteric binding inhibitor of mTOR. GBM cells treated with PP242 demonstrated significantly decreased activation of mTORC1 and mTORC2, as shown by reduced phosphorylation of their substrate levels, p70 S6KThr389 and AKTSer473, respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, insulin induced activation of these kinases was abrogated by pretreatment with PP242 as compared with rapamycin. Unlike rapamycin, PP242 modestly activates extracellular regulated kinase (ERK1/2), as shown by expression of pERKThr202/Tyr204. Cell proliferation and S-phase entry of GBM cells was significantly suppressed by PP242, which was more pronounced compared to rapamycin treatment. Lastly, PP242 significantly suppressed the migration of GBM cells, which was associated with a change in cellular behavior rather than cytoskeleton loss. In conclusion, these results underscore the potential therapeutic use of the PP242, a novel ATP-competitive binding inhibitor of mTORC1/2 kinase, in suppression of GBM growth and dissemination. PMID:26719046

  9. Activity of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor in the plasma of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Dubis, Joanna; Zuk, Natalia; Grendziak, Ryszard; Zapotoczny, Norbert; Pfanhauser, Monika; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2014-04-01

    Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) experience impaired balance between fibrinolysis and coagulation, manifested by increased prothrombotic tendency and intensified inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the TAFI activity level (thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor) in the plasma of AAA patients. Plasma levels of PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1), urokinase-type plasminogen activator and uPAR (urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor) were measured as markers of fibrinolytic activity. The study showed that the activity of the thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor in the plasma of AAA patients was significantly lower than in the plasma of the control individuals (64.6 ± 10.1 vs. 54.2 ± 10.9%, P < 0.0001). TAFI activity positively correlated with the white blood cell count (r = 0.486, P < 0.005). The uPAR concentration in the AAA patients was statistically significantly higher than in the control group and positively correlated with TAFI activity (r = 0.409, P = 0.02). The levels of PAI-1 and D-dimers (fibrin fragments) were significantly higher in patients with AAA than in the control group (44.3 ± 17.5 vs. 21.7 ± 8.7 ng/ml and 1869.6 ± 1490.1 vs. 181.5 ± 188.6 ng/ml, respectively). Lowered activity of the fibrinolysis inhibitor TAFI may heighten the blood fibrinolytic potential in AAA patients and contribute to the development of comorbidities. Therefore, TAFI participation in AAA pathogenesis cannot be excluded. PMID:24378973

  10. Reduction of urease activity by interaction with the flap covering the active site.

    PubMed

    Macomber, Lee; Minkara, Mona S; Hausinger, Robert P; Merz, Kenneth M

    2015-02-23

    With the increasing appreciation for the human microbiome coupled with the global rise of antibiotic resistant organisms, it is imperative that new methods be developed to specifically target pathogens. To that end, a novel computational approach was devised to identify compounds that reduce the activity of urease, a medically important enzyme of Helicobacter pylori, Proteus mirabilis, and many other microorganisms. Urease contains a flexible loop that covers its active site; Glide was used to identify small molecules predicted to lock this loop in an open conformation. These compounds were screened against the model urease from Klebsiella aerogenes, and the natural products epigallocatechin and quercetin were shown to inhibit at low and high micromolar concentrations, respectively. These molecules exhibit a strong time-dependent inactivation of urease that was not due to their oxygen sensitivity. Rather, these compounds appear to inactivate urease by reacting with a specific Cys residue located on the flexible loop. Substitution of this cysteine by alanine in the C319A variant increased the urease resistance to both epigallocatechin and quercetin, as predicted by the computational studies. Protein dynamics are integral to the function of many enzymes; thus, identification of compounds that lock an enzyme into a single conformation presents a useful approach to define potential inhibitors. PMID:25594724

  11. Reduction of Urease Activity by Interaction with the Flap Covering the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Macomber, Lee; Minkara, Mona S.; Hausinger, Robert P.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing appreciation for the human microbiome coupled with the global rise of antibiotic resistant organisms, it is imperative that new methods be developed to specifically target pathogens. To that end, a novel computational approach was devised to identify compounds that reduce the activity of urease, a medically important enzyme of Helicobacter pylori, Proteus mirabilis, and many other microorganisms. Urease contains a flexible loop that covers its active site; Glide was used to identify small molecules predicted to lock this loop in an open conformation. These compounds were screened against the model urease from Klebsiella aerogenes and the natural products epigallocatechin and quercetin were shown to inhibit at low and high micromolar concentrations, respectively. These molecules exhibit a strong time-dependent inactivation of urease that was not due to their oxygen sensitivity. Rather, these compounds appear to inactivate urease by reacting with a specific Cys residue located on the flexible loop. Substitution of this cysteine by alanine in the C319A variant increased the urease resistance to both epigallocatechin and quercetin, as predicted by the computational studies. Protein dynamics are integral to the function of many enzymes; thus, identification of compounds that lock an enzyme into a single conformation presents a useful approach to define potential inhibitors. PMID:25594724

  12. Plasminogen activator and serine protease inhibitor-E2 (protease nexin-1) expression by bovine granulosa cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mingju; Sahmi, Malha; Lussier, Jacques G; Price, Christopher A

    2004-09-01

    Remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) occurs during antral follicle growth, and the plasminogen activators (PA) have been implicated in this process in rodents. In the present study, we measured the expression and secretion of PA and the PA inhibitor protease nexin-1 (SerpinE2) in antral and basal bovine granulosa cells from small (<6 mm), medium (6-8 mm), and large follicles (>8 mm) during 6 days of culture in serum-free medium. Casein zymography revealed that the cells secreted predominantly tissue-type PA (tPA) with urokinase (uPA) being associated mainly with cell lysates, and Western blot demonstrated that the cells secreted SerpinE2. Overall, secreted tPA activity was higher in cultures of cells from small follicles compared with large follicles, and secreted SerpinE2 levels were higher in cultures of cells from large follicles. In cultures of cells from small follicles, secreted tPA levels increased with time of culture for antral but not basal cells, and SerpinE2 levels increased with time for basal but not antral cells. In cultures of granulosa cells from large follicles, tPA activity increased significantly with time of culture, whereas SerpinE2 levels decreased. Cell-associated uPA activity decreased with time in cells from medium and large follicles. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Northern blot analysis showed that SerpinE2 secretion was regulated largely at the transcriptional level, whereas tPA secretion was not. The data suggest stage-dependent regulation of granulosa cell PA and SerpinE2 production, consistent with a role in ECM remodeling during follicle growth. PMID:15128599

  13. Active site conformational changes of prostasin provide a new mechanism of protease regulation by divalent cations

    SciTech Connect

    Spraggon, Glen; Hornsby, Michael; Shipway, Aaron; Tully, David C.; Bursulaya, Badry; Danahay, Henry; Harris, Jennifer L.; Lesley, Scott A.

    2010-01-12

    Prostasin or human channel-activating protease 1 has been reported to play a critical role in the regulation of extracellular sodium ion transport via its activation of the epithelial cell sodium channel. Here, the structure of the extracellular portion of the membrane associated serine protease has been solved to high resolution in complex with a nonselective d-FFR chloromethyl ketone inhibitor, in an apo form, in a form where the apo crystal has been soaked with the covalent inhibitor camostat and in complex with the protein inhibitor aprotinin. It was also crystallized in the presence of the divalent cation Ca{sup +2}. Comparison of the structures with each other and with other members of the trypsin-like serine protease family reveals unique structural features of prostasin and a large degree of conformational variation within specificity determining loops. Of particular interest is the S1 subsite loop which opens and closes in response to basic residues or divalent ions, directly binding Ca{sup +2} cations. This induced fit active site provides a new possible mode of regulation of trypsin-like proteases adapted in particular to extracellular regions with variable ionic concentrations such as the outer membrane layer of the epithelial cell.

