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Sample records for active site interactions

  1. BAX Activation is Initiated at a Novel Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Suzuki, Motoshi; Davis, Marguerite L.; Pitter, Kenneth; Bird, Gregory H.; Katz, Samuel G.; Tu, Ho-Chou; Kim, Hyungjin; Cheng, Emily H.-Y.; Tjandra, Nico; Walensky, Loren D.

    2008-01-01

    BAX is a pro-apoptotic protein of the BCL-2 family stationed in the cytosol until activated by a diversity of stress stimuli to induce cell death. Anti-apoptotic proteins such as BCL-2 counteract BAX-mediated cell death. Although an interaction site that confers survival functionality has been defined for anti-apoptotic proteins, an activation site has not been identified for BAX, rendering its explicit trigger mechanism unknown. We previously developed Stabilized Alpha-Helix of BCL-2 domains (SAHBs) that directly initiate BAX-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis. Here we demonstrate by NMR analysis that BIM SAHB binds BAX at an interaction site that is distinct from the canonical binding groove characterized for anti-apoptotic proteins. The specificity of the BIM SAHB-BAX interaction is highlighted by point mutagenesis that abrogates functional activity, confirming that BAX activation is initiated at this novel structural location. Thus, we have now defined a BAX interaction site for direct activation, establishing a new target for therapeutic modulation of apoptosis. PMID:18948948

  2. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites. PMID:26893379

  3. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kalamajski, Sebastian; Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W

    2016-04-08

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites.

  4. Unmasking tandem site interaction in human acetylcholinesterase. Substrate activation with a cationic acetanilide substrate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joseph L; Cusack, Bernadette; Davies, Matthew P; Fauq, Abdul; Rosenberry, Terrone L

    2003-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) contains a narrow and deep active site gorge with two sites of ligand binding, an acylation site (or A-site) at the base of the gorge, and a peripheral site (or P-site) near the gorge entrance. The P-site contributes to catalytic efficiency by transiently binding substrates on their way to the acylation site, where a short-lived acyl enzyme intermediate is produced. A conformational interaction between the A- and P-sites has recently been found to modulate ligand affinities. We now demonstrate that this interaction is of functional importance by showing that the acetylation rate constant of a substrate bound to the A-site is increased by a factor a when a second molecule of substrate binds to the P-site. This demonstration became feasible through the introduction of a new acetanilide substrate analogue of acetylcholine, 3-(acetamido)-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium (ATMA), for which a = 4. This substrate has a low acetylation rate constant and equilibrates with the catalytic site, allowing a tractable algebraic solution to the rate equation for substrate hydrolysis. ATMA affinities for the A- and P-sites deduced from the kinetic analysis were confirmed by fluorescence titration with thioflavin T as a reporter ligand. Values of a >1 give rise to a hydrolysis profile called substrate activation, and the AChE site-specific mutant W86F, and to a lesser extent wild-type human AChE itself, showed substrate activation with acetylthiocholine as the substrate. Substrate activation was incorporated into a previous catalytic scheme for AChE in which a bound P-site ligand can also block product dissociation from the A-site, and two additional features of the AChE catalytic pathway were revealed. First, the ability of a bound P-site ligand to increase the substrate acetylation rate constant varied with the structure of the ligand: thioflavin T accelerated ATMA acetylation by a factor a(2) of 1.3, while propidium failed to accelerate. Second, catalytic rate

  5. An active site rearrangement within the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme releases nonproductive interactions and allows formation of catalytic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Raghuvir N.; Van Schie, Sabine N.S.; Giambaşu, George; Dai, Qing; Yesselman, Joseph D.; York, Darrin; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Biological catalysis hinges on the precise structural integrity of an active site that binds and transforms its substrates and meeting this requirement presents a unique challenge for RNA enzymes. Functional RNAs, including ribozymes, fold into their active conformations within rugged energy landscapes that often contain misfolded conformers. Here we uncover and characterize one such “off-pathway” species within an active site after overall folding of the ribozyme is complete. The Tetrahymena group I ribozyme (E) catalyzes cleavage of an oligonucleotide substrate (S) by an exogenous guanosine (G) cofactor. We tested whether specific catalytic interactions with G are present in the preceding E•S•G and E•G ground-state complexes. We monitored interactions with G via the effects of 2′- and 3′-deoxy (–H) and −amino (–NH2) substitutions on G binding. These and prior results reveal that G is bound in an inactive configuration within E•G, with the nucleophilic 3′-OH making a nonproductive interaction with an active site metal ion termed MA and with the adjacent 2′-OH making no interaction. Upon S binding, a rearrangement occurs that allows both –OH groups to contact a different active site metal ion, termed MC, to make what are likely to be their catalytic interactions. The reactive phosphoryl group on S promotes this change, presumably by repositioning the metal ions with respect to G. This conformational transition demonstrates local rearrangements within an otherwise folded RNA, underscoring RNA's difficulty in specifying a unique conformation and highlighting Nature's potential to use local transitions of RNA in complex function. PMID:26567314

  6. Differential Assembly of Catalytic Interactions within the Conserved Active Sites of Two Ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Molecular recognition is central to biology and a critical aspect of RNA function. Yet structured RNAs typically lack the preorganization needed for strong binding and precise positioning. A striking example is the group I ribozyme from Tetrahymena, which binds its guanosine substrate (G) orders of magnitude slower than diffusion. Binding of G is also thermodynamically coupled to binding of the oligonucleotide substrate (S) and further work has shown that the transition from E•G to E•S•G accompanies a conformational change that allows G to make the active site interactions required for catalysis. The group I ribozyme from Azoarcus has a similarly slow association rate but lacks the coupled binding observed for the Tetrahymena ribozyme. Here we test, using G analogs and metal ion rescue experiments, whether this absence of coupling arises from a higher degree of preorganization within the Azoarcus active site. Our results suggest that the Azoarcus ribozyme forms cognate catalytic metal ion interactions with G in the E•G complex, interactions that are absent in the Tetrahymena E•G complex. Thus, RNAs that share highly similar active site architectures and catalyze the same reactions can differ in the assembly of transition state interactions. More generally, an ability to readily access distinct local conformational states may have facilitated the evolutionary exploration needed to attain RNA machines that carry out complex, multi-step processes. PMID:27501145

  7. Two interacting binding sites for quinacrine derivatives in the active site of trypanothione reductase – a template for drug design

    PubMed Central

    Saravanamuthu, Ahilan; Vickers, Tim J.; Bond, Charles S.; Peterson, Mark R.; Hunter, William N.; Fairlamb, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Trypanothione reductase is a key enzyme in the trypanothione-based redox metabolism of pathogenic trypanosomes. Since this system is absent in humans, being replaced with glutathione and glutathione reductase, it offers a target for selective inhibition. The rational design of potent inhibitors requires accurate structures of enzyme-inhibitor complexes, but this is lacking for trypanothione reductase. We therefore used quinacrine mustard, an alkylating derivative of the competitive inhibitor quinacrine, to probe the active site of this dimeric flavoprotein. Quinacrine mustard irreversibly inactivates Trypanosoma cruzi trypanothione reductase, but not human glutathione reductase, in a time-dependent manner with a stoichiometry of two inhibitors bound per monomer. The rate of inactivation is dependent upon the oxidation state of trypanothione reductase, with the NADPH-reduced form being inactivated significantly faster than the oxidised form. Inactivation is slowed by clomipramine and a melarsen oxide-trypanothione adduct (both are competitive inhibitors) but accelerated by quinacrine. The structure of the trypanothione reductase-quinacrine mustard adduct was determined to 2.7 Å, revealing two molecules of inhibitor bound in the trypanothione-binding site. The acridine moieties interact with each other through π-stacking effects, and one acridine interacts in a similar fashion with a tryptophan residue. These interactions provide a molecular explanation for the differing effects of clomipramine and quinacrine on inactivation by quinacrine mustard. Synergism with quinacrine occurs as a result of these planar acridines being able to stack together in the active site cleft, thereby gaining an increased number of binding interactions, whereas antagonism occurs with non-planar molecules, such as clomipramine, where stacking is not possible. PMID:15102853

  8. Quantum mechanics study of the hydroxyethylamines-BACE-1 active site interaction energies.

    PubMed

    Gueto-Tettay, Carlos; Drosos, Juan Carlos; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo

    2011-06-01

    The identification of BACE-1, a key enzyme in the production of Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, generated by the proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein, was a major advance in the field of Alzheimer's disease as this pathology is characterized by the presence of extracellular senile plaques, mainly comprised of Aβ peptides. Hydroxyethylamines have demonstrated a remarkable potential, like candidate drugs, for this disease using BACE-1 as target. Density Functional Theory calculations were employed to estimate interaction energies for the complexes formed between the hydroxyethylamine derivated inhibitors and 24 residues in the BACE-1 active site. The collected data offered not only a general but a particular quantitative description that gives a deep insight of the interactions in the active site, showing at the same time how ligand structural variations affect them. Polar interactions are the major energetic contributors for complex stabilization and those ones with charged aspartate residues are highlighted, as they contribute over 90% of the total attractive interaction energy. Ligand-ARG296 residue interaction reports the most repulsive value and decreasing of the magnitude of this repulsion can be a key feature for the design of novel and more potent BACE-1 inhibitors. Also it was explained why sultam derivated BACE-1 inhibitors are better ones than lactam based. Hydrophobic interactions concentrated at S1 zone and other relevant repulsions and attractions were also evaluated. The comparison of two different theory levels (X3LYP and M062X) allowed to confirm the relevance of the detected interactions as each theory level has its own strength to depict the forces involved, as is the case of M062X which is better describing the hydrophobic interactions. Those facts were also evaluated and confirmed by comparing the quantitative trend, of selected ligand-residue interactions, with MP2 theory level as reference standard method for electrostatic plus

  9. Quantum mechanics study of the hydroxyethylamines-BACE-1 active site interaction energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueto-Tettay, Carlos; Drosos, Juan Carlos; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo

    2011-06-01

    The identification of BACE-1, a key enzyme in the production of Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, generated by the proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein, was a major advance in the field of Alzheimer's disease as this pathology is characterized by the presence of extracellular senile plaques, mainly comprised of Aβ peptides. Hydroxyethylamines have demonstrated a remarkable potential, like candidate drugs, for this disease using BACE-1 as target. Density Functional Theory calculations were employed to estimate interaction energies for the complexes formed between the hydroxyethylamine derivated inhibitors and 24 residues in the BACE-1 active site. The collected data offered not only a general but a particular quantitative description that gives a deep insight of the interactions in the active site, showing at the same time how ligand structural variations affect them. Polar interactions are the major energetic contributors for complex stabilization and those ones with charged aspartate residues are highlighted, as they contribute over 90% of the total attractive interaction energy. Ligand-ARG296 residue interaction reports the most repulsive value and decreasing of the magnitude of this repulsion can be a key feature for the design of novel and more potent BACE-1 inhibitors. Also it was explained why sultam derivated BACE-1 inhibitors are better ones than lactam based. Hydrophobic interactions concentrated at S1 zone and other relevant repulsions and attractions were also evaluated. The comparison of two different theory levels (X3LYP and M062X) allowed to confirm the relevance of the detected interactions as each theory level has its own strength to depict the forces involved, as is the case of M062X which is better describing the hydrophobic interactions. Those facts were also evaluated and confirmed by comparing the quantitative trend, of selected ligand-residue interactions, with MP2 theory level as reference standard method for electrostatic plus

  10. Interaction of aspartic acid-104 and proline-287 with the active site of m-calpain.

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, J S; Elce, J S

    1996-01-01

    In an ongoing study of the mechanisms of calpain catalysis and Ca(2+)-induced activation, the effects of Asp-104-->Ser and Pro-287-->Ser large subunit mutations on m-calpain activity, the pH-activity profile, Ca(2+)-sensitivity, and autolysis were measured. The importance of these positions was suggested by sequence comparisons between the calpain and papain families of cysteine proteinases. Asp-104 is adjacent to the active-site Cys-105, and Pro-287 is adjacent to the active-site Asn-286 and probably to the active-site His-262; both Asp-104 and Pro-287 are absolutely conserved in the known calpains, but are replaced by highly conserved serine residues in the papains. The single mutants had approx. 10-15% of wild-type activity, due mainly to a decrease in kcat, since Km was only slightly increased. The Pro-287-->Ser mutation appeared to cause a local perturbation of the catalytic Cys-105/His-262 catalytic ion pair, reducing its efficiency without major effect on the conformation and stability of the enzyme. The Asp-104-->Ser mutation caused a marked narrowing of the pH-activity curve, a 9-fold increase in Ca2+ requirement, and an acceleration of autolysis, when compared with the wild-type enzyme. The results indicated that Asp-104 alters the nature of its interaction with the catalytic ion pair during Ca(2+)-induced conformational change in calpain. This interaction may be direct or indirect, but is important in activation of the enzyme. PMID:8912692

  11. Interactions of biapenem with active-site serine and metallo-beta-lactamases.

    PubMed Central

    Felici, A; Perilli, M; Segatore, B; Franceschini, N; Setacci, D; Oratore, A; Stefani, S; Galleni, M; Amicosante, G

    1995-01-01

    Biapenem, formerly LJC 10,627 or L-627, a carbapenem antibiotic, was studied in its interactions with 12 beta-lactamases belonging to the four molecular classes proposed by R. P. Ambler (Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. Biol. Sci. 289:321-331, 1980). Kinetic parameters were determined. Biapenem was readily inactivated by metallo-beta-lactamases but behaved as a transient inhibitor of the active-site serine enzymes tested, although with different acylation efficiency values. Class A and class D beta-lactamases were unable to confer in vitro resistance toward this carbapenem antibiotic. Surprisingly, the same situation was found in the case of class B enzymes from Aeromonas hydrophila AE036 and Bacillus cereus 5/B/6 when expressed in Escherichia coli strains. PMID:7574520

  12. Noncovalent intermolecular interactions between dehydroepiandrosterone and the active site of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulphotransferase: A density functional theory based treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astani, Elahe; Heshmati, Emran; Chen, Chun-Jung; Hadipour, Nasser L.; Shekarsaraei, Setareh

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical study was performed to characterize noncovalent intermolecular interactions, especially hydrogen bond (HB), in the active site of enzyme human dehydroepiandrosterone sulphotransferase (SULT2A1/DHEA) using the local (M06-L) and hybrid (M06, M06-2X) meta-GGA functionals of density functional theory (DFT). Results revealed that DHEA is able to form HBs with residues His99, Tyr231, Met137 and Met16 in the active site of the SULT2A1/DHEA. It was found that DHEA interacts with the other residues through electrostatic and Van der Waals interactions.

  13. Characterization of the interactions between the active site of a protein tyrosine kinase and a divalent metal activator

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaofeng; Ayrapetov, Marina K; Sun, Gongqin

    2005-01-01

    Background Protein tyrosine kinases are important enzymes for cell signalling and key targets for anticancer drug discovery. The catalytic mechanisms of protein tyrosine kinase-catalysed phosphorylation are not fully understood. Protein tyrosine kinase Csk requires two Mg2+ cations for activity: one (M1) binds to ATP, and the other (M2) acts as an essential activator. Results Experiments in this communication characterize the interaction between M2 and Csk. Csk activity is sensitive to pH in the range of 6 to 7. Kinetic characterization indicates that the sensitivity is not due to altered substrate binding, but caused by the sensitivity of M2 binding to pH. Several residues in the active site with potential of binding M2 are mutated and the effect on metal activation studied. An active mutant of Asn319 is generated, and this mutation does not alter the metal binding characteristics. Mutations of Glu236 or Asp332 abolish the kinase activity, precluding a positive or negative conclusion on their role in M2 coordination. Finally, the ability of divalent metal cations to activate Csk correlates to a combination of ionic radius and the coordination number. Conclusion These studies demonstrate that M2 binding to Csk is sensitive to pH, which is mainly responsible for Csk activity change in the acidic arm of the pH response curve. They also demonstrate critical differences in the metal activator coordination sphere in protein tyrosine kinase Csk and a protein Ser/Thr kinase, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. They shed light on the physical interactions between a protein tyrosine kinase and a divalent metal activator. PMID:16305747

  14. Excited state potential energy surfaces and their interactions in Fe(IV)=O active sites.

    PubMed

    Srnec, Martin; Wong, Shaun D; Solomon, Edward I

    2014-12-21

    The non-heme ferryl active sites are of significant interest for their application in biomedical and green catalysis. These sites have been shown to have an S = 1 or S = 2 ground spin state; the latter is functional in biology. Low-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (LT MCD) spectroscopy probes the nature of the excited states in these species including ligand-field (LF) states that are otherwise difficult to study by other spectroscopies. In particular, the temperature dependences of MCD features enable their unambiguous assignment and thus determination of the low-lying excited states in two prototypical S = 1 and S = 2 NHFe(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O complexes. Furthermore, some MCD bands exhibit vibronic structures that allow mapping of excited-state interactions and their effects on the potential energy surfaces (PESs). For the S = 2 species, there is also an unusual spectral feature in both near-infrared absorption and MCD spectra - Fano antiresonance (dip in Abs) and Fano resonance (sharp peak in MCD) that indicates the weak spin-orbit coupling of an S = 1 state with the S = 2 LF state. These experimental data are correlated with quantum-chemical calculations that are further extended to analyze the low-lying electronic states and the evolution of their multiconfigurational characters along the Fe-O PESs. These investigations show that the lowest-energy states develop oxyl Fe(III) character at distances that are relevant to the transition state (TS) for H-atom abstraction and define the frontier molecular orbitals that participate in the reactivity of S = 1 vs. S = 2 non-heme Fe(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O active sites. The S = 1 species has only one available channel that requires the C-H bond of a substrate to approach perpendicular to the Fe-oxo bond (the π channel). In contrast, there are three channels (one σ and two π) available for the S = 2 non-heme Fe(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O system allowing C-H substrate approach

  15. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  16. Non-empirical analysis of the nature of the inhibitor active-site interactions in leucine aminopeptidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grembecka, J.; K ȩdzierski, P.; Sokalski, W. A.

    1999-11-01

    Non-empirical analysis of the physical nature of the intermolecular interactions between several leucine aminopeptidase inhibitors and various constituents of the enzyme active site has been performed using a direct version of the hybrid variation-perturbation decomposition of SCF and MP2 interaction energies. The interaction energy terms obtained at different theory levels have been correlated with experimentally measured activities of the inhibitors, indicating that the more advanced the quantum-chemical method and, the larger the active-site model, the better is the correlation between calculated and measured binding energies. The electrostatic multipole term constitutes the dominant contribution in the total interaction energy, whereas Zn 2+488 and Lys +262 enzyme residues play the crucial role in the binding of these inhibitors by leucine aminopeptidase.

  17. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  18. Interaction of mining activities and aquatic environment: A review from Greek mine sites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileiou, Eleni; Kallioras, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In Greece a significant amount of mineral and ore deposits have been recorded accompanied by large industrial interest and a long mining history. Today many active and/or abandoned mine sites are scattered within the country; while mining activities take place in different sites for exploiting various deposits (clay, limestone, slate, gypsum, kaolin, mixed sulphide ores (lead, zinc, olivine, pozzolan, quartz lignite, nickel, magnesite, aluminum, bauxite, gold, marbles etc). The most prominent recent ones are: (i) the lignite exploitation that is extended in the area of Ptolemais (Western Macedonia) and Megalopolis (Central Peloponnese); and (ii) the major bauxite deposits located in central Greece within the Parnassos-Ghiona geotectonic zone and on Euboea Island. In the latter area, significant ores of magnesite were exploited and mixed sulphide ores. Centuries of intensive mining exploitation and metallurgical treatment of lead-silver deposits in Greece, have also resulted in significant abandoned sites, such as the one in Lavrion. Mining activities in Lavrio, were initiated in ancient times and continued until the 1980s, resulting in the production of significant waste stockpiles deposited in the area, crucial for the local water resources. Ιn many mining sites, environmental pressures are also recorded after the mine closure to the aquatic environment, as the surface waters flow through waste dump areas and contaminated soils. This paper aims to the geospatial visualization of the mining activities in Greece, in connection to their negative (surface- and/or ground-water pollution; overpumping due to extensive dewatering practices) or positive (enhanced groundwater recharge; pit lakes, improvement of water budget in the catchment scale) impacts on local water resources.

  19. A Hydrophobic Pocket in the Active Site of Glycolytic Aldolase Mediates Interactions with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein

    SciTech Connect

    St-Jean,M.; Izard, T.; Sygusch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aldolase plays essential catalytic roles in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. However, aldolase is a highly abundant protein that is remarkably promiscuous in its interactions with other cellular proteins. In particular, aldolase binds to highly acidic amino acid sequences, including the C-terminus of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor. Here we report the crystal structure of tetrameric rabbit muscle aldolase in complex with a C-terminal peptide of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Aldolase recognizes a short, 4-residue DEWD motif (residues 498-501), which adopts a loose hairpin turn that folds about the central aromatic residue, enabling its tryptophan side chain to fit into a hydrophobic pocket in the active site of aldolase. The flanking acidic residues in this binding motif provide further interactions with conserved aldolase active site residues, Arg-42 and Arg-303, aligning their side chains and forming the sides of the hydrophobic pocket. The binding of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein to aldolase precludes intramolecular interactions of its C-terminus with its active site, and is competitive with substrate as well as with binding by actin and cortactin. Finally, based on this structure a novel naphthol phosphate-based inhibitor of aldolase was identified and its structure in complex with aldolase demonstrated mimicry of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-aldolase interaction. The data support a model whereby aldolase exists in distinct forms that regulate glycolysis or actin dynamics.

  20. Metal Ion Interactions in the DNA Cleavage/Ligation Active Site of Human Topoisomerase IIα†

    PubMed Central

    Deweese, Joseph E.; Guengerich, F. Peter; Burgin, Alex B.; Osheroff, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Human topoisomerase IIα utilizes a two-metal-ion mechanism for DNA cleavage. One of the metal ions (M12+) is believed to make a critical interaction with the 3′-bridging atom of the scissile phosphate, while the other (M22+) is believed to interact with a non-bridging oxygen of the scissile phosphate. Based on structural and mutagenesis studies of prokaryotic nucleic acid enzymes, it has been proposed that the active site divalent metal ions interact with type II topoisomerases through a series of conserved acidic amino acid residues. The homologous residues in human topoisomerase IIα are E461, D541, D543, and D545. To address the validity of these assignments and to delineate interactions between individual amino acids and M12+ and M22+, we individually mutated each of these acidic amino acid residues in topoisomerase IIα to either cysteine or alanine. Mutant enzymes displayed a marked loss of catalytic and DNA cleavage activity as well as a reduced affinity for divalent metal ions. Additional experiments determined the ability of wild-type and mutant topoisomerase IIα enzymes to cleave an oligonucleotide substrate that contained a sulfur atom in place of the 3′-bridging oxygen of the scissile phosphate in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+, or Ca2+. Based on the results of these studies, we conclude that the four acidic amino acid residues interact with metal ions in the DNA cleavage/ligation active site of topoisomerase IIα. Furthermore, we propose that M12+ interacts with E461, D543, and D545 and M22+ interacts with E461 and D541. PMID:19697956

  1. Ortho-7 bound to the active-site gorge of free and OP-conjugated acetylcholinesterase: cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Arup Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Tusar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the immense importance of cation-π interactions prevailing in bispyridinium drug acetylcholinesterase (AChE) complexes, a precise description of cation-π interactions at molecular level has remained elusive. Here, we consider a bispyridinium drug, namely, ortho-7 in three different structures of AChE, with and without complexation with organophosphorus (OP) compounds for detailed investigation using all atom molecular dynamics simulation. By quantum mechanical calculations, Y72, W86, Y124, W286, Y337, and Y341 aromatic residues of the enzyme are investigated for possible cation-π interactions with ortho-7. The cation-π interactions in each of the protein-drug complexes are studied using distance, angle, a suitable functional form of them, and electrostatic criteria. The variation of cation-π functional is remarkably consistent with that of the Columbic variation. It is clearly observed that cation-π interactions for some of the residues in the catalytic active site (CAS) and peripheral anionic site (PAS) of the enzyme are either enhanced or reduced based on the nature of OP conjugation (i.e., nerve gas, tabun or pesticide, fenamiphos) when compared with the OP-free enzyme. The strength of cation-π interaction is strongly dependent on the type OP conjugation. The effect of conjugation at CAS is also seen to influence the cation-π interaction at the PAS region. The variation of cation-π interactions on the type of conjugating OP compounds might be suggestive of a reason as to why wide spectrum drug against any OP poisoning is yet to arrive in the market.

  2. Mapping intermolecular interactions and active site conformations: from human MMP-1 crystal structure to molecular dynamics free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Nash, Anthony; Birch, Helen L; de Leeuw, Nora H

    2017-02-01

    The zinc-dependent Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) found within the extracellular matrix (ECM) of vertebrates are linked to pathological processes such as arthritis, skin ulceration and cancer. Although a general backbone proteolytic mechanism is understood, crystallographic data continue to suggest an active site that is too narrow to encompass the respective substrate. We present a fully parameterised Molecular Dynamics (MD) study of the structural properties of an MMP-1-collagen crystallographic structure (Protein Data Bank - 4AUO), followed by an exploration of the free energy surface of a collagen polypeptide chain entering the active site, using a combined meta-dynamics and umbrella sampling (MDUS) approach. We conclude that the interactions between MMP-1 and the collagen substrate are in good agreement with a number of experimental studies. As such, our unrestrained MD simulations and our MDUS results, which indicate an energetic barrier for a local uncoiling and insertion event, can inform future investigations of the collagen-peptide non-bonded association steps with the active site prior to proteolytic mechanisms. The elucidation of such free energy barriers provides a better understanding of the role of the enzyme in the ECM and is important in the design of future MMP inhibitors.

  3. Molecular protein adaptor with genetically encoded interaction sites guiding the hierarchical assembly of plasmonically active nanoparticle architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Andreas; Huber, Matthias C.; Cölfen, Helmut; Schiller, Stefan M.

    2015-03-01

    The control over the defined assembly of nano-objects with nm-precision is important to create systems and materials with enhanced properties, for example, metamaterials. In nature, the precise assembly of inorganic nano-objects with unique features, for example, magnetosomes, is accomplished by efficient and reliable recognition schemes involving protein effectors. Here we present a molecular approach using protein-based ‘adaptors/connectors’ with genetically encoded interaction sites to guide the assembly and functionality of different plasmonically active gold nanoparticle architectures (AuNP). The interaction of the defined geometricaly shaped protein adaptors with the AuNP induces the self-assembly of nanoarchitectures ranging from AuNP encapsulation to one-dimensional chain-like structures, complex networks and stars. Synthetic biology and bionanotechnology are applied to co-translationally encode unnatural amino acids as additional site-specific modification sites to generate functionalized biohybrid nanoarchitectures. This protein adaptor-based nano-object assembly approach might be expanded to other inorganic nano-objects creating biohybrid materials with unique electronic, photonic, plasmonic and magnetic properties.

  4. Myc-Max heterodimers activate a DEAD box gene and interact with multiple E box-related sites in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Grandori, C; Mac, J; Siëbelt, F; Ayer, D E; Eisenman, R N

    1996-01-01

    The c-Myc protein is involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis though heterodimerization with Max to form a transcriptionally active sequence-specific DNA binding complex. By means of sequential immunoprecipitation of chromatin using anti-Max and anti-Myc antibodies, we have identified a Myc-regulated gene and genomic sites occupied by Myc-Max in vivo. Four of 27 sites recovered by this procedure corresponded to the highest affinity 'canonical' CACGTG sequence. However, the most common in vivo binding sites belonged to the group of 'non-canonical' E box-related binding sites previously identified by in vitro selection. Several of the genomic fragments isolated contained transcribed sequences, including one, MrDb, encoding an evolutionarily conserved RNA helicase of the DEAD box family. The corresponding mRNA was induced following activation of a Myc-estrogen receptor fusion protein (Myc-ER) in the presence of a protein synthesis inhibitor, consistent with this helicase gene being a direct target of Myc-Max. In addition, as for c-Myc, the expression of MrDb is induced upon proliferative stimulation of primary human fibroblasts as well as B cells and down-regulated during terminal differentiation of HL60 leukemia cells. Our results indicate that Myc-Max heterodimers interact in vivo with a specific set of E box-related DNA sequences and that Myc is likely to activate multiple target genes including a highly conserved DEAD box protein. Therefore, Myc may exert its effects on cell behavior through proteins that affect RNA structure and metabolism. Images PMID:8861962

  5. Cytochalasin B binding proteins in human erythrocyte membranes. Modulation of glucose sensitivity by site interaction and partial solubilization of binding activities.

    PubMed

    Pinkofsky, H B; Rampal, A L; Cowden, M A; Jung, C Y

    1978-07-25

    We have previously described three different cytochalasin B binding sites in human erythrocyte membranes, a D-glucose-sensitive site (Site I), a cytochalasin E-sensitive site (Site II), and a site (Site III) insensitive to both D-glucose and cytochalasin E. Ligand bindings to each of these sites were considered to be independent (Jung, C., and Rampal, A. (1977) J. Biol. Chem. 252, 5456-5463). However, we have obtained subsequently the following evidence which indicated that an interaction occurs between Sites II and III, and this modulates sensitivity of Site III to the sugar. The displacement of cytochalasin E greatly exceeds the sum of their independent displacements. This ghosts extracted with EDTA or 2,3-dimethylmaleic anhydride at low ionic strength lack Site II activity but retain Site I and III activities, and both of these activities are displaceable by D-glucose alone. This indicated that the removal of Site II from the membrane confers glucose sensitivity to Site III. These observations are consistent with a model that Sites II and III in the membrane exist in a close association through which unliganded Site II maintains the glucose insensitivity of Site III, and once site II is liganded or removed by extraction this association is disrupted and Site III becomes glucose-sensitive. The ghosts extracted with Triton X-100 retain a cytochalasin B binding activity similar to that of site II (Kd = 1.8 X 10(-7) M, cytochalasin E-sensitive, glucose-insensitive), whereas a binding activity similar to that of Site I (Kd = 4 X 10(-7) M, cytochalasin E-insensitive, glucose-sensitive) is recovered in the Triton extract. A cytochalasin B binding activity similar to that of Site II is solubilized by EDTA at low ionic strength.

  6. Interaction of potassium cyanide with the [Ni-4Fe-5S] active site cluster of CO dehydrogenase from Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seung-Wook; Korbas, Malgorzata; Klepsch, Mirjam; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Meyer, Ortwin; Svetlitchnyi, Vitali

    2007-04-06

    The Ni-Fe carbon monoxide (CO) dehydrogenase II (CODHII(Ch)) from the anaerobic CO-utilizing hydrogenogenic bacterium Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans catalyzes the oxidation of CO, presumably at the Ni-(micro(2)S)-Fe1 subsite of the [Ni-4S-5S] cluster in the active site. The CO oxidation mechanism proposed on the basis of several CODHII(Ch) crystal structures involved the apical binding of CO at the nickel ion and the activation of water at the Fe1 ion of the cluster. To understand how CO interacts with the active site, we have studied the reactivity of the cluster with potassium cyanide and analyzed the resulting type of nickel coordination by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Cyanide acts as a competitive inhibitor of reduced CODHII(Ch) with respect to the substrate CO and is therefore expected to mimic the substrate. It inhibits the enzyme reversibly, forming a nickel cyanide. In this reaction, one of the four square-planar sulfur ligands of nickel is replaced by the carbon atom of cyanide, suggesting removal of the micro(2)S from the Ni-(micro(2)S)-Fe1 subsite. Upon reactivation of the inhibited enzyme, cyanide is released, and the square-planar coordination of nickel by 4S ligands is recovered, which includes the reformation of the Ni-(micro(2)S)-Fe1 bridge. The results are summarized in a model of the CO oxidation mechanism at the [Ni-4Fe-5S] active site cluster of CODHII(Ch) from C. hydrogenoformans.

  7. Enzyme-ligand interactions that drive active site rearrangements in the Helicobacter pylori 5´-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Ronning, Donald R; Iacopelli, Natalie M; Mishra, Vidhi

    2012-03-15

    The bacterial enzyme 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) plays a central role in three essential metabolic pathways in bacteria: methionine salvage, purine salvage, and polyamine biosynthesis. Recently, its role in the pathway that leads to the production of autoinducer II, an important component in quorum-sensing, has garnered much interest. Because of this variety of roles, MTAN is an attractive target for developing new classes of inhibitors that influence bacterial virulence and biofilm formation. To gain insight toward the development of new classes of MTAN inhibitors, the interactions between the Helicobacter pylori-encoded MTAN and its substrates and substrate analogs were probed using X-ray crystallography. The structures of MTAN, an MTAN-Formycin A complex, and an adenine bound form were solved by molecular replacement and refined to 1.7, 1.8, and 1.6 Å, respectively. The ribose-binding site in the MTAN and MTAN-adenine cocrystal structures contain a tris[hydroxymethyl]aminomethane molecule that stabilizes the closed form of the enzyme and displaces a nucleophilic water molecule necessary for catalysis. This research gives insight to the interactions between MTAN and bound ligands that promote closing of the enzyme active site and highlights the potential for designing new classes of MTAN inhibitors using a link/grow or ligand assembly development strategy based on the described H. pylori MTAN crystal structures.

  8. List 9 - Active CERCLIS Sites:

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The List 9 displays the sequence of activities undertaken at active CERCLIS sites. An active site is one at which site assessment, removal, remedial, enforcement, cost recovery, or oversight activities are being planned or conducted.

  9. Electrostatic Interactions Guide the Active Site Face of a Structure-Specific Ribonuclease to Its RNA Substrate†

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Restrictocin, a member of the α-sarcin family of site-specific endoribonucleases, uses electrostatic interactions to bind to the ribosome and to RNA oligonucleotides, including the minimal specific substrate, the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) of 23S−28S rRNA. Restrictocin binds to the SRL by forming a ground-state E:S complex that is stabilized predominantly by Coulomb interactions and depends on neither the sequence nor structure of the RNA, suggesting a nonspecific complex. The 22 cationic residues of restrictocin are dispersed throughout this protein surface, complicating a priori identification of a Coulomb interacting surface. Structural studies have identified an enzyme−substrate interface, which is expected to overlap with the electrostatic E:S interface. Here, we identified restrictocin residues that contribute to binding in the E:S complex by determining the salt dependence [∂ log(k2/K1/2)/∂ log[KCl

  10. Comparative residue interaction analysis (CoRIA): a 3D-QSAR approach to explore the binding contributions of active site residues with ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datar, Prasanna A.; Khedkar, Santosh A.; Malde, Alpeshkumar K.; Coutinho, Evans C.

    2006-06-01

    A novel approach termed comparative residue-interaction analysis (CoRIA), emphasizing the trends and principles of QSAR in a ligand-receptor environment has been developed to analyze and predict the binding affinity of enzyme inhibitors. To test this new approach, a training set of 36 COX-2 inhibitors belonging to nine families was selected. The putative binding (bioactive) conformations of inhibitors in the COX-2 active site were searched using the program DOCK. The docked configurations were further refined by a combination of Monte Carlo and simulated annealing methods with the Affinity program. The non-bonded interaction energies of the inhibitors with the individual amino acid residues in the active site were then computed. These interaction energies, plus specific terms describing the thermodynamics of ligand-enzyme binding, were correlated to the biological activity with G/PLS. The various QSAR models obtained were validated internally by cross validation and boot strapping, and externally using a test set of 13 molecules. The QSAR models developed on the CoRIA formalism were robust with good r 2, q 2 and r pred 2 values. The major highlights of the method are: adaptation of the QSAR formalism in a receptor setting to answer both the type (qualitative) and the extent (quantitative) of ligand-receptor binding, and use of descriptors that account for the complete thermodynamics of the ligand-receptor binding. The CoRIA approach can be used to identify crucial interactions of inhibitors with the enzyme at the residue level, which can be gainfully exploited in optimizing the inhibitory activity of ligands. Furthermore, it can be used with advantage to guide point mutation studies. As regards the COX-2 dataset, the CoRIA approach shows that improving Coulombic interaction with Pro528 and reducing van der Waals interaction with Tyr385 will improve the binding affinity of inhibitors.

  11. Multilayer Dye Adsorption in Activated Carbons-Facile Approach to Exploit Vacant Sites and Interlayer Charge Interaction.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Pejman; Guo, Jiaxin; Barford, John; McKay, Gordon

    2016-05-17

    Altering the textural properties of activated carbons (ACs) via physicochemical techniques to increase their specific surface area and/or to manipulate their pore size is a common practice to enhance their adsorption capacity. Instead, this study proposes the utilization of the vacant sites remaining unoccupied after dye uptake saturation by removing the steric hindrance and same-charge repulsion phenomena via multilayer adsorption. Herein, it has been shown that the adsorption capacity of the fresh AC is a direct function of the dye molecular size. As the cross-sectional area of the dye molecule increases, the steric hindrance effect exerted on the neighboring adsorbed molecules increases, and the geometrical packing efficiency is constrained. Thus, ACs saturated with larger dye molecules render higher concentrations of vacant adsorption sites which can accommodate an additional layer of dye molecules on the exhausted adsorbent through interlayer attractive forces. The second layer adsorption capacity (60-200 mg·g(-1)) has been demonstrated to have a linear relationship with the uncovered surface area of the exhausted AC, which is, in turn, inversely proportional to the adsorbate molecular size. Unlike the second layer adsorption, the third layer adsorption is a direct function of the charge density of the second layer.

  12. In Silico Structure Prediction of Human Fatty Acid Synthase-Dehydratase: A Plausible Model for Understanding Active Site Interactions.

    PubMed

    John, Arun; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Samdani, A; Sangeetha, Manoharan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Deepa, Perinkulam Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN, UniProt ID: P49327) is a multienzyme dimer complex that plays a critical role in lipogenesis. Consequently, this lipogenic enzyme has gained tremendous biomedical importance. The role of FASN and its inhibition is being extensively researched in several clinical conditions, such as cancers, obesity, and diabetes. X-ray crystallographic structures of some of its domains, such as β-ketoacyl synthase, acetyl transacylase, malonyl transacylase, enoyl reductase, β-ketoacyl reductase, and thioesterase, (TE) are already reported. Here, we have attempted an in silico elucidation of the uncrystallized dehydratase (DH) catalytic domain of human FASN. This theoretical model for DH domain was predicted using comparative modeling methods. Different stand-alone tools and servers were used to validate and check the reliability of the predicted models, which suggested it to be a highly plausible model. The stereochemical analysis showed 92.0% residues in favorable region of Ramachandran plot. The initial physiological substrate β-hydroxybutyryl group was docked into active site of DH domain using Glide. The molecular dynamics simulations carried out for 20 ns in apo and holo states indicated the stability and accuracy of the predicted structure in solvated condition. The predicted model provided useful biochemical insights into the substrate-active site binding mechanisms. This model was then used for identifying potential FASN inhibitors using high-throughput virtual screening of the National Cancer Institute database of chemical ligands. The inhibitory efficacy of the top hit ligands was validated by performing molecular dynamics simulation for 20 ns, where in the ligand NSC71039 exhibited good enzyme inhibition characteristics and exhibited dose-dependent anticancer cytotoxicity in retinoblastoma cancer cells in vitro.

  13. In Silico Structure Prediction of Human Fatty Acid Synthase–Dehydratase: A Plausible Model for Understanding Active Site Interactions

    PubMed Central

    John, Arun; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Samdani, A.; Sangeetha, Manoharan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Deepa, Perinkulam Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN, UniProt ID: P49327) is a multienzyme dimer complex that plays a critical role in lipogenesis. Consequently, this lipogenic enzyme has gained tremendous biomedical importance. The role of FASN and its inhibition is being extensively researched in several clinical conditions, such as cancers, obesity, and diabetes. X-ray crystallographic structures of some of its domains, such as β-ketoacyl synthase, acetyl transacylase, malonyl transacylase, enoyl reductase, β-ketoacyl reductase, and thioesterase, (TE) are already reported. Here, we have attempted an in silico elucidation of the uncrystallized dehydratase (DH) catalytic domain of human FASN. This theoretical model for DH domain was predicted using comparative modeling methods. Different stand-alone tools and servers were used to validate and check the reliability of the predicted models, which suggested it to be a highly plausible model. The stereochemical analysis showed 92.0% residues in favorable region of Ramachandran plot. The initial physiological substrate β-hydroxybutyryl group was docked into active site of DH domain using Glide. The molecular dynamics simulations carried out for 20 ns in apo and holo states indicated the stability and accuracy of the predicted structure in solvated condition. The predicted model provided useful biochemical insights into the substrate–active site binding mechanisms. This model was then used for identifying potential FASN inhibitors using high-throughput virtual screening of the National Cancer Institute database of chemical ligands. The inhibitory efficacy of the top hit ligands was validated by performing molecular dynamics simulation for 20 ns, where in the ligand NSC71039 exhibited good enzyme inhibition characteristics and exhibited dose-dependent anticancer cytotoxicity in retinoblastoma cancer cells in vitro. PMID:27559295

  14. Interaction of on-site and near real time measured turbidity and enzyme activity in stream water.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Philipp; Farnleitner, Andreas H.; Zessner, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    On-site and on-line systems that provide an integrated surveillance of physicochemical and microbiological parameters gain significance in water quality monitoring. Particular relating to diffuse pollution from agricultural areas and use-orientated protection of waters the detection of faecal pollution is a fundamental part. For the near real time and on-site detection of microbiological faecal pollution of water, the beta-D- Glucuronidase (GLUC) enzymatic activity has been suggested as a surrogate parameter. Due to possible short measure intervals of three hours, this method has high potential as a water quality monitoring tool. While cultivation based standard determination takes more than one working day (Cabral 2010) the potential advantage of detecting the GLUC activity is the high temporal measuring resolution. Yet, there is still a big gap of knowledge on the sensitivity and specificity concerning the faecal indication capacity of GLUC in relation to standard assays (Cabral 2010). Interference effects of physicochemical parameters on the enzymatic activity respectively fluorescence have been discussed (Molina-Munoz et al. 2007; Tryland and Fiksdal 1998, Biswal et al. 2003). Results from a monitoring of a rivulet in an agricultural catchment in Lower Austria (HOAL - Hydrological Open Air Laboratory) are presented here. The HOAL offers technical resources that allow measurements at high temporal and spatial resolution and to apply various hydrological methods in one catchment. Two automated enzymatic measuring devices (Coliguard, mbOnline, Austria) and physicochemical in-stream measurements are used, as well as in-stream spectroscopy (spectrolyser, s::can, Austria). Accuracy of both enzymatic measuring devices is compared through diverse hydrological and seasonal conditions. Reference analyses by cultivation based determination were performed. Data from Coliguard devices is combined with physicochemical and spectroscopy data to gain information about the

  15. Arginine residues on the opposite side of the active site stimulate the catalysis of ribosome depurination by ricin A chain by interacting with the P-protein stalk.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Ping; Kahn, Peter C; Kahn, Jennifer Nielsen; Grela, Przemyslaw; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2013-10-18

    Ricin inhibits protein synthesis by depurinating the α-sarcin/ricin loop (SRL). Ricin holotoxin does not inhibit translation unless the disulfide bond between the A (RTA) and B (RTB) subunits is reduced. Ricin holotoxin did not bind ribosomes or depurinate them but could depurinate free RNA. When RTA is separated from RTB, arginine residues located at the interface are exposed to the solvent. Because this positively charged region, but not the active site, is blocked by RTB, we mutated arginine residues at or near the interface of RTB to determine if they are critical for ribosome binding. These variants were structurally similar to wild type RTA but could not bind ribosomes. Their K(m) values and catalytic rates (k(cat)) for an SRL mimic RNA were similar to those of wild type, indicating that their activity was not altered. However, they showed an up to 5-fold increase in K(m) and up to 38-fold decrease in kcat toward ribosomes. These results suggest that the stalk binding stimulates the catalysis of ribosome depurination by RTA. The mutated arginines have side chains behind the active site cleft, indicating that the ribosome binding surface of RTA is on the opposite side of the surface that interacts with the SRL. We propose that stalk binding stimulates the catalysis of ribosome depurination by orienting the active site of RTA toward the SRL and thereby allows docking of the target adenine into the active site. This model may apply to the translation factors that interact with the stalk.

  16. Interaction of the Transcription Start Site Core Region and Transcription Factor YY1 Determine Ascorbate Transporter SVCT2 Exon 1a Promoter Activity

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Huan; May, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of the ascorbate transporter, SVCT2, is driven by two distinct promoters in exon 1 of the transporter sequence. The exon 1a promoter lacks a classical transcription start site and little is known about regulation of promoter activity in the transcription start site core (TSSC) region. Here we present evidence that the TSSC binds the multifunctional initiator-binding protein YY1. Electrophoresis shift assays using YY1 antibody showed that YY1 is present as one of two major complexes that specifically bind to the TSSC. The other complex contains the transcription factor NF-Y. Mutations in the TSSC that decreased YY1 binding also impaired the exon 1a promoter activity despite the presence of an upstream activating NF-Y/USF complex, suggesting that YY1 is involved in the regulation of the exon 1a transcription. Furthermore, YY1 interaction with NF-Y and/or USF synergistically enhanced the exon 1a promoter activity in transient transfections and co-activator p300 enhanced their synergistic activation. We propose that the TSSC plays a vital role in the exon 1a transcription and that this function is partially carried out by the transcription factor YY1. Moreover, co-activator p300 might be able to synergistically enhance the TSSC function via a “bridge” mechanism with upstream sequences. PMID:22532872

  17. Specific Sites in the C Terminus of CTCF Interact with the SA2 Subunit of the Cohesin Complex and Are Required for Cohesin-Dependent Insulation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Tiaojiang; Wallace, Julie; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the protein CTCF, which plays an important role in insulation and in large-scale organization of chromatin within the eukaryotic nucleus, depends for both activities on recruitment of the cohesin complex. We show here that the interaction of CTCF with the cohesin complex involves direct contacts between the cohesin subunit SA2 and specific regions of the C-terminal tail of CTCF. All other cohesin components are recruited through their interaction with SA2. Expression in vivo of CTCF mutants lacking the C-terminal domain, or with mutations at sites within it required for SA2 binding, disrupts the normal expression profile of the imprinted genes IGF2-H19 and also results in a loss of insulation activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that specific sites on the C terminus of CTCF are essential for cohesin binding and insulator function. The only direct interaction between CTCF and cohesin involves contact with SA2, which is external to the cohesin ring. This suggests that in recruiting cohesin to CTCF, SA2 could bind first and the ring could assemble subsequently. PMID:21444719

  18. Implication of site quality on mitochondrial electron transport activity and its interaction with temperature in feral Mya arenaria clams from the Saguenay Fjord.

    PubMed

    Gagné, F; Blaise, C; André, C; Pellerin, J

    2007-02-01

    The advent of global warming has given rise to questions about the impact of temperature/pollution interactions on the integrity of certain benthic organisms like bivalves. This interaction was examined in intertidal Mya arenaria clams from the Saguenay Fjord using the concepts of cellular energy allocation and temperature-dependent mitochondrial electron transport (METT) activity. Clams were collected at low tide from six sites (two clean, four polluted) for determinations of condition factor (weight/shell length), growth index (age-to-length ratio), gonadal lipids and maturation index, gonad MET at various habitat temperatures, METT, gill xanthine oxidase and gill DNA damage. Condition factor was generally lower at the four polluted sites, with growth index being severely affected at two of them. Gonadal maturation was also significantly dampened at two of the four pollution-impacted sites. Gill xanthine oxidase (purine bases salvage pathway) and DNA strand breaks were significantly increased at most of the polluted sites, confirming pollution-mediated damage in clams. Moreover, MET at 20 degrees C, METT and gonad lipids were significantly induced at the polluted sites. Clam condition factor was negatively correlated with most of the biomarkers for cellular energy allocation (gonadal lipids, MET and METT), but not with gonadal maturation. DNA damage and xanthine oxidase were positively correlated with MET at 20 degrees C and METT. This is the first report of electron transport in mitochondria being more sensitive to incremental temperature increases in clams under pollution stress. The gradual warming of clam habitats would likely worsen the impacts of pollution in feral clam populations.

  19. Implication of site quality on mitochondrial electron transport activity and its interaction with temperature in feral Mya arenaria clams from the Saguenay Fjord

    SciTech Connect

    Gagne, F. . E-mail: Francois.Gagne@ec.gc.ca; Blaise, C.; Andre, C.; Pellerin, J.

    2007-02-15

    The advent of global warming has given rise to questions about the impact of temperature/pollution interactions on the integrity of certain benthic organisms like bivalves. This interaction was examined in intertidal Mya arenaria clams from the Saguenay Fjord using the concepts of cellular energy allocation and temperature-dependent mitochondrial electron transport (MET{sub T}) activity. Clams were collected at low tide from six sites (two clean, four polluted) for determinations of condition factor (weight/shell length), growth index (age-to-length ratio), gonadal lipids and maturation index, gonad MET at various habitat temperatures, MET{sub T}, gill xanthine oxidase and gill DNA damage. Condition factor was generally lower at the four polluted sites, with growth index being severely affected at two of them. Gonadal maturation was also significantly dampened at two of the four pollution-impacted sites. Gill xanthine oxidase (purine bases salvage pathway) and DNA strand breaks were significantly increased at most of the polluted sites, confirming pollution-mediated damage in clams. Moreover, MET at 20 deg. C, MET{sub T} and gonad lipids were significantly induced at the polluted sites. Clam condition factor was negatively correlated with most of the biomarkers for cellular energy allocation (gonadal lipids, MET and MET{sub T}), but not with gonadal maturation. DNA damage and xanthine oxidase were positively correlated with MET at 20 deg. C and MET{sub T}. This is the first report of electron transport in mitochondria being more sensitive to incremental temperature increases in clams under pollution stress. The gradual warming of clam habitats would likely worsen the impacts of pollution in feral clam populations.

  20. Discovery and evaluation of inhibitors to the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1): Probing the active site-inhibitor interactions.

    PubMed

    Tomek, Petr; Palmer, Brian D; Flanagan, Jack U; Sun, Chuanwen; Raven, Emma L; Ching, Lai-Ming

    2017-01-27

    High expression of the immunosuppressive enzyme, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) for a broad range of malignancies is associated with poor patient prognosis, and the enzyme is a validated target for cancer intervention. To identify novel IDO1 inhibitors suitable for drug development, 1597 compounds in the National Cancer Institute Diversity Set III library were tested for inhibitory activity against recombinant human IDO1. We retrieved 35 hits that inhibited IDO1 activity >50% at 20 μM. Five structural filters and the PubChem Bioassay database were used to guide the selection of five inhibitors with IC50 between 3 and 12 μM for subsequent experimental evaluation. A pyrimidinone scaffold emerged as being the most promising. It showed excellent cell penetration, negligible cytotoxicity and passed four out of the five structural filters applied. To evaluate the importance of Ser167 and Cys129 residues in the IDO1 active site for inhibitor binding, the entire NCI library was subsequently screened against alanine-replacement mutant enzymes of these two residues. The results established that Ser167 but not Cys129 is important for inhibitory activity of a broad range of IDO1 inhibitors. Structure-activity-relationship studies proposed substituents interacting with Ser167 on four investigated IDO1 inhibitors. Three of these four Ser167 interactions associated with an increased IDO1 inhibition and were correctly predicted by molecular docking supporting Ser167 as an important mediator of potency for IDO1 inhibitors.

  1. Studies of the Interaction between Isoimperatorin and Human Serum Albumin by Multispectroscopic Method: Identification of Possible Binding Site of the Compound Using Esterase Activity of the Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Samira; Shokoohinia, Yalda; Ghobadi, Sirous; Gholamzadeh, Saeed; Moradi, Nastaran; Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Aghaei, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Isoimperatorin is one of the main components of Prangos ferulacea as a linear furanocoumarin and used as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antispasmodic, and anticancer drug. Human serum albumin (HSA) is a principal extracellular protein with a high concentration in blood plasma and carrier for many drugs to different molecular targets. Since the carrying of drug by HSA may affect on its structure and action, we decided to investigate the interaction between HSA and isoimperatorin using fluorescence and UV spectroscopy. Fluorescence data indicated that isoimperatorin quenches the intrinsic fluorescence of the HSA via a static mechanism and hydrophobic interaction play the major role in the drug binding. The binding average distance between isoimperatorin and Trp 214 of HSA was estimated on the basis of the theory of Förster energy transfer. Decrease of protein surface hydrophobicity (PSH) was also documented upon isoimperatorin binding. Furthermore, the synchronous fluorescence spectra show that the microenvironment of the tryptophan residues does not have obvious changes. Site marker compettive and fluorescence experiments revealed that the binding of isoimperatorin to HSA occurred at or near site I. Finally, the binding details between isoimperatorin and HSA were further confirmed by molecular docking and esterase activity inhibition studies which revealed that drug was bound at subdomain IIA. PMID:24319355

  2. SufE D74R Substitution Alters Active Site Loop Dynamics To Further Enhance SufE Interaction with the SufS Cysteine Desulfurase

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yuyuan; Kim, Dokyong; Dong, Guangchao; Busenlehner, Laura S.; Frantom, Patrick A.; Outten, F. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Many essential metalloproteins require iron–sulfur (Fe–S) cluster cofactors for their function. In vivo persulfide formation from L-cysteine is a key step in the biogenesis of Fe–S clusters in most organisms. In Escherichia coli, the SufS cysteine desulfurase mobilizes persulfide from L-cysteine via a PLP-dependent ping-pong reaction. SufS requires the SufE partner protein to transfer the persulfide to the SufB Fe–S cluster scaffold. Without SufE, the SufS enzyme fails to efficiently turn over and remains locked in the persulfide-bound state. Coordinated protein–protein interactions mediate sulfur transfer from SufS to SufE. Multiple studies have suggested that SufE must undergo a conformational change to extend its active site Cys loop during sulfur transfer from SufS. To test this putative model, we mutated SufE Asp74 to Arg (D74R) to increase the dynamics of the SufE Cys51 loop. Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) analysis of SufE D74R revealed an increase in solvent accessibility and dynamics in the loop containing the active site Cys51 used to accept persulfide from SufS. Our results indicate that the mutant protein has a stronger binding affinity for SufS than that of wild-type SufE. In addition, SufE D74R can still enhance SufS desulfurase activity and did not show saturation at higher SufE D74R concentrations, unlike wild-type SufE. These results show that dynamic changes may shift SufE to a sulfur-acceptor state that interacts more strongly with SufS. PMID:26171726

  3. Relocation of active site carboxylates in major facilitator superfamily multidrug transporter LmrP reveals plasticity in proton interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Asha V.; Singh, Himansha; Raturi, Sagar; Neuberger, Arthur; Tong, Zhen; Ding, Ning; Agboh, Kelvin; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2016-01-01

    The expression of polyspecific membrane transporters is one important mechanism by which cells can obtain resistance to structurally different antibiotics and cytotoxic agents. These transporters reduce intracellular drug concentrations to subtoxic levels by mediating drug efflux across the cell envelope. The major facilitator superfamily multidrug transporter LmrP from Lactococcus lactis catalyses drug efflux in a membrane potential and chemical proton gradient-dependent fashion. To enable the interaction with protons and cationic substrates, LmrP contains catalytic carboxyl residues on the surface of a large interior chamber that is formed by transmembrane helices. These residues co-localise together with polar and aromatic residues, and are predicted to be present in two clusters. To investigate the functional role of the catalytic carboxylates, we generated mutant proteins catalysing membrane potential-independent dye efflux by removing one of the carboxyl residues in Cluster 1. We then relocated this carboxyl residue to six positions on the surface of the interior chamber, and tested for restoration of wildtype energetics. The reinsertion at positions towards Cluster 2 reinstated the membrane potential dependence of dye efflux. Our data uncover a remarkable plasticity in proton interactions in LmrP, which is a consequence of the flexibility in the location of key residues that are responsible for proton/multidrug antiport. PMID:27917857

  4. Investigation by site-directed mutagenesis of the role of cytochrome P450 2B4 non-active site residues in protein-ligand interactions based on crystal structures of the ligand-bound enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Wilderman, P. Ross; Gay, Sean C.; Jang, Hyun-Hee; Zhang, Qinghai; Stout, C. David; Halpert, James R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Residues located outside of the active site of cytochromes P450 2B have exhibited importance in ligand binding, structural stability, and drug metabolism. However, contributions of non-active site residues to the plasticity of these enzymes are not known. Thus, a systematic investigation was undertaken of unique residue-residue interactions found in crystal structures of P450 2B4 in complex with 4-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazole (4-CPI), a closed conformation, or in complex with bifonazole, an expanded conformation. Nineteen mutants distributed over eleven sites were constructed, expressed in E. coli, and purified. Most mutants showed significantly decreased expression, especially in the case of interactions found in the 4-CPI structure. Six mutants (H172A, H172F, H172Q, L437A, E474D, and E474Q) were chosen for detailed functional analysis. Among these, the Ks of H172F for bifonazole was ~20-times higher than wild type 2B4, and the Ks of L437A for 4-CPI was ~50-times higher than wild type, leading to significantly altered inhibitor selectivity. Enzyme function was tested with the substrates 7-ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin (7-EFC), 7-methoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin (7-MFC), and 7-benzyloxyresorufin (7-BR). H172F was inactive with all three substrates, and L437A did not turn over 7-BR. Furthermore, H172A, H172Q, E474D and E474Q showed large changes in kcat/KM for each of the three substrates, in some cases up to 50-fold. Concurrent molecular dynamics simulations yield distances between some of the residues in these putative interaction pairs that are not consistent with contact. The results indicate that small changes in the protein scaffold lead to large differences in solution behavior and enzyme function. PMID:22051155

  5. F+ tunable laser activity and interaction of atomic halogens (F, Cl and Br) at the low coordinated surface sites of SrOAb initio and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Shalabi, Ahmed S

    2002-10-01

    The twofold potential of F+ color centers at the low coordinated surfaces of SrO for providing tunable laser activity and adsorption properties for atomic halogens (F, Cl and Br) has been investigated using ab initio electronic structure calculations. SrO clusters of variable sizes were embedded in simulated Coulomb fields that closely approximate the Madelung fields of the host surfaces and the nearest neighbor ions to F+ were allowed to relax to equilibrium. Based on Stokes shifted optical transition bands and horizontal shifts along the configuration coordinate diagrams, the F+ laser activity was found to decrease as the coordination number of the surface ions decreases from 5 (flat) to 4 (edge) to 3 (corner). An attempt has been made to explain this result in terms of Madelung potentials and optical-optical conversion efficiencies. All relaxed excited states are deep below the conduction bands of the perfect ground states, implying that F+ is a laser-suitable defect. The most laser active flat surface is the least probable for relaxed excited state orientational destruction of F+. The excited state at the edge has the highest energy, implying exciton (energy) transfer to the flat and edge sites. F+ relaxation and defect-formation energies increase with increasing surface coordination number. The Glasner-Tompkins relation between the fundamental optical absorption of F+ in solids and the fundamental absorption of the host crystals can be generalized to include the low coordinated surfaces of SrO. The F+ color center changes the nature of halogen-surface interaction (adsorption energies) from physical adsorption to chemical adsorption. The halogen-surface interactions increase with increasing electronegativity of the halogen. The calculated adsorption energies can be explained in terms of surface electrostatic potentials, and the covalent spin pairing mechanism plays a dominant role in determining adsorbate-substrate interactions.

