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Sample records for active site interactions

  1. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites. PMID:26893379

  2. Calorimetric studies of the interactions of metalloenzyme active site mimetics with zinc-binding inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sophia G; Burns, Philip T; Miceli, Amanda M; Grice, Kyle A; Karver, Caitlin E; Jin, Lihua

    2016-07-19

    The binding of drugs to metalloenzymes is an intricate process that involves several interactions, including binding of the drug to the enzyme active site metal, as well as multiple interactions between the drug and the enzyme residues. In order to determine the free energy contribution of Zn(2+) binding by known metalloenzyme inhibitors without the other interactions, valid active site zinc structural mimetics must be formed and binding studies need to be performed in biologically relevant conditions. The potential of each of five ligands to form a structural mimetic with Zn(2+) was investigated in buffer using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). All five ligands formed strong 1 : 1 (ligand : Zn(2+)) binary complexes. The complexes were used in further ITC experiments to study their interaction with 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) and/or acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), two bidentate anionic zinc-chelating enzyme inhibitors. It was found that tetradentate ligands were not suitable for creating zinc structural mimetics for inhibitor binding in solution due to insufficient coordination sites remaining on Zn(2+). A stable binary complex, [Zn(BPA)](2+), which was formed by a tridentate ligand, bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (BPA), was found to bind one AHA in buffer or a methanol : buffer mixture (60 : 40 by volume) at pH 7.25 or one 8-HQ in the methanol : buffer mixture at pH 6.80, making it an effective structural mimetic for the active site of zinc metalloenzymes. These results are consistent with the observation that metalloenzyme active site zinc ions have three residues coordinated to them, leaving one or two sites open for inhibitors to bind. Our findings indicate that Zn(BPA)X2 can be used as an active site structural mimetic for zinc metalloenzymes for estimating the free energy contribution of zinc binding to the overall inhibitor active site interactions. Such use will help aid in the rational design of inhibitors to a variety of zinc metalloenzymes

  3. An active site rearrangement within the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme releases nonproductive interactions and allows formation of catalytic interactions.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Raghuvir N; Van Schie, Sabine N S; Giambaşu, George; Dai, Qing; Yesselman, Joseph D; York, Darrin; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Biological catalysis hinges on the precise structural integrity of an active site that binds and transforms its substrates and meeting this requirement presents a unique challenge for RNA enzymes. Functional RNAs, including ribozymes, fold into their active conformations within rugged energy landscapes that often contain misfolded conformers. Here we uncover and characterize one such "off-pathway" species within an active site after overall folding of the ribozyme is complete. The Tetrahymena group I ribozyme (E) catalyzes cleavage of an oligonucleotide substrate (S) by an exogenous guanosine (G) cofactor. We tested whether specific catalytic interactions with G are present in the preceding E•S•G and E•G ground-state complexes. We monitored interactions with G via the effects of 2'- and 3'-deoxy (-H) and -amino (-NH(2)) substitutions on G binding. These and prior results reveal that G is bound in an inactive configuration within E•G, with the nucleophilic 3'-OH making a nonproductive interaction with an active site metal ion termed MA and with the adjacent 2'-OH making no interaction. Upon S binding, a rearrangement occurs that allows both -OH groups to contact a different active site metal ion, termed M(C), to make what are likely to be their catalytic interactions. The reactive phosphoryl group on S promotes this change, presumably by repositioning the metal ions with respect to G. This conformational transition demonstrates local rearrangements within an otherwise folded RNA, underscoring RNA's difficulty in specifying a unique conformation and highlighting Nature's potential to use local transitions of RNA in complex function. PMID:26567314

  4. Differential Assembly of Catalytic Interactions within the Conserved Active Sites of Two Ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Molecular recognition is central to biology and a critical aspect of RNA function. Yet structured RNAs typically lack the preorganization needed for strong binding and precise positioning. A striking example is the group I ribozyme from Tetrahymena, which binds its guanosine substrate (G) orders of magnitude slower than diffusion. Binding of G is also thermodynamically coupled to binding of the oligonucleotide substrate (S) and further work has shown that the transition from E•G to E•S•G accompanies a conformational change that allows G to make the active site interactions required for catalysis. The group I ribozyme from Azoarcus has a similarly slow association rate but lacks the coupled binding observed for the Tetrahymena ribozyme. Here we test, using G analogs and metal ion rescue experiments, whether this absence of coupling arises from a higher degree of preorganization within the Azoarcus active site. Our results suggest that the Azoarcus ribozyme forms cognate catalytic metal ion interactions with G in the E•G complex, interactions that are absent in the Tetrahymena E•G complex. Thus, RNAs that share highly similar active site architectures and catalyze the same reactions can differ in the assembly of transition state interactions. More generally, an ability to readily access distinct local conformational states may have facilitated the evolutionary exploration needed to attain RNA machines that carry out complex, multi-step processes. PMID:27501145

  5. Site-specific Interaction Mapping of Phosphorylated Ubiquitin to Uncover Parkin Activation.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Koji; Queliconi, Bruno B; Koyano, Fumika; Saeki, Yasushi; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Tanaka, Keiji; Matsuda, Noriyuki

    2015-10-16

    Damaged mitochondria are eliminated through autophagy machinery. A cytosolic E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin, a gene product mutated in familial Parkinsonism, is essential for this pathway. Recent progress has revealed that phosphorylation of both Parkin and ubiquitin at Ser(65) by PINK1 are crucial for activation and recruitment of Parkin to the damaged mitochondria. However, the mechanism by which phosphorylated ubiquitin associates with and activates phosphorylated Parkin E3 ligase activity remains largely unknown. Here, we analyze interactions between phosphorylated forms of both Parkin and ubiquitin at a spatial resolution of the amino acid residue by site-specific photo-crosslinking. We reveal that the in-between-RING (IBR) domain along with RING1 domain of Parkin preferentially binds to ubiquitin in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, another approach, the Fluoppi (fluorescent-based technology detecting protein-protein interaction) assay, also showed that pathogenic mutations in these domains blocked interactions with phosphomimetic ubiquitin in mammalian cells. Molecular modeling based on the site-specific photo-crosslinking interaction map combined with mass spectrometry strongly suggests that a novel binding mechanism between Parkin and ubiquitin leads to a Parkin conformational change with subsequent activation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. PMID:26260794

  6. Reduction of urease activity by interaction with the flap covering the active site.

    PubMed

    Macomber, Lee; Minkara, Mona S; Hausinger, Robert P; Merz, Kenneth M

    2015-02-23

    With the increasing appreciation for the human microbiome coupled with the global rise of antibiotic resistant organisms, it is imperative that new methods be developed to specifically target pathogens. To that end, a novel computational approach was devised to identify compounds that reduce the activity of urease, a medically important enzyme of Helicobacter pylori, Proteus mirabilis, and many other microorganisms. Urease contains a flexible loop that covers its active site; Glide was used to identify small molecules predicted to lock this loop in an open conformation. These compounds were screened against the model urease from Klebsiella aerogenes, and the natural products epigallocatechin and quercetin were shown to inhibit at low and high micromolar concentrations, respectively. These molecules exhibit a strong time-dependent inactivation of urease that was not due to their oxygen sensitivity. Rather, these compounds appear to inactivate urease by reacting with a specific Cys residue located on the flexible loop. Substitution of this cysteine by alanine in the C319A variant increased the urease resistance to both epigallocatechin and quercetin, as predicted by the computational studies. Protein dynamics are integral to the function of many enzymes; thus, identification of compounds that lock an enzyme into a single conformation presents a useful approach to define potential inhibitors. PMID:25594724

  7. Reduction of Urease Activity by Interaction with the Flap Covering the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Macomber, Lee; Minkara, Mona S.; Hausinger, Robert P.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing appreciation for the human microbiome coupled with the global rise of antibiotic resistant organisms, it is imperative that new methods be developed to specifically target pathogens. To that end, a novel computational approach was devised to identify compounds that reduce the activity of urease, a medically important enzyme of Helicobacter pylori, Proteus mirabilis, and many other microorganisms. Urease contains a flexible loop that covers its active site; Glide was used to identify small molecules predicted to lock this loop in an open conformation. These compounds were screened against the model urease from Klebsiella aerogenes and the natural products epigallocatechin and quercetin were shown to inhibit at low and high micromolar concentrations, respectively. These molecules exhibit a strong time-dependent inactivation of urease that was not due to their oxygen sensitivity. Rather, these compounds appear to inactivate urease by reacting with a specific Cys residue located on the flexible loop. Substitution of this cysteine by alanine in the C319A variant increased the urease resistance to both epigallocatechin and quercetin, as predicted by the computational studies. Protein dynamics are integral to the function of many enzymes; thus, identification of compounds that lock an enzyme into a single conformation presents a useful approach to define potential inhibitors. PMID:25594724

  8. Noncovalent intermolecular interactions between dehydroepiandrosterone and the active site of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulphotransferase: A density functional theory based treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astani, Elahe; Heshmati, Emran; Chen, Chun-Jung; Hadipour, Nasser L.; Shekarsaraei, Setareh

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical study was performed to characterize noncovalent intermolecular interactions, especially hydrogen bond (HB), in the active site of enzyme human dehydroepiandrosterone sulphotransferase (SULT2A1/DHEA) using the local (M06-L) and hybrid (M06, M06-2X) meta-GGA functionals of density functional theory (DFT). Results revealed that DHEA is able to form HBs with residues His99, Tyr231, Met137 and Met16 in the active site of the SULT2A1/DHEA. It was found that DHEA interacts with the other residues through electrostatic and Van der Waals interactions.

  9. Structural Mutations that Probe the Interactions between the Catalytic and Dianion Activation Sites at Triosephosphate Isomerase‡

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Xiang; Amyes, Tina L.; Wierenga, Rik K.; Loria, J. Patrick; Richard, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) catalyzes the isomerization of dihydroxyacetone phosphate to form D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The effects of two structural mutations at TIM on the kinetic parameters for catalysis of the reaction of the truncated substrate glycolaldehyde (GA) and the activation of this reaction by phosphite dianion are reported. The P168A mutation results in similar 50-fold and 80-fold decreases, respectively, in (kcat/Km)E and (kcat/Km)E•HPi for deprotonation of GA catalyzed by free TIM and by the TIM•HPO32− complex. The mutation has little effect on the observed and intrinsic phosphite dianion binding energy, or on the magnitude of phosphite dianion activation of TIM for catalysis of deprotonation of GA. A loop 7 replacement mutant (L7RM) of TIM from chicken muscle was prepared by substitution of the archaeal sequence 208-TGAG for 208-YGGS. The L7RM exhibits a 25-fold decrease in (kcat/Km)E and a larger 170-fold decrease in (kcat/Km)E•HPi for reactions of GA. The mutation has little effect on the observed and intrinsic phosphodianion binding energy, and only a modest effect on phosphite dianion activation of TIM. The observation that both the P168A and loop 7 replacement mutations affect mainly the kinetic parameters for TIM-catalyzed deprotonation, but result in much smaller changes in the parameters for enzyme activation by phosphite dianion provide support for the conclusion that catalysis of proton transfer and dianion activation of TIM take place at separate, weakly interacting, sites in the protein catalyst. PMID:23909928

  10. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  11. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  12. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  13. An active site-tail interaction in the structure of hexahistidine-tagged Thermoplasma acidophilum citrate synthase.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jesse R; Donini, Stefano; Kappock, T Joseph

    2015-10-01

    Citrate synthase (CS) plays a central metabolic role in aerobes and many other organisms. The CS reaction comprises two half-reactions: a Claisen aldol condensation of acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) and oxaloacetate (OAA) that forms citryl-CoA (CitCoA), and CitCoA hydrolysis. Protein conformational changes that `close' the active site play an important role in the assembly of a catalytically competent condensation active site. CS from the thermoacidophile Thermoplasma acidophilum (TpCS) possesses an endogenous Trp fluorophore that can be used to monitor the condensation reaction. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of TpCS fused to a C-terminal hexahistidine tag (TpCSH6) reported here is an `open' structure that, when compared with several liganded TpCS structures, helps to define a complete path for active-site closure. One active site in each dimer binds a neighboring His tag, the first nonsubstrate ligand known to occupy both the AcCoA and OAA binding sites. Solution data collectively suggest that this fortuitous interaction is stabilized by the crystalline lattice. As a polar but almost neutral ligand, the active site-tail interaction provides a new starting point for the design of bisubstrate-analog inhibitors of CS. PMID:26457521

  14. Influence of protonation on substrate and inhibitor interactions at the active site of human monoamine oxidase-A.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Torres, Gerald; Fierro, Angelica; Miranda-Rojas, Sebastian; Guajardo, Carlos; Saez-Briones, Patricio; Salgado, J Cristian; Celis-Barros, Cristian

    2012-05-25

    Although substrate conversion mediated by human monoaminooxidase (hMAO) has been associated with the deprotonated state of their amine moiety, data regarding the influence of protonation on substrate binding at the active site are scarce. Thus, in order to assess protonation influence, steered molecular dynamics (SMD) runs were carried out. These simulations revealed that the protonated form of the substrate serotonin (5-HT) exhibited stronger interactions at the protein surface compared to the neutral form. The latter displayed stronger interactions in the active site cavity. These observations support the possible role of the deprotonated form in substrate conversion. Multigrid docking studies carried out to rationalize the role of 5-HT protonation in other sites besides the active site indicated two energetically favored docking sites for the protonated form of 5-HT on the enzyme surface. These sites seem to be interconnected with the substrate/inhibitor cavity, as revealed by the tunnels observed by means of CAVER program. pK(a) calculations in the surface loci pointed to Glu³²⁷, Asp³²⁸, His⁴⁸⁸, and Asp¹³² as candidates for a possible in situ deprotonation step. Docking analysis of a group of inhibitors (structurally related to substrates) showed further interactions with the same two docking access sites. Interestingly, the protonated/deprotonated amine moiety of almost all compounds attained different docking poses in the active site, none of them oriented to the flavin moiety, thus producing a more variable and less productive orientations to act as substrates. Our results highlight the role of deprotonation in facilitating substrate conversion and also might reflect the necessity of inhibitor molecules to adopt specific orientations to achieve enzyme inhibition. PMID:22540832

  15. Kinetic model of ethopropazine interaction with horse serum butyrylcholinesterase and its docking into the active site.

    PubMed

    Golicnik, Marko; Sinko, Goran; Simeon-Rudolf, Vera; Grubic, Zoran; Stojan, Jure

    2002-02-01

    The action of a potent tricyclic cholinesterase inhibitor ethopropazine on the hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine and butyrylthiocholine by purified horse serum butyrylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.8) was investigated at 25 and 37 degrees C. The enzyme activities were measured on a stopped-flow apparatus and the analysis of experimental data was done by applying a six-parameter model for substrate hydrolysis. The model, which was introduced to explain the kinetics of Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase [Stojan et al. (1998) FEBS Lett. 440, 85-88], is defined with two dissociation constants and four rate constants and can describe both cooperative phenomena, apparent activation at low substrate concentrations and substrate inhibition by excess of substrate. For the analysis of the data in the presence of ethopropazine at two temperatures, we have enlarged the reaction scheme to allow primarily its competition with the substrate at the peripheral site, but the competition at the acylation site was not excluded. The proposed reaction scheme revealed, upon analysis, competitive effects of ethopropazine at both sites; at 25 degrees C, three enzyme-inhibitor dissociation constants could be evaluated; at 37 degrees C, only two constants could be evaluated. Although the model considers both cooperative phenomena, it appears that decreased enzyme sensitivity at higher temperature, predominantly for the ligands at the peripheral binding site, makes the determination of some expected enzyme substrate and/or inhibitor complexes technically impossible. The same reason might also account for one of the paradoxes in cholinesterases: activities at 25 degrees C at low substrate concentrations are higher than at 37 degrees C. Positioning of ethopropazine in the active-site gorge by molecular dynamics simulations shows that A328, W82, D70, and Y332 amino acid residues stabilize binding of the inhibitor. PMID:11811945

  16. Interaction of mining activities and aquatic environment: A review from Greek mine sites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileiou, Eleni; Kallioras, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In Greece a significant amount of mineral and ore deposits have been recorded accompanied by large industrial interest and a long mining history. Today many active and/or abandoned mine sites are scattered within the country; while mining activities take place in different sites for exploiting various deposits (clay, limestone, slate, gypsum, kaolin, mixed sulphide ores (lead, zinc, olivine, pozzolan, quartz lignite, nickel, magnesite, aluminum, bauxite, gold, marbles etc). The most prominent recent ones are: (i) the lignite exploitation that is extended in the area of Ptolemais (Western Macedonia) and Megalopolis (Central Peloponnese); and (ii) the major bauxite deposits located in central Greece within the Parnassos-Ghiona geotectonic zone and on Euboea Island. In the latter area, significant ores of magnesite were exploited and mixed sulphide ores. Centuries of intensive mining exploitation and metallurgical treatment of lead-silver deposits in Greece, have also resulted in significant abandoned sites, such as the one in Lavrion. Mining activities in Lavrio, were initiated in ancient times and continued until the 1980s, resulting in the production of significant waste stockpiles deposited in the area, crucial for the local water resources. Ιn many mining sites, environmental pressures are also recorded after the mine closure to the aquatic environment, as the surface waters flow through waste dump areas and contaminated soils. This paper aims to the geospatial visualization of the mining activities in Greece, in connection to their negative (surface- and/or ground-water pollution; overpumping due to extensive dewatering practices) or positive (enhanced groundwater recharge; pit lakes, improvement of water budget in the catchment scale) impacts on local water resources.

  17. A Hydrophobic Pocket in the Active Site of Glycolytic Aldolase Mediates Interactions with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein

    SciTech Connect

    St-Jean,M.; Izard, T.; Sygusch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aldolase plays essential catalytic roles in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. However, aldolase is a highly abundant protein that is remarkably promiscuous in its interactions with other cellular proteins. In particular, aldolase binds to highly acidic amino acid sequences, including the C-terminus of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor. Here we report the crystal structure of tetrameric rabbit muscle aldolase in complex with a C-terminal peptide of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Aldolase recognizes a short, 4-residue DEWD motif (residues 498-501), which adopts a loose hairpin turn that folds about the central aromatic residue, enabling its tryptophan side chain to fit into a hydrophobic pocket in the active site of aldolase. The flanking acidic residues in this binding motif provide further interactions with conserved aldolase active site residues, Arg-42 and Arg-303, aligning their side chains and forming the sides of the hydrophobic pocket. The binding of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein to aldolase precludes intramolecular interactions of its C-terminus with its active site, and is competitive with substrate as well as with binding by actin and cortactin. Finally, based on this structure a novel naphthol phosphate-based inhibitor of aldolase was identified and its structure in complex with aldolase demonstrated mimicry of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-aldolase interaction. The data support a model whereby aldolase exists in distinct forms that regulate glycolysis or actin dynamics.

  18. Dimer-dimer interaction of the bacterial selenocysteine synthase SelA promotes functional active site formation and catalytic specificity

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Yuzuru; Bröcker, Markus J.; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Söll, Dieter; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    The 21st amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec), is incorporated translationally into proteins, and is synthesized on its specific tRNA (tRNASec). In Bacteria, the selenocysteine synthase SelA converts Ser-tRNASec, formed by seryl-tRNA synthetase, to Sec-tRNASec. SelA, a member of the fold-type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme superfamily, has an exceptional homodecameric quaternary structure with a molecular mass of about 500 kDa. Our previously determined crystal structures of Aquifex aeolicus SelA complexed with tRNASec revealed that the ring-shaped decamer is composed of pentamerized SelA dimers, with two SelA dimers arranged to collaboratively interact with one Ser-tRNASec. The SelA catalytic site is close to the dimer-dimer interface, but the significance of the dimer-pentamerization in the catalytic site formation remained elusive. In the present study, we examined the quaternary interactions, and demonstrated their importance for SelA activity by systematic mutagenesis. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of “depentamerized” SelA variants with mutations at the dimer-dimer interface that prevent pentamerization. These dimeric SelA variants formed a distorted and inactivated catalytic site, and confirmed that the pentamer interactions are essential for productive catalytic site formation. Intriguingly, the conformation of the non-functional active site of dimeric SelA shares structural features with other fold-type-I PLP-dependent enzymes with native dimer or tetramer (dimer-of-dimers) quaternary structures. PMID:24456689

  19. Ortho-7 bound to the active-site gorge of free and OP-conjugated acetylcholinesterase: cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Arup Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Tusar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the immense importance of cation-π interactions prevailing in bispyridinium drug acetylcholinesterase (AChE) complexes, a precise description of cation-π interactions at molecular level has remained elusive. Here, we consider a bispyridinium drug, namely, ortho-7 in three different structures of AChE, with and without complexation with organophosphorus (OP) compounds for detailed investigation using all atom molecular dynamics simulation. By quantum mechanical calculations, Y72, W86, Y124, W286, Y337, and Y341 aromatic residues of the enzyme are investigated for possible cation-π interactions with ortho-7. The cation-π interactions in each of the protein-drug complexes are studied using distance, angle, a suitable functional form of them, and electrostatic criteria. The variation of cation-π functional is remarkably consistent with that of the Columbic variation. It is clearly observed that cation-π interactions for some of the residues in the catalytic active site (CAS) and peripheral anionic site (PAS) of the enzyme are either enhanced or reduced based on the nature of OP conjugation (i.e., nerve gas, tabun or pesticide, fenamiphos) when compared with the OP-free enzyme. The strength of cation-π interaction is strongly dependent on the type OP conjugation. The effect of conjugation at CAS is also seen to influence the cation-π interaction at the PAS region. The variation of cation-π interactions on the type of conjugating OP compounds might be suggestive of a reason as to why wide spectrum drug against any OP poisoning is yet to arrive in the market. PMID:26270602

  20. Molecular protein adaptor with genetically encoded interaction sites guiding the hierarchical assembly of plasmonically active nanoparticle architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Andreas; Huber, Matthias C.; Cölfen, Helmut; Schiller, Stefan M.

    2015-03-01

    The control over the defined assembly of nano-objects with nm-precision is important to create systems and materials with enhanced properties, for example, metamaterials. In nature, the precise assembly of inorganic nano-objects with unique features, for example, magnetosomes, is accomplished by efficient and reliable recognition schemes involving protein effectors. Here we present a molecular approach using protein-based ‘adaptors/connectors’ with genetically encoded interaction sites to guide the assembly and functionality of different plasmonically active gold nanoparticle architectures (AuNP). The interaction of the defined geometricaly shaped protein adaptors with the AuNP induces the self-assembly of nanoarchitectures ranging from AuNP encapsulation to one-dimensional chain-like structures, complex networks and stars. Synthetic biology and bionanotechnology are applied to co-translationally encode unnatural amino acids as additional site-specific modification sites to generate functionalized biohybrid nanoarchitectures. This protein adaptor-based nano-object assembly approach might be expanded to other inorganic nano-objects creating biohybrid materials with unique electronic, photonic, plasmonic and magnetic properties.

  1. Molecular protein adaptor with genetically encoded interaction sites guiding the hierarchical assembly of plasmonically active nanoparticle architectures.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Andreas; Huber, Matthias C; Cölfen, Helmut; Schiller, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    The control over the defined assembly of nano-objects with nm-precision is important to create systems and materials with enhanced properties, for example, metamaterials. In nature, the precise assembly of inorganic nano-objects with unique features, for example, magnetosomes, is accomplished by efficient and reliable recognition schemes involving protein effectors. Here we present a molecular approach using protein-based 'adaptors/connectors' with genetically encoded interaction sites to guide the assembly and functionality of different plasmonically active gold nanoparticle architectures (AuNP). The interaction of the defined geometricaly shaped protein adaptors with the AuNP induces the self-assembly of nanoarchitectures ranging from AuNP encapsulation to one-dimensional chain-like structures, complex networks and stars. Synthetic biology and bionanotechnology are applied to co-translationally encode unnatural amino acids as additional site-specific modification sites to generate functionalized biohybrid nanoarchitectures. This protein adaptor-based nano-object assembly approach might be expanded to other inorganic nano-objects creating biohybrid materials with unique electronic, photonic, plasmonic and magnetic properties. PMID:25813537

  2. ATPase active-site electrostatic interactions control the global conformation of the 100 kDa SecA translocase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dorothy M.; Zheng, Haiyan; Huang, Yuanpeng J.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Hunt, John F.

    2013-01-01

    SecA is an intensively studied mechanoenzyme that uses ATP hydrolysis to drive processive extrusion of secreted proteins through a protein-conducting channel in the cytoplasmic membrane of eubacteria. The ATPase motor of SecA is strongly homologous to that in DEAD-box RNA helicases. It remains unclear how local chemical events in its ATPase active site control the overall conformation of an ~100 kDa multidomain enzyme and drive protein transport. In this paper, we use biophysical methods to establish that a single electrostatic charge in the ATPase active site controls the global conformation of SecA. The enzyme undergoes an ATP-modulated endothermic conformational transition (ECT) believed to involve similar structural mechanics to the protein transport reaction. We have characterized the effects of an isosteric glutamate-to-glutamine mutation in the catalytic base, which mimics the immediate electrostatic consequences of ATP hydrolysis in the active site. Calorimetric studies demonstrate that this mutation facilitates the ECT in E. coli SecA and triggers it completely in B. subtilis SecA. Consistent with the substantial increase in entropy observed in the course of the ECT, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry demonstrates that it increases protein backbone dynamics in domain-domain interfaces at remote locations from the ATPase active site. The catalytic glutamate is one of ~250 charged amino acids in SecA, and yet neutralization of its sidechain charge is sufficient to trigger a global order-disorder transition in this 100 kDa enzyme. The intricate network of structural interactions mediating this effect couples local electrostatic changes during ATP hydrolysis to global conformational and dynamic changes in SecA. This network forms the foundation of the allosteric mechanochemistry that efficiently harnesses the chemical energy stored in ATP to drive complex mechanical processes. PMID:23167435

  3. Modelling active sites for the Beckmann rearrangement reaction in boron-containing zeolites and their interaction with probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Lezcano-González, Inés; Vidal-Moya, Alejandro; Boronat, Mercedes; Blasco, Teresa; Corma, Avelino

    2010-06-28

    Theoretical calculations and in situ solid state NMR spectroscopy have been combined to get insight on the nature of the active sites for the Beckmann rearrangement reaction in borosilicate zeolites. The interaction of a B site in zeolite Beta with a series of probe molecules (ammonia, pyridine, acetone and water) has been modelled and the (15)N and (11)B NMR isotropic chemical shift of the resulting complexes calculated and compared with experimental in situ NMR results. This approach has allowed validation of the methodology to model the adsorption on a zeolite boron site of molecules of varying basicity which are either protonated or non-protonated. The limitation is that theoretical calculations overestimate the effect of molecular adsorption through hydrogen bonds on the calculated isotropic (11)B NMR chemical shift.Theoretical and experimental results on the adsorption of acetophenone and cyclohexanone oximes on zeolite B-Beta indicate that Brønsted acid sites protonate the oximes, changing the boron coordination from trigonal to tetrahedral. Comparison of theoretical and experimental (15)N NMR chemical shifts of the adsorbed amides (acetanilide and epsilon-caprolactam) indicates that they are non-protonated, and the (11)B NMR spectra show that, as expected, boron remains in trigonal coordination with an isotropic delta(11)B(exp) which differs from the calculated value delta(11)B(calc). PMID:20454729

  4. Myc-Max heterodimers activate a DEAD box gene and interact with multiple E box-related sites in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Grandori, C; Mac, J; Siëbelt, F; Ayer, D E; Eisenman, R N

    1996-01-01

    The c-Myc protein is involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis though heterodimerization with Max to form a transcriptionally active sequence-specific DNA binding complex. By means of sequential immunoprecipitation of chromatin using anti-Max and anti-Myc antibodies, we have identified a Myc-regulated gene and genomic sites occupied by Myc-Max in vivo. Four of 27 sites recovered by this procedure corresponded to the highest affinity 'canonical' CACGTG sequence. However, the most common in vivo binding sites belonged to the group of 'non-canonical' E box-related binding sites previously identified by in vitro selection. Several of the genomic fragments isolated contained transcribed sequences, including one, MrDb, encoding an evolutionarily conserved RNA helicase of the DEAD box family. The corresponding mRNA was induced following activation of a Myc-estrogen receptor fusion protein (Myc-ER) in the presence of a protein synthesis inhibitor, consistent with this helicase gene being a direct target of Myc-Max. In addition, as for c-Myc, the expression of MrDb is induced upon proliferative stimulation of primary human fibroblasts as well as B cells and down-regulated during terminal differentiation of HL60 leukemia cells. Our results indicate that Myc-Max heterodimers interact in vivo with a specific set of E box-related DNA sequences and that Myc is likely to activate multiple target genes including a highly conserved DEAD box protein. Therefore, Myc may exert its effects on cell behavior through proteins that affect RNA structure and metabolism. Images PMID:8861962

  5. Enzyme-ligand interactions that drive active site rearrangements in the Helicobacter pylori 5´-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Ronning, Donald R; Iacopelli, Natalie M; Mishra, Vidhi

    2012-03-15

    The bacterial enzyme 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) plays a central role in three essential metabolic pathways in bacteria: methionine salvage, purine salvage, and polyamine biosynthesis. Recently, its role in the pathway that leads to the production of autoinducer II, an important component in quorum-sensing, has garnered much interest. Because of this variety of roles, MTAN is an attractive target for developing new classes of inhibitors that influence bacterial virulence and biofilm formation. To gain insight toward the development of new classes of MTAN inhibitors, the interactions between the Helicobacter pylori-encoded MTAN and its substrates and substrate analogs were probed using X-ray crystallography. The structures of MTAN, an MTAN-Formycin A complex, and an adenine bound form were solved by molecular replacement and refined to 1.7, 1.8, and 1.6 Å, respectively. The ribose-binding site in the MTAN and MTAN-adenine cocrystal structures contain a tris[hydroxymethyl]aminomethane molecule that stabilizes the closed form of the enzyme and displaces a nucleophilic water molecule necessary for catalysis. This research gives insight to the interactions between MTAN and bound ligands that promote closing of the enzyme active site and highlights the potential for designing new classes of MTAN inhibitors using a link/grow or ligand assembly development strategy based on the described H. pylori MTAN crystal structures.

  6. A Novel Functional Site in the PB2 Subunit of Influenza A Virus Essential for Acetyl-CoA Interaction, RNA Polymerase Activity, and Viral Replication*

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Dai; Shoji, Masaki; Yamayoshi, Seiya; Hirota, Takenori; Nagae, Monami; Yanagisawa, Shin; Nakano, Masahiro; Ohmi, Naho; Noda, Takeshi; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Kuzuhara, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The PA, PB1, and PB2 subunits, components of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza A virus, are essential for viral transcription and replication. The PB2 subunit binds to the host RNA cap (7-methylguanosine triphosphate (m7GTP)) and supports the endonuclease activity of PA to “snatch” the cap from host pre-mRNAs. However, the structure of PB2 is not fully understood, and the functional sites remain unknown. In this study, we describe a novel Val/Arg/Gly (VRG) site in the PB2 cap-binding domain, which is involved in interaction with acetyl-CoA found in eukaryotic histone acetyltransferases (HATs). In vitro experiments revealed that the recombinant PB2 cap-binding domain that includes the VRG site interacts with acetyl-CoA; moreover, it was found that this interaction could be blocked by CoA and various HAT inhibitors. Interestingly, m7GTP also inhibited this interaction, suggesting that the same active pocket is capable of interacting with acetyl-CoA and m7GTP. To elucidate the importance of the VRG site on PB2 function and viral replication, we constructed a PB2 recombinant protein and recombinant viruses including several patterns of amino acid mutations in the VRG site. Substitutions of the valine and arginine residues or of all 3 residues of the VRG site to alanine significantly reduced the binding ability of PB2 to acetyl-CoA and its RNA polymerase activity. Recombinant viruses containing the same mutations could not be replicated in cultured cells. These results indicate that the PB2 VRG sequence is a functional site that is essential for acetyl-CoA interaction, RNA polymerase activity, and viral replication. PMID:25063805

  7. Localization of a TNF-activated transcription site and interactions with the gamma activated site within the CAEV U3 70 base pair repeat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cytokines TNF' and IFN' have previously been shown to activate caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) transcription. Increased viral titers correlate with increased lesion severity. Therefore, TNF' and IFN' may augment the caprine arthritis lesion by increasing viral titers. CAEV transcr...

  8. An interaction site of the envelope proteins of Semliki Forest virus that is preserved after proteolytic activation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xinyong; Kielian, Margaret . E-mail: kielian@aecom.yu.edu

    2005-07-05

    Semliki Forest virus (SFV) membrane fusion is mediated by the viral E1 protein at acidic pH and regulated by the dimeric interaction of E1 with the E2 membrane protein. During low pH-triggered fusion, the E2/E1 heterodimer dissociates, freeing E1 to drive membrane fusion. E2 is synthesized as a precursor, p62, which is processed to mature E2 by the cellular protease furin. Both the dissociation of the p62/E1 dimer and the fusion reaction of p62 virus have a more acidic pH threshold than that of the mature E2 virus. We have previously isolated SFV mutations that allow virus growth in furin-deficient cells. Here we have used such pci mutations to compare the interactions of the p62/E1 and E2/E1 dimers. Our data suggest that there is an important p62/E1 dimer interaction site identified by an E2 R250G mutation and that this interaction is maintained after processing to the mature E2 protein.

  9. Study of chaperone-like activity of human haptoglobin: conformational changes under heat shock conditions and localization of interaction sites.

    PubMed

    Ettrich, Rüdiger; Brandt, Wolfgang; Kopecký, Vladimír; Baumruk, Vladimír; Hofbauerová, Katerina; Pavlícek, Zdenek

    2002-10-01

    With respect to the mechanism of chaperone-like activity, we examined the behavior of haptoglobin under heat shock conditions. Secondary structure changes during heat treatment were followed by circular dichroism, Raman and infrared spectroscopy. A model of the haptoglobin tetramer, based on its sequence homology with serine proteases and the CCP modules, has been proposed. Sequence regions responsible for the chaperone-like activity were not fully identical with the region that takes part in formation of the hemoglobin-haptoglobin complex. We can postulate the presence of at least two different chaperone-binding sites on each haptoglobin heavy chain. PMID:12452443

  10. RGS12 and RGS14 GoLoco motifs are G alpha(i) interaction sites with guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor Activity.

    PubMed

    Kimple, R J; De Vries, L; Tronchère, H; Behe, C I; Morris, R A; Gist Farquhar, M; Siderovski, D P

    2001-08-01

    The regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins accelerate the intrinsic guanosine triphosphatase activity of heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunits and are thus recognized as key modulators of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. RGS12 and RGS14 contain not only the hallmark RGS box responsible for GTPase-accelerating activity but also a single G alpha(i/o)-Loco (GoLoco) motif predicted to represent a second G alpha interaction site. Here, we describe functional characterization of the GoLoco motif regions of RGS12 and RGS14. Both regions interact exclusively with G alpha(i1), G alpha(i2), and G alpha(i3) in their GDP-bound forms. In GTP gamma S binding assays, both regions exhibit guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) activity, inhibiting the rate of exchange of GDP for GTP by G alpha(i1). Both regions also stabilize G alpha(i1) in its GDP-bound form, inhibiting the increase in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence stimulated by AlF(4)(-). Our results indicate that both RGS12 and RGS14 harbor two distinctly different G alpha interaction sites: a previously recognized N-terminal RGS box possessing G alpha(i/o) GAP activity and a C-terminal GoLoco region exhibiting G alpha(i) GDI activity. The presence of two, independent G alpha interaction sites suggests that RGS12 and RGS14 participate in a complex coordination of G-protein signaling beyond simple G alpha GAP activity. PMID:11387333

  11. EPR and 1H-NMR spectroscopic studies on the paramagnetic iron at the active site of phenylalanine hydroxylase and its interaction with substrates and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Martínez, A; Andersson, K K; Haavik, J; Flatmark, T

    1991-06-15

    The paramagnetic iron at the active site of highly purified, catalytically active phenylalanine hydroxylase was studied by EPR at 3.6 K and one-dimensional 1H-NMR spectroscopy at 293 K. The EPR-detectable iron of the bovine enzyme was found to be present as a high-spin form (S = 5/2) in different ligand field symmetries depending on medium conditions (buffer ions) and the presence of ligands known to bind at the active site. At 3.6 K and in phosphate buffer, the paramagnetic iron is coordinated in an environment of rhombic symmetry (g = 4.3), whereas Tris buffer favours an environment of axial ligand field symmetry (g = 6.7, 5.3 and 2.0). The latter axial type of signals resembles those observed at g = 7.0, 5.2 and 1.9 for the enzyme in phosphate buffer when L-noradrenaline is added as an active-site ligand (inhibitor). The same proportion of iron that coordinates to L-noradrenaline seems to be reduced by the pterin cofactor and participate in catalysis. Experimental evidence is presented that Tris inhibits the enzyme by interacting with the enzyme-bound ferric iron and decreases its rate of reduction by the tetrahydropterin cofactor. Preincubation with dithiothreitol also inhibits the enzyme activity and prevents the reduction of its catalytically active ferric iron by pterin cofactors as well as binding of catecholamines to the enzyme. 1H-NMR spectroscopy revealed that the substrate (L-phenylalanine) and L-noradrenaline bind close to the paramagnetic iron, and that the catecholamine displaces the substrate from its binding at the active site. The results support our recently proposed model for the cooperative binding of inhibitor and substrate at the active site [Martínez, A. et al. (1990) Eur. J. Biochem. 193, 211-219]. PMID:1646718

  12. Activating and deactivating mutations in the receptor interaction site of GDF5 cause symphalangism or brachydactyly type A2.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Petra; Schwappacher, Raphaela; Kjaer, Klaus W; Krakow, Deborah; Lehmann, Katarina; Dawson, Katherine; Stricker, Sigmar; Pohl, Jens; Plöger, Frank; Staub, Eike; Nickel, Joachim; Sebald, Walter; Knaus, Petra; Mundlos, Stefan

    2005-09-01

    Here we describe 2 mutations in growth and differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) that alter receptor-binding affinities. They cause brachydactyly type A2 (L441P) and symphalangism (R438L), conditions previously associated with mutations in the GDF5 receptor bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1b (BMPR1B) and the BMP antagonist NOGGIN, respectively. We expressed the mutant proteins in limb bud micromass culture and treated ATDC5 and C2C12 cells with recombinant GDF5. Our results indicated that the L441P mutant is almost inactive. The R438L mutant, in contrast, showed increased biological activity when compared with WT GDF5. Biosensor interaction analyses revealed loss of binding to BMPR1A and BMPR1B ectodomains for the L441P mutant, whereas the R438L mutant showed normal binding to BMPR1B but increased binding to BMPR1A, the receptor normally activated by BMP2. The binding to NOGGIN was normal for both mutants. Thus, the brachydactyly type A2 phenotype (L441P) is caused by inhibition of the ligand-receptor interaction, whereas the symphalangism phenotype (R438L) is caused by a loss of receptor-binding specificity, resulting in a gain of function by the acquisition of BMP2-like properties. The presented experiments have identified some of the main determinants of GDF5 receptor-binding specificity in vivo and open new prospects for generating antagonists and superagonists of GDF5. PMID:16127465

  13. Multilayer Dye Adsorption in Activated Carbons-Facile Approach to Exploit Vacant Sites and Interlayer Charge Interaction.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Pejman; Guo, Jiaxin; Barford, John; McKay, Gordon

    2016-05-17

    Altering the textural properties of activated carbons (ACs) via physicochemical techniques to increase their specific surface area and/or to manipulate their pore size is a common practice to enhance their adsorption capacity. Instead, this study proposes the utilization of the vacant sites remaining unoccupied after dye uptake saturation by removing the steric hindrance and same-charge repulsion phenomena via multilayer adsorption. Herein, it has been shown that the adsorption capacity of the fresh AC is a direct function of the dye molecular size. As the cross-sectional area of the dye molecule increases, the steric hindrance effect exerted on the neighboring adsorbed molecules increases, and the geometrical packing efficiency is constrained. Thus, ACs saturated with larger dye molecules render higher concentrations of vacant adsorption sites which can accommodate an additional layer of dye molecules on the exhausted adsorbent through interlayer attractive forces. The second layer adsorption capacity (60-200 mg·g(-1)) has been demonstrated to have a linear relationship with the uncovered surface area of the exhausted AC, which is, in turn, inversely proportional to the adsorbate molecular size. Unlike the second layer adsorption, the third layer adsorption is a direct function of the charge density of the second layer. PMID:27088796

  14. In Silico Structure Prediction of Human Fatty Acid Synthase–Dehydratase: A Plausible Model for Understanding Active Site Interactions

    PubMed Central

    John, Arun; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Samdani, A.; Sangeetha, Manoharan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Deepa, Perinkulam Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN, UniProt ID: P49327) is a multienzyme dimer complex that plays a critical role in lipogenesis. Consequently, this lipogenic enzyme has gained tremendous biomedical importance. The role of FASN and its inhibition is being extensively researched in several clinical conditions, such as cancers, obesity, and diabetes. X-ray crystallographic structures of some of its domains, such as β-ketoacyl synthase, acetyl transacylase, malonyl transacylase, enoyl reductase, β-ketoacyl reductase, and thioesterase, (TE) are already reported. Here, we have attempted an in silico elucidation of the uncrystallized dehydratase (DH) catalytic domain of human FASN. This theoretical model for DH domain was predicted using comparative modeling methods. Different stand-alone tools and servers were used to validate and check the reliability of the predicted models, which suggested it to be a highly plausible model. The stereochemical analysis showed 92.0% residues in favorable region of Ramachandran plot. The initial physiological substrate β-hydroxybutyryl group was docked into active site of DH domain using Glide. The molecular dynamics simulations carried out for 20 ns in apo and holo states indicated the stability and accuracy of the predicted structure in solvated condition. The predicted model provided useful biochemical insights into the substrate–active site binding mechanisms. This model was then used for identifying potential FASN inhibitors using high-throughput virtual screening of the National Cancer Institute database of chemical ligands. The inhibitory efficacy of the top hit ligands was validated by performing molecular dynamics simulation for 20 ns, where in the ligand NSC71039 exhibited good enzyme inhibition characteristics and exhibited dose-dependent anticancer cytotoxicity in retinoblastoma cancer cells in vitro. PMID:27559295

  15. In Silico Structure Prediction of Human Fatty Acid Synthase-Dehydratase: A Plausible Model for Understanding Active Site Interactions.

    PubMed

    John, Arun; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Samdani, A; Sangeetha, Manoharan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Deepa, Perinkulam Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN, UniProt ID: P49327) is a multienzyme dimer complex that plays a critical role in lipogenesis. Consequently, this lipogenic enzyme has gained tremendous biomedical importance. The role of FASN and its inhibition is being extensively researched in several clinical conditions, such as cancers, obesity, and diabetes. X-ray crystallographic structures of some of its domains, such as β-ketoacyl synthase, acetyl transacylase, malonyl transacylase, enoyl reductase, β-ketoacyl reductase, and thioesterase, (TE) are already reported. Here, we have attempted an in silico elucidation of the uncrystallized dehydratase (DH) catalytic domain of human FASN. This theoretical model for DH domain was predicted using comparative modeling methods. Different stand-alone tools and servers were used to validate and check the reliability of the predicted models, which suggested it to be a highly plausible model. The stereochemical analysis showed 92.0% residues in favorable region of Ramachandran plot. The initial physiological substrate β-hydroxybutyryl group was docked into active site of DH domain using Glide. The molecular dynamics simulations carried out for 20 ns in apo and holo states indicated the stability and accuracy of the predicted structure in solvated condition. The predicted model provided useful biochemical insights into the substrate-active site binding mechanisms. This model was then used for identifying potential FASN inhibitors using high-throughput virtual screening of the National Cancer Institute database of chemical ligands. The inhibitory efficacy of the top hit ligands was validated by performing molecular dynamics simulation for 20 ns, where in the ligand NSC71039 exhibited good enzyme inhibition characteristics and exhibited dose-dependent anticancer cytotoxicity in retinoblastoma cancer cells in vitro. PMID:27559295

  16. Dimer-dimer interaction of the bacterial selenocysteine synthase SelA promotes functional active-site formation and catalytic specificity.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yuzuru; Bröcker, Markus J; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Söll, Dieter; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-04-17

    The 21st amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec), is incorporated translationally into proteins and is synthesized on its specific tRNA (tRNA(Sec)). In Bacteria, the selenocysteine synthase SelA converts Ser-tRNA(Sec), formed by seryl-tRNA synthetase, to Sec-tRNA(Sec). SelA, a member of the fold-type-I pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme superfamily, has an exceptional homodecameric quaternary structure with a molecular mass of about 500kDa. Our previously determined crystal structures of Aquifex aeolicus SelA complexed with tRNA(Sec) revealed that the ring-shaped decamer is composed of pentamerized SelA dimers, with two SelA dimers arranged to collaboratively interact with one Ser-tRNA(Sec). The SelA catalytic site is close to the dimer-dimer interface, but the significance of the dimer pentamerization in the catalytic site formation remained elusive. In the present study, we examined the quaternary interactions and demonstrated their importance for SelA activity by systematic mutagenesis. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of "depentamerized" SelA variants with mutations at the dimer-dimer interface that prevent pentamerization. These dimeric SelA variants formed a distorted and inactivated catalytic site and confirmed that the pentamer interactions are essential for productive catalytic site formation. Intriguingly, the conformation of the non-functional active site of dimeric SelA shares structural features with other fold-type-I pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes with native dimer or tetramer (dimer-of-dimers) quaternary structures. PMID:24456689

  17. Interactions between dendrotoxin, a blocker of voltage-dependent potassium channels, and charybdotoxin, a blocker of calcium-activated potassium channels, at binding sites on neuronal membranes.

    PubMed

    Harvey, A L; Marshall, D L; De-Allie, F A; Strong, P N

    1989-08-30

    Dendrotoxin I (DpI) from black mamba venom (Dendroaspis polylepis) has high affinity binding sites on rat brain synaptic membranes. Native DpI displaced [125I]-DpI binding with a Ki of 1 x 10(-10) M, and over 90% of specific binding was displaceable. Charybdotoxin isolated from the Israeli scorpion venom (Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus), also displaced [125I]-DpI binding, with a Ki of approximately 3 x 10(-9) M, although the displacement curve was shallower than with native DpI. Both toxins are thought to be high affinity blockers of specific K+ currents. Charybdotoxin selectively blocks some types of Ca2+-activated K+ channels, whereas dendrotoxins only block certain voltage-dependent K+ channels. The interaction between the two types of toxin at the DpI binding site is unexpected and may suggest the presence of related binding sites on different K+ channel proteins. PMID:2476127

  18. Interaction of on-site and near real time measured turbidity and enzyme activity in stream water.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Philipp; Farnleitner, Andreas H.; Zessner, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    On-site and on-line systems that provide an integrated surveillance of physicochemical and microbiological parameters gain significance in water quality monitoring. Particular relating to diffuse pollution from agricultural areas and use-orientated protection of waters the detection of faecal pollution is a fundamental part. For the near real time and on-site detection of microbiological faecal pollution of water, the beta-D- Glucuronidase (GLUC) enzymatic activity has been suggested as a surrogate parameter. Due to possible short measure intervals of three hours, this method has high potential as a water quality monitoring tool. While cultivation based standard determination takes more than one working day (Cabral 2010) the potential advantage of detecting the GLUC activity is the high temporal measuring resolution. Yet, there is still a big gap of knowledge on the sensitivity and specificity concerning the faecal indication capacity of GLUC in relation to standard assays (Cabral 2010). Interference effects of physicochemical parameters on the enzymatic activity respectively fluorescence have been discussed (Molina-Munoz et al. 2007; Tryland and Fiksdal 1998, Biswal et al. 2003). Results from a monitoring of a rivulet in an agricultural catchment in Lower Austria (HOAL - Hydrological Open Air Laboratory) are presented here. The HOAL offers technical resources that allow measurements at high temporal and spatial resolution and to apply various hydrological methods in one catchment. Two automated enzymatic measuring devices (Coliguard, mbOnline, Austria) and physicochemical in-stream measurements are used, as well as in-stream spectroscopy (spectrolyser, s::can, Austria). Accuracy of both enzymatic measuring devices is compared through diverse hydrological and seasonal conditions. Reference analyses by cultivation based determination were performed. Data from Coliguard devices is combined with physicochemical and spectroscopy data to gain information about the

  19. Specific Sites in the C Terminus of CTCF Interact with the SA2 Subunit of the Cohesin Complex and Are Required for Cohesin-Dependent Insulation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Tiaojiang; Wallace, Julie; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the protein CTCF, which plays an important role in insulation and in large-scale organization of chromatin within the eukaryotic nucleus, depends for both activities on recruitment of the cohesin complex. We show here that the interaction of CTCF with the cohesin complex involves direct contacts between the cohesin subunit SA2 and specific regions of the C-terminal tail of CTCF. All other cohesin components are recruited through their interaction with SA2. Expression in vivo of CTCF mutants lacking the C-terminal domain, or with mutations at sites within it required for SA2 binding, disrupts the normal expression profile of the imprinted genes IGF2-H19 and also results in a loss of insulation activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that specific sites on the C terminus of CTCF are essential for cohesin binding and insulator function. The only direct interaction between CTCF and cohesin involves contact with SA2, which is external to the cohesin ring. This suggests that in recruiting cohesin to CTCF, SA2 could bind first and the ring could assemble subsequently. PMID:21444719

  20. Specific sites in the C terminus of CTCF interact with the SA2 subunit of the cohesin complex and are required for cohesin-dependent insulation activity.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Tiaojiang; Wallace, Julie; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that the protein CTCF, which plays an important role in insulation and in large-scale organization of chromatin within the eukaryotic nucleus, depends for both activities on recruitment of the cohesin complex. We show here that the interaction of CTCF with the cohesin complex involves direct contacts between the cohesin subunit SA2 and specific regions of the C-terminal tail of CTCF. All other cohesin components are recruited through their interaction with SA2. Expression in vivo of CTCF mutants lacking the C-terminal domain, or with mutations at sites within it required for SA2 binding, disrupts the normal expression profile of the imprinted genes IGF2-H19 and also results in a loss of insulation activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that specific sites on the C terminus of CTCF are essential for cohesin binding and insulator function. The only direct interaction between CTCF and cohesin involves contact with SA2, which is external to the cohesin ring. This suggests that in recruiting cohesin to CTCF, SA2 could bind first and the ring could assemble subsequently. PMID:21444719

  1. Lys39-Lysophosphatidate Carbonyl Oxygen Interaction Locks LPA1 N-terminal Cap to the Orthosteric Site and partners Arg124 During Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Omotuyi, Olaposi I.; Nagai, Jun; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor 1 (LPA1) is a member of the G protein-coupled receptors mediating the biological response to LPA species. Lack of detailed mechanism underlying LPA/LPA1 interaction has hampered the development of specific antagonists. Here, novel N-terminal Lys39 has been identified as a key residue during LPA-type agonist binding and LPA1 activation. Analysis of the molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories showed that LPA-type agonist but not VPC-32183 (antagonist) evolved structures with classical GPCR activation signatures such as reduced cytoplasmic transmembrane (TM) 3/TM6 dynamic network, ruptured ionic lock, and formation of a continuous and highly ordered internal water pathway was also observed. In activated state, LPA-type agonists interact with Arg124 (R3.28), Gln125 (Q3.29), Lys294 (K7.36) and a novel N-terminal Lys39. Site-directed mutagenesis showed complete loss of intracellular calcium mobilization in B103 cells expressing R3.28A and Lys39Ala when treated with LPA-type agonists. Structurally, LPA-type agonist via Carbonyl-oxygen/Lys39 interaction facilitated the formation of a hypothetical N-terminal cap tightly packed over LPA1 heptahelical bundle. This packing may represent a key mechanism to distinguish an apo-receptor from bound LPA1. PMID:26268898

  2. Lys39-Lysophosphatidate Carbonyl Oxygen Interaction Locks LPA1 N-terminal Cap to the Orthosteric Site and partners Arg124 During Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Omotuyi, Olaposi I; Nagai, Jun; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor 1 (LPA1) is a member of the G protein-coupled receptors mediating the biological response to LPA species. Lack of detailed mechanism underlying LPA/LPA1 interaction has hampered the development of specific antagonists. Here, novel N-terminal Lys39 has been identified as a key residue during LPA-type agonist binding and LPA1 activation. Analysis of the molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories showed that LPA-type agonist but not VPC-32183 (antagonist) evolved structures with classical GPCR activation signatures such as reduced cytoplasmic transmembrane (TM) 3/TM6 dynamic network, ruptured ionic lock, and formation of a continuous and highly ordered internal water pathway was also observed. In activated state, LPA-type agonists interact with Arg124 (R3.28), Gln125 (Q3.29), Lys294 (K7.36) and a novel N-terminal Lys39. Site-directed mutagenesis showed complete loss of intracellular calcium mobilization in B103 cells expressing R3.28A and Lys39Ala when treated with LPA-type agonists. Structurally, LPA-type agonist via Carbonyl-oxygen/Lys39 interaction facilitated the formation of a hypothetical N-terminal cap tightly packed over LPA1 heptahelical bundle. This packing may represent a key mechanism to distinguish an apo-receptor from bound LPA1. PMID:26268898

  3. Implication of site quality on mitochondrial electron transport activity and its interaction with temperature in feral Mya arenaria clams from the Saguenay Fjord

    SciTech Connect

    Gagne, F. . E-mail: Francois.Gagne@ec.gc.ca; Blaise, C.; Andre, C.; Pellerin, J.

    2007-02-15

    The advent of global warming has given rise to questions about the impact of temperature/pollution interactions on the integrity of certain benthic organisms like bivalves. This interaction was examined in intertidal Mya arenaria clams from the Saguenay Fjord using the concepts of cellular energy allocation and temperature-dependent mitochondrial electron transport (MET{sub T}) activity. Clams were collected at low tide from six sites (two clean, four polluted) for determinations of condition factor (weight/shell length), growth index (age-to-length ratio), gonadal lipids and maturation index, gonad MET at various habitat temperatures, MET{sub T}, gill xanthine oxidase and gill DNA damage. Condition factor was generally lower at the four polluted sites, with growth index being severely affected at two of them. Gonadal maturation was also significantly dampened at two of the four pollution-impacted sites. Gill xanthine oxidase (purine bases salvage pathway) and DNA strand breaks were significantly increased at most of the polluted sites, confirming pollution-mediated damage in clams. Moreover, MET at 20 deg. C, MET{sub T} and gonad lipids were significantly induced at the polluted sites. Clam condition factor was negatively correlated with most of the biomarkers for cellular energy allocation (gonadal lipids, MET and MET{sub T}), but not with gonadal maturation. DNA damage and xanthine oxidase were positively correlated with MET at 20 deg. C and MET{sub T}. This is the first report of electron transport in mitochondria being more sensitive to incremental temperature increases in clams under pollution stress. The gradual warming of clam habitats would likely worsen the impacts of pollution in feral clam populations.

  4. Ionic interactions near the loop L4 are important for maintaining the active-site environment and the dimer stability of (pro)caspase 3

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    We have examined the role of a salt bridge between Lys242 and Glu246 in loop L4 of procaspase 3 and of mature caspase 3, and we show that the interactions are required for stabilizing the active site. Replacing either of the residues with an alanine residue results in a complete loss of procaspase 3 activity. Although both mutants are active in the context of the mature caspase 3, the mutations result in an increase in Km and a decrease in kcat when compared with the wild-type caspase 3. In addition, the mutations result in an increase in the pKa value associated with a change in kcat with pH, but does not affect the transition observed for Km versus pH. The mutations also affect the accessibility of the active-site solvent as measured by tryptophan fluorescence emission in the presence of quenching agents and as a function of pH. We show that, as the pH is lowered, the (pro)caspase dissociates, and the mutations increase the pH-dependent instability of the dimer. Overall, the results suggest that the contacts lost in the procaspase as a result of replacing Lys242 and Glu246 are compensated partially in the mature caspase as a result of new contacts that are known to form on zymogen processing. PMID:15312047

  5. Physical nature of intermolecular interactions inside Sir2 homolog active site: molecular dynamics and ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Czeleń, Przemysław; Czyżnikowska, Żaneta

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, we analyze the interactions of NAD+-dependent deacetylase (Sir2 homolog yeast Hst2) with carba-nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide (ADP-HPD). For the Sir2 homolog, a yeast Hst2 docking procedure was applied. The structure of the protein-ADP-HPD complex obtained during the docking procedure was used as a starting point for molecular dynamics simulation. The intermolecular interaction energy partitioning was performed for protein-ADP-HPD complex resulting from molecular dynamics simulation. The analysis was performed for ADP-HPD and 15 amino acids forming a deacetylase binding pocket. Although the results indicate that the first-order electrostatic interaction energy is substantial, the presence of multiple hydrogen bonds in investigated complexes can lead to significant value of induction component. PMID:27154340

  6. Interactive Web Sites for Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Ken

    2005-01-01

    Eighty-three percent of teenagers are online. The average teen spends 5 to 10 hours a week on the Web. When using Web sites, teenagers are easily bored. Teenagers are also not nearly as skilled as adults at navigating the Web and do not really care for glitzy graphics. Insufficient reading skills, immature research strategies, and unwillingness to…

  7. Carboxymethylation of methionine residues in bovine pituitary luteinizing hormone and its subunits. Effects on the binding activity with receptor sites and interactions between subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, K W

    1976-01-01

    The reaction of iodoacetic acid with bovine lutropin (luteinizing hormone) at pH 3.0 was specific for methionine residues; it was slow and reached its equilibrium after 12 h at 37 degrees C. The number of modified methionine residues increased proportionately with the amount of the alkylating reagent in the reaction mixture. In the presence of a 20-fold molar excess of iodoacetic acid with respect to methionine, essentially all methionine residues in both subunits of bovine lutropin were carboxymethylated. Studies of various recombinations of modified and native alpha and beta subunits showed that methionine residues in bovine lutropin were not essential for interactions between subunits. Various recombinants were characterized by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and gel filtration of Sephadex G-100. Immunological cross-reactivity by radioimmunoassay of the recombinants of modified alpha and beta subunits was relatively similar to that of the native subunits. However, the biological activity measured by receptor-site binding of the recombinants of alpha and beta chains with a total of three alkylated methionine residues was less than 5% of the activity of native lutropin. It is noteworthy that recombinants of a modified subunit and a native counterpart subunit regenerated 20-30 % of biological activity. These findings suggested that at least 1-2 methionine residues in each subunit are involved in the hormone-receptor interaction for bovine lutropin. Images PLATE 1 PMID:187169

  8. Conserved functional domains and a novel tertiary interaction near the pseudoknot drive translational activity of hepatitis C virus and hepatitis C virus-like internal ribosome entry sites

    PubMed Central

    Easton, Laura E.; Locker, Nicolas; Lukavsky, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    The translational activity of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) and other HCV-like IRES RNAs depends on structured RNA elements in domains II and III, which serve to recruit the ribosomal 40S subunit, eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 3 and the ternary eIF2/Met-tRNAiMet/GTP complex and subsequently domain II assists subunit joining. Porcine teschovirus-1 talfan (PTV-1) is a member of the Picornaviridae family, with a predicted HCV-like secondary structure, but only stem-loops IIId and IIIe in the 40S-binding domain display significant sequence conservation with the HCV IRES. Here, we use chemical probing to show that interaction sites with the 40S subunit and eIF3 are conserved between HCV and HCV-like IRESs. In addition, we reveal the functional role of a strictly conserved co-variation between a purine–purine mismatch near the pseudoknot (A–A/G) and the loop sequence of domain IIIe (GAU/CA). These nucleotides are involved in a tertiary interaction, which serves to stabilize the pseudoknot structure and correlates with translational efficiency in both the PTV-1 and HCV IRES. Our data demonstrate conservation of functional domains in HCV and HCV-like IRESs including a more complex structure surrounding the pseudoknot than previously assumed. PMID:19596815

  9. Studies of the Interaction between Isoimperatorin and Human Serum Albumin by Multispectroscopic Method: Identification of Possible Binding Site of the Compound Using Esterase Activity of the Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Samira; Shokoohinia, Yalda; Ghobadi, Sirous; Gholamzadeh, Saeed; Moradi, Nastaran; Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Aghaei, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Isoimperatorin is one of the main components of Prangos ferulacea as a linear furanocoumarin and used as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antispasmodic, and anticancer drug. Human serum albumin (HSA) is a principal extracellular protein with a high concentration in blood plasma and carrier for many drugs to different molecular targets. Since the carrying of drug by HSA may affect on its structure and action, we decided to investigate the interaction between HSA and isoimperatorin using fluorescence and UV spectroscopy. Fluorescence data indicated that isoimperatorin quenches the intrinsic fluorescence of the HSA via a static mechanism and hydrophobic interaction play the major role in the drug binding. The binding average distance between isoimperatorin and Trp 214 of HSA was estimated on the basis of the theory of Förster energy transfer. Decrease of protein surface hydrophobicity (PSH) was also documented upon isoimperatorin binding. Furthermore, the synchronous fluorescence spectra show that the microenvironment of the tryptophan residues does not have obvious changes. Site marker compettive and fluorescence experiments revealed that the binding of isoimperatorin to HSA occurred at or near site I. Finally, the binding details between isoimperatorin and HSA were further confirmed by molecular docking and esterase activity inhibition studies which revealed that drug was bound at subdomain IIA. PMID:24319355

  10. SufE D74R Substitution Alters Active Site Loop Dynamics To Further Enhance SufE Interaction with the SufS Cysteine Desulfurase

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yuyuan; Kim, Dokyong; Dong, Guangchao; Busenlehner, Laura S.; Frantom, Patrick A.; Outten, F. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Many essential metalloproteins require iron–sulfur (Fe–S) cluster cofactors for their function. In vivo persulfide formation from L-cysteine is a key step in the biogenesis of Fe–S clusters in most organisms. In Escherichia coli, the SufS cysteine desulfurase mobilizes persulfide from L-cysteine via a PLP-dependent ping-pong reaction. SufS requires the SufE partner protein to transfer the persulfide to the SufB Fe–S cluster scaffold. Without SufE, the SufS enzyme fails to efficiently turn over and remains locked in the persulfide-bound state. Coordinated protein–protein interactions mediate sulfur transfer from SufS to SufE. Multiple studies have suggested that SufE must undergo a conformational change to extend its active site Cys loop during sulfur transfer from SufS. To test this putative model, we mutated SufE Asp74 to Arg (D74R) to increase the dynamics of the SufE Cys51 loop. Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) analysis of SufE D74R revealed an increase in solvent accessibility and dynamics in the loop containing the active site Cys51 used to accept persulfide from SufS. Our results indicate that the mutant protein has a stronger binding affinity for SufS than that of wild-type SufE. In addition, SufE D74R can still enhance SufS desulfurase activity and did not show saturation at higher SufE D74R concentrations, unlike wild-type SufE. These results show that dynamic changes may shift SufE to a sulfur-acceptor state that interacts more strongly with SufS. PMID:26171726

  11. 15N NMR spectroscopy of hydrogen-bonding interactions in the active site of serine proteases: evidence for a moving histidine mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, W W

    1986-11-18

    Nitrogen-15 NMR spectroscopy has been used to study the hydrogen-bonding interactions involving the histidyl residue in the catalytic triad of alpha-lytic protease in the resting enzyme and in the transition-state or tetrahedral intermediate analogue complexes formed with phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and diisopropyl fluorophosphate. The 15N shifts indicate that a strong hydrogen bond links the active site histidine and serine residues in the resting enzyme in solution. This result is at odds with interpretations of the X-ray diffraction data of alpha-lytic protease and of other serine proteases, which indicate that the serine and histidine residues are too far apart and not properly aligned for the formation of a hydrogen bond. In addition, the nitrogen-15 shifts demonstrate that protonation of the histidine imidazole ring at low pH in the transition-state or tetrahedral intermediate analogue complexes formed with phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and diisopropyl fluorophosphate triggers the disruption of the aspartate-histidine hydrogen bond. These results suggest a catalytic mechanism involving directed movement of the imidazole ring of the active site histidyl residue. PMID:3542033

  12. Effects of Site-Directed Mutagenesis of Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Enterotoxin on ADP-Ribosyltransferase Activity and Interaction with ADP-Ribosylation Factors

    PubMed Central

    A. Stevens, Linda; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), an oligomeric protein with one A subunit (LTA) and five B subunits, exerts its effects via the ADP-ribosylation of Gsα, a guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein that activates adenylyl cyclase. LTA also ADP-ribosylates simple guanidino compounds (e.g., arginine) and catalyzes its own auto-ADP-ribosylation. All LTA-catalyzed reactions are enhanced by ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. Replacement of arginine-7 (R7K), valine-53 (V53D), serine-63 (S63K), valine 97 (V97K), or tyrosine-104 (Y104K) in LTA resulted in fully assembled but nontoxic proteins. S63K, V53D, and R7K are catalytic-site mutations, whereas V97K and Y104K are amino acid replacements adjacent to and outside of the catalytic site, respectively. The effects of mutagenesis were quantified by measuring ADP-ribosyltransferase activity (i.e., auto-ADP-ribosylation and ADP-ribosylagmatine synthesis) and interaction with ARF (i.e., inhibition of ARF-stimulated cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and effects of ARF on mutant auto-ADP-ribosylation). All mutants were inactive in the ADP-ribosyltransferase assay; however, auto-ADP-ribosylation in the presence of recombinant human ARF6 was detected, albeit much less than that of native LT (Y104K > V53D > V97K > R7K, S63K). Based on the lack of inhibition by free ADP-ribose, the observed auto-ADP-ribosylation activity was enzymatic and not due to the nonenzymatic addition of free ADP-ribose. V53D, S63K, and R7K were more effective than Y104K or V97K in blocking ARF stimulation of cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase. Based on these data, it appears that ARF-binding and catalytic sites are not identical and that a region outside the NAD cleft may participate in the LTA-ARF interaction. PMID:9864224

  13. Effects of site-directed mutagenesis of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin on ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and interaction with ADP-ribosylation factors.