  14. Characterization of a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor from Solanum tuberosum having lectin activity.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kunal R; Patel, Dhaval K; Pappachan, Anju; Prabha, C Ratna; Singh, Desh Deepak

    2016-02-01

    Plant lectins and protease inhibitors constitute a class of proteins which plays a crucial role in plant defense. In our continuing investigations on lectins from plants, we have isolated, purified and characterized a protein of about 20 kDa, named PotHg, showing hemagglutination activity from tubers of Indian potato, Solanum tuberosum. De novo sequencing and MS/MS analysis confirmed that the purified protein was a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor having two chains (15 kDa and 5 kDa). SDS and native PAGE analysis showed that the protein was glycosylated and was a heterodimer of about 15 and 5 kDa subunits. PotHg agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes with specific activity of 640 H.U./mg which was inhibited by complex sugars like fetuin. PotHg retained hemagglutination activity over a pH range 4-9 and up to 80°C. Mannose and galactose interacted with the PotHg with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.5×10(-3) M and 2.8×10(-3) M, respectively as determined through fluorescence studies. Fluorescence studies suggested the involvement of a tryptophan in sugar binding which was further confirmed through modification of tryptophan residues using N-bromosuccinimide. Circular dichroism (CD) studies showed that PotHg contains mostly β sheets (∼45%) and loops which is in line with previously characterized protease inhibitors and modeling studies. There are previous reports of Kunitz-type protease inhibitors showing lectin like activity from Peltophorum dubium and Labramia bojeri. This is the first report of a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor showing lectin like activity from a major crop plant and this makes PotHg an interesting candidate for further investigation. PMID:26645142

  15. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Activity on Egg Albumen Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Nahariah, N.; Legowo, A. M.; Abustam, E.; Hintono, A.

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is used for fermentation of fish products, meat and milk. However, the utilization of these bacteria in egg processing has not been done. This study was designed to evaluate the potential of fermented egg albumen as a functional food that is rich in angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitors activity (ACE-inhibitor activity) and is antihypertensive. A completely randomized design was used in this study with six durations of fermentation (6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 h) as treatments. Six hundred eggs obtained from the same chicken farm were used in the experiment as sources of egg albumen. Bacteria L. plantarum FNCC 0027 used in the fermentation was isolated from cow’s milk. The parameters measured were the total bacteria, dissolved protein, pH, total acid and the activity of ACE-inhibitors. The results showed that there were significant effects of fermentation time on the parameters tested. Total bacteria increased significantly during fermentation for 6, 12, 18, and 24 h and then decreased with the increasing time of fermentation to 30 and 36 h. Soluble protein increased significantly during fermentation to 18 h and then subsequently decreased during of fermentation to 24, 30, and 36 h. The pH value decreased markedly during fermentation. The activities of ACE-inhibitor in fermented egg albumen increased during fermentation to 18 h and then decreased with the increasing of the duration of fermentation to 24, 30, and 36 h. The egg albumen which was fermented for 18 h resulted in a functional food that was rich in ACE-inhibitor activity. PMID:25715689

  16. CINPA1 Is an Inhibitor of Constitutive Androstane Receptor That Does Not Activate Pregnane X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Milu T; Lin, Wenwei; Wu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic sensors that enhance the detoxification and elimination of xenobiotics and endobiotics by modulating the expression of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Elevated levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters, resulting from CAR activation in various cancers, promote the elimination of chemotherapeutic agents, leading to reduced therapeutic effectiveness and acquired drug resistance. CAR inhibitors, in combination with existing chemotherapeutics, could therefore be used to attenuate multidrug resistance in cancers. Interestingly, all previously reported CAR inverse-agonists are also activators of PXR, rendering them mechanistically counterproductive in tissues where both these xenobiotic receptors are present and active. We used a directed high-throughput screening approach, followed by subsequent mechanistic studies, to identify novel, potent, and specific small-molecule CAR inhibitors that do not activate PXR. We describe here one such inhibitor, CINPA1 (CAR inhibitor not PXR activator 1), capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription with an IC50 of ∼70 nM. CINPA1 1) is a specific xenobiotic receptor inhibitor and has no cytotoxic effects up to 30 µM; 2) inhibits CAR-mediated gene expression in primary human hepatocytes, where CAR is endogenously expressed; 3) does not alter the protein levels or subcellular localization of CAR; 4) increases corepressor and reduces coactivator interaction with the CAR ligand-binding domain in mammalian two-hybrid assays; and 5) disrupts CAR binding to the promoter regions of target genes in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. CINPA1 could be used as a novel molecular tool for understanding CAR function. PMID:25762023

  17. Binding of the potential antitumour agent indirubin-5-sulphonate at the inhibitor site of rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b. Comparison with ligand binding to pCDK2-cyclin A complex.

    PubMed

    Kosmopoulou, Magda N; Leonidas, Demetres D; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Bischler, Nicolas; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Sakarellos, Constantinos E; Pauptit, Richard; Oikonomakos, Nikos G

    2004-06-01

    The binding of indirubin-5-sulphonate (E226), a potential anti-tumour agent and a potent inhibitor (IC(50) = 35 nm) of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP) has been studied by kinetic and crystallographic methods. Kinetic analysis revealed that E226 is a moderate inhibitor of GPb (K(i) = 13.8 +/- 0.2 micro m) and GPa (K(i) = 57.8 +/- 7.1 micro m) and acts synergistically with glucose. To explore the molecular basis of E226 binding we have determined the crystal structure of the GPb/E226 complex at 2.3 A resolution. Structure analysis shows clearly that E226 binds at the purine inhibitor site, where caffeine and flavopiridol also bind [Oikonomakos, N.G., Schnier, J.B., Zographos, S.E., Skamnaki, V.T., Tsitsanou, K.E. & Johnson, L.N. (2000) J. Biol. Chem.275, 34566-34573], by intercalating between the two aromatic rings of Phe285 and Tyr613. The mode of binding of E226 to GPb is similar, but not identical, to that of caffeine and flavopiridol. Comparative structural analyses of the GPb-E226, GPb-caffeine and GPb-flavopiridol complex structures reveal the structural basis of the differences in the potencies of the three inhibitors and indicate binding residues in the inhibitor site that can be exploited to obtain more potent inhibitors. Structural comparison of the GPb-E226 complex structure with the active pCDK2-cyclin A-E226 complex structure clearly shows the different binding modes of the ligand to GPb and CDK2; the more extensive interactions of E226 with the active site of CDK2 may explain its higher affinity towards the latter enzyme. PMID:15153119

  18. Measuring the serotonin uptake site using (/sup 3/H)paroxetine--a new serotonin uptake inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiter, C.H.; Nutt, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that may be involved in ethanol preference and dependence. It is possible to label the serotonin uptake site in brain using the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, but this also binds to other sites. We have used the new high-affinity uptake blocker paroxetine to define binding to this site and report it to have advantages over imipramine as a ligand.

  19. Targeting KIT on innate immune cells to enhance the antitumor activity of checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Maximilian; Gedrich, Richard; Peck, Ronald; LaVallee, Theresa; Eder, Joseph Paul

    2016-06-01

    Innate immune cells such as mast cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells are key components of the tumor microenvironment. Recent evidence indicates that levels of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in melanoma patients are associated with poor survival to checkpoint inhibitors. This suggests that targeting both the innate and adaptive suppressive components of the immune system will maximize clinical benefit and elicit more durable responses in cancer patients. Preclinical data suggest that targeting signaling by the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT, particularly on mast cells, may modulate innate immune cell numbers and activity in tumors. Here, we review data highlighting the importance of the KIT signaling in regulating antitumor immune responses and the potential benefit of combining selective KIT inhibitors with immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:27349976

  20. Inhibitors of enzymes catalyzing modifications to histone lysine residues: structure, function and activity.

    PubMed

    Lillico, Ryan; Stesco, Nicholas; Khorshid Amhad, Tina; Cortes, Claudia; Namaka, Mike P; Lakowski, Ted M

    2016-05-01

    Gene expression is partly controlled by epigenetic mechanisms including histone-modifying enzymes. Some diseases are caused by changes in gene expression that can be mitigated by inhibiting histone-modifying enzymes. This review covers the enzyme inhibitors targeting histone lysine modifications. We summarize the enzymatic mechanisms of histone lysine acetylation, deacetylation, methylation and demethylation and discuss the biochemical roles of these modifications in gene expression and in disease. We discuss inhibitors of lysine acetylation, deacetylation, methylation and demethylation defining their structure-activity relationships and their potential mechanisms. We show that there are potentially indiscriminant off-target effects on gene expression even with the use of selective epigenetic enzyme inhibitors. PMID:27173004

  1. Identification of the KDM2/7 Histone Lysine Demethylase Subfamily Inhibitor and its Antiproliferative Activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Histone Nε-methyl lysine demethylases KDM2/7 have been identified as potential targets for cancer therapies. On the basis of the crystal structure of KDM7B, we designed and prepared a series of hydroxamate analogues bearing an alkyl chain. Enzyme assays revealed that compound 9 potently inhibits KDM2A, KDM7A, and KDM7B, with IC50s of 6.8, 0.2, and 1.2 μM, respectively. While inhibitors of KDM4s did not show any effect on cancer cells tested, the KDM2/7-subfamily inhibitor 9 exerted antiproliferative activity, indicating the potential for KDM2/7 inhibitors as anticancer agents. PMID:23964788