  6. Interactive Design Activism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulev, Petar; Farrer, Joan

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Computers and Human Well-being * To Fuzzy or Yes (No)! * Interactive Design Activism * Sensing the Sun * Personalised Public Health Advice * Modifying Human Behaviour * Transdisciplinarity, Knowledge Transfer and Multi-domain

  7. Fourier transform infrared studies of active-site-methylated rhodopsin. Implications for chromophore-protein interaction, transducin activation, and the reaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Ganter, U M; Longstaff, C; Pajares, M A; Rando, R R; Siebert, F

    1991-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared studies of active-site-methylated rhodopsin (ASMR) show that, as compared to unmodified rhodopsin, the photoreaction is almost unchanged up to the formation of lumirhodopsin. Especially, the deviations are much smaller than those observed for the corresponding intermediates of 13-desmethyl-rhodopsin. In metarhodopsin-I, larger alterations are present with respect to the three internal carboxyl groups. Similar deviations have been observed in meta-I of 13-desmethyl-rhodopsin. This indicates that, in agreement with our previous investigations, these carboxyl groups are located in close proximity to the chromophore. Because this latter pigment is capable, when bleached, of activating transducin, our data provide support for the earlier conclusion that deprotonation of the Schiff base is a prerequisite for transducin activation. The positions of the C = C and C - C stretching modes of the retinal suggest that the redshift observed in ASMR and its photoproducts can be explained by an increased distance of the Schiff base from the counterion(s). It is further shown that the photoreaction does not stop at metarhodopsin-I, but that this intermediate directly decays to a metarhodopsin-III-like species.

  8. Fourier transform infrared studies of active-site-methylated rhodopsin. Implications for chromophore-protein interaction, transducin activation, and the reaction pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ganter, U.M.; Longstaff, C.; Pajares, M.A.; Rando, R.R.; Siebert, F. )

    1991-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared studies of active-site-methylated rhodopsin (ASMR) show that, as compared to unmodified rhodopsin, the photoreaction is almost unchanged up to the formation of lumirhodopsin. Especially, the deviations are much smaller than those observed for the corresponding intermediates of 13-desmethyl-rhodopsin. In metarhodopsin-I, larger alterations are present with respect to the three internal carboxyl groups. Similar deviations have been observed in meta-I of 13-desmethyl-rhodopsin. This indicates that, in agreement with our previous investigations, these carboxyl groups are located in close proximity to the chromophore. Because this latter pigment is capable, when bleached, of activating transducin, our data provide support for the earlier conclusion that deprotonation of the Schiff base is a prerequisite for transducin activation. The positions of the C = C and C - C stretching modes of the retinal suggest that the redshift observed in ASMR and its photoproducts can be explained by an increased distance of the Schiff base from the counterion(s). It is further shown that the photoreaction does not stop at metarhodopsin-I, but that this intermediate directly decays to a metarhodopsin-III-like species.

  9. Thermal interaction effect on nucleation site distribution in subcooled boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Ling Zou; Barclay Joned

    2012-05-01

    An experimental work on subcooled boiling of refrigerant, R134a, to examine nucleation site distributions on both copper and stainless steel heating surfaces was performed. In order to obtain high fidelity active nucleation site density and distribution data, a high-speed digital camera was utilized to record bubble emission images from a view normal to heating surfaces. Statistical analyses on nucleation site data were done and their statistical distributions were obtained. Those experimentally observed nucleation site distributions were compared to the random spatial Poisson distribution. The comparisons showed that, rather than purely random, active nucleation site distributions on boiling surfaces are relatively more uniform. Experimental results also showed that on the copper heating surface, nucleation site distributions are slightly more uniform than on the stainless steel surface. This was concluded as the results of thermal interactions between nucleation sites with different solid thermal conductivities. A two dimensional thermal interaction model was then developed to quantitatively examine the thermal interactions between nucleation sites. The results give a reasonable explanation to the experimental observation on nucleation site distributions.

  10. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Tetrazepam: a benzodiazepine which dissociates sedation from other benzodiazepine activities. II. In vitro and in vivo interactions with benzodiazepine binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, P.E.; Bachy, A.; Morre, M.; Biziere, K.

    1988-05-01

    Tetrazepam is a 1,4-benzodiazepine (BZD) derivative which, in rodents, appears to have very little sedative and ataxic effects. In an attempt to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this particular pharmacological profile we examined the interaction of tetrazepam with BZD binding sites. Tetrazepam interacted competitively with central and peripheral BZD binding sites and exhibited comparable affinities for both sites. Tetrazepam was approximately one-seventh as potent as diazepam at the central receptor and as potent as diazepam at the peripheral binding site. Tetrazepam did not distinguish type I from type II central BZD receptors, as evidenced by comparable affinities for the cerebellar and hippocampal receptors. In vitro autoradiographic studies showed that tetrazepam displaced (3H)flunitrazepam from rat brain membranes without any clear regional specificity. Like all BZD receptor agonists, tetrazepam exhibited a gamma-aminobutyric acid shift, a photoaffinity shift and potentiated the binding of 35S-t-butyl-bicyclophosphorothionate to rat brain membranes. However, the latter effect was observed at relatively high concentrations of tetrazepam. In vivo, tetrazepam displaced specifically bound (3H)flunitrazepam from mouse brain (ID50, 37 mg/kg p.o. vs 3.5 mg/kg p.o. for diazepam) and from mouse kidney (ID50, 38 mg/kg p.o. vs. 21 mg/kg p.o. for diazepam). It is concluded that tetrazepam is a BZD receptor agonist; the molecular mechanisms which underly the low sedative potential of the drug cannot at present be explained by a particular interaction with either central or peripheral BZD binding sites, but may be related to the drug's relatively weak effect on 35S-t-butyl-bicyclophosphorothionate binding.

  12. NMR Localization of Divalent Cations at the Active Site of the Neurospora VS Ribozyme Provides Insights into RNA–Metal-Ion Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metal cations represent key elements of RNA structure and function. In the Neurospora VS ribozyme, metal cations play diverse roles; they are important for substrate recognition, formation of the active site, and shifting the pKa’s of two key nucleobases that contribute to the general acid–base mechanism. Recently, we determined the NMR structure of the A730 loop of the VS ribozyme active site (SLVI) that contributes the general acid (A756) in the enzymatic mechanism of the cleavage reaction. Our studies showed that magnesium (Mg2+) ions are essential to stabilize the formation of the S-turn motif within the A730 loop that exposes the A756 nucleobase for catalysis. In this article, we extend these NMR investigations by precisely mapping the Mg2+-ion binding sites using manganese-induced paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and cadmium-induced chemical-shift perturbation of phosphorothioate RNAs. These experiments identify five Mg2+-ion binding sites within SLVI. Four Mg2+ ions in SLVI are associated with known RNA structural motifs, including the G–U wobble pair and the GNRA tetraloop, and our studies reveal novel insights about Mg2+ ion binding to these RNA motifs. Interestingly, one Mg2+ ion is specifically associated with the S-turn motif, confirming its structural role in the folding of the A730 loop. This Mg2+ ion is likely important for formation of the active site and may play an indirect role in catalysis. PMID:24364590

  13. Access to Space Interactive Design Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, John; Cutlip, William; Hametz, Mark

    2000-01-01

    The Access To Space (ATS) Group at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) supports the science and technology community at GSFC by facilitating frequent and affordable opportunities for access to space. Through partnerships established with access mode suppliers, the ATS Group has developed an interactive Mission Design web site. The ATS web site provides both the information and the tools necessary to assist mission planners in selecting and planning their ride to space. This includes the evaluation of single payloads vs. ride-sharing opportunities to reduce the cost of access to space. Features of this site include the following: (1) Mission Database. Our mission database contains a listing of missions ranging from proposed missions to manifested. Missions can be entered by our user community through data input tools. Data is then accessed by users through various search engines: orbit parameters, ride-share opportunities, spacecraft parameters, other mission notes, launch vehicle, and contact information. (2) Launch Vehicle Toolboxes. The launch vehicle toolboxes provide the user a full range of information on vehicle classes and individual configurations. Topics include: general information, environments, performance, payload interface, available volume, and launch sites.

  14. Femtosecond resolution of ligand-heme interactions in the high-affinity quinol oxidase bd: A di-heme active site?

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Marten H.; Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Liebl, Ursula; Martin, Jean-Louis; Konstantinov, Alexander A.

    2000-01-01

    Interaction of the two high-spin hemes in the oxygen reduction site of the bd-type quinol oxidase from Escherichia coli has been studied by femtosecond multicolor transient absorption spectroscopy. The previously unidentified Soret band of ferrous heme b595 was determined to be centered around 440 nm by selective excitation of the fully reduced unliganded or CO-bound cytochrome bd in the α-band of heme b595. The redox state of the b-type hemes strongly affects both the line shape and the kinetics of the absorption changes induced by photodissociation of CO from heme d. In the reduced enzyme, CO photodissociation from heme d perturbs the spectrum of ferrous cytochrome b595 within a few ps, pointing to a direct interaction between hemes b595 and d. Whereas in the reduced enzyme no heme d-CO geminate recombination is observed, in the mixed-valence CO-liganded complex with heme b595 initially oxidized, a significant part of photodissociated CO does not leave the protein and recombines with heme d within a few hundred ps. This caging effect may indicate that ferrous heme b595 provides a transient binding site for carbon monoxide within one of the routes by which the dissociated ligand leaves the protein. Taken together, the data indicate physical proximity of the hemes d and b595 and corroborate the possibility of a functional cooperation between the two hemes in the dioxygen-reducing center of cytochrome bd. PMID:10660685

  15. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site

    PubMed Central

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme. PMID:26487708

  16. Molecular interactions of the gating modifier toxin ProTx-II with NaV 1.5: implied existence of a novel toxin binding site coupled to activation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jaime J; Cummins, Theodore R; Alphy, Sujith; Blumenthal, Kenneth M

    2007-04-27

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels are critical components in the generation of action potentials in excitable cells, but despite numerous structure-function studies on these proteins, their gating mechanism remains unclear. Peptide toxins often modify channel gating, thereby providing a great deal of information about these channels. ProTx-II is a 30-amino acid peptide toxin from the venom of the tarantula, Thrixopelma pruriens, that conforms to the inhibitory cystine knot motif and which modifies activation kinetics of Na(v) and Ca(v), but not K(v), channels. ProTx-II inhibits current by shifting the voltage dependence of activation to more depolarized potentials and, therefore, differs from the classic site 4 toxins that shift voltage dependence of activation in the opposite direction. Despite this difference in functional effects, ProTx-II has been proposed to bind to neurotoxin site 4 because it modifies activation. Here, we investigate the bioactive surface of ProTx-II by alanine-scanning the toxin and analyzing the interactions of each mutant with the cardiac isoform, Na(v)1.5. The active face of the toxin is largely composed of hydrophobic and cationic residues, joining a growing group of predominantly K(v) channel gating modifier toxins that are thought to interact with the lipid environment. In addition, we performed extensive mutagenesis of Na(v)1.5 to locate the receptor site with which ProTx-II interacts. Our data establish that, contrary to prior assumptions, ProTx-II does not bind to the previously characterized neurotoxin site 4, thus making it a novel probe of activation gating in Na(v) channels with potential to shed new light on this process.

  17. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  18. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  19. 1H NMR study of the influence of mutation on the interaction of the C-terminus with the active site in heme oxygenase from Neisseria meningitidis: implications for product release.

    PubMed

    Peng, Dungeng; Ma, Li-Hua; Ogura, Hiroshi; Yang, En-Che; Zhang, Xuhong; Yoshida, Tadashi; La Mar, Gerd N

    2010-07-20

    The HO from the pathogenic bacterium Neisseria meningitidis, NmHO, possesses C-terminal His207, Arg208, and His209 residues that are undetected in crystal structures. NMR found the C-terminus ordered and interacting with the active site and shown to undergo a spontaneous cleavage of the C-terminal Arg208-His209 bond that affects the product off rate. A preliminary model for the interaction based on the wild-type (WT) NmHO complexes has been presented [Liu, Y., Ma, L.-H., Satterlee, J. D., Zhang, X., Yoshida, T., and La Mar, G. N. (2006) Biochemistry 45, 3875-3886]. Two-dimensional (1)H NMR data of resting-state, azide-inhibited substrate complexes of the three C-terminal truncation mutants (Des-His209-, Des-Arg208His209-, and Des-His207Arg208His209-NmHO) confirm the previous proposed roles for His207 and Arg208 and reveal important additional salt bridges involving the His209 carboxylate and the side chains of both Lys126 and Arg208. Deletion of His209 leads to a qualitatively retained C-terminal geometry, but with increased separation between the C-terminus and active site. Moreover, replacing vinyls with methyls on the substrate leads to a decrease in the separation between the C-terminus and the active site. The expanded model for the C-terminus reveals a less stable His207-Arg208 cis peptide bond, providing a rationalization for its spontaneous cleavage. The rate of this spontaneous cleavage is shown to correlate with the proximity of the C-terminus to the active site, suggesting that the closer interaction leads to increased strain on the already weak His207-Arg208 peptide bond. The relevance of the C-terminus structure for in vitro studies, and the physiological function of product release, is discussed.

  20. The importance of the negative charge of beta-lactam compounds in the interactions with active-site serine DD-peptidases and beta-lactamases.

    PubMed Central

    Varetto, L; De Meester, F; Monnaie, D; Marchand-Brynaert, J; Dive, G; Jacob, F; Frère, J M

    1991-01-01

    The interaction between various penicillins and cephalosporins the carboxylate group of which at C-3 or C-4 had been esterified or amidated and different penicillin-recognizing enzymes was studied. In general, our findings reinforced the common assumption that an anionic group at that position is necessary for the effective acylation of these enzymes. However, the relative activities of the modified beta-lactams as inactivators of the Streptomyces R61 DD-peptidase or as substrates of the Bacillus licheniformis, Streptomyces albus G and Enterobacter cloacae beta-lactamases did not fit a general scheme in which the intrinsic electronic and geometric properties of the beta-lactam compounds would be sufficient to explain their substrate or inactivator properties towards the various types of enzymes investigated. PMID:1898366

  1. Interaction of PARP-2 with AP site containing DNA.

    PubMed

    Kutuzov, Mikhail M; Khodyreva, Svetlana N; Ilina, Ekaterina S; Sukhanova, Maria V; Amé, Jean-Christophe; Lavrik, Olga I

    2015-05-01

    In eukaryotes the stability of genome is provided by functioning of DNA repair systems. One of the main DNA repair pathways in eukaryotes is the base excision repair (BER). This system requires precise regulation for correct functioning. Two members of the PARP family - PARP-1 and PARP-2, which can be activated by DNA damage - are widely considered as regulators of DNA repair processes, including BER. In contrast to PARP-1, the role of PARP-2 in BER has not been extensively studied yet. Since AP site is one of the most frequent type of DNA damage and a key intermediate of BER at the stage preceding formation of DNA breaks, in this paper we focused on the characterization of PARP-2 interaction with AP site-containing DNAs. We demonstrated that PARP-2, like PARP-1, can interact with the intact AP site via Schiff base formation, in spite of crucial difference in the structure of the DNA binding domains of these PARPs. By cross-linking of PARPs to AP DNA, we determined that the N-terminal domains of both PARPs are involved in formation of cross-links with AP DNA. We have also confirmed that DNA binding by PARP-2, in contrast to PARP-1, is not modulated by autoPARylation. PARP-2, like PARP-1, can inhibit the activity of APE1 by binding to AP site, but, in contrast to PARP-1, this inhibitory influence is hardly regulated by PAR synthesis. At the same time, 5'-dRP lyase activity of both PARPs is comparable, although being much weaker than that of Pol β, which is considered as the main 5'-dRP lyase of the BER process.

  2. Increasing the binding affinity of VEGFR-2 inhibitors by extending their hydrophobic interaction with the active site: Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of 1-substituted-4-(4-methoxybenzyl)phthalazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Eldehna, Wagdy M; Abou-Seri, Sahar M; El Kerdawy, Ahmed M; Ayyad, Rezk R; Hamdy, Abdallah M; Ghabbour, Hazem A; Ali, Mamdouh M; Abou El Ella, Dalal A

    2016-05-04

    A series of anilinophthalazine derivatives 4a-j was initially synthesized and tested for its VEGFR-2 inhibitory activity where it showed promising activity (IC50 = 0.636-5.76 μM). Molecular docking studies guidance was used to improve the binding affinity for series 4a-j towards VEGFR-2 active site. This improvement was achieved by increasing the hydrophobic interaction with the hydrophobic back pocket of the VEGFR-2 active site lined with the hydrophobic side chains of Ile888, Leu889, Ile892, Val898, Val899, Leu1019 and Ile1044. Increasing the hydrophobic interaction was accomplished by extending the anilinophthalazine scaffold with a substituted phenyl moiety through an uriedo linker which should give this extension the flexibility required to accommodate itself deeply into the hydrophobic back pocket. As planned, the designed uriedo-anilinophthalazines 7a-i showed superior binding affinity than their anilinophthalazine parents (IC50 = 0.083-0.473 μM). In particular, compounds 7g-i showed IC50 of 0.086, 0.083 and 0.086 μM, respectively, which are better than that of the reference drug sorafenib (IC50 = 0.09 μM).

  3. Site-specific N-linked glycosylation of receptor guanylyl cyclase C regulates ligand binding, ligand-mediated activation and interaction with vesicular integral membrane protein 36, VIP36.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Najla; Ballal, Suhas; Visweswariah, Sandhya S

    2013-02-08

    Guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C) is a multidomain, membrane-associated receptor guanylyl cyclase. GC-C is primarily expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, where it mediates fluid-ion homeostasis, intestinal inflammation, and cell proliferation in a cGMP-dependent manner, following activation by its ligands guanylin, uroguanylin, or the heat-stable enterotoxin peptide (ST). GC-C is also expressed in neurons, where it plays a role in satiation and attention deficiency/hyperactive behavior. GC-C is glycosylated in the extracellular domain, and differentially glycosylated forms that are resident in the endoplasmic reticulum (130 kDa) and the plasma membrane (145 kDa) bind the ST peptide with equal affinity. When glycosylation of human GC-C was prevented, either by pharmacological intervention or by mutation of all of the 10 predicted glycosylation sites, ST binding and surface localization was abolished. Systematic mutagenesis of each of the 10 sites of glycosylation in GC-C, either singly or in combination, identified two sites that were critical for ligand binding and two that regulated ST-mediated activation. We also show that GC-C is the first identified receptor client of the lectin chaperone vesicular integral membrane protein, VIP36. Interaction with VIP36 is dependent on glycosylation at the same sites that allow GC-C to fold and bind ligand. Because glycosylation of proteins is altered in many diseases and in a tissue-dependent manner, the activity and/or glycan-mediated interactions of GC-C may have a crucial role to play in its functions in different cell types.

  4. Application of molecular docking and ONIOM methods for the description of interactions between anti-quorum sensing active (AHL) analogues and the Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasR binding site.

    PubMed

    Ahumedo, Maicol; Drosos, Juan Carlos; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    Molecular docking methods were applied to simulate the coupling of a set of nineteen acyl homoserine lactone analogs into the binding site of the transcriptional receptor LasR. The best pose of each ligand was explored and a qualitative analysis of the possible interactions present in the complex was performed. From the results of the protein-ligand complex analysis, it was found that residues Tyr-64 and Tyr-47 are involved in important interactions, which mainly determine the antagonistic activity of the AHL analogues considered for this study. The effect of different substituents on the aromatic ring, the common structure to all ligands, was also evaluated focusing on how the interaction with the two previously mentioned tyrosine residues was affected. Electrostatic potential map calculations based on the electron density and the van der Waals radii were performed on all ligands to graphically aid in the explanation of the variation of charge density on their structures when the substituent on the aromatic ring is changed through the elements of the halogen group series. A quantitative approach was also considered and for that purpose the ONIOM method was performed to estimate the energy change in the different ligand-receptor complex regions. Those energy values were tested for their relationship with the corresponding IC50 in order to establish if there is any correlation between energy changes in the selected regions and the biological activity. The results obtained using the two approaches may contribute to the field of quorum sensing active molecules; the docking analysis revealed the role of some binding site residues involved in the formation of a halogen bridge with ligands. These interactions have been demonstrated to be responsible for the interruption of the signal propagation needed for the quorum sensing circuit. Using the other approach, the structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis, it was possible to establish which structural characteristics

  5. Activities for an Interactive Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golub, Jeffrey N.

    Focusing particularly on student writing, this book describes the principles of an interactive classroom and presents specific activities which adhere to those principles. Acknowledging that such classrooms require that the students feel comfortable with each other, the book details several activities that help to build a positive classroom…

  6. A novel interaction partner for the C-terminus of Arabidopsis thaliana plasma membrane H+-ATPase (AHA1 isoform): site and mechanism of action on H+-ATPase activity differ from those of 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Morandini, Piero; Valera, Marco; Albumi, Cristina; Bonza, Maria Cristina; Giacometti, Sonia; Ravera, Giuseppe; Murgia, Irene; Soave, Carlo; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2002-08-01

    Using the two-hybrid technique we identified a novel protein whose N-terminal 88 amino acids (aa) interact with the C-terminal regulatory domain of the plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase from Arabidopsis thaliana (aa 847-949 of isoform AHA1). The corresponding gene has been named Ppi1 for Proton pump interactor 1. The encoded protein is 612 aa long and rich in charged and polar residues, except for the extreme C-terminus, where it presents a hydrophobic stretch of 24 aa. Several genes in the A. thaliana genome and many ESTs from different plant species share significant similarity (50-70% at the aa level over stretches of 200-600 aa) to Ppi1. The PPI1 N-terminus, expressed in bacteria as a fusion protein with either GST or a His-tag, binds the PM H+-ATPase in overlay experiments. The same fusion proteins and the entire coding region fused to GST stimulate H+-ATPase activity. The effect of the His-tagged peptide is synergistic with that of fusicoccin (FC) and of tryptic removal of a C-terminal 10 kDa fragment. The His-tagged peptide binds also the trypsinised H+-ATPase. Altogether these results indicate that PPI1 N-terminus is able to modulate the PM H+-ATPase activity by binding to a site different from the 14-3-3 binding site and is located upstream of the trypsin cleavage site.

  7. Active and regulatory sites of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Pesi, Rossana; Allegrini, Simone; Careddu, Maria Giovanna; Filoni, Daniela Nicole; Camici, Marcella; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2010-12-01

    Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II), which acts preferentially on 6-hydroxypurine nucleotides, is essential for the survival of several cell types. cN-II catalyses both the hydrolysis of nucleotides and transfer of their phosphate moiety to a nucleoside acceptor through formation of a covalent phospho-intermediate. Both activities are regulated by a number of phosphorylated compounds, such as diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap₄A), ADP, ATP, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) and phosphate. On the basis of a partial crystal structure of cN-II, we mutated two residues located in the active site, Y55 and T56. We ascertained that the ability to catalyse the transfer of phosphate depends on the presence of a bulky residue in the active site very close to the aspartate residue that forms the covalent phospho-intermediate. The molecular model indicates two possible sites at which adenylic compounds may interact. We mutated three residues that mediate interaction in the first activation site (R144, N154, I152) and three in the second (F127, M436 and H428), and found that Ap₄A and ADP interact with the same site, but the sites for ATP and BPG remain uncertain. The structural model indicates that cN-II is a homotetrameric protein that results from interaction through a specific interface B of two identical dimers that have arisen from interaction of two identical subunits through interface A. Point mutations in the two interfaces and gel-filtration experiments indicated that the dimer is the smallest active oligomerization state. Finally, gel-filtration and light-scattering experiments demonstrated that the native enzyme exists as a tetramer, and no further oligomerization is required for enzyme activation.

  8. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  9. A highly conserved interaction involving the middle residue of the SXN active-site motif is crucial for function of class B penicillin-binding proteins: mutational and computational analysis of PBP 2 from N. gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Tomberg, Joshua; Temple, Brenda; Fedarovich, Alena; Davies, Christopher; Nicholas, Robert A

    2012-04-03

    Insertion of an aspartate residue at position 345a in penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP 2), which lowers the rate of penicillin acylation by ~6-fold, is commonly observed in penicillin-resistant strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Here, we show that insertions of other amino acids also lower the penicillin acylation rate of PBP 2, but none supported growth of N. gonorrhoeae, indicating loss of essential transpeptidase activity. The Asp345a mutation likely acts by altering the interaction between its adjacent residue, Asp346, in the β2a-β2d hairpin loop and Ser363, the middle residue of the SXN active site motif. Because the adjacent aspartate creates ambiguity in the position of the insertion, we also examined if insertions at position 346a could confer decreased susceptibility to penicillin. However, only aspartate insertions were identified, indicating that only an Asp-Asp couple can confer resistance and retain transpeptidase function. The importance of the Asp346-Ser363 interaction was assessed by mutation of each residue to Ala. Although both mutants lowered the acylation rate of penicillin G by 5-fold, neither could support growth of N. gonorrhoeae, again indicating loss of transpeptidase function. Interaction between a residue in the equivalent of the β2a-β2d hairpin loop and the middle residue of the SXN motif is observed in crystal structures of other Class B PBPs, and its importance is also supported by multisequence alignments. Overall, these results suggest that this conserved interaction can be manipulated (e.g., by insertion) to lower the acylation rate by β-lactam antibiotics and increase resistance, but only if essential transpeptidase activity is preserved.

  10. The Interaction-Activity Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borne, Kirk D.

    1996-01-01

    A review is presented of the numerous studies that have been undertaken to investigate the likely interaction-activity connection among galaxies. Both observational evidence and theoretical supporting models are reviewed. Some specific examples of "interactive" galaxies from the author's own research are presented: (a) the collision-induced AGN (Active Galactic Nuclei) activity in the radio jet source 3C278; and (b) the collision-induced starburst activity in the spectacular "Cartwheel" ring galaxy. Some comments are offered concerning some of the more promising theoretical investigations that are now taking place. A few words of warning are also offered about the possible misinterpretation of putative collision-induced morphologies among some galaxy samples.

  11. Metalloprotein-inhibitor binding: Human carbonic anhydrase II as a model for probing metal-ligand interactions in a metalloprotein active site

    PubMed Central

    Martin, David P.; Hann, Zachary S.; Cohen, Seth M.

    2013-01-01

    An ever increasing number of metalloproteins are being discovered that play essential roles in physiological processes. Inhibitors of these proteins have significant potential for the treatment of human disease, but clinical success of these compounds has been limited. Herein, Zn(II)-dependent metalloprotein inhibitors in clinical use are reviewed, and the potential for using novel metal-binding groups (MBGs) in the design of these inhibitors is discussed. By using human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) as a model system, the nuances of MBG-metal interactions in the context of a protein environment can be probed. Understanding how metal coordination influences inhibitor binding may help in the design new therapeutics targeting metalloproteins. PMID:23706138

  12. Diffusion and interactions of carbon dioxide and oxygen in the vicinity of the active site of Rubisco: Molecular dynamics and quantum chemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hendawy, Morad M.; Garate, José-Antonio; English, Niall J.; O'Reilly, Stephen; Mooney, Damian A.

    2012-10-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) at the molecular mechanical level and geometry optimisation at the quantum mechanical level have been performed to investigate the transport and fixation of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the cavity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, or Rubisco. Multiple MD simulations have been carried out to study the diffusive behaviour of O2 and CO2 molecules from the Mg2+ cation in Rubisco at 298 K and 1 bar, being one step in the overall process of carboxylation/oxygenation in Rubisco. In addition to this work, in order to gain additional perspective on the role of chemical reaction rates and thermodynamics, oxygen, and carbon dioxide uptake mechanisms have also been investigated by the aid of quantum chemical calculations. The results indicate that the activation barrier for carboxylation is slightly lower than that of oxygenation. This agrees qualitatively with experimental findings, and rationalises the observed competition between both catalytic processes in nature. Finally, the longer-lived persistence of CO2 in the vicinity of the active centre (i.e., slower self-diffusion) may serve to explain, in part, why carboxylation is the more kinetically favoured on an overall basis compared to oxygenation.

  13. Interactivity versus Interaction: What Really Matters for State Legislature Web Sites?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferber, Paul; Foltz, Franz; Pugliese, Rudy

    2005-01-01

    The Internet, not unlike previous communication technologies, has been predicted to dramatically change the nature of democracy. The interactive nature of Web sites, in particular, is seen as the basis for a new cyberdemocracy. Although the definition of interactivity is less than precise, an evaluation of state legislature Web sites finds them…

  14. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  15. In vivo binding of PRDM9 reveals interactions with noncanonical genomic sites

    PubMed Central

    Grey, Corinne; Clément, Julie A.J.; Buard, Jérôme; Leblanc, Benjamin; Gut, Ivo; Gut, Marta; Duret, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    In mouse and human meiosis, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) initiate homologous recombination and occur at specific sites called hotspots. The localization of these sites is determined by the sequence-specific DNA binding domain of the PRDM9 histone methyl transferase. Here, we performed an extensive analysis of PRDM9 binding in mouse spermatocytes. Unexpectedly, we identified a noncanonical recruitment of PRDM9 to sites that lack recombination activity and the PRDM9 binding consensus motif. These sites include gene promoters, where PRDM9 is recruited in a DSB-dependent manner. Another subset reveals DSB-independent interactions between PRDM9 and genomic sites, such as the binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF. We propose that these DSB-independent sites result from interactions between hotspot-bound PRDM9 and genomic sequences located on the chromosome axis. PMID:28336543

  16. In vivo binding of PRDM9 reveals interactions with noncanonical genomic sites.

    PubMed

    Grey, Corinne; Clément, Julie A J; Buard, Jérôme; Leblanc, Benjamin; Gut, Ivo; Gut, Marta; Duret, Laurent; de Massy, Bernard

    2017-04-01

    In mouse and human meiosis, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) initiate homologous recombination and occur at specific sites called hotspots. The localization of these sites is determined by the sequence-specific DNA binding domain of the PRDM9 histone methyl transferase. Here, we performed an extensive analysis of PRDM9 binding in mouse spermatocytes. Unexpectedly, we identified a noncanonical recruitment of PRDM9 to sites that lack recombination activity and the PRDM9 binding consensus motif. These sites include gene promoters, where PRDM9 is recruited in a DSB-dependent manner. Another subset reveals DSB-independent interactions between PRDM9 and genomic sites, such as the binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF. We propose that these DSB-independent sites result from interactions between hotspot-bound PRDM9 and genomic sequences located on the chromosome axis.

  17. Androgen receptor exon 1 mutation causes androgen insensitivity by creating phosphorylation site and inhibiting melanoma antigen-A11 activation of NH2- and carboxyl-terminal interaction-dependent transactivation.

    PubMed

    Lagarde, William H; Blackwelder, Amanda J; Minges, John T; Hnat, Andrew T; French, Frank S; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2012-03-30

    Naturally occurring germ line mutations in the X-linked human androgen receptor (AR) gene cause incomplete masculinization of the external genitalia by disrupting AR function in males with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Almost all AR missense mutations that cause androgen insensitivity syndrome are located in the highly structured DNA and ligand binding domains. In this report we investigate the functional defect associated with an AR exon 1 missense mutation, R405S, that caused partial androgen insensitivity. The 46,XX heterozygous maternal carrier had a wild-type Arg-405 CGC allele but transmitted an AGC mutant allele coding for Ser-405. At birth, the 46,XY proband had a bifid scrotum, hypospadias, and micropenis consistent with clinical stage 3 partial androgen insensitivity. Androgen-dependent transcriptional activity of AR-R405S expressed in CV1 cells was less than wild-type AR and refractory in androgen-dependent AR NH(2)- and carboxyl interaction transcription assays that depend on the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11. This mutation created a Ser-405 phosphorylation site evident by the gel migration of an AR-R405S NH(2)-terminal fragment as a double band that converted to the wild-type single band after treatment with λ-phosphatase. Detrimental effects of the R405S mutation were related to the proximity of the AR WXXLF motif (433)WHTLF(437) required for melanoma antigen-A11 and p300 to stimulate transcriptional activity associated with the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction. We conclude that the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11 on the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction amplify the androgen-dependent transcriptional response to p300 required for normal human male sex development in utero.

  18. Corrosion Research And Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  19. Corrosion Research and Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  20. Evidence for a common pharmacological interaction site on K(Ca)2 channels providing both selective activation and selective inhibition of the human K(Ca)2.1 subtype.

    PubMed

    Hougaard, Charlotte; Hammami, Sofia; Eriksen, Birgitte L; Sørensen, Ulrik S; Jensen, Marianne L; Strøbæk, Dorte; Christophersen, Palle

    2012-02-01

    We have previously identified Ser293 in transmembrane segment 5 as a determinant for selective K(Ca)2.1 channel activation by GW542573X (4-(2-methoxyphenylcarbamoyloxymethyl)-piperidine-1-carboxylic acid tert-butyl ester). Now we show that Ser293 mediates both activation and inhibition of K(Ca)2.1: CM-TPMF (N-{7-[1-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)ethyl]-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-2-yl}-N'-methoxy-formamidine) and B-TPMF (N-{7-[1-(4-tert-butyl-phenoxy)ethyl]-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-2-yl}-N'-methoxy-formamidine), two newly identified and structurally related [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines, act either as activators or as inhibitors of the human K(Ca)2.1 channel. Whereas (-)-CM-TPMF activates K(Ca)2.1 with an EC(50) value of 24 nM, (-)-B-TPMF inhibits the channel with an IC(50) value of 31 nM. In contrast, their (+)-enantiomers are 40 to 100 times less active. Both (-)-CM-TPMF and (-)-B-TPMF are subtype-selective, with 10- to 20-fold discrimination toward other K(Ca)2 channels and the K(Ca)3 channel. Coapplication experiments reveal competitive-like functional interactions between the effects of (-)-CM-TPMF and (-)-B-TPMF. Despite belonging to a different chemical class than GW542573X, the K(Ca)2.1 selectivity of (-)-CM-TPMF and (-)-B-TPMF depend critically on Ser293 as revealed by loss- and gain-of-function mutations. We conclude that compounds occupying the TPMF site may either positively or negatively influence the gating process depending on their substitution patterns. It is noteworthy that (-)-CM-TPMF is 10 times more potent on K(Ca)2.1 than NS309 (6,7-dichloro-1H-indole-2,3-dione 3-oxime), an unselective but hitherto the most potent K(Ca)3/K(Ca)2 channel activator. (-)-B-TPMF is the first small-molecule inhibitor with significant selectivity among the K(Ca)2 channel subtypes. In contrast to peptide blockers such as apamin and scyllatoxin, which preferentially affect K(Ca)2.2, (-)-B-TPMF exhibits K(Ca)2.1 selectivity. These high-affinity compounds

  1. Spatial games with cyclic interactions: the response of empty sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bart; Pleimling, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Predator-prey models of the May-Leonard family employ empty sites in a spatial setting as an intermediate step in the reproduction process. This requirement makes the number and arrangement of empty sites important to the formation of space-time patterns. We study the density of empty sites in a stochastic predator-prey model in which the species compete in a cyclic way in two dimensions. In some cases systems of this type quickly form domains of neutral species after which all predation, and therefore, reproduction occur near the interface of competing domains. Using Monte Carlo simulations we investigate the relationship of this density of empty sites to the time-dependent domain length. We further explore the dynamics by introducing perturbations to the interaction rates of the system after which we measure the perturbed density, i.e. the response of empty sites, as the system relaxes. A dynamical scaling behavior is observed in the response of empty sites. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation through Grant DMR-1205309.

  2. Predicting Protein–Protein Interaction Sites Using Sequence Descriptors and Site Propensity of Neighboring Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tzu-Hao; Li, Kuo-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Information about the interface sites of Protein–Protein Interactions (PPIs) is useful for many biological research works. However, despite the advancement of experimental techniques, the identification of PPI sites still remains as a challenging task. Using a statistical learning technique, we proposed a computational tool for predicting PPI interaction sites. As an alternative to similar approaches requiring structural information, the proposed method takes all of the input from protein sequences. In addition to typical sequence features, our method takes into consideration that interaction sites are not randomly distributed over the protein sequence. We characterized this positional preference using protein complexes with known structures, proposed a numerical index to estimate the propensity and then incorporated the index into a learning system. The resulting predictor, without using structural information, yields an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.675, recall of 0.597, precision of 0.311 and accuracy of 0.583 on a ten-fold cross-validation experiment. This performance is comparable to the previous approach in which structural information was used. Upon introducing the B-factor data to our predictor, we demonstrated that the AUC can be further improved to 0.750. The tool is accessible at http://bsaltools.ym.edu.tw/predppis. PMID:27792167

  3. Environmental Research Translation: Enhancing Interactions with Communities at Contaminated Sites

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Andreotta, Monica D.; Brusseau, Mark L.; Artiola, Janick F.; Maier, Raina M.; Gandolfi, A. Jay

    2014-01-01

    The characterization and remediation of contaminated sites are complex endeavors fraught with numerous challenges. One particular challenge that is receiving increased attention is the development and encouragement of full participation by communities and community members affected by a given site in all facets of decision-making. Many disciplines have been grappling with the challenges associated with environmental and risk communication, public participation in environmental data generation, and decision-making and increasing community capacity. The concepts and methods developed by these disciplines are reviewed, with a focus on their relevance to the specific dynamics associated with environmental contamination sites. The contributions of these disciplines are then synthesized and integrated to help develop Environmental Research Translation (ERT), a proposed framework for environmental scientists to promote interaction and communication among involved parties at contaminated sites. This holistic approach is rooted in public participation approaches to science, which includes: a transdisciplinary team, effective collaboration, information transfer, public participation in environmental projects, and a cultural model of risk communication. Although there are challenges associated with the implementation of ERT, it is anticipated that application of this proposed translational science method could promote more robust community participation at contaminated sites. PMID:25173762

  4. Environmental Research Translation: Enhancing Interactions with Communities at Contaminated Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Andreotta, M.; Brusseau, M. L. L.; Artiola, J. F.; Maier, R. M.; Gandolfi, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The characterization and remediation of contaminated sites are complex endeavors fraught with numerous challenges. One particular challenge that is receiving increased attention is the development and encouragement of full participation by communities and community members affected by a given site in all facets of decision-making. Many disciplines have been grappling with the challenges associated with environmental and risk communication, public participation in environmental data generation and decision-making, and increasing community capacity. The concepts and methods developed by these disciplines are reviewed, with a focus on their relevance to the specific dynamics associated with contaminated sites. The contributions of these disciplines are then synthesized and integrated to help develop Environmental Research Translation (ERT), a proposed framework for environmental scientists to promote interaction and communication among involved parties at contaminated sites. This holistic approach is rooted in public participation approaches to science, which includes: a transdisciplinary team, effective collaboration, information transfer, public participation in environmental projects, and a cultural model of risk communication. Although there are challenges associated with the implementation of ERT, it is anticipated that application of this proposed translational science method could promote more robust community participation at contaminated sites.

  5. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  6. [Structural regularities in activated cleavage sites of thrombin receptors].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlik, I V; Verevka, S V

    1999-01-01

    Comparison of thrombin receptors activation splitting sites sequences testifies to their similarity both in activation splitting sites of protein precursors and protein proteinase inhibitors reactive sites. In all these sites corresponded to effectory sites P2'-positions are placed by hydrophobic amino-acids only. The regularity defined conforms with previous thesis about the role of effectory S2'-site in regulation of the processes mediated by serine proteinases.

  7. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  8. Complexes containing activating transcription factor (ATF)/cAMP-responsive-element-binding protein (CREB) interact with the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)-ATF composite site to regulate Gadd153 expression during the stress response.

    PubMed Central

    Fawcett, T W; Martindale, J L; Guyton, K Z; Hai, T; Holbrook, N J

    1999-01-01

    Gadd153, also known as chop, encodes a member of the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) transcription factor family and is transcriptionally activated by cellular stress signals. We recently demonstrated that arsenite treatment of rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells results in the biphasic induction of Gadd153 mRNA expression, controlled in part through binding of C/EBPbeta and two uncharacterized protein complexes to the C/EBP-ATF (activating transcription factor) composite site in the Gadd153 promoter. In this report, we identified components of these additional complexes as two ATF/CREB (cAMP-responsive-element-binding protein) transcription factors having differential binding activities dependent upon the time of arsenite exposure. During arsenite treatment of PC12 cells, we observed enhanced binding of ATF4 to the C/EBP-ATF site at 2 h as Gadd153 mRNA levels increased, and enhanced binding of ATF3 complexes at 6 h as Gadd153 expression declined. We further demonstrated that ATF4 activates, while ATF3 represses, Gadd153 promoter activity through the C/EBP-ATF site. ATF3 also repressed ATF4-mediated transactivation and arsenite-induced activation of the Gadd153 promoter. Our results suggest that numerous members of the ATF/CREB family are involved in the cellular stress response, and that regulation of stress-induced biphasic Gadd153 expression in PC12 cells involves the ordered, sequential binding of multiple transcription factor complexes to the C/EBP-ATF composite site. PMID:10085237

  9. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  10. An active site water network in the plasminogen activator pla from Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-07-14

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 A. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  11. Prediction of allosteric sites and mediating interactions through bond-to-bond propensities

    PubMed Central

    Amor, B. R. C.; Schaub, M. T.; Yaliraki, S. N.; Barahona, M.

    2016-01-01

    Allostery is a fundamental mechanism of biological regulation, in which binding of a molecule at a distant location affects the active site of a protein. Allosteric sites provide targets to fine-tune protein activity, yet we lack computational methodologies to predict them. Here we present an efficient graph-theoretical framework to reveal allosteric interactions (atoms and communication pathways strongly coupled to the active site) without a priori information of their location. Using an atomistic graph with energy-weighted covalent and weak bonds, we define a bond-to-bond propensity quantifying the non-local effect of instantaneous bond fluctuations propagating through the protein. Significant interactions are then identified using quantile regression. We exemplify our method with three biologically important proteins: caspase-1, CheY, and h-Ras, correctly predicting key allosteric interactions, whose significance is additionally confirmed against a reference set of 100 proteins. The almost-linear scaling of our method renders it suitable for high-throughput searches for candidate allosteric sites. PMID:27561351

  12. Prediction of allosteric sites and mediating interactions through bond-to-bond propensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, B. R. C.; Schaub, M. T.; Yaliraki, S. N.; Barahona, M.

    2016-08-01

    Allostery is a fundamental mechanism of biological regulation, in which binding of a molecule at a distant location affects the active site of a protein. Allosteric sites provide targets to fine-tune protein activity, yet we lack computational methodologies to predict them. Here we present an efficient graph-theoretical framework to reveal allosteric interactions (atoms and communication pathways strongly coupled to the active site) without a priori information of their location. Using an atomistic graph with energy-weighted covalent and weak bonds, we define a bond-to-bond propensity quantifying the non-local effect of instantaneous bond fluctuations propagating through the protein. Significant interactions are then identified using quantile regression. We exemplify our method with three biologically important proteins: caspase-1, CheY, and h-Ras, correctly predicting key allosteric interactions, whose significance is additionally confirmed against a reference set of 100 proteins. The almost-linear scaling of our method renders it suitable for high-throughput searches for candidate allosteric sites.

  13. First Principles Computational Study of the Active Site of Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Ivaylo; Klien, Micheal

    2004-01-14

    Ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to investigate the structural features of the active site of the binuclear enzyme rat liver arginase. Special emphasis was placed on the crucial role of the second shell ligand interactions. These interactions were systematically studied by performing calculations on models of varying size. It was determined that a water molecule, and not hydroxide, is the bridging exogenous ligand. The carboxylate ligands facilitate the close approach of the Mn (II) ions by attenuating the metal-metal electrostatic repulsion. Of the two metals, MnA was shown to carry a larger positive charge. Analysis of the electronic properties of the active site revealed that orbitals involving the terminal Asp234 residue, as well as the flexible -1,1 bridging Asp232, lie at high energies, suggesting weaker coordination. This is reflected in certain structural variability present in our models and is also consistent with recent experimental findings. Finally, implications of our findings for the biological function of the enzyme are delineated.

  14. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-04

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases.

  15. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases. PMID:22020126

  16. Tetragonal Lysozyme Interactions Studied by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    A number of recent experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth proceeds by the addition of aggregates, formed by reversible self association of the solute molecules in the bulk'solution. Periodic bond chain and atomic force microscopy studies have indicated that the probable growth unit is at minimum a 43 tetramer, and most likely an octamer composed of two complete turns about the 4(sub 3) axis. If these results are correct, then there are intermolecular interactions which are only formed in the solution and others only formed at the joining of the growth unit to the crystal surface. We have set out to study these interactions, and the correctness of this hypothesis, using site directed mutagenesis of specific amino acid residues involved in the different bonds. We had initially expressed wild type lysozyme in S. cervasiae with yields of approximately 5 mg/L, which were eventually raised to approximately 40 mg/L. We are now moving the expression to the Pichia system, with anticipated yields of 300 to greater than 500 mg/L, comparable to what can be obtained from egg whites. An additional advantage of using recombinant protein is the greater genetic homogeneity of the material obtained and the absence of any other contaminating egg proteins. The first mutation experiments are TYR 23 yields PHE or ALA and ASN 113 yields ALA or ASP. Both TYR 23 and ASN 113 form part of the postulated dimerization intermolecular binding site which lead to the formation of the 4(sub 3) helix. Tyrosine also participates in an intermolecular hydrogen bond with ARG 114. The results of these and subsequent experiments will be discussed.

  17. Tetragonal Lysozyme Interactions Studied by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel J.; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc

    1999-01-01

    A number of recent experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth proceeds by the addition of aggregates, formed by reversible self association of the solute molecules in the bulk solution. Periodic bond chain and atomic force microscopy studies have indicated that the probable growth unit is at minimum a 43 tetramer, and most likely an octamer composed of two complete turns about the 43 axis. If these results are correct, then there are intermolecular interactions which are only formed in the solution and others only formed at the joining of the growth unit to the crystal surface. We have set out to study these interactions, and the correctness of this hypothesis, using site directed mutagenesis of specific amino acid residues involved in the different bonds. We had initially expressed wild type lysozyme in S. cervasiae with yields of approximately 5 mg/L, which were eventually raised to approximately 40 mg/L. We are now moving the expression to the Pichia system, with anticipated yields of 300 to (3)500 mg/L, comparable to what can be obtained from egg whites. An additional advantage of using recombinant protein is the greater genetic homogeneity of the material obtained and the absence of any other contaminating egg proteins. The first mutation experiments are TYR 23 (Registered) PHE or ALA and ASN 113 (Registered) ALA or ASP. Both TYR 23 and ASN 113 form part of the postulated dimerization intermolecular binding site which lead to the formation of the 43 helix. Tyrosine also participates in an intermolecular hydrogen bond with ARG 114. The results of these and subsequent experiments will be discussed.

  18. Photoreactive stapled peptides to identify and characterize BCL-2 family interaction sites by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Susan; Braun, Craig R; Bird, Gregory H; Walensky, Loren D

    2014-01-01

    Protein interactions dictate a myriad of cellular activities that maintain health or cause disease. Dissecting these binding partnerships, and especially their sites of interaction, fuels the discovery of signaling pathways, disease mechanisms, and next-generation therapeutics. We previously applied all-hydrocarbon peptide stapling to chemically restore α-helical shape to bioactive motifs that become unfolded when taken out of context from native signaling proteins. For example, we developed stabilized alpha-helices of BCL-2 domains (SAHBs) to dissect and target protein interactions of the BCL-2 family, a critical network that regulates the apoptotic pathway. SAHBs are α-helical surrogates that bind both stable and transient physiologic interactors and have effectively uncovered novel sites of BCL-2 family protein interaction. To leverage stapled peptides for proteomic discovery, we describe our conversion of SAHBs into photoreactive agents that irreversibly capture their protein targets and facilitate rapid identification of the peptide helix binding sites. We envision that the development of photoreactive stapled peptides will accelerate the discovery of novel and unanticipated protein interactions and how they impact health and disease.

  19. Number of Hydroxyl Groups on the B-Ring of Flavonoids Affects Their Antioxidant Activity and Interaction with Phorbol Ester Binding Site of PKCδ C1B Domain: In Vitro and in Silico Studies.

    PubMed

    Kongpichitchoke, Teeradate; Hsu, Jue-Liang; Huang, Tzou-Chi

    2015-05-13

    Although flavonoids have been reported for their benefits and nutraceutical potential use, the importance of their structure on their beneficial effects, especially on signal transduction mechanisms, has not been well clarified. In this study, three flavonoids, pinocembrin, naringenin, and eriodictyol, were chosen to determine the effect of hydroxyl groups on the B-ring of flavonoid structure on their antioxidant activity. In vitro assays, including DPPH scavenging activity, ROS quantification by flow cytometer, and proteins immunoblotting, and in silico analysis by molecular docking between the flavonoids and C1B domain of PKCδ phorbol ester binding site were both used to complete this study. Eriodictyol (10 μM), containing two hydroxyl groups on the B-ring, exhibited significantly higher (p < 0.05) antioxidant activity than pinocembrin and naringenin. The IC50 values of eriodictyol, naringenin, and pinocembrin were 17.4 ± 0.40, 30.2 ± 0.61, and 44.9 ± 0.57 μM, respectively. In addition, eriodictyol at 10 μM remarkably inhibited the phosphorylation of PKCδ at 63.4% compared with PMA-activated RAW264.7, whereas pinocembrin and naringenin performed inhibition activity at 76.8 and 72.6%, respectively. According to the molecular docking analysis, pinocembrin, naringenin, and eriodictyol showed -CDOCKER_energy values of 15.22, 16.95, and 21.49, respectively, reflecting that eriodictyol could bind with the binding site better than the other two flavonoids. Interestingly, eriodictyol had a remarkably different pose to bind with the kinase as a result of the two hydroxyl groups on its B-ring, which consequently contributed to greater antioxidant activity over pinocembrin and naringenin.

  20. Monocytes harboring cytomegalovirus: interactions with endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Possible mechanisms for activating virus delivered by monocytes to sites of vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Guetta, E; Guetta, V; Shibutani, T; Epstein, S E

    1997-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and its periodic reactivation from latency may contribute to atherogenesis and restenosis. It is unknown how CMV is delivered to the vessel wall and is reactivated. We examined the following hypothesis: CMV, present in monocytes recruited to sites of vascular injury, is activated by endothelial cell (EC) or smooth muscle cell (SMC) contact and by oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDLs). The CMV major immediate-early promoter (MIEP) controls immediate-early (IE) gene expression, and thereby viral replication. To determine whether elements of the vessel wall can activate CMV present in monocytes, we transiently transfected the promonocytic cell line HL-60 with a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene construct driven by MIEP. MIEP activity increased 1.7 +/- 0.5-fold (P = .02) when the transfected HL-60 cells were cocultured with ECs, 4.5 +/- 1.5-fold when cocultured with SMCs (P = .03), and 2.0 +/- 0.5-fold (P = .01) when exposed to oxLDL. The combination of oxLDL and EC coculture increased MIEP activity over 7-fold. We also found that freshly isolated human monocytes, infected with endothelium-passaged CMV, were capable of transmitting infectious virus to cocultured ECs or SMCs. CMV-related progression of atherosclerosis or restenosis may, at least in part, involve monocyte delivery of the virus to the site of vascular injury, where the vascular milieu, ie, contact with ECs, SMCs, and oxLDL, can contribute to viral reactivation and/or replication by enhancing CMV IE gene expression. The virus may then infect neighboring ECs or SMCs, initiating a cascade of events predisposing to the development of atherogenesis-related processes.

  1. Antiferromagnetic interaction between A'-site Mn spins in A-site-ordered perovskite YMn3Al4O12.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Takenori; Saito, Takashi; Mizumaki, Masaichiro; Agui, Akane; Shimakawa, Yuichi

    2010-03-01

    The A-site-ordered perovskite YMn(3)Al(4)O(12) was prepared by high-pressure synthesis. Structural analysis with synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data and the Mn L-edges X-ray absorption spectrum revealed that the compound has a chemical composition Y(3+)Mn(3+)(3)Al(3+)(4)O(2-)(12) with magnetic Mn(3+) at the A' site and non-magnetic Al(3+) at the B site. An antiferromagnetic interaction between the A'-site Mn(3+) spins is induced by the nearest neighboring Mn-Mn direct exchange interaction and causes an antiferromagnetic transition at 34.3 K.

  2. Carbene footprinting accurately maps binding sites in protein–ligand and protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Manzi, Lucio; Barrow, Andrew S.; Scott, Daniel; Layfield, Robert; Wright, Timothy G.; Moses, John E.; Oldham, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Specific interactions between proteins and their binding partners are fundamental to life processes. The ability to detect protein complexes, and map their sites of binding, is crucial to understanding basic biology at the molecular level. Methods that employ sensitive analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry have the potential to provide valuable insights with very little material and on short time scales. Here we present a differential protein footprinting technique employing an efficient photo-activated probe for use with mass spectrometry. Using this methodology the location of a carbohydrate substrate was accurately mapped to the binding cleft of lysozyme, and in a more complex example, the interactions between a 100 kDa, multi-domain deubiquitinating enzyme, USP5 and a diubiquitin substrate were located to different functional domains. The much improved properties of this probe make carbene footprinting a viable method for rapid and accurate identification of protein binding sites utilizing benign, near-UV photoactivation. PMID:27848959

  3. Carbene footprinting accurately maps binding sites in protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Lucio; Barrow, Andrew S; Scott, Daniel; Layfield, Robert; Wright, Timothy G; Moses, John E; Oldham, Neil J

    2016-11-16

    Specific interactions between proteins and their binding partners are fundamental to life processes. The ability to detect protein complexes, and map their sites of binding, is crucial to understanding basic biology at the molecular level. Methods that employ sensitive analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry have the potential to provide valuable insights with very little material and on short time scales. Here we present a differential protein footprinting technique employing an efficient photo-activated probe for use with mass spectrometry. Using this methodology the location of a carbohydrate substrate was accurately mapped to the binding cleft of lysozyme, and in a more complex example, the interactions between a 100 kDa, multi-domain deubiquitinating enzyme, USP5 and a diubiquitin substrate were located to different functional domains. The much improved properties of this probe make carbene footprinting a viable method for rapid and accurate identification of protein binding sites utilizing benign, near-UV photoactivation.

  4. Carbene footprinting accurately maps binding sites in protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzi, Lucio; Barrow, Andrew S.; Scott, Daniel; Layfield, Robert; Wright, Timothy G.; Moses, John E.; Oldham, Neil J.

    2016-11-01

    Specific interactions between proteins and their binding partners are fundamental to life processes. The ability to detect protein complexes, and map their sites of binding, is crucial to understanding basic biology at the molecular level. Methods that employ sensitive analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry have the potential to provide valuable insights with very little material and on short time scales. Here we present a differential protein footprinting technique employing an efficient photo-activated probe for use with mass spectrometry. Using this methodology the location of a carbohydrate substrate was accurately mapped to the binding cleft of lysozyme, and in a more complex example, the interactions between a 100 kDa, multi-domain deubiquitinating enzyme, USP5 and a diubiquitin substrate were located to different functional domains. The much improved properties of this probe make carbene footprinting a viable method for rapid and accurate identification of protein binding sites utilizing benign, near-UV photoactivation.

  5. Doxorubicin inhibits E. coli division by interacting at a novel site in FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Panda, Pragnya; Taviti, Ashoka Chary; Satpati, Suresh; Kar, Mitali Madhusmita; Dixit, Anshuman; Beuria, Tushar Kant

    2015-11-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistance has become a major health concern in recent times. It is therefore essential to identify novel antibacterial targets as well as discover and develop new antibacterial agents. FtsZ, a highly conserved bacterial protein, is responsible for the initiation of cell division in bacteria. The functions of FtsZ inside cells are tightly regulated and any perturbation in its functions leads to inhibition of bacterial division. Recent reports indicate that small molecules targeting the functions of FtsZ may be used as leads to develop new antibacterial agents. To identify small molecules targeting FtsZ and inhibiting bacterial division, we screened a U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drug library of 800 molecules using an independent computational, biochemical and microbial approach. From this screen, we identified doxorubicin, an anthracycline molecule that inhibits Escherichia coli division and forms filamentous cells. A fluorescence-binding assay shows that doxorubicin interacts strongly with FtsZ. A detailed biochemical analysis demonstrated that doxorubicin inhibits FtsZ assembly and its GTPase activity through binding to a site other than the GTP-binding site. Furthermore, using molecular docking, we identified a probable doxorubicin-binding site in FtsZ. A number of single amino acid mutations at the identified binding site in FtsZ resulted in a severalfold decrease in the affinity of FtsZ for doxorubicin, indicating the importance of this site for doxorubicin interaction. The present study suggests the presence of a novel binding site in FtsZ that interacts with the small molecules and can be targeted for the screening and development of new antibacterial agents.

  6. Does an Interactive WebCT Site Help Students Learn?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elicker, Joelle D.; O'Malley, Alison L.; Williams, Christine M.

    2008-01-01

    We examined whether students with access to a supplemental course Web site enhanced with e-mail, discussion boards, and chat room capability reacted to it more positively than students who used a Web site with the same content but no communication features. Students used the Web sites on a voluntary basis. At the end of the semester, students…

  7. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  8. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  9. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  10. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  11. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site

    PubMed Central

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called ‘catalytic residues’ are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06181.001 PMID:25902402

  12. Controlled Orientation of Active Sites in a Nanostructured Multienzyme Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Yang, Byungseop; Jung, Younghan; Cha, Jaehyun; Cho, Jinhwan; Choi, Eun-Sil; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-01-01

    Multistep cascade reactions in nature maximize reaction efficiency by co-assembling related enzymes. Such organization facilitates the processing of intermediates by downstream enzymes. Previously, the studies on multienzyme nanocomplexes assembled on DNA scaffolds demonstrated that closer interenzyme distance enhances the overall reaction efficiency. However, it remains unknown how the active site orientation controlled at nanoscale can have an effect on multienzyme reaction. Here, we show that controlled alignment of active sites promotes the multienzyme reaction efficiency. By genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and two compatible bioorthogonal chemistries, we conjugated mannitol dehydrogenase to formate dehydrogenase with the defined active site arrangement with the residue-level accuracy. The study revealed that the multienzyme complex with the active sites directed towards each other exhibits four-fold higher relative efficiency enhancement in the cascade reaction and produces 60% more D-mannitol than the other complex with active sites directed away from each other. PMID:28004799

  13. Selectivity for strand-transfer over 3′-processing and susceptibility to clinical resistance of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors are driven by key enzyme–DNA interactions in the active site

    PubMed Central

    Métifiot, Mathieu; Johnson, Barry C.; Kiselev, Evgeny; Marler, Laura; Zhao, Xue Zhi; Burke, Terrence R.; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H.; Pommier, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are highly effective against HIV infections. Co-crystal structures of the prototype foamy virus intasome have shown that all three FDA-approved drugs, raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir and dolutegravir (DTG), act as interfacial inhibitors during the strand transfer (ST) integration step. However, these structures give only a partial sense for the limited inhibition of the 3′-processing reaction by INSTIs and how INSTIs can be modified to overcome drug resistance, notably against the G140S-Q148H double mutation. Based on biochemical experiments with modified oligonucleotides, we demonstrate that both the viral DNA +1 and −1 bases, which flank the 3′-processing site, play a critical role for 3′-processing efficiency and inhibition by RAL and DTG. In addition, the G140S-Q148H (SH) mutant integrase, which has a reduced 3′-processing activity, becomes more active and more resistant to inhibition of 3′-processing by RAL and DTG in the absence of the −1 and +1 bases. Molecular modeling of HIV-1 integrase, together with biochemical data, indicate that the conserved residue Q146 in the flexible loop of HIV-1 integrase is critical for productive viral DNA binding through specific contacts with the virus DNA ends in the 3′-processing and ST reactions. The potency of integrase inhibitors against 3′-processing and their ability to overcome resistance is discussed. PMID:27369381

  14. Structural characterization of single nucleotide variants at ligand binding sites and enzyme active sites of human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazunori D.; Nishi, Hafumi; Nakata, Junichi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Functional sites on proteins play an important role in various molecular interactions and reactions between proteins and other molecules. Thus, mutations in functional sites can severely affect the overall phenotype. Progress of genome sequencing projects has yielded a wealth of information on single nucleotide variants (SNVs), especially those with less than 1% minor allele frequency (rare variants). To understand the functional influence of genetic variants at a protein level, we investigated the relationship between SNVs and protein functional sites in terms of minor allele frequency and the structural position of variants. As a result, we observed that SNVs were less abundant at ligand binding sites, which is consistent with a previous study on SNVs and protein interaction sites. Additionally, we found that non-rare variants tended to be located slightly apart from enzyme active sites. Examination of non-rare variants revealed that most of the mutations resulted in moderate changes of the physico-chemical properties of amino acids, suggesting the existence of functional constraints. In conclusion, this study shows that the mapping of genetic variants on protein structures could be a powerful approach to evaluate the functional impact of rare genetic variations. PMID:27924270

  15. Interaction of metallic clusters with biologically active curcumin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; He, Haiying; Liu, Chunhui; Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of subnano metallic Gd and Au clusters with curcumin, an important biomolecule having pharmacological activity. Gd clusters show different site preference to curcumin and much stronger interaction strength, in support of the successful synthesis of highly stable curcumin-coated Gd nanoparticles as reported recently. It can be attributed to significant charge transfer from the Gd cluster to curcumin together with a relatively strong hybridization of the Gd df-orbitals with curcumin p-orbitals. These results suggest that Gd nanoparticles can effectively be used as delivery carriers for curcumin at the cellular level for therapy and medical imaging applications.