    PubMed

    Stevens, L A; Moss, J; Vaughan, M; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), an oligomeric protein with one A subunit (LTA) and five B subunits, exerts its effects via the ADP-ribosylation of Gsalpha, a guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein that activates adenylyl cyclase. LTA also ADP-ribosylates simple guanidino compounds (e.g., arginine) and catalyzes its own auto-ADP-ribosylation. All LTA-catalyzed reactions are enhanced by ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. Replacement of arginine-7 (R7K), valine-53 (V53D), serine-63 (S63K), valine 97 (V97K), or tyrosine-104 (Y104K) in LTA resulted in fully assembled but nontoxic proteins. S63K, V53D, and R7K are catalytic-site mutations, whereas V97K and Y104K are amino acid replacements adjacent to and outside of the catalytic site, respectively. The effects of mutagenesis were quantified by measuring ADP-ribosyltransferase activity (i.e., auto-ADP-ribosylation and ADP-ribosylagmatine synthesis) and interaction with ARF (i.e., inhibition of ARF-stimulated cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and effects of ARF on mutant auto-ADP-ribosylation). All mutants were inactive in the ADP-ribosyltransferase assay; however, auto-ADP-ribosylation in the presence of recombinant human ARF6 was detected, albeit much less than that of native LT (Y104K > V53D > V97K > R7K, S63K). Based on the lack of inhibition by free ADP-ribose, the observed auto-ADP-ribosylation activity was enzymatic and not due to the nonenzymatic addition of free ADP-ribose. V53D, S63K, and R7K were more effective than Y104K or V97K in blocking ARF stimulation of cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase. Based on these data, it appears that ARF-binding and catalytic sites are not identical and that a region outside the NAD cleft may participate in the LTA-ARF interaction. PMID:9864224

  14. Fourier transform infrared studies of active-site-methylated rhodopsin. Implications for chromophore-protein interaction, transducin activation, and the reaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Ganter, U M; Longstaff, C; Pajares, M A; Rando, R R; Siebert, F

    1991-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared studies of active-site-methylated rhodopsin (ASMR) show that, as compared to unmodified rhodopsin, the photoreaction is almost unchanged up to the formation of lumirhodopsin. Especially, the deviations are much smaller than those observed for the corresponding intermediates of 13-desmethyl-rhodopsin. In metarhodopsin-I, larger alterations are present with respect to the three internal carboxyl groups. Similar deviations have been observed in meta-I of 13-desmethyl-rhodopsin. This indicates that, in agreement with our previous investigations, these carboxyl groups are located in close proximity to the chromophore. Because this latter pigment is capable, when bleached, of activating transducin, our data provide support for the earlier conclusion that deprotonation of the Schiff base is a prerequisite for transducin activation. The positions of the C = C and C - C stretching modes of the retinal suggest that the redshift observed in ASMR and its photoproducts can be explained by an increased distance of the Schiff base from the counterion(s). It is further shown that the photoreaction does not stop at metarhodopsin-I, but that this intermediate directly decays to a metarhodopsin-III-like species. PMID:2049524

  15. NMR Localization of Divalent Cations at the Active Site of the Neurospora VS Ribozyme Provides Insights into RNA–Metal-Ion Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metal cations represent key elements of RNA structure and function. In the Neurospora VS ribozyme, metal cations play diverse roles; they are important for substrate recognition, formation of the active site, and shifting the pKa’s of two key nucleobases that contribute to the general acid–base mechanism. Recently, we determined the NMR structure of the A730 loop of the VS ribozyme active site (SLVI) that contributes the general acid (A756) in the enzymatic mechanism of the cleavage reaction. Our studies showed that magnesium (Mg2+) ions are essential to stabilize the formation of the S-turn motif within the A730 loop that exposes the A756 nucleobase for catalysis. In this article, we extend these NMR investigations by precisely mapping the Mg2+-ion binding sites using manganese-induced paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and cadmium-induced chemical-shift perturbation of phosphorothioate RNAs. These experiments identify five Mg2+-ion binding sites within SLVI. Four Mg2+ ions in SLVI are associated with known RNA structural motifs, including the G–U wobble pair and the GNRA tetraloop, and our studies reveal novel insights about Mg2+ ion binding to these RNA motifs. Interestingly, one Mg2+ ion is specifically associated with the S-turn motif, confirming its structural role in the folding of the A730 loop. This Mg2+ ion is likely important for formation of the active site and may play an indirect role in catalysis. PMID:24364590

  16. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W; Jensen, Kaj Frank; Willemoës, Martin; Grubmeyer, Charles; Winther, Jakob R

    2014-01-15

    The enigmatic kinetics, half-of-the-sites binding, and structural asymmetry of the homodimeric microbial OMP synthases (orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.10) have been proposed to result from an alternating site mechanism in these domain-swapped enzymes [R.W. McClard et al., Biochemistry 45 (2006) 5330-5342]. This behavior was investigated in the yeast enzyme by mutations in the conserved catalytic loop and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) binding motif. Although the reaction is mechanistically sequential, the wild-type (WT) enzyme shows parallel lines in double reciprocal initial velocity plots. Replacement of Lys106, the postulated intersubunit communication device, produced intersecting lines in kinetic plots with a 2-fold reduction of kcat. Loop (R105G K109S H111G) and PRPP-binding motif (D131N D132N) mutant proteins, each without detectable enzymatic activity and ablated ability to bind PRPP, complemented to produce a heterodimer with a single fully functional active site showing intersecting initial velocity plots. Equilibrium binding of PRPP and orotidine 5'-monophosphate showed a single class of two binding sites per dimer in WT and K106S enzymes. Evidence here shows that the enzyme does not follow half-of-the-sites cooperativity; that interplay between catalytic sites is not an essential feature of the catalytic mechanism; and that parallel lines in steady-state kinetics probably arise from tight substrate binding. PMID:24262852

  18. Access to Space Interactive Design Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, John; Cutlip, William; Hametz, Mark

    2000-01-01

    The Access To Space (ATS) Group at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) supports the science and technology community at GSFC by facilitating frequent and affordable opportunities for access to space. Through partnerships established with access mode suppliers, the ATS Group has developed an interactive Mission Design web site. The ATS web site provides both the information and the tools necessary to assist mission planners in selecting and planning their ride to space. This includes the evaluation of single payloads vs. ride-sharing opportunities to reduce the cost of access to space. Features of this site include the following: (1) Mission Database. Our mission database contains a listing of missions ranging from proposed missions to manifested. Missions can be entered by our user community through data input tools. Data is then accessed by users through various search engines: orbit parameters, ride-share opportunities, spacecraft parameters, other mission notes, launch vehicle, and contact information. (2) Launch Vehicle Toolboxes. The launch vehicle toolboxes provide the user a full range of information on vehicle classes and individual configurations. Topics include: general information, environments, performance, payload interface, available volume, and launch sites.

  19. Axial interactions in the mixed-valent CuA active site and role of the axial methionine in electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Li; Hadt, Ryan G.; Marshall, Nicholas M.; Wilson, Tiffany D.; Lu, Yi; Solomon, Edward I.

    2013-01-01

    Within Cu-containing electron transfer active sites, the role of the axial ligand in type 1 sites is well defined, yet its role in the binuclear mixed-valent CuA sites is less clear. Recently, the mutation of the axial Met to Leu in a CuA site engineered into azurin (CuA Az) was found to have a limited effect on E0 relative to this mutation in blue copper (BC). Detailed low-temperature absorption and magnetic circular dichroism, resonance Raman, and electron paramagnetic resonance studies on CuA Az (WT) and its M123X (X = Q, L, H) axial ligand variants indicated stronger axial ligation in M123L/H. Spectroscopically validated density functional theory calculations show that the smaller ΔE0 is attributed to H2O coordination to the Cu center in the M123L mutant in CuA but not in the equivalent BC variant. The comparable stabilization energy of the oxidized over the reduced state in CuA and BC (CuA ∼ 180 mV; BC ∼ 250 mV) indicates that the S(Met) influences E0 similarly in both. Electron delocalization over two Cu centers in CuA was found to minimize the Jahn–Teller distortion induced by the axial Met ligand and lower the inner-sphere reorganization energy. The Cu–S(Met) bond in oxidized CuA is weak (5.2 kcal/mol) but energetically similar to that of BC, which demonstrates that the protein matrix also serves an entatic role in keeping the Met bound to the active site to tune down E0 while maintaining a low reorganization energy required for rapid electron transfer under physiological conditions. PMID:23964128

  20. The Binding Mode Prediction and Similar Ligand Potency in the Active Site of Vitamin D Receptor with QM/MM Interaction, MESP, and MD Simulation.

    PubMed

    Selvaraman, Nagamani; Selvam, Saravana Kumar; Muthusamy, Karthikeyan

    2016-08-01

    Non-secosteroidal ligands are well-known vitamin D receptor (VDR) agonists. In this study, we described a combined QM/MM to define the protein-ligand interaction energy a strong positive correlation in both QM-MM interaction energy and binding free energy against the biological activity. The molecular dynamics simulation study was performed, and specific interactions were extensively studied. The molecular docking results and surface analysis shed light on steric and electrostatic complementarities of these non-secosteroidal ligands to VDR. Finally, the drug likeness properties were also calculated and found within the acceptable range. The results show that bulky group substitutions in side chain decrease the VDR activity, whereas a small substitution increased it. Functional analyses of H393A and H301A mutations substantiate their roles in the VDR agonistic and antagonistic activities. Apart from the His393 and His301, two other amino acids in the hinge region viz. Ser233 and Arg270 acted as an electron donor/acceptor specific to the agonist in the distinct ligand potency. The results from this study disclose the binding mechanism of VDR agonists and structural modifications required to improve the selectivity. PMID:26945790

  1. Active site specificity of plasmepsin II.

    PubMed Central

    Westling, J.; Cipullo, P.; Hung, S. H.; Saft, H.; Dame, J. B.; Dunn, B. M.

    1999-01-01

    Members of the aspartic proteinase family of enzymes have very similar three-dimensional structures and catalytic mechanisms. Each, however, has unique substrate specificity. These distinctions arise from variations in amino acid residues that line the active site subsites and interact with the side chains of the amino acids of the peptides that bind to the active site. To understand the unique binding preferences of plasmepsin II, an enzyme of the aspartic proteinase class from the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, chromogenic octapeptides having systematic substitutions at various positions in the sequence were analyzed. This enabled the design of new, improved substrates for this enzyme (Lys-Pro-Ile-Leu-Phe*Nph-Ala/Glu-Leu-Lys, where * indicates the cleavage point). Additionally, the crystal structure of plasmepsin II was analyzed to explain the binding characteristics. Specific amino acids (Met13, Ser77, and Ile287) that were suspected of contributing to active site binding and specificity were chosen for site-directed mutagenesis experiments. The Met13Glu and Ile287Glu single mutants and the Met13Glu/Ile287Glu double mutant gain the ability to cleave substrates containing Lys residues. PMID:10548045

  2. In Situ Studies of the Active Sites for the Water Gas Shift Reaction over Cu-CeO2 Catalysts: Complex Interaction Between Metallic Copper and Oxygen Vacancies of Ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,X.; Rodriguez, J.; Hanson, J.; Gamarra, D.; Martinez-Arias, A.; Fernandez-Garcia, M.

    2006-01-01

    New information about the active sites for the water gas shift (WGS) reaction over Cu-CeO{sub 2} systems was obtained using in-situ, time-resolved X-ray diffraction (TR-XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (TR-XAS, Cu K and Ce L3 edges), and infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Cu-CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles prepared by a novel reversed microemulsion method (doped Ce1-xCuxO2 sample) and an impregnation method (impregnated CuO{sub x}/CeO{sub 2} sample) were studied. The results from all of the samples indicate that both metallic copper and oxygen vacancies in ceria were involved in the generation of active sites for the WGS reaction. Evidence was found for a synergistic Cu-O vacancy interaction. This interaction enhances the chemical activity of Cu, and the presence of Cu facilitates the formation of O vacancies in ceria under reaction conditions. Water dissociation occurred on the O vacancy sites or the Cu-O vacancy interface. No significant amounts of formate were formed on the catalysts during the WGS reaction. The presence of strongly bound carbonates is an important factor for the deactivation of the catalysts at high temperatures. This work identifies for the first time the active sites for the WGS reaction on Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalysts and illustrates the importance of in situ structural studies for heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

  3. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site.

    PubMed

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme. PMID:26487708

  4. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site

    PubMed Central

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme. PMID:26487708

  5. Dissecting the active site of a photoreceptor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Wouter; Hara, Miwa; Ren, Jie; Moghadam, Farzaneh; Xie, Aihua; Kumauchi, Masato

    While enzymes are quite large molecules, functionally important chemical events are often limited to a small region of the protein: the active site. The physical and chemical properties of residues at such active sites are often strongly altered compared to the same groups dissolved in water. Understanding such effects is important for unraveling the mechanisms underlying protein function and for protein engineering, but has proven challenging. Here we report on our ongoing efforts on using photoactive yellow protein (PYP), a bacterial photoreceptor, as a model system for such effects. We will report on the following questions: How many residues affect active site properties? Are these residues in direct physical contact with the active site? Can functionally important residues be recognized in the crystal structure of a protein? What structural resolution is needed to understand active sites? What spectroscopic techniques are most informative? Which weak interactions dominate active site properties?

  6. Interaction of the 268-282 region of glycoprotein Ibalpha with the heparin-binding site of thrombin inhibits the enzyme activation of factor VIII.

    PubMed Central

    De Cristofaro, R; De Filippis, V

    2003-01-01

    Activation of factor VIII (FVIII) by thrombin plays a fundamental role in the amplification of the coagulation cascade and takes place through specific proteolytic cleavages at Arg(372), Arg(740) and Arg(1689). Full FVIII activation requires cleavage at Arg(372), a process involving the alpha-thrombin exosite-II; referred to as heparin-binding site (HBS). The present study was aimed at investigating the effect of glycoprotein Ibalpha (GpIbalpha; 1-282 fragment) binding to thrombin HBS on FVIII activation. Similar experiments were also performed using a synthetic peptide modelled on the 268-282 sequence of GpIbalpha, and sulphated successfully at all tyrosine residues present along its sequence, at positions 276, 278 and 279. Both GpIbalpha 1-282 and the sulphated GpIb 268-282 peptides induced a progressive decrease (up to 70%) in activated FVIII generation, assessed by coagulation and FXa-generation assays. Furthermore, SDS/PAGE and Western-blot experiments showed that the specific appearance of the 44 kDa A2 domain on cleavage of the FVIII Arg(372)-Ser(373) peptide bond was delayed significantly in the presence of either GpIbalpha 1-282 or GpIb 268-282 peptide. Moreover, the effect of the latter on thrombin-mediated hydrolysis of a peptide having the sequence 341-376 of FVIII was investigated using reverse-phase HPLC. The k (cat)/ K (m) values of the FVIII 341-376 peptide hydrolysis by thrombin decreased linearly as a function of the GpIbalpha 268-282 peptide concentration, according to a competitive inhibition effect. Taken together, these experiments suggest that the sulphated 268-282 region of GpIbalpha binds to thrombin HBS, and is responsible for the inhibition of the Arg(372)-Ser(373) bond cleavage and activation of FVIII. PMID:12689334

  7. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  8. The active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. I. Light sensitivity and magnetic hyperfine interactions as observed by electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Albracht, Simon P J; Roseboom, Winfried; Hatchikian, E Claude

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogen-activating cluster (H cluster) in [FeFe]-hydrogenases consists of two moieties. The [2Fe]H subcluster is a (L)(CO)(CN)Fe(mu-RS2)(mu-CO)Fe(CysS)(CO)(CN) centre. The Cys-bound Fe is called Fe1, the other iron Fe2. The Cys-thiol forms a bridge to a [4Fe-4S] cluster, the [4Fe-4S]H subcluster. We report that electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of the 57Fe-enriched enzyme from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in the H(ox)-CO state are consistent with a magnetic hyperfine interaction of the unpaired spin with all six Fe atoms of the H cluster. In contrast to the inactive aerobic enzyme, the active enzyme is easily destroyed by light. The [2Fe]H subcluster in some enzyme molecules loses CO by photolysis, whereupon other molecules firmly bind the released CO to form the H(ox)-CO state giving rise to the so-called axial 2.06 EPR signal. Though not destroyed by light, the H(ox)-CO state is affected by it. As demonstrated in the accompanying paper [49] two of the intrinsic COs, both bound to Fe2, can be exchanged by extrinsic 13CO during illumination at 2 degrees C. We found that only one of the three 13COs, the one at the extrinsic position, gives an EPR-detectable isotropic superhyperfine interaction of 0.6 mT. At 30 K both the inhibiting extrinsic CO bound to Fe2 and one more CO can be photolysed. EPR spectra of the photolysed products are consistent with a 3d7 system of Fe with the formal oxidation state +1. The damaged enzyme shows a light-sensitive g = 5 signal which is ascribed to an S = 3/2 form of the [2Fe](H) subcluster. The light sensitivity of the enzyme explains the occurrence of the g = 5 signal and the axial 2.06 signal in published EPR spectra of nearly all preparations studied thus far. PMID:16323020

  9. The Interaction-Activity Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borne, Kirk D.

    1996-01-01

    A review is presented of the numerous studies that have been undertaken to investigate the likely interaction-activity connection among galaxies. Both observational evidence and theoretical supporting models are reviewed. Some specific examples of "interactive" galaxies from the author's own research are presented: (a) the collision-induced AGN (Active Galactic Nuclei) activity in the radio jet source 3C278; and (b) the collision-induced starburst activity in the spectacular "Cartwheel" ring galaxy. Some comments are offered concerning some of the more promising theoretical investigations that are now taking place. A few words of warning are also offered about the possible misinterpretation of putative collision-induced morphologies among some galaxy samples.

  10. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1990-10-01

    DOE Order 5820.2A requires that low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites active on or after September 1988 and all transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites be monitored periodically to assure that radioactive contamination does not escape from the waste sites and pose a threat to the public or to the environment. This plan describes such a monitoring program for the active LLW disposal sites in SWSA 6 and the TRU waste storage sites in SWSA 5 North. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Algorithmic approaches to protein-protein interaction site prediction.

    PubMed

    Aumentado-Armstrong, Tristan T; Istrate, Bogdan; Murgita, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Interaction sites on protein surfaces mediate virtually all biological activities, and their identification holds promise for disease treatment and drug design. Novel algorithmic approaches for the prediction of these sites have been produced at a rapid rate, and the field has seen significant advancement over the past decade. However, the most current methods have not yet been reviewed in a systematic and comprehensive fashion. Herein, we describe the intricacies of the biological theory, datasets, and features required for modern protein-protein interaction site (PPIS) prediction, and present an integrative analysis of the state-of-the-art algorithms and their performance. First, the major sources of data used by predictors are reviewed, including training sets, evaluation sets, and methods for their procurement. Then, the features employed and their importance in the biological characterization of PPISs are explored. This is followed by a discussion of the methodologies adopted in contemporary prediction programs, as well as their relative performance on the datasets most recently used for evaluation. In addition, the potential utility that PPIS identification holds for rational drug design, hotspot prediction, and computational molecular docking is described. Finally, an analysis of the most promising areas for future development of the field is presented. PMID:25713596

  12. Ethanol (EtOH) inhibition of NMDA-activated ion current is not voltage-dependent and EtOH does not interact with other binding sites on the NMDA receptor/ionophore complex

    SciTech Connect

    Lovinger, D.M.; White, G.; Weight, F.F. )

    1990-02-26

    Recent studies indicate that intoxicating concentrations of EtOH inhibit neuronal responses to activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors. The authors have observed that the potency of different alcohols for inhibiting NMDA-activated ion current in hippocampal neurons increases as a function of increasing hydrophobicity, suggesting that EtOH acts at a hydrophobic site. To further characterize the mechanisms of this effect, the authors examined the voltage-dependence of the EtOH inhibition of NMDA-activated ion current as well as potential interactions of EtOH with other effectors of the NMDA receptor/ionophore complex. The amount of inhibition of peak NMDA-activated current by 50 mM EtOH did not differ over a range of membrane potentials from {minus}60 to +60 mV, and EtOH did not alter the reversal potential of NMDA-activated current. The percent inhibition observed in the presence of 10-100 mM EtOH did not differ with NMDA concentrations from 10-100 {mu}M. The percent inhibition by 50 mM EtOH (30-48%) did not differ in the absence or presence of the channel blockers Mg{sup 2+} (50-500 {mu}M), Zn{sup 2+} (5 and 20 {mu}M) or ketamine (2 and 10 {mu}M), or with increasing concentrations of the NMDA receptor cofactor glycine (0.01-1 {mu}M). These data indicate that: (i) EtOH does not change the ion selectivity of the ionophore, and (ii) EtOH does not appear to interact with previously described binding sites on the NMDA receptor/ionophore complex.

  13. Ionizable Side Chains at Catalytic Active Sites of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic active sites of enzymes of known structure can be well defined by a modern program of computational geometry. The CASTp program was used to define and measure the volume of the catalytic active sites of 573 enzymes in the Catalytic Site Atlas database. The active sites are identified as catalytic because the amino acids they contain are known to participate in the chemical reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Acid and base side chains are reliable markers of catalytic active sites. The catalytic active sites have 4 acid and 5 base side chains, in an average volume of 1072 Å3. The number density of acid side chains is 8.3 M (in chemical units); the number density of basic side chains is 10.6 M. The catalytic active site of these enzymes is an unusual electrostatic and steric environment in which side chains and reactants are crowded together in a mixture more like an ionic liquid than an ideal infinitely dilute solution. The electrostatics and crowding of reactants and side chains seems likely to be important for catalytic function. In three types of analogous ion channels, simulation of crowded charges accounts for the main properties of selectivity measured in a wide range of solutions and concentrations. It seems wise to use mathematics designed to study interacting complex fluids when making models of the catalytic active sites of enzymes. PMID:22484856

  14. Active site - a site of binding of affinity inhibitors in baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Svyato, I.E.; Sklyankina, V.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-03-20

    The interaction of the enzyme-substrate complex with methyl phosphate, O-phosphoethanolamine, O-phosphopropanolamine, N-acetylphosphoserine, and phosphoglyolic acid, as well as pyrophosphatase, modified by monoesters of phosphoric acid, with pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate, was investigated. It was shown that the enzyme containing the substrate in the active site does not react with monophosphates, but modified pyrophosphatase entirely retains the ability to bind polyanions to the regulatory site. It is concluded that the inactivation of baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase by monoesters of phosphoric acid, which are affinity inhibitors of it, is the result of modification of the active site of the enzyme.

  15. Structures of the Wild-Type And Activated Catalytic Domains of Brachydanio Rerio Polo-Like Kinase 1 (Plk1): Changes in the Active-Site Conformation And Interactions With Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Elling, R.A.; Fucini, R.V.; Romanowski, M.J.

    2009-05-18

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a member of a family of serine/threonine kinases involved in the regulation of cell-cycle progression and cytokinesis and is an attractive target for the development of anticancer therapeutics. A zebrafish homolog of the human Plk1 (hPlk1) kinase domain (KD) was identified that can be expressed in large quantities in bacteria and crystallizes readily, whether in a wild-type form or as a variant containing the activating Thr196-->Asp substitution, in one space group and under similar conditions both in the absence and presence of active-site compounds. This construct was validated by testing a panel of hPlk1 inhibitors against human and zebrafish proteins and it was shown that the selected small molecules inhibited the homologs with a high degree of correlation. Crystal structures of ligand-free wild-type and activated zebrafish Plk1 (zPlk1) KDs revealed the organization of the secondary structural elements around the active site and demonstrated that the activation segment was disordered in the activated form of the domain but possessed a well defined secondary structure in the wild-type enzyme. The cocrystal structure of wild-type zPlk1 KD with ADP documented the hydrolysis of ATP and revealed the phosphorylation site. The cocrystal structure of the activated KD with wortmannin, a covalent inhibitor of Plk1 and PI3 kinases, showed the binding mode of the small molecule to the enzyme and may facilitate the design of more potent Plk1 inhibitors. The work presented in this study establishes the zPlk1 KD as a useful tool for rapid low- and high-throughput structure-based screening and drug discovery of compounds specific for this mitotic target.

  16. A non-active-site SET domain surface crucial for the interaction of MLL1 and the RbBP5/Ash2L heterodimer within MLL family core complexes.

    PubMed

    Shinsky, Stephen A; Hu, Michael; Vought, Valarie E; Ng, Sarah B; Bamshad, Michael J; Shendure, Jay; Cosgrove, Michael S

    2014-06-12

    The mixed lineage leukemia-1 (MLL1) enzyme is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) monomethyltransferase and has served as a paradigm for understanding the mechanism of action of the human SET1 family of enzymes that include MLL1-MLL4 and SETd1a,b. Dimethylation of H3K4 requires a sub-complex including WRAD (WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30), which binds to each SET1 family member forming a minimal core complex that is required for multiple lysine methylation. We recently demonstrated that WRAD is a novel histone methyltransferase that preferentially catalyzes H3K4 dimethylation in a manner that is dependent on an unknown non-active-site surface from the MLL1 SET domain. Recent genome sequencing studies have identified a number of human disease-associated missense mutations that localize to the SET domains of several MLL family members. In this investigation, we mapped many of these mutations onto the three-dimensional structure of the SET domain and noticed that a subset of MLL2 (KMT2D, ALR, MLL4)-associated Kabuki syndrome missense mutations map to a common solvent-exposed surface that is not expected to alter enzymatic activity. We introduced these mutations into the MLL1 SET domain and observed that all are defective for H3K4 dimethylation by the MLL1 core complex, which is associated with a loss of the ability of MLL1 to interact with WRAD or with the RbBP5/Ash2L heterodimer. Our results suggest that amino acids from this surface, which we term the Kabuki interaction surface or KIS, are required for formation of a second active site within SET1 family core complexes. PMID:24680668

  17. A non-active site SET domain surface crucial for the interaction of MLL1 and the RbBP5-ASH2L heterodimer within MLL family core complexes

    PubMed Central

    Shinsky, Stephen A.; Hu, Michael; Vought, Valarie E.; Ng, Sarah B.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Cosgrove, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    The Mixed Lineage Leukemia-1 (MLL1) enzyme is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) monomethyltransferase and has served as a paradigm for understanding the mechanism of action of the human SET1 family of enzymes that include MLL1–4, and SET1d1a,b. Dimethylation of H3K4 requires a sub-complex including WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30 (WRAD), which binds to each SET1 family member forming a minimal core complex that is required for multiple lysine methylation. We recently demonstrated that WRAD is a novel histone methyltransferase that preferentially catalyzes H3K4 dimethylation in a manner that is dependent on an unknown non-active site surface from the MLL1 SET domain. Recent genome sequencing studies have identified a number of human disease-associated missense mutations that localize to the SET domains of several MLL family members. In this investigation, we mapped many of these mutations onto the three-dimensional structure of the SET domain and noticed that a subset of MLL2 (KMT2D, ALR, MLL4)-associated Kabuki syndrome (KS) missense mutations map to a common solvent-exposed surface that is not expected to alter enzymatic activity. We introduced these mutations into the MLL1 SET domain and observed that all are defective for H3K4 dimethylation by the MLL1 core complex, which is associated with a loss of the ability of MLL1 to interact with WRAD or with the RbBP5-Ash2L heterodimer. Our results suggest that amino acids from this surface, which we term the Kabuki interaction surface or (KIS), are required for formation of a second active site within SET1 family core complexes. PMID:24680668

  18. The Interactions in the Carboxyl Terminus of Human 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase Are Critical to Mediate the Conformation of the Final Helix and the Tail to Shield the Active Site for Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tsu-Chung; Chang, Ni-Yuan; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Shen, Chia-Pei; Lee, Hwei-Jen

    2013-01-01

    4-Hydroxylphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4-HPPD) is an important enzyme for tyrosine catabolism, which catalyzes the conversion of 4-hydroxylphenylpyruvate (4-HPP) to homogentisate. In the present study, human 4-HPPD was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The kinetic parameters for 4-HPP conversion were: kcat = 2.2±0.1 s−1; and Km = 0.08±0.02 mM. Sequence alignments show that human 4-HPPD possesses an extended C-terminus compared to other 4-HPPD enzymes. Successive truncation of the disordered tail which follows the final α-helix resulted in no changes in the Km value for 4-HPP substrate but the kcat values were significantly reduced. The results suggest that this disordered C-terminal tail plays an important role in catalysis. For inspection the effect of terminal truncation on protein structure, mutant models were built. These models suggest that the different conformation of E254, R378 and Q375 in the final helix might be the cause of the activity loss. In the structure E254 interacts with R378, the end residue in the final helix; mutation of either one of these residues causes a ca. 95% reductions in kcat values. Q375 provides bifurcate interactions to fix the tail and the final helix in position. The model of the Q375N mutant shows that a solvent accessible channel opens to the putative substrate binding site, suggesting this is responsible for the complete loss of activity. These results highlight the critical role of Q375 in orientating the tail and ensuring the conformation of the terminal α-helix to maintain the integrity of the active site for catalysis. PMID:23950902

  19. Educational Activity Sites for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troutner, Joanne

    2005-01-01

    Finding quality Internet resources for high school students is a continuing challenge. Several high-quality web sites are presented for educators and students. These sites offer activities to learn how an art conservator looks at paintings, create a newspaper, research and develop an end product, build geometry and physics skills, explore science…

  20. Metalloprotein-inhibitor binding: Human carbonic anhydrase II as a model for probing metal-ligand interactions in a metalloprotein active site

    PubMed Central

    Martin, David P.; Hann, Zachary S.; Cohen, Seth M.

    2013-01-01

    An ever increasing number of metalloproteins are being discovered that play essential roles in physiological processes. Inhibitors of these proteins have significant potential for the treatment of human disease, but clinical success of these compounds has been limited. Herein, Zn(II)-dependent metalloprotein inhibitors in clinical use are reviewed, and the potential for using novel metal-binding groups (MBGs) in the design of these inhibitors is discussed. By using human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) as a model system, the nuances of MBG-metal interactions in the context of a protein environment can be probed. Understanding how metal coordination influences inhibitor binding may help in the design new therapeutics targeting metalloproteins. PMID:23706138

  1. Structural Basis of Brr2-Prp8 Interactions and Implications for U5 snRNP Biogenesis and the Spliceosome Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Hoang Duong; Li, Jade; Galej, Wojciech P.; Oshikane, Hiroyuki; Newman, Andrew J.; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Summary The U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) helicase Brr2 disrupts the U4/U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) duplex and allows U6 snRNA to engage in an intricate RNA network at the active center of the spliceosome. Here, we present the structure of yeast Brr2 in complex with the Jab1/MPN domain of Prp8, which stimulates Brr2 activity. Contrary to previous reports, our crystal structure and mutagenesis data show that the Jab1/MPN domain binds exclusively to the N-terminal helicase cassette. The residues in the Jab1/MPN domain, whose mutations in human Prp8 cause the degenerative eye disease retinitis pigmentosa, are found at or near the interface with Brr2, clarifying its molecular pathology. In the cytoplasm, Prp8 forms a precursor complex with U5 snRNA, seven Sm proteins, Snu114, and Aar2, but after nuclear import, Brr2 replaces Aar2 to form mature U5 snRNP. Our structure explains why Aar2 and Brr2 are mutually exclusive and provides important insights into the assembly of U5 snRNP. PMID:23727230

  2. Low dielectric response in enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Edward L.; Krishtalik, Lev I.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of charge transfer depend crucially on the dielectric reorganization of the medium. In enzymatic reactions that involve charge transfer, atomic dielectric response of the active site and of its surroundings determines the efficiency of the protein as a catalyst. We report direct spectroscopic measurements of the reorganization energy associated with the dielectric response in the active site of α-chymotrypsin. A chromophoric inhibitor of the enzyme is used as a spectroscopic probe. We find that water strongly affects the dielectric reorganization in the active site of the enzyme in solution. The reorganization energy of the protein matrix in the vicinity of the active site is similar to that of low-polarity solvents. Surprisingly, water exhibits an anomalously high dielectric response that cannot be described in terms of the dielectric continuum theory. As a result, sequestering the active site from the aqueous environment inside low-dielectric enzyme body dramatically reduces the dielectric reorganization. This reduction is particularly important for controlling the rate of enzymatic reactions. PMID:10681440

  3. Interactivity versus Interaction: What Really Matters for State Legislature Web Sites?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferber, Paul; Foltz, Franz; Pugliese, Rudy

    2005-01-01

    The Internet, not unlike previous communication technologies, has been predicted to dramatically change the nature of democracy. The interactive nature of Web sites, in particular, is seen as the basis for a new cyberdemocracy. Although the definition of interactivity is less than precise, an evaluation of state legislature Web sites finds them…

  4. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined. PMID:27243042

  5. The bifunctional active site of s-adenosylmethionine synthetase. Roles of the active site aspartates.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J C; Markham, G D

    1999-11-12

    S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzes the biosynthesis of AdoMet in a unique enzymatic reaction. Initially the sulfur of methionine displaces the intact tripolyphosphate chain (PPP(i)) from ATP, and subsequently PPP(i) is hydrolyzed to PP(i) and P(i) before product release. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli AdoMet synthetase shows that the active site contains four aspartate residues. Aspartate residues Asp-16* and Asp-271 individually provide the sole protein ligand to one of the two required Mg(2+) ions (* denotes a residue from a second subunit); aspartates Asp-118 and Asp-238* are proposed to interact with methionine. Each aspartate has been changed to an uncharged asparagine, and the metal binding residues were also changed to alanine, to assess the roles of charge and ligation ability on catalytic efficiency. The resultant enzyme variants all structurally resemble the wild type enzyme as indicated by circular dichroism spectra and are tetramers. However, all have k(cat) reductions of approximately 10(3)-fold in AdoMet synthesis, whereas the MgATP and methionine K(m) values change by less than 3- and 8-fold, respectively. In the partial reaction of PPP(i) hydrolysis, mutants of the Mg(2+) binding residues have >700-fold reduced catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)), whereas the D118N and D238*N mutants are impaired less than 35-fold. The catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by Mg(2+) site mutants is improved by AdoMet, like the wild type enzyme. In contrast AdoMet reduces the catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by the D118N and D238*N mutants, indicating that the events involved in AdoMet activation are hindered in these methionyl binding site mutants. Ca(2+) uniquely activates the D271A mutant enzyme to 15% of the level of Mg(2+), in contrast to the approximately 1% Ca(2+) activation of the wild type enzyme. This indicates that the Asp-271 side chain size is a discriminator between the activating ability of Ca(2+) and the

  6. Corrosion Research And Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  7. Corrosion Research and Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  8. Exchange interactions in systems with multiple magnetic sites.

    PubMed

    Paul, Satadal; Misra, Anirban

    2010-06-24

    Nonequivalent magnetic interactions in systems with multiple magnetic centers can be explored through a proper description of exchange coupling. The magnetic exchange coupling constant (J) in systems with two magnetic sites is reliably estimated using Heisenberg-Dirac-van Vleck (HDVV) model through broken symmetry approach (BS) within a density functional theory (DFT) framework. However, in case of systems with multiple magnetic centers, exchange coupling constants, evaluated through state-of-the-art techniques, are often found to be inadequate to produce a correct fingerprint of the nature of magnetic interactions therein. This work suggests a new scheme to estimate exchange coupling constants in such systems. In this strategy, distribution of spins on magnetic sites in the ground state of systems with multiple magnetic centers is computed. On the basis of this spin mapping, exchange coupling constants between specific pairs are estimated through BS-DFT approach while keeping all other paramagnetic atoms magnetically inactive. Nonetheless, the effect of magnetically inert paramagnetic sites is already taken into account by the process of spin mapping, which is further justified through expressing the HDVV Hamiltonian in terms of spin density operators. We employ this technique to hypothetical benchmark systems, H(3)He(3) and H(4)He(4) followed by real molecules, cationic manganese trimer, 1,3,5-benzenetriyltris (N-tert-butyl nitroxide), and a pentanuclear manganese complex. Results are found to be concordant with the already established nature of magnetic interaction in these systems. This strategy is different from the most popular scheme to compute J in systems with multiple magnetic centers in the sense that it avoids the formation of a large matrix out of different spin configurations and thus provides a reliable and computationally economic way to address the magnetic interactions in non isotropic systems with multiple magnetic sites. PMID:20496941

  9. Detection of Binding Site Molecular Interaction Field Similarities.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Matthieu; Najmanovich, Rafael

    2015-08-24

    Protein binding-site similarity detection methods can be used to predict protein function and understand molecular recognition, as a tool in drug design for drug repurposing and polypharmacology, and for the prediction of the molecular determinants of drug toxicity. Here, we present IsoMIF, a method able to identify binding site molecular interaction field similarities across protein families. IsoMIF utilizes six chemical probes and the detection of subgraph isomorphisms to identify geometrically and chemically equivalent sections of protein cavity pairs. The method is validated using six distinct data sets, four of those previously used in the validation of other methods. The mean area under the receiver operator curve (AUC) obtained across data sets for IsoMIF is higher than those of other methods. Furthermore, while IsoMIF obtains consistently high AUC values across data sets, other methods perform more erratically across data sets. IsoMIF can be used to predict function from structure, to detect potential cross-reactivity or polypharmacology targets, and to help suggest bioisosteric replacements to known binding molecules. Given that IsoMIF detects spatial patterns of molecular interaction field similarities, its predictions are directly related to pharmacophores and may be readily translated into modeling decisions in structure-based drug design. IsoMIF may in principle detect similar binding sites with distinct amino acid arrangements that lead to equivalent interactions within the cavity. The source code to calculate and visualize MIFs and MIF similarities are freely available. PMID:26158641

  10. Reverse footprinting to map sites of RNA-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Timothy W

    2014-06-01

    Nuclease protection of a site-specifically labeled RNA by an RNA-binding protein is an extremely powerful method for determining the site of an RNA-protein interaction. If a protein binds to the region that contains the site-specific label, it will protect the label and adjoining sequences from nuclease digestion. The protected region, or "footprint," can then be characterized by extensive fragmentation and gel electrophoresis. As the name implies, reverse footprinting produces a mirror image of a conventional footprint; the footprint is revealed by the presence, not the absence, of bands. This method has a distinct advantage over conventional footprinting in that only a small fraction of the labeled RNA must be bound. PMID:24890211

  11. Active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Stringer, C.D.; Milanez, S.; Lee, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Previous affinity labeling studies and comparative sequence analyses have identified two different lysines at the active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and have suggested their essentiality to function. The essential lysines occupy positions 166 and 329 in the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and positions 175 and 334 in the spinach enzyme. Based on the pH-dependencies of inactivations of the two enzymes by trinitrobenzene sulfonate, Lys-166 (R. rubrum enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 7.9 and Lys-334 (spinach enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 9.0. These low pK/sub a/ values as well as the enhanced nucleophilicities of the lysyl residues argue that both are important to catalysis rather than to substrate binding. Lys-166 may correspond to the essential base that initiates catalysis and that displays a pK/sub a/ of 7.5 in the pH-curve for V/sub max//K/sub m/. Cross-linking experiments with 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonate stilbene demonstrate that the two active-site lysines are within 12 A. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Water in the Active Site of Ketosteroid Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Hanoian, Philip; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to investigate the structural and dynamical properties of water in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) to provide insight into the role of these water molecules in the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. This reaction is thought to proceed via a dienolate intermediate that is stabilized by hydrogen bonding with residues Tyr16 and Asp103. A comparative study was performed for the wild-type (WT) KSI and the Y16F, Y16S, and Y16F/Y32F/Y57F (FFF) mutants. These systems were studied with three different bound ligands: equilenin, which is an intermediate analog, and the intermediate states of two steroid substrates. Several distinct water occupation sites were identified in the active site of KSI for the WT and mutant systems. Three additional sites were identified in the Y16S mutant that were not occupied in WT KSI or the other mutants studied. The number of water molecules directly hydrogen bonded to the ligand oxygen was approximately two waters in the Y16S mutant, one water in the Y16F and FFF mutants, and intermittent hydrogen bonding of one water molecule in WT KSI. The molecular dynamics trajectories of the Y16F and FFF mutants reproduced the small conformational changes of residue 16 observed in the crystal structures of these two mutants. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations of 1H NMR chemical shifts of the protons in the active site hydrogen-bonding network suggest that the presence of water in the active site does not prevent the formation of short hydrogen bonds with far-downfield chemical shifts. The molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the active site water molecules exchange much more frequently for WT KSI and the FFF mutant than for the Y16F and Y16S mutants. This difference is most likely due to the hydrogen-bonding interaction between Tyr57 and an active site water molecule that is persistent in the Y16F and Y16S mutants but absent in the FFF mutant and significantly less

  13. Environmental Research Translation: Enhancing Interactions with Communities at Contaminated Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Andreotta, M.; Brusseau, M. L. L.; Artiola, J. F.; Maier, R. M.; Gandolfi, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The characterization and remediation of contaminated sites are complex endeavors fraught with numerous challenges. One particular challenge that is receiving increased attention is the development and encouragement of full participation by communities and community members affected by a given site in all facets of decision-making. Many disciplines have been grappling with the challenges associated with environmental and risk communication, public participation in environmental data generation and decision-making, and increasing community capacity. The concepts and methods developed by these disciplines are reviewed, with a focus on their relevance to the specific dynamics associated with contaminated sites. The contributions of these disciplines are then synthesized and integrated to help develop Environmental Research Translation (ERT), a proposed framework for environmental scientists to promote interaction and communication among involved parties at contaminated sites. This holistic approach is rooted in public participation approaches to science, which includes: a transdisciplinary team, effective collaboration, information transfer, public participation in environmental projects, and a cultural model of risk communication. Although there are challenges associated with the implementation of ERT, it is anticipated that application of this proposed translational science method could promote more robust community participation at contaminated sites.

  14. Environmental Research Translation: enhancing interactions with communities at contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Andreotta, Monica D; Brusseau, Mark L; Artiola, Janick F; Maier, Raina M; Gandolfi, A Jay

    2014-11-01

    The characterization and remediation of contaminated sites are complex endeavors fraught with numerous challenges. One particular challenge that is receiving increased attention is the development and encouragement of full participation by communities and community members affected by a given site in all facets of decision-making. Many disciplines have been grappling with the challenges associated with environmental and risk communication, public participation in environmental data generation, and decision-making and increasing community capacity. The concepts and methods developed by these disciplines are reviewed, with a focus on their relevance to the specific dynamics associated with environmental contamination sites. The contributions of these disciplines are then synthesized and integrated to help develop Environmental Research Translation (ERT), a proposed framework for environmental scientists to promote interaction and communication among involved parties at contaminated sites. This holistic approach is rooted in public participation approaches to science, which includes: a transdisciplinary team, effective collaboration, information transfer, public participation in environmental projects, and a cultural model of risk communication. Although there are challenges associated with the implementation of ERT, it is anticipated that application of this proposed translational science method could promote more robust community participation at contaminated sites. PMID:25173762

  15. Environmental Research Translation: Enhancing Interactions with Communities at Contaminated Sites

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Andreotta, Monica D.; Brusseau, Mark L.; Artiola, Janick F.; Maier, Raina M.; Gandolfi, A. Jay

    2014-01-01

    The characterization and remediation of contaminated sites are complex endeavors fraught with numerous challenges. One particular challenge that is receiving increased attention is the development and encouragement of full participation by communities and community members affected by a given site in all facets of decision-making. Many disciplines have been grappling with the challenges associated with environmental and risk communication, public participation in environmental data generation, and decision-making and increasing community capacity. The concepts and methods developed by these disciplines are reviewed, with a focus on their relevance to the specific dynamics associated with environmental contamination sites. The contributions of these disciplines are then synthesized and integrated to help develop Environmental Research Translation (ERT), a proposed framework for environmental scientists to promote interaction and communication among involved parties at contaminated sites. This holistic approach is rooted in public participation approaches to science, which includes: a transdisciplinary team, effective collaboration, information transfer, public participation in environmental projects, and a cultural model of risk communication. Although there are challenges associated with the implementation of ERT, it is anticipated that application of this proposed translational science method could promote more robust community participation at contaminated sites. PMID:25173762

  16. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  17. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  18. Interactive Video Training and Development Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troy State Univ., AL.

    The Interactive Video Training and Development Activity of Troy State University (Troy, Alabama) is described in this report. The project has trained more than 30 people in the production of interactive video programs since its inception in 1983. Since 1985, training programs have been offered twice a year to individuals within and outside the…

  19. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  20. The activation of interactive attentional networks.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Bin; Mackie, Melissa-Ann; Spagna, Alfredo; Wu, Tingting; Tian, Yanghua; Hof, Patrick R; Fan, Jin

    2016-04-01

    Attention can be conceptualized as comprising the functions of alerting, orienting, and executive control. Although the independence of these functions has been demonstrated, the neural mechanisms underlying their interactions remain unclear. Using the revised attention network test and functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined cortical and subcortical activity related to these attentional functions and their interactions. Results showed that areas in the extended frontoparietal network (FPN), including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, frontal eye fields (FEF), areas near and along the intraparietal sulcus, anterior cingulate and anterior insular cortices, basal ganglia, and thalamus were activated across multiple attentional functions. Specifically, the alerting function was associated with activation in the locus coeruleus (LC) in addition to regions in the FPN. The orienting functions were associated with activation in the superior colliculus (SC) and the FEF. The executive control function was mainly associated with activation of the FPN and cerebellum. The interaction effect of alerting by executive control was also associated with activation of the FPN, while the interaction effect of orienting validity by executive control was mainly associated with the activation in the pulvinar. The current findings demonstrate that cortical and specific subcortical areas play a pivotal role in the implementation of attentional functions and underlie their dynamic interactions. PMID:26794640

  1. Regulatory site of inorganic pyrophosphatase. Interaction with substrate analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Baikov, A.A.; Pavlov, A.R.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-08-10

    The effect of four PP/sub 1/ analogs with the structure PXP (X = N, C), phosphate, and the complex Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 4/PP/sub 1/ on the activity of inorganic pyrophosphatase from baker's yeast was studied over a wide range of substrate (Mg-PP/sub 1/) concentrations (lower limit 0.5 ..mu..M). The enzyme activity decreased in the presence of imidodiphosphate, hydroxymethane diphosphonate (PC(OH)P), and P/sub 1/, and a double reciprocal plot of the rate of hydrolysis of Mg-PP/sub 1/ versus its concentration became linear. Small amounts of methane diphosphonate (PCP), ethane-1-hydroxy-1,1-diphosphonate (0.1-1..mu..M), and Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 4/PP/sub 1/ (10 ..mu..M) activated the enzyme almost 2-fold by a competitive mechanism. The activation was due to an increase in the affinity of the protein for the activating Mg/sup 2 +/ ion. Ultrafiltration showed that the pyrophosphatase molecule has 2.1 and 3.1 binding sites for PCP and PC(OHP)P, respectively. These results confirm the hypothesis that the enzyme contains a regulatory site whose occupation by PP/sub 1/, P/sub 1/, and substrate analogs increases the affinity of the protein for the activating metal.

  2. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site.

    PubMed

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called 'catalytic residues' are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. PMID:25902402

  3. Prediction of allosteric sites and mediating interactions through bond-to-bond propensities

    PubMed Central

    Amor, B. R. C.; Schaub, M. T.; Yaliraki, S. N.; Barahona, M.

    2016-01-01

    Allostery is a fundamental mechanism of biological regulation, in which binding of a molecule at a distant location affects the active site of a protein. Allosteric sites provide targets to fine-tune protein activity, yet we lack computational methodologies to predict them. Here we present an efficient graph-theoretical framework to reveal allosteric interactions (atoms and communication pathways strongly coupled to the active site) without a priori information of their location. Using an atomistic graph with energy-weighted covalent and weak bonds, we define a bond-to-bond propensity quantifying the non-local effect of instantaneous bond fluctuations propagating through the protein. Significant interactions are then identified using quantile regression. We exemplify our method with three biologically important proteins: caspase-1, CheY, and h-Ras, correctly predicting key allosteric interactions, whose significance is additionally confirmed against a reference set of 100 proteins. The almost-linear scaling of our method renders it suitable for high-throughput searches for candidate allosteric sites. PMID:27561351

  4. Prediction of allosteric sites and mediating interactions through bond-to-bond propensities.

    PubMed

    Amor, B R C; Schaub, M T; Yaliraki, S N; Barahona, M

    2016-01-01

    Allostery is a fundamental mechanism of biological regulation, in which binding of a molecule at a distant location affects the active site of a protein. Allosteric sites provide targets to fine-tune protein activity, yet we lack computational methodologies to predict them. Here we present an efficient graph-theoretical framework to reveal allosteric interactions (atoms and communication pathways strongly coupled to the active site) without a priori information of their location. Using an atomistic graph with energy-weighted covalent and weak bonds, we define a bond-to-bond propensity quantifying the non-local effect of instantaneous bond fluctuations propagating through the protein. Significant interactions are then identified using quantile regression. We exemplify our method with three biologically important proteins: caspase-1, CheY, and h-Ras, correctly predicting key allosteric interactions, whose significance is additionally confirmed against a reference set of 100 proteins. The almost-linear scaling of our method renders it suitable for high-throughput searches for candidate allosteric sites. PMID:27561351

  5. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where "nonspecific" interactions contribute to biological function. PMID:26064949

  6. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where “nonspecific” interactions contribute to biological function. PMID:26064949

  7. Signalling specificity of Ser/Thr protein kinases through docking-site-mediated interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Ricardo M; Nebreda, Angel R

    2003-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways use protein kinases for the modification of protein function by phosphorylation. A major question in the field is how protein kinases achieve the specificity required to regulate multiple cellular functions. Here we review recent studies that illuminate the mechanisms used by three families of Ser/Thr protein kinases to achieve substrate specificity. These kinases rely on direct docking interactions with substrates, using sites distinct from the phospho-acceptor sequences. Docking interactions also contribute to the specificity and regulation of protein kinase activities. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members can associate with and phosphorylate specific substrates by virtue of minor variations in their docking sequences. Interestingly, the same MAPK docking pocket that binds substrates also binds docking sequences of positive and negative MAPK regulators. In the case of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), the presence of a phosphate-binding site allows docking of previously phosphorylated (primed) substrates; this docking site is also required for the mechanism of GSK3 inhibition by phosphorylation. In contrast, non-primed substrates interact with a different region of GSK3. Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) contains a hydrophobic pocket that interacts with a hydrophobic motif present in all known substrates, enabling their efficient phosphorylation. Binding of the substrate hydrophobic motifs to the pocket in the kinase domain activates PDK1 and other members of the AGC family of protein kinases. Finally, the analysis of protein kinase structures indicates that the sites used for docking substrates can also bind N- and C-terminal extensions to the kinase catalytic core and participate in the regulation of its activity. PMID:12600273

  8. Interaction of metallic clusters with biologically active curcumin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; He, Haiying; Liu, Chunhui; Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of subnano metallic Gd and Au clusters with curcumin, an important biomolecule having pharmacological activity. Gd clusters show different site preference to curcumin and much stronger interaction strength, in support of the successful synthesis of highly stable curcumin-coated Gd nanoparticles as reported recently. It can be attributed to significant charge transfer from the Gd cluster to curcumin together with a relatively strong hybridization of the Gd df-orbitals with curcumin p-orbitals. These results suggest that Gd nanoparticles can effectively be used as delivery carriers for curcumin at the cellular level for therapy and medical imaging applications.

  9. Photoreactive stapled peptides to identify and characterize BCL-2 family interaction sites by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Susan; Braun, Craig R; Bird, Gregory H; Walensky, Loren D

    2014-01-01

    Protein interactions dictate a myriad of cellular activities that maintain health or cause disease. Dissecting these binding partnerships, and especially their sites of interaction, fuels the discovery of signaling pathways, disease mechanisms, and next-generation therapeutics. We previously applied all-hydrocarbon peptide stapling to chemically restore α-helical shape to bioactive motifs that become unfolded when taken out of context from native signaling proteins. For example, we developed stabilized alpha-helices of BCL-2 domains (SAHBs) to dissect and target protein interactions of the BCL-2 family, a critical network that regulates the apoptotic pathway. SAHBs are α-helical surrogates that bind both stable and transient physiologic interactors and have effectively uncovered novel sites of BCL-2 family protein interaction. To leverage stapled peptides for proteomic discovery, we describe our conversion of SAHBs into photoreactive agents that irreversibly capture their protein targets and facilitate rapid identification of the peptide helix binding sites. We envision that the development of photoreactive stapled peptides will accelerate the discovery of novel and unanticipated protein interactions and how they impact health and disease. PMID:24974285

  10. Tetragonal Lysozyme Interactions Studied by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel J.; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc

    1999-01-01

    A number of recent experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth proceeds by the addition of aggregates, formed by reversible self association of the solute molecules in the bulk solution. Periodic bond chain and atomic force microscopy studies have indicated that the probable growth unit is at minimum a 43 tetramer, and most likely an octamer composed of two complete turns about the 43 axis. If these results are correct, then there are intermolecular interactions which are only formed in the solution and others only formed at the joining of the growth unit to the crystal surface. We have set out to study these interactions, and the correctness of this hypothesis, using site directed mutagenesis of specific amino acid residues involved in the different bonds. We had initially expressed wild type lysozyme in S. cervasiae with yields of approximately 5 mg/L, which were eventually raised to approximately 40 mg/L. We are now moving the expression to the Pichia system, with anticipated yields of 300 to (3)500 mg/L, comparable to what can be obtained from egg whites. An additional advantage of using recombinant protein is the greater genetic homogeneity of the material obtained and the absence of any other contaminating egg proteins. The first mutation experiments are TYR 23 (Registered) PHE or ALA and ASN 113 (Registered) ALA or ASP. Both TYR 23 and ASN 113 form part of the postulated dimerization intermolecular binding site which lead to the formation of the 43 helix. Tyrosine also participates in an intermolecular hydrogen bond with ARG 114. The results of these and subsequent experiments will be discussed.

  11. Tetragonal Lysozyme Interactions Studied by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    A number of recent experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth proceeds by the addition of aggregates, formed by reversible self association of the solute molecules in the bulk'solution. Periodic bond chain and atomic force microscopy studies have indicated that the probable growth unit is at minimum a 43 tetramer, and most likely an octamer composed of two complete turns about the 4(sub 3) axis. If these results are correct, then there are intermolecular interactions which are only formed in the solution and others only formed at the joining of the growth unit to the crystal surface. We have set out to study these interactions, and the correctness of this hypothesis, using site directed mutagenesis of specific amino acid residues involved in the different bonds. We had initially expressed wild type lysozyme in S. cervasiae with yields of approximately 5 mg/L, which were eventually raised to approximately 40 mg/L. We are now moving the expression to the Pichia system, with anticipated yields of 300 to greater than 500 mg/L, comparable to what can be obtained from egg whites. An additional advantage of using recombinant protein is the greater genetic homogeneity of the material obtained and the absence of any other contaminating egg proteins. The first mutation experiments are TYR 23 yields PHE or ALA and ASN 113 yields ALA or ASP. Both TYR 23 and ASN 113 form part of the postulated dimerization intermolecular binding site which lead to the formation of the 4(sub 3) helix. Tyrosine also participates in an intermolecular hydrogen bond with ARG 114. The results of these and subsequent experiments will be discussed.

  12. Metavanadate at the active site of the phosphatase VHZ.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav I; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Hengge, Alvan C

    2012-09-01

    Vanadate is a potent modulator of a number of biological processes and has been shown by crystal structures and NMR spectroscopy to interact with numerous enzymes. Although these effects often occur under conditions where oligomeric forms dominate, the crystal structures and NMR data suggest that the inhibitory form is usually monomeric orthovanadate, a particularly good inhibitor of phosphatases because of its ability to form stable trigonal-bipyramidal complexes. We performed a computational analysis of a 1.14 Å structure of the phosphatase VHZ in complex with an unusual metavanadate species and compared it with two classical trigonal-bipyramidal vanadate-phosphatase complexes. The results support extensive delocalized bonding to the apical ligands in the classical structures. In contrast, in the VHZ metavanadate complex, the central, planar VO(3)(-) moiety has only one apical ligand, the nucleophilic Cys95, and a gap in electron density between V and S. A computational analysis showed that the V-S interaction is primarily ionic. A mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of metavanadate in the active site from a dimeric vanadate species that previous crystallographic evidence has shown to be able to bind to the active sites of phosphatases related to VHZ. Together, the results show that the interaction of vanadate with biological systems is not solely reliant upon the prior formation of a particular inhibitory form in solution. The catalytic properties of an enzyme may act upon the oligomeric forms primarily present in solution to generate species such as the metavanadate ion observed in the VHZ structure. PMID:22876963

  13. Allosteric interaction of trimebutine maleate with dihydropyridine binding sites.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, M; Kurosawa, H; Naito, K; Tamaki, H

    1990-07-31

    The effects of trimebutine maleate on [3H]nitrendipine binding to guinea-pig ileal smooth muscle membranes and Ca2(+)-induced contraction of the taenia cecum were studied. Specific binding of [3H]nitrendipine to smooth muscle membranes was saturable, with a KD value and maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) of 0.16 nM and 1070 fmol/mg protein, respectively. Trimebutine inhibited [3H]nitrendipine binding in a concentration-dependent manner with a Ki value of 9.3 microM. In the presence of trimebutine (10 microM), Scatchard analysis indicated a competitive-like inhibition with a decrease in the binding affinity (0.31 nM) without a change in Bmax (1059 fmol/mg protein). However, a dissociation experiment using trimebutine (10 or 100 microM) showed that the decreased affinity was due to an increase of the dissociation rate constant of [3H]nitrendipine binding to the membrane. In mechanical experiments using the taenia cecum, trimebutine (3-30 microM) caused a parallel rightward shift of the dose-response curve for the contractile response to a higher concentration range of Ca2+ under high-K+ conditions in a noncompetitive manner. These results suggest that trimebutine has negative allosteric interactions with 1,4-dihydropyridine binding sites on voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and antagonizes Ca2+ influx, consequently inhibiting contractions of intestinal smooth muscle. PMID:2171963

  14. A functional activating protein 1 (AP-1) site regulates matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) transcription by cardiac cells through interactions with JunB-Fra1 and JunB-FosB heterodimers.