  2. A Covalent Cysteine-Targeting Kinase Inhibitor of Ire1 Permits Allosteric Control of Endoribonuclease Activity.

    PubMed

    Waller, Daniel D; Jansen, Gregor; Golizeh, Makan; Martel-Lorion, Chloe; Dejgaard, Kurt; Shiao, Tze Chieh; Mancuso, John; Tsantrizos, Youla S; Roy, René; Sebag, Michael; Sleno, Lekha; Thomas, David Y

    2016-05-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) initiated by the transmembrane kinase/ribonuclease Ire1 has been implicated in a variety of diseases. Ire1, with its unique position in the UPR, is an ideal target for the development of therapies; however, the identification of specific kinase inhibitors is challenging. Recently, the development of covalent inhibitors has gained great momentum because of the irreversible deactivation of the target. We identified and determined the mechanism of action of the Ire1-inhibitory compound UPRM8. MS analysis revealed that UPRM8 inhibition occurs by covalent adduct formation at a conserved cysteine at the regulatory DFG+2 position in the Ire1 kinase activation loop. Mutational analysis of the target cysteine residue identified both UPRM8-resistant and catalytically inactive Ire1 mutants. We describe a novel covalent inhibition mechanism of UPRM8, which can serve as a lead for the rational design and optimization of inhibitors of human Ire1. PMID:26792008

  3. Structure of recombinant Leishmania donovani pteridine reductase reveals a disordered active site

    PubMed Central

    Barrack, Keri L.; Tulloch, Lindsay B.; Burke, Lynsey-Ann; Fyfe, Paul K.; Hunter, William N.

    2011-01-01

    Pteridine reductase (PTR1) is a potential target for drug development against parasitic Trypanosoma and Leishmania species, protozoa that are responsible for a range of serious diseases found in tropical and subtropical parts of the world. As part of a structure-based approach to inhibitor development, specifically targeting Leishmania species, well ordered crystals of L. donovani PTR1 were sought to support the characterization of complexes formed with inhibitors. An efficient system for recombinant protein production was prepared and the enzyme was purified and crystallized in an orthorhombic form with ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. Diffraction data were measured to 2.5 Å resolution and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. However, a sulfate occupies a phosphate-binding site used by NADPH and occludes cofactor binding. The nicotinamide moiety is a critical component of the active site and without it this part of the structure is disordered. The crystal form obtained under these conditions is therefore unsuitable for the characterization of inhibitor complexes. PMID:21206018

  4. Rational targeting of active-site tyrosine residues using sulfonyl fluoride probes.

    PubMed

    Hett, Erik C; Xu, Hua; Geoghegan, Kieran F; Gopalsamy, Ariamala; Kyne, Robert E; Menard, Carol A; Narayanan, Arjun; Parikh, Mihir D; Liu, Shenping; Roberts, Lee; Robinson, Ralph P; Tones, Michael A; Jones, Lyn H

    2015-04-17

    This work describes the first rational targeting of tyrosine residues in a protein binding site by small-molecule covalent probes. Specific tyrosine residues in the active site of the mRNA-decapping scavenger enzyme DcpS were modified using reactive sulfonyl fluoride covalent inhibitors. Structure-based molecular design was used to create an alkyne-tagged probe bearing the sulfonyl fluoride warhead, thus enabling the efficient capture of the protein from a complex proteome. Use of the probe in competition experiments with a diaminoquinazoline DcpS inhibitor permitted the quantification of intracellular target occupancy. As a result, diaminoquinazoline upregulators of survival motor neuron protein that are used for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy were confirmed as inhibitors of DcpS in human primary cells. This work illustrates the utility of sulfonyl fluoride probes designed to react with specific tyrosine residues of a protein and augments the chemical biology toolkit by these probes uses in target validation and molecular pharmacology. PMID:25571984

  5. Targeting Large Kinase Active Site with Rigid, Bulky Octahedral Ruthenium Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimoska, Jasna; Feng, Li; Harms, Klaus; Yi, Chunling; Kissil, Joseph; Marmorstein, Ronen; Meggers, Eric

    2009-09-02

    A strategy for targeting protein kinases with large ATP-binding sites by using bulky and rigid octahedral ruthenium complexes as structural scaffolds is presented. A highly potent and selective GSK3 and Pim1 half-sandwich complex NP309 was successfully converted into a PAK1 inhibitor by making use of the large octahedral compounds {Lambda}-FL172 and {Lambda}-FL411 in which the cyclopentadienyl moiety of NP309 is replaced by a chloride and sterically demanding diimine ligands. A 1.65 {angstrom}cocrystal structure of PAK1 with {Lambda}-FL172 reveals how the large coordination sphere of the ruthenium complex matches the size of the active site and serves as a yardstick to discriminate between otherwise closely related binding sites.

  6. Mixed lineage kinases activate MEK independently of RAF to mediate resistance to RAF inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Marusiak, Anna A.; Edwards, Zoe C.; Hugo, Willy; Trotter, Eleanor W.; Girotti, Maria R.; Stephenson, Natalie L.; Kong, Xiangju; Gartside, Michael G.; Fawdar, Shameem; Hudson, Andrew; Breitwieser, Wolfgang; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Marais, Richard; Lo, Roger S.; Brognard, John

    2014-01-01

    RAF inhibitor therapy yields significant reductions in tumour burden in the majority of V600E-positive melanoma patients; however, resistance occurs within 2–18 months. Here we demonstrate that the mixed lineage kinases (MLK1–4) are MEK kinases that reactivate the MEK/ERK pathway in the presence of RAF inhibitors. Expression of MLK1–4 mediates resistance to RAF inhibitors and promotes survival in V600E-positive melanoma cell lines. Furthermore, we observe upregulation of the MLKs in 9 of 21 melanoma patients with acquired drug resistance. Consistent with this observation, MLKs promote resistance to RAF inhibitors in mouse models and contribute to acquired resistance in a cell line model. Lastly, we observe that a majority of MLK1 mutations identified in patients are gain-of-function mutations. In summary, our data demonstrate a role for MLKs as direct activators of the MEK/ERK pathway with implications for melanomagenesis and resistance to RAF inhibitors. PMID:24849047

  7. Basis Tetrapeptides as Potent Intracellular Inhibitors of type A Botulinum Neurotoxin Protease Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, M.; Swaminathan, S.; Oyler, G.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2011-01-21

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent of all toxins that cause flaccid muscle paralysis leading to death. They are also potential biothreat agents. A systematic investigation of various short peptide inhibitors of the BoNT protease domain with a 17-residue peptide substrate led to arginine-arginine-glycine-cysteine having a basic tetrapeptide structure as the most potent inhibitor. When assayed in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT), the inhibitory effect was drastically reduced. Replacing the terminal cysteine with one hydrophobic residue eliminated the DTT effect but with two hydrophobic residues made the pentapeptide a poor inhibitor. Replacing the first arginine with cysteine or adding an additional cysteine at the N terminus did not improve inhibition. When assessed using mouse brain lysates, the tetrapeptides also inhibited BoNT/A cleavage of the endogenous SNAP-25. The peptides penetrated the neuronal cell lines, N2A and BE(2)-M17, without adversely affecting metabolic functions as measured by ATP production and P-38 phosphorylation. Biological activity of the peptides persisted within cultured chick motor neurons and rat and mouse cerebellar neurons for more than 40 h and inhibited BoNT/A protease action inside the neurons in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Our results define a tetrapeptide as the smallest peptide inhibitor in the backdrop of a large substrate protein of 200+ amino acids having multiple interaction regions with its cognate enzyme. The inhibitors should also be valuable candidates for drug development.

  8. The Inhibitor DBMIB Provides Insight into the Functional Architecture of the Qo Site in the Cytochrome b(6)f Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Arthur G.; Bowman, Michael K.; Kramer, David M.