  16. Perspective: On the active site model in computational catalyst screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Karsten; Plaisance, Craig P.; Oberhofer, Harald; Andersen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    First-principles screening approaches exploiting energy trends in surface adsorption represent an unparalleled success story in recent computational catalysis research. Here we argue that our still limited understanding of the structure of active sites is one of the major bottlenecks towards an ever extended and reliable use of such computational screening for catalyst discovery. For low-index transition metal surfaces, the prevalently chosen high-symmetry (terrace and step) sites offered by the nominal bulk-truncated crystal lattice might be justified. For more complex surfaces and composite catalyst materials, computational screening studies will need to actively embrace a considerable uncertainty with respect to what truly are the active sites. By systematically exploring the space of possible active site motifs, such studies might eventually contribute towards a targeted design of optimized sites in future catalysts.

  17. Diffusional correlations among multiple active sites in a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-04-07

    Simulations of the enzymatic dynamics of a model enzyme containing multiple substrate binding sites indicate the existence of diffusional correlations in the chemical reactivity of the active sites. A coarse-grain, particle-based, mesoscopic description of the system, comprising the enzyme, the substrate, the product and solvent, is constructed to study these effects. The reactive and non-reactive dynamics is followed using a hybrid scheme that combines molecular dynamics for the enzyme, substrate and product molecules with multiparticle collision dynamics for the solvent. It is found that the reactivity of an individual active site in the multiple-active-site enzyme is reduced substantially, and this effect is analyzed and attributed to diffusive competition for the substrate among the different active sites in the enzyme.

  18. Protein-Binding RNA Aptamers Affect Molecular Interactions Distantly from Their Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Daniel M.; Thuesen, Cathrine K.; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A.; Behrens, Manja A.; Dam, Karen; Sørensen, Hans P.; Pedersen, Jan S.; Ploug, Michael; Jensen, Jan K.; Andreasen, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies on the molecular basis underlying aptamer-protease interactions and the associated mechanisms of inhibition. In the present study, we use site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the binding sites of two 2´-fluoropyrimidine RNA aptamers (upanap-12 and upanap-126) with therapeutic potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A) controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126) binds to the area around the C-terminal α-helix in pro-uPA, while the other aptamer (upanap-12) binds to both the β-hairpin of the growth factor domain and the kringle domain of uPA. Based on the mapping studies, combined with data from small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, we construct a model for the upanap-12:pro-uPA complex. The results suggest and highlight that the size and shape of an aptamer as well as the domain organization of a multi-domain protein such as uPA, may provide the basis for extensive sterical interference with protein ligand interactions considered distant from the aptamer binding site. PMID:25793507

  19. Robotics at Savannah River site: activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.S.

    1984-09-01

    The objectives of the Robotics Technology Group at the Savannah River Laboratory are to employ modern industrial robots and to develop unique automation and robotic systems to enhance process operations at the Savannah River site (SRP and SRL). The incentives are to improve safety, reduce personnel radiation exposure, improve product quality and productivity, and to reduce operating costs. During the past year robotic systems have been installed to fill chemical dilution vials in a SRP laboratory at 772-F and remove radioactive waste materials in the SRL Californium Production Facility at 773-A. A robotic system to lubricate an extrusion press has been developed and demonstrated in the SRL robotics laboratory and is scheduled for installation at the 321-M fuel fabrication area. A mobile robot was employed by SRP for a radiation monitoring task at a waste tank top in H-Area. Several other robots are installed in the SRL robotics laboratories and application development programs are underway. The status of these applications is presented in this report.

  20. Glycyl radical activating enzymes: structure, mechanism, and substrate interactions.

    PubMed

    Shisler, Krista A; Broderick, Joan B

    2014-03-15

    The glycyl radical enzyme activating enzymes (GRE-AEs) are a group of enzymes that belong to the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) superfamily and utilize a [4Fe-4S] cluster and SAM to catalyze H-atom abstraction from their substrate proteins. GRE-AEs activate homodimeric proteins known as glycyl radical enzymes (GREs) through the production of a glycyl radical. After activation, these GREs catalyze diverse reactions through the production of their own substrate radicals. The GRE-AE pyruvate formate lyase activating enzyme (PFL-AE) is extensively characterized and has provided insights into the active site structure of radical SAM enzymes including GRE-AEs, illustrating the nature of the interactions with their corresponding substrate GREs and external electron donors. This review will highlight research on PFL-AE and will also discuss a few GREs and their respective activating enzymes.

  1. Signal-regulator interactions. Genetic analysis of the effector binding site of xylS, the benzoate-activated positive regulator of Pseudomonas TOL plasmid meta-cleavage pathway operon.

    PubMed

    Ramos, J L; Michan, C; Rojo, F; Dwyer, D; Timmis, K

    1990-01-20

    This study reports a genetic analysis of the interactions between a positive regulator of gene expression and its effector molecules. Transcription of the TOL plasmid meta-cleavage pathway operon is specifically stimulated by the XylS protein positive regulator either through activation of this regulator by benzoate effectors or through its hyperproduction. One xylS mutant that exhibits constitutive expression of the operon promoter has been characterized, together with six mutants encoding altered XylS proteins that recognize as effectors benzoate analogues that are non-effectors for the XylS wild-type protein. The changes in two mutant regulators are located at the N-terminal end of the protein, within a putative beta-pleated domain. These mutant proteins exhibit a markedly increased affinity for normal benzoate effectors, with K's values fivefold to 60-fold lower than those of the wild-type XylS protein. They are additionally activated by new effectors having certain substituents at position 2, 3 and 4 of the aromatic ring. Two other mutant proteins recognize new effectors having substituents at position 4 and 5 of the aromatic ring, and contain mutations at their C-terminal end within a putative alpha-helix-rich domain. Three other mutations, one of which leads to constitutive expression from Pm, each result in an amino acid change in the central region of the regulator. These findings suggest but do not prove that the effector binding pocket of the XylS protein may be composed of two or more non-contiguous segments of its primary structure. The XylS protein exhibits homology with the AraC protein of Escherichia coli, a protein that stimulates transcription from ara promoters when it is activated by arabinose or benzoate. Mutations influencing effector activation of the XylS protein characterized in this study are all located in regions exhibiting a high degree of homology with the corresponding aligned sequence of AraC protein.

  2. Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: why selenoproteins?

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Johansson, Linda; Bauer, Holger; Arscott, L David; Rauch, Susanne; Ballou, David P; Williams, Charles H; Schirmer, R Heiner; Arnér, Elias S J

    2003-10-28

    Selenium, an essential trace element for mammals, is incorporated into a selected class of selenoproteins as selenocysteine. All known isoenzymes of mammalian thioredoxin (Trx) reductases (TrxRs) employ selenium in the C-terminal redox center -Gly-Cys-Sec-Gly-COOH for reduction of Trx and other substrates, whereas the corresponding sequence in Drosophila melanogaster TrxR is -Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser-COOH. Surprisingly, the catalytic competence of these orthologous enzymes is similar, whereas direct Sec-to-Cys substitution of mammalian TrxR, or other selenoenzymes, yields almost inactive enzyme. TrxRs are therefore ideal for studying the biology of selenocysteine by comparative enzymology. Here we show that the serine residues flanking the C-terminal Cys residues of Drosophila TrxRs are responsible for activating the cysteines to match the catalytic efficiency of a selenocysteine-cysteine pair as in mammalian TrxR, obviating the need for selenium. This finding suggests that the occurrence of selenoenzymes, which implies that the organism is selenium-dependent, is not necessarily associated with improved enzyme efficiency. Our data suggest that the selective advantage of selenoenzymes is a broader range of substrates and a broader range of microenvironmental conditions in which enzyme activity is possible.

  3. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-06

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions.

  4. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C.; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F.; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W.; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa. Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  5. Probing the Sites of Interactions of Rotaviral Proteins Involved in Replication

    PubMed Central

    Viskovska, Maria; Anish, Ramakrishnan; Hu, Liya; Chow, Dar-Chone; Hurwitz, Amy M.; Brown, Nicholas G.; Palzkill, Timothy; Estes, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Replication and packaging of the rotavirus genome occur in cytoplasmic compartments called viroplasms, which form during virus infection. These processes are orchestrated by yet-to-be-understood complex networks of interactions involving nonstructural proteins (NSPs) 2, 5, and 6 and structural proteins (VPs) 1, 2, 3, and 6. The multifunctional enzyme NSP2, an octamer with RNA binding activity, is critical for viroplasm formation with its binding partner, NSP5, and for genome replication/packaging through its interactions with replicating RNA, the viral polymerase VP1, and the inner core protein VP2. Using isothermal calorimetry, biolayer interferometry, and peptide array screening, we examined the interactions between NSP2, VP1, VP2, NSP5, and NSP6. These studies provide the first evidence that NSP2 can directly bind to VP1, VP2, and NSP6, in addition to the previously known binding to NSP5. The interacting sites identified from reciprocal peptide arrays were found to be in close proximity to the RNA template entry and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) exit tunnels of VP1 and near the catalytic cleft and RNA-binding grooves of NSP2; these sites are consistent with the proposed role of NSP2 in facilitating dsRNA synthesis by VP1. Peptide screening of VP2 identified NSP2-binding sites in the regions close to the intersubunit junctions, suggesting that NSP2 binding could be a regulatory mechanism for preventing the premature self-assembly of VP2. The binding sites on NSP2 for NSP6 were found to overlap that of VP1, and the NSP5-binding sites overlap those of VP2 and VP1, suggesting that interaction of these proteins with NSP2 is likely spatially and/or temporally regulated. IMPORTANCE Replication and packaging of the rotavirus genome occur in cytoplasmic compartments called viroplasms that form during virus infection and are orchestrated by complex networks of interactions involving nonstructural proteins (NSPs) and structural proteins (VPs). A multifunctional RNA

  6. Mapping Cholesterol Interaction Sites on Serotonin Transporter through Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Mariarosaria; Masetti, Matteo; Recanatini, Maurizio; Cavalli, Andrea; Bottegoni, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) modulates serotonergic signaling via re-uptake of serotonin in pre-synaptic cells. The inclusion in cholesterol-enriched membrane domains is crucial for SERT activity, suggesting a cross-talk between the protein and the sterol. Here, we develop a protocol to identify potential cholesterol interaction sites coupling statistical analysis to multi-microsecond coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of SERT in a previously validated raft-like membrane model. Six putative sites were found, including a putative CRAC motif on TM4 and a CARC motif on TM10. Among them, four hot-spots near regions related to ion binding, transport, and inhibition were detected. Our results encourage prospective studies to unravel mechanistic features of the transporter and related drug discovery implications. PMID:27907003

  7. Toward the Computational Prediction of Muon Sites and Interaction Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfà, Pietro; De Renzi, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The rapid developments of computational quantum chemistry methods and supercomputing facilities motivate the renewed interest in the analysis of the muon/electron interactions in μSR experiments with ab initio approaches. Modern simulation methods seem to be able to provide the answers to the frequently asked questions of many μSR experiments: where is the muon? Is it a passive probe? What are the interaction parameters governing the muon-sample interaction? In this review we describe some of the approaches used to provide quantitative estimations of the aforementioned quantities and we provide the reader with a short discussion on the current developments in this field.

  8. Community Update on Site Activities, July 19, 2013

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In an effort to engage and inform community members interested in the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site cleanup, EPA will be issuing periodic topic-based fact sheets that will provide background information and updates about ongoing activities.

  9. Functional interaction of nitrogenous organic bases with cytochrome P450: a critical assessment and update of substrate features and predicted key active-site elements steering the access, binding, and orientation of amines.

    PubMed

    Hlavica, Peter

    2006-04-01

    The widespread use of nitrogenous organic bases as environmental chemicals, food additives, and clinically important drugs necessitates precise knowledge about the molecular principles governing biotransformation of this category of substrates. In this regard, analysis of the topological background of complex formation between amines and P450s, acting as major catalysts in C- and N-oxidative attack, is of paramount importance. Thus, progress in collaborative investigations, combining physico-chemical techniques with chemical-modification as well as genetic engineering experiments, enables substantiation of hypothetical work resulting from the design of pharmacophores or homology modelling of P450s. Based on a general, CYP2D6-related construct, the majority of prospective amine-docking residues was found to cluster near the distal heme face in the six known SRSs, made up by the highly variant helices B', F and G as well as the N-terminal portion of helix C and certain beta-structures. Most of the contact sites examined show a frequency of conservation < 20%, hinting at the requirement of some degree of conformational versatility, while a limited number of amino acids exhibiting a higher level of conservation reside close to the heme core. Some key determinants may have a dual role in amine binding and/or maintenance of protein integrity. Importantly, a series of non-SRS elements are likely to be operative via long-range effects. While hydrophobic mechanisms appear to dominate orientation of the nitrogenous compounds toward the iron-oxene species, polar residues seem to foster binding events through H-bonding or salt-bridge formation. Careful uncovering of structure-function relationships in amine-enzyme association together with recently developed unsupervised machine learning approaches will be helpful in both tailoring of novel amine-type drugs and early elimination of potentially toxic or mutagenic candidates. Also, chimeragenesis might serve in the construction

  10. Interaction of Sr-90 with site candidate soil for demonstration disposal facility at Serpong

    SciTech Connect

    Setiawan, Budi; Mila, Oktri; Safni

    2014-03-24

    Interaction of radiostrontium (Sr-90) with site candidate soil for demonstration disposal facility to be constructed in the near future at Serpong has been done. This activity is to anticipate the interim storage facility at Serpong nuclear area becomes full off condition, and show to the public how radioactive waste can be well managed with the existing technology. To ensure that the location is save, a reliability study of site candidate soil becomes very importance to be conducted through some experiments consisted some affected parameters such as contact time, effect of ionic strength, and effect of Sr{sup +} ion in solution. Radiostrontium was used as a tracer on the experiments and has role as radionuclide reference in low-level radioactive waste due to its long half-live and it's easy to associate with organism in nature. So, interaction of radiostrontium and soil samples from site becomes important to be studied. Experiment was performed in batch method, and soil sample-solution containing radionuclide was mixed in a 20 ml of PE vial. Ratio of solid: liquid was 10{sup −2} g/ml. Objective of the experiment is to collect the specific characteristics data of radionuclide sorption onto soil from site candidate. Distribution coefficient value was used as indicator where the amount of initial and final activities of radiostrontium in solution was compared. Result showed that equilibrium condition was reached after contact time 10 days with Kd values ranged from 1600-2350 ml/g. Increased in ionic strength in solution made decreased of Kd value into soil sample due to competition of background salt and radiostrontium into soil samples, and increased in Sr ion in solution caused decreased of Kd value in soil sample due to limitation of sorption capacity in soil samples. Fast condition in saturated of metal ion into soil samples was reached due to a simple reaction was occurred.

  11. Interaction of Sr-90 with site candidate soil for demonstration disposal facility at Serpong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Budi; Mila, Oktri; Safni

    2014-03-01

    Interaction of radiostrontium (Sr-90) with site candidate soil for demonstration disposal facility to be constructed in the near future at Serpong has been done. This activity is to anticipate the interim storage facility at Serpong nuclear area becomes full off condition, and show to the public how radioactive waste can be well managed with the existing technology. To ensure that the location is save, a reliability study of site candidate soil becomes very importance to be conducted through some experiments consisted some affected parameters such as contact time, effect of ionic strength, and effect of Sr+ ion in solution. Radiostrontium was used as a tracer on the experiments and has role as radionuclide reference in low-level radioactive waste due to its long half-live and it's easy to associate with organism in nature. So, interaction of radiostrontium and soil samples from site becomes important to be studied. Experiment was performed in batch method, and soil sample-solution containing radionuclide was mixed in a 20 ml of PE vial. Ratio of solid: liquid was 10-2 g/ml. Objective of the experiment is to collect the specific characteristics data of radionuclide sorption onto soil from site candidate. Distribution coefficient value was used as indicator where the amount of initial and final activities of radiostrontium in solution was compared. Result showed that equilibrium condition was reached after contact time 10 days with Kd values ranged from 1600-2350 ml/g. Increased in ionic strength in solution made decreased of Kd value into soil sample due to competition of background salt and radiostrontium into soil samples, and increased in Sr ion in solution caused decreased of Kd value in soil sample due to limitation of sorption capacity in soil samples. Fast condition in saturated of metal ion into soil samples was reached due to a simple reaction was occurred.

  12. Study of Cytochrome c-DNA Interaction - Evaluation of Binding Sites on the Redox Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wettstein, Christoph; Kyne, Ciara; M. Doolan, Aishling; Möhwald, Helmuth; Crowley, Peter B.; Lisdat, Fred

    2014-10-01

    Artificial assemblies consisting of the cationic cytochrome c (cyt c) and double-stranded DNA are interesting for the field of biohybrid systems because of the high electro-activity of the incorporated redox protein. However, little is known about the interactions between these two biomolecules. Here, the complex of reduced cyt c and a 41 base pair oligonucleotide was characterized in solution as a function of pH and ionic strength. Persistent cyt c-DNA agglomerates were observed by UV-vis and DLS (dynamic light scattering) at pH 5.0 and low ionic strength. The strength of the interaction was attenuated by raising the pH or the ionic strength. At pH 7.0 agglomerates were not formed, allowing interaction analysis by NMR spectroscopy. Using TROSY (transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy)-HSQC (heteronuclear single quantum coherence) experiments it was possible to identify the DNA binding site on the cyt c surface. Numerous residues surrounding the exposed heme edge of cyt c were involved in transient binding to DNA under these conditions. This result was supported by SEC (size exclusion chromatography) experiments at pH 7.0 showing that the interaction is sufficient for co-elution of cyt c and DNA.Artificial assemblies consisting of the cationic cytochrome c (cyt c) and double-stranded DNA are interesting for the field of biohybrid systems because of the high electro-activity of the incorporated redox protein. However, little is known about the interactions between these two biomolecules. Here, the complex of reduced cyt c and a 41 base pair oligonucleotide was characterized in solution as a function of pH and ionic strength. Persistent cyt c-DNA agglomerates were observed by UV-vis and DLS (dynamic light scattering) at pH 5.0 and low ionic strength. The strength of the interaction was attenuated by raising the pH or the ionic strength. At pH 7.0 agglomerates were not formed, allowing interaction analysis by NMR spectroscopy. Using TROSY (transverse relaxation

  13. M sub 1 muscarinic antagonists interact with. sigma. recognition sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hudkins, R.L. ); DeHaven-Hudkins, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    The M{sub 1}-selective muscarinic antagonists aprophen, caramiphen, carbetapentane, 2-DAEX, dicyclomine, hexahydrosiladifenidol, iodocaramiphen, nitrocaramiphen, oxybutynin and trihexyphenidyl potently inhibited binding to {sigma} sites in brain. Both basic ester and non-ester structural type compounds which exhibit affinity for the muscarinic receptor also demonstrated affinity for the {sigma} site, while the classical antimuscarinic agents atropine and QNB, and the tricyclic pirenzepine, were ineffective in binding to this site. The authors also observed a significant correlation between the K{sub i} values for {sigma}compounds to inhibit ({sup 3}H)pirenzepine binding and their IC{sub 50} values to inhibit carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide turnover. These observations may aid in elucidating the relationship of {sigma} binding to inhibition of phosphoinositide turnover stimulated by cholinergic agonists.

  14. How Users Take Advantage of Different Forms of Interactivity on Online News Sites: Clicking, E-Mailing, and Commenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boczkowski, Pablo J.; Mitchelstein, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the uptake of multiple interactive features on news sites. It looks at the thematic composition of the most clicked, most e-mailed, and most commented stories during periods of heightened and routine political activity. Results show that (a) during the former period, the most commented stories were more likely to be focused on…

  15. Interactive NCORP Map Details Community Research Sites | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    An interactive map of the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) with detailed information on hundreds of community sites that take part in clinical trials is available on the NCORP website. NCORP Map NCORP Community Sites, Minority/Underserved Community Sites, and Research Bases |

  16. Functional classification of protein 3D structures from predicted local interaction sites.

    PubMed

    Parasuram, Ramya; Lee, Joslynn S; Yin, Pengcheng; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Ondrechen, Mary Jo

    2010-12-01

    A new approach to the functional classification of protein 3D structures is described with application to some examples from structural genomics. This approach is based on functional site prediction with THEMATICS and POOL. THEMATICS employs calculated electrostatic potentials of the query structure. POOL is a machine learning method that utilizes THEMATICS features and has been shown to predict accurate, precise, highly localized interaction sites. Extension to the functional classification of structural genomics proteins is now described. Predicted functionally important residues are structurally aligned with those of proteins with previously characterized biochemical functions. A 3D structure match at the predicted local functional site then serves as a more reliable predictor of biochemical function than an overall structure match. Annotation is confirmed for a structural genomics protein with the ribulose phosphate binding barrel (RPBB) fold. A putative glucoamylase from Bacteroides fragilis (PDB ID 3eu8) is shown to be in fact probably not a glucoamylase. Finally a structural genomics protein from Streptomyces coelicolor annotated as an enoyl-CoA hydratase (PDB ID 3g64) is shown to be misannotated. Its predicted active site does not match the well-characterized enoyl-CoA hydratases of similar structure but rather bears closer resemblance to those of a dehalogenase with similar fold.

  17. Dynamics of two interacting active Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayati, Parvin; Najafi, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Starting from a microscopic model for a spherically symmetric active Janus particle, we study the interactions between two such active motors. The ambient fluid mediates a long range hydrodynamic interaction between two motors. This interaction has both direct and indirect hydrodynamic contributions. The direct contribution is due to the propagation of fluid flow that originated from a moving motor and affects the motion of the other motor. The indirect contribution emerges from the re-distribution of the ionic concentrations in the presence of both motors. Electric force exerted on the fluid from this ionic solution enhances the flow pattern and subsequently changes the motion of both motors. By formulating a perturbation method for very far separated motors, we derive analytic results for the translation and rotational dynamics of the motors. We show that the overall interaction at the leading order modifies the translational and rotational speeds of motors which scale as O (" separators=" [ 1 / D ] 3 ) and O (" separators=" [ 1 / D ] 4 ) with their separation, respectively. Our findings open up the way for studying the collective dynamics of synthetic micro-motors.

  18. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions.

  19. Correlated structural kinetics and retarded solvent dynamics at the metalloprotease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Moran; Born, Benjamin; Heyden, Matthias; Tworowski, Dmitry; Fields, Gregg B.; Sagi, Irit; Havenith, Martina

    2011-09-18

    Solvent dynamics can play a major role in enzyme activity, but obtaining an accurate, quantitative picture of solvent activity during catalysis is quite challenging. Here, we combine terahertz spectroscopy and X-ray absorption analyses to measure changes in the coupled water-protein motions during peptide hydrolysis by a zinc-dependent human metalloprotease. These changes were tightly correlated with rearrangements at the active site during the formation of productive enzyme-substrate intermediates and were different from those in an enzyme–inhibitor complex. Molecular dynamics simulations showed a steep gradient of fast-to-slow coupled protein-water motions around the protein, active site and substrate. Our results show that water retardation occurs before formation of the functional Michaelis complex. We propose that the observed gradient of coupled protein-water motions may assist enzyme-substrate interactions through water-polarizing mechanisms that are remotely mediated by the catalytic metal ion and the enzyme active site.

  20. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2008-08-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes.

  1. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  2. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide.

  3. Metal interactions with voltage- and receptor-activated ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Vijverberg, H P; Oortgiesen, M; Leinders, T; van Kleef, R G

    1994-01-01

    Effects of Pb and several other metal ions on various distinct types of voltage-, receptor- and Ca-activated ion channels have been investigated in cultured N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. Experiments were performed using the whole-cell voltage clamp and single-channel patch clamp techniques. External superfusion of nanomolar to submillimolar concentrations of Pb causes multiple effects on ion channels. Barium current through voltage-activated Ca channels is blocked by micromolar concentrations of Pb, whereas voltage-activated Na current appears insensitive. Neuronal type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-activated ion current is blocked by nanomolar concentrations of Pb and this block is reversed at micromolar concentrations. Serotonin 5-HT3 receptor-activated ion current is much less sensitive to Pb. In addition, external superfusion with micromolar concentrations of Pb as well as of Cd and aluminum induces inward current, associated with the direct activation of nonselective cation channels by these metal ions. In excised inside-out membrane patches of neuroblastoma cells, micromolar concentrations of Ca activate small (SK) and big (BK) Ca-activated K channels. Internally applied Pb activates SK and BK channels more potently than Ca, whereas Cd is approximately equipotent to Pb with respect to SK channel activation, but fails to activate BK channels. The results show that metal ions cause distinct, selective effects on the various types of ion channels and that metal ion interaction sites of ion channels may be highly selective for particular metal ions. PMID:7531139

  4. In silico analysis of Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase active site with toxic industrial dyes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nirmal K; Vindal, Vaibhav; Narayana, Siva Lakshmi; Ramakrishna, V; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan; Srinivas, M

    2012-05-01

    Laccases belong to multicopper oxidases, a widespread class of enzymes implicated in many oxidative functions in various industrial oxidative processes like production of fine chemicals to bioremediation of contaminated soil and water. In order to understand the mechanisms of substrate binding and interaction between substrates and Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase, a homology model was generated. The resulted model was further validated and used for docking studies with toxic industrial dyes- acid blue 74, reactive black 5 and reactive blue 19. Interactions of chemical mediators with the laccase was also examined. The docking analysis showed that the active site always cannot accommodate the dye molecules, due to constricted nature of the active site pocket and steric hindrance of the residues whereas mediators are relatively small and can easily be accommodated into the active site pocket, which, thereafter leads to the productive binding. The binding properties of these compounds along with identification of critical active site residues can be used for further site-directed mutagenesis experiments in order to identify their role in activity and substrate specificity, ultimately leading to improved mutants for degradation of these toxic compounds.

  5. Multiple active site residues are important for photochemical efficiency in the light-activated enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR).

    PubMed

    Menon, Binuraj R K; Hardman, Samantha J O; Scrutton, Nigel S; Heyes, Derren J

    2016-08-01

    Protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) catalyzes the light-driven reduction of protochlorophyllide (Pchlide), an essential, regulatory step in chlorophyll biosynthesis. The unique requirement of the enzyme for light has provided the opportunity to investigate how light energy can be harnessed to power biological catalysis and enzyme dynamics. Excited state interactions between the Pchlide molecule and the protein are known to drive the subsequent reaction chemistry. However, the structural features of POR and active site residues that are important for photochemistry and catalysis are currently unknown, because there is no crystal structure for POR. Here, we have used static and time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of a number of active site variants to study the role of a number of residues, which are located in the proposed NADPH/Pchlide binding site based on previous homology models, in the reaction mechanism of POR. Our findings, which are interpreted in the context of a new improved structural model, have identified several residues that are predicted to interact with the coenzyme or substrate. Several of the POR variants have a profound effect on the photochemistry, suggesting that multiple residues are important in stabilizing the excited state required for catalysis. Our work offers insight into how the POR active site geometry is finely tuned by multiple active site residues to support enzyme-mediated photochemistry and reduction of Pchlide, both of which are crucial to the existence of life on Earth.

  6. Promoter-proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Pia K.; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites on transcription requires promoter proximity, as demonstrated using artificial constructs and supported by a genome-wide data set. Importantly, transcription down-regulation can be recapitulated in a gene context devoid of splice sites by placing a functional bona fide pA site/transcription terminator within ∼500 base pairs of the promoter. In contrast, promoter-proximal positioning of a pA site-independent histone gene terminator supports high transcription levels. We propose that optimal communication between a pA site-dependent gene terminator and its promoter critically depends on gene length and that short RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels. PMID:23028143

  7. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  8. Denaturation studies of active-site labeled papain using electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Z A; Butterfiel, D A

    1991-01-01

    A spin-labeled p-chloromercuribenzoate (SL-PMB) and a fluorescence probe, 6-acryloyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Acrylodan), both of which bind to the single SH group located in the active site of papain, were used to investigate the interaction of papain (EC 3.4.22.2) with two protein denaturants. It was found that the active site of papain was highly stable in urea solution, but underwent a large conformational change in guanidine hydrochloride solution. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence results were in agreement and both paralleled enzymatic activity of papain with respect to both the variation in pH and denaturation. These results strongly suggest that SL-PMB and Acrylodan labels can be used to characterize the physical state of the active site of the enzyme. PMID:1657229

  9. Dynamically achieved active site precision in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes' enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme-substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C-H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed.

  10. Involvement of novel autophosphorylation sites in ATM activation.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Graham, Mark E; Peng, Cheng; Chen, Philip; Robinson, Phillip J; Lavin, Martin F

    2006-08-09

    ATM kinase plays a central role in signaling DNA double-strand breaks to cell cycle checkpoints and to the DNA repair machinery. Although the exact mechanism of ATM activation remains unknown, efficient activation requires the Mre11 complex, autophosphorylation on S1981 and the involvement of protein phosphatases and acetylases. We report here the identification of several additional phosphorylation sites on ATM in response to DNA damage, including autophosphorylation on pS367 and pS1893. ATM autophosphorylates all these sites in vitro in response to DNA damage. Antibodies against phosphoserine 1893 revealed rapid and persistent phosphorylation at this site after in vivo activation of ATM kinase by ionizing radiation, paralleling that observed for S1981 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation was dependent on functional ATM and on the Mre11 complex. All three autophosphorylation sites are physiologically important parts of the DNA damage response, as phosphorylation site mutants (S367A, S1893A and S1981A) were each defective in ATM signaling in vivo and each failed to correct radiosensitivity, genome instability and cell cycle checkpoint defects in ataxia-telangiectasia cells. We conclude that there are at least three functionally important radiation-induced autophosphorylation events in ATM.

  11. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  12. Polarity Alteration of a Calcium Site Induces a Hydrophobic Interaction Network and Enhances Cel9A Endoglucanase Thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsiu-Jung; Hsiao, Yu-Yuan; Chen, Yu-Pei; Ma, Tien-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Structural calcium sites control protein thermostability and activity by stabilizing native folds and changing local conformations. Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius survives in thermal-acidic conditions and produces an endoglucanase Cel9A (AaCel9A) which contains a calcium-binding site (Ser465 to Val470) near the catalytic cleft. By superimposing the Ca2+-free and Ca2+-bounded conformations of the calcium site, we found that Ca2+ induces hydrophobic interactions between the calcium site and its nearby region by driving a conformational change. The hydrophobic interactions at the high-B-factor region could be enhanced further by replacing the surrounding polar residues with hydrophobic residues to affect enzyme thermostability and activity. Therefore, the calcium-binding residue Asp468 (whose side chain directly ligates Ca2+), Asp469, and Asp471 of AaCel9A were separately replaced by alanine and valine. Mutants D468A and D468V showed increased activity compared with those of the wild type with 0 mM or 10 mM Ca2+ added, whereas the Asp469 or Asp471 substitution resulted in decreased activity. The D468A crystal structure revealed that mutation D468A triggered a conformational change similar to that induced by Ca2+ in the wild type and developed a hydrophobic interaction network between the calcium site and the neighboring hydrophobic region (Ala113 to Ala117). Mutations D468V and D468A increased 4.5°C and 5.9°C, respectively, in melting temperature, and enzyme half-life at 75°C increased approximately 13 times. Structural comparisons between AaCel9A and other endoglucanases of the GH9 family suggested that the stability of the regions corresponding to the AaCel9A calcium site plays an important role in GH9 endoglucanase catalysis at high temperature. PMID:26729722

  13. Distinct parietal sites mediate the influences of mood, arousal, and their interaction on human recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Greene, Ciara M; Flannery, Oliver; Soto, David

    2014-12-01

    The two dimensions of emotion, mood valence and arousal, have independent effects on recognition memory. At present, however, it is not clear how those effects are reflected in the human brain. Previous research in this area has generally dealt with memory for emotionally valenced or arousing stimuli, but the manner in which interacting mood and arousal states modulate responses in memory substrates remains poorly understood. We investigated memory for emotionally neutral items while independently manipulating mood valence and arousal state by means of music exposure. Four emotional conditions were created: positive mood/high arousal, positive mood/low arousal, negative mood/high arousal, and negative mood/low arousal. We observed distinct effects of mood valence and arousal in parietal substrates of recognition memory. Positive mood increased activity in ventral posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and orbitofrontal cortex, whereas arousal condition modulated activity in dorsal PPC and the posterior cingulate. An interaction between valence and arousal was observed in left ventral PPC, notably in a parietal area distinct from the those identified for the main effects, with a stronger effect of mood on recognition memory responses here under conditions of relative high versus low arousal. We interpreted the PPC activations in terms of the attention-to-memory hypothesis: Increased arousal may lead to increased top-down control of memory, and hence dorsal PPC activation, whereas positive mood valence may result in increased activity in ventral PPC regions associated with bottom-up attention to memory. These findings indicate that distinct parietal sites mediate the influences of mood, arousal, and their interplay during recognition memory.

  14. The Importance of Synchronous Interaction for Student Satisfaction with Course Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Qidong; Griffin, Thomas E.; Bai, Xue

    2009-01-01

    As more affordable synchronous communications are becoming available, the use of synchronous interactions has not been noted in course Web sites as often as asynchronous communications. Previous research indicated that the integration of synchronous tools into course Web sites has made a positive impact on students. While most of the previous…

  15. Scaling laws of human interaction activity.

    PubMed

    Rybski, Diego; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Havlin, Shlomo; Liljeros, Fredrik; Makse, Hernán A

    2009-08-04

    Even though people in our contemporary technological society are depending on communication, our understanding of the underlying laws of human communicational behavior continues to be poorly understood. Here we investigate the communication patterns in 2 social Internet communities in search of statistical laws in human interaction activity. This research reveals that human communication networks dynamically follow scaling laws that may also explain the observed trends in economic growth. Specifically, we identify a generalized version of Gibrat's law of social activity expressed as a scaling law between the fluctuations in the number of messages sent by members and their level of activity. Gibrat's law has been essential in understanding economic growth patterns, yet without an underlying general principle for its origin. We attribute this scaling law to long-term correlation patterns in human activity, which surprisingly span from days to the entire period of the available data of more than 1 year. Further, we provide a mathematical framework that relates the generalized version of Gibrat's law to the long-term correlated dynamics, which suggests that the same underlying mechanism could be the source of Gibrat's law in economics, ranging from large firms, research and development expenditures, gross domestic product of countries, to city population growth. These findings are also of importance for designing communication networks and for the understanding of the dynamics of social systems in which communication plays a role, such as economic markets and political systems.

  16. Molecular dynamics explorations of active site structure in designed and evolved enzymes.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Sílvia; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Noey, Elizabeth L; Houk, K N

    2015-04-21

    This Account describes the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reveal how mutations alter the structure and organization of enzyme active sites. As proposed by Pauling about 70 years ago and elaborated by many others since then, biocatalysis is efficient when functional groups in the active site of an enzyme are in optimal positions for transition state stabilization. Changes in mechanism and covalent interactions are often critical parts of enzyme catalysis. We describe our explorations of the dynamical preorganization of active sites using MD, studying the fluctuations between active and inactive conformations normally concealed to static crystallography. MD shows how the various arrangements of active site residues influence the free energy of the transition state and relates the populations of the catalytic conformational ensemble to the enzyme activity. This Account is organized around three case studies from our laboratory. We first describe the importance of dynamics in evaluating a series of computationally designed and experimentally evolved enzymes for the Kemp elimination, a popular subject in the enzyme design field. We find that the dynamics of the active site is influenced not only by the original sequence design and subsequent mutations but also by the nature of the ligand present in the active site. In the second example, we show how microsecond MD has been used to uncover the role of remote mutations in the active site dynamics and catalysis of a transesterase, LovD. This enzyme was evolved by Tang at UCLA and Codexis, Inc., and is a useful commercial catalyst for the production of the drug simvastatin. X-ray analysis of inactive and active mutants did not reveal differences in the active sites, but relatively long time scale MD in solution showed that the active site of the wild-type enzyme preorganizes only upon binding of the acyl carrier protein (ACP) that delivers the natural acyl group to the active site. In the absence of bound ACP

  17. The Identity of the Nucleophile Substitution may Influence Metal Interactions with the Cleavage Site of the Minimal Hammerhead Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Edith M.; Ward, W. Luke; Ruehle, Max Z.; DeRose, Victoria J.

    2010-01-01

    Potential metal interactions with the cleavage site of a minimal hammerhead ribozyme (mHHRz) were probed using 31P NMR-detected Cd2+ titration studies of HHRz constructs containing a phosphorothioate (PS) modification at the cleavage site. The mHHRz nucleophile position was replaced by either a 2′-F or a 2′-NH2 in order to block cleavage activity during the study. The 2′-F/PS cleavage site mHHRz construct, in which the 2′-F should closely imitate the atom size and electronegativity of a 2′OH, demonstrates low levels of metal ion association (<1 ppm 31P chemical shift changes). This observation indicates that having an atom size and electrostatic properties that are similar to the 2′-OH are not the governing factors in allowing metal interactions with the scissile phosphate of the mHHRz. With a 2′-NH2 substitution, a large upfield change in 31P NMR chemical shift of the phosphorothioate peak (Δ~3 ppm with 6 equivalents added Cd2+) indicates observable Cd2+ interactions with the substituted site. Since a 2′-NH2, but not a 2′-F, can serve as a metal ligand, these data suggest that a metal ion interaction with the HHRz cleavage site may include both the scissile phosphate and the 2′ nucleophile. Control samples in which the 2′-NH2/PS unit is placed either next to the mHHRz cleavage site (at U16.1), in a duplex, or in a amUPSU dinucleotide, show much weaker interactions with Cd2+. Results with these control samples indicate that simply the presence of a 2′-NH2/PS unit does not create a strong metal binding site, reinforcing the possibility that the 2′-NH2-moderated Cd-PS interaction is specific to the mHHRz cleavage site. Upfield chemical shifts of both 31P and H2′ 1H resonances in amUPSU are observed with addition of Cd2+, consistent with the predicted metal coordination to both 2′-NH2 and phosphorothioate ligands. These data suggest that metal ion association with the HHRz cleavage site may include an interaction with the 2

  18. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  19. Spectroscopic studies of the active site of galactose oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, P.F.; Brown, R.D. III; Koenig, S.H.

    1995-07-19

    X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopy have been used to probe the copper site structure in galactose oxidase at pH 4.5 and 7.0. the results suggest that there are no major differences in the structure of the tetragonal Cu(II) site at these pH values. Analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicates that four N,O scatterers are present at approximately 2 {Angstrom}; these are presumably the equatorial ligands. In addition, the EXAFS data establish that oxidative activation to produce the active-site tyrosine radical does not cause major changes in the copper coordination environment. Therefore results obtained on the one-electron reduced enzyme, containing Cu(II) but not the tyrosine radical, probably also apply to the catalytically active Cu(II)/tyrosine radical state. Solvent water exchange, inhibitor binding, and substrate binding have been probed via nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) measurements. The NMRD profile of galactose oxidase is quantitatively consistent with the rapid exchange of a single, equatorial water ligand with a Cu(II)-O separation of about 2.4 {Angstrom}. Azide and cyanide displace this coordinated water. The binding of azide and the substrate dihydroxyacetone produce very similar effects on the NMRD profile of galactose oxidase, indicating that substrates also bind to the active site Cu(II) in an equatorial position.

  20. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  1. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  2. The Internet and Public Participation: State Legislature Web Sites and the Many Definitions of Interactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferber, Paul; Foltz, Franz; Pugliese, Rudy

    2005-01-01

    The interactive nature of the Internet is seen by some as a technological innovation that might boost participation in politics and civic affairs. That potential, however, is clouded by imprecise definitions of interactivity found among scholars and practitioners alike. Evaluation of state legislature Web sites found them to not be very…

  3. User-Centric Secure Cross-Site Interaction Framework for Online Social Networking Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, Moo Nam

    2011-01-01

    Social networking service is one of major technological phenomena on Web 2.0. Hundreds of millions of users are posting message, photos, and videos on their profiles and interacting with other users, but the sharing and interaction are limited within the same social networking site. Although users can share some content on a social networking site…

  4. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  5. A Druggable Pocket at the Nucleocapsid/Phosphoprotein Interaction Site of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ouizougun-Oubari, Mohamed; Pereira, Nelson; Tarus, Bogdan; Galloux, Marie; Lassoued, Safa; Fix, Jenna; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Hoos, Sylviane; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Desmaële, Didier; Couvreur, Patrick; Bontems, François; Rey, Félix A.; Eléouët, Jean-François; Slama-Schwok, Anny

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Presently, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the main cause of severe respiratory infections in infants, cannot be treated efficiently with antivirals. However, its RNA-dependent polymerase complex offers potential targets for RSV-specific drugs. This includes the recognition of its template, the ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP), consisting of genomic RNA encapsidated by the RSV nucleoprotein, N. This recognition proceeds via interaction between the phosphoprotein P, which is the main polymerase cofactor, and N. The determinant role of the C terminus of P, and more particularly of the last residue, F241, in RNP binding and viral RNA synthesis has been assessed previously. Here, we provide detailed structural insight into this crucial interaction for RSV polymerase activity. We solved the crystallographic structures of complexes between the N-terminal domain of N (N-NTD) and C-terminal peptides of P and characterized binding by biophysical approaches. Our results provide a rationale for the pivotal role of F241, which inserts into a well-defined N-NTD pocket. This primary binding site is completed by transient contacts with upstream P residues outside the pocket. Based on the structural information of the N-NTD:P complex, we identified inhibitors of this interaction, selected by in silico screening of small compounds, that efficiently bind to N and compete with P in vitro. One of the compounds displayed inhibitory activity on RSV replication, thereby strengthening the relevance of N-NTD for structure-based design of RSV-specific antivirals. IMPORTANCE Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a widespread pathogen that is a leading cause of acute lower respiratory infections in infants worldwide. RSV cannot be treated efficiently with antivirals, and no vaccine is presently available, with the development of pediatric vaccines being particularly challenging. Therefore, there is a need for new therapeutic strategies that specifically target RSV. The interaction

  6. Room-temperature activation of methane and dry re-forming with CO2 on Ni-CeO2 (111) surfaces: Effect of Ce3+ sites and metal–support interactions on C–H bond cleavage

    DOE PAGES

    Lustemberg, Pablo G.; Ramírez, Pedro J.; Liu, Zongyuan; ...

    2016-10-27

    The results of core-level photoemission indicate that Ni-CeO2(111) surfaces with small or medium coverages of nickel are able to activate methane at 300 K, producing adsorbed CHx and COx (x = 2, 3) groups. Calculations based on density functional theory predict a relatively low activation energy of 0.6–0.7 eV for the cleavage of the first C–H bond in the adsorbed methane molecule. Ni and O centers of ceria work in a cooperative way in the dissociation of the C–H bond at room temperature, where a low Ni loading is crucial for the catalyst activity and stability. The strong electronic perturbationsmore » in the Ni nanoparticles produced by the ceria supports of varying natures, such as stoichiometric and reduced, result in a drastic change in their chemical properties toward methane adsorption and dissociation as well as the dry reforming of methane reaction. Lastly, the coverage of Ni has a drastic effect on the ability of the system to dissociate methane and catalyze the dry re-forming process.« less

  7. Prediction of Protein–Protein Interaction Sites in Sequences and 3D Structures by Random Forests

    PubMed Central

    Šikić, Mile; Tomić, Sanja; Vlahoviček, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    Identifying interaction sites in proteins provides important clues to the function of a protein and is becoming increasingly relevant in topics such as systems biology and drug discovery. Although there are numerous papers on the prediction of interaction sites using information derived from structure, there are only a few case reports on the prediction of interaction residues based solely on protein sequence. Here, a sliding window approach is combined with the Random Forests method to predict protein interaction sites using (i) a combination of sequence- and structure-derived parameters and (ii) sequence information alone. For sequence-based prediction we achieved a precision of 84% with a 26% recall and an F-measure of 40%. When combined with structural information, the prediction performance increases to a precision of 76% and a recall of 38% with an F-measure of 51%. We also present an attempt to rationalize the sliding window size and demonstrate that a nine-residue window is the most suitable for predictor construction. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of our prediction methods by modeling the Ras–Raf complex using predicted interaction sites as target binding interfaces. Our results suggest that it is possible to predict protein interaction sites with quite a high accuracy using only sequence information. PMID:19180183

  8. Interaction of P-aminobenzoic acid with normal and sickel erythrocyte membrane: photoaffinity labelling of the binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Premachandra, B.R.

    1986-03-05

    Electron microscopic studies revealed that P-Amino benzoic acid (PABA) could prevent eichinocytosis of red cells in vitro. Equilibrium binding studies with right side out membrane vesicles (ROV) revealed a similar number of binding sites (1.2-1.4 ..mu..mol/mg) and Kd (1.4-1.6 mM) values for both normal and sickle cell membranes. /sup 14/C-Azide analogue of PABA was synthesized as a photoaffinity label to probe its sites of interaction on the erythrocyte membranes. Competitive binding studies of PABA with its azide indicated that both the compounds share common binding sites on the membrane surface since a 20 fold excess of azide inhibited PABA binding in a linear fashion. The azide was covalently incorporated into the membrane components only upon irradiation (52-35% of the label found in the proteins and the rest in lipids). Electrophoretic analysis of photolabelled ROV revealed that the azide interacts chiefly with Band 3 protein. PABA inhibited both high and low affinity calcium (Ca) binding sites situated on either surface of the membrane in a non-competitive manner; however, Ca binding stimulated by Mg-ATP was not affected. Ca transport into inside out vesicles was inhibited by PABA; but it did not affect the calcium ATP-ase activity. The authors studies suggest that the mechanism of action of PABA is mediated by its interaction with Band 3 protein (anion channel), calcium channel and calcium binding sites of erythrocyte membrane.

  9. Probing the promiscuous active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase using synthetic substrates, homology modeling, and active site modification.

    PubMed

    Daniellou, Richard; Zheng, Hongyan; Langill, David M; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2007-06-26

    The active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase (IDH, EC 1.1.1.18) from Bacillus subtilis recognizes a variety of mono- and disaccharides, as well as 1l-4-O-substituted inositol derivatives. It catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the axial alcohol of these substrates with comparable kinetic constants. We have found that 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol does not act as a substrate for IDH, in contrast to structurally similar compounds such as those bearing substituted benzyl substituents in the same position. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol and 4-O-(2-naphthyl)methyl-myo-inositol, which is a substrate for IDH, shows a distinct difference in the preferred conformation of the aryl substituent. Conformational analysis of known substrates of IDH suggests that this conformational difference may account for the difference in reactivity of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol in the presence of IDH. A sequence alignment of IDH with the homologous glucose-fructose oxidoreductase allowed the construction of an homology model of inositol dehydrogenase, to which NADH and 4-O-benzyl-scyllo-inosose were docked and the active site energy minimized. The active site model is consistent with all experimental results and suggests that a conserved tyrosine-glycine-tyrosine motif forms the hydrophobic pocket adjoining the site of inositol recognition. Y233F and Y235F retain activity, while Y233R and Y235R do not. A histidine-aspartate pair, H176 and D172, are proposed to act as a dyad in which H176 is the active site acid/base. The enzyme is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate, and the mutants H176A and D172N show a marked loss of activity. Kinetic isotope effect experiments with D172N indicate that chemistry is rate-determining for this mutant.

  10. The active site structure and mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Arginine specific reagents showed irreversible inhibition of avian liver mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Potent protection against modification was elicited by CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} in the presence of other substrates. Labeling of enzyme with (7-{sup 14}C) phenylglyoxal showed that 1 or 2 arginines are involved in CO{sub 2} binding and activation. Peptide map studies showed this active site arginine residues is located at position 289. Histidine specific reagents showed pseudo first order inhibition of avian mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity. The best protection against modification was elicited by IDP or IDP and Mn{sup +2}. One histidine residue is at or near the phosphoenolpyruvate binding site as demonstrated in the increased absorbance at 240 nm and proton relaxation rate studies. Circular dichroism studies reveal that enzyme structure was perturbed by diethylpyrocarbonate modification. Metal binding studies suggest that this enzyme has only one metal binding site. The putative binding sites from several GTP and phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes are observed in P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase from different species.

  11. Recruitment of the inhibitor Cand1 to the cullin substrate adaptor site mediates interaction to the neddylation site

    PubMed Central

    Helmstaedt, Kerstin; Schwier, Elke U.; Christmann, Martin; Nahlik, Krystyna; Westermann, Mieke; Harting, Rebekka; Grond, Stephanie; Busch, Silke; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2011-01-01

    Cand1 inhibits cullin RING ubiquitin ligases by binding unneddylated cullins. The Cand1 N-terminus blocks the cullin neddylation site, whereas the C-terminus inhibits cullin adaptor interaction. These Cand1 binding sites can be separated into two functional polypeptides which bind sequentially. C-terminal Cand1 can directly bind to unneddylated cullins in the nucleus without blocking the neddylation site. The smaller N-terminal Cand1 cannot bind to the cullin neddylation region without C-terminal Cand1. The separation of a single cand1 into two independent genes represents the in vivo situation of the fungus Aspergillus nidulans, where C-terminal Cand1 recruits smaller N-terminal Cand1 in the cytoplasm. Either deletion results in an identical developmental and secondary metabolism phenotype in fungi, which resembles csn mutants deficient in the COP9 signalosome (CSN) deneddylase. We propose a two-step Cand1 binding to unneddylated cullins which initiates at the adaptor binding site and subsequently blocks the neddylation site after CSN has left. PMID:21119001

  12. Active Interaction Mapping Reveals the Hierarchical Organization of Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Michael H; Farré, Jean-Claude; Mitra, Koyel; Yu, Michael Ku; Ono, Keiichiro; Demchak, Barry; Licon, Katherine; Flagg, Mitchell; Balakrishnan, Rama; Cherry, J Michael; Subramani, Suresh; Ideker, Trey

    2017-02-16

    We have developed a general progressive procedure, Active Interaction Mapping, to guide assembly of the hierarchy of functions encoding any biological system. Using this process, we assemble an ontology of functions comprising autophagy, a central recycling process implicated in numerous diseases. A first-generation model, built from existing gene networks in Saccharomyces, captures most known autophagy components in broad relation to vesicle transport, cell cycle, and stress response. Systematic analysis identifies synthetic-lethal interactions as most informative for further experiments; consequently, we saturate the model with 156,364 such measurements across autophagy-activating conditions. These targeted interactions provide more information about autophagy than all previous datasets, producing a second-generation ontology of 220 functions. Approximately half are previously unknown; we confirm roles for Gyp1 at the phagophore-assembly site, Atg24 in cargo engulfment, Atg26 in cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting, and Ssd1, Did4, and others in selective and non-selective autophagy. The procedure and autophagy hierarchy are at http://atgo.ucsd.edu/.

  13. Substrate shuttling between active sites of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase is not required to generate coproporphyrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, John D.; Warby, Christy A.; Whitby, Frank G.; Kushner, James P.; Hill, Christopher P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase (URO-D; EC 4.1.1.37), the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is required for the production of heme, vitamin B12, siroheme, and chlorophyll precursors. URO-D catalyzes the sequential decarboxylation of the four acetate side chains on the pyrrole groups of uroporphyrinogen to produce coproporphyrinogen. URO-D is a stable homodimer with the active site clefts of the two subunits adjacent to each other. It has been hypothesized that the two catalytic centers interact functionally, perhaps by shuttling of reaction intermediates between subunits. We tested this hypothesis by construction of a single chain protein (scURO-D) in which the two subunits were connected by a flexible linker. The crystal structure of this protein was shown to be superimposible with wild-type activity and have comparable catalytic activity. Mutations that impaired one or the other of the two active sites of scURO-D resulted in approximately half of wild-type activity. The distribution of reaction intermediates was the same for mutant and wild-type sequences, and was unaltered in a competition experiment using the I and III isomer substrates. These observations indicate that communication between active sites is not required for enzyme function, and suggest that the dimeric structure of URO-D is required to achieve conformational stability and create a large active site cleft. PMID:19362562

  14. Substrate Shuttling Between Active Sites of Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase in Not Required to Generate Coproporphyrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.; Warby, C; Whitby, F; Kushner, J; Hill, C

    2009-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D; EC 4.1.1.37), the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is required for the production of heme, vitamin B12, siroheme, and chlorophyll precursors. URO-D catalyzes the sequential decarboxylation of four acetate side chains in the pyrrole groups of uroporphyrinogen to produce coproporphyrinogen. URO-D is a stable homodimer, with the active-site clefts of the two subunits adjacent to each other. It has been hypothesized that the two catalytic centers interact functionally, perhaps by shuttling of reaction intermediates between subunits. We tested this hypothesis by construction of a single-chain protein (single-chain URO-D) in which the two subunits were connected by a flexible linker. The crystal structure of this protein was shown to be superimposable with wild-type activity and to have comparable catalytic activity. Mutations that impaired one or the other of the two active sites of single-chain URO-D resulted in approximately half of wild-type activity. The distributions of reaction intermediates were the same for mutant and wild-type sequences and were unaltered in a competition experiment using I and III isomer substrates. These observations indicate that communication between active sites is not required for enzyme function and suggest that the dimeric structure of URO-D is required to achieve conformational stability and to create a large active-site cleft.

  15. Halides with Fifteen Aliphatic C–H···Anion Interaction Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Genggongwo; Aliakbar Tehrani, Zahra; Kim, Dongwook; Cho, Woo Jong; Youn, Il-Seung; Lee, Han Myoung; Yousuf, Muhammad; Ahmed, Nisar; Shirinfar, Bahareh; Teator, Aaron J.; Lastovickova, Dominika N.; Rasheed, Lubna; Lah, Myoung Soo; Bielawski, Christopher W.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2016-07-01

    Since the aliphatic C–H···anion interaction is relatively weak, anion binding using hydrophobic aliphatic C–H (Cali–H) groups has generally been considered not possible without the presence of additional binding sites that contain stronger interactions to the anion. Herein, we report X-ray structures of organic crystals that feature a chloride anion bound exclusively by hydrophobic Cali–H groups. An X-ray structure of imidazolium-based scaffolds using Cali–H···A‑ interactions (A‑ = anion) shows that a halide anion is directly interacting with fifteen Cali–H groups (involving eleven hydrogen bonds, two bidentate hydrogen-bond-type binding interactions and two weakly hydrogen-bonding-like binding interactions). Additional supporting interactions and/or other binding sites are not observed. We note that such types of complexes may not be rare since such high numbers of binding sites for an anion are also found in analogous tetraalkylammonium complexes. The Cali–H···A‑ interactions are driven by the formation of a near-spherical dipole layer shell structure around the anion. The alternating layers of electrostatic charge around the anion arise because the repulsions between weakly positively charged H atoms are reduced by the presence of the weakly negatively charged C atoms connected to H atoms.

  16. Halides with Fifteen Aliphatic C–H···Anion Interaction Sites

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Genggongwo; Aliakbar Tehrani, Zahra; Kim, Dongwook; Cho, Woo Jong; Youn, Il-Seung; Lee, Han Myoung; Yousuf, Muhammad; Ahmed, Nisar; Shirinfar, Bahareh; Teator, Aaron J.; Lastovickova, Dominika N.; Rasheed, Lubna; Lah, Myoung Soo; Bielawski, Christopher W.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2016-01-01

    Since the aliphatic C–H···anion interaction is relatively weak, anion binding using hydrophobic aliphatic C–H (Cali–H) groups has generally been considered not possible without the presence of additional binding sites that contain stronger interactions to the anion. Herein, we report X-ray structures of organic crystals that feature a chloride anion bound exclusively by hydrophobic Cali–H groups. An X-ray structure of imidazolium-based scaffolds using Cali–H···A− interactions (A− = anion) shows that a halide anion is directly interacting with fifteen Cali–H groups (involving eleven hydrogen bonds, two bidentate hydrogen-bond-type binding interactions and two weakly hydrogen-bonding-like binding interactions). Additional supporting interactions and/or other binding sites are not observed. We note that such types of complexes may not be rare since such high numbers of binding sites for an anion are also found in analogous tetraalkylammonium complexes. The Cali–H···A− interactions are driven by the formation of a near-spherical dipole layer shell structure around the anion. The alternating layers of electrostatic charge around the anion arise because the repulsions between weakly positively charged H atoms are reduced by the presence of the weakly negatively charged C atoms connected to H atoms. PMID:27444513

  17. Sites of interaction between aldolase and thrombospondin-related anonymous protein in plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Buscaglia, Carlos A; Coppens, Isabelle; Hol, Wim G J; Nussenzweig, Victor

    2003-12-01

    Gliding motility and host cell invasion by apicomplexan parasites are empowered by an acto-myosin motor located underneath the parasite plasma membrane. The motor is connected to host cell receptors through trans-membrane invasins belonging to the thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP) family. A recent study indicates that aldolase bridges the cytoplasmic tail of MIC2, the homologous TRAP protein in Toxoplasma, and actin. Here, we confirm these unexpected findings in Plasmodium sporozoites and identify conserved features of the TRAP family cytoplasmic tail required to bind aldolase: a subterminal tryptophan residue and two noncontiguous stretches of negatively charged amino acids. The aldolase substrate and other compounds that bind to the active site inhibit its interaction with TRAP and with F-actin, suggesting that the function of the motor is metabolically regulated. Ultrastructural studies in salivary gland sporozoites localize aldolase to the periphery of the secretory micronemes containing TRAP. Thus, the interaction between aldolase and the TRAP tail takes place during or preceding the biogenesis of the micronemes. The release of their contents in the anterior pole of the parasite upon contact with the target cells should bring simultaneously aldolase, TRAP and perhaps F-actin to the proper subcellular location where the motor is engaged.