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Marina R; Cheng, Sunfa; Honbo, Norman; Piacentini, Lucia; Karliner, Joel S; Lovett, David H

    2003-01-01

    Enhanced synthesis of a specific matrix metalloproteinase, MMP-2, has been demonstrated in experimental models of ventricular failure and in cardiac extracts from patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy. Cultured neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts and myocytes were used to analyse the determinants of MMP-2 synthesis, including the effects of hypoxia. Culture of rat cardiac fibroblasts for 24 h in 1% oxygen enhanced MMP-2 synthesis by more than 5-fold and augmented the MMP-2 synthetic responses of these cells to endothelin-1, angiotensin II and interleukin 1beta. A series of MMP-2 promoter-luciferase constructs were used to map the specific enhancer element(s) that drive MMP-2 transcription in cardiac cells. Deletion studies mapped a region of potent transactivating function within the 91 bp region from -1433 to -1342 bp, the activity of which was increased by hypoxia. Oligonucleotides from this region were cloned in front of a heterologous simian-virus-40 (SV40) promoter and mapped the enhancer activity to a region between -1410 and -1362 bp that included a potential activating protein 1 (AP-1)-binding sequence, C(-1394)CTGACCTCC. Site-specific mutagenesis of the core TGAC sequence (indicated in bold) eliminated the transactivating activity within the -1410 to -1362 bp sequence. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) using the -1410 to -1362 bp oligonucleotide and rat cardiac fibroblast nuclear extracts demonstrated specific nuclear-protein binding that was eliminated by cold competitor oligonucleotide, but not by the AP-1-mutated oligonucleotide. Antibody-supershift EMSAs of nuclear extracts from normoxic rat cardiac fibroblasts demonstrated Fra1 and JunB binding to the -1410 to -1362 bp oligonucleotide. Nuclear extracts isolated from hypoxic rat cardiac fibroblasts contained Fra1, JunB and also included FosB. Co-transfection of cardiac fibroblasts with Fra1-JunB and FosB-JunB expression plasmids led to significant increases in transcriptional activity. These

  15. Differential Effects of Methoxy Group on the Interaction of Curcuminoids with Two Major Ligand Binding Sites of Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hiroki; Chuang, Victor Tuan Giam; Yamasaki, Keishi; Yamaotsu, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Nagumo, Kohei; Anraku, Makoto; Kadowaki, Daisuke; Ishima, Yu; Hirono, Shuichi; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Curcuminoids are a group of compounds with a similar chemical backbone structure but containing different numbers of methoxy groups that have therapeutic potential due to their anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties. They mainly bind to albumin in plasma. These findings influence their body disposition and biological activities. Spectroscopic analysis using site specific probes on human serum albumin (HSA) clearly indicated that curcumin (Cur), demethylcurcumin (Dmc) and bisdemethoxycurcumin (Bdmc) bind to both Site I (sub-site Ia and Ib) and Site II on HSA. At pH 7.4, the binding constants for Site I were relatively comparable between curcuminoids, while the binding constants for Site II at pH 7.4 were increased in order Cur < Dmc < Bdmc. Binding experiments using HSA mutants showed that Trp214 and Arg218 at Site I, and Tyr411 and Arg410 at Site II are involved in the binding of curcuminoids. The molecular docking of all curcuminoids to the Site I pocket showed that curcuminoids stacked with Phe211 and Trp214, and interacted with hydrophobic and aromatic amino acid residues. In contrast, each curcuminoid interacted with Site II in a different manner depending whether a methoxy group was present or absent. A detailed analysis of curcuminoids-albumin interactions would provide valuable information in terms of understanding the pharmacokinetics and the biological activities of this class of compounds. PMID:24498401

  16. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program --now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human Exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines be opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  17. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program -- now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history. The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines the opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  18. Active galactic nuclei and galaxy interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, M. Sol; Lambas, Diego G.; Tissera, Patricia; Coldwell, Georgina

    2007-03-01

    We perform a statistical analysis of active galactic nucleus (AGN) host characteristics and nuclear activity for AGNs in pairs and without companions. Our study concerns a sample of AGNs derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4 data by Kauffmann et al. and pair galaxies obtained from the same data set by Alonso et al. An eye-ball classification of images of 1607 close pairs (rp < 25 kpc h-1,ΔV < 350 km s-1) according to the evidence of interaction through distorted morphologies and tidal features provides us with a more confident assessment of galaxy interactions from this sample. We notice that, at a given luminosity or stellar mass content, the fraction of AGNs is larger for pair galaxies exhibiting evidence for strong interaction and tidal features which also show signs of strong star formation activity. Nevertheless, this process accounts only for a ~10per cent increase of the fraction of AGNs. As in previous works, we find AGN hosts to be redder and with a larger concentration morphological index than non-AGN galaxies. This effect does not depend on whether AGN hosts are in pairs or in isolation. The OIII luminosity of AGNs with strong interaction features is found to be significantly larger than that of other AGNs, either in pairs or in isolation. Estimations of the accretion rate, L[OIII]/MBH, show that AGNs in merging pairs are actively feeding their black holes, regardless of their stellar masses. We also find that the luminosity of the companion galaxy seems to be a key parameter in the determination of the black hole activity. At a given host luminosity, both the OIII luminosity and the L[ OIII]/MBH are significantly larger in AGNs with a bright companion (Mr < -20) than otherwise.

  19. Role of support-nanoalloy interactions in the atomic-scale structural and chemical ordering for tuning catalytic sites

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lefu; Shan, Shiyao; Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Petkov, Valeri; Ren, Yang; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Luo, Jin; Yin, Jun; Chen, Yongsheng; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2012-09-12

    The understanding of the atomic-scale structural and chemical ordering in supported nanosized alloy particles is fundamental for achieving active catalysts by design. This report shows how such knowledge can be obtained by a combination of techniques including x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation based x-ray fine structure absorption spectroscopy and high-energy x-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis, and how the support-nanoalloy interaction influences the catalytic activity of a ternary nanoalloy (platinum-nickel-cobalt) particles on three different supports: carbon, silica and titania. The reaction of carbon monoxide with oxygen is employed as a probe of the catalytic activity. This ternary composition, in combination with the different support materials, is demonstrated to be capable of fine-tuning the catalytic activity and stability. The support-nanoalloy interaction is shown to influence structural and chemical ordering in the nanoparticles, leading to support-tunable active sites on the nanoalloys for oxygen activation in the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide. A nickel/cobalt-tuned catalytic site on the surface of nanoalloy was revealed for oxygen activation, which differs from the traditional oxygen-activation sites known for oxide-supported noble metal catalysts. The discovery of such support-nanoalloy interaction enabled oxygen-activation sites introduces a very promising strategy for designing active catalysts in heterogeneous catalysis.

  20. Dynamics of two interacting active Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayati, Parvin; Najafi, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Starting from a microscopic model for a spherically symmetric active Janus particle, we study the interactions between two such active motors. The ambient fluid mediates a long range hydrodynamic interaction between two motors. This interaction has both direct and indirect hydrodynamic contributions. The direct contribution is due to the propagation of fluid flow that originated from a moving motor and affects the motion of the other motor. The indirect contribution emerges from the re-distribution of the ionic concentrations in the presence of both motors. Electric force exerted on the fluid from this ionic solution enhances the flow pattern and subsequently changes the motion of both motors. By formulating a perturbation method for very far separated motors, we derive analytic results for the translation and rotational dynamics of the motors. We show that the overall interaction at the leading order modifies the translational and rotational speeds of motors which scale as O (" separators=" [ 1 / D ] 3 ) and O (" separators=" [ 1 / D ] 4 ) with their separation, respectively. Our findings open up the way for studying the collective dynamics of synthetic micro-motors.

  1. Selectivity for strand-transfer over 3'-processing and susceptibility to clinical resistance of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors are driven by key enzyme-DNA interactions in the active site.

    PubMed

    Métifiot, Mathieu; Johnson, Barry C; Kiselev, Evgeny; Marler, Laura; Zhao, Xue Zhi; Burke, Terrence R; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H; Pommier, Yves

    2016-08-19

    Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are highly effective against HIV infections. Co-crystal structures of the prototype foamy virus intasome have shown that all three FDA-approved drugs, raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir and dolutegravir (DTG), act as interfacial inhibitors during the strand transfer (ST) integration step. However, these structures give only a partial sense for the limited inhibition of the 3'-processing reaction by INSTIs and how INSTIs can be modified to overcome drug resistance, notably against the G140S-Q148H double mutation. Based on biochemical experiments with modified oligonucleotides, we demonstrate that both the viral DNA +1 and -1 bases, which flank the 3'-processing site, play a critical role for 3'-processing efficiency and inhibition by RAL and DTG. In addition, the G140S-Q148H (SH) mutant integrase, which has a reduced 3'-processing activity, becomes more active and more resistant to inhibition of 3'-processing by RAL and DTG in the absence of the -1 and +1 bases. Molecular modeling of HIV-1 integrase, together with biochemical data, indicate that the conserved residue Q146 in the flexible loop of HIV-1 integrase is critical for productive viral DNA binding through specific contacts with the virus DNA ends in the 3'-processing and ST reactions. The potency of integrase inhibitors against 3'-processing and their ability to overcome resistance is discussed. PMID:27369381

  2. A study on the flexibility of enzyme active sites

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A common assumption about enzyme active sites is that their structures are highly conserved to specifically distinguish between closely similar compounds. However, with the discovery of distinct enzymes with similar reaction chemistries, more and more studies discussing the structural flexibility of the active site have been conducted. Results Most of the existing works on the flexibility of active sites focuses on a set of pre-selected active sites that were already known to be flexible. This study, on the other hand, proposes an analysis framework composed of a new data collecting strategy, a local structure alignment tool and several physicochemical measures derived from the alignments. The method proposed to identify flexible active sites is highly automated and robust so that more extensive studies will be feasible in the future. The experimental results show the proposed method is (a) consistent with previous works based on manually identified flexible active sites and (b) capable of identifying potentially new flexible active sites. Conclusions This proposed analysis framework and the former analyses on flexibility have their own advantages and disadvantage, depending on the cause of the flexibility. In this regard, this study proposes an alternative that complements previous studies and helps to construct a more comprehensive view of the flexibility of enzyme active sites. PMID:21342563

  3. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  4. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  5. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  6. Binding sites for interaction of peroxiredoxin 6 with surfactant protein A.

    PubMed

    Krishnaiah, Saikumari Y; Dodia, Chandra; Sorokina, Elena M; Li, Haitao; Feinstein, Sheldon I; Fisher, Aron B

    2016-04-01

    Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6) is a bifunctional enzyme with peroxidase and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activities. This protein participates in the degradation and remodeling of internalized dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), the major phospholipid component of lung surfactant. We have shown previously that the PLA2 activity of Prdx6 is inhibited by the lung surfactant-associated protein called surfactant protein A (SP-A) through direct protein-protein interaction. Docking of SPA and Prdx6 was modeled using the ZDOCK (zlab.bu.edu) program in order to predict molecular sites for binding of the two proteins. The predicted peptide sequences were evaluated for binding to the opposite protein using isothermal titration calorimetry and circular dichroism measurement followed by determination of the effect of the SP-A peptide on the PLA2 activity of Prdx6. The sequences 195EEEAKKLFPK204.in the Prdx6 helix and 83DEELQTELYEIKHQIL99 in SP-A were identified as the sites for hydrophobic interaction and H(+)-bonding between the 2 proteins. Treatment of mouse endothelial cells with the SP-A peptide inhibited their recovery from lipid peroxidation associated with oxidative stress indicating inhibition of Prdx6 activity by the peptide in the intact cell. PMID:26723227

  7. Universe Interactive: Static Displays with Active Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Michelle B.

    2005-01-01

    As the World Year of Physics (WYP) approaches, the AAPT WYP Committee would like to encourage everyone to consider ways to engage those around us in celebrating the science that makes us the proud geeks we are. The geek sentiment is my own, and does not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the committee. This paper offers simple and inexpensive astronomy-related ideas for a bulletin-board-type display. The particular ideas presented below are hands-on classroom activities that I've adapted for display purposes. The display is static in that once constructed it does not require a personal facilitator, but each component invites interaction. At the end of the paper I revisit the idea of building a sundial1 as a highly visible and artistic way to engage students and communities in physics. The activities presented here are available for use when constructing your own display. In addition, these examples are meant to illustrate how instructional products might be modified for display purposes, and I encourage others to consider their favorite activities for an interactive display.

  8. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  9. Disruption of NAD+ binding site in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase affects its intranuclear interactions

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia; Mishra, Anurag; Barrero, Carlos; Merali, Salim; Gothe, Scott A; Krynetskiy, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize phosphorylation of human glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and mobility of GAPDH in cancer cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents. METHODS: We used proteomics analysis to detect and characterize phosphorylation sites within human GAPDH. Site-specific mutagenesis and alanine scanning was then performed to evaluate functional significance of phosphorylation sites in the GAPDH polypeptide chain. Enzymatic properties of mutated GAPDH variants were assessed using kinetic studies. Intranuclear dynamics parameters (diffusion coefficient and the immobile fraction) were estimated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments and confocal microscopy. Molecular modeling experiments were performed to estimate the effects of mutations on NAD+ cofactor binding. RESULTS: Using MALDI-TOF analysis, we identified novel phosphorylation sites within the NAD+ binding center of GAPDH at Y94, S98, and T99. Using polyclonal antibody specific to phospho-T99-containing peptide within GAPDH, we demonstrated accumulation of phospho-T99-GAPDH in the nuclear fractions of A549, HCT116, and SW48 cancer cells after cytotoxic stress. We performed site-mutagenesis, and estimated enzymatic properties, intranuclear distribution, and intranuclear mobility of GAPDH mutated variants. Site-mutagenesis at positions S98 and T99 in the NAD+ binding center reduced enzymatic activity of GAPDH due to decreased affinity to NAD+ (Km = 741 ± 257 μmol/L in T99I vs 57 ± 11.1 µmol/L in wild type GAPDH. Molecular modeling experiments revealed the effect of mutations on NAD+ binding with GAPDH. FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching) analysis showed that mutations in NAD+ binding center of GAPDH abrogated its intranuclear interactions. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest an important functional role of phosphorylated amino acids in the NAD+ binding center in GAPDH interactions with its intranuclear partners. PMID:26629320

  10. Interaction forces between waterborne bacteria and activated carbon particles.

    PubMed

    Busscher, Henk J; Dijkstra, Rene J B; Langworthy, Don E; Collias, Dimitris I; Bjorkquist, David W; Mitchell, Michael D; Van der Mei, Henny C

    2008-06-01

    Activated carbons remove waterborne bacteria from potable water systems through attractive Lifshitz-van der Waals forces despite electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged cells and carbon surfaces. In this paper we quantify the interaction forces between bacteria with negatively and positively charged, mesoporous wood-based carbons, as well as with a microporous coconut carbon. To this end, we glued carbon particles to the cantilever of an atomic force microscope and measured the interaction forces upon approach and retraction of thus made tips. Waterborne Raoultella terrigena and Escherichia coli adhered weakly (1-2 nN) to different activated carbon particles, and the main difference between the activated carbons was the percentage of curves with attractive sites revealed upon traversing of a carbon particle through the bacterial EPS layer. The percentage of curves showing adhesion forces upon retraction varied between 21% and 69%, and was highest for R. terrigena with positively charged carbon (66%) and a coconut carbon (69%). Macroscopic bacterial removal by the mesoporous carbon particles increased with increasing percentages of attractive sites revealed upon traversing a carbon particle through the outer bacterial surface layer. PMID:18405910

  11. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program FY 1996 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, C.M.; Marshall, D.S.; Cunningham, G.R.

    1997-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1995 through September 1996. The Radioactive Solid Waste Operations Group (RSWOG) of the Waste Management and Remedial Action Division (WMRAD) and the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) established ASEMP in 1989. The purpose of the program is to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 North as required by Chapters 2 and 3 of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A.

  12. Active sites environmental monitoring Program - Program Plan: Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, C.M.; Hicks, D.S.; Ashwood, T.L.; Cunningham, G.R.

    1994-05-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of active low-level-waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Several changes have recently occurred in regard to the sites that are currently used for waste storage and disposal. These changes require a second set of revisions to the ASEMP program plan. This document incorporates those revisions. This program plan presents the organization and procedures for monitoring the active sites. The program plan also provides internal reporting levels to guide the evaluation of monitoring results.

  13. The active site behaviour of electrochemically synthesised gold nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Plowman, Blake J; O'Mullane, Anthony P; Bhargava, Suresh K

    2011-01-01

    Even though gold is the noblest of metals, a weak chemisorber and is regarded as being quite inert, it demonstrates significant electrocatalytic activity in its nanostructured form. It is demonstrated here that nanostructured and even evaporated thin films of gold are covered with active sites which are responsible for such activity. The identification of these sites is demonstrated with conventional electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry as well as a large amplitude Fourier transformed alternating current (FT-ac) method under acidic and alkaline conditions. The latter technique is beneficial in determining if an electrode process is either Faradaic or capacitive in nature. The observed behaviour is analogous to that observed for activated gold electrodes whose surfaces have been severely disrupted by cathodic polarisation in the hydrogen evolution region. It is shown that significant electrochemical oxidation responses occur at discrete potential values well below that for the formation of the compact monolayer oxide of bulk gold and are attributed to the facile oxidation of surface active sites. Several electrocatalytic reactions are explored in which the onset potential is determined by the presence of such sites on the surface. Significantly, the facile oxidation of active sites is used to drive the electroless deposition of metals such as platinum, palladium and silver from their aqueous salts on the surface of gold nanostructures. The resultant surface decoration of gold with secondary metal nanoparticles not only indicates regions on the surface which are rich in active sites but also provides a method to form interesting bimetallic surfaces. PMID:22455038

  14. Nicotinamide Cofactors Suppress Active-Site Labeling of Aldehyde Dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Stiti, Naim; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Strubl, Laura; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bartels, Dorothea; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-06-17

    Active site labeling by (re)activity-based probes is a powerful chemical proteomic tool to globally map active sites in native proteomes without using substrates. Active site labeling is usually taken as a readout for the active state of the enzyme because labeling reflects the availability and reactivity of active sites, which are hallmarks for enzyme activities. Here, we show that this relationship holds tightly, but we also reveal an important exception to this rule. Labeling of Arabidopsis ALDH3H1 with a chloroacetamide probe occurs at the catalytic Cys, and labeling is suppressed upon nitrosylation and oxidation, and upon treatment with other Cys modifiers. These experiments display a consistent and strong correlation between active site labeling and enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, however, labeling is suppressed by the cofactor NAD(+), and this property is shared with other members of the ALDH superfamily and also detected for unrelated GAPDH enzymes with an unrelated hydantoin-based probe in crude extracts of plant cell cultures. Suppression requires cofactor binding to its binding pocket. Labeling is also suppressed by ALDH modulators that bind at the substrate entrance tunnel, confirming that labeling occurs through the substrate-binding cavity. Our data indicate that cofactor binding adjusts the catalytic Cys into a conformation that reduces the reactivity toward chloroacetamide probes. PMID:26990764

  15. Pneumococcal phosphoglycerate kinase interacts with plasminogen and its tissue activator.

    PubMed

    Fulde, M; Bernardo-García, N; Rohde, M; Nachtigall, N; Frank, R; Preissner, K T; Klett, J; Morreale, A; Chhatwal, G S; Hermoso, J A; Bergmann, S

    2014-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is not only a commensal of the nasopharyngeal epithelium, but may also cause life-threatening diseases. Immune-electron microscopy studies revealed that the bacterial glycolytic enzyme, phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK), is localised on the pneumococcal surface of both capsulated and non-capsulated strains and colocalises with plasminogen. Since pneumococci may concentrate host plasminogen (PLG) together with its activators on the bacterial cell surface to facilitate the formation of plasmin, the involvement of PGK in this process was studied. Specific binding of human or murine PLG to strain-independent PGK was documented, and surface plasmon resonance analyses indicated a high affinity interaction with the kringle domains 1-4 of PLG. Crystal structure determination of pneumococcal PGK together with peptide array analysis revealed localisation of PLG-binding site in the N-terminal region and provided structural motifs for the interaction with PLG. Based on structural analysis data, a potential interaction of PGK with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) was proposed and experimentally confirmed by binding studies, plasmin activity assays and thrombus degradation analyses. PMID:24196407

  16. Chronic caffeine or theophylline exposure reduces gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor site interactions.

    PubMed

    Roca, D J; Schiller, G D; Farb, D H

    1988-05-01

    Methylxanthines, such as caffeine and theophylline, are adenosine receptor antagonists that exert dramatic effects upon the behavior of vertebrate animals by increasing attentiveness, anxiety, and convulsive activity. Benzodiazepines, such as flunitrazepam, generally exert behavioral effects that are opposite to those of methylxanthines. We report the finding that chronic exposure of embryonic brain neurons to caffeine or theophylline reduces the ability of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to potentiate the binding of [3H]flunitrazepam to the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor. This theophylline-induced "uncoupling" of GABA- and benzodiazepine-binding site allosteric interactions is blocked by chloroadenosine, an adenosine receptor agonist, indicating that the chronic effects of theophylline are mediated by a site that resembles an adenosine receptor. We speculate that adverse central nervous system effects of long-term exposure to methylxanthines such as in caffeine-containing beverages or theophylline-containing medications may be exerted by a cell-mediated modification of the GABAA receptor. PMID:2835648

  17. Study of Cytochrome c-DNA Interaction - Evaluation of Binding Sites on the Redox Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wettstein, Christoph; Kyne, Ciara; M. Doolan, Aishling; Möhwald, Helmuth; Crowley, Peter B.; Lisdat, Fred

    2014-10-01

    Artificial assemblies consisting of the cationic cytochrome c (cyt c) and double-stranded DNA are interesting for the field of biohybrid systems because of the high electro-activity of the incorporated redox protein. However, little is known about the interactions between these two biomolecules. Here, the complex of reduced cyt c and a 41 base pair oligonucleotide was characterized in solution as a function of pH and ionic strength. Persistent cyt c-DNA agglomerates were observed by UV-vis and DLS (dynamic light scattering) at pH 5.0 and low ionic strength. The strength of the interaction was attenuated by raising the pH or the ionic strength. At pH 7.0 agglomerates were not formed, allowing interaction analysis by NMR spectroscopy. Using TROSY (transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy)-HSQC (heteronuclear single quantum coherence) experiments it was possible to identify the DNA binding site on the cyt c surface. Numerous residues surrounding the exposed heme edge of cyt c were involved in transient binding to DNA under these conditions. This result was supported by SEC (size exclusion chromatography) experiments at pH 7.0 showing that the interaction is sufficient for co-elution of cyt c and DNA.Artificial assemblies consisting of the cationic cytochrome c (cyt c) and double-stranded DNA are interesting for the field of biohybrid systems because of the high electro-activity of the incorporated redox protein. However, little is known about the interactions between these two biomolecules. Here, the complex of reduced cyt c and a 41 base pair oligonucleotide was characterized in solution as a function of pH and ionic strength. Persistent cyt c-DNA agglomerates were observed by UV-vis and DLS (dynamic light scattering) at pH 5.0 and low ionic strength. The strength of the interaction was attenuated by raising the pH or the ionic strength. At pH 7.0 agglomerates were not formed, allowing interaction analysis by NMR spectroscopy. Using TROSY (transverse relaxation

  18. How Users Take Advantage of Different Forms of Interactivity on Online News Sites: Clicking, E-Mailing, and Commenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boczkowski, Pablo J.; Mitchelstein, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the uptake of multiple interactive features on news sites. It looks at the thematic composition of the most clicked, most e-mailed, and most commented stories during periods of heightened and routine political activity. Results show that (a) during the former period, the most commented stories were more likely to be focused on…

  19. Interaction of Sr-90 with site candidate soil for demonstration disposal facility at Serpong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Budi; Mila, Oktri; Safni

    2014-03-01

    Interaction of radiostrontium (Sr-90) with site candidate soil for demonstration disposal facility to be constructed in the near future at Serpong has been done. This activity is to anticipate the interim storage facility at Serpong nuclear area becomes full off condition, and show to the public how radioactive waste can be well managed with the existing technology. To ensure that the location is save, a reliability study of site candidate soil becomes very importance to be conducted through some experiments consisted some affected parameters such as contact time, effect of ionic strength, and effect of Sr+ ion in solution. Radiostrontium was used as a tracer on the experiments and has role as radionuclide reference in low-level radioactive waste due to its long half-live and it's easy to associate with organism in nature. So, interaction of radiostrontium and soil samples from site becomes important to be studied. Experiment was performed in batch method, and soil sample-solution containing radionuclide was mixed in a 20 ml of PE vial. Ratio of solid: liquid was 10-2 g/ml. Objective of the experiment is to collect the specific characteristics data of radionuclide sorption onto soil from site candidate. Distribution coefficient value was used as indicator where the amount of initial and final activities of radiostrontium in solution was compared. Result showed that equilibrium condition was reached after contact time 10 days with Kd values ranged from 1600-2350 ml/g. Increased in ionic strength in solution made decreased of Kd value into soil sample due to competition of background salt and radiostrontium into soil samples, and increased in Sr ion in solution caused decreased of Kd value in soil sample due to limitation of sorption capacity in soil samples. Fast condition in saturated of metal ion into soil samples was reached due to a simple reaction was occurred.

  20. Interaction of Sr-90 with site candidate soil for demonstration disposal facility at Serpong

    SciTech Connect

    Setiawan, Budi; Mila, Oktri; Safni

    2014-03-24

    Interaction of radiostrontium (Sr-90) with site candidate soil for demonstration disposal facility to be constructed in the near future at Serpong has been done. This activity is to anticipate the interim storage facility at Serpong nuclear area becomes full off condition, and show to the public how radioactive waste can be well managed with the existing technology. To ensure that the location is save, a reliability study of site candidate soil becomes very importance to be conducted through some experiments consisted some affected parameters such as contact time, effect of ionic strength, and effect of Sr{sup +} ion in solution. Radiostrontium was used as a tracer on the experiments and has role as radionuclide reference in low-level radioactive waste due to its long half-live and it's easy to associate with organism in nature. So, interaction of radiostrontium and soil samples from site becomes important to be studied. Experiment was performed in batch method, and soil sample-solution containing radionuclide was mixed in a 20 ml of PE vial. Ratio of solid: liquid was 10{sup −2} g/ml. Objective of the experiment is to collect the specific characteristics data of radionuclide sorption onto soil from site candidate. Distribution coefficient value was used as indicator where the amount of initial and final activities of radiostrontium in solution was compared. Result showed that equilibrium condition was reached after contact time 10 days with Kd values ranged from 1600-2350 ml/g. Increased in ionic strength in solution made decreased of Kd value into soil sample due to competition of background salt and radiostrontium into soil samples, and increased in Sr ion in solution caused decreased of Kd value in soil sample due to limitation of sorption capacity in soil samples. Fast condition in saturated of metal ion into soil samples was reached due to a simple reaction was occurred.

  1. Estradiol and tamoxifen interaction at receptor sites at 37 C.

    PubMed

    Fishman, J H

    1983-09-01

    Mature rat uterine cytosol was pretreated with dextran-coated charcoal at 0 C for 2 h. This renders the subsequently formed estradiol-receptor complex thermostable at 37 C and also uncovers antiestrogen binding sites, possibly by removing an endogenous ligand. A sharp distinction is found between tamoxifen and estradiol as receptor ligands in pretreated cytosols in that tamoxifen will inhibit estradiol binding, on incubation at 37 C, only if dithiothreitol (DTT) had been included in the pretreatment solution. The presence of tamoxifen as the sole ligand in cytosol pretreated in the presence of DTT does not protect the estradiol receptor from thermal inactivation and following 37 C incubation tamoxifen is found bound exclusively to antiestrogen binding sites. Incubating the cytosol at 37 C with an equimolar mixture of estradiol and tamoxifen results in a very large increase in receptor-bound estradiol. This effect is attributed to the presence of tamoxifen complexed with antiestrogen sites. Tamoxifen in such equimolar ligand mixture binds to antiestrogen sites and is excluded from receptor sites by the estradiol, whose affinity for these sites is much greater than that of tamoxifen. PMID:6191968

  2. Toward the Computational Prediction of Muon Sites and Interaction Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfà, Pietro; De Renzi, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The rapid developments of computational quantum chemistry methods and supercomputing facilities motivate the renewed interest in the analysis of the muon/electron interactions in μSR experiments with ab initio approaches. Modern simulation methods seem to be able to provide the answers to the frequently asked questions of many μSR experiments: where is the muon? Is it a passive probe? What are the interaction parameters governing the muon-sample interaction? In this review we describe some of the approaches used to provide quantitative estimations of the aforementioned quantities and we provide the reader with a short discussion on the current developments in this field.

  3. Mapping of sites on the Src family protein tyrosine kinases p55blk, p59fyn, and p56lyn which interact with the effector molecules phospholipase C-gamma 2, microtubule-associated protein kinase, GTPase-activating protein, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Pleiman, C M; Clark, M R; Gauen, L K; Winitz, S; Coggeshall, K M; Johnson, G L; Shaw, A S; Cambier, J C

    1993-01-01

    Engagement of the B-cell antigen receptor complex induces immediate activation of receptor-associated Src family tyrosine kinases including p55blk, p59fyn, p53/56lyn, and perhaps p56lck, and this response is accompanied by tyrosine phosphorylation of distinct cellular substrates. These kinases act directly or indirectly to phosphorylate and/or activate effector proteins including p42 (microtubule-associated protein kinase) (MAPK), phospholipases C-gamma 1 (PLC gamma 1) and C-gamma 2 (PLC gamma 2), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-K), and p21ras-GTPase-activating protein (GAP). Although coimmunoprecipitation results indicate that the Src family protein tyrosine kinases interact physically with some of these effector molecules, the molecular basis of this interaction has not been established. Here, we show that three distinct sites mediate the interaction of these kinases with effectors. The amino-terminal 27 residues of the unique domain of p56lyn mediate association with PLC gamma 2, MAPK, and GAP. Binding to PI 3-K is mediated through the Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of the Src family kinases. Relatively small proportions of cellular PI 3-K, PLC gamma 2, MAPK, and GAP, presumably those which are tyrosine phosphorylated, bind to the SH2 domains of these kinases. Comparative analysis of binding activities of Blk, Lyn, and Fyn shows that these kinases differ in their abilities to associate with MAPK and PI 3-K, suggesting that they may preferentially bind and subsequently phosphorylate distinct sets of downstream effector molecules in vivo. Fast protein liquid chromatography Mono Q column-fractionated MAPK maintains the ability to bind bacterially expressed Lyn, suggesting that the two kinases may interact directly. Images PMID:8395016

  4. New activity pattern in human interactive dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formentin, Marco; Lovison, Alberto; Maritan, Amos; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the response function of human agents as demonstrated by written correspondence, uncovering a new pattern for how the reactive dynamics of individuals is distributed across the set of each agent’s contacts. In long-term empirical data on email, we find that the set of response times considered separately for the messages to each different correspondent of a given writer, generate a family of heavy-tailed distributions, which have largely the same features for all agents, and whose characteristic times grow exponentially with the rank of each correspondent. We furthermore show that this new behavioral pattern emerges robustly by considering weighted moving averages of the priority-conditioned response-time probabilities generated by a basic prioritization model. Our findings clarify how the range of priorities in the inputs from one’s environment underpin and shape the dynamics of agents embedded in a net of reactive relations. These newly revealed activity patterns might be universal, being present in other general interactive environments, and constrain future models of communication and interaction networks, affecting their architecture and evolution.

  5. A small ribozyme with dual-site kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Elisa; Maxwell, Adam W.R.; Burke, Donald H.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoryl transfer onto backbone hydroxyls is a recognized catalytic activity of nucleic acids. We find that kinase ribozyme K28 possesses an unusually complex active site that promotes (thio)phosphorylation of two residues widely separated in primary sequence. After allowing the ribozyme to radiolabel itself by phosphoryl transfer from [γ-32P]GTP, DNAzyme-mediated cleavage yielded two radiolabeled cleavage fragments, indicating phosphorylation sites within each of the two cleavage fragments. These sites were mapped by alkaline digestion and primer extension pausing. Enzymatic digestion and mutational analysis identified nucleotides important for activity and established the active structure as being a constrained pseudoknot with unusual connectivity that may juxtapose the two reactive sites. Nuclease sensitivities for nucleotides near the pseudoknot core were altered in the presence of GTPγS, indicating donor-induced folding. The 5′ target site was more strongly favored in full-length ribozyme K28 (128 nt) than in truncated RNAs (58 nt). Electrophoretic mobilities of self-thiophosphorylated products on organomercurial gels are distinct from the 5′ mono-thiophosphorylated product produced by reaction with polynucleotide kinase, potentially indicating simultaneous labeling of both sites within individual RNA strands. Our evidence supports a single, compact structure with local dynamics, rather than global rearrangement, as being responsible for dual-site phosphorylation. PMID:22618879

  6. Correlated structural kinetics and retarded solvent dynamics at the metalloprotease active site

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Moran; Born, Benjamin; Heyden, Matthias; Tworowski, Dmitry; Fields, Gregg B; Sagi, Irit; Havenith, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Solvent dynamics can play a major role in enzyme activity, but obtaining an accurate, quantitative picture of solvent activity during catalysis is quite challenging. Here, we combine terahertz spectroscopy and X-ray absorption analyses to measure changes in the coupled water-protein motions during peptide hydrolysis by a zinc-dependent human metalloprotease. These changes were tightly correlated with rearrangements at the active site during the formation of productive enzyme-substrate intermediates and were different from those in an enzyme–inhibitor complex. Molecular dynamics simulations showed a steep gradient of fast-to-slow coupled protein-water motions around the protein, active site and substrate. Our results show that water retardation occurs before formation of the functional Michaelis complex. We propose that the observed gradient of coupled protein-water motions may assist enzyme-substrate interactions through water-polarizing mechanisms that are remotely mediated by the catalytic metal ion and the enzyme active site. PMID:21926991

  7. Correlated structural kinetics and retarded solvent dynamics at the metalloprotease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Moran; Born, Benjamin; Heyden, Matthias; Tworowski, Dmitry; Fields, Gregg B.; Sagi, Irit; Havenith, Martina

    2011-09-18

    Solvent dynamics can play a major role in enzyme activity, but obtaining an accurate, quantitative picture of solvent activity during catalysis is quite challenging. Here, we combine terahertz spectroscopy and X-ray absorption analyses to measure changes in the coupled water-protein motions during peptide hydrolysis by a zinc-dependent human metalloprotease. These changes were tightly correlated with rearrangements at the active site during the formation of productive enzyme-substrate intermediates and were different from those in an enzyme–inhibitor complex. Molecular dynamics simulations showed a steep gradient of fast-to-slow coupled protein-water motions around the protein, active site and substrate. Our results show that water retardation occurs before formation of the functional Michaelis complex. We propose that the observed gradient of coupled protein-water motions may assist enzyme-substrate interactions through water-polarizing mechanisms that are remotely mediated by the catalytic metal ion and the enzyme active site.

  8. Improving upon Nature: Active site remodeling produces highly efficient aldolase activity towards hydrophobic electrophilic substrates

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Manoj; Toone, Eric J.; Fierke, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Substrate specificity of enzymes is frequently narrow and constrained by multiple interactions, limiting the use of natural enzymes in biocatalytic applications. Aldolases have important synthetic applications, but the usefulness of these enzymes is hampered by their narrow reactivity profile with unnatural substrates. To explore the determinants of substrate selectivity and alter the specificity of E. coli 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate (KDPG) aldolase, we employed structure-based mutagenesis coupled with library screening of mutant enzymes localized to the bacterial periplasm. We identified two active site mutations (T161S/S184L) that work additively to enhance the substrate specificity of this aldolase to include catalysis of retro-aldol cleavage of (4S)-2-keto-4-hydroxy-4-(2′-pyridyl)butyrate (S-KHPB). These mutations improve the value of kcat/KMS-KHPB by >450-fold, resulting in a catalytic efficiency that is comparable to that of the wild-type enzyme with the natural substrate while retaining high stereoselectivity. Moreover, the value of kcatS-KHPB for this mutant enzyme, a parameter critical for biocatalytic applications, is 3-fold higher than the maximum value achieved by the natural aldolase with any substrate. This mutant also possesses high catalytic efficiency for the retro-aldol cleavage of the natural substrate, KDPG, and a >50-fold improved activity for cleavage of 2-keto-4-hydroxy-octonoate (KHO), a non-functionalized hydrophobic analog. These data suggest a substrate binding mode that illuminates the origin of facial selectivity in aldol addition reactions catalyzed by KDPG and 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogalactonate (KDPGal) aldolases. Furthermore, targeting mutations to the active site provides marked improvement in substrate selectivity, demonstrating that structure-guided active site mutagenesis combined with selection techniques can efficiently identify proteins with characteristics that compare favorably to naturally occurring enzymes. PMID

  9. NMR structure of the active conformation of the Varkud satellite ribozyme cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Mitchell, G. Thomas; Gendron, Patrick; Major, François; Andersen, Angela A.; Collins, Richard A.; Legault, Pascale

    2003-01-01

    Substrate cleavage by the Neurospora Varkud satellite (VS) ribozyme involves a structural change in the stem-loop I substrate from an inactive to an active conformation. We have determined the NMR solution structure of a mutant stem-loop I that mimics the active conformation of the cleavage site internal loop. This structure shares many similarities, but also significant differences, with the previously determined structures of the inactive internal loop. The active internal loop displays different base-pairing interactions and forms a novel RNA fold composed exclusively of sheared G-A base pairs. From chemical-shift mapping we identified two Mg2+ binding sites in the active internal loop. One of the Mg2+ binding sites forms in the active but not the inactive conformation of the internal loop and is likely important for catalysis. Using the structure comparison program mc-search, we identified the active internal loop fold in other RNA structures. In Thermus thermophilus 16S rRNA, this RNA fold is directly involved in a long-range tertiary interaction. An analogous tertiary interaction may form between the active internal loop of the substrate and the catalytic domain of the VS ribozyme. The combination of NMR and bioinformatic approaches presented here has identified a novel RNA fold and provides insights into the structural basis of catalytic function in the Neurospora VS ribozyme. PMID:12782785

  10. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, Paul A.; Kachroo, Aashiq H.; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D.; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5′ to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions. PMID:25999343

  11. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions. PMID:25999343

  12. Dashboard applications to monitor experiment activities at sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Julia; Belforte, Stefano; Boehm, Max; Casajus, Adrian; Flix, Josep; Gaidioz, Benjamin; Grigoras, Costin; Kokoszkiewicz, Lukasz; Lanciotti, Elisa; Rocha, Ricardo; Saiz, Pablo; Santinelli, Roberto; Sidorova, Irina; Sciabà, Andrea; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei

    2010-04-01

    In the framework of a distributed computing environment, such as WLCG, monitoring has a key role in order to keep under control activities going on in sites located in different countries and involving people based in many different sites. To be able to cope with such a large scale heterogeneous infrastructure, it is necessary to have monitoring tools providing a complete and reliable view of the overall performance of the sites. Moreover, the structure of a monitoring system critically depends on the object to monitor and on the users it is addressed to. In this article we will describe two different monitoring systems both aimed to monitor activities and services provided in the WLCG framework, but designed in order to meet the requirements of different users: Site Status Board has an overall view of the services available in all the sites supporting an experiment, whereas Siteview provides a complete view of all the activities going on at a site, for all the experiments supported by the site.

  13. Architecture and active site of particulate methane monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Culpepper, Megen A.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria, organisms that live on methane gas as their sole carbon source. Understanding pMMO function has important implications for bioremediation applications and for the development of new, environmentally friendly catalysts for the direct conversion of methane to methanol. Crystal structures of pMMOs from three different methanotrophs reveal a trimeric architecture, consisting of three copies each of the pmoB, pmoA, and pmoC subunits. There are three distinct metal centers in each protomer of the trimer, mononuclear and dinuclear copper sites in the periplasmic regions of pmoB and a mononuclear site within the membrane that can be occupied by copper or zinc. Various models for the pMMO active site have been proposed within these structural constraints, including dicopper, tricopper, and diiron centers. Biochemical and spectroscopic data on pMMO and recombinant soluble fragments, denoted spmoB proteins, indicate that the active site involves copper and is located at the site of the dicopper center in the pmoB subunit. Initial spectroscopic evidence for O2 binding at this site has been obtained. Despite these findings, questions remain about the active site identity and nuclearity and will be the focus of future studies. PMID:22725967

  14. Multiple active site residues are important for photochemical efficiency in the light-activated enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR).

    PubMed

    Menon, Binuraj R K; Hardman, Samantha J O; Scrutton, Nigel S; Heyes, Derren J

    2016-08-01

    Protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) catalyzes the light-driven reduction of protochlorophyllide (Pchlide), an essential, regulatory step in chlorophyll biosynthesis. The unique requirement of the enzyme for light has provided the opportunity to investigate how light energy can be harnessed to power biological catalysis and enzyme dynamics. Excited state interactions between the Pchlide molecule and the protein are known to drive the subsequent reaction chemistry. However, the structural features of POR and active site residues that are important for photochemistry and catalysis are currently unknown, because there is no crystal structure for POR. Here, we have used static and time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of a number of active site variants to study the role of a number of residues, which are located in the proposed NADPH/Pchlide binding site based on previous homology models, in the reaction mechanism of POR. Our findings, which are interpreted in the context of a new improved structural model, have identified several residues that are predicted to interact with the coenzyme or substrate. Several of the POR variants have a profound effect on the photochemistry, suggesting that multiple residues are important in stabilizing the excited state required for catalysis. Our work offers insight into how the POR active site geometry is finely tuned by multiple active site residues to support enzyme-mediated photochemistry and reduction of Pchlide, both of which are crucial to the existence of life on Earth. PMID:27285815

  15. In silico analysis of Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase active site with toxic industrial dyes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nirmal K; Vindal, Vaibhav; Narayana, Siva Lakshmi; Ramakrishna, V; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan; Srinivas, M

    2012-05-01

    Laccases belong to multicopper oxidases, a widespread class of enzymes implicated in many oxidative functions in various industrial oxidative processes like production of fine chemicals to bioremediation of contaminated soil and water. In order to understand the mechanisms of substrate binding and interaction between substrates and Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase, a homology model was generated. The resulted model was further validated and used for docking studies with toxic industrial dyes- acid blue 74, reactive black 5 and reactive blue 19. Interactions of chemical mediators with the laccase was also examined. The docking analysis showed that the active site always cannot accommodate the dye molecules, due to constricted nature of the active site pocket and steric hindrance of the residues whereas mediators are relatively small and can easily be accommodated into the active site pocket, which, thereafter leads to the productive binding. The binding properties of these compounds along with identification of critical active site residues can be used for further site-directed mutagenesis experiments in order to identify their role in activity and substrate specificity, ultimately leading to improved mutants for degradation of these toxic compounds. PMID:21877154

  16. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2domains reveal that the (HhH)2domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  17. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  18. Methionine Ligand Interaction in a Blue Copper Protein Characterized by Site-Selective Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Le Sueur, Amanda L; Schaugaard, Richard N; Baik, Mu-Hyun; Thielges, Megan C

    2016-06-01

    The reactivity of metal sites in proteins is tuned by protein-based ligands. For example, in blue copper proteins such as plastocyanin (Pc), the structure imparts a highly elongated bond between the Cu and a methionine (Met) axial ligand to modulate its redox properties. Despite extensive study, a complete understanding of the contribution of the protein to redox activity is challenged by experimentally accessing both redox states of metalloproteins. Using infrared (IR) spectroscopy in combination with site-selective labeling with carbon-deuterium (C-D) vibrational probes, we characterized the localized changes at the Cu ligand Met97 in the oxidized and reduced states, as well as the Zn(II) or Co(II)-substituted, the pH-induced low-coordinate, the apoprotein, and the unfolded states. The IR absorptions of (d3-methyl)Met97 are highly sensitive to interaction of the sulfur-based orbitals with the metal center and are demonstrated to be useful reporters of its modulation in the different states. Unrestricted Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations performed on a model of the Cu site of Pc confirm the observed dependence. IR spectroscopy was then applied to characterize the impact of binding to the physiological redox partner cytochrome (cyt) f. The spectral changes suggest a slightly stronger Cu-S(Met97) interaction in the complex with cyt f that has potential to modulate the electron transfer properties. Besides providing direct, molecular-level comparison of the oxidized and reduced states of Pc from the perspective of the axial Met ligand and evidence for perturbation of the Cu site properties by redox partner binding, this study demonstrates the localized spatial information afforded by IR spectroscopy of selectively incorporated C-D probes. PMID:27164303

  19. Learning person-person interaction in collective activity recognition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaobin; Zheng, Wei-Shi; Zhang, Jianguo

    2015-06-01

    Collective activity is a collection of atomic activities (individual person's activity) and can hardly be distinguished by an atomic activity in isolation. The interactions among people are important cues for recognizing collective activity. In this paper, we concentrate on modeling the person-person interactions for collective activity recognition. Rather than relying on hand-craft description of the person-person interaction, we propose a novel learning-based approach that is capable of computing the class-specific person-person interaction patterns. In particular, we model each class of collective activity by an interaction matrix, which is designed to measure the connection between any pair of atomic activities in a collective activity instance. We then formulate an interaction response (IR) model by assembling all these measurements and make the IR class specific and distinct from each other. A multitask IR is further proposed to jointly learn different person-person interaction patterns simultaneously in order to learn the relation between different person-person interactions and keep more distinct activity-specific factor for each interaction at the same time. Our model is able to exploit discriminative low-rank representation of person-person interaction. Experimental results on two challenging data sets demonstrate our proposed model is comparable with the state-of-the-art models and show that learning person-person interactions plays a critical role in collective activity recognition. PMID:25769156

  20. TRIP8b regulates HCN1 channel trafficking and gating through two distinct C-terminal interaction sites

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Bina; Hu, Lei; Liu, Haiying; Saponaro, Andrea; Pian, Phillip; Piskorowski, Rebecca A.; Moroni, Anna; Siegelbaum, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated (HCN) channels in the brain associate with their auxiliary subunit TRIP8b (also known as PEX5R), a cytoplasmic protein expressed as a family of alternatively spliced isoforms. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that association of TRIP8b with HCN subunits both inhibits channel opening and alters channel membrane trafficking, with some splice variants increasing and others decreasing channel surface expression. Here, we address the structural bases of the regulatory interactions between mouse TRIP8b and HCN1. We find that HCN1 and TRIP8b interact at two distinct sites: an upstream site where the C-linker/cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of HCN1 interacts with an 80 amino acid domain in the conserved central core of TRIP8b, and a downstream site where the C-terminal -SNL tripeptide of the channel interacts with the tetratricopeptide repeat domain of TRIP8b. These two interaction sites play distinct functional roles in the effects of TRIP8b on HCN1 trafficking and gating. Binding at the upstream site is both necessary and sufficient for TRIP8b to inhibit channel opening. It is also sufficient to mediate the trafficking effects of those TRIP8b isoforms that downregulate channel surface expression, in combination with the trafficking motifs present in the N-terminal region of TRIP8b. In contrast, binding at the downstream interaction site serves to stabilize the C-terminal domain of TRIP8b, allowing for optimal interaction between HCN1 and TRIP8b as well as for proper assembly of the molecular complexes that mediate the effects of TRIP8b on HCN1 channel trafficking. PMID:21411649

  1. Denaturation studies of active-site labeled papain using electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Z A; Butterfiel, D A

    1991-01-01

    A spin-labeled p-chloromercuribenzoate (SL-PMB) and a fluorescence probe, 6-acryloyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Acrylodan), both of which bind to the single SH group located in the active site of papain, were used to investigate the interaction of papain (EC 3.4.22.2) with two protein denaturants. It was found that the active site of papain was highly stable in urea solution, but underwent a large conformational change in guanidine hydrochloride solution. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence results were in agreement and both paralleled enzymatic activity of papain with respect to both the variation in pH and denaturation. These results strongly suggest that SL-PMB and Acrylodan labels can be used to characterize the physical state of the active site of the enzyme. PMID:1657229

  2. Possible intermolecular interaction between quinolones and biphenylacetic acid inhibits gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor sites.

    PubMed

    Akahane, K; Kimura, Y; Tsutomi, Y; Hayakawa, I

    1994-10-01

    The combination of some new quinolone antibacterial agents with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA), a metabolite of fenbufen, is known to specifically induce functional blockade of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. The mechanisms of these drug interactions were further examined. Scatchard analysis of [3H]muscimol binding to rat brain plasma membranes in the presence of enoxacin and BPAA revealed that a significant decrease in the number of muscimol binding sites was produced without affecting the affinity of binding to the receptors. In the presence of norfloxacin, BPAA inhibited muscimol binding the most potently of the six BPAA-related compounds tested. Fenbufen and 9,10-dihydro-gamma-oxo-2-phenanthrenebutyric acid also inhibited the binding, and 4-biphenylcarboxylic acid and methyl 4-biphenylacetate inhibited it slightly, but 3-benzoylpropionic acid exhibited no competitive inhibition. Accordingly, hybrid molecules of norfloxacin and BPAA were synthesized for stereochemical analysis of these drug interactions. A hybrid with a -CONH(CH2)3- chain between norfloxacin and BPAA (flexible structure) inhibited muscimol binding, and intracisternal injection of this hybrid caused clonic convulsions in mice more potently than the combination of norfloxacin and BPAA did. In contrast, a hybrid linked by -CONH- (stretched structure) showed almost no such inhibitory effect. 1H NMR analysis indicated the presence of intramolecular attraction at the quinoline ring of the hybrid exhibiting the antagonistic activity. These results suggest the possibility that quinolones and BPAA interact with the GABA receptor at nearby sites and that the binding affinity of quinolones to the GABA receptors is largely enhanced by the intermolecular interaction with BPAA. PMID:7840564

  3. Possible intermolecular interaction between quinolones and biphenylacetic acid inhibits gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor sites.

    PubMed Central

    Akahane, K; Kimura, Y; Tsutomi, Y; Hayakawa, I

    1994-01-01

    The combination of some new quinolone antibacterial agents with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA), a metabolite of fenbufen, is known to specifically induce functional blockade of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. The mechanisms of these drug interactions were further examined. Scatchard analysis of [3H]muscimol binding to rat brain plasma membranes in the presence of enoxacin and BPAA revealed that a significant decrease in the number of muscimol binding sites was produced without affecting the affinity of binding to the receptors. In the presence of norfloxacin, BPAA inhibited muscimol binding the most potently of the six BPAA-related compounds tested. Fenbufen and 9,10-dihydro-gamma-oxo-2-phenanthrenebutyric acid also inhibited the binding, and 4-biphenylcarboxylic acid and methyl 4-biphenylacetate inhibited it slightly, but 3-benzoylpropionic acid exhibited no competitive inhibition. Accordingly, hybrid molecules of norfloxacin and BPAA were synthesized for stereochemical analysis of these drug interactions. A hybrid with a -CONH(CH2)3- chain between norfloxacin and BPAA (flexible structure) inhibited muscimol binding, and intracisternal injection of this hybrid caused clonic convulsions in mice more potently than the combination of norfloxacin and BPAA did. In contrast, a hybrid linked by -CONH- (stretched structure) showed almost no such inhibitory effect. 1H NMR analysis indicated the presence of intramolecular attraction at the quinoline ring of the hybrid exhibiting the antagonistic activity. These results suggest the possibility that quinolones and BPAA interact with the GABA receptor at nearby sites and that the binding affinity of quinolones to the GABA receptors is largely enhanced by the intermolecular interaction with BPAA. PMID:7840564

  4. Lipid interaction sites on channels, transporters and receptors: Recent insights from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Hedger, George; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-10-01

    Lipid molecules are able to selectively interact with specific sites on integral membrane proteins, and modulate their structure and function. Identification and characterization of these sites are of importance for our understanding of the molecular basis of membrane protein function and stability, and may facilitate the design of lipid-like drug molecules. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a powerful tool for the identification of these sites, complementing advances in membrane protein structural biology and biophysics. We describe recent notable biomolecular simulation studies which have identified lipid interaction sites on a range of different membrane proteins. The sites identified in these simulation studies agree well with those identified by complementary experimental techniques. This demonstrates the power of the molecular dynamics approach in the prediction and characterization of lipid interaction sites on integral membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26946244

  5. Entropic Ratchet transport of interacting active Brownian particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Bao-Quan; He, Ya-Feng; Zhong, Wei-Rong

    2014-11-21

    Directed transport of interacting active (self-propelled) Brownian particles is numerically investigated in confined geometries (entropic barriers). The self-propelled velocity can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport. It is found that the interaction between active particles can greatly affect the ratchet transport. For attractive particles, on increasing the interaction strength, the average velocity first decreases to its minima, then increases, and finally decreases to zero. For repulsive particles, when the interaction is very weak, there exists a critical interaction at which the average velocity is minimal, nearly tends to zero, however, for the strong interaction, the average velocity is independent of the interaction.

  6. Molecular Imprint of Enzyme Active Site by Camel Nanobodies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiang-Wei; Xia, Lijie; Su, Youhong; Liu, Hongchun; Xia, Xueqing; Lu, Qinxia; Yang, Chunjin; Reheman, Kalbinur

    2012-01-01

    Screening of inhibitory Ab1 antibodies is a critical step for producing catalytic antibodies in the anti-idiotypic approach. However, the incompatible surface of the active site of the enzyme and the antigen-binding site of heterotetrameric conventional antibodies become the limiting step. Because camelid-derived nanobodies possess the potential to preferentially bind to the active site of enzymes due to their small size and long CDR3, we have developed a novel approach to produce antibodies with alliinase activities by exploiting the molecular mimicry of camel nanobodies. By screening the camelid-derived variable region of the heavy chain cDNA phage display library with alliinase, we obtained an inhibitory nanobody VHHA4 that recognizes the active site. Further screening with VHHA4 from the same variable domain of the heavy chain of a heavy-chain antibody library led to a higher incidence of anti-idiotypic Ab2 abzymes with alliinase activities. One of the abzymes, VHHC10, showed the highest activity that can be inhibited by Ab1 VHHA4 and alliinase competitive inhibitor penicillamine and significantly suppressed the B16 tumor cell growth in the presence of alliin in vitro. The results highlight the feasibility of producing abzymes via anti-idiotypic nanobody approach. PMID:22374998

  7. Galaxy interactions and the stimulation of nuclear activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, Timothy M.

    1990-01-01

    The author discusses the idea that interactions between galaxies can lead to enhanced galactic activity. He discusses whether, apart from the observational evidence, there is a strong theoretical or heuristic motivation for investigating galaxy interactions as stimulators of nuclear activity in galaxies. Galactic interactions as mechanisms for triggering nuclear starbursts are covered.

  8. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  9. An active-site peptide from pepsin C

    PubMed Central

    Kay, J.; Ryle, A. P.

    1971-01-01

    Porcine pepsin C is inactivated rapidly and irreversibly by diazoacetyl-dl-norleucine methyl ester in the presence of cupric ions at pH values above 4.5. The inactivation is specific in that complete inactivation accompanies the incorporation of 1mol of inhibitor residue/mol of enzyme and evidence has been obtained to suggest that the reaction occurs with an active site residue. The site of reaction is the β-carboxyl group of an aspartic acid residue in the sequence Ile-Val-Asp-Thr. This sequence is identical with the active-site sequence in pepsin and the significance of this in terms of the different activities of the two enzymes is discussed. PMID:4942834

  10. Method of predicting Splice Sites based on signal interactions

    PubMed Central

    Churbanov, Alexander; Rogozin, Igor B; Deogun, Jitender S; Ali, Hesham

    2006-01-01

    Background Predicting and proper ranking of canonical splice sites (SSs) is a challenging problem in bioinformatics and machine learning communities. Any progress in SSs recognition will lead to better understanding of splicing mechanism. We introduce several new approaches of combining a priori knowledge for improved SS detection. First, we design our new Bayesian SS sensor based on oligonucleotide counting. To further enhance prediction quality, we applied our new de novo motif detection tool MHMMotif to intronic ends and exons. We combine elements found with sensor information using Naive Bayesian Network, as implemented in our new tool SpliceScan. Results According to our tests, the Bayesian sensor outperforms the contemporary Maximum Entropy sensor for 5' SS detection. We report a number of putative Exonic (ESE) and Intronic (ISE) Splicing Enhancers found by MHMMotif tool. T-test statistics on mouse/rat intronic alignments indicates, that detected elements are on average more conserved as compared to other oligos, which supports our assumption of their functional importance. The tool has been shown to outperform the SpliceView, GeneSplicer, NNSplice, Genio and NetUTR tools for the test set of human genes. SpliceScan outperforms all contemporary ab initio gene structural prediction tools on the set of 5' UTR gene fragments. Conclusion Designed methods have many attractive properties, compared to existing approaches. Bayesian sensor, MHMMotif program and SpliceScan tools are freely available on our web site. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Manyuan Long, Arcady Mushegian and Mikhail Gelfand. PMID:16584568

  11. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  12. Differential behavior of the sub-sites of cytochrome 450 active site in binding of substrates, and products (implications for coupling/uncoupling).

    PubMed

    Narasimhulu, Shakunthala

    2007-03-01

    The cytochrome P450 catalyzes hydroxylation of many substrates in the presence of O(2) and specific electron transport system. The ternary complex S-Fe(+)O(2) with substrate and O(2) bound to their respective sites on the reduced enzyme is an important intermediate in the formation of the hydroxylating species. Then the active site may be considered as having two sub-sites geared for entirely different types of functionally relevant interactions. The two sites are the substrate binding site, the specific protein residues (Site I), and the L(6) position of the iron (Site II) to which O(2) binds upon reduction. In the ferric enzyme, when substrate binds to Site I, the low spin six-coordinated P450 is converted to the readily reducible high spin five coordinated state. Certain amines and OH compounds, such as products of P450-catalyzed reactions, can bind to Site II resulting in six coordinated inhibited complexes. Then the substrate and product interactions with the two sub-sites can regulate the functional state of the enzyme during catalysis. Product interactions have received very little attention. CYP101 is the only P450 in which X-ray and spectroscopic data on all three structures, the substrate-free, camphor-bound and the 5-exo-OHcamphor-bound are available. The substrate-free CYP101 is low spin and six-coordinated with a water molecule ligated at the L(6) position of the iron. The substrate camphor binds to Site I, and releases the L(6) water despite its inability to bind to this site, indicating that Site I binding can inhibit Site II ligation. The product 5-exo-OHcamphor in addition to binding to Site I, binds to Site II through its -OH group forming Fe-O bond, resulting in the low spin six-coordinated complex. New temperature-jump relaxation kinetic data indicating that Site II ligation inhibits Site I binding are presented. It appears that the Site I and Site II function as interacting sub-sites. The inhibitory allosteric interactions between the two sub-sites

  13. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interaction Sites Based on Naive Bayes Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Haijiang; Lu, Tao; Lin, Xiao; Liu, Yu; Yan, Fangrong

    2015-01-01

    Protein functions through interactions with other proteins and biomolecules and these interactions occur on the so-called interface residues of the protein sequences. Identifying interface residues makes us better understand the biological mechanism of protein interaction. Meanwhile, information about the interface residues contributes to the understanding of metabolic, signal transduction networks and indicates directions in drug designing. In recent years, researchers have focused on developing new computational methods for predicting protein interface residues. Here we creatively used a 181-dimension protein sequence feature vector as input to the Naive Bayes Classifier- (NBC-) based method to predict interaction sites in protein-protein complexes interaction. The prediction of interaction sites in protein interactions is regarded as an amino acid residue binary classification problem by applying NBC with protein sequence features. Independent test results suggested that Naive Bayes Classifier-based method with the protein sequence features as input vectors performed well. PMID:26697220

  14. Docking of noncompetitive inhibitors into dengue virus type 2 protease: understanding the interactions with allosteric binding sites.

    PubMed

    Othman, Rozana; Kiat, Tan Siew; Khalid, Norzulaani; Yusof, Rohana; Newhouse, E Irene; Newhouse, James S; Alam, Masqudul; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abdul

    2008-08-01

    A group of flavanones and their chalcones, isolated from Boesenbergia rotunda L., were previously reported to show varying degrees of noncompetitive inhibitory activities toward Dengue virus type 2 (Den2) protease. Results obtained from automated docking studies are in agreement with experimental data in which the ligands were shown to bind to sites other than the active site of the protease. The calculated K(i) values are very small, indicating that the ligands bind quite well to the allosteric binding site. Greater inhibition by pinostrobin, compared to the other compounds, can be explained by H-bonding interaction with the backbone carbonyl of Lys74, which is bonded to Asp75 (one of the catalytic triad residues). In addition, structure-activity relationship analysis yields structural information that may be useful for designing more effective therapeutic drugs against dengue virus infections. PMID:18656912

  15. Interactive NCORP Map Details Community Research Sites | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    An interactive map of the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) with detailed information on hundreds of community sites that take part in clinical trials is available on the NCORP website. |

  16. Coexistence and competition of on-site and intersite Coulomb interactions in Mott-molecular-dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliano, R. C.; de Arruda, A. S.; Craco, L.

    2016-02-01

    We reveal the interplay between on-site (U) and intersite (V) Coulomb interactions in the extended two-site Hubbard model. Due to its atomic-like form quantum correlations intrinsic to Mott-molecular-dimers are exactly computed. Our results for physical quantities such as double occupancy and specific heat are consistent with those obtained for the one-band Hubbard model, suggesting that a two-site dimer model is able to capture the essential thermodynamic properties of strongly interacting electron systems. It is noted that intersite Coulomb interactions promote the formation of doublons, which compete with the spin-singlet state induced by the on-site Coulomb repulsion. Our results are expected to be relevant for understanding electronic and thermodynamical properties of interacting electrons in systems with strongly coupled magnetic atoms.