    2004-06-22

    Previously, we showed that two equivalents of the quinone analog, 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropylbenzoquinone (DBMIB), could occupy the Qo site of the cytochrome (cyt) b6f complex simultaneously. In this work, study of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra from oriented cyt b6f complex shows that the Rieske iron-sulfur protein (ISP) is in distinct orientations, depending on the stoichiometry of the inhibitor at the Qo site. With a single DBMIB at the Qo site, the ISP is oriented with the 2Fe2S cluster toward cyt f, which is similar to the orientation of the ISP in the x-ray crystal structure of the cyt b6f complex from thermophilic cyanobacteria, Mastigocladus laminosus, in the presence of DBMIB, as well as that of the chicken mitochondrial cyt bc1 complex in the presence of the class II inhibitor myxothiazol, which binds in the so-called ''proximal niche,'' near the cyt bL heme. These data suggest that the high affinity DBMIB site is at the proximal niche Qo pocket. With 2 equivalents or more of DBMIB bound, the Rieske ISP is in a position that resembles the ISPB position of chicken mitochondrial cyt bc1 complex in the presence of stigmatellin and Chlamydamonas reinhardtii cyt b6f complex in the presence of tridecyl-stigmatellin (TDS), which suggests that the low affinity DBMIB site is at the distal niche. The close interaction of DBMIB bound at the distal niche with the ISP induced the well-known effects on the 2Fe2S EPR spectrum and redox potential. To further test the effects of DBMIB on the ISP, the extents of cyt f oxidation after flash excitation in the presence of photosystem II inhibitor DCMU were measured as a function of DBMIB concentration in thylakoids. Addition of DBMIB concentrations where single binding was expected, did not markedly affect the extent of cyt f oxidation, whereas higher concentrations, where double occupancy was expected, increased the extent of cyt f oxidation to levels similar to cyt f oxidation in the presence of

  9. John Montgomery's legacy: carbocyclic adenosine analogues as SAH hydrolase inhibitors with broad-spectrum antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Ever since the S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy, SAH) hydrolase was recognized as a pharmacological target for antiviral agents (J. A. Montgomery et al., J. Med. Chem. 25:626-629, 1982), an increasing number of adenosine, acyclic adenosine, and carbocyclic adenosine analogues have been described as potent SAH hydrolase inhibitors endowed with broad-spectrum antiviral activity. The antiviral activity spectrum of the SAH hydrolase inhibitors include pox-, rhabdo-, filo-, arena-, paramyxo-, reo-, and retroviruses. Among the most potent SAH hydrolase inhibitors and antiviral agents rank carbocyclic 3-deazaadenosine (C-c3 Ado), neplanocin A, 3-deazaneplanocin A, the 5'-nor derivatives of carbocyclic adenosine (C-Ado, aristeromycin), and the 2-halo (i.e., 2-fluoro) and 6'-R-alkyl (i.e., 6'-R-methyl) derivatives of neplanocin A. These compounds are particularly active against poxviruses (i.e., vaccinia virus), and rhabdoviruses (i.e., vesicular stomatitis virus). The in vivo efficacy of C-c3 Ado and 3-deazaneplanocin A has been established in mouse models for vaccinia virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and Ebola virus. SAH hydrolase inhibitors such as C-c3Ado and 3-deazaneplanocin A should in thefirst place be considered for therapeutic (or prophylactic) use against poxvirus infections, including smallpox, and hemorrhagic fever virus infections such as Ebola. PMID:16438025

  10. Crystal Structures and Structure–Activity Relationships of Imidazothiazole Derivatives as IDO1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) is considered as a promising target for the treatment of several diseases, including neurological disorders and cancer. We report here the crystal structures of two IDO1/IDO1 inhibitor complexes, one of which shows that Amg-1 is directly bound to the heme iron of IDO1 with a clear induced fit. We also describe the identification and preliminary optimization of imidazothiazole derivatives as novel IDO1 inhibitors. Using our crystal structure information and structure–activity relationships (SAR) at the pocket-B of IDO1, we found a series of urea derivatives as potent IDO1 inhibitors and revealed that generation of an induced fit and the resulting interaction with Phe226 and Arg231 are essential for potent IDO1 inhibitory activity. The results of this study are very valuable for understanding the mechanism of IDO1 activation, which is very important for structure-based drug design (SBDD) to discover potent IDO1 inhibitors. PMID:25313323

  11. A Novel Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Inhibitor Optimized for Acute Myeloid Leukemia Differentiation Activity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sophia; Ueda, Masumi; Stetson, Lindsay; Ignatz-Hoover, James; Moreton, Stephen; Chakrabarti, Amit; Xia, Zhiqiang; Karan, Goutam; de Lima, Marcos; Agrawal, Mukesh K; Wald, David N

    2016-07-01

    Standard therapies used for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are cytotoxic agents that target rapidly proliferating cells. Unfortunately, this therapeutic approach has limited efficacy and significant toxicity and the majority of AML patients still die of their disease. In contrast to the poor prognosis of most AML patients, most individuals with a rare subtype of AML, acute promyelocytic leukemia, can be cured by differentiation therapy using regimens containing all-trans retinoic acid. GSK3 has been previously identified as a therapeutic target in AML where its inhibition can lead to the differentiation and growth arrest of leukemic cells. Unfortunately, existing GSK3 inhibitors lead to suboptimal differentiation activity making them less useful as clinical AML differentiation agents. Here, we describe the discovery of a novel GSK3 inhibitor, GS87. GS87 was discovered in efforts to optimize GSK3 inhibition for AML differentiation activity. Despite GS87's dramatic ability to induce AML differentiation, kinase profiling reveals its high specificity in targeting GSK3 as compared with other kinases. GS87 demonstrates high efficacy in a mouse AML model system and unlike current AML therapeutics, exhibits little effect on normal bone marrow cells. GS87 induces potent differentiation by more effectively activating GSK3-dependent signaling components including MAPK signaling as compared with other GSK3 inhibitors. GS87 is a novel GSK3 inhibitor with therapeutic potential as a differentiation agent for non-promyelocytic AML. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1485-94. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196775

  12. Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Kinetics Demonstrate Long Range Allosteric Effects of Thumb Site 2 Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Viral RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Deredge, Daniel; Li, Jiawen; Johnson, Kenneth A; Wintrode, Patrick L

    2016-05-01

    New nonnucleoside analogs are being developed as part of a multi-drug regimen to treat hepatitis C viral infections. Particularly promising are inhibitors that bind to the surface of the thumb domain of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B). Numerous crystal structures have been solved showing small molecule non-nucleoside inhibitors bound to the hepatitis C viral polymerase, but these structures alone do not define the mechanism of inhibition. Our prior kinetic analysis showed that nonnucleoside inhibitors binding to thumb site-2 (NNI2) do not block initiation or elongation of RNA synthesis; rather, they block the transition from the initiation to elongation, which is thought to proceed with significant structural rearrangement of the enzyme-RNA complex. Here we have mapped the effect of three NNI2 inhibitors on the conformational dynamics of the enzyme using hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics. All three inhibitors rigidify an extensive allosteric network extending >40 Å from the binding site, thus providing a structural rationale for the observed disruption of the transition from distributive initiation to processive elongation. The two more potent inhibitors also suppress slow cooperative unfolding in the fingers extension-thumb interface and primer grip, which may contribute their stronger inhibition. These results establish that NNI2 inhibitors act through long range allosteric effects, reveal important conformational changes underlying normal polymerase function, and point the way to the design of more effective allosteric inhibitors that exploit this new information. PMID:27006396

  13. The Mechanism by which 146-N-Glycan Affects the Active Site of Neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pi; Wang, Zhonghua; Zhang, Lijie; Li, Dongmei; Lin, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    One of the most conserved glycosylation sites of neuraminidase (NA) is 146-N-glycan. This site is adjacent to the 150-cavity of NA, which is found within the active site and thought to be a target for rational drug development against the antiviral resistance of influenza. Here, through a total of 2.4 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we demonstrated that 146-N-glycan can stabilize the conformation of the 150-loop that controls the volume of the 150-cavity. Moreover, with 146-N-glycan, our simulation result was more consistent with crystal structures of NAs than simulations conducted without glycans. Cluster analysis of the MD trajectories showed that 146-N-glycan adopted three distinct conformations: monomer-bridged, dimer-bridged and standing. Of these conformations, the dimer-bridged 146-N-glycan was the most stable one and contributed to stabilization of the 150-loop conformation. Furthermore, our simulation revealed that various standing conformations of 146-N-glycan could block the entrance of the binding pocket. This result was consistent with experimental data and explained the relatively low activity of inhibitors with flexible substituents toward the 150-cavity. Together, our results lead us to hypothesize that rigid and hydrophobic substituents could serve as better inhibitors targeting the 150-cavity. PMID:26267136