  18. Dynamics of the Active Sites of Dimeric Seryl tRNA Synthetase from Methanopyrus kandleri.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Saheb; Nandi, Nilashis

    2015-08-27

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) carry out the first step of protein biosynthesis. Several aaRSs are multimeric, and coordination between the dynamics of active sites present in each monomer is a prerequisite for the fast and accurate aminoacylation. However, important lacunae of understanding exist concerning the conformational dynamics of multimeric aaRSs. Questions remained unanswered pertaining to the dynamics of the active site. Little is known concerning the conformational dynamics of the active sites in response to the substrate binding, reorganization of the catalytic residues around reactants, time-dependent changes at the reaction center, which are essential for facilitating the nucleophilic attack, and interactions at the interface of neighboring monomers. In the present work, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of dimeric (mk)SerRS from Methanopyrus kandleri bound with tRNA using an explicit solvent system. Two dimeric states of seryl tRNA synthetase (open, substrate bound, and adenylate bound) and two monomeric states (open and substrate bound) are simulated with bound tRNA. The aim is to understand the conformational dynamics of (mk)SerRS during its reaction cycle. While the present results provide a clear dynamical perspective of the active sites of (mk)SerRS, they corroborate with the results from the time-averaged experimental data such as crystallographic and mutation analysis of methanogenic SerRS from M. kandleri and M. barkeri. It is observed from the present simulation that the motif 2 loop gates the active site and its Glu351 and Arg360 stabilizes ATP in a bent state favorable for nucleophilic attack. The flexibility of the walls of the active site gradually reduces near reaction center, which is a more organized region compared to the lid region. The motif 2 loop anchors Ser and ATP using Arg349 in a hydrogen bonded geometry crucial for nucleophilic attack and favorably influences the electrostatic potential at the

  19. Probing the catalytic mechanism of bovine CD38/NAD+ glycohydrolase by site directed mutagenesis of key active site residues.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Isabelle; Kellenberger, Esther; Cakir-Kiefer, Céline; Muller-Steffner, Hélène; Schuber, Francis

    2014-07-01

    Bovine CD38/NAD(+) glycohydrolase catalyzes the hydrolysis of NAD(+) to nicotinamide and ADP-ribose and the formation of cyclic ADP-ribose via a stepwise reaction mechanism. Our recent crystallographic study of its Michaelis complex and covalently-trapped intermediates provided insights into the modalities of substrate binding and the molecular mechanism of bCD38. The aim of the present work was to determine the precise role of key conserved active site residues (Trp118, Glu138, Asp147, Trp181 and Glu218) by focusing mainly on the cleavage of the nicotinamide-ribosyl bond. We analyzed the kinetic parameters of mutants of these residues which reside within the bCD38 subdomain in the vicinity of the scissile bond of bound NAD(+). To address the reaction mechanism we also performed chemical rescue experiments with neutral (methanol) and ionic (azide, formate) nucleophiles. The crucial role of Glu218, which orients the substrate for cleavage by interacting with the N-ribosyl 2'-OH group of NAD(+), was highlighted. This contribution to catalysis accounts for almost half of the reaction energy barrier. Other contributions can be ascribed notably to Glu138 and Asp147 via ground-state destabilization and desolvation in the vicinity of the scissile bond. Key interactions with Trp118 and Trp181 were also proven to stabilize the ribooxocarbenium ion-like transition state. Altogether we propose that, as an alternative to a covalent acylal reaction intermediate with Glu218, catalysis by bCD38 proceeds through the formation of a discrete and transient ribooxocarbenium intermediate which is stabilized within the active site mostly by electrostatic interactions.

  20. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Silicate Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts [1-3]. Nevertheless, among those structures K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. In this study, the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars were investigated in closer details. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. We give a potential explanation of the increased ice nucleation activity of K-feldspar. The ice nucleating sites are very much dependent on the alkali ion present by altering the water structure and the feldspar surface. The higher activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to the presence of potassium ions on the surface and surface bilayer. The alkali-ions have different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar. Chaotropic behavior of Calcium and Sodium ions are lowering the ice nucleation potential of the other feldspars, while kosmotropic Potassium has a neutral or even positive effect. Furthermore we investigated the influence of milling onto the ice nucleation of quartz particles. The ice nucleation activity can be increased by mechanical milling, by introducing more molecular, nucleation active defects to the particle surface. This effect is larger than expected by plane surface increase. [1] Atkinson et al. The Importance of Feldspar for Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust in Mixed-Phase Clouds. Nature 2013, 498, 355-358. [2] Yakobi-Hancock et al.. Feldspar Minerals as Efficient Deposition Ice Nuclei. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2013, 13, 11175-11185. [3] Zolles et al. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015 accepted.

  1. Human 15-LOX-1 active site mutations alter inhibitor binding and decrease potency.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Michelle; van Hoorebeke, Christopher; Horn, Thomas; Deschamps, Joshua; Freedman, J Cody; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Jacobson, Matthew P; Holman, Theodore

    2016-11-01

    Human 15-lipoxygenase-1 (h15-LOX-1 or h12/15-LOX) reacts with polyunsaturated fatty acids and produces bioactive lipid derivatives that are implicated in many important human diseases. One such disease is stroke, which is the fifth leading cause of death and the first leading cause of disability in America. The discovery of h15-LOX-1 inhibitors could potentially lead to novel therapeutics in the treatment of stroke, however, little is known about the inhibitor/active site interaction. This study utilizes site-directed mutagenesis, guided in part by molecular modeling, to gain a better structural understanding of inhibitor interactions within the active site. We have generated eight mutants (R402L, R404L, F414I, F414W, E356Q, Q547L, L407A, I417A) of h15-LOX-1 to determine whether these active site residues interact with two h15-LOX-1 inhibitors, ML351 and an ML094 derivative, compound 18. IC50 values and steady-state inhibition kinetics were determined for the eight mutants, with four of the mutants affecting inhibitor potency relative to wild type h15-LOX-1 (F414I, F414W, E356Q and L407A). The data indicate that ML351 and compound 18, bind in a similar manner in the active site to an aromatic pocket close to F414 but have subtle differences in their specific binding modes. This information establishes the binding mode for ML094 and ML351 and will be leveraged to develop next-generation inhibitors.

  2. Docking and molecular dynamics studies at trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase active sites.

    PubMed

    Iribarne, Federico; Paulino, Margot; Aguilera, Sara; Murphy, Miguel; Tapia, Orlando

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical docking study on the active sites of trypanothione reductase (TR) and glutathione reductase (GR) with the corresponding natural substrates, trypanothione disulfide (T[S]2) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), is reported. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to check the robustness of the docking results. The energetic results are in agreement with previous experimental findings and show the crossed complexes have lower stabilization energies than the natural ones. To test DOCK3.5, four nitro furanic compounds, previously designed as potentially active anti-chagasic molecules, were docked at the GR and TR active sites with the DOCK3.5 procedure. A good correlation was found between differential inhibitory activity and relative interaction energy (affinity). The results provide a validation test for the use of DOCK3.5 in connection with the design of anti-chagasic drugs.

  3. Face the Edges: Catalytic Active Sites of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Edges are special sites in nanomaterials. The atoms residing on the edges have different environments compared to those in other parts of a nanomaterial and, therefore, they may have different properties. Here, recent progress in nanomaterial fields is summarized from the viewpoint of the edges. Typically, edge sites in MoS2 or metals, other than surface atoms, can perform as active centers for catalytic reactions, so the method to enhance performance lies in the optimization of the edge structures. The edges of multicomponent interfaces present even more possibilities to enhance the activities of nanomaterials. Nanoframes and ultrathin nanowires have similarities to conventional edges of nanoparticles, the application of which as catalysts can help to reduce the use of costly materials. Looking beyond this, the edge structures of graphene are also essential for their properties. In short, the edge structure can influence many properties of materials. PMID:27980960

  4. Multiple DNA binding activities of the novel site-specific recombinase, Piv, from Moraxella lacunata.

    PubMed

    Tobiason, D M; Lenich, A G; Glasgow, A C

    1999-04-02

    The recombinase, Piv, is essential for site-specific DNA inversion of the type IV pilin DNA segment in Moraxella lacunata and Moraxella bovis. Piv shows significant homology with the transposases of the IS110/IS492 family of insertion elements, but, surprisingly, Piv contains none of the conserved amino acid motifs of the lambda Int or Hin/Res families of site-specific recombinases. Therefore, Piv may mediate site-specific recombination by a novel mechanism. To begin to determine how Piv may assemble a synaptic nucleoprotein structure for DNA cleavage and strand exchange, we have characterized the interaction of Piv with the DNA inversion region of M. lacunata. Gel shift and nuclease/chemical protection assays, competition and dissociation rate analyses, and cooperativity studies indicate that Piv binds two distinct recognition sequences. One recognition sequence, found at multiple sites within and outside of the invertible segment, is bound by Piv protomers with high affinity. The second recognition sequence is located at the recombination cross-over sites at the ends of the invertible element; Piv interacts with this sequence as an oligomer with apparent low affinity. A model is proposed for the role of the different Piv binding sites of the M. lacunata inversion region in the formation of an active synaptosome.

  5. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  6. Conformational Change in the Active Site of Streptococcal Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase Through Site-Directed Mutagenesis at Asp-115.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Yusuke; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (UGL) degrades unsaturated disaccharides generated from mammalian extracellular matrices, glycosaminoglycans, by polysaccharide lyases. Two Asp residues, Asp-115 and Asp-175 of Streptococcus agalactiae UGL (SagUGL), are completely conserved in other bacterial UGLs, one of which (Asp-175 of SagUGL) acts as a general acid and base catalyst. The other Asp (Asp-115 of SagUGL) also affects the enzyme activity, although its role in the enzyme reaction has not been well understood. Here, we show substitution of Asp-115 in SagUGL with Asn caused a conformational change in the active site. Tertiary structures of SagUGL mutants D115N and D115N/K370S with negligible enzyme activity were determined at 2.00 and 1.79 Å resolution, respectively, by X-ray crystallography. The side chain of Asn-115 is drastically shifted in both mutants owing to the interaction with several residues, including Asp-175, by formation of hydrogen bonds. This interaction between Asn-115 and Asp-175 probably prevents the mutants from triggering the enzyme reaction using Asp-175 as an acid catalyst.

  7. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  8. Nest predation increases with parental activity: separating nest site and parental activity effects.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T E; Scott, J; Menge, C

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection. PMID:11413645

  9. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  10. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  11. [Mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2012-04-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent for inhibiting arginine-auxotrophic tumors (such as melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas) in phase III clinical trials. In this work, we studied the molecular mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutation sites, A128, H404 and 1410, were introduced into wild-type ADI gene by QuikChange site-directed mutagenesis method, and four ADI mutants M1 (A128T), M2 (H404R), M3 (I410L), and M4 (A128T, H404R) were obtained. The ADI mutants were individually expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the enzymatic properties of the purified mutant proteins were determined. The results show that both A128T and H404R had enhanced optimum pH, higher activity and stability of ADI under physiological condition (pH 7.4), as well as reduced K(m) value. This study provides an insight into the molecular mechanism of the ADI activity, and also the experimental evidence for the rational protein evolution in the future.

  12. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J.; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  13. Entropic Ratchet transport of interacting active Brownian particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Bao-Quan; He, Ya-Feng; Zhong, Wei-Rong

    2014-11-21

    Directed transport of interacting active (self-propelled) Brownian particles is numerically investigated in confined geometries (entropic barriers). The self-propelled velocity can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport. It is found that the interaction between active particles can greatly affect the ratchet transport. For attractive particles, on increasing the interaction strength, the average velocity first decreases to its minima, then increases, and finally decreases to zero. For repulsive particles, when the interaction is very weak, there exists a critical interaction at which the average velocity is minimal, nearly tends to zero, however, for the strong interaction, the average velocity is independent of the interaction.

  14. MSK1 activity is controlled by multiple phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    McCOY, Claire E.; Campbell, David G.; Deak, Maria; Bloomberg, Graham B.; Arthur, J. Simon C.

    2004-01-01

    MSK1 (mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase) is a kinase activated in cells downstream of both the ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades. In the present study, we show that, in addition to being phosphorylated on Thr-581 and Ser-360 by ERK1/2 or p38, MSK1 can autophosphorylate on at least six sites: Ser-212, Ser-376, Ser-381, Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758. Of these sites, the N-terminal T-loop residue Ser-212 and the ‘hydrophobic motif’ Ser-376 are phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain of MSK1, and their phosphorylation is essential for the catalytic activity of the N-terminal kinase domain of MSK1 and therefore for the phosphorylation of MSK1 substrates in vitro. Ser-381 is also phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain, and mutation of Ser-381 decreases MSK1 activity, probably through the inhibition of Ser-376 phosphorylation. Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758 are phosphorylated by the N-terminal kinase domain; however, their function is not known. The activation of MSK1 in cells therefore requires the activation of the ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK cascades and does not appear to require additional signalling inputs. This is in contrast with the closely related RSK (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase) proteins, whose activity requires phosphorylation by PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1) in addition to phosphorylation by ERK1/2. PMID:15568999

  15. Interactions of divalent cations with calcium binding sites of BK channels reveal independent motions within the gating ring

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Pablo; Giraldez, Teresa; Holmgren, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance voltage- and calcium-activated K+ (BK) channels are key physiological players in muscle, nerve, and endocrine function by integrating intracellular Ca2+ and membrane voltage signals. The open probability of BK channels is regulated by the intracellular concentration of divalent cations sensed by a large structure in the BK channel called the “gating ring,” which is formed by four tandems of regulator of conductance for K+ (RCK1 and RCK2) domains. In contrast to Ca2+ that binds to both RCK domains, Mg2+, Cd2+, or Ba2+ interact preferentially with either one or the other. Interaction of cations with their binding sites causes molecular rearrangements of the gating ring, but how these motions occur remains elusive. We have assessed the separate contributions of each RCK domain to the cation-induced gating-ring structural rearrangements, using patch-clamp fluorometry. Here we show that Mg2+ and Ba2+ selectively induce structural movement of the RCK2 domain, whereas Cd2+ causes motions of RCK1, in all cases substantially smaller than those elicited by Ca2+. By combining divalent species interacting with unique sites, we demonstrate that RCK1 and RCK2 domains move independently when their specific binding sites are occupied. Moreover, binding of chemically distinct cations to both RCK domains is additive, emulating the effect of fully occupied Ca2+ binding sites. PMID:27872281

  16. Galaxy interactions and the stimulation of nuclear activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, Timothy M.

    1990-01-01

    The author discusses the idea that interactions between galaxies can lead to enhanced galactic activity. He discusses whether, apart from the observational evidence, there is a strong theoretical or heuristic motivation for investigating galaxy interactions as stimulators of nuclear activity in galaxies. Galactic interactions as mechanisms for triggering nuclear starbursts are covered.

  17. Different cleavage sites are aligned differently in the active site of M1 RNA, the catalytic subunit of Escherichia coli RNase P.

    PubMed Central

    Kufel, J; Kirsebom, L A

    1996-01-01

    We have studied RNase P RNA (M1 RNA) cleavage of model tRNA precursors that are cleaved at two independent positions. Here we present data demonstrating that cleavage at both sites depends on the 2'-OH immediately 5' of the respective cleavage site. However, we show that the 2-amino group of a guanosine at the cleavage site plays a significant role in cleavage at one of these sites but not at the other. These data suggest that these two cleavage sites are handled differently by the ribozyme. This theory is supported by our finding that the cross-linking pattern between Ml RNA and tRNA precursors carrying 4-thioU showed distinct differences, depending on the location of the 4-thioU relative to the respective cleavage site. These findings lead us to suggest that different cleavage sites are aligned differently in the active site, possibly as a result of different binding modes of a substrate to M1 RNA. We discuss a model in which the interaction between the 3'-terminal "RCCA" motif (first three residues interact) of a tRNA precursor and M1 RNA plays a significant role in this process. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8650223

  18. A Variable Active Site Residue Influences the Kinetics of Response Regulator Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Immormino, Robert M; Silversmith, Ruth E; Bourret, Robert B

    2016-10-04

    Two-component regulatory systems, minimally composed of a sensor kinase and a response regulator protein, are common mediators of signal transduction in microorganisms. All response regulators contain a receiver domain with conserved active site residues that catalyze the signal activating and deactivating phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions. We explored the impact of variable active site position T+1 (one residue C-terminal to the conserved Thr/Ser) on reaction kinetics and signaling fidelity, using wild type and mutant Escherichia coli CheY, CheB, and NarL to represent the three major sequence classes observed across response regulators: Ala/Gly, Ser/Thr, and Val/Ile/Met, respectively, at T+1. Biochemical and structural data together suggested that different amino acids at T+1 impacted reaction kinetics by altering access to the active site while not perturbing overall protein structure. A given amino acid at position T+1 had similar effects on autodephosphorylation in each protein background tested, likely by modulating access of the attacking water molecule to the active site. Similarly, rate constants for CheY autophosphorylation with three different small molecule phosphodonors were consistent with the steric constraints on access to the phosphorylation site arising from combination of specific phosphodonors with particular amino acids at T+1. Because other variable active site residues also influence response regulator phosphorylation biochemistry, we began to explore how context (here, the amino acid at T+2) affected the influence of position T+1 on CheY autocatalytic reactions. Finally, position T+1 affected the fidelity and kinetics of phosphotransfer between sensor kinases and response regulators but was not a primary determinant of their interaction.

  19. Structure-based drug design: exploring the proper filling of apolar pockets at enzyme active sites.

    PubMed

    Zürcher, Martina; Diederich, François

    2008-06-20

    The proper filling of apolar pockets at enzyme active sites is central for increasing binding activity and selectivity of hits and leads in medicinal chemistry. In our structure-based design approach toward the generation of potent enzyme inhibitors, we encountered a variety of challenges in gaining suitable binding affinity from the occupation of such pockets. We summarize them here for the first time. A fluorine scan of tricyclic thrombin inhibitors led to the discovery of favorable orthogonal dipolar C-F...CO interactions. Efficient cation-pi interactions were established in the S4 pocket of factor Xa, another serine protease from the blood coagulation cascade. Changing from mono- to bisubstrate inhibitors of catechol O-methyltransferase, a target in the L-Dopa-based treatment of Parkinson's disease, enabled the full exploitation of a previously unexplored hydrophobic pocket. Conformational preorganization of a pocket at an enzyme active site is crucial for harvesting binding affinity. This is demonstrated for two enzymes from the nonmevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis, IspE and IspF, which are pursued as antimalarial targets. Disrupting crystallographically defined water networks on the way into a pocket might cost all of the binding free enthalpy gained from its occupation, as revealed in studies with tRNA-guanine transglycosylase, a target against shigellosis. Investigations of the active site of plasmepsin II, another antimalarial target, showed that principles for proper apolar cavity filling, originally developed for synthetic host-guest systems, are also applicable to enzyme environments.

  20. O2 activation by binuclear Cu sites: Noncoupled versus exchange coupled reaction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Solomon, Edward I.

    2004-09-01

    Binuclear Cu proteins play vital roles in O2 binding and activation in biology and can be classified into coupled and noncoupled binuclear sites based on the magnetic interaction between the two Cu centers. Coupled binuclear Cu proteins include hemocyanin, tyrosinase, and catechol oxidase. These proteins have two Cu centers strongly magnetically coupled through direct bridging ligands that provide a mechanism for the 2-electron reduction of O2 to a µ-2:2 side-on peroxide bridged species. This side-on bridged peroxo-CuII2 species is activated for electrophilic attack on the phenolic ring of substrates. Noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins include peptidylglycine -hydroxylating monooxygenase and dopamine -monooxygenase. These proteins have binuclear Cu active sites that are distant, that exhibit no exchange interaction, and that activate O2 at a single Cu center to generate a reactive CuII/O2 species for H-atom abstraction from the C-H bond of substrates. O2 intermediates in the coupled binuclear Cu enzymes can be trapped and studied spectroscopically. Possible intermediates in noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins can be defined through correlation to mononuclear CuII/O2 model complexes. The different intermediates in these two classes of binuclear Cu proteins exhibit different reactivities that correlate with their different electronic structures and exchange coupling interactions between the binuclear Cu centers. These studies provide insight into the role of exchange coupling between the Cu centers in their reaction mechanisms.

  1. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  2. Vitamin K epoxide reductase: homology, active site and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P

    2004-06-01

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) recycles reduced vitamin K, which is used subsequently as a co-factor in the gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid residues in blood coagulation enzymes. VKORC1, a subunit of the VKOR complex, has recently been shown to possess this activity. Here, we show that VKORC1 is a member of a large family of predicted enzymes that are present in vertebrates, Drosophila, plants, bacteria and archaea. Four cysteine residues and one residue, which is either serine or threonine, are identified as likely active-site residues. In some plant and bacterial homologues the VKORC1 homologous domain is fused with domains of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. These might reduce disulfide bonds of VKORC1-like enzymes as a prerequisite for their catalytic activities.

  3. Analysis of the Interaction of the Eg5 Loop5 with the Nucleotide Site

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Timothy D.; Naber, Nariman; Larson, Adam G.; Cooke, Roger; Rice, Sarah E.; Pate, Edward F.

    2011-11-21

    Loop 5 (L5) is a conserved loop that projects from the α2-helix adjacent to the nucleotide site of all kinesin-family motors. L5 is critical to the function of the mito tickinesin-5 family motors and is the binding site for several kinesin-5 inhibitors that are currently in clinical trials. Its conformational dynamics and its role in motor function are not fully understood. Our previous work using EPR spectroscopy suggested that L5 alters the nucleotide pocket conformation of the kinesin-5 motor Eg5 (Larsonetal.,2010). EPR spectra of a spin-labeled nucleotide analog bound at the nucleotide site of Eg5 display a highly immobilized component that is absent if L5 is shortened or if the inhibitor STLC is added (Larson etal.,2010), which X-ray structures suggest stabilizes an L5 conformation pointing away from the nucleotide site. These data, coupled with the proximity of L5 to the nucleotide site suggest L5 could interact with a bound nucleotide, modulating function. Here we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Eg5 to explore the interaction of L5 with the nucleotide site in greater detail. We performed MD simulations in which the L5-domain of the Eg5•ADP X-ray structure was manually deformed via backbone bond rotations. The L5-domain of Eg5 was sufficiently lengthy that portions of L5 could belocated in proximity to bound ADP. The MD simulations evolved to thermodynamically stable structures at 300K showing that L5 can interact directly with bound nucleotide with significant impingement on the ribosehydroxyls, consistent with the EPR spectroscopy results. Taken together, these data provide support for the hypothes is that L5 modulates Eg5 function via interaction with the nucleotide-binding site.

  4. ANALYSIS OF THE INTERACTION OF THE EG5 LOOP5 WITH THE NUCLEOTIDE SITE

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Timothy D.; Naber, Nariman; Larson, Adam G.; Cooke, Roger; Rice, Sarah; Pate, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Loop 5 (L5) is a conserved loop that projects from the α2-helix adjacent to the nucleotide site of all kinesin-family motors. L5 is critical to the function of the mitotic kinesin-5 family motors and is the binding site for several kinesin-5 inhibitors that are currently in clinical trials. Its conformational dynamics and its role in motor function are not fully understood. Our previous work using EPR spectroscopy suggested that L5 alters the nucleotide pocket conformation of the kinesin-5 motor Eg5 [1]. EPR spectra of a spin-labeled nucleotide analog bound at the nucleotide site of Eg5 display a highly immobilized component that is absent if L5 is shortened or if the inhibitor STLC is added [1], which X-ray structures suggest stabilizes a L5 conformation pointing away from the nucleotide site. These data, coupled with the proximity of L5 to the nucleotide site suggest L5 could interact with a bound nucleotide, modulating function. Here we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Eg5 to explore the interaction of L5 with the nucleotide site in greater detail. We performed MD simulations in which the L5-domain of the Eg5•ADP X-ray structure was manually deformed via backbone bond rotations. The L5-domain of Eg5 was sufficiently lengthy that portions of L5 could be located in proximity to bound ADP. The MD simulations evolved to thermodynamically stable structures at 300K showing that L5 can interact directly with bound nucleotide with significant impingement on the ribose hydroxyls, consistent with the EPR spectroscopy results. Taken together, these data provide support for the hypothesis that L5 modulates Eg5 function via interaction with the nucleotide-binding site. PMID:21872609

  5. Radial Glial Cell–Neuron Interaction Directs Axon Formation at the Opposite Side of the Neuron from the Contact Site

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Takano, Tetsuya; Nakamuta, Shinichi; Namba, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    How extracellular cues direct axon–dendrite polarization in mouse developing neurons is not fully understood. Here, we report that the radial glial cell (RGC)–cortical neuron interaction directs axon formation at the opposite side of the neuron from the contact site. N-cadherin accumulates at the contact site between the RGC and cortical neuron. Inhibition of the N-cadherin-mediated adhesion decreases this oriented axon formation in vitro, and disrupts the axon–dendrite polarization in vivo. Furthermore, the RGC–neuron interaction induces the polarized distribution of active RhoA at the contacting neurite and active Rac1 at the opposite neurite. Inhibition of Rho–Rho-kinase signaling in a neuron impairs the oriented axon formation in vitro, and prevents axon–dendrite polarization in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that the N-cadherin-mediated radial glia–neuron interaction determines the contacting neurite as the leading process for radial glia-guided neuronal migration and directs axon formation to the opposite side acting through the Rho family GTPases. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons are highly polarized cell lines typically with a single axon and multiple dendrites, which underlies the ability of integrating and transmitting the information in the brain. How is the axon–dendrite polarity of neurons established in the developing neocortex? Here we show that the N-cadherin-mediated radial glial cell–neuron interaction directs axon–dendrite polarization, the radial glial cell–neuron interaction induces polarized distribution of active RhoA and active Rac1 in neurons, and Rho–Rho-kinase signaling is required for axon–dendrite polarization. Our work advances the overall understanding of how extracellular cues direct axon–dendrite polarization in mouse developing neurons. PMID:26511243

  6. Understanding and Designing for Interactional Privacy Needs within Social Networking Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisniewski, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    "Interpersonal boundary regulation" is a way to optimize social interactions when sharing and connecting through Social Networking Sites (SNSs). The theoretical foundation of much of my research comes from Altman's work on privacy management in the physical world. Altman believed that "we should attempt to design responsive…

  7. Evolutionary, structural and biochemical evidence for a new interaction site of the leptin obesity protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaucher, Eric A.; Miyamoto, Michael M.; Benner, Steven A.

    2003-01-01

    The Leptin protein is central to the regulation of energy metabolism in mammals. By integrating evolutionary, structural, and biochemical information, a surface segment, outside of its known receptor contacts, is predicted as a second interaction site that may help to further define its roles in energy balance and its functional differences between humans and other mammals.

  8. Exploring site-specific chemical interactions at surfaces: a case study on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdeviren, Omur E.; Götzen, Jan; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2016-12-01

    A material’s ability to interact with approaching matter is governed by the structural and chemical nature of its surfaces. Tailoring surfaces to meet specific needs requires developing an understanding of the underlying fundamental principles that determine a surface’s reactivity. A particularly insightful case occurs when the surface site exhibiting the strongest attraction changes with distance. To study this issue, combined noncontact atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy experiments have been carried out, where the evolution of the local chemical interaction with distance leads to a contrast reversal in the force channel. Using highly ordered pyrolytic graphite surfaces and metallic probe tips as a model system, we find that at larger tip-sample distances, carbon atoms exhibit stronger attractions than hollow sites while upon further approach, hollow sites become energetically more favorable. For the tunneling current that is recorded at large tip-sample separations during acquisition of a constant-force image, the contrast is dominated by the changes in tip-sample distance required to hold the force constant (‘cross-talk’) at smaller separations the contrast turns into a convolution of this cross-talk and the local density of states. Analysis shows that the basic factors influencing the force channel contrast reversal are locally varying decay lengths and an onset of repulsive forces that occurs for distinct surface sites at different tip-sample distances. These findings highlight the importance of tip-sample distance when comparing the relative strength of site-specific chemical interactions.

  9. Specific interactions between proteins implicated in splice site selection and regulated alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Wu, J Y; Maniatis, T

    1993-12-17

    Specific recognition and pairing of the 5' and 3' splice sites are critical steps in pre-mRNA splicing. We report that the splicing factors SC35 and SF2/ASF specifically interact with both the integral U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP U1-70K) and with the 35 kd subunit of the splicing factor U2AF (U2AF35). Previous studies indicated that the U1 snRNP binds specifically to the 5' splice site, while U2AF35-U2AF65 heterodimer binds to the 3' splice site. Together, these observations suggest that SC35 and other members of the SR family of splicing factors may function in splice site selection by acting as a bridge between components bound to the 5' and 3' splice sites. Interestingly, SC35, SF2/ASF, and U2AF35 also interact with the Drosophila splicing regulators Transformer (Tra) and Transformer-2 (Tra2), suggesting that protein-protein interactions mediated by SR proteins may also play an important role in regulating alternative splicing.

  10. A Relaxed Active Site After Exon Ligation by the Group I Intron

    SciTech Connect

    Lipchock,S.; Strobel, S.

    2008-01-01

    During RNA maturation, the group I intron promotes two sequential phosphorotransfer reactions resulting in exon ligation and intron release. Here, we report the crystal structure of the intron in complex with spliced exons and two additional structures that examine the role of active-site metal ions during the second step of RNA splicing. These structures reveal a relaxed active site, in which direct metal coordination by the exons is lost after ligation, while other tertiary interactions are retained between the exon and the intron. Consistent with these structural observations, kinetic and thermodynamic measurements show that the scissile phosphate makes direct contact with metals in the ground state before exon ligation and in the transition state, but not after exon ligation. Despite no direct exonic interactions and even in the absence of the scissile phosphate, two metal ions remain bound within the active site. Together, these data suggest that release of the ligated exons from the intron is preceded by a change in substrate-metal coordination before tertiary hydrogen bonding contacts to the exons are broken.

  11. β-Lactoglobulin nanofibrils can be assembled into nanotapes via site-specific interactions with pectin.

    PubMed

    Hettiarachchi, Charith A; Melton, Laurence D; McGillivray, Duncan J; Loveday, Simon M; Gerrard, Juliet A; Williams, Martin A K

    2016-01-21

    Controlling the self-assembly of individual supramolecular entities, such as amyloid fibrils, into hierarchical architectures enables the 'bottom-up' fabrication of useful bionanomaterials. Here, we present the hierarchical assembly of β-lactoglobulin nanofibrils into the form of 'nanotapes' in the presence of a specific pectin with a high degree of methylesterification. The nanotapes produced were highly ordered, and had an average width of 180 nm at pH 3. Increasing the ionic strength or the pH of the medium led to the disassembly of nanotapes, indicating that electrostatic interactions stabilised the nanotape architecture. Small-angle X-ray scattering experiments conducted on the nanotapes showed that adequate space is available between adjacent nanofibrils to accommodate pectin molecules. To locate the interaction sites on the pectin molecule, it was subjected to endopolygalacturonase digestion, and the resulting products were analysed using capillary electrophoresis and size-exclusion chromatography for their charge and molecular weight, respectively. Results suggested that the functional pectin molecules carry short (<10 residues) enzyme-susceptible blocks of negatively charged, non-methylesterified galacturonic acid residues in the middle of their homogalacturonan backbones (and possibly near their ends), that specifically bind to sites on the nanofibrils. Blocking the interaction sites on the nanofibril surface using small oligomers of non-methylesterified galacturonic acid residues similar in size to the interaction sites of the pectin molecule decreased the nanotape formation, indicating that site-specific electrostatic interactions are vital for the cross-linking of nanofibrils. We propose a structural model for the pectin-cross-linked β-lactoglobulin nanotapes, the elements of which will inform the future design of bionanomaterials.

  12. NMR detection of intermolecular interaction sites in the dimeric 5'-leader of the HIV-1 genome.

    PubMed

    Keane, Sarah C; Van, Verna; Frank, Heather M; Sciandra, Carly A; McCowin, Sayo; Santos, Justin; Heng, Xiao; Summers, Michael F

    2016-11-15

    HIV type-1 (HIV-1) contains a pseudodiploid RNA genome that is selected for packaging and maintained in virions as a noncovalently linked dimer. Genome dimerization is mediated by conserved elements within the 5'-leader of the RNA, including a palindromic dimer initiation signal (DIS) that has been proposed to form kissing hairpin and/or extended duplex intermolecular contacts. Here, we have applied a (2)H-edited NMR approach to directly probe for intermolecular interactions in the full-length, dimeric HIV-1 5'-leader (688 nucleotides; 230 kDa). The interface is extensive and includes DIS:DIS base pairing in an extended duplex state as well as intermolecular pairing between elements of the upstream Unique-5' (U5) sequence and those near the gag start site (AUG). Other pseudopalindromic regions of the leader, including the transcription activation (TAR), polyadenylation (PolyA), and primer binding (PBS) elements, do not participate in intermolecular base pairing. Using a (2)H-edited one-dimensional NMR approach, we also show that the extended interface structure forms on a time scale similar to that of overall RNA dimerization. Our studies indicate that a kissing dimer-mediated structure, if formed, exists only transiently and readily converts to the extended interface structure, even in the absence of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein or other RNA chaperones.

  13. Target-classification approach applied to active UXO sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Shamatava, Irma; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study is designed to illustrate the discrimination performance at two UXO active sites (Oklahoma's Fort Sill and the Massachusetts Military Reservation) of a set of advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) inversion/discrimination models which include the orthonormalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS), joint diagonalization (JD), and differential evolution (DE) approaches and whose power and flexibility greatly exceed those of the simple dipole model. The Fort Sill site is highly contaminated by a mix of the following types of munitions: 37-mm target practice tracers, 60-mm illumination mortars, 75-mm and 4.5'' projectiles, 3.5'', 2.36'', and LAAW rockets, antitank mine fuzes with and without hex nuts, practice MK2 and M67 grenades, 2.5'' ballistic windshields, M2A1-mines with/without bases, M19-14 time fuzes, and 40-mm practice grenades with/without cartridges. The site at the MMR site contains targets of yet different sizes. In this work we apply our models to EMI data collected using the MetalMapper (MM) and 2 × 2 TEMTADS sensors. The data for each anomaly are inverted to extract estimates of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters associated with each buried target. (The latter include the total volume magnetic source or NVMS, which relates to size, shape, and material properties; the former includes location, depth, and orientation). The estimated intrinsic parameters are then used for classification performed via library matching and the use of statistical classification algorithms; this process yielded prioritized dig-lists that were submitted to the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) for independent scoring. The models' classification performance is illustrated and assessed based on these independent evaluations.

  14. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Altering Pollen Soluble Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Deborah J; Haque, Tamanna; Tudor, Richard L; Barron, Yoshimi; Zampronio, Cleidiane G; Cotton, Nicholas P J; de Graaf, Barend H J; White, Scott A; Cooper, Helen J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Harper, Jeffery F; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2017-03-01

    Protein phosphorylation regulates numerous cellular processes. Identifying the substrates and protein kinases involved is vital to understand how these important posttranslational modifications modulate biological function in eukaryotic cells. Pyrophosphatases catalyze the hydrolysis of inorganic phosphate (PPi) to inorganic phosphate Pi, driving biosynthetic reactions; they are essential for low cytosolic inorganic phosphate. It was suggested recently that posttranslational regulation of Family I soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (sPPases) may affect their activity. We previously demonstrated that two pollen-expressed sPPases, Pr-p26.1a and Pr-p26.1b, from the flowering plant Papaver rhoeas were inhibited by phosphorylation. Despite the potential significance, there is a paucity of data on sPPase phosphorylation and regulation. Here, we used liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry to map phosphorylation sites to the otherwise divergent amino-terminal extensions on these pollen sPPases. Despite the absence of reports in the literature on mapping phosphorylation sites on sPPases, a database survey of various proteomes identified a number of examples, suggesting that phosphorylation may be a more widely used mechanism to regulate these enzymes. Phosphomimetic mutants of Pr-p26.1a/b significantly and differentially reduced PPase activities by up to 2.5-fold at pH 6.8 and 52% in the presence of Ca(2+) and hydrogen peroxide over unmodified proteins. This indicates that phosphoregulation of key sites can inhibit the catalytic responsiveness of these proteins in concert with key intracellular events. As sPPases are essential for many metabolic pathways in eukaryotic cells, our findings identify the phosphorylation of sPPases as a potential master regulatory mechanism that could be used to attenuate metabolism.

  15. Evidence for segmental mobility in the active site of pepsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, J.; Strop, P.; Senn, H.; Foundling, S.; Kostka, V.

    1986-05-01

    The low hydrolytic activity (k/sub cat/ < 0.001 s/sup -1/) of chicken pepsin (CP) towards tri- and tetrapeptides is enhanced at least 100 times by modification of its single sulfhydryl group of Cys-115, with little effect on K/sub m/-values. Modification thus simulates the effect of secondary substrate binding on pepsin catalysis. The rate of Cys-115 modification is substantially decreased in the presence of some competitive inhibitors, suggesting its active site location. Experiments with CP alkylated at Cys-115 with Acrylodan as a fluorescent probe or with N-iodoacetyl-(4-fluoro)-aniline as a /sup 19/F-nmr probe suggest conformation change around Cys-115 to occur on substrate or substrate analog binding. The difference /sup 1/H-nmr spectra (500 MHz) of unmodified free and inhibitor-complexed CP reveal chemical shifts almost exclusively in the aromatic region. The effects of Cu/sup + +/ on /sup 19/F- and /sup 1/H-nmr spectra have been studied. Examination of a computer graphics model of CP based on E. parasitica pepsin-inhibitor complex X-ray coordinates suggests that Cys-115 is located near the S/sub 3//S/sub 5/ binding site. The results are interpreted in favor of segmental mobility of this region important for pepsin substrate binding and catalysis.

  16. A ligand peptide motif selected from a cancer patient is a receptor-interacting site within human interleukin-11.

    PubMed

    Cardó-Vila, Marina; Zurita, Amado J; Giordano, Ricardo J; Sun, Jessica; Rangel, Roberto; Guzman-Rojas, Liliana; Anobom, Cristiane D; Valente, Ana P; Almeida, Fábio C L; Lahdenranta, Johanna; Kolonin, Mikhail G; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin-11 (IL-11) is a pleiotropic cytokine approved by the FDA against chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. From a combinatorial selection in a cancer patient, we isolated an IL-11-like peptide mapping to domain I of the IL-11 (sequence CGRRAGGSC). Although this motif has ligand attributes, it is not within the previously characterized interacting sites. Here we design and validate in-tandem binding assays, site-directed mutagenesis and NMR spectroscopy to show (i) the peptide mimics a receptor-binding site within IL-11, (ii) the binding of CGRRAGGSC to the IL-11R alpha is functionally relevant, (iii) Arg4 and Ser8 are the key residues mediating the interaction, and (iv) the IL-11-like motif induces cell proliferation through STAT3 activation. These structural and functional results uncover an as yet unrecognized receptor-binding site in human IL-11. Given that IL-11R alpha has been proposed as a target in human cancer, our results provide clues for the rational design of targeted drugs.

  17. Roles of s3 site residues of nattokinase on its activity and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuming; Feng, Chi; Zhong, Jin; Huan, Liandong

    2007-09-01

    Nattokinase (Subtilisin NAT, NK) is a bacterial serine protease with high fibrinolytic activity. To probe their roles on protease activity and substrate specificity, three residues of S3 site (Gly(100), Ser(101) and Leu(126)) were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis. Kinetics parameters of 20 mutants were measured using tetrapeptides as substrates, and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. Results of mutation analysis showed that Gly(100) and Ser(101) had reverse steric and electrostatic effects. Residues with bulky or positively charged side chains at position 100 decreased the substrate binding and catalytic activity drastically, while residues with the same characters at position 101 could obviously enhance protease and fibrinolytic activity of NK. Mutation of Leu(126) might impair the structure of the active cleft and drastically decreased the activity of NK. Kinetics studies of the mutants showed that S3 residues were crucial to keep protease activity while they moderately affected substrate specificity of NK. The present study provided some original insight into the P3-S3 interaction in NK and other subtilisins, as well as showed successful protein engineering cases to improve NK as a potential therapeutic agent.

  18. An Overview of Tubulin Inhibitors That Interact with the Colchicine Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Chen, Jianjun; Xiao, Min; Li, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Tubulin dynamics is a promising target for new chemotherapeutic agents. The colchicine binding site is one of the most important pockets for potential tubulin polymerization destabilizers. Colchicine binding site inhibitors (CBSI) exert their biological effects by inhibiting tubulin assembly and suppressing microtubule formation. A large number of molecules interacting with the colchicine binding site have been designed and synthesized with significant structural diversity. CBSIs have been modified as to chemical structure as well as pharmacokinetic properties, and tested in order to find a highly potent, low toxicity agent for treatment of cancers. CBSIs are believed to act by a common mechanism via binding to the colchicine site on tubulin. The present review is a synopsis of compounds that have been reported in the past decade that have provided an increase in our understanding of the actions of CBSIs. PMID:22814904

  19. C-H Activation on Co,O Sites: Isolated Surface Sites versus Molecular Analogs.

    PubMed

    Estes, Deven P; Siddiqi, Georges; Allouche, Florian; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Safonova, Olga V; Trigub, Alexander L; Koptyug, Igor V; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-11-16

    The activation and conversion of hydrocarbons is one of the most important challenges in chemistry. Transition-metal ions (V, Cr, Fe, Co, etc.) isolated on silica surfaces are known to catalyze such processes. The mechanisms of these processes are currently unknown but are thought to involve C-H activation as the rate-determining step. Here, we synthesize well-defined Co(II) ions on a silica surface using a metal siloxide precursor followed by thermal treatment under vacuum at 500 °C. We show that these isolated Co(II) sites are catalysts for a number of hydrocarbon conversion reactions, such as the dehydrogenation of propane, the hydrogenation of propene, and the trimerization of terminal alkynes. We then investigate the mechanisms of these processes using kinetics, kinetic isotope effects, isotopic labeling experiments, parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) NMR, and comparison with a molecular analog. The data are consistent with all of these reactions occurring by a common mechanism, involving heterolytic C-H or H-H activation via a 1,2 addition across a Co-O bond.

  20. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  1. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  2. A binding site outside the canonical PDZ domain determines the specific interaction between Shank and SAPAP and their function

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Menglong; Shang, Yuan; Guo, Tingfeng; He, Qinghai; Yung, Wing-Ho; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-01-01

    Shank and SAPAP (synapse-associated protein 90/postsynaptic density-95–associated protein) are two highly abundant scaffold proteins that directly interact with each other to regulate excitatory synapse development and plasticity. Mutations of SAPAP, but not other reported Shank PDZ domain binders, share a significant overlap on behavioral abnormalities with the mutations of Shank both in patients and in animal models. The molecular mechanism governing the exquisite specificity of the Shank/SAPAP interaction is not clear, however. Here we report that a sequence preceding the canonical PDZ domain of Shank, together with the elongated PDZ BC loop, form another binding site for a sequence upstream of the SAPAP PDZ-binding motif, leading to a several hundred-fold increase in the affinity of the Shank/SAPAP interaction. We provide evidence that the specific interaction afforded by this newly identified site is required for Shank synaptic targeting and the Shank-induced synaptic activity increase. Our study provides a molecular explanation of how Shank and SAPAP dosage changes due to their gene copy number variations can contribute to different psychiatric disorders. PMID:27185935

  3. Radial Glial Cell-Neuron Interaction Directs Axon Formation at the Opposite Side of the Neuron from the Contact Site.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Takano, Tetsuya; Nakamuta, Shinichi; Namba, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-10-28

    How extracellular cues direct axon-dendrite polarization in mouse developing neurons is not fully understood. Here, we report that the radial glial cell (RGC)-cortical neuron interaction directs axon formation at the opposite side of the neuron from the contact site. N-cadherin accumulates at the contact site between the RGC and cortical neuron. Inhibition of the N-cadherin-mediated adhesion decreases this oriented axon formation in vitro, and disrupts the axon-dendrite polarization in vivo. Furthermore, the RGC-neuron interaction induces the polarized distribution of active RhoA at the contacting neurite and active Rac1 at the opposite neurite. Inhibition of Rho-Rho-kinase signaling in a neuron impairs the oriented axon formation in vitro, and prevents axon-dendrite polarization in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that the N-cadherin-mediated radial glia-neuron interaction determines the contacting neurite as the leading process for radial glia-guided neuronal migration and directs axon formation to the opposite side acting through the Rho family GTPases.

  4. Prediction of protein-protein interaction sites using an ensemble method

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Prediction of protein-protein interaction sites is one of the most challenging and intriguing problems in the field of computational biology. Although much progress has been achieved by using various machine learning methods and a variety of available features, the problem is still far from being solved. Results In this paper, an ensemble method is proposed, which combines bootstrap resampling technique, SVM-based fusion classifiers and weighted voting strategy, to overcome the imbalanced problem and effectively utilize a wide variety of features. We evaluate the ensemble classifier using a dataset extracted from 99 polypeptide chains with 10-fold cross validation, and get a AUC score of 0.86, with a sensitivity of 0.76 and a specificity of 0.78, which are better than that of the existing methods. To improve the usefulness of the proposed method, two special ensemble classifiers are designed to handle the cases of missing homologues and structural information respectively, and the performance is still encouraging. The robustness of the ensemble method is also evaluated by effectively classifying interaction sites from surface residues as well as from all residues in proteins. Moreover, we demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method to identify interaction sites from the non-structural proteins (NS) of the influenza A virus, which may be utilized as potential drug target sites. Conclusion Our experimental results show that the ensemble classifiers are quite effective in predicting protein interaction sites. The Sub-EnClassifiers with resampling technique can alleviate the imbalanced problem and the combination of Sub-EnClassifiers with a wide variety of feature groups can significantly improve prediction performance. PMID:20015386

  5. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  6. Crystallographic Analysis of Active Site Contributions to Regiospecificity in the Diiron Enzyme Toluene 4-Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Lucas J.; Acheson, Justin F.; McCoy, Jason G.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Fox, Brian G.

    2014-10-02

    Crystal structures of toluene 4-monooxygenase hydroxylase in complex with reaction products and effector protein reveal active site interactions leading to regiospecificity. Complexes with phenolic products yield an asymmetric {mu}-phenoxo-bridged diiron center and a shift of diiron ligand E231 into a hydrogen bonding position with conserved T201. In contrast, complexes with inhibitors p-NH{sub 2}-benzoate and p-Br-benzoate showed a {mu}-1,1 coordination of carboxylate oxygen between the iron atoms and only a partial shift in the position of E231. Among active site residues, F176 trapped the aromatic ring of products against a surface of the active site cavity formed by G103, E104 and A107, while F196 positioned the aromatic ring against this surface via a {pi}-stacking interaction. The proximity of G103 and F176 to the para substituent of the substrate aromatic ring and the structure of G103L T4moHD suggest how changes in regiospecificity arise from mutations at G103. Although effector protein binding produced significant shifts in the positions of residues along the outer portion of the active site (T201, N202, and Q228) and in some iron ligands (E231 and E197), surprisingly minor shifts (<1 {angstrom}) were produced in F176, F196, and other interior residues of the active site. Likewise, products bound to the diiron center in either the presence or absence of effector protein did not significantly shift the position of the interior residues, suggesting that positioning of the cognate substrates will not be strongly influenced by effector protein binding. Thus, changes in product distributions in the absence of the effector protein are proposed to arise from differences in rates of chemical steps of the reaction relative to motion of substrates within the active site channel of the uncomplexed, less efficient enzyme, while structural changes in diiron ligand geometry associated with cycling between diferrous and diferric states are discussed for their potential

  7. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  8. Impact of interspecific interactions on antimicrobial activity among soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tyc, Olaf; van den Berg, Marlies; Gerards, Saskia; van Veen, Johannes A; Raaijmakers, Jos M; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2014-01-01

    Certain bacterial species produce antimicrobial compounds only in the presence of a competing species. However, little is known on the frequency of interaction-mediated induction of antibiotic compound production in natural communities of soil bacteria. Here we developed a high-throughput method to screen for the production of antimicrobial activity by monocultures and pair-wise combinations of 146 phylogenetically different bacteria isolated from similar soil habitats. Growth responses of two human pathogenic model organisms, Escherichia coli WA321 and Staphylococcus aureus 533R4, were used to monitor antimicrobial activity. From all isolates, 33% showed antimicrobial activity only in monoculture and 42% showed activity only when tested in interactions. More bacterial isolates were active against S. aureus than against E. coli. The frequency of interaction-mediated induction of antimicrobial activity was 6% (154 interactions out of 2798) indicating that only a limited set of species combinations showed such activity. The screening revealed also interaction-mediated suppression of antimicrobial activity for 22% of all combinations tested. Whereas all patterns of antimicrobial activity (non-induced production, induced production and suppression) were seen for various bacterial classes, interaction-mediated induction of antimicrobial activity was more frequent for combinations of Flavobacteria and alpha- Proteobacteria. The results of our study give a first indication on the frequency of interference competitive interactions in natural soil bacterial communities which may forms a basis for selection of bacterial groups that are promising for the discovery of novel, cryptic antibiotics.

  9. Theoretical investigation on nevirapine and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase binding site interaction, based on ONIOM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuno, Mayuso; Hannongbua, Supa; Morokuma, Keiji

    2003-10-01

    The ONIOM method was applied to the interaction of nevirapine with the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase binding site. The isolated complex of pyridine (part of nevirapine) and methyl phenol (part of Tyr181) was found at the MP2/6-31+G(d) level to have stacking interaction with 8.8 kcal/mol binding energy. Optimization of nevirapine and Tyr181 geometry in the pocket of 16 amino acid residues at the ONIOM3(MP2/6-31G(d):HF/3-21G:PM3) level gave the complex structure with weak hydrogen bonding but without stacking interaction. The binding energy of 8.9 kcal/mol comes almost entirely from the interaction of nevirapine with amino acid residues other than Tyr181.

  10. Interactional Competence and the Development of Alignment Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dings, Abby

    2014-01-01

    Based on qualitative analysis of conversational interactions collected over the course of a Spanish language learner's academic year abroad, this article explores the development of interactional resources related to alignment activity in the learner's conversational participation. Alignment activity refers to the means interlocutors use…

  11. Characterizing Interactive Engagement Activities in a Flipped Introductory Physics Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Anna K.; Galloway, Ross K.; Donnelly, Robyn; Hardy, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Interactive engagement activities are increasingly common in undergraduate physics teaching. As research efforts move beyond simply showing that interactive engagement pedagogies work towards developing an understanding of "how" they lead to improved learning outcomes, a detailed analysis of the way in which these activities are used in…

  12. Mapping of Protein–Protein Interaction Sites by the ‘Absence of Interference’ Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dhayalan, Arunkumar; Jurkowski, Tomasz P.; Laser, Heike; Reinhardt, Richard; Jia, Da; Cheng, Xiaodong; Jeltsch, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are critical to most biological processes, and locating protein–protein interfaces on protein structures is an important task in molecular biology. We developed a new experimental strategy called the ‘absence of interference’ approach to determine surface residues involved in protein–protein interaction of established yeast two-hybrid pairs of interacting proteins. One of the proteins is subjected to high-level randomization by error-prone PCR. The resulting library is selected by yeast two-hybrid system for interacting clones that are isolated and sequenced. The interaction region can be identified by an absence or depletion of mutations. For data analysis and presentation, we developed a Web interface that analyzes the mutational spectrum and displays the mutational frequency on the surface of the structure (or a structural model) of the randomized protein†. Additionally, this interface might be of use for the display of mutational distributions determined by other types of random mutagenesis experiments. We applied the approach to map the interface of the catalytic domain of the DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3a with its regulatory factor Dnmt3L. Dnmt3a was randomized with high mutational load. A total of 76 interacting clones were isolated and sequenced, and 648 mutations were identified. The mutational pattern allowed to identify a unique interaction region on the surface of Dnmt3a, which comprises about 500−600 Å2. The results were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and structural analysis. The absence-of-interference approach will allow high-throughput mapping of protein interaction sites suitable for functional studies and protein docking. PMID:18191145

  13. Cross-protomer interaction with the photoactive site in oligomeric proteorhodopsin complexes.

    PubMed

    Ran, Tingting; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Gao, Yanyan; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Wang, Weiwu; Spudich, John L; Luecke, Hartmut

    2013-10-01

    Proteorhodopsins (PRs), members of the microbial rhodopsin superfamily of seven-transmembrane-helix proteins that use retinal chromophores, comprise the largest subfamily of rhodopsins, yet very little structural information is available. PRs are ubiquitous throughout the biosphere and their genes have been sequenced in numerous species of bacteria. They have been shown to exhibit ion-pumping activity like their archaeal homolog bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Here, the first crystal structure of a proteorhodopsin, that of a blue-light-absorbing proteorhodopsin (BPR) isolated from the Mediterranean Sea at a depth of 12 m (Med12BPR), is reported. Six molecules of Med12BPR form a doughnut-shaped C6 hexameric ring, unlike BR, which forms a trimer. Furthermore, the structures of two mutants of a related BPR isolated from the Pacific Ocean near Hawaii at a depth of 75 m (HOT75BPR), which show a C5 pentameric arrangement, are reported. In all three structures the retinal polyene chain is shifted towards helix C when compared with other microbial rhodopsins, and the putative proton-release group in BPR differs significantly from those of BR and xanthorhodopsin (XR). The most striking feature of proteorhodopsin is the position of the conserved active-site histidine (His75, also found in XR), which forms a hydrogen bond to the proton acceptor from the same molecule (Asp97) and also to Trp34 of a neighboring protomer. Trp34 may function by stabilizing His75 in a conformation that favors a deprotonated Asp97 in the dark state, and suggests cooperative behavior between protomers when the protein is in an oligomeric form. Mutation-induced alterations in proton transfers in the BPR photocycle in Escherichia coli cells provide evidence for a similar cross-protomer interaction of BPR in living cells and a functional role of the inter-protomer Trp34-His75 interaction in ion transport. Finally, Wat402, a key molecule responsible for proton translocation between the Schiff base and the

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of Zika virus NS3 helicase: Insights into RNA binding site activity.

    PubMed

    Mottin, Melina; Braga, Rodolpho C; da Silva, Roosevelt A; Silva, Joao H Martins da; Perryman, Alexander L; Ekins, Sean; Andrade, Carolina Horta

    2017-03-21

    America is still suffering with the outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection. Congenital ZIKV syndrome has already caused a public health emergency of international concern. However, there are still no vaccines to prevent or drugs to treat the infection caused by ZIKV. The ZIKV NS3 helicase (NS3h) protein is a promising target for drug discovery due to its essential role in viral genome replication. NS3h unwinds the viral RNA to enable the replication of the viral genome by the NS5 protein. NS3h contains two important binding sites: the NTPase binding site and the RNA binding site. Here, we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the molecular behavior of ZIKV NS3h in the presence and absence of ssRNA and the potential implications for NS3h activity and inhibition. Although there is conformational variability and poor electron densities of the RNA binding loop in various apo flaviviruses NS3h crystallographic structures, the MD trajectories of NS3h-ssRNA demonstrated that the RNA binding loop becomes more stable when NS3h is occupied by RNA. Our results suggest that the presence of RNA generates important interactions with the RNA binding loop, and these interactions stabilize the loop sufficiently that it remains in a closed conformation. This closed conformation likely keeps the ssRNA bound to the protein for a sufficient duration to enable the unwinding/replication activities of NS3h to occur. In addition, conformational changes of this RNA binding loop can change the nature and location of the optimal ligand binding site, according to ligand binding site prediction results. These are important findings to help guide the design and discovery of new inhibitors of NS3h as promising compounds to treat the ZIKV infection.

  15. Structural role of the active-site metal in the conformation of Trypanosoma brucei phosphoglycerate mutase.

    PubMed

    Mercaldi, Gustavo F; Pereira, Humberto M; Cordeiro, Artur T; Michels, Paul A M; Thiemann, Otavio H

    2012-06-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutases (PGAMs) participate in both the glycolytic and the gluconeogenic pathways in reversible isomerization of 3-phosphoglycerate and 2-phosphoglycerate. PGAMs are members of two distinct protein families: enzymes that are dependent on or independent of the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate cofactor. We determined the X-ray structure of the monomeric Trypanosoma brucei independent PGAM (TbiPGAM) in its apoenzyme form, and confirmed this observation by small angle X-ray scattering data. Comparing the TbiPGAM structure with the Leishmania mexicana independent PGAM structure, previously reported with a phosphoglycerate molecule bound to the active site, revealed the domain movement resulting from active site occupation. The structure reported here shows the interaction between Asp319 and the metal bound to the active site, and its contribution to the domain movement. Substitution of the metal-binding residue Asp319 by Ala resulted in complete loss of independent PGAM activity, and showed for the first time its involvement in the enzyme's function. As TbiPGAM is an attractive molecular target for drug development, the apoenzyme conformation described here provides opportunities for its use in structure-based drug design approaches. Database Structural data for the Trypanosoma brucei 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-independent phosphoglycerate mutase (iPGAM) has been deposited with the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) Protein Data Bank under code 3NVL.

  16. Interactive activation and mutual constraint satisfaction in perception and cognition.

    PubMed

    McClelland, James L; Mirman, Daniel; Bolger, Donald J; Khaitan, Pranav

    2014-08-01

    In a seminal 1977 article, Rumelhart argued that perception required the simultaneous use of multiple sources of information, allowing perceivers to optimally interpret sensory information at many levels of representation in real time as information arrives. Building on Rumelhart's arguments, we present the Interactive Activation hypothesis-the idea that the mechanism used in perception and comprehension to achieve these feats exploits an interactive activation process implemented through the bidirectional propagation of activation among simple processing units. We then examine the interactive activation model of letter and word perception and the TRACE model of speech perception, as early attempts to explore this hypothesis, and review the experimental evidence relevant to their assumptions and predictions. We consider how well these models address the computational challenge posed by the problem of perception, and we consider how consistent they are with evidence from behavioral experiments. We examine empirical and theoretical controversies surrounding the idea of interactive processing, including a controversy that swirls around the relationship between interactive computation and optimal Bayesian inference. Some of the implementation details of early versions of interactive activation models caused deviation from optimality and from aspects of human performance data. More recent versions of these models, however, overcome these deficiencies. Among these is a model called the multinomial interactive activation model, which explicitly links interactive activation and Bayesian computations. We also review evidence from neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies supporting the view that interactive processing is a characteristic of the perceptual processing machinery in the brain. In sum, we argue that a computational analysis, as well as behavioral and neuroscience evidence, all support the Interactive Activation hypothesis. The evidence suggests that

  17. Physical interaction of the activator protein-1 factors c-Fos and c-Jun with Cbfa1 for collagenase-3 promoter activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Alonzo, Richard C.; Selvamurugan, Nagarajan; Karsenty, Gerard; Partridge, Nicola C.

    2002-01-01

    Previously, we determined that the activator protein-1 (AP-1)-binding site and the runt domain (RD)-binding site and their binding proteins, c-Fos.c-Jun and Cbfa, regulate the collagenase-3 promoter in parathyroid hormone-treated and differentiating osteoblasts. Here we show that Cbfa1 and c-Fos.c-Jun appear to cooperatively bind the RD- and AP-1-binding sites and form ternary structures in vitro. Both in vitro and in vivo co-immunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid studies further demonstrate interaction between Cbfa1 with c-Fos and c-Jun in the absence of phosphorylation and without binding to DNA. Additionally, only the runt domain of Cbfa1 was required for interaction with c-Jun and c-Fos. In mammalian cells, overexpression of Cbfa1 enhanced c-Jun activation of AP-1-binding site promoter activity, demonstrating functional interaction. Finally, insertion of base pairs that disrupted the helical phasing between the AP-1- and RD-binding sites also inhibited collagenase-3 promoter activation. Thus, we provide direct evidence that Cbfa1 and c-Fos.c-Jun physically interact and cooperatively bind the AP-1- and RD-binding sites in the collagenase-3 promoter. Moreover, the AP-1- and RD-binding sites appear to be organized in a specific required helical arrangement that facilitates transcription factor interaction and enables promoter activation.