  17. Dynamically Achieved Active Site Precision in Enzyme Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes’ enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme–substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C–H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed. PMID:25539048

  18. Mapping Topoisomerase IV Binding and Activity Sites on the E. coli Genome.

    PubMed

    El Sayyed, Hafez; Le Chat, Ludovic; Lebailly, Elise; Vickridge, Elise; Pages, Carine; Cornet, Francois; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco; Espéli, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Catenation links between sister chromatids are formed progressively during DNA replication and are involved in the establishment of sister chromatid cohesion. Topo IV is a bacterial type II topoisomerase involved in the removal of catenation links both behind replication forks and after replication during the final separation of sister chromosomes. We have investigated the global DNA-binding and catalytic activity of Topo IV in E. coli using genomic and molecular biology approaches. ChIP-seq revealed that Topo IV interaction with the E. coli chromosome is controlled by DNA replication. During replication, Topo IV has access to most of the genome but only selects a few hundred specific sites for its activity. Local chromatin and gene expression context influence site selection. Moreover strong DNA-binding and catalytic activities are found at the chromosome dimer resolution site, dif, located opposite the origin of replication. We reveal a physical and functional interaction between Topo IV and the XerCD recombinases acting at the dif site. This interaction is modulated by MatP, a protein involved in the organization of the Ter macrodomain. These results show that Topo IV, XerCD/dif and MatP are part of a network dedicated to the final step of chromosome management during the cell cycle. PMID:27171414

  19. Mapping Topoisomerase IV Binding and Activity Sites on the E. coli Genome

    PubMed Central

    Lebailly, Elise; Pages, Carine; Cornet, Francois; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Catenation links between sister chromatids are formed progressively during DNA replication and are involved in the establishment of sister chromatid cohesion. Topo IV is a bacterial type II topoisomerase involved in the removal of catenation links both behind replication forks and after replication during the final separation of sister chromosomes. We have investigated the global DNA-binding and catalytic activity of Topo IV in E. coli using genomic and molecular biology approaches. ChIP-seq revealed that Topo IV interaction with the E. coli chromosome is controlled by DNA replication. During replication, Topo IV has access to most of the genome but only selects a few hundred specific sites for its activity. Local chromatin and gene expression context influence site selection. Moreover strong DNA-binding and catalytic activities are found at the chromosome dimer resolution site, dif, located opposite the origin of replication. We reveal a physical and functional interaction between Topo IV and the XerCD recombinases acting at the dif site. This interaction is modulated by MatP, a protein involved in the organization of the Ter macrodomain. These results show that Topo IV, XerCD/dif and MatP are part of a network dedicated to the final step of chromosome management during the cell cycle. PMID:27171414

  20. Rat intestinal trehalase. Studies of the active site.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Guo, W J; Isselbacher, K J

    1987-11-01

    Rat intestinal trehalase was solubilized, purified and reconstituted into proteoliposomes. With octyl glucoside as the solubilizing detergent, the purified protein appeared as a single band on SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis with an apparent molecular mass of 67 kDa. Kinetic studies indicated that the active site of this enzyme can be functionally divided into two adjacent regions, namely a binding site (with pKa 4.8) and a catalytic site (with pKa 7.2). Other findings suggested that the catalytic site contains a functional thiol group, which is sensitive to inhibition by N-ethylmaleimide, Hg2+ and iodoacetate. Substrate protection and iodoacetate labelling of the thiol group demonstrated that only a protein of 67 kDa was labelled. Furthermore, sucrose and phlorizin protected the thiol group, but Tris-like inhibitors did not. Structure-inhibition analysis of Tris-like inhibitors, the pH effect of Tris inhibition and Tris protection of 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodi-imide inactivation permitted characterization and location of a separate site containing a carboxy group for Tris binding, which may also be the binding region. On the basis of these findings, a possible structure for the active site of trehalase is proposed. PMID:3426558

  1. RNA-RNA Interactions Enable Specific Targeting of Noncoding RNAs to Nascent Pre-mRNAs and Chromatin Sites

    PubMed Central

    Engreitz, Jesse M.; Sirokman, Klara; McDonel, Patrick; Shishkin, Alexander; Surka, Christine; Russell, Pamela; Grossman, Sharon R.; Chow, Amy Y.; Guttman, Mitchell; Lander, Eric S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Intermolecular RNA-RNA interactions are used by many noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) to achieve their diverse functions. To aid in identifying these contacts, we developed a method based on RNA Antisense Purification to systematically map RNA-RNA interactions (RAP-RNA) and applied it to investigate two ncRNAs implicated in RNA processing: U1 snRNA, a component of the spliceosome, and Malat1, a lncRNA that localizes to nuclear speckles. U1 and Malat1 interact with nascent transcripts through distinct targeting mechanisms. Using differential crosslinking, we confirmed that U1 directly hybridizes to both 5’ splice sites and 5’-splice-site motifs throughout introns and found that Malat1 interacts with pre-mRNAs indirectly through protein intermediates. Interactions with nascent pre-mRNAs cause U1 and Malat1 to localize proximally to chromatin at active genes, demonstrating that ncRNAs can use RNA-RNA interactions to target specific pre-mRNAs and genomic sites. RAP-RNA is sensitive to lower abundance RNAs as well, making it generally applicable for investigating ncRNAs. PMID:25259926

  2. RNA-RNA interactions enable specific targeting of noncoding RNAs to nascent Pre-mRNAs and chromatin sites.

    PubMed

    Engreitz, Jesse M; Sirokman, Klara; McDonel, Patrick; Shishkin, Alexander A; Surka, Christine; Russell, Pamela; Grossman, Sharon R; Chow, Amy Y; Guttman, Mitchell; Lander, Eric S

    2014-09-25

    Intermolecular RNA-RNA interactions are used by many noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) to achieve their diverse functions. To identify these contacts, we developed a method based on RNA antisense purification to systematically map RNA-RNA interactions (RAP-RNA) and applied it to investigate two ncRNAs implicated in RNA processing: U1 small nuclear RNA, a component of the spliceosome, and Malat1, a large ncRNA that localizes to nuclear speckles. U1 and Malat1 interact with nascent transcripts through distinct targeting mechanisms. Using differential crosslinking, we confirmed that U1 directly hybridizes to 5' splice sites and 5' splice site motifs throughout introns and found that Malat1 interacts with pre-mRNAs indirectly through protein intermediates. Interactions with nascent pre-mRNAs cause U1 and Malat1 to localize proximally to chromatin at active genes, demonstrating that ncRNAs can use RNA-RNA interactions to target specific pre-mRNAs and genomic sites. RAP-RNA is sensitive to lower abundance RNAs as well, making it generally applicable for investigating ncRNAs. PMID:25259926

  3. Active Site and Remote Contributions to Catalysis in Methylthioadenosine Nucleosidases

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Keisha; Cameron, Scott A.; Almo, Steven C.; Burgos, Emmanuel S.; Gulab, Shivali A.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2015-01-01

    5′-Methylthioadenosine/S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine nucleosidases (MTANs) catalyze the hydrolysis of 5′-methylthioadenosine to adenine and 5-methylthioribose. The amino acid sequences of the MTANs from Vibrio cholerae (VcMTAN) and Escherichia coli (EcMTAN) are 60% identical and 75% similar. Protein structure folds and kinetic properties are similar. However, binding of transition-state analogues is dominated by favorable entropy in VcMTAN and by enthalpy in EcMTAN. Catalytic sites of VcMTAN and EcMTAN in contact with reactants differ by two residues; Ala113 and Val153 in VcMTAN are Pro113 and Ile152, respectively, in EcMTAN. We mutated the VcMTAN catalytic site residues to match those of EcMTAN in anticipation of altering its properties toward EcMTAN. Inhibition of VcMTAN by transition-state analogues required filling both active sites of the homodimer. However, in the Val153Ile mutant or double mutants, transition-state analogue binding at one site caused complete inhibition. Therefore, a single amino acid, Val153, alters the catalytic site cooperativity in VcMTAN. The transition-state analogue affinity and thermodynamics in mutant VcMTAN became even more unlike those of EcMTAN, the opposite of expectations from catalytic site similarity; thus, catalytic site contacts in VcMTAN are unable to recapitulate the properties of EcMTAN. X-ray crystal structures of EcMTAN, VcMTAN, and a multiple-site mutant of VcMTAN most closely resembling EcMTAN in catalytic site contacts show no major protein conformational differences. The overall protein architectures of these closely related proteins are implicated in contributing to the catalytic site differences. PMID:25806409

  4. Polarity Alteration of a Calcium Site Induces a Hydrophobic Interaction Network and Enhances Cel9A Endoglucanase Thermostability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiu-Jung; Hsiao, Yu-Yuan; Chen, Yu-Pei; Ma, Tien-Yang; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Structural calcium sites control protein thermostability and activity by stabilizing native folds and changing local conformations. Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius survives in thermal-acidic conditions and produces an endoglucanase Cel9A (AaCel9A) which contains a calcium-binding site (Ser465 to Val470) near the catalytic cleft. By superimposing the Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bounded conformations of the calcium site, we found that Ca(2+) induces hydrophobic interactions between the calcium site and its nearby region by driving a conformational change. The hydrophobic interactions at the high-B-factor region could be enhanced further by replacing the surrounding polar residues with hydrophobic residues to affect enzyme thermostability and activity. Therefore, the calcium-binding residue Asp468 (whose side chain directly ligates Ca(2+)), Asp469, and Asp471 of AaCel9A were separately replaced by alanine and valine. Mutants D468A and D468V showed increased activity compared with those of the wild type with 0 mM or 10 mM Ca(2+) added, whereas the Asp469 or Asp471 substitution resulted in decreased activity. The D468A crystal structure revealed that mutation D468A triggered a conformational change similar to that induced by Ca(2+) in the wild type and developed a hydrophobic interaction network between the calcium site and the neighboring hydrophobic region (Ala113 to Ala117). Mutations D468V and D468A increased 4.5°C and 5.9°C, respectively, in melting temperature, and enzyme half-life at 75°C increased approximately 13 times. Structural comparisons between AaCel9A and other endoglucanases of the GH9 family suggested that the stability of the regions corresponding to the AaCel9A calcium site plays an important role in GH9 endoglucanase catalysis at high temperature. PMID:26729722

  5. Polarity Alteration of a Calcium Site Induces a Hydrophobic Interaction Network and Enhances Cel9A Endoglucanase Thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsiu-Jung; Hsiao, Yu-Yuan; Chen, Yu-Pei; Ma, Tien-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Structural calcium sites control protein thermostability and activity by stabilizing native folds and changing local conformations. Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius survives in thermal-acidic conditions and produces an endoglucanase Cel9A (AaCel9A) which contains a calcium-binding site (Ser465 to Val470) near the catalytic cleft. By superimposing the Ca2+-free and Ca2+-bounded conformations of the calcium site, we found that Ca2+ induces hydrophobic interactions between the calcium site and its nearby region by driving a conformational change. The hydrophobic interactions at the high-B-factor region could be enhanced further by replacing the surrounding polar residues with hydrophobic residues to affect enzyme thermostability and activity. Therefore, the calcium-binding residue Asp468 (whose side chain directly ligates Ca2+), Asp469, and Asp471 of AaCel9A were separately replaced by alanine and valine. Mutants D468A and D468V showed increased activity compared with those of the wild type with 0 mM or 10 mM Ca2+ added, whereas the Asp469 or Asp471 substitution resulted in decreased activity. The D468A crystal structure revealed that mutation D468A triggered a conformational change similar to that induced by Ca2+ in the wild type and developed a hydrophobic interaction network between the calcium site and the neighboring hydrophobic region (Ala113 to Ala117). Mutations D468V and D468A increased 4.5°C and 5.9°C, respectively, in melting temperature, and enzyme half-life at 75°C increased approximately 13 times. Structural comparisons between AaCel9A and other endoglucanases of the GH9 family suggested that the stability of the regions corresponding to the AaCel9A calcium site plays an important role in GH9 endoglucanase catalysis at high temperature. PMID:26729722

  6. Distinct parietal sites mediate the influences of mood, arousal, and their interaction on human recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Greene, Ciara M; Flannery, Oliver; Soto, David

    2014-12-01

    The two dimensions of emotion, mood valence and arousal, have independent effects on recognition memory. At present, however, it is not clear how those effects are reflected in the human brain. Previous research in this area has generally dealt with memory for emotionally valenced or arousing stimuli, but the manner in which interacting mood and arousal states modulate responses in memory substrates remains poorly understood. We investigated memory for emotionally neutral items while independently manipulating mood valence and arousal state by means of music exposure. Four emotional conditions were created: positive mood/high arousal, positive mood/low arousal, negative mood/high arousal, and negative mood/low arousal. We observed distinct effects of mood valence and arousal in parietal substrates of recognition memory. Positive mood increased activity in ventral posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and orbitofrontal cortex, whereas arousal condition modulated activity in dorsal PPC and the posterior cingulate. An interaction between valence and arousal was observed in left ventral PPC, notably in a parietal area distinct from the those identified for the main effects, with a stronger effect of mood on recognition memory responses here under conditions of relative high versus low arousal. We interpreted the PPC activations in terms of the attention-to-memory hypothesis: Increased arousal may lead to increased top-down control of memory, and hence dorsal PPC activation, whereas positive mood valence may result in increased activity in ventral PPC regions associated with bottom-up attention to memory. These findings indicate that distinct parietal sites mediate the influences of mood, arousal, and their interplay during recognition memory. PMID:24604603

  7. Identification of a new JNK inhibitor targeting the JNK-JIP interaction site

    PubMed Central

    Stebbins, John L.; De, Surya K.; Machleidt, Thomas; Becattini, Barbara; Vazquez, Jesus; Kuntzen, Christian; Chen, Li-Hsing; Cellitti, Jason F.; Riel-Mehan, Megan; Emdadi, Aras; Solinas, Giovanni; Karin, Michael; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    JNK is a stress-activated protein kinase that modulates pathways implicated in a variety of disease states. JNK-interacting protein-1 (JIP1) is a scaffolding protein that enhances JNK signaling by creating a proximity effect between JNK and upstream kinases. A minimal peptide region derived from JIP1 is able to inhibit JNK activity both in vitro and in cell. We report here a series of small molecules JIP1 mimics that function as substrate competitive inhibitors of JNK. One such compound, BI-78D3, dose-dependently inhibits the phosphorylation of JNK substrates both in vitro and in cell. In animal studies, BI-78D3 not only blocks JNK dependent Con A-induced liver damage but also restores insulin sensitivity in mouse models of type 2 diabetes. Our findings open the way for the development of protein kinase inhibitors targeting substrate specific docking sites, rather than the highly conserved ATP binding sites. In view of its favorable inhibition profile, selectivity, and ability to function in the cellular milieu and in vivo, BI-78D3 represents not only a JNK inhibitor, but also a promising stepping stone toward the development of an innovative class of therapeutics. PMID:18922779

  8. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  9. Evidence from molecular dynamics simulations of conformational preorganization in the ribonuclease H active site

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Kate A.; Palmer III, Arthur G.

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease H1 (RNase H) enzymes are well-conserved endonucleases that are present in all domains of life and are particularly important in the life cycle of retroviruses as domains within reverse transcriptase. Despite extensive study, especially of the E. coli homolog, the interaction of the highly negatively charged active site with catalytically required magnesium ions remains poorly understood. In this work, we describe molecular dynamics simulations of the E. coli homolog in complex with magnesium ions, as well as simulations of other homologs in their apo states. Collectively, these results suggest that the active site is highly rigid in the apo state of all homologs studied and is conformationally preorganized to favor the binding of a magnesium ion. Notably, representatives of bacterial, eukaryotic, and retroviral RNases H all exhibit similar active-site rigidity, suggesting that this dynamic feature is only subtly modulated by amino acid sequence and is primarily imposed by the distinctive RNase H protein fold. PMID:25075292

  10. The Identity of the Nucleophile Substitution may Influence Metal Interactions with the Cleavage Site of the Minimal Hammerhead Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Edith M.; Ward, W. Luke; Ruehle, Max Z.; DeRose, Victoria J.

    2010-01-01

    Potential metal interactions with the cleavage site of a minimal hammerhead ribozyme (mHHRz) were probed using 31P NMR-detected Cd2+ titration studies of HHRz constructs containing a phosphorothioate (PS) modification at the cleavage site. The mHHRz nucleophile position was replaced by either a 2′-F or a 2′-NH2 in order to block cleavage activity during the study. The 2′-F/PS cleavage site mHHRz construct, in which the 2′-F should closely imitate the atom size and electronegativity of a 2′OH, demonstrates low levels of metal ion association (<1 ppm 31P chemical shift changes). This observation indicates that having an atom size and electrostatic properties that are similar to the 2′-OH are not the governing factors in allowing metal interactions with the scissile phosphate of the mHHRz. With a 2′-NH2 substitution, a large upfield change in 31P NMR chemical shift of the phosphorothioate peak (Δ~3 ppm with 6 equivalents added Cd2+) indicates observable Cd2+ interactions with the substituted site. Since a 2′-NH2, but not a 2′-F, can serve as a metal ligand, these data suggest that a metal ion interaction with the HHRz cleavage site may include both the scissile phosphate and the 2′ nucleophile. Control samples in which the 2′-NH2/PS unit is placed either next to the mHHRz cleavage site (at U16.1), in a duplex, or in a amUPSU dinucleotide, show much weaker interactions with Cd2+. Results with these control samples indicate that simply the presence of a 2′-NH2/PS unit does not create a strong metal binding site, reinforcing the possibility that the 2′-NH2-moderated Cd-PS interaction is specific to the mHHRz cleavage site. Upfield chemical shifts of both 31P and H2′ 1H resonances in amUPSU are observed with addition of Cd2+, consistent with the predicted metal coordination to both 2′-NH2 and phosphorothioate ligands. These data suggest that metal ion association with the HHRz cleavage site may include an interaction with the 2

  11. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  12. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  13. ATP and AMP Mutually Influence Their Interaction with the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) at Separate Binding Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Randak, Christoph O.; Dong, Qian; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Elcock, Adrian H.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein family. In the presence of ATP and physiologically relevant concentrations of AMP, CFTR exhibits adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). Previous studies suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for this activity. Two other ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome protein, also have adenylate kinase activity. All three ABC adenylate kinases bind and hydrolyze ATP in the absence of other nucleotides. However, little is known about how an ABC adenylate kinase interacts with ATP and AMP when both are present. Based on data from non-ABC adenylate kinases, we hypothesized that ATP and AMP mutually influence their interaction with CFTR at separate binding sites. We further hypothesized that only one of the two CFTR ATP-binding sites is involved in the adenylate kinase reaction. We found that 8-azidoadenosine 5′-triphosphate (8-N3-ATP) and 8-azidoadenosine 5′-monophosphate (8-N3-AMP) photolabeled separate sites in CFTR. Labeling of the AMP-binding site with 8-N3-AMP required the presence of ATP. Conversely, AMP enhanced photolabeling with 8-N3-ATP at ATP-binding site 2. The adenylate kinase active center probe P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate interacted simultaneously with an AMP-binding site and ATP-binding site 2. These results show that ATP and AMP interact with separate binding sites but mutually influence their interaction with the ABC adenylate kinase CFTR. They further indicate that the active center of the adenylate kinase comprises ATP-binding site 2. PMID:23921386

  14. ATP and AMP mutually influence their interaction with the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) adenylate kinase cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) at separate binding sites.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Dong, Qian; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Elcock, Adrian H; Welsh, Michael J

    2013-09-20

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein family. In the presence of ATP and physiologically relevant concentrations of AMP, CFTR exhibits adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP &lrarr2; 2 ADP). Previous studies suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for this activity. Two other ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome protein, also have adenylate kinase activity. All three ABC adenylate kinases bind and hydrolyze ATP in the absence of other nucleotides. However, little is known about how an ABC adenylate kinase interacts with ATP and AMP when both are present. Based on data from non-ABC adenylate kinases, we hypothesized that ATP and AMP mutually influence their interaction with CFTR at separate binding sites. We further hypothesized that only one of the two CFTR ATP-binding sites is involved in the adenylate kinase reaction. We found that 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8-N3-ATP) and 8-azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate (8-N3-AMP) photolabeled separate sites in CFTR. Labeling of the AMP-binding site with 8-N3-AMP required the presence of ATP. Conversely, AMP enhanced photolabeling with 8-N3-ATP at ATP-binding site 2. The adenylate kinase active center probe P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate interacted simultaneously with an AMP-binding site and ATP-binding site 2. These results show that ATP and AMP interact with separate binding sites but mutually influence their interaction with the ABC adenylate kinase CFTR. They further indicate that the active center of the adenylate kinase comprises ATP-binding site 2. PMID:23921386

  15. The Importance of Synchronous Interaction for Student Satisfaction with Course Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Qidong; Griffin, Thomas E.; Bai, Xue

    2009-01-01

    As more affordable synchronous communications are becoming available, the use of synchronous interactions has not been noted in course Web sites as often as asynchronous communications. Previous research indicated that the integration of synchronous tools into course Web sites has made a positive impact on students. While most of the previous…

  16. Understanding Patterns of User Visits to Web Sites: Interactive Starfield Visualizations of WWW Log Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochheiser, Harry; Shneiderman, Ben

    1999-01-01

    Describes the use of Spotfire, a starfield visualization tool, to generate interactive visualizations of log data, ranging from aggregate views of all Web site hits in a time interval to close-ups that approximate the path of a user through a site. Highlights current efforts and provides examples of the visualizations created in Spotfire.…

  17. Computational study on the roles of amino acid residues in the active site formation mechanism of blue-light photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ryuma; Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka; Ando, Koji; Yamato, Takahisa

    2015-07-01

    To examine the functional roles of the active site methionine (M-site) and glutamic acid (E-site) residues of blue-light photoreceptors, we performed in silico mutation at the M-site in a systematic manner and focused on the hydrogen bonding between the E-site and the substrate: the cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimer (CPD). Fragment molecular orbital calculations with electron correlations demonstrated that substitution of the M-site methionine with either alanine or glutamine always destabilizes the interaction energy between the E-site and the CPD by more than 12.0 kcal/mol, indicating that the methionine and glutamic acid residues cooperatively facilitate the enzymatic reaction in the active site.

  18. Active sites environmental monitoring program. Annual report FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, C.M.; Ashwood, T.L.; Hicks, D.S.

    1994-04-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) at ORNL from October 1991 through September 1992. Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division established ASEMP in 1989 to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by Chapter 2 and 3 of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. The Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF) began operation in December 1991. Monitoring results from the tumulus and IWMF disposal pads continue to indicate that no LLW is leaching from the storage vaults. Storm water falling on the IWMF active pad was collected and transported to the Process Waste Treatment Plant while operators awaited approval of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. Several of the recent samples collected from the active IWMF pad had pH levels above the NPDES limit of 9.0 because of alkali leached from the concrete. The increase in gross beta activity has been slight; only 1 of the 21 samples collected contained activity above the 5.0 Bq/L action level. Automated sample-collection and flow-measurement equipment has been installed at IWMF and is being tested. The flume designed to electronically measure flow from the IWMF pads and underpads is too large to be of practical value for measuring most flows at this site. Modification of this system will be necessary. A CO{sub 2} bubbler system designed to reduce the pH of water from the pads is being tested at IWMF.

  19. Analysis of ground response data at Lotung large-scale soil- structure interaction experiment site

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.Y.; Mok, C.M.; Power, M.S. )

    1991-12-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in cooperation with the Taiwan Power Company (TPC), constructed two models (1/4-scale and 1/2-scale) of a nuclear plant containment structure at a site in Lotung (Tang, 1987), a seismically active region in northeast Taiwan. The models were constructed to gather data for the evaluation and validation of soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis methodologies. Extensive instrumentation was deployed to record both structural and ground responses at the site during earthquakes. The experiment is generally referred to as the Lotung Large-Scale Seismic Test (LSST). As part of the LSST, two downhole arrays were installed at the site to record ground motions at depths as well as at the ground surface. Structural response and ground response have been recorded for a number of earthquakes (i.e. a total of 18 earthquakes in the period of October 1985 through November 1986) at the LSST site since the completion of the installation of the downhole instruments in October 1985. These data include those from earthquakes having magnitudes ranging from M{sub L} 4.5 to M{sub L} 7.0 and epicentral distances range from 4.7 km to 77.7 km. Peak ground surface accelerations range from 0.03 g to 0.21 g for the horizontal component and from 0.01 g to 0.20 g for the vertical component. The objectives of the study were: (1) to obtain empirical data on variations of earthquake ground motion with depth; (2) to examine field evidence of nonlinear soil response due to earthquake shaking and to determine the degree of soil nonlinearity; (3) to assess the ability of ground response analysis techniques including techniques to approximate nonlinear soil response to estimate ground motions due to earthquake shaking; and (4) to analyze earth pressures recorded beneath the basemat and on the side wall of the 1/4 scale model structure during selected earthquakes.

  20. The Internet and Public Participation: State Legislature Web Sites and the Many Definitions of Interactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferber, Paul; Foltz, Franz; Pugliese, Rudy

    2005-01-01

    The interactive nature of the Internet is seen by some as a technological innovation that might boost participation in politics and civic affairs. That potential, however, is clouded by imprecise definitions of interactivity found among scholars and practitioners alike. Evaluation of state legislature Web sites found them to not be very…

  1. User-Centric Secure Cross-Site Interaction Framework for Online Social Networking Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, Moo Nam

    2011-01-01

    Social networking service is one of major technological phenomena on Web 2.0. Hundreds of millions of users are posting message, photos, and videos on their profiles and interacting with other users, but the sharing and interaction are limited within the same social networking site. Although users can share some content on a social networking site…

  2. A Druggable Pocket at the Nucleocapsid/Phosphoprotein Interaction Site of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ouizougun-Oubari, Mohamed; Pereira, Nelson; Tarus, Bogdan; Galloux, Marie; Lassoued, Safa; Fix, Jenna; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Hoos, Sylviane; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Desmaële, Didier; Couvreur, Patrick; Bontems, François; Rey, Félix A.; Eléouët, Jean-François; Slama-Schwok, Anny

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Presently, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the main cause of severe respiratory infections in infants, cannot be treated efficiently with antivirals. However, its RNA-dependent polymerase complex offers potential targets for RSV-specific drugs. This includes the recognition of its template, the ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP), consisting of genomic RNA encapsidated by the RSV nucleoprotein, N. This recognition proceeds via interaction between the phosphoprotein P, which is the main polymerase cofactor, and N. The determinant role of the C terminus of P, and more particularly of the last residue, F241, in RNP binding and viral RNA synthesis has been assessed previously. Here, we provide detailed structural insight into this crucial interaction for RSV polymerase activity. We solved the crystallographic structures of complexes between the N-terminal domain of N (N-NTD) and C-terminal peptides of P and characterized binding by biophysical approaches. Our results provide a rationale for the pivotal role of F241, which inserts into a well-defined N-NTD pocket. This primary binding site is completed by transient contacts with upstream P residues outside the pocket. Based on the structural information of the N-NTD:P complex, we identified inhibitors of this interaction, selected by in silico screening of small compounds, that efficiently bind to N and compete with P in vitro. One of the compounds displayed inhibitory activity on RSV replication, thereby strengthening the relevance of N-NTD for structure-based design of RSV-specific antivirals. IMPORTANCE Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a widespread pathogen that is a leading cause of acute lower respiratory infections in infants worldwide. RSV cannot be treated efficiently with antivirals, and no vaccine is presently available, with the development of pediatric vaccines being particularly challenging. Therefore, there is a need for new therapeutic strategies that specifically target RSV. The interaction

  3. Hierarchical Interaction Structure of Neural Activities in Cortical Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Gustavo S.; Gireesh, Elakkat D.; Plenz, Dietmar; Nakahara, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the analysis of neuronal activities suggest that the instantaneous activity patterns can be mostly explained by considering only first-order and pairwise interactions between recorded elements, i.e., action potentials or local field potentials (LFP), and do not require higher-than-pairwise-order interactions. If generally applicable, this pairwise approach greatly simplifies the description of network interactions. However, an important question remains: are the recorded elements the units of interaction that best describe neuronal activity patterns? To explore this, we recorded spontaneous LFP peak activities in cortical organotypic cultures using planar, integrated 60-microelectrode arrays. We compared predictions obtained using a pairwise approach with those using a hierarchical approach that uses two different spatial units for describing the activity interactions: single electrodes and electrode clusters. In this hierarchical model, short-range interactions within each cluster were modeled by pairwise interactions of electrode activities and long-range interactions were modeled by pairwise interactions of cluster activities. Despite the relatively low number of parameters used, the hierarchical model provided a more accurate description of the activity patterns than the pairwise model when applied to ensembles of 10 electrodes. Furthermore, the hierarchical model was successfully applied to a larger-scale data of ~60 electrodes. Electrode activities within clusters were highly correlated and spatially contiguous. In contrast, long-range interactions were diffuse, suggesting the presence of higher-than-pairwise-order interactions involved in the LFP peak activities. Thus, the identification of appropriate units of interaction may allow for the successful characterization of neuronal activities in large-scale networks. PMID:20592194

  4. Interaction of P-aminobenzoic acid with normal and sickel erythrocyte membrane: photoaffinity labelling of the binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Premachandra, B.R.

    1986-03-05

    Electron microscopic studies revealed that P-Amino benzoic acid (PABA) could prevent eichinocytosis of red cells in vitro. Equilibrium binding studies with right side out membrane vesicles (ROV) revealed a similar number of binding sites (1.2-1.4 ..mu..mol/mg) and Kd (1.4-1.6 mM) values for both normal and sickle cell membranes. /sup 14/C-Azide analogue of PABA was synthesized as a photoaffinity label to probe its sites of interaction on the erythrocyte membranes. Competitive binding studies of PABA with its azide indicated that both the compounds share common binding sites on the membrane surface since a 20 fold excess of azide inhibited PABA binding in a linear fashion. The azide was covalently incorporated into the membrane components only upon irradiation (52-35% of the label found in the proteins and the rest in lipids). Electrophoretic analysis of photolabelled ROV revealed that the azide interacts chiefly with Band 3 protein. PABA inhibited both high and low affinity calcium (Ca) binding sites situated on either surface of the membrane in a non-competitive manner; however, Ca binding stimulated by Mg-ATP was not affected. Ca transport into inside out vesicles was inhibited by PABA; but it did not affect the calcium ATP-ase activity. The authors studies suggest that the mechanism of action of PABA is mediated by its interaction with Band 3 protein (anion channel), calcium channel and calcium binding sites of erythrocyte membrane.

  5. Probing the promiscuous active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase using synthetic substrates, homology modeling, and active site modification.

    PubMed

    Daniellou, Richard; Zheng, Hongyan; Langill, David M; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2007-06-26

    The active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase (IDH, EC 1.1.1.18) from Bacillus subtilis recognizes a variety of mono- and disaccharides, as well as 1l-4-O-substituted inositol derivatives. It catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the axial alcohol of these substrates with comparable kinetic constants. We have found that 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol does not act as a substrate for IDH, in contrast to structurally similar compounds such as those bearing substituted benzyl substituents in the same position. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol and 4-O-(2-naphthyl)methyl-myo-inositol, which is a substrate for IDH, shows a distinct difference in the preferred conformation of the aryl substituent. Conformational analysis of known substrates of IDH suggests that this conformational difference may account for the difference in reactivity of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol in the presence of IDH. A sequence alignment of IDH with the homologous glucose-fructose oxidoreductase allowed the construction of an homology model of inositol dehydrogenase, to which NADH and 4-O-benzyl-scyllo-inosose were docked and the active site energy minimized. The active site model is consistent with all experimental results and suggests that a conserved tyrosine-glycine-tyrosine motif forms the hydrophobic pocket adjoining the site of inositol recognition. Y233F and Y235F retain activity, while Y233R and Y235R do not. A histidine-aspartate pair, H176 and D172, are proposed to act as a dyad in which H176 is the active site acid/base. The enzyme is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate, and the mutants H176A and D172N show a marked loss of activity. Kinetic isotope effect experiments with D172N indicate that chemistry is rate-determining for this mutant. PMID:17539607

  6. Force Spectroscopy of Substrate Molecules En Route to the Proteasome's Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Classen, Mirjam; Breuer, Sarah; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Guckenberger, Reinhard; Witt, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    We used an atomic force microscope to study the mechanism underlying the translocation of substrate molecules inside the proteasome. Our specific experimental setup allowed us to measure interaction forces between the 20S proteasome and its substrates. The substrate (β-casein) was covalently bound either via a thiol-Au bond or by a PEG-based binding procedure to the atomic force microscope cantilever tip and offered as bait to proteasomes from Methanosarcina mazei. The proteasomes were immobilized densely in an upright orientation on mica, which made their upper pores accessible for substrates to enter. Besides performing conventional single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments, we developed a three-step procedure that allows the detection of specific proteasome-substrate single-molecule events without tip-sample contact. Using the active 20S wild type and an inactive active-site mutant, as well as two casein mutants bound with opposite termini to the microscope tip, we detected no directional preference of the proteasome-substrate interactions. By comparing the distribution of the measured forces for the proteasome-substrate interactions, were observed that a significant proportion of interaction events occurred at higher forces for the active versus the inactive proteasome. These forces can be attributed to the translocation of substrate en route to the active sites that are harbored deep inside the proteasome. PMID:21244845

  7. Identification of ginsenoside interaction sites in 5-HT3A receptors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hwan; Lee, Jun-Ho; Lee, Sang-Mok; Jeong, Sang Min; Yoon, In-Soo; Lee, Joon-Hee; Choi, Sun-Hye; Pyo, Mi Kyung; Rhim, Hyewhon; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Jang, Choon-Gon; Lee, Byoung-Cheol; Park, Chul-Seung; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2007-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that 20(S)-ginsenoside Rg(3) (Rg(3)), one of the active components of Panax ginseng, non-competitively inhibits 5-HT(3A) receptor channel activity on extracellular side of the cell. Here, we sought to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying Rg(3)-induced 5-HT(3A) receptor regulation. We used the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique to investigate the effect of Rg(3) on 5-HT-mediated ion currents (I(5-HT)) in Xenopus oocytes expressing wild-type or 5-HT(3A) receptors harboring mutations in the gating pore region of transmembrane domain 2 (TM2). In oocytes expressing wild-type 5-HT(3A) receptors, Rg(3) dose-dependently inhibited peak I(5-HT) with an IC(50) of 27.6+/-4.3microM. Mutations V291A, F292A, and I295A in TM2 greatly attenuated or abolished the Rg(3)-induced inhibition of peak I(5-HT). Mutation V291A but not F292A and I295A induced constitutively active ion currents with decrease of current decay rate. Rg(3) accelerated the rate of current decay with dose-dependent manner in the presence of 5-HT. Rg(3) and TMB-8, an open channel blocker, dose-dependently inhibited constitutively active ion currents. The IC(50) values of constitutively active ion currents in V291A mutant receptor were 72.4+/-23.1 and 6.5+/-0.7microM for Rg(3) and TMB-8, respectively. Diltiazem did not prevent Rg(3)-induced inhibition of constitutively active ion currents in occlusion experiments. These results indicate that Rg(3) inhibits 5-HT(3A) receptor channel activity through interactions with residues V291, F292, and I295 in the channel gating region of TM2 and further demonstrate that Rg(3) regulates 5-HT(3A) receptor channel activity in the open state at different site(s) from those of TMB-8 and diltiazem. PMID:17257631

  8. Bayesian hidden Markov models to identify RNA-protein interaction sites in PAR-CLIP.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jonghyun; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Guanghua

    2014-06-01

    The photoactivatable ribonucleoside enhanced cross-linking immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) has been increasingly used for the global mapping of RNA-protein interaction sites. There are two key features of the PAR-CLIP experiments: The sequence read tags are likely to form an enriched peak around each RNA-protein interaction site; and the cross-linking procedure is likely to introduce a specific mutation in each sequence read tag at the interaction site. Several ad hoc methods have been developed to identify the RNA-protein interaction sites using either sequence read counts or mutation counts alone; however, rigorous statistical methods for analyzing PAR-CLIP are still lacking. In this article, we propose an integrative model to establish a joint distribution of observed read and mutation counts. To pinpoint the interaction sites at single base-pair resolution, we developed a novel modeling approach that adopts non-homogeneous hidden Markov models to incorporate the nucleotide sequence at each genomic location. Both simulation studies and data application showed that our method outperforms the ad hoc methods, and provides reliable inferences for the RNA-protein binding sites from PAR-CLIP data. PMID:24571656

  9. Identification of the Interaction Sites of Inhibitor-3 for Protein Phosphatase-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lifang; Qi, Zhiqing; Gao, Yan; Lee, Ernest Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    Inhibitor-3 is a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase-1, with an IC50 in the nanomolar range for the inhibition of the dephosphorylation of phosphorylase a. Human Inhibitor-3 possesses a putative protein phosphatase-1 binding motif, 39KKVEW43. We provide direct evidence that this sequence is involved in PP1 interaction by examining the effects of site-directed mutations of Inhibitor-3 on its ability to inhibit protein phosphatase-1. A second interaction site whose deletion led to loss of inhibitory potency was identified between residues 65–77. The existence of two interaction sites is consistent with the high inhibitory potency of Inhibitor-3, and with current models for other inhibitor and targeting proteins that interact with protein phosphatase-1 with high affinity. PMID:18951879

  10. Dynamics of the Active Sites of Dimeric Seryl tRNA Synthetase from Methanopyrus kandleri.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Saheb; Nandi, Nilashis

    2015-08-27

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) carry out the first step of protein biosynthesis. Several aaRSs are multimeric, and coordination between the dynamics of active sites present in each monomer is a prerequisite for the fast and accurate aminoacylation. However, important lacunae of understanding exist concerning the conformational dynamics of multimeric aaRSs. Questions remained unanswered pertaining to the dynamics of the active site. Little is known concerning the conformational dynamics of the active sites in response to the substrate binding, reorganization of the catalytic residues around reactants, time-dependent changes at the reaction center, which are essential for facilitating the nucleophilic attack, and interactions at the interface of neighboring monomers. In the present work, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of dimeric (mk)SerRS from Methanopyrus kandleri bound with tRNA using an explicit solvent system. Two dimeric states of seryl tRNA synthetase (open, substrate bound, and adenylate bound) and two monomeric states (open and substrate bound) are simulated with bound tRNA. The aim is to understand the conformational dynamics of (mk)SerRS during its reaction cycle. While the present results provide a clear dynamical perspective of the active sites of (mk)SerRS, they corroborate with the results from the time-averaged experimental data such as crystallographic and mutation analysis of methanogenic SerRS from M. kandleri and M. barkeri. It is observed from the present simulation that the motif 2 loop gates the active site and its Glu351 and Arg360 stabilizes ATP in a bent state favorable for nucleophilic attack. The flexibility of the walls of the active site gradually reduces near reaction center, which is a more organized region compared to the lid region. The motif 2 loop anchors Ser and ATP using Arg349 in a hydrogen bonded geometry crucial for nucleophilic attack and favorably influences the electrostatic potential at the

  11. Sequence-based prediction of protein-protein interaction sites with L1-logreg classifier.

    PubMed

    Dhole, Kaustubh; Singh, Gurdeep; Pai, Priyadarshini P; Mondal, Sukanta

    2014-05-01

    Protein-protein interactions are of central importance for virtually every process in a living cell. Information about the interaction sites in proteins improves our understanding of disease mechanisms and can provide the basis for new therapeutic approaches. Since a multitude of unique residue-residue contacts facilitate the interactions, protein-protein interaction sites prediction has become one of the most important and challenging problems of computational biology. Although much progress in this field has been reported, this problem is yet to be satisfactorily solved. Here, a novel method (LORIS: L1-regularized LOgistic Regression based protein-protein Interaction Sites predictor) is proposed, that identifies interaction residues, using sequence features and is implemented via the L1-logreg classifier. Results show that LORIS is not only quite effective, but also, performs better than existing state-of-the art methods. LORIS, available as standalone package, can be useful for facilitating drug-design and targeted mutation related studies, which require a deeper knowledge of protein interactions sites. PMID:24486250

  12. DARC: Mapping Surface Topography by Ray-Casting for Effective Virtual Screening at Protein Interaction Sites.

    PubMed

    Gowthaman, Ragul; Miller, Sven A; Rogers, Steven; Khowsathit, Jittasak; Lan, Lan; Bai, Nan; Johnson, David K; Liu, Chunjing; Xu, Liang; Anbanandam, Asokan; Aubé, Jeffrey; Roy, Anuradha; Karanicolas, John

    2016-05-12

    Protein-protein interactions represent an exciting and challenging target class for therapeutic intervention using small molecules. Protein interaction sites are often devoid of the deep surface pockets presented by "traditional" drug targets, and crystal structures reveal that inhibitors typically engage these sites using very shallow binding modes. As a consequence, modern virtual screening tools developed to identify inhibitors of traditional drug targets do not perform as well when they are instead deployed at protein interaction sites. To address the need for novel inhibitors of important protein interactions, here we introduce an alternate docking strategy specifically designed for this regime. Our method, termed DARC (Docking Approach using Ray-Casting), matches the topography of a surface pocket "observed" from within the protein to the topography "observed" when viewing a potential ligand from the same vantage point. We applied DARC to carry out a virtual screen against the protein interaction site of human antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1 and found that four of the top-scoring 21 compounds showed clear inhibition in a biochemical assay. The Ki values for these compounds ranged from 1.2 to 21 μM, and each had ligand efficiency comparable to promising small-molecule inhibitors of other protein-protein interactions. These hit compounds do not resemble the natural (protein) binding partner of Mcl-1, nor do they resemble any known inhibitors of Mcl-1. Our results thus demonstrate the utility of DARC for identifying novel inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. PMID:26126123

  13. Active-Site-Accessible, Porphyrinic Metal;#8722;Organic Framework Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Omar K.; Shultz, Abraham M.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2012-02-06

    On account of their structural similarity to cofactors found in many metallo-enzymes, metalloporphyrins are obvious potential building blocks for catalytically active, metal-organic framework (MOF) materials. While numerous porphyrin-based MOFs have already been described, versions featuring highly accessible active sites and permanent microporosity are remarkably scarce. Indeed, of the more than 70 previously reported porphyrinic MOFs, only one has been shown to be both permanently microporous and contain internally accessible active sites for chemical catalysis. Attempts to generalize the design approach used in this single successful case have failed. Reported here, however, is the synthesis of an extended family of MOFs that directly incorporate a variety of metalloporphyrins (specifically Al{sup 3+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Pd{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 3+}, and Fe{sup 3+} complexes). These robust porphyrinic materials (RPMs) feature large channels and readily accessible active sites. As an illustrative example, one of the manganese-containing RPMs is shown to be catalytically competent for the oxidation of alkenes and alkanes.

  14. Expansion of access tunnels and active-site cavities influence activity of haloalkane dehalogenases in organic cosolvents.

    PubMed

    Stepankova, Veronika; Khabiri, Morteza; Brezovsky, Jan; Pavelka, Antonin; Sykora, Jan; Amaro, Mariana; Minofar, Babak; Prokop, Zbynek; Hof, Martin; Ettrich, Rudiger; Chaloupkova, Radka; Damborsky, Jiri

    2013-05-10

    The use of enzymes for biocatalysis can be significantly enhanced by using organic cosolvents in the reaction mixtures. Selection of the cosolvent type and concentration range for an enzymatic reaction is challenging and requires extensive empirical testing. An understanding of protein-solvent interaction could provide a theoretical framework for rationalising the selection process. Here, the behaviour of three model enzymes (haloalkane dehalogenases) was investigated in the presence of three representative organic cosolvents (acetone, formamide, and isopropanol). Steady-state kinetics assays, molecular dynamics simulations, and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy were used to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of enzyme-solvent interactions. Cosolvent molecules entered the enzymes' access tunnels and active sites, enlarged their volumes with no change in overall protein structure, but surprisingly did not act as competitive inhibitors. At low concentrations, the cosolvents either enhanced catalysis by lowering K(0.5) and increasing k(cat), or caused enzyme inactivation by promoting substrate inhibition and decreasing k(cat). The induced activation and inhibition of the enzymes correlated with expansion of the active-site pockets and their occupancy by cosolvent molecules. The study demonstrates that quantitative analysis of the proportions of the access tunnels and active-sites occupied by organic solvent molecules provides the valuable information for rational selection of appropriate protein-solvent pair and effective cosolvent concentration. PMID:23564727

  15. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  16. Nest predation increases with parental activity: separating nest site and parental activity effects.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T E; Scott, J; Menge, C

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection. PMID:11413645

  17. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Silicate Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts [1-3]. Nevertheless, among those structures K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. In this study, the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars were investigated in closer details. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. We give a potential explanation of the increased ice nucleation activity of K-feldspar. The ice nucleating sites are very much dependent on the alkali ion present by altering the water structure and the feldspar surface. The higher activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to the presence of potassium ions on the surface and surface bilayer. The alkali-ions have different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar. Chaotropic behavior of Calcium and Sodium ions are lowering the ice nucleation potential of the other feldspars, while kosmotropic Potassium has a neutral or even positive effect. Furthermore we investigated the influence of milling onto the ice nucleation of quartz particles. The ice nucleation activity can be increased by mechanical milling, by introducing more molecular, nucleation active defects to the particle surface. This effect is larger than expected by plane surface increase. [1] Atkinson et al. The Importance of Feldspar for Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust in Mixed-Phase Clouds. Nature 2013, 498, 355-358. [2] Yakobi-Hancock et al.. Feldspar Minerals as Efficient Deposition Ice Nuclei. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2013, 13, 11175-11185. [3] Zolles et al. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015 accepted.

  18. Interactional Competence and the Development of Alignment Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dings, Abby

    2014-01-01

    Based on qualitative analysis of conversational interactions collected over the course of a Spanish language learner's academic year abroad, this article explores the development of interactional resources related to alignment activity in the learner's conversational participation. Alignment activity refers to the means interlocutors use…

  19. Characterizing Interactive Engagement Activities in a Flipped Introductory Physics Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Anna K.; Galloway, Ross K.; Donnelly, Robyn; Hardy, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Interactive engagement activities are increasingly common in undergraduate physics teaching. As research efforts move beyond simply showing that interactive engagement pedagogies work towards developing an understanding of "how" they lead to improved learning outcomes, a detailed analysis of the way in which these activities are used in…

  20. Insight into the mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate mutase catalysis derived from site-directed mutagenesis studies of active site residues.

    PubMed

    Jia, Y; Lu, Z; Huang, K; Herzberg, O; Dunaway-Mariano, D

    1999-10-26

    PEP mutase catalyzes the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to phosphonopyruvate in biosynthetic pathways leading to phosphonate secondary metabolites. A recent X-ray structure [Huang, K., Li, Z., Jia, Y., Dunaway-Mariano, D., and Herzberg, O. (1999) Structure (in press)] of the Mytilus edulis enzyme complexed with the Mg(II) cofactor and oxalate inhibitor reveals an alpha/beta-barrel backbone-fold housing an active site in which Mg(II) is bound by the two carboxylate groups of the oxalate ligand and the side chain of D85 and, via bridging water molecules, by the side chains of D58, D85, D87, and E114. The oxalate ligand, in turn, interacts with the side chains of R159, W44, and S46 and the backbone amide NHs of G47 and L48. Modeling studies identified two feasible PEP binding modes: model A in which PEP replaces oxalate with its carboxylate group interacting with R159 and its phosphoryl group positioned close to D58 and Mg(II) shifting slightly from its original position in the crystal structure, and model B in which PEP replaces oxalate with its phosphoryl group interacting with R159 and Mg(II) retaining its original position. Site-directed mutagenesis studies of the key mutase active site residues (R159, D58, D85, D87, and E114) were carried out in order to evaluate the catalytic roles predicted by the two models. The observed retention of low catalytic activity in the mutants R159A, D85A, D87A, and E114A, coupled with the absence of detectable catalytic activity in D58A, was interpreted as evidence for model A in which D58 functions in nucleophilic catalysis (phosphoryl transfer), R159 functions in PEP carboxylate group binding, and the carboxylates of D85, D87 and E114 function in Mg(II) binding. These results also provide evidence against model B in which R159 serves to mediate the phosphoryl transfer. A catalytic motif, which could serve both the phosphoryl transfer and the C-C cleavage enzymes of the PEP mutase superfamily, is proposed. PMID:10571990

  1. Halides with Fifteen Aliphatic C-H···Anion Interaction Sites.

    PubMed

    Shi, Genggongwo; Aliakbar Tehrani, Zahra; Kim, Dongwook; Cho, Woo Jong; Youn, Il-Seung; Lee, Han Myoung; Yousuf, Muhammad; Ahmed, Nisar; Shirinfar, Bahareh; Teator, Aaron J; Lastovickova, Dominika N; Rasheed, Lubna; Lah, Myoung Soo; Bielawski, Christopher W; Kim, Kwang S

    2016-01-01

    Since the aliphatic C-H···anion interaction is relatively weak, anion binding using hydrophobic aliphatic C-H (Cali-H) groups has generally been considered not possible without the presence of additional binding sites that contain stronger interactions to the anion. Herein, we report X-ray structures of organic crystals that feature a chloride anion bound exclusively by hydrophobic Cali-H groups. An X-ray structure of imidazolium-based scaffolds using Cali-H···A(-) interactions (A(-) = anion) shows that a halide anion is directly interacting with fifteen Cali-H groups (involving eleven hydrogen bonds, two bidentate hydrogen-bond-type binding interactions and two weakly hydrogen-bonding-like binding interactions). Additional supporting interactions and/or other binding sites are not observed. We note that such types of complexes may not be rare since such high numbers of binding sites for an anion are also found in analogous tetraalkylammonium complexes. The Cali-H···A(-) interactions are driven by the formation of a near-spherical dipole layer shell structure around the anion. The alternating layers of electrostatic charge around the anion arise because the repulsions between weakly positively charged H atoms are reduced by the presence of the weakly negatively charged C atoms connected to H atoms. PMID:27444513

  2. Halides with Fifteen Aliphatic C–H···Anion Interaction Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Genggongwo; Aliakbar Tehrani, Zahra; Kim, Dongwook; Cho, Woo Jong; Youn, Il-Seung; Lee, Han Myoung; Yousuf, Muhammad; Ahmed, Nisar; Shirinfar, Bahareh; Teator, Aaron J.; Lastovickova, Dominika N.; Rasheed, Lubna; Lah, Myoung Soo; Bielawski, Christopher W.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2016-07-01

    Since the aliphatic C–H···anion interaction is relatively weak, anion binding using hydrophobic aliphatic C–H (Cali–H) groups has generally been considered not possible without the presence of additional binding sites that contain stronger interactions to the anion. Herein, we report X-ray structures of organic crystals that feature a chloride anion bound exclusively by hydrophobic Cali–H groups. An X-ray structure of imidazolium-based scaffolds using Cali–H···A‑ interactions (A‑ = anion) shows that a halide anion is directly interacting with fifteen Cali–H groups (involving eleven hydrogen bonds, two bidentate hydrogen-bond-type binding interactions and two weakly hydrogen-bonding-like binding interactions). Additional supporting interactions and/or other binding sites are not observed. We note that such types of complexes may not be rare since such high numbers of binding sites for an anion are also found in analogous tetraalkylammonium complexes. The Cali–H···A‑ interactions are driven by the formation of a near-spherical dipole layer shell structure around the anion. The alternating layers of electrostatic charge around the anion arise because the repulsions between weakly positively charged H atoms are reduced by the presence of the weakly negatively charged C atoms connected to H atoms.

  3. Halides with Fifteen Aliphatic C–H···Anion Interaction Sites

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Genggongwo; Aliakbar Tehrani, Zahra; Kim, Dongwook; Cho, Woo Jong; Youn, Il-Seung; Lee, Han Myoung; Yousuf, Muhammad; Ahmed, Nisar; Shirinfar, Bahareh; Teator, Aaron J.; Lastovickova, Dominika N.; Rasheed, Lubna; Lah, Myoung Soo; Bielawski, Christopher W.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2016-01-01

    Since the aliphatic C–H···anion interaction is relatively weak, anion binding using hydrophobic aliphatic C–H (Cali–H) groups has generally been considered not possible without the presence of additional binding sites that contain stronger interactions to the anion. Herein, we report X-ray structures of organic crystals that feature a chloride anion bound exclusively by hydrophobic Cali–H groups. An X-ray structure of imidazolium-based scaffolds using Cali–H···A− interactions (A− = anion) shows that a halide anion is directly interacting with fifteen Cali–H groups (involving eleven hydrogen bonds, two bidentate hydrogen-bond-type binding interactions and two weakly hydrogen-bonding-like binding interactions). Additional supporting interactions and/or other binding sites are not observed. We note that such types of complexes may not be rare since such high numbers of binding sites for an anion are also found in analogous tetraalkylammonium complexes. The Cali–H···A− interactions are driven by the formation of a near-spherical dipole layer shell structure around the anion. The alternating layers of electrostatic charge around the anion arise because the repulsions between weakly positively charged H atoms are reduced by the presence of the weakly negatively charged C atoms connected to H atoms. PMID:27444513

  4. Novel autophosphorylation sites of Src family kinases regulate kinase activity and SH2 domain-binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Weir, Marion E; Mann, Jacqueline E; Corwin, Thomas; Fulton, Zachary W; Hao, Jennifer M; Maniscalco, Jeanine F; Kenney, Marie C; Roman Roque, Kristal M; Chapdelaine, Elizabeth F; Stelzl, Ulrich; Deming, Paula B; Ballif, Bryan A; Hinkle, Karen L

    2016-04-01

    Src family tyrosine kinases (SFKs) are critical players in normal and aberrant biological processes. While phosphorylation importantly regulates SFKs at two known tyrosines, large-scale phosphoproteomics have revealed four additional tyrosines commonly phosphorylated in SFKs. We found these novel tyrosines to be autophosphorylation sites. Mimicking phosphorylation at the C-terminal site to the activation loop decreased Fyn activity. Phosphomimetics and direct phosphorylation at the three SH2 domain sites increased Fyn activity while reducing phosphotyrosine-dependent interactions. While 68% of human SH2 domains exhibit conservation of at least one of these tyrosines, few have been found phosphorylated except when found in cis to a kinase domain. PMID:27001024

  5. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program. FY 1993: Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, C.M.; Ashwood, T.L.; Hicks, D.S.; Marsh, J.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report continues a series of annual and semiannual reports that present the results of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) monitoring activities. The report details monitoring data for fiscal year (FY) 1993 and is divided into three major areas: SWSA 6 [including tumulus pads, Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), and other sites], the low-level Liquid-Waste Solidification Project (LWSP), and TRU-waste storage facilities in SWSA 5 N. The detailed monitoring methodology is described in the second revision of the ASEMP program plan. This report also presents a summary of the methodology used to gather data for each major area along with the results obtained during FY 1993.

  6. Implication of crystal water molecules in inhibitor binding at ALR2 active site.

    PubMed

    Hymavati; Kumar, Vivek; Sobhia, M Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Water molecules play a crucial role in mediating the interaction between a ligand and a macromolecule. The solvent environment around such biomolecule controls their structure and plays important role in protein-ligand interactions. An understanding of the nature and role of these water molecules in the active site of a protein could greatly increase the efficiency of rational drug design approaches. We have performed the comparative crystal structure analysis of aldose reductase to understand the role of crystal water in protein-ligand interaction. Molecular dynamics simulation has shown the versatile nature of water molecules in bridge H bonding during interaction. Occupancy and life time of water molecules depend on the type of cocrystallized ligand present in the structure. The information may be useful in rational approach to customize the ligand, and thereby longer occupancy and life time for bridge H-bonding. PMID:22649481

  7. A kinetic description for sodium and potassium effects on (Na+ plus K+)-adenosine triphosphatase: a model for a two-nonequivalent site potassium activation and an analysis of multiequivalent site models for sodium activation.

    PubMed

    Lindenmayer, G E; Schwartz, A; Thompson, H K

    1974-01-01

    1. Dissociation constants for sodium and potassium of a site that modulates the rate of ouabain-(Na(+)+K(+))-ATPase interaction were applied to models for potassium activation of (Na(+)+K(+))-ATPase. The constants for potassium (0.213 mM) and for sodium (13.7 mM) were defined, respectively, as activation constant, K(a) and inhibitory constant, K(i).2. Tests of the one- and the two-equivalent site models, that describe sodium and potassium competition, revealed that neither model adequately predicts the activation effects of potassium in the presence of 100 or 200 mM sodium.3. The potassium-activation data, obtained at low potassium and high sodium, were explained by a two-nonequivalent site model where the dissociation constants of the first site are 0.213 mM for potassium and 13.7 mM for sodium. The second site was characterized by dissociation constants of 0.091 mM for potassium and 74.1 mM for sodium.4. The two-nonequivalent site model adequately predicted the responses to concentrations of potassium between 0.25 and 5 mM in the presence of 100-500 mM sodium. At lower sodium concentrations the predicted responses formed an upper limit for the function of observed activities. This limit was reached at lower concentrations of potassium and higher concentrations of sodium, which inferred saturation of the sodium-activation sites with sodium.5. Sodium-activation data were corrected for sodium interaction with potassium-activation sites by use of the two-nonequivalent site model for potassium activation. Tests of equivalent site models suggested that the corrected data for sodium activation may be most consistent with a model that has three-equivalent sites. Other multiequivalent site models (n = 2, 4, 5 or 6), however, cannot be statistically eliminated as possibilities. The three-equivalent site activation model was characterized by dissociation constants of 1.39 mM for sodium and 11.7 mM for potassium. The system theoretically would be half-maximally activated by

  8. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  9. Conformational Change in the Active Site of Streptococcal Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase Through Site-Directed Mutagenesis at Asp-115.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Yusuke; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (UGL) degrades unsaturated disaccharides generated from mammalian extracellular matrices, glycosaminoglycans, by polysaccharide lyases. Two Asp residues, Asp-115 and Asp-175 of Streptococcus agalactiae UGL (SagUGL), are completely conserved in other bacterial UGLs, one of which (Asp-175 of SagUGL) acts as a general acid and base catalyst. The other Asp (Asp-115 of SagUGL) also affects the enzyme activity, although its role in the enzyme reaction has not been well understood. Here, we show substitution of Asp-115 in SagUGL with Asn caused a conformational change in the active site. Tertiary structures of SagUGL mutants D115N and D115N/K370S with negligible enzyme activity were determined at 2.00 and 1.79 Å resolution, respectively, by X-ray crystallography. The side chain of Asn-115 is drastically shifted in both mutants owing to the interaction with several residues, including Asp-175, by formation of hydrogen bonds. This interaction between Asn-115 and Asp-175 probably prevents the mutants from triggering the enzyme reaction using Asp-175 as an acid catalyst. PMID:27402448

  10. Distinct sites on tenascin-C mediate repellent or adhesive interactions with different neuronal cell types.

    PubMed

    Husmann, K; Carbonetto, S; Schachner, M

    1995-11-01

    In this study we have determined the binding specificities of four different neuronal cell types to tenascin-C (TN-C) and laminin using a cell adhesion assay. TN-C was repulsive for small cerebellar neurons and PC12 phaeochromocytoma cells, since after short-term adhesion to the substrate-bound molecule with a maximum of cell binding at 45 min, the cells detached from the substrate and after 22 h only about 25% of the originally adherent cells were still bound. For N2A neuroblastoma cells and retinal cells TN-C was an adhesive substrate, since the number of adherent cells did not decrease after the initial attachment period. All four cell types adhered well to laminin at all time points studied. For short-term adhesion of small cerebellar neurons and PC12 cells two binding sites were identified on TN-C, one being localized within the epidermal growth factor-like repeats three to five and the second within fibronectin type III-like repeats three and four. One binding site for N2A and retinal cells was localized within fibronectin type III-like repeat seven. Binding of small cerebellar neurons to TN-C was dependent on Ca2+, but not on Mg2+ and was inhibitable by polyclonal antibodies to beta 1 integrin. Short-term adhesion of small cerebellar neurons was also inhibitable with a mixture of recombinant fragments of TN-C encompassing the whole molecule, although the specific inhibitory activity of this mixture was ten-fold lower on a molar basis when compared to the native molecule. Our observations indicate that different neuronal cell types use distinct binding sites on TN-C for repellent or adhesive interactions and that beta 1 integrin is involved in the recognition event leading to repulsion of small cerebellar neurons. PMID:8821032

  11. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R; Hanrahan, John W

    2016-05-01

    The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  12. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  13. Probing the Role of Active Site Water in the Sesquiterpene Cyclization Reaction Catalyzed by Aristolochene Synthase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengbin; Chou, Wayne K W; Al-Lami, Naeemah; Faraldos, Juan A; Allemann, Rudolf K; Cane, David E; Christianson, David W

    2016-05-24

    Aristolochene synthase (ATAS) is a high-fidelity terpenoid cyclase that converts farnesyl diphosphate exclusively into the bicyclic hydrocarbon aristolochene. Previously determined crystal structures of ATAS complexes revealed trapped active site water molecules that could potentially interact with catalytic intermediates: water "w" hydrogen bonds with S303 and N299, water molecules "w1" and "w2" hydrogen bond with Q151, and a fourth water molecule coordinates to the Mg(2+)C ion. There is no obvious role for water in the ATAS mechanism because the enzyme exclusively generates a hydrocarbon product. Thus, these water molecules are tightly controlled so that they cannot react with carbocation intermediates. Steady-state kinetics and product distribution analyses of eight ATAS mutants designed to perturb interactions with active site water molecules (S303A, S303H, S303D, N299A, N299L, N299A/S303A, Q151H, and Q151E) indicate relatively modest effects on catalysis but significant effects on sesquiterpene product distributions. X-ray crystal structures of S303A, N299A, N299A/S303A, and Q151H mutants reveal minimal perturbation of active site solvent structure. Seven of the eight mutants generate farnesol and nerolidol, possibly resulting from addition of the Mg(2+)C-bound water molecule to the initially formed farnesyl cation, but no products are generated that would suggest enhanced reactivity of other active site water molecules. However, intermediate germacrene A tends to accumulate in these mutants. Thus, apart from the possible reactivity of Mg(2+)C-bound water, active site water molecules in ATAS are not directly involved in the chemistry of catalysis but instead contribute to the template that governs the conformation of the flexible substrate and carbocation intermediates. PMID:27172425

  14. A novel method for protein-protein interaction site prediction using phylogenetic substitution models

    PubMed Central

    La, David; Kihara, Daisuke

    2011-01-01

    Protein-protein binding events mediate many critical biological functions in the cell. Typically, functionally important sites in proteins can be well identified by considering sequence conservation. However, protein-protein interaction sites exhibit higher sequence variation than other functional regions, such as catalytic sites of enzymes. Consequently, the mutational behavior leading to weak sequence conservation poses significant challenges to the protein-protein interaction site prediction. Here, we present a phylogenetic framework to capture critical sequence variations that favor the selection of residues essential for protein-protein binding. Through the comprehensive analysis of diverse protein families, we show that protein binding interfaces exhibit distinct amino acid substitution as compared with other surface residues. Based on this analysis, we have developed a novel method, BindML, which utilizes the substitution models to predict protein-protein binding sites of protein with unknown interacting partners. BindML estimates the likelihood that a phylogenetic tree of a local surface region in a query protein structure follows the substitution patterns of protein binding interface and non-binding surfaces. BindML is shown to perform well compared to alternative methods for protein binding interface prediction. The methodology developed in this study is very versatile in the sense that it can be generally applied for predicting other types of functional sites, such as DNA, RNA, and membrane binding sites in proteins. PMID:21989996

  15. DNA binding induces active site conformational change in the human TREX2 3'-exonuclease.

    PubMed

    de Silva, Udesh; Perrino, Fred W; Hollis, Thomas

    2009-04-01

    The TREX enzymes process DNA as the major 3'-->5' exonuclease activity in mammalian cells. TREX2 and TREX1 are members of the DnaQ family of exonucleases and utilize a two metal ion catalytic mechanism of hydrolysis. The structure of the dimeric TREX2 enzyme in complex with single-stranded DNA has revealed binding properties that are distinct from the TREX1 protein. The TREX2 protein undergoes a conformational change in the active site upon DNA binding including ordering of active site residues and a shift of an active site helix. Surprisingly, even when a single monomer binds DNA, both monomers in the dimer undergo the structural rearrangement. From this we have proposed a model for DNA binding and 3' hydrolysis for the TREX2 dimer. The structure also shows how TREX proteins potentially interact with double-stranded DNA and suggest features that might be involved in strand denaturation to provide a single-stranded substrate for the active site. PMID:19321497

  16. A site for direct integrin αvβ6·uPAR interaction from structural modelling and docking.

    PubMed

    Sowmya, Gopichandran; Khan, Javed Mohammed; Anand, Samyuktha; Ahn, Seong Beom; Baker, Mark S; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2014-03-01

    Integrin αvβ6 is an epithelially-restricted heterodimeric transmembrane glycoprotein, known to interact with the urokinase plasminogen activating receptor (uPAR), playing a critical role in cancer progression. While the X-ray crystallographic structures of segments of other integrin heterodimers are known, there is no structural information for the complete αvβ6 integrin to assess its direct interaction with uPAR. We have performed structural analysis of αvβ6·uPAR interactions using model data with docking simulations to pinpoint their interface, in accord with earlier reports of the β-propeller region of integrin α-chain interacting with uPAR. Interaction of αvβ6·uPAR was demonstrated by our previous study using immunoprecipitation coupled with proteomic analysis by mass spectrometry. Recently this interaction was validated with proximity ligation assays and peptide arrays. The data suggested that two potential peptide regions from domain II and one peptide region from domain III of uPAR, interact with αvβ6 integrin. Only the peptide region from domain III is consistent with the three-dimensional interaction site proposed in this study. The molecular basis of integrin αvβ6·uPAR binding using structural data is discussed for its implications as a potential therapeutic target in cancer management. PMID:24423664

  17. LISE: a server using ligand-interacting and site-enriched protein triangles for prediction of ligand-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhong-Ru; Liu, Chuan-Kun; Hsiao, Fang-Chih; Yao, Adam; Hwang, Ming-Jing

    2013-07-01

    LISE is a web server for a novel method for predicting small molecule binding sites on proteins. It differs from a number of servers currently available for such predictions in two aspects. First, rather than relying on knowledge of similar protein structures, identification of surface cavities or estimation of binding energy, LISE computes a score by counting geometric motifs extracted from sub-structures of interaction networks connecting protein and ligand atoms. These network motifs take into account spatial and physicochemical properties of ligand-interacting protein surface atoms. Second, LISE has now been more thoroughly tested, as, in addition to the evaluation we previously reported using two commonly used small benchmark test sets and targets of two community-based experiments on ligand-binding site predictions, we now report an evaluation using a large non-redundant data set containing >2000 protein-ligand complexes. This unprecedented test, the largest ever reported to our knowledge, demonstrates LISE's overall accuracy and robustness. Furthermore, we have identified some hard to predict protein classes and provided an estimate of the performance that can be expected from a state-of-the-art binding site prediction server, such as LISE, on a proteome scale. The server is freely available at http://lise.ibms.sinica.edu.tw. PMID:23609546

  18. Interaction sites of DivIVA and RodA from Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Sieger, Boris; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Elongation growth in actinobacteria is localized at the cell poles. This is in contrast to many classical model organisms where insertion of new cell wall material is localized around the lateral site. We previously described a role of RodA from Corynebacterium glutamicum in apical cell growth and morphogenesis. Deletion of rodA had drastic effects on morphology and growth, likely a result from misregulation of penicillin-binding proteins and cell wall precursor delivery. We identified the interaction of RodA with the polar scaffold protein DivIVA, thus explaining subcellular localization of RodA to the cell poles. In this study, we describe this interaction in detail and map the interaction sites of DivIVA and RodA. A single amino acid residue in the N-terminal domain of DivIVA was found to be crucial for the interaction with RodA. The interaction site of RodA was mapped to its cytoplasmic, C-terminal domain, in a region encompassing the last 10 amino acids (AAs). Deletion of these 10 AAs significantly decreased the interaction efficiency with DivIVA. Our results corroborate the interaction of DivIVA and RodA, underscoring the important role of DivIVA as a spatial organizer of the elongation machinery in Corynebacterineae. PMID:25709601

  19. Far upstream element binding protein 2 interacts with enterovirus 71 internal ribosomal entry site and negatively regulates viral translation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing-Yi; Li, Mei-Ling; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2009-01-01

    An internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) that directs the initiation of viral protein translation is a potential drug target for enterovirus 71 (EV71). Regulation of internal initiation requires the interaction of IRES trans-acting factors (ITAFs) with the internal ribosomal entry site. Biotinylated RNA-affinity chromatography and proteomic approaches were employed to identify far upstream element (FUSE) binding protein 2 (FBP2) as an ITAF for EV71. The interactions of FBP2 with EV71 IRES were confirmed by competition assay and by mapping the association sites in both viral IRES and FBP2 protein. During EV71 infection, FBP2 was enriched in cytoplasm where viral replication occurs, whereas FBP2 was localized in the nucleus in mock-infected cells. The synthesis of viral proteins increased in FBP2-knockdown cells that were infected by EV71. IRES activity in FBP2-knockdown cells exceeded that in the negative control (NC) siRNA-treated cells. On the other hand, IRES activity decreased when FBP2 was over-expressed in the cells. Results of this study suggest that FBP2 is a novel ITAF that interacts with EV71 IRES and negatively regulates viral translation. PMID:19010963

  20. Physical interaction of the activator protein-1 factors c-Fos and c-Jun with Cbfa1 for collagenase-3 promoter activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Alonzo, Richard C.; Selvamurugan, Nagarajan; Karsenty, Gerard; Partridge, Nicola C.