  14. Binding mode prediction of biologically active compounds from plant Salvia Miltiorrhiza as integrase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Nunthaboot, Nadtanet; Lugsanangarm, Kiattisak; Kokpol, Sirirat; Abd-Elazem, Ibrahim S

    2013-01-01

    Integrase (IN), an essential enzyme for HIV-1 replication, has been targeted in antiretroviral drug therapy. The emergence of HIV-1 variants clinically resistant to antiretroviral agents has lead to the development of alternative IN inhibitors. In the present work, binding modes of a high potent IN inhibitor, M522 and M532, within the catalytic binding site of wild type (WT) IN were determined using molecular docking calculation. Both M522 and M532 displayed similar modes of binding within the IN putative binding pocket and exhibited favorable interactions with the catalytic Mg2+ ions, the nearby amino acids and viral DNA through metal-ligand chelation, hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking interactions. Furthermore, the modes of action of these two compounds against the mutated Y212R, N224H and S217H PFV IN were also predicted. Although the replacement of amino acid could somehow disturb inhibitor binding mode, almost key interactions which detected in the WT complexes were fairly conserved. Detailed information could highlight the application of M522 and M532 as candidate IN inhibitors for drug development against drug resistant strains. PMID:23750093

  15. Structure of the binding site for nonnucleoside inhibitors of the reverse transcriptase of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Smerdon, S J; Jäger, J; Wang, J; Kohlstaedt, L A; Chirino, A J; Friedman, J M; Rice, P A; Steitz, T A

    1994-01-01

    The dipyridodiazepinone Nevirapine is a potent and highly specific inhibitor of the reverse transcriptase (RT) from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). It is a member of an important class of nonnucleoside drugs that appear to share part or all of the same binding site on the enzyme but are susceptible to a variety of spontaneous drug-resistance mutations. The co-crystal-structure of HIV-1 RT and Nevirapine has been solved previously at 3.5-A resolution and now is partially refined against data extending to 2.9-A spacing. The drug is bound in a hydrophobic pocket and in contact with some 38 protein atoms from the p66 palm and thumb subdomains. Most, but not all, nonnucleoside drug-resistance mutations map to residues in close contact with Nevirapine. The major effects of these mutations are to introduce steric clashes with the drug molecule or to remove favorable protein-drug contacts. Additionally, four residues (Phe-227, Trp-229, Leu-234, and Tyr-319) in contact with Nevirapine have not been selected as sites of drug-resistance mutations, implying that there may be limitations on the number and types of resistance mutations that yield viable virus. Strategies of inhibitor design that target interactions with these conserved residues may yield drugs that are less vulnerable to escape mutations. Images PMID:7513427

  16. A human fatty acid synthase inhibitor binds β-ketoacyl reductase in the keto-substrate site.

    PubMed

    Hardwicke, Mary Ann; Rendina, Alan R; Williams, Shawn P; Moore, Michael L; Wang, Liping; Krueger, Julie A; Plant, Ramona N; Totoritis, Rachel D; Zhang, Guofeng; Briand, Jacques; Burkhart, William A; Brown, Kristin K; Parrish, Cynthia A

    2014-09-01

    Human fatty acid synthase (hFAS) is a complex, multifunctional enzyme that is solely responsible for the de novo synthesis of long chain fatty acids. hFAS is highly expressed in a number of cancers, with low expression observed in most normal tissues. Although normal tissues tend to obtain fatty acids from the diet, tumor tissues rely on de novo fatty acid synthesis, making hFAS an attractive metabolic target for the treatment of cancer. We describe here the identification of GSK2194069, a potent and specific inhibitor of the β-ketoacyl reductase (KR) activity of hFAS; the characterization of its enzymatic and cellular mechanism of action; and its inhibition of human tumor cell growth. We also present the design of a new protein construct suitable for crystallography, which resulted in what is to our knowledge the first co-crystal structure of the human KR domain and includes a bound inhibitor. PMID:25086508

  17. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program FY 1996 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, C.M.; Marshall, D.S.; Cunningham, G.R.

    1997-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1995 through September 1996. The Radioactive Solid Waste Operations Group (RSWOG) of the Waste Management and Remedial Action Division (WMRAD) and the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) established ASEMP in 1989. The purpose of the program is to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 North as required by Chapters 2 and 3 of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A.

  18. Active sites environmental monitoring Program - Program Plan: Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, C.M.; Hicks, D.S.; Ashwood, T.L.; Cunningham, G.R.

    1994-05-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of active low-level-waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Several changes have recently occurred in regard to the sites that are currently used for waste storage and disposal. These changes require a second set of revisions to the ASEMP program plan. This document incorporates those revisions. This program plan presents the organization and procedures for monitoring the active sites. The program plan also provides internal reporting levels to guide the evaluation of monitoring results.

  19. Site-specific cleavage by metal ion cofactors and inhibitors of M1 RNA, the catalytic subunit of RNase P from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kazakov, S; Altman, S

    1991-01-01

    The location of phosphate residues involved in specific centers for binding of metal ions in M1 RNA, the catalytic RNA subunit of RNase P from Escherichia coli, was determined by analysis of induction of cleavage of RNA by metal ions. At pH 9.5, Mg2+ catalyzes cleavage of M1 RNA at five principal sites. Under certain conditions, Mn2+ and Ca2+ can each replace Mg2+ as the cofactor in the processing of precursor tRNAs by M1 RNA and P RNA, the RNA subunit of RNase P from Bacillus subtilis. These cations, as well as various metal ion inhibitors of the catalytic activity of M1 RNA, also promote cleavage of M1 RNA in a specific manner. Certain conditions that affect the catalytic activity of M1 RNA also alter the rate of metal ion-induced cleavage at the various sites. From these results and a comparison of cleavage of M1 RNA with that of a deletion mutant of M1 RNA and of P RNA, we have identified two different centers for binding of metal ions in M1 RNA that are important for the processing of the precursor to tRNA(Tyr) from E. coli. There is also a center for the binding of metal ions in the substrate, close to the site of cleavage by M1 RNA. Images PMID:1718000

  20. Lovastatin Inhibits VEGFR and AKT Activation: Synergistic Cytotoxicity in Combination with VEGFR Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Addison, Christina L.; Dimitroulakos, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Background In a recent study, we demonstrated the ability of lovastatin, a potent inhibitor of mevalonate synthesis, to inhibit the function of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Lovastatin attenuated ligand-induced receptor activation and downstream signaling through the PI3K/AKT pathway. Combining lovastatin with gefitinib, a potent EGFR inhibitor, induced synergistic cytotoxicity in a variety of tumor derived cell lines. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and EGFR share similar activation, internalization and downstream signaling characteristics. Methodology/Principal Findings The VEGFRs, particularly VEGFR-2 (KDR, Flt-1), play important roles in regulating tumor angiogenesis by promoting endothelial cell proliferation, survival and migration. Certain tumors, such as malignant mesothelioma (MM), also express both the VEGF ligand and VEGFRs that act in an autocrine loop to directly stimulate tumor cell growth and survival. In this study, we have shown that lovastatin inhibits ligand-induced VEGFR-2 activation through inhibition of receptor internalization and also inhibits VEGF activation of AKT in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and H28 MM cells employing immunofluorescence and Western blotting. Combinations of lovastatin and a VEGFR-2 inhibitor showed more robust AKT inhibition than either agent alone in the H28 MM cell line. Furthermore, combining 5 µM lovastatin treatment, a therapeutically relevant dose, with two different VEGFR-2 inhibitors in HUVEC and the H28 and H2052 mesothelioma derived cell lines demonstrated synergistic cytotoxicity as demonstrated by MTT cell viability and flow cytometric analyses. Conclusions/Significance These results highlight a novel mechanism by which lovastatin can regulate VEGFR-2 function and a potential therapeutic approach for MM through combining statins with VEGFR-2 inhibitors. PMID:20838437

  1. Anorectic activities of serotonin uptake inhibitors: correlation with their potencies at inhibiting serotonin uptake in vivo and /sup 3/H-mazindol binding in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, I.; Taranger, M.A.; Claustre, Y.; Scatton, B.; Langer, S.Z.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism of anorectic action of several serotonin uptake inhibitors was investigated by comparing their anorectic potencies with several biochemical and pharmacological properties and in reference to the novel compound SL 81.0385. The anorectic effect of the potent serotonin uptake inhibitor SL 81.0385 was potentiated by pretreatment with 5-hydroxytryptophan and blocked by the serotonin receptor antagonist metergoline. A good correlation was obtained between the ED/sub 50/ values of anorectic action and the ED/sub 50/ values of serotonin uptake inhibition in vivo (but not in vitro) for several specific serotonin uptake inhibitors. Most of the drugs tested displaced (/sup 3/H)-mazindol from its binding to the anorectic recognition site in the hypothalamus, except the pro-drug zimelidine which was inactive. Excluding zimelidine, a good correlation was obtained between the affinities of these drugs for (/sup 3/H)-mazindol binding and their anorectic action indicating that their anorectic activity may be associated with an effect mediated through this site. Taken together these results suggest that the anorectic action of serotonin uptake inhibitors is directly associated to their ability to inhibit serotonin uptake and thus increasing the synaptic levels of serotonin. The interactions of these drugs with the anorectic recognition site labelled with (/sup 3/H)-mazindol is discussed in connection with the serotonergic regulation of carbohydrate intake.