  18. Atomic level understanding of site-specific interactions in Polyaniline/TiO2 composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabungbam, Satyananda; Loh, G. C.; Sahariah, Munima B.; Pal, Arup R.; Pandey, Ravindra

    2016-02-01

    Spin-polarized density functional theory calculations have been performed to understand the interactions in polyaniline (PAni) and TiO2 composite at the atomic level. Binding energy calculation shows that composite structure is energetically more stable when Ti atom of TiO2 sits on top of PAni. It is also found that there is a dependency of the CBM on the site of TiO2 interaction in this composite system. The results suggest that optimization of the synthesis parameters at atomic level can be an effective way to improve the performance of a photovoltaic device based on PAni-TiO2 composite.

  19. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  20. Altered binding of thioflavin t to the peripheral anionic site of acetylcholinesterase after phosphorylation of the active site by chlorpyrifos oxon or dichlorvos

    SciTech Connect

    Sultatos, L.G. Kaushik, R.

    2008-08-01

    The peripheral anionic site of acetylcholinesterase, when occupied by a ligand, is known to modulate reaction rates at the active site of this important enzyme. The current report utilized the peripheral anionic site specific fluorogenic probe thioflavin t to determine if the organophosphates chlorpyrifos oxon and dichlorvos bind to the peripheral anionic site of human recombinant acetylcholinesterase, since certain organophosphates display concentration-dependent kinetics when inhibiting this enzyme. Incubation of 3 nM acetylcholinesterase active sites with 50 nM or 2000 nM inhibitor altered both the B{sub max} and K{sub d} for thioflavin t binding to the peripheral anionic site. However, these changes resulted from phosphorylation of Ser203 since increasing either inhibitor from 50 nM to 2000 nM did not alter further thioflavin t binding kinetics. Moreover, the organophosphate-induced decrease in B{sub max} did not represent an actual reduction in binding sites, but instead likely resulted from conformational interactions between the acylation and peripheral anionic sites that led to a decrease in the rigidity of bound thioflavin t. A drop in fluorescence quantum yield, leading to an apparent decrease in B{sub max}, would accompany the decreased rigidity of bound thioflavin t molecules. The organophosphate-induced alterations in K{sub d} represented changes in binding affinity of thioflavin t, with diethylphosphorylation of Ser203 increasing K{sub d}, and dimethylphosphorylation of Ser203 decreasing K{sub d}. These results indicate that chlorpyrifos oxon and dichlorvos do not bind directly to the peripheral anionic site of acetylcholinesterase, but can affect binding to that site through phosphorylation of Ser203.

  1. Characterization of the active site of ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munshi, C; Thiel, D J; Mathews, I I; Aarhus, R; Walseth, T F; Lee, H C

    1999-10-22

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase synthesizes two Ca(2+) messengers by cyclizing NAD to produce cyclic ADP-ribose and exchanging nicotinic acid with the nicotinamide group of NADP to produce nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Recombinant Aplysia cyclase was expressed in yeast and co-crystallized with a substrate, nicotinamide. x-ray crystallography showed that the nicotinamide was bound in a pocket formed in part by a conserved segment and was near the central cleft of the cyclase. Glu(98), Asn(107) and Trp(140) were within 3.5 A of the bound nicotinamide and appeared to coordinate it. Substituting Glu(98) with either Gln, Gly, Leu, or Asn reduced the cyclase activity by 16-222-fold, depending on the substitution. The mutant N107G exhibited only a 2-fold decrease in activity, while the activity of W140G was essentially eliminated. The base exchange activity of all mutants followed a similar pattern of reduction, suggesting that both reactions occur at the same active site. In addition to NAD, the wild-type cyclase also cyclizes nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide to cyclic GDP-ribose. All mutant enzymes had at least half of the GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity of the wild type, some even 2-3-fold higher, indicating that the three coordinating amino acids are responsible for positioning of the substrate but not absolutely critical for catalysis. To search for the catalytic residues, other amino acids in the binding pocket were mutagenized. E179G was totally devoid of GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity, and both its ADP-ribosyl cyclase and the base exchange activities were reduced by 10,000- and 18,000-fold, respectively. Substituting Glu(179) with either Asn, Leu, Asp, or Gln produced similar inactive enzymes, and so was the conversion of Trp(77) to Gly. However, both E179G and the double mutant E179G/W77G retained NAD-binding ability as shown by photoaffinity labeling with [(32)P]8-azido-NAD. These results indicate that both Glu(179) and Trp(77) are crucial for catalysis and

  2. Interactive Activation Model of Speech Perception.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    contract. 0 Elar, .l... & .McC’lelland .1.1. Speech perception a, a cognitive proces,: The interactive act ia- %e., tion model of speech perception. In...attempts to provide a machine solution to the problem of speech perception. A second kind of model, growing out of Cognitive Psychology, attempts to...architectures to cognitive and perceptual problems. We also owe a debt to what we might call the computational connectionists -- those who have applied highly

  3. Mutations inducing an active-site aperture in Rhizobium sp. sucrose isomerase confer hydrolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Alexandra; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Robert, Xavier; Rhimi, Moez; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Aghajari, Nushin

    2013-02-01

    Sucrose isomerase is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of sucrose isomers of high biotechnological and pharmaceutical interest. Owing to the complexity of the chemical synthesis of these isomers, isomaltulose and trehalulose, enzymatic conversion remains the preferred method for obtaining these products. Depending on the microbial source, the ratio of the sucrose-isomer products varies significantly. In studies aimed at understanding and explaining the underlying molecular mechanisms of these reactions, mutations obtained using a random-mutagenesis approach displayed a major hydrolytic activity. Two of these variants, R284C and F164L, of sucrose isomerase from Rhizobium sp. were therefore crystallized and their crystal structures were determined. The three-dimensional structures of these mutants allowed the identification of the molecular determinants that favour hydrolytic activity compared with transferase activity. Substantial conformational changes resulting in an active-site opening were observed, as were changes in the pattern of water molecules bordering the active-site region.

  4. Generalized Hierarchical Sparse Model for Arbitrary-Order Interactive Antigenic Sites Identification in Flu Virus Data

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lei; Zhang, Yu; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Recent statistical evidence has shown that a regression model by incorporating the interactions among the original covariates/features can significantly improve the interpretability for biological data. One major challenge is the exponentially expanded feature space when adding high-order feature interactions to the model. To tackle the huge dimensionality, hierarchical sparse models (HSM) are developed by enforcing sparsity under heredity structures in the interactions among the covariates. However, existing methods only consider pairwise interactions, making the discovery of important high-order interactions a non-trivial open problem. In this paper, we propose a generalized hierarchical sparse model (GHSM) as a generalization of the HSM models to tackle arbitrary-order interactions. The GHSM applies the ℓ1 penalty to all the model coefficients under a constraint that given any covariate, if none of its associated kth-order interactions contribute to the regression model, then neither do its associated higher-order interactions. The resulting objective function is non-convex with a challenge lying in the coupled variables appearing in the arbitrary-order hierarchical constraints and we devise an efficient optimization algorithm to directly solve it. Specifically, we decouple the variables in the constraints via both the general iterative shrinkage and thresholding (GIST) and the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) methods into three subproblems, each of which is proved to admit an efficiently analytical solution. We evaluate the GHSM method in both synthetic problem and the antigenic sites identification problem for the influenza virus data, where we expand the feature space up to the 5th-order interactions. Empirical results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed methods and the learned high-order interactions have meaningful synergistic covariate patterns in the influenza virus antigenicity.

  5. Combining Natural Sequence Variation with High Throughput Mutational Data to Reveal Protein Interaction Sites

    PubMed Central

    Melamed, Daniel; Young, David L.; Miller, Christina R.; Fields, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Many protein interactions are conserved among organisms despite changes in the amino acid sequences that comprise their contact sites, a property that has been used to infer the location of these sites from protein homology. In an inter-species complementation experiment, a sequence present in a homologue is substituted into a protein and tested for its ability to support function. Therefore, substitutions that inhibit function can identify interaction sites that changed over evolution. However, most of the sequence differences within a protein family remain unexplored because of the small-scale nature of these complementation approaches. Here we use existing high throughput mutational data on the in vivo function of the RRM2 domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae poly(A)-binding protein, Pab1, to analyze its sites of interaction. Of 197 single amino acid differences in 52 Pab1 homologues, 17 reduce the function of Pab1 when substituted into the yeast protein. The majority of these deleterious mutations interfere with the binding of the RRM2 domain to eIF4G1 and eIF4G2, isoforms of a translation initiation factor. A large-scale mutational analysis of the RRM2 domain in a two-hybrid assay for eIF4G1 binding supports these findings and identifies peripheral residues that make a smaller contribution to eIF4G1 binding. Three single amino acid substitutions in yeast Pab1 corresponding to residues from the human orthologue are deleterious and eliminate binding to the yeast eIF4G isoforms. We create a triple mutant that carries these substitutions and other humanizing substitutions that collectively support a switch in binding specificity of RRM2 from the yeast eIF4G1 to its human orthologue. Finally, we map other deleterious substitutions in Pab1 to inter-domain (RRM2–RRM1) or protein-RNA (RRM2–poly(A)) interaction sites. Thus, the combined approach of large-scale mutational data and evolutionary conservation can be used to characterize interaction sites at single

  6. Epidemic phase and the site percolation with distant-neighbor interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, C. B.; Barbin, D.; Caliri, A.

    1998-01-01

    A generalized site percolation model is used to construct an analogy with the epidemic problem, involving spatial coordinates. Epidemic phase and concepts like herd immunity are analyzed in terms of connectivity in a 2D square lattice. The epidemic model used in this work considers a specific interaction topology that includes up to the fifth-nearest neighbors. The results, obtained by Monte Carlo simulation, emphasize the meaning of the spatial coordinates and are illustrated by an epidemic/non-epidemic phase diagram.

  7. Identification of a multifunctional docking site on the catalytic unit of phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) that is utilised by multiple interaction partners

    PubMed Central

    Houslay, Kirsty F.; Christian, Frank; MacLeod, Ruth; Adams, David R.; Houslay, Miles D.

    2017-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-specific phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) enzymes underpin compartmentalised cAMP signalling by localising to distinct signalling complexes. PDE4 long isoforms can be phosphorylated by mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), which attenuates activation of such enzymes through their phosphorylation by protein kinase A. Here we show that MK2 interacts directly with PDE4 long isoforms and define the sites of interaction. One is a unique site that locates within the regulatory upstream conserved region 1 (UCR1) domain and contains a core Phe141, Leu142 and Tyr143 (FLY) cluster (PDE4A5 numbering). Located with the second site is a critical core Phe693, Glu694, Phe695 (FQF) motif that is also employed in the sequestering of PDE4 long forms by an array of other signalling proteins, including the signalling scaffold β-arrestin, the tyrosyl kinase Lyn, the SUMOylation E2 ligase UBC9, the dynein regulator Lis1 (PAFAH1B1) and the protein kinase Erk. We propose that the FQF motif lies at the heart of a multifunctional docking (MFD) site located within the PDE4 catalytic unit. It is clear from our data that, as well as aiding fidelity of interaction, the MFD site confers exclusivity of binding between PDE4 and a single specific partner protein from the cohort of signalling proteins whose interaction with PDE4 involves the FQF motif. PMID:27993970

  8. Calculating the habitable zones of multiple star systems with a new interactive Web site

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Tobias W. A.; Haghighipour, Nader

    2014-02-10

    We have developed a comprehensive methodology and an interactive Web site for calculating the habitable zone (HZ) of multiple star systems. Using the concept of spectral weight factor, as introduced in our previous studies of the calculations of HZ in and around binary star systems, we calculate the contribution of each star (based on its spectral energy distribution) to the total flux received at the top of the atmosphere of an Earth-like planet, and use the models of the HZ of the Sun to determine the boundaries of the HZ in multiple star systems. Our interactive Web site for carrying out these calculations is publicly available at http://astro.twam.info/hz. We discuss the details of our methodology and present its application to some of the multiple star systems detected by the Kepler space telescope. We also present the instructions for using our interactive Web site, and demonstrate its capabilities by calculating the HZ for two interesting analytical solutions of the three-body problem.

  9. Interaction of triprolidine hydrochloride with serum albumins: thermodynamic and binding characteristics, and influence of site probes.

    PubMed

    Sandhya, B; Hegde, Ashwini H; Kalanur, Shankara S; Katrahalli, Umesha; Seetharamappa, J

    2011-04-05

    The interaction between triprolidine hydrochloride (TRP) to serum albumins viz. bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) has been studied by spectroscopic methods. The experimental results revealed the static quenching mechanism in the interaction of TRP with protein. The number of binding sites close to unity for both TRP-BSA and TRP-HSA indicated the presence of single class of binding site for the drug in protein. The binding constant values of TRP-BSA and TRP-HSA were observed to be 4.75 ± 0.018 × 10(3) and 2.42 ± 0.024 × 10(4)M(-1) at 294 K, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters indicated that the hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces played the major role in the binding of TRP to proteins. The distance of separation between the serum albumin and TRP was obtained from the Förster's theory of non-radioactive energy transfer. The metal ions viz., K(+), Ca(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Mn(2+) and Zn(2+) were found to influence the binding of the drug to protein. Displacement experiments indicated the binding of TRP to Sudlow's site I on both BSA and HSA. The CD, 3D fluorescence spectra and FT-IR spectral results revealed the changes in the secondary structure of protein upon interaction with TRP.

  10. The Methodology of Interactive Parametric Modelling of Construction Site Facilities in BIM Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovská, Mária; Čabala, Jozef; Struková, Zuzana

    2014-11-01

    Information technology is becoming a strong tool in different industries, including construction. The recent trend of buildings designing is leading up to creation of the most comprehensive virtual building model (Building Information Model) in order to solve all the problems relating to the project as early as in the designing phase. Building information modelling is a new way of approaching to the design of building projects documentation. Currently, the building site layout as a part of the building design documents has a very little support in the BIM environment. Recently, the research of designing the construction process conditions has centred on improvement of general practice in planning and on new approaches to construction site layout planning. The state of art in field of designing the construction process conditions indicated an unexplored problem related to connection of knowledge system with construction site facilities (CSF) layout through interactive modelling. The goal of the paper is to present the methodology for execution of 3D construction site facility allocation model (3D CSF-IAM), based on principles of parametric and interactive modelling.

  11. Speech Perception as a Cognitive Process: The Interactive Activation Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    one another in COHORT, the nodes for sell, your, light, and cellulite , wil all bc in active competition with one another. The system will have no way...7 AD-AI28 787 SPEECH PERCEPTION AS A COGNITIVE PROCESS: THE INTERACTIVE ACTIVATION MODE..(U) CALIFORNIA UNIV SAN D IEGO LA dOLLA INST FOR COGNITIVE...TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Speech Perception as a Cognitive Process: Technical Report The Interactive Activation Model S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT

  12. Mapping of the interaction sites of galanthamine: a quantitative analysis through pairwise potentials and quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Galland, Nicolas; Kone, Soleymane; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2012-10-01

    A quantitative analysis of the interaction sites of the anti-Alzheimer drug galanthamine with molecular probes (water and benzene molecules) representative of its surroundings in the binding site of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been realized through pairwise potentials calculations and quantum chemistry. This strategy allows a full and accurate exploration of the galanthamine potential energy surface of interaction. Significantly different results are obtained according to the distances of approaches between the various molecular fragments and the conformation of the galanthamine N-methyl substituent. The geometry of the most relevant complexes has then been fully optimized through MPWB1K/6-31 + G(d,p) calculations, final energies being recomputed at the LMP2/aug-cc-pVTZ(-f) level of theory. Unexpectedly, galanthamine is found to interact mainly from its hydrogen-bond donor groups. Among those, CH groups in the vicinity of the ammonium group are prominent. The trends obtained provide rationales to the predilection of the equatorial orientation of the galanthamine N-methyl substituent for binding to AChE. The analysis of the interaction energies pointed out the independence between the various interaction sites and the rigid character of galanthamine. The comparison between the cluster calculations and the crystallographic observations in galanthamine-AChE co-crystals allows the validation of the theoretical methodology. In particular, the positions of several water molecules appearing as strongly conserved in galanthamine-AChE co-crystals are predicted by the calculations. Moreover, the experimental position and orientation of lateral chains of functionally important aminoacid residues are in close agreement with the ones predicted theoretically. Our study provides relevant information for a rational drug design of galanthamine based AChE inhibitors.

  13. Site-specific PEGylation of lidamycin and its antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Shang, Boyang; Hu, Lei; Shao, Rongguang; Zhen, Yongsu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, N-terminal site-specific mono-PEGylation of the recombinant lidamycin apoprotein (rLDP) of lidamycin (LDM) was prepared using a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) derivative (Mw 20 kDa) through a reactive terminal aldehyde group under weak acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The biochemical properties of mPEG-rLDP-AE, an enediyne-integrated conjugate, were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of mPEG-rLDP-AE was evaluated by MTT assays and in xenograft model. The results indicated that mPEG-rLDP-AE showed significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. After PEGylation, mPEG-rLDP still retained the binding capability to the enediyne AE and presented the physicochemical characteristics similar to that of native LDP. It is of interest that the PEGylation did not diminish the antitumor efficacy of LDM, implying the possibility that this derivative may function as a payload to deliver novel tumor-targeted drugs. PMID:26579455

  14. A NMR and MD study of the active site of factor Xa by selective inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, B. T.; Fraternali, F.; Do, Q. T.; Atkinson, R. A.; Palmas, P.; Sklenar, V.; Wildgoose, P.; Strop, P.; Saudek, V.

    1998-02-01

    The structure of two selective inhibitors obtained by the screening of a vast combinatorial library, Ac-Tyr-Ile-Arg-Ile-NH2 and Ac-(4-amino-Phe)-(Cyc.-Gly)-NH2, in the active site of the blood clotting enzyme factor Xa was determined using transferred NOE NMR and simulated annealing (SA) under NMR constraints. The refined structures of the inhibitors were docked in the active site and SA was performed inside the enzyme which has been kept as a rigid charged template. The final structures were optimised by molecular dynamics simulation of the complexes in water. The inhibitors assume a compact, very well defined conformation embedded in the binding site without blocking the catalysis. The model allows to explain the mode of action, affinity and specificity. L'étude structurale d'inhibiteurs du facteur Xa, une enzyme de coagulation, obtenus par chimie combinatoire : Ac-Tyr-Ile-Arg-Ile-NH2, Ac-(4-amino-Phe)-(Cyc.-Gly)-NH2, a été réalisée par RMN NOE de transfert et modélisation moléculaire. Les structures ont été calculées sous contraintes RMN : géométrie de distance, recuit simulé et minimisation, affinées par une recherche conformationnelle et recuit de l'inhibiteur placé dans le site actif et optimisées par simulation de dynamique moléculaire du complexe dans l'eau. L'inhibiteur présente une structure compacte positionnée dans le site d'interaction hors d'accès du site catalytique. Ce modèle permet d'expliquer le mode d'action, l'affinité et la spécificité des peptides.

  15. Allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a using Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside and its combination.

    PubMed

    Rani, Nidhi; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; P T V, Lakshmi; Arunachalam, Annamalai

    2016-08-01

    Recent crystallographic study revealed the involvement of allosteric site in active site inhibition of penicillin binding protein (PBP2a), where one molecule of Ceftaroline (Cef) binds to the allosteric site of PBP2a and paved way for the other molecule (Cef) to bind at the active site. Though Cef has the potency to inhibit the PBP2a, its adverse side effects are of major concern. Previous studies have reported the antibacterial property of Quercetin derivatives, a group of natural compounds. Hence, the present study aims to evaluate the effect of Quercetin 3-o-rutinoside (Rut) in allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a. The molecular docking studies between allosteric site and ligands (Rut, Que, and Cef) revealed a better binding efficiency (G-score) of Rut (-7.790318) and Cef (-6.194946) with respect to Que (-5.079284). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies showed significant changes at the active site in the presence of ligands (Rut and Cef) at allosteric site. Four different combinations of Rut and Cef were docked and their G-scores ranged between -6.320 and -8.623. MD studies revealed the stability of the key residue (Ser403) with Rut being at both sites, compared to other complexes. Morphological analysis through electron microscopy confirmed that combination of Rut and Cefixime was able to disturb the bacterial cell membrane in a similar fashion to that of Rut and Cefixime alone. The results of this study indicate that the affinity of Rut at both sites were equally good, with further validations Rut could be considered as an alternative for inhibiting MRSA growth.

  16. Site-Directed Chemical Probing to map transient RNA/protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Duval, Mélodie; Marenna, Alessandra; Chevalier, Clément; Marzi, Stefano

    2017-03-15

    RNA-protein interactions are at the bases of many biological processes, forming either tight and stable functional ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes (i.e. the ribosome) or transitory ones, such as the complexes involving RNA chaperone proteins. To localize the sites where a protein interacts on an RNA molecule, a common simple and inexpensive biochemical method is the footprinting technique. The protein leaves its footprint on the RNA acting as a shield to protect the regions of interaction from chemical modification or cleavages obtained with chemical or enzymatic nucleases. This method has proven its efficiency to study in vitro the organization of stable RNA-protein complexes. Nevertheless, when the protein binds the RNA very dynamically, with high off-rates, protections are very often difficult to observe. For the analysis of these transient complexes, we describe an alternative strategy adapted from the Site Directed Chemical Probing (SDCP) approach and we compare it with classical footprinting. SDCP relies on the modification of the RNA binding protein to tether an RNA probe (usually Fe-EDTA) to specific protein positions. Local cleavages on the regions of interaction can be used to localize the protein and position its domains on the RNA molecule. This method has been used in the past to monitor stable complexes; we provide here a detailed protocol and a practical example of its application to the study of Escherichia coli RNA chaperone protein S1 and its transitory complexes with mRNAs.

  17. Substrate-binding specificity of chitinase and chitosanase as revealed by active-site architecture analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shijia; Shao, Shangjin; Li, Linlin; Cheng, Zhi; Tian, Li; Gao, Peiji; Wang, Lushan

    2015-12-11

    Chitinases and chitosanases, referred to as chitinolytic enzymes, are two important categories of glycoside hydrolases (GH) that play a key role in degrading chitin and chitosan, two naturally abundant polysaccharides. Here, we investigate the active site architecture of the major chitosanase (GH8, GH46) and chitinase families (GH18, GH19). Both charged (Glu, His, Arg, Asp) and aromatic amino acids (Tyr, Trp, Phe) are observed with higher frequency within chitinolytic active sites as compared to elsewhere in the enzyme structure, indicating significant roles related to enzyme function. Hydrogen bonds between chitinolytic enzymes and the substrate C2 functional groups, i.e. amino groups and N-acetyl groups, drive substrate recognition, while non-specific CH-π interactions between aromatic residues and substrate mainly contribute to tighter binding and enhanced processivity evident in GH8 and GH18 enzymes. For different families of chitinolytic enzymes, the number, type, and position of substrate atoms bound in the active site vary, resulting in different substrate-binding specificities. The data presented here explain the synergistic action of multiple enzyme families at a molecular level and provide a more reasonable method for functional annotation, which can be further applied toward the practical engineering of chitinases and chitosanases.

  18. Identification of active site residues of Fenugreek β-amylase: chemical modification and in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Garima; Singh, Vinay K; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2014-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of Fenugreek β-amylase is not available in protein data bank. Therefore, an attempt has been made to identify the catalytic amino acid residues of enzyme by employing studies of pH dependence of enzyme catalysis, chemical modification and bioinformatics. Treatment of purified Fenugreek β-amylase with EDAC in presence of glycine methyl ester and sulfhydryl group specific reagents (IAA, NEM and p-CMB), followed a pseudo first-order kinetics and resulted in effective inactivation of enzyme. The reaction with EDAC in presence of NTEE (3-nitro-l-tyrosine ethylester) resulted into modification of two carboxyl groups per molecule of enzyme and presence of one accessible sulfhydryl group at the active site, per molecule of enzyme was ascertained by titration with DTNB. The above results were supported by the prevention of inactivation of enzyme in presence of substrate. Based on MALDI-TOF analysis of purified Fenugreek β-amylase and MASCOT search, β-amylase of Medicago sativa was found to be the best match. To further confirm the amino acid involved in catalysis, homology modelling of β-amylase of M. sativa was performed. The sequence alignment, superimposition of template and target models, along with study of interactions involved in docking of sucrose and maltose at the active site, led to identification of Glu187, Glu381 and Cys344 as active site residues.

  19. Fat-soluble vitamin intestinal absorption: absorption sites in the intestine and interactions for absorption.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Roi, Stéphanie; Nowicki, Marion; Dhaussy, Amélie; Huertas, Alain; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2015-04-01

    The interactions occurring at the intestinal level between the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K (FSVs) are poorly documented. We first determined each FSV absorption profile along the duodenal-colonic axis of mouse intestine to clarify their respective absorption sites. We then investigated the interactions between FSVs during their uptake by Caco-2 cells. Our data show that vitamin A was mostly absorbed in the mouse proximal intestine, while vitamin D was absorbed in the median intestine, and vitamin E and K in the distal intestine. Significant competitive interactions for uptake were then elucidated among vitamin D, E and K, supporting the hypothesis of common absorption pathways. Vitamin A also significantly decreased the uptake of the other FSVs but, conversely, its uptake was not impaired by vitamins D and K and even promoted by vitamin E. These results should be taken into account, especially for supplement formulation, to optimise FSV absorption.

  20. A split active site couples cap recognition by Dcp2 to activation

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N.; Jones, Brittnee N.; Hernandez, Gail A.; Gross, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Decapping by Dcp2 is an essential step in 5′-3′ mRNA decay. In yeast, decapping requires an open-to-closed transition in Dcp2, though the link between closure and catalysis remains elusive. Here we show using NMR that cap binds conserved residues on both the catalytic and regulatory domains of Dcp2. Lesions in the cap-binding site on the regulatory domain reduce the catalytic step two orders of magnitude and block formation of the closed state whereas Dcp1 enhances the catalytic step by a factor of ten and promotes closure. We conclude that closure occurs during the rate-limiting catalytic step of decapping, juxtaposing the cap-binding region of each domain to form a composite active site. This work suggests a model for regulation of decapping, where coactivators trigger decapping by stabilizing a labile composite active site. PMID:20711189

  1. Cdc37 (Cell Division Cycle 37) Restricts Hsp90 (Heat Shock Protein 90) Motility by Interaction with N-terminal and Middle Domain Binding Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Eckl, Julia M.; Rutz, Daniel A.; Haslbeck, Veronika; Zierer, Bettina K.; Reinstein, Jochen; Richter, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The ATPase-driven dimeric molecular Hsp90 (heat shock protein 90) and its cofactor Cdc37 (cell division cycle 37 protein) are crucial to prevent the cellular depletion of many protein kinases. In complex with Hsp90, Cdc37 is thought to bind an important lid structure in the ATPase domain of Hsp90 and inhibit ATP turnover by Hsp90. As different interaction modes have been reported, we were interested in the interaction mechanism of Hsp90 and Cdc37. We find that Cdc37 can bind to one subunit of the Hsp90 dimer. The inhibition of the ATPase activity is caused by a reduction in the closing rate of Hsp90 without obviously bridging the two subunits or affecting nucleotide accessibility to the binding site. Although human Cdc37 binds to the N-terminal domain of Hsp90, nematodal Cdc37 preferentially interacts with the middle domain of CeHsp90 and hHsp90, exposing two Cdc37 interaction sites. A previously unreported site in CeCdc37 is utilized for the middle domain interaction. Dephosphorylation of CeCdc37 by the Hsp90-associated phosphatase PPH-5, a step required during the kinase activation process, proceeds normally, even if only the new interaction site is used. This shows that the second interaction site is also functionally relevant and highlights that Cdc37, similar to the Hsp90 cofactors Sti1 and Aha1, may utilize two different attachment sites to restrict the conformational freedom and the ATP turnover of Hsp90. PMID:23569206

  2. Ferromagnetic interaction model of activity level in workplace communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akitomi, Tomoaki; Ara, Koji; Watanabe, Jun-ichiro; Yano, Kazuo

    2013-03-01

    The nature of human-human interaction, specifically, how people synchronize with each other in multiple-participant conversations, is described by a ferromagnetic interaction model of people’s activity levels. We found two microscopic human interaction characteristics from a real-environment face-to-face conversation. The first characteristic is that people quite regularly synchronize their activity level with that of the other participants in a conversation. The second characteristic is that the degree of synchronization increases as the number of participants increases. Based on these microscopic ferromagnetic characteristics, a “conversation activity level” was modeled according to the Ising model. The results of a simulation of activity level based on this model well reproduce macroscopic experimental measurements of activity level. This model will give a new insight into how people interact with each other in a conversation.

  3. Characterizing interactive engagement activities in a flipped introductory physics class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Anna K.; Galloway, Ross K.; Donnelly, Robyn; Hardy, Judy

    2016-06-01

    Interactive engagement activities are increasingly common in undergraduate physics teaching. As research efforts move beyond simply showing that interactive engagement pedagogies work towards developing an understanding of how they lead to improved learning outcomes, a detailed analysis of the way in which these activities are used in practice is needed. Our aim in this paper is to present a characterization of the type and duration of interactions, as experienced by students, that took place during two introductory physics courses (1A and 1B) at a university in the United Kingdom. Through this work, a simple framework for analyzing lectures—the framework for interactive learning in lectures (FILL), which focuses on student interactions (with the lecturer, with each other, and with the material) is proposed. The pedagogical approach is based on Peer Instruction (PI) and both courses are taught by the same lecturer. We find lecture activities can be categorized into three types: interactive (25%), vicarious interactive (20%) (involving questions to and from the lecturer), and noninteractive (55%). As expected, the majority of both interactive and vicarious interactive activities took place during PI. However, the way that interactive activities were used during non-PI sections of the lecture varied significantly between the two courses. Differences were also found in the average time spent on lecturer-student interactions (28% for 1A and 12% for 1B), although not on student-student interactions (12% and 12%) or on individual learning (10% and 7%). These results are explored in detail and the implications for future research are discussed.

  4. Site-city interaction: theoretical, numerical and experimental crossed-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwan, L.; Boutin, C.; Padrón, L. A.; Dietz, M. S.; Bard, P.-Y.; Taylor, C.

    2016-05-01

    The collective excitation of city structures by a seismic wavefield and the subsequent multiple Structure-Soil-Structure Interactions (SSSIs) between the buildings are usually disregarded in conventional seismology and earthquake engineering practice. The objective here is to qualify and quantify these complex multiple SSSIs through the design of an elementary study case, which serves as a benchmark for theoretical, numerical and experimental crossed-analysis. The experimental specimen consists of an idealized site-city setup with up to 37 anisotropic resonant structures arranged at the top surface of an elastic layer and in co-resonance with it. The experimental data from shaking table measurements is compared with the theoretical and numerical results provided respectively by an equivalent city-impedance model derived analytically from homogenization in the long-wavelength approximation and a model based on boundary elements. The signatures of the site-city interactions are identified in the frequency, time and space domain, and in particular consist of a frequency-dependent free/rigid switch in the surface condition at the city resonance, beatings in the records and the depolarization of the wavefield. A parametric study on the city density shows that multiple SSSIs among the city structures (five are sufficient) can have significant effects on both the seismic response of its implantation site and that of the buildings. Key parameters are provided to assess site-city interactions in the low seismic frequency range: They involve the mass and rigidity of the city compared to those of the soil and the damping of the building.

  5. Testing Geometrical Discrimination within an Enzyme Active Site: Constrained Hydrogen Bonding in the Ketosteroid Isomerase Oxyanion Hole

    PubMed Central

    Sigala, Paul A.; Kraut, Daniel A.; Caaveiro, Jose M. M.; Pybus, Brandon; Ruben, Eliza A.; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Enzymes are classically proposed to accelerate reactions by binding substrates within active site environments that are structurally preorganized to optimize binding interactions with reaction transition states rather than ground states. This is a remarkably formidable task considering the limited 0.1 – 1 Å scale of most substrate rearrangements. The flexibility of active site functional groups along the coordinate of substrate rearrangement, the distance scale on which enzymes can distinguish structural rearrangement, and the energetic significance of discrimination on that scale remain open questions that are fundamental to a basic physical understanding of enzyme active sites and catalysis. We bring together high resolution X-ray crystallography, 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy, quantum mechanical calculations, and transition state analog binding measurements to test the distance scale on which non-covalent forces can constrain side chain and ligand relaxation or translation along a specific coordinate and the energetic consequences of such geometric constraints within the active site of bacterial ketosteroid isomerase (KSI). Our results strongly suggest that packing and binding interactions within the KSI active site can constrain local side chain reorientation and prevent hydrogen bond shortening by 0.1 Å or less. Further, this constraint has substantial energetic effects on ligand binding and stabilization of negative charge within the oxyanion hole. These results provide evidence that subtle geometric effects, indistinguishable in most X-ray crystallographic structures, can have significant energetic consequences and highlight the importance of using synergistic experimental approaches to dissect enzyme function. PMID:18808119

  6. Heparanase Activates Antithrombin through the Binding to Its Heparin Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Águila, Sonia; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that participates in morphogenesis, tissue repair, heparan sulphates turnover and immune response processes. It is over-expressed in tumor cells favoring the metastasis as it penetrates the endothelial layer that lines blood vessels and facilitates the metastasis by degradation of heparan sulphate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix. Heparanase may also affect the hemostatic system in a non-enzymatic manner, up-regulating the expression of tissue factor, which is the initiator of blood coagulation, and dissociating tissue factor pathway inhibitor on the cell surface membrane of endothelial and tumor cells, thus resulting in a procoagulant state. Trying to check the effect of heparanase on heparin, a highly sulphated glycosaminoglycan, when it activates antithrombin, our results demonstrated that heparanase, but not proheparanase, interacted directly with antithrombin in a non-covalent manner. This interaction resulted in the activation of antithrombin, which is the most important endogenous anticoagulant. This activation mainly accelerated FXa inhibition, supporting an allosteric activation effect. Heparanase bound to the heparin binding site of antithrombin as the activation of Pro41Leu, Arg47Cys, Lys114Ala and Lys125Alaantithrombin mutants was impaired when it was compared to wild type antithrombin. Intrinsic fluorescence analysis showed that heparanase induced an activating conformational change in antithrombin similar to that induced by heparin and with a KD of 18.81 pM. In conclusion, under physiological pH and low levels of tissue factor, heparanase may exert a non-enzymatic function interacting and activating the inhibitory function of antithrombin. PMID:27322195

  7. Tertiary Contacts Distant from the Active Site Prime a Ribozyme for Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Minimal hammerhead ribozymes have been characterized extensively by static and time-resolved crystallography as well as numerous biochemical analyses, leading to mutually contradictory mechanistic explanations for catalysis. We present the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a full-length Schistosoma mansoni hammerhead ribozyme that permits us to explain the structural basis for its 1000-fold catalytic enhancement. The full-length hammerhead structure reveals how tertiary interactions occurring remotely from the active site prime this ribozyme for catalysis. G-12 and G-8 are positioned consistent with their previously suggested roles in acid-base catalysis, the nucleophile is aligned with a scissile phosphate positioned proximal to the A-9 phosphate, and previously unexplained roles of other conserved nucleotides become apparent within the context of a distinctly new fold that nonetheless accommodates the previous structural studies. These interactions permit us to explain the previously irreconcilable sets of experimental results in a unified, consistent, and unambiguous manner. PMID:16859740

  8. Transcription Activator Interactions with Multiple SWI/SNF Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Kristen E.; Hassan, Ahmed H.; Brown, Christine E.; Howe, LeAnn; Workman, Jerry L.

    2002-01-01

    We have previously shown that the yeast SWI/SNF complex stimulates in vitro transcription from chromatin templates in an ATP-dependent manner. SWI/SNF function in this regard requires the presence of an activator with which it can interact directly, linking activator recruitment of SWI/SNF to transcriptional stimulation. In this study, we determine the SWI/SNF subunits that mediate its interaction with activators. Using a photo-cross-linking label transfer strategy, we show that the Snf5, Swi1, and Swi2/Snf2 subunits are contacted by the yeast acidic activators, Gcn4 and Hap4, in the context of the intact native SWI/SNF complex. In addition, we show that the same three subunits can interact individually with acidic activation domains, indicating that each subunit contributes to binding activators. Furthermore, mutations that reduce the activation potential of these activators also diminish its interaction with each of these SWI/SNF subunits. Thus, three distinct subunits of the SWI/SNF complex contribute to its interactions with activation domains. PMID:11865042

  9. Interaction of tRNAs with the ribosome at the A and P sites.

    PubMed Central

    Dabrowski, M; Spahn, C M; Nierhaus, K H

    1995-01-01

    In vitro transcribed tRNA(Phe) analogues from Escherichia coli containing up to four randomly distributed A, G, U or C phosphorothioated nucleotides were used to investigate contact patterns with the ribosome in the A and P sites. The tRNAs were biologically active. Molecular iodine (I2) can trigger a break in the sugar-phosphate backbone at phosphorothioated positions of the ribosomal bound tRNAs if contacts with ribosomal components do not prevent access of the iodine. Highly differentiated protection patterns were found which were strikingly different in the A and P sites, respectively. Strong protections accumulated in the T psi C loop and no protection was seen in the extra-arm region in both sites, whereas the phosphates in the anticodon loop are more strongly protected in the A site. Strong common protections in both the A and P sites were found neighbouring universally or semi-universally conserved bases in prominent regions of the tertiary structure of tRNAs: Y11, Y32, U33, psi55, C56, A58 and Y60. These bases are therefore candidates for 'identity elements' in ribosomal tRNA recognition. The data further indicate that tRNAs change their conformations upon binding to either ribosomal site. Images PMID:7588616

  10. Analysis of structural changes in active site of luciferase adsorbed on nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface by molecular-dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Tadatsugu

    2007-05-21

    Interactions between luciferase and a nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface were explored by molecular-dynamics simulations. The structural changes in the active-site residues, the residues affecting the luciferin binding, and the residues affecting the bioluminescence color were smaller on the nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface than on both a hydrophobic Si surface and a hydrophilic Si surface. The nanofabrication and wet-treatment techniques are expected to prevent the decrease in activity of luciferase on the Si surface.

  11. Characterization of Active Site Residues of Nitroalkane Oxidase†

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Michael P.; Fenny, Nana S.; Ali, Shah R.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of primary and secondary nitrolkanes to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones plus nitrite. The structure of the enzyme shows that Serl71 forms a hydrogen bond to the flavin N5, suggesting that it plays a role in catalysis. Cys397 and Tyr398 were previously identified by chemical modification as potential active site residues. To more directly probe the roles of these residues, the S171A, S171V, S171T, C397S, and Y398F enzymes have been characterized with nitroethane as substrate. The C397S and Y398 enzymes were less stable than the wild-type enzyme, and the C397S enzyme routinely contained a substoichiometric amount of FAD. Analysis of the steady-state kinetic parameters for the mutant enzymes, including deuterium isotope effects, establishes that all of the mutations result in decreases in the rate constants for removal of the substrate proton by ~5-fold and decreases in the rate constant for product release of ~2-fold. Only the S171V and S171T mutations alter the rate constant for flavin oxidation. These results establish that these residues are not involved in catalysis, but rather are required for maintaining the protein structure. PMID:20056514

  12. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  13. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems.

  14. DARC 2.0: Improved Docking and Virtual Screening at Protein Interaction Sites

    PubMed Central

    Gowthaman, Ragul; Lyskov, Sergey; Karanicolas, John

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, protein-protein interactions have emerged as attractive but challenging targets for therapeutic intervention using small molecules. Due to the relatively flat surfaces that typify protein interaction sites, modern virtual screening tools developed for optimal performance against “traditional” protein targets perform less well when applied instead at protein interaction sites. Previously, we described a docking method specifically catered to the shallow binding modes characteristic of small-molecule inhibitors of protein interaction sites. This method, called DARC (Docking Approach using Ray Casting), operates by comparing the topography of the protein surface when “viewed” from a vantage point inside the protein against the topography of a bound ligand when “viewed” from the same vantage point. Here, we present five key enhancements to DARC. First, we use multiple vantage points to more accurately determine protein-ligand surface complementarity. Second, we describe a new scheme for rapidly determining optimal weights in the DARC scoring function. Third, we incorporate sampling of ligand conformers “on-the-fly” during docking. Fourth, we move beyond simple shape complementarity and introduce a term in the scoring function to capture electrostatic complementarity. Finally, we adjust the control flow in our GPU implementation of DARC to achieve greater speedup of these calculations. At each step of this study, we evaluate the performance of DARC in a “pose recapitulation” experiment: predicting the binding mode of 25 inhibitors each solved in complex with its distinct target protein (a protein interaction site). Whereas the previous version of DARC docked only one of these inhibitors to within 2 Å RMSD of its position in the crystal structure, the newer version achieves this level of accuracy for 12 of the 25 complexes, corresponding to a statistically significant performance improvement (p < 0.001). Collectively then, we

  15. Interaction of thiocolchicoside with [3H]strychnine binding sites in rat spinal cord and brainstem.

    PubMed

    Cimino, M; Marini, P; Cattabeni, F

    1996-12-27

    Radioreceptor binding assays and receptor autoradiography were used to investigate the activity of thiocolchicoside on strychnine-sensitive binding sites in rat brain and spinal cord using [3H]strychnine as a ligand. Thiocolchicoside displaced the binding of [3H]strychnine with an affinity similar to that of unlabeled glycine, and showed a Hill coefficient and proportionality parameter (P) less than unity. The activity of thiocolchicoside toward [3H]strychnine binding sites was confirmed in autoradiographic studies. The results suggest that thiocolchicoside behaves as an allosteric compound acting on the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor in rat brainstem and spinal cord, and that this may provide a possible mechanism for the myorelaxant activity of this colchicoside derivative, the first clinically useful drug acting on this receptor.

  16. An important base triple anchors the substrate helix recognition surface within the Tetrahymena ribozyme active site.

    PubMed

    Szewczak, A A; Ortoleva-Donnelly, L; Zivarts, M V; Oyelere, A K; Kazantsev, A V; Strobel, S A

    1999-09-28

    Key to understanding the structural biology of catalytic RNA is determining the underlying networks of interactions that stabilize RNA folding, substrate binding, and catalysis. Here we demonstrate the existence and functional importance of a Hoogsteen base triple (U300.A97-U277), which anchors the substrate helix recognition surface within the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme active site. Nucleotide analog interference suppression analysis of the interacting functional groups shows that the U300.A97-U277 triple forms part of a network of hydrogen bonds that connect the P3 helix, the J8/7 strand, and the P1 substrate helix. Product binding and substrate cleavage kinetics experiments performed on mutant ribozymes that lack this base triple (C A-U, U G-C) or replace it with the isomorphous C(+).G-C triple show that the A97 Hoogsteen triple contributes to the stabilization of both substrate helix docking and the conformation of the ribozyme's active site. The U300. A97-U277 base triple is not formed in the recently reported crystallographic model of a portion of the group I intron, despite the presence of J8/7 and P3 in the RNA construct [Golden, B. L., Gooding, A. R., Podell, E. R. & Cech, T. R. (1998) Science 282, 259-264]. This, along with other biochemical evidence, suggests that the active site in the crystallized form of the ribozyme is not fully preorganized and that substantial rearrangement may be required for substrate helix docking and catalysis.

  17. PPIcons: identification of protein-protein interaction sites in selected organisms.

    PubMed

    Sriwastava, Brijesh K; Basu, Subhadip; Maulik, Ujjwal; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2013-09-01

    The physico-chemical properties of interaction interfaces have a crucial role in characterization of protein-protein interactions (PPI). In silico prediction of participating amino acids helps to identify interface residues for further experimental verification using mutational analysis, or inhibition studies by screening library of ligands against given protein. Given the unbound structure of a protein and the fact that it forms a complex with another known protein, the objective of this work is to identify the residues that are involved in the interaction. We attempt to predict interaction sites in protein complexes using local composition of amino acids together with their physico-chemical characteristics. The local sequence segments (LSS) are dissected from the protein sequences using a sliding window of 21 amino acids. The list of LSSs is passed to the support vector machine (SVM) predictor, which identifies interacting residue pairs considering their inter-atom distances. We have analyzed three different model organisms of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces Cerevisiae and Homo sapiens, where the numbers of considered hetero-complexes are equal to 40, 123 and 33 respectively. Moreover, the unified multi-organism PPI meta-predictor is also developed under the current work by combining the training databases of above organisms. The PPIcons interface residues prediction method is measured by the area under ROC curve (AUC) equal to 0.82, 0.75, 0.72 and 0.76 for the aforementioned organisms and the meta-predictor respectively.

  18. Multiple, Ligand-Dependent Routes from the Active Site of Cytochrome P450 2C9

    SciTech Connect

    Cojocaru, Vlad; Winn, Peter J.; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-02-13

    The active site of liver-specific, drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenases is deeply buried in the protein and is connected to the protein surface through multiple tunnels, many of which were found open in different CYP crystal structures. It has been shown that different tunnels could serve as ligand passage routes in different CYPs. However, it is not understood whether one CYP uses multiple routes for substrate access and product release and whether these routes depend on ligand properties. From 300 ns of molecular dynamics simulations of CYP2C9, the second most abundant CYP in the human liver we found four main ligand exit routes, the occurrence of each depending on the ligand type and the conformation of the F-G loop, which is likely to be affected by the CYP-membrane interaction. A non-helical F-G loop favored exit towards the putative membrane-embedded region. Important protein features that direct ligand exit include aromatic residues that divide the active site and whose motions control access to two pathways. The ligands interacted with positively charged residues on the protein surface through hydrogen bonds that appear to select for acidic substrates. The observation of multiple, ligand-dependent routes in a CYP aids understanding of how CYP mutations affect drug metabolism and provides new possibilities for CYP inhibition.

  19. The effect of methyl-donated hydrogen bonding on active site conformations of hyaluronate lyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migues, Angela N.; Vergenz, Robert A.; Moore, Kevin B.

    2010-03-01

    Geometric evidence shows a val-A252 methyl-donated (MD) hydrogen bond (HB) in hyaluronate lyase (Streptococcus pneumoniae) interacts with nearby NH--O and OH--O HBs, distorting active-site helical structure. Results for model fragment A248-254 are based on experimental heavy atom positions with ab initio hydrogen atoms. The MDHB, with (H-O distance, donor-H-O angle) = (2.3å; 174^o), exhibits more favorable geometry than thr-A253 OH--O HB (1.8å; 170^o) to the same ala-249 C=O. Consequently, thr-253 N-H--O interaction is forced closer to lys-250 C=O than ala-249 C=O(2.6 versus 2.7å). A novel method has been developed to quantify the effects of atomic diplacements on motions of neighboring helices. A coordinate system was established to track the movement of specific residues and to ascertain the effect of such motions on active site conformations.

  20. Automated docking of maltose, 2-deoxymaltose, and maltotetraose into the soybean beta-amylase active site.

    PubMed

    Laederach, A; Dowd, M K; Coutinho, P M; Reilly, P J

    1999-11-01

    In this study, products and substrates were docked into the active site of beta-amylase using the simulated annealing algorithm AutoDock. Lowest-energy conformers reproduced known crystallographic atom positions within 0.4 to 0.8 A rmsd. Docking studies were carried out with both open and closed configurations of the beta-amylase mobile flap, a loop comprising residues 96 to 103. Ligands with two rings docked within the cleft near the active site when the flap was open, but those with four rings did not. The flap must be closed for alpha-maltotetraose to adopt a conformation allowing it to dock near the crystallographically determined subsites. The closed flap is necessary for productive but not for nonproductive binding, and therefore it plays a essential role in catalysis. The gain in total binding energy upon closing of the flap for alpha-maltose docked to subsites -2, -1 and +1, +2 is about 22 kcal/mol, indicating more favorable interactions are possible with the flap closed. Larger intermolecular interaction energies are observed for two alpha-maltose molecules docked to subsites -2, -1 and +1, +2 than for one alpha-maltotetraose molecule docked from subsites -2 to +2, suggesting that it is only upon cleavage of the alpha-1,4 linkage that optimal closed-flap binding can occur with the crytallographically determined enzyme structure.

  1. Galaxy interactions and strength of nuclear activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simkin, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of data in the literature for differential velocities and projected separations of nearby Seyfert galaxies with possible companions shows a clear difference in projected separations between type 1's and type 2's. This kinematic difference between the two activity classes reinforces other independent evidence that their different nuclear characteristics are related to a non-nuclear physical distinction between the two classes. The differential velocities and projected separations of the galaxy pairs in this sample yield mean galaxy masses, sizes, and mass to light ratios which are consistent with those found by the statistical methods of Karachentsev. Although the galaxy sample discussed here is too small and too poorly defined to provide robust support for these conclusions, the results strongly suggest that nuclear activity in Seyfert galaxies is associated with gravitational perturbations from companion galaxies, and that there are physical distinctions between the host companions of Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 nuclei which may depend both on the environment and the structure of the host galaxy itself.

  2. Interaction of activated leukocytes with polymeric microspheres.

    PubMed

    Ayhan, H; Pişkin, E

    1997-12-01

    Three types of polymeric particles with different surface wettabilities, i.e., poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), poly(methylmethacrylate-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (P(MMA/HEMA)) and poly(methylmethacrylate)/poly(vinyl alcohol) PMMA/PVAL with a diameter of 1.5 microm were produced in this study These particles were incubated with blood samples obtained both from three patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass. In the blood samples taken before the bypass operations, there was considerable phagocytosis and/or adhesion of the PMMA particles, i.e., 14+/-4 particles per monocyte and 11+/-3 particles per neutrophil. While there was almost no phagocytosis and/or adhesion of the P(MMA/HEMA) and PMMA/PVAL particles. In the blood samples which were taken during bypass operations, phagocytosis and/or adhesion of PMMA microspheres increased significantly. The P(MMA/HEMA) and/or PMMA/PVAL particles adhered, or were even phagocytosed by the activated leukocytes in this case. Leukocytes activated during the bypass operations gradually returned to normal in about 24 h.

  3. Active-site properties of Phrixotrix railroad worm green and red bioluminescence-eliciting luciferases.

    PubMed

    Viviani, V R; Arnoldi, F G C; Venkatesh, B; Neto, A J S; Ogawa, F G T; Oehlmeyer, A T L; Ohmiya, Y

    2006-10-01

    The luciferases of the railroad worm Phrixotrix (Coleoptera: Phengodidae) are the only beetle luciferases that naturally produce true red bioluminescence. Previously, we cloned the green- (PxGR) and red-emitting (PxRE) luciferases of railroad worms Phrixotrix viviani and P. hirtus[OLE1]. These luciferases were expressed and purified, and their active-site properties were determined. The red-emitting PxRE luciferase displays flash-like kinetics, whereas PxGR luciferase displays slow-type kinetics. The substrate affinities and catalytic efficiency of PxRE luciferase are also higher than those of PxGR luciferase. Fluorescence studies with 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid and 6-p-toluidino-2-naphthalene sulfonic acid showed that the PxRE luciferase luciferin-binding site is more polar than that of PxGR luciferase, and it is sensitive to guanidine. Mutagenesis and modelling studies suggest that several invariant residues in the putative luciferin-binding site of PxRE luciferase cannot interact with excited oxyluciferin. These results suggest that one portion of the luciferin-binding site of the red-emitting luciferase is tighter than that of PxGR luciferase, whereas the other portion could be more open and polar.

  4. Key Role of Active-Site Water Molecules in Bacteriorhodopsin Proton-Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, A.N.; Baudry, Jerome Y; Suhai, Sandor; Fischer, S.; Smith, Jeremy C

    2008-10-01

    The functional mechanism of the light-driven proton pump protein bacteriorhodopsin depends on the location of water molecules in the active site at various stages of the photocycle and on their roles in the proton-transfer steps. Here, free energy computations indicate that electrostatic interactions favor the presence of a cytoplasmic-side water molecule hydrogen bonding to the retinal Schiff base in the state preceding proton transfer from the retinal Schiff base to Asp85. However, the nonequilibrium nature of the pumping process means that the probability of occupancy of a water molecule in a given site depends both on the free energies of insertion of the water molecule in this and other sites during the preceding photocycle steps and on the kinetic accessibility of these sites on the time scale of the reaction steps. The presence of the cytoplasmic-side water molecule has a dramatic effect on the mechanism of proton transfer: the proton is channeled on the Thr89 side of the retinal, whereas the transfer on the Asp212 side is hindered. Reaction-path simulations and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the presence of the cytoplasmic-side water molecule permits a low-energy bacteriorhodopsin conformer in which the water molecule bridges the twisted retinal Schiff base and the proton acceptor Asp85. From this low-energy conformer, proton transfer occurs via a concerted mechanism in which the water molecule participates as an intermediate proton carrier.

  5. Active Site Structures in Nitrogen-Doped Carbon-Supported Cobalt Catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yingdan; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Ping; Cai, Chenxin

    2016-12-07

    The catalytic mechanism and the nature of active sites are revealed for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with new non-noble-metal nitrogen-doped carbon-supported transition-metal catalysts (metal-N-C catalyst). Specifically, new nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt catalysts (Co-N-C catalysts) are made by pyrolyzing various ratios of the nitrogen-atom rich heterocycle compound, 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium dicyanamide (EMIM-dca) and cobalt salt (Co(NO3)2). The ORR activity (JK at 0.8 V vs RHE, in 0.1 M KOH solution) of a typical catalyst in this family, Co15-N-C800, is 8.25 mA/mg, which is much higher than the ORR activity values of N-C catalysts (0.41 mA/mg). The active site in the catalyst is found to be the Co-N species, which is most likely in the form of Co2N. Metallic cobalt (Co) particles, Co3C species, and N-C species are not catalytically active sites, nor do these moieties interact with the Co-N active sites during the catalysis of the ORR. Increasing the Co salt content during the synthesis favors the formation of Co-N active sites in the final catalyst. Higher pyrolysis temperatures (e.g., a temperature higher than 800 °C) do not favor the formation of the Co-N active sites, but cause the formed Co-N active sites to decompose, which, therefore, leads to a lower catalytic activity. This reveals that the control of the parameters that affect the final structure is critical to catalyst performance and, therefore, the effective development of high-performance heteroatom-doped non-noble-metal ORR catalysts.

  6. Delineating the Tes Interaction Site in Zyxin and Studying Cellular Effects of Its Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Hadzic, Ermin; Catillon, Marie; Halavatyi, Aliaksandr; Medves, Sandrine; Van Troys, Marleen; Moes, Michèle; Baird, Michelle A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Schaffner-Reckinger, Elisabeth; Ampe, Christophe; Friederich, Evelyne

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesions are integrin-based structures that link the actin cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. They play an important role in various cellular functions such as cell signaling, cell motility and cell shape. To ensure and fine tune these different cellular functions, adhesions are regulated by a large number of proteins. The LIM domain protein zyxin localizes to focal adhesions where it participates in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Because of its interactions with a variety of binding partners, zyxin has been proposed to act as a molecular scaffold. Here, we studied the interaction of zyxin with such a partner: Tes. Similar to zyxin, Tes harbors three highly conserved LIM domains of which the LIM1 domain directly interacts with zyxin. Using different zyxin variants in pull-down assays and ectopic recruitment experiments, we identified the Tes binding site in zyxin and showed that four highly conserved amino acids are crucial for its interaction with Tes. Based upon these findings, we used a zyxin mutant defective in Tes-binding to assess the functional consequences of abrogating the zyxin-Tes interaction in focal adhesions. Performing fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we showed that zyxin recruits Tes to focal adhesions and modulates its turnover in these structures. However, we also provide evidence for zyxin-independent localization of Tes to focal adhesions. Zyxin increases focal adhesion numbers and reduces focal adhesion lifetimes, but does so independent of Tes. Quantitative analysis showed that the loss of interaction between zyxin and Tes affects the process of cell spreading. We conclude that zyxin influences focal adhesion dynamics, that it recruits Tes and that this interaction is functional in regulating cell spreading. PMID:26509500

  7. Tricyclic covalent inhibitors selectively target Jak3 through an active site thiol.

    PubMed

    Goedken, Eric R; Argiriadi, Maria A; Banach, David L; Fiamengo, Bryan A; Foley, Sage E; Frank, Kristine E; George, Jonathan S; Harris, Christopher M; Hobson, Adrian D; Ihle, David C; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J; Michalak, Mark E; Murdock, Sara E; Tomlinson, Medha J; Voss, Jeffrey W

    2015-02-20

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. We have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nm) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. These results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases.

  8. Hydroxynonenal inactivates cathepsin B by forming Michael adducts with active site residues.

    PubMed

    Crabb, John W; O'Neil, June; Miyagi, Masaru; West, Karen; Hoff, Henry F

    2002-04-01

    Oxidation of plasma low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) generates the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2 nonenal (HNE) and also reduces proteolytic degradation of oxLDL and other proteins internalized by mouse peritoneal macrophages in culture. This leads to accumulation of undegraded material in lysosomes and formation of ceroid, a component of foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions. To explore the possibility that HNE contributes directly to the inactivation of proteases, structure-function studies of the lysosomal protease cathepsin B have been pursued. We found that treatment of mouse macrophages with HNE reduces degradation of internalized maleyl bovine serine albumin and cathepsin B activity. Purified bovine cathepsin B treated briefly with 15 microM HNE lost approximately 76% of its protease activity and also developed immunoreactivity with antibodies to HNE adducts in Western blot analysis. After stabilization of the potential Michael adducts by sodium borohydride reduction, modified amino acids were localized within the bovine cathepsin B protein structure by mass spectrometric analysis of tryptic peptides. Michael adducts were identified by tandem mass spectrometry at cathepsin B active site residues Cys 29 (mature A chain) and His 150 (mature B chain). Thus, covalent interaction between HNE and critical active site residues inactivates cathepsin B. These results support the hypothesis that the accumulation of undegraded macromolecules in lysosomes after oxidative damage are caused in part by direct protease inactivation by adduct formation with lipid peroxidation products such as HNE.

  9. Tricyclic Covalent Inhibitors Selectively Target Jak3 through an Active Site Thiol*

    PubMed Central

    Goedken, Eric R.; Argiriadi, Maria A.; Banach, David L.; Fiamengo, Bryan A.; Foley, Sage E.; Frank, Kristine E.; George, Jonathan S.; Harris, Christopher M.; Hobson, Adrian D.; Ihle, David C.; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J.; Michalak, Mark E.; Murdock, Sara E.; Tomlinson, Medha J.; Voss, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. We have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nm) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. These results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:25552479

  10. Orphan Nuclear Receptor NR4A1 Binds a Novel Protein Interaction Site on Anti-apoptotic B Cell Lymphoma Gene 2 Family Proteins.