    2002-01-01

    Previously, we determined that the activator protein-1 (AP-1)-binding site and the runt domain (RD)-binding site and their binding proteins, c-Fos.c-Jun and Cbfa, regulate the collagenase-3 promoter in parathyroid hormone-treated and differentiating osteoblasts. Here we show that Cbfa1 and c-Fos.c-Jun appear to cooperatively bind the RD- and AP-1-binding sites and form ternary structures in vitro. Both in vitro and in vivo co-immunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid studies further demonstrate interaction between Cbfa1 with c-Fos and c-Jun in the absence of phosphorylation and without binding to DNA. Additionally, only the runt domain of Cbfa1 was required for interaction with c-Jun and c-Fos. In mammalian cells, overexpression of Cbfa1 enhanced c-Jun activation of AP-1-binding site promoter activity, demonstrating functional interaction. Finally, insertion of base pairs that disrupted the helical phasing between the AP-1- and RD-binding sites also inhibited collagenase-3 promoter activation. Thus, we provide direct evidence that Cbfa1 and c-Fos.c-Jun physically interact and cooperatively bind the AP-1- and RD-binding sites in the collagenase-3 promoter. Moreover, the AP-1- and RD-binding sites appear to be organized in a specific required helical arrangement that facilitates transcription factor interaction and enables promoter activation.

  1. On-site screened Coulomb interactions for localized electrons in transition metal oxides and defect systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Bi-Ching; Zhang, Peihong; Department of Physics Team

    2011-03-01

    Electronic and structural properties of strongly correlated material systems are largely determined by the strength of the on-site Coulomb interaction. Theoretical models devised to capture the physics of strongly correlated materials usually involve screened Coulomb interactions as adjustable parameters. We present first-principles results for the screened on-site Coulomb and exchange energy for transition metal oxides. The dielectric screening is calculated within the random phase approximation and the localized electrons are represented by maximally localized Wannier functions. We further extend our study to calculate on-site Coulomb interactions for localized defect states in semiconductors. We acknowledge the computational support provided by the Center for Computational Research at the University at Buffalo, SUNY. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-0946404 and by the Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-SC0002623.

  2. O2 activation by binuclear Cu sites: Noncoupled versus exchange coupled reaction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Solomon, Edward I.

    2004-09-01

    Binuclear Cu proteins play vital roles in O2 binding and activation in biology and can be classified into coupled and noncoupled binuclear sites based on the magnetic interaction between the two Cu centers. Coupled binuclear Cu proteins include hemocyanin, tyrosinase, and catechol oxidase. These proteins have two Cu centers strongly magnetically coupled through direct bridging ligands that provide a mechanism for the 2-electron reduction of O2 to a µ-2:2 side-on peroxide bridged species. This side-on bridged peroxo-CuII2 species is activated for electrophilic attack on the phenolic ring of substrates. Noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins include peptidylglycine -hydroxylating monooxygenase and dopamine -monooxygenase. These proteins have binuclear Cu active sites that are distant, that exhibit no exchange interaction, and that activate O2 at a single Cu center to generate a reactive CuII/O2 species for H-atom abstraction from the C-H bond of substrates. O2 intermediates in the coupled binuclear Cu enzymes can be trapped and studied spectroscopically. Possible intermediates in noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins can be defined through correlation to mononuclear CuII/O2 model complexes. The different intermediates in these two classes of binuclear Cu proteins exhibit different reactivities that correlate with their different electronic structures and exchange coupling interactions between the binuclear Cu centers. These studies provide insight into the role of exchange coupling between the Cu centers in their reaction mechanisms.

  3. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: A Temperley-Lieb quantum chain with two- and three-site interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhlef, Y.; Jacobsen, J. L.; Saleur, H.

    2009-07-01

    We study the phase diagram of a quantum chain of spin-1/2 particles whose world lines form a dense loop gas with loop weight n. In addition to the usual two-site interaction corresponding to the XXZ spin chain, we introduce a three-site interaction. The resulting model contains a Majumdar-Ghosh-like gapped phase and a new integrable point, which we solve exactly. We also locate a critical line realizing dilute O(n) criticality, without introducing explicit dilution in the loops. Our results have implications for anisotropic spin chains, as well as anyonic quantum chains.

  4. Ferromagnetic interaction model of activity level in workplace communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akitomi, Tomoaki; Ara, Koji; Watanabe, Jun-ichiro; Yano, Kazuo

    2013-03-01

    The nature of human-human interaction, specifically, how people synchronize with each other in multiple-participant conversations, is described by a ferromagnetic interaction model of people’s activity levels. We found two microscopic human interaction characteristics from a real-environment face-to-face conversation. The first characteristic is that people quite regularly synchronize their activity level with that of the other participants in a conversation. The second characteristic is that the degree of synchronization increases as the number of participants increases. Based on these microscopic ferromagnetic characteristics, a “conversation activity level” was modeled according to the Ising model. The results of a simulation of activity level based on this model well reproduce macroscopic experimental measurements of activity level. This model will give a new insight into how people interact with each other in a conversation.

  5. Characterizing interactive engagement activities in a flipped introductory physics class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Anna K.; Galloway, Ross K.; Donnelly, Robyn; Hardy, Judy

    2016-06-01

    Interactive engagement activities are increasingly common in undergraduate physics teaching. As research efforts move beyond simply showing that interactive engagement pedagogies work towards developing an understanding of how they lead to improved learning outcomes, a detailed analysis of the way in which these activities are used in practice is needed. Our aim in this paper is to present a characterization of the type and duration of interactions, as experienced by students, that took place during two introductory physics courses (1A and 1B) at a university in the United Kingdom. Through this work, a simple framework for analyzing lectures—the framework for interactive learning in lectures (FILL), which focuses on student interactions (with the lecturer, with each other, and with the material) is proposed. The pedagogical approach is based on Peer Instruction (PI) and both courses are taught by the same lecturer. We find lecture activities can be categorized into three types: interactive (25%), vicarious interactive (20%) (involving questions to and from the lecturer), and noninteractive (55%). As expected, the majority of both interactive and vicarious interactive activities took place during PI. However, the way that interactive activities were used during non-PI sections of the lecture varied significantly between the two courses. Differences were also found in the average time spent on lecturer-student interactions (28% for 1A and 12% for 1B), although not on student-student interactions (12% and 12%) or on individual learning (10% and 7%). These results are explored in detail and the implications for future research are discussed.

  6. Radial Glial Cell–Neuron Interaction Directs Axon Formation at the Opposite Side of the Neuron from the Contact Site

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Takano, Tetsuya; Nakamuta, Shinichi; Namba, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    How extracellular cues direct axon–dendrite polarization in mouse developing neurons is not fully understood. Here, we report that the radial glial cell (RGC)–cortical neuron interaction directs axon formation at the opposite side of the neuron from the contact site. N-cadherin accumulates at the contact site between the RGC and cortical neuron. Inhibition of the N-cadherin-mediated adhesion decreases this oriented axon formation in vitro, and disrupts the axon–dendrite polarization in vivo. Furthermore, the RGC–neuron interaction induces the polarized distribution of active RhoA at the contacting neurite and active Rac1 at the opposite neurite. Inhibition of Rho–Rho-kinase signaling in a neuron impairs the oriented axon formation in vitro, and prevents axon–dendrite polarization in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that the N-cadherin-mediated radial glia–neuron interaction determines the contacting neurite as the leading process for radial glia-guided neuronal migration and directs axon formation to the opposite side acting through the Rho family GTPases. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons are highly polarized cell lines typically with a single axon and multiple dendrites, which underlies the ability of integrating and transmitting the information in the brain. How is the axon–dendrite polarity of neurons established in the developing neocortex? Here we show that the N-cadherin-mediated radial glial cell–neuron interaction directs axon–dendrite polarization, the radial glial cell–neuron interaction induces polarized distribution of active RhoA and active Rac1 in neurons, and Rho–Rho-kinase signaling is required for axon–dendrite polarization. Our work advances the overall understanding of how extracellular cues direct axon–dendrite polarization in mouse developing neurons. PMID:26511243

  7. PRECISE: a Database of Predicted and Consensus Interaction Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Shu-Hsien; Lancia, David R.; Clodfelter, Karl H.; Landon, Melissa R.; Vajda, Sandor

    2005-01-01

    PRECISE (Predicted and Consensus Interaction Sites in Enzymes) is a database of interactions between the amino acid residues of an enzyme and its ligands (substrate and transition state analogs, cofactors, inhibitors and products). It is available online at http://precise.bu.edu/. In the current version, all information on interactions is extracted from the enzyme–ligand complexes in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) by performing the following steps: (i) clustering homologous enzyme chains such that, in each cluster, the proteins have the same EC number and all sequences are similar; (ii) selecting a representative chain for each cluster; (iii) selecting ligand types; (iv) finding non-bonded interactions and hydrogen bonds; and (v) summing the interactions for all chains within the cluster. The output of the search is the color-coded sequence of the representative. The colors indicate the total number of interactions found at each amino acid position in all chains of the cluster. Clicking on a residue displays a detailed list of interactions for that residue. Optional filters allow restricting the output to selected chains in the cluster, to non-bonded or hydrogen bonding interactions, and to selected ligand types. The binding site information is essential for understanding and altering substrate specificity and for the design of enzyme inhibitors. PMID:15608178

  8. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  9. Homology Inference of Protein-Protein Interactions via Conserved Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Manoj; Thangudu, Ratna R.; Zhang, Dachuan; Bryant, Stephen H.; Madej, Thomas; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2012-01-01

    The coverage and reliability of protein-protein interactions determined by high-throughput experiments still needs to be improved, especially for higher organisms, therefore the question persists, how interactions can be verified and predicted by computational approaches using available data on protein structural complexes. Recently we developed an approach called IBIS (Inferred Biomolecular Interaction Server) to predict and annotate protein-protein binding sites and interaction partners, which is based on the assumption that the structural location and sequence patterns of protein-protein binding sites are conserved between close homologs. In this study first we confirmed high accuracy of our method and found that its accuracy depends critically on the usage of all available data on structures of homologous complexes, compared to the approaches where only a non-redundant set of complexes is employed. Second we showed that there exists a trade-off between specificity and sensitivity if we employ in the prediction only evolutionarily conserved binding site clusters or clusters supported by only one observation (singletons). Finally we addressed the question of identifying the biologically relevant interactions using the homology inference approach and demonstrated that a large majority of crystal packing interactions can be correctly identified and filtered by our algorithm. At the same time, about half of biological interfaces that are not present in the protein crystallographic asymmetric unit can be reconstructed by IBIS from homologous complexes without the prior knowledge of crystal parameters of the query protein. PMID:22303436

  10. Investigation of the active site and the conformational stability of nucleoside diphosphate kinase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Tepper, A D; Dammann, H; Bominaar, A A; Véron, M

    1994-12-23

    Nucleoside-diphosphate kinase (EC 2.7.4.6) catalyzes phosphate exchange between nucleoside triphosphates and nucleoside diphosphates. Its 17 kDa subunits are highly conserved throughout evolution in both sequence and tertiary structure. Using site-directed mutagenesis we investigated the function of 8 amino acids (Lys16, Tyr56, Arg92, Thr98, Arg109, Asn119, Ser124, and Glu133) that are totally conserved among all nucleoside diphosphate kinases known to date. The mutant proteins all show decreased specific activity and support roles for these residues in catalysis, substrate binding, or both, as was previously proposed on the basis of the x-ray structure (Moréra, S., Lascu, I., Dumas, C., LeBras, G., Briozzo, P., Véron, M., and Janin, J. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 459-467). Furthermore, residues Lys16, Arg109, and Asn 119 were identified to play important roles in conformational stability or subunit interactions. We show that Lys16 and Asn119 form a rigid structure that is important for enzymatic function and that Arg109, known to interact with the phosphate moiety of the substrate, also plays an important role in subunit association. The dual roles of Lys16, Arg109, and Asn119 in both substrate binding and subunit assembly provide further evidence for a functional coupling between catalytic activity and quaternary structure in nucleoside diphosphate kinase. PMID:7798215

  11. Predicting target-ligand interactions using protein ligand-binding site and ligand substructures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Cell proliferation, differentiation, Gene expression, metabolism, immunization and signal transduction require the participation of ligands and targets. It is a great challenge to identify rules governing molecular recognition between chemical topological substructures of ligands and the binding sites of the targets. Methods We suppose that the ligand-target interactions are determined by ligand substructures as well as the physical-chemical properties of the binding sites. Therefore, we propose a fragment interaction model (FIM) to describe the interactions between ligands and targets, with the purpose of facilitating the chemical interpretation of ligand-target binding. First we extract target-ligand complexes from sc-PDB database, based on which, we get the target binding sites and the ligands. Then we represent each binding site as a fragment vector based on a target fragment dictionary that is composed of 199 clusters (denoted as fragements in this work) obtained by clustering 4200 trimers according to their physical-chemical properties. And then, we represent each ligand as a substructure vector based on a dictionary containing 747 substructures. Finally, we build the FIM by generating the interaction matrix M (representing the fragment interaction network), and the FIM can later be used for predicting unknown ligand-target interactions as well as providing the binding details of the interactions. Results The five-fold cross validation results show that the proposed model can get higher AUC score (92%) than three prevalence algorithms CS-PD (80%), BLM-NII (85%) and RF (85%), demonstrating the remarkable predictive ability of FIM. We also show that the ligand binding sites (local information) overweight the sequence similarities (global information) in ligand-target binding, and introducing too much global information would be harmful to the predictive ability. Moreover, The derived fragment interaction network can provide the chemical insights on

  12. A Relaxed Active Site After Exon Ligation by the Group I Intron

    SciTech Connect

    Lipchock,S.; Strobel, S.

    2008-01-01

    During RNA maturation, the group I intron promotes two sequential phosphorotransfer reactions resulting in exon ligation and intron release. Here, we report the crystal structure of the intron in complex with spliced exons and two additional structures that examine the role of active-site metal ions during the second step of RNA splicing. These structures reveal a relaxed active site, in which direct metal coordination by the exons is lost after ligation, while other tertiary interactions are retained between the exon and the intron. Consistent with these structural observations, kinetic and thermodynamic measurements show that the scissile phosphate makes direct contact with metals in the ground state before exon ligation and in the transition state, but not after exon ligation. Despite no direct exonic interactions and even in the absence of the scissile phosphate, two metal ions remain bound within the active site. Together, these data suggest that release of the ligated exons from the intron is preceded by a change in substrate-metal coordination before tertiary hydrogen bonding contacts to the exons are broken.

  13. ANALYSIS OF THE INTERACTION OF THE EG5 LOOP5 WITH THE NUCLEOTIDE SITE

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Timothy D.; Naber, Nariman; Larson, Adam G.; Cooke, Roger; Rice, Sarah; Pate, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Loop 5 (L5) is a conserved loop that projects from the α2-helix adjacent to the nucleotide site of all kinesin-family motors. L5 is critical to the function of the mitotic kinesin-5 family motors and is the binding site for several kinesin-5 inhibitors that are currently in clinical trials. Its conformational dynamics and its role in motor function are not fully understood. Our previous work using EPR spectroscopy suggested that L5 alters the nucleotide pocket conformation of the kinesin-5 motor Eg5 [1]. EPR spectra of a spin-labeled nucleotide analog bound at the nucleotide site of Eg5 display a highly immobilized component that is absent if L5 is shortened or if the inhibitor STLC is added [1], which X-ray structures suggest stabilizes a L5 conformation pointing away from the nucleotide site. These data, coupled with the proximity of L5 to the nucleotide site suggest L5 could interact with a bound nucleotide, modulating function. Here we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Eg5 to explore the interaction of L5 with the nucleotide site in greater detail. We performed MD simulations in which the L5-domain of the Eg5•ADP X-ray structure was manually deformed via backbone bond rotations. The L5-domain of Eg5 was sufficiently lengthy that portions of L5 could be located in proximity to bound ADP. The MD simulations evolved to thermodynamically stable structures at 300K showing that L5 can interact directly with bound nucleotide with significant impingement on the ribose hydroxyls, consistent with the EPR spectroscopy results. Taken together, these data provide support for the hypothesis that L5 modulates Eg5 function via interaction with the nucleotide-binding site. PMID:21872609

  14. Analysis of the interaction of the Eg5 Loop5 with the nucleotide site.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Timothy D; Naber, Nariman; Larson, Adam G; Cooke, Roger; Rice, Sarah E; Pate, Edward

    2011-11-21

    Loop 5 (L5) is a conserved loop that projects from the α2-helix adjacent to the nucleotide site of all kinesin-family motors. L5 is critical to the function of the mitotic kinesin-5 family motors and is the binding site for several kinesin-5 inhibitors that are currently in clinical trials. Its conformational dynamics and its role in motor function are not fully understood. Our previous work using EPR spectroscopy suggested that L5 alters the nucleotide pocket conformation of the kinesin-5 motor Eg5 (Larson et al., 2010). EPR spectra of a spin-labeled nucleotide analog bound at the nucleotide site of Eg5 display a highly immobilized component that is absent if L5 is shortened or if the inhibitor STLC is added (Larson et al., 2010), which X-ray structures suggest stabilizes an L5 conformation pointing away from the nucleotide site. These data, coupled with the proximity of L5 to the nucleotide site suggest L5 could interact with a bound nucleotide, modulating function. Here we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Eg5 to explore the interaction of L5 with the nucleotide site in greater detail. We performed MD simulations in which the L5-domain of the Eg5·ADP X-ray structure was manually deformed via backbone bond rotations. The L5-domain of Eg5 was sufficiently lengthy that portions of L5 could be located in proximity to bound ADP. The MD simulations evolved to thermodynamically stable structures at 300 K showing that L5 can interact directly with bound nucleotide with significant impingement on the ribose hydroxyls, consistent with the EPR spectroscopy results. Taken together, these data provide support for the hypothesis that L5 modulates Eg5 function via interaction with the nucleotide-binding site. PMID:21872609

  15. Analysis of the Interaction of the Eg5 Loop5 with the Nucleotide Site

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Timothy D.; Naber, Nariman; Larson, Adam G.; Cooke, Roger; Rice, Sarah E.; Pate, Edward F.

    2011-11-21

    Loop 5 (L5) is a conserved loop that projects from the α2-helix adjacent to the nucleotide site of all kinesin-family motors. L5 is critical to the function of the mito tickinesin-5 family motors and is the binding site for several kinesin-5 inhibitors that are currently in clinical trials. Its conformational dynamics and its role in motor function are not fully understood. Our previous work using EPR spectroscopy suggested that L5 alters the nucleotide pocket conformation of the kinesin-5 motor Eg5 (Larsonetal.,2010). EPR spectra of a spin-labeled nucleotide analog bound at the nucleotide site of Eg5 display a highly immobilized component that is absent if L5 is shortened or if the inhibitor STLC is added (Larson etal.,2010), which X-ray structures suggest stabilizes an L5 conformation pointing away from the nucleotide site. These data, coupled with the proximity of L5 to the nucleotide site suggest L5 could interact with a bound nucleotide, modulating function. Here we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Eg5 to explore the interaction of L5 with the nucleotide site in greater detail. We performed MD simulations in which the L5-domain of the Eg5•ADP X-ray structure was manually deformed via backbone bond rotations. The L5-domain of Eg5 was sufficiently lengthy that portions of L5 could belocated in proximity to bound ADP. The MD simulations evolved to thermodynamically stable structures at 300K showing that L5 can interact directly with bound nucleotide with significant impingement on the ribosehydroxyls, consistent with the EPR spectroscopy results. Taken together, these data provide support for the hypothes is that L5 modulates Eg5 function via interaction with the nucleotide-binding site.

  16. Probing the Electrostatics of Active Site Microenvironments along the Catalytic Cycle for Escherichia coli Dihydrofolate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions play an important role in enzyme catalysis by guiding ligand binding and facilitating chemical reactions. These electrostatic interactions are modulated by conformational changes occurring over the catalytic cycle. Herein, the changes in active site electrostatic microenvironments are examined for all enzyme complexes along the catalytic cycle of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) by incorporation of thiocyanate probes at two site-specific locations in the active site. The electrostatics and degree of hydration of the microenvironments surrounding the probes are investigated with spectroscopic techniques and mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. Changes in the electrostatic microenvironments along the catalytic environment lead to different nitrile (CN) vibrational stretching frequencies and 13C NMR chemical shifts. These environmental changes arise from protein conformational rearrangements during catalysis. The QM/MM calculations reproduce the experimentally measured vibrational frequency shifts of the thiocyanate probes across the catalyzed hydride transfer step, which spans the closed and occluded conformations of the enzyme. Analysis of the molecular dynamics trajectories provides insight into the conformational changes occurring between these two states and the resulting changes in classical electrostatics and specific hydrogen-bonding interactions. The electric fields along the CN axes of the probes are decomposed into contributions from specific residues, ligands, and solvent molecules that make up the microenvironments around the probes. Moreover, calculation of the electric field along the hydride donor–acceptor axis, along with decomposition of this field into specific contributions, indicates that the cofactor and substrate, as well as the enzyme, impose a substantial electric field that facilitates hydride transfer. Overall, experimental and theoretical data provide evidence for

  17. Roles of s3 site residues of nattokinase on its activity and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuming; Feng, Chi; Zhong, Jin; Huan, Liandong

    2007-09-01

    Nattokinase (Subtilisin NAT, NK) is a bacterial serine protease with high fibrinolytic activity. To probe their roles on protease activity and substrate specificity, three residues of S3 site (Gly(100), Ser(101) and Leu(126)) were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis. Kinetics parameters of 20 mutants were measured using tetrapeptides as substrates, and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. Results of mutation analysis showed that Gly(100) and Ser(101) had reverse steric and electrostatic effects. Residues with bulky or positively charged side chains at position 100 decreased the substrate binding and catalytic activity drastically, while residues with the same characters at position 101 could obviously enhance protease and fibrinolytic activity of NK. Mutation of Leu(126) might impair the structure of the active cleft and drastically decreased the activity of NK. Kinetics studies of the mutants showed that S3 residues were crucial to keep protease activity while they moderately affected substrate specificity of NK. The present study provided some original insight into the P3-S3 interaction in NK and other subtilisins, as well as showed successful protein engineering cases to improve NK as a potential therapeutic agent. PMID:17673485

  18. Identification of a fibronectin interaction site in the extracellular matrix protein ameloblastin.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, Michael; Schild, Christof; Lutz, Roman; Chiquet, Matthias; Trueb, Beat

    2010-04-15

    Mammalian teeth are composed of hydroxyapatite crystals that are embedded in a rich extracellular matrix. This matrix is produced by only two cell types, the mesenchymal odontoblasts and the ectodermal ameloblasts. Ameloblasts secrete the enamel proteins amelogenin, ameloblastin, enamelin and amelotin. Odontoblasts secrete collagen type I and several calcium-binding phosphoproteins including dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein, bone sialoprotein and osteopontin. The latter four proteins have recently been grouped in the family of the SIBLINGs (small integrin-binding ligand, N-linked glycoproteins) because they display similar gene structures and because they contain an RGD tripeptide sequence that binds to integrin receptors and thus mediates cell adhesion. We have prepared all the other tooth-specific proteins in recombinant form and examined whether they might also promote cell adhesion similar to the SIBLINGs. We found that only ameloblastin consistently mediated adhesion of osteoblastic and fibroblastic cells to plastic or titanium surfaces. The activity was dependent on the intact three-dimensional structure of ameloblastin and required de novo protein synthesis of the adhering cells. By deletion analysis and in vitro mutagenesis, the active site could be narrowed down to a sequence of 13 amino acid residues (VPIMDFADPQFPT) derived from exon 7 of the rat ameloblastin gene or exons 7-9 of the human gene. Kinetic studies and RNA interference experiments further demonstrated that this sequence does not directly bind to a cell surface receptor but that it interacts with cellular fibronectin, which in turn binds to integrin receptors. The identification of a fibronectin-binding domain in ameloblastin might permit interesting applications for dental implantology. Implants could be coated with peptides containing the active sequence, which in turn would recruit fibronectin from the patient's blood. The recruited fibronectin should then promote cell

  19. Galaxy interactions and strength of nuclear activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simkin, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of data in the literature for differential velocities and projected separations of nearby Seyfert galaxies with possible companions shows a clear difference in projected separations between type 1's and type 2's. This kinematic difference between the two activity classes reinforces other independent evidence that their different nuclear characteristics are related to a non-nuclear physical distinction between the two classes. The differential velocities and projected separations of the galaxy pairs in this sample yield mean galaxy masses, sizes, and mass to light ratios which are consistent with those found by the statistical methods of Karachentsev. Although the galaxy sample discussed here is too small and too poorly defined to provide robust support for these conclusions, the results strongly suggest that nuclear activity in Seyfert galaxies is associated with gravitational perturbations from companion galaxies, and that there are physical distinctions between the host companions of Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 nuclei which may depend both on the environment and the structure of the host galaxy itself.

  20. Mechanism of SNARE protein binding and regulation of Cav2 channels by phosphorylation of the synaptic protein interaction site.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Charles T; Myers, Scott J; Fu, Jian; Mockus, Susan M; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2005-01-01

    Ca(v)2.1 and Ca(v)2.2 channels conduct P/Q-type and N-type Ca(2+) currents that initiate neurotransmission and bind SNARE proteins through a synaptic protein interaction (synprint) site. PKC and CaMKII phosphorylate the synprint site and inhibit SNARE protein binding in vitro. Here we identify two separate microdomains that each bind syntaxin 1A and SNAP-25 in vitro and are regulated by PKC phosphorylation at serines 774 and 898 and CaMKII phosphorylation at serines 784 and 896. Activation of PKC resulted in its recruitment to and phosphorylation of Ca(V)2.2 channels, but PKC phosphorylation did not dissociate Ca(V)2.2 channel/syntaxin 1A complexes. Chimeric Ca(V)2.1a channels containing the synprint site of Ca(v)2.2 gain modulation by syntaxin 1A, which is blocked by PKC phosphorylation at the sites identified above. Our results support a bipartite model for the synprint site in which each SNARE-binding microdomain is controlled by a separate PKC and CaMKII phosphorylation site that regulates channel modulation by SNARE proteins. PMID:15607937

  1. Influence of cysteine 164 on active site structure in rat cysteine dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Matthias; Siakkou, Eleni; Faponle, Abayomi S; Tchesnokov, Egor P; de Visser, Sam P; Wilbanks, Sigurd M; Jameson, Guy N L

    2016-07-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a non-heme mononuclear iron enzyme with unique structural features, namely an intramolecular thioether cross-link between cysteine 93 and tyrosine 157, and a disulfide bond between substrate L-cysteine and cysteine 164 in the entrance channel to the active site. We investigated how these posttranslational modifications affect catalysis through a kinetic, crystallographic and computational study. The enzyme kinetics of a C164S variant are identical to WT, indicating that disulfide formation at C164 does not significantly impair access to the active site at physiological pH. However, at high pH, the cysteine-tyrosine cross-link formation is enhanced in C164S. This supports the view that disulfide formation at position 164 can limit access to the active site. The C164S variant yielded crystal structures of unusual clarity in both resting state and with cysteine bound. Both show that the iron in the cysteine-bound complex is a mixture of penta- and hexa-coordinate with a water molecule taking up the final site (60 % occupancy), which is where dioxygen is believed to coordinate during turnover. The serine also displays stronger hydrogen bond interactions to a water bound to the amine of the substrate cysteine. However, the interactions between cysteine and iron appear unchanged. DFT calculations support this and show that WT and C164S have similar binding energies for the water molecule in the final site. This variant therefore provides evidence that WT also exists in an equilibrium between penta- and hexa-coordinate forms and the presence of the sixth ligand does not strongly affect dioxygen binding. PMID:27193596

  2. Social interaction is associated with changes in infants’ motor activity

    PubMed Central

    Scola, Céline; Bourjade, Marie; Jover, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Background In developmental research, infants are commonly assumed to be early stakeholders in interactions with their caregivers. The tools that infants can use to interact with others vary from visual contact to smiling or vocalizing, and also include motor activity. However, surprisingly few studies have explored how the nature and context of social interactions affect infants’ engagement in motor activity. Methods We investigated the kinematic properties of foot and face movements produced by 11 infants aged between 5 and 9 months during six contrasting dyadic episodes (i.e. passive presence of a stranger or the infant's mother, weak or intense interaction with the stranger/mother as she sings a nursery play song). Results The infants’ face and foot motor activity was significantly reduced during the interactive episodes, compared with the episodes without any interaction, in both the mother and stranger conditions. Furthermore, the level of their motor activity was significantly lower in the stranger condition than in the mother one for some parameters. Conclusion These results are in line with those reported by previous studies and confirm the relevance of using motor activity to delineate the early forms of interactive episodes in infants. PMID:26546793

  3. Understanding and Designing for Interactional Privacy Needs within Social Networking Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisniewski, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    "Interpersonal boundary regulation" is a way to optimize social interactions when sharing and connecting through Social Networking Sites (SNSs). The theoretical foundation of much of my research comes from Altman's work on privacy management in the physical world. Altman believed that "we should attempt to design responsive…

  4. Evolutionary, structural and biochemical evidence for a new interaction site of the leptin obesity protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaucher, Eric A.; Miyamoto, Michael M.; Benner, Steven A.

    2003-01-01

    The Leptin protein is central to the regulation of energy metabolism in mammals. By integrating evolutionary, structural, and biochemical information, a surface segment, outside of its known receptor contacts, is predicted as a second interaction site that may help to further define its roles in energy balance and its functional differences between humans and other mammals.

  5. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology's energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  6. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-06-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work.

  7. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  8. Bithionol Potently Inhibits Human Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase through Binding to the Allosteric Activator Site.

    PubMed

    Kleinboelting, Silke; Ramos-Espiritu, Lavoisier; Buck, Hannes; Colis, Laureen; van den Heuvel, Joop; Glickman, J Fraser; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen; Steegborn, Clemens

    2016-04-29

    The signaling molecule cAMP regulates functions ranging from bacterial transcription to mammalian memory. In mammals, cAMP is synthesized by nine transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and one soluble AC (sAC). Despite similarities in their catalytic domains, these ACs differ in regulation. Transmembrane ACs respond to G proteins, whereas sAC is uniquely activated by bicarbonate. Via bicarbonate regulation, sAC acts as a physiological sensor for pH/bicarbonate/CO2, and it has been implicated as a therapeutic target, e.g. for diabetes, glaucoma, and a male contraceptive. Here we identify the bisphenols bithionol and hexachlorophene as potent, sAC-specific inhibitors. Inhibition appears mostly non-competitive with the substrate ATP, indicating that they act via an allosteric site. To analyze the interaction details, we solved a crystal structure of an sAC·bithionol complex. The structure reveals that the compounds are selective for sAC because they bind to the sAC-specific, allosteric binding site for the physiological activator bicarbonate. Structural comparison of the bithionol complex with apo-sAC and other sAC·ligand complexes along with mutagenesis experiments reveals an allosteric mechanism of inhibition; the compound induces rearrangements of substrate binding residues and of Arg(176), a trigger between the active site and allosteric site. Our results thus provide 1) novel insights into the communication between allosteric regulatory and active sites, 2) a novel mechanism for sAC inhibition, and 3) pharmacological compounds targeting this allosteric site and utilizing this mode of inhibition. These studies provide support for the future development of sAC-modulating drugs. PMID:26961873

  9. The nuclear quadrupole interaction at inequivalent lattice sites in ammonium paramolybdate: A TDPAC study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. K.; Heinrich, F.; Butz, T.

    2006-09-01

    A nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) study using the time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique on ammonium paramolybdate (APM) has shown three inequivalent molybdenum sites in this compound which consists of seven MoO 6 polyhedra connected through edges. In this study the nuclear probe 99Mo was used to measure the γ- γ perturbed angular correlation of 99Tc on Mo-sites to obtain the quadrupole interaction parameters. The quadrupole interaction frequencies ( ωQ) for the three sites are 0.0224, 0.0386 and 0.0434 rad/ns and the asymmetry parameters ( η) of the electric field gradient (EFG) are 0.45, 0.18, and 0.58, respectively. The site assignment is based on the population ratios 4:2:1. The Mo atoms with the highest population show the lowest ωQ indicating that this set of polyhedra is "least" distorted or condensed. Besides the least squares fit, a cross-correlation algorithm has been used to analyze the experimental data to corroborate the fitted parameters and quoted errors. The derived NQI-parameters can be used for site assignments in other compounds built from condensed Mo-O octahedra.

  10. Protein-protein interactions in a higher-order structure direct lambda site-specific recombination.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J F; de Vargas, L M; Skinner, S E; Landy, A

    1987-06-01

    The highly directional site-specific recombination of bacteriophage lambda is tightly regulated by the binding of three different proteins to a complex array of sites. The manner in which these reactions are both stimulated and inhibited by co-operative binding of proteins to specific sites on the P arm of attP and AttR has been elucidated by correlation of nuclease protection with recombination studies of both wild-type and mutant DNAs. In addition to co-operative forces, there is a specific competitive interaction that allows the protein-DNA complex to serve as a "biological switch". This switch does not depend upon the simple occlusion of DNA binding sites by neighboring proteins; but, rather, the outcome of this competition is dependent on long-range interactions that vary between the higher-order structures of attP and attR. These higher-order structures are dependent on cooperative interactions involving three proteins binding to five or more sites. PMID:2958633

  11. The copper active site of CBM33 polysaccharide oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Hemsworth, Glyn R; Taylor, Edward J; Kim, Robbert Q; Gregory, Rebecca C; Lewis, Sally J; Turkenburg, Johan P; Parkin, Alison; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2013-04-24

    The capacity of metal-dependent fungal and bacterial polysaccharide oxygenases, termed GH61 and CBM33, respectively, to potentiate the enzymatic degradation of cellulose opens new possibilities for the conversion of recalcitrant biomass to biofuels. GH61s have already been shown to be unique metalloenzymes containing an active site with a mononuclear copper ion coordinated by two histidines, one of which is an unusual τ-N-methylated N-terminal histidine. We now report the structural and spectroscopic characterization of the corresponding copper CBM33 enzymes. CBM33 binds copper with high affinity at a mononuclear site, significantly stabilizing the enzyme. X-band EPR spectroscopy of Cu(II)-CBM33 shows a mononuclear type 2 copper site with the copper ion in a distorted axial coordination sphere, into which azide will coordinate as evidenced by the concomitant formation of a new absorption band in the UV/vis spectrum at 390 nm. The enzyme's three-dimensional structure contains copper, which has been photoreduced to Cu(I) by the incident X-rays, confirmed by X-ray absorption/fluorescence studies of both aqueous solution and intact crystals of Cu-CBM33. The single copper(I) ion is ligated in a T-shaped configuration by three nitrogen atoms from two histidine side chains and the amino terminus, similar to the endogenous copper coordination geometry found in fungal GH61. PMID:23540833

  12. The Copper Active Site of CBM33 Polysaccharide Oxygenases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of metal-dependent fungal and bacterial polysaccharide oxygenases, termed GH61 and CBM33, respectively, to potentiate the enzymatic degradation of cellulose opens new possibilities for the conversion of recalcitrant biomass to biofuels. GH61s have already been shown to be unique metalloenzymes containing an active site with a mononuclear copper ion coordinated by two histidines, one of which is an unusual τ-N-methylated N-terminal histidine. We now report the structural and spectroscopic characterization of the corresponding copper CBM33 enzymes. CBM33 binds copper with high affinity at a mononuclear site, significantly stabilizing the enzyme. X-band EPR spectroscopy of Cu(II)-CBM33 shows a mononuclear type 2 copper site with the copper ion in a distorted axial coordination sphere, into which azide will coordinate as evidenced by the concomitant formation of a new absorption band in the UV/vis spectrum at 390 nm. The enzyme’s three-dimensional structure contains copper, which has been photoreduced to Cu(I) by the incident X-rays, confirmed by X-ray absorption/fluorescence studies of both aqueous solution and intact crystals of Cu-CBM33. The single copper(I) ion is ligated in a T-shaped configuration by three nitrogen atoms from two histidine side chains and the amino terminus, similar to the endogenous copper coordination geometry found in fungal GH61. PMID:23540833

  13. Interaction of Carthamus tinctorius lignan arctigenin with the binding site of tryptophan-degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Temml, Veronika; Kuehnl, Susanne; Schuster, Daniela; Schwaiger, Stefan; Stuppner, Hermann; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    Mediterranean Carthamus tinctorius (Safflower) is used for treatment of inflammatory conditions and neuropsychiatric disorders. Recently C. tinctorius lignans arctigenin and trachelogenin but not matairesinol were described to interfere with the activity of tryptophan-degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. We examined a potential direct influence of compounds on IDO enzyme activity applying computational calculations based on 3D geometry of the compounds. The interaction pattern analysis and force field-based minimization was performed within LigandScout 3.03, the docking simulation with MOE 2011.10 using the X-ray crystal structure of IDO. Results confirm the possibility of an intense interaction of arctigenin and trachelogenin with the binding site of the enzyme, while matairesinol had no such effect. PMID:24251110

  14. Uranyl Solvation by a Three-Dimensional Reference Interaction Site Model.

    PubMed

    Matveev, Alexei; Li, Bo; Rösch, Notker

    2015-08-13

    We report an implementation of the three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D RISM) that in particular addresses the treatment of the long-range Coulomb field of charged species, represented by point charges and/or a distributed charge density. A comparison of 1D and 3D results for atomic ions demonstrates a reasonable accuracy, even for a moderate size of the unit cell and a moderate grid resolution. In an application to uranyl complexes with 4-6 explicit aqua ligands and an implicit bulk solvent modeled by RISM, we show that the 3D technique is not susceptible to the deficiencies of the 1D technique exposed in our previous work [Li, Matveev, Krüger, Rösch, Comp. Theor. Chem. 2015, 1051, 151]. The 3D method eliminates the artificial superposition of explicit aqua ligands and the RISM medium and predicts essentially the same values for uranyl and uranyl-water bond lengths as a state-of-the-art polarizable continuum model. With the first solvation shell treated explicitly, the observables are nearly independent of the order of the closure relationship used when solving the set of integral equations for the various distribution functions. Furthermore, we calculated the activation barrier of water exchange with a hybrid approach that combines the 3D RISM model for the bulk aqueous solvent and a quantum mechanical description (at the level of electronic density functional theory) of uranyl interacting with explicitly represented water molecules. The calculated result agrees very well with experiment and the best theoretical estimates. PMID:26167741

  15. Target-classification approach applied to active UXO sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Shamatava, Irma; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study is designed to illustrate the discrimination performance at two UXO active sites (Oklahoma's Fort Sill and the Massachusetts Military Reservation) of a set of advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) inversion/discrimination models which include the orthonormalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS), joint diagonalization (JD), and differential evolution (DE) approaches and whose power and flexibility greatly exceed those of the simple dipole model. The Fort Sill site is highly contaminated by a mix of the following types of munitions: 37-mm target practice tracers, 60-mm illumination mortars, 75-mm and 4.5'' projectiles, 3.5'', 2.36'', and LAAW rockets, antitank mine fuzes with and without hex nuts, practice MK2 and M67 grenades, 2.5'' ballistic windshields, M2A1-mines with/without bases, M19-14 time fuzes, and 40-mm practice grenades with/without cartridges. The site at the MMR site contains targets of yet different sizes. In this work we apply our models to EMI data collected using the MetalMapper (MM) and 2 × 2 TEMTADS sensors. The data for each anomaly are inverted to extract estimates of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters associated with each buried target. (The latter include the total volume magnetic source or NVMS, which relates to size, shape, and material properties; the former includes location, depth, and orientation). The estimated intrinsic parameters are then used for classification performed via library matching and the use of statistical classification algorithms; this process yielded prioritized dig-lists that were submitted to the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) for independent scoring. The models' classification performance is illustrated and assessed based on these independent evaluations.

  16. Differential Active Site Loop Conformations Mediate Promiscuous Activities in the Lactonase SsoPox

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Mikael; Chabriere, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes are proficient catalysts that enable fast rates of Michaelis-complex formation, the chemical step and products release. These different steps may require different conformational states of the active site that have distinct binding properties. Moreover, the conformational flexibility of the active site mediates alternative, promiscuous functions. Here we focused on the lactonase SsoPox from Sulfolobus solfataricus. SsoPox is a native lactonase endowed with promiscuous phosphotriesterase activity. We identified a position in the active site loop (W263) that governs its flexibility, and thereby affects the substrate specificity of the enzyme. We isolated two different sets of substitutions at position 263 that induce two distinct conformational sampling of the active loop and characterized the structural and kinetic effects of these substitutions. These sets of mutations selectively and distinctly mediate the improvement of the promiscuous phosphotriesterase and oxo-lactonase activities of SsoPox by increasing active-site loop flexibility. These observations corroborate the idea that conformational diversity governs enzymatic promiscuity and is a key feature of protein evolvability. PMID:24086491

  17. Spectroscopic Definition of the Ferroxidase Site in M Ferritin: Comparison of Binuclear Substrate vs. Cofactor Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jennifer K.; Liu, Xiaofeng S.; Tosha, Takehiko; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2008-01-01

    Maxi ferritins, 24 subunit protein nanocages, are essential in humans, plants, bacteria, and other animals for the concentration and storage of iron as hydrated ferric oxide, while minimizing free radical generation or use by pathogens. Formation of the precursors to these ferric oxides is catalyzed at a non-heme biferrous substrate site, which has some parallels with the cofactor sites in other biferrous enzymes. A combination of circular dichroism (CD), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH MCD) has been used to probe Fe(II) binding to the substrate active site in frog M ferritin. These data determined that the active site within each subunit consists of two inequivalent five-coordinate (5C) ferrous centers that are weakly anti-ferromagnetically coupled, consistent with a μ-1,3 carboxylate bridge. The active site ligand set is unusual and likely includes a terminal water bound to each Fe(II) center. The Fe(II) ions bind to the active sites in a concerted manner, and cooperativity among the sites in each subunit is observed, potentially providing a mechanism for the control of ferritin iron loading. Differences in geometric and electronic structure – including a weak ligand field, availability of two water ligands at the biferrous substrate site, and the single carboxylate bridge in ferritin – coincide with the divergent reaction pathways observed between this substrate site and the previously studied cofactor active sites. PMID:18576633

  18. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  19. A Ligand Peptide Motif Selected from a Cancer Patient Is a Receptor-Interacting Site within Human Interleukin-11

    PubMed Central

    Cardó-Vila, Marina; Zurita, Amado J.; Giordano, Ricardo J.; Sun, Jessica; Rangel, Roberto; Guzman-Rojas, Liliana; Anobom, Cristiane D.; Valente, Ana P.; Almeida, Fábio C. L.; Lahdenranta, Johanna; Kolonin, Mikhail G.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin-11 (IL-11) is a pleiotropic cytokine approved by the FDA against chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. From a combinatorial selection in a cancer patient, we isolated an IL-11-like peptide mapping to domain I of the IL-11 (sequence CGRRAGGSC). Although this motif has ligand attributes, it is not within the previously characterized interacting sites. Here we design and validate in-tandem binding assays, site-directed mutagenesis and NMR spectroscopy to show (i) the peptide mimics a receptor-binding site within IL-11, (ii) the binding of CGRRAGGSC to the IL-11Rα is functionally relevant, (iii) Arg4 and Ser8 are the key residues mediating the interaction, and (iv) the IL-11-like motif induces cell proliferation through STAT3 activation. These structural and functional results uncover an as yet unrecognized receptor-binding site in human IL-11. Given that IL-11Rα has been proposed as a target in human cancer, our results provide clues for the rational design of targeted drugs. PMID:18941632

  20. Evidence for segmental mobility in the active site of pepsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, J.; Strop, P.; Senn, H.; Foundling, S.; Kostka, V.

    1986-05-01

    The low hydrolytic activity (k/sub cat/ < 0.001 s/sup -1/) of chicken pepsin (CP) towards tri- and tetrapeptides is enhanced at least 100 times by modification of its single sulfhydryl group of Cys-115, with little effect on K/sub m/-values. Modification thus simulates the effect of secondary substrate binding on pepsin catalysis. The rate of Cys-115 modification is substantially decreased in the presence of some competitive inhibitors, suggesting its active site location. Experiments with CP alkylated at Cys-115 with Acrylodan as a fluorescent probe or with N-iodoacetyl-(4-fluoro)-aniline as a /sup 19/F-nmr probe suggest conformation change around Cys-115 to occur on substrate or substrate analog binding. The difference /sup 1/H-nmr spectra (500 MHz) of unmodified free and inhibitor-complexed CP reveal chemical shifts almost exclusively in the aromatic region. The effects of Cu/sup + +/ on /sup 19/F- and /sup 1/H-nmr spectra have been studied. Examination of a computer graphics model of CP based on E. parasitica pepsin-inhibitor complex X-ray coordinates suggests that Cys-115 is located near the S/sub 3//S/sub 5/ binding site. The results are interpreted in favor of segmental mobility of this region important for pepsin substrate binding and catalysis.

  1. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  2. Eel calcitonin binding site distribution and antinociceptive activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Guidobono, F.; Netti, C.; Sibilia, V.; Villa, I.; Zamboni, A.; Pecile, A.

    1986-03-01

    The distribution of binding site for (/sup 125/I)-eel-calcitonin (ECT) to rat central nervous system, studied by an autoradiographic technique, showed concentrations of binding in the diencephalon, the brain stem and the spinal cord. Large accumulations of grains were seen in the hypothalamus, the amygdala, in the fasciculus medialis prosencephali, in the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, in the ventrolateral part of the periventricular gray matter, in the lemniscus medialis and in the raphe nuclei. The density of grains in the reticular formation and in the nucleus tractus spinalis nervi trigemini was more moderate. In the spinal cord, grains were scattered throughout the dorsal horns. Binding of the ligand was displaced equally by cold ECT and by salmon CT(sCT), indicating that both peptides bind to the same receptors. Human CT was much weaker than sCT in displacing (/sup 125/I)-ECT binding. The administration of ECT into the brain ventricles of rats dose-dependently induced a significant and long-lasting enhancement of hot-plate latencies comparable with that obtained with sCT. The antinociceptive activity induced by ECT is compatible with the topographical distribution of binding sites for the peptide and is a further indication that fish CTs are active in the mammalian brain.

  3. Crystallographic Analysis of Active Site Contributions to Regiospecificity in the Diiron Enzyme Toluene 4-Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Lucas J.; Acheson, Justin F.; McCoy, Jason G.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Fox, Brian G.

    2014-10-02

    Crystal structures of toluene 4-monooxygenase hydroxylase in complex with reaction products and effector protein reveal active site interactions leading to regiospecificity. Complexes with phenolic products yield an asymmetric {mu}-phenoxo-bridged diiron center and a shift of diiron ligand E231 into a hydrogen bonding position with conserved T201. In contrast, complexes with inhibitors p-NH{sub 2}-benzoate and p-Br-benzoate showed a {mu}-1,1 coordination of carboxylate oxygen between the iron atoms and only a partial shift in the position of E231. Among active site residues, F176 trapped the aromatic ring of products against a surface of the active site cavity formed by G103, E104 and A107, while F196 positioned the aromatic ring against this surface via a {pi}-stacking interaction. The proximity of G103 and F176 to the para substituent of the substrate aromatic ring and the structure of G103L T4moHD suggest how changes in regiospecificity arise from mutations at G103. Although effector protein binding produced significant shifts in the positions of residues along the outer portion of the active site (T201, N202, and Q228) and in some iron ligands (E231 and E197), surprisingly minor shifts (<1 {angstrom}) were produced in F176, F196, and other interior residues of the active site. Likewise, products bound to the diiron center in either the presence or absence of effector protein did not significantly shift the position of the interior residues, suggesting that positioning of the cognate substrates will not be strongly influenced by effector protein binding. Thus, changes in product distributions in the absence of the effector protein are proposed to arise from differences in rates of chemical steps of the reaction relative to motion of substrates within the active site channel of the uncomplexed, less efficient enzyme, while structural changes in diiron ligand geometry associated with cycling between diferrous and diferric states are discussed for their potential

  4. A binding site outside the canonical PDZ domain determines the specific interaction between Shank and SAPAP and their function.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Menglong; Shang, Yuan; Guo, Tingfeng; He, Qinghai; Yung, Wing-Ho; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-05-31

    Shank and SAPAP (synapse-associated protein 90/postsynaptic density-95-associated protein) are two highly abundant scaffold proteins that directly interact with each other to regulate excitatory synapse development and plasticity. Mutations of SAPAP, but not other reported Shank PDZ domain binders, share a significant overlap on behavioral abnormalities with the mutations of Shank both in patients and in animal models. The molecular mechanism governing the exquisite specificity of the Shank/SAPAP interaction is not clear, however. Here we report that a sequence preceding the canonical PDZ domain of Shank, together with the elongated PDZ BC loop, form another binding site for a sequence upstream of the SAPAP PDZ-binding motif, leading to a several hundred-fold increase in the affinity of the Shank/SAPAP interaction. We provide evidence that the specific interaction afforded by this newly identified site is required for Shank synaptic targeting and the Shank-induced synaptic activity increase. Our study provides a molecular explanation of how Shank and SAPAP dosage changes due to their gene copy number variations can contribute to different psychiatric disorders. PMID:27185935

  5. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  6. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins. PMID:27080133

  7. An Overview of Tubulin Inhibitors That Interact with the Colchicine Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Chen, Jianjun; Xiao, Min; Li, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Tubulin dynamics is a promising target for new chemotherapeutic agents. The colchicine binding site is one of the most important pockets for potential tubulin polymerization destabilizers. Colchicine binding site inhibitors (CBSI) exert their biological effects by inhibiting tubulin assembly and suppressing microtubule formation. A large number of molecules interacting with the colchicine binding site have been designed and synthesized with significant structural diversity. CBSIs have been modified as to chemical structure as well as pharmacokinetic properties, and tested in order to find a highly potent, low toxicity agent for treatment of cancers. CBSIs are believed to act by a common mechanism via binding to the colchicine site on tubulin. The present review is a synopsis of compounds that have been reported in the past decade that have provided an increase in our understanding of the actions of CBSIs. PMID:22814904

  8. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  9. Active site and laminarin binding in glycoside hydrolase family 55.

    PubMed

    Bianchetti, Christopher M; Takasuka, Taichi E; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S; Yik, Eric J; Bergeman, Lai F; Fox, Brian G

    2015-05-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100-10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  10. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  11. MARCKS is a natively unfolded protein with an inaccessible actin-binding site: evidence for long-range intramolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Tapp, Hazel; Al-Naggar, Iman M; Yarmola, Elena G; Harrison, Alexis; Shaw, Gerry; Edison, Arthur S; Bubb, Michael R

    2005-03-18

    Myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) is an unfolded protein that contains well characterized actin-binding sites within the phosphorylation site domain (PSD), yet paradoxically, we now find that intact MARCKS does not bind to actin. Intact MARCKS also does not bind as well to calmodulin as does the PSD alone. Myristoylation at the N terminus alters how calmodulin binds to MARCKS, implying that, despite its unfolded state, the distant N terminus influences binding events at the PSD. We show that the free PSD binds with site specificity to MARCKS, suggesting that long-range intramolecular interactions within MARCKS are also possible. Because of the unusual primary sequence of MARCKS with an overall isoelectric point of 4.2 yet a very basic PSD (overall charge of +13), we speculated that ionic interactions between oppositely charged domains of MARCKS were responsible for long-range interactions within MARCKS that sterically influence binding events at the PSD and that explain the observed differences between properties of the PSD and MARCKS. Consistent with this hypothesis, chemical modifications of MARCKS that neutralize negatively charged residues outside of the PSD allow the PSD to bind to actin and increase the affinity of MARCKS for calmodulin. Similarly, both myristoylation of MARCKS and cleavage of MARCKS by calpain are shown to increase the availability of the PSD so as to activate its actin-binding activity. Because abundant evidence supports the conclusion that MARCKS is an important protein in regulating actin dynamics, our data imply that post-translational modifications of MARCKS are necessary and sufficient to regulate actin-binding activity. PMID:15640140

  12. The Histamine N-Methyltransferase T105I Polymorphism Affects Active Site Structure and Dynamics†

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Karen; Parson, William W.; Daggett, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT) is the sole enzyme responsible for inactivating histamine in the mammalian brain. The human HNMT gene contains a common threonine-isoleucine polymorphism at residue 105, distal from the active site. The 105I variant has decreased activity and lower protein levels relative to the 105T protein. Crystal structures of both variants have been solved, but reveal little regarding how the T105I polymorphism affects activity. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of both 105T and 105I at 37°C to explore the structural and dynamic consequences of the polymorphism. The simulations indicate that replacing Thr with the larger Ile residue leads to greater burial of residue 105 and heightened packing interactions between residue105 and residues within helix α3 and strand β3. This altered packing is directly translated to the active site resulting in the reorientation of several co-substrate-binding residues. The simulations also show that the hydrophobic histamine-binding domain in both proteins undergoes a large-scale breathing motion that exposes key catalytic residues and lessens the hydrophobicity of the substrate-binding site. PMID:18154359

  13. Structural Basis for the Active Site Inhibition Mechanism of Human Kidney-Type Glutaminase (KGA)

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K.; Chong, Qing Yun; Low, Boon Chuan; Sivaraman, J.

    2014-01-01

    Glutaminase is a metabolic enzyme responsible for glutaminolysis, a process harnessed by cancer cells to feed their accelerated growth and proliferation. Among the glutaminase isoforms, human kidney-type glutaminase (KGA) is often upregulated in cancer and is thus touted as an attractive drug target. Here we report the active site inhibition mechanism of KGA through the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of KGA (cKGA) in complex with 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON), a substrate analogue of glutamine. DON covalently binds with the active site Ser286 and interacts with residues such as Tyr249, Asn335, Glu381, Asn388, Tyr414, Tyr466 and Val484. The nucleophilic attack of Ser286 sidechain on DON releases the diazo group (N2) from the inhibitor and results in the formation of an enzyme-inhibitor complex. Mutational studies confirmed the key role of these residues in the activity of KGA. This study will be important in the development of KGA active site inhibitors for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24451979

  14. In vivo interaction of the Escherichia coli integration host factor with its specific binding sites.

    PubMed

    Engelhorn, M; Boccard, F; Murtin, C; Prentki, P; Geiselmann, J

    1995-08-11

    The histone-like protein integration host factor (IHF) of Escherichia coli binds to specific binding sites on the chromosome or on mobile genetic elements, and is involved in many cellular processes. We have analyzed the interaction of IHF with five different binding sites in vitro and in vivo using UV laser footprinting, a technique that probes the immediate environment and conformation of a segment of DNA. Using this generally applicable technique we can directly compare the binding modes and interaction strengths of a DNA binding protein in its physiological environment within the cell to measurements performed in vitro. We conclude that the interactions between IHF and its specific binding sites are identical in vitro and in vivo. The footprinting signal is consistent with the model of IHF-binding to DNA proposed by Yang and Nash (1989). The occupancy of binding sites varies with the concentration of IHF in the cell and allows to estimate the concentration of free IHF protein in the cell. PMID:7659518

  15. In vivo interaction of the Escherichia coli integration host factor with its specific binding sites.

    PubMed

    Engelhorn, M; Boccard, F; Murtin, C; Prentki, P; Geiselmann, J

    1995-09-11

    The histone-like protein integration host factor (IHF) of Escherichia coli binds to specific binding sites on the chromosome or on mobile genetic elements, and is involved in many cellular processes. We have analyzed the interaction of IHF with five different binding sites in vitro and in vivo using UV laser footprinting, a technique that probes the immediate environment and conformation of a segment of DNA. Using this generally applicable technique we can directly compare the binding modes and interaction strengths of a DNA binding protein in its physiological environment within the cell to measurements performed in vitro. We conclude that the interactions between IHF and its specific binding sites are identical in vitro and in vivo. The footprinting signal is consistent with the model of IHF-binding to DNA proposed by Yang and Nash (1989). The occupancy of binding sites varies with the concentration of IHF in the cell and allows to estimate the concentration of free IHF protein in the cell. PMID:7567442

  16. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interaction Sites Using Electrostatic Desolvation Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Fiorucci, Sébastien; Zacharias, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Protein-protein complex formation involves removal of water from the interface region. Surface regions with a small free energy penalty for water removal or desolvation may correspond to preferred interaction sites. A method to calculate the electrostatic free energy of placing a neutral low-dielectric probe at various protein surface positions has been designed and applied to characterize putative interaction sites. Based on solutions of the finite-difference Poisson equation, this method also includes long-range electrostatic contributions and the protein solvent boundary shape in contrast to accessible-surface-area-based solvation energies. Calculations on a large set of proteins indicate that in many cases (>90%), the known binding site overlaps with one of the six regions of lowest electrostatic desolvation penalty (overlap with the lowest desolvation region for 48% of proteins). Since the onset of electrostatic desolvation occurs even before direct protein-protein contact formation, it may help guide proteins toward the binding region in the final stage of complex formation. It is interesting that the probe desolvation properties associated with residue types were found to depend to some degree on whether the residue was outside of or part of a binding site. The probe desolvation penalty was on average smaller if the residue was part of a binding site compared to other surface locations. Applications to several antigen-antibody complexes demonstrated that the approach might be useful not only to predict protein interaction sites in general but to map potential antigenic epitopes on protein surfaces. PMID:20441756

  17. Micro-phase assembly of active sites in a coarse-grained model of chromatin by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Heermann, Dieter; Farmer, Barry; Pandey, Ras

    2011-03-01

    A coarse-grained model is used to study the self-assembly of active sites in a DNA (chromatin) chain. The chromosome is described by a bond-fluctuating chain of two types of nodes A (interacting) and B (non-interacting), distributed randomly with concentration C and 1 - C respectively. Active nodes interact with a Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential and execute their stochastic motion with the Metropolis algorithm. The depth of the LJ potential (f) , a measure of interaction strength and the concentration (C) of the active sites are varied. A number of local and global physical quantities are studied such as mobility (Mn) profile of each node, their local structural profile, root mean square (RMS) displacement (R) , radius of gyration (Rg) , and structure factor S (q) . We find that the chain segments assemble into microphase of blobs which requires higher concentration of active sites at weaker interaction. These findings are consistent with that of a dynamic loop model of chromatin on global (large) scale but differ at small scales. This work is supported in part by the Alexander von Humboldt foundation and AFRL.