  2. Computation of Rate Constants for Diffusion of Small Ligands to and from Buried Protein Active Sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, P-H; De Sancho, D; Best, R B; Blumberger, J

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of ligands to actives sites of proteins is essential to enzyme catalysis and many cellular signaling processes. In this contribution we review our recently developed methodology for calculation of rate constants for diffusion and binding of small molecules to buried protein active sites. The diffusive dynamics of the ligand obtained from molecular dynamics simulation is coarse grained and described by a Markov state model. Diffusion and binding rate constants are then obtained either from the reactive flux formalism or by fitting the time-dependent population of the Markov state model to a phenomenological rate law. The method is illustrated by applications to diffusion of substrate and inhibitors in [NiFe] hydrogenase, CO-dehydrogenase, and myoglobin. We also discuss a recently developed sensitivity analysis that allows one to identify hot spots in proteins, where mutations are expected to have the strongest effects on ligand diffusion rates. PMID:27497172

  3. Identification of triazolo[4,5-b]pyrazine derivatives as hepatocyte growth factor receptor inhibitors through structure-activity relationships and molecular docking simulations.

    PubMed

    Dong, Minghui; Ren, Yujie; Gao, Xiaodong

    2015-10-01

    c-MET is a receptor tyrosine kinase and potential oncological target for cancer therapy. The activities of 1,2,3-triazolo[4,5-b]pyrazine series of c-MET inhibitors were analyzed according to the three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship and molecular docking methods. The results indicated that the hydrophobic and electrostatic fields play key roles in activity and QSAR model was reliable enough for activity prediction. Moreover, the docking results do validate the predicted 3D-QSAR scores, vital residues Asp1222, Asp1231, Met1160, Tyr1259 and Tyr1230 found in binding site. Four new c-MET inhibitor analogs designed in this Letter which are being currently synthesized by our laboratories. PMID:26321362

  4. Quantification of active mitochondrial permeability transition pores using GNX-4975 inhibitor titrations provides insights into molecular identity.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Andrew P; Halestrap, Andrew P

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) by the novel inhibitor GNX-4975 was characterized. Titration of MPTP activity in de-energized rat liver mitochondria allowed determination of the number of GNX-4975-binding sites and their dissociation constant (Ki). Binding sites increased in number when MPTP opening was activated by increasing [Ca(2+)], phenylarsine oxide (PAO) or KSCN, and decreased when MPTP opening was inhibited with bongkrekic acid (BKA) or ADP. Values ranged between 9 and 50 pmol/mg of mitochondrial protein, but the Ki remained unchanged at ∼1.8 nM when the inhibitor was added before Ca(2+) However, when GNX-4975 was added after Ca(2+) it was much less potent with a Ki of ∼140 nM. These data imply that a protein conformational change is required to form the MPTP complex and generate the GNX-4975-binding site. Occupation of the latter with GNX-4975 prevents the Ca(2+) binding that triggers pore opening. We also demonstrated that GNX-4975 stabilizes an interaction between the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), held in its 'c' conformation with carboxyatractyloside (CAT), and the phosphate carrier (PiC) bound to immobilized PAO. No components of the F1Fo-ATP synthase bound significantly to immobilized PAO. Our data are consistent with our previous proposal that the MPTP may form at an interface between the PiC and ANT (or other similar mitochondrial carrier proteins) when they adopt novel conformations induced by factors that sensitize the MPTP to [Ca(2+)]. We propose that GNX-4975 binds to this interface preventing a calcium-triggered event that opens the interface into a pore. PMID:26920024

  5. Quantification of active mitochondrial permeability transition pores using GNX-4975 inhibitor titrations provides insights into molecular identity

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Andrew P.; Halestrap, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) by the novel inhibitor GNX-4975 was characterized. Titration of MPTP activity in de-energized rat liver mitochondria allowed determination of the number of GNX-4975-binding sites and their dissociation constant (Ki). Binding sites increased in number when MPTP opening was activated by increasing [Ca2+], phenylarsine oxide (PAO) or KSCN, and decreased when MPTP opening was inhibited with bongkrekic acid (BKA) or ADP. Values ranged between 9 and 50 pmol/mg of mitochondrial protein, but the Ki remained unchanged at ∼1.8 nM when the inhibitor was added before Ca2+. However, when GNX-4975 was added after Ca2+ it was much less potent with a Ki of ∼140 nM. These data imply that a protein conformational change is required to form the MPTP complex and generate the GNX-4975-binding site. Occupation of the latter with GNX-4975 prevents the Ca2+ binding that triggers pore opening. We also demonstrated that GNX-4975 stabilizes an interaction between the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), held in its ‘c’ conformation with carboxyatractyloside (CAT), and the phosphate carrier (PiC) bound to immobilized PAO. No components of the F1Fo-ATP synthase bound significantly to immobilized PAO. Our data are consistent with our previous proposal that the MPTP may form at an interface between the PiC and ANT (or other similar mitochondrial carrier proteins) when they adopt novel conformations induced by factors that sensitize the MPTP to [Ca2+]. We propose that GNX-4975 binds to this interface preventing a calcium-triggered event that opens the interface into a pore. PMID:26920024

  6. The active site behaviour of electrochemically synthesised gold nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Plowman, Blake J; O'Mullane, Anthony P; Bhargava, Suresh K

    2011-01-01

    Even though gold is the noblest of metals, a weak chemisorber and is regarded as being quite inert, it demonstrates significant electrocatalytic activity in its nanostructured form. It is demonstrated here that nanostructured and even evaporated thin films of gold are covered with active sites which are responsible for such activity. The identification of these sites is demonstrated with conventional electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry as well as a large amplitude Fourier transformed alternating current (FT-ac) method under acidic and alkaline conditions. The latter technique is beneficial in determining if an electrode process is either Faradaic or capacitive in nature. The observed behaviour is analogous to that observed for activated gold electrodes whose surfaces have been severely disrupted by cathodic polarisation in the hydrogen evolution region. It is shown that significant electrochemical oxidation responses occur at discrete potential values well below that for the formation of the compact monolayer oxide of bulk gold and are attributed to the facile oxidation of surface active sites. Several electrocatalytic reactions are explored in which the onset potential is determined by the presence of such sites on the surface. Significantly, the facile oxidation of active sites is used to drive the electroless deposition of metals such as platinum, palladium and silver from their aqueous salts on the surface of gold nanostructures. The resultant surface decoration of gold with secondary metal nanoparticles not only indicates regions on the surface which are rich in active sites but also provides a method to form interesting bimetallic surfaces. PMID:22455038

  7. Nicotinamide Cofactors Suppress Active-Site Labeling of Aldehyde Dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Stiti, Naim; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Strubl, Laura; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bartels, Dorothea; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-06-17

    Active site labeling by (re)activity-based probes is a powerful chemical proteomic tool to globally map active sites in native proteomes without using substrates. Active site labeling is usually taken as a readout for the active state of the enzyme because labeling reflects the availability and reactivity of active sites, which are hallmarks for enzyme activities. Here, we show that this relationship holds tightly, but we also reveal an important exception to this rule. Labeling of Arabidopsis ALDH3H1 with a chloroacetamide probe occurs at the catalytic Cys, and labeling is suppressed upon nitrosylation and oxidation, and upon treatment with other Cys modifiers. These experiments display a consistent and strong correlation between active site labeling and enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, however, labeling is suppressed by the cofactor NAD(+), and this property is shared with other members of the ALDH superfamily and also detected for unrelated GAPDH enzymes with an unrelated hydantoin-based probe in crude extracts of plant cell cultures. Suppression requires cofactor binding to its binding pocket. Labeling is also suppressed by ALDH modulators that bind at the substrate entrance tunnel, confirming that labeling occurs through the substrate-binding cavity. Our data indicate that cofactor binding adjusts the catalytic Cys into a conformation that reduces the reactivity toward chloroacetamide probes. PMID:26990764