    PubMed

    Godoi, Paulo H C; Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Hishiki, Asami; Sano, Renata; Matsuzawa, Yasuko; Yanagi, Hiroko; Munte, Claudia E; Chen, Ya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M; Kalbitzer, Hans R; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Reed, John C

    2016-07-01

    B cell lymphoma gene 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins are key regulators of programmed cell death and important targets for drug discovery. Pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins reciprocally modulate their activities in large part through protein interactions involving a motif known as BH3 (Bcl-2 homology 3). Nur77 is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family that lacks a BH3 domain but nevertheless binds certain anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2, Bfl-1, and Bcl-B), modulating their effects on apoptosis and autophagy. We used a combination of NMR spectroscopy-based methods, mutagenesis, and functional studies to define the interaction site of a Nur77 peptide on anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins and reveal a novel interaction surface. Nur77 binds adjacent to the BH3 peptide-binding crevice, suggesting the possibility of cross-talk between these discrete binding sites. Mutagenesis of residues lining the identified interaction site on Bcl-B negated the interaction with Nur77 protein in cells and prevented Nur77-mediated modulation of apoptosis and autophagy. The findings establish a new protein interaction site with the potential to modulate the apoptosis and autophagy mechanisms governed by Bcl-2 family proteins.

  11. Extracellular matrix-specific focal adhesions in vascular smooth muscle produce mechanically active adhesion sites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhe; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Hill, Michael A.; Meininger, Gerald A.

    2008-01-01

    Integrin-mediated mechanotransduction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays an important role in the physiological control of tissue blood flow and vascular resistance. To test whether force applied to specific extracellular matrix (ECM)-integrin interactions could induce myogenic-like mechanical activity at focal adhesion sites, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to apply controlled forces to specific ECM adhesion sites on arteriolar VSMCs. The tip of AFM probes were fused with a borosilicate bead (2∼5 μm) coated with fibronectin (FN), collagen type I (CNI), laminin (LN), or vitronectin (VN). ECM-coated beads induced clustering of α5- and β3-integrins and actin filaments at sites of bead-cell contact indicative of focal adhesion formation. Step increases of an upward (z-axis) pulling force (800∼1,600 pN) applied to the bead-cell contact site for FN-specific focal adhesions induced a myogenic-like, force-generating response from the VSMC, resulting in a counteracting downward pull by the cell. This micromechanical event was blocked by cytochalasin D but was enhanced by jasplakinolide. Function-blocking antibodies to α5β1- and αvβ3-integrins also blocked the micromechanical cell event in a concentration-dependent manner. Similar pulling experiments with CNI, VN, or LN failed to induce myogenic-like micromechanical events. Collectively, these results demonstrate that mechanical force applied to integrin-FN adhesion sites induces an actin-dependent, myogenic-like, micromechanical event. Focal adhesions formed by different ECM proteins exhibit different mechanical characteristics, and FN appears of particular relevance in its ability to strongly attach to VSMCs and to induce myogenic-like, force-generating reactions from sites of focal adhesion in response to externally applied forces. PMID:18495809

  12. Lithosphere-biosphere interaction at a shallow-sea hydrothermal vent site; Hot Lake, Panarea, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chia-I.; Amann, Rudolf; Amend, Jan P.; Bach, Wolfgang; Brunner, Benjamin; Meyerdierks, Anke; Price, Roy E.; Schubotz, Florence; Summons, Roger; Wenzhöfer, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Deep-Sea hydrothermal systems are unique habitats for microbial life with primary production based on chemosynthesis and are considered to be windows to the subsurface biosphere. It is often overlooked, however, that their far more accessible shallow-sea counterparts are also valuable targets to study the effects of hydrothermal activity on geology, seawater chemistry and finally, on microbial life. Such an area of shallow marine hydrothermal venting is observed approximately 2.5 km east of Panarea Island (Sicily, Italy). This system is characterized by fluid temperatures of up to 135° C, gas emissions dominated by CO2 and precipitation of elemental sulfur on the seafloor. In an interdisciplinary project to investigate the influence of geofuels on marine microbiota, sediment cores and pore fluids were sampled for geological and geochemical analyses. An attempt was made to link these geochemical data with a characterization of the microbial community. One of the investigated sites (Lago Caldo, Hot Lake) is an oval-shaped (~10 by 6 meters) shallow (~2.5 m deep) depression covered by elemental sulfur. The sediments in this depression are strongly affected by hydrothermal activity: the pH of pore fluids is in a range between 5 and 6; the salinity is approximately two times higher than seawater. In situ temperatures of 36° C and 74° C (10 cm sediment depth) at two different locations within Hot Lake indicate variability in hydrothermal flux. The sediment surface layer is anoxic, and with increasing depth from the sediment-water interface, sulfate concentrations decrease from ~30 mM to less than 10 mM, whereas sulfide concentrations increase from less than 50 μm to ~1000 μm at 25 cm sediment depth, thus suggesting a higher potential for energy gain based on sulfur disequilibrium. As indicated by the variability in the sediment temperatures at 10 cm, fluid fluxes and mixing with seawater is not found to be uniform at Hot Lake. This is reflected in variability of the

  13. Catalytic roles of flexible regions at the active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco)

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Harpel, M.R.; Chen, Yuh-Ru; Larson, E.M.; Larimer, F.W.

    1995-12-31

    Chemical and mutagenesis studies of Rubisco have identified Lys329 and Glu48 as active-site residues that are located in distinct, interacting domains from adjacent subunits. Crystallographic analyses have shown that Lys329 is the apical residue in a 12-residue flexible loop (loop 6) of the {Beta},{alpha}-barrel domain of the active site and that Glu48 resides at the end of helix B of the N-terminal domain of the active site. When phosphorylated ligands are bound by the enzyme, loop 6 adopts a closed conformation and, in concert with repositioning of helix B, thereby occludes the active site from the external environment. In this closed conformation, the {gamma}-carboxylate of Glu48 and the {epsilon}-amino group of Lys329 engage in intersubunit electrostatic interaction. By use of appropriate site-directed mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum Rubisco, we are addressing several issues: the catalytic roles of Lys329 and Glu48, the functional significance of the intersubunit salt bridge comprised of these two residues, and the roles of loop 6 and helix B in stabilizing labile reaction intermediates. Characterization of novel products derived from misprocessing of D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) by the mutant proteins have illuminated the structure of the key intermediate in the normal oxygenase pathway.

  14. Competition between heavy fermion and Kondo interaction in isoelectronic A-site-ordered perovskites.

    PubMed

    Meyers, D; Middey, S; Cheng, J-G; Mukherjee, Swarnakamal; Gray, B A; Cao, Yanwei; Zhou, J-S; Goodenough, J B; Choi, Yongseong; Haskel, D; Freeland, J W; Saha-Dasgupta, T; Chakhalian, J

    2014-12-17

    With current research efforts shifting towards the 4d and 5d transition metal oxides, understanding the evolution of the electronic and magnetic structure as one moves away from 3d materials is of critical importance. Here we perform X-ray spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations on A-site-ordered perovskites with Cu in the A-site and the B-sites descending along the ninth group of the periodic table to elucidate the emerging properties as d-orbitals change from partially filled 3d to 4d to 5d. The results show that when descending from Co to Ir, the charge transfers from the cuprate-like Zhang-Rice state on Cu to the t(2g) orbital of the B site. As the Cu d-orbital occupation approaches the Cu(2+) limit, a mixed valence state in CaCu(3)Rh(4)O(12) and heavy fermion state in CaCu(3)Ir(4)O(12) are obtained. The investigated d-electron compounds are mapped onto the Doniach phase diagram of the competing RKKY and Kondo interactions developed for the f-electron systems.

  15. Effects of active site cleft residues on oligosaccharide binding, hydrolysis, and glycosynthase activities of rice BGlu1 and its mutants.

    PubMed

    Pengthaisong, Salila; Ketudat Cairns, James R

    2014-12-01

    Rice BGlu1 (Os3BGlu7) is a glycoside hydrolase family 1 β-glucosidase that hydrolyzes cellooligosaccharides with increasing efficiency as the degree of polymerization (DP) increases from 2 to 6, indicating six subsites for glucosyl residue binding. Five subsites have been identified in X-ray crystal structures of cellooligosaccharide complexes with its E176Q acid-base and E386G nucleophile mutants. X-ray crystal structures indicate that cellotetraose binds in a similar mode in BGlu1 E176Q and E386G, but in a different mode in the BGlu1 E386G/Y341A variant, in which glucosyl residue 4 (Glc4) interacts with Q187 instead of the eliminated phenolic group of Y341. Here, we found that the Q187A mutation has little effect on BGlu1 cellooligosaccharide hydrolysis activity or oligosaccharide binding in BGlu1 E176Q, and only slight effects on BGlu1 E386G glycosynthase activity. X-ray crystal structures showed that cellotetraose binds in a different position in BGlu1 E176Q/Y341A, in which it interacts directly with R178 and W337, and the Q187A mutation had little effect on cellotetraose binding. Mutations of R178 and W337 to A had significant and nonadditive effects on oligosaccharide hydrolysis by BGlu1, pNPGlc cleavage and cellooligosaccharide inhibition of BGlu1 E176Q and BGlu1 E386G glycosynthase activity. Hydrolysis activity was partially rescued by Y341 for longer substrates, suggesting stacking of Glc4 on Y341 stabilizes binding of cellooligosaccharides in the optimal position for hydrolysis. This analysis indicates that complex interactions between active site cleft residues modulate substrate binding and hydrolysis.

  16. Patient-oriented interactive E-health tools on U.S. hospital Web sites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Edgar; Chang, Chiu-Chi Angela

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide evidence for strategic planning regarding e-health development in U.S. hospitals. A content analysis of a representative sample of the U.S. hospital Web sites has revealed how U.S. hospitals have taken advantage of the 21 patient-oriented interactive tools identified in this study. Significant gaps between various types of hospitals have also been found. It is concluded that although the majority of the U.S. hospitals have adopted traditional functional tools, they need to make significant inroad in implementing the core e-business tools to serve their patients/users, making their Web sites more efficient marketing tools.

  17. Thermochemistry of solvation: A self-consistent three-dimensional reference interaction site model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, Andriy; Truong, Thanh N.

    2000-11-01

    We developed a self-consistent three-dimensional reference interaction site model integral equation theory with the molecular hypernetted chain closure (SC-3D-RISM/HNC) for studying thermochemistry of solvation of ionic solutes in a polar molecular solvent. It is free from the inconsistency in the positions of the ion-solvent site distribution peaks, peculiar to the conventional RISM/HNC approach and improves the predictions for the solvation thermodynamics. The SC-3D-RISM treatment can be readily generalized to the case of finite ionic concentrations, including the consistent dielectric corrections to provide a consistent description of the dielectric properties of ion-molecular solution. The proposed theory is tested for hydration of the Na+ and Cl- ions in ambient water at infinite dilution. An improved agreement of the ion hydration structure and thermodynamics with molecular simulation results is found as compared to the conventional RISM/HNC treatment.

  18. Denosumab mimics the natural decoy receptor osteoprotegerin by interacting with its major binding site on RANKL.

    PubMed

    Schieferdecker, Aneta; Voigt, Mareike; Riecken, Kristoffer; Braig, Friederike; Schinke, Thorsten; Loges, Sonja; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Fehse, Boris; Binder, Mascha

    2014-08-30

    Bone homeostasis critically relies on the RANKL-RANK-OPG axis which can be targeted by the fully human monoclonal antibody denosumab in conditions with increased bone resporption such as bone metastases. The binding site and therefore the molecular mechanism by which this antibody inhibits RANKL has not been characterized so far. Here, we used random peptide phage display library screenings to identify the denosumab epitope on RANKL. Alignments of phage derived peptide sequences with RANKL suggested that this antibody recognized a linear epitope between position T233 and Y241. Mutational analysis confirmed the core residues as critical for this interaction. The spatial localization of this epitope on a 3-dimensional model of RANKL showed that it overlapped with the major binding sites of OPG and RANK on RANKL. We conclude that denosumab inhibits RANKL by both functional and molecular mimicry of the natural decoy receptor OPG.

  19. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  20. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  1. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins.

  2. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  3. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  4. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  5. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  6. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  7. Robotics and Automation Activities at the Savannah River Site: A Site Report for SUBWOG 39F

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.

    1995-09-28

    The Savannah River Site has successfully used robots, teleoperators, and remote video to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, improve worker safety, and improve the quality of operations. Previous reports have described the use of mobile teleoperators in coping with a high level liquid waste spill, the removal of highly contaminated equipment, and the inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. This report will cover recent applications at the Savannah River, as well as systems which SRS has delivered to other DOE site customers.

  8. GAS HYDRATES AT TWO SITES OF AN ACTIVE CONTINENTAL MARGIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart on the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m.

  9. A surface site interaction point methodology for macromolecules and huge molecular databases.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Antoni; Hunter, Christopher A; Prohens, Rafel; Rosselló, Josep L

    2017-03-15

    Determining the position and magnitude of Surface Site Interaction Points (SSIP) is a useful technique for understanding intermolecular interactions. SSIPs have been used for the prediction of solvation properties and for virtual co-crystal screening. To determine the SSIPs for a molecule, the Molecular Electrostatic Potential Surface (MEPS) is first calculated using ab initio methods such as Density Functional Theory. This leads to a high cost in terms of computation time and is not compatible with the analysis of huge molecular databases. Herein, we present a method for the fast estimation of SSIPs, which is based on the MEPS calculated from MMFF94 atomic partial charges. The results show that this method can be used to calculate SSIPs for large molecular databases with a much higher speed than the original ab initio methodology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Lidar research activities and observations at NARL site, Gadanki, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellapragada, Bhavani Kumar

    2016-05-01

    The National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), a unit of Department of Space (DOS), located at Gadanki village (13.5°N, 79.2°E, 370 m AMSL) in India, is involved in the development of lidar remote sensing technologies for atmospheric research. Several advanced lidar technologies employing micropulse, polarization, Raman and scanning have been developed at this site and demonstrated for atmospheric studies during the period between 2008 and 2015. The technology of micropulse lidar, operates at 532 nm wavelength, was successfully transferred to an industry and the commercial version has been identified for Indian Lidar network (I-LINK) programme. Under this lidar network activity, several lidar units were installed at different locations in India to study tropospheric aerosols and clouds. The polarization sensitive lidar technology was realized using a set of mini photomultiplier tube (PMT) units and has the capability to operate during day and night without a pause. The lidar technology uses a compact flashlamp pumped Qswitched laser and employs biaxial configuration between the transmitter and receiver units. The lidar technology has been utilized for understanding the polarization characteristics of boundary layer aerosols during the mixed layer development. The demonstrated Raman lidar technology, uses the third harmonic wavelength of Nd:YAG laser, provides the altitude profiles of aerosol backscattering, extinction and water vapor covering the boundary layer range and allows operation during nocturnal periods. The Raman lidar derived height profiles of aerosol backscattering and extinction coefficient, lidar ratio, and watervapor mixing ratio inform the tropical boundary layer aerosol characteristics. The scanning lidar technology uses a near infrared laser wavelength for probing the lower atmosphere and has been utilized for high resolution cloud profiling during convective periods. The lidar technology is also used for rain rate measurement during

  11. Overlapping Regions in HIV-1 Genome Act as Potential Sites for Host–Virus Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Deeya; Podder, Soumita; Ghosh, Tapash C.

    2016-01-01

    More than a decade, overlapping genes in RNA viruses became a subject of research which has explored various effect of gene overlapping on the evolution and function of viral genomes like genome size compaction. Additionally, overlapping regions (OVRs) are also reported to encode elevated degree of protein intrinsic disorder (PID) in unspliced RNA viruses. With the aim to explore the roles of OVRs in HIV-1 pathogenesis, we have carried out an in-depth analysis on the association of gene overlapping with PID in 35 HIV1- M subtypes. Our study reveals an over representation of PID in OVR of HIV-1 genomes. These disordered residues endure several vital, structural features like short linear motifs (SLiMs) and protein phosphorylation (PP) sites which are previously shown to be involved in massive host–virus interaction. Moreover, SLiMs in OVRs are noticed to be more functionally potential as compared to that of non-overlapping region. Although, density of experimentally verified SLiMs, resided in 9 HIV-1 genes, involved in host–virus interaction do not show any bias toward clustering into OVR, tat and rev two important proteins mediates host–pathogen interaction by their experimentally verified SLiMs, which are mostly localized in OVR. Finally, our analysis suggests that the acquisition of SLiMs in OVR is mutually exclusive of the occurrence of disordered residues, while the enrichment of PPs in OVR is solely dependent on PID and not on overlapping coding frames. Thus, OVRs of HIV-1 genomes could be demarcated as potential molecular recognition sites during host–virus interaction. PMID:27867372

  12. GPS-SUMO: a tool for the prediction of sumoylation sites and SUMO-interaction motifs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Xie, Yubin; Zheng, Yueyuan; Jiang, Shuai; Liu, Wenzhong; Mu, Weiping; Liu, Zexian; Zhao, Yong; Xue, Yu; Ren, Jian

    2014-07-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) regulate a variety of cellular processes through two distinct mechanisms, including covalent sumoylation and non-covalent SUMO interaction. The complexity of SUMO regulations has greatly hampered the large-scale identification of SUMO substrates or interaction partners on a proteome-wide level. In this work, we developed a new tool called GPS-SUMO for the prediction of both sumoylation sites and SUMO-interaction motifs (SIMs) in proteins. To obtain an accurate performance, a new generation group-based prediction system (GPS) algorithm integrated with Particle Swarm Optimization approach was applied. By critical evaluation and comparison, GPS-SUMO was demonstrated to be substantially superior against other existing tools and methods. With the help of GPS-SUMO, it is now possible to further investigate the relationship between sumoylation and SUMO interaction processes. A web service of GPS-SUMO was implemented in PHP+JavaScript and freely available at http://sumosp.biocuckoo.org.

  13. Spatiotemporal Dynamics and Epistatic Interaction Sites in Dengue Virus Type 1: A Comprehensive Sequence-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Pei-Yu; Ke, Guan-Ming; Chen, Po-Chih; Liu, Li-Teh; Tsai, Yen-Chun; Tsai, Jih-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The continuing threat of dengue fever necessitates a comprehensive characterisation of its epidemiological trends. Phylogenetic and recombination events were reconstructed based on 100 worldwide dengue virus (DENV) type 1 genome sequences with an outgroup (prototypes of DENV2-4). The phylodynamic characteristics and site-specific variation were then analysed using data without the outgroup. Five genotypes (GI-GV) and a ladder-like structure with short terminal branch topology were observed in this study. Apparently, the transmission of DENV1 was geographically random before gradual localising with human activity as GI-GIII in South Asia, GIV in the South Pacific, and GV in the Americas. Genotypes IV and V have recently shown higher population densities compared to older genotypes. All codon regions and all tree branches were skewed toward a negative selection, which indicated that their variation was restricted by protein function. Notably, multi-epistatic interaction sites were found in both PrM 221 and NS3 1730. Recombination events accumulated in regions E, NS3-NS4A, and particularly in region NS5. The estimated coevolution pattern also highlights the need for further study of the biological role of protein PrM 221 and NS3 1730. The recent transmission of emergent GV sublineages into Central America and Europe mandates closely monitoring of genotype interaction and succession. PMID:24040199

  14. Active-site zinc ligands and activated H2O of zinc enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Vallee, B L; Auld, D S

    1990-01-01

    The x-ray crystallographic structures of 12 zinc enzymes have been chosen as standards of reference to identify the ligands to the catalytic and structural zinc atoms of other members of their respective enzyme families. Universally, H2O is a ligand and critical component of the catalytically active zinc sites. In addition, three protein side chains bind to the catalytic zinc atom, whereas four protein ligands bind to the structural zinc atom. The geometry and coordination number of zinc can vary greatly to accommodate particular ligands. Zinc forms complexes with nitrogen and oxygen just as readily as with sulfur, and this is reflected in catalytic zinc sites having a binding frequency of His much greater than Glu greater than Asp = Cys, three of which bind to the metal atom. The systematic spacing between the ligands is striking. For all catalytic zinc sites except the coenzyme-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase, the first two ligands are separated by a "short-spacer" consisting of 1 to 3 amino acids. These ligands are separated from the third ligand by a "long spacer" of approximately 20 to approximately 120 amino acids. The spacer enables formation of a primary bidentate zinc complex, whereas the long spacer contributes flexibility to the coordination sphere, which can poise the zinc for catalysis as well as bring other catalytic and substrate binding groups into apposition with the active site. The H2O is activated by ionization, polarization, or poised for displacement. Collectively, the data imply that the preferred mechanistic pathway for activating the water--e.g., zinc hydroxide or Lewis acid catalysis--will be determined by the identity of the other three ligands and their spacing. Images PMID:2104979

  15. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 Interactions with Western Corn Rootworm Midgut Membrane Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huarong; Olson, Monica; Lin, Gaofeng; Hey, Timothy; Tan, Sek Yee; Narva, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 are binary insecticidal proteins that are co-expressed in transgenic corn hybrids for control of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. Bt crystal (Cry) proteins with limited potential for field-relevant cross-resistance are used in combination, along with non-transgenic corn refuges, as a strategy to delay development of resistant rootworm populations. Differences in insect midgut membrane binding site interactions are one line of evidence that Bt protein mechanisms of action differ and that the probability of receptor-mediated cross-resistance is low. Methodology/Principal Findings Binding site interactions were investigated between Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 and coleopteran active insecticidal proteins Cry3Aa, Cry6Aa, and Cry8Ba on western corn rootworm midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Competitive binding of radio-labeled proteins to western corn rootworm BBMV was used as a measure of shared binding sites. Our work shows that 125I-Cry35Ab1 binds to rootworm BBMV, Cry34Ab1 enhances 125I-Cry35Ab1 specific binding, and that 125I-Cry35Ab1 with or without unlabeled Cry34Ab1 does not share binding sites with Cry3Aa, Cry6Aa, or Cry8Ba. Two primary lines of evidence presented here support the lack of shared binding sites between Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 and the aforementioned proteins: 1) No competitive binding to rootworm BBMV was observed for competitor proteins when used in excess with 125I-Cry35Ab1 alone or combined with unlabeled Cry34Ab1, and 2) No competitive binding to rootworm BBMV was observed for unlabeled Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1, or a combination of the two, when used in excess with 125I-Cry3Aa, or 125I-Cry8Ba. Conclusions/Significance Combining two or more insecticidal proteins active against the same target pest is one tactic to delay the onset of resistance to either protein. We conclude that Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 are compatible with Cry3Aa, Cry6Aa, or Cry8Ba for deployment as insect

  16. Structural Characterization of Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase Variants Bearing Active Site Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Radom,C.; Banerjee, A.; Verdine, G.

    2007-01-01

    The human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) protein is responsible for initiating base excision DNA repair of the endogenous mutagen 8-oxoguanine. Like nearly all DNA glycosylases, hOGG1 extrudes its substrate from the DNA helix and inserts it into an extrahelical enzyme active site pocket lined with residues that participate in lesion recognition and catalysis. Structural analysis has been performed on mutant versions of hOGG1 having changes in catalytic residues but not on variants having altered 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (oxoG) contact residues. Here we report high resolution structural analysis of such recognition variants. We found that Ala substitution at residues that contact the phosphate 5 to the lesion (H270A mutation) and its Watson-Crick face (Q315A mutation) simply removed key functionality from the contact interface but otherwise had no effect on structure. Ala substitution at the only residue making an oxoG-specific contact (G42A mutation) introduced torsional stress into the DNA contact surface of hOGG1, but this was overcome by local interactions within the folded protein, indicating that this oxoG recognition motif is 'hardwired'. Introduction of a side chain intended to sterically obstruct the active site pocket (Q315F mutation) led to two different structures, one of which (Q315F{sup *149}) has the oxoG lesion in an exosite flanking the active site and the other of which (Q315F{sup *292}) has the oxoG inserted nearly completely into the lesion recognition pocket. The latter structure offers a view of the latest stage in the base extrusion pathway yet observed, and its lack of catalytic activity demonstrates that the transition state for displacement of the lesion base is geometrically demanding.

  17. A phosphorylation site in the ftz homeodomain is required for activity.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, J; Hung, L H; Strome, R; Krause, H M

    1998-01-01

    The Drosophila homeodomain-containing protein Fushi tarazu (Ftz) is expressed sequentially in the embryo, first in alternate segments, then in specific neuroblasts and neurons in the central nervous system, and finally in parts of the gut. During these different developmental stages, the protein is heavily phosphorylated on different subsets of Ser and Thr residues. This stage-specific phosphorylation suggests possible roles for signal transduction pathways in directing tissue-specific Ftz activities. Here we show that one of the Ftz phosphorylation sites, T263 in the N-terminus of the Ftz homeodomain, is phosphorylated in vitro by Drosophila embryo extracts and protein kinase A. In the embryo, mutagenesis of this site to the non-phosphorylatable residue Ala resulted in loss of ftz-dependent segments. Conversely, substitution of T263 with Asp, which is also non-phosphorylatable, but which successfully mimics phosphorylated residues in a number of proteins, rescued the mutant phenotype. This suggests that T263 is in the phosphorylated state when functioning normally in vivo. We also demonstrate that the T263 substitutions of Ala and Asp do not affect Ftz DNA-binding activity in vitro, nor do they affect stability or transcriptional activity in transfected S2 cells. This suggests that T263 phosphorylation is most likely required for a homeodomain-mediated interaction with an embryonically expressed protein. PMID:9545243

  18. Beta-thiomaltosides as active site probes for alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, P J; Cascio, D; McPherson, A

    1983-12-01

    A series of substituted 1-thio-beta-D-maltopyranosides was synthesized and confirmed by elemental analysis, optical rotation, NMR, and liquid chromatography. These compounds were shown by several biochemical techniques to bind to the active site of alpha-amylase. Steady-state kinetic studies showed the compounds to be competitive inhibitors, with affinities lying within the range of the natural ligands, maltose and maltotriose. Affinity chromatography employing p-aminophenyl-1-thio-beta-D-maltopyranoside linked to Sepharose provides a relatively simple procedure for alpha-amylase purification. The binding of p-bromphenyl-1-thio-beta-D-maltoside was observed in crystals of alpha-amylase using X-ray crystallography, and through the use of difference Fourier analysis its interaction at 5.0-A resolution with the active site of the enzyme has been visualized. The inhibitor binds in a long, deep cleft that divides the two major domains of the enzyme. These studies are believed to provide a first step toward the rational design of ligands for the physiological regulation of starch breakdown and utilization through modulation of alpha-amylase activity.

  19. A computational study of the protein-ligand interactions in CDK2 inhibitors: using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics interaction energy as a predictor of the biological activity.

    PubMed

    Alzate-Morales, Jans H; Contreras, Renato; Soriano, Alejandro; Tuñon, Iñaki; Silla, Estanislao

    2007-01-15

    We report a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study to determine the protein-ligand interaction energy between CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2) and five inhibitors with the N(2)-substituted 6-cyclohexyl-methoxy-purine scaffold. The computational results in this work show that the QM/MM interaction energy is strongly correlated to the biological activity and can be used as a predictor, at least within a family of substrates. A detailed analysis of the protein-ligand structures obtained from molecular dynamics simulations shows specific interactions within the active site that, in some cases, have not been reported before to our knowledge. The computed interaction energy gauges the strength of protein-ligand interactions. Finally, energy decomposition and multiple regression analyses were performed to check the contribution of the electrostatic and van der Waals energies to the total interaction energy and to show the capabilities of the computational model to identify new potent inhibitors.

  20. Shift reagents in ion mobility spectrometry: the effect of the number of interaction sites, size and interaction energies on the mobilities of valinol and ethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Maestre, Roberto; Meza-Morelos, Dairo; Wu, Ching

    2016-05-01

    Overlapping peaks interfere in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), but they are separated introducing mobility shift reagents (SR) in the buffer gas forming adducts with different collision cross-sections (size). IMS separations using SR depend on the ion mobility shifts which are governed by adduct's size and interaction energies (stabilities). Mobility shifts of valinol and ethanolamine ions were measured by electrospray-ionization ion mobility-mass spectrometry (MS). Methyl-chloro propionate (M) was used as SR; 2-butanol (B) and nitrobenzene (N) were used for comparison. Density functional theory was used for calculations. B produced the smallest mobility shifts because of its small size. M and N have two strong interaction sites (oxygen atoms) and similar molecular mass, and they should produce similar shifts. For both ethanolamine and valinol ions, stabilities were larger for N adducts than those of M. With ethanolamine, M produced a 68% shift, large compared to that using N, 61%, because M has a third weak interaction site on the chlorine atom and, therefore, M has more interaction possibilities than N. This third site overrode the oxygen atoms' interaction energy that favored the adduction of ethanolamine with N over that with M. On the contrary, with valinol mobility shifts were larger with N than with M (21 vs 18%) because interaction energy favored even more adduction of valinol with N than with M; that is, the interaction energy difference between adducts of valinol with M and N was larger than that between those adducts with ethanolamine, and the third M interaction could not override this larger difference. Mobility shifts were explained based on the number of SR's interaction sites, size of ions and SR, and SR-ion interaction energies. This is the first time that the number of interaction sites is used to explain mobility shifts in SR-assisted IMS. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  2. Crown ether–electrolyte interactions permit nanopore detection of individual DNA abasic sites in single molecules

    PubMed Central

    An, Na; Fleming, Aaron M.; White, Henry S.; Burrows, Cynthia J.

    2012-01-01

    DNA abasic (AP) sites are one of the most frequent lesions in the genome and have a high mutagenic potential if unrepaired. After selective attachment of 2-aminomethyl-18-crown-6 (18c6), individual AP lesions are detected during electrophoretic translocation through the bacterial protein ion channel α-hemolysin (α-HL) embedded in a lipid bilayer. Interactions between 18c6 and Na+ produce characteristic pulse-like current amplitude signatures that allow the identification of individual AP sites in single molecules of homopolymeric or heteropolymeric DNA sequences. The bulky 18c6-cation complexes also dramatically slow the DNA motion to more easily recordable levels. Further, the behaviors of the AP-18c6 adduct are different with respect to the directionalities of DNA entering the protein channel, and they can be precisely manipulated by altering the cation (Li+, Na+ or K+) of the electrolyte. This method permits detection of multiple AP lesions per strand, which is unprecedented in other work. Additionally, insights into the thermodynamics and kinetics of 18c6-cation interactions at a single-molecule level are provided by the nanopore measurement. PMID:22711805

  3. Efficient analysis using custom interactive visualization tools at a Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G. ); Durham, L. )

    1992-01-01

    Custom visualization analysis programs were developed and used to analyze contaminant transport calculations from a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model developed for a Department of Energy Superfund site. The site hydrogeology, which is highly heterogenous, includes both fractured limestone and dolomite and alluvium deposits. Three-dimensional interactive visualization techniques were used to understand and analyze the three-dimensional, double-porosity modeling results. A graphical object oriented programming environment was applied to efficiently develop custom visualization programs in a coarse-grained data structure language. Comparisons were made, using the results from the three-dimensional, finite-difference model, between traditional two-dimensional analyses (contour and vector plots) and interactive three-dimensional techniques. Subjective comparison areas include the accuracy of analysis, the ability to understand the results of three-dimensional contaminant transport simulation, and the capability to transmit the results of the analysis to the project management. In addition, a quantitative comparison was made on the time required to develop a thorough analysis of the modeling results. The conclusions from the comparative study showed that the visualization analysis provided an increased awareness of the contaminant transport mechanisms, provided new insights into contaminant migration, and resulted in a significant time savings.

  4. Efficient analysis using custom interactive visualization tools at a Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.; Durham, L.

    1992-12-01

    Custom visualization analysis programs were developed and used to analyze contaminant transport calculations from a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model developed for a Department of Energy Superfund site. The site hydrogeology, which is highly heterogenous, includes both fractured limestone and dolomite and alluvium deposits. Three-dimensional interactive visualization techniques were used to understand and analyze the three-dimensional, double-porosity modeling results. A graphical object oriented programming environment was applied to efficiently develop custom visualization programs in a coarse-grained data structure language. Comparisons were made, using the results from the three-dimensional, finite-difference model, between traditional two-dimensional analyses (contour and vector plots) and interactive three-dimensional techniques. Subjective comparison areas include the accuracy of analysis, the ability to understand the results of three-dimensional contaminant transport simulation, and the capability to transmit the results of the analysis to the project management. In addition, a quantitative comparison was made on the time required to develop a thorough analysis of the modeling results. The conclusions from the comparative study showed that the visualization analysis provided an increased awareness of the contaminant transport mechanisms, provided new insights into contaminant migration, and resulted in a significant time savings.

  5. Two-site fluctuations and multipolar intersite exchange interactions in strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourovskii, L. V.

    2016-09-01

    An approach is proposed for evaluating dipolar and multipolar intersite interactions in strongly correlated materials. This approach is based on the single-site dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) in conjunction with the atomic approximation for the local self-energy. Starting from the local-moment paramagnetic state described by DMFT, we derive intersite interactions by considering the response of the DMFT grand potential to small fluctuations of atomic configurations on two neighboring sites. The present method is validated by applying it to one-band and two-band eg Hubbard models on the simple-cubic 3 d lattice. It is also applied to study the spin-orbital order in the parent cubic structure of ternary chromium fluoride KCrF3. We obtain the onset of a G-type antiferro-orbital order at a significantly lower temperature compared to that in real distorted KCrF3. In contrast, its layered A-type antiferromagnetic order and Néel temperature are rather well reproduced. The calculated full Kugel-Khomskii Hamiltonian contains spin-orbital coupling terms inducing a misalignment in the antiferro-orbital order upon the onset of antiferromagnetism.

  6. The yeast regulator of transcription protein Rtr1 lacks an active site and phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kehui; Manley, James L; Tong, Liang

    2012-07-10

    The activity of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is controlled in part by the phosphorylation state of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Recent reports have suggested that yeast regulator of transcription protein, Rtr1, and its human homologue RPAP2, possess Pol II CTD Ser5 phosphatase activity. Here we report the crystal structure of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1, which reveals a new type of zinc finger protein and does not have any close structural homologues. Importantly, the structure does not show evidence of an active site, and extensive experiments to demonstrate its CTD phosphatase activity have been unsuccessful, suggesting that Rtr1 has a non-catalytic role in CTD dephosphorylation.

  7. Interannual active layer thermal and dynamics evolution at the crater Lake CALM site, Deception Island (Antarctica).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Miguel; Vieira, Gonzalo; Ángel De Pablo, Miguel; Molina, Antonio; Abramov, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    Deception Island, is an active strato-volcano on South Shetland Archipelago of Antarctica (62° 55' 0″ S, 60° 37' 0″ W), is a cold region with harsh remote and hostile environmental conditions. The permafrost and active layer existence, and the cold climate conditions together with volcanic material with height water content inside made this region of the Earth a perfect site to study the active layer and permafrost evolution involved in the Circumpolar Active Layer South (CALM-S) program. The active layer is measured in late January or firs february (during the end of the thaw period) at the "Crater Lake" CALM site (62°58'06.7''; 60°40'44.8'') on Deception Island, Antarctica, at the period 2006 to 2014 we obtained a mean annual value of 29,7±2 cm. In this paper, we describe the spatial active layer thickness distribution and report the reduction on the mean thickness between February 2006 and 2014. Below the active layer, permafrost could be also reported (with a mean thickness of 4.5± 0.5 m.) based on the temperature data acquired by sensors installed at different depth inside the soil; three different shallow boreholes was drilled (1.0 m., 1.6 m., 4.5 m. in depth) and we have been registered its temperature gradient at the 2010 to 2013 period. Here we use all those data 1) to describe the thermal behavior of the permafrost at the CALM site, and 2) to describe its evolution (aggradation/degradation) along fourteen years of continuous measurements. We develop this study, to known the thermal behavior of the permafrost and the active layer related with the air/soil interaction being one of the most important factors the snow layer that was measured by the installation of termo-snowmeters with the complement of an automatic digital camera during the 2008 to 2014 period. On the other hand, the pyroclastics soil materials has a very high values of water content then the latent heat in the freezing/thawing process controls the active layer evolution and the

  8. Predicting Ligand Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces by 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Jhih-Wei; Elumalai, Pavadai; Pitti, Thejkiran; Wu, Chih Yuan; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Peng, Hung-Pin; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Predicting ligand binding sites (LBSs) on protein structures, which are obtained either from experimental or computational methods, is a useful first step in functional annotation or structure-based drug design for the protein structures. In this work, the structure-based machine learning algorithm ISMBLab-LIG was developed to predict LBSs on protein surfaces with input attributes derived from the three-dimensional probability density maps of interacting atoms, which were reconstructed on the query protein surfaces and were relatively insensitive to local conformational variations of the tentative ligand binding sites. The prediction accuracy of the ISMBLab-LIG predictors is comparable to that of the best LBS predictors benchmarked on several well-established testing datasets. More importantly, the ISMBLab-LIG algorithm has substantial tolerance to the prediction uncertainties of computationally derived protein structure models. As such, the method is particularly useful for predicting LBSs not only on experimental protein structures without known LBS templates in the database but also on computationally predicted model protein structures with structural uncertainties in the tentative ligand binding sites. PMID:27513851

  9. Proteins and Their Interacting Partners: An Introduction to Protein-Ligand Binding Site Prediction Methods.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel Barry; Brackenridge, Danielle Allison; McGuffin, Liam James

    2015-12-15

    Elucidating the biological and biochemical roles of proteins, and subsequently determining their interacting partners, can be difficult and time consuming using in vitro and/or in vivo methods, and consequently the majority of newly sequenced proteins will have unknown structures and functions. However, in silico methods for predicting protein-ligand binding sites and protein biochemical functions offer an alternative practical solution. The characterisation of protein-ligand binding sites is essential for investigating new functional roles, which can impact the major biological research spheres of health, food, and energy security. In this review we discuss the role in silico methods play in 3D modelling of protein-ligand binding sites, along with their role in predicting biochemical functionality. In addition, we describe in detail some of the key alternative in silico prediction approaches that are available, as well as discussing the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) and the Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) projects, and their impact on developments in the field. Furthermore, we discuss the importance of protein function prediction methods for tackling 21st century problems.

  10. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H; Miller, Katherine H; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L

    2015-06-05

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome.

  11. Glucocorticoid--receptor interactions. Studies of the negative co-operativity induced by steroid interactions with a secondary, hydrophobic, binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, T R; Bell, P A

    1980-01-01

    The effects of steroids on the binding of [1,2-3H]dexamethasone and [1,2-3H]progesterone to the glucocorticoid receptor of rat thymus cytosol were studied. Although both glucocorticoid agonists and antagonists competed with [1,2-3H]dexamethasone for binding to the receptor under equilibrium conditions, only glucocorticoid antagonists of partial agonists, at micromolar concentrations, were capable of accelerating the rate of dissociation of previously bound [1,2-3H]dexamethasone from the receptor. Antagonists or partial agonists also enhanced the rate of dissociation of [1,2-3H]progesterone from the glucocorticoid receptor, with identical specificity and concentration--response characteristics. These effects are attributed to the presence on the receptor of a secondary, low-affinity, binding site for glucocorticoid antagonists, the occupancy of which produces negatively co-operative interactions with the primary glucocorticoid-binding site. In contrast with the interactions with the primary site, the interactions of steroids with the negatively co-operative site appear to be primarily hydrophobic in nature, and the site resembles the steroid-binding site of progestin-binding proteins in its specificity, though not its affinity. The results also suggest that the initial interactions of both glucocorticoid agonists and antagonists with the receptor under equilibrium conditions are with one primary site on a receptor existing in one conformation only. PMID:7406882

  12. Understanding functional miRNA-target interactions in vivo by site-specific genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Andrew R; Azzam, Ghows; Wheatley, Lucy; Tibbit, Charlotte; Rajakumar, Timothy; McGowan, Simon; Stanger, Nathan; Ewels, Philip Andrew; Taylor, Stephen; Ponting, Chris P; Liu, Ji-Long; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Fulga, Tudor A

    2014-08-19

    MicroRNA (miRNA) target recognition is largely dictated by short 'seed' sequences, and single miRNAs therefore have the potential to regulate a large number of genes. Understanding the contribution of specific miRNA-target interactions to the regulation of biological processes in vivo remains challenging. Here we use transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 technologies to interrogate the functional relevance of predicted miRNA response elements (MREs) to post-transcriptional silencing in zebrafish and Drosophila. We also demonstrate an effective strategy that uses CRISPR-mediated homology-directed repair with short oligonucleotide donors for the assessment of MRE activity in human cells. These methods facilitate analysis of the direct phenotypic consequences resulting from blocking specific miRNA-MRE interactions at any point during development.

  13. Differences and similarities in binding of pyruvate and L-lactate in the active site of M4 and H4 isoforms of human lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Swiderek, Katarzyna; Paneth, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We present QM/MM calculations that show differences in geometries of active sites of M(4) and H(4) isoforms of human LDH ligated with oxamate, pyruvate or L-lactate. As the consequence of these differences, binding isotope effects of the methyl hydrogen atoms of pyruvate and l-lactate may be used to experimentally distinguish these isoforms. Based on the FEP calculations we argue that L-lactate is a better candidate for the experimental studies. Our calculations of energies of interactions of ligands with the active site residues provide explanation for the observed experimentally sensitivity to inhibition of the M(4) isoenzyme isoform and pinpoint the differences to interactions of the ligand with the histidine residue. We conclude that pyruvate interacts much stronger in the active site of H(4) than M(4) isoform and that the latter interactions are weaker than with water molecules in the aqueous solution.

  14. Large, motile epifauna interact strongly with harpacticoid copepods and polychaetes at a bathyal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thistle, David; Eckman, James E.; Paterson, Gordon L. J.

    2008-03-01

    Strengths of interactions among groups of animals in deep-sea-sediment communities are poorly known. Large, motile epifauna (LME) such as sea cucumbers, star fishes, and demersal fishes occur in the deep sea and are sources of predation, disturbance, and habitat alteration and thus have the potential to interact strongly with infauna. At a site off the southwestern coast of the United States (32°57.3'N, 117°32.2'W, 780 m depth), we excluded the LME from five 75- ×75-cm plots with cages. After 143 d, we sampled these plots and five plots of the same size paired with them as controls. Abundances of harpacticoid copepods and polychaetes were significantly lower in cages than in controls. In several cages, nematodes and kinorhynchs were also dramatically less abundant than in paired controls. Results suggest that LME ordinarily affect the infaunal assemblage in such a way that harpacticoids and polychaetes (and perhaps nematodes and kinorhynchs) can maintain higher abundances than they can in the absence of LME, indicating that strong interactions can influence the organization of deep-sea-sediment communities. In a multivariate analysis of environmental parameters, cage and control samples were intermixed, so if the effect is transmitted by alterations of the environment by the LME, the nature of the alterations must be relatively local and remains to be discovered.

  15. Reference interaction site model and optimized perturbation theories of colloidal dumbbells with increasing anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Munaò, Gianmarco Costa, Dino; Caccamo, Carlo; Gámez, Francisco; Giacometti, Achille

    2015-06-14

    We investigate thermodynamic properties of anisotropic colloidal dumbbells in the frameworks provided by the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM) theory and an Optimized Perturbation Theory (OPT), this latter based on a fourth-order high-temperature perturbative expansion of the free energy, recently generalized to molecular fluids. Our model is constituted by two identical tangent hard spheres surrounded by square-well attractions with same widths and progressively different depths. Gas-liquid coexistence curves are obtained by predicting pressures, free energies, and chemical potentials. In comparison with previous simulation results, RISM and OPT agree in reproducing the progressive reduction of the gas-liquid phase separation as the anisotropy of the interaction potential becomes more pronounced; in particular, the RISM theory provides reasonable predictions for all coexistence curves, bar the strong anisotropy regime, whereas OPT performs generally less well. Both theories predict a linear dependence of the critical temperature on the interaction strength, reproducing in this way the mean-field behavior observed in simulations; the critical density—that drastically drops as the anisotropy increases—turns to be less accurate. Our results appear as a robust benchmark for further theoretical studies, in support to the simulation approach, of self-assembly in model colloidal systems.

  16. Framing medical tourism: an examination of appeal, risk, convalescence, accreditation, and interactivity in medical tourism web sites.

    PubMed

    Mason, Alicia; Wright, Kevin B

    2011-02-01

    This exploratory study analyzed the content of medical tourism Web sites in an attempt to examine how they convey information about benefits and risks of medical procedures, how they frame credibility, and the degree to which these Web sites include interactive features for consumers. Drawing upon framing theory, the researchers content analyzed a sample of 66 medical tourism Web sites throughout the world. The results indicated that medical tourism Web sites largely promote the benefits of medical procedures while downplaying the risks, and relatively little information regarding the credibility of these services appears. In addition, the presentation of benefits/risks, credibility, and Web site interactivity were found to differ by region and type of facility. The authors discuss the implications of these findings concerning the framing of medical tourism Web site content, future directions for research, and limitations.

  17. Active aerodynamic control of wake-airfoil interaction noise - Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Lavrich, P. L.; Sofrin, T. G.; Topol, D. A.

    A proof of concept experiment is conducted that shows the potential for active aerodynamic control of rotor wake/stator interaction noise in a simplified manner. A single airfoil model representing the stator was fitted with a moveable trailing edge flap controlled by a servo motor. The control system moves the motor driven flap in the correct angular displacement phase and rate to reduce the unsteady load on the airfoil during the wake interaction.

  18. The Interaction between Polynucleotide Kinase Phosphatase and the DNA Repair Protein XRCC1 Is Critical for Repair of DNA Alkylation Damage and Stable Association at DNA Damage Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Della-Maria, Julie; Hegde, Muralidhar L.; McNeill, Daniel R.; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Ellenberger, Tom; Wilson, David M.; Mitra, Sankar; Tomkinson, Alan E.

    2012-01-01

    XRCC1 plays a key role in the repair of DNA base damage and single-strand breaks. Although it has no known enzymatic activity, XRCC1 interacts with multiple DNA repair proteins and is a subunit of distinct DNA repair protein complexes. Here we used the yeast two-hybrid genetic assay to identify mutant versions of XRCC1 that are selectively defective in interacting with a single protein partner. One XRCC1 mutant, A482T, that was defective in binding to polynucleotide kinase phosphatase (PNKP) not only retained the ability to interact with partner proteins that bind to different regions of XRCC1 but also with aprataxin and aprataxin-like factor whose binding sites overlap with that of PNKP. Disruption of the interaction between PNKP and XRCC1 did not impact their initial recruitment to localized DNA damage sites but dramatically reduced their retention there. Furthermore, the interaction between PNKP and the DNA ligase IIIα-XRCC1 complex significantly increased the efficiency of reconstituted repair reactions and was required for complementation of the DNA damage sensitivity to DNA alkylation agents of xrcc1 mutant cells. Together our results reveal novel roles for the interaction between PNKP and XRCC1 in the retention of XRCC1 at DNA damage sites and in DNA alkylation damage repair. PMID:22992732

  19. Explosive lava-water interactions II: self-organization processes among volcanic rootless eruption sites in the 1783-1784 Laki lava flow, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Christopher W.; Fagents, Sarah A.; Thordarson, Thorvaldur

    2010-05-01

    We have applied quantitative geospatial analyses to rootless eruption sites in the Hnúta and Hrossatungur groups of the 1783-1784 Laki lava flow to establish how patterns of spatial distribution can be used to obtain information about rootless cone emplacement processes and paleo-environments. This study utilizes sample-size-dependent nearest neighbor (NN) statistics and Voronoi tessellations to quantify the spatial distribution of rootless eruption sites and validate the use of statistical NN analysis as a remote sensing tool. Our results show that rootless eruption sites cluster in environments with abundant lava and water resources, but competition for limited groundwater in these clusters can cause rootless eruption sites to develop repelled distributions. This pattern of self-organization can be interpreted within the context of resource availability and depletion. Topography tends to concentrate lava (fuel) and water (coolant) within topographic lows, thereby promoting explosive lava-water interactions in these regions. Given an excess supply of lava within broad sheet lobes, rootless eruption sites withdraw groundwater from their surroundings until there is insufficient water to maintain analogs to explosive molten fuel-coolant interactions. Rootless eruption sites may be modeled as a network of water extraction wells that draw down the water table in their vicinity. Rootless eruptions at locations with insufficient groundwater may either fail to initiate or terminate before explosive activity has ceased at nearby locations with a greater supply of water, thus imparting a repelled distribution to observed rootless eruption sites.

  20. Interactions Increase Forager Availability and Activity in Harvester Ants.

    PubMed

    Pless, Evlyn; Queirolo, Jovel; Pinter-Wollman, Noa; Crow, Sam; Allen, Kelsey; Mathur, Maya B; Gordon, Deborah M

    2015-01-01

    Social insect colonies use interactions among workers to regulate collective behavior. Harvester ant foragers interact in a chamber just inside the nest entrance, here called the 'entrance chamber'. Previous studies of the activation of foragers in red harvester ants show that an outgoing forager inside the nest experiences an increase in brief antennal contacts before it leaves the nest to forage. Here we compare the interaction rate experienced by foragers that left the nest and ants that did not. We found that ants in the entrance chamber that leave the nest to forage experienced more interactions than ants that descend to the deeper nest without foraging. Additionally, we found that the availability of foragers in the entrance chamber is associated with the rate of forager return. An increase in the rate of forager return leads to an increase in the rate at which ants descend to the deeper nest, which then stimulates more ants to ascend into the entrance chamber. Thus a higher rate of forager return leads to more available foragers in the entrance chamber. The highest density of interactions occurs near the nest entrance and the entrances of the tunnels from the entrance chamber to the deeper nest. Local interactions with returning foragers regulate both the activation of waiting foragers and the number of foragers available to be activated.

  1. Androgen receptor serine 81 mediates Pin1 interaction and activity

    PubMed Central

    La Montagna, Raffaele; Caligiuri, Isabella; Maranta, Pasquale; Lucchetti, Chiara; Esposito, Luca; Paggi, Marco G.; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Rizzolio, Flavio; Giordano, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Hormone-dependent tumors are characterized by deregulated activity of specific steroid receptors, allowing aberrant expression of many genes involved in cancer initiation, progression and metastasis. In prostate cancer, the androgen receptor (AR) protein has pivotal functions, and over the years it has been the target of different drugs. AR is a nuclear receptor whose activity is regulated by a phosphorylation mechanism controlled by hormone and growth factors. Following phosphorylation, AR interacts with many cofactors that closely control its function. Among such cofactors, Pin1 is a peptidyl-prolyl isomerase that is involved in the control of protein phosphorylation and has a prognostic value in prostate cancer. In the present study, we demonstrate that ARSer81 is involved in the interaction with Pin1, and that this interaction is important for the transcriptional activity of AR. Since Pin1 expression positively correlates with tumor grade, our results suggest that Pin1 can participate in this process by modulating AR function. PMID:22894932

  2. Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 stimulates the AP-site cleavage activity of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Natalia A; Anarbaev, Rashid O; Sukhanova, Maria; Vasil'eva, Inna A; Rechkunova, Nadejda I; Lavrik, Olga I

    2015-06-15

    The influence of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP1) on the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP)-site cleavage activity of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1) and interaction of PARP1 and TDP1 were studied. The efficiency of single or clustered AP-site hydrolysis catalysed by TDP1 was estimated. It was shown that the efficiency of AP-site cleavage increases in the presence of an additional AP-site in the opposite DNA strand depending on its position. PARP1 stimulates TDP1; the stimulation effect was abolished in the presence of NAD(+). The interaction of these two proteins was characterized quantitatively by measuring the dissociation constant for the TDP1-PARP1 complex using fluorescently-labelled proteins. The distance between the N-termini of the proteins within the complex was estimated using FRET. The data obtained suggest that PARP1 and TDP1 bind in an antiparallel orientation; the N-terminus of the former protein interacts with the C-terminal domain of the latter. The functional significance of PARP1 and TDP1 interaction in the process of DNA repair was demonstrated for the first time.

  3. Triazine-benzimidazole hybrids: anticancer activity, DNA interaction and dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Singla, Prinka; Luxami, Vijay; Paul, Kamaldeep

    2015-04-15

    A new series of triazine-benzimidazole hybrids has been synthesized with different substitution of primary and secondary amines at one of the position of triazine in moderate to good yields. These compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory activities over 60 human tumor cell lines at one dose and five dose concentrations. Compounds 6b, 8 and 9 showed broad spectrum of antitumor activities with GI50 values of 9.79, 2.58 and 3.81μM, respectively. DNA binding studies also indicated strong interaction properties of these compounds. These synthesized compounds also showed inhibition of mammalian dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). Compound 6b was depicted as the most active member of DHFR inhibitor with IC50 value of 1.05μM. Molecular modelling studies were used to identify the stabilized interactions of Compound 6b within the active site of enzyme for DHFR.

  4. Experimental warming differentially affects microbial structure and activity in two contrasted moisture sites in a Sphagnum-dominated peatland.

    PubMed

    Delarue, Frédéric; Buttler, Alexandre; Bragazza, Luca; Grasset, Laurent; Jassey, Vincent E J; Gogo, Sébastien; Laggoun-Défarge, Fatima

    2015-04-01

    Several studies on the impact of climate warming have indicated that peat decomposition/mineralization will be enhanced. Most of these studies deal with the impact of experimental warming during summer when prevalent abiotic conditions are favorable to decomposition. Here, we investigated the effect of experimental air warming by open-top chambers (OTCs) on water-extractable organic matter (WEOM), microbial biomasses and enzymatic activities in two contrasted moisture sites named Bog and Fen sites, the latter considered as the wetter ones. While no or few changes in peat temperature and water content appeared under the overall effect of OTCs, we observed that air warming smoothed water content differences and led to a decrease in mean peat temperature at the warmed Bog sites. This thermal discrepancy between the two sites led to contrasting changes in microbial structure and activities: a rise in hydrolytic activity at the warmed Bog sites and a relative enhancement of bacterial biomass at the warmed Fen sites. These features were not associated with any change in WEOM properties namely carbon and sugar contents and aromaticity, suggesting that air warming did not trigger any shift in OM decomposition. Using various tools, we show that the use of single indicators of OM decomposition can lead to fallacious conclusions. Lastly, these patterns may change seasonally as a consequence of complex interactions between groundwater level and air warming, suggesting the need to improve our knowledge using a high time-resolution approach.

  5. The ClpP N-Terminus Coordinates Substrate Access with Protease Active Site Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, L.; Bohon, J; Chance, M; Licht, S

    2008-01-01

    Energy-dependent protein degradation machines, such as the Escherichia coli protease ClpAP, require regulated interactions between the ATPase component (ClpA) and the protease component (ClpP) for function. Recent studies indicate that the ClpP N-terminus is essential in these interactions, yet the dynamics of this region remain unclear. Here, we use synchrotron hydroxyl radical footprinting and kinetic studies to characterize functionally important conformational changes of the ClpP N-terminus. Footprinting experiments show that the ClpP N-terminus becomes more solvent-exposed upon interaction with ClpA. In the absence of ClpA, deletion of the ClpP N-terminus increases the initial degradation rate of large peptide substrates 5-15-fold. Unlike ClpAP, ClpP?N exhibits a distinct slow phase of product formation that is eliminated by the addition of hydroxylamine, suggesting that truncation of the N-terminus leads to stabilization of the acyl-enzyme intermediate. These results indicate that (1) the ClpP N-terminus acts as a 'gate' controlling substrate access to the active sites, (2) binding of ClpA opens this 'gate', allowing substrate entry and formation of the acyl-enzyme intermediate, and (3) closing of the N-terminal 'gate' stimulates acyl-enzyme hydrolysis.

  6. Catalytic and Structural Role of a Conserved Active Site Histidine in Berberine Bridge Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Berberine bridge enzyme (BBE) is a paradigm for the class of bicovalently flavinylated oxidases, which catalyzes the oxidative cyclization of (S)-reticuline to (S)-scoulerine. His174 was identified as an important active site residue because of its role in the stabilization of the reduced state of the flavin cofactor. It is also strictly conserved in the family of BBE-like oxidases. Here, we present a detailed biochemical and structural characterization of a His174Ala variant supporting its importance during catalysis and for the structural organization of the active site. Substantial changes in all kinetic parameters and a decrease in midpoint potential were observed for the BBE His174Ala variant protein. Moreover, the crystal structure of the BBE His174Ala variant showed significant structural rearrangements compared to wild-type enzyme. On the basis of our findings, we propose that His174 is part of a hydrogen bonding network that stabilizes the negative charge at the N1–C2=O locus via interaction with the hydroxyl group at C2′ of the ribityl side chain of the flavin cofactor. Hence, replacement of this residue with alanine reduces the stabilizing effect for the transiently formed negative charge and results in drastically decreased kinetic parameters as well as a lower midpoint redox potential. PMID:22757961

  7. QM/MM Analysis of Cellulase Active Sites and Actions of the Enzymes on Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Saharay, Moumita; Guo, Hao-Bo; Smith, Jeremy C; Guo, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradation of cellulosic biomass requires the actions of three types of secreted enzymes; endoglucanase (EC 3.2.1.4), cellobiohydrolase or exoglucanase (EC 3.2.1.91), and -glucosidase (EC 4.2.1.21). These enzymes act synergistically to hydrolyse the -1,4 bonds of cellulose and converts it into simple sugar. Hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond can occur either by net retention or by inversion of anomeric configuration at the anomeric center. QM/MM simulations are useful tools to study the energetics of the reactions and analyze the active-site structures at different states of the catalysis, including the formation of unstable transition states. Here, a brief description of previous work on glycoside hydrolases is first given. The results of the QM/MM potential energy and free energy simulations corresponding to glycosylation and deglycosylation processes are then provided for two retaining endoglucanases, Cel12A and Cel5A. The active-site structural features are analyzed based on the QM/MM results. The role of different residues and hydrogen bonding interactions during the catalysis and the importance of the sugar ring distortion are discussed for these two enzymes.

  8. Characterization of the Dielectric Constant in the Trichoderma reesei Cel7B Active Site.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiangfei; Wang, Yefei; Zhang, Shujun; Yan, Shihai; Li, Tong; Yao, Lishan

    2015-07-27

    An attempt is made to evaluate the dielectric constant of the Trichoderma reesei Cel7B active site. Through kinetic measurements, the pKa value of the catalytic acid E201 is determined. Mutations (away from E201) with net charge changes are introduced to perturb the E201 pKa. It is shown that the mutation with a +1 charge change (including G225R, G230R, and A335R) decreases the pKa of E201, whereas the mutation with a -1 charge change (including Q149E, A222D, G225D, and G230D) increases the pKa. This effect is consistent with the electrostatic interaction between the changed charge and the E201 side chain. The fitting of the experimental data yields an apparent dielectric constant of 25-80. Molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water molecules indicate that the high solvent accessibility of the active site contributes largely to the high dielectric constant. ONIOM calculations show that high dielectric constant benefits the catalysis through decreasing the energy of the transition state relative to that of the enzyme substrate complex.

  9. Computer-aided active-site-directed modeling of the Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and human thymidine kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkers, Gerd; Trumpp-Kallmeyer, Susanne; Gutbrod, Oliver; Krickl, Sabine; Fetzer, Jürgen; Keil, Günther M.

    1991-10-01

    Thymidine kinase (TK), which is induced by Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV1), plays a key role in the antiviral activity of guanine derivatives such as aciclovir (ACV). In contrast, ACV shows only low affinity to the corresponding host cell enzyme. In order to define the differences in substrate binding of the two enzymes on molecular level, models for the three-dimensional (3-D) structures of the active sites of HSV1-TK and human TK were developed. The reconstruction of the active sites started from primary and secondary structure analysis of various kinases. The results were validated to homologous enzymes with known 3-D structures. The models predict that both enzymes consist of a central core β-sheet structure, connected by loops and α-helices very similar to the overall structure of other nucleotide binding enzymes. The phosphate binding is made up of a highly conserved glycine-rich loop at the N-terminus of the proteins and a conserved region at the C-terminus. The thymidine recognition site was found about 100 amino acids downstream from the phosphate binding loop. The differing substrate specificity of human and HSV1-TK can be explained by amino-acid substitutions in the homologous regions. To achieve a better understanding of the structure of the active site and how the thymidine kinase proteins interact with their substrates, the corresponding complexes of thymidine and dihydroxypropoxyguanine (DHPG) with HSV1 and human TK were built. For the docking of the guanine derivative, the X-ray structure of Elongation Factor Tu (EF-Tu), co-crystallized with guanosine diphosphate, was taken as reference. Fitting of thymidine into the active sites was done with respect to similar interactions found in thymidylate kinase. To complement the analysis of the 3-D structures of the two kinases and the substrate enzyme interactions, site-directed mutagenesis of the thymidine recognition site of HSV1-TK has been undertaken, changing Asp162 in the thymidine recognition site

  10. Emerging activity in bilayered dispersions with wake-mediated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartnick, Jörg; Kaiser, Andreas; Löwen, Hartmut; Ivlev, Alexei V.

    2016-06-01

    In a bilayered system of particles with wake-mediated interactions, the action-reaction symmetry for the effective forces between particles of different layers is broken. Under quite general conditions we show that, if the interaction nonreciprocity exceeds a certain threshold, this creates an active dispersion of self-propelled clusters of Brownian particles. The emerging activity promotes unusual melting scenarios and an enormous diffusivity in the dense fluid. Our results are obtained by computer simulation and analytical theory and can be verified in experiments with colloidal dispersions and complex plasmas.

  11. Nuclear Site Security in the Event of Terrorist Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M.L.; Sims, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper, presented as a poster, identifies why ballistic protection should now be considered at nuclear sites to counter terrorist threats. A proven and flexible form of multi purpose protection is described in detail with identification of trial results that show its suitability for this role. (authors)

  12. Role of a cysteine residue in the active site of ERK and the MAPKK family

    SciTech Connect

    Ohori, Makoto; Kinoshita, Takayoshi; Yoshimura, Seiji; Warizaya, Masaichi; Nakajima, Hidenori . E-mail: hidenori.nakajima@jp.astellas.com; Miyake, Hiroshi

    2007-02-16

    Kinases of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, including extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), represent likely targets for pharmacological intervention in proliferative diseases. Here, we report that FR148083 inhibits ERK2 enzyme activity and TGF{beta}-induced AP-1-dependent luciferase expression with respective IC{sub 50} values of 0.08 and 0.05 {mu}M. FR265083 (1'-2' dihydro form) and FR263574 (1'-2' and 7'-8' tetrahydro form) exhibited 5.5-fold less and no activity, respectively, indicating that both the {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated ketone and the conformation of the lactone ring contribute to this inhibitory activity. The X-ray crystal structure of the ERK2/FR148083 complex revealed that the compound binds to the ATP binding site of ERK2, involving a covalent bond to S{gamma} of ERK2 Cys166, hydrogen bonds with the backbone NH of Met108, N{zeta} of Lys114, backbone C=O of Ser153, N{delta}2 of Asn154, and hydrophobic interactions with the side chains of Ile31, Val39, Ala52, and Leu156. The covalent bond motif in the ERK2/FR148083 complex assures that the inhibitor has high activity for ERK2 and no activity for other MAPKs such as JNK1 and p38MAPK{alpha}/{beta}/{gamma}/{delta} which have leucine residues at the site corresponding to Cys166 in ERK2. On the other hand, MEK1 and MKK7, kinases of the MAPKK family which also can be inhibited by FR148083, contain a cysteine residue corresponding to Cys166 of ERK2. The covalent binding to the common cysteine residue in the ATP-binding site is therefore likely to play a crucial role in the inhibitory activity for these MAP kinases. These findings on the molecular recognition mechanisms of FR148083 for kinases with Cys166 should provide a novel strategy for the pharmacological intervention of MAPK cascades.

  13. CTnDOT Integrase Interactions with Attachment Site DNA and Control of Directionality of the Recombination Reaction▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Margaret M.; DiChiara, Jeanne M.; Yoneji, Sumiko; Gardner, Jeffrey F.

    2010-01-01

    IntDOT is a tyrosine recombinase encoded by the conjugative transposon CTnDOT. The core binding (CB) and catalytic (CAT) domains of IntDOT interact with core-type sites adjacent to the regions of strand exchange, while the N-terminal arm binding (N) domain interacts with arm-type sites distal to the core. Previous footprinting experiments identified five arm-type sites, but how the arm-type sites participate in the integration and excision of CTnDOT was not known. In vitro integration assays with substrates containing arm-type site mutants demonstrated that attDOT sequences containing mutations in the L1 arm-type site or in the R1 and R2 or R1 and R2′ arm-type sites were dramatically defective in integration. Substrates containing mutations in the L1 and R1 arm-type sites showed a 10- to 20-fold decrease in detectable in vitro excision, but introduction of multiple arm-type site mutations in attR did not have an effect on the excision frequency. A sixth arm-type site, the R1′ site, was also identified and shown to be required for integration and important for efficient excision. These results suggest that intramolecular IntDOT interactions are required for integration, while the actions of accessory factors are more important for excision. Gel shift assays performed in the presence of core- and arm-type site DNAs showed that IntDOT affinity for the attDOT core was enhanced when IntDOT was simultaneously bound to arm-type site DNA. PMID:20511494

  14. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  15. Target selectivity of vertebrate notch proteins. Collaboration between discrete domains and CSL-binding site architecture determines activation probability.

    PubMed

    Ong, Chin-Tong; Cheng, Hui-Teng; Chang, Li-Wei; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Stormo, Gary D; Kopan, Raphael

    2006-02-24

    All four mammalian Notch proteins interact with a single DNA-binding protein (RBP-jkappa), yet they are not equivalent in activating target genes. Parallel assays of three Notch-responsive promoters in several cell lines revealed that relative activation strength is dependent on protein module and promoter context more than the cellular context. Each Notch protein reads binding site orientation and distribution on the promoter differently; Notch1 performs extremely well on paired sites, and Notch3 prefers single sites in conjunction with a proximal zinc finger transcription factor. Although head-head sites can elicit a Notch response on their own, use of CBS (CSL binding site) in tail-tail orientation is context-dependent. Bias for specific DNA elements is achieved by interplay between the N-terminal RAM (RBP-jkappa-associated molecule/ankyrin region), which interprets CBS proximity and orientation, and the C-terminal transactivation domain that interacts specifically with the transcription machinery or nearby factors. To confirm the prediction that modular design underscores the evolution of functional divergence between Notch proteins, we generated a synthetic Notch protein (Notch1 ankyrin with Notch3 transactivation domain) that displayed superior signaling strength on the hes5 promoter. Consistent with the prediction that "preferred" targets (Hes1) should respond faster and at lower Notch concentration than other targets, we showed that Hes5-GFP was extinguished fast and recovered slowly, whereas Hes1-GFP was inhibited late and recovered quickly after a pulse of DAPT in metanephroi cultures.

  16. Revealing the nature of the active site on the carbon catalyst for C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, XiaoYing; Li, Bo; Su, Dangsheng

    2014-09-28

    A reactivity descriptor for the C-H bond activation on the nanostructured carbon catalyst is proposed. Furthermore the calculations reveal that the single ketone group can be an active site in ODH reaction.

  17. Cellular Active N-Hydroxyurea FEN1 Inhibitors Block Substrate Entry to the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Exell, Jack C.; Thompson, Mark J.; Finger, L. David; Shaw, Steven J.; Debreczeni, Judit; Ward, Thomas A.; McWhirter, Claire; Siöberg, Catrine L. B.; Martinez Molina, Daniel; Mark Abbott, W.; Jones, Clifford D.; Nissink, J. Willem M.; Durant, Stephen T.; Grasby, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    The structure-specific nuclease human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) plays a key role in DNA replication and repair and may be of interest as an oncology target. We present the first crystal structure of inhibitor-bound hFEN1 and show a cyclic N-hydroxyurea bound in the active site coordinated to two magnesium ions. Three such compounds had similar IC50 values but differed subtly in mode of action. One had comparable affinity for protein and protein–substrate complex and prevented reaction by binding to active site catalytic metal ions, blocking the unpairing of substrate DNA necessary for reaction. Other compounds were more competitive with substrate. Cellular thermal shift data showed engagement of both inhibitor types with hFEN1 in cells with activation of the DNA damage response evident upon treatment. However, cellular EC50s were significantly higher than in vitro inhibition constants and the implications of this for exploitation of hFEN1 as a drug target are discussed. PMID:27526030

  18. Nuclear Protein Sam68 Interacts with the Enterovirus 71 Internal Ribosome Entry Site and Positively Regulates Viral Protein Translation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Song, Lei; Cong, Haolong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71) recruits various cellular factors to assist in the replication and translation of its genome. Identification of the host factors involved in the EV71 life cycle not only will enable a better understanding of the infection mechanism but also has the potential to be of use in the development of antiviral therapeutics. In this study, we demonstrated that the cellular factor 68-kDa Src-associated protein in mitosis (Sam68) acts as an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) trans-acting factor (ITAF) that binds specifically to the EV71 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR). Interaction sites in both the viral IRES (stem-loops IV and V) and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K homology (KH) domain of Sam68 protein were further mapped using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and biotin RNA pulldown assay. More importantly, dual-luciferase (firefly) reporter analysis suggested that overexpression of Sam68 positively regulated IRES-dependent translation of virus proteins. In contrast, both IRES activity and viral protein translation significantly decreased in Sam68 knockdown cells compared with the negative-control cells treated with short hairpin RNA (shRNA). However, downregulation of Sam68 did not have a significant inhibitory effect on the accumulation of the EV71 genome. Moreover, Sam68 was redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and interacts with cellular factors, such as poly(rC)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), during EV71 infection. The cytoplasmic relocalization of Sam68 in EV71-infected cells may be involved in the enhancement of EV71 IRES-mediated translation. Since Sam68 is known to be a RNA-binding protein, these results provide direct evidence that Sam68 is a novel ITAF that interacts with EV71 IRES and positively regulates viral protein translation. IMPORTANCE The nuclear protein Sam68 is found as an additional new host factor that interacts with the EV71 IRES during infection

  19. Spectroscopic Evidence for Room Temperature Interaction of Molecular Oxygen with Cobalt Porphyrin Linker Sites within a Metal-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Lahanas, Nicole; Kucheryavy, Pavel; Lockard, Jenny V

    2016-10-17

    Metalloporphyrin-based metal-organic frameworks offer a promising platform for developing solid-state porous materials with accessible, coordinatively unsaturated metal sites. Probing small-molecule interactions at the metalloporphyrin sites within these materials on a molecular level under ambient conditions is crucial for both understanding and ultimately harnessing this functionality for potential catalytic purposes. Co-PCN-222, a metal-organic framework based on cobalt(II) porphyrin linkers. is investigated using in situ UV-vis diffuse-reflectance and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Spectroscopic evidence for the axial interaction of diatomic oxygen with the framework's open metalloporphyrin sites at room temperature is presented and discussed.

  20. DNA interaction of europium(III) complex containing 2,2'-bipyridine and its antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Jahani, Shohreh; Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of native fish salmon DNA (FS-DNA) with [Eu(bpy)3Cl2(H2O)]Cl, where bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, is studied at physiological pH in Tris-HCl buffer by spectroscopic methods, viscometric techniques as well as circular dichroism (CD). These experiments reveal that Eu(III) complex has interaction with FS-DNA. Moreover, binding constant and binding site size have been determined. The value of Kb has been defined 2.46 ± .02 × 10(5) M(-1). The thermodynamic parameters are calculated by Van't Hoff equation, the results show that the interaction of the complex with FS-DNA is an entropically driven phenomenon. CD spectroscopy followed by viscosity as well as fluorescence and UV--Vis measurements indicate that the complex interacts with FS-DNA via groove binding mode. Also, the synthesized Eu(III) complex has been screened for antimicrobial activities.

  1. Head and rod 1 interactions in vimentin: identification of contact sites, structure, and changes with phosphorylation using site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Atya; Hess, John F; Budamagunta, Madhu S; FitzGerald, Paul G; Voss, John C

    2009-03-13

    We have used site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to identify residues 17 and 137 as sites of interaction between the head domain and rod domain 1A of the intermediate filament protein vimentin. This interaction was maximal when compared with the spin labels placed at up- and downstream positions in both head and rod regions, indicating that residues 17 and 137 were the closest point of interaction in this region. SDSL EPR characterization of residues 120-145, which includes the site of head contact with rod 1A, reveals that this region exhibits the heptad repeat pattern indicative of alpha-helical coiled-coil structure, but that this heptad repeat pattern begins to decay near residue 139, suggesting a transition out of coiled-coil structure. By monitoring the spectra of spin labels placed at the 17 and 137 residues during in vitro assembly, we show that 17-137 interaction occurs early in the assembly process. We also explored the effect of phosphorylation on the 17-137 interaction and found that phosphorylation-induced changes affected the head-head interaction (17-17) in the dimer, without significantly influencing the rod-rod (137-137) and head-rod (17-137) interactions in the dimer. These data provide the first direct evidence for, and location of, head-rod interactions in assembled intermediate filaments, as well as direct evidence of coiled-coil structure in rod 1A. Finally, the data identify changes in the structure in this region following in vitro phosphorylation.

  2. Atomistic characterization of the active-site solvation dynamics of a model photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel, Tim B.; Kjær, Kasper S.; Hartsock, Robert W.; Dohn, Asmus O.; Harlang, Tobias; Chollet, Matthieu; Christensen, Morten; Gawelda, Wojciech; Henriksen, Niels E.; Kim, Jong Goo; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Kim, Jeongho; Lemke, Henrik; Sun, Zheng; Sundström, Villy; Zhang, Wenkai; Zhu, Diling; Møller, Klaus B.; Nielsen, Martin M.; Gaffney, Kelly J.

    2016-11-01

    The interactions between the reactive excited state of molecular photocatalysts and surrounding solvent dictate reaction mechanisms and pathways, but are not readily accessible to conventional optical spectroscopic techniques. Here we report an investigation of the structural and solvation dynamics following excitation of a model photocatalytic molecular system [Ir2(dimen)4]2+, where dimen is para-diisocyanomenthane. The time-dependent structural changes in this model photocatalyst, as well as the changes in the solvation shell structure, have been measured with ultrafast diffuse X-ray scattering and simulated with Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics. Both methods provide direct access to the solute-solvent pair distribution function, enabling the solvation dynamics around the catalytically active iridium sites to be robustly characterized. Our results provide evidence for the coordination of the iridium atoms by the acetonitrile solvent and demonstrate the viability of using diffuse X-ray scattering at free-electron laser sources for studying the dynamics of photocatalysis.

  3. Simulation analysis of formycin 5?-monophosphate analog substrates in the ricin A-chain active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Mark A.; Scovill, John P.; Hack, Dallas C.

    1995-06-01

    Ricin is an RNA N-glycosidase that hydrolyzes a single adenine base from a conserved loop of 28S ribosomal RNA, thus inactivating protein synthesis. Molecular-dynamics simulation methods are used to analyze the structural interactions and thermodynamics that govern the binding of formycin 5'-monophosphate (FMP) and several of its analogs to the active site of ricin A-chain. Simulations are carried out initiated from the X-ray crystal structure of the ricin-FMP complex with the ligand modeled as a dianion, monoanion and zwitterion. Relative changes in binding free energies are estimated for FMP analogs constructed from amino substitutions at the 2- and 2'-positions, and from hydroxyl substitution at the 2'-position.

  4. Active Layer and Moisture Measurements for Intensive Site 0 and 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-04-17

    These are measurements of Active Layer Thickness collected along several lines beginning in September, 2011 to the present. The data were collected at several time periods along the Site0 L2 Line, the Site1 AB Line, and an ERT Monitoring Line near Area A in Site1.

  5. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  6. Transient Protein-Protein Interaction of the SH3-Peptide Complex via Closely Located Multiple Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Seungsoo; Kim, Dongsup

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play an essential role in cellular processes. Certain proteins form stable complexes with their partner proteins, whereas others function by forming transient complexes. The conventional protein-protein interaction model describes an interaction between two proteins under the assumption that a protein binds to its partner protein through a single binding site. In this study, we improved the conventional interaction model by developing a Multiple-Site (MS) model in which a protein binds to its partner protein through closely located multiple binding sites on a surface of the partner protein by transiently docking at each binding site with individual binding free energies. To test this model, we used the protein-protein interaction mediated by Src homology 3 (SH3) domains. SH3 domains recognize their partners via a weak, transient interaction and are therefore promiscuous in nature. Because the MS model requires large amounts of data compared with the conventional interaction model, we used experimental data from the positionally addressable syntheses of peptides on cellulose membranes (SPOT-synthesis) technique. From the analysis of the experimental data, individual binding free energies for each binding site of peptides were extracted. A comparison of the individual binding free energies from the analysis with those from atomistic force fields gave a correlation coefficient of 0.66. Furthermore, application of the MS model to 10 SH3 domains lowers the prediction error by up to 9% compared with the conventional interaction model. This improvement in prediction originates from a more realistic description of complex formation than the conventional interaction model. The results suggested that, in many cases, SH3 domains increased the protein complex population through multiple binding sites of their partner proteins. Our study indicates that the consideration of general complex formation is important for the accurate description of

  7. An intron element modulating 5' splice site selection in the hnRNP A1 pre-mRNA interacts with hnRNP A1.

    PubMed Central

    Chabot, B; Blanchette, M; Lapierre, I; La Branche, H

    1997-01-01

    The hnRNP A1 pre-mRNA is alternatively spliced to yield the A1 and A1b mRNAs, which encode proteins differing in their ability to modulate 5' splice site selection. Sequencing a genomic portion of the murine A1 gene revealed that the intron separating exon 7 and the alternative exon 7B is highly conserved between mouse and human. In vitro splicing assays indicate that a conserved element (CE1) from the central portion of the intron shifts selection toward the distal donor site when positioned in between the 5' splice sites of exon 7 and 7B. In vivo, the CE1 element promotes exon 7B skipping. A 17-nucleotide sequence within CE1 (CE1a) is sufficient to activate the distal 5' splice site. RNase T1 protection/immunoprecipitation assays indicate that hnRNP A1 binds to CE1a, which contains the sequence UAGAGU, a close match to the reported optimal A1 binding site, UAGGGU. Replacing CE1a by different oligonucleotides carrying the sequence UAGAGU or UAGGGU maintains the preference for the distal 5' splice site. In contrast, mutations in the AUGAGU sequence activate the proximal 5' splice site. In support of a direct role of the A1-CE1 interaction in 5'-splice-site selection, we observed that the amplitude of the shift correlates with the efficiency of A1 binding. Whereas addition of SR proteins abrogates the effect of CE1, the presence of CE1 does not modify U1 snRNP binding to competing 5' splice sites, as judged by oligonucleotide-targeted RNase H protection assays. Our results suggest that hnRNP A1 modulates splice site selection on its own pre-mRNA without changing the binding of U1 snRNP to competing 5' splice sites. PMID:9121425

  8. Are nest sites actively chosen? Testing a common assumption for three non-resource limited birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, A. E.; Elliot, S. L.; Hart, A. G.

    2009-09-01

    Many widely-accepted ecological concepts are simplified assumptions about complex situations that remain largely untested. One example is the assumption that nest-building species choose nest sites actively when they are not resource limited. This assumption has seen little direct empirical testing: most studies on nest-site selection simply assume that sites are chosen actively (and seek explanations for such behaviour) without considering that sites may be selected randomly. We used 15 years of data from a nestbox scheme in the UK to test the assumption of active nest-site choice in three cavity-nesting bird species that differ in breeding and migratory strategy: blue tit ( Cyanistes caeruleus), great tit ( Parus major) and pied flycatcher ( Ficedula hypoleuca). Nest-site selection was non-random (implying active nest-site choice) for blue and great tits, but not for pied flycatchers. We also considered the relative importance of year-specific and site-specific factors in determining occupation of nest sites. Site-specific factors were more important than year-specific factors for the tit species, while the reverse was true for pied flycatchers. Our results show that nest-site selection, in birds at least, is not always the result of active choice, such that choice should not be assumed automatically in studies of nesting behaviour. We use this example to highlight the need to test key ecological assumptions empirically, and the importance of doing so across taxa rather than for single "model" species.

  9. Site-specific DOTA/europium-labeling of recombinant human relaxin-3 for receptor-ligand interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Jie; Luo, Xiao; Liu, Ya-Li; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Wade, John D; Bathgate, Ross A D; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2012-08-01

    Relaxin-3 (also known as INSL7) is a recently identified neuropeptide belonging to the insulin/relaxin superfamily. It has putative roles in the regulation of stress responses, food intake, and reproduction by activation of its cognate G-protein-coupled receptor RXFP3. It also binds and activates the relaxin family peptide receptors RXFP1 and RXFP4 in vitro. To obtain a europium-labeled relaxin-3 as tracer for studying the interaction of these receptors with various ligands, in the present work we propose a novel site-specific labeling strategy for the recombinant human relaxin-3 that has been previously prepared in our laboratory. First, the N-terminal 6 × His-tag of the single-chain relaxin-3 precursor was removed by Aeromonas aminopeptidase and all of the primary amines of the resultant peptide were reversibly blocked by citroconic anhydride. Second, the A-chain N-terminus of the blocked peptide was released by endoproteinase Asp-N cleavage that removed the linker peptide between the B- and A-chains. Third, an alkyne moiety was introduced to the newly released A-chain N-terminus by reaction with the highly active primary amine-specific N-hydroxysuccinimide ester. Fourth, after removal of the reversible blockage under mild acidic condition, europium-loaded DOTA with an azide moiety was introduced to the two-chain relaxin-3 carrying the alkyne moiety through click chemistry. Using this site-specific labeling strategy, homogeneous monoeuropium-labeled human relaxin-3 could be obtained with good overall yield. In contrast, conventional random labeling resulted in a complex mixture that was poorly resolved because human relaxin-3 has four primary amine moieties that all react with the modification reagent. Both saturation and competition binding assays demonstrated that the DOTA/Eu(3+)-labeled relaxin-3 retained high binding affinity for human RXFP3, RXFP4, and RXFP1 and was therefore a suitable non-radioactive and stable tracer to study the interaction of various

  10. Synergic Effect of Active Sites in Zinc-Modified ZSM-5 Zeolites as Revealed by High-Field Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guodong; Wang, Qiang; Xu, Jun; Trébosc, Julien; Lafon, Olivier; Wang, Chao; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Deng, Feng

    2016-12-19

    Understanding the nature of active sites in metal-supported catalysts is of great importance towards establishing their structure-property relationships. The outstanding catalytic performance of metal-supported catalysts is frequently ascribed to the synergic effect of different active sites, which is however not well spectroscopically characterized. Herein, we report the direct detection of surface Zn species and (1) H-(67) Zn internuclear interaction between Zn(2+) ions and Brønsted acid sites on Zn-modified ZSM-5 zeolites by high-field solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The observed promotion of C-H bond activation of methane is rationalized by the enhanced Brønsted acidity generated by synergic effects arising from the spatial proximity/interaction between Zn(2+) ions and Brønsted acidic protons. The concentration of synergic active sites is determined by (1) H-(67) Zn double-resonance solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

  11. Copper(I)-α-synuclein interaction: structural description of two independent and competing metal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Camponeschi, Francesca; Valensin, Daniela; Tessari, Isabella; Bubacco, Luigi; Dell'Acqua, Simone; Casella, Luigi; Monzani, Enrico; Gaggelli, Elena; Valensin, Gianni

    2013-02-04

    The aggregation of α-synuclein (αS) is a critical step in the etiology of Parkinson's disease. Metal ions such as copper and iron have been shown to bind αS, enhancing its fibrillation rate in vitro. αS is also susceptible to copper-catalyzed oxidation that involves the reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I) and the conversion of O(2) into reactive oxygen species. The mechanism of the reaction is highly selective and site-specific and involves interactions of the protein with both oxidation states of the copper ion. The reaction can induce oxidative modification of the protein, which generally leads to extensive protein oligomerization and precipitation. Cu(II) binding to αS has been extensively characterized, indicating the N terminus and His-50 as binding donor residues. In this study, we have investigated αS-Cu(I) interaction by means of NMR and circular dichroism analysis on the full-length protein (αS(1-140)) and on two, designed ad hoc, model peptides: αS(1-15) and αS(113-130). In order to identify and characterize the metal binding environment in full-length αS, in addition to Cu(I), we have also used Ag(I) as a probe for Cu(I) binding. Two distinct Cu(I)/Ag(I) binding domains with comparable affinities have been identified. The structural rearrangements induced by the metal ions and the metal coordination spheres of both sites have been extensively characterized.

  12. Contribution of active-site glutamine to rate enhancement in ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Boudreaux, David; Chaney, Joseph; Maiti, Tushar K.; Das, Chittaranjan

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases (UCHs) are cysteine proteases featuring a classical cysteine-histidine-aspartate catalytic triad, also a highly conserved glutamine thought to be a part of the oxyanion hole. However, the contribution of this side chain to the catalysis by UCH enzymes is not known. Herein, we demonstrate that the glutamine side chain contributes to rate enhancement in UCHL1, UCHL3 and UCHL5. Mutation of the glutamine to alanine in these enzymes impairs the catalytic efficiency mainly due to a 16 to 30-fold reduction in kcat, which is consistent with a loss of approximately 2 kcal/mol in transition-state stabilization. However, the contribution to transition-state stabilization observed here is rather modest for the side chain’s role in oxyanion stabilization. Interestingly, we discovered that the carbonyl oxygen of this side chain is engaged in a C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding contact with the CεH group of the catalytic histidine. Upon further analysis, we found that this interaction is a common active-site structural feature in most cysteine proteases, including papain, belonging to families with the QCH(N/D) type of active-site configuration. It is possible that removal of the glutamine side chain might have abolished the C—H•••O interaction, which typically accounts for 2 kcal/mol of stabilization, leading to the effect on catalysis observed here. Additional studies performed on UCHL3 by mutating the glutamine to glutamate (strong C—H•••O acceptor but oxyanion destabilizer) and to lysine (strong oxyanion stabilizer but lacking C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding property) suggest that the C—H•••O hydrogen bond could contribute to catalysis. PMID:22284438

  13. Modification and activation of Ras proteins by electrophilic prostanoids with different structure are site-selective.

    PubMed

    Renedo, Marta; Gayarre, Javier; García-Domínguez, Carlota A; Pérez-Rodríguez, Andrea; Prieto, Alicia; Cañada, F Javier; Rojas, José M; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2007-06-05

    Cyclopentenone prostanoids (cyP) arise as important modulators of inflammation and cell proliferation. Although their physiological significance has not been fully elucidated, their potent biological effects have spurred their study as leads for the development of therapeutic agents. A key determinant of cyP action is their ability to bind to thiol groups in proteins or in glutathione through Michael addition. Even though several protein targets for cyP addition have been identified, little is known about the structural determinants from the protein or the cyP that drive this modification. The results herein presented provide the first evidence that cyP with different structures target distinct thiol sites in a protein molecule, namely, H-Ras. Whereas 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) and Delta12-PGJ2 preferentially target the C-terminal region containing cysteines 181 and 184, PGA1 and 8-iso-PGA1 bind mainly to cysteine 118, located in the GTP-binding motif. The biological counterparts of this specificity are the site-selective modification and activation of H-Ras in cells and the differential interaction of cyP with H, N, and K-Ras proteins. Cysteine 184 is unique to H-Ras, whereas cysteine 118 is present in the three Ras homologues. Consistent with this, PGA1 binds to and activates H-, N-, and K-Ras, thus differing from the preferential interaction of 15d-PGJ2 with H-Ras. These results put forward the possibility of influencing the selectivity of cyP-protein addition by modifying cyP structure. Furthermore, they may open new avenues for the development of cyP-based drugs.

  14. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  15. Lamellipodial actin mechanically links myosin activity with adhesion site formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannone, Gregory; Dubin-Thaler, Benjamin; Rossier, Olivier; Cai, Yunfei; Chaga, Oleg; Jiang, Guoying; Beaver, William; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Freund, Yoav; Borisy, Gary; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell motility proceeds by cycles of edge protrusion, adhesion and retraction. Whether these functions are coordinated by biochemical or biomechanical processes is unknown. We find that myosin II pulls the rear of the lamellipodial actin network, causing upward bending, edge retraction and initiation of new adhesion sites. The network then separates from the edge and condenses over the myosin. Protrusion resumes as lamellipodial actin regenerates from the front and extends rearward until it reaches newly assembled myosin, initiating the next cycle. Upward bending, observed by evanescence and electron microscopy, results in ruffle formation when adhesion strength is low. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy shows that the regenerating lamellipodium forms a cohesive, separable layer of actin above the lamellum. Thus, actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process. PMID:17289574

  16. Nuclear quadrupole interaction of111Cd on type-1 Cu-sites in blue copper proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tröger, W.; Butz, T.; Danielsen, E.; Bauer, R.; Thoenes, U.; Messerschmidt, A.; Huber, R.; Canters, G. W.; den Blaauwen, T.

    1993-03-01

    The nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) of111Cd substituted for Cu(II) on type-1 sites in blue copper proteins is characterized by high values of ω0 in the region of 300 Mrad/s, close to that for the catalytic zinc site in alcohol dehydrogenase. Type-1 Cu has usually two sulfur ligands and two nitrogen ligands and in some cases an oxygen ligand in either a distorted tetrahedral geometry or in a trigonal bipyramidal geometry. The near tetrahedral arrangement together with the ligand sphere containing the same number of sulfur ligands explains the value of ω0 in the blue copper proteins. The present work determined the partial NQI for methionine using the known structure of azurin. This value was then used in the angular overlap model to calculate the NQI for ascorbate oxidase the structure of which is also known and gave good agreement with experiment. NQI data for laccase and stellacyanin the structures of which are unknown, are also given.

  17. Two RNA-binding sites in plant fibrillarin provide interactions with various RNA substrates

    PubMed Central

    Rakitina, D. V.; Taliansky, Michael; Brown, J. W. S.; Kalinina, N. O.

    2011-01-01

    Fibrillarin, one of the major proteins of the nucleolus, plays several essential roles in ribosome biogenesis including pre-rRNA processing and 2′-O-ribose methylation of rRNA and snRNAs. Recently, it has been shown that fibrillarin plays a role in virus infections and is associated with viral RNPs. Here, we demonstrate the ability of recombinant fibrillarin 2 from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtFib2) to interact with RNAs of different lengths and types including rRNA, snoRNA, snRNA, siRNA and viral RNAs in vitro. Our data also indicate that AtFib2 possesses two RNA-binding sites in the central (138–179 amino acids) and C-terminal (225–281 amino acids) parts of the protein, respectively. The conserved GCVYAVEF octamer does not bind RNA directly as suggested earlier, but may assist with the proper folding of the central RNA-binding site. PMID:21785141

  18. The interaction site for tamoxifen aziridine with the bovine estrogen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ratajczak, T.; Wilkinson, S.P.; Brockway, M.J.; Haehnel, R.M.; Moritz, R.L.; Begg, G.S.; Simpson, R.J.

    1989-08-15

    Calf uterine estrogen receptor was covalently labeled with ({sup 3}H)tamoxifen aziridine during affinity chromatography purification. After carboxymethylation, affinity labeled receptor was digested with trypsin under limit conditions and the labeled peptides were fractionated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography into one major and two minor components. Sequence analysis of the dominant labeled fragment indicated the facile cleavage of label during Edman degradation but identified two peptides, both derived from the extreme carboxyl terminus of the steroid-binding domain. The 17 residues of one peptide were fully conserved in all estrogen receptors. This fragment contained five nucleophilic amino acids and was considered as the more favored interaction site for tamoxifen aziridine. A corresponding region of the glucocorticoid receptor has recently been identified as one of three major contact sites for glucocorticoids. A comparison of amino acid physical characteristics in the hormone-binding domains of human estrogen and glucocorticoid receptors demonstrated an excellent structural correlation between the two regions and delineated elements in the estrogen receptor which may be directly involved in estradiol binding.

  19. Science-Policy Interactions in MPA Site Selection in the Dutch Part of the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haastrecht, Eline K.; Toonen, Hilde M.

    2011-04-01

    At the 7th conference of the parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD-COP7, Kuala Lumpur, 2004) it was agreed to establish a global network of marine and coastal protected areas by 2012. The defined objectives of this MPA-network are based on the ecosystem approach: to protect biodiversity and other ecological values, and to ensure sustainable use. The (inter)national policy guidelines state that the selection of MPAs should be based on scientific information and ecological criteria only. As a signatory to the Convention, the Netherlands is now faced with meeting this obligation, and the process of designating the first Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in the Dutch part of the North Sea is currently in progress. We focus on the science-policy interactions that are part of this Dutch MPA selection process. By taking a closer look at the contemporary site selection process as well as its historical background, we show that ecological, socio-economic and political considerations cannot always be easily separated. Uncertainty is high and the ultimate selection and delimitation of candidate sites rather seems to be the result of a balancing act between ecological, socio-economic and political interests, in which scientific and policy guiding procedures blend with ad-hoc political decision making, and with expert judgment in cases where data is lacking. As such, this paper presents an example of present-day environmental policy making in action.

  20. Using Unnatural Amino Acids to Probe the Energetics of Oxyanion Hole Hydrogen Bonds in the Ketosteroid Isomerase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds are ubiquitous in enzyme active sites, providing binding interactions and stabilizing charge rearrangements on substrate groups over the course of a reaction. But understanding the origin and magnitude of their catalytic contributions relative to hydrogen bonds made in aqueous solution remains difficult, in part because of complexities encountered in energetic interpretation of traditional site-directed mutagenesis experiments. It has been proposed for ketosteroid isomerase and other enzymes that active site hydrogen bonding groups provide energetic stabilization via “short, strong” or “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds that are formed due to matching of their pKa or proton affinity to that of the transition state. It has also been proposed that the ketosteroid isomerase and other enzyme active sites provide electrostatic environments that result in larger energetic responses (i.e., greater “sensitivity”) to ground-state to transition-state charge rearrangement, relative to aqueous solution, thereby providing catalysis relative to the corresponding reaction in water. To test these models, we substituted tyrosine with fluorotyrosines (F-Tyr’s) in the ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) oxyanion hole to systematically vary the proton affinity of an active site hydrogen bond donor while minimizing steric or structural effects. We found that a 40-fold increase in intrinsic F-Tyr acidity caused no significant change in activity for reactions with three different substrates. F-Tyr substitution did not change the solvent or primary kinetic isotope effect for proton abstraction, consistent with no change in mechanism arising from these substitutions. The observed shallow dependence of activity on the pKa of the substituted Tyr residues suggests that the KSI oxyanion hole does not provide catalysis by forming an energetically exceptional pKa-matched hydrogen bond. In addition, the shallow dependence provides no indication of an active site electrostatic

  1. Dynamic Kinetics of Nitrogen Cycle in Groundwater-Surface Water Interaction Zone at Hanford Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Liu, C.; Liu, Y.; Xu, F.; Yan, A.; Shi, L.; Zachara, J. M.; Gao, Y.; Qian, W.; Nelson, W.; Fredrickson, J.; Zhong, L.; Thompson, C.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen cycle carried out by microbes is an important geobiological process that has global implications for carbon and nitrogen cycling and climate change. This presentation describes a study of nitrogen cycle in groundwater-surface water interaction zone (GSIZ) at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Groundwater at Hanford sites has long been documented with nitrate contamination. Nearby Columbia River stage changes of up to 3 m every day because of daily discharge fluctuation from upstream Priest Rapids Dam; resulting an exchange of groundwater and surface water in a short time period. Yet, nitrogen cycle in the GSIZ at Hanford Site remains unclear. Column studies have been used to identify nitrogen metabolism pathways and investigate kinetics of nitrogen cycle in groundwater saturated zone, surface water saturated zone, and GSIZ. Functional gene and protein abundances were determined by qPCR and PRISM-SRM (high-pressure, high-resolution separations coupled with intelligent selection and multiplexing for sensitive selected reaction monitoring) to identify key enzymatic reactions and metabolic pathways of nitrogen cycle. The results showed that dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) competed with denitrification under anaerobic conditions, reducing 30% of NO3- to NH4+, a cation strongly retained on the sediments. As dissolved oxygen intruded the anaerobic zone with river water, NH4+ was oxidized to NO3-, increasing the mobility of NO3-. Multiplicative Monod models were established to describe nitrogen cycle in columns fed with O2 depleted synthetic groundwater and O2 saturated synthetic river water, respectively. The two models were then coupled to predict the dynamic kinetics of nitrogen cycle in GSIZ.

  2. Stimulation, Inhibition, or Stabilization of Na,K-ATPase Caused by Specific Lipid Interactions at Distinct Sites

    PubMed Central

    Habeck, Michael; Haviv, Haim; Katz, Adriana; Kapri-Pardes, Einat; Ayciriex, Sophie; Shevchenko, Andrej; Ogawa, Haruo; Toyoshima, Chikashi; Karlish, Steven J. D.

    2015-01-01

    The activity of membrane proteins such as Na,K-ATPase depends strongly on the surrounding lipid environment. Interactions can be annular, depending on the physical properties of the membrane, or specific with lipids bound in pockets between transmembrane domains. This paper describes three specific lipid-protein interactions using purified recombinant Na,K-ATPase. (a) Thermal stability of the Na,K-ATPase depends crucially on a specific interaction with 18:0/18:1 phosphatidylserine (1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine; SOPS) and cholesterol, which strongly amplifies stabilization. We show here that cholesterol associates with SOPS, FXYD1, and the α subunit between trans-membrane segments αTM8 and -10 to stabilize the protein. (b) Polyunsaturated neutral lipids stimulate Na,K-ATPase turnover by >60%. A screen of the lipid specificity showed that 18:0/20:4 and 18:0/22:6 phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) are the optimal phospholipids for this effect. (c) Saturated phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin, but not saturated phosphatidylserine or PE, inhibit Na,K-ATPase activity by 70–80%. This effect depends strongly on the presence of cholesterol. Analysis of the Na,K-ATPase activity and E1-E2 conformational transitions reveals the kinetic mechanisms of these effects. Both stimulatory and inhibitory lipids poise the conformational equilibrium toward E2, but their detailed mechanisms of action are different. PE accelerates the rate of E1 → E2P but does not affect E2(2K)ATP → E13NaATP, whereas sphingomyelin inhibits the rate of E2(2K)ATP → E13NaATP, with very little effect on E1 → E2P. We discuss these lipid effects in relation to recent crystal structures of Na,K-ATPase and propose that there are three separate sites for the specific lipid interactions, with potential physiological roles to regulate activity and stability of the pump. PMID:25533463

  3. Stimulation, inhibition, or stabilization of Na,K-ATPase caused by specific lipid interactions at distinct sites.

    PubMed

    Habeck, Michael; Haviv, Haim; Katz, Adriana; Kapri-Pardes, Einat; Ayciriex, Sophie; Shevchenko, Andrej; Ogawa, Haruo; Toyoshima, Chikashi; Karlish, Steven J D

    2015-02-20

    The activity of membrane proteins such as Na,K-ATPase depends strongly on the surrounding lipid environment. Interactions can be annular, depending on the physical properties of the membrane, or specific with lipids bound in pockets between transmembrane domains. This paper describes three specific lipid-protein interactions using purified recombinant Na,K-ATPase. (a) Thermal stability of the Na,K-ATPase depends crucially on a specific interaction with 18:0/18:1 phosphatidylserine (1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine; SOPS) and cholesterol, which strongly amplifies stabilization. We show here that cholesterol associates with SOPS, FXYD1, and the α subunit between trans-membrane segments αTM8 and -10 to stabilize the protein. (b) Polyunsaturated neutral lipids stimulate Na,K-ATPase turnover by >60%. A screen of the lipid specificity showed that 18:0/20:4 and 18:0/22:6 phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) are the optimal phospholipids for this effect. (c) Saturated phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin, but not saturated phosphatidylserine or PE, inhibit Na,K-ATPase activity by 70-80%. This effect depends strongly on the presence of cholesterol. Analysis of the Na,K-ATPase activity and E1-E2 conformational transitions reveals the kinetic mechanisms of these effects. Both stimulatory and inhibitory lipids poise the conformational equilibrium toward E2, but their detailed mechanisms of action are different. PE accelerates the rate of E1 → E2P but does not affect E2(2K)ATP → E13NaATP, whereas sphingomyelin inhibits the rate of E2(2K)ATP → E13NaATP, with very little effect on E1 → E2P. We discuss these lipid effects in relation to recent crystal structures of Na,K-ATPase and propose that there are three separate sites for the specific lipid interactions, with potential physiological roles to regulate activity and stability of the pump.

  4. Emergent ultra-long-range interactions between active particles in hybrid active-inactive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimel, Joshua P.; Aragones, Juan L.; Hu, Helen; Qureshi, Naser

    2016-04-01

    Particle-particle interactions determine the state of a system. Control over the range of such interactions as well as their magnitude has been an active area of research for decades due to the fundamental challenges it poses in science and technology. Very recently, effective interactions between active particles have gathered much attention as they can lead to out-of-equilibrium cooperative states such as flocking. Inspired by nature, where active living cells coexist with lifeless objects and structures, here we study the effective interactions that appear in systems composed of active and passive mixtures of colloids. Our systems are 2D colloidal monolayers composed primarily of passive (inactive) colloids, and a very small fraction of active (spinning) ferromagnetic colloids. We find an emergent ultra-long-range attractive interaction induced by the activity of the spinning particles and mediated by the elasticity of the passive medium. Interestingly, the appearance of such interaction depends on the spinning protocol and has a minimum actuation timescale below which no attraction is observed. Overall, these results clearly show that, in the presence of elastic components, active particles can interact across very long distances without any chemical modification of the environment. Such a mechanism might potentially be important for some biological systems and can be harnessed for newer developments in synthetic active soft materials.

  5. Active-Site Hydration and Water Diffusion in Cytochrome P450cam: A Highly Dynamic Process

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome Y

    2011-01-01

    Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (300 ns) are performed on both the apo- (i.e., camphor-free) and camphor-bound cytochrome P450cam (CYP101). Water diffusion into and out of the protein active site is observed without biased sampling methods. During the course of the molecular dynamics simulation, an average of 6.4 water molecules is observed in the camphor-binding site of the apo form, compared to zero water molecules in the binding site of the substrate-bound form, in agreement with the number of water molecules observed in crystal structures of the same species. However, as many as 12 water molecules can be present at a given time in the camphor-binding region of the active site in the case of apo-P450cam, revealing a highly dynamic process for hydration of the protein active site, with water molecules exchanging rapidly with the bulk solvent. Water molecules are also found to exchange locations frequently inside the active site, preferentially clustering in regions surrounding the water molecules observed in the crystal structure. Potential-of-mean-force calculations identify thermodynamically favored trans-protein pathways for the diffusion of water molecules between the protein active site and the bulk solvent. Binding of camphor in the active site modifies the free-energy landscape of P450cam channels toward favoring the diffusion of water molecules out of the protein active site.

  6. Hedgehog Pathway Antagonist 5E1 Binds Hedgehog at the Pseudo-active Site

    PubMed Central

    Maun, Henry R.; Wen, Xiaohui; Lingel, Andreas; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Lazarus, Robert A.; Scales, Suzie J.; Hymowitz, Sarah G.

    2010-01-01

    Proper hedgehog (Hh) signaling is crucial for embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Dysregulation of this pathway is associated with several types of cancer. The monoclonal antibody 5E1 is a Hh pathway inhibitor that has been extensively used to elucidate vertebrate Hh biology due to its ability to block binding of the three mammalian Hh homologs to the receptor, Patched1 (Ptc1). Here, we engineered a murine:human chimeric 5E1 (ch5E1) with similar Hh-binding properties to the original murine antibody. Using biochemical, biophysical, and x-ray crystallographic studies, we show that, like the regulatory receptors Cdon and Hedgehog-interacting protein (Hhip), ch5E1 binding to Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is enhanced by calcium ions. In the presence of calcium and zinc ions, the ch5E1 binding affinity increases 10–20-fold to tighter than 1 nm primarily because of a decrease in the dissociation rate. The co-crystal structure of Shh bound to the Fab fragment of ch5E1 reveals that 5E1 binds at the pseudo-active site groove of Shh with an epitope that largely overlaps with the binding site of its natural receptor antagonist Hhip. Unlike Hhip, the side chains of 5E1 do not directly coordinate the Zn2+ cation in the pseudo-active site, despite the modest zinc-dependent increase in 5E1 affinity for Shh. Furthermore, to our knowledge, the ch5E1 Fab-Shh complex represents the first structure of an inhibitor antibody bound to a metalloprotease fold. PMID:20504762

  7. Structural analysis of the active site geometry of N5-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M; Firestine, Steven M

    2008-12-16

    N(5)-Carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase (N(5)-CAIR synthetase) converts 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR), MgATP, and bicarbonate into N(5)-CAIR, MgADP, and P(i). The enzyme is required for de novo purine biosynthesis in microbes yet is not found in humans suggesting that it represents an ideal and unexplored target for antimicrobial drug design. Here we report the X-ray structures of N(5)-CAIR synthetase from Escherichia coli with either MgATP or MgADP/P(i) bound in the active site cleft. These structures, determined to 1.6-A resolution, provide detailed information regarding the active site geometry before and after ATP hydrolysis. In both structures, two magnesium ions are observed. Each of these is octahedrally coordinated, and the carboxylate side chain of Glu238 bridges them. For the structure of the MgADP/P(i) complex, crystals were grown in the presence of AIR and MgATP. No electron density was observed for AIR, and the electron density corresponding to the nucleotide clearly revealed the presence of ADP and P(i) rather than ATP. The bound P(i) shifts by approximately 3 A relative to the gamma-phosphoryl group of ATP and forms electrostatic interactions with the side chains of Arg242 and His244. Since the reaction mechanism of N(5)-CAIR synthetase is believed to proceed via a carboxyphosphate intermediate, we propose that the location of the inorganic phosphate represents the binding site for stabilization of this reactive species. Using the information derived from the two structures reported here, coupled with molecular modeling, we propose a catalytic mechanism for N(5)-CAIR synthetase.

  8. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine.

    PubMed

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-11-13

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO(2). We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O(2) and CO(2) bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO(2) defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg(2+) surrounded by three H(2)O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming.

  9. Interactive Marine Spatial Planning: Siting Tidal Energy Arrays around the Mull of Kintyre

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Karen A.; Janssen, Ron; Arciniegas, Gustavo; O'Higgins, Timothy G.; Eikelboom, Tessa; Wilding, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid development of the offshore renewable energy sector has led to an increased requirement for Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) and, increasingly, this is carried out in the context of the ‘ecosystem approach’ (EA) to management. We demonstrate a novel method to facilitate implementation of the EA. Using a real-time interactive mapping device (touch-table) and stakeholder workshops we gathered data and facilitated negotiation of spatial trade-offs at a potential site for tidal renewable energy off the Mull of Kintyre (Scotland). Conflicts between the interests of tidal energy developers and commercial and recreational users of the area were identified, and use preferences and concerns of stakeholders were highlighted. Social, cultural and spatial issues associated with conversion of common pool to private resource were also revealed. The method identified important gaps in existing spatial data and helped to fill these through interactive user inputs. The workshops developed a degree of consensus between conflicting users on the best areas for potential development suggesting that this approach should be adopted during MSP. PMID:22253865

  10. Predicting Protein-Protein Interaction Sites with a Novel Membership Based Fuzzy SVM Classifier.

    PubMed

    Sriwastava, Brijesh K; Basu, Subhadip; Maulik, Ujjwal

    2015-01-01

    Predicting residues that participate in protein-protein interactions (PPI) helps to identify, which amino acids are located at the interface. In this paper, we show that the performance of the classical support vector machine (SVM) algorithm can further be improved with the use of a custom-designed fuzzy membership function, for the partner-specific PPI interface prediction problem. We evaluated the performances of both classical SVM and fuzzy SVM (F-SVM) on the PPI databases of three different model proteomes of Homo sapiens, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces Cerevisiae and calculated the statistical significance of the developed F-SVM over classical SVM algorithm. We also compared our performance with the available state-of-the-art fuzzy methods in this domain and observed significant performance improvements. To predict interaction sites in protein complexes, local composition of amino acids together with their physico-chemical characteristics are used, where the F-SVM based prediction method exploits the membership function for each pair of sequence fragments. The average F-SVM performance (area under ROC curve) on the test samples in 10-fold cross validation experiment are measured as 77.07, 78.39, and 74.91 percent for the aforementioned organisms respectively. Performances on independent test sets are obtained as 72.09, 73.24 and 82.74 percent respectively. The software is available for free download from http://code.google.com/p/cmater-bioinfo.

  11. Interactive marine spatial planning: siting tidal energy arrays around the Mull of Kintyre.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Karen A; Janssen, Ron; Arciniegas, Gustavo; O'Higgins, Timothy G; Eikelboom, Tessa; Wilding, Thomas A

    2012-01-01

    The rapid development of the offshore renewable energy sector has led to an increased requirement for Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) and, increasingly, this is carried out in the context of the 'ecosystem approach' (EA) to management. We demonstrate a novel method to facilitate implementation of the EA. Using a real-time interactive mapping device (touch-table) and stakeholder workshops we gathered data and facilitated negotiation of spatial trade-offs at a potential site for tidal renewable energy off the Mull of Kintyre (Scotland). Conflicts between the interests of tidal energy developers and commercial and recreational users of the area were identified, and use preferences and concerns of stakeholders were highlighted. Social, cultural and spatial issues associated with conversion of common pool to private resource were also revealed. The method identified important gaps in existing spatial data and helped to fill these through interactive user inputs. The workshops developed a degree of consensus between conflicting users on the best areas for potential development suggesting that this approach should be adopted during MSP.

  12. Delineation of Polypharmacology across the Human Structural Kinome Using a Functional Site Interaction Fingerprint Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zheng; Xie, Li; Xie, Lei; Bourne, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted polypharmacology of kinases has emerged as a promising strategy to design efficient and safe therapeutics. Here, we perform a systematic study of kinase–ligand binding modes for the human structural kinome at scale (208 kinases, 1777 unique ligands, and their complexes) by integrating chemical genomics and structural genomics data and by introducing a functional site interaction fingerprint (Fs-IFP) method. New insights into kinase–ligand binding modes were obtained. We establish relationships between the features of binding modes, the ligands, and the binding pockets, respectively. We also drive the intrinsic binding specificity and which correlation with amino acid conservation. Third, we explore the landscape of the binding modes and highlight the regions of “selectivity pocket” and “selectivity entrance”. Finally, we demonstrate that Fs-IFP similarity is directly correlated to the experimentally determined profile. These improve our understanding of kinase–ligand interactions and contribute to the design of novel polypharmacological therapies targeting kinases. PMID:26929980

  13. Infant Smiling during Social Interaction: Arousal Modulation or Activation Indicator?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewy, Richard

    In a study of infant smiling, 20 mother-infant dyads were videotaped in normal face-to-face interaction when the infants were 9 and 14 weeks of age. Videotapes were used to determine which of two classes of smiling behavior models, either arousal modulation or activation indicator, was most supported by empirical data. Arousal modulation models…

  14. Learner-Interface Interaction for Technology-Enhanced Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinha, Neelu; Khreisat, Laila; Sharma, Kiron

    2009-01-01

    Neelu Sinha, Laila Khreisat, and Kiron Sharma describe how learner-interface interaction promotes active learning in computer science education. In a pilot study using technology that combines DyKnow software with a hardware platform of pen-enabled HP Tablet notebook computers, Sinha, Khreisat, and Sharma created dynamic learning environments by…

  15. Lectin Activation in Giardia lamblia by Host Protease: A Novel Host-Parasite Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Boaz; Ward, Honorine; Keusch, Gerald T.; Pereira, Miercio E. A.

    1986-04-01

    A lectin in Giardia lamblia was activated by secretions from the human duodenum, the environment where the parasite lives. Incubation of the secretions with trypsin inhibitors prevented the appearance of lectin activity, implicating proteases as the activating agent. Accordingly, lectin activation was also produced by crystalline trypsin and Pronase; other proteases tested were ineffective. When activated, the lectin agglutinated intestinal cells to which the parasite adheres in vivo. The lectin was most specific to mannose-6-phosphate and apparently was bound to the plasma membrane. Activation of a parasite lectin by a host protease represents a novel mechanism of hostparasite interaction and may contribute to the affinity of Giardia lamblia to the infection site.

  16. Identification of a site in the phosphocarrier protein, HPr, which influences its interactions with sugar permeases of the bacterial phosphotransferase system: kinetic analyses employing site-specific mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, S; Sutrina, S L; Wu, L F; Reizer, J; Schnetz, K; Rak, B; Saier, M H

    1996-01-01

    The permeases of the Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS), the sugar-specific enzymes II, are energized by sequential phosphoryl transfer from phosphoenolpyruvate to (i) enzyme I, (ii) the phosphocarrier protein HPr, (iii) the enzyme IIA domains of the permeases, and (iv) the enzyme IIBC domains of the permeases which transport and phosphorylate their sugar substrates. A number of site-specific mutants of HPr were examined by using kinetic approaches. Most of the mutations exerted minimal effects on the kinetic parameters characterizing reactions involving phosphoryl transfer from phospho-HPr to various sugars. However, when the well-conserved aspartyl 69 residue in HPr was changed to a glutamyl residue, the affinities for phospho-HPr of the enzymes II specific for mannitol, N-acetylglucosamine, and beta-glucosides decreased markedly without changing the maximal reaction rates. The same mutation reduced the spontaneous rate of phosphohistidyl HPr hydrolysis but did not appear to alter the rate of phosphoryl transfer from phospho-enzyme I to HPr. When the adjacent glutamyl residue 70 in HPr was changed to a lysyl residue, the Vmax values of the reactions catalyzed by the enzymes II were reduced, but the Km values remained unaltered. Changing this residue to alanine exerted little effect. Site-specific alterations in the C terminus of the beta-glucoside enzyme II which reduced the maximal reaction rate of phosphoryl transfer about 20-fold did not alter the relative kinetic parameters because of the aforementioned mutations in HPr. Published three-dimensional structural analyses of HPr and the complex of HPr with the glucose-specific enzyme IIA (IIAGlc) (homologous to the beta-glucoside and N-acetylglucosamine enzyme IIA domains) have revealed that residues 69 and 70 in HPr are distant from the active phosphorylation site and the IIAGlc binding interface in HPr. The results reported therefore suggest that residues D-69 and E-70 in

  17. An Integrated Approach to Quantify Groundwater - Surface Water Interactions: the Norman Research Site, Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Sanchez, I.; Phanikumar, M. S.; Masoner, J.; Cozzarelli, I.; McGuire, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    An intensive investigation of hydrogeologic and biogeochemical processes controlling contaminant migration and attenuation is in progress at the Norman Landfill Research Site in Oklahoma. The site involves a wetland that overlies a landfill leachate plume. The wetland-aquifer system actively exchanges contaminants and nutrients. These chemicals move from the wetland to the aquifer and vice versa depending on the groundwater-surface water (GW-SW) exchange rate and flow direction. The GW-SW flux has to be quantified to better understand the fate and transport of contaminants and nutrients. Different types of data have been collected at the site over a period of ten years including meteorological data, isotopic composition of water samples, water levels, pan evaporation rates, and seepage fluxes. This paper reports the development and application of a process-based water balance model based on long-term climate, soil, vegetation and hydrological dynamics of the system to determine the GW-SW flow rates. Our integrated approach involved model evaluation by means of the following independent measurements: (a) groundwater inflow calculation using stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen ( ) (b) seepage flux measurements in the wetland hyporheic sediment and c) pan evaporation measurements on land and in the wetland. The approach was found to be useful for identifying the dominant hydrological processes at the site, including recharge and subsurface flows. Recharge results from the model compared well with estimates obtained using isotope methods from previous studies and allowed us to identify specific annual signatures of this important process during the period of study. Results indicate that subsurface flow components in the system are seasonal and readily respond to rainfall events. The wetland water balance is dominated by local groundwater inputs and regional groundwater flow contributes little to the overall water balance.

  18. Functional properties and active-site topographies of factor X Gla- and prothrombin Gla-domain chimeras of activated protein C.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Shabir H; Yang, Likui; Manithody, Chandrashekhara; Bae, Jong-Sup; Rezaie, Alireza R

    2008-09-01

    Substitution of the Gla-domain of activated protein C (APC) with the Gla-domain of prothrombin (APC-PTGla) improves the anticoagulant activity of APC independent of protein S. Previous FRET studies showed that this substitution alters the active-site topography of this mutant, rendering it identical to the active site of the APC-protein S complex. In this study, we characterized the functional properties and the active-site topography of another APC chimera containing the Gla-domain of factor X (APC-FXGla). We discovered that the anticoagulant activity of this mutant was similarly improved independent of protein S. The average distance of the closest approach (L) between the donor dye fluorescein attached to the active site of APC derivatives and the acceptor dye octadecylrhodamine incorporated into PC/PS vesicles was determined to be 99 A for APC and 84-86 A for both APC-PTGla and APC-FXGla. Protein S minimally influenced the L values of the APC chimeras, however, it lowered this value to 87 A for wild-type APC. Further studies revealed that neither chimera elicits a protective signaling response in the TNF-alpha-activated endothelial cells. These results suggest that unique structural features within the Gla-domain of APC enable the protease to interact with endothelial protein C receptor in the antiinflammatory pathway, while the same features also cause an inherently lower specific activity for APC in the anticoagulant pathway. This adaptation has made APC a cofactor-dependent protease, requiring the cofactor function of protein S for its optimal anticoagulant function, which appears to involve the alteration of the active-site topography of APC above the membrane surface.

  19. A General Pairwise Interaction Model Provides an Accurate Description of In Vivo Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Santolini, Marc; Mora, Thierry; Hakim, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) on genomic DNA is of crucial importance for understanding and predicting regulatory elements in gene networks. TFBS motifs are commonly described by Position Weight Matrices (PWMs), in which each DNA base pair contributes independently to the transcription factor (TF) binding. However, this description ignores correlations between nucleotides at different positions, and is generally inaccurate: analysing fly and mouse in vivo ChIPseq data, we show that in most cases the PWM model fails to reproduce the observed statistics of TFBSs. To overcome this issue, we introduce the pairwise interaction model (PIM), a generalization of the PWM model. The model is based on the principle of maximum entropy and explicitly describes pairwise correlations between nucleotides at different positions, while being otherwise as unconstrained as possible. It is mathematically equivalent to considering a TF-DNA binding energy that depends additively on each nucleotide identity at all positions in the TFBS, like the PWM model, but also additively on pairs of nucleotides. We find that the PIM significantly improves over the PWM model, and even provides an optimal description of TFBS statistics within statistical noise. The PIM generalizes previous approaches to interdependent positions: it accounts for co-variation of two or more base pairs, and predicts secondary motifs, while outperforming multiple-motif models consisting of mixtures of PWMs. We analyse the structure of pairwise interactions between nucleotides, and find that they are sparse and dominantly located between consecutive base pairs in the flanking region of TFBS. Nonetheless, interactions between pairs of non-consecutive nucleotides are found to play a significant role in the obtained accurate description of TFBS statistics. The PIM is computationally tractable, and provides a general framework that should be useful for describing and predicting TFBSs beyond

  20. Silver-Coated Nylon Dressing Plus Active DC Microcurrent for Healing of Autogenous Skin Donor Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Silver-Coated Nylon Dressing Plus Active DC Microcurrent for Healing of Autogenous Skin Donor Sites Edward W. Malin, MD, Chaya M. Galin, BSN, RN... microcurrent in comparison to silver-coated dressing with sham microcurrent on wound-closure time for autogenous skin donor sites. Methods: Four...hundred five patients were screened for treatment of their donor sites using a silver-coated nylon dressing with either sham or active microcurrent

  1. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth’s crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts. Here we investigated in closer detail the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. Finally, we give a potential explanation of this effect, finding alkali-metal ions having different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar surfaces. PMID:25584435

  2. 76 FR 30696 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... eligible active uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of the Energy... requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs of...

  3. 76 FR 24871 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... from eligible active uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of...). Title X requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs...

  4. Definition of a short region of XPG necessary for TFIIH interaction and stable recruitment to sites of UV damage.

    PubMed

    Thorel, Fabrizio; Constantinou, Angelos; Dunand-Sauthier, Isabelle; Nouspikel, Thierry; Lalle, Philippe; Raams, Anja; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Vermeulen, Wim; Shivji, Mahmud K K; Wood, Richard D; Clarkson, Stuart G

    2004-12-01

    XPG is the human endonuclease that cuts 3' to DNA lesions during nucleotide excision repair. Missense mutations in XPG can lead to xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), whereas truncated or unstable XPG proteins cause Cockayne syndrome (CS), normally yielding life spans of <7 years. One XP-G individual who had advanced XP/CS symptoms at 28 years has been identified. The genetic, biochemical, and cellular defects in this remarkable case provide insight into the onset of XP and CS, and they reveal a previously unrecognized property of XPG. Both of this individual's XPG alleles produce a severely truncated protein, but an infrequent alternative splice generates an XPG protein lacking seven internal amino acids, which can account for his very slight cellular UV resistance. Deletion of XPG amino acids 225 to 231 does not abolish structure-specific endonuclease activity. Instead, this region is essential for interaction with TFIIH and for the stable recruitment of XPG to sites of local UV damage after the prior recruitment of TFIIH. These results define a new functional domain of XPG, and they demonstrate that recruitment of DNA repair proteins to sites of damage does not necessarily lead to productive repair reactions. This observation has potential implications that extend beyond nucleotide excision repair.

  5. A theoretical study of CO and NO interaction with Cu sites in ZSM-5: Electronic structure and vibrational spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ramprasad, R.; Hass, K.C.; Schneider, W.F.

    1996-10-01

    The interaction of CO and NO with various Cu sites in zeolites were studied theoretically within the framework of density functional theory. Our models of the active sites are simple charged clusters, with Cu ions coordinated to a certain number of water ligands and in some cases to a hydroxyl ligand in addition to water ligands. We have studied the electronic and geometric structure of monocarbonyl, mono- and dinitrosyl complexes. We find that in all mono- and dinitrosyl complexes that we considered, the Cu preferred to be in its 1+ oxidation state, irrespective of the overall cluster charge or the degree of coordination resulting in three different binding modes. We have also performed vibrational frequency calculations for the optimal monocarbonyl, mono- and dinitrosyl geometries. Of all the complexes that we considered, our results for low coordinated Cu(I) (coordinated to about 2 water ligands) and hydroxyl ligand coordinated Cu(II) are consistent with experimentally observed CO and NO stretch frequencies in Cu-ZSM-5.

  6. Understanding the conformational flexibility and electrostatic properties of curcumin in the active site of rhAChE via molecular docking, molecular dynamics, and charge density analysis.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Kandasamy; Kalaiarasi, Chinnasamy; Kumaradhas, Poomani

    2017-01-04

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an important enzyme responsible for Alzheimer's disease, as per report, keto-enol form of curcumin inhibits this enzyme. The present study aims to understand the binding mechanism of keto-enol curcumin with the recombinant human Acetylcholinesterase (rhAChE) from its conformational flexibility, intermolecular interactions, charge density distribution, and the electrostatic properties at the active site of rhAChE. To accomplish this, a molecular docking analysis of curcumin with the rhAChE was performed, which gives the structure and conformation of curcumin in the active site of rhAChE. Further, the charge density distribution and the electrostatic properties of curcumin molecule (lifted from the active site of rhAChE) were determined from the high level density functional theory (DFT) calculations coupled with the charge density analysis. On the other hand, the curcumin molecule was optimized (gas phase) using DFT method and further, the structure and charge density analysis were also carried out. On comparing the conformation, charge density distribution and the electrostatic potential of the active site form of curcumin with the corresponding gas phase form reveals that the above said properties are significantly altered when curcumin is present in the active site of rhAChE. The conformational stability and the interaction of curcumin in the active site are also studied using molecular dynamics simulation, which shows a large variation in the conformational geometry of curcumin as well as the intermolecular interactions.

  7. Galaxy interactions and active galactic nuclei in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Christopher J.

    2009-06-01

    It has been suggested that galaxy interactions may be the principal mechanism responsible for triggering non-thermal activity in galactic nuclei. This thesis investigates the possible role of interactions in the local Universe by searching for evidence of a causal relationship between major interactions and the initiation of activity in Seyfert galaxies using high-quality, multiwavelength imaging data. The connection between interacting galaxies and Seyferts is explored by comparing the clustering properties of their environments, as quantified by the spatial cross-correlation function amplitude. If a direct evolutionary relationship exists, the objects should be located in environments that are statistically similar. It was previously demonstrated that Seyferts are found in fields comparable to isolated galaxies. The analysis presented in this work reveals that interacting galaxies are preferentially situated in regions consistent with Abell Richness Classes of 0 to 1. The apparent dissimilarity of their environments provides a strong argument against a link between major interactions and Seyfert galaxies. An examination of the photometric and morphological properties of the interacting systems does not uncover any trends that could be associated with the initiation of nuclear activity. The role of major interactions in triggering low-redshift AGNs is then assessed using near-infrared imagery of a sample of Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies. It has been postulated that these objects are evolutionarily young AGNs, powered by accretion onto supermassive black holes that are considerably lower in mass than those found in typical broad-line Seyferts. By employing the correlation between black hole mass and host galaxy bulge luminosity, the mean black hole mass, [Special characters omitted.] BH , in solar units for the sample is found to be [left angle bracket]log [Special characters omitted.] ( BH )[right angle bracket] = 7.7 ± 0.1, consistent with typical broad

  8. A model of the rabies virus glycoprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Rustici, M; Bracci, L; Lozzi, L; Neri, P; Santucci, A; Soldani, P; Spreafico, A; Niccolai, N

    1993-06-01

    The glycoprotein from the neurotropic rabies virus shows a significant homology with the alpha neurotoxin that binds to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The crystal structure of the alpha neurotoxins suggests that the Arg 37 guanidinium group and the Asp 31 side-chain carboxylate of the erabutoxin have stereochemical features resembling those of acetylcholine. Conformational studies on the Asn194-Ser195-Arg196-Gly197 tetrapeptide, an essential part of the binding site of the rabies virus glycoprotein, indicate that the side chains of Asn and Arg could also mimic the acetylcholine structure. This observation is consistent with the recently proposed mechanism of the viral infection.

  9. Interactive Whiteboards and All That Jazz: Analysing Classroom Activity with Interactive Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Howard; Beauchamp, Gary; Jones, Sonia; Kennewell, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The term "orchestration", has been used to describe the teacher's role in activity settings incorporating interactive technologies. This musical analogy suggests pre-planned manipulation of events to generate "performance" leading to learning. However, in two recent projects we have observed how effective teaching and learning…

  10. QM/MM modelling of ketosteroid isomerase reactivity indicates that active site closure is integral to catalysis.

    PubMed

    van der Kamp, Marc W; Chaudret, Robin; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2013-07-01

    Ketosteroid isomerase (Δ⁵-3-keto steroid isomerase or steroid Δ-isomerase) is a highly efficient enzyme at the centre of current debates on enzyme catalysis. We have modelled the reaction mechanism of the isomerization of 3-oxo-Δ⁵-steroids into their Δ⁴-conjugated isomers using high-level combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods, and semi-empirical QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations. Energy profiles were obtained at various levels of QM theory (AM1, B3LYP and SCS-MP2). The high-level QM/MM profile is consistent with experimental data. QM/MM dynamics simulations indicate that active site closure and desolvation of the catalytic Asp38 occur before or during formation of dienolate intermediates. These changes have a significant effect on the reaction barrier. A low barrier to reaction is found only when the active site is closed, poising it for catalysis. This conformational change is thus integral to the whole process. The effects on the barrier are apparently largely due to changes in solvation. The combination of high-level QM/MM energy profiles and QM/MM dynamics simulation shows that the reaction involves active site closure, desolvation of the catalytic base, efficient isomerization and re-opening of the active site. These changes highlight the transition between the ligand binding/releasing form and the catalytic form of the enzyme. The results demonstrate that electrostatic interactions (as a consequence of pre-organization of the active site) are crucial for stabilization during the chemical reaction step, but closure of the active site is essential for efficient catalysis to occur.

  11. Interactive lecture demonstrations, active learning, and the ALOP project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2011-05-01

    There is considerable evidence from the physics education literature that traditional approaches are ineffective in teaching physics concepts. A better teaching method is to use the active learning environment, which can be created using interactive lecture demonstrations. Based on the active learning methodology and within the framework of the UNESCO mandate in physics education and introductory physics, the ALOP project (active learning in optics and photonics) was started in 2003, to provide a focus on an experimental area that is adaptable and relevant to research and educational conditions in many developing countries. This project is discussed in this paper.

  12. Development of a protein-ligand-binding site prediction method based on interaction energy and sequence conservation.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Hiroto; Sato, Kenta; Wei, Cao; Saad, Gul; Sumikoshi, Kazuya; Nakamura, Shugo; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2016-09-01

    We present a new method for predicting protein-ligand-binding sites based on protein three-dimensional structure and amino acid conservation. This method involves calculation of the van der Waals interaction energy between a protein and many probes placed on the protein surface and subsequent clustering of the probes with low interaction energies to identify the most energetically favorable locus. In addition, it uses amino acid conservation among homologous proteins. Ligand-binding sites were predicted by combining the interaction energy and the amino acid conservation score. The performance of our prediction method was evaluated using a non-redundant dataset of 348 ligand-bound and ligand-unbound protein structure pairs, constructed by filtering entries in a ligand-binding site structure database, LigASite. Ligand-bound structure prediction (bound prediction) indicated that 74.0 % of predicted ligand-binding sites overlapped with real ligand-binding sites by over 25 % of their volume. Ligand-unbound structure prediction (unbound prediction) indicated that 73.9 % of predicted ligand-binding residues overlapped with real ligand-binding residues. The amino acid conservation score improved the average prediction accuracy by 17.0 and 17.6 points for the bound and unbound predictions, respectively. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the combined use of the interaction energy and amino acid conservation in the ligand-binding site prediction.

  13. Active Site Hydrophobicity and the Convergent Evolution of Paraoxonase Activity in Structurally Divergent Enzymes: The Case of Serum Paraoxonase 1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a native lactonase capable of promiscuously hydrolyzing a broad range of substrates, including organophosphates, esters, and carbonates. Structurally, PON1 is a six-bladed β-propeller with a flexible loop (residues 70–81) covering the active site. This loop contains a functionally critical Tyr at position 71. We have performed detailed experimental and computational analyses of the role of selected Y71 variants in the active site stability and catalytic activity in order to probe the role of Y71 in PON1’s lactonase and organophosphatase activities. We demonstrate that the impact of Y71 substitutions on PON1’s lactonase activity is minimal, whereas the kcat for the paraoxonase activity is negatively perturbed by up to 100-fold, suggesting greater mutational robustness of the native activity. Additionally, while these substitutions modulate PON1’s active site shape, volume, and loop flexibility, their largest effect is in altering the solvent accessibility of the active site by expanding the active site volume, allowing additional water molecules to enter. This effect is markedly more pronounced in the organophosphatase activity than the lactonase activity. Finally, a detailed comparison of PON1 to other organophosphatases demonstrates that either a similar “gating loop” or a highly buried solvent-excluding active site is a common feature of these enzymes. We therefore posit that modulating the active site hydrophobicity is a key element in facilitating the evolution of organophosphatase activity. This provides a concrete feature that can be utilized in the rational design of next-generation organophosphate hydrolases that are capable of selecting a specific reaction from a pool of viable substrates. PMID:28026940

  14. Prediction of protein-protein interaction sites from weakly homologous template structures using meta-threading and machine learning.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Surabhi; Brylinski, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The identification of protein-protein interactions is vital for understanding protein function, elucidating interaction mechanisms, and for practical applications in drug discovery. With the exponentially growing protein sequence data, fully automated computational methods that predict interactions between proteins are becoming essential components of system-level function inference. A thorough analysis of protein complex structures demonstrated that binding site locations as well as the interfacial geometry are highly conserved across evolutionarily related proteins. Because the conformational space of protein-protein interactions is highly covered by experimental structures, sensitive protein threading techniques can be used to identify suitable templates for the accurate prediction of interfacial residues. Toward this goal, we developed eFindSite(PPI) , an algorithm that uses the three-dimensional structure of a target protein, evolutionarily remotely related templates and machine learning techniques to predict binding residues. Using crystal structures, the average sensitivity (specificity) of eFindSite(PPI) in interfacial residue prediction is 0.46 (0.92). For weakly homologous protein models, these values only slightly decrease to 0.40-0.43 (0.91-0.92) demonstrating that eFindSite(PPI) performs well not only using experimental data but also tolerates structural imperfections in computer-generated structures. In addition, eFindSite(PPI) detects specific molecular interactions at the interface; for instance, it correctly predicts approximately one half of hydrogen bonds and aromatic interactions, as well as one third of salt bridges and hydrophobic contacts. Comparative benchmarks against several dimer datasets show that eFindSite(PPI) outperforms other methods for protein-binding residue prediction. It also features a carefully tuned confidence estimation system, which is particularly useful in large-scale applications using raw genomic data. eFindSite(PPI) is

  15. Proteome-wide analysis of nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations in active sites of human proteins.

    PubMed

    Dingerdissen, Hayley; Motwani, Mona; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2013-03-01

    An enzyme's active site is essential to normal protein activity such that any disruptions at this site may lead to dysfunction and disease. Nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations (nsSNVs), which alter the amino acid sequence, are one type of disruption that can alter the active site. When this occurs, it is assumed that enzyme activity will vary because of the criticality of the site to normal protein function. We integrate nsSNV data and active site annotations from curated resources to identify all active-site-impacting nsSNVs in the human genome and search for all pathways observed to be associated with this data set to assess the likely consequences. We find that there are 934 unique nsSNVs that occur at the active sites of 559 proteins. Analysis of the nsSNV data shows an over-representation of arginine and an under-representation of cysteine, phenylalanine and tyrosine when comparing the list of nsSNV-impacted active site residues with the list of all possible proteomic active site residues, implying a potential bias for or against variation of these residues at the active site. Clustering analysis shows an abundance of hydrolases and transferases. Pathway and functional analysis shows several pathways over- or under-represented in the data set, with the most significantly affected pathways involved in carbohydrate metabolism. We provide a table of 32 variation-substrate/product pairs that can be used in targeted metabolomics experiments to assay the effects of specific variations. In addition, we report the significant prevalence of aspartic acid to histidine variation in eight proteins associated with nine diseases including glycogen storage diseases, lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital syndrome, Parkinson's disease and several cancers.

  16. Structure of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with the Inhibitor β-thujaplicinol Bound at the RNase H Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Himmel, Daniel M.; Maegley, Karen A.; Pauly, Tom A.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Das, Kalyan; Dharia, Chhaya; Clark, Arthur D.; Ryan, Kevin; Hickey, Michael J.; Love, Robert A.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Bergqvist, Simon; Arnold, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Summary Novel inhibitors are needed to counteract the rapid emergence of drug-resistant HIV variants. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has both DNA polymerase and RNase H (RNH) enzymatic activities, but approved drugs that inhibit RT target the polymerase. Inhibitors that act against new targets, like RNH, would be effective against all of the current drug-resistant variants. Here, we present 2.80 Å and 2.04 Å resolution crystal structures of an RNH inhibitor, β-thujaplicinol, bound at the RNH active site of both HIV-1 RT and an isolated RNH domain. β-thujaplicinol chelates two divalent metal ions at the RNH active site. We provide biochemical evidence that β-thujaplicinol is a slow-binding RNH inhibitor with non-competitive kinetics and suggest that it forms a tropylium ion that interacts favorably with RT and the RNA:DNA substrate. PMID:20004166

  17. Development of a Model Protein Interaction Pair as a Benchmarking Tool for the Quantitative Analysis of 2-Site Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yamniuk, Aaron P; Newitt, John A; Doyle, Michael L; Arisaka, Fumio; Giannetti, Anthony M; Hensley, Preston; Myszka, David G; Schwarz, Fred P; Thomson, James A; Eisenstein, Edward

    2015-12-01

    A significant challenge in the molecular interaction field is to accurately determine the stoichiometry and stepwise binding affinity constants for macromolecules having >1 binding site. The mission of the Molecular Interactions Research Group (MIRG) of the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) is to show how biophysical technologies are used to quantitatively characterize molecular interactions, and to educate the ABRF members and scientific community on the utility and limitations of core technologies [such as biosensor, microcalorimetry, or analytic ultracentrifugation (AUC)]. In the present work, the MIRG has developed a robust model protein interaction pair consisting of a bivalent variant of the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens extracellular RNase barnase and a variant of its natural monovalent intracellular inhibitor protein barstar. It is demonstrated that this system can serve as a benchmarking tool for the quantitative analysis of 2-site protein-protein interactions. The protein interaction pair enables determination of precise binding constants for the barstar protein binding to 2 distinct sites on the bivalent barnase binding partner (termed binase), where the 2 binding sites were engineered to possess affinities that differed by 2 orders of magnitude. Multiple MIRG laboratories characterized the interaction using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), AUC, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) methods to evaluate the feasibility of the system as a benchmarking model. Although general agreement was seen for the binding constants measured using solution-based ITC and AUC approaches, weaker affinity was seen for surface-based method SPR, with protein immobilization likely affecting affinity. An analysis of the results from multiple MIRG laboratories suggests that the bivalent barnase-barstar system is a suitable model for benchmarking new approaches for the quantitative characterization of complex biomolecular interactions.

  18. The roles of active site residues in the catalytic mechanism of methylaspartate ammonia-lyase.

    PubMed

    Raj, Hans; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2013-01-01

    Methylaspartate ammonia-lyase (MAL; EC 4.3.1.2) catalyzes the reversible addition of ammonia to mesaconate to yield l-threo-(2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate and l-erythro-(2S,3R)-3-methylaspartate as products. In the proposed minimal mechanism for MAL of Clostridium tetanomorphum, Lys-331 acts as the (S)-specific base catalyst and abstracts the 3S-proton from l-threo-3-methylaspartate, resulting in an enolate anion intermediate. This enolic intermediate is stabilized by coordination to the essential active site Mg(2+) ion and hydrogen bonding to the Gln-329 residue. Collapse of this intermediate results in the release of ammonia and the formation of mesaconate. His-194 likely acts as the (R)-specific base catalyst and abstracts the 3R-proton from the l-erythro isomer of 3-methylaspartate, yielding the enolic intermediate. In the present study, we have investigated the importance of the residues Gln-73, Phe-170, Gln-172, Tyr-356, Thr-360, Cys-361 and Leu-384 for the catalytic activity of C. tetanomorphum MAL. These residues, which are part of the enzyme surface lining the substrate binding pocket, were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis and the mutant enzymes were characterized for their structural integrity, ability to catalyze the amination of mesaconate, and regio- and diastereoselectivity. Based on the observed properties of the mutant enzymes, combined with previous structural studies and protein engineering work, we propose a detailed catalytic mechanism for the MAL-catalyzed reaction, in which the side chains of Gln-73, Gln-172, Tyr-356, Thr-360, and Leu-384 provide favorable interactions with the substrate, which are important for substrate binding and activation. This detailed knowledge of the catalytic mechanism of MAL can serve as a guide for future protein engineering experiments.

  19. Fluconazole Binding and Sterol Demethylation in Three CYP51 Isoforms Indicate Differences in Active Site Topology

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamine, A.; Lepesheva, Galina I.; Waterman, Mike

    2010-11-16

    14{alpha}-Demethylase (CYP51) is a key enzyme in all sterol biosynthetic pathways (animals, fungi, plants, protists, and some bacteria), catalyzing the removal of the C-14 methyl group following cyclization of squalene. Based on mutations found in CYP51 genes from Candida albicans azole-resistant isolates obtained after fluconazole treatment of fungal infections, and using site-directed mutagenesis, we have found that fluconazole binding and substrate metabolism vary among three different CYP51 isoforms: human, fungal, and mycobacterial. In C. albicans, the Y132H mutant from isolates shows no effect on fluconazole binding, whereas the F145L mutant results in a 5-fold increase in its IC{sub 50} for fluconazole, suggesting that F145 (conserved only in fungal 14{alpha}-demethylases) interacts with this azole. In C. albicans, F145L accounts, in part, for the difference in fluconazole sensitivity reported between mammals and fungi, providing a basis for treatment of fungal infections. The C. albicans Y132H and human Y145H CYP51 mutants show essentially no effect on substrate metabolism, but the Mycobacterium tuberculosis F89H CYP51 mutant loses both its substrate binding and metabolism. Because these three residues align in the three isoforms, the results indicate that their active sites contain important structural differences, and further emphasize that fluconazole and substrate binding are uncoupled properties.

  20. Multiple allosteric sites are involved in the modulation of insulin-degrading-enzyme activity by somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Tundo, Grazia R; Di Muzio, Elena; Ciaccio, Chiara; Sbardella, Diego; Di Pierro, Donato; Polticelli, Fabio; Coletta, Massimo; Marini, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    Somatostatin is a cyclic peptide, released in the gastrointestinal system and the central nervous system, where it is involved in the regulation of cognitive and sensory functions, motor activity and sleep. It is a substrate of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), as well as a modulator of its activity and expression. In the present study, we have investigated the modulatory role of somatostatin on IDE activity at 37 °C and pH 7.3 for various substrates [i.e. insulin, β-amyloid (Aβ)1-40 and bradykinin], aiming to quantitatively characterize the correlation between the specific features of the substrates and the regulatory mechanism. Functional data indicate that somatostatin, in addition to the catalytic site of IDE (being a substrate), is also able to bind to two additional exosites, which play different roles according to the size of the substrate and its binding mode to the IDE catalytic cleft. In particular, one exosite, which displays high affinity for somatostatin, regulates only the interaction of IDE with larger substrates (such as insulin and Aβ1-40 ) in a differing fashion according to their various modes of binding to the enzyme. A second exosite, which is involved in the regulation of enzymatic processing by IDE of all substrates investigated (including a 10-25 amino acid long amyloid-like peptide, bradykinin and somatostatin itself, which had been studied previously), probably acts through the alteration of an 'open-closed' equilibrium.

  1. NOX Activation by Subunit Interaction and Underlying Mechanisms in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Radhika; Geng, Xiaokun; Li, Fengwu; Ding, Yuchuan

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAPDH) oxidase (NOX) is an enzyme complex with the sole function of producing superoxide anion and reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the expense of NADPH. Vital to the immune system as well as cellular signaling, NOX is also involved in the pathologies of a wide variety of disease states. Particularly, it is an integral player in many neurological diseases, including stroke, TBI, and neurodegenerative diseases. Pathologically, NOX produces an excessive amount of ROS that exceed the body’s antioxidant ability to neutralize them, leading to oxidative stress and aberrant signaling. This prevalence makes it an attractive therapeutic target and as such, NOX inhibitors have been studied and developed to counter NOX’s deleterious effects. However, recent studies of NOX have created a better understanding of the NOX complex. Comprised of independent cytosolic subunits, p47-phox, p67-phox, p40-phox and Rac, and membrane subunits, gp91-phox and p22-phox, the NOX complex requires a unique activation process through subunit interaction. Of these subunits, p47-phox plays the most important role in activation, binding and translocating the cytosolic subunits to the membrane and anchoring to p22-phox to organize the complex for NOX activation and function. Moreover, these interactions, particularly that between p47-phox and p22-phox, are dependent on phosphorylation initiated by upstream processes involving protein kinase C (PKC). This review will look at these interactions between subunits and with PKC. It will focus on the interaction involving p47-phox with p22-phox, key in bringing the cytosolic subunits to the membrane. Furthermore, the implication of these interactions as a target for NOX inhibitors such as apocynin will be discussed as a potential avenue for further investigation, in order to develop more specific NOX inhibitors based on the inhibition of NOX assembly and activation. PMID:28119569

  2. Active-constructive-interactive: a conceptual framework for differentiating learning activities.

    PubMed

    Chi, Michelene T H

    2009-01-01

    Active, constructive, and interactive are terms that are commonly used in the cognitive and learning sciences. They describe activities that can be undertaken by learners. However, the literature is actually not explicit about how these terms can be defined; whether they are distinct; and whether they refer to overt manifestations, learning processes, or learning outcomes. Thus, a framework is provided here that offers a way to differentiate active, constructive, and interactive in terms of observable overt activities and underlying learning processes. The framework generates a testable hypothesis for learning: that interactive activities are most likely to be better than constructive activities, which in turn might be better than active activities, which are better than being passive. Studies from the literature are cited to provide evidence in support of this hypothesis. Moreover, postulating underlying learning processes allows us to interpret evidence in the literature more accurately. Specifying distinct overt activities for active, constructive, and interactive also offers suggestions for how learning activities can be coded and how each kind of activity might be elicited.

  3. Assessment of activation products in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.

    1996-07-01

    This document assesses the impact of radioactive activation products released from SRS facilities since the first reactor became operational late in 1953. The isotopes reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS: {sup 32}P, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 60}C, and {sup 65}Zn. Release pathways, emission control features, and annual releases to the aqueous and atmospheric environments are discussed. No single incident has resulted in a major acute release of activation products to the environment. The releases were the result of normal operations of the reactors and separations facilities. Releases declined over the years as better controls were established and production was reduced. The overall radiological impact of SRS activation product atmospheric releases from 1954 through 1994 on the offsite maximally exposed individual can be characterized by a total dose of 0.76 mrem. During the same period, such an individual received a total dose of 14,400 mrem from non-SRS sources of ionizing radiation present in the environment. SRS activation product aqueous releases between 1954 and 1994 resulted in a total dose of 54 mrem to the offsite maximally exposed individual. The impact of SRS activation product releases on offsite populations also has been evaluated.

  4. Analyzing the catalytic role of active site residues in the Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Salette; Wu, Rui; Krzywda, Karoline; Opalka, Veronika; Chan, Hei; Liu, Dali; Holz, Richard C

    2015-07-01

    A strictly conserved active site arginine residue (αR157) and two histidine residues (αH80 and αH81) located near the active site of the Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1 (CtNHase), were mutated. These mutant enzymes were examined for their ability to bind iron and hydrate acrylonitrile. For the αR157A mutant, the residual activity (k cat = 10 ± 2 s(-1)) accounts for less than 1% of the wild-type activity (k cat = 1100 ± 30 s(-1)) while the K m value is nearly unchanged at 205 ± 10 mM. On the other hand, mutation of the active site pocket αH80 and αH81 residues to alanine resulted in enzymes with k cat values of 220 ± 40 and 77 ± 13 s(-1), respectively, and K m values of 187 ± 11 and 179 ± 18 mM. The double mutant (αH80A/αH81A) was also prepared and provided an enzyme with a k cat value of 132 ± 3 s(-1) and a K m value of 213 ± 61 mM. These data indicate that all three residues are catalytically important, but not essential. X-ray crystal structures of the αH80A/αH81A, αH80W/αH81W, and αR157A mutant CtNHase enzymes were solved to 2.0, 2.8, and 2.5 Å resolutions, respectively. In each mutant enzyme, hydrogen-bonding interactions crucial for the catalytic function of the αCys(104)-SOH ligand are disrupted. Disruption of these hydrogen bonding interactions likely alters the nucleophilicity of the sulfenic acid oxygen and the Lewis acidity of the active site Fe(III) ion.

  5. All the catalytic active sites of MoS2 for hydrogen evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Du; Qiao, Qiao; ...

    2016-11-29

    MoS2 presents a promising low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), but the understanding about its active sites has remained limited. Here we present an unambiguous study of the catalytic activities of all possible reaction sites of MoS2, including edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries. We demonstrate that, in addition to the well-known catalytically active edge sites, sulfur vacancies provide another major active site for the HER, while the catalytic activity of grain boundaries is much weaker. Here, the intrinsic turnover frequencies (Tafel slopes) of the edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries are estimated to be 7.5more » s–1 (65–75 mV/dec), 3.2 s–1 (65–85 mV/dec), and 0.1 s–1 (120–160 mV/dec), respectively. We also demonstrate that the catalytic activity of sulfur vacancies strongly depends on the density of the vacancies and the local crystalline structure in proximity to the vacancies. Unlike edge sites, whose catalytic activity linearly depends on the length, sulfur vacancies show optimal catalytic activities when the vacancy density is in the range of 7–10%, and the number of sulfur vacancies in high crystalline quality MoS2 is higher than that in low crystalline quality MoS2, which may be related with the proximity of different local crystalline structures to the vacancies.« less

  6. [Interactions between natural vegetation succession and waste residue in lead-zinc tailings deposited sites].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-yan; Xing, Dan; Xlao, Jiu-jun; Liu, Fang

    2010-12-01

    Natural vegetation succession process and related mechanism is one of the important research contents in ecological restoration of abandoned mining land. Taking 4 lead-zinc tailings deposited sites with the recovery time being about 10 years, 20 years, 30 year, and over 40 years under similar site conditions in northwest Guizhou Provinnce as study areas, this paper studied the interactions between the natural vegetation succession and the physicochemical properties of waste residue. The results showed that with the increasing dumping time of the waste residue, the nutritional conditions of base material improved significantly, the total N, P, and K contents and the pH value increased, while the EC, bulk density, and especially, available lead and cadmium contents decreased. Meanwhile, the plant community species richness (S), diversity index (H), and evenness (J) increased correspondingly with increasing recovery time. The composition of plant communities was dominated by perennial herbaceous. In the first 20 years of recovery, the vegetation succession process was very slow, but after 30- and 40-year recovery, the vegetation coverage reached 53% and 87%, respectively. Canonical correlation analysis showed that there were significant correlations between base material properties and species diversity, and the canonical variables were the total N, P, and K contents of base material. The species diversity index was significantly negatively correlated with the available Pb and Cd contents of base material. The natural vegetation succession process in the study areas accelerated after 30 years of recovery, and the limiting factors of vegetation recovery were the nutrient deficiency and the high availability of Pb and Cd in base material.

  7. Inorganic lead and calcium interact positively in activation of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Kern, M; Wisniewski, M; Cabell, L; Audesirk, G

    2000-06-01

    Calmodulin is a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein that mediates many of the intracellular actions of Ca2+ ions. The calcium-binding sites of calmodulin consist of four EF-hand motifs; full activation of calmodulin normally occurs when all four sites are occupied by Ca2+. Inorganic lead (PY2+) has been shown to activate calmodulin at total lead concentrations similar to the concentrations of Ca2+ required for activation (Goldstein and Ar, 1983; Habermann et al., 1983), but the free Pb2+ concentrations required for calmodulin activation have not been determined. In addition, it is possible that activation may occur with different sites occupied by different divalent cations, for example Ca2+ and Pb2+. We investigated the ability of free Pb2+, alone or in combination with Ca2+, to activate calmodulin. In aqueous media, N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN) and 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate (ANS) show increased fluorescence when bound to hydrophobic regions of proteins. This increased fluorescence has been used to monitor the conformational change that occurs during calmodulin activation (LaPorte et al., 1980). In the presence of calmodulin, both Ca2+ and Pb2+ stimulated increased fluorescence of NPN and ANS. Threshold and EC50 free metal concentrations were approximately 100 nM and 450-500 nM, respectively, for Ca2+ and 100 pM and 400-550 pM, respectively, for Pb2+. Fluorescence was enhanced by combinations of low concentrations of free Ca2+ and Pb2+; for example, as little as 20 pM free Pb2+ enhanced fluorescence in combination with 200 nM free Ca2+. The activity of the PDE1 isoform of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase is stimulated by Ca2+/calmodulin (Wang et al., 1990). In the presence of calmodulin, we found that Ca2+ and Pb2+ activated calmodulin-stimulated PDE activity, with threshold and EC50 free metal concentrations of approximately 200 nM and 1200 nM, respectively, for Ca2+ and 300 pM and 430 pM, respectively, for Pb2+. PDE activity was stimulated by

  8. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  9. The active site of hen egg-white lysozyme: flexibility and chemical bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Held, Jeanette Smaalen, Sander van

    2014-04-01

    Chemical bonding at the active site of lysozyme is analyzed on the basis of a multipole model employing transferable multipole parameters from a database. Large B factors at low temperatures reflect frozen-in disorder, but therefore prevent a meaningful free refinement of multipole parameters. Chemical bonding at the active site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) is analyzed on the basis of Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules [QTAIM; Bader (1994 ▶), Atoms in Molecules: A Quantum Theory. Oxford University Press] applied to electron-density maps derived from a multipole model. The observation is made that the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) of HEWL at a temperature of 100 K are larger than ADPs in crystals of small biological molecules at 298 K. This feature shows that the ADPs in the cold crystals of HEWL reflect frozen-in disorder rather than thermal vibrations of the atoms. Directly generalizing the results of multipole studies on small-molecule crystals, the important consequence for electron-density analysis of protein crystals is that multipole parameters cannot be independently varied in a meaningful way in structure refinements. Instead, a multipole model for HEWL has been developed by refinement of atomic coordinates and ADPs against the X-ray diffraction data of Wang and coworkers [Wang et al. (2007), Acta Cryst. D63, 1254–1268], while multipole parameters were fixed to the values for transferable multipole parameters from the ELMAM2 database [Domagala et al. (2012), Acta Cryst. A68, 337–351] . Static and dynamic electron densities based on this multipole model are presented. Analysis of their topological properties according to the QTAIM shows that the covalent bonds possess similar properties to the covalent bonds of small molecules. Hydrogen bonds of intermediate strength are identified for the Glu35 and Asp52 residues, which are considered to be essential parts of the active site of HEWL. Furthermore, a series of weak C

  10. Marine Biology Field Trip Sites. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  11. Molecular dynamics studies unravel role of conserved residues responsible for movement of ions into active site of DHBPS

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Ranajit Nivrutti; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Singh, Balvinder

    2017-01-01

    3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase (DHBPS) catalyzes the conversion of D-ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru5P) to L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate in the presence of Mg2+. Although crystal structures of DHBPS in complex with Ru5P and non-catalytic metal ions have been reported, structure with Ru5P along with Mg2+ is still elusive. Therefore, mechanistic role played by Mg2+ in the structure of DHBPS is poorly understood. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations of DHBPS-Ru5P complex along with Mg2+ have shown entry of Mg2+ from bulk solvent into active site. Presence of Mg2+ in active site has constrained conformations of Ru5P and has reduced flexibility of loop-2. Formation of hydrogen bonds among Thr-108 and residues - Gly-109, Val-110, Ser-111, and Asp-114 are found to be critical for entry of Mg2+ into active site. Subsequent in silico mutations of residues, Thr-108 and Asp-114 have substantiated the importance of these interactions. Loop-4 of one monomer is being proposed to act as a “lid” covering the active site of other monomer. Further, the conserved nature of residues taking part in the transfer of Mg2+ suggests the same mechanism being present in DHBPS of other microorganisms. Thus, this study provides insights into the functioning of DHBPS that can be used for the designing of inhibitors. PMID:28079168

  12. Molecular dynamics studies unravel role of conserved residues responsible for movement of ions into active site of DHBPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Ranajit Nivrutti; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Singh, Balvinder

    2017-01-01

    3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase (DHBPS) catalyzes the conversion of D-ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru5P) to L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate in the presence of Mg2+. Although crystal structures of DHBPS in complex with Ru5P and non-catalytic metal ions have been reported, structure with Ru5P along with Mg2+ is still elusive. Therefore, mechanistic role played by Mg2+ in the structure of DHBPS is poorly understood. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations of DHBPS-Ru5P complex along with Mg2+ have shown entry of Mg2+ from bulk solvent into active site. Presence of Mg2+ in active site has constrained conformations of Ru5P and has reduced flexibility of loop-2. Formation of hydrogen bonds among Thr-108 and residues - Gly-109, Val-110, Ser-111, and Asp-114 are found to be critical for entry of Mg2+ into active site. Subsequent in silico mutations of residues, Thr-108 and Asp-114 have substantiated the importance of these interactions. Loop-4 of one monomer is being proposed to act as a “lid” covering the active site of other monomer. Further, the conserved nature of residues taking part in the transfer of Mg2+ suggests the same mechanism being present in DHBPS of other microorganisms. Thus, this study provides insights into the functioning of DHBPS that can be used for the designing of inhibitors.

  13. Integron Gene Cassettes: A Repository of Novel Protein Folds with Distinct Interaction Sites

    PubMed Central

    Sureshan, Visaahini; Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Boucher, Yan; Koenig, Jeremy E.; Stokes, H. W.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Mabbutt, Bridget C.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile gene cassettes captured within integron arrays encompass a vast and diverse pool of genetic novelty. In most cases, functional annotation of gene cassettes directly recovered by cassette-PCR is obscured by their characteristically high sequence novelty. This inhibits identification of those specific functions or biological features that might constitute preferential factors for lateral gene transfer via the integron system. A structural genomics approach incorporating x-ray crystallography has been utilised on a selection of cassettes to investigate evolutionary relationships hidden at the sequence level. Gene cassettes were accessed from marine sediments (pristine and contaminated sites), as well as a range of Vibrio spp. We present six crystal structures, a remarkably high proportion of our survey of soluble proteins, which were found to possess novel folds. These entirely new structures are diverse, encompassing all-α, α+β and α/β fold classes, and many contain clear binding pocket features for small molecule substrates. The new structures emphasise the large repertoire of protein families encoded within the integron cassette metagenome and which remain to be characterised. Oligomeric association is a notable recurring property common to these new integron-derived proteins. In some cases, the protein–protein contact sites utilised in homomeric assembly could instead form suitable contact points for heterogeneous regulator/activator proteins or domains. Such functional features are ideal for a flexible molecular componentry needed to ensure responsive and adaptive bacterial functions. PMID:23349695

  14. Using Highly Interactive Virtual Environments for Safeguards Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, Bradley S; Alcala, Benjamin S; Alcala, Scott; Eipeldauer, Mary D; Weil, Logan B

    2010-01-01

    Highly interactive virtual environment (HIVE) is a term that refers to interactive educational simulations, serious games and virtual worlds. Studies indicate that learning with the aid of interactive environments produces better retention and depth of knowledge by promoting improved trainee engagement and understanding. Virtual reality or three dimensional (3D) visualization is often used to promote the understanding of something when personal observation, photographs, drawings, and/or sketches are not possible or available. Subjects and situations, either real or hypothetical, can be developed using a 3D model. Models can be tailored to the audience allowing safeguards and security features to be demonstrated for educational purposes in addition to engineering evaluation and performance analysis. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has begun evaluating the feasibility of HIVEs for improving safeguards activities such as training, mission planning, and evaluating worker task performance. This paper will discuss the development workflow of HIVEs and present some recent examples.

  15. An active site mutation increases the polymerase activity of the guinea pig-lethal Marburg virus.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Alexander; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Becker, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) causes severe, often fatal, disease in humans and transient illness in rodents. Sequential passaging of MARV in guinea pigs resulted in selection of a lethal virus containing 4 aa changes. A D184N mutation in VP40 (VP40D184N), which leads to a species-specific gain of viral fitness, and three mutations in the active site of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase L, which were investigated in the present study for functional significance in human and guinea pig cells. The transcription/replication activity of L mutants was strongly enhanced by a substitution at position 741 (S741C), and inhibited by other substitutions (D758A and A759D) in both species. The polymerase activity of L carrying the S741C substitution was eightfold higher in guinea pig cells than in human cells upon co-expression with VP40D184N, suggesting that the additive effect of the two mutations provides MARV a replicative advantage in the new host.

  16. Periostin is expressed within the developing teeth at the sites of epithelial-mesenchymal interaction.

    PubMed

    Kruzynska-Frejtag, Agnieszka; Wang, Jian; Maeda, Manabu; Rogers, Rhonda; Krug, Edward; Hoffman, Stanley; Markwald, Roger R; Conway, Simon J

    2004-04-01

    Periostin was originally isolated as an osteoblast-specific factor that functions as a cell adhesion molecule for preosteoblasts and is thought to be involved in osteoblast recruitment, attachment, and spreading. The protein was renamed "periostin" because of its expression in the periosteum and periodontal ligament, indicating a potential role in bone and maintenance of tooth structure. Periostin has structural similarity to insect fasciclin-I and can be induced by TGF-beta and Bmp2. Because tooth and periodontium development is a well-described genetic model for organogenesis governed by a reciprocal set of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, thought to be controlled by various TGF-beta superfamily members, we investigated whether periostin is present during tooth morphogenesis. Both periostin mRNA and protein expression were analyzed throughout normal tooth development (embryonic day [E] 9.5-newborn) and within both Bmp4- and Msx2-null embryos. Periostin mRNA is initially present within the E9.5 first branchial arch epithelium and then shifts to underlying ectomesenchyme. Both mRNA and protein are asymmetrically localized to the lingual/palatal and buccal side during the early epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Periostin is also present in dental papilla cells and within the trans-differentiating odontoblasts during the bell and hard tissue formation stages of tooth development. We suggest that periostin plays multiple roles as a primary responder molecule during tooth development and may be linked to deposition and organization of other extracellular matrix adhesion molecules during maintenance of the adult tooth, particularly at the sites of hard-soft tissue interface.

  17. Encroachment of Human Activity on Sea Turtle Nesting Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziskin, D.; Aubrecht, C.; Elvidge, C.; Tuttle, B.; Baugh, K.; Ghosh, T.

    2008-12-01

    The encroachment of anthropogenic lighting on sea turtle nesting sites poses a serious threat to the survival of these animals [Nicholas, 2001]. This danger is quantified by combining two established data sets. The first is the Nighttime Lights data produced by the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center [Elvidge et al., 1997]. The second is the Marine Turtle Database produced by the World Conservation Monitoring Centre (WCMC). The technique used to quantify the threat of encroachment is an adaptation of the method described in Aubrecht et al. [2008], which analyzes the stress on coral reef systems by proximity to nighttime lights near the shore. Nighttime lights near beaches have both a direct impact on turtle reproductive success since they disorient hatchlings when they mistake land-based lights for the sky-lit surf [Lorne and Salmon, 2007] and the lights are also a proxy for other anthropogenic threats. The identification of turtle nesting sites with high rates of encroachment will hopefully steer conservation efforts to mitigate their effects [Witherington, 1999]. Aubrecht, C, CD Elvidge, T Longcore, C Rich, J Safran, A Strong, M Eakin, KE Baugh, BT Tuttle, AT Howard, EH Erwin, 2008, A global inventory of coral reef stressors based on satellite observed nighttime lights, Geocarto International, London, England: Taylor and Francis. In press. Elvidge, CD, KE Baugh, EA Kihn, HW Kroehl, ER Davis, 1997, Mapping City Lights with Nighttime Data from the DMSP Operational Linescan System, Photogrammatic Engineering and Remote Sensing, 63:6, pp. 727-734. Lorne, JK, M Salmon, 2007, Effects of exposure to artificial lighting on orientation of hatchling sea turtles on the beach and in the ocean, Endangered Species Research, Vol. 3: 23-30. Nicholas, M, 2001, Light Pollution and Marine Turtle Hatchlings: The Straw that Breaks the Camel's Back?, George Wright Forum, 18:4, p77-82. Witherington, BE, 1999, Reducing Threats To Nesting Habitat, Research and Management Techniques for

  18. Interaction of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 and Vip3A proteins with Spodoptera frugiperda midgut binding sites.

    PubMed

    Sena, Janete A D; Hernández-Rodríguez, Carmen Sara; Ferré, Juan

    2009-04-01

    Vip3Aa, Vip3Af, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Fa were tested for their toxicities and binding interactions. Vip3A proteins were more toxic than Cry1 proteins. Binding assays showed independent specific binding sites for Cry1 and Vip3A proteins. Cry1Ab and Cry1Fa competed for the same binding sites, whereas Vip3Aa competed for those of Vip3Af.

  19. Multisite interaction with Sufu regulates Ci/Gli activity through distinct mechanisms in Hh signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuhong; Shi, Qing; Jiang, Jin

    2015-05-19

    The tumor suppressor protein Suppressor of fused (Sufu) plays a conserved role in the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway by inhibiting Cubitus interruptus (Ci)/Glioma-associated oncogene homolog (Gli) transcription factors, but the molecular mechanism by which Sufu inhibits Ci/Gli activity remains poorly understood. Here we show that Sufu can bind Ci/Gli through a C-terminal Sufu-interacting site (SIC) in addition to a previously identified N-terminal site (SIN), and that both SIC and SIN are required for optimal inhibition of Ci/Gli by Sufu. We show that Sufu can sequester Ci/Gli in the cytoplasm through binding to SIN while inhibiting Ci/Gli activity in the nucleus depending on SIC. We also find that binding of Sufu to SIC and the middle region of Ci can impede recruitment of the transcriptional coactivator CBP by masking its binding site in the C-terminal region of Ci. Indeed, moving the CBP-binding site to an "exposed" location can render Ci resistant to Sufu-mediated inhibition in the nucleus. Hence, our study identifies a previously unidentified and conserved Sufu-binding motif in the C-terminal region of Ci/Gli and provides mechanistic insight into how Sufu inhibits Ci/Gli activity in the nucleus.

  20. Barium ions selectively activate BK channels via the Ca2+-bowl site.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Zeng, Xu-Hui; Lingle, Christopher J

    2012-07-10

    Activation of Ca(2+)-dependent BK channels is increased via binding of micromolar Ca(2+) to two distinct high-affinity sites per BK α-subunit. One site, termed the Ca(2+) bowl, is embedded within the second RCK domain (RCK2; regulator of conductance for potassium) of each α-subunit, while oxygen-containing residues in the first RCK domain (RCK1) have been linked to a separate Ca(2+) ligation site. Although both sites are activated by Ca(2+) and Sr(2+), Cd(2+) selectively favors activation via the RCK1 site. Divalent cations of larger ionic radius than Sr(2+) are thought to be ineffective at activating BK channels. Here we show that Ba(2+), better known as a blocker of K(+) channels, activates BK channels and that this effect arises exclusively from binding at the Ca(2+)-bowl site. Compared with previous estimates for Ca(2+) bowl-mediated activation by Ca(2+), the affinity of Ba(2+) to the Ca(2+) bowl is reduced about fivefold, and coupling of binding to activation is reduced from ∼3.6 for Ca(2+) to about ∼2.8 for Ba(2+). These results support the idea that ionic radius is an important determinant of selectivity differences among different divalent cations observed for each Ca(2+)-binding site.

  1. Activation of brown adipose tissue mitochondrial GDP binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Swick, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    The primary function of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is heat production. This ability is attributed to the existence of a unique inner mitochondrial membrane protein termed the uncoupling protein or thermogenin. This protein is permeable to H+ and thus allows respiration (and therefore thermogenesis) to proceed at a rapid rate, independent of ADP phosphorylation. Proton conductance can be inhibited by the binding of purine nucleotides to the uncoupling protein. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-GDP to BAT mitochondria is frequently used as a measure of BAT thermogenic activity. Rats fed a diet that was low but adequate in protein exhibited a decrease in feed efficiency. In addition, BAT thermogenesis was activated as indicated by an elevation in the level of GDP binding to BAT mitochondria. This phenomena occurred in older rats and persisted over time.

  2. Structure and Reactivity of the Phosphotriesterase Active Site

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    characterize different catalytic conformations for chorismate mutase . Preliminary evidence for water binding in phosphotriesterase suggests that activity in...MD/QM study of the chorismate mutase catalyzed Claisen rearrangement reaction. 2001.subm. J.Phys.Chem.B 22.Day, P.N.J., J.H.; Gordon,M.S.; Webb,S.P...Claisen rearrangement of an unusual substrate in chorismate mutase . 2001.subm. J.Phys.Chem.B 38.Stevens, W.J., Basch,H., Krauss,M., Compact effective

  3. Pressure and phase equilibria in interacting active brownian spheres.

    PubMed

    Solon, Alexandre P; Stenhammar, Joakim; Wittkowski, Raphael; Kardar, Mehran; Kafri, Yariv; Cates, Michael E; Tailleur, Julien

    2015-05-15

    We derive a microscopic expression for the mechanical pressure P in a system of spherical active Brownian particles at density ρ. Our exact result relates P, defined as the force per unit area on a bounding wall, to bulk correlation functions evaluated far away from the wall. It shows that (i) P(ρ) is a state function, independent of the particle-wall interaction; (ii) interactions contribute two terms to P, one encoding the slow-down that drives motility-induced phase separation, and the other a direct contribution well known for passive systems; and (iii) P is equal in coexisting phases. We discuss the consequences of these results for the motility-induced phase separation of active Brownian particles and show that the densities at coexistence do not satisfy a Maxwell construction on P.

  4. Identification of a putative binding site critical for general anesthetic activation of TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Ton, Hoai T; Phan, Thieu X; Abramyan, Ara M; Shi, Lei; Ahern, Gerard P

    2017-04-04

    General anesthetics suppress CNS activity by modulating the function of membrane ion channels, in particular, by enhancing activity of GABAA receptors. In contrast, several volatile (isoflurane, desflurane) and i.v. (propofol) general anesthetics excite peripheral sensory nerves to cause pain and irritation upon administration. These noxious anesthetics activate transient receptor potential ankyrin repeat 1 (TRPA1), a major nociceptive ion channel, but the underlying mechanisms and site of action are unknown. Here we exploit the observation that pungent anesthetics activate mammalian but not Drosophila TRPA1. Analysis of chimeric Drosophila and mouse TRPA1 channels reveal a critical role for the fifth transmembrane domain (S5) in sensing anesthetics. Interestingly, we show that anesthetics share with the antagonist A-967079 a potential binding pocket lined by residues in the S5, S6, and the first pore helix; isoflurane competitively disrupts A-967079 antagonism, and introducing these mammalian TRPA1 residues into dTRPA1 recapitulates anesthetic agonism. Furthermore, molecular modeling predicts that isoflurane and propofol bind to this pocket by forming H-bond and halogen-bond interactions with Ser-876, Met-915, and Met-956. Mutagenizing Met-915 or Met-956 selectively abolishes activation by isoflurane and propofol without affecting actions of A-967079 or the agonist, menthol. Thus, our combined experimental and computational results reveal the potential binding mode of noxious general anesthetics at TRPA1. These data may provide a structural basis for designing drugs to counter the noxious and vasorelaxant properties of general anesthetics and may prove useful in understanding effects of anesthetics on related ion channels.

  5. Fcp1 directly recognizes the C-terminal domain (CTD) and interacts with a site on RNA polymerase II distinct from the CTD

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Man-Hee; Ye, Ping; Zhang, Mincheng; Hausmann, Stéphane; Shuman, Stewart; Gnatt, Averell L.; Fu, Jianhua

    2005-01-01

    Fcp1 is an essential protein phosphatase that hydrolyzes phosphoserines within the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Fcp1 plays a major role in the regulation of CTD phosphorylation and, hence, critically influences the function of Pol II throughout the transcription cycle. The basic understanding of Fcp1–CTD interaction has remained ambiguous because two different modes have been proposed: the “dockingsite” model versus the “distributive” mechanism. Here we demonstrate biochemically that Fcp1 recognizes and dephosphorylates the CTD directly, independent of the globular non-CTD part of the Pol II structure. We point out that the recognition of CTD by the phosphatase is based on random access and is not driven by Pol II conformation. Results from three different types of experiments reveal that the overall interaction between Fcp1 and Pol II is not stable but dynamic. In addition, we show that Fcp1 also interacts with a region on the polymerase distinct from the CTD. We emphasize that this non-CTD site is functionally distinct from the docking site invoked previously as essential for the CTD phosphatase activity of Fcp1. We speculate that Fcp1 interaction with the non-CTD site may mediate its stimulatory effect on transcription elongation reported previously. PMID:16301539

  6. Automated docking of {alpha}-(1,4)- and {alpha}-(1,6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides in the glucoamylase active site

    SciTech Connect

    Countinho, P.M.; Reilly, P.J.; Dowd, M.K.

    1998-06-01

    Low-energy conformers of five {alpha}-(1,4)- and {alpha}-(1,6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides were flexibly docked into the glucoamylase active site using AutoDock 2.2. To ensure that all significant conformational space was searched, the starting trisaccharide conformers for docking were all possible combinations of the corresponding disaccharide low-energy conformers. All docked trisaccharides occupied subsites {minus}1 and +1 in very similar modes to those of corresponding nonreducing-end disaccharides. For linear substrates, full binding at subsite +2 occurred only when the substrate reducing end was {alpha}-(1,4)-linked, with hydrogen-bonding with the hydroxy-methyl group being the only polar interaction there. Given the absence of other important interactions at this subsite, multiple substrate conformations are allowed. For the one docked branched substrate, steric hindrance in the {alpha}-(1,6)-glycosidic oxygen suggests that the active-site residues have to change position for hydrolysis to occur. Subsite +1 of the glucoamylase active site allows flexibility in binding but, at least in Aspergillus glucoamylases, subsite +2 selectively binds substrates {alpha}-(1,4)-linked between subsites +1 and +2. Enzyme engineering to limit substrate flexibility at subsite +2 could improve glucoamylase industrial properties.

  7. Interatomic Coulombic Decay Effects in Theoretical DNA Recombination Systems Involving Protein Interaction Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, E. L.; Rivas, D. A.; Duot, A. C.; Hovey, R. T.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2015-03-01

    DNA replication is the basis for all biological reproduction. A strand of DNA will ``unzip'' and bind with a complimentary strand, creating two identical strands. In this study, we are considering how this process is affected by Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD), specifically how ICD affects the individual coding proteins' ability to hold together. ICD mainly deals with how the electron returns to its original state after excitation and how this affects its immediate atomic environment, sometimes affecting the connectivity between interaction sites on proteins involved in the DNA coding process. Biological heredity is fundamentally controlled by DNA and its replication therefore it affects every living thing. The small nature of the proteins (within the range of nanometers) makes it a good candidate for research of this scale. Understanding how ICD affects DNA molecules can give us invaluable insight into the human genetic code and the processes behind cell mutations that can lead to cancer. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate in Angwin, California, for their financial support.

  8. Problematic use of social network sites: the interactive relationship between gratifications sought and privacy concerns.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsuan-Ting; Kim, Yonghwan

    2013-11-01

    Problematic Internet use has long been a matter of concern; however, few studies extend this line of research from general Internet use to the use of social network sites (SNSs), or explicate the problematic use of SNSs by understanding what factors may enhance or reduce users' compulsive behaviors and excessive form of use on SNSs. Building on literature that found a positive relationship between gratifications sought from the Internet and problematic Internet use, this study first explores the types of gratifications sought from SNSs and examines their relationship with problematic SNS use. It found that three types of gratifications-diversion, self-presentation, and relationship building-were positively related to problematic SNS use. In addition, with a growing body of research on SNS privacy, a moderating role of privacy concerns on SNSs has been proposed to understand how it can influence the relationship between gratifications sought from SNSs and problematic SNS use. The findings suggest that different subdimensions of privacy concerns interact with gratifications sought in different manners. In other words, privacy concerns, including unauthorized secondary use and improper access, play a more influential role in constraining the positive relationship between gratifications sought and problematic SNS use when individuals seek to build relationships on SNSs. However, if individuals seek to have diversion on SNSs, their privacy concerns will be overridden by their gratifications sought, which in turn leads to problematic SNS use. Implications of these findings for future research are discussed.

  9. Group tele-immersion:enabling natural interactions between groups at distant sites.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Christine L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stewart, Corbin (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Nashel, Andrew (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC)

    2005-08-01

    We present techniques and a system for synthesizing views for video teleconferencing between small groups. In place of replicating one-to-one systems for each pair of users, we create a single unified display of the remote group. Instead of performing dense 3D scene computation, we use more cameras and trade-off storage and hardware for computation. While it is expensive to directly capture a scene from all possible viewpoints, we have observed that the participants viewpoints usually remain at a constant height (eye level) during video teleconferencing. Therefore, we can restrict the possible viewpoint to be within a virtual plane without sacrificing much of the realism, and in cloning so we significantly reduce the number of required cameras. Based on this observation, we have developed a technique that uses light-field style rendering to guarantee the quality of the synthesized views, using a linear array of cameras with a life-sized, projected display. Our full-duplex prototype system between Sandia National Laboratories, California and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has been able to synthesize photo-realistic views at interactive rates, and has been used to video conference during regular meetings between the sites.

  10. Conformation-selective ATP-competitive inhibitors control regulatory interactions and noncatalytic functions of mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Hari, Sanjay B; Merritt, Ethan A; Maly, Dustin J

    2014-05-22

    Most potent protein kinase inhibitors act by competing with ATP to block the phosphotransferase activity of their targets. However, emerging evidence demonstrates that ATP-competitive inhibitors can affect kinase interactions and functions in ways beyond blocking catalytic activity. Here, we show that stabilizing alternative ATP-binding site conformations of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p38α and Erk2 with ATP-competitive inhibitors differentially, and in some cases divergently, modulates the abilities of these kinases to interact with upstream activators and deactivating phosphatases. Conformation-selective ligands are also able to modulate Erk2's ability to allosterically activate the MAPK phosphatase DUSP6, highlighting how ATP-competitive ligands can control noncatalytic kinase functions. Overall, these studies underscore the relationship between the ATP-binding and regulatory sites of MAPKs and provide insight into how ATP-competitive ligands can be designed to confer graded control over protein kinase function.

  11. Active site proton delivery and the lyase activity of human CYP17A1

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Yogan; Gregory, Michael C.; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2014-01-03

    equivalents and protons are funneled into non-productive pathways. This is similar to previous work with other P450 catalyzed hydroxylation. However, catalysis of carbon–carbon bond scission by the T306A mutant was largely unimpeded by disruption of the CYP17A1 acid-alcohol pair. The unique response of CYP17A1 lyase activity to mutation of Thr306 is consistent with a reactive intermediate formed independently of proton delivery in the active site, and supports involvement of a nucleophilic peroxo-anion rather than the traditional Compound I in catalysis.

  12. The smallest active fragment of microtubule-associated protein 4 and its interaction with microtubules in phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Hashi, Yurika; Nagase, Lisa; Matsushima, Kazuyuki; Kotani, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the interaction between microtubule-associated protein (MAP) 4 and microtubules physicochemically, a MAP4 active site fragment was designed for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) use. The fragment was bacterially expressed and purified to homogeneity. The buffer conditions for NMR were optimized to support microtubule assembly. The fragment was found to bind to microtubules under the optimized buffer conditions.

  13. Pathways of H2 toward the Active Site of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Vitor H.; Baptista, António M.; Soares, Cláudio M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2), but little is known about the diffusion of H2 toward the active site. Here we analyze pathways for H2 permeation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent. Various MD simulation replicates were done, to improve the sampling of the system states. H2 easily permeates hydrogenase in every simulation and it moves preferentially in channels. All H2 molecules that reach the active site made their approach from the side of the Ni ion. H2 is able to reach distances of <4 Å from the