  18. Atomic level understanding of site-specific interactions in Polyaniline/TiO2 composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabungbam, Satyananda; Loh, G. C.; Sahariah, Munima B.; Pal, Arup R.; Pandey, Ravindra

    2016-02-01

    Spin-polarized density functional theory calculations have been performed to understand the interactions in polyaniline (PAni) and TiO2 composite at the atomic level. Binding energy calculation shows that composite structure is energetically more stable when Ti atom of TiO2 sits on top of PAni. It is also found that there is a dependency of the CBM on the site of TiO2 interaction in this composite system. The results suggest that optimization of the synthesis parameters at atomic level can be an effective way to improve the performance of a photovoltaic device based on PAni-TiO2 composite.

  19. Monitoring Ras Interactions with the Nucleotide Exchange Factor Son of Sevenless (Sos) Using Site-specific NMR Reporter Signals and Intrinsic Fluorescence*

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Flavell, Liz; Bobby, Romel; Breeze, Alexander L.; Embrey, Kevin J.; Golovanov, Alexander P.

    2016-01-01

    The activity of Ras is controlled by the interconversion between GTP- and GDP-bound forms partly regulated by the binding of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Son of Sevenless (Sos). The details of Sos binding, leading to nucleotide exchange and subsequent dissociation of the complex, are not completely understood. Here, we used uniformly 15N-labeled Ras as well as [13C]methyl-Met,Ile-labeled Sos for observing site-specific details of Ras-Sos interactions in solution. Binding of various forms of Ras (loaded with GDP and mimics of GTP or nucleotide-free) at the allosteric and catalytic sites of Sos was comprehensively characterized by monitoring signal perturbations in the NMR spectra. The overall affinity of binding between these protein variants as well as their selected functional mutants was also investigated using intrinsic fluorescence. The data support a positive feedback activation of Sos by Ras·GTP with Ras·GTP binding as a substrate for the catalytic site of activated Sos more weakly than Ras·GDP, suggesting that Sos should actively promote unidirectional GDP → GTP exchange on Ras in preference of passive homonucleotide exchange. Ras·GDP weakly binds to the catalytic but not to the allosteric site of Sos. This confirms that Ras·GDP cannot properly activate Sos at the allosteric site. The novel site-specific assay described may be useful for design of drugs aimed at perturbing Ras-Sos interactions. PMID:26565026

  20. Monitoring Ras Interactions with the Nucleotide Exchange Factor Son of Sevenless (Sos) Using Site-specific NMR Reporter Signals and Intrinsic Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Flavell, Liz; Bobby, Romel; Breeze, Alexander L; Embrey, Kevin J; Golovanov, Alexander P

    2016-01-22

    The activity of Ras is controlled by the interconversion between GTP- and GDP-bound forms partly regulated by the binding of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Son of Sevenless (Sos). The details of Sos binding, leading to nucleotide exchange and subsequent dissociation of the complex, are not completely understood. Here, we used uniformly (15)N-labeled Ras as well as [(13)C]methyl-Met,Ile-labeled Sos for observing site-specific details of Ras-Sos interactions in solution. Binding of various forms of Ras (loaded with GDP and mimics of GTP or nucleotide-free) at the allosteric and catalytic sites of Sos was comprehensively characterized by monitoring signal perturbations in the NMR spectra. The overall affinity of binding between these protein variants as well as their selected functional mutants was also investigated using intrinsic fluorescence. The data support a positive feedback activation of Sos by Ras·GTP with Ras·GTP binding as a substrate for the catalytic site of activated Sos more weakly than Ras·GDP, suggesting that Sos should actively promote unidirectional GDP → GTP exchange on Ras in preference of passive homonucleotide exchange. Ras·GDP weakly binds to the catalytic but not to the allosteric site of Sos. This confirms that Ras·GDP cannot properly activate Sos at the allosteric site. The novel site-specific assay described may be useful for design of drugs aimed at perturbing Ras-Sos interactions. PMID:26565026

  1. Modeling Active Mechanosensing in Cell-Matrix Interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Ji, Baohua; Gao, Huajian

    2015-01-01

    Cells actively sense the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix, such as its rigidity, morphology, and deformation. The cell-matrix interaction influences a range of cellular processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and differentiation, among others. This article aims to review some of the recent progress that has been made in modeling mechanosensing in cell-matrix interactions at different length scales. The issues discussed include specific interactions between proteins, the structure and mechanosensitivity of focal adhesions, the cluster effects of the specific binding, the structure and behavior of stress fibers, cells' sensing of substrate stiffness, and cell reorientation on cyclically stretched substrates. The review concludes by looking toward future opportunities in the field and at the challenges to understanding active cell-matrix interactions. PMID:26098510

  2. Mimicking enzymatic active sites on surfaces for energy conversion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gutzler, Rico; Stepanow, Sebastian; Grumelli, Doris; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Kern, Klaus

    2015-07-21

    Metal-organic supramolecular chemistry on surfaces has matured to a point where its underlying growth mechanisms are well understood and structures of defined coordination environments of metal atoms can be synthesized in a controlled and reproducible procedure. With surface-confined molecular self-assembly, scientists have a tool box at hand which can be used to prepare structures with desired properties, as for example a defined oxidation number and spin state of the transition metal atoms within the organic matrix. From a structural point of view, these coordination sites in the supramolecular structure resemble the catalytically active sites of metallo-enzymes, both characterized by metal centers coordinated to organic ligands. Several chemical reactions take place at these embedded metal ions in enzymes and the question arises whether these reactions also take place using metal-organic networks as catalysts. Mimicking the active site of metal atoms and organic ligands of enzymes in artificial systems is the key to understanding the selectivity and efficiency of enzymatic reactions. Their catalytic activity depends on various parameters including the charge and spin configuration in the metal ion, but also on the organic environment, which can stabilize intermediate reaction products, inhibits catalytic deactivation, and serves mostly as a transport channel for the reactants and products and therefore ensures the selectivity of the enzyme. Charge and spin on the transition metal in enzymes depend on the one hand on the specific metal element, and on the other hand on its organic coordination environment. These two parameters can carefully be adjusted in surface confined metal-organic networks, which can be synthesized by virtue of combinatorial mixing of building synthons. Different organic ligands with varying functional groups can be combined with several transition metals and spontaneously assemble into ordered networks. The catalytically active metal

  3. Quantum phase transitions in a generalized compass chain with three-site interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Wen-Long; Qiu, Yu-Cheng; Oleś, Andrzej M.

    2016-06-01

    We consider a class of one-dimensional compass models with an XYZ-YZX type of three-site exchange interaction in an external magnetic field. We present the exact solution derived by means of Jordan-Wigner transformation, and study the excitation gap, spin correlations, and establish the phase diagram. Besides the canted antiferromagnetic and polarized phases, the three-site interactions induce two distinct chiral phases, corresponding to gapless spinless-fermion systems having two or four Fermi points. We find that the z component of the scalar chirality operator can act as an order parameter for these chiral phases. We also find that the thermodynamic quantities including the Wilson ratio can characterize the liquid phases. Finally, a nontrivial magnetoelectric effect is explored, and we show that the polarization can be manipulated by the magnetic field in the absence of electric field.

  4. Improved oxygen reduction activity on Pt3Ni(111) via increased surface site availability.

    PubMed

    Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Fowler, Ben; Mun, Bongjin Simon; Wang, Guofeng; Ross, Philip N; Lucas, Christopher A; Marković, Nenad M

    2007-01-26

    The slow rate of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is the main limitation for automotive applications. We demonstrated that the Pt3Ni(111) surface is 10-fold more active for the ORR than the corresponding Pt(111) surface and 90-fold more active than the current state-of-the-art Pt/C catalysts for PEMFC. The Pt3Ni(111) surface has an unusual electronic structure (d-band center position) and arrangement of surface atoms in the near-surface region. Under operating conditions relevant to fuel cells, its near-surface layer exhibits a highly structured compositional oscillation in the outermost and third layers, which are Pt-rich, and in the second atomic layer, which is Ni-rich. The weak interaction between the Pt surface atoms and nonreactive oxygenated species increases the number of active sites for O2 adsorption. PMID:17218494

  5. Modulating protein activity using tethered ligands with mutually exclusive binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Schena, Alberto; Griss, Rudolf; Johnsson, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to design proteins whose activities can be switched on and off by unrelated effector molecules would enable applications in various research areas, ranging from biosensing to synthetic biology. We describe here a general method to modulate the activity of a protein in response to the concentration of a specific effector. The approach is based on synthetic ligands that possess two mutually exclusive binding sites, one for the protein of interest and one for the effector. Tethering such a ligand to the protein of interest results in an intramolecular ligand–protein interaction that can be disrupted through the presence of the effector. Specifically, we introduce a luciferase controlled by another protein, a human carbonic anhydrase whose activity can be controlled by proteins or small molecules in vitro and on living cells, and novel fluorescent and bioluminescent biosensors. PMID:26198003

  6. Coordination of MYH DNA glycosylase and APE1 endonuclease activities via physical interactions.

    PubMed

    Luncsford, Paz J; Manvilla, Brittney A; Patterson, Dimeka N; Malik, Shuja S; Jin, Jin; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Gunther, Randall; Kalvakolanu, Snigdha; Lipinski, Leonora J; Yuan, Weirong; Lu, Wuyuan; Drohat, Alexander C; Lu, A-Lien; Toth, Eric A

    2013-12-01

    MutY homologue (MYH) is a DNA glycosylase which excises adenine paired with the oxidative lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG, or G(o)) during base excision repair (BER). Base excision by MYH results in an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site in the DNA where the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone remains intact. A key feature of MYH activity is its physical interaction and coordination with AP endonuclease I (APE1), which subsequently nicks DNA 5' to the AP site. Because AP sites are mutagenic and cytotoxic, they must be processed by APE1 immediately after the action of MYH glycosylase. Our recent reports show that the interdomain connector (IDC) of human MYH (hMYH) maintains interactions with hAPE1 and the human checkpoint clamp Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex. In this study, we used NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments to determine hMYH-binding site on hAPE1. Chemical shift perturbations indicate that the hMYH IDC peptide binds to the DNA-binding site of hAPE1 and an additional site which is distal to the APE1 DNA-binding interface. In these two binding sites, N212 and Q137 of hAPE1 are key mediators of the MYH/APE1 interaction. Intriguingly, despite the fact that hHus1 and hAPE1 both interact with the MYH IDC, hHus1 does not compete with hAPE1 for binding to hMYH. Rather, hHus1 stabilizes the hMYH/hAPE1 complex both in vitro and in cells. This is consistent with a common theme in BER, namely that the assembly of protein-DNA complexes enhances repair by efficiently coordinating multiple enzymatic steps while simultaneously minimizing the release of harmful repair intermediates. PMID:24209961

  7. Coordination of MYH DNA glycosylase and APE1 endonuclease activities via physical interactions

    PubMed Central

    Luncsford, Paz J.; Manvilla, Brittney A.; Patterson, Dimeka N.; Malik, Shuja S.; Jin, Jin; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Gunther, Randall; Kalvakolanu, Snigdha; Lipinski, Leonora J.; Yuan, Weirong; Lu, Wuyuan; Drohat, Alexander C.; Lu-Chang, A-Lien; Toth, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    MutY homologue (MYH) is a DNA glycosylase which excises adenine paired with the oxidative lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG, or G°) during base excision repair (BER). Base excision by MYH results in an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site in the DNA where the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone remains intact. A key feature of MYH activity is its physical interaction and coordination with AP endonuclease I (APE1), which subsequently nicks DNA 5' to the AP site. Because AP sites are mutagenic and cytotoxic, they must be processed by APE1 immediately after the action of MYH glycosylase. Our recent reports show that the interdomain connector (IDC) of human MYH (hMYH) maintains interactions with hAPE1 and the human checkpoint clamp Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex. In this study, we used NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments to determine hMYH-binding site on hAPE1. Chemical shift perturbations indicate that the hMYH IDC peptide binds to the DNA-binding site of hAPE1 and an additional site which is distal to the APE1 DNA-binding interface. In these two binding sites, N212 and Q137 of hAPE1 are key mediators of the MYH/APE1 interaction. Intriguingly, despite the fact that hHus1 and hAPE1 both interact with the MYH IDC, hHus1 does not compete with hAPE1 for binding to hMYH. Rather, hHus1 stabilizes the hMYH/hAPE1 complex both in vitro and in cells. This is consistent with a common theme in BER, namely that the assembly of protein-DNA complexes enhances repair by efficiently coordinating multiple enzymatic steps while simultaneously minimizing the release of harmful repair intermediates. PMID:24209961

  8. Identification of active site residues of Fenugreek β-amylase: chemical modification and in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Garima; Singh, Vinay K; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2014-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of Fenugreek β-amylase is not available in protein data bank. Therefore, an attempt has been made to identify the catalytic amino acid residues of enzyme by employing studies of pH dependence of enzyme catalysis, chemical modification and bioinformatics. Treatment of purified Fenugreek β-amylase with EDAC in presence of glycine methyl ester and sulfhydryl group specific reagents (IAA, NEM and p-CMB), followed a pseudo first-order kinetics and resulted in effective inactivation of enzyme. The reaction with EDAC in presence of NTEE (3-nitro-l-tyrosine ethylester) resulted into modification of two carboxyl groups per molecule of enzyme and presence of one accessible sulfhydryl group at the active site, per molecule of enzyme was ascertained by titration with DTNB. The above results were supported by the prevention of inactivation of enzyme in presence of substrate. Based on MALDI-TOF analysis of purified Fenugreek β-amylase and MASCOT search, β-amylase of Medicago sativa was found to be the best match. To further confirm the amino acid involved in catalysis, homology modelling of β-amylase of M. sativa was performed. The sequence alignment, superimposition of template and target models, along with study of interactions involved in docking of sucrose and maltose at the active site, led to identification of Glu187, Glu381 and Cys344 as active site residues. PMID:25179433

  9. Active site coupling in PDE:PKA complexes promotes resetting of mammalian cAMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Srinath; Moorthy, Balakrishnan Shenbaga; Xin Xiang, Lim; Xin Shan, Lim; Bharatham, Kavitha; Tulsian, Nikhil Kumar; Mihalek, Ivana; Anand, Ganesh S

    2014-09-16

    Cyclic 3'5' adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent-protein kinase (PKA) signaling is a fundamental regulatory pathway for mediating cellular responses to hormonal stimuli. The pathway is activated by high-affinity association of cAMP with the regulatory subunit of PKA and signal termination is achieved upon cAMP dissociation from PKA. Although steps in the activation phase are well understood, little is known on how signal termination/resetting occurs. Due to the high affinity of cAMP to PKA (KD ∼ low nM), bound cAMP does not readily dissociate from PKA, thus begging the question of how tightly bound cAMP is released from PKA to reset its signaling state to respond to subsequent stimuli. It has been recently shown that phosphodiesterases (PDEs) can catalyze dissociation of bound cAMP and thereby play an active role in cAMP signal desensitization/termination. This is achieved through direct interactions with the regulatory subunit of PKA, thereby facilitating cAMP dissociation and hydrolysis. In this study, we have mapped direct interactions between a specific cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE8A) and a PKA regulatory subunit (RIα isoform) in mammalian cAMP signaling, by a combination of amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, peptide array, and computational docking. The interaction interface of the PDE8A:RIα complex, probed by peptide array and hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, brings together regions spanning the phosphodiesterase active site and cAMP-binding sites of RIα. Computational docking combined with amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry provided a model for parallel dissociation of bound cAMP from the two tandem cAMP-binding domains of RIα. Active site coupling suggests a role for substrate channeling in the PDE-dependent dissociation and hydrolysis of cAMP bound to PKA. This is the first instance, to our knowledge, of PDEs directly interacting with a cAMP-receptor protein in a mammalian system, and

  10. Quantifying the π-Stacking Interactions in Nitroarene Binding Sites of Proteins.

    PubMed

    An, Yi; Bloom, Jacob W G; Wheeler, Steven E

    2015-11-12

    Stacking interactions in nitroarene binding sites of proteins were studied through analyses of structures in the protein data bank (PDB), as well as DFT and ab initio computations applied to model systems. Stacked dimers of mono-, di-, and trinitrobenzene with the amino acid side chains histidine (His), phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), and tryptophan (Trp) were optimized at the B97-D/TZV(2d,2p) level of theory. Binding energies for the global minimum dimer geometries were further refined at the estimated CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. The results show that the interactions between aromatic amino acids and nitroarenes are very strong (up to -14.6 kcal mol(-1)), and the regiochemistry of the nitro substituents plays a significant role in the relative monomer orientations and strength of the interaction. In contrast to model stacked benzene dimers, effects of nitro substituents in stacking complexes with aromatic amino acid side chains are not perfectly additive. This is attributed to direct interactions of the nitro substituents with functional groups in the amino acid side chain. Overall, the strength of stacking interactions with these nitrobenzenes follows the order Trp > Tyr > Phe ≈ His. We also analyzed nitroarene binding sites in the PDB. Out of 216 selected crystal structures containing nitroarene ligands, 191 have nearby aromatic residues, providing 65 examples of π-stacking interactions involving a nitroarene. Of these, the representations of the different aromatic amino acids (Trp > Tyr > Phe > His) are correlated with the strength of model complexes of nitroarenes, with the exception of His. B97-D computations applied to complexes extracted from these crystal structures reveal that π-stacking interactions between the nitroarene and aromatic amino acid side chains exhibit a broad range of strengths, with many contributing significantly to binding. PMID:26491883

  11. A Cascade Random Forests Algorithm for Predicting Protein-Protein Interaction Sites.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhi-Sen; Yang, Jing-Yu; Shen, Hong-Bin; Yu, Dong-Jun

    2015-10-01

    Protein-protein interactions exist ubiquitously and play important roles in the life cycles of living cells. The interaction sites (residues) are essential to understanding the underlying mechanisms of protein-protein interactions. Previous research has demonstrated that the accurate identification of protein-protein interaction sites (PPIs) is helpful for developing new therapeutic drugs because many drugs will interact directly with those residues. Because of its significant potential in biological research and drug development, the prediction of PPIs has become an important topic in computational biology. However, a severe data imbalance exists in the PPIs prediction problem, where the number of the majority class samples (non-interacting residues) is far larger than that of the minority class samples (interacting residues). Thus, we developed a novel cascade random forests algorithm (CRF) to address the serious data imbalance that exists in the PPIs prediction problem. The proposed CRF resolves the negative effect of data imbalance by connecting multiple random forests in a cascade-like manner, each of which is trained with a balanced training subset that includes all minority samples and a subset of majority samples using an effective ensemble protocol. Based on the proposed CRF, we implemented a new sequence-based PPIs predictor, called CRF-PPI, which takes the combined features of position-specific scoring matrices, averaged cumulative hydropathy, and predicted relative solvent accessibility as model inputs. Benchmark experiments on both the cross validation and independent validation datasets demonstrated that the proposed CRF-PPI outperformed the state-of-the-art sequence-based PPIs predictors. The source code for CRF-PPI and the benchmark datasets are available online at http://csbio.njust.edu.cn/bioinf/CRF-PPI for free academic use. PMID:26441427

  12. Interactions Increase Forager Availability and Activity in Harvester Ants

    PubMed Central

    Pinter-Wollman, Noa; Crow, Sam; Allen, Kelsey; Mathur, Maya B.; Gordon, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    Social insect colonies use interactions among workers to regulate collective behavior. Harvester ant foragers interact in a chamber just inside the nest entrance, here called the 'entrance chamber'. Previous studies of the activation of foragers in red harvester ants show that an outgoing forager inside the nest experiences an increase in brief antennal contacts before it leaves the nest to forage. Here we compare the interaction rate experienced by foragers that left the nest and ants that did not. We found that ants in the entrance chamber that leave the nest to forage experienced more interactions than ants that descend to the deeper nest without foraging. Additionally, we found that the availability of foragers in the entrance chamber is associated with the rate of forager return. An increase in the rate of forager return leads to an increase in the rate at which ants descend to the deeper nest, which then stimulates more ants to ascend into the entrance chamber. Thus a higher rate of forager return leads to more available foragers in the entrance chamber. The highest density of interactions occurs near the nest entrance and the entrances of the tunnels from the entrance chamber to the deeper nest. Local interactions with returning foragers regulate both the activation of waiting foragers and the number of foragers available to be activated. PMID:26539724

  13. Interactions Increase Forager Availability and Activity in Harvester Ants.

    PubMed

    Pless, Evlyn; Queirolo, Jovel; Pinter-Wollman, Noa; Crow, Sam; Allen, Kelsey; Mathur, Maya B; Gordon, Deborah M

    2015-01-01

    Social insect colonies use interactions among workers to regulate collective behavior. Harvester ant foragers interact in a chamber just inside the nest entrance, here called the 'entrance chamber'. Previous studies of the activation of foragers in red harvester ants show that an outgoing forager inside the nest experiences an increase in brief antennal contacts before it leaves the nest to forage. Here we compare the interaction rate experienced by foragers that left the nest and ants that did not. We found that ants in the entrance chamber that leave the nest to forage experienced more interactions than ants that descend to the deeper nest without foraging. Additionally, we found that the availability of foragers in the entrance chamber is associated with the rate of forager return. An increase in the rate of forager return leads to an increase in the rate at which ants descend to the deeper nest, which then stimulates more ants to ascend into the entrance chamber. Thus a higher rate of forager return leads to more available foragers in the entrance chamber. The highest density of interactions occurs near the nest entrance and the entrances of the tunnels from the entrance chamber to the deeper nest. Local interactions with returning foragers regulate both the activation of waiting foragers and the number of foragers available to be activated. PMID:26539724

  14. Hybrid [FeFe]-hydrogenases with modified active sites show remarkable residual enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Siebel, Judith F; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Weber, Katharina; Rumpel, Sigrun; Reijerse, Edward; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-02-24

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are to date the only enzymes for which it has been demonstrated that the native inorganic binuclear cofactor of the active site Fe2(adt)(CO)3(CN)2 (adt = azadithiolate = [S-CH2-NH-CH2-S](2-)) can be synthesized on the laboratory bench and subsequently inserted into the unmaturated enzyme to yield fully functional holo-enzyme (Berggren, G. et al. (2013) Nature 499, 66-70; Esselborn, J. et al. (2013) Nat. Chem. Biol. 9, 607-610). In the current study, we exploit this procedure to introduce non-native cofactors into the enzyme. Mimics of the binuclear subcluster with a modified bridging dithiolate ligand (thiodithiolate, N-methylazadithiolate, dimethyl-azadithiolate) and three variants containing only one CN(-) ligand were inserted into the active site of the enzyme. We investigated the activity of these variants for hydrogen oxidation as well as proton reduction and their structural accommodation within the active site was analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Interestingly, the monocyanide variant with the azadithiolate bridge showed ∼50% of the native enzyme activity. This would suggest that the CN(-) ligands are not essential for catalytic activity, but rather serve to anchor the binuclear subsite inside the protein pocket through hydrogen bonding. The inserted artificial cofactors with a propanedithiolate and an N-methylazadithiolate bridge as well as their monocyanide variants also showed residual activity. However, these activities were less than 1% of the native enzyme. Our findings indicate that even small changes in the dithiolate bridge of the binuclear subsite lead to a rather strong decrease of the catalytic activity. We conclude that both the Brønsted base function and the conformational flexibility of the native azadithiolate amine moiety are essential for the high catalytic activity of the native enzyme. PMID:25633077

  15. (-)-Reboxetine inhibits muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by interacting with luminal and non-luminal sites.

    PubMed

    Arias, Hugo R; Ortells, Marcelo O; Feuerbach, Dominik

    2013-11-01

    The interaction of (-)-reboxetine, a non-tricyclic norepinephrine selective reuptake inhibitor, with muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in different conformational states was studied by functional and structural approaches. The results established that (-)-reboxetine: (a) inhibits (±)-epibatidine-induced Ca(2+) influx in human (h) muscle embryonic (hα1β1γδ) and adult (hα1β1εδ) AChRs in a non-competitive manner and with potencies IC50=3.86±0.49 and 1.92±0.48 μM, respectively, (b) binds to the [(3)H]TCP site with ~13-fold higher affinity when the Torpedo AChR is in the desensitized state compared to the resting state, (c) enhances [(3)H]cytisine binding to the resting but activatableTorpedo AChR but not to the desensitized AChR, suggesting desensitizing properties, (d) overlaps the PCP luminal site located between rings 6' and 13' in the Torpedo but not human muscle AChRs. In silico mutation results indicate that ring 9' is the minimum structural component for (-)-reboxetine binding, and (e) interacts to non-luminal sites located within the transmembrane segments from the Torpedo AChR γ subunit, and at the α1/ε transmembrane interface from the adult muscle AChR. In conclusion, (-)-reboxetine non-competitively inhibits muscle AChRs by binding to the TCP luminal site and by inducing receptor desensitization (maybe by interacting with non-luminal sites), a mechanism that is shared by tricyclic antidepressants. PMID:23917086

  16. Three dimensional visualization in support of Yucca Mountain Site characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Brickey, D.W.

    1992-02-01

    An understanding of the geologic and hydrologic environment for the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, NV is a critical component of site characterization activities. Conventional methods allow visualization of geologic data in only two or two and a half dimensions. Recent advances in computer workstation hardware and software now make it possible to create interactive three dimensional visualizations. Visualization software has been used to create preliminary two-, two-and-a-half-, and three-dimensional visualizations of Yucca Mountain structure and stratigraphy. The three dimensional models can also display lithologically dependent or independent parametric data. Yucca Mountain site characterization studies that will be supported by this capability include structural, lithologic, and hydrologic modeling, and repository design.

  17. Site-specific PEGylation of lidamycin and its antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Shang, Boyang; Hu, Lei; Shao, Rongguang; Zhen, Yongsu

    2015-05-01

    In this study, N-terminal site-specific mono-PEGylation of the recombinant lidamycin apoprotein (rLDP) of lidamycin (LDM) was prepared using a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) derivative (M w 20 kDa) through a reactive terminal aldehyde group under weak acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The biochemical properties of mPEG-rLDP-AE, an enediyne-integrated conjugate, were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of mPEG-rLDP-AE was evaluated by MTT assays and in xenograft model. The results indicated that mPEG-rLDP-AE showed significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. After PEGylation, mPEG-rLDP still retained the binding capability to the enediyne AE and presented the physicochemical characteristics similar to that of native LDP. It is of interest that the PEGylation did not diminish the antitumor efficacy of LDM, implying the possibility that this derivative may function as a payload to deliver novel tumor-targeted drugs. PMID:26579455

  18. Designing for selectivity: weak interactions and the competition for reactive sites on gold catalysts.

    PubMed

    Siler, C G F; Madix, R J; Friend, C M

    2016-07-01

    A major challenge in heterogeneous catalysis is controlling reaction selectivity, especially in complex environments. When more than one species is present in the gas mixture, the competition for binding sites on the surface of a catalyst is an important factor in determining reaction selectivity and activity. We establish an experimental hierarchy for the binding of a series of reaction intermediates on Au(111) and demonstrate that this hierarchy accounts for reaction selectivity on both the single crystal surface and under operating catalytic conditions at atmospheric pressure using a nanoporous Au catalyst. A partial set of measurements of relative binding has been measured by others on other catalyst materials, including Ag, Pd and metal oxide surfaces; a comparison demonstrates the generality of this concept and identifies differences in the trends. Theoretical calculations for a subset of reactants on Au(111) show that weak van der Waals interactions are key to predicting the hierarchy of binding strengths for alkoxides bound to Au(111). This hierarchy is key to the control of the selectivity for partial oxidation of alcohols to esters on both Au surfaces and under working catalytic conditions using nanoporous gold. The selectivity depends on the competition for active sites among key intermediates. New results probing the effect of fluorine substitution are also presented to extend the relation of reaction selectivity to the hierarchy of binding. Motivated by an interest in synthetic manipulation of fluorinated organics, we specifically investigated the influence of the -CF3 group on alcohol reactivity and selectivity. 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol couples on O-covered Au(111) to yield CF3CH2O-C([double bond, length as m-dash]O)(CF3), but in the presence of methanol or ethanol it preferentially forms the respective 2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy-esters. The ester is not the dominant product in any of these cases, though, indicating that the rate of β-H elimination from

  19. Heparanase Activates Antithrombin through the Binding to Its Heparin Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Águila, Sonia; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier; Martínez-Martínez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that participates in morphogenesis, tissue repair, heparan sulphates turnover and immune response processes. It is over-expressed in tumor cells favoring the metastasis as it penetrates the endothelial layer that lines blood vessels and facilitates the metastasis by degradation of heparan sulphate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix. Heparanase may also affect the hemostatic system in a non-enzymatic manner, up-regulating the expression of tissue factor, which is the initiator of blood coagulation, and dissociating tissue factor pathway inhibitor on the cell surface membrane of endothelial and tumor cells, thus resulting in a procoagulant state. Trying to check the effect of heparanase on heparin, a highly sulphated glycosaminoglycan, when it activates antithrombin, our results demonstrated that heparanase, but not proheparanase, interacted directly with antithrombin in a non-covalent manner. This interaction resulted in the activation of antithrombin, which is the most important endogenous anticoagulant. This activation mainly accelerated FXa inhibition, supporting an allosteric activation effect. Heparanase bound to the heparin binding site of antithrombin as the activation of Pro41Leu, Arg47Cys, Lys114Ala and Lys125Alaantithrombin mutants was impaired when it was compared to wild type antithrombin. Intrinsic fluorescence analysis showed that heparanase induced an activating conformational change in antithrombin similar to that induced by heparin and with a KD of 18.81 pM. In conclusion, under physiological pH and low levels of tissue factor, heparanase may exert a non-enzymatic function interacting and activating the inhibitory function of antithrombin. PMID:27322195

  20. Calculating the habitable zones of multiple star systems with a new interactive Web site

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Tobias W. A.; Haghighipour, Nader

    2014-02-10

    We have developed a comprehensive methodology and an interactive Web site for calculating the habitable zone (HZ) of multiple star systems. Using the concept of spectral weight factor, as introduced in our previous studies of the calculations of HZ in and around binary star systems, we calculate the contribution of each star (based on its spectral energy distribution) to the total flux received at the top of the atmosphere of an Earth-like planet, and use the models of the HZ of the Sun to determine the boundaries of the HZ in multiple star systems. Our interactive Web site for carrying out these calculations is publicly available at http://astro.twam.info/hz. We discuss the details of our methodology and present its application to some of the multiple star systems detected by the Kepler space telescope. We also present the instructions for using our interactive Web site, and demonstrate its capabilities by calculating the HZ for two interesting analytical solutions of the three-body problem.

  1. Interaction of triprolidine hydrochloride with serum albumins: thermodynamic and binding characteristics, and influence of site probes.

    PubMed

    Sandhya, B; Hegde, Ashwini H; Kalanur, Shankara S; Katrahalli, Umesha; Seetharamappa, J

    2011-04-01

    The interaction between triprolidine hydrochloride (TRP) to serum albumins viz. bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) has been studied by spectroscopic methods. The experimental results revealed the static quenching mechanism in the interaction of TRP with protein. The number of binding sites close to unity for both TRP-BSA and TRP-HSA indicated the presence of single class of binding site for the drug in protein. The binding constant values of TRP-BSA and TRP-HSA were observed to be 4.75 ± 0.018 × 10(3) and 2.42 ± 0.024 × 10(4)M(-1) at 294 K, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters indicated that the hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces played the major role in the binding of TRP to proteins. The distance of separation between the serum albumin and TRP was obtained from the Förster's theory of non-radioactive energy transfer. The metal ions viz., K(+), Ca(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Mn(2+) and Zn(2+) were found to influence the binding of the drug to protein. Displacement experiments indicated the binding of TRP to Sudlow's site I on both BSA and HSA. The CD, 3D fluorescence spectra and FT-IR spectral results revealed the changes in the secondary structure of protein upon interaction with TRP. PMID:21215548

  2. The Methodology of Interactive Parametric Modelling of Construction Site Facilities in BIM Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovská, Mária; Čabala, Jozef; Struková, Zuzana

    2014-11-01

    Information technology is becoming a strong tool in different industries, including construction. The recent trend of buildings designing is leading up to creation of the most comprehensive virtual building model (Building Information Model) in order to solve all the problems relating to the project as early as in the designing phase. Building information modelling is a new way of approaching to the design of building projects documentation. Currently, the building site layout as a part of the building design documents has a very little support in the BIM environment. Recently, the research of designing the construction process conditions has centred on improvement of general practice in planning and on new approaches to construction site layout planning. The state of art in field of designing the construction process conditions indicated an unexplored problem related to connection of knowledge system with construction site facilities (CSF) layout through interactive modelling. The goal of the paper is to present the methodology for execution of 3D construction site facility allocation model (3D CSF-IAM), based on principles of parametric and interactive modelling.

  3. The divalent metal ion in the active site of uteroferrin modulates substrate binding and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Mitić, Nataša; Hadler, Kieran S.; Gahan, Lawrence R; Hengge, Alvan C.; Schenk, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    The purple acid phosphatases (PAP) are binuclear metallohydrolases that catalyze the hydrolysis of a broad range of phosphomonoester substrates. The mode of substrate binding during catalysis and the identity of the nucleophile is subject to debate. Here, we used native Fe3+-Fe2+ pig PAP (uteroferrin; Uf) and its Fe3+-Mn2+ derivative to investigate the effect of metal ion substitution on the mechanism of catalysis. Replacement of the Fe2+ by Mn2+ lowers the reactivity of Uf. However, using stopped-flow measurements it could be shown that this replacement facilitates approximately a ten-fold faster reaction between both substrate and inorganic phosphate with the chromophoric Fe3+ site. These data also indicate that in both metal forms of Uf, phenyl phosphate hydrolysis occurs faster than formation of a μ-1,3 phosphate complex. The slower rate of interaction between substrate and the Fe3+ site relative to catalysis suggests that the substrate is hydrolyzed while coordinated only to the divalent metal ion. The likely nucleophile is a water molecule in the second coordination sphere, activated by a hydroxide terminally coordinated to Fe3+. The faster rates of interaction with the Fe3+ site in the Fe3+-Mn2+ derivative than the native Fe3+-Fe2+ form are likely mediated via a hydrogen bond network connecting the first and second coordination spheres, and illustrate how the selection of metal ions may be important in fine-tuning the function of this enzyme. PMID:20433174

  4. Emerging activity in bilayered dispersions with wake-mediated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartnick, Jörg; Kaiser, Andreas; Löwen, Hartmut; Ivlev, Alexei V.

    2016-06-01

    In a bilayered system of particles with wake-mediated interactions, the action-reaction symmetry for the effective forces between particles of different layers is broken. Under quite general conditions we show that, if the interaction nonreciprocity exceeds a certain threshold, this creates an active dispersion of self-propelled clusters of Brownian particles. The emerging activity promotes unusual melting scenarios and an enormous diffusivity in the dense fluid. Our results are obtained by computer simulation and analytical theory and can be verified in experiments with colloidal dispersions and complex plasmas.

  5. Interaction between bud-site selection and polarity-establishment machineries in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chi-Fang; Savage, Natasha S.; Lew, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells polarize in order to form a single bud in each cell cycle. Distinct patterns of bud-site selection are observed in haploid and diploid cells. Genetic approaches have identified the molecular machinery responsible for positioning the bud site: during bud formation, specific locations are marked with immobile landmark proteins. In the next cell cycle, landmarks act through the Ras-family GTPase Rsr1 to promote local activation of the conserved Rho-family GTPase, Cdc42. Additional Cdc42 accumulates by positive feedback, creating a concentrated patch of GTP-Cdc42, which polarizes the cytoskeleton to promote bud emergence. Using time-lapse imaging and mathematical modelling, we examined the process of bud-site establishment. Imaging reveals unexpected effects of the bud-site-selection system on the dynamics of polarity establishment, raising new questions about how that system may operate. We found that polarity factors sometimes accumulate at more than one site among the landmark-specified locations, and we suggest that competition between clusters of polarity factors determines the final location of the Cdc42 cluster. Modelling indicated that temporally constant landmark-localized Rsr1 would weaken or block competition, yielding more than one polarity site. Instead, we suggest that polarity factors recruit Rsr1, effectively sequestering it from other locations and thereby terminating landmark activity. PMID:24062579

  6. Tertiary Contacts Distant from the Active Site Prime a Ribozyme for Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Minimal hammerhead ribozymes have been characterized extensively by static and time-resolved crystallography as well as numerous biochemical analyses, leading to mutually contradictory mechanistic explanations for catalysis. We present the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a full-length Schistosoma mansoni hammerhead ribozyme that permits us to explain the structural basis for its 1000-fold catalytic enhancement. The full-length hammerhead structure reveals how tertiary interactions occurring remotely from the active site prime this ribozyme for catalysis. G-12 and G-8 are positioned consistent with their previously suggested roles in acid-base catalysis, the nucleophile is aligned with a scissile phosphate positioned proximal to the A-9 phosphate, and previously unexplained roles of other conserved nucleotides become apparent within the context of a distinctly new fold that nonetheless accommodates the previous structural studies. These interactions permit us to explain the previously irreconcilable sets of experimental results in a unified, consistent, and unambiguous manner. PMID:16859740

  7. Active-Site-Directed Inhibitors of Prolyl Oligopeptidase Abolish Its Conformational Dynamics.

    PubMed

    López, Abraham; Herranz-Trillo, Fátima; Kotev, Martin; Gairí, Margarida; Guallar, Víctor; Bernadó, Pau; Millet, Oscar; Tarragó, Teresa; Giralt, Ernest

    2016-05-17

    Deciphering conformational dynamics is crucial for understanding the biological functions of proteins and for designing compounds targeting them. In particular, providing an accurate description of microsecond-millisecond motions opens the opportunity for regulating protein-protein interactions (PPIs) by modulating the dynamics of one interacting partner. Here we analyzed the conformational dynamics of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) and the effects of active-site-directed inhibitors on the dynamics. We used an integrated structural biology approach based on NMR spectroscopy and SAXS experiments complemented by MD simulations. We found that POP is in a slow equilibrium in solution between open and closed conformations, and that inhibitors effectively abolished this equilibrium by stabilizing the enzyme in the closed conformation. PMID:26918396

  8. Analysis of structural changes in active site of luciferase adsorbed on nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface by molecular-dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Tadatsugu

    2007-05-21

    Interactions between luciferase and a nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface were explored by molecular-dynamics simulations. The structural changes in the active-site residues, the residues affecting the luciferin binding, and the residues affecting the bioluminescence color were smaller on the nanofabricated hydrophilic Si surface than on both a hydrophobic Si surface and a hydrophilic Si surface. The nanofabrication and wet-treatment techniques are expected to prevent the decrease in activity of luciferase on the Si surface.

  9. Emergent Ultra-Long-Range Interactions Between Active Particles in Hybrid Active-Inactive Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimel, Joshua; Aragones, Juan; Hu, Helen; Qureshi, Naser; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    Particle-particle interactions determine the state of a system. Control over the range and magnitude of such interactions has been an active area of research for decades due to the fundamental challenges it poses in science and technology. Effective interactions between active particles have gathered much attention as they can lead to out-of-equilibrium cooperative states such as flocking. Inspired by nature, where active living cells coexist with lifeless, immobile objects and structures, here we study the effective interactions that appear in systems composed of active and passive mixtures of colloids. Our system is a two dimensional colloidal monolayer composed primarily of passive (inactive) colloids and a very small fraction of active (sinning) ferromagnetic colloids. We find an emergent ultra-long-range attractive interaction between active particles induced by the activity of the spinning particles and mediated by the elasticity of the passive medium. Interestingly, the appearance of such interaction depends on the spinning protocol and has a minimum actuation time scale below which no attraction is observed. Overall, these results clearly show that in the presence of elastic components, active particles can interact across very long distances without any chemical modification of the environment. Such a mechanism might potentially be important for some biological systems and can be harnessed for newer developments in synthetic active soft materials.

  10. Can Specific Protein-Lipid Interactions Stabilize an Active State of the Beta 2 Adrenergic Receptor?

    PubMed

    Neale, Chris; Herce, Henry D; Pomès, Régis; García, Angel E

    2015-10-20

    G-protein-coupled receptors are eukaryotic membrane proteins with broad biological and pharmacological relevance. Like all membrane-embedded proteins, their location and orientation are influenced by lipids, which can also impact protein function via specific interactions. Extensive simulations totaling 0.25 ms reveal a process in which phospholipids from the membrane's cytosolic leaflet enter the empty G-protein binding site of an activated β2 adrenergic receptor and form salt-bridge interactions that inhibit ionic lock formation and prolong active-state residency. Simulations of the receptor embedded in an anionic membrane show increased lipid binding, providing a molecular mechanism for the experimental observation that anionic lipids can enhance receptor activity. Conservation of the arginine component of the ionic lock among Rhodopsin-like G-protein-coupled receptors suggests that intracellular lipid ingression between receptor helices H6 and H7 may be a general mechanism for active-state stabilization. PMID:26488656

  11. Deconstructing the DGAT1 Enzyme: Membrane Interactions at Substrate Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Jose L. S.; Beltramini, Leila M.; Wallace, Bonnie A.; Araujo, Ana P. U.

    2015-01-01

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) is a key enzyme in the triacylglyceride synthesis pathway. Bovine DGAT1 is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane-bound protein associated with the regulation of fat content in milk and meat. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interaction of DGAT1 peptides corresponding to putative substrate binding sites with different types of model membranes. Whilst these peptides are predicted to be located in an extramembranous loop of the membrane-bound protein, their hydrophobic substrates are membrane-bound molecules. In this study, peptides corresponding to the binding sites of the two substrates involved in the reaction were examined in the presence of model membranes in order to probe potential interactions between them that might influence the subsequent binding of the substrates. Whilst the conformation of one of the peptides changed upon binding several types of micelles regardless of their surface charge, suggesting binding to hydrophobic domains, the other peptide bound strongly to negatively-charged model membranes. This binding was accompanied by a change in conformation, and produced leakage of the liposome-entrapped dye calcein. The different hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions observed suggest the peptides may be involved in the interactions of the enzyme with membrane surfaces, facilitating access of the catalytic histidine to the triacylglycerol substrates. PMID:25719207

  12. Differences between MyoD DNA binding and activation site requirements revealed by functional random sequence selection.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J; Blackwell, T K; Kedes, L; Weintraub, H

    1996-01-01

    A method has been developed for selecting functional enhancer/promoter sites from random DNA sequences in higher eukaryotic cells. Of sequences that were thus selected for transcriptional activation by the muscle-specific basic helix-loop-helix protein MyoD, only a subset are similar to the preferred in vitro binding consensus, and in the same promoter context an optimal in vitro binding site was inactive. Other sequences with full transcriptional activity instead exhibit sequence preferences that, remarkably, are generally either identical or very similar to those found in naturally occurring muscle-specific promoters. This first systematic examination of the relation between DNA binding and transcriptional activation by basic helix-loop-helix proteins indicates that binding per se is necessary but not sufficient for transcriptional activation by MyoD and implies a requirement for other DNA sequence-dependent interactions or conformations at its binding site. PMID:8668207

  13. Allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a using Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside and its combination.

    PubMed

    Rani, Nidhi; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; P T V, Lakshmi; Arunachalam, Annamalai

    2016-08-01

    Recent crystallographic study revealed the involvement of allosteric site in active site inhibition of penicillin binding protein (PBP2a), where one molecule of Ceftaroline (Cef) binds to the allosteric site of PBP2a and paved way for the other molecule (Cef) to bind at the active site. Though Cef has the potency to inhibit the PBP2a, its adverse side effects are of major concern. Previous studies have reported the antibacterial property of Quercetin derivatives, a group of natural compounds. Hence, the present study aims to evaluate the effect of Quercetin 3-o-rutinoside (Rut) in allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a. The molecular docking studies between allosteric site and ligands (Rut, Que, and Cef) revealed a better binding efficiency (G-score) of Rut (-7.790318) and Cef (-6.194946) with respect to Que (-5.079284). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies showed significant changes at the active site in the presence of ligands (Rut and Cef) at allosteric site. Four different combinations of Rut and Cef were docked and their G-scores ranged between -6.320 and -8.623. MD studies revealed the stability of the key residue (Ser403) with Rut being at both sites, compared to other complexes. Morphological analysis through electron microscopy confirmed that combination of Rut and Cefixime was able to disturb the bacterial cell membrane in a similar fashion to that of Rut and Cefixime alone. The results of this study indicate that the affinity of Rut at both sites were equally good, with further validations Rut could be considered as an alternative for inhibiting MRSA growth. PMID:26360629

  14. Multiple, Ligand-Dependent Routes from the Active Site of Cytochrome P450 2C9

    SciTech Connect

    Cojocaru, Vlad; Winn, Peter J.; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-02-13

    The active site of liver-specific, drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenases is deeply buried in the protein and is connected to the protein surface through multiple tunnels, many of which were found open in different CYP crystal structures. It has been shown that different tunnels could serve as ligand passage routes in different CYPs. However, it is not understood whether one CYP uses multiple routes for substrate access and product release and whether these routes depend on ligand properties. From 300 ns of molecular dynamics simulations of CYP2C9, the second most abundant CYP in the human liver we found four main ligand exit routes, the occurrence of each depending on the ligand type and the conformation of the F-G loop, which is likely to be affected by the CYP-membrane interaction. A non-helical F-G loop favored exit towards the putative membrane-embedded region. Important protein features that direct ligand exit include aromatic residues that divide the active site and whose motions control access to two pathways. The ligands interacted with positively charged residues on the protein surface through hydrogen bonds that appear to select for acidic substrates. The observation of multiple, ligand-dependent routes in a CYP aids understanding of how CYP mutations affect drug metabolism and provides new possibilities for CYP inhibition.

  15. The effect of methyl-donated hydrogen bonding on active site conformations of hyaluronate lyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migues, Angela N.; Vergenz, Robert A.; Moore, Kevin B.

    2010-03-01

    Geometric evidence shows a val-A252 methyl-donated (MD) hydrogen bond (HB) in hyaluronate lyase (Streptococcus pneumoniae) interacts with nearby NH--O and OH--O HBs, distorting active-site helical structure. Results for model fragment A248-254 are based on experimental heavy atom positions with ab initio hydrogen atoms. The MDHB, with (H-O distance, donor-H-O angle) = (2.3å; 174^o), exhibits more favorable geometry than thr-A253 OH--O HB (1.8å; 170^o) to the same ala-249 C=O. Consequently, thr-253 N-H--O interaction is forced closer to lys-250 C=O than ala-249 C=O(2.6 versus 2.7å). A novel method has been developed to quantify the effects of atomic diplacements on motions of neighboring helices. A coordinate system was established to track the movement of specific residues and to ascertain the effect of such motions on active site conformations.

  16. Active site hydrophobicity is critical to the bioluminescence activity of Vibrio harveyi luciferase.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi-Hui; Tu, Shiao-Chun

    2005-10-01

    Vibrio harveyi luciferase is an alphabeta heterodimer containing a single active site, proposed earlier to be at a cleft in the alpha subunit. In this work, six conserved phenylalanine residues at this proposed active site were subjected to site-directed mutations to investigate their possible functional roles and to delineate the makeup of luciferase active site. After initial screening of Phe --> Ala mutants, alphaF46, alphaF49, alphaF114, and alphaF117 were chosen for additional mutations to Asp, Ser, and Tyr. Comparisons of the general kinetic properties of wild-type and mutated luciferases indicated that the hydrophobic nature of alphaF46, alphaF49, alphaF114, and alphaF117 was important to luciferase V(max) and V(max)/K(m), which were reduced by 3-5 orders of magnitude for the Phe --> Asp mutants. Both alphaF46 and alphaF117 also appeared to be involved in the binding of reduced flavin substrate. Additional studies on the stability and yield of the 4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate II and measurements of decanal substrate oxidation by alphaF46D, alphaF49D, alphaF114D, and alphaF117D revealed that their marked reductions in the overall quantum yield (phi( degrees )) were a consequence of diminished yields of luciferase intermediates and, with the exception of alphaF114D, emission quantum yield of the excited emitter due to the replacement of the hydrophobic Phe by the anionic Asp. The locations of these four critical Phe residues in relation to other essential and/or hydrophobic residues are depicted in a refined map of the active site. Functional implications of these residues are discussed. PMID:16185065

  17. Emergent ultra-long-range interactions between active particles in hybrid active-inactive systems.

    PubMed

    Steimel, Joshua P; Aragones, Juan L; Hu, Helen; Qureshi, Naser; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2016-04-26

    Particle-particle interactions determine the state of a system. Control over the range of such interactions as well as their magnitude has been an active area of research for decades due to the fundamental challenges it poses in science and technology. Very recently, effective interactions between active particles have gathered much attention as they can lead to out-of-equilibrium cooperative states such as flocking. Inspired by nature, where active living cells coexist with lifeless objects and structures, here we study the effective interactions that appear in systems composed of active and passive mixtures of colloids. Our systems are 2D colloidal monolayers composed primarily of passive (inactive) colloids, and a very small fraction of active (spinning) ferromagnetic colloids. We find an emergent ultra-long-range attractive interaction induced by the activity of the spinning particles and mediated by the elasticity of the passive medium. Interestingly, the appearance of such interaction depends on the spinning protocol and has a minimum actuation timescale below which no attraction is observed. Overall, these results clearly show that, in the presence of elastic components, active particles can interact across very long distances without any chemical modification of the environment. Such a mechanism might potentially be important for some biological systems and can be harnessed for newer developments in synthetic active soft materials. PMID:27071096

  18. Investigating the Conformational Structure and Potential Site Interactions of SOD Inhibitors on Ec-SOD in Marine Mud Crab Scylla serrata: A Molecular Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Sablok, Gaurav; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Chainy, G B N

    2016-09-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) act as a first line of the enzymatic antioxidant defense system to control cellular superoxide anion toxicity. Previously, several inhibitors have been widely identified and catalogued for inhibition of SOD activity; however, still the information about the mechanism of interaction and points toward the inhibitor interactions in structures of SODs in general and in extracellular (Ec)-SOD in particular is still in naive. In the present research, we present an insight to elucidate the molecular basis of interactions of SOD inhibitors with Ec-SOD in mud crab Scylla serrata using molecular modeling and docking approaches. Different inhibitors of SOD such as hydrogen peroxide [Formula: see text], potassium cyanide, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), [Formula: see text]-mercaptoethanol and dithiocarbamate were screened to understand the potential sites that may act as sites for cleavage or blocking in the protein. SOD-SDS and [Formula: see text] complex interactions indicate residues Pro72 and Asp102 of the predicted crab Ec-SOD as common targets. The GOLD result indicates that Pro72, Asp102 and Thr103 are commonly acting as the site of interaction in Ec-SOD of S. serrata with SOD inhibitors. For the first time, the results of this study provide an insight into the structural properties of Ec-SOD of S. serrata and define the possible involvements between the amino acids present in its active sites, i.e., in the regions from 70 to 84 and from 101 to 103 and different inhibitors. PMID:26286009

  19. The inducible elongin A elongation activation domain: structure, function and interaction with the elongin BC complex.

    PubMed Central

    Aso, T; Haque, D; Barstead, R J; Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W

    1996-01-01

    The elongin (SIII) complex strongly stimulates the rate of elongation by RNA polymerase II by suppressing transient pausing by polymerase at many sites along the DNA. Elongin (SIII) is composed of a transcriptionally active A subunit and two small regulatory B and C subunits, which bind stably to each other to form a binary complex that interacts with elongin A and strongly induces its transcriptional activity. The elongin (SIII) complex is a potential target for negative regulation by the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor protein, which is capable of binding stably to the elongin BC complex and preventing it from activating elongin A. Here, we identify an elongin A domain sufficient for activation of elongation and demonstrate that it is a novel type of inducible activator that targets the RNA polymerase II elongation complex and is evolutionarily conserved in species as distantly related as Caenorhabditis elegans and man. In addition, we demonstrate that both the elongin A elongation activation domain and the VHL tumor suppressor protein interact with the elongin BC complex through a conserved elongin BC binding site motif that is essential for induction of elongin A activity by elongin BC and for tumor suppression by the VHL protein. Images PMID:8896449

  20. Site-city interaction: theoretical, numerical and experimental crossed-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwan, L.; Boutin, C.; Padrón, L. A.; Dietz, M. S.; Bard, P.-Y.; Taylor, C.

    2016-05-01

    The collective excitation of city structures by a seismic wavefield and the subsequent multiple Structure-Soil-Structure Interactions (SSSIs) between the buildings are usually disregarded in conventional seismology and earthquake engineering practice. The objective here is to qualify and quantify these complex multiple SSSIs through the design of an elementary study case, which serves as a benchmark for theoretical, numerical and experimental crossed-analysis. The experimental specimen consists of an idealized site-city setup with up to 37 anisotropic resonant structures arranged at the top surface of an elastic layer and in co-resonance with it. The experimental data from shaking table measurements is compared with the theoretical and numerical results provided respectively by an equivalent city-impedance model derived analytically from homogenization in the long-wavelength approximation and a model based on boundary elements. The signatures of the site-city interactions are identified in the frequency, time and space domain, and in particular consist of a frequency-dependent free/rigid switch in the surface condition at the city resonance, beatings in the records and the depolarization of the wavefield. A parametric study on the city density shows that multiple SSSIs among the city structures (five are sufficient) can have significant effects on both the seismic response of its implantation site and that of the buildings. Key parameters are provided to assess site-city interactions in the low seismic frequency range: They involve the mass and rigidity of the city compared to those of the soil and the damping of the building.

  1. Site-city interaction: Theoretical, numerical and experimental crossed-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwan, L.; Boutin, C.; Padrón, L. A.; Dietz, M. S.; Bard, P.-Y.; Taylor, C.

    2016-02-01

    The collective excitation of city structures by a seismic wave-field and the subsequent multiple Structure-Soil-Structure Interactions (SSSI) between the buildings are usually disregarded in conventional seismology and earthquake engineering practice. The objective here is to qualify and quantify these complex multiple SSSI through the design of an elementary study case which serves as a benchmark for theoretical, numerical and experimental crossed-analysis. The experimental specimen consists of an idealized site-city setup with up to 37 anisotropic resonant structures arranged at the top surface of an elastic layer and in co-resonance with it. The experimental data from shaking table measurements is compared with the theoretical and numerical results provided respectively by: An equivalent city-impedance model derived analytically from homogenization in the long-wavelength approximation; and a model based on boundary elements. The signatures of the site-city interactions are identified in the frequency, time and space domain, and in particular consist of: A frequency-dependent free/rigid switch in the surface condition at the city resonance; beatings in the records; and the depolarization of the wave-field. A parametric study on the city density shows that multiple SSSI among the city structures (5 are sufficient) can have significant effects on both the seismic response of its implantation site and that of the buildings. Key parameters are provided to assess site-city interactions in the low seismic frequency range: They involve the mass and rigidity of the city compared to those of the soil and the damping of the building.

  2. Tricyclic covalent inhibitors selectively target Jak3 through an active site thiol.

    PubMed

    Goedken, Eric R; Argiriadi, Maria A; Banach, David L; Fiamengo, Bryan A; Foley, Sage E; Frank, Kristine E; George, Jonathan S; Harris, Christopher M; Hobson, Adrian D; Ihle, David C; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J; Michalak, Mark E; Murdock, Sara E; Tomlinson, Medha J; Voss, Jeffrey W

    2015-02-20

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. We have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nm) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. These results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:25552479

  3. Tricyclic Covalent Inhibitors Selectively Target Jak3 through an Active Site Thiol*

    PubMed Central

    Goedken, Eric R.; Argiriadi, Maria A.; Banach, David L.; Fiamengo, Bryan A.; Foley, Sage E.; Frank, Kristine E.; George, Jonathan S.; Harris, Christopher M.; Hobson, Adrian D.; Ihle, David C.; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J.; Michalak, Mark E.; Murdock, Sara E.; Tomlinson, Medha J.; Voss, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. We have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nm) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. These results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:25552479

  4. Key Role of Active-Site Water Molecules in Bacteriorhodopsin Proton-Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, A.N.; Baudry, Jerome Y; Suhai, Sandor; Fischer, S.; Smith, Jeremy C

    2008-10-01

    The functional mechanism of the light-driven proton pump protein bacteriorhodopsin depends on the location of water molecules in the active site at various stages of the photocycle and on their roles in the proton-transfer steps. Here, free energy computations indicate that electrostatic interactions favor the presence of a cytoplasmic-side water molecule hydrogen bonding to the retinal Schiff base in the state preceding proton transfer from the retinal Schiff base to Asp85. However, the nonequilibrium nature of the pumping process means that the probability of occupancy of a water molecule in a given site depends both on the free energies of insertion of the water molecule in this and other sites during the preceding photocycle steps and on the kinetic accessibility of these sites on the time scale of the reaction steps. The presence of the cytoplasmic-side water molecule has a dramatic effect on the mechanism of proton transfer: the proton is channeled on the Thr89 side of the retinal, whereas the transfer on the Asp212 side is hindered. Reaction-path simulations and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the presence of the cytoplasmic-side water molecule permits a low-energy bacteriorhodopsin conformer in which the water molecule bridges the twisted retinal Schiff base and the proton acceptor Asp85. From this low-energy conformer, proton transfer occurs via a concerted mechanism in which the water molecule participates as an intermediate proton carrier.

  5. A proposed definition of the 'activity' of surface sites on lactose carriers for dry powder inhalation.

    PubMed

    Grasmeijer, Floris; Frijlink, Henderik W; de Boer, Anne H

    2014-06-01

    A new definition of the activity of surface sites on lactose carriers for dry powder inhalation is proposed which relates to drug detachment during dispersion. The new definition is expected to improve the understanding of 'carrier surface site activity', which stimulates the unambiguous communication about this subject and may aid in the rational design and interpretation of future formulation studies. In contrast to the currently prevailing view on carrier surface site activity, it follows from the newly proposed definition that carrier surface site activity depends on more variables than just the physicochemical properties of the carrier surface. Because the term 'active sites' is ambiguous, it is recommended to use the term 'highly active sites' instead to denote carrier surface sites with a relatively high activity. PMID:24613490

  6. Death-Associated Protein Kinase Activity Is Regulated by Coupled Calcium/Calmodulin Binding to Two Distinct Sites.

    PubMed

    Simon, Bertrand; Huart, Anne-Sophie; Temmerman, Koen; Vahokoski, Juha; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Komadina, Dana; Hoffmann, Jan-Erik; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Svergun, Dmitri I; Kursula, Petri; Schultz, Carsten; McCarthy, Andrew A; Hart, Darren J; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    The regulation of many protein kinases by binding to calcium/calmodulin connects two principal mechanisms in signaling processes: protein phosphorylation and responses to dose- and time-dependent calcium signals. We used the calcium/calmodulin-dependent members of the death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) family to investigate the role of a basic DAPK signature loop near the kinase active site. In DAPK2, this loop comprises a novel dimerization-regulated calcium/calmodulin-binding site, in addition to a well-established calcium/calmodulin site in the C-terminal autoregulatory domain. Unexpectedly, impairment of the basic loop interaction site completely abolishes calcium/calmodulin binding and DAPK2 activity is reduced to a residual level, indicative of coupled binding to the two sites. This contrasts with the generally accepted view that kinase calcium/calmodulin interactions are autonomous of the kinase catalytic domain. Our data establish an intricate model of multi-step kinase activation and expand our understanding of how calcium binding connects with other mechanisms involved in kinase activity regulation. PMID:27133022

  7. Catalytic roles of flexible regions at the active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco)

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Harpel, M.R.; Chen, Yuh-Ru; Larson, E.M.; Larimer, F.W.

    1995-12-31

    Chemical and mutagenesis studies of Rubisco have identified Lys329 and Glu48 as active-site residues that are located in distinct, interacting domains from adjacent subunits. Crystallographic analyses have shown that Lys329 is the apical residue in a 12-residue flexible loop (loop 6) of the {Beta},{alpha}-barrel domain of the active site and that Glu48 resides at the end of helix B of the N-terminal domain of the active site. When phosphorylated ligands are bound by the enzyme, loop 6 adopts a closed conformation and, in concert with repositioning of helix B, thereby occludes the active site from the external environment. In this closed conformation, the {gamma}-carboxylate of Glu48 and the {epsilon}-amino group of Lys329 engage in intersubunit electrostatic interaction. By use of appropriate site-directed mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum Rubisco, we are addressing several issues: the catalytic roles of Lys329 and Glu48, the functional significance of the intersubunit salt bridge comprised of these two residues, and the roles of loop 6 and helix B in stabilizing labile reaction intermediates. Characterization of novel products derived from misprocessing of D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) by the mutant proteins have illuminated the structure of the key intermediate in the normal oxygenase pathway.

  8. Two-dimensional IR spectroscopy of protein dynamics using two vibrational labels: a site-specific genetically encoded unnatural amino acid and an active site ligand.