  8. CETSA screening identifies known and novel thymidylate synthase inhibitors and slow intracellular activation of 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dan, Chen; Mateus, André; Haraldsson, Martin; Larsson, Andreas; Martinez Molina, Daniel; Artursson, Per; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Target engagement is a critical factor for therapeutic efficacy. Assessment of compound binding to native target proteins in live cells is therefore highly desirable in all stages of drug discovery. We report here the first compound library screen based on biophysical measurements of intracellular target binding, exemplified by human thymidylate synthase (TS). The screen selected accurately for all the tested known drugs acting on TS. We also identified TS inhibitors with novel chemistry and marketed drugs that were not previously known to target TS, including the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. By following the cellular uptake and enzymatic conversion of known drugs we correlated the appearance of active metabolites over time with intracellular target engagement. These data distinguished a much slower activation of 5-fluorouracil when compared with nucleoside-based drugs. The approach establishes efficient means to associate drug uptake and activation with target binding during drug discovery. PMID:27010513

  9. CETSA screening identifies known and novel thymidylate synthase inhibitors and slow intracellular activation of 5-fluorouracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dan, Chen; Mateus, André; Haraldsson, Martin; Larsson, Andreas; Molina, Daniel Martinez; Artursson, Per; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-03-01

    Target engagement is a critical factor for therapeutic efficacy. Assessment of compound binding to native target proteins in live cells is therefore highly desirable in all stages of drug discovery. We report here the first compound library screen based on biophysical measurements of intracellular target binding, exemplified by human thymidylate synthase (TS). The screen selected accurately for all the tested known drugs acting on TS. We also identified TS inhibitors with novel chemistry and marketed drugs that were not previously known to target TS, including the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. By following the cellular uptake and enzymatic conversion of known drugs we correlated the appearance of active metabolites over time with intracellular target engagement. These data distinguished a much slower activation of 5-fluorouracil when compared with nucleoside-based drugs. The approach establishes efficient means to associate drug uptake and activation with target binding during drug discovery.

  10. Synthesis of Novel Tricyclic Chromenone-Based Inhibitors of IRE-1 RNase Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE-1) is a kinase/RNase ER stress sensor that is activated in response to excessive accumulation of unfolded proteins, hypoxic conditions, calcium imbalance, and other stress stimuli. Activation of IRE-1 RNase function exerts a cytoprotective effect and has been implicated in the progression of cancer via increased expression of the transcription factor XBP-1s. Here, we describe the synthesis and biological evaluation of novel chromenone-based covalent inhibitors of IRE-1. Preparation of a family of 8-formyltetrahydrochromeno[3,4-c]pyridines was achieved via a Duff formylation that is attended by an unusual cyclization reaction. Biological evaluation in vitro and in whole cells led to the identification of 30 as a potent inhibitor of IRE-1 RNase activity and XBP-1s expression in wild type B cells and human mantle cell lymphoma cell lines. PMID:24749861

  11. Physiological and pathological roles of tissue plasminogen activator and its inhibitor neuroserpin in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tet Woo; Tsang, Vicky W. K.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    Although its roles in the vascular space are most well-known, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is widely expressed in the developing and adult nervous system, where its activity is believed to be regulated by neuroserpin, a predominantly brain-specific member of the serpin family of protease inhibitors. In the normal physiological state, tPA has been shown to play roles in the development and plasticity of the nervous system. Ischemic damage, however, may lead to excess tPA activity in the brain and this is believed to contribute to neurodegeneration. In this article, we briefly review the physiological and pathological roles of tPA in the nervous system, which includes neuronal migration, axonal growth, synaptic plasticity, neuroprotection and neurodegeneration, as well as a contribution to neurological disease. We summarize tPA's multiple mechanisms of action and also highlight the contributions of the inhibitor neuroserpin to these processes. PMID:26528129

  12. Ovicidal activity of chitin synthesis inhibitors when fed to adult German cockroaches (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae).

    PubMed

    DeMark, J J; Bennett, G W

    1990-07-01

    Ovicidal activity was observed in four adult groups (virgin males; virgin females; newly gravid females; and inseminated, reproducing females) of the German cockroach, Blattella germanica (L.), fed the chitin synthesis inhibitors triflumuron, chlorfluazuron, hexafluron, and UC 84572 (structure not disclosed) at the LC50's and LC95's determined from fifth-stage nymphs. All compounds were active only when fed to reproducing females (including the feeding period in which the ootheca is developing). Hexafluron and triflumuron at the LC50 caused 100% inhibition of hatch in reproducing females. Chlorfluazuron and UC 84572 at the LC50 had similar ovicidal activity (45.8 and 50.0% hatch, respectively). Female German cockroaches fed the chitin synthesis inhibitors before mating and after the ootheca had protruded from the abdomen were not affected. Reproductive capabilities of males were not affected, and males did not effectively transfer the compounds to untreated females during mating. PMID:2388230

  13. Enhancement of active corrosion protection via combination of inhibitor-loaded nanocontainers.

    PubMed

    Tedim, J; Poznyak, S K; Kuznetsova, A; Raps, D; Hack, T; Zheludkevich, M L; Ferreira, M G S

    2010-05-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) nanocontainers loaded with different corrosion inhibitors (vanadate, phosphate, and 2-mercaptobenzothiazolate) and the characterization of the resulting pigments by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The anticorrosion activity of these nanocontainers with respect to aluminum alloy AA2024 was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The bare metallic substrates were immersed in dispersions of nanocontainers in sodium chloride solution and tested to understand the inhibition mechanisms and efficiency. The nanocontainers were also incorporated into commercial coatings used for aeronautical applications to study the active corrosion protection properties in systems of industrial relevance. The results show that an enhancement of the active protection effect can be reached when nanocontainers loaded with different inhibitors are combined in the same protective coating system. PMID:20455547

  14. Structure-Activity Relationships of Novel Tryptamine-Based Inhibitors of Bacterial Transglycosylase.

    PubMed

    Sosič, Izidor; Anderluh, Marko; Sova, Matej; Gobec, Martina; Mlinarič Raščan, Irena; Derouaux, Adeline; Amoroso, Ana; Terrak, Mohammed; Breukink, Eefjan; Gobec, Stanislav

    2015-12-24

    Penicillin-binding proteins represent well-established, validated, and still very promising targets for the design and development of new antibacterial agents. The transglycosylase domain of penicillin-binding proteins is especially important, as it catalyzes polymerization of glycan chains, using the peptidoglycan precursor lipid II as a substrate. On the basis of the previous discovery of a noncovalent small-molecule inhibitor of transglycosylase activity, we systematically explored the structure-activity relationships of these tryptamine-based inhibitors. The main aim was to reduce the nonspecific cytotoxic properties of the initial hit compound and concurrently to retain the mode of its inhibition. A focused library of tryptamine-based compounds was synthesized, characterized, and evaluated biochemically. The results presented here show the successful reduction of the nonspecific cytotoxicity, and the retention of the inhibition of transglycosylase enzymatic activity, as well as the ability of these compounds to bind to lipid II and to have antibacterial actions. PMID:26588190

  15. CETSA screening identifies known and novel thymidylate synthase inhibitors and slow intracellular activation of 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dan, Chen; Mateus, André; Haraldsson, Martin; Larsson, Andreas; Molina, Daniel Martinez; Artursson, Per; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Target engagement is a critical factor for therapeutic efficacy. Assessment of compound binding to native target proteins in live cells is therefore highly desirable in all stages of drug discovery. We report here the first compound library screen based on biophysical measurements of intracellular target binding, exemplified by human thymidylate synthase (TS). The screen selected accurately for all the tested known drugs acting on TS. We also identified TS inhibitors with novel chemistry and marketed drugs that were not previously known to target TS, including the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. By following the cellular uptake and enzymatic conversion of known drugs we correlated the appearance of active metabolites over time with intracellular target engagement. These data distinguished a much slower activation of 5-fluorouracil when compared with nucleoside-based drugs. The approach establishes efficient means to associate drug uptake and activation with target binding during drug discovery. PMID:27010513

  16. Activity Based Profiling of Deubiquitylating Enzymes and Inhibitors in Animal Tissues.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Lauren; Forder, Cassie; Cranston, Aaron; Harrigan, Jeanine; Jacq, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of ubiquitin or ubiquitin-like modifiers to proteins is an important signal for the regulation of a variety of biological processes including the targeting of substrates for degradation, receptor internalization, regulation of gene expression, and DNA repair. Posttranslational modification of proteins by ubiquitin controls many cellular processes, and aberrant ubiquitylation can contribute to cancer, immunopathologies, and neurodegeneration. Thus, deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) that remove ubiquitin from proteins have become attractive therapeutic targets. Monitoring the activity of DUBs in cells or in tissues is critical for understanding the biological function of DUBs in particular pathways and is essential for determining the physiological specificity and potency of small-molecule DUB inhibitors. Here, we describe a method for the homogenization of animal tissues and incubation of tissue lysates with ubiquitin-based activity probes to monitor DUB activity in mouse tissues and target engagement following treatment of animals with small-molecule DUB inhibitors. PMID:27613053

  17. An Integrated Computational Approach to Rationalize the Activity of Non-Zinc-Binding MMP-2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Di Pizio, Antonella; Agamennone, Mariangela; Aschi, Massimiliano

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases are a family of Zn-proteases involved in tissue remodeling and in many pathological conditions. Among them MMP-2 is one of the most relevant target in anticancer therapy. Commonly, MMP inhibitors contain a functional group able to bind the zinc ion and responsible for undesired side effects. The discovery of potent and selective MMP inhibitors not bearing a zinc-binding group is arising for some MMP family members and represents a new opportunity to find selective and non toxic inhibitors. In this work we attempted to get more insight on the inhibition process of MMP-2 by two non-zinc-binding inhibitors, applying a general protocol that combines several computational tools (docking, Molecular Dynamics and Quantum Chemical calculations), that all together contribute to rationalize experimental inhibition data. Molecular Dynamics studies showed both structural and mechanical-dynamical effects produced by the ligands not disclosed by docking analysis. Thermodynamic Integration provided relative binding free energies consistent with experimentally observed activity data. Quantum Chemical calculations of the tautomeric equilibrium involving the most active ligand completed the picture of the binding process. Our study highlights the crucial role of the specificity loop and suggests that enthalpic effect predominates over the entropic one. PMID:23144829

  18. Inhibition of dihydroceramide desaturase activity by the sphingosine kinase inhibitor SKI II[S

    PubMed Central

    Cingolani, Francesca; Casasampere, Mireia; Sanllehí, Pol; Casas, Josefina; Bujons, Jordi; Fabrias, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase inhibitor (SKI) II has been reported as a dual inhibitor of sphingosine kinases (SKs) 1 and 2 and has been extensively used to prove the involvement of SKs and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in cellular processes. Dihydroceramide desaturase (Des1), the last enzyme in the de novo synthesis of ceramide (Cer), regulates the balance between dihydroceramides (dhCers) and Cers. Both SKs and Des1 have interest as therapeutic targets. Here we show that SKI II is a noncompetitive inhibitor (Ki = 0.3 μM) of Des1 activity with effect also in intact cells without modifying Des1 protein levels. Molecular modeling studies support that the SKI II-induced decrease in Des1 activity could result from inhibition of NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. SKI II, but not the SK1-specific inhibitor PF-543, provoked a remarkable accumulation of dhCers and their metabolites, while both SKI II and PF-543 reduced S1P to almost undetectable levels. SKI II, but not PF543, reduced cell proliferation with accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase. SKI II, but not PF543, induced autophagy. These overall findings should be taken into account when using SKI II as a pharmacological tool, as some of the effects attributed to decreased S1P may actually be caused by augmented dhCers and/or their metabolites. PMID:24875537

  19. Effect of ace inhibitors and TMOF on growth, development, and trypsin activity of larval Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Lemeire, Els; Borovsky, Dov; Van Camp, John; Smagghe, Guy

    2008-12-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc metallopeptidase capable of cleaving dipeptide or dipeptideamide moieties at the C-terminal end of peptides. ACE is present in the hemolymph and reproductive tissues of insects. The presence of ACE in the hemolymph and its broad substrate specificity suggests an important role in processing of bioactive peptides. This study reports the effects of ACE inhibitors on larval growth in the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis. Feeding ACE inhibitors ad lib decreased the growth rate, inhibited ACE activity in the larval hemolymph, and down-regulated trypsin activity in the larval gut. These results indicate that S. littoralis ACE may influence trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut by interacting with a trypsin-modulating oostatic factor (TMOF). Injecting third instar larvae with a combination of Aea-TMOF and the ACE inhibitor captopril, down-regulated trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut indicating that an Aea-TMOF gut receptor analogue could be present. Injecting captopril and enalapril into newly molted fifth instar larvae stopped larval feeding and decreased weight gain. Together, these results indicate that ACE inhibitors are efficacious in stunting larval growth and ACE plays an important role in larval growth and development. PMID:18949805

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of ILTI, a Kunitz-Type Trypsin Inhibitor from Inga laurina (SW.) Willd.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Maria Lígia R; Ribeiro, Suzanna F F; Taveira, Gabriel B; Gomes, Valdirene M; de Barros, Karina M C A; Maria-Neto, Simone

    2016-05-01

    Over the last few years, a growing number of proteinase inhibitors have been isolated from plants and particularly from seeds and have shown antimicrobial activity. A 20,000 Da serine peptidase inhibitor, named ILTI, was isolated from Inga laurina seeds and showed potent inhibitory enzymatic activity against trypsin. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ILTI on the growth of pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms. We observed that ILTI strongly inhibited in particular the growth of Candida tropicalis and Candida buinensis, inducing cellular agglomeration. However, it was ineffective against human pathogenic bacteria. We also investigated the potential of ILTI to permeabilize the plasma membrane of yeast cells. C. tropicalis and C. buinensis were incubated for 24 h with the ILTI at different concentrations, which showed that this inhibitor induced changes in the membranes of yeast cells, leading to their permeabilization. Interestingly, ILTI induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in C. tropicalis and C. buinensis cells. Finally, ILTI was coupled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, and subsequent treatment of C. tropicalis and C. buinensis with DAPI revealed the presence of the labeled protein in the intracellular spaces. In conclusion, our results indicated the ability of peptidase inhibitors to induce microbial inhibition; therefore, they might offer templates for the design of new antifungal agents. PMID:26769111

  1. Optical Detection of Enzymatic Activity and Inhibitors on Non-Covalently Functionalized Fluorescent Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Woog; Jeon, Su-Ji; Kim, Hye-In; Park, Jung Hyun; Yim, DaBin; Lee, Hye-Rim; Ju, Jong-Min; Kim, Man-Jin; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2016-05-24

    It has been of great interest to measure the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and its inhibitor, as AChE is known to accelerate the aggregation of the amyloid beta peptides that underlie Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we report the development of graphene oxide (GO) fluorescence-based biosensors for the detection of AChE activity and AChE inhibitors. To this end, GO was non-covalently functionalized with phenoxy-modified dextran (PhO-dex-GO) through hydrophobic interaction; the resulting GO showed excellent colloidal stability and intense fluorescence in various aqueous solutions as compared to pristine GO and the GO covalently functionalized with dextran. The fluorescence of PhO-dex-GO remarkably increased as AChE catalyzed the hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine (ATCh) to give thiocholine and acetic acid. It was found that the turn-on fluorescence response of PhO-dex-GO to AChE activity was induced by protonation of carboxyl groups on it from the product of the enzymatic hydrolysis reaction, acetic acid. On the basis of its turn-on fluorescence response, PhO-dex-GO was able to report kinetic and thermodynamic parameters involving a maximum velocity, a Michaelis constant, and an inhibition dissociation constant for AChE activity and inhibition. These parameters enable us to determine the activity of AChE and the efficiency of the inhibitor. PMID:27136042

  2. A Novel Time-Dependent CENP-E Inhibitor with Potent Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Akihiro; Ohori, Momoko; Iwai, Kenichi; Nambu, Tadahiro; Miyamoto, Maki; Kawamoto, Tomohiro; Okaniwa, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Centromere-associated protein E (CENP-E) regulates both chromosome congression and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) during mitosis. The loss of CENP-E function causes chromosome misalignment, leading to SAC activation and apoptosis during prolonged mitotic arrest. Here, we describe the biological and antiproliferative activities of a novel small-molecule inhibitor