    PubMed

    Thielges, Megan C; Axup, Jun Y; Wong, Daryl; Lee, Hyun Soo; Chung, Jean K; Schultz, Peter G; Fayer, Michael D

    2011-09-29

    Protein dynamics and interactions in myoglobin (Mb) were characterized via two vibrational dynamics labels (VDLs): a genetically incorporated site-specific azide (Az) bearing unnatural amino acid (AzPhe43) and an active site CO ligand. The Az-labeled protein was studied using ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy. CO bound at the active site of the heme serves as a second VDL located nearby. Therefore, it was possible to use Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and 2D IR spectroscopic experiments on the Az in unligated Mb and in Mb bound to CO (MbAzCO) and on the CO in MbCO and MbAzCO to investigate the environment and motions of different states of one protein from the perspective of two spectrally resolved VDLs. A very broad bandwidth 2D IR spectrum, encompassing both the Az and CO spectral regions, found no evidence of direct coupling between the two VDLs. In MbAzCO, both VDLs reported similar time scale motions: very fast homogeneous dynamics, fast, ∼1 ps dynamics, and dynamics on a much slower time scale. Therefore, each VDL reports independently on the protein dynamics and interactions, and the measured dynamics are reflective of the protein motions rather than intrinsic to the chemical nature of the VDL. The AzPhe VDL also permitted study of oxidized Mb dynamics, which could not be accessed previously with 2D IR spectroscopy. The experiments demonstrate that the combined application of 2D IR spectroscopy and site-specific incorporation of VDLs can provide information on dynamics, structure, and interactions at virtually any site throughout any protein. PMID:21823631

  9. Two-Dimensional IR Spectroscopy of Protein Dynamics Using Two Vibrational Labels: A Site-Specific Genetically Encoded Unnatural Amino Acid and an Active Site Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Thielges, Megan C.; Axup, Jun Y.; Wong, Daryl; Lee, Hyun Soo; Chung, Jean K.; Schultz, Peter G.; Fayer, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Protein dynamics and interactions in myoglobin (Mb) were characterized via two vibrational dynamics labels (VDLs): a genetically incorporated site-specific azide (Az) bearing unnatural amino acid (AzPhe43) and an active site CO ligand. The Az-labeled protein was studied using ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy. CO bound at the active site of the heme serves as a second VDL located nearby. Therefore, it was possible to use Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and 2D IR spectroscopic experiments on the Az in unligated Mb and in Mb bound to CO (MbAzCO) and on the CO in MbCO and MbAzCO to investigate the environment and motions of different states of one protein from the perspective of two spectrally resolved VDLs. A very broad bandwidth 2D IR spectrum, encompassing both the Az and CO spectral regions, found no evidence of direct coupling between the two VDLs. In MbAzCO, both VDLs reported similar time scale motions: very fast homogeneous dynamics, fast, ~1 ps dynamics, and dynamics on a much slower time scale. Therefore, each VDL reports independently on the protein dynamics and interactions, and the measured dynamics are reflective of the protein motions rather than intrinsic to the chemical nature of the VDL. The AzPhe VDL also permitted study of oxidized Mb dynamics, which could not be accessed previously with 2D IR spectroscopy. The experiments demonstrate that the combined application of 2D IR spectroscopy and site-specific incorporation of VDLs can provide information on dynamics, structure, and interactions at virtually any site throughout any protein. PMID:21823631

  10. Infant Smiling during Social Interaction: Arousal Modulation or Activation Indicator?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewy, Richard

    In a study of infant smiling, 20 mother-infant dyads were videotaped in normal face-to-face interaction when the infants were 9 and 14 weeks of age. Videotapes were used to determine which of two classes of smiling behavior models, either arousal modulation or activation indicator, was most supported by empirical data. Arousal modulation models…

  11. Orphan Nuclear Receptor NR4A1 Binds a Novel Protein Interaction Site on Anti-apoptotic B Cell Lymphoma Gene 2 Family Proteins.

    PubMed

    Godoi, Paulo H C; Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Hishiki, Asami; Sano, Renata; Matsuzawa, Yasuko; Yanagi, Hiroko; Munte, Claudia E; Chen, Ya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M; Kalbitzer, Hans R; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Reed, John C

    2016-07-01

    B cell lymphoma gene 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins are key regulators of programmed cell death and important targets for drug discovery. Pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins reciprocally modulate their activities in large part through protein interactions involving a motif known as BH3 (Bcl-2 homology 3). Nur77 is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family that lacks a BH3 domain but nevertheless binds certain anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2, Bfl-1, and Bcl-B), modulating their effects on apoptosis and autophagy. We used a combination of NMR spectroscopy-based methods, mutagenesis, and functional studies to define the interaction site of a Nur77 peptide on anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins and reveal a novel interaction surface. Nur77 binds adjacent to the BH3 peptide-binding crevice, suggesting the possibility of cross-talk between these discrete binding sites. Mutagenesis of residues lining the identified interaction site on Bcl-B negated the interaction with Nur77 protein in cells and prevented Nur77-mediated modulation of apoptosis and autophagy. The findings establish a new protein interaction site with the potential to modulate the apoptosis and autophagy mechanisms governed by Bcl-2 family proteins. PMID:27129202

  12. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems. PMID:25727891

  13. Construction of DNA recognition sites active in Haemophilus transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Danner, D B; Smith, H O; Narang, S A

    1982-01-01

    Competent Haemophilus cells recognize and preferentially take up Haemophilus DNA during genetic transformation. This preferential uptake is correlated with the presence on incoming DNA of an 11-base-pair (bp) sequence, 5'-A-A-G-T-G-C-G-G-T-C-A-3'. To prove that this sequence is the recognition site that identifies Haemophilus DNA to the competent cell, we have now constructed a series of plasmids, each of which contains the 11-bp sequence. Using two different assay systems we have tested the ability of fragments from these plasmids to compete with cloned Haemophilus DNA fragments that naturally contain the 11-bp sequence. We find that the addition of the 11-bp sequence to a DNA fragment is necessary and sufficient for preferential uptake of that fragment. However, plasmid DNAs containing this sequence may vary as much as 48-fold in uptake activity, and this variation correlates with the A+T-richness of the DNA flanking the 11-mer. Images PMID:6285382

  14. Characterization of active site residues of nitroalkane oxidase.

    PubMed

    Valley, Michael P; Fenny, Nana S; Ali, Shah R; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2010-06-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of primary and secondary nitroalkanes to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones plus nitrite. The structure of the enzyme shows that Ser171 forms a hydrogen bond to the flavin N5, suggesting that it plays a role in catalysis. Cys397 and Tyr398 were previously identified by chemical modification as potential active site residues. To more directly probe the roles of these residues, the S171A, S171V, S171T, C397S, and Y398F enzymes have been characterized with nitroethane as substrate. The C397S and Y398 enzymes were less stable than the wild-type enzyme, and the C397S enzyme routinely contained a substoichiometric amount of FAD. Analysis of the steady-state kinetic parameters for the mutant enzymes, including deuterium isotope effects, establishes that all of the mutations result in decreases in the rate constants for removal of the substrate proton by approximately 5-fold and decreases in the rate constant for product release of approximately 2-fold. Only the S171V and S171T mutations alter the rate constant for flavin oxidation. These results establish that these residues are not involved in catalysis, but rather are required for maintaining the protein structure. PMID:20056514

  15. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  16. N6-Methyldeoxyadenosine Marks Active Transcription Start Sites in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Deng, Xin; Yu, Miao; Han, Dali; Hao, Ziyang; Liu, Jianzhao; Lu, Xingyu; Dore, Louis C; Weng, Xiaocheng; Ji, Quanjiang; Mets, Laurens; He, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY N6-methyldeoxyadenosine (6mA or m6A) is a DNA modification preserved in prokaryotes to eukaryotes. It is widespread in bacteria, and functions in DNA mismatch repair, chromosome segregation, and virulence regulation. In contrast, the distribution and function of 6mA in eukaryotes have been unclear. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the 6mA landscape in the genome of Chlamydomonas using new sequencing approaches. We identified the 6mA modification in 84% of genes in Chlamydomonas. We found that 6mA mainly locates at ApT dinucleotides around transcription start sites (TSS) with a bimodal distribution, and appears to mark active genes. A periodic pattern of 6mA deposition was also observed at base resolution, which is associated with nucleosome distribution near the TSS, suggesting a possible role in nucleosome positioning. The new genome-wide mapping of 6mA and its unique distribution in the Chlamydomonas genome suggest potential regulatory roles of 6mA in gene expression in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:25936837

  17. L2′ loop is critical for caspase-7 active site formation

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, Witold A; Hardy, Jeanne A

    2009-01-01

    The active sites of caspases are composed of four mobile loops. A loop (L2) from one half of the dimer interacts with a loop (L2′) from the other half of the dimer to bind substrate. In an inactive form, the two L2′ loops form a cross-dimer hydrogen-bond network over the dimer interface. Although the L2′ loop has been implicated as playing a central role in the formation of the active-site loop bundle, its precise role in catalysis has not been shown. A detailed understanding of the active and inactive conformations is essential to control the caspase function. We have interrogated the contributions of the residues in the L2′ loop to catalytic function and enzyme stability. In wild-type and all mutants, active-site binding results in substantial stabilization of the complex. One mutation, P214A, is significantly destabilized in the ligand-free conformation, but is as stable as wild type when bound to substrate, indicating that caspase-7 rests in different conformations in the absence and presence of substrate. Residues K212 and I213 in the L2′ loop are shown to be essential for substrate-binding and thus proper catalytic function of the caspase. In the crystal structure of I213A, the void created by side-chain deletion is compensated for by rearrangement of tyrosine 211 to fill the void, suggesting that the requirements of substrate-binding are sufficiently strong to induce the active conformation. Thus, although the L2′ loop makes no direct contacts with substrate, it is essential for buttressing the substrate-binding groove and is central to native catalytic efficiency. PMID:19530232

  18. Screening Outside the Catalytic Site: Inhibition of Macromolecular Inter-actions Through Structure-Based Virtual Ligand Screening Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Olivier; Miteva, Maria A; Segers, Kenneth; Nicolaes, Gerry A. F; Villoutreix, Bruno O

    2008-01-01

    During these last 15 years, drug discovery strategies have essentially focused on identifying small molecules able to inhibit catalytic sites. However, other mechanisms could be targeted. Protein-protein interactions play crucial roles in a number of biological processes, and, as such, their disruption or stabilization is becoming an area of intense activity. Along the same line, inhibition of protein-membrane could be of major importance in several disease indications. Despite the many challenges associated with the development of such classes of interaction modulators, there has been considerable success in the recent years. Importantly, through the existence of protein hot-spots and the presence of druggable pockets at the macromolecular interfaces or in their vicinities, it has been possible to find small molecule effectors using a variety of screening techniques, including combined virtual ligand-in vitro screening strategy. Indeed such in silico-in vitro protocols emerge as the method of choice to facilitate our quest of novel drug-like compounds or of mechanistic probes aiming at facilitating the understanding of molecular reactions involved in the Health and Disease process. In this review, we comment recent successes of combined in silico-in vitro screening methods applied to modulating macromolecular interactions with a special emphasis on protein-membrane interactions. PMID:18949072

  19. Simple Ligand-Receptor Interaction Descriptor (SILIRID) for alignment-free binding site comparison.

    PubMed

    Chupakhin, Vladimir; Marcou, Gilles; Gaspar, Helena; Varnek, Alexandre

    2014-06-01

    We describe SILIRID (Simple Ligand-Receptor Interaction Descriptor), a novel fixed size descriptor characterizing protein-ligand interactions. SILIRID can be obtained from the binary interaction fingerprints (IFPs) by summing up the bits corresponding to identical amino acids. This results in a vector of 168 integer numbers corresponding to the product of the number of entries (20 amino acids and one cofactor) and 8 interaction types per amino acid (hydrophobic, aromatic face to face, aromatic edge to face, H-bond donated by the protein, H-bond donated by the ligand, ionic bond with protein cation and protein anion, and interaction with metal ion). Efficiency of SILIRID to distinguish different protein binding sites has been examined in similarity search in sc-PDB database, a druggable portion of the Protein Data Bank, using various protein-ligand complexes as queries. The performance of retrieval of structurally and evolutionary related classes of proteins was comparable to that of state-of-the-art approaches (ROC AUC ≈ 0.91). SILIRID can efficiently be used to visualize chemogenomic space covered by sc-PDB using Generative Topographic Mapping (GTM): sc-PDB SILIRID data form clusters corresponding to different protein types. PMID:25210596

  20. Lectin Activation in Giardia lamblia by Host Protease: A Novel Host-Parasite Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Boaz; Ward, Honorine; Keusch, Gerald T.; Pereira, Miercio E. A.

    1986-04-01

    A lectin in Giardia lamblia was activated by secretions from the human duodenum, the environment where the parasite lives. Incubation of the secretions with trypsin inhibitors prevented the appearance of lectin activity, implicating proteases as the activating agent. Accordingly, lectin activation was also produced by crystalline trypsin and Pronase; other proteases tested were ineffective. When activated, the lectin agglutinated intestinal cells to which the parasite adheres in vivo. The lectin was most specific to mannose-6-phosphate and apparently was bound to the plasma membrane. Activation of a parasite lectin by a host protease represents a novel mechanism of hostparasite interaction and may contribute to the affinity of Giardia lamblia to the infection site.

  1. DARC 2.0: Improved Docking and Virtual Screening at Protein Interaction Sites

    PubMed Central

    Gowthaman, Ragul; Lyskov, Sergey; Karanicolas, John

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, protein-protein interactions have emerged as attractive but challenging targets for therapeutic intervention using small molecules. Due to the relatively flat surfaces that typify protein interaction sites, modern virtual screening tools developed for optimal performance against “traditional” protein targets perform less well when applied instead at protein interaction sites. Previously, we described a docking method specifically catered to the shallow binding modes characteristic of small-molecule inhibitors of protein interaction sites. This method, called DARC (Docking Approach using Ray Casting), operates by comparing the topography of the protein surface when “viewed” from a vantage point inside the protein against the topography of a bound ligand when “viewed” from the same vantage point. Here, we present five key enhancements to DARC. First, we use multiple vantage points to more accurately determine protein-ligand surface complementarity. Second, we describe a new scheme for rapidly determining optimal weights in the DARC scoring function. Third, we incorporate sampling of ligand conformers “on-the-fly” during docking. Fourth, we move beyond simple shape complementarity and introduce a term in the scoring function to capture electrostatic complementarity. Finally, we adjust the control flow in our GPU implementation of DARC to achieve greater speedup of these calculations. At each step of this study, we evaluate the performance of DARC in a “pose recapitulation” experiment: predicting the binding mode of 25 inhibitors each solved in complex with its distinct target protein (a protein interaction site). Whereas the previous version of DARC docked only one of these inhibitors to within 2 Å RMSD of its position in the crystal structure, the newer version achieves this level of accuracy for 12 of the 25 complexes, corresponding to a statistically significant performance improvement (p < 0.001). Collectively then, we

  2. Predicting Interaction Sites from the Energetics of Isolated Proteins: A New Approach to Epitope Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Scarabelli, Guido; Morra, Giulia; Colombo, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Abstract An increasing number of functional studies of proteins have shown that sequence and structural similarities alone may not be sufficient for reliable prediction of their interaction properties. This is particularly true for proteins recognizing specific antibodies, where the prediction of antibody-binding sites, called epitopes, has proven challenging. The antibody-binding properties of an antigen depend on its structure and related dynamics. Aiming to predict the antibody-binding regions of a protein, we investigate a new approach based on the integrated analysis of the dynamical and energetic properties of antigens, to identify nonoptimized, low-intensity energetic interaction networks in the protein structure isolated in solution. The method is based on the idea that recognition sites may correspond to localized regions with low-intensity energetic couplings with the rest of the protein, which allows them to undergo conformational changes, to be recognized by a binding partner, and to tolerate mutations with minimal energetic expense. Upon analyzing the results on isolated proteins and benchmarking against antibody complexes, it is found that the method successfully identifies binding sites located on the protein surface that are accessible to putative binding partners. The combination of dynamics and energetics can thus discriminate between epitopes and other substructures based only on physical properties. We discuss implications for vaccine design. PMID:20441761

  3. Steady-state interactions of glibenclamide with CFTR: evidence for multiple sites in the pore.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z R; Zeltwanger, S; McCarty, N A

    2004-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to clarify the mechanism by which the sulfonylurea drug, glibenclamide, inhibits single CFTR channels in excised patches from Xenopus oocytes. Glibenclamide blocks the open pore of the channel via binding at multiple sites with varying kinetics. In the absence of glibenclamide, open-channel bursts exhibited a flickery intraburst closed state (C1); this is due to block of the pore by the pH buffer, TES. Application of 25 microM glibenclamide to the cytoplasmic solution resulted in the appearance of two drug-induced intraburst closed states (C2, C3) of widely different duration, which differed in pH-dependence. The kinetics of interaction with the C3 state, but not the C2 state, were strongly voltage-dependent. The durations of both the C2 and C3 states were concentration-dependent, indicating a non-linear reaction scheme. Application of drug also increased the burst duration, which is consistent with an open-channel blocking mechanism. A kinetic model is proposed. These results indicate that glibenclamide interacts with open CFTR channels in a complex manner, involving interactions with multiple binding sites in the channel pore. PMID:15366420

  4. Evolutionary interactions between N-linked glycosylation sites in the HIV-1 envelope.

    PubMed

    Poon, Art F Y; Lewis, Fraser I; Pond, Sergei L Kosakovsky; Frost, Simon D W

    2007-01-19

    The addition of asparagine (N)-linked polysaccharide chains (i.e., glycans) to the gp120 and gp41 glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope is not only required for correct protein folding, but also may provide protection against neutralizing antibodies as a "glycan shield." As a result, strong host-specific selection is frequently associated with codon positions where nonsynonymous substitutions can create or disrupt potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGSs). Moreover, empirical data suggest that the individual contribution of PNGSs to the neutralization sensitivity or infectivity of HIV-1 may be critically dependent on the presence or absence of other PNGSs in the envelope sequence. Here we evaluate how glycan-glycan interactions have shaped the evolution of HIV-1 envelope sequences by analyzing the distribution of PNGSs in a large-sequence alignment. Using a "covarion"-type phylogenetic model, we find that the rates at which individual PNGSs are gained or lost vary significantly over time, suggesting that the selective advantage of having a PNGS may depend on the presence or absence of other PNGSs in the sequence. Consequently, we identify specific interactions between PNGSs in the alignment using a new paired-character phylogenetic model of evolution, and a Bayesian graphical model. Despite the fundamental differences between these two methods, several interactions are jointly identified by both. Mapping these interactions onto a structural model of HIV-1 gp120 reveals that negative (exclusive) interactions occur significantly more often between colocalized glycans, while positive (inclusive) interactions are restricted to more distant glycans. Our results imply that the adaptive repertoire of alternative configurations in the HIV-1 glycan shield is limited by functional interactions between the N-linked glycans. This represents a potential vulnerability of rapidly evolving HIV-1 populations that may provide useful glycan

  5. Ultrafast optical pulse interactions in active disordered condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, Masood

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this research is to better understand the basic physics that governs the behavior of short-pulsed light propagating in scattering media where either the host medium or the scattering particles exhibit emission or absorption interact with the incident light in form of absorption or stimulated emission. The temporal and spectral dynamics from the interactions of optically active disordered-media with ultrashort optical pulses is the focus of the research performed in this thesis. The interaction processes studied are optical gain, spectral narrowing, fluorescence and pulse lifetime reduction and transport of ultrashort optical pulses in disordered media containing optically active discrete scattering particles. Linear and nonlinear effects are presented where the propagation of picosecond and femtosecond laser pulses in active disordered media is measured experimentally and compared with the theories of Boltzmann radiative transport and diffusive propagation of radiation in disordered media. Active media can be involved in optical processes in disordered media where either the propagation of optical radiation can result in gain or absorption upon optical excitation. A study of optical scattering in non-discrete media such as the biological heterogeneously-continuous scattering tissues is carried out as well. Lasing in random media is one of the outcomes of these results. The optical gain of optically excited active media is divided into clear subdivisions of Amplified Spontaneous Emission, Stimulated Emission and Laser Emission by characterizing them by their temporal and spectral emission.

  6. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  7. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  8. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  9. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  10. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  11. Effect of hydrodynamic interactions in confined active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezhilan, Barath; Saintillan, David

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of biologically active suspensions in confined geometries is investigated by incorporating accurate boundary conditions within the kinetic theory framework [Saintillan and Shelley, Phys. Fluids. (2008)]. Even in the absence of wall hydrodynamic interactions or imposed flow, swimming microorganisms have a tendency to accumulate at confining boundaries due to self-propulsion. Satisfying a zero wall-normal translational flux condition on the active particle probability distribution function captures this effect. Using a moment-closure approximation, analytical expressions for the equilibrium concentration/polarization profiles are derived in the dilute limit. As particle density increases, we expect particle-particle hydrodynamic interactions to become significant and to destabilize these equilibrium distributions. Using a linear stability analysis and 3D finite volume simulation of the equations for the orientational moments, we study in detail the effect of fluid coupling on the stability properties of the equilibrium states in confined active suspensions.

  12. Insight on the interaction of an agmatinase-like protein with Mn(2+) activator ions.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, Matías; Cofre, Jaime; Benítez, José; García, David; Romero, Nicol; González, Arlette; Carvajal, Nelson; García, María; López, Vasthi; Schenk, Gerhard; Uribe, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Agmatinase is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of agmatine, a compound that is associated with numerous functions in the brain of mammalian organisms such as neurotransmitter, anticonvulsant, antinociceptive, anxiolytic and antidepressant-like actions. To date the only characterized agmatinases with significant enzymatic activity were extracted from bacterial organisms. These agmatinases are closely related to another ureahydrolase, arginase; both have binuclear Mn(2+) centers in their active sites. An agmatinase-like protein (ALP) from rat brain was identified that bears no sequence homology to known agmatinases (E. Uribe, M. Salas, S. Enriquez, M.S. Orellana, N. Carvajal, Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 461(2007) 146-150). Since all known ureahydrolases contain histidines in their binuclear Mn(2+) site each of the five histidine residues in ALP was individually replaced by alanines to identify those that may be involved in metal ion binding. Reactivation assays and thermal stability measurements indicated that His206 is likely to interact with a Mn(2+) bound to a high affinity site. In contrast, His65 and possibly His435 are important for binding of a second Mn(2+) to a lower affinity site. Metal ion binding to that site is not only leading to an increase in reactivity but also enzyme stability. Thus, similar to bacterial agmatinases and some of the antibiotic-degrading, Zn(2+)-dependent metallo-β-lactamases ALP appears to be active in the mono and binuclear form, with binding of the second metal ion increasing both reactivity and stability. PMID:25635913

  13. Lithosphere-biosphere interaction at a shallow-sea hydrothermal vent site; Hot Lake, Panarea, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chia-I.; Amann, Rudolf; Amend, Jan P.; Bach, Wolfgang; Brunner, Benjamin; Meyerdierks, Anke; Price, Roy E.; Schubotz, Florence; Summons, Roger; Wenzhöfer, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Deep-Sea hydrothermal systems are unique habitats for microbial life with primary production based on chemosynthesis and are considered to be windows to the subsurface biosphere. It is often overlooked, however, that their far more accessible shallow-sea counterparts are also valuable targets to study the effects of hydrothermal activity on geology, seawater chemistry and finally, on microbial life. Such an area of shallow marine hydrothermal venting is observed approximately 2.5 km east of Panarea Island (Sicily, Italy). This system is characterized by fluid temperatures of up to 135° C, gas emissions dominated by CO2 and precipitation of elemental sulfur on the seafloor. In an interdisciplinary project to investigate the influence of geofuels on marine microbiota, sediment cores and pore fluids were sampled for geological and geochemical analyses. An attempt was made to link these geochemical data with a characterization of the microbial community. One of the investigated sites (Lago Caldo, Hot Lake) is an oval-shaped (~10 by 6 meters) shallow (~2.5 m deep) depression covered by elemental sulfur. The sediments in this depression are strongly affected by hydrothermal activity: the pH of pore fluids is in a range between 5 and 6; the salinity is approximately two times higher than seawater. In situ temperatures of 36° C and 74° C (10 cm sediment depth) at two different locations within Hot Lake indicate variability in hydrothermal flux. The sediment surface layer is anoxic, and with increasing depth from the sediment-water interface, sulfate concentrations decrease from ~30 mM to less than 10 mM, whereas sulfide concentrations increase from less than 50 μm to ~1000 μm at 25 cm sediment depth, thus suggesting a higher potential for energy gain based on sulfur disequilibrium. As indicated by the variability in the sediment temperatures at 10 cm, fluid fluxes and mixing with seawater is not found to be uniform at Hot Lake. This is reflected in variability of the

  14. Interactive Whiteboards and All That Jazz: Analysing Classroom Activity with Interactive Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Howard; Beauchamp, Gary; Jones, Sonia; Kennewell, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The term "orchestration", has been used to describe the teacher's role in activity settings incorporating interactive technologies. This musical analogy suggests pre-planned manipulation of events to generate "performance" leading to learning. However, in two recent projects we have observed how effective teaching and learning is often based on…

  15. Free Energy Landscape of Lipid Interactions with Regulatory Binding Sites on the Transmembrane Domain of the EGF Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lipid molecules can bind to specific sites on integral membrane proteins, modulating their structure and function. We have undertaken coarse-grained simulations to calculate free energy profiles for glycolipids and phospholipids interacting with modulatory sites on the transmembrane helix dimer of the EGF receptor within a lipid bilayer environment. We identify lipid interaction sites at each end of the transmembrane domain and compute interaction free energy profiles for lipids with these sites. Interaction free energies ranged from ca. −40 to −4 kJ/mol for different lipid species. Those lipids (glycolipid GM3 and phosphoinositide PIP2) known to modulate EGFR function exhibit the strongest binding to interaction sites on the EGFR, and we are able to reproduce the preference for interaction with GM3 over other glycolipids suggested by experiment. Mutation of amino acid residues essential for EGFR function reduce the binding free energy of these key lipid species. The residues interacting with the lipids in the simulations are in agreement with those suggested by experimental (mutational) studies. This approach provides a generalizable tool for characterizing the interactions of lipids that bind to specific sites on integral membrane proteins. PMID:27109430

  16. Harvester ants use interactions to regulate forager activation and availability

    PubMed Central

    Pinter-Wollman, Noa; Bala, Ashwin; Merrell, Andrew; Queirolo, Jovel; Stumpe, Martin C.; Holmes, Susan; Gordon, Deborah M.

    2013-01-01

    Social groups balance flexibility and robustness in their collective response to environmental changes using feedback between behavioural processes that operate at different timescales. Here we examine how behavioural processes operating at two timescales regulate the foraging activity of colonies of the harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex barbatus, allowing them to balance their response to food availability and predation. Previous work showed that the rate at which foragers return to the nest with food influences the rate at which foragers leave the nest. To investigate how interactions inside the nest link the rates of returning and outgoing foragers, we observed outgoing foragers inside the nest in field colonies using a novel observation method. We found that the interaction rate experienced by outgoing foragers inside the nest corresponded to forager return rate, and that the interactions of outgoing foragers were spatially clustered. Activation of a forager occurred on the timescale of seconds: a forager left the nest 3–8 s after a substantial increase in interactions with returning foragers. The availability of outgoing foragers to become activated was adjusted on the timescale of minutes: when forager return was interrupted for more than 4–5 min, available foragers waiting near the nest entrance went deeper into the nest. Thus, forager activation and forager availability both increased with the rate at which foragers returned to the nest. This process was checked by negative feedback between forager activation and forager availability. Regulation of foraging activation on the timescale of seconds provides flexibility in response to fluctuations in food abundance, whereas regulation of forager availability on the timescale of minutes provides robustness in response to sustained disturbance such as predation. PMID:24031094

  17. Active-site mutagenesis of tetanus neurotoxin implicates TYR-375 and GLU-271 in metalloproteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, O; Caccin, P; Rigoni, M; Tonello, F; Bortoletto, N; Stevens, R C; Montecucco, C

    2001-08-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) blocks neurotransmitter release by cleaving VAMP/synaptobrevin, a membrane associated protein involved in synaptic vesicle fusion. Such activity is exerted by the N-terminal 50kDa domain of TeNT which is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase (TeNT-L-chain). Based on the three-dimensional structure of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) and serotype B (BoNT/B), two proteins closely related to TeNT, and on X-ray scattering studies of TeNT, we have designed mutations at two active site residues to probe their involvement in activity. The active site of metalloproteases is composed of a primary sphere of residues co-ordinating the zinc atom, and a secondary sphere of residues that determines proteolytic specificity and activity. Glu-261 and Glu-267 directly co-ordinates the zinc atom in BoNT/A and BoNT/B respectively and the corresponding residue of TeNT was replaced by Asp or by the non conservative residue Ala. Tyr-365 is 4.3A away from zinc in BoNT/A, and the corresponding residue of TeNT was replaced by Phe or by Ala. The purified mutants had CD, fluorescence and UV spectra closely similar to those of the wild-type molecule. The proteolytic activity of TeNT-Asp-271 (E271D) is similar to that of the native molecule, whereas that of TeNT-Phe-375 (Y375F) is lower than the control. Interestingly, the two Ala mutants are completely devoid of enzymatic activity. These results demonstrate that both Glu-271 and Tyr-375 are essential for the proteolytic activity of TeNT. PMID:11306125

  18. Structural Characterization of Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase Variants Bearing Active Site Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Radom,C.; Banerjee, A.; Verdine, G.

    2007-01-01

    The human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) protein is responsible for initiating base excision DNA repair of the endogenous mutagen 8-oxoguanine. Like nearly all DNA glycosylases, hOGG1 extrudes its substrate from the DNA helix and inserts it into an extrahelical enzyme active site pocket lined with residues that participate in lesion recognition and catalysis. Structural analysis has been performed on mutant versions of hOGG1 having changes in catalytic residues but not on variants having altered 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (oxoG) contact residues. Here we report high resolution structural analysis of such recognition variants. We found that Ala substitution at residues that contact the phosphate 5 to the lesion (H270A mutation) and its Watson-Crick face (Q315A mutation) simply removed key functionality from the contact interface but otherwise had no effect on structure. Ala substitution at the only residue making an oxoG-specific contact (G42A mutation) introduced torsional stress into the DNA contact surface of hOGG1, but this was overcome by local interactions within the folded protein, indicating that this oxoG recognition motif is 'hardwired'. Introduction of a side chain intended to sterically obstruct the active site pocket (Q315F mutation) led to two different structures, one of which (Q315F{sup *149}) has the oxoG lesion in an exosite flanking the active site and the other of which (Q315F{sup *292}) has the oxoG inserted nearly completely into the lesion recognition pocket. The latter structure offers a view of the latest stage in the base extrusion pathway yet observed, and its lack of catalytic activity demonstrates that the transition state for displacement of the lesion base is geometrically demanding.

  19. GAS HYDRATES AT TWO SITES OF AN ACTIVE CONTINENTAL MARGIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart on the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m.

  20. Coulombic effects of remote subsites on the active site of ribonuclease A.

    PubMed

    Fisher, B M; Schultz, L W; Raines, R T

    1998-12-15

    The active-site cleft of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) is lined with cationic residues that interact with a bound nucleic acid. Those residues interacting with the phosphoryl groups comprise the P0, P1, and P2 subsites, with the scissile P-O5' bond residing in the P1 subsite. Coulombic interactions between the P0 and P2 subsites and phosphoryl groups of the substrate were characterized previously [Fisher, B. M., Ha, J.-H., and Raines, R. T. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 12121-12132]. Here, the interactions between these subsites and the active-site residues His12 and His119 are described in detail. A protein variant in which the cationic residues in these subsites (Lys66 in the P0 subsite and Lys7 and Arg10 in the P2 subsite) were replaced with alanine was crystallized, both free and with bound 3'-uridine monophosphate (3'-UMP). Structures of K7A/R10A/K66A RNase A and the K7A/R10A/K66A RNase A.3'-UMP complex were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis to resolutions of 2.0 and 2.1 A, respectively. There is little observable change between these structures and that of wild-type RNase A, either free or with bound 3'-cytidine monophosphate. K7A/R10A/K66A RNase A was evaluated for its ability to cleave UpA, a dinucleotide substrate that does not span the P0 or the P2 subsites. In comparison to the wild-type enzyme, the value of kcat was decreased by 5-fold and that of kcat/Km was decreased 10-fold, suggesting that these remote subsites interact with the active site. These interactions were characterized by determining the pKa values of His12 and His119 at 0.018 and 0.142 M Na+, both in wild-type RNase A and the K7A/R10A/K66A variant. The side chains of Lys7, Arg10, and Lys66 depress the pKa values of these histidine residues, and this depression is sensitive to the salt concentration. In addition, the P0 and P2 subsites influence the interaction of His12 and His119 with each other, as demonstrated by changes in the cooperativity that gives rise to microscopic

  1. Delineation of Polypharmacology across the Human Structural Kinome Using a Functional Site Interaction Fingerprint Approach.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zheng; Xie, Li; Xie, Lei; Bourne, Philip E

    2016-05-12

    Targeted polypharmacology of kinases has emerged as a promising strategy to design efficient and safe therapeutics. Here, we perform a systematic study of kinase-ligand binding modes for the human structural kinome at scale (208 kinases, 1777 unique ligands, and their complexes) by integrating chemical genomics and structural genomics data and by introducing a functional site interaction fingerprint (Fs-IFP) method. New insights into kinase-ligand binding modes were obtained. We establish relationships between the features of binding modes, the ligands, and the binding pockets, respectively. We also drive the intrinsic binding specificity and which correlation with amino acid conservation. Third, we explore the landscape of the binding modes and highlight the regions of "selectivity pocket" and "selectivity entrance". Finally, we demonstrate that Fs-IFP similarity is directly correlated to the experimentally determined profile. These improve our understanding of kinase-ligand interactions and contribute to the design of novel polypharmacological therapies targeting kinases. PMID:26929980

  2. Spatiotemporal dynamics and epistatic interaction sites in dengue virus type 1: a comprehensive sequence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Pei-Yu; Ke, Guan-Ming; Chen, Po-Chih; Liu, Li-Teh; Tsai, Yen-Chun; Tsai, Jih-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The continuing threat of dengue fever necessitates a comprehensive characterisation of its epidemiological trends. Phylogenetic and recombination events were reconstructed based on 100 worldwide dengue virus (DENV) type 1 genome sequences with an outgroup (prototypes of DENV2-4). The phylodynamic characteristics and site-specific variation were then analysed using data without the outgroup. Five genotypes (GI-GV) and a ladder-like structure with short terminal branch topology were observed in this study. Apparently, the transmission of DENV1 was geographically random before gradual localising with human activity as GI-GIII in South Asia, GIV in the South Pacific, and GV in the Americas. Genotypes IV and V have recently shown higher population densities compared to older genotypes. All codon regions and all tree branches were skewed toward a negative selection, which indicated that their variation was restricted by protein function. Notably, multi-epistatic interaction sites were found in both PrM 221 and NS3 1730. Recombination events accumulated in regions E, NS3-NS4A, and particularly in region NS5. The estimated coevolution pattern also highlights the need for further study of the biological role of protein PrM 221 and NS3 1730. The recent transmission of emergent GV sublineages into Central America and Europe mandates closely monitoring of genotype interaction and succession. PMID:24040199

  3. Shift reagents in ion mobility spectrometry: the effect of the number of interaction sites, size and interaction energies on the mobilities of valinol and ethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Maestre, Roberto; Meza-Morelos, Dairo; Wu, Ching

    2016-05-01

    Overlapping peaks interfere in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), but they are separated introducing mobility shift reagents (SR) in the buffer gas forming adducts with different collision cross-sections (size). IMS separations using SR depend on the ion mobility shifts which are governed by adduct's size and interaction energies (stabilities). Mobility shifts of valinol and ethanolamine ions were measured by electrospray-ionization ion mobility-mass spectrometry (MS). Methyl-chloro propionate (M) was used as SR; 2-butanol (B) and nitrobenzene (N) were used for comparison. Density functional theory was used for calculations. B produced the smallest mobility shifts because of its small size. M and N have two strong interaction sites (oxygen atoms) and similar molecular mass, and they should produce similar shifts. For both ethanolamine and valinol ions, stabilities were larger for N adducts than those of M. With ethanolamine, M produced a 68% shift, large compared to that using N, 61%, because M has a third weak interaction site on the chlorine atom and, therefore, M has more interaction possibilities than N. This third site overrode the oxygen atoms' interaction energy that favored the adduction of ethanolamine with N over that with M. On the contrary, with valinol mobility shifts were larger with N than with M (21 vs 18%) because interaction energy favored even more adduction of valinol with N than with M; that is, the interaction energy difference between adducts of valinol with M and N was larger than that between those adducts with ethanolamine, and the third M interaction could not override this larger difference. Mobility shifts were explained based on the number of SR's interaction sites, size of ions and SR, and SR-ion interaction energies. This is the first time that the number of interaction sites is used to explain mobility shifts in SR-assisted IMS. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27194523

  4. Highly homologous proteins exert opposite biological activities by using different interaction interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iosub Amir, Anat; van Rosmalen, Martijn; Mayer, Guy; Lebendiker, Mario; Danieli, Tsafi; Friedler, Assaf

    2015-07-01

    We present a possible molecular basis for the opposite activity of two homologues proteins that bind similar ligands and show that this is achieved by fine-tuning of the interaction interface. The highly homologous ASPP proteins have opposite roles in regulating apoptosis: ASPP2 induces apoptosis while iASPP inhibits it. The ASPP proteins are regulated by an autoinhibitory interaction between their Ank-SH3 and Pro domains. We performed a detailed biophysical and molecular study of the Pro - Ank-SH3 interaction in iASPP and compared it to the interaction in ASPP2. We found that iASPP Pro is disordered and that the interaction sites are entirely different: iASPP Ank-SH3 binds iASPP Pro via its fourth Ank repeat and RT loop while ASPP2 Ank-SH3 binds ASPP2 Pro via its first Ank repeat and the n-src loop. It is possible that by using different moieties in the same interface, the proteins can have distinct and specific interactions resulting in differential regulation and ultimately different biological activities.

  5. Highly homologous proteins exert opposite biological activities by using different interaction interfaces.

    PubMed

    Amir, Anat Iosub; van Rosmalen, Martijn; Mayer, Guy; Lebendiker, Mario; Danieli, Tsafi; Friedler, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    We present a possible molecular basis for the opposite activity of two homologues proteins that bind similar ligands and show that this is achieved by fine-tuning of the interaction interface. The highly homologous ASPP proteins have opposite roles in regulating apoptosis: ASPP2 induces apoptosis while iASPP inhibits it. The ASPP proteins are regulated by an autoinhibitory interaction between their Ank-SH3 and Pro domains. We performed a detailed biophysical and molecular study of the Pro - Ank-SH3 interaction in iASPP and compared it to the interaction in ASPP2. We found that iASPP Pro is disordered and that the interaction sites are entirely different: iASPP Ank-SH3 binds iASPP Pro via its fourth Ank repeat and RT loop while ASPP2 Ank-SH3 binds ASPP2 Pro via its first Ank repeat and the n-src loop. It is possible that by using different moieties in the same interface, the proteins can have distinct and specific interactions resulting in differential regulation and ultimately different biological activities. PMID:26130271

  6. Highly homologous proteins exert opposite biological activities by using different interaction interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Iosub Amir, Anat; van Rosmalen, Martijn; Mayer, Guy; Lebendiker, Mario; Danieli, Tsafi; Friedler, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    We present a possible molecular basis for the opposite activity of two homologues proteins that bind similar ligands and show that this is achieved by fine-tuning of the interaction interface. The highly homologous ASPP proteins have opposite roles in regulating apoptosis: ASPP2 induces apoptosis while iASPP inhibits it. The ASPP proteins are regulated by an autoinhibitory interaction between their Ank-SH3 and Pro domains. We performed a detailed biophysical and molecular study of the Pro – Ank-SH3 interaction in iASPP and compared it to the interaction in ASPP2. We found that iASPP Pro is disordered and that the interaction sites are entirely different: iASPP Ank-SH3 binds iASPP Pro via its fourth Ank repeat and RT loop while ASPP2 Ank-SH3 binds ASPP2 Pro via its first Ank repeat and the n-src loop. It is possible that by using different moieties in the same interface, the proteins can have distinct and specific interactions resulting in differential regulation and ultimately different biological activities. PMID:26130271

  7. Gene–Physical Activity Interactions: Overview of Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rankinen, Tuomo; Bouchard, Claude

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity level is an important component of the total daily energy expenditure and as such contributes to body weight regulation. A body of data indicates that the level of physical activity plays a role in the risk of excessive weight gain, in weight loss programs, and particularly in the prevention of weight regain. Most studies dealing with potential gene–physical activity interaction effects use an exercise and fitness or performance paradigm as opposed to an obesity-driven model. From these studies, it is clear that there are considerable individual differences in the response to an exercise regimen and that there is a substantial familial aggregation component to the observed heterogeneity. Few studies have focused on the role of specific genes in accounting for the highly prevalent gene–exercise interaction effects. Results for specific genes have been inconsistent with few exceptions. Progress is likely to come when studies will be designed to truly address gene–exercise or physical activity interaction issues and with sample sizes that will provide adequate statistical power. PMID:19037212

  8. The juxtamembrane regions of human receptor tyrosine kinases exhibit conserved interaction sites with anionic lipids

    PubMed Central

    Hedger, George; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Koldsø, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play a critical role in diverse cellular processes and their activity is regulated by lipids in the surrounding membrane, including PIP2 (phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate) in the inner leaflet, and GM3 (monosialodihexosylganglioside) in the outer leaflet. However, the precise details of the interactions at the molecular level remain to be fully characterised. Using a multiscale molecular dynamics simulation approach, we comprehensively characterise anionic lipid interactions with all 58 known human RTKs. Our results demonstrate that the juxtamembrane (JM) regions of RTKs are critical for inducing clustering of anionic lipids, including PIP2, both in simple asymmetric bilayers, and in more complex mixed membranes. Clustering is predominantly driven by interactions between a conserved cluster of basic residues within the first five positions of the JM region, and negatively charged lipid headgroups. This highlights a conserved interaction pattern shared across the human RTK family. In particular predominantly the N-terminal residues of the JM region are involved in the interactions with PIP2, whilst residues within the distal JM region exhibit comparatively less lipid specificity. Our results suggest that JM–lipid interactions play a key role in RTK structure and function, and more generally in the nanoscale organisation of receptor-containing cell membranes. PMID:25779975

  9. Active-site mutants altering the cooperativity of E. coli phosphofructokinase.

    PubMed

    Berger, S A; Evans, P R

    1990-02-01

    Crystal structures of the high- and low-activity states of the allosteric enzyme phosphofructokinase implicate three arginines in substrate binding, catalysis and cooperativity. Arginines 162 and 243 reach into the active site from an adjacent subunit and interact with the cooperative substrate fructose 6-phosphate. Mutation of these arginines to serine results in mutant enzymes with reduced substrate binding and lowered cooperativity, but with little change in their catalytic ability (kcat). Arg 72 bridges the two substrates fructose 6-phosphate and ATP, and interacts with the 1-phosphate of the product fructose 1,6-biphosphate. Mutation of this residue to serine reduces the catalytic activity, cooperativity and binding of fructose 6-phosphate and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. In the reverse reaction, the kinetics of wild-type and the Ser 72 mutant with respect to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate are hyperbolic, whereas those of the Ser 162 and Ser 243 mutants are sigmoidal. These results show that each of the three arginines contributes to cooperativity and to the transmission of allosteric signals between the four subunit of the enzyme. PMID:2137204

  10. Interannual active layer thermal and dynamics evolution at the crater Lake CALM site, Deception Island (Antarctica).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Miguel; Vieira, Gonzalo; Ángel De Pablo, Miguel; Molina, Antonio; Abramov, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    Deception Island, is an active strato-volcano on South Shetland Archipelago of Antarctica (62° 55' 0″ S, 60° 37' 0″ W), is a cold region with harsh remote and hostile environmental conditions. The permafrost and active layer existence, and the cold climate conditions together with volcanic material with height water content inside made this region of the Earth a perfect site to study the active layer and permafrost evolution involved in the Circumpolar Active Layer South (CALM-S) program. The active layer is measured in late January or firs february (during the end of the thaw period) at the "Crater Lake" CALM site (62°58'06.7''; 60°40'44.8'') on Deception Island, Antarctica, at the period 2006 to 2014 we obtained a mean annual value of 29,7±2 cm. In this paper, we describe the spatial active layer thickness distribution and report the reduction on the mean thickness between February 2006 and 2014. Below the active layer, permafrost could be also reported (with a mean thickness of 4.5± 0.5 m.) based on the temperature data acquired by sensors installed at different depth inside the soil; three different shallow boreholes was drilled (1.0 m., 1.6 m., 4.5 m. in depth) and we have been registered its temperature gradient at the 2010 to 2013 period. Here we use all those data 1) to describe the thermal behavior of the permafrost at the CALM site, and 2) to describe its evolution (aggradation/degradation) along fourteen years of continuous measurements. We develop this study, to known the thermal behavior of the permafrost and the active layer related with the air/soil interaction being one of the most important factors the snow layer that was measured by the installation of termo-snowmeters with the complement of an automatic digital camera during the 2008 to 2014 period. On the other hand, the pyroclastics soil materials has a very high values of water content then the latent heat in the freezing/thawing process controls the active layer evolution and the

  11. Varenicline Interactions at the 5-HT3 Receptor Ligand Binding Site are Revealed by 5-HTBP

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cys-loop receptors are the site of action of many therapeutic drugs. One of these is the smoking cessation agent varenicline, which has its major therapeutic effects at nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors but also acts at 5-HT3 receptors. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the 5-HT binding protein (5-HTBP) in complex with varenicline, and test the predicted interactions by probing the potency of varenicline in a range of mutant 5-HT3 receptors expressed in HEK293 cells and Xenopus oocytes. The structure reveals a range of interactions between varenicline and 5-HTBP. We identified residues within 5 Å of varenicline and substituted the equivalent residues in the 5-HT3 receptor with Ala or a residue with similar chemical properties. Functional characterization of these mutant 5-HT3 receptors, using a fluorescent membrane potential dye in HEK cells and voltage clamp in oocytes, supports interactions between varenicline and the receptor that are similar to those in 5-HTBP. The structure also revealed C-loop closure that was less than in the 5-HT-bound 5-HTBP, and hydrogen bonding between varenicline and the complementary face of the binding pocket via a water molecule, which are characteristics consistent with partial agonist behavior of varenicline in the 5-HT3 receptor. Together, these data reveal detailed insights into the molecular interaction of varenicline in the 5-HT3 receptor. PMID:25648658

  12. Using Highly Interactive Virtual Environments for Safeguards Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, Bradley S; Alcala, Benjamin S; Alcala, Scott; Eipeldauer, Mary D; Weil, Logan B

    2010-01-01

    Highly interactive virtual environment (HIVE) is a term that refers to interactive educational simulations, serious games and virtual worlds. Studies indicate that learning with the aid of interactive environments produces better retention and depth of knowledge by promoting improved trainee engagement and understanding. Virtual reality or three dimensional (3D) visualization is often used to promote the understanding of something when personal observation, photographs, drawings, and/or sketches are not possible or available. Subjects and situations, either real or hypothetical, can be developed using a 3D model. Models can be tailored to the audience allowing safeguards and security features to be demonstrated for educational purposes in addition to engineering evaluation and performance analysis. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has begun evaluating the feasibility of HIVEs for improving safeguards activities such as training, mission planning, and evaluating worker task performance. This paper will discuss the development workflow of HIVEs and present some recent examples.

  13. Effect of the interactions and environment on nuclear activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabater, J.; Best, P. N.; Argudo-Fernández, M.

    2013-03-01

    We present a study of the prevalence of optical and radio nuclear activity with respect to the environment and interactions in a sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. The aim is to determine the independent effects of distinct aspects of source environment on the triggering of different types of nuclear activity. We defined a local density parameter and a tidal force estimator and used a cluster richness estimator from the literature to trace different aspects of environment and interaction. The possible correlations between the environmental parameters were removed using a principal component analysis. By far, the strongest trend found for the active galactic nuclei (AGN) fractions, of all AGN types, is with galaxy mass. We therefore applied a stratified statistical method that takes into account the effect of possible confounding factors like the galaxy mass. We found that (at fixed mass) the prevalence of optical AGN is a factor of 2-3 lower in the densest environments, but increases by a factor of ˜2 in the presence of strong one-on-one interactions. These effects are even more pronounced for star-forming nuclei. The importance of galaxy interactions decreases from star-forming nuclei to Seyferts to low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions to passive galaxies, in accordance with previous suggestions of an evolutionary time-sequence. The fraction of radio AGN increases very strongly (by nearly an order of magnitude) towards denser environments, and is also enhanced by galaxy interactions. Overall, the results agree with a scenario in which the mechanisms of accretion into the black hole are determined by the presence and nature of a supply of gas, which in turn is controlled by the local density of galaxies and their interactions. A plentiful cold gas supply is required to trigger star formation, optical AGN and radiatively efficient radio AGN. This is less common in the cold-gas-poor environments of groups and clusters, but is enhanced by

  14. Robotics and Automation Activities at the Savannah River Site: A Site Report for SUBWOG 39F

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.

    1995-09-28

    The Savannah River Site has successfully used robots, teleoperators, and remote video to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, improve worker safety, and improve the quality of operations. Previous reports have described the use of mobile teleoperators in coping with a high level liquid waste spill, the removal of highly contaminated equipment, and the inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. This report will cover recent applications at the Savannah River, as well as systems which SRS has delivered to other DOE site customers.

  15. Human uroporphyrinogen III synthase: NMR-based mapping of the active site.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Luis; Kuti, Miklos; Bishop, David F; Mezei, Mihaly; Zeng, Lei; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Desnick, Robert J

    2008-05-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase (URO-synthase) catalyzes the cyclization and D-ring isomerization of hydroxymethylbilane (HMB) to uroporphyrinogen (URO'gen) III, the cyclic tetrapyrrole and physiologic precursor of heme, chlorophyl, and corrin. The deficient activity of human URO-synthase results in the autosomal recessive cutaneous disorder, congenital erythropoietic porphyria. Mapping of the structural determinants that specify catalysis and, potentially, protein-protein interactions is lacking. To map the active site and assess the enzyme's possible interaction in a complex with hydroxymethylbilane-synthase (HMB-synthase) and/or uroporphyrinogen-decarboxylase (URO-decarboxylase) by NMR, an efficient expression and purification procedure was developed for these cytosolic enzymes of heme biosynthesis that enabled preparation of special isotopically-labeled protein samples for NMR characterization. Using an 800 MHz instrument, assignment of the URO-synthase backbone (13)C(alpha) (100%), (1)H(alpha) (99.6%), and nonproline (1)H(N) and (15)N resonances (94%) was achieved as well as 85% of the side-chain (13)C and (1)H resonances. NMR analyses of URO-synthase titrated with competitive inhibitors N(D)-methyl-1-formylbilane (NMF-bilane) or URO'gen III, revealed resonance perturbations of specific residues lining the cleft between the two major domains of URO synthase that mapped the enzyme's active site. In silico docking of the URO-synthase crystal structure with NMF-bilane and URO'gen III was consistent with the perturbation results and provided a 3D model of the enzyme-inhibitor complex. The absence of chemical shift changes in the (15)N spectrum of URO-synthase mixed with the homogeneous HMB-synthase holoenzyme or URO-decarboxylase precluded occurrence of a stable cytosolic enzyme complex. PMID:18004775

  16. Multidimensional stationary probability distribution for interacting active particles.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Claudio; Marconi, Umberto Marini Bettolo; Gnan, Nicoletta; Di Leonardo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    We derive the stationary probability distribution for a non-equilibrium system composed by an arbitrary number of degrees of freedom that are subject to Gaussian colored noise and a conservative potential. This is based on a multidimensional version of the Unified Colored Noise Approximation. By comparing theory with numerical simulations we demonstrate that the theoretical probability density quantitatively describes the accumulation of active particles around repulsive obstacles. In particular, for two particles with repulsive interactions, the probability of close contact decreases when one of the two particle is pinned. Moreover, in the case of isotropic confining potentials, the radial density profile shows a non trivial scaling with radius. Finally we show that the theory well approximates the "pressure" generated by the active particles allowing to derive an equation of state for a system of non-interacting colored noise-driven particles. PMID:26021260

  17. Atomically-thin two-dimensional sheets for understanding active sites in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongfu; Gao, Shan; Lei, Fengcai; Xie, Yi

    2015-02-01

    Catalysis can speed up chemical reactions and it usually occurs on the low coordinated steps, edges, terraces, kinks and corner atoms that are often called "active sites". However, the atomic level interplay between active sites and catalytic activity is still an open question, owing to the large difference between idealized models and real catalysts. This stimulates us to pursue a suitable material model for studying the active sites-catalytic activity relationship, in which the atomically-thin two-dimensional sheets could serve as an ideal model, owing to their relatively simple type of active site and the ultrahigh fraction of active sites that are comparable to the overall atoms. In this tutorial review, we focus on the recent progress in disclosing the factors that affect the activity of reactive sites, including characterization of atomic coordination number, structural defects and disorder in ultrathin two-dimensional sheets by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, positron annihilation spectroscopy, electron spin resonance and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Also, we overview their applications in CO catalytic oxidation, photocatalytic water splitting, electrocatalytic oxygen and hydrogen evolution reactions, and hence highlight the atomic level interplay among coordination number, structural defects/disorder, active sites and catalytic activity in the two-dimensional sheets with atomic thickness. Finally, we also present the major challenges and opportunities regarding the role of active sites in catalysis. We believe that this review provides critical insights for understanding the catalysis and hence helps to develop new catalysts with high catalytic activity. PMID:25382246

  18. The active sites of supported silver particle catalysts in formaldehyde oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaxin; Huang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Meijuan; Hu, Pingping; Du, Chengtian; Kong, Lingdong; Chen, Jianmin; Tang, Xingfu

    2016-08-01

    Surface silver atoms with upshifted d-orbitals are identified as the catalytically active sites in formaldehyde oxidation by correlating their activity with the number of surface silver atoms, and the degree of the d-orbital upshift governs the catalytic performance of the active sites. PMID:27406403

  19. Activated Ras interacts with the Ral guanine nucleotide dissociation stimulator.

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, F; Fields, S; Schneider, C; Martin, G S

    1994-01-01

    The yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify proteins that interact with Ras. The H-Ras protein was found to interact with a guanine nucleotide dissociation stimulator (GDS) that has been previously shown to regulate guanine nucleotide exchange on another member of the Ras protein family, Ral. The interaction is mediated by the C-terminal, noncatalytic segment of the RalGDS and can be detected both in vivo, using the two-hybrid system, and in vitro, with purified recombinant proteins. The interaction of the RalGDS C-terminal segment with Ras is specific, dependent on activation of Ras by GTP, and blocked by a mutation that affects Ras effector function. These characteristics are similar to those previously demonstrated for the interaction between Ras and its putative effector, Raf, suggesting that the RalGDS may also be a Ras effector. Consistent with this idea, the RalGDS was found to inhibit the binding of Raf to Ras. Images PMID:7972015

  20. Temperature affects microbial abundance, activity and interactions in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiang; De Vrieze, Jo; Li, Jiabao; Li, Xiangzhen

    2016-06-01

    Temperature is a major factor determining the performance of the anaerobic digestion process. The microbial abundance, activity and interactional networks were investigated under a temperature gradient from 25°C to 55°C through amplicon sequencing, using 16S ribosomal RNA and 16S rRNA gene-based approaches. Comparative analysis of past accumulative elements presented by 16S rRNA gene-based analysis, and the in-situ conditions presented by 16S rRNA-based analysis, provided new insights concerning the identification of microbial functional roles and interactions. The daily methane production and total biogas production increased with temperature up to 50°C, but decreased at 55°C. Increased methanogenesis and hydrolysis at 50°C were main factors causing higher methane production which was also closely related with more well-defined methanogenic and/or related modules with comprehensive interactions and increased functional orderliness referred to more microorganisms participating in interactions. This research demonstrated the importance of evaluating functional roles and interactions of microbial community. PMID:26970926

  1. A comparative structure-function analysis of active-site inhibitors of Vibrio cholerae cholix toxin.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Miguel R; Merrill, A Rod

    2015-09-01

    Cholix toxin from Vibrio cholerae is a novel mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase (mART) toxin that shares structural and functional properties with Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A and Corynebacterium diphtheriae diphtheria toxin. Herein, we have used the high-resolution X-ray structure of full-length cholix toxin in the apo form, NAD(+) bound, and 10 structures of the cholix catalytic domain (C-domain) complexed with several strong inhibitors of toxin enzyme activity (NAP, PJ34, and the P-series) to study the binding mode of the ligands. A pharmacophore model based on the active pose of NAD(+) was compared with the active conformation of the inhibitors, which revealed a cationic feature in the side chain of the inhibitors that may determine the active pose. Moreover, a conformational search was conducted for the missing coordinates of one of the main active-site loops (R-loop). The resulting structural models were used to evaluate the interaction energies and for 3D-QSAR modeling. Implications for a rational drug design approach for mART toxins were derived. PMID:25756608

  2. Tumor Suppressor Activity of Profilin Requires a Functional Actin Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Wittenmayer, Nina; Jandrig, Burkhard; Rothkegel, Martin; Schlüter, Kathrin; Arnold, Wolfgang; Haensch, Wolfgang; Scherneck, Siegfried; Jockusch, Brigitte M.

    2004-01-01

    Profilin 1 (PFN1) is a regulator of the microfilament system and is involved in various signaling pathways. It interacts with many cytoplasmic and nuclear ligands. The importance of PFN1 for human tissue differentiation has been demonstrated by the findings that human cancer cells, expressing conspicuously low PFN1 levels, adopt a nontumorigenic phenotype upon raising their PFN1 level. In the present study, we characterize the ligand binding site crucial for profilin's tumor suppressor activity. Starting with CAL51, a human breast cancer cell line highly tumorigenic in nude mice, we established stable clones that express PFN1 mutants differentially defective in ligand binding. Clones expressing PFN1 mutants with reduced binding to either poly-proline-stretch ligands or phosphatidyl-inositol-4,5-bisphosphate, but with a functional actin binding site, were normal in growth, adhesion, and anchorage dependence, with only a weak tendency to elicit tumors in nude mice, similar to controls expressing wild-type PFN1. In contrast, clones expressing a mutant with severely reduced capacity to bind actin still behaved like the parental CAL51 and were highly tumorigenic. We conclude that the actin binding site on profilin is instrumental for normal differentiation of human epithelia and the tumor suppressor function of PFN1. PMID:14767055

  3. Site-Specific Epithelial-Mesenchymal Interactions in Digestive Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dumortier, Jérôme; Ratineau, Christelle; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Pourreyron, Céline; Anderson, Wena; Jacquier, Marie-France; Blanc, Martine; Bernard, Christine; Bellaton, Claire; Remy, Lionel; Chayvialle, Jean-Alain; Roche, Colette

    2000-01-01

    Little is known about the functional interactions between digestive neuroendocrine tumor cells and their stromal microenvironment. The focus of our study is whether mesenchymal cells modulate peptide expression, cell proliferation, and invasiveness in digestive neuroendocrine tumor cells. We designed an experimental in vivo and in vitro study using the mouse enteroendocrine cell line STC-1. In vivo, STC-1 cells were injected subcutaneously in 18 immunosuppressed newborn rats. At day 21, all animals presented poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumors with lung metastases. Subcutaneous tumors were usually limited by a capsule containing basement membrane components and myofibroblasts that presented a low mitotic index. Lung tumors were devoid of capsule and poor in myofibroblasts, and their mitotic index was high. The profile of peptide expression in STC-1 tumors was different from that of cultured STC-1 cells. In vitro, STC-1 cells were cultured with fibroblasts of different origins, including dermis, lung, digestive tract, and liver. Based on their origin, myofibroblasts differentially modulated hormone synthesis, proliferation, spreading, and adhesion of STC-1 cells. In conclusion, our results show that site-specific functional interactions between mesenchymal and neuroendocrine cells may contribute to modulating the behavior of digestive neuroendocrine tumors, depending on their growth site. PMID:10666396

  4. Interactions between 23S rRNA and tRNA in the ribosomal E site.

    PubMed Central

    Bocchetta, M; Xiong, L; Shah, S; Mankin, A S

    2001-01-01

    Interactions between tRNA or its analogs and 23S rRNA in the large ribosomal subunit were analyzed by RNA footprinting and by modification-interference selection. In the E site, tRNA protected bases G2112, A2392, and C2394 of 23S rRNA. Truncated tRNA, lacking the anticodon stem-loop, protected A2392 and C2394, but not G2112, and tRNA derivatives with a shortened 3' end protected only G2112, but not A2392 or C2394. Modification interference revealed C2394 as the only accessible nucleotide in 23S rRNA whose modification interferes with binding of tRNA in the large ribosomal subunit E site. The results suggest a direct contact between A76 of tRNA A76 and C2394 of 23S rRNA. Protections at G2112 may reflect interaction of this 23S rRNA region with the tRNA central fold. PMID:11214181

  5. Efficient analysis using custom interactive visualization tools at a Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.; Durham, L.

    1992-12-01

    Custom visualization analysis programs were developed and used to analyze contaminant transport calculations from a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model developed for a Department of Energy Superfund site. The site hydrogeology, which is highly heterogenous, includes both fractured limestone and dolomite and alluvium deposits. Three-dimensional interactive visualization techniques were used to understand and analyze the three-dimensional, double-porosity modeling results. A graphical object oriented programming environment was applied to efficiently develop custom visualization programs in a coarse-grained data structure language. Comparisons were made, using the results from the three-dimensional, finite-difference model, between traditional two-dimensional analyses (contour and vector plots) and interactive three-dimensional techniques. Subjective comparison areas include the accuracy of analysis, the ability to understand the results of three-dimensional contaminant transport simulation, and the capability to transmit the results of the analysis to the project management. In addition, a quantitative comparison was made on the time required to develop a thorough analysis of the modeling results. The conclusions from the comparative study showed that the visualization analysis provided an increased awareness of the contaminant transport mechanisms, provided new insights into contaminant migration, and resulted in a significant time savings.

  6. Efficient analysis using custom interactive visualization tools at a Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G. ); Durham, L. )

    1992-01-01

    Custom visualization analysis programs were developed and used to analyze contaminant transport calculations from a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model developed for a Department of Energy Superfund site. The site hydrogeology, which is highly heterogenous, includes both fractured limestone and dolomite and alluvium deposits. Three-dimensional interactive visualization techniques were used to understand and analyze the three-dimensional, double-porosity modeling results. A graphical object oriented programming environment was applied to efficiently develop custom visualization programs in a coarse-grained data structure language. Comparisons were made, using the results from the three-dimensional, finite-difference model, between traditional two-dimensional analyses (contour and vector plots) and interactive three-dimensional techniques. Subjective comparison areas include the accuracy of analysis, the ability to understand the results of three-dimensional contaminant transport simulation, and the capability to transmit the results of the analysis to the project management. In addition, a quantitative comparison was made on the time required to develop a thorough analysis of the modeling results. The conclusions from the comparative study showed that the visualization analysis provided an increased awareness of the contaminant transport mechanisms, provided new insights into contaminant migration, and resulted in a significant time savings.

  7. Physicochemical nature of interfaces controlling ferredoxin NADP(+) reductase activity through its interprotein interactions with ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Misaki; Kim, Ju Yaen; Kume, Satoshi; Sakakibara, Yukiko; Sugiki, Toshihiko; Kojima, Chojiro; Kurisu, Genji; Ikegami, Takahisa; Hase, Toshiharu; Kimata-Ariga, Yoko; Lee, Young-Ho

    2015-10-01

    Although acidic residues of ferredoxin (Fd) are known to be essential for activities of various Fd-dependent enzymes, including ferredoxin NADP(+) reductase (FNR) and sulfite reductase (SiR), through electrostatic interactions with basic residues of partner enzymes, non-electrostatic contributions such as hydrophobic forces remain largely unknown. We herein demonstrated that intermolecular hydrophobic and charge-charge interactions between Fd and enzymes were both critical for enzymatic activity. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis, which altered physicochemical properties of residues on the interfaces of Fd for FNR /SiR, revealed various changes in activities of both enzymes. The replacement of serine 43 of Fd to a hydrophobic residue (S43W) and charged residue (S43D) increased and decreased FNR activity, respectively, while S43W showed significantly lower SiR activity without affecting SiR activity by S43D, suggesting that hydrophobic and electrostatic interprotein forces affected FNR activity. Enzyme kinetics revealed that changes in FNR activity by mutating Fd correlated with Km, but not with kcat or activation energy, indicating that interprotein interactions determined FNR activity. Calorimetry-based binding thermodynamics between Fd and FNR showed different binding modes of FNR to wild-type, S43W, or S43D, which were controlled by enthalpy and entropy, as shown by the driving force plot. Residue-based NMR spectroscopy of (15)N FNR with Fds also revealed distinct binding modes of each complex based on different directions of NMR peak shifts with similar overall chemical shift differences. We proposed that subtle adjustments in both hydrophobic and electrostatic forces were critical for enzymatic activity, and these results may be applicable to protein-based electron transfer systems. PMID:26087388

  8. Interactions between Multiple Phosphorylation Sites in the Inactivation Particle of a K+ Channel

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Edward J.; Sorensen, Roger G.; Slater, Simon J.; Covarrubias, Manuel

    1998-01-01

    Protein kinase C inhibits inactivation gating of Kv3.4 K+ channels, and at least two NH2-terminal serines (S15 and S21) appeared involved in this interaction (Covarrubias et al. 1994. Neuron. 13:1403–1412). Here we have investigated the molecular mechanism of this regulatory process. Site-directed mutagenesis (serine → alanine) revealed two additional sites at S8 and S9. The mutation S9A inhibited the action of PKC by ∼85%, whereas S8A, S15A, and S21A exhibited smaller reductions (41, 35, and 50%, respectively). In spite of the relatively large effects of individual S → A mutations, simultaneous mutation of the four sites was necessary to completely abolish inhibition of inactivation by PKC. Accordingly, a peptide corresponding to the inactivation domain of Kv3.4 was phosphorylated by specific PKC isoforms, but the mutant peptide (S[8,9,15,21]A) was not. Substitutions of negatively charged aspartate (D) for serine at positions 8, 9, 15, and 21 closely mimicked the effect of phosphorylation on channel inactivation. S → D mutations slowed the rate of inactivation and accelerated the rate of recovery from inactivation. Thus, the negative charge of the phosphoserines is an important incentive to inhibit inactivation. Consistent with this interpretation, the effects of S8D and S8E (E = Glu) were very similar, yet S8N (N = Asn) had little effect on the onset of inactivation but accelerated the recovery from inactivation. Interestingly, the effects of single S → D mutations were unequal and the effects of combined mutations were greater than expected assuming a simple additive effect of the free energies that the single mutations contribute to impair inactivation. These observations demonstrate that the inactivation particle of Kv3.4 does not behave as a point charge and suggest that the NH2-terminal phosphoserines interact in a cooperative manner to disrupt inactivation. Inspection of the tertiary structure of the inactivation domain of Kv3.4 revealed the

  9. AraPPISite: a database of fine-grained protein-protein interaction site annotations for Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Yang, Shiping; Wang, Chuan; Zhou, Yuan; Zhang, Ziding

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge about protein interaction sites provides detailed information of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). To date, nearly 20,000 of PPIs from Arabidopsis thaliana have been identified. Nevertheless, the interaction site information has been largely missed by previously published PPI databases. Here, AraPPISite, a database that presents fine-grained interaction details for A. thaliana PPIs is established. First, the experimentally determined 3D structures of 27 A. thaliana PPIs are collected from the Protein Data Bank database and the predicted 3D structures of 3023 A. thaliana PPIs are modeled by using two well-established template-based docking methods. For each experimental/predicted complex structure, AraPPISite not only provides an interactive user interface for browsing interaction sites, but also lists detailed evolutionary and physicochemical properties of these sites. Second, AraPPISite assigns domain-domain interactions or domain-motif interactions to 4286 PPIs whose 3D structures cannot be modeled. In this case, users can easily query protein interaction regions at the sequence level. AraPPISite is a free and user-friendly database, which does not require user registration or any configuration on local machines. We anticipate AraPPISite can serve as a helpful database resource for the users with less experience in structural biology or protein bioinformatics to probe the details of PPIs, and thus accelerate the studies of plant genetics and functional genomics. AraPPISite is available at http://systbio.cau.edu.cn/arappisite/index.html . PMID:27338257

  10. Promoter-distal RNA polymerase II binding discriminates active from inactive CCAAT/ enhancer-binding protein beta binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Daniel; Roberts, Brian S.; Carleton, Julia B.; Partridge, E. Christopher; White, Michael A.; Cohen, Barak A.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind to thousands of DNA sequences in mammalian genomes, but most of these binding events appear to have no direct effect on gene expression. It is unclear why only a subset of TF bound sites are actively involved in transcriptional regulation. Moreover, the key genomic features that accurately discriminate between active and inactive TF binding events remain ambiguous. Recent studies have identified promoter-distal RNA polymerase II (RNAP2) binding at enhancer elements, suggesting that these interactions may serve as a marker for active regulatory sequences. Despite these correlative analyses, a thorough functional validation of these genomic co-occupancies is still lacking. To characterize the gene regulatory activity of DNA sequences underlying promoter-distal TF binding events that co-occur with RNAP2 and TF sites devoid of RNAP2 occupancy using a functional reporter assay, we performed cis-regulatory element sequencing (CRE-seq). We tested more than 1000 promoter-distal CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (CEBPB)-bound sites in HepG2 and K562 cells, and found that CEBPB-bound sites co-occurring with RNAP2 were more likely to exhibit enhancer activity. CEBPB-bound sites further maintained substantial cell-type specificity, indicating that local DNA sequence can accurately convey cell-type–specific regulatory information. By comparing our CRE-seq results to a comprehensive set of genome annotations, we identified a variety of genomic features that are strong predictors of regulatory element activity and cell-type–specific activity. Collectively, our functional assay results indicate that RNAP2 occupancy can be used as a key genomic marker that can distinguish active from inactive TF bound sites. PMID:26486725

  11. Aerosol-Cloud Interaction at the Land Site of VOCALS-REx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fochesatto, Javier; Shaw, Glenn; Krejci, Radovan; Chand, Duli; Gallarado, Laura; Cordova, Ana

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol-Cloud-Ocean interactions in the South-East Pacific represent one of the best natural laboratories to study aerosol-cloud-climate processes thanks to stable large scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation and large anthropogenic sources associated mainly with copper industry. This article discuss the microphysical and optical characteristics of aerosols in the marine boundary layer (MBL) and the free troposphere(FT) related to the coastal MBL dynamics, stratocumulus cloud formation and dissipation in an environment influenced by air pollution sources in the FT and MBL. The analysis is based on observations from the Land Sites of VOCALS-REx at Paposo (25 S, 70 W, 700 masl) on the Pacific ocean coast, about 150 km south of Antofagasta in Chile and from free tropospheric site at ESO Paranal Observatory located inland at 2435 masl some 40 km NE from Paposo site. Combination of the in situ measurements from both, free troposphere and MBL together with lidar observations provides comprehensive insight into MBL-free troposphere interactions. The aerosol properties in FT are to a large degree controlled by sulfate-dominated aerosol from copper industry in northern Chile. The free tropospheric aerosol close to the coast has very stable accumulation mode dominated size distribution with mode diameter ~0.1 µm, but the aerosol number density for particles > 0.01 µm as well as for particles > 0.26 µm show large variability between 300 and 1600 cm-3 and 5 and 50 cm-3, respectively. The large variability can be attributed to changing influence from individual emission sources due to changing intensity of the coastal jet flow and diurnal ventilation of the shallow boundary layer in hilly region of the Atacama Desert mountain plateau. Polluted aerosols from FT are transported to the MBL along the Andes western slope through katabatic flows and downward mixed into the MBL most intensively in a narrow band along the coast.

  12. Proteins and Their Interacting Partners: An Introduction to Protein-Ligand Binding Site Prediction Methods.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel Barry; Brackenridge, Danielle Allison; McGuffin, Liam James

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the biological and biochemical roles of proteins, and subsequently determining their interacting partners, can be difficult and time consuming using in vitro and/or in vivo methods, and consequently the majority of newly sequenced proteins will have unknown structures and functions. However, in silico methods for predicting protein-ligand binding sites and protein biochemical functions offer an alternative practical solution. The characterisation of protein-ligand binding sites is essential for investigating new functional roles, which can impact the major biological research spheres of health, food, and energy security. In this review we discuss the role in silico methods play in 3D modelling of protein-ligand binding sites, along with their role in predicting biochemical functionality. In addition, we describe in detail some of the key alternative in silico prediction approaches that are available, as well as discussing the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) and the Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) projects, and their impact on developments in the field. Furthermore, we discuss the importance of protein function prediction methods for tackling 21st century problems. PMID:26694353

  13. Predicting Ligand Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces by 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Jhih-Wei; Elumalai, Pavadai; Pitti, Thejkiran; Wu, Chih Yuan; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Peng, Hung-Pin; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Predicting ligand binding sites (LBSs) on protein structures, which are obtained either from experimental or computational methods, is a useful first step in functional annotation or structure-based drug design for the protein structures. In this work, the structure-based machine learning algorithm ISMBLab-LIG was developed to predict LBSs on protein surfaces with input attributes derived from the three-dimensional probability density maps of interacting atoms, which were reconstructed on the query protein surfaces and were relatively insensitive to local conformational variations of the tentative ligand binding sites. The prediction accuracy of the ISMBLab-LIG predictors is comparable to that of the best LBS predictors benchmarked on several well-established testing datasets. More importantly, the ISMBLab-LIG algorithm has substantial tolerance to the prediction uncertainties of computationally derived protein structure models. As such, the method is particularly useful for predicting LBSs not only on experimental protein structures without known LBS templates in the database but also on computationally predicted model protein structures with structural uncertainties in the tentative ligand binding sites. PMID:27513851

  14. WebFEATURE: An interactive web tool for identifying and visualizing functional sites on macromolecular structures.

    PubMed

    Liang, Mike P; Banatao, D Rey; Klein, Teri E; Brutlag, Douglas L; Altman, Russ B

    2003-07-01

    WebFEATURE (http://feature.stanford.edu/webfeature/) is a web-accessible structural analysis tool that allows users to scan query structures for functional sites in both proteins and nucleic acids. WebFEATURE is the public interface to the scanning algorithm of the FEATURE package, a supervised learning algorithm for creating and identifying 3D, physicochemical motifs in molecular structures. Given an input structure or Protein Data Bank identifier (PDB ID), and a statistical model of a functional site, WebFEATURE will return rank-scored 'hits' in 3D space that identify regions in the structure where similar distributions of physicochemical properties occur relative to the site model. Users can visualize and interactively manipulate scored hits and the query structure in web browsers that support the Chime plug-in. Alternatively, results can be downloaded and visualized through other freely available molecular modeling tools, like RasMol, PyMOL and Chimera. A major application of WebFEATURE is in rapid annotation of function to structures in the context of structural genomics. PMID:12824318

  15. Interaction of P-glycoprotein with anti-tumor drugs: the site, gate and pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junqiao; Li, Debing; Sun, Tianyang; Liang, Lijun; Wang, Qi

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the mechanism and pathway of anti-cancer drugs to be pumped out by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in cancer cell is very important for the successful chemotherapy. P-gp is a member of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. In this study, random accelerated molecular dynamics (RAMD) simulation was used to explore the potential egress pathway of ligands from the binding pocket. This could be considered as a reverse process of drug binding. The most possible portal of drugs to dissociate is TM4/TM6, which is almost the same for different drugs, such as paclitaxel and doxorubicin. The interactions in the binding site are found to be remarkably stronger than that outside of the binding site. The results were suggested by the free energy calculation between P-gp and different drugs from metadynamics simulation. All the results indicate that the flexibility of inner residues, especially the residue Phe339, is very important for the drugs to access the binding site. PMID:26205623

  16. Proteins and Their Interacting Partners: An Introduction to Protein–Ligand Binding Site Prediction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Daniel Barry; Brackenridge, Danielle Allison; McGuffin, Liam James

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the biological and biochemical roles of proteins, and subsequently determining their interacting partners, can be difficult and time consuming using in vitro and/or in vivo methods, and consequently the majority of newly sequenced proteins will have unknown structures and functions. However, in silico methods for predicting protein–ligand binding sites and protein biochemical functions offer an alternative practical solution. The characterisation of protein–ligand binding sites is essential for investigating new functional roles, which can impact the major biological research spheres of health, food, and energy security. In this review we discuss the role in silico methods play in 3D modelling of protein–ligand binding sites, along with their role in predicting biochemical functionality. In addition, we describe in detail some of the key alternative in silico prediction approaches that are available, as well as discussing the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) and the Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) projects, and their impact on developments in the field. Furthermore, we discuss the importance of protein function prediction methods for tackling 21st century problems. PMID:26694353

  17. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  18. A membrane protein enriched in endoplasmic reticulum exit sites interacts with COPII.

    PubMed

    Tang, B L; Ong, Y S; Huang, B; Wei, S; Wong, E T; Qi, R; Horstmann, H; Hong, W

    2001-10-26

    Although all mammalian COPII components have now been cloned, little is known of their interactions with other regulatory proteins involved in exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We report here that a mammalian protein (Yip1A) that is about 31% identical to S. cerevisiae and which interacts with and modulates COPII-mediated ER-Golgi transport. Yip1A transcripts are ubiquitously expressed. Transcripts of a related mammalian homologue, Yip1B, are found specifically in the heart. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that Yip1A is localized to vesicular structures that are concentrated at the perinuclear region. The structures marked by Yip1A co-localized with Sec31A and Sec13, components of the COPII coat protein complex. Immunoelectron microscopy also showed that Yip1A co-localizes with Sec13 at ER exit sites. Overexpression of the hydrophilic N terminus of Yip1A arrests ER-Golgi transport of the vesicular stomatitis G protein and causes fragmentation and dispersion of the Golgi apparatus. A glutathione S-transferase fusion protein with the hydrophilic N terminus of Yip1A (GST-Yip1A) is able to bind to and deplete vital components from rat liver cytosol that is essential for in vitro vesicular stomatitis G transport. Peptide sequence analysis of cytosolic proteins that are specifically bound to GST-Yip1A revealed, among other proteins, mammalian COPII components Sec23 and Sec24. A highly conserved domain at the N terminus of Yip1A is required for Sec23/Sec24 interaction. Our results suggest that Yip1A is involved in the regulation of ER-Golgi traffic at the level of ER exit sites. PMID:11489904

  19. Interacting sites of scorpion toxin ErgTx1 with hERG1 K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Vargas, J M; Restano-Cassulini, R; Possani, L D

    2012-05-01

    Peptides purified from scorpion venoms were shown to interact with specific amino acid residues present in the outer vestibule of various sub-types of potassium channels, occluding the pore and causing a decrement of K(+) permeability through the membrane of excitable and non excitable cells. This communication describes the identification of several interacting sites of toxin ErgTx1, a toxin purified from the venom of the scorpion Centruroides noxius, with the human ERG1 K(+) channels, by means of site-directed mutagenesis of specific residues of the toxin. Recombinant mutants of the gene coding for ErgTx1 were expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli, properly folded and their affinities and interactions with hERG1 channels were determined by patch-clamp techniques. Residues in position Y14, Y17 and F37 of the solvent exposed hydrophobic surface, and charged residues at the position K13 and K38 of ErgTx1 were shown to cause a decrement of the affinity from 20 folds to 3 orders of magnitude, thus suggesting that they are certainly participating on the binding surface of this toxin towards the hERG1 channels. Double mutants at positions K13 and F37, Y14 and F37, Y17 and F37 and K13 and K38 were also prepared and assayed, but the results obtained are not much different from the single point mutants of ErgTx1. The results of the present work indicate the most probable surface area of ErgTx1 that makes contact with the hERG channels. PMID:22366117

  20. Leaving Group Ability Observably Affects Transition State Structure in a Single Enzyme Active Site.

    PubMed

    Roston, Daniel; Demapan, Darren; Cui, Qiang

    2016-06-15

    A reaction's transition state (TS) structure plays a critical role in determining reactivity and has important implications for the design of catalysts, drugs, and other applications. Here, we explore TS structure in the enzyme alkaline phosphatase using hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics simulations. We find that minor perturbations to the substrate have major effects on TS structure and the way the enzyme stabilizes the TS. Substrates with good leaving groups (LGs) have little cleavage of the phosphorus-LG bond at the TS, while substrates with poor LGs have substantial cleavage of that bond. The results predict nonlinear free energy relationships for a single rate-determining step, and substantial differences in kinetic isotope effects for different substrates; both trends were observed in previous experimental studies, although the original interpretations differed from the present model. Moreover, due to different degrees of phosphorus-LG bond cleavage at the TS for different substrates, the LG is stabilized by different interactions at the TS: while a poor LG is directly stabilized by an active site zinc ion, a good LG is mainly stabilized by active site water molecules. Our results demonstrate the considerable plasticity of TS structure and stabilization in enzymes. Furthermore, perturbations to reactivity that probe TS structure experimentally (i.e., substituent effects) may substantially perturb the TS they aim to probe, and thus classical experimental approaches such as free energy relations should be interpreted with care. PMID:27186960

  1. QM/MM Analysis of Cellulase Active Sites and Actions of the Enzymes on Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Saharay, Moumita; Guo, Hao-Bo; Smith, Jeremy C; Guo, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradation of cellulosic biomass requires the actions of three types of secreted enzymes; endoglucanase (EC 3.2.1.4), cellobiohydrolase or exoglucanase (EC 3.2.1.91), and -glucosidase (EC 4.2.1.21). These enzymes act synergistically to hydrolyse the -1,4 bonds of cellulose and converts it into simple sugar. Hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond can occur either by net retention or by inversion of anomeric configuration at the anomeric center. QM/MM simulations are useful tools to study the energetics of the reactions and analyze the active-site structures at different states of the catalysis, including the formation of unstable transition states. Here, a brief description of previous work on glycoside hydrolases is first given. The results of the QM/MM potential energy and free energy simulations corresponding to glycosylation and deglycosylation processes are then provided for two retaining endoglucanases, Cel12A and Cel5A. The active-site structural features are analyzed based on the QM/MM results. The role of different residues and hydrogen bonding interactions during the catalysis and the importance of the sugar ring distortion are discussed for these two enzymes.

  2. Characterization of the Dielectric Constant in the Trichoderma reesei Cel7B Active Site.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiangfei; Wang, Yefei; Zhang, Shujun; Yan, Shihai; Li, Tong; Yao, Lishan

    2015-07-27

    An attempt is made to evaluate the dielectric constant of the Trichoderma reesei Cel7B active site. Through kinetic measurements, the pKa value of the catalytic acid E201 is determined. Mutations (away from E201) with net charge changes are introduced to perturb the E201 pKa. It is shown that the mutation with a +1 charge change (including G225R, G230R, and A335R) decreases the pKa of E201, whereas the mutation with a -1 charge change (including Q149E, A222D, G225D, and G230D) increases the pKa. This effect is consistent with the electrostatic interaction between the changed charge and the E201 side chain. The fitting of the experimental data yields an apparent dielectric constant of 25-80. Molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water molecules indicate that the high solvent accessibility of the active site contributes largely to the high dielectric constant. ONIOM calculations show that high dielectric constant benefits the catalysis through decreasing the energy of the transition state relative to that of the enzyme substrate complex. PMID:26114648

  3. Structural plasticity of an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase active site

    PubMed Central

    Turner, James M.; Graziano, James; Spraggon, Glen; Schultz, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, tRNA aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs have been evolved that allow one to genetically encode a large array of unnatural amino acids in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. We have determined the crystal structures of two substrate-bound Methanococcus jannaschii tyrosyl aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that charge the unnatural amino acids p-bromophenylalanine and 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine (NpAla). A comparison of these structures with the substrate-bound WT synthetase, as well as a mutant synthetase that charges p-acetylphenylalanine, shows that altered specificity is due to both side-chain and backbone rearrangements within the active site that modify hydrogen bonds and packing interactions with substrate, as well as disrupt the α8-helix, which spans the WT active site. The high degree of structural plasticity that is observed in these aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is rarely found in other mutant enzymes with altered specificities and provides an explanation for the surprising adaptability of the genetic code to novel amino acids. PMID:16618920

  4. Role of a cysteine residue in the active site of ERK and the MAPKK family

    SciTech Connect

    Ohori, Makoto; Kinoshita, Takayoshi; Yoshimura, Seiji; Warizaya, Masaichi; Nakajima, Hidenori . E-mail: hidenori.nakajima@jp.astellas.com; Miyake, Hiroshi

    2007-02-16

    Kinases of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, including extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), represent likely targets for pharmacological intervention in proliferative diseases. Here, we report that FR148083 inhibits ERK2 enzyme activity and TGF{beta}-induced AP-1-dependent luciferase expression with respective IC{sub 50} values of 0.08 and 0.05 {mu}M. FR265083 (1'-2' dihydro form) and FR263574 (1'-2' and 7'-8' tetrahydro form) exhibited 5.5-fold less and no activity, respectively, indicating that both the {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated ketone and the conformation of the lactone ring contribute to this inhibitory activity. The X-ray crystal structure of the ERK2/FR148083 complex revealed that the compound binds to the ATP binding site of ERK2, involving a covalent bond to S{gamma} of ERK2 Cys166, hydrogen bonds with the backbone NH of Met108, N{zeta} of Lys114, backbone C=O of Ser153, N{delta}2 of Asn154, and hydrophobic interactions with the side chains of Ile31, Val39, Ala52, and Leu156. The covalent bond motif in the ERK2/FR148083 complex assures that the inhibitor has high activity for ERK2 and no activity for other MAPKs such as JNK1 and p38MAPK{alpha}/{beta}/{gamma}/{delta} which have leucine residues at the site corresponding to Cys166 in ERK2. On the other hand, MEK1 and MKK7, kinases of the MAPKK family which also can be inhibited by FR148083, contain a cysteine residue corresponding to Cys166 of ERK2. The covalent binding to the common cysteine residue in the ATP-binding site is therefore likely to play a crucial role in the inhibitory activity for these MAP kinases. These findings on the molecular recognition mechanisms of FR148083 for kinases with Cys166 should provide a novel strategy for the pharmacological intervention of MAPK cascades.

  5. Framing medical tourism: an examination of appeal, risk, convalescence, accreditation, and interactivity in medical tourism web sites.

    PubMed

    Mason, Alicia; Wright, Kevin B

    2011-02-01

    This exploratory study analyzed the content of medical tourism Web sites in an attempt to examine how they convey information about benefits and risks of medical procedures, how they frame credibility, and the degree to which these Web sites include interactive features for consumers. Drawing upon framing theory, the researchers content analyzed a sample of 66 medical tourism Web sites throughout the world. The results indicated that medical tourism Web sites largely promote the benefits of medical procedures while downplaying the risks, and relatively little information regarding the credibility of these services appears. In addition, the presentation of benefits/risks, credibility, and Web site interactivity were found to differ by region and type of facility. The authors discuss the implications of these findings concerning the framing of medical tourism Web site content, future directions for research, and limitations. PMID:21161812

  6. Reference interaction site model and optimized perturbation theories of colloidal dumbbells with increasing anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Munaò, Gianmarco Costa, Dino; Caccamo, Carlo; Gámez, Francisco; Giacometti, Achille

    2015-06-14

    We investigate thermodynamic properties of anisotropic colloidal dumbbells in the frameworks provided by the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM) theory and an Optimized Perturbation Theory (OPT), this latter based on a fourth-order high-temperature perturbative expansion of the free energy, recently generalized to molecular fluids. Our model is constituted by two identical tangent hard spheres surrounded by square-well attractions with same widths and progressively different depths. Gas-liquid coexistence curves are obtained by predicting pressures, free energies, and chemical potentials. In comparison with previous simulation results, RISM and OPT agree in reproducing the progressive reduction of the gas-liquid phase separation as the anisotropy of the interaction potential becomes more pronounced; in particular, the RISM theory provides reasonable predictions for all coexistence curves, bar the strong anisotropy regime, whereas OPT performs generally less well. Both theories predict a linear dependence of the critical temperature on the interaction strength, reproducing in this way the mean-field behavior observed in simulations; the critical density—that drastically drops as the anisotropy increases—turns to be less accurate. Our results appear as a robust benchmark for further theoretical studies, in support to the simulation approach, of self-assembly in model colloidal systems.

  7. Large, motile epifauna interact strongly with harpacticoid copepods and polychaetes at a bathyal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thistle, David; Eckman, James E.; Paterson, Gordon L. J.

    2008-03-01

    Strengths of interactions among groups of animals in deep-sea-sediment communities are poorly known. Large, motile epifauna (LME) such as sea cucumbers, star fishes, and demersal fishes occur in the deep sea and are sources of predation, disturbance, and habitat alteration and thus have the potential to interact strongly with infauna. At a site off the southwestern coast of the United States (32°57.3'N, 117°32.2'W, 780 m depth), we excluded the LME from five 75- ×75-cm plots with cages. After 143 d, we sampled these plots and five plots of the same size paired with them as controls. Abundances of harpacticoid copepods and polychaetes were significantly lower in cages than in controls. In several cages, nematodes and kinorhynchs were also dramatically less abundant than in paired controls. Results suggest that LME ordinarily affect the infaunal assemblage in such a way that harpacticoids and polychaetes (and perhaps nematodes and kinorhynchs) can maintain higher abundances than they can in the absence of LME, indicating that strong interactions can influence the organization of deep-sea-sediment communities. In a multivariate analysis of environmental parameters, cage and control samples were intermixed, so if the effect is transmitted by alterations of the environment by the LME, the nature of the alterations must be relatively local and remains to be discovered.

  8. Protein Kinase A and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways Antagonistically Regulate Fission Yeast fbp1 Transcription by Employing Different Modes of Action at Two Upstream Activation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Lori A.; Hoffman, Charles S.

    2000-01-01

    A significant challenge to our understanding of eukaryotic transcriptional regulation is to determine how multiple signal transduction pathways converge on a single promoter to regulate transcription in divergent fashions. To study this, we have investigated the transcriptional regulation of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe fbp1 gene that is repressed by a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) pathway and is activated by a stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. In this study, we identified and characterized two cis-acting elements in the fbp1 promoter required for activation of fbp1 transcription. Upstream activation site 1 (UAS1), located approximately 900 bp from the transcriptional start site, resembles a cAMP response element (CRE) that is the binding site for the atf1-pcr1 heterodimeric transcriptional activator. Binding of this activator to UAS1 is positively regulated by the MAPK pathway and negatively regulated by PKA. UAS2, located approximately 250 bp from the transcriptional start site, resembles a Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress response element. UAS2 is bound by transcriptional activators and repressors regulated by both the PKA and MAPK pathways, although atf1 itself is not present in these complexes. Transcriptional regulation of fbp1 promoter constructs containing only UAS1 or UAS2 confirms that the PKA and MAPK regulation is targeted to both sites. We conclude that the PKA and MAPK signal transduction pathways regulate fbp1 transcription at UAS1 and UAS2, but that the antagonistic interactions between these pathways involve different mechanisms at each site. PMID:10938120

  9. The Interaction between tRNALys3 and the Primer Activation Signal Deciphered by NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brachet, Franck; Tisne, Carine

    2013-01-01

    The initiation of reverse transcription of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) requires the opening of the three-dimensional structure of the primer tRNALys3 for its annealing to the viral RNA at the primer binding site (PBS). Despite the fact that the result of this rearrangement is thermodynamically more stable, there is a high-energy barrier that requires the chaperoning activity of the viral nucleocapsid protein. In addition to the nucleotide complementarity to the PBS, several regions of tRNALys3 have been described as interacting with the viral genomic RNA. Among these sequences, a sequence of the viral genome called PAS for “primer activation signal” was proposed to interact with the T-arm of tRNALys3, this interaction stimulating the initiation of reverse transcription. In this report, we investigate the formation of this additional interaction with NMR spectroscopy, using a simple system composed of the primer tRNALys3, the 18 nucleotides of the PBS, the PAS (8 nucleotides) encompassed or not in a hairpin structure, and the nucleocapsid protein. Our NMR study provides molecular evidence of the existence of this interaction and highlights the role of the nucleocapsid protein in promoting this additional RNA-RNA annealing. This study presents the first direct observation at a single base-pair resolution of the PAS/anti-PAS association, which has been proposed to be involved in the chronological regulation of the reverse transcription. PMID:23762248

  10. A structural model for across membrane coupling between the Qo and Qi active sites of cytochrome bc1.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Jason W

    2010-12-01

    The two spatially distant quinone-binding sites of the ubihydroquinone: cytochrome c oxidoreductase (cyt bc(1)) complex have been shown to influence one another in some fashion. This transmembrane communication alters cofactor and redox partner binding interactions and could potentially influence the timing or 'concerted' steps involved in the steady-state turnover of the homodimeric enzymes. Yet, despite several lines of evidence corroborating the coupling of the quinone binding active sites to one another, little to no testable hypothesis has been offered to explain how such a "signal" might be transmitted across the presumably rigid hydrophobic domain of the enzyme. Recently, it has been shown that this interquinone binding sites communication influences the steady-state position of the mobile [2Fe-2S] cluster containing iron sulfur protein (Sarewicz M., Dutka M., Froncisz W., Osyczka A. (2009) Biochemistry 48, 5708-5720) as mediated by at least one transmembrane helix of the b-type cyt containing subunit (Cooley, J. W., Lee, D. W., and Daldal, F. (2009) Biochemistry 48, 1988-1999). Here we provide an overview of the evidence supporting the structural coupling of these sites and provide a theoretical framework for how the redox state of a quinone at one cofactor binding site might influence the cofactor-, inhibitor-, and/or protein-protein interactions at the structurally distant opposing Q binding site. PMID:20513347

  11. Metal-Metal Interactions in Heterobimetallic Complexes with Dinucleating Redox-Active Ligands.

    PubMed

    Broere, Daniël L J; Modder, Dieuwertje K; Blokker, Eva; Siegler, Maxime A; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2016-02-12

    The tuning of metal-metal interactions in multinuclear assemblies is a challenge. Selective P coordination of a redox-active PNO ligand to Au(I) followed by homoleptic metalation of the NO pocket with Ni(II) affords a unique trinuclear Au-Ni-Au complex. This species features two antiferromagnetically coupled ligand-centered radicals and a double intramolecular d(8)-d(10) interaction, as supported by spectroscopic, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and computational data. A corresponding cationic dinuclear Au-Ni analogue with a stronger d(8)-d(10) interaction is also reported. Although both heterobimetallic structures display rich electrochemistry, only the trinuclear Au-Ni-Au complex facilitates electrocatalytic C-X bond activation of alkyl halides in its doubly reduced state. Hence, the presence of a redox-active ligand framework, an available coordination site at gold, and the nature of the nickel-gold interaction appear to be essential for this reactivity. PMID:26762546

  12. Contribution of active-site glutamine to rate enhancement in ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Boudreaux, David; Chaney, Joseph; Maiti, Tushar K.; Das, Chittaranjan

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases (UCHs) are cysteine proteases featuring a classical cysteine-histidine-aspartate catalytic triad, also a highly conserved glutamine thought to be a part of the oxyanion hole. However, the contribution of this side chain to the catalysis by UCH enzymes is not known. Herein, we demonstrate that the glutamine side chain contributes to rate enhancement in UCHL1, UCHL3 and UCHL5. Mutation of the glutamine to alanine in these enzymes impairs the catalytic efficiency mainly due to a 16 to 30-fold reduction in kcat, which is consistent with a loss of approximately 2 kcal/mol in transition-state stabilization. However, the contribution to transition-state stabilization observed here is rather modest for the side chain’s role in oxyanion stabilization. Interestingly, we discovered that the carbonyl oxygen of this side chain is engaged in a C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding contact with the CεH group of the catalytic histidine. Upon further analysis, we found that this interaction is a common active-site structural feature in most cysteine proteases, including papain, belonging to families with the QCH(N/D) type of active-site configuration. It is possible that removal of the glutamine side chain might have abolished the C—H•••O interaction, which typically accounts for 2 kcal/mol of stabilization, leading to the effect on catalysis observed here. Additional studies performed on UCHL3 by mutating the glutamine to glutamate (strong C—H•••O acceptor but oxyanion destabilizer) and to lysine (strong oxyanion stabilizer but lacking C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding property) suggest that the C—H•••O hydrogen bond could contribute to catalysis. PMID:22284438

  13. Analysis of ground response data at Lotung large-scale soil- structure interaction experiment site. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.Y.; Mok, C.M.; Power, M.S.

    1991-12-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in cooperation with the Taiwan Power Company (TPC), constructed two models (1/4-scale and 1/2-scale) of a nuclear plant containment structure at a site in Lotung (Tang, 1987), a seismically active region in northeast Taiwan. The models were constructed to gather data for the evaluation and validation of soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis methodologies. Extensive instrumentation was deployed to record both structural and ground responses at the site during earthquakes. The experiment is generally referred to as the Lotung Large-Scale Seismic Test (LSST). As part of the LSST, two downhole arrays were installed at the site to record ground motions at depths as well as at the ground surface. Structural response and ground response have been recorded for a number of earthquakes (i.e. a total of 18 earthquakes in the period of October 1985 through November 1986) at the LSST site since the completion of the installation of the downhole instruments in October 1985. These data include those from earthquakes having magnitudes ranging from M{sub L} 4.5 to M{sub L} 7.0 and epicentral distances range from 4.7 km to 77.7 km. Peak ground surface accelerations range from 0.03 g to 0.21 g for the horizontal component and from 0.01 g to 0.20 g for the vertical component. The objectives of the study were: (1) to obtain empirical data on variations of earthquake ground motion with depth; (2) to examine field evidence of nonlinear soil response due to earthquake shaking and to determine the degree of soil nonlinearity; (3) to assess the ability of ground response analysis techniques including techniques to approximate nonlinear soil response to estimate ground motions due to earthquake shaking; and (4) to analyze earth pressures recorded beneath the basemat and on the side wall of the 1/4 scale model structure during selected earthquakes.

  14. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine

    PubMed Central

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO2. We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O2 and CO2 bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO2 defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg2+ surrounded by three H2O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming. PMID:23112176

  15. Nuclear Protein Sam68 Interacts with the Enterovirus 71 Internal Ribosome Entry Site and Positively Regulates Viral Protein Translation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Song, Lei; Cong, Haolong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71) recruits various cellular factors to assist in the replication and translation of its genome. Identification of the host factors involved in the EV71 life cycle not only will enable a better understanding of the infection mechanism but also has the potential to be of use in the development of antiviral therapeutics. In this study, we demonstrated that the cellular factor 68-kDa Src-associated protein in mitosis (Sam68) acts as an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) trans-acting factor (ITAF) that binds specifically to the EV71 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR). Interaction sites in both the viral IRES (stem-loops IV and V) and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K homology (KH) domain of Sam68 protein were further mapped using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and biotin RNA pulldown assay. More importantly, dual-luciferase (firefly) reporter analysis suggested that overexpression of Sam68 positively regulated IRES-dependent translation of virus proteins. In contrast, both IRES activity and viral protein translation significantly decreased in Sam68 knockdown cells compared with the negative-control cells treated with short hairpin RNA (shRNA). However, downregulation of Sam68 did not have a significant inhibitory effect on the accumulation of the EV71 genome. Moreover, Sam68 was redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and interacts with cellular factors, such as poly(rC)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), during EV71 infection. The cytoplasmic relocalization of Sam68 in EV71-infected cells may be involved in the enhancement of EV71 IRES-mediated translation. Since Sam68 is known to be a RNA-binding protein, these results provide direct evidence that Sam68 is a novel ITAF that interacts with EV71 IRES and positively regulates viral protein translation. IMPORTANCE The nuclear protein Sam68 is found as an additional new host factor that interacts with the EV71 IRES during infection

  16. Interaction of receptor-activity-modifying protein1 with tubulin.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Thomas H; Mueller-Steiner, Sarah; Schwerdtfeger, Kerstin; Kleinert, Peter; Troxler, Heinz; Kelm, Jens M; Ittner, Lars M; Fischer, Jan A; Born, Walter

    2007-08-01

    Receptor-activity-modifying protein (RAMP) 1 is an accessory protein of the G protein-coupled calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR). The CLR/RAMP1 heterodimer defines a receptor for the potent vasodilatory calcitonin gene-related peptide. A wider tissue distribution of RAMP1, as compared to that of the CLR, is consistent with additional biological functions. Here, glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down, coimmunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid experiments identified beta-tubulin as a novel RAMP1-interacting protein. GST pull-down experiments indicated interactions between the N- and C-terminal domains of RAMP1 and beta-tubulin. Yeast two-hybrid experiments confirmed the interaction between the N-terminal region of RAMP1 and beta-tubulin. Interestingly, alpha-tubulin was co-extracted with beta-tubulin in pull-down experiments and immunoprecipitation of RAMP1 coprecipitated alpha- and beta-tubulin. Confocal microscopy indicated colocalization of RAMP1 and tubulin predominantly in axon-like processes of neuronal differentiated human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. In conclusion, the findings point to biological roles of RAMP1 beyond its established interaction with G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:17493758

  17. 78 FR 33908 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... identified Wind Energy Area (WEA) on the OCS offshore Rhode Island (RI) and Massachusetts (MA). The revised... from leasing, site characterization, and site assessment in and around the Call Area (76 FR 51391). The... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on...

  18. 77 FR 39508 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... specific project proposals on those leases) in an identified Wind Energy Area (WEA) on the OCS offshore..., site characterization, and site assessment in and around the Call Area (76 FR 51391). The Call Area is... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on...

  19. Active Layer and Moisture Measurements for Intensive Site 0 and 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-04-17

    These are measurements of Active Layer Thickness collected along several lines beginning in September, 2011 to the present. The data were collected at several time periods along the Site0 L2 Line, the Site1 AB Line, and an ERT Monitoring Line near Area A in Site1.

  20. Nuclear Site Security in the Event of Terrorist Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M.L.; Sims, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper, presented as a poster, identifies why ballistic protection should now be considered at nuclear sites to counter terrorist threats. A proven and flexible form of multi purpose protection is described in detail with identification of trial results that show its suitability for this role. (authors)

  1. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  2. Site-specific DOTA/europium-labeling of recombinant human relaxin-3 for receptor-ligand interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Jie; Luo, Xiao; Liu, Ya-Li; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Wade, John D; Bathgate, Ross A D; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2012-08-01

    Relaxin-3 (also known as INSL7) is a recently identified neuropeptide belonging to the insulin/relaxin superfamily. It has putative roles in the regulation of stress responses, food intake, and reproduction by activation of its cognate G-protein-coupled receptor RXFP3. It also binds and activates the relaxin family peptide receptors RXFP1 and RXFP4 in vitro. To obtain a europium-labeled relaxin-3 as tracer for studying the interaction of these receptors with various ligands, in the present work we propose a novel site-specific labeling strategy for the recombinant human relaxin-3 that has been previously prepared in our laboratory. First, the N-terminal 6 × His-tag of the single-chain relaxin-3 precursor was removed by Aeromonas aminopeptidase and all of the primary amines of the resultant peptide were reversibly blocked by citroconic anhydride. Second, the A-chain N-terminus of the blocked peptide was released by endoproteinase Asp-N cleavage that removed the linker peptide between the B- and A-chains. Third, an alkyne moiety was introduced to the newly released A-chain N-terminus by reaction with the highly active primary amine-specific N-hydroxysuccinimide ester. Fourth, after removal of the reversible blockage under mild acidic condition, europium-loaded DOTA with an azide moiety was introduced to the two-chain relaxin-3 carrying the alkyne moiety through click chemistry. Using this site-specific labeling strategy, homogeneous monoeuropium-labeled human relaxin-3 could be obtained with good overall yield. In contrast, conventional random labeling resulted in a complex mixture that was poorly resolved because human relaxin-3 has four primary amine moieties that all react with the modification reagent. Both saturation and competition binding assays demonstrated that the DOTA/Eu(3+)-labeled relaxin-3 retained high binding affinity for human RXFP3, RXFP4, and RXFP1 and was therefore a suitable non-radioactive and stable tracer to study the interaction of various

  3. Blogs and Social Network Sites as Activity Systems: Exploring Adult Informal Learning Process through Activity Theory Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heo, Gyeong Mi; Lee, Romee

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses an Activity Theory framework to explore adult user activities and informal learning processes as reflected in their blogs and social network sites (SNS). Using the assumption that a web-based space is an activity system in which learning occurs, typical features of the components were investigated and each activity system then…

  4. Stigma's Effect on Social Interaction and Social Media Activity.

    PubMed

    Boudewyns, Vanessa; Himelboim, Itai; Hansen, Derek L; Southwell, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    Stigmatized topics, such as HIV/STD, likely constrain related information sharing in ways that should be apparent in social interactions both on and off the Internet. Specifically, the authors predicted that the more people perceive an issue as stigmatized, the less likely they are to talk about the issue both privately (with sexual partners and peers) and publicly (on Twitter). Study 1 tested the effect of stigma on conversations at the individual level: The authors asked a group of participants (N = 138) about perceived STD-testing stigma, interactions with a sexual partner, and conversations with peers about STD testing. Study 2 assessed whether health conditions, in the aggregate, were less likely to generate social media activity as a function of current stigmatization. Using 259,758 archived Twitter posts mentioning 13 medical conditions, the authors tested whether level of stigma predicted the volume of relevant social media conversation, controlling for each condition's amount of advocacy and Google search popularity from a user's perspective. Findings supported our hypotheses. Individuals who reported perceiving a given health conditions in more stigmatic ways also reported interacting less with others about that topic; Twitter results showed a similar pattern. Results also suggest a more complex story of influence, as funding from the National Institutes of Health (i.e., each conditions amount of advocacy) associated with the examined health conditions also predicted Twitter activity. Overall, these results indicated that stigma had a similar, dampening effect on face-to-face and Twitter interactions. Findings hold theoretical and practical implications, which are discussed. PMID:26087307

  5. Active-Site Hydration and Water Diffusion in Cytochrome P450cam: A Highly Dynamic Process

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome Y

    2011-01-01

    Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (300 ns) are performed on both the apo- (i.e., camphor-free) and camphor-bound cytochrome P450cam (CYP101). Water diffusion into and out of the protein active site is observed without biased sampling methods. During the course of the molecular dynamics simulation, an average of 6.4 water molecules is observed in the camphor-binding site of the apo form, compared to zero water molecules in the binding site of the substrate-bound form, in agreement with the number of water molecules observed in crystal structures of the same species. However, as many as 12 water molecules can be present at a given time in the camphor-binding region of the active site in the case of apo-P450cam, revealing a highly dynamic process for hydration of the protein active site, with water molecules exchanging rapidly with the bulk solvent. Water molecules are also found to exchange locations frequently inside the active site, preferentially clustering in regions surrounding the water molecules observed in the crystal structure. Potential-of-mean-force calculations identify thermodynamically favored trans-protein pathways for the diffusion of water molecules between the protein active site and the bulk solvent. Binding of camphor in the active site modifies the free-energy landscape of P450cam channels toward favoring the diffusion of water molecules out of the protein active site.

  6. Pair interaction of catalytically active colloids: from assembly to escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi-Mood, Nima; Mozaffari, Ali; Córdova-Figueroa, Ubaldo M.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics and pair trajectory of two self-propelled colloids are reported. The autonomous motions of the colloids are due to a catalytic chemical reaction taking place asymmetrically on their surfaces that generates a concentration gradient of interactive solutes around the particles and actuate particle propulsion. We consider two spherical particles with symmetric catalytic caps extending over the local polar angles $\\theta^1_{cap}$ and $\\theta^2_{cap}$ from the centers of active sectors in an otherwise quiescent fluid. A combined analytical-numerical technique was developed to solve the coupled mass transfer equation and the hydrodynamics in the Stokes flow regime. The ensuing pair trajectory of the colloids is controlled by the reacting coverages $\\theta^j_{cap}$ and their initial relative orientation with respect to each other. Our analysis indicates two possible scenarios for pair trajectories of catalytic self-propelled particles: either the particles approach, come into contact and assemble or they interact and move away from each other (escape). For arbitrary motions of the colloids, it is found that the direction of particle rotations is the key factor in determining the escape or assembly scenario. Based on the analysis, a phase diagram is sketched for the pair trajectory of the catalytically active particles as a function of active coverages and their initial relative orientations. We believe this study has important implications in elucidation of collective behaviors of auotophoretically self-propelled colloids.

  7. An unequivocal example of cysteine proteinase activity affected by multiple electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M A; Baker, K C; Connerton, I F; Cummings, N J; Harris, G W; Henderson, I M; Jones, S T; Pickersgill, R W; Sumner, I G; Warwicker, J

    1994-10-01

    The role of electrostatic interactions between the ionizable Asp158 and the active site thiolate-imidazolium ion pair of some cysteine proteinases has been the subject of controversy for some time. This study reports the expression of wild type procaricain and Asp158Glu, Asp158Asn and Asp158Ala mutants from Escherichia coli. Purification of autocatalytically matured enzymes yielded sufficient fully active material for pH (kcat/Km) profiles to be obtained. Use of both uncharged and charged substrates allowed the effects of different reactive enzyme species to be separated from the complications of electrostatic effects between enzyme and substrate. At least three ionizations are detectable in the acid limb of wild type caricain and the Glu and Asn mutants. Only two pKa values, however, are detectable in the acid limb using the Ala mutant. Comparison of pH activity profiles shows that whilst an ionizable residue at position 158 is not essential for the formation of the thiolate-imidazolium ion pair, it does form a substantial part of the electrostatic field responsible for increased catalytic competence. Changing the position of this ionizable group in any way reduces activity. Complete removal of the charged group reduces catalytic competence even further. This work indicates that hydronations distant to the active site are contributing to the electrostatic effects leading to multiple active ionization states of the enzyme. PMID:7855143

  8. Multigrid solver for the reference interaction site model of molecular liquids theory.

    PubMed

    Sergiievskyi, Volodymyr P; Hackbusch, Wolfgang; Fedorov, Maxim V

    2011-07-15

    In this article, we propose a new multigrid-based algorithm for solving integral equations of the reference interactions site model (RISM). We also investigate the relationship between the parameters of the algorithm and the numerical accuracy of the hydration free energy calculations by RISM. For this purpose, we analyzed the performance of the method for several numerical tests with polar and nonpolar compounds. The results of this analysis provide some guidelines for choosing an optimal set of parameters to minimize computational expenses. We compared the performance of the proposed multigrid-based method with the one-grid Picard iteration and nested Picard iteration methods. We show that the proposed method is over 30 times faster than the one-grid iteration method, and in the high accuracy regime, it is almost seven times faster than the nested Picard iteration method. PMID:21455965

  9. Soil formation in post mining sites: the role of vegatation soil microflora and fauna interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouz, J.

    2009-04-01

    The role of vegetation and soil micro flora and fauna interaction during soil formation was studied in post mining sites in Czech Republic, Germany and USA. Vegetation and character of substrate substantially effect, micro flora, namely fungal bacterial ration, fauna composition and resulting microstructure of soil. Plants that bring more nitrogen in to the system support larger biomass of soil fauna and namely occurrence of earthworms which yield in larger bioturbation and associated faster production of A horizon in newly developing soil. Manipulation experiment show that presence of fauna have crucial effect of soil formation in these soil and positive effect of many plant species which are assumed to beneficial for reclamation is in fact indirect and caused by its positive effect on soil fauna development.

  10. The role of on-site and nearest-neighbor interactions in the correlated two-particles quantum walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peixoto, A. S.; Dias, W. S.

    2016-09-01

    We study the influence of the on-site and nearest-neighbor interactions on the eigenstates and dynamics of two-particles restricted to move in a one-dimensional optical lattice. An effective tight-binding approach with non-local interactions is employed in order to consider the non-perfect screening of the coulomb interaction between two-particles. Numerical and analytical results unveil the emergence of a new sub-band of bound states due to the nearest-neighbor interaction, besides a broadening of the usual sub-band associated with the hubbard-like on-site coupling. Furthermore, we solve the time-dependent schrodinger equation to follow the time evolution of an initially localized two-particles state. While the on-site interaction is responsible for a correlated dynamics in which particles occupy predominantly the same site, nearest-neighbor interactions is shown to be able to induce a quantum walk on which the particles remain predominantly in neighboring sites.

  11. Active site densities, oxygen activation and adsorbed reactive oxygen in alcohol activation on npAu catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Cun; Friend, C M; Fushimi, Rebecca; Madix, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    The activation of molecular O2 as well as the reactivity of adsorbed oxygen species is of central importance in aerobic selective oxidation chemistry on Au-based catalysts. Herein, we address the issue of O2 activation on unsupported nanoporous gold (npAu) catalysts by applying a transient pressure technique, a temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor, to measure the saturation coverage of atomic oxygen, its collisional dissociation probability, the activation barrier for O2 dissociation, and the facility with which adsorbed O species activate methanol, the initial step in the catalytic cycle of esterification. The results from these experiments indicate that molecular O2 dissociation is associated with surface silver, that the density of reactive sites is quite low, that adsorbed oxygen atoms do not spill over from the sites of activation onto the surrounding surface, and that methanol reacts quite facilely with the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In addition, the O species from O2 dissociation exhibits reactivity for the selective oxidation of methanol but not for CO. The TAP experiments also revealed that the surface of the npAu catalyst is saturated with adsorbed O under steady state reaction conditions, at least for the pulse reaction. PMID:27376884

  12. Active Site Structure and Peroxidase Activity of Oxidatively Modified Cytochrome c Species in Complexes with Cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Capdevila, Daiana A; Oviedo Rouco, Santiago; Tomasina, Florencia; Tortora, Verónica; Demicheli, Verónica; Radi, Rafael; Murgida, Daniel H

    2015-12-29

    We report a resonance Raman and UV-vis characterization of the active site structure of oxidatively modified forms of cytochrome c (Cyt-c) free in solution and in complexes with cardiolipin (CL). The studied post-translational modifications of Cyt-c include methionine sulfoxidation and tyrosine nitration, which lead to altered heme axial ligation and increased peroxidase activity with respect to those of the wild-type protein. In spite of the structural and activity differences between the protein variants free in solution, binding to CL liposomes induces in all cases the formation of a spectroscopically identical bis-His axial coordination conformer that more efficiently promotes lipid peroxidation. The spectroscopic results indicate that the bis-His form is in equilibrium with small amounts of high-spin species, thus suggesting a labile distal His ligand as the basis for the CL-induced increase in enzymatic activity observed for all protein variants. For Cyt-c nitrated at Tyr74 and sulfoxidized at Met80, the measured apparent binding affinities for CL are ∼4 times larger than for wild-type Cyt-c. On the basis of these results, we propose that these post-translational modifications may amplify the pro-apoptotic signal of Cyt-c under oxidative stress conditions at CL concentrations lower than for the unmodified protein. PMID:26620444

  13. Structure of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with the Inhibitor -thujaplicinol Bound at the RNase H Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel, D.; Maegley, K; Pauly, T; Bauman, J; Das, K; Dharia, C; Clark, Jr., A; Ryan, K; Hickey, M; et al.

    2009-01-01

    Novel inhibitors are needed to counteract the rapid emergence of drug-resistant HIV variants. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has both DNA polymerase and RNase H (RNH) enzymatic activities, but approved drugs that inhibit RT target the polymerase. Inhibitors that act against new targets, such as RNH, should be effective against all of the current drug-resistant variants. Here, we present 2.80 {angstrom} and 2.04 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures of an RNH inhibitor, {beta}-thujaplicinol, bound at the RNH active site of both HIV-1 RT and an isolated RNH domain. {beta}-thujaplicinol chelates two divalent metal ions at the RNH active site. We provide biochemical evidence that {beta}-thujaplicinol is a slow-binding RNH inhibitor with noncompetitive kinetics and suggest that it forms a tropylium ion that interacts favorably with RT and the RNA:DNA substrate.

  14. Mapping and Quantitation of the Interaction between the Recombination Activating Gene Proteins RAG1 and RAG2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Hang; Shetty, Keerthi; Surleac, Marius D; Petrescu, Andrei J; Schatz, David G

    2015-05-01

    The RAG endonuclease consists of RAG1, which contains the active site for DNA cleavage, and RAG2, an accessory factor whose interaction with RAG1 is critical for catalytic function. How RAG2 activates RAG1 is not understood. Here, we used biolayer interferometry and pulldown assays to identify regions of RAG1 necessary for interaction with RAG2 and to measure the RAG1-RAG2 binding affinity (KD ∼0.4 μM) (where RAG1 and RAG2 are recombination activating genes 1 or 2). Using the Hermes transposase as a guide, we constructed a 36-kDa "mini" RAG1 capable of interacting robustly with RAG2. Mini-RAG1 consists primarily of the catalytic center and the residues N-terminal to it, but it lacks a zinc finger region in RAG1 previously implicated in binding RAG2. The ability of Mini-RAG1 to interact with RAG2 depends on a predicted α-helix (amino acids 997-1008) near the RAG1 C terminus and a region of RAG1 from amino acids 479 to 559. Two adjacent acidic amino acids in this region (Asp-546 and Glu-547) are important for both the RAG1-RAG2 interaction and recombination activity, with Asp-546 of particular importance. Structural modeling of Mini-RAG1 suggests that Asp-546/Glu-547 lie near the predicted 997-1008 α-helix and components of the active site, raising the possibility that RAG2 binding alters the structure of the RAG1 active site. Quantitative Western blotting allowed us to estimate that mouse thymocytes contain on average ∼1,800 monomers of RAG1 and ∼15,000 molecules of RAG2, implying that nuclear concentrations of RAG1 and RAG2 are below the KD value for their interaction, which could help limit off-target RAG activity. PMID:25745109

  15. Mapping and Quantitation of the Interaction between the Recombination Activating Gene Proteins RAG1 and RAG2*♦

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Hang; Shetty, Keerthi; Surleac, Marius D.; Petrescu, Andrei J.; Schatz, David G.

    2015-01-01

    The RAG endonuclease consists of RAG1, which contains the active site for DNA cleavage, and RAG2, an accessory factor whose interaction with RAG1 is critical for catalytic function. How RAG2 activates RAG1 is not understood. Here, we used biolayer interferometry and pulldown assays to identify regions of RAG1 necessary for interaction with RAG2 and to measure the RAG1-RAG2 binding affinity (KD ∼0.4 μm) (where RAG1 and RAG2 are recombination activating genes 1 or 2). Using the Hermes transposase as a guide, we constructed a 36-kDa “mini” RAG1 capable of interacting robustly with RAG2. Mini-RAG1 consists primarily of the catalytic center and the residues N-terminal to it, but it lacks a zinc finger region in RAG1 previously implicated in binding RAG2. The ability of Mini-RAG1 to interact with RAG2 depends on a predicted α-helix (amino acids 997–1008) near the RAG1 C terminus and a region of RAG1 from amino acids 479 to 559. Two adjacent acidic amino acids in this region (Asp-546 and Glu-547) are important for both the RAG1-RAG2 interaction and recombination activity, with Asp-546 of particular importance. Structural modeling of Mini-RAG1 suggests that Asp-546/Glu-547 lie near the predicted 997-1008 α-helix and components of the active site, raising the possibility that RAG2 binding alters the structure of the RAG1 active site. Quantitative Western blotting allowed us to estimate that mouse thymocytes contain on average ∼1,800 monomers of RAG1 and ∼15,000 molecules of RAG2, implying that nuclear concentrations of RAG1 and RAG2 are below the KD value for their interaction, which could help limit off-target RAG activity. PMID:25745109

  16. An active site–tail interaction in the structure of hexahistidine-tagged Thermoplasma acidophilum citrate synthase

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Jesse R.; Donini, Stefano; Kappock, T. Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Citrate synthase (CS) plays a central metabolic role in aerobes and many other organisms. The CS reaction comprises two half-reactions: a Claisen aldol condensation of acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) and oxaloacetate (OAA) that forms citryl-CoA (CitCoA), and CitCoA hydrolysis. Protein conformational changes that ‘close’ the active site play an important role in the assembly of a catalytically competent condensation active site. CS from the thermoacidophile Thermoplasma acidophilum (TpCS) possesses an endogenous Trp fluorophore that can be used to monitor the condensation reaction. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of TpCS fused to a C-terminal hexahistidine tag (TpCSH6) reported here is an ‘open’ structure that, when compared with several liganded TpCS structures, helps to define a complete path for active-site closure. One active site in each dimer binds a neighboring His tag, the first nonsubstrate ligand known to occupy both the AcCoA and OAA binding sites. Solution data collectively suggest that this fortuitous interaction is stabilized by the crystalline lattice. As a polar but almost neutral ligand, the active site–tail interaction provides a new starting point for the design of bisubstrate-analog inhibitors of CS. PMID:26457521

  17. Nuclear quadrupole interaction of111Cd on type-1 Cu-sites in blue copper proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tröger, W.; Butz, T.; Danielsen, E.; Bauer, R.; Thoenes, U.; Messerschmidt, A.; Huber, R.; Canters, G. W.; den Blaauwen, T.

    1993-03-01

    The nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) of111Cd substituted for Cu(II) on type-1 sites in blue copper proteins is characterized by high values of ω0 in the region of 300 Mrad/s, close to that for the catalytic zinc site in alcohol dehydrogenase. Type-1 Cu has usually two sulfur ligands and two nitrogen ligands and in some cases an oxygen ligand in either a distorted tetrahedral geometry or in a trigonal bipyramidal geometry. The near tetrahedral arrangement together with the ligand sphere containing the same number of sulfur ligands explains the value of ω0 in the blue copper proteins. The present work determined the partial NQI for methionine using the known structure of azurin. This value was then used in the angular overlap model to calculate the NQI for ascorbate oxidase the structure of which is also known and gave good agreement with experiment. NQI data for laccase and stellacyanin the structures of which are unknown, are also given.

  18. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth’s crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts. Here we investigated in closer detail the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. Finally, we give a potential explanation of this effect, finding alkali-metal ions having different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar surfaces. PMID:25584435

  19. Inhibiting fungal multidrug resistance by disrupting an activator-Mediator interaction.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Joy L; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Vale-Silva, Luis A; Torelli, Riccardo; Posteraro, Brunella; Sohn, Yoo-Jin; Ji, Fei; Gelev, Vladimir; Sanglard, Dominique; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Mukherjee, Goutam; Bhyravabhotla, Jayaram; Buhrlage, Sara J; Gray, Nathanael S; Wagner, Gerhard; Näär, Anders M; Arthanari, Haribabu

    2016-02-25

    Eukaryotic transcription activators stimulate the expression of specific sets of target genes through recruitment of co-activators such as the RNA polymerase II-interacting Mediator complex. Aberrant function of transcription activators has been implicated in several diseases. However, therapeutic targeting efforts have been hampered by a lack of detailed molecular knowledge of the mechanisms of gene activation by disease-associated transcription activators. We previously identified an activator-targeted three-helix bundle KIX domain in the human MED15 Mediator subunit that is structurally conserved in Gal11/Med15 Mediator subunits in fungi. The Gal11/Med15 KIX domain engages pleiotropic drug resistance transcription factor (Pdr1) orthologues, which are key regulators of the multidrug resistance pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in the clinically important human pathogen Candida glabrata. The prevalence of C. glabrata is rising, partly owing to its low intrinsic susceptibility to azoles, the most widely used antifungal agent. Drug-resistant clinical isolates of C. glabrata most commonly contain point mutations in Pdr1 that render it constitutively active, suggesting that this transcriptional activation pathway represents a linchpin in C. glabrata multidrug resistance. Here we perform sequential biochemical and in vivo high-throughput screens to identify small-molecule inhibitors of the interaction of the C. glabrata Pdr1 activation domain with the C. glabrata Gal11A KIX domain. The lead compound (iKIX1) inhibits Pdr1-dependent gene activation and re-sensitizes drug-resistant C. glabrata to azole antifungals in vitro and in animal models for disseminated and urinary tract C. glabrata infection. Determining the NMR structure of the C. glabrata Gal11A KIX domain provides a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanism of Pdr1 gene activation and multidrug resistance inhibition by iKIX1. We have demonstrated the feasibility of small-molecule targeting of a

  20. Dynamic Kinetics of Nitrogen Cycle in Groundwater-Surface Water Interaction Zone at Hanford Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Liu, C.; Liu, Y.; Xu, F.; Yan, A.; Shi, L.; Zachara, J. M.; Gao, Y.; Qian, W.; Nelson, W.; Fredrickson, J.; Zhong, L.; Thompson, C.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen cycle carried out by microbes is an important geobiological process that has global implications for carbon and nitrogen cycling and climate change. This presentation describes a study of nitrogen cycle in groundwater-surface water interaction zone (GSIZ) at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Groundwater at Hanford sites has long been documented with nitrate contamination. Nearby Columbia River stage changes of up to 3 m every day because of daily discharge fluctuation from upstream Priest Rapids Dam; resulting an exchange of groundwater and surface water in a short time period. Yet, nitrogen cycle in the GSIZ at Hanford Site remains unclear. Column studies have been used to identify nitrogen metabolism pathways and investigate kinetics of nitrogen cycle in groundwater saturated zone, surface water saturated zone, and GSIZ. Functional gene and protein abundances were determined by qPCR and PRISM-SRM (high-pressure, high-resolution separations coupled with intelligent selection and multiplexing for sensitive selected reaction monitoring) to identify key enzymatic reactions and metabolic pathways of nitrogen cycle. The results showed that dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) competed with denitrification under anaerobic conditions, reducing 30% of NO3- to NH4+, a cation strongly retained on the sediments. As dissolved oxygen intruded the anaerobic zone with river water, NH4+ was oxidized to NO3-, increasing the mobility of NO3-. Multiplicative Monod models were established to describe nitrogen cycle in columns fed with O2 depleted synthetic groundwater and O2 saturated synthetic river water, respectively. The two models were then coupled to predict the dynamic kinetics of nitrogen cycle in GSIZ.

  1. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizat