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Sample records for active site iron

  1. The active site of low-temperature methane hydroxylation in iron-containing zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Benjamin E. R.; Vanelderen, Pieter; Bols, Max L.; Hallaert, Simon D.; Böttger, Lars H.; Ungur, Liviu; Pierloot, Kristine; Schoonheydt, Robert A.; Sels, Bert F.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2016-08-01

    An efficient catalytic process for converting methane into methanol could have far-reaching economic implications. Iron-containing zeolites (microporous aluminosilicate minerals) are noteworthy in this regard, having an outstanding ability to hydroxylate methane rapidly at room temperature to form methanol. Reactivity occurs at an extra-lattice active site called α-Fe(II), which is activated by nitrous oxide to form the reactive intermediate α-O; however, despite nearly three decades of research, the nature of the active site and the factors determining its exceptional reactivity are unclear. The main difficulty is that the reactive species—α-Fe(II) and α-O—are challenging to probe spectroscopically: data from bulk techniques such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility are complicated by contributions from inactive ‘spectator’ iron. Here we show that a site-selective spectroscopic method regularly used in bioinorganic chemistry can overcome this problem. Magnetic circular dichroism reveals α-Fe(II) to be a mononuclear, high-spin, square planar Fe(II) site, while the reactive intermediate, α-O, is a mononuclear, high-spin Fe(IV)=O species, whose exceptional reactivity derives from a constrained coordination geometry enforced by the zeolite lattice. These findings illustrate the value of our approach to exploring active sites in heterogeneous systems. The results also suggest that using matrix constraints to activate metal sites for function—producing what is known in the context of metalloenzymes as an ‘entatic’ state—might be a useful way to tune the activity of heterogeneous catalysts.

  2. Structure and nuclearity of active sites in Fe-zeolites: comparison with iron sites in enzymes and homogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zecchina, Adriano; Rivallan, Mickaël; Berlier, Gloria; Lamberti, Carlo; Ricchiardi, Gabriele

    2007-07-21

    Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite zeolites efficiently catalyse several oxidation reactions which find close analogues in the oxidation reactions catalyzed by homogeneous and enzymatic compounds. The iron centres are highly dispersed in the crystalline matrix and on highly diluted samples, mononuclear and dinuclear structures are expected to become predominant. The crystalline and robust character of the MFI framework has allowed to hypothesize that the catalytic sites are located in well defined crystallographic positions. For this reason these catalysts have been considered as the closest and best defined heterogeneous counterparts of heme and non heme iron complexes and of Fenton type Fe(2+) homogeneous counterparts. On this basis, an analogy with the methane monooxygenase has been advanced several times. In this review we have examined the abundant literature on the subject and summarized the most widely accepted views on the structure, nuclearity and catalytic activity of the iron species. By comparing the results obtained with the various characterization techniques, we conclude that Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite are not the ideal samples conceived before and that many types of species are present, some active and some other silent from adsorptive and catalytic point of view. The relative concentration of these species changes with thermal treatments, preparation procedures and loading. Only at lowest loadings the catalytically active species become the dominant fraction of the iron species. On the basis of the spectroscopic titration of the active sites by using NO as a probe, we conclude that the active species on very diluted samples are isolated and highly coordinatively unsaturated Fe(2+) grafted to the crystalline matrix. Indication of the constant presence of a smaller fraction of Fe(2+) presumably located on small clusters is also obtained. The nitrosyl species formed upon dosing NO from the gas phase on activated Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite, have been analyzed

  3. Hydrogen production by the naked active site of the di-iron hydrogenases in water.

    PubMed

    Zipoli, Federico; Car, Roberto; Cohen, Morrel H; Selloni, Annabella

    2009-10-01

    We explored the reactivity of the active center of the [FeFe]-hydrogenases detached from the enzyme and immersed in acidified water by first-principles Car-Parrinello molecular-dynamics simulations. We focused on the identification of the structures that are stable and metastable in acidified water and on their activity for hydrogen production. Our calculations revealed that the naked active center could be an efficient catalyst provided that electrons are transferred to the cluster. We found that both bridging and terminal isomers are present at equilibrium and that the bridging configuration is essential for efficient hydrogen production. The formation of the hydrogen molecule occurs via sequential protonations of the distal iron and of the N-atom of the S-CH(2)-NH-CH(2)-S chelating group. H(2) desorption does not involve a significant energy barrier, making the process very efficient at room temperature. We established that the bottleneck in the reaction is the direct proton transfer from water to the vacant site of the distal iron. Moreover, we found that even if the terminal isomer is present at the equilibrium, its strong local hydrophobicity prevents poisoning of the cluster.

  4. Active-site iron dynamics in heme proteins and model compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Kristl L.

    Active-site iron dynamics in heme proteins and model compounds are studied via nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) and compared with other experimental vibrational probes and theoretical calculations, yielding new insight into the vibrational dynamics of biologically significant proteins. NRVS is a novel technique that selectively probes only 57Fe; experiments provide quantitative information on the amplitude and frequency of all normal modes having significant iron vibrational motion. Data from other vibrational probes including traditional Mossbauer, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and inelastic neutron scattering provide complementary information on the vibrational dynamics of the heme-protein system as a whole. Specific iron participation is identified in resonance Raman and inelastic neutron modes when these spectroscopic modes are seen at the same frequency as NRVS vibrations. NRVS data is examined for 57Fe-containing myoglobin, cytochrome f, hemoglobin, and several heme model compounds. A template of heme normal modes is obtained from analyses of several model compound systems: phenyl-like modes or modes associated with the protein peak at very low-energies ˜30--60 cm-1, out-of-plane modes in the ˜70--130 cm-1 region, imidazole or histidine modes near 220 cm-1, in-plane modes from ˜200--500 cm-1, and ligand modes at the highest frequencies ˜460--600 cm-1. A qualitative understanding of the more complicated heme-protein dynamics is obtained by applying this template to the protein vibrational density of states (VDOS). Differences in heme-to-protein binding configurations in myoglobin and cytochrome f are reflected in the iron VDOS, suggesting a structural and dynamical correlation with their different biological functions (i.e. ligand binding versus electron transport). Hemoglobin hybrids containing 57Fe and 56Fe have been prepared for the first time and NRVS measurements show data for the selected alpha or beta subunits within a relatively

  5. Manganese oxide-induced strategy to high-performance iron/nitrogen/carbon electrocatalysts with highly exposed active sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Wu, Qiang; Zhuo, Ou; Jiang, Yufei; Bu, Yongfeng; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Xizhang; Hu, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    Iron/nitrogen/carbon (Fe/N/C) catalyst is so far the most promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic medium, whose performance depends closely on the synthesis chemistry. Herein, we report a MnOx-induced strategy to construct the Fe/N/C with highly exposed Fe-Nx active sites, which involves the uniform spreading of polyaniline on hierarchical N-doped carbon nanocages by a reactive-template polymerization, followed by the successive iron incorporation and polyaniline pyrolysis. The resulting Fe/N/C demonstrates an excellent ORR performance, including an onset potential of 0.92 V (vs. RHE), four electron selectivity, superb stability and immunity to methanol crossover. The excellent performance is well correlated with the greatly enhanced surface active sites of the catalyst stemming from the unique MnOx-induced strategy. This study provides an efficient approach for exploring the advanced ORR electrocatalysts by increasing the exposed active sites.Iron/nitrogen/carbon (Fe/N/C) catalyst is so far the most promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic medium, whose performance depends closely on the synthesis chemistry. Herein, we report a MnOx-induced strategy to construct the Fe/N/C with highly exposed Fe-Nx active sites, which involves the uniform spreading of polyaniline on hierarchical N-doped carbon nanocages by a reactive-template polymerization, followed by the successive iron incorporation and polyaniline pyrolysis. The resulting Fe/N/C demonstrates an excellent ORR performance, including an onset potential of 0.92 V (vs. RHE), four electron selectivity, superb stability and immunity to methanol crossover. The excellent performance is well correlated with the greatly enhanced surface active sites of the catalyst stemming from the unique MnOx-induced strategy. This study provides an efficient approach for exploring the advanced ORR electrocatalysts by increasing the

  6. Mechanistic Insights into the Bifunctional Non-Heme Iron Oxygenase Carbapenem Synthase by Active Site Saturation Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Ryan M.; Townsend, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    The carbapenem class of β-lactam antibiotics is known for its remarkable potency, antibacterial spectrum and resistance to β-lactamase-mediated inactivation. While the biosynthesis of structurally “complex” carbapenems, such as thienamycin, share initial biochemical steps with carbapenem-3-carboxylate (“simple” carbapenem), the requisite inversion at C5 and formation of the characteristic α,β-unsaturated carboxylate are different in origin between the two groups. Here we consider carbapenem synthase, a mechanistically distinct bifunctional non-heme iron α-ketoglutarate-dependent enzyme responsible for the terminal reactions, C5 epimerization and desaturation, in simple carbapenem production. Interestingly, this enzyme accepts two stereoisomeric substrates and transforms each to a common active antibiotic. Owing both to enzyme and product instability, resort to saturation mutagenesis of active site and selected second-sphere residues gave clearly differing profiles of CarC tolerance to structural modification. Guided by a crystal structure and the mutational data, in silico docking was used to suggest the positioning of each disastereomeric substrate in the active site. The two orientations relative to the reactive iron-oxo center are manifest in the two distinct reactions, C5-epimerization and C2/3-desaturation. These observations favor a two-step reaction scheme involving two complete oxidative cycles as opposed to a single catalytic cycle in which an active site tyrosine, Tyr67, after hydrogen donation to achieve bicyclic ring inversion, is further hypothesized to serve as a radical carrier. PMID:23611403

  7. Involvement of the Cys-Tyr cofactor on iron binding in the active site of human cysteine dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Arjune, Sita; Schwarz, Guenter; Belaidi, Abdel A

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur metabolism has gained increasing medical interest over the last years. In particular, cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been recognized as a potential marker in oncology due to its altered gene expression in various cancer types. Human CDO is a non-heme iron-dependent enzyme, which catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid, which is further metabolized to taurine or pyruvate and sulfate. Several studies have reported a unique post-translational modification of human CDO consisting of a cross-link between cysteine 93 and tyrosine 157 (Cys-Tyr), which increases catalytic efficiency in a substrate-dependent manner. However, the reaction mechanism by which the Cys-Tyr cofactor increases catalytic efficiency remains unclear. In this study, steady-state kinetics were determined for wild type CDO and two different variants being either impaired or saturated with the Cys-Tyr cofactor. Cofactor formation in CDO resulted in an approximately fivefold increase in k cat and tenfold increase in k cat/K m over the cofactor-free CDO variant. Furthermore, iron titration experiments revealed an 18-fold decrease in K d of iron upon cross-link formation. This finding suggests a structural role of the Cys-Tyr cofactor in coordinating the ferrous iron in the active site of CDO in accordance with the previously postulated reaction mechanism of human CDO. Finally, we identified product-based inhibition and α-ketoglutarate and glutarate as CDO inhibitors using a simplified well plate-based activity assay. This assay can be used for high-throughput identification of additional inhibitors, which may contribute to understand the functional importance of CDO in sulfur amino acid metabolism and related diseases.

  8. Active site formation mechanism of carbon-based oxygen reduction catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraike, Yusuke; Saito, Makoto; Niwa, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Masaki; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Kim, Jaehong; Nabae, Yuta; Kakimoto, Masa-aki

    2015-04-01

    Carbon-based cathode catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer (HB-FePc) were characterized, and their active-site formation mechanism was studied by synchrotron-based spectroscopy. The properties of the HB-FePc catalyst are compared with those of a catalyst with high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity synthesized from a mixture of iron phthalocyanine and phenolic resin (FePc/PhRs). Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the HB-FePc catalyst does not lose its ORR activity up to 900°C, whereas that of the FePc/PhRs catalyst decreases above 700°C. Hard X-ray photoemission spectra reveal that the HB-FePc catalysts retain more nitrogen components than the FePc/PhRs catalysts between pyrolysis temperatures of 600°C and 800°C. This is because the linked structure of the HB-FePc precursor has high thermostability against nitrogen desorption. Consequently, effective doping of active nitrogen species into the sp 2 carbon network of the HB-FePc catalysts may occur up to 900°C.

  9. Iron Acyl Thiolato Carbonyls: Structural Models for the Active Site of the [Fe]-Hydrogenase (Hmd)

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Aaron M.; Salomone-Stagni, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Phosphine-modified thioester derivatives are shown to serve as efficient precursors to phosphine-stabilized ferrous acyl thiolato carbonyls via the reaction of phosphine thioesters and sources of Fe(0). The reaction generates both Fe(SPh)(Ph2PC6H4CO)(CO)3 (1) and the diferrous diacyl Fe2(SPh)2(CO)3(Ph2PC6H4CO)2, which carbonylates to give 1. For the extremely bulky arylthioester Ph2PC6H4C(O)SC6H4-2,6-(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)2, oxidative addition is arrested and the Fe(0) adduct of the phosphine is obtained. Complex 1 reacts with cyanide to give Et4N[Fe(SPh)(Ph2PC6H4CO)(CN)(CO)2] (Et4N[2]). 13C and 31P NMR spectra indicate that substitution is stereospecific and cis to P. The IR spectrum of [2]− in CH2Cl2 solution very closely matches that for HmdCN. XANES and EXAFS measurements also indicate close structural and electronic similarity of Et4N[2] to the active site of wild-type Hmd. Complex 1 also stereospecifically forms a derivative with TsCH2NC, but the adduct is more labile than Et4N[2]. Tricarbonyl 1 was found to reversibly protonate to give a thermally labile derivative, IR measurements of which indicate that the acyl and thiolate ligands are probably not protonated in Hmd. PMID:21062066

  10. Invited award contribution for ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry. Geometric and electronic structure contributions to function in bioinorganic chemistry: active sites in non-heme iron enzymes.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E I

    2001-07-16

    Spectroscopy has played a major role in the definition of structure/function correlations in bioinorganic chemistry. The importance of spectroscopy combined with electronic structure calculations is clearly demonstrated by the non-heme iron enzymes. Many members of this large class of enzymes activate dioxygen using a ferrous active site that has generally been difficult to study with most spectroscopic methods. A new spectroscopic methodology has been developed utilizing variable temperature, variable field magnetic circular dichroism, which enables one to obtain detailed insight into the geometric and electronic structure of the non-heme ferrous active site and probe its reaction mechanism on a molecular level. This spectroscopic methodology is presented and applied to a number of key mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes leading to a general mechanistic strategy for O2 activation. These studies are then extended to consider the new features present in the binuclear non-heme iron enzymes and applied to understand (1) the mechanism of the two electron/coupled proton transfer to dioxygen binding to a single iron center in hemerythrin and (2) structure/function correlations over the oxygen-activating enzymes stearoyl-ACP Delta9-desaturase, ribonucleotide reductase, and methane monooxygenase. Electronic structure/reactivity correlations for O2 activation by non-heme relative to heme iron enzymes will also be developed.

  11. Hydride-Containing Models for the Active Site of the Nickel-Iron Hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Bryan E.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    The [NiFe]-hydrogenase model complex NiFe(pdt)(dppe)(CO)3 (1) (pdt = 1,3-propanedithiolate) has been efficiently synthesized and found to be robust. This neutral complex sustains protonation to give the first nickel-iron hydride [1H]BF4. One CO ligand in [1H]BF4 is readily substituted by organophosphorus ligand to afford the substituted derivatives [HNiFe(pdt)(dppe)(CO)2(PR3)]BF4, where PR3 = P(OPh)3 ([2H]BF4); PPh3 ([3H]BF4); PPh2Py ([4H]BF4, where Py = 2-pyridyl). Variable temperature NMR measurements show that the neutral and protonated derivatives are dynamic on the NMR timescale, which partially symmetrizes the phosphine complex. The proposed stereodynamics involve twisting of the Ni(dppe) center, not rotation at the Fe(CO)2(PR3) center. In MeCN solution, 3, which can be prepared by deprotonation of [3H]BF4 with NaOMe, is about 104 stronger base than is 1. X-ray crystallographic analysis of [3H]BF4 revealed a highly unsymmetrical bridging hydride, the Fe-H bond being 0.40 Å shorter than the Ni-H distance. Complexes [2H]BF4, [3H]BF4, [4H]BF4 undergo reductions near −1.46 V vs Fc0/+. For [2H]BF4, this reduction process is reversible, and we assign it as a one-electron process. In the presence of trifluoroacetic acid, proton reduction catalysis coincides with this reductive event. The dependence of ic/ip on the concentration of the acid indicates that H2 evolution entails protonation of a reduced hydride. For [2H]+, [3H]+, and [4H]+, the acid-independent rate constants are 50-75 s−1. For [2H]+ and [3H]+, the overpotentials for H2 evolution are ~430 mV, whereas the overpotential for the N-protonated pyridinium complex [4H2]2+ is estimated to be 260 mV. The mechanism of H2 evolution is proposed to follow an ECEC sequence, where E and C correspond to one-electron reductions and protonations, respectively. On the basis of their values for its pKa and redox potentials, ΔGH• and ΔGH− are 57 and 79 kcal/mol for [1H]+ and [1]2+, respectively. PMID:20925337

  12. Mixed-Valence Nickel-Iron Dithiolate Models of the [NiFe]-Hydrogenase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Schilter, David; Nilges, Mark J.; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Stein, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    A series of mixed-valence iron-nickel dithiolates is described. Oxidation of (diphosphine)Ni(dithiolate)Fe(CO)3 complexes 1, 2, and 3 with ferrocenium salts affords the corresponding tricarbonyl cations [(dppe)Ni(pdt)Fe(CO)3]+ ([1]+), [(dppe)Ni(edt)Fe(CO)3]+ ([2]+) and [(dcpe)Ni(pdt)Fe(CO)3]+ ([3]+), respectively, where dppe = Ph2PCH2CH2PPh2, dcpe = Cy2PCH2CH2PCy2, pdtH2 = HSCH2CH2CH2SH and edtH2 = HSCH2CH2SH. The cation [2]+ proved unstable, but the propanedithiolates are robust. IR and EPR spectroscopic measurements indicate that these species exist as Cs-symmetric species. Crystallographic characterization of [3]BF4 shows that Ni is square planar. Interaction of [1]BF4 with P-donor ligands (L) afforded a series of substituted derivatives of type [(dppe)Ni(pdt)Fe(CO)2L]BF4 for L = P(OPh)3 ([4a]BF4), P(p-C6H4Cl)3 ([4b]BF4), PPh2(2-py) ([4c]BF4), PPh2(OEt) ([4d]BF4), PPh3 ([4e]BF4), PPh2(o-C6H4OMe) ([4f]BF4), PPh2(o-C6H4OCH2OMe) ([4g]BF4), P(p-tol)3 ([4h]BF4), P(p-C6H4OMe)3 ([4i]BF4), PMePh2 ([4j]BF4). EPR analysis indicates that ethanedithiolate [2]+ exists as a single species at 110 K, whereas the propanedithiolate cations exist as a mixture of two conformers, which are proposed to be related through a flip of the chelate ring. Mössbauer spectra of 1 and oxidized S = ½ [4e]BF4 are both consistent with a low-spin Fe(i) state. The hyperfine coupling tensor of [4e]BF4 has a small isotropic component and significant anisotropy. DFT calculations using the BP86, B3LYP, and PBE0 exchange-correlation functionals agree with the structural and spectroscopic data, suggesting that the SOMOs in complexes of the present type are localized in a Fe(i)-centered d(z2) orbital. The DFT calculations allow an assignment of oxidation states of the metals and rationalization of the conformers detected by EPR spectroscopy. Treatment of [1]+ with CN- and compact basic phosphines results in complex reactions. With dppe, [1]+ undergoes quasi-disproportionation to give 1 and the

  13. Site distribution of iron in staurolite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowty, Eric

    1972-01-01

    The Mo??ssbauer spectrum of staurolite does not necessarily indicate that ferrous iron is distributed over both the tetrahedral Fe site and one or more of the octahedral sites, as previously thought. Two doublets are present in the spectrum, but their quadrupole spliting and isomer shift are more consistent with both being due to tetrahedrally coordinated ferrous iron. Smith's X-ray work has shown that cations in the Fe site actually assume several slightly different positions, and iron in each of these positions may give rise to a different Mo??ssbauer doublet. ?? 1972.

  14. Memo is homologous to nonheme iron dioxygenases and binds an ErbB2-derived phosphopeptide in its vestigial active site.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chen; Lienhard, Susanne; Hynes, Nancy E; Badache, Ali; Leahy, Daniel J

    2008-02-01

    Memo (mediator of ErbB2-driven cell motility) is a 297-amino-acid protein recently shown to co-precipitate with the C terminus of ErbB2 and be required for ErbB2-driven cell motility. Memo is not homologous to any known signaling proteins, and how it mediates ErbB2 signals is not known. To provide a molecular basis for understanding Memo function, we have determined and report here the 2.1A crystal structure of human Memo and show it be homologous to class III nonheme iron-dependent dioxygenases, a structural class that now includes a zinc-binding protein of unknown function. No metal binding or enzymatic activity can be detected for Memo, but Memo does bind directly to a specific ErbB2-derived phosphopeptide encompassing Tyr-1227 using its vestigial enzymatic active site. Memo thus represents a new class of phosphotyrosine-binding protein.

  15. Memo is Homologous to Nonheme Iron Dioxygenases and Binds an ErbB2-Derived Phosphopeptide in its Vestigial Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu,C.; Lienhard, S.; Hynes, N.; Badache, A.; Leahy, D.

    2008-01-01

    Memo (mediator of ErbB2-driven cell motility) is a 297-amino-acid protein recently shown to co-precipitate with the C terminus of ErbB2 and be required for ErbB2-driven cell motility. Memo is not homologous to any known signaling proteins, and how it mediates ErbB2 signals is not known. To provide a molecular basis for understanding Memo function, we have determined and report here the 2.1A crystal structure of human Memo and show it be homologous to class III nonheme iron-dependent dioxygenases, a structural class that now includes a zinc-binding protein of unknown function. No metal binding or enzymatic activity can be detected for Memo, but Memo does bind directly to a specific ErbB2-derived phosphopeptide encompassing Tyr-1227 using its vestigial enzymatic active site. Memo thus represents a new class of phosphotyrosine-binding protein.

  16. Modeling the active site of [NiFe] hydrogenases and the [NiFeu] subsite of the C-cluster of carbon monoxide dehydrogenases: low-spin iron(II) versus high-spin iron(II).

    PubMed

    Weber, Katharina; Erdem, Özlen F; Bill, Eckhard; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2014-06-16

    A series of four [S2Ni(μ-S)2FeCp*Cl] compounds with different tetradentate thiolate/thioether ligands bound to the Ni(II) ion is reported (Cp* = C5Me5). The {S2Ni(μ-S)2Fe} core of these compounds resembles structural features of the active site of [NiFe] hydrogenases. Detailed analyses of the electronic structures of these compounds by Mössbauer and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, and density functional theory calculations reveal the oxidation states Ni(II) low spin and Fe(II) high spin for the metal ions. The same electronic configurations have been suggested for the Cred1 state of the C-cluster [NiFeu] subsite in carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (CODH). The Ni-Fe distance of ∼3 Å excludes a metal-metal bond between nickel and iron, which is in agreement with the computational results. Electrochemical experiments show that iron is the redox active site in these complexes, performing a reversible one-electron oxidation. The four complexes are discussed with regard to their similarities and differences both to the [NiFe] hydrogenases and the C-cluster of Ni-containing CODH.

  17. Acetylene hydratase: a non-redox enzyme with tungsten and iron-sulfur centers at the active site.

    PubMed

    Kroneck, Peter M H

    2016-03-01

    In living systems, tungsten is exclusively found in microbial enzymes coordinated by the pyranopterin cofactor, with additional metal coordination provided by oxygen and/or sulfur, and/or selenium atoms in diverse arrangements. Prominent examples are formate dehydrogenase, formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase, and aldehyde oxidoreductase all of which catalyze redox reactions. The bacterial enzyme acetylene hydratase (AH) stands out of its class as it catalyzes the conversion of acetylene to acetaldehyde, clearly a non-redox reaction and a reaction distinct from the reduction of acetylene to ethylene by nitrogenase. AH harbors two pyranopterins bound to W, and a [4Fe-4S] cluster. W is coordinated by four dithiolene sulfur atoms, one cysteine sulfur, and one oxygen ligand. AH activity requires a strong reductant suggesting W(IV) as the active oxidation state. Two different types of reaction pathways have been proposed. The 1.26 Å structure reveals a water molecule coordinated to W which could gain a partially positive net charge by the adjacent protonated Asp-13, enabling a direct attack of C2H2. To access the W-Asp site, a substrate channel was evolved distant from where it is found in other members of the DMSOR family. Computational studies of this second shell mechanism led to unrealistically high energy barriers, and alternative pathways were proposed where C2H2 binds directly to W. The architecture of the catalytic cavity, the specificity for C2H2 and the results from site-directed mutagenesis do not support this first shell mechanism. More investigations including structural information on the binding of C2H2 are needed to present a conclusive answer.

  18. Effect of microwave radiation on surface charge, surface sites and ionic state of iron, and the activity of crocidolite asbestos fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulumian, M.; Pollak, H.

    1998-12-01

    Surface charge, surface sites, and the content of ferrous ions of crocidolite asbestos fibres are some of the properties which are considered to play a role in determining their activity in biological systems. Any treatment which changes these properties may therefore change their activity and subsequently increase or decrease their toxicity in biological surroundings. Surfaces of crocidolite fibres are shown to be negatively charged. In the present study, microwave radiation at 300°C was able to increase the number of positive charges within the bulk of the crocidolite fibres. In the presence of atmospheric oxygen, this increase could simultaneously reduce the hydroxyl groups on the surface of the fibres. The increase in positive charge was monitored by: (i) Mössbauer spectroscopy, where a change in the oxidation state of iron from ferrous to ferric was observed, (ii) visual microscopic observations of the irradiated fibres where there was an increase in their aggregation, and (iii) the difficulty to suspend these radiated fibres in solution. A decrease in the number of the surface hydroxyl groups on the other hand, was monitored by infrared spectroscopy. The reduction in the activity of the radiated crocidolite fibres was investigated by studying their ability to peroxidize lipids. Results have shown that changes in their surface charge, surface site and a reduction of the content of ferrous ions produce a concomitant decrease in their ability to initiate lipid peroxidation.

  19. Sulfur K-Edge XAS and DFT Calculations on NitrileHydratase: Geometric and Electronic Structure of the Non-heme Iron Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Abhishek; Chow, Marina; Taniguchi, Kayoko; Lugo-Mas, Priscilla; Davin, Steven; Maeda, Mizuo; Kovacs, Julie A.; Odaka, Masafumi; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-09-28

    The geometric and electronic structure of the active site of the non-heme iron enzyme nitrile hydratase (NHase) is studied using sulfur K-edge XAS and DFT calculations. Using thiolate (RS{sup -})-, sulfenate (RSO{sup -})-, and sulfinate (RSO{sub 2}{sup -})-ligated model complexes to provide benchmark spectral parameters, the results show that the S K-edge XAS is sensitive to the oxidation state of S-containing ligands and that the spectrum of the RSO- species changes upon protonation as the S-O bond is elongated (by {approx}0.1 {angstrom}). These signature features are used to identify the three cysteine residues coordinated to the low-spin Fe{sup III} in the active site of NHase as CysS{sup -}, CysSOH, and CysSO{sub 2}{sup -} both in the NO-bound inactive form and in the photolyzed active form. These results are correlated to geometry-optimized DFT calculations. The pre-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectrum is sensitive to the Z{sub eff} of the Fe and reveals that the Fe in [FeNO]{sup 6} NHase species has a Z{sub eff} very similar to that of its photolyzed Fe{sup III} counterpart. DFT calculations reveal that this results from the strong {pi} back-bonding into the {pi}* antibonding orbital of NO, which shifts significant charge from the formally t{sub 2}{sup 6} low-spin metal to the coordinated NO.

  20. Active-Site Models for the Nickel-Iron Hydrogenases: Effects of Ligands on Reactivity and Catalytic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Maria E.; Barton, Bryan E.; Gray, Danielle L.; Mack, Amanda E.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    Described are new derivatives of the type [HNiFe(SR)2(diphosphine)(CO)3]+, which feature a Ni(diphosphine) group linked to a Fe(CO)3 group via two bridging thiolate ligands. Previous work had described [HNiFe(pdt)(dppe)(CO)3]+ ([1H]+) and its activity as a catalyst for the reduction of protons. Work described in this paper focused on the effects of the diphosphine attached to nickel as well as the dithiolate bridge, 1,3-propanedithiolate (pdt) vs 1,2-ethanedithiolate (edt). A new synthetic route to these Ni-Fe dithiolates is described, involving reaction of Ni(SR)2(diphosphine) with FeI2(CO)4 followed by in situ reduction with cobaltocene. Evidence is presented that this route proceeds via metastable μ-iodo derivatives. Attempted isolation of such species led to the crystallization of NiFe(Me2pdt)(dppe)I2, which features tetrahedral Fe(II) and square planar Ni(II) centers (Me2pdt = 2,2-dimethylpropanedithiol). The new tricarbonyls prepared in this work are NiFe(pdt)(dcpe)(CO)3 (2, dcpe = 1,2-bis(dicyclohexylphosphino)ethane), NiFe(edt)(dppe)(CO)3 (3), and NiFe(edt)(dcpe)(CO)3 (4). Attempted preparation of a phenylthiolate-bridged complex via the FeI2(CO)4 + Ni(SPh)2(dppe) route gave the tetrametallic species [(CO)2Fe(SPh)2Ni(CO)]2(μ-dppe)2. Crystallographic analysis of the edt-dcpe compund [2H]BF4 and the edt-dppe compound [3H]BF4 verified their close resemblance. Each features pseudo-octahedral Fe and square pyramidal Ni centers. Starting from [4H]BF4 we prepared the PPh3 derivative [HNiFe(edt)(dppe)(PPh3)(CO)2]BF4 ([5H]BF4), which was obtained as a ~2:1 mixture of unsymmetrical and symmetrical isomers. Acid-base measurements indicate that changing from Ni(dppe) to Ni(dcpe) decreases the acidity of the cationic hydride complexes by 2.5 pKaMeCN units, from ~11 to ~13.5 (previous work showed that substitution at Fe leads to more dramatic effects). The redox potentials are more strongly affected by the change from dppe to dcpe, for example the [2]0/+ couple occurs

  1. Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Activity and Cytosolic Iron Regulate Iron Traffic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Joshua D; Lindahl, Paul A

    2015-11-06

    An ordinary differential equation-based mathematical model was developed to describe trafficking and regulation of iron in growing fermenting budding yeast. Accordingly, environmental iron enters the cytosol and moves into mitochondria and vacuoles. Dilution caused by increasing cell volume is included. Four sites are regulated, including those in which iron is imported into the cytosol, mitochondria, and vacuoles, and the site at which vacuolar Fe(II) is oxidized to Fe(III). The objective of this study was to determine whether cytosolic iron (Fecyt) and/or a putative sulfur-based product of iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) activity was/were being sensed in regulation. The model assumes that the matrix of healthy mitochondria is anaerobic, and that in ISC mutants, O2 diffuses into the matrix where it reacts with nonheme high spin Fe(II) ions, oxidizing them to nanoparticles and generating reactive oxygen species. This reactivity causes a further decline in ISC/heme biosynthesis, which ultimately gives rise to the diseased state. The ordinary differential equations that define this model were numerically integrated, and concentrations of each component were plotted versus the concentration of iron in the growth medium and versus the rate of ISC/heme biosynthesis. Model parameters were optimized by fitting simulations to literature data. The model variant that assumed that both Fecyt and ISC biosynthesis activity were sensed in regulation mimicked observed behavior best. Such "dual sensing" probably arises in real cells because regulation involves assembly of an ISC on a cytosolic protein using Fecyt and a sulfur species generated in mitochondria during ISC biosynthesis and exported into the cytosol.

  2. Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Activity and Cytosolic Iron Regulate Iron Traffic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Wofford, Joshua D.; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    An ordinary differential equation-based mathematical model was developed to describe trafficking and regulation of iron in growing fermenting budding yeast. Accordingly, environmental iron enters the cytosol and moves into mitochondria and vacuoles. Dilution caused by increasing cell volume is included. Four sites are regulated, including those in which iron is imported into the cytosol, mitochondria, and vacuoles, and the site at which vacuolar FeII is oxidized to FeIII. The objective of this study was to determine whether cytosolic iron (Fecyt) and/or a putative sulfur-based product of iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) activity was/were being sensed in regulation. The model assumes that the matrix of healthy mitochondria is anaerobic, and that in ISC mutants, O2 diffuses into the matrix where it reacts with nonheme high spin FeII ions, oxidizing them to nanoparticles and generating reactive oxygen species. This reactivity causes a further decline in ISC/heme biosynthesis, which ultimately gives rise to the diseased state. The ordinary differential equations that define this model were numerically integrated, and concentrations of each component were plotted versus the concentration of iron in the growth medium and versus the rate of ISC/heme biosynthesis. Model parameters were optimized by fitting simulations to literature data. The model variant that assumed that both Fecyt and ISC biosynthesis activity were sensed in regulation mimicked observed behavior best. Such “dual sensing” probably arises in real cells because regulation involves assembly of an ISC on a cytosolic protein using Fecyt and a sulfur species generated in mitochondria during ISC biosynthesis and exported into the cytosol. PMID:26306041

  3. Yap5 Is an Iron-Responsive Transcriptional Activator That Regulates Vacuolar Iron Storage in Yeast▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liangtao; Bagley, Dustin; Ward, Diane M.; Kaplan, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    The transporter Ccc1 imports iron into the vacuole, which is the major site of iron storage in fungi and plants. CCC1 mRNA is destabilized under low-iron conditions by the binding of Cth1 and Cth2 to the 3′ untranslated region (S. Puig, E. Askeland, and D. J. Thiele, Cell 120:99-110, 2005). Here, we show that the transcription of CCC1 is stimulated by iron through a Yap consensus site in the CCC1 promoter. We identified YAP5 as being the iron-sensitive transcription factor and show that a yap5Δ strain is sensitive to high iron. Green fluorescent protein-tagged Yap5 is localized to the nucleus and occupies the CCC1 promoter independent of the iron concentration. Yap5 contains two cysteine-rich domains, and the mutation of the cysteines to alanines in each of the domains affects the transcription of CCC1 but not DNA binding. The fusion of the Yap5 cysteine-containing domains to a GAL4 DNA binding domain results in iron-sensitive GAL1-lacZ expression. Iron affects the sulfhydryl status of Yap5, which is indicative of the generation of intramolecular disulfide bonds. These results show that Yap5 is an iron-sensing transcription factor and that iron regulates transcriptional activation. PMID:18070921

  4. Yap5 is an iron-responsive transcriptional activator that regulates vacuolar iron storage in yeast.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangtao; Bagley, Dustin; Ward, Diane M; Kaplan, Jerry

    2008-02-01

    The transporter Ccc1 imports iron into the vacuole, which is the major site of iron storage in fungi and plants. CCC1 mRNA is destabilized under low-iron conditions by the binding of Cth1 and Cth2 to the 3' untranslated region (S. Puig, E. Askeland, and D. J. Thiele, Cell 120:99-110, 2005). Here, we show that the transcription of CCC1 is stimulated by iron through a Yap consensus site in the CCC1 promoter. We identified YAP5 as being the iron-sensitive transcription factor and show that a yap5Delta strain is sensitive to high iron. Green fluorescent protein-tagged Yap5 is localized to the nucleus and occupies the CCC1 promoter independent of the iron concentration. Yap5 contains two cysteine-rich domains, and the mutation of the cysteines to alanines in each of the domains affects the transcription of CCC1 but not DNA binding. The fusion of the Yap5 cysteine-containing domains to a GAL4 DNA binding domain results in iron-sensitive GAL1-lacZ expression. Iron affects the sulfhydryl status of Yap5, which is indicative of the generation of intramolecular disulfide bonds. These results show that Yap5 is an iron-sensing transcription factor and that iron regulates transcriptional activation.

  5. Optimization Review, Peck Iron and Metal Superfund Site, Portsmouth, Virginia

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Peck Iron and Metal Superfund Site is a 33-acre property located in Norfolk County, Portsmouth, Virginia. PIM (Figure 1) is the site of a former scrap metal storage and recycling facility that began operation in the 1940s.

  6. Highly exposed Fe-N4 active sites in porous poly-iron-phthalocyanine based oxygen reduction electrocatalyst with ultrahigh performance for air cathode.

    PubMed

    Anandhababu, Ganesan; Abbas, Syed Comail; Lv, Jiangquan; Ding, Kui; Liu, Qin; Babu, Dickson D; Huang, Yiyin; Xie, Jiafang; Wu, Maoxiang; Wang, Yaobing

    2017-02-14

    Progress in the development of efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions is imperative for various energy systems such as metal-air batteries and fuel cells. In this paper, an innovative porous two-dimensional (2D) poly-iron-phthalocyanine (PFe-Pc) based oxygen reduction electrocatalyst created with a simple solid-state chemical reaction without pyrolysis is reported. In this strategy, silicon dioxide nanoparticles play a pivotal role in preserving the Fe-N4 structure during the polymerization process and thereby assist in the development of a porous structure. The new polymerized phthalocyanine electrocatalyst with tuned porous structure, improved specific surface area and more exposed catalytic active sites via the 2D structure shows an excellent performance towards an oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media. The onset potential (E = 1.033 V) and limiting current density (I = 5.58 mA cm(-2)) are much better than those obtained with the commercial 20% platinum/carbon electrocatalyst (1.046 V and 4.89 mA cm(-2)) and also show better stability and tolerance to methanol crossover. For practical applications, a zinc-air (Zn-air) battery and methanol fuel cell equipped with the PFe-Pc electrocatalyst as an air cathode reveal a high open circuit voltage and maximum power output (1.0 V and 23.6 mW cm(-2) for a methanol fuel cell, and 1.6 V and 192 mW cm(-2) for the liquid Zn-air battery). In addition, using the PFe-Pc electrocatalyst as an air cathode in a flexible cable-type Zn-air battery exhibits excellent performance with an open-circuit voltage of 1.409 V. This novel porous 2D PFe-Pc has been designed logically using a new, simple strategy with ultrahigh electrochemical performances in Zn-air batteries and methanol fuel cell applications.

  7. 76 FR 51029 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Carpenter Avenue Mercury Site, Iron...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Carpenter Avenue Mercury Site, Iron... Mercury site in Iron Mountain, Dickenson County, Michigan with the following settling parties: The.... Comments should reference the Carpenter Avenue Mercury site, Iron Mountain, Dickenson County, Michigan...

  8. Performance Evaluation of In-Situ Iron Reactive Barriers at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Site

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.B.

    2003-12-30

    In November 1997, a permeable iron reactive barrier trench was installed at the S-3 Ponds Pathway 2 Site located at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The overall goal of the project is to evaluate the ability of permeable reactive barrier technology to remove uranium, nitrate, and other inorganic contaminants in groundwater and to assess impacts of biogeochemical interactions on long-term performance of the treatment system. Zero-valent iron (Fe0) was used as the reactive medium, which creates a localized zone of reduction or low oxidation reduction potential (ORP), elevated pH, and dissolved H{sub 2} as Fe{sup 0} corrodes in groundwater. These conditions favor the removal of metals and radionuclides (such as uranium and technetium) through redox-driven precipitation and/or sorption to iron corrosion byproducts, such as iron oxyhydroxides. The technology is anticipated to be economical and low in maintenance as compared with conventional pump-and-treat technology. Groundwater monitoring results indicate that the iron barrier is effectively removing uranium and technetium, the primary contaminants of concern, as anticipated from our previous laboratory studies. In addition to uranium and technetium, nitrate, sulfate, bicarbonate, calcium, and magnesium are also found to be removed, either partially or completely by the iron barrier. Elevated concentrations of ferrous ions and sulfide, and pH were observed within the iron barrier. Although ferrous iron concentrations were initially very high after barrier installation, ferrous ion concentrations have decreased to low to non-detectable levels as the pH within the iron has increased over time (as high as 9 or 10). Iron and soil core samples were taken in February 1999 and May 2000 in order to evaluate the iron surface passivation, morphology, mineral precipitation and cementation, and microbial activity within and in the vicinity of the iron barrier. Results indicate that most of the iron filings collected in cores

  9. Determination of the Substrate Binding Mode to the Active Site Iron of (S)-2-Hydroxypropylphosphonic Acid Epoxidase Using 17O-Enriched Substrates and Substrate Analogues†

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Feng; Moon, Sung-Ju; Liu, Pinghua; Zhao, Zongbao; Lipscomb, John D.; Liu, Aimin; Liu, Hung-wen

    2009-01-01

    (S)-2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid epoxidase (HppE) is an O2-dependent, nonheme Fe(II)-containing oxidase that converts (S)-2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid ((S)-HPP) to the regio-and enantiomerically specific epoxide, fosfomycin. Use of (R)-2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid ((R)-HPP) yields the 2-keto-adduct rather than the epoxide. Here we report the chemical synthesis of a range of HPP analogs designed to probe the basis for this specificity. In past studies, NO has been used as an O2 surrogate to provide an EPR probe of the Fe(II) environment. These studies suggest that O2 binds to the iron, and substrates bind in a single orientation that strongly perturbs the iron environment. Recently, the X-ray crystal structure showed direct binding of the substrate to the iron, but both monodentate (via the phosphonate) and chelated (via the hydroxyl and phosphonate) orientations were observed. In the current study, hyperfine broadening of the homogeneous S = 3/2 EPR spectrum of the HppE-NO-HPP complex was observed when either the hydroxyl or the phosphonate group of HPP was enriched with 17O (I = 5/2). These results indicate that both functional groups of HPP bind to Fe(II) ion at the same time as NO, suggesting that the chelated substrate binding mode dominates in solution. (R)- and (S)-analog compounds that maintained the core structure of HPP but added bulky terminal groups were turned over to give products analogous to those from (R)- and (S)-HPP, respectively. In contrast, substrate analogs lacking either the phosphonate or hydroxyl group were not turned over. Elongation of the carbon chain between the hydroxyl and phosphonate allowed binding to the iron in a variety of orientations to give keto and diol products at positions determined by the hydroxyl substituent, but no stable epoxide was formed. These studies show the importance of the Fe(II)-substrate chelate structure to active antibiotic formation. This fixed orientation may align the substrate next to the iron

  10. List 9 - Active CERCLIS Sites:

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The List 9 displays the sequence of activities undertaken at active CERCLIS sites. An active site is one at which site assessment, removal, remedial, enforcement, cost recovery, or oversight activities are being planned or conducted.

  11. Requirements for functional models of the iron hydrogenase active site: D2/H2O exchange activity in ((mu-SMe)(mu-pdt)[Fe(CO)2(PMe3)]2+)[BF4-].

    PubMed

    Georgakaki, Irene P; Miller, Matthew L; Darensbourg, Marcetta Y

    2003-04-21

    Hydrogen uptake in hydrogenase enzymes can be assayed by H/D exchange reactivity in H(2)/D(2)O or H(2)/D(2)/H(2)O mixtures. Diiron(I) complexes that serve as structural models for the active site of iron hydrogenase are not active in such isotope scrambling but serve as precursors to Fe(II)Fe(II) complexes that are functional models of [Fe]H(2)ase. Using the same experimental protocol as used previously for ((mu-H)(mu-pdt)[Fe(CO)(2)(PMe(3))](2)(+)), 1-H(+) (Zhao et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 9710), we now report the results of studies of ((mu-SMe)(mu-pdt)[Fe(CO)(2)(PMe(3))](2)(+)), 1-SMe(+), toward H/D exchange. The 1-SMe(+) complex can take up H(2) and catalyze the H/D exchange reaction in D(2)/H(2)O mixtures under photolytic, CO-loss conditions. Unlike 1-H(+), it does not catalyze H(2)/D(2) scrambling under anhydrous conditions. The molecular structure of 1-SMe(+) involves an elongated Fe.Fe separation, 3.11 A, relative to 2.58 A in 1-H(+). It is proposed that the strong SMe(-) bridging ligand results in catalytic activity localized on a single Fe(II) center, a scenario that is also a prominent possibility for the enzyme active site. The single requirement is an open site on Fe(II) available for binding of D(2) (or H(2)), followed by deprotonation by the external base H(2)O (or D(2)O).

  12. Evidence That the [beta] Subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase Is Active with the Manganese Ion of Its Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Site 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dassama, Laura M.K.; Boal, Amie K.; Krebs, Carsten; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Bollinger, Jr., J. Martin

    2014-10-02

    The reaction of a class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) begins when a cofactor in the {beta} subunit oxidizes a cysteine residue {approx}35 {angstrom} away in the {alpha} subunit, generating a thiyl radical. In the class Ic enzyme from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), the cysteine oxidant is the Mn{sup IV} ion of a Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} cluster, which assembles in a reaction between O{sub 2} and the Mn{sup II}/Fe{sup II} complex of {beta}. The heterodinuclear nature of the cofactor raises the question of which site, 1 or 2, contains the Mn{sup IV} ion. Because site 1 is closer to the conserved location of the cysteine-oxidizing tyrosyl radical of class Ia and Ib RNRs, we suggested that the Mn{sup IV} ion most likely resides in this site (i.e., {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}), but a subsequent computational study favored its occupation of site 2 ({sup 1}Fe{sup III}/{sup 2}Mn{sup IV}). In this work, we have sought to resolve the location of the Mn{sup IV} ion in Ct RNR-{beta} by correlating X-ray crystallographic anomalous scattering intensities with catalytic activity for samples of the protein reconstituted in vitro by two different procedures. In samples containing primarily Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} clusters, Mn preferentially occupies site 1, but some anomalous scattering from site 2 is observed, implying that both {sup 1}Mn{sup II}/{sup 2}Fe{sup II} and {sup 1}Fe{sup II}/{sup 2}Mn{sup II} complexes are competent to react with O{sub 2} to produce the corresponding oxidized states. However, with diminished Mn{sup II} loading in the reconstitution, there is no evidence for Mn occupancy of site 2, and the greater activity of these 'low-Mn' samples on a per-Mn basis implies that the {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}-{beta} is at least the more active of the two oxidized forms and may be the only active form.

  13. Probing the Protonation State and the Redox-Active Sites of Pendant Base Iron(II) and Zinc(II) Pyridinediimine Complexes.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Mayra; Sommer, Samantha K; Swanson, Seth P; Berger, Robert F; Seda, Takele; Zakharov, Lev N; Gilbertson, John D

    2015-08-03

    Utilizing the pyridinediimine ligand [(2,6-(i)PrC6H3)N═CMe)(N((i)Pr)2C2H4)N═CMe)C5H3N] (didpa), the zinc(II) and iron(II) complexes Zn(didpa)Cl2 (1), Fe(didpa)Cl2 (2), [Zn(Hdidpa)Cl2][PF6] (3), [Fe(Hdidpa)Cl2][PF6] (4), Zn(didpa)Br2 (5), and [Zn(Hdidpa)Br2][PF6] (6), Fe(didpa)(CO)2 (7), and [Fe(Hdidpa)(CO)2][PF6] (8) were synthesized and characterized. These complexes allowed for the study of the secondary coordination sphere pendant base and the redox-activity of the didpa ligand scaffold. The protonated didpa ligand is capable of forming metal halogen hydrogen bonds (MHHBs) in complexes 3, 4, and 6. The solution behavior of the MHHBs was probed via pKa measurements and (1)H NMR titrations of 3 and 6 with solvents of varying H-bond accepting strength. The H-bond strength in 3 and 6 was calculated in silico to be 5.9 and 4.9 kcal/mol, respectively. The relationship between the protonation state and the ligand-based redox activity was probed utilizing 7 and 8, where the reduction potential of the didpa scaffold was found to shift by 105 mV upon protonation of the reduced ligand in Fe(didpa)(CO)2.

  14. MEASUREMENT OF BIOAVAILABLE IRON AT TWO HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past, the concentrations of iron II in monitoring wells has been used to evaluate natural attenuation processes at hazardous waste sites. Changes in the aqueous concentrations of electron acceptors/products are important to the evaluation of natural biological attenuation...

  15. Active ultramicrobacterial alteration of iron in granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. Ann; Sherriff, Barbara L.

    1997-07-01

    Microorganisms are able to exist in extreme environments, where they often form biofilms. We are investigating an iron metabolizing biofilm consortium derived from groundwater draining the Canadian Shield. This was first discovered in the Underground Research Laboratory of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., where its influence on the management of nuclear fuel waste was examined. Incubations have shown that the microbial consortium contains different morphological forms. Ultramicrobacteria, 0.3 micrometers diameter cocci, are dominant on magnetite surfaces, which they are able to transform rapidly to hematite. Larger rods, 1.0 micrometers long, aggregate on silicon minerals containing little iron. Carbon is limited in these natural groundwaters so that iron is utilized as an alternative energy source. The cell surface of the organisms and the extracellular polymers of the biofilm are both negatively-charged allowing metal cations to be quickly bound by physicochemical sorption, thus providing nucleation sites for mineralization within the boundaries. The biofilm consortium is able to mediate a wide range of iron reactions. Aerobically a ferric gel is precipitated throughout the biofilm slime, which alters first to ferrihydrite and later to hematite. When anaerobic fermentation produces a reducing environment the iron is converted to the ferrous state which may then be precipitated as ferrous hydroxide, vivianite or siderite. Since iron is widespread in the natural environment, these reactions could have important geochemical implications.

  16. Dinuclear iron(II)-cyanocarbonyl complexes linked by two/three bridging ethylthiolates: relevance to the active site of [Fe] hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Wen-Feng; Tsai, Wen-Ting; Gau, Hung-Bin; Lee, Chien-Ming; Chou, Shin-Yuan; Chen, Wen-Yuan; Lee, Gene-Hsiang

    2003-04-21

    Dinuclear iron(II)-cyanocarbonyl complex [PPN](2)[Fe(CN)(2)(CO)(2)(mu-SEt)](2) (1) was prepared by the reaction of [PPN][FeBr(CN)(2)(CO)(3)] and [Na][SEt] in THF at ambient temperature. Reaction of complex 1 with [PPN][SEt] produced the triply thiolate-bridged dinuclear Fe(II) complex [PPN][(CN)(CO)(2)Fe(mu-SEt)(3)Fe(CO)(2)(CN)] (2) with the torsion angle of two CN(-) groups (C(5)N(2) and C(3)N(1)) being 126.9 degrees. The extrusion of two sigma-donor CN(-) ligands from Fe(II)Fe(II) centers of complex 1 as a result of the reaction of complex 1 and [PPN][SEt] reflects the electron-rich character of the dinuclear iron(II) when ligated by the third bridging ethylthiolate. The Fe-S distances (2.338(2) and 2.320(3) A for complexes 1 and 2, respectively) do not change significantly, but the Fe(II)-Fe(II) distance contracts from 3.505 A in complex 1 to 3.073 A in complex 2. The considerably longer Fe(II)-Fe(II) distance of 3.073 A in complex 2, compared to the reported Fe-Fe distances of 2.6/2.62 A in DdHase and CpHase, was attributed to the presence of the third bridging ethylthiolate, instead of pi-accepting CO-bridged ligand as observed in [Fe] hydrogenases. Additionally, in a compound of unusual composition ([Na.(5)/(2)H(2)O][(CN)(CO)(2)Fe(mu-SEt)(3)Fe(CO)(2)(CN)])(n)((1)/(2)O(Et)(2))(n) (3), the Na(+) cations and H(2)O molecules combining with dinuclear [(CN)(CO)(2)Fe(mu-SEt)(3)Fe(CO)(2)(CN)](-) anions create a polymeric framework wherein two CN(-) ligands are coordinated via CN(-)-Na(+)/CN(-)-(Na(+))(2) linkages, respectively.

  17. Sulfur-Modified Zero-Valent Iron for Remediation Applications at DOE Sites - 13600

    SciTech Connect

    Fogwell, Thomas W.; Santina, Pete

    2013-07-01

    Many DOE remediation sites have chemicals of concern that are compounds in higher oxidation states, which make them both more mobile and more toxic. The chemical reduction of these compounds both prevents the migration of these chemicals and in some cases reduces the toxicity. It has also been shown that zero-valent iron is a very effective substance to use in reducing oxygenated compounds in various treatment processes. These have included the treatment of halogenated hydrocarbons in the form volatile organic compounds used as solvents and pesticides. Zero-valent iron has also been used to reduce various oxidized metals such as chromium, arsenic, and mercury in order to immobilize them, decrease their toxicity, and prevent further transport. In addition, it has been used to immobilize or break down other non-metallic species such as selenium compounds and nitrates. Of particular interest at several DOE remediation sites is the fact that zero-valent iron is very effective in immobilizing several radioactive metals which are mobile in their oxidized states. These include both technetium and uranium. The main difficulty in using zero-valent iron has been its tendency to become inactive after relatively short periods of time. While it is advantageous to have the zero-valent iron particles as porous as possible in order to provide maximum surface area for reactions to take place, these pores can become clogged when the iron is oxidized. This is due to the fact that ferric oxide has a greater volume for a given mass than metallic iron. When the surfaces of the iron particles oxidize to ferric oxide, the pores become narrower and will eventually shut. In order to minimize the degradation of the chemical activity of the iron due to this process, a modification of zero-valent iron has been developed which prevents or slows this process, which decreases its effectiveness. It is called sulfur-modified iron, and it has been produced in high purity for applications in

  18. Lactoferrin inhibits or promotes Legionella pneumophila intracellular multiplication in nonactivated and interferon gamma-activated human monocytes depending upon its degree of iron saturation. Iron-lactoferrin and nonphysiologic iron chelates reverse monocyte activation against Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, T F; Horwitz, M A

    1991-01-01

    We have been exploring the role of iron in the pathogenesis of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication in human monocytes is iron dependent and that IFN gamma-activated monocytes inhibit L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication by limiting the availability of iron. In this study, we have investigated the effect on L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication of lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein which is internalized via specific receptors on monocytes, and of nonphysiologic iron chelates which enter monocytes by a receptor-independent route. Apolactoferrin completely inhibited L. pneumophila multiplication in nonactivated monocytes, and enhanced the capacity of IFN gamma-activated monocytes to inhibit L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication. In contrast, iron-saturated lactoferrin had no effect on the already rapid rate of L. pneumophila multiplication in nonactivated monocytes. Moreover, it reversed the capacity of activated monocytes to inhibit L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication, demonstrating that L. pneumophila can utilize iron from the lactoferrin-lactoferrin receptor pathway. The capacity of iron-lactoferrin to reverse monocyte activation was dependent upon its percent iron saturation and not just its total iron content. Similarly, the nonphysiologic iron chelates ferric nitrilotriacetate and ferric ammonium citrate completely reverse and ferric pyrophosphate partially reversed the capacity of IFN gamma-activated monocytes to inhibit L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication, demonstrating that L. pneumophila can utilize iron derived from nonphysiologic iron chelates internalized by monocytes independently of the transferrin and lactoferrin endocytic pathways. This study suggests that at sites of inflammation, lactoferrin may inhibit or promote L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication in mononuclear phagocytes depending upon

  19. Iron-Catalyzed Oxyfunctionalization of Aliphatic Amines at Remote Benzylic C-H Sites.

    PubMed

    Mbofana, Curren T; Chong, Eugene; Lawniczak, James; Sanford, Melanie S

    2016-09-02

    We report the development of an iron-catalyzed method for the selective oxyfunctionalization of benzylic C(sp(3))-H bonds in aliphatic amine substrates. This transformation is selective for benzylic C-H bonds that are remote (i.e., at least three carbons) from the amine functional group. High site selectivity is achieved by in situ protonation of the amine with trifluoroacetic acid, which deactivates more traditionally reactive C-H sites that are α to nitrogen. The scope and synthetic utility of this method are demonstrated via the synthesis and derivatization of a variety of amine-containing, biologically active molecules.

  20. Electronic structure contributions to electron-transfer reactivity in iron-sulfur active sites: 1. Photoelectron spectroscopic determination of electronic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kennepohl, Pierre; Solomon, Edward I

    2003-02-10

    Electronic relaxation, the change in molecular electronic structure as a response to oxidation, is investigated in [FeX(4)](2)(-)(,1)(-) (X = Cl, SR) model complexes. Photoelectron spectroscopy, in conjunction with density functional methods, is used to define and evaluate the core and valence electronic relaxation upon ionization of [FeX(4)](2)(-). The presence of intense yet formally forbidden charge-transfer satellite peaks in the PES data is a direct reflection of electronic relaxation. The phenomenon is evaluated as a function of charge redistribution at the metal center (Deltaq(rlx)) resulting from changes in the electronic structure. This charge redistribution is calculated from experimental core and valence PES data using a valence bond configuration interaction (VBCI) model. It is found that electronic relaxation is very large for both core (Fe 2p) and valence (Fe 3d) ionization processes and that it is greater in [Fe(SR)(4)](2)(-) than in [FeCl(4)](2)(-). Similar results are obtained from DFT calculations. The results suggest that, although the lowest-energy valence ionization (from the redox-active molecular orbital) is metal-based, electronic relaxation causes a dramatic redistribution of electron density ( approximately 0.7ē) from the ligands to the metal center corresponding to a generalized increase in covalency over all M-L bonds. The more covalent tetrathiolate achieves a larger Deltaq(rlx) because the LMCT states responsible for relaxation are significantly lower in energy than those in the tetrachloride. The large observed electronic relaxation can make significant contributions to the thermodynamics and kinetics of electron transfer in inorganic systems.

  1. Iron, lactoferrin and iron regulatory protein activity in the synovium; relative importance of iron loading and the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Guillen, C; McInnes, I; Kruger, H; Brock, J

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To determine the ability of lactoferrin in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial fluid to bind "free" iron, and to study the regulatory mechanisms therein that control iron homeostasis.
METHODS—"Free" iron was determined by the bleomycin assay and lactoferrin concentrations by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The activities of iron regulatory protein (IRP) and NF-κB in synovial fluid cells were assayed by mobility shift assay.
RESULTS—30% of synovial fluids contained "free" iron and in these, lactoferrin concentrations were significantly lower than in those with no "free" iron (p<0.01). Addition of exogenous lactoferrin consistently reduced the amount of "free" iron in positive synovial fluids. IRP activity in synovial cells did not correlate with synovial fluid iron concentrations but did correlate with NF-κB activation and with serum C reactive protein.
CONCLUSION—Lactoferrin may prevent iron mediated tissue damage in RA by reducing "free" synovial iron concentration when inflammatory stimuli have disregulated IRP mediated iron homeostasis.

 Keywords: lactoferrin; rheumatoid arthritis; inflammation PMID:9741316

  2. Regulation of rat liver phenylalanine hydroxylase. I. Kinetic properties of the enzyme's iron and enzyme reduction site.

    PubMed

    Shiman, R; Gray, D W; Hill, M A

    1994-10-07

    Tetrahydropterins react with phenylalanine hydroxylase at a redox site, a regulatory site, and the catalytic site, but neither the properties of nor relationships among these sites are well understood. We have studied the redox site using the fluorescent iron chelators 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene and bathophenanthroline; these compounds act as site-specific reporter groups for reactions on oxidized and reduced enzyme, respectively. The chelators bind reversibly and specifically to the enzyme's iron with 1:1 stoichiometry, high affinity (Kd values approximately 1 nM), and complete quenching of their own fluorescence. The kinetic behavior of these and other iron chelators indicates that the enzyme's iron is solvent accessible and in a hydrophobic pocket of the protein. Both ferrous and ferric chelators inhibit phenylalanine hydroxylase activity. Bathophenanthroline inhibits by binding to Fe2+ on reduced, active enzyme. 2,3-Dihydroxynaphthalene inhibits by binding to Fe3+ on enzyme that is oxidized during catalysis. This oxidation occurs approximately 1/150 enzyme turnovers, and its rate is increased when p-chloro- or p-fluorophenylalanine is used as the reaction substrate. Studies of the reaction of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) at the enzyme's redox site showed that BH4 reduces the enzyme more slowly than 6-methyltetrahydropterin under catalytic and non-catalytic conditions. Reduction occurs at a distinct site whose binding determinants and reaction characteristics are different from those of the BH4 regulatory or catalytic sites, and phenylalanine-activated enzyme is reduced more rapidly than unactivated enzyme. In reducing phenylalanine activated enzyme, BH4 donates one electron/subunit (1/iron atom); the reduction kinetics suggest a trihydrobiopterin-free radical as a reaction intermediate.

  3. Di/mono-nuclear iron(I)/(II) complexes as functional models for the 2Fe2S subunit and distal Fe moiety of the active site of [FeFe] hydrogenases: protonations, molecular structures and electrochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shang; Fan, Jiangli; Sun, Shiguo; Song, Fengling; Peng, Xiaojun; Duan, Qian; Jiang, Dayong; Liang, Qingcheng

    2012-10-21

    Di/mono-nuclear iron(I)/(II) complexes containing conjugated and electron-withdrawing S-to-S linkers, [{(μ-S)(2)(C(4)N(2)H(2))}Fe(2)(CO)(6)] (1), [{(μ-S)(2)(C(4)N(2)H(2))}Fe(2)(CO)(5)(PMe(3))] (1P), and [{(μ-S)(2)(C(4)N(2)H(2))}Fe(CO)(2)(PMe(3))(2)] (2) were prepared as biomimetic models for the 2Fe2S subunit and distal Fe moiety of the active site of [FeFe] hydrogenases. The N atoms in the heterocyclic pyrazines of 1 and 2 were protonated in the presence of proton acid to generate one and two hydrides, [1(NH)](+) CF(3)SO(3)(-), [2(NH)](+) CF(3)SO(3)(-), and [2(NH)(2)](2+) (CF(3)SO(3)(-))(2), respectively. The protonation processes were evidenced by in situ IR and NMR spectroscopy. The molecular structures of the protonated species [1(NH)](+) CF(3)SO(3)(-) and [2(NH)(2)](2+) (CF(3)SO(3)(-))(2) together with their originating complexes and , and the mono-PMe(3) substituted diiron complex were identified by X-ray crystallography. The IR and single-crystal analysis data all suggested that the electron-withdrawing bridge, pyrazine, led to decreased electron density at the Fe centers of the model complexes, which was consistent with the electrochemical studies. The cyclic voltammograms indicated that complex exhibited a low primary reduction potential at -1.17 V vs. Fc-Fc(+) with a 270 mV positive shift compared with that of the benzene-1,2-dithiolate (bdt) bridged analogue [(μ-bdt)Fe(2)(CO)(6)]. Under the weak acid conditions, complexes 1 and 2 could electrochemically catalyze the proton reduction. More interestingly, the mononuclear ferrous complex 2 showed two catalytic peaks during the formation of hydrogen, confirming its potential as a catalyst for hydrogen production.

  4. "Opening" the ferritin pore for iron release by mutation of conserved amino acids at interhelix and loop sites.

    PubMed

    Jin, W; Takagi, H; Pancorbo, B; Theil, E C

    2001-06-26

    Ferritin concentrates, stores, and detoxifies iron in most organisms. The iron is a solid, ferric oxide mineral (< or =4500 Fe) inside the protein shell. Eight pores are formed by subunit trimers of the 24 subunit protein. A role for the protein in controlling reduction and dissolution of the iron mineral was suggested in preliminary experiments [Takagi et al. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 18685-18688] with a proline/leucine substitution near the pore. Localized pore disorder in frog L134P crystals coincided with enhanced iron exit, triggered by reduction. In this report, nine additional substitutions of conserved amino acids near L134 were studied for effects on iron release. Alterations of a conserved hydrophobic pair, a conserved ion pair, and a loop at the ferritin pores all increased iron exit (3-30-fold). Protein assembly was unchanged, except for a slight decrease in volume (measured by gel filtration); ferroxidase activity was still in the millisecond range, but a small decrease indicates slight alteration of the channel from the pore to the oxidation site. The sensitivity of reductive iron exit rates to changes in conserved residues near the ferritin pores, associated with localized unfolding, suggests that the structure around the ferritin pores is a target for regulated protein unfolding and iron release.

  5. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Polarization dictates iron handling by inflammatory and alternatively activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Corna, Gianfranca; Campana, Lara; Pignatti, Emanuele; Castiglioni, Alessandra; Tagliafico, Enrico; Bosurgi, Lidia; Campanella, Alessandro; Brunelli, Silvia; Manfredi, Angelo A.; Apostoli, Pietro; Silvestri, Laura; Camaschella, Clara; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    Background Macrophages play a key role in iron homeostasis. In peripheral tissues, they are known to polarize into classically activated (or M1) macrophages and alternatively activated (or M2) macrophages. Little is known on whether the polarization program influences the ability of macrophages to store or recycle iron and the molecular machinery involved in the processes. Design and Methods Inflammatory/M1 and alternatively activated/M2 macrophages were propagated in vitro from mouse bone-marrow precursors and polarized in the presence of recombinant interferon-γ or interleukin-4. We characterized and compared their ability to handle radioactive iron, the characteristics of the intracellular iron pools and the expression of molecules involved in internalization, storage and export of the metal. Moreover we verified the influence of iron on the relative ability of polarized macrophages to activate antigen-specific T cells. Results M1 macrophages have low iron regulatory protein 1 and 2 binding activity, express high levels of ferritin H, low levels of transferrin receptor 1 and internalize – albeit with low efficiency -iron only when its extracellular concentration is high. In contrast, M2 macrophages have high iron regulatory protein binding activity, express low levels of ferritin H and high levels of transferrin receptor 1. M2 macrophages have a larger intracellular labile iron pool, effectively take up and spontaneously release iron at low concentrations and have limited storage ability. Iron export correlates with the expression of ferroportin, which is higher in M2 macrophages. M1 and M2 cells activate antigen-specific, MHC class II-restricted T cells. In the absence of the metal, only M1 macrophages are effective. Conclusions Cytokines that drive macrophage polarization ultimately control iron handling, leading to the differentiation of macrophages into a subset which has a relatively sealed intracellular iron content (M1) or into a subset endowed with

  7. Iron active electrode and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Jackovitz, John F.; Seidel, Joseph; Pantier, Earl A.

    1982-10-26

    An iron active electrode and method of preparing same in which iron sulfate is calcined in an oxidizing atmosphere at a temperature in the range of from about 600.degree. C. to about 850.degree. C. for a time sufficient to produce an iron oxide with a trace amount of sulfate. The calcined material is loaded into an electrically conductive support and then heated in a reducing atmosphere at an elevated temperature to produce activated iron having a trace amount of sulfide which is formed into an electrode plate.

  8. IRON REGULATES XANTHINE OXIDASE ACTIVITY IN THE LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    The iron chelator deferoxamine has been reported to inhibit both xanthine oxidase (XO) and xanthine dehydrogenase activity, but the relationship of this effect to the availability of iron in the cellular and tissue environment remains unexplored. XO and total xanthine oxidoreduct...

  9. A single iron site confined in a graphene matrix for the catalytic oxidation of benzene at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Dehui; Chen, Xiaoqi; Yu, Liang; Wu, Xing; Liu, Qingfei; Liu, Yun; Yang, Huaixin; Tian, Huanfang; Hu, Yongfeng; Du, Peipei; Si, Rui; Wang, Junhu; Cui, Xiaoju; Li, Haobo; Xiao, Jianping; Xu, Tao; Deng, Jiao; Yang, Fan; Duchesne, Paul N.; Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Jigang; Sun, Litao; Li, Jianqi; Pan, Xiulian; Bao, Xinhe

    2015-01-01

    Coordinatively unsaturated (CUS) iron sites are highly active in catalytic oxidation reactions; however, maintaining the CUS structure of iron during heterogeneous catalytic reactions is a great challenge. Here, we report a strategy to stabilize single-atom CUS iron sites by embedding highly dispersed FeN4 centers in the graphene matrix. The atomic structure of FeN4 centers in graphene was revealed for the first time by combining high-resolution transmission electron microscopy/high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy with low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. These confined single-atom iron sites exhibit high performance in the direct catalytic oxidation of benzene to phenol at room temperature, with a conversion of 23.4% and a yield of 18.7%, and can even proceed efficiently at 0°C with a phenol yield of 8.3% after 24 hours. Both experimental measurements and density functional theory calculations indicate that the formation of the Fe═O intermediate structure is a key step to promoting the conversion of benzene to phenol. These findings could pave the way toward highly efficient nonprecious catalysts for low-temperature oxidation reactions in heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis. PMID:26665170

  10. Raman spectroscopy of efflorescent sulfate salts from Iron Mountain Mine Superfund Site, California.

    PubMed

    Sobron, Pablo; Alpers, Charles N

    2013-03-01

    The Iron Mountain Mine Superfund Site near Redding, California, is a massive sulfide ore deposit that was mined for iron, silver, gold, copper, zinc, and pyrite intermittently for nearly 100 years. As a result, both water and air reached the sulfide deposits deep within the mountain, producing acid mine drainage consisting of sulfuric acid and heavy metals from the ore. Particularly, the drainage water from the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain is among the most acidic waters naturally found on Earth. The mineralogy at Iron Mountain can serve as a proxy for understanding sulfate formation on Mars. Selected sulfate efflorescent salts from Iron Mountain, formed from extremely acidic waters via drainage from sulfide mining, have been characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy. Gypsum, ferricopiapite, copiapite, melanterite, coquimbite, and voltaite are found within the samples. This work has implications for Mars mineralogical and geochemical investigations as well as for terrestrial environmental investigations related to acid mine drainage contamination.

  11. Raman spectroscopy of efflorescent sulfate salts from Iron Mountain Mine Superfund Site, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sobron, Pablo; Alpers, Charles N.

    2013-01-01

    The Iron Mountain Mine Superfund Site near Redding, California, is a massive sulfide ore deposit that was mined for iron, silver, gold, copper, zinc, and pyrite intermittently for nearly 100 years. As a result, both water and air reached the sulfide deposits deep within the mountain, producing acid mine drainage consisting of sulfuric acid and heavy metals from the ore. Particularly, the drainage water from the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain is among the most acidic waters naturally found on Earth. The mineralogy at Iron Mountain can serve as a proxy for understanding sulfate formation on Mars. Selected sulfate efflorescent salts from Iron Mountain, formed from extremely acidic waters via drainage from sulfide mining, have been characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy. Gypsum, ferricopiapite, copiapite, melanterite, coquimbite, and voltaite are found within the samples. This work has implications for Mars mineralogical and geochemical investigations as well as for terrestrial environmental investigations related to acid mine drainage contamination.

  12. Iron binding activity is essential for the function of IscA in iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Landry, Aaron P; Cheng, Zishuo; Ding, Huangen

    2013-03-07

    Iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis requires coordinated delivery of iron and sulphur to scaffold proteins, followed by transfer of the assembled clusters from scaffold proteins to target proteins. This complex process is accomplished by a group of dedicated iron-sulphur cluster assembly proteins that are conserved from bacteria to humans. While sulphur in iron-sulphur clusters is provided by L-cysteine via cysteine desulfurase, the iron donor(s) for iron-sulphur cluster assembly remains largely elusive. Here we report that among the primary iron-sulphur cluster assembly proteins, IscA has a unique and strong binding activity for mononuclear iron in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the ferric iron centre tightly bound in IscA can be readily extruded by l-cysteine, followed by reduction to ferrous iron for iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis. Substitution of the highly conserved residue tyrosine 40 with phenylalanine (Y40F) in IscA results in a mutant protein that has a diminished iron binding affinity but retains the iron-sulphur cluster binding activity. Genetic complementation studies show that the IscA Y40F mutant is inactive in vivo, suggesting that the iron binding activity is essential for the function of IscA in iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis.

  13. Reactive transport modeling at uranium in situ recovery sites: uncertainties in uranium sorption on iron hydroxides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Tutu, Hlanganani; Brown, Adrian; Figueroa, Linda; Wolkersdorfer, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Geochemical changes that can occur down gradient from uranium in situ recovery (ISR) sites are important for various stakeholders to understand when evaluating potential effects on surrounding groundwater quality. If down gradient solid-phase material consists of sandstone with iron hydroxide coatings (no pyrite or organic carbon), sorption of uranium on iron hydroxides can control uranium mobility. Using one-dimensional reactive transport models with PHREEQC, two different geochemical databases, and various geochemical parameters, the uncertainties in uranium sorption on iron hydroxides are evaluated, because these oxidized zones create a greater risk for future uranium transport than fully reduced zones where uranium generally precipitates.

  14. Zero-valent iron for the removal of soluble uranium in simulated DOE site groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Jarabek, R.J.; Fiedor, J.N.

    1997-12-31

    Groundwater at the Bear Creek Valley Characterization Area, located at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, is contaminated with regulated metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) due to former site activities and disposal practices. The contaminant of principle concern, from the perspective of protecting human health, is soluble uranium, which is present in some waters at concentrations up to a few parts-per-million. We present product speciation and relative reaction kinetics; for removal of soluble uranium under oxic and anoxic conditions with use of zero-valent iron. Under oxic conditions, U(VI) is rapidly and strongly sorbed to hydrous ferric oxide particulate ({open_quotes}rust{close_quotes}), whereas uranium is slowly and incompletely reduced to U(IV) under anoxic conditions.

  15. Investigation of oxidation process of mechanically activated ultrafine iron powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysenko, E. N.; Nikolaev, E. V.; Vlasov, V. A.; Zhuravkov, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    The oxidation of mechanically activated ultrafine iron powders was studied using X- ray powder diffraction and thermogravimetric analyzes. The powders with average particles size of 100 nm were made by the electric explosion of wire, and were subjected to mechanical activation in planetary ball mill for 15 and 40 minutes. It was shown that a certain amount of FeO phase is formed during mechanical activation of ultrafine iron powders. According to thermogravimetric analysis, the oxidation process of non-milled ultrafine iron powders is a complex process and occurs in three stages. The preliminary mechanical activation of powders considerably changes the nature of the iron powders oxidation, leads to increasing in the temperature of oxidation onset and shifts the reaction to higher temperatures. For the milled powders, the oxidation is more simple process and occurs in a single step.

  16. Toxicity and biodistribution of activated and non-activated intravenous iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, J. A.; Ogden, J. A.; Strawbridge, R. R.; Pierce, Z. E.; Hoopes, P. J.

    2009-02-01

    The use of nanoparticles in medical treatment has prompted the question of their safety. In this study, the pathophysiology and biodistribution of three different concentrations of intravenously-delivered dextran-coated Fe3O4 iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) were evaluated in mice. Some groups of mice were exposed to an AC magnetic field (AMF) at levels comparable with those proposed for cancer treatments. Iron biodistribution analysis for both AMF and non-AMF treated mice was performed for all three concentrations used (.6 mg Fe/mouse, 1.8 mg Fe/mouse, and 5.6 mg Fe/mouse). Blood urea nitrogen, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, total serum protein, and creatinine were also assessed at 4 hours, 7 days, and 14 days post-injection. Histological analysis of lung, spleen, heart, liver, and kidney tissue was conducted at 7 and 14 days post-injection. Prussian blue and H&E stains were used to histomorphometrically assess iron content in the tissues studied. Preliminary results demonstrate small temporary elevation in liver enzymes and hepatocyte vacuolization at all iron concentrations studied. Liver and spleen were the primary sites of IONP deposition. None of the animals demonstrated systemic or local toxicity or illness, with or without AMF activation.

  17. Dominance of Ferritrophicum populations at an AMD site with rapid iron oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grettenberger, C.; Pearce, A.; Bibby, K. J.; Burgos, W.; Jones, D. S.; Macalady, J.

    2015-12-01

    Acid mine drainage is a major environmental problem affecting watersheds across the globe. Bioremediation of AMD relies on microbial communities to oxidize and thus remove iron from the system. Iron-oxidation rates in AMD environments are highly variable across sites. At Scalp Level Run in Summerset County PA, iron-oxidation rates are five to eight times faster than other coal-associated AMD sites. We examined the microbial community at Scalp Level Run to determine whether a unique microbial community may be responsible for the observed rapid iron-oxidation rates. Using MiSeq sequence tags, 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we found that Scalp Level Run sediments host microbial populations closely related to the betaproteobacterium Ferritrophicum radicicola, an iron-oxidizing species isolated from an acid mine drainage wetland in Virginia. Ferritrophicum spp. was not found at the four other coal-associated AMD sites in the study and is uncommon in the published literature. The influence of Ferritrophicum spp. populations in biogeochemical cycling, specifically their role in determining the iron-oxidation rate at Scalp Level Run is unknown. Therefore, we employed metagenomic sequencing to examine the metabolic potential of the microbial community at Scalp Level Run.

  18. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  19. Wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation of phenol with FeAC (iron-embedded activated carbon) catalysts.

    PubMed

    Liou, Rey-May; Chen, Shih-Hsiung; Huang, Cheng-Hsien; Hung, Mu-Ya; Chang, Jing-Song; Lai, Cheng-Lee

    2010-01-01

    This investigation aims at exploring the catalytic oxidation activity of iron-embedded activated carbon (FeAC) and the application for the degradation of phenol in the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO). FeAC catalysts were prepared by pre-impregnating iron in coconut shell with various iron loadings in the range of 27.5 to 46.5% before they were activated. The FeAC catalysts were characterised by measuring their surface area, pore distribution, functional groups on the surface, and X-ray diffraction patterns. The effects of iron loading strongly inhibited the pore development of the catalyst but benefited the oxidation activity in WHPCO. It was found that the complete conversion of phenol was observed with all FeAC catalysts in oxidation. High level of chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement can be achieved within the first 30 minutes of oxidation. The iron embedded in the activated carbon showed good performance in the degradation and mineralisation of phenol during the oxidation due to the active sites as iron oxides formed on the surface of the activated carbon. It was found that the embedding irons were presented in gamma-Fe(2)O(3), alpha-Fe(2)O(3), and alpha-FeCOOH forms on the activated carbon. The aging tests on FeAC catalysts showed less activity loss, and less iron leaching was found after four oxidation runs.

  20. Effect of Transport and Aging Processes on Metal Speciation in Iron Oxyhydroxide Aggregates, Tar Creek Superfund Site, Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estes, E. R.; Schaider, L. A.; Shine, J. P.; Brabander, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    Following the cessation of mining activity in the late 20th century, Tar Creek Superfund Site was left highly contaminated by Pb, Zn, and Cd. Tar Creek, which flows through the site and into the Neosho River, has been studied extensively because of its potential to transport metals from the mining site to downstream communities. Previous research identified aggregated iron oxyhydroxide material, which forms when mine seepage mixes with Tar Creek surface water, as a major transport vector of metals. Frequent flooding in Tar Creek deposits aggregates on downstream floodplains, where wetting and drying processes alter the speciation of iron and other metals. This study seeks to better quantify those changes and to determine how transport and aging affects the human and ecological health risk. Sequential extractions of aggregate samples collected from the creek demonstrate that Fe is present in both amorphous (10-35% of Fe extracted) and more crystalline (8-23% of Fe extracted) phases. Substantial portions of heavy metals sorb to amorphous iron oxyhydroxide phases (accounting for 10-30% of Pb and Zn extracted) but are not associated with more crystalline iron oxide phases (representing only 1% or less of the Pb and Zn extracted). Samples have a high organic matter content (18-25% mass loss on ignition), but only Fe was significantly extracted by the oxidizing step targeting organic matter (1-2% of Pb and Zn extracted, but 10-26% of Fe extracted). The majority of metals were extracted by the soluble or residual steps. If metals and organic matter inhibit transformation of amorphous iron oxyhydroxide material to nano and crystalline iron oxides, then a steady-state volume of amorphous iron oxyhydroxide material with a high total sorption capacity may exist within Tar Creek, enhancing the metal flux accommodated by this transport mechanism. Once transported downstream and deposited on floodplains, however, it is hypothesized that repeated changes in soil matrix

  1. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  2. Serum paraoxonase 1 activity in patients with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Gedikbasi, Asuman; Akalin, Nilgul; Gunaldi, Meral; Yilmaz, Deniz; Mert, Meral; Harmankaya, Ozlem; Soylu, Aliye; Karakaya, Pinar; Kumbasar, Abdulbaki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In this study we aimed to detect paraoxonase 1 (PON-1) activity in iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and to compare it with healthy controls by observing the change after iron therapy. Material and methods In this study, 50 adult patients with IDA and 40 healthy subjects were enrolled. All patients were analyzed at the beginning and after treatment according to laboratory assessments. Results Mean paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in the iron deficiency anemia group were significantly lower than mean activities of the control group (102.4 ±19.2 U/l and 163.3 ±13.68 U/l, respectively and 157.3 ±26.4 U/l and 256.1 ±24.6 U/l, respectively; p = 0.0001 for both). Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities significantly increased after treatment for IDA (143.2 ±13.9 and 197.6 ±27.9 U/l, respectively, p = 0.0001). Mean activities after treatment with iron were significantly lower than mean activities in the control group (p = 0.002; p = 0.0001 respectively). Conclusions Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in patients with IDA significantly increased after treatment with iron therapy. In adults IDA may also be one of the factors associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis. PMID:27478448

  3. Substrate Activation by Iron Superoxo Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Krebs, Carsten; Bollinger, J. Martin

    2010-01-01

    A growing number of non-heme-iron oxygenases and oxidases catalyze reactions for which the well-established mechanistic paradigm involving a single C-H-bond cleaving intermediate of the Fe(IV)-oxo (ferryl) type [1] is insufficient to explain the chemistry. It is becoming clear that, in several of these cases, Fe(III)-superoxide complexes formed by simple addition of O2 to the reduced [Fe(II)] cofactor initiate substrate oxidation by abstracting hydrogen [2]. This substrate-oxidizing entry route into high-valent-iron intermediates makes possible an array of complex and elegant oxidation reactions without consumption of valuable reducing equivalents. Examples of this novel mechanistic strategy are discussed with the goal of bringing forth unifying principles. PMID:20951572

  4. Both immanently high active iron contents and increased root ferrous uptake in response to low iron stress contribute to the iron deficiency tolerance in Malus xiaojinensis.

    PubMed

    Zha, Qian; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Xin-Zhong; Han, Zhen-Hai

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the mechanism of low-iron stress tolerance in Malus xiaojinensis, the differences in physiological parameters and gene expression between an iron deficiency-sensitive species, Malus baccata, and an iron deficiency-tolerant species, M. xiaojinensis were investigated under low-iron (4 μM Fe) conditions. Under iron sufficient conditions, the expressions of iron uptake- and transport-related genes, i.e. FIT1, IRT1, CS1, FRD3 and NRMAP1, and the immanent leaf and root active iron contents were higher in M. xiaojinensis than those in M. baccata. However, on the first three days of low iron stress, the rhizospheric pH decreased and the root ferric chelate reductase (FCR) activity and the expression of ferrous uptake- and iron transport-related genes in the roots increased significantly only in M. xiaojinensis. Leaf chlorosis occurred on the 3rd and the 9th day after low-iron treatment in M. baccata and M. xiaojinensis, respectively. The expression of iron relocalization-related genes, such as NAS1, FRD3 and NRMAP3, increased after the 5th or 6th day of low iron stress in leaves of M. xiaojinensis, whereas the expression of NAS1, FRD3 and NRMAP3 in the leaves of M. baccata increased immediately after the onset of low iron treatment. Conclusively, the relative high active iron contents caused by the immanently active root ferrous uptake and the increased root ferrous uptake in response to low iron stress were the dominant mechanisms for the tolerance to iron deficiency in M. xiaojinensis.

  5. Saugus Iron Works: Life and Work at an Early American Industrial Site. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Maryann

    In 1948 archeologists verified that a now overgrown and urbanized landscape along the Saugus River (Massachusetts) was the site of the Saugus Iron Works from 1646 until 1648. That discovery led to a careful, though partly conjectural, reconstruction of the first successful integrated ironmaking plant in the colonial America. The early Puritan…

  6. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved amino acids in the alpha subunit of toluene dioxygenase: potential mononuclear non-heme iron coordination sites.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, H; Parales, R E; Lynch, N A; Gibson, D T

    1996-01-01

    The terminal oxygenase component of toluene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida F1 is an iron-sulfur protein (ISP(TOL)) that requires mononuclear iron for enzyme activity. Alignment of all available predicted amino acid sequences for the large (alpha) subunits of terminal oxygenases showed a conserved cluster of potential mononuclear iron-binding residues. These were between amino acids 210 and 230 in the alpha subunit (TodC1) of ISP(TOL). The conserved amino acids, Glu-214, Asp-219, Tyr-221, His-222, and His-228, were each independently replaced with an alanine residue by site-directed mutagenesis. Tyr-266 in TodC1, which has been suggested as an iron ligand, was treated in an identical manner. To assay toluene dioxygenase activity in the presence of TodC1 and its mutant forms, conditions for the reconstitution of wild-type ISP(TOL) activity from TodC1 and purified TodC2 (beta subunit) were developed and optimized. A mutation at Glu-214, Asp-219, His-222, or His-228 completely abolished toluene dioxygenase activity. TodC1 with an alanine substitution at either Tyr-221 or Tyr-266 retained partial enzyme activity (42 and 12%, respectively). In experiments with [14C]toluene, the two Tyr-->Ala mutations caused a reduction in the amount of Cis-[14C]-toluene dihydrodiol formed, whereas a mutation at Glu-214, Asp-219, His-222, or His-228 eliminated cis-toluene dihydrodiol formation. The expression level of all of the mutated TWO proteins was equivalent to that of wild-type TodC1 as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot (immunoblot) analyses. These results, in conjunction with the predicted amino acid sequences of 22 oxygenase components, suggest that the conserved motif Glu-X3-4,-Asp-X2-His-X4-5-His is critical for catalytic function and the glutamate, aspartate, and histidine residues may act as mononuclear iron ligands at the site of oxygen activation. PMID:8655491

  7. Landfill-stimulated iron reduction and arsenic release at the Coakley Superfund Site (NH).

    PubMed

    deLemos, Jamie L; Bostick, Benjamin C; Renshaw, Carl E; Stürup, Stefan; Feng, Xiahong

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic is a contaminant at more than one-third of all Superfund Sites in the United States. Frequently this contamination appearsto resultfrom geochemical processes rather than the presence of a well-defined arsenic source. Here we examine the geochemical processes that regulate arsenic levels at the Coakley Landfill Superfund Site (NH), a site contaminated with As, Cr, Pb, Ni, Zn, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Long-term field observations indicate that the concentrations of most of these contaminants have diminished as a result of treatment by monitored natural attenuation begun in 1998; however, dissolved arsenic levels increased modestly over the same interval. We attribute this increase to the reductive release of arsenic associated with poorly crystalline iron hydroxides within a glaciomarine clay layer within the overburden underlying the former landfill. Anaerobic batch incubations that stimulated iron reduction in the glaciomarine clay released appreciable dissolved arsenic and iron. Field observations also suggest that iron reduction associated with biodegradation of organic waste are partly responsible for arsenic release; over the five-year study period since a cap was emplaced to prevent water flow through the site, decreases in groundwater dissolved benzene concentrations at the landfill are correlated with increases in dissolved arsenic concentrations, consistent with the microbial decomposition of both benzene and other organics, and reduction of arsenic-bearing iron oxides. Treatment of contaminated groundwater increasingly is based on stimulating natural biogeochemical processes to degrade the contaminants. These results indicate that reducing environments created within organic contaminant plumes may release arsenic. In fact, the strong correlation (>80%) between elevated arsenic levels and organic contamination in groundwater systems at Superfund Sites across the United States suggests that arsenic contamination caused by natural degradation of

  8. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  9. Cisplatin upregulates Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in iron homeostasis through activation of the iron insufficiency-responsive transcription factor Aft1.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Akiko; Ohashi, Kazuaki; Naganuma, Akira

    2007-02-01

    The response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to cisplatin was investigated by examining variations in gene expression using cDNA microarrays and confirming the results by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The mRNA levels of 14 proteins involved in iron homeostasis were shown to be increased by cisplatin. Interestingly, the expression of all 14 genes is known to be regulated by Aft1, a transcription factor activated in response to iron insufficiency. The promoter of one of these genes, FET3, has been relatively well studied, so we performed a reporter assay using the FET3 promoter and showed that an Aft1 binding site in the promoter region is indispensable for induction of transcription by cisplatin. The active domain of Aft1 necessary for activation of the FET3 promoter by cisplatin is identical to the one required for activation by bathophenanthroline sulfonate, an inhibitor of cellular iron uptake. Furthermore, we found that cisplatin inhibits the uptake of (55)Fe(II) into yeast cells. These findings suggest that cisplatin activates Aft1 through the inhibition of iron uptake into the cells, after which the expression of Aft1 target genes involved in iron uptake might be induced.

  10. Superoxide scavenging activity of pirfenidone-iron complex

    SciTech Connect

    Mitani, Yoshihiro; Sato, Keizo Muramoto, Yosuke; Karakawa, Tomohiro; Kitamado, Masataka; Iwanaga, Tatsuya; Nabeshima, Tetsuji; Maruyama, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Kazuko; Ishida, Kazuhiko; Sasamoto, Kazumi

    2008-07-18

    Pirfenidone (PFD) is focused on a new anti-fibrotic drug, which can minimize lung fibrosis etc. We evaluated the superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -}) scavenging activities of PFD and the PFD-iron complex by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, luminol-dependent chemiluminescence assay, and cytochrome c reduction assay. Firstly, we confirmed that the PFD-iron complex was formed by mixing iron chloride with threefold molar PFD, and the complex was stable in distillated water and ethanol. Secondary, the PFD-iron complex reduced the amount of O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} produced by xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine without inhibiting the enzyme activity. Thirdly, it also reduced the amount of O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} released from phorbor ester-stimulated human neutrophils. PFD alone showed few such effects. These results suggest the possibility that the O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} scavenging effect of the PFD-iron complex contributes to the anti-fibrotic action of PFD used for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  11. Vertical movement of iron-cyanide complexes in soils of a former Manufactured Gas Plant site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sut, Magdalena; Repmann, Frank; Raab, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In Germany, soil and groundwater at more than a thousand sites are contaminated with iron-cyanide complexes. These contaminations originate from the gas purification process that was conducted in Manufactured Gas Plants (MGP). The phenomenon of iron-cyanide complexes mobility in soil, according to the literature, is mainly governed by the dissolution and precipitation of ferric ferrocyanide, which is only slightly soluble (< 1 mg L-1) under acidic conditions. This study suggests vertical transport of a colloidal ferric ferrocyanide, in the excess of iron and circum-neutral pH conditions, as an alternative process that influences the retardation of the pollutant movement through the soil profile. Preliminary in situ investigations of the two boreholes implied transport of ferric ferricyanide from the initial deposition in the wastes layer towards the sandy loam material (secondary accumulation), which possibly retarded the mobility of cyanide (CN). The acidic character of the wastes and the accumulation of the blue patches suggested the potential filter function of a sandy loam material due to colloidal transport of the ferric ferricyanide. Series of batch and column experiments, using sandy loam soil, revealed reduction of CN concentration due to mechanical filtration of precipitated solid iron-cyanide complexes and due to the formation of potassium manganese iron-cyanide (K2Mn[Fe(CN)6]).

  12. Modeling the speciation and biogeochemistry of iron at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, L.; VöLker, C.; Schartau, M.; Wolf-Gladrow, D. A.

    2005-03-01

    By means of numerical modeling, we analyze the cycling of iron between its various physical (dissolved, colloidal, particulate) and chemical (redox state and organic complexation) forms in the upper mixed layer. With our proposed model it is possible to obtain a first quantitative assessment of how this cycling influences iron uptake by phytoplankton and its loss via particle export. The model is forced with observed dust deposition rates, mixed layer depths, and solar radiation at the site of the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS). It contains an objectively optimized ecosystem model which yields results close to the observational data from BATS that has been used for the data-assimilation procedure. It is shown that the mixed layer cycle strongly influences the cycling of iron between its various forms. This is mainly due to the light dependency of photoreductive processes, and to the seasonality of primary production. The daily photochemical cycle is driven mainly by the production of superoxide, and its amplitude depends on the concentration and speciation of dissolved copper. Model results are almost insensitive to the dominant form of dissolved iron within dust deposition, and also to the form of iron that is taken up directly during algal growth. In our model solutions, the role of the colloidal pumping mechanism depends strongly on assumptions on the colloid aggregation and photoreduction rate.

  13. Oxidation of ethane to ethanol by N2O in a metal-organic framework with coordinatively unsaturated iron(II) sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Dianne J.; Bloch, Eric D.; Mason, Jarad A.; Queen, Wendy L.; Hudson, Matthew R.; Planas, Nora; Borycz, Joshua; Dzubak, Allison L.; Verma, Pragya; Lee, Kyuho; Bonino, Francesca; Crocellà, Valentina; Yano, Junko; Bordiga, Silvia; Truhlar, Donald G.; Gagliardi, Laura; Brown, Craig M.; Long, Jeffrey R.

    2014-07-01

    Enzymatic haem and non-haem high-valent iron-oxo species are known to activate strong C-H bonds, yet duplicating this reactivity in a synthetic system remains a formidable challenge. Although instability of the terminal iron-oxo moiety is perhaps the foremost obstacle, steric and electronic factors also limit the activity of previously reported mononuclear iron(IV)-oxo compounds. In particular, although nature's non-haem iron(IV)-oxo compounds possess high-spin S = 2 ground states, this electronic configuration has proved difficult to achieve in a molecular species. These challenges may be mitigated within metal-organic frameworks that feature site-isolated iron centres in a constrained, weak-field ligand environment. Here, we show that the metal-organic framework Fe2(dobdc) (dobdc4- = 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate) and its magnesium-diluted analogue, Fe0.1Mg1.9(dobdc), are able to activate the C-H bonds of ethane and convert it into ethanol and acetaldehyde using nitrous oxide as the terminal oxidant. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the active oxidant is likely to be a high-spin S = 2 iron(IV)-oxo species.

  14. Electric field gradient and mean square displacement of iron sites in cubic iron sulphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, V. K.

    1981-01-01

    Mössbauer absorption of Fe57, for four equivalent but differently oriented sites, in naturally occuring single crystals of FeS2 (pyrite) has been studied as a function of the orientation of the crystal axes with respect to the γ-ray beam from a Co57/Pd source. Polarization effects for our absorbers of ˜0.1 mm thickness were found not to be appreciable. Experimental peak area ratio of ˜1 in the case of powdered absorber and monocrystalline absorbers in (111), (110), and (100) planes has been analyzed to obtain the principal axes of the electric-field-gradient and the mean-square displacement as ‖1,1,1‖, ‖-1,1,1‖, ‖1,1,-1‖, and ‖1,-1,1‖ direction for the Fe sites corresponding to 000, 1/2 1/2 0, 1/2 0 1/2 , and 0 1/2 1/2, respectively. The angular independent recoilless fraction at 298 K has been obtained to be 0.20±0.02 and for the mean-square displacement =< y2>=, and its value at 298 K is 4.34±0.23×10-19 cm2.

  15. Binding of oxygen on vacuum fractured pyrite surfaces: Reactivity of iron and sulfur surface sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlich, A. G.; Nesbitt, H. W.; Bancroft, G. M.; Szargan, R.

    2013-05-01

    Synchrotron radiation excited photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS) has been used to study the interaction of oxygen with vacuum fractured pyrite surfaces. Especially valence band spectra obtained with 30 eV photon energy were analyzed to provide a mechanism of the incipient steps of pyrite oxidation. These spectra are far more sensitive to the oxidation than sulfur or iron core level spectra. It is shown that oxygen is adsorbed on Fe(II) surface sites restoring the octahedral coordination of the Fe(II) sites. This process leads to the removal of two surface states in the valence band which are located at the low and high binding energy sides of the outer valence band, respectively. The existence of these surface states which have been proposed by calculations is experimentally proven. Furthermore, it is shown, that the sulfur sites are more reactive than expected. Sulfite like species are already formed after the lowest oxygen exposure of 10 L. This oxidation occurs at sulfur sites neighboring the Fe(II) surface sites. Oxidation of the S2 - surface sites which were considered as the most reactive species in former studies is second. No iron(III) oxides are formed during oxygen exposure, supporting the assumption that water plays an important role in the oxidation mechanism of pyrite surfaces.

  16. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  17. Iron budgets for three distinct biogeochemical sites around the Kerguelen Archipelago (Southern Ocean) during the natural fertilisation study, KEOPS-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowie, A. R.; van der Merwe, P.; Quéroué, F.; Trull, T.; Fourquez, M.; Planchon, F.; Sarthou, G.; Chever, F.; Townsend, A. T.; Obernosterer, I.; Sallée, J.-B.; Blain, S.

    2015-07-01

    Iron availability in the Southern Ocean controls phytoplankton growth, community composition and the uptake of atmospheric CO2 by the biological pump. The KEOPS-2 (KErguelen Ocean and Plateau compared Study 2) "process study", took place around the Kerguelen Plateau in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean. This is a region naturally fertilised with iron on the scale of hundreds to thousands of square kilometres, producing a mosaic of spring blooms which show distinct biological and biogeochemical responses to fertilisation. This paper presents biogeochemical iron budgets (incorporating vertical and lateral supply, internal cycling, and sinks) for three contrasting sites: an upstream high-nutrient low-chlorophyll reference, over the plateau and in the offshore plume east of the Kerguelen Islands. These budgets show that distinct regional environments driven by complex circulation and transport pathways are responsible for differences in the mode and strength of iron supply, with vertical supply dominant on the plateau and lateral supply dominant in the plume. Iron supply from "new" sources (diffusion, upwelling, entrainment, lateral advection, atmospheric dust) to the surface waters of the plume was double that above the plateau and 20 times greater than at the reference site, whilst iron demand (measured by cellular uptake) in the plume was similar to that above the plateau but 40 times greater than at the reference site. "Recycled" iron supply by bacterial regeneration and zooplankton grazing was a relatively minor component at all sites (< 8 % of new supply), in contrast to earlier findings from other biogeochemical iron budgets in the Southern Ocean. Over the plateau, a particulate iron dissolution term of 2.5 % was invoked to balance the budget; this approximately doubled the standing stock of dissolved iron in the mixed layer. The exchange of iron between dissolved, biogenic particulate and lithogenic particulate pools was highly dynamic in time and space

  18. Influence of iron status and iron supplements on natural killer cell activity in trained women runners.

    PubMed

    Flynn, M G; Mackinnon, L; Gedge, V; Fahlman, M; Brickman, T

    2003-04-01

    Twenty-two trained women runners (.VO2peak 48.1 + 1.2 ml x kg -1 x min -1) were divided into an iron supplement (n = 13) or placebo group (n = 9) based on initial serum ferritin concentration (24.2 +/- 2.9 and 58.5 +/- 4.0 microg x l -1, respectively). Exercise consisted of a 35-min run (80 % .VO2peak) and was performed at week 0 (WK0), after two weeks of intensified training (WK2) and after eight weeks recovery training (WK10). The eight weeks recovery training were concomitant with subjects taking iron supplements or placebo in a double blind fashion. Concentrations of serum ferritin, serum iron and total iron binding capacity were assessed pre-exercise and complete blood count, natural killer cell activity (NKACT), and cell surface markers for CD3+, CD4+, CD3+,CD8+, CD3-, CD16+, CD56+ cells were determined both pre- and post-exercise. Serum ferritin concentrations were significantly (p < 0.05) increased on WK10 compared to WK2 (time effect). NKACT (%lysis) and NK cell number was lower (p < 0.05) at WK0 for supplement (42.9 +/- 1.9 % and 305.5 +/- 15.0 x 10 6 x l -1, respectively) compared to placebo groups (50.9 +/- 2.0 and 406.1 +/- 25.6, respectively). Two weeks of intensified training did not alter indices of host defense. In conclusion, NKACT and NK cell numbers were lower in subjects with greater body mass and lower iron stores (p < 0.05), but were not significantly altered after two weeks of intensified training or when serum ferritin levels increased.

  19. An innovative method for nondestructive analysis of cast iron artifacts at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, R.A.; Helmke, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Iron ore containing elevated concentrations of trace metals was smelted at Hopewell Furnace during its 113 years of operation (1771-1883). For this study, we sampled iron ore, cast iron furnace products, slag, soil, groundwater, streamflow, and streambed sediment to determine the fate of trace metals released into the environment during the iron-smelting process. Standard techniques were used to sample and analyze all media except cast iron. We analyzed the trace-metal content of the cast iron using a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, which provided rapid, on-site, nondestructive analyses for 23 elements. The artifacts analyzed included eight cast iron stoves, a footed pot, and a kettle in the Hopewell Furnace museum. We measured elevated concentrations of arsenic, copper, lead, and zinc in the cast iron. Lead concentrations as great as 3,150 parts per million were measured in the stoves. Cobalt was detectable but not quantifiable because of interference with iron. Our study found that arsenic, cobalt, and lead were not released to soil or slag, which could pose a significant health risk to visitors and employees. Instead, our study demonstrates these heavy metals remained with the cast iron and were removed from the site.

  20. Interaction between non-heme iron of lipoxygenases and cumene hydroperoxide: basis for enzyme activation, inactivation, and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeshir; Brault, Pierre-Alexandre; Shah, Priya; Kim, Yong-Wah; Dunham, William R; Funk, Max O

    2004-02-25

    Lipoxygenase catalysis depends in a critical fashion on the redox properties of a unique mononuclear non-heme iron cofactor. The isolated enzyme contains predominantly, if not exclusively, iron(II), but the catalytically active form of the enzyme has iron(III). The activating oxidation of the iron takes place in a reaction with the hydroperoxide product of the catalyzed reaction. In a second peroxide-dependent process, lipoxygenases are also inactivated. To examine the redox activation/inactivation dichotomy in lipoxygenase chemistry, the interaction between lipoxygenase-1 (and -3) and cumene hydroperoxide was investigated. Cumene hydroperoxide was a reversible inhibitor of the reaction catalyzed by lipoxygenase-1 under standard assay conditions at high substrate concentrations. Reconciliation of the data with the currently held kinetic mechanism requires simultaneous binding of substrate and peroxide. The enzyme also was both oxidized and largely inactivated in a reaction with the peroxide in the absence of substrate. The consequences of this reaction for the enzyme included the hydroxylation at C beta of two amino acid side chains in the vicinity of the cofactor, Trp and Leu. The modifications were identified by mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. The peroxide-induced oxidation of iron was also accompanied by a subtle rearrangement in the coordination sphere of the non-heme iron atom. Since the enzyme retains catalytic activity, albeit diminished, after treatment with cumene hydroperoxide, the structure of the iron site may reflect the catalytically relevant form of the cofactor.

  1. Iron spin state and site distribution in FeAlO3-bearing bridgmanite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohn, Chris E.; Trønnes, Reidar G.

    2016-04-01

    DFT at the GGA, GGA + U and hybrid functional levels were used to investigate thousands of different Al and Fe3+ configurations of MgSiO3-FeAlO3 (MS-FA) and MgSiO3-FeAlO3-Al2O3 bridgmanite at deep mantle conditions. Comparison of the different functionals and atomic charge analysis suggests that GGA, frequently used to explain high to low spin transitions observed in several Mössbauer and X-ray emission spectroscopy experiments, is hampered by spurious self-interaction errors in the exchange-correlation energy. Configurational Boltzmann averaging shows that the B site is thermally inaccessible to Fe3+ at the GGA + U and hybrid levels, and we find no evidence for a spin-pairing transition in fully (thermodynamically) equilibrated samples of bridgmanite, even at the lowermost mantle conditions. The comparison of the cation radii of Fe3+ and Mg supports a spin transition accompanied by a site exchange, but the flexibility of Fesbnd O bonds to locally adapt promotes the incorporation of iron in the irregularly coordinated A-site. The concept of ionic radii is therefore unsuitable for analysis of spin state and site exchange in bridgmanite at these conditions. Consistent with previous computational work and experimental studies with glass and gel as starting material, we find that ferric iron kinetically trapped at the B site undergoes a spin transition under lowermost mantle conditions. In bridgmanite with mole fraction of Fe3+ >Al a charge-balancing amount of low spin Fe3+ will be thermodynamically stable at the B site, but because bridgmanite in peridotitic and basaltic lithologies mostly has Al/Fetotal above unity, FA with high spin Fe3+ in the A-site will be the dominant iron component. The lack of a Fe3+ spin transition in the FA-component has important implications for bridgmanite-ferropericlase partitioning of iron and magnesium and the mineral physics of the lowermost mantle.

  2. Mechanism of Oxidation of Ethane to Ethanol at Iron(IV)-Oxo Sites in Magnesium-Diluted Fe2(dobdc).

    PubMed

    Verma, Pragya; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos D; Planas, Nora; Borycz, Joshua; Xiao, Dianne J; Long, Jeffrey R; Gagliardi, Laura; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-05-06

    The catalytic properties of the metal-organic framework Fe2(dobdc), containing open Fe(II) sites, include hydroxylation of phenol by pure Fe2(dobdc) and hydroxylation of ethane by its magnesium-diluted analogue, Fe0.1Mg1.9(dobdc). In earlier work, the latter reaction was proposed to occur through a redox mechanism involving the generation of an iron(IV)-oxo species, which is an intermediate that is also observed or postulated (depending on the case) in some heme and nonheme enzymes and their model complexes. In the present work, we present a detailed mechanism by which the catalytic material, Fe0.1Mg1.9(dobdc), activates the strong C-H bonds of ethane. Kohn-Sham density functional and multireference wave function calculations have been performed to characterize the electronic structure of key species. We show that the catalytic nonheme-Fe hydroxylation of the strong C-H bond of ethane proceeds by a quintet single-state σ-attack pathway after the formation of highly reactive iron-oxo intermediate. The mechanistic pathway involves three key transition states, with the highest activation barrier for the transfer of oxygen from N2O to the Fe(II) center. The uncatalyzed reaction, where nitrous oxide directly oxidizes ethane to ethanol is found to have an activation barrier of 280 kJ/mol, in contrast to 82 kJ/mol for the slowest step in the iron(IV)-oxo catalytic mechanism. The energetics of the C-H bond activation steps of ethane and methane are also compared. Dehydrogenation and dissociation pathways that can compete with the formation of ethanol were shown to involve higher barriers than the hydroxylation pathway.

  3. Geophysical prospection on an Early Iron Age Cult Site near Frankfurt/Oder, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Burkart; Kaufmann, Georg; Beilke-Voigt, Ines

    2010-05-01

    The Free University of Berlin and the Humboldt University of Berlin hosts the excellence cluster 264 Topoi, "The Formation and Transformation of Space and Knowledge in Ancient Civilizations". The Excellence Cluster pursues the goal of researching the interdependence of space and knowledge in the civilizations of the Ancient Near East, the Mediterranean, and Black Sea region and parts of the Eurasian steppe from the 6th millennium BC to around AD 500. Within this excellence cluster, the project A-I-11 "Lossow near Frankfurt/Oder - An Early Iron Age Cult Site of the Ancient Peripheral Zone" examines the evolution of an important cult site in Central Europe. The castle mound of Lossow was built as a fortified settlement in the late Bronze Age (10th century B.C.). After a phase of around 200 years, a supra-regionally significant, early Iron Age cult centre developed on this site (8th-6th century B.C.). Several pieces of evidence indicate that the locality had a central-site character. Typical for the site are well-shapes shafts, filled with large amounts of human and animal bones. The shafts with a diameter of about 1 meter and a depth of about 5 to 7 meters are a great challenge to near surface geophysics. Here, geophysical methods (geomagnetic gradiometry, geoelectric imaging, georadar survey) have been used to obtain a large-scale conclusive picture of the sub-surface both within the castle mount and around the perimeter. While the magnetic results reveal numerous archaeological artefacts, geoelectric imaging decipers the subsurface structure of the site.

  4. C-H and C-N Activation at Redox-Active Pyridine Complexes of Iron.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, K Cory; Lewis, Richard A; DeRosha, Daniel E; Mercado, Brandon Q; Holland, Patrick L

    2017-01-19

    Pyridine activation by inexpensive iron catalysts has great utility, but the steps through which iron species can break the strong (105-111 kcal mol(-1) ) C-H bonds of pyridine substrates are unknown. In this work, we report the rapid room-temperature cleavage of C-H bonds in pyridine, 4-tert-butylpyridine, and 2-phenylpyridine by an iron(I) species, to give well-characterized iron(II) products. In addition, 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) undergoes room-temperature C-N bond cleavage, which forms a dimethylamidoiron(II) complex and a pyridyl-bridged tetrairon(II) square. These facile bond-cleaving reactions are proposed to occur through intermediates having a two-electron reduced pyridine that bridges two iron centers. Thus, the redox non-innocence of the pyridine can play a key role in enabling high regioselectivity for difficult reactions.

  5. Heme oxygenase activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirm...

  6. Impact of transition metal on nitrogen retention and activity of iron-nitrogen-carbon oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Selvarani; Leonard, Nathaniel; Barton, Scott Calabrese

    2014-03-14

    Iron based nitrogen doped carbon (FeNC) catalysts are synthesized by high-pressure pyrolysis of carbon and melamine with varying amounts of iron acetate in a closed, constant-volume reactor. The optimum nominal amount of Fe (1.2 wt%) in FeNC catalysts is established through oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) polarization. Since the quantity of iron used in FeNCs is very small, the amount of Fe retained in FeNC catalysts after leaching is determined by UV-VIS spectroscopy. As nitrogen is considered to be a component of active sites, the amount of bulk and surface nitrogen retention in FeNC catalysts are measured using elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. It is found that increasing nominal Fe content in FeNC catalysts leads to a decreased level of nitrogen retention. Thermogravimetric analysis demonstrates that increasing nominal Fe content leads to increased weight loss during pyrolysis, particularly at high temperatures. Catalysts are also prepared in the absence of iron source, and with iron removed by washing with hot aqua regia post-pyrolysis. FeNC catalysts prepared with no Fe show high retained nitrogen content but poor ORR activity, and aqua regia washed catalysts demonstrate similar activity to Fe-free catalysts, indicating that Fe is an active site component.

  7. Quercetin-Iron Complex: Synthesis, Characterization, Antioxidant, DNA Binding, DNA Cleavage, and Antibacterial Activity Studies.

    PubMed

    Raza, Aun; Xu, Xiuquan; Xia, Li; Xia, Changkun; Tang, Jian; Ouyang, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Quercetin-iron (II) complex was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron micrography and molar conductivity. The low molar conductivity value investigates the non-electrolyte nature of the complex. The elemental analysis and other physical and spectroscopic methods reveal the 1:2 stoichiometric ratio (metal:ligand) of the complex. Antioxidant study of the quercetin and its metal complex against 2, 2-di-phenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical showed that the complex has much more radical scavenging activity than free quercetin. The interaction of quercetin-iron (II) complex with DNA was determined using ultraviolet visible spectra, fluorescence spectra and agarose gel electrophoresis. The results showed that quercetin-iron (II) complex can intercalate moderately with DNA, quench a strong intercalator ethidium bromide and compete for the intercalative binding sites. The complex showed significant cleavage of pBR 322 DNA from supercoiled form to nicked circular form and these cleavage effects were dose-dependent. Moreover, the mechanism of DNA cleavage indicated that it was an oxidative cleavage pathway. These results revealed the potential nuclease activity of complex to cleave DNA. In addition, antibacterial activity of complex on E.coli and S. aureus was also investigated. The results showed that complex has higher antibacterial activity than ligand.

  8. Expression of IroN, the salmochelin siderophore receptor, requires mRNA activation by RyhB small RNA homologues.

    PubMed

    Balbontín, Roberto; Villagra, Nicolás; Pardos de la Gándara, Maria; Mora, Guido; Figueroa-Bossi, Nara; Bossi, Lionello

    2016-04-01

    The iroN gene of Salmonella enterica and uropathogenic Escherichia coli encodes the outer membrane receptor of Fe(3+) -bound salmochelin, a siderophore tailored to evade capture by the host's immune system. The iroN gene is under negative control of the Fur repressor and transcribed under iron limiting conditions. We show here that transcriptional de-repression is not sufficient to allow iroN expression, as this also requires activation by either of two partially homologous small RNAs (sRNAs), RyhB1 and RyhB2. The two sRNAs target the same sequence segment approximately in the middle of the 94-nucleotide 5' untranslated region (UTR) of iroN mRNA. Several lines of evidence suggest that base pair interaction stimulates iroN mRNA translation. Activation does not result from the disruption of a secondary structure masking the ribosome binding site; rather it involves sequences at the 5' end of iroN 5' UTR. In vitro 'toeprint' assays revealed that this upstream site binds the 30S ribosomal subunit provided that RyhB1 is paired with the mRNA. Altogether, our data suggest that RyhB1, and to lesser extent RyhB2, activate iroN mRNA translation by promoting entry of the ribosome at an upstream 'standby' site. These findings add yet an additional nuance to the polychromatic landscape of sRNA-mediated regulation.

  9. Effects of Iron Supplementation and Activity on Serum Iron Depletion and Hemoglobin Levels in Female Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooter, G. Rankin; Mowbray, Kathy W.

    1978-01-01

    Research revealed that a four-month basketball training program did not significantly alter serum iron, total iron binding capacity, hemoglobin, and percent saturation levels in female basketball athletes. (JD)

  10. RATES OF IRON OXIDATION AND ARSENIC SORPTION DURING GROUND WATER-SURFACE WATER MIXING AT A HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of arsenic discharged from contaminated ground water to a pond at a hazardous waste site is controlled, in part, by the rate of ferrous iron oxidation-precipitation and arsenic sorption. Laboratory experiments were conducted using site-derived water to assess the impact...

  11. Corrosion Research And Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  12. Corrosion Research and Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  13. Oxidation of ethane to ethanol by N2O in a metal-organic framework with coordinatively unsaturated iron(II) sites

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Dianne J.; Bloch, Eric D.; Mason, Jarad A.; Queen, Wendy L.; Hudson, Matthew R.; Planas, Nora; Borycz, Joshua; Dzubak, Allison L.; Verma, Pragya; Lee, Kyuho; Bonino, Francesca; Crocellà, Valentina; Yano, Junko; Bordiga, Silvia; Truhlar, Donald G.; Gagliardi, Laura; Brown, Craig M.; Long, Jeffrey R.

    2014-08-19

    Enzymatic haem and non-haem high-valent iron–oxo species are known to activate strong C–H bonds, yet duplicating this reactivity in a synthetic system remains a formidable challenge. Although instability of the terminal iron–oxo moiety is perhaps the foremost obstacle, steric and electronic factors also limit the activity of previously reported mononuclear iron(IV)–oxo compounds. In particular, although nature's non-haem iron(IV)–oxo compounds possess high-spin S = 2 ground states, this electronic configuration has proved difficult to achieve in a molecular species. These challenges may be mitigated within metal–organic frameworks that feature site-isolated iron centres in a constrained, weak-field ligand environment. Here, we show that the metal–organic framework Fe2(dobdc) (dobdc4- = 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate) and its magnesium-diluted analogue, Fe0.1Mg1.9(dobdc), are able to activate the C–H bonds of ethane and convert it into ethanol and acetaldehyde using nitrous oxide as the terminal oxidant. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the active oxidant is likely to be a high-spin S = 2 iron(IV)–oxo species.

  14. Systematic Perturbations of Binuclear Non-heme Iron Sites: Structure and Dioxygen Reactivity of de Novo Due Ferri Proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Snyder, Rae Ana; Betzu, Justine; Butch, Susan E.; ...

    2015-07-08

    We report that DFsc (single-chain due ferri) proteins allow for modeling binuclear non-heme iron enzymes with a similar fold. Three 4A → 4G variants of DFsc were studied to investigate the effects of (1) increasing the size of the substrate/solvent access channel (G4DFsc), (2) including an additional His residue in the first coordination sphere along with three additional helix-stabilizing mutations [3His-G4DFsc(Mut3)], and (3) the three helix-stabilizing mutations alone [G4DFsc-(Mut3)] on the biferrous structures and their O2 reactivities. Near-infrared circular dichroism and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy show that the 4A → 4G mutations increase coordination of the diiron site frommore » 4-coordinate/5-coordinate to 5-coordinate/5-coordinate, likely reflecting increased solvent accessibility. While the three helix-stabilizing mutations [G4DFsc(Mut3)] do not affect the coordination number, addition of the third active site His residue [3His-G4DFsc(Mut3)] results in a 5-coordinate/6-coordinate site. Although all 4A → 4G variants have significantly slower pseudo-first-order rates when reacting with excess O2 than DFsc (~2 s₋1), G4DFsc and 3His-G4DFsc(Mut3) have rates (~0.02 and ~0.04 s₋1) faster than that of G4DFsc(Mut3) (~0.002 s₋1). These trends in the rate of O2 reactivity correlate with exchange coupling between the Fe(II) sites and suggest that the two-electron reduction of O2 occurs through end-on binding at one Fe(II) rather than through a peroxy-bridged intermediate. Finally, UV–vis absorption and MCD spectroscopies indicate that an Fe(III)Fe(III)-OH species first forms in all three variants but converts into an Fe(III)-μ-OH-Fe(III) species only in the 2-His forms, a process inhibited by the additional active site His ligand that coordinatively saturates one of the iron centers in 3His-G4DFsc(Mut3).« less

  15. Systematic Perturbations of Binuclear Non-heme Iron Sites: Structure and Dioxygen Reactivity of de Novo Due Ferri Proteins.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Rae Ana; Betzu, Justine; Butch, Susan E; Reig, Amanda J; DeGrado, William F; Solomon, Edward I

    2015-08-04

    DFsc (single-chain due ferri) proteins allow for modeling binuclear non-heme iron enzymes with a similar fold. Three 4A → 4G variants of DFsc were studied to investigate the effects of (1) increasing the size of the substrate/solvent access channel (G4DFsc), (2) including an additional His residue in the first coordination sphere along with three additional helix-stabilizing mutations [3His-G4DFsc(Mut3)], and (3) the three helix-stabilizing mutations alone [G4DFsc(Mut3)] on the biferrous structures and their O2 reactivities. Near-infrared circular dichroism and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy show that the 4A → 4G mutations increase coordination of the diiron site from 4-coordinate/5-coordinate to 5-coordinate/5-coordinate, likely reflecting increased solvent accessibility. While the three helix-stabilizing mutations [G4DFsc(Mut3)] do not affect the coordination number, addition of the third active site His residue [3His-G4DFsc(Mut3)] results in a 5-coordinate/6-coordinate site. Although all 4A→ 4G variants have significantly slower pseudo-first-order rates when reacting with excess O2 than DFsc (∼2 s(-1)), G4DFsc and 3His-G4DFsc(Mut3) have rates (∼0.02 and ∼0.04 s(-1)) faster than that of G4DFsc(Mut3) (∼0.002 s(-1)). These trends in the rate of O2 reactivity correlate with exchange coupling between the Fe(II) sites and suggest that the two-electron reduction of O2 occurs through end-on binding at one Fe(II) rather than through a peroxy-bridged intermediate. UV-vis absorption and MCD spectroscopies indicate that an Fe(III)Fe(III)-OH species first forms in all three variants but converts into an Fe(III)-μ-OH-Fe(III) species only in the 2-His forms, a process inhibited by the additional active site His ligand that coordinatively saturates one of the iron centers in 3His-G4DFsc(Mut3).

  16. How iron controls iron.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Lukas C

    2009-12-01

    Cells regulate iron homeostasis by posttranscriptional regulation of proteins responsible for iron uptake and storage. This requires RNA-binding activity of iron-regulatory proteins, IRP1 and IRP2. Two studies recently published in Science by Vashisht et al. (2009) and Salahudeen et al. (2009) reveal how cells adjust IRP2 activity.

  17. Performance of Nonmigratory Iron Chelating Active Packaging Materials in Viscous Model Food Systems.

    PubMed

    Roman, Maxine J; Decker, Eric A; Goddard, Julie M

    2015-09-01

    Many packaged food products undergo quality deterioration due to iron promoted oxidative reactions. Recently, we have developed a nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging material that represents a novel approach to inhibit oxidation of foods while addressing consumer demands for "cleanˮ labels. A challenge to the field of nonmigratory active packaging is ensuring that surface-immobilized active agents retain activity in a true food system despite diffusional limitations. Yet, the relationship between food viscosity and nonmigratory active packaging activity retention has never been characterized. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of food viscosity on iron chelation by a nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging material. Methyl cellulose was added to aqueous buffered iron solutions to yield model systems with viscosities ranging from ∼1 to ∼10(5)  mPa·s, representing viscosities ranging from beverage to mayonnaise. Iron chelation was quantified by material-bound iron content using colorimetry and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES).  Maximum iron chelation was reached in solutions up to viscosity ∼10(2)  mPa·s. In more viscous solutions (up to ∼10(4)  mPa·s), there was a significant decrease in iron chelating capacity (P < 0.05). However, materials still retained at least 76% iron chelating capacity. Additionally, the influence of different food hydrocolloids on the performance of nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging was characterized. Methyl cellulose and carrageenan did not compete with the material for specific iron chelation (P > 0.05). Materials retained 32% to 45% chelating capacity when in contact with competitively chelating hydrocolloids guar gum, locust bean gum, and xanthan gum. This work demonstrates the potential application of nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging in liquid and semi-liquid foods to allow for the removal of synthetic chelators, while

  18. Nitric Oxide Activation by Distal Redox Modulation in Tetranuclear Iron Nitrosyl Complexes

    PubMed Central

    de Ruiter, Graham; Thompson, Niklas B.; Lionetti, Davide; Agapie, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    A series of tetranuclear iron complexes displaying a site-differentiated metal center were synthesized. Three of the metal centers are coordinated to our previously reported ligand, based on a 1,3,5-triarylbenzene motif with nitrogen and oxygen donors. The fourth (apical) iron center is coordinatively unsaturated and appended to the trinuclear core through three bridging pyrazolates and an interstitial μ4-oxide moiety. Electrochemical studies of complex [LFe3(PhPz)3OFe][OTf]2 revealed three reversible redox events assigned to the FeII4/FeII3FeIII (−1.733 V), FeII3FeIII/FeII2FeIII2 (−0.727 V), and FeII2FeIII2/FeIIFeIII3 (0.018 V) redox-couples. Complexes in all redox states were isolated, and three were characterized structurally by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Combined Mössbauer spectroscopic and crystallographic studies indicate that the change in oxidation state is exclusively localized at the triiron core, without changing the oxidation state of the apical metal center. This phenomenon is assigned to differences in the coordination environment of the two metal sites in the cluster, and provides a strategy for storing electron and hole equivalents without affecting the oxidation state of the coordinatively unsaturated metal. The presence of an additional single ligand-binding site allowed for study of the effect of redox modulation on nitric oxide activation by an FeII metal center. Treatment of the clusters with nitric oxide resulted in binding of NO to the apical iron center generating a {FeNO}7 moiety. As with the NO-free precursors, three reversible redox events are observed electrochemically and are localized at the iron centers distal from the NO ligand. Altering the redox state of the triiron core resulted in significant change in the NO stretching frequency, by as much as 100 cm−1, indicative of NO activation modulated by remote metal centers. The increased activation of NO is attributed to structural changes within the clusters, in

  19. Identification of catalytic sites for oxygen reduction in iron- and nitrogen-doped graphene materials.

    PubMed

    Zitolo, Andrea; Goellner, Vincent; Armel, Vanessa; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Mineva, Tzonka; Stievano, Lorenzo; Fonda, Emiliano; Jaouen, Frédéric

    2015-09-01

    While platinum has hitherto been the element of choice for catalysing oxygen electroreduction in acidic polymer fuel cells, tremendous progress has been reported for pyrolysed Fe-N-C materials. However, the structure of their active sites has remained elusive, delaying further advance. Here, we synthesized Fe-N-C materials quasi-free of crystallographic iron structures after argon or ammonia pyrolysis. These materials exhibit nearly identical Mössbauer spectra and identical X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) spectra, revealing the same Fe-centred moieties. However, the much higher activity and basicity of NH3-pyrolysed Fe-N-C materials demonstrates that the turnover frequency of Fe-centred moieties depends on the physico-chemical properties of the support. Following a thorough XANES analysis, the detailed structures of two FeN4 porphyrinic architectures with different O2 adsorption modes were then identified. These porphyrinic moieties are not easily integrated in graphene sheets, in contrast with Fe-centred moieties assumed hitherto for pyrolysed Fe-N-C materials. These new insights open the path to bottom-up synthesis approaches and studies on site-support interactions.

  20. Impact of iron-site defects on superconductivity in LiFeAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Shun; Aluru, Ramakrishna; Singh, Udai Raj; Liang, Ruixing; Hardy, Walter N.; Bonn, D. A.; Kreisel, A.; Andersen, Brian M.; Nelson, R.; Berlijn, T.; Ku, W.; Hirschfeld, P. J.; Wahl, Peter

    2016-10-01

    In conventional s -wave superconductors, only magnetic impurities exhibit impurity bound states, whereas for an s± order parameter they can occur for both magnetic and nonmagnetic impurities. Impurity bound states in superconductors can thus provide important insight into the order parameter. Here, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study of native and engineered iron-site defects in LiFeAs. A detailed comparison of tunneling spectra measured on impurities with spin-fluctuation theory reveals a continuous evolution from negligible impurity-bound-state features for weaker scattering potential to clearly detectable states for somewhat stronger scattering potentials. All bound states for these intermediate strength potentials are pinned at or close to the gap edge of the smaller gap, a phenomenon that we explain and ascribe to multiorbital physics.

  1. The Influence of NOx and Iron on Halogen Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleicher, Sergej; Oeste, Franz D.; Wittmer, Julian; Buxmann, Joelle; Sander, Rolf; Platt, Ulrich; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2013-04-01

    Reactive Halogen Species (RHS) have a high impact on tropospheric trace gases, such as ozone and methane. Their activation from halides in sea spray aerosol and salt pans is a topic of intensive research. Here we present smog chamber measurements on both: aerosol and salt pans, using NOx and iron(III) as activation species. The experiments were performed in a Teflon (FEP) chamber, equipped with Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) in a White setup. Using DOAS we were able to observe BrO, OClO and ClO directly. Moreover, we could observe the concentration of chlorine atoms with the radical clock technique. In addition, we calculated the ionic composition and pH of the aerosol using an adapted CAABA/MECCA model. In contrast to salt pans the activation of both: bromide and chloride is strongly dependent on the initial NOx concentration in the aerosol. Experiments with salt pans show almost no influence of NOx on activation of chloride. Moreover, although the total surface of salt pans compared to aerosol was a factor of 102 to 103 larger, no rapid consumption of NOx was observed over wet salt pans (RH>50%). While in the aerosol case NOx had a lifetime of approx. 15 min, its observed consumption over salt pans was a factor of 10 slower. Additionally, experiments on the salt pan with added iron(III) will be shown. The related photo-Fenton cycle is supposed to release chlorine to the gas phase, which could be considered to remove tropospheric methane in future, potential climate-engineering applications.

  2. Heme Oxygenase Activity Correlates with Serum Indices of Iron Homeostasis in Healthy Nonsmokers

    PubMed Central

    Ghio, Andrew J.; Schreinemachers, Dina M.

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirmed such participation of HO in iron homeostasis of humans. Carbon monoxide produced through HO activity will bind to hemoglobin in circulating erythrocytes, and therefore, blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) can be used as an index of HO activity. Using the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we tested the postulate that HO activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers. The investigation included 844 lifetime nonsmokers (586 females) 18 years of age and older in the study population. Significant correlations were demonstrated between COHb and several indices of iron homeostasis including serum levels of both ferritin and iron and percentage iron saturation of transferrin. There was no significant association between COHb and hemoglobin, the largest repository of heme in the human body, which functions as the substrate for HO. We conclude that HO activity contributes to human iron homeostasis with significant correlations between COHb and serum ferritin and iron levels and percentage iron saturation of transferrin. PMID:27199547

  3. Nitric oxide activation by distal redox modulation in tetranuclear iron nitrosyl complexes.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Graham; Thompson, Niklas B; Lionetti, Davide; Agapie, Theodor

    2015-11-11

    A series of tetranuclear iron complexes displaying a site-differentiated metal center was synthesized. Three of the metal centers are coordinated to our previously reported ligand, based on a 1,3,5-triarylbenzene motif with nitrogen and oxygen donors. The fourth (apical) iron center is coordinatively unsaturated and appended to the trinuclear core through three bridging pyrazolates and an interstitial μ4-oxide moiety. Electrochemical studies of complex [LFe3(PhPz)3OFe][OTf]2 revealed three reversible redox events assigned to the Fe(II)4/Fe(II)3Fe(III) (-1.733 V), Fe(II)3Fe(III)/Fe(II)2Fe(III)2 (-0.727 V), and Fe(II)2Fe(III)2/Fe(II)Fe(III)3 (0.018 V) redox couples. Combined Mössbauer and crystallographic studies indicate that the change in oxidation state is exclusively localized at the triiron core, without changing the oxidation state of the apical metal center. This phenomenon is assigned to differences in the coordination environment of the two metal sites and provides a strategy for storing electron and hole equivalents without affecting the oxidation state of the coordinatively unsaturated metal. The presence of a ligand-binding site allowed the effect of redox modulation on nitric oxide activation by an Fe(II) metal center to be studied. Treatment of the clusters with nitric oxide resulted in binding of NO to the apical iron center, generating a {FeNO}(7) moiety. As with the NO-free precursors, the three reversible redox events are localized at the iron centers distal from the NO ligand. Altering the redox state of the triiron core resulted in significant change in the NO stretching frequency, by as much as 100 cm(-1). The increased activation of NO is attributed to structural changes within the clusters, in particular, those related to the interaction of the metal centers with the interstitial atom. The differences in NO activation were further shown to lead to differential reactivity, with NO disproportionation and N2O formation performed by the more

  4. Prenatal Iron Deficiency in Guinea Pigs Increases Locomotor Activity but Does Not Influence Learning and Memory.

    PubMed

    Fiset, Catherine; Rioux, France M; Surette, Marc E; Fiset, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine whether prenatal iron deficiency induced during gestation in guinea pigs affected locomotor activity and learning and memory processes in the progeny. Dams were fed either iron-deficient anemic or iron-sufficient diets throughout gestation and lactation. After weaning, all pups were fed an iron-sufficient diet. On postnatal day 24 and 40, the pups' locomotor activity was observed within an open-field test, and from postnatal day 25 to 40, their learning and memory processes were assessed within a Morris Water Maze. The behavioural and cognitive tests revealed that the iron deficient pup group had increased locomotor activity, but solely on postnatal day 40, and that there were no group differences in the Morris Water Maze. In the general discussion, we propose that prenatal iron deficiency induces an increase in nervousness due to anxiety in the progeny, which, in the current study, resulted in an increase of locomotor activity.

  5. Ceruloplasmin ferroxidase activity stimulates cellular iron uptake by a trivalent cation-specific transport mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attieh, Z. K.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Seshadri, V.; Tripoulas, N. A.; Fox, P. L.

    1999-01-01

    The balance required to maintain appropriate cellular and tissue iron levels has led to the evolution of multiple mechanisms to precisely regulate iron uptake from transferrin and low molecular weight iron chelates. A role for ceruloplasmin (Cp) in vertebrate iron metabolism is suggested by its potent ferroxidase activity catalyzing conversion of Fe2+ to Fe3+, by identification of yeast copper oxidases homologous to Cp that facilitate high affinity iron uptake, and by studies of "aceruloplasminemic" patients who have extensive iron deposits in multiple tissues. We have recently shown that Cp increases iron uptake by cultured HepG2 cells. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which Cp stimulates cellular iron uptake. Cp stimulated the rate of non-transferrin 55Fe uptake by iron-deficient K562 cells by 2-3-fold, using a transferrin receptor-independent pathway. Induction of Cp-stimulated iron uptake by iron deficiency was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, consistent with a transcriptionally induced or regulated transporter. Cp-stimulated iron uptake was completely blocked by unlabeled Fe3+ and by other trivalent cations including Al3+, Ga3+, and Cr3+, but not by divalent cations. These results indicate that Cp utilizes a trivalent cation-specific transporter. Cp ferroxidase activity was required for iron uptake as shown by the ineffectiveness of two ferroxidase-deficient Cp preparations, copper-deficient Cp and thiomolybdate-treated Cp. We propose a model in which iron reduction and subsequent re-oxidation by Cp are essential for an iron uptake pathway with high ion specificity.

  6. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  7. Delineating site-specific management zones for pH-induced iron chlorosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron chlorosis can be a yield limiting factor in crop production especially on calcareous soils. Typical management for iron chlorosis includes the use of soil or foliar application of iron fertilizers, or the use of chlorosis tolerant cultivars. However, due to the interspersion of calcareous and n...

  8. [Structural regularities in activated cleavage sites of thrombin receptors].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlik, I V; Verevka, S V

    1999-01-01

    Comparison of thrombin receptors activation splitting sites sequences testifies to their similarity both in activation splitting sites of protein precursors and protein proteinase inhibitors reactive sites. In all these sites corresponded to effectory sites P2'-positions are placed by hydrophobic amino-acids only. The regularity defined conforms with previous thesis about the role of effectory S2'-site in regulation of the processes mediated by serine proteinases.

  9. Active iron-rich belite sulfoaluminate cements: clinkering and hydration.

    PubMed

    Cuberos, Antonio J M; De la Torre, Angeles G; Alvarez-Pinazo, G; Martín-Sedeño, M Carmen; Schollbach, Katrin; Pöllmann, Herbert; Aranda, Miguel A G

    2010-09-01

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) is an environmentally contentious material, as for every ton of OPC produced, on average, 0.97 tons of CO2 are released. Conversely, belite sulfoaluminate (BSA) cements are promising eco-friendly building materials, as their production may deplete CO2 emissions up to 35% (compared to OPC). However, the hydration rate of belite is slow. Here, we report the clinkering of iron-rich BSA materials, their activation with B2O3, and establishing a methodology to measure their improved reactivities. Nonactivated BSA clinker contained only beta belite phase, 52 wt %. Meanwhile, BSA clinkers activated with 1 and 2 wt % of B2O3 contained 28 wt % of beta and 25 wt % of alpha'H; and 54 wt % of alpha'H phase, respectively. Therefore, activation of BSA has been proved as alpha'H-belite is stabilized. The hydration of the cements has been studied by laboratory and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (using Rietveld method and chemical constraints), calorimetry, and environmental scanning electron microscopy. Cement pastes have different hydration rates. For nonactivated BSA cement, 20 and 48% of the belite reacted after one and three months, respectively. Conversely, 37-49% after one month and 52-62% after three months of overall belite reactivities have been measured for BSA cements activated with B2O3.

  10. Jasmonate signaling is activated in the very early stages of iron deficiency responses in rice roots.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Itai, Reiko Nakanishi; Senoura, Takeshi; Oikawa, Takaya; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Ueda, Minoru; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2016-07-01

    Under low iron availability, plants induce the expression of various genes involved in iron uptake and translocation at the transcriptional level. This iron deficiency response is affected by various plant hormones, but the roles of jasmonates in this response are not well-known. We investigated the involvement of jasmonates in rice iron deficiency responses. High rates of jasmonate-inducible genes were induced during the very early stages of iron deficiency treatment in rice roots. Many jasmonate-inducible genes were also negatively regulated by the ubiquitin ligases OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 and positively regulated by the transcription factor IDEF1. Ten out of 35 genes involved in jasmonate biosynthesis and signaling were rapidly induced at 3 h of iron deficiency treatment, and this induction preceded that of known iron deficiency-inducible genes involved in iron uptake and translocation. Twelve genes involved in jasmonate biosynthesis and signaling were also upregulated in HRZ-knockdown roots. Endogenous concentrations of jasmonic acid and jasmonoyl isoleucine tended to be rapidly increased in roots in response to iron deficiency treatment, whereas these concentrations were higher in HRZ-knockdown roots under iron-sufficient conditions. Analysis of the jasmonate-deficient cpm2 mutant revealed that jasmonates repress the expression of many iron deficiency-inducible genes involved in iron uptake and translocation under iron sufficiency, but this repression is partly canceled under an early stage of iron deficiency. These results indicate that jasmonate signaling is activated during the very early stages of iron deficiency, which is partly regulated by IDEF1 and OsHRZs.

  11. Effect of iron concentration on the expression and activity of catalase-peroxidases in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Veena C; Sundaram, C A S Sivagami; Sritharan, Manjula

    2005-02-01

    Mycobacterial catalases are known to exist in different isoforms. We studied the influence of iron concentration on the expression and activity of the different isoforms in Mycobacterium bovis BCG, M. smegmatis, M. fortuitum, M. kansasii and M. vaccae by growing them under iron-sufficient (4 microg Fe/mL) and iron-deficient (0.02 microg Fe/ml) conditions. Upon iron deprivation, significant differences were observed in the catalase/peroxidase activities in both quantitative spectrophotometric assays and in the activity staining in native gels. Notable feature was that the peroxidase activity showed a significant decrease upon iron deprivation in all the mycobacteria, except M. vaccae. Peroxidase activity in all the mycobacteria, irrespective of the iron status was susceptible to heat inactivation. However, the isoforms of catalase showed differences in their heat stability, indicating possible structural differences in these proteins. For example, M. bovis BCG expressed a heat labile catalase under iron-sufficient conditions, while a heat stable catalase band of similar mobility was expressed under iron-deprivation conditions. The study clearly indicates that iron plays an important role in the regulation of expression of the different isoforms of the catalase-peroxidases.

  12. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution.

    PubMed

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments.

  13. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments. PMID:27729845

  14. Non-transferrin bound iron, cytokine activation and intracellular reactive oxygen species generation in hemodialysis patients receiving intravenous iron dextran or iron sucrose.

    PubMed

    Pai, Amy Barton; Conner, Todd; McQuade, Charles R; Olp, Jonathan; Hicks, Paul

    2011-08-01

    Intravenous (IV) iron supplementation is widely used to support erythropoeisis in hemodialysis patients. IV iron products are associated with oxidative stress that has been measured principally by circulating biomarkers such as products of lipid peroxidation. The pro-oxidant effects of IV iron are presumed to be due at least in part, by free or non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI). However, the effects of IV iron on intracellular redox status and downstream effectors is not known. This prospective, crossover study compared cytokine activation, reactive oxygen species generation and oxidative stress after single IV doses of iron sucrose and iron dextran. This was a prospective, open-label, crossover study. Ten patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis and four age and sex-matched healthy were assigned to receive 100 mg of each IV iron product over 5 min in random sequence with a 2 week washout between products. Subjects were fasted and fed a low iron diet in the General Clinical Research Center at the University of New Mexico. Serum and plasma samples for IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10 and NTBI were obtained at baseline, 60 and 240 min after iron infusion. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated at the same time points and stained with fluorescent probes to identify intracellular reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) by flow cytometry. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by plasma F(2) isoprostane concentration. Mean ± SEM maximum serum NTBI values were significantly higher among patients receiving IS compared to ID (2.59 ± 0.31 and 1.0 ± 0.36 µM, respectively, P = 0.005 IS vs. ID) Mean ± SEM NTBI area under the serum concentration-time curve (AUC) was 3-fold higher after IS versus ID (202 ± 53 vs. 74 ± 23 µM*min/l, P = 0.04) in ESRD patients, indicating increased exposure to NTBI. IV iron administration was associated with increased pro-inflammatory cytokines. Serum IL-6 concentrations increased most

  15. Preparation of iron-impregnated granular activated carbon for arsenic removal from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qigang; Lin, Wei; Ying, Wei-chi

    2010-12-15

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) was impregnated with iron through a new multi-step procedure using ferrous chloride as the precursor for removing arsenic from drinking water. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis demonstrated that the impregnated iron was distributed evenly on the internal surface of the GAC. Impregnated iron formed nano-size particles, and existed in both crystalline (akaganeite) and amorphous iron forms. Iron-impregnated GACs (Fe-GACs) were treated with sodium hydroxide to stabilize iron in GAC and impregnated iron was found very stable at the common pH range in water treatments. Synthetic arsenate-contaminated drinking water was used in isotherm tests to evaluate arsenic adsorption capacities and iron use efficiencies of Fe-GACs with iron contents ranging from 1.64% to 12.13% (by weight). Nonlinear regression was used to obtain unbiased estimates of Langmuir model parameters. The arsenic adsorption capacity of Fe-GAC increased significantly with impregnated iron up to 4.22% and then decreased with more impregnated iron. Fe-GACs synthesized in this study exhibited higher affinity for arsenate as compared with references in literature and shows great potential for real implementations.

  16. Long-term aerobic exercise increases redox-active iron through nitric oxide in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Xiao, De-Sheng

    2014-01-30

    Adult hippocampus is highly vulnerable to iron-induced oxidative stress. Aerobic exercise has been proposed to reduce oxidative stress but the findings in the hippocampus are conflicting. This study aimed to observe the changes of redox-active iron and concomitant regulation of cellular iron homeostasis in the hippocampus by aerobic exercise, and possible regulatory effect of nitric oxide (NO). A randomized controlled study was designed in the rats with swimming exercise treatment (for 3 months) and/or an unselective inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS) (L-NAME) treatment. The results from the bleomycin-detectable iron assay showed additional redox-active iron in the hippocampus by exercise treatment. The results from nonheme iron content assay, combined with the redox-active iron content, showed increased storage iron content by exercise treatment. NOx (nitrate plus nitrite) assay showed increased NOx content by exercise treatment. The results from the Western blot assay showed decreased ferroportin expression, no changes of TfR1 and DMT1 expressions, increased IRP1 and IRP2 expression, increased expressions of eNOS and nNOS rather than iNOS. In these effects of exercise treatment, the increased redox-active iron content, storage iron content, IRP1 and IRP2 expressions were completely reversed by L-NAME treatment, and decreased ferroportin expression was in part reversed by L-NAME. L-NAME treatment completely inhibited increased NOx and both eNOS and nNOS expression in the hippocampus. Our findings suggest that aerobic exercise could increase the redox-active iron in the hippocampus, indicating an increase in the capacity to generate hydroxyl radicals through the Fenton reactions, and aerobic exercise-induced iron accumulation in the hippocampus might mainly result from the role of the endogenous NO.

  17. Trace metals related to historical iron smelting at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Berks and Chester Counties, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    Iron ore containing elevated concentrations of trace metals was smelted at Hopewell Furnace during its 113 years of operation (1771-1883). The ore used at Hopewell Furnace was obtained from iron mines within 5 miles of the furnace. The iron-ore deposits were formed about 200 million years ago and contain abundant magnetite, the primary iron mineral, and accessory minerals enriched in arsenic, cobalt, copper, lead, and other metals. Hopewell Furnace, built by Mark Bird during 1770-71, was one of the last of the charcoal-burning, cold-blast iron furnaces operated in Pennsylvania. The most productive years for Hopewell Furnace were from 1830 to 1837. Castings were the most profitable product, especially the popular Hopewell Stove. More than 80,000 stoves were cast at Hopewell, which produced as many as 23 types and sizes of cooking and heating stoves. Beginning in the 1840s, the iron industry shifted to large-scale, steam-driven coke and anthracite furnaces. Independent rural enterprises like Hopewell could no longer compete when the iron and steel industries consolidated in urban manufacturing centers. The furnace ceased operation in 1883 (Kurjack, 1954). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Park Service, completed a study at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site (NHS) in Berks and Chester Counties, Pennsylvania, to determine the fate of toxic trace metals, such as arsenic, cobalt, and lead, released into the environment during historical iron-smelting operations. The results of the study, conducted during 2008-10, are presented in this fact sheet.

  18. Study of adsorption process of iron colloid substances on activated carbon by ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machekhina, K. I.; Shiyan, L. N.; Yurmazova, T. A.; Voyno, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    The paper reports on the adsorption of iron colloid substances on activated carbon (PAC) Norit SA UF with using ultrasound. It is found that time of adsorption is equal to three hours. High-frequency electrical oscillation is 35 kHz. The adsorption capacity of activated carbon was determined and it is equal to about 0.25 mg iron colloid substances /mg PAC. The iron colloid substances size ranging from 30 to 360 nm was determined. The zeta potential of iron colloid substances which consists of iron (III) hydroxide, silicon compounds and natural organic substances is about (-38mV). The process of destruction iron colloid substances occurs with subsequent formation of a precipitate in the form of Fe(OH)3 as a result of the removal of organic substances from the model solution.

  19. Maintenance of Iron Status in Healthy Men during an Extended Period of Stress and Physical Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    scribed elsewhere who engage in physical training with low re- and physical activity in healthy men. a serves and marginal dietary iron intakes (6. 12. 28...116 ± 84 to 202 ± 106 /g/L (P > 0.05). Ade- is unclear whether the changes in iron metabolism persist during quate dietary iron, initiation of...the entire 8-wk training course. Beaumont Army Medical Center, El Paso, TX (phase 4). Differ- The average daily energy and protein intakes , determined

  20. Recombination Activity of Iron in Boron Doped Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yli-Koski, M.; Palokangas, M.; Sokolov, V.; Storgårds, J.; Väinölä, H.; Holmberg, H.; Sinkkonen, J.

    The charge carrier lifetime in iron contaminated boron doped silicon wafers was determined by surface photovoltage, SPV, and microwave photoconductive decay, µPCD, techniques. Our results show that the charge carrier lifetime in boron doped silicon wafers depends on the boron concentration when the lifetime is limited by iron-boron pairs.

  1. Activable enriched stable isotope iron-58 for monitoring absorption rate of juvenile athletes for iron: a case study.

    PubMed

    Qian, Qinfang; Chai, Zhifang; Feng, Weiyu; Chen, Jidi; Zhang, Peiqun; Pan, Jianxiang

    2002-09-01

    Activable enriched stable isotopes can play a unique role in studies of nutritional status, metabolism, absorption rates, and bioavailability of minerals. As a practical example, eight juvenile athletes were selected to test the absorption rates of iron during training and non-training periods by enriched stable isotope of Fe-58 (enriched degree: 51.1%) via activation analysis Fe-58 (n, gamma) Fe-59 of the collected feces samples. The results indicated that the average iron absorption rates of the juvenile athletes with and without training are 9.1 +/- 2.8 and 11.9 +/- 4.7%, respectively, which implies that the long-term endurance training with high intensity makes the iron absorption rate of athletes lower. In the meantime, the comparison of the activable enriched isotope technique with atomic absorption spectrometry was performed, which showed that the former was better than the latter in reliability and sensitivity. It is because this nuclear method can distinguish the exogenous and endogenous iron in the samples, but not for non-nuclear methods.

  2. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites. PMID:27538720

  3. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Varnell, Jason A; Tse, Edmund C M; Schulz, Charles E; Fister, Tim T; Haasch, Richard T; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-08-19

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  4. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-08-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  5. Iron-impregnated granular activated carbon for arsenic removal from drinking water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Qigang

    A new multi-step iron impregnation method was developed in this study to impregnate GAC with a high amount of iron that possesses desired characteristics: stable, even distribution, and high arsenic adsorption capacity. Research was carried out to investigate the impact of the amount of impregnated iron on arsenic adsorption properties: capacity, affinity, and kinetics. Fe-GACs were characterized in terms of the amount, stability, distribution, morphology, and species of impregnated iron. It was found that a high amount of iron was stably impregnated in GAC. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis demonstrated that the impregnated iron was evenly distributed on the internal surface of GAC. Impregnated iron formed nano-size particles and existed in both crystalline (akaganeite) and amorphous iron. Arsenic adsorption tests were conducted using Fe-GACs with iron content of 1.64--28.90% in a low arsenic concentration that is typical for drinking water treatment. The amount of impregnated iron affects arsenic maximum adsorption capacity (qm) but has little impact on the Langmuir constant h (the affinity of adsorbent for adsorbate). The qm for both As(V) and As(III) adsorptions increased significantly with increase of the amount of impregnated iron up to 13.59%. Further increase of iron amounts caused a gradual decrease of qm for As(V). BET analysis indicated impregnated iron possesses the highest surface area at iron content of 13.59%. A new second-order kinetic model was developed to investigate the impact of the amounts of impregnated iron on arsenic adsorption kinetics. With iron content increased from 1.64% to 28.90%, the intrinsic adsorption rate constants reduced from 4.6x10-2 1/hr to 1.18x10 -3 1/hr, which indicates that impregnated iron slows arsenic intraparticle diffusion rate in Fe-GAC. The decreased arsenic intraparticle diffusion rate was most likely caused by reduced pore size of Fe-GACs. Column tests were

  6. Creep cavitation in iron - I. Sulfides and carbides as nucleation sites

    SciTech Connect

    George, E.P.; Li, P.L.; Pope, D.P.

    1987-10-01

    The nucleation of creep cavities in iron containing controlled additions of C, P and S has been studied using slow strain rate tensile tests (epsilon = 1.1 x 10/sup -6/ and 4.4 x 10/sup -5/s/sup -1/)at temperatures between 500 and 800/sup 0/C. The test materials all had the same 100 ..mu..m grain size and showed approximately the same UTS at 700/sup 0/C. When failure occurred by grain boundary cavitation a ductility minimum was found at 700/sup 0/C and the ductility (% RA) was less than about 40%. The cavitation process depends strongly on the S content: if the S content is above the solubility limit, cavities nucleate easily on grain boundary sulfides and the ductility is very low. In this S regime additions of P can improve the ductility, but the mechanism of this improvement has not been identified. If the S content is well below the solubility limit (about 1 wt ppm), the material is always very ductile, even though there are many small (--0.1 ..mu..m dia.) oxide particles on the grain boundaries that are potential nucleation sites. Carbides were never seen to nucleate cavities, even when the C concentration is as high as 4 times the solubility limit at 700/sup 0/C. Auger analyses of the grain boundary facets of one of the brittle alloys showed that both S and C segregate to the grain boundaries.

  7. Impacts of amount of impregnated iron in granular activated carbon on arsenate adsorption capacities and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qigang; Lin, Wei; Ying, Wei-Chi

    2012-06-01

    Iron-impregnated granular activated carbons (Fe-GAC) can remove arsenic effectively from water. In this study, Fe-GACs with iron content of 1.64 to 28.90% were synthesized using a new multi-step procedure for the investigation of effects of iron amount on arsenic adsorption capacities and kinetics. Langmuir model satisfactorily fit arsenic adsorption on Fe-GACs. The maximum arsenic adsorption capacity (q(m)) increased significantly with iron impregnation and reached 1,867 to 1,912 microg/g with iron content of 9.96 to 13.59%. Further increase of iron content (> 13.59%) caused gradual decrease of q(m). It was found that the amount of impregnated iron showed little impact on the affinity for arsenate. Kinetic study showed that the amount of impregnated iron affected the arsenic intraparticle diffusion rate greatly. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model fit arsenic adsorption kinetics on Fe-GACs better than the pseudo-first-order model. The arsenic adsorption rate increased with increasing of iron content from 1.64% to 13.59%, and then decreased with more impregnated iron (13.59 to 28.90%).

  8. Simultaneous pore enlargement and introduction of highly dispersed Fe active sites in MSNs for enhanced catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Jinlou; Dong Xu; Elangovan, S.P.; Li Yongsheng; Zhao Wenru; Iijima, Toshio; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Shi Jianlin

    2012-02-15

    An effective post-hydrothermal treatment strategy has been developed to dope highly dispersed iron catalytical centers into the framework of mesoporous silica, to keep the particle size in nanometric scale, and in the meanwhile, to expand the pore size of the synthesized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). Characterization techniques such as XRD, BET, SEM and TEM support that the synthesized samples are long period ordered with particles size about 100 nm and a relatively large pore size of ca. 3.5 nm. UV-vis, XPS and EPR measurements demonstrate that the introduced iron active centers are highly dispersed in a coordinatively unsaturated status. NH{sub 3}-TPD verifies that the acid amount of iron-doped MSNs is quite high. The synthesized nanocatalysts show an excellent catalytic performance for benzylation of benzene by benzyl chloride, and they present relatively higher yield and selectivity to diphenylmethane with a lower iron content and much shorter reaction time. - Graphical abstract: Uniform MSNs with iron active centers and large pore size have been prepared by a newly developed strategy, which demonstrates enhanced catalytic performance for benzylation of benzene by benzyl chloride. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron species were introduced into the framework of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with uniform dispersion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The pore sizes of the synthesized nanocatalysts were expanded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acidic site quantities were quite high and the acidic centers were accessible. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nanocatalysts presented higher yield and selectivity to diphenylmethane with significantly lower Fe content.

  9. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  10. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-04

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases.

  11. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases. PMID:22020126

  12. CIPK23 is involved in iron acquisition of Arabidopsis by affecting ferric chelate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qiuying; Zhang, Xinxin; Yang, An; Wang, Tianzuo; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-05-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the major limiting factors affecting quality and production of crops in calcareous soils. Numerous signaling molecules and transcription factors have been demonstrated to play a regulatory role in adaptation of plants to iron deficiency. However, the mechanisms underlying the iron deficiency-induced physiological processes remain to be fully dissected. Here, we demonstrated that the protein kinase CIPK23 was involved in iron acquisition. Lesion of CIPK23 rendered Arabidopsis mutants hypersensitive to iron deficiency, as evidenced by stronger chlorosis in young leaves and lower iron concentration than wild-type plants under iron-deficient conditions by down-regulating ferric chelate reductase activity. We found that iron deficiency evoked an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and the elevated Ca(2+) would bind to CBL1/CBL9, leading to activation of CIPK23. These novel findings highlight the involvement of calcium-dependent CBL-CIPK23 complexes in the regulation of iron acquisition. Moreover, mutation of CIPK23 led to changes in contents of mineral elements, suggesting that CBL-CIPK23 complexes could be as "nutritional sensors" to sense and regulate the mineral homeostasis in Arabisopsis.

  13. Scavenging iron: a novel mechanism of plant immunity activation by microbial siderophores.

    PubMed

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Rigault, Martine; Riache, Nassima; Joseph, Delphine; Desmaële, Didier; Mouille, Grégory; Boutet, Stéphanie; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Thomine, Sébastien; Expert, Dominique; Dellagi, Alia

    2014-04-01

    Siderophores are specific ferric iron chelators synthesized by virtually all microorganisms in response to iron deficiency. We have previously shown that they promote infection by the phytopathogenic enterobacteria Dickeya dadantii and Erwinia amylovora. Siderophores also have the ability to activate plant immunity. We have used complete Arabidopsis transcriptome microarrays to investigate the global transcriptional modifications in roots and leaves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants after leaf treatment with the siderophore deferrioxamine (DFO). Physiological relevance of these transcriptional modifications was validated experimentally. Immunity and heavy-metal homeostasis were the major processes affected by DFO. These two physiological responses could be activated by a synthetic iron chelator ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid, indicating that siderophores eliciting activities rely on their strong iron-chelating capacity. DFO was able to protect Arabidopsis against the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Siderophore treatment caused local modifications of iron distribution in leaf cells visible by ferrocyanide and diaminobenzidine-H₂O₂ staining. Metal quantifications showed that DFO causes a transient iron and zinc uptake at the root level, which is presumably mediated by the metal transporter iron regulated transporter1 (IRT1). Defense gene expression and callose deposition in response to DFO were compromised in an irt1 mutant. Consistently, plant susceptibility to D. dadantii was increased in the irt1 mutant. Our work shows that iron scavenging is a unique mechanism of immunity activation in plants. It highlights the strong relationship between heavy-metal homeostasis and immunity.

  14. Scavenging Iron: A Novel Mechanism of Plant Immunity Activation by Microbial Siderophores1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W.G.; Rigault, Martine; Riache, Nassima; Joseph, Delphine; Desmaële, Didier; Mouille, Grégory; Boutet, Stéphanie; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Thomine, Sébastien; Expert, Dominique; Dellagi, Alia

    2014-01-01

    Siderophores are specific ferric iron chelators synthesized by virtually all microorganisms in response to iron deficiency. We have previously shown that they promote infection by the phytopathogenic enterobacteria Dickeya dadantii and Erwinia amylovora. Siderophores also have the ability to activate plant immunity. We have used complete Arabidopsis transcriptome microarrays to investigate the global transcriptional modifications in roots and leaves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants after leaf treatment with the siderophore deferrioxamine (DFO). Physiological relevance of these transcriptional modifications was validated experimentally. Immunity and heavy-metal homeostasis were the major processes affected by DFO. These two physiological responses could be activated by a synthetic iron chelator ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid, indicating that siderophores eliciting activities rely on their strong iron-chelating capacity. DFO was able to protect Arabidopsis against the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Siderophore treatment caused local modifications of iron distribution in leaf cells visible by ferrocyanide and diaminobenzidine-H2O2 staining. Metal quantifications showed that DFO causes a transient iron and zinc uptake at the root level, which is presumably mediated by the metal transporter iron regulated transporter1 (IRT1). Defense gene expression and callose deposition in response to DFO were compromised in an irt1 mutant. Consistently, plant susceptibility to D. dadantii was increased in the irt1 mutant. Our work shows that iron scavenging is a unique mechanism of immunity activation in plants. It highlights the strong relationship between heavy-metal homeostasis and immunity. PMID:24501001

  15. Siderophore Cephalosporin Cefiderocol Utilizes Ferric Iron Transporter Systems for Antibacterial Activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Toru; Yoshizawa, Hidenori; Sato, Takafumi; Nakamura, Rio; Tsuji, Masakatsu; Yamano, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Cefiderocol (S-649266) is a novel parenteral siderophore cephalosporin conjugated with a catechol moiety at the third-position side chain. The in vitro activity of cefiderocol against Pseudomonas aeruginosa was enhanced under iron-depleted conditions, whereas that of ceftazidime was not affected. The monitoring of [thiazole-14C]cefiderocol revealed the increased intracellular accumulation of cefiderocol in P. aeruginosa cells incubated under iron-depleted conditions compared with those incubated under iron-sufficient conditions. Cefiderocol was shown to have potent chelating activity with ferric iron, and extracellular iron was efficiently transported into P. aeruginosa cells in the presence of cefiderocol as well as siderophores, while enhanced transport of extracellular ferric iron was not observed when one of the hydroxyl groups of the catechol moiety of cefiderocol was replaced with a methoxy group. We conclude that cefiderocol forms a chelating complex with iron, which is actively transported into P. aeruginosa cells via iron transporters, resulting in potent antibacterial activity of cefiderocol against P. aeruginosa. PMID:27736756

  16. Iron content and acid phosphatase activity in hepatic parenchymal lysosomes of patients with hemochromatosis before and after phlebotomy treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Cleton, M.I.; de Bruijn, W.C.; van Blokland, W.T.; Marx, J.J.; Roelofs, J.M.; Rademakers, L.H.

    1988-03-01

    Lysosomal structures in liver parenchymal cells of 3 patients with iron overload and of 3 subjects without iron-storage disorders were investigated. A combination of enzyme cytochemistry--with cerium as a captive ion to demonstrate lysosomal acid phosphatase activity--and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) was used. We were able (1) to define and quantify lysosomal structures as lysosomes, siderosomes, or residual bodies, (2) to quantify the amount of iron and cerium simultaneously in these structures, and (3) to evaluate a possible relation between iron storage and enzyme activity. With histopathologically increased iron storage, the number of siderosomes had increased at the cost of lysosomes, with a corresponding increase in acid phosphatase activity in both organelles. In histopahtologically severe iron overload, however, acid phosphatase activity was low or not detectable and most of the iron was stored in residual bodies. After phlebotomy treatment, the number of siderosomes had decreased in favor of the lysosomes, approaching values obtained in control subjects, and acid phosphatase activity was present in all iron-containing structures. In this way a relationship between iron storage and enzyme activity was established. The iron content of the individual lysosomal structures per unit area had increased with histopathologically increased iron storage and had decreased after phlebotomy treatment. From this observation, it is concluded that the iron status of the patient is not only reflected by the amount of iron-containing hepatocytes but, as well, by the iron content lysosomal unit area.

  17. Biodiversity of acidophilic moderate thermophiles isolated from two sites in Yellowstone National Park and their roles in the dissimilatory oxido-reduction of iron

    SciTech Connect

    D. B. Johnson; D.A. Body; T. A. M. Bridge; D. F. Bruhn; F. F. Roberto

    2001-07-01

    Some of the thermal sites within Yellowstone National Park are extremely acidic and are therefore potential sites for isolating novel strains of acidophilic thermophiles, including those that are involved in the biogeochemical cycling of iron. This paper describes the isolation and characterization of thermotolerant, acidophilic “iron bacteria” isolated from two such sites in Yellowstone National Park, and reports the biodiversity of isolates in terms of their physiological traits and their phylogenetic make-up.

  18. Iron-Catalyzed Activation of Chloride from Saline Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, Julian; Bleicher, Sergej; Ofner, Johannes; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2015-04-01

    Iron (Fe) occurs in highly saline media (e.g. sea salt aerosol, salt brines etc.). High salinity, low pH, and organic constituents promote the dissolution of iron, forming photosensitive complexes that are responsible for a gaseous Cl production when irradiated by sunlight [1]. We studied the production of atomic Cl, Br and OH radicals from modeled salt pans [2] and artificial sea-salt aerosols containing Fe(III) ions or pyrogenic Fe2O3particles (Sicotrans Orange, BASF) at various compositions in a Teflon smog-chamber. The samples were either spread on a Teflon sheet or they were nebulized from dilute brines (most abundant particle diameter: ~0.4 μm, initial surface area: up to 3-10-2 cm2cm-3) and exposed to simulated sunlight at 60-90% relative humidity. The photochemical formation of Cl, OH and Br (if possible) in the gas phase was quantified by the radical clock method [3] resulting in time profiles of the radical-production rates and total productions. Simultaneous monitoring of the aerosol surface area enabled us to determine the initial Cl production rate per cm2 aerosol surface. Whereas no significant Cl production was detected employing a molar Cl-/Fe(III) ratio of 13, it increased to ~2.8-1017 atoms cm-2s-1 (at a ratio of 101), ~4.1-1017 atoms cm-2s-1(at a ratio of 53) and ~1.9-1018 atoms cm-2s-1(at a ratio of 13). The presence of NO2 (~20 ppb) or O3 (630 ppb) in the gas phase additionally increased the Fe(III)-induced chloride activation to ~7-1018 atoms cm-2s-1 and ~9-1018 atoms cm-2s-1(at a Cl-/Fe(III) ratio of 13), respectively. SO2 slightly restrained the Cl formation. Artificial sea salt aerosols doped with Fe2O3 (Cl-/Fetot ~13) did not result in detectable Cl concentrations. However, decreasing the pH below 2 favored the dissolution of Fe and led to Cl production rates comparable to the Fe(III) experiments. These observations are in accord with the speciation of the photolabile, aqueous Fe(III) complexes obtained from an equilibrium model (PHREEQC

  19. Iron-dependent RNA-binding activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis aconitase.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sharmistha; Nandyala, Ashok Kumar; Raviprasad, Podili; Ahmed, Niyaz; Hasnain, Seyed E

    2007-06-01

    Cellular iron levels are closely monitored by iron regulatory and sensor proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis for survival inside macrophages. One such class of proteins systematically studied in eukaryotes and reported in a few prokaryotes are the iron-responsive proteins (IRPs). These IRPs bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) present at untranslated regions (UTRs) of mRNAs and are responsible for posttranscriptional regulation of the expression of proteins involved in iron homeostasis. Amino acid sequence analysis of M. tuberculosis aconitase (Acn), a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzyme, showed the presence of the conserved residues of the IRP class of proteins. We demonstrate that M. tuberculosis Acn is bifunctional. It is a monomeric protein that is enzymatically active in converting isocitrate to cis-aconitate at a broad pH range of 7 to 10 (optimum, pH 8). As evident from gel retardation assays, M. tuberculosis Acn also behaves like an IRP by binding to known mammalian IRE-like sequences and to predicted IRE-like sequences present at the 3' UTR of thioredoxin (trxC) and the 5' UTR of the iron-dependent repressor and activator (ideR) of M. tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis Acn when reactivated with Fe(2+) functions as a TCA cycle enzyme, but upon iron depletion by a specific iron chelator, it behaves like an IRP, binding to the selected IREs in vitro. Since iron is required for the Acn activity and inhibits the RNA-binding activity of Acn, the two activities of M. tuberculosis Acn are mutually exclusive. Our results demonstrate the bifunctional nature of M. tuberculosis Acn, pointing to its likely role in iron homeostasis.

  20. Higher concentrations of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in soil induced rice chlorosis due to inhibited active iron transportation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Fang, Zhanqiang; Cheng, Wen; Yan, Xiaomin; Tsang, Pokeung Eric; Zhao, Dongye

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the effects of concentrations 0, 100, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 mg kg(-1) of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) on germination, seedlings growth, physiology and toxicity mechanisms were investigated. The results showed that nZVI had no effect on germination, but inhibited the rice seedlings growth in higher concentrations (>500 mg kg(-1) nZVI). The highest suppression rate of the length of roots and shoots reached 46.9% and 57.5%, respectively. The 1000mg kg(-1) nZVI caused the highest suppression rates for chlorophyll and carotenoids, at 91.6% and 85.2%, respectively. In addition, the activity of antioxidant enzymes was altered by the translocation of nanoparticles and changes in active iron content. Visible symptoms of iron deficiency were observed at higher concentrations, at which the active iron content decreased 61.02% in the shoots, but the active iron content not decreased in roots. Interestingly, the total and available amounts of iron in the soil were not less than those in the control. Therefore, the plants iron deficiency was not caused by (i) deficiency of available iron in the soil and (ii) restraint of the absorption that plant takes in the available iron, while induced by (ⅲ) the transport of active iron from the root to the shoot was blocked. The cortex tissues were seriously damaged by nZVI which was transported from soil to the root, these were proved by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). This current study shows that the mechanism of iron deficiency in rice seedling was due to transport of active iron from the root to the shoot blocked, which was caused by the uptake of nZVI.

  1. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC is activated by catecholamines and iron and regulates genes encoding proteins associated with anaerobic respiration and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, WA; Demuth, DR; Torres-Escobar, A; Juárez-Rodríguez, MD

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC regulates its own expression and is essential for biofilm growth and virulence. However, the signal that activates the QseC sensor has not been identified and the qseBC regulon has not been defined. In this study, we show that QseC is activated by catecholamine hormones and iron but not by either component alone. Activation of QseC requires an EYRDD motif in the periplasmic domain of the sensor and site-specific mutations in EYRDD or the deletion of the periplasmic domain inhibits catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of the ygiW-qseBC operon. Catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of transcription also requires interaction of the QseB response regulator with its binding site in the ygiW-qseBC promoter. Whole genome microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles of A. actinomycetemcomitans grown in a chemically defined medium with and without catecholamine and iron supplementation. Approximately 11.5% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome was differentially expressed by at least two-fold upon exposure to catecholamines and iron. The expression of ferritin was strongly induced, suggesting that intracellular iron storage capacity is increased upon QseBC activation. Consistent with this, genes encoding iron binding and transport proteins were down-regulated by QseBC. Strikingly, 57% of the QseBC up-regulated genes (56/99) encode proteins associated with anaerobic metabolism and respiration. Most of these up-regulated genes were recently reported to be induced during in vivo growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results suggest that detection of catecholamines and iron by QseBC may alter the cellular metabolism of A. actinomycetemcomitans for increased fitness and growth in an anaerobic host environment. PMID:25923132

  2. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC is activated by catecholamines and iron and regulates genes encoding proteins associated with anaerobic respiration and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Weigel, W A; Demuth, D R; Torres-Escobar, A; Juárez-Rodríguez, M D

    2015-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC regulates its own expression and is essential for biofilm growth and virulence. However, the signal that activates the QseC sensor has not been identified and the qseBC regulon has not been defined. In this study, we show that QseC is activated by catecholamine hormones and iron but not by either component alone. Activation of QseC requires an EYRDD motif in the periplasmic domain of the sensor and site-specific mutations in EYRDD or the deletion of the periplasmic domain inhibits catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of the ygiW-qseBC operon. Catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of transcription also requires interaction of the QseB response regulator with its binding site in the ygiW-qseBC promoter. Whole genome microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles of A. actinomycetemcomitans grown in a chemically defined medium with and without catecholamine and iron supplementation. Approximately 11.5% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome was differentially expressed by at least two-fold upon exposure to catecholamines and iron. The expression of ferritin was strongly induced, suggesting that intracellular iron storage capacity is increased upon QseBC activation. Consistent with this, genes encoding iron binding and transport proteins were down-regulated by QseBC. Strikingly, 57% of the QseBC up-regulated genes (56/99) encode proteins associated with anaerobic metabolism and respiration. Most of these up-regulated genes were recently reported to be induced during in vivo growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results suggest that detection of catecholamines and iron by QseBC may alter the cellular metabolism of A. actinomycetemcomitans for increased fitness and growth in an anaerobic host environment.

  3. Iron uptake and increased intracellular enzyme activity follow host lactoferrin binding by Trichomonas vaginalis receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.M.; Alderete, J.F.

    1984-08-01

    Lactoferrin acquisition and iron uptake by pathogenic Trichomonas vaginalis was examined. Saturation binding kinetics were obtained for trichomonads using increasing amounts of radioiodinated lactoferrin, while no significant binding by transferrin under similar conditions was achieved. Only unlabeled lactoferrin successfully and stoichiometrically competed with 125I-labeled lactoferrin binding. Time course studies showed maximal lactoferrin binding by 30 min at 37 degrees C. Data suggest no internalization of bound lactoferrin. The accumulation of radioactivity in supernatants after incubation of T. vaginalis with 125I-labeled lactoferrin and washing in PBS suggested the presence of low affinity sites for this host macromolecule. Scatchard analysis indicated the presence of 90,000 receptors per trichomonad with an apparent Kd of 1.0 microM. Two trichomonad lactoferrin binding proteins were identified by affinity chromatography and immunoprecipitation of receptor-ligand complexes. A 30-fold accumulation of iron was achieved using 59Fe-lactoferrin when compared to the steady state concentration of bound lactoferrin. The activity of pyruvate/ferrodoxin oxidoreductase, an enzyme involved in trichomonal energy metabolism, increased more than sixfold following exposure of the parasites to lactoferrin, demonstrating a biologic response to the receptor-mediated binding of lactoferrin. These data suggest that T. vaginalis possesses specific receptors for biologically relevant host proteins and that these receptors contribute to the metabolic processes of the parasites.

  4. Removal of arsenic(V) from aqueous solutions using iron-oxide-coated modified activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q L; Gao, Nai-Yun; Lin, Y C; Xu, Bin; Le, Lin-sheng

    2007-08-01

    Removal of arsenic(V) from aqueous solutions was evaluated with the following three different sorption materials: coal-based activated carbon 12 x 40 (activated carbon), iron(II) oxide (FeO)/activated carbon-H, and iron oxide. The apparent characteristics and physical chemistry performances of these adsorbents were investigated by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, and scanning electronic microscope. Also, batch experiments for arsenic removal were performed, and the effects of pH value on arsenic(V) removal were studied. The results suggest that the main phases of the iron oxide surface are magnetite, maghemite, hematite, and goethite; fine and uniform iron oxide particles can cover activated carbon surfaces and affect the surface area or pore structures of activated carbon; adsorption kinetics obey a pseudo-first-order rate equation; and adsorption capacities of adsorbents are affected by the values of pH. The optimum value of pH for iron oxide lies in a narrow range between 4.0 and 5.5, and arsenic(V) removal by FeO/activated carbon-H is ideal and stable in the pH range 3 to 7, while activated carbon has the lowest adsorption capacity in the entire pH range. Also, the adsorption characteristics of FeO/activated carbon-H composites and virgin activated carbon match well the Langmuir adsorption model, while those of iron oxide fit well the Freundlich adsorption model.

  5. Iron-Regulated Phospholipase C Activity Contributes to the Cytolytic Activity and Virulence of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Fiester, Steven E.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Beckett, Amber C.; Ticak, Tomislav; Carrier, Mary V.; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Ohneck, Emily J.; Metz, Maeva L.; Sellin Jeffries, Marlo K.; Actis, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen that causes a wide range of infections including pneumonia, septicemia, necrotizing fasciitis and severe wound and urinary tract infections. Analysis of A. baumannii representative strains grown in Chelex 100-treated medium for hemolytic activity demonstrated that this pathogen is increasingly hemolytic to sheep, human and horse erythrocytes, which interestingly contain increasing amounts of phosphatidylcholine in their membranes. Bioinformatic, genetic and functional analyses of 19 A. baumannii isolates showed that the genomes of each strain contained two phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) genes, which were named plc1 and plc2. Accordingly, all of these strains were significantly hemolytic to horse erythrocytes and their culture supernatants tested positive for PC-PLC activity. Further analyses showed that the transcriptional expression of plc1 and plc2 and the production of phospholipase and thus hemolytic activity increased when bacteria were cultured under iron-chelation as compared to iron-rich conditions. Testing of the A. baumannii ATCC 19606T plc1::aph-FRT and plc2::aph isogenic insertion derivatives showed that these mutants had a significantly reduced PC-PLC activity as compared to the parental strain, while testing of plc1::ermAM/plc2::aph demonstrated that this double PC-PLC isogenic mutant expressed significantly reduced cytolytic and hemolytic activity. Interestingly, only plc1 was shown to contribute significantly to A. baumannii virulence using the Galleria mellonella infection model. Taken together, our data demonstrate that both PLC1 and PLC2, which have diverged from a common ancestor, play a concerted role in hemolytic and cytolytic activities; although PLC1 seems to play a more critical role in the virulence of A. baumannii when tested in an invertebrate model. These activities would provide access to intracellular iron stores this pathogen could use during

  6. Paleomagnetic Determination of Pre-Mining Metal Flux Rates at the Iron Mountain Superfund Site, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpers, C. N.; Nordstrom, D. K.; Verosub, K. L.; Helm-Clark, C.

    2007-05-01

    Iron Mountain, located near Redding in northern California, hosts a group of mines that were active from the late 1870s to the early 1960s. The mineral deposit is classified as a type-I volcanogenic massive sulfide, similar to the Noranda deposit of Ontario, Canada. Three large, isolated blocks of sulfide mineralization contain 90-95 percent pyrite and a few percent chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) and sphalerite (ZnS). Prior to mining, weathering converted parts of the massive sulfide to gossan consisting of hematite, goethite, and silica. Mining further exposed the pyritic masses to water and air, creating optimal conditions for sulfide oxidation and production of acid mine drainage. Because the acidic, metal-rich effluent reached the Sacramento River, the site has been one of the highest priorities on the US EPA's Superfund list since the early 1980s. A crucial area of scientific uncertainty that needed to be resolved was the magnitude of natural background metal flux. We collected 25 paleomagnetic samples from the gossan to determine the polarity of the Earth's magnetic field during pre-mining sulfide weathering. Nineteen samples exhibited stable magnetic endpoints during thermal demagnetization; of these, four were of reversed polarity and the remainder were of normal polarity. This result established that the gossan was already forming 780,000 years ago, and this information made it possible to estimate natural, pre- mining flux rates of copper and zinc. These rates were three orders of magnitude lower than post-mining (pre- remediation) rates. Resolution of the question of the background flux led to one of the largest legal settlements in U.S. history for remediation of an inactive mine site.

  7. Iron chelators in medicinal applications - chemical equilibrium considerations in pharmaceutical activity.

    PubMed

    Manning, Thomas; Kean, Greg; Thomas, Jessica; Thomas, Khaleh; Corbitt, Michael; Gosnell, Donna; Ware, Ronald; Fulp, Sonya; Jarrard, Joey; Phillips, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Iron chelators are being examined as a potential class of pharmaceutical agents to battle different types of cancer as well as iron overload diseases. In recent studies, iron binding species such as desferrioxamine, triapine, tachpyridine, Dp44Mt, and PIH have been tested in cell line tests and clinical trials. Using published chemical equilibrium values (stability constants, equilibrium constants), it is argued that an iron chelator cannot competitively remove iron from a heme-containing biomolecule (i.e. hemoglobin (Hb), myoglobin) causing a cancerous cell to die. This type of reaction (DFO(aq) + [Fe(2+,3+)-Hb] --> [Fe(2+,3+)-DFO] + Hb) has been proposed in a number of published studies using circumstantial evidence. It is argued that iron chelators can potentially interact with iron from ferritin or iron that has precipitated or flocculated as oxyhydroxide under physiological pH's. It is argued that chelators can interfere with various physiological processes by binding cations such as Ca(2+), Zn(2+) or K(+). A number of siderophores and natural products that have the ability to bind Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) as well as other cations are discussed in terms of their potential pharmaceutical activity as chelators. Chemical equilibria between cations and pharmaceutical agents, which are rarely quantitated in explaining medicinal mechanisms, are used to show that chelators can bind and remove iron and other cations from physiologically important systems required for cell survival and propagation.

  8. Iron corrosion activity of anaerobic hydrogen-consuming microorganisms isolated from oil facilities.

    PubMed

    Mori, Koji; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that anaerobic hydrogen-consuming microorganisms generally promote iron corrosion. We isolated 26 hydrogen-consuming microorganisms (acetogens, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and methanogens) from oil facilities in Japan using hydrogen as an electron donor. The iron corrosion activities of these microorganisms were examined using iron (Fe0) granules as the sole electron donor. Almost all the isolates consumed hydrogen that was chemically generated from iron granules but did not induce significant iron corrosion. The amount of corroded iron in the cultures of these organisms was less than 2-fold that in an abiotic chemical corrosion reaction. These results indicated that hydrogen consumption did not strongly stimulate iron corrosion. On the other hand, one isolate, namely, Methanococcus maripaludis Mic1c10, considerably corroded iron: this phenomenon was not accompanied by hydrogen consumption, methane formation, or cell growth. This finding also provided strong evidence that M. maripaludis Mic1c10 produced some material that caused iron to corrode.

  9. Spectroscopic definition of the biferrous and biferric sites of de novo designed 4-helix bundle DFsc peptides: Implications for O2 reactivity of binuclear non-heme iron enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Caleb B.; Calhoun, Jennifer R.; Bobyr, Elena; Wei, Pin-pin; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; DeGrado, William F.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2009-01-01

    DFsc is a single chain de novo designed 4-helix bundle peptide that mimics the core protein fold and primary ligand set of various binuclear non-heme iron enzymes. DFsc and the E11D, Y51L and Y18F single amino acid variants have been studied using a combination of near-IR circular dichroism (CD), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), variable temperature variable field MCD (VTVH MCD) and x-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies. The biferrous sites are all weakly antiferromagnetically coupled with μ-1,3 carboxylate bridges and one 4-coordinate and one 5-coordinate Fe, very similar to the active site of Class I ribonucleotide reductase (R2) providing open coordination positions on both irons for dioxygen to bridge. From perturbations of the MCD and VTVH MCD the iron proximal to Y51 can be assigned as the 4-coordinate center and XAS results show that Y51 is not bound to this iron in the reduced state. The two open coordination positions on one iron in the biferrous state would become occupied by dioxygen and Y51 along the O2 reaction coordinate. Subsequent binding of Y51 functions as an internal spectral probe of the O2 reaction and as a proton source that would promote loss of H2O2. Coordination by a ligand that functions as a proton source could be a structural mechanism used by natural binuclear iron enzymes to drive their reactions past peroxo biferric level intermediates. PMID:19090676

  10. Promoter analysis of intestinal genes induced during iron-deprivation reveals enrichment of conserved SP1-like binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James F; Hu, Zihua

    2007-01-01

    Background Iron-deficiency leads to the induction of genes related to intestinal iron absorption and homeostasis. By analyzing a large GeneChip® dataset from the rat intestine, we identified a large cluster of 228 genes that was induced by iron-deprivation. Only 2 of these genes contained 3' iron-response elements, suggesting that other regulation including transcriptional may be involved. We therefore utilized computational methods to test the hypothesis that some of the genes within this large up-regulated cluster are co-ordinately regulated by common transcriptional mechanisms. We thus identified promoters from the up-regulated gene cluster from rat, mouse and human, and performed enrichment analyses with the Clover program and the TRANSFAC database. Results Surprisingly, we found a strong statistical enrichment for SP1 binding sites in our experimental promoters as compared to background sequences. As the TRANSFAC database cannot distinguish among SP/KLF family members, many of which bind similar GC-rich DNA sequences, we surmise that SP1 or an SP1-like factor could be involved in this response. In fact, we detected induction of SP6/KLF14 in the GeneChip® studies, and confirmed it by real-time PCR. Additional computational analyses suggested that an SP1-like factor may function synergistically with a FOX TF to regulate a subset of these genes. Furthermore, analysis of promoter sequences identified many genes with multiple, conserved SP1 and FOX binding sites, the relative location of which within orthologous promoters was highly conserved. Conclusion SP1 or a closely related factor may play a primary role in the genetic response to iron-deficiency in the mammalian intestine. PMID:18005439

  11. Lithium Iron Phosphate Cell Performance Evaluations for Lunar Extravehicular Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha

    2007-01-01

    Lithium-ion battery cells are being evaluated for their ability to provide primary power and energy storage for NASA s future Exploration missions. These missions include the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, the Ares Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage, Extravehicular Activities (EVA, the advanced space suit), the Lunar Surface Ascent Module (LSAM), and the Lunar Precursor and Robotic Program (LPRP), among others. Each of these missions will have different battery requirements. Some missions may require high specific energy and high energy density, while others may require high specific power, wide operating temperature ranges, or a combination of several of these attributes. EVA is one type of mission that presents particular challenges for today s existing power sources. The Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for the advanced Lunar surface suit will be carried on an astronaut s back during eight hour long sorties, requiring a lightweight power source. Lunar sorties are also expected to occur during varying environmental conditions, requiring a power source that can operate over a wide range of temperatures. Concepts for Lunar EVAs include a primary power source for the PLSS that can recharge rapidly. A power source that can charge quickly could enable a lighter weight system that can be recharged while an astronaut is taking a short break. Preliminary results of Al23 Ml 26650 lithium iron phosphate cell performance evaluations for an advanced Lunar surface space suit application are discussed in this paper. These cells exhibit excellent recharge rate capability, however, their specific energy and energy density is lower than typical lithium-ion cell chemistries. The cells were evaluated for their ability to provide primary power in a lightweight battery system while operating at multiple temperatures.

  12. Study on accumulation ability of two lichen species Hypogymnia physodes and Usnea hirta at iron-steel factory site, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Cansaran-Duman, Demet

    2011-11-01

    The use of biological responses to contaminant exposure by lichen species has become a useful tool in environmental quality evaluation and risk assesment. Lichen Hypogymnia physodes and Usnea hirta samples were collected in 2006 from 10 sites around iron-steel factory in Karabük, Turkey. H. physodes and U. hirta samples from Yenice forest were used as a control. The aim of present study was to evaluate the bioaccumulation ability and to determine the environmental impact of an iron-steel factory in Karabük. Seven elements (Zn, Cu, Mn, Fe, Pb, Ni, Cr and Cd) were analysed by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The analytical results were compared statistically by using SPSS. As expected, the study area (Yenice forest, Karabük) chosen as control site (site no 11) showed significantly lower impact in comparison to other site (site no 1-10). Compared with the two lichen species, H. physodes showed highest metal accumulating capacity while U. hirta showed lowest. These criteria attested the best suitability for H. physodes, followed by U. hirta.

  13. Bmp6 Expression in Murine Liver Non Parenchymal Cells: A Mechanism to Control their High Iron Exporter Activity and Protect Hepatocytes from Iron Overload?

    PubMed Central

    Rausa, Marco; Pagani, Alessia; Nai, Antonella; Campanella, Alessandro; Gilberti, Maria Enrica; Apostoli, Pietro; Camaschella, Clara; Silvestri, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Bmp6 is the main activator of hepcidin, the liver hormone that negatively regulates plasma iron influx by degrading the sole iron exporter ferroportin in enterocytes and macrophages. Bmp6 expression is modulated by iron but the molecular mechanisms are unknown. Although hepcidin is expressed almost exclusively by hepatocytes (HCs), Bmp6 is produced also by non-parenchymal cells (NPCs), mainly sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). To investigate the regulation of Bmp6 in HCs and NPCs, liver cells were isolated from adult wild type mice whose diet was modified in iron content in acute or chronic manner and in disease models of iron deficiency (Tmprss6 KO mouse) and overload (Hjv KO mouse). With manipulation of dietary iron in wild-type mice, Bmp6 and Tfr1 expression in both HCs and NPCs was inversely related, as expected. When hepcidin expression is abnormal in murine models of iron overload (Hjv KO mice) and deficiency (Tmprss6 KO mice), Bmp6 expression in NPCs was not related to Tfr1. Despite the low Bmp6 in NPCs from Tmprss6 KO mice, Tfr1 mRNA was also low. Conversely, despite body iron overload and high expression of Bmp6 in NPCs from Hjv KO mice, Tfr1 mRNA and protein were increased. However, in the same cells ferritin L was only slightly increased, but the iron content was not, suggesting that Bmp6 in these cells reflects the high intracellular iron import and export. We propose that NPCs, sensing the iron flux, not only increase hepcidin through Bmp6 with a paracrine mechanism to control systemic iron homeostasis but, controlling hepcidin, they regulate their own ferroportin, inducing iron retention or release and further modulating Bmp6 production in an autocrine manner. This mechanism, that contributes to protect HC from iron loading or deficiency, is lost in disease models of hepcidin production. PMID:25860887

  14. Bmp6 expression in murine liver non parenchymal cells: a mechanism to control their high iron exporter activity and protect hepatocytes from iron overload?

    PubMed

    Rausa, Marco; Pagani, Alessia; Nai, Antonella; Campanella, Alessandro; Gilberti, Maria Enrica; Apostoli, Pietro; Camaschella, Clara; Silvestri, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Bmp6 is the main activator of hepcidin, the liver hormone that negatively regulates plasma iron influx by degrading the sole iron exporter ferroportin in enterocytes and macrophages. Bmp6 expression is modulated by iron but the molecular mechanisms are unknown. Although hepcidin is expressed almost exclusively by hepatocytes (HCs), Bmp6 is produced also by non-parenchymal cells (NPCs), mainly sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). To investigate the regulation of Bmp6 in HCs and NPCs, liver cells were isolated from adult wild type mice whose diet was modified in iron content in acute or chronic manner and in disease models of iron deficiency (Tmprss6 KO mouse) and overload (Hjv KO mouse). With manipulation of dietary iron in wild-type mice, Bmp6 and Tfr1 expression in both HCs and NPCs was inversely related, as expected. When hepcidin expression is abnormal in murine models of iron overload (Hjv KO mice) and deficiency (Tmprss6 KO mice), Bmp6 expression in NPCs was not related to Tfr1. Despite the low Bmp6 in NPCs from Tmprss6 KO mice, Tfr1 mRNA was also low. Conversely, despite body iron overload and high expression of Bmp6 in NPCs from Hjv KO mice, Tfr1 mRNA and protein were increased. However, in the same cells ferritin L was only slightly increased, but the iron content was not, suggesting that Bmp6 in these cells reflects the high intracellular iron import and export. We propose that NPCs, sensing the iron flux, not only increase hepcidin through Bmp6 with a paracrine mechanism to control systemic iron homeostasis but, controlling hepcidin, they regulate their own ferroportin, inducing iron retention or release and further modulating Bmp6 production in an autocrine manner. This mechanism, that contributes to protect HC from iron loading or deficiency, is lost in disease models of hepcidin production.

  15. Mechanism of the Iron(II)-Catalyzed Hydrosilylation of Ketones: Activation of Iron Carboxylate Precatalysts and Reaction Pathways of the Active Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Bleith, Tim; Gade, Lutz H

    2016-04-13

    A detailed mechanistic study of the catalytic hydrosilylation of ketones with the highly active and enantioselective iron(II) boxmi complexes as catalysts (up to >99% ee) was carried out to elucidate the pathways for precatalyst activation and the mechanism for the iron-catalyzed hydrosilylation. Carboxylate precatalysts were found to be activated by reduction of the carboxylate ligand to the corresponding alkoxide followed by entering the catalytic cycle for the iron-catalyzed hydrosilylation. An Eyring-type analysis of the temperature dependence of the enantiomeric ratio established a linear relationship of ln(S/R) and T(-1), indicating a single selectivity-determining step over the whole temperature range from -40 to +65 °C (ΔΔG(‡)sel, 233 K = 9 ± 1 kJ/mol). The rate law as well as activation parameters for the rate-determining step were derived and complemented by a Hammett analysis, radical clock experiments, kinetic isotope effect (KIE) measurements (kH/kD = 3.0 ± 0.2), the isolation of the catalytically active alkoxide intermediate, and DFT-modeling of the whole reaction sequence. The proposed reaction mechanism is characterized by a rate-determining σ-bond metathesis of an alkoxide complex with the silane, subsequent coordination of the ketone to the iron hydride complex, and insertion of the ketone into the Fe-H bond to regenerate the alkoxide complex.

  16. Matriptase-2 mutations in iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia patients provide new insights into protease activation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Andrew J; Quesada, Victor; Sanchez, Mayka; Garabaya, Cecilia; Sardà, María P; Baiget, Montserrat; Remacha, Angel; Velasco, Gloria; López-Otín, Carlos

    2009-10-01

    Mutations leading to abrogation of matriptase-2 proteolytic activity in humans are associated with an iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) due to elevated hepcidin levels. Here we describe two novel heterozygous mutations within the matriptase-2 (TMPRSS6) gene of monozygotic twin girls exhibiting an IRIDA phenotype. The first is the frameshift mutation (P686fs) caused by the insertion of the four nucleotides CCCC in exon 16 (2172_2173insCCCC) that is predicted to terminate translation before the catalytic serine. The second mutation is the di-nucleotide substitution c.467C>A and c.468C>T in exon 3 that causes the missense mutation A118D in the SEA domain of the extracellular stem region of matriptase-2. Functional analysis of both variant matriptase-2 proteases has revealed that they lead to ineffective suppression of hepcidin transcription. We also demonstrate that the A118D SEA domain mutation causes an intra-molecular structural imbalance that impairs matriptase-2 activation. Collectively, these results extend the pattern of TMPRSS6 mutations associated with IRIDA and functionally demonstrate that mutations affecting protease regions other than the catalytic domain may have a profound impact in the regulatory role of matriptase-2 during iron deficiency.

  17. Iron oxide nanoparticles embedded in activated carbons prepared from hydrothermally treated waste biomass.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wenming; Björkman, Eva; Yun, Yifeng; Lilliestråle, Malte; Hedin, Niklas

    2014-03-01

    Particles of iron oxide (Fe3O4 ; 20–40 nm) were embedded within activated carbons during the activation of hydrothermally carbonized (HTC) biomasses in a flow of CO2. Four different HTC biomass samples (horse manure, grass cuttings, beer production waste, and biosludge) were used as precursors for the activated carbons. Nanoparticles of iron oxide formed from iron catalyst included in the HTC biomasses. After systematic optimization, the activated carbons had specific surface areas of about 800 m2g1. The pore size distributions of the activated carbons depended strongly on the degree of carbonization of the precursors. Activated carbons prepared from highly carbonized precursors had mainly micropores, whereas those prepared from less carbonized precursors contained mainly mesopores. Given the strong magnetism of the activated carbon–nano-Fe3O4 composites, they could be particularly useful for water purification.

  18. A greenhouse trial to investigate the ameliorative properties of biosolids and plants on physicochemical conditions of iron ore tailings: Implications for an iron ore mine site remediation.

    PubMed

    Cele, Emmanuel Nkosinathi; Maboeta, Mark

    2016-01-01

    An iron ore mine site in Swaziland is currently (2015) in a derelict state as a consequence of past (1964-1988) and present (2011 - current) iron ore mining operations. In order to control problems associated with mine wastes, the Swaziland Water Services Corporation (SWSC) recently (2013) proposed the application of biosolids in sites degraded by mining operations. It is thought that this practice could generally improve soil conditions and enhance plant reestablishment. More importantly, the SWSC foresees this as a potential solution to the biosolids disposal problems. In order to investigate the effects of biosolids and plants in soil physicochemical conditions of iron mine soils, we conducted two plant growth trials. Trial 1 consisted of tailings that received biosolids and topsoil (TUSB mix) while in trial 2, tailings received biosolids only (TB mix). In the two trials, the application rates of 0 (control), 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 t ha(-1) were used. After 30 days of equilibration, 25 seeds of Cynodon dactylon were sown in each pot and thinned to 10 plants after 4 weeks. Plants were watered twice weekly and remained under greenhouse conditions for 12 weeks, subsequent to which soils were subjected to chemical analysis. According to the results obtained, there were significant improvements in soil parameters related to fertility such as organic matter (OM), water holding capacity (WHC), cation exchange capacity (CEC), ammonium [Formula: see text] , magnesium (Mg(2+)), calcium (Ca(2+)) and phosphorus ( [Formula: see text] ). With regard to heavy metals, biosolids led to significant increases in soil total concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg and Pb. The higher concentrations of Zn and Cu in treated tailings compared to undisturbed adjacent soils are a cause for concern because in the field, this might work against the broader objectives of mine soil remediation, which include the recolonization of reclaimed sites by soil-dwelling organisms. Therefore, while

  19. Using in situ voltammetry as a tool to identify and characterize habitats of iron-oxidizing bacteria: from fresh water wetlands to hydrothermal vent sites.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Daniel J; Findlay, Alyssa J; McAllister, Sean M; Barnett, Josh M; Hredzak-Showalter, Patricia; Krepski, Sean T; Cone, Shane G; Scott, Jarrod; Bennett, Sarah K; Chan, Clara S; Emerson, David; Luther Iii, George W

    2014-09-20

    Iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) likely play a large role in the biogeochemistry of iron, making the detection and understanding of the biogeochemical processes FeOB are involved in of critical importance. By deploying our in situ voltammetry system, we are able to measure a variety of redox species, specifically Fe(ii) and O2, simultaneously. This technique provides significant advantages in both characterizing the environments in which microaerophilic FeOB are found, and finding diverse conditions in which FeOB could potentially thrive. Described here are four environments with different salinities [one fresh groundwater seep site, one beach-groundwater mixing site, one hydrothermal vent site (Mid-Atlantic Ridge), and one estuary (Chesapeake Bay)] where in situ voltammetry was deployed, and where the presence of FeOB were confirmed by either culturing methods or molecular data. The sites varied in both O2 and Fe(ii) content with O2 ranging from below the 3 μM detection limit of the electrodes at the Chesapeake Bay suboxic zone, to as high 150 μM O2 at the vent site. In addition, a range of Fe(ii) concentrations supported FeOB communities, from 3 μM Fe(ii) in the Chesapeake Bay to 300 μM in the beach aquifer. In situ electrochemistry provides the means to quickly measure these redox gradients at appropriate resolution, making it possible in real time to detect niches likely inhabited by microaerophilic FeOB, then accurately sample for proof of FeOB presence and activity. This study demonstrates the utility of this approach while also greatly expanding our knowledge of FeOB habitats.

  20. Crystal structure of the ectoine hydroxylase, a snapshot of the active site.

    PubMed

    Höppner, Astrid; Widderich, Nils; Lenders, Michael; Bremer, Erhard; Smits, Sander H J

    2014-10-24

    Ectoine and its derivative 5-hydroxyectoine are compatible solutes that are widely synthesized by bacteria to cope physiologically with osmotic stress. They also serve as chemical chaperones and maintain the functionality of macromolecules. 5-Hydroxyectoine is produced from ectoine through a stereo-specific hydroxylation, an enzymatic reaction catalyzed by the ectoine hydroxylase (EctD). The EctD protein is a member of the non-heme-containing iron(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily and is evolutionarily well conserved. We studied the ectoine hydroxylase from the cold-adapted marine ultra-microbacterium Sphingopyxis alaskensis (Sa) and found that the purified SaEctD protein is a homodimer in solution. We determined the SaEctD crystal structure in its apo-form, complexed with the iron catalyst, and in a form that contained iron, the co-substrate 2-oxoglutarate, and the reaction product of EctD, 5-hydroxyectoine. The iron and 2-oxoglutarate ligands are bound within the EctD active site in a fashion similar to that found in other members of the dioxygenase superfamily. 5-Hydroxyectoine, however, is coordinated by EctD in manner different from that found in high affinity solute receptor proteins operating in conjunction with microbial import systems for ectoines. Our crystallographic analysis provides a detailed view into the active site of the ectoine hydroxylase and exposes an intricate network of interactions between the enzyme and its ligands that collectively ensure the hydroxylation of the ectoine substrate in a position- and stereo-specific manner.

  1. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Microwave-assisted combustion synthesis of nano iron oxide/iron-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica, with arsenic adsorption studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combustion synthesis of iron oxide/iron coated carbons such as activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber and silica is described. The reactions were carried out in alumina crucibles using a Panasonic kitchen microwave with inverter technology, and the reaction process was com...

  3. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  4. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  5. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  6. Cytosolic aconitase activity sustains adipogenic capacity of adipose tissue connecting iron metabolism and adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Moreno, María; Ortega, Francisco; Xifra, Gemma; Ricart, Wifredo; Fernández-Real, José Manuel; Moreno-Navarrete, José María

    2015-04-01

    To gain insight into the regulation of intracellular iron homeostasis in adipose tissue, we investigated the role of iron regulatory protein 1/cytosolic aconitase 1 (ACO1). ACO1 gene expression and activity increased in parallel to expression of adipogenic genes during differentiation of both murine 3T3-L1 cells and human preadipocytes. Lentiviral knockdown (KD) of Aco1 in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes led to diminished cytosolic aconitase activity and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (NADP(+)), soluble (Idh1) mRNA levels, decreased intracellular NADPH:NADP ratio, and impaired adipogenesis during adipocyte differentiation. In addition, Aco1 KD in fully differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes decreased lipogenic, Idh1, Adipoq, and Glut4 gene expression. A bidirectional cross-talk was found between intracellular iron levels and ACO1 gene expression and protein activity. Although iron in excess, known to increase reactive oxygen species production, and iron depletion both resulted in decreased ACO1 mRNA levels and activity, Aco1 KD led to reduced gene expression of transferrin receptor (Tfrc) and transferrin, disrupting intracellular iron uptake. In agreement with these findings, in 2 human independent cohorts (n = 85 and n = 38), ACO1 gene expression was positively associated with adipogenic markers in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue. ACO1 gene expression was also positively associated with the gene expression of TFRC while negatively linked to ferroportin (solute carrier family 40 (iron-regulated transporter), member 1) mRNA levels. Altogether, these results suggest that ACO1 activity is required for the normal adipogenic capacity of adipose tissue by connecting iron, energy metabolism, and adipogenesis.

  7. Controlled Orientation of Active Sites in a Nanostructured Multienzyme Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Yang, Byungseop; Jung, Younghan; Cha, Jaehyun; Cho, Jinhwan; Choi, Eun-Sil; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-01-01

    Multistep cascade reactions in nature maximize reaction efficiency by co-assembling related enzymes. Such organization facilitates the processing of intermediates by downstream enzymes. Previously, the studies on multienzyme nanocomplexes assembled on DNA scaffolds demonstrated that closer interenzyme distance enhances the overall reaction efficiency. However, it remains unknown how the active site orientation controlled at nanoscale can have an effect on multienzyme reaction. Here, we show that controlled alignment of active sites promotes the multienzyme reaction efficiency. By genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and two compatible bioorthogonal chemistries, we conjugated mannitol dehydrogenase to formate dehydrogenase with the defined active site arrangement with the residue-level accuracy. The study revealed that the multienzyme complex with the active sites directed towards each other exhibits four-fold higher relative efficiency enhancement in the cascade reaction and produces 60% more D-mannitol than the other complex with active sites directed away from each other. PMID:28004799

  8. Iron regulates glucose homeostasis in liver and muscle via AMP-activated protein kinase in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingyu; Simcox, Judith; Mitchell, T. Creighton; Jones, Deborah; Cox, James; Luo, Bai; Cooksey, Robert C.; Boros, Laszlo G.; McClain, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    Excess iron is associated with hepatic damage and diabetes in humans, although the detailed molecular mechanisms are not known. To investigate how iron regulates glucose homeostasis, we fed C57BL/6J male mice with high-iron (HI) diets (2 or 20 g Fe/kg chow). Mice fed an HI diet exhibited elevated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and impaired insulin signaling in skeletal muscle and liver. Consistent with the increased AMPK activity, glucose uptake was enhanced in mice fed an HI diet. The effects of improved glucose tolerance induced by HI feeding were abolished in transgenic mice with expression of muscle specific dominant-negative AMPK. Glucose output was suppressed in the liver of wild-type mice fed an HI diet, due to decreased expression of gluconeogenic genes and decreased substrate (lactate) from peripheral glycolysis. Iron activated AMPK by increasing deacetylase and decreasing LKB1 acetylation, in turn stimulating the phosphorylation of LKB1 and AMPK. The effects of HI diet were abrogated by treatment of the mice with N-acetyl cysteine, suggesting a redox-dependent mechanism for increasing deacetylase activity. In addition, tissue from iron-fed mice exhibited an elevated AMP/ATP ratio, further contributing to AMPK activation. In summary, a diet high in iron improves glucose tolerance by activating AMPK through mechanisms that include deacetylation.—Huang J., Simcox, J., Mitchell, T. C., Jones, D., Cox, J., Luo, B., Cooksey, R. C., Boros, L. G., McClain, D. A. Iron regulates glucose homeostasis in liver and muscle via AMP-activated protein kinase in mice. PMID:23515442

  9. Removal of trichloroethylene by zerovalent iron/activated carbon derived from agricultural wastes.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuh-fan; Cheng, Yu-ling; Shih, Yang-hsin

    2013-11-15

    Activated carbon (AC) and zerovalent iron (ZVI) have been widely used in the adsorption and dehalogenation process, respectively, for the removal of organic compounds in environmental treatments. This study aims to prepare ZVI/AC derived from an agricultural waste, coir pith, through simple one-step pyrolysis. The effect of activation temperature and time on the surface area, iron content, and zerovalent iron ratio of ZVI/AC was systemically investigated. The results indicated that the activation of AC by FeSO4 significantly increased surface area of AC and distributed elemental iron over the AC. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of ZVI/AC revealed that zerovalent iron was present. As compared to AC without FeSO4 activation, ZVI/AC increased the trichloroethylene removal rate constant by 7 times. The dechlorination ability of ZVI/AC was dominated by the zerovalent iron content. We have shown that lab-made ZVI/AC from coir pith can effectively adsorb and dehalogenate the chlorinated compounds in water.

  10. Prenatal Iron Deficiency in Guinea Pigs Increases Locomotor Activity but Does Not Influence Learning and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Fiset, Catherine; Rioux, France M.; Surette, Marc E.; Fiset, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine whether prenatal iron deficiency induced during gestation in guinea pigs affected locomotor activity and learning and memory processes in the progeny. Dams were fed either iron-deficient anemic or iron-sufficient diets throughout gestation and lactation. After weaning, all pups were fed an iron-sufficient diet. On postnatal day 24 and 40, the pups’ locomotor activity was observed within an open-field test, and from postnatal day 25 to 40, their learning and memory processes were assessed within a Morris Water Maze. The behavioural and cognitive tests revealed that the iron deficient pup group had increased locomotor activity, but solely on postnatal day 40, and that there were no group differences in the Morris Water Maze. In the general discussion, we propose that prenatal iron deficiency induces an increase in nervousness due to anxiety in the progeny, which, in the current study, resulted in an increase of locomotor activity. PMID:26186713

  11. Non-haem iron and the dissociation of piericidin A sensitivity from site 1 energy conservation in mitochondria from Torulopsis utilis

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, R. A.; Garland, P. B.

    1971-01-01

    1. The aerobic incubation of iron-deficient Torulopsis utilis cells for 12h under non-growing conditions results in the recovery by mitochondria of the previously absent site 1 energy conservation and sensitivity to piericidin A. 2. The recovery of piericidin A sensitivity but not site 1 is prevented by the presence of cycloheximide (100μg/ml) in the medium used for aerobic incubation of the cells. Rotenone sensitivity behaved similarly. 3. Chloramphenicol, erythromycin and tetracycline were without effect on the recovery of site 1 and piericidin A sensitivity. 4. Inclusion of 59Fe in the growth medium can be used as the basis for a highly sensitive assay for non-haem iron. 5. Iron-limited growth of T. utilis lowers the concentration of both non-haem iron and acid-labile sulphide of submitochondrial particles by over 20-fold compared with the `normal' situation with iron-supplemented glycerol-limited growth. 6. Increases in the non-haem iron and acid-labile sulphide concentrations of submitochondrial particles occur when site 1 and piericidin A sensitivity are recovered. The increase is approximately halved by the presence of cycloheximide. 7. The non-haem iron of T. utilis submitochondrial particles does not exchange with added iron. 8. Continuous culture of T. utilis at the transition between glycerol- and iron-limitation results in cells where mitochondria possess site 1 energy conservation but lack piericidin A sensitivity. 8. It is concluded, in contrast with widely held views to the opposite, that energy conservation at site 1 does not require electron flow to proceed through a piericidin A- or rotenone-sensitive route. 9. Restriction of the iron supplied to growing T. utilis to a concentration just above that required for growth limitation demonstrates that a 10- to 20-fold decrease of the `normal' non-haem iron concentration of both cells and mitochondria is without effect on the growth yield per unit of carbon source. Submitochondrial particles prepared

  12. Growth and activity of Bulgarian yogurt starter culture in iron-fortified milk.

    PubMed

    Simova, Emilina; Ivanov, Galin; Simov, Zhelyazko

    2008-10-01

    Bulgarian yogurts were manufactured and fortified with 8, 15 and 27 mg of iron kg(-1) of yogurt. The growth and acidifying activity of the starter culture bacteria Streptococcus thermophilus 13a and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2-11 were monitored during milk fermentation and over 15 days of yogurt storage at 4 degrees C. Fortifying milk with iron did not affect significantly the growth of the starter culture during manufacture and storage of yogurt. Counts of yogurt bacteria at the end of fermentation of iron-fortified milks were between 2.1 x 10(10) and 4.6 x 10(10) CFU ml(-1), which were not significantly different from numbers in unfortified yogurts. In all batches of yogurt, the viable cell counts of S. thermophilus 13a were approximately three times higher than those of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2-11. Greater decrease in viable cell count over 15 days of storage was observed for S. thermophilus 13a compared to L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2-11. Intensive accumulation of lactic acid was observed during incubation of milk and all batches reached pH 4.5 +/- 0.1 after 3.0 h. At the end of fermentation process, lactic acid concentrations in iron-fortified yogurts were between 6.9 +/- 0.4 and 7.3 +/- 0.5 g l(-1). The acidifying activity of starter culture bacteria in the control and iron-fortified milks was similar. There was no increase in oxidized, metallic and bitter off-flavors in iron-fortified yogurts compared to the control. Iron-fortified yogurts did not differ significantly in their sensorial, chemical and microbiological characteristics with unfortified yogurt, suggesting that yogurt is a suitable vehicle for iron fortification and that the ferrous lactate is an appropriate iron source for yogurt fortification.

  13. Diel cycles in dissolved barium, lead, iron, vanadium, and nitrite in a stream draining a former zinc smelter site near Hegeler, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kay, R.T.; Groschen, G.E.; Cygan, G.; Dupre, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Diel variations in the concentrations of a number of constituents have the potential to substantially affect the appropriate sampling regimen in acidic streams. Samples taken once during the course of the day cannot adequately reflect diel variations in water quality and may result in an inaccurate understanding of biogeochemical processes, ecological conditions, and of the threat posed by the water to human health and the associated wildlife. Surface water and groundwater affected by acid drainage were sampled every 60 to 90. min over a 48-hour period at a former zinc smelter known as the Hegeler Zinc Superfund Site, near Hegeler, Illinois. Diel variations related to water quality in the aquifer were not observed in groundwater. Diel variations were observed in the temperature, pH, and concentration of dissolved oxygen, nitrite, barium, iron, lead, vanadium, and possibly uranium in surface water. Temperature, dissolved oxygen, nitrite, barium, lead, and uranium generally attained maximum values during the afternoon and minimum values during the night. Iron, vanadium, and pH generally attained minimum values during the afternoon and maximum values during the night. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen were affected by the intensity of photosynthetic activity and respiration, which are dependent upon insolation. Nitrite, an intermediary in many nitrogen reactions, may have been formed by the oxidation of ammonium by dissolved oxygen and converted to other nitrogen species as part of the decomposition of organic matter. The timing of the pH cycles was distinctly different from the cycles found in Midwestern alkaline streams and likely was the result of the photoreduction of Fe3+ to Fe 2+ and variations in the intensity of precipitation of hydrous ferric oxide minerals. Diel cycles of iron and vanadium also were primarily the result of variations in the intensity of precipitation of hydrous ferric oxide minerals. The diel variation in the concentrations of lead, uranium

  14. Mineral ecophysiological evidence for microbial activity in banded iron formation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dr. Yi-Liang; Konhauser, Dr, Kurt; Cole, David R; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2011-01-01

    The phosphorus composition of banded-iron formations (BIFs) has been used as a proxy for Precambrian seawater composition and the paleoeredox state of Earth's surface environment. However, it is unclear whether the phosphorus in BIFs originally entered the sediment as a sorbed component of the iron oxyhydroxide particles, or whether it was incorporated into the biomass of marine phytoplankton. We conducted high-resolution mineral analyses and report here the first detection of an Fe(III) acetate salt, as well as nanocrystals of apatite in association with magnetite, in the 2.48 Ga Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation (a BIF), Hamersley, Western Australia. The clusters of apatite are similar in size and morphology to biogenic apatite crystals resulting from biomass decay in Phanerozoic marine sediments, while the formation of an Fe(III) acetate salt and magnetite not only implies the original presence of biomass in the BIF sediments, but also that organic carbon likely served as an electron donor during bacterial Fe(III) reduction. This study is important because it suggests that phytoplankton may have played a key role in the transfer of phosphorus (and other trace elements) from the photic zone to the seafloor.

  15. Binding dynamics at the quinone reduction (Qi) site influence the equilibrium interactions of the iron sulfur protein and hydroquinone oxidation (Qo) site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Jason W; Ohnishi, Tomoko; Daldal, Fevzi

    2005-08-09

    Multiple instances of low-potential electron-transport pathway inhibitors that affect the structure of the cytochrome (cyt) bc(1) complex to varying degrees, ranging from changes in hydroquinone (QH(2)) oxidation and cyt c(1) reduction kinetics to proteolytic accessibility of the hinge region of the iron-sulfur-containing subunit (Fe/S protein), have been reported. However, no instance has been documented of any ensuing change on the environment(s) of the [2Fe-2S] cluster. In this work, this issue was addressed in detail by taking advantage of the increased spectral and spatial resolution obtainable with orientation-dependent electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic analysis of ordered membrane preparations. For the first time, perturbation of the low-potential electron-transport pathway by Q(i)-site inhibitors or various mutations was shown to change the EPR spectra of both the cyt b hemes and the [2Fe-2S] cluster of the Fe/S protein. In particular, two interlinked effects of Q(i)-site modifications on the Fe/S subunit, one changing the local environment of its [2Fe-2S] cluster and a second affecting the mobility of this subunit, are revealed. Remarkably, different inhibitors and mutations at or near the Q(i) site induce these two effects differently, indicating that the events occurring at the Q(i) site affect the global structure of the cyt bc(1). Furthermore, occupancy of discrete Q(i)-site subdomains differently impede the location of the Fe/S protein at the Q(o) site. These findings led us to propose that antimycin A and HQNO mimic the presence of QH(2) and Q at the Q(i) site, respectively. Implications of these findings in respect to the Q(o)-Q(i) sites communications and to multiple turnovers of the cyt bc(1) are discussed.

  16. Perspective: On the active site model in computational catalyst screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Karsten; Plaisance, Craig P.; Oberhofer, Harald; Andersen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    First-principles screening approaches exploiting energy trends in surface adsorption represent an unparalleled success story in recent computational catalysis research. Here we argue that our still limited understanding of the structure of active sites is one of the major bottlenecks towards an ever extended and reliable use of such computational screening for catalyst discovery. For low-index transition metal surfaces, the prevalently chosen high-symmetry (terrace and step) sites offered by the nominal bulk-truncated crystal lattice might be justified. For more complex surfaces and composite catalyst materials, computational screening studies will need to actively embrace a considerable uncertainty with respect to what truly are the active sites. By systematically exploring the space of possible active site motifs, such studies might eventually contribute towards a targeted design of optimized sites in future catalysts.

  17. Diffusional correlations among multiple active sites in a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-04-07

    Simulations of the enzymatic dynamics of a model enzyme containing multiple substrate binding sites indicate the existence of diffusional correlations in the chemical reactivity of the active sites. A coarse-grain, particle-based, mesoscopic description of the system, comprising the enzyme, the substrate, the product and solvent, is constructed to study these effects. The reactive and non-reactive dynamics is followed using a hybrid scheme that combines molecular dynamics for the enzyme, substrate and product molecules with multiparticle collision dynamics for the solvent. It is found that the reactivity of an individual active site in the multiple-active-site enzyme is reduced substantially, and this effect is analyzed and attributed to diffusive competition for the substrate among the different active sites in the enzyme.

  18. Robotics at Savannah River site: activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.S.

    1984-09-01

    The objectives of the Robotics Technology Group at the Savannah River Laboratory are to employ modern industrial robots and to develop unique automation and robotic systems to enhance process operations at the Savannah River site (SRP and SRL). The incentives are to improve safety, reduce personnel radiation exposure, improve product quality and productivity, and to reduce operating costs. During the past year robotic systems have been installed to fill chemical dilution vials in a SRP laboratory at 772-F and remove radioactive waste materials in the SRL Californium Production Facility at 773-A. A robotic system to lubricate an extrusion press has been developed and demonstrated in the SRL robotics laboratory and is scheduled for installation at the 321-M fuel fabrication area. A mobile robot was employed by SRP for a radiation monitoring task at a waste tank top in H-Area. Several other robots are installed in the SRL robotics laboratories and application development programs are underway. The status of these applications is presented in this report.

  19. The speciation of marine particulate iron adjacent to active and passive continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Ohnemus, Daniel C.; Marcus, Matthew A.

    2012-03-01

    We use synchrotron-based chemical-species mapping techniques to compare the speciation of suspended (1-51 μm) marine particulate iron collected in two open ocean environments adjacent to active and passive continental margins. Chemical-species mapping provides speciation information for heterogeneous environmental samples, and is especially good for detecting spectroscopically distinct trace minerals and species that could not be detectable by other methods. The average oxidation state of marine particulate iron determined by chemical-species mapping is comparable to that determined by standard bulk X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure spectroscopy. Using chemical-species mapping, we find that up to 43% of particulate Fe in the Northwest Pacific at the depth of the adjacent active continental margin is in the Fe(II) state, with the balance Fe(III). In contrast, particulate iron in the eastern tropical North Atlantic, which receives the highest dust deposition on Earth and is adjacent to a passive margin, is dominated by weathered and oxidized Fe compounds, with Fe(III) contributing 90% of total iron. The balance is composed primarily of Fe(II)-containing species, but we detected individual pyrite particles in some samples within an oxygen minimum zone in the upper thermocline. Several lines of evidence point to the adjacent Mauritanian continental shelf as the source of pyrite to the water column. The speciation of suspended marine particulate iron reflects the mineralogy of iron from the adjacent continental margins. Since the solubility of particulate iron has been shown to be a function of its speciation, this may have implications for the bioavailability of particulate iron adjacent to passive compared to active continental margins.

  20. In-situ Activation of Persulfate by Iron Filings and Degradation of 1,4-dioxane

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hua; Brusseau, Mark L; Wang, Yake; Yan, Ni; Quig, Lauren; Johnson, Gwynn R

    2015-01-01

    Activation of persulfate by iron filings and subsequent degradation of 1,4-dioxane (dioxane) was studied in both batch-reactor and column systems to evaluate the potential of a persulfate-enhanced permeable reactive barrier (PRB) system for combined oxidative-reductive removal of organic contaminants from groundwater. In batch experiments, decomposition of persulfate to sulfate and degradation of dioxane both occurred rapidly in the presence of iron filings. Conversely, dioxane degradation by persulfate was considerably slower in the absence of iron filings. For the column experiments, decomposition and retardation of persulfate was observed for transport in the columns packed with iron filings, whereas no decomposition or retardation was observed for transport in columns packed with a reference quartz sand. Both sulfate production and dioxane degradation were observed for the iron-filings columns, but not for the sand column. The pH of the column effluent increased temporarily before persulfate breakthrough, and significant increases in both ferrous and ferric iron coincided with persulfate breakthrough. Multiple species of free radicals were produced from persulfate activation as determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The impact of the oxidation process on solution composition and iron-filings surface chemistry was examined using ICP-MS, SEM-EDS, and XRD analyses. A two-stage reaction mechanism is proposed to describe the oxidation process, consisting of a first stage of rapid, solution-based, radical-driven, decomposition of dioxane and a second stage governed by rate-limited surface reaction. The results of this study show successful persulfate activation using iron filings, and the potential to apply an enhanced PRB method for improving in-situ removal of organic contaminants from groundwater. PMID:26141426

  1. Assessment of Vegetation Establishment on Tailings Dam at an Iron Ore Mining Site of Suburban Beijing, China, 7 Years After Reclamation with Contrasting Site Treatment Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Demin; Zhao, Fangying; Sun, Osbert Jianxin

    2013-09-01

    Strip-mining operations greatly disturb soil, vegetation and landscape elements, causing many ecological and environmental problems. Establishment of vegetation is a critical step in achieving the goal of ecosystem restoration in mining areas. At the Shouyun Iron Ore Mine in suburban Beijing, China, we investigated selective vegetation and soil traits on a tailings dam 7 years after site treatments with three contrasting approaches: (1) soil covering (designated as SC), (2) application of a straw mat, known as "vegetation carpet", which contains prescribed plant seed mix and water retaining agent (designated as VC), on top of sand piles, and (3) combination of soil covering and application of vegetation carpet (designated as SC+VC). We found that after 7 years of reclamation, the SC+VC site had twice the number of plant species and greater biomass than the SC and VC sites, and that the VC site had a comparable plant abundance with the SC+VC site but much less biodiversity and plant coverage. The VC site did not differ with the SC site in the vegetation traits, albeit low soil fertility. It is suggested that application of vegetation carpet can be an alternative to introduction of topsoil for treatment of tailings dam with fine-structured substrate of ore sands. However, combination of topsoil treatment and application of vegetation carpet greatly increases vegetation coverage and plant biodiversity, and is therefore a much better approach for assisting vegetation establishment on the tailings dam of strip-mining operations. While application of vegetation carpet helps to stabilize the loose surface of fine-structured mine wastes and to introduce seed bank, introduction of fertile soil is necessary for supplying nutrients to plant growth in the efforts of ecosystem restoration of mining areas.

  2. Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: why selenoproteins?

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Johansson, Linda; Bauer, Holger; Arscott, L David; Rauch, Susanne; Ballou, David P; Williams, Charles H; Schirmer, R Heiner; Arnér, Elias S J

    2003-10-28

    Selenium, an essential trace element for mammals, is incorporated into a selected class of selenoproteins as selenocysteine. All known isoenzymes of mammalian thioredoxin (Trx) reductases (TrxRs) employ selenium in the C-terminal redox center -Gly-Cys-Sec-Gly-COOH for reduction of Trx and other substrates, whereas the corresponding sequence in Drosophila melanogaster TrxR is -Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser-COOH. Surprisingly, the catalytic competence of these orthologous enzymes is similar, whereas direct Sec-to-Cys substitution of mammalian TrxR, or other selenoenzymes, yields almost inactive enzyme. TrxRs are therefore ideal for studying the biology of selenocysteine by comparative enzymology. Here we show that the serine residues flanking the C-terminal Cys residues of Drosophila TrxRs are responsible for activating the cysteines to match the catalytic efficiency of a selenocysteine-cysteine pair as in mammalian TrxR, obviating the need for selenium. This finding suggests that the occurrence of selenoenzymes, which implies that the organism is selenium-dependent, is not necessarily associated with improved enzyme efficiency. Our data suggest that the selective advantage of selenoenzymes is a broader range of substrates and a broader range of microenvironmental conditions in which enzyme activity is possible.

  3. Modulatory effect of iron chelators on adenosine deaminase activity and gene expression in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Primon-Barros, Muriel; Rigo, Graziela Vargas; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Santos, Odelta dos; Smiderle, Lisiane; Almeida, Silvana; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-11-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellate protozoan that parasitises the urogenital human tract and causes trichomoniasis. During the infection, the acquisition of nutrients, such as iron and purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, is essential for the survival of the parasite. The enzymes for purinergic signalling, including adenosine deaminase (ADA), which degrades adenosine to inosine, have been characterised in T. vaginalis. In the evaluation of the ADA profile in different T. vaginalis isolates treated with different iron sources or with limited iron availability, a decrease in activity and an increase in ADA gene expression after iron limitation by 2,2-bipyridyl and ferrozine chelators were observed. This supported the hypothesis that iron can modulate the activity of the enzymes involved in purinergic signalling. Under bovine serum limitation conditions, no significant differences were observed. The results obtained in this study allow for the assessment of important aspects of ADA and contribute to a better understanding of the purinergic system in T. vaginalis and the role of iron in establishing infection and parasite survival.

  4. Iron, copper, and manganese complexes with in vitro superoxide dismutase and/or catalase activities that keep Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells alive under severe oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Thales P; Fernandes, Christiane; Melo, Karen V; Ferreira, Sarah S; Lessa, Josane A; Franco, Roberto W A; Schenk, Gerhard; Pereira, Marcos D; Horn, Adolfo

    2015-03-01

    Due to their aerobic lifestyle, eukaryotic organisms have evolved different strategies to overcome oxidative stress. The recruitment of some specific metalloenzymes such as superoxide dismutases (SODs) and catalases (CATs) is of great importance for eliminating harmful reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion). Using the ligand HPClNOL {1-[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]-3-chloropropan-2-ol}, we have synthesized three coordination compounds containing iron(III), copper(II), and manganese(II) ions, which are also present in the active site of the above-noted metalloenzymes. These compounds were evaluated as SOD and CAT mimetics. The manganese and iron compounds showed both SOD and CAT activities, while copper showed only SOD activity. The copper and manganese in vitro SOD activities are very similar (IC50~0.4 μmol dm(-3)) and about 70-fold higher than those of iron. The manganese compound showed CAT activity higher than that of the iron species. Analyzing their capacity to protect Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells against oxidative stress (H2O2 and the O2(•-) radical), we observed that all compounds act as antioxidants, increasing the resistance of yeast cells mainly due to a reduction of lipid oxidation. Especially for the iron compound, the data indicate complete protection when wild-type cells were exposed to H2O2 or O2(•-) species. Interestingly, these compounds also compensate for both superoxide dismutase and catalase deficiencies; their antioxidant activity is metal ion dependent, in the order iron(III)>copper(II)>manganese(II). The protection mechanism employed by the complexes proved to be independent of the activation of transcription factors (such as Yap1, Hsf1, Msn2/Msn4) and protein synthesis. There is no direct relation between the in vitro and the in vivo antioxidant activities.

  5. Disorders of iron metabolism. Part 1: molecular basis of iron homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Manuel; García-Erce, José Antonio; Remacha, Angel Francisco

    2011-04-01

    IRON FUNCTIONS: Iron is an essential micronutrient, as it is required for satisfactory erythropoietic function, oxidative metabolism and cellular immune response. IRON PHYSIOLOGY: Absorption of dietary iron (1-2 mg/day) is tightly regulated and just balanced against iron loss because there are no active iron excretory mechanisms. Dietary iron is found in haem (10%) and non-haem (ionic, 90%) forms, and their absorption occurs at the apical surface of duodenal enterocytes via different mechanisms. Iron is exported by ferroportin 1 (the only putative iron exporter) across the basolateral membrane of the enterocyte into the circulation (absorbed iron), where it binds to transferrin and is transported to sites of use and storage. Transferrin-bound iron enters target cells-mainly erythroid cells, but also immune and hepatic cells-via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Senescent erythrocytes are phagocytosed by reticuloendothelial system macrophages, haem is metabolised by haem oxygenase, and the released iron is stored as ferritin. Iron will be later exported from macrophages to transferrin. This internal turnover of iron is essential to meet the requirements of erythropoiesis (20-30 mg/day). As transferrin becomes saturated in iron-overload states, excess iron is transported to the liver, the other main storage organ for iron, carrying the risk of free radical formation and tissue damage. REGULATION OF IRON HOMOEOSTASIS: Hepcidin, synthesised by hepatocytes in response to iron concentrations, inflammation, hypoxia and erythropoiesis, is the main iron-regulatory hormone. It binds ferroportin on enterocytes, macrophages and hepatocytes triggering its internalisation and lysosomal degradation. Inappropriate hepcidin secretion may lead to either iron deficiency or iron overload.

  6. Utilization of iron-catecholamine complexes involving ferric reductase activity in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Coulanges, V; Andre, P; Ziegler, O; Buchheit, L; Vidon, D J

    1997-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous potentially pathogenic organism requiring iron for growth and virulence. Although it does not produce siderophores, L. monocytogenes is able to obtain iron by using either exogenous siderophores produced by various microorganisms or natural catechol compounds widespread in the environment. In the presence of tropolone, an iron-chelating agent, growth of L. monocytogenes is completely inhibited. However, the growth inhibition can be relieved by the addition of dopamine or norepinephrine under their different isomeric forms, while the catecholamine derivatives 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol and normetanephrine did not relieve the inhibitory effect of tropolone. Preincubation of L. monocytogenes with chlorpromazine and yohimbine did not antagonize the growth-promoting effect of catecholamines in iron-complexed medium. In addition, norepinephrine stimulated the growth-promoting effect induced by human transferrin in iron-limited medium. Furthermore, dopamine and norepinephrine allowed 55Fe uptake by iron-deprived bacterial cells. The uptake of iron was energy dependent, as indicated by inhibition of 55Fe uptake at 0 degrees C as well as by preincubating the bacteria with KCN. Inhibition of 55Fe uptake by L. monocytogenes was also observed in the presence of Pt(II). Moreover, when assessed by a whole-cell ferric reductase assay, reductase activity of L. monocytogenes was inhibited by Pt(II). These data demonstrate that dopamine and norepinephrine can function as siderophore-like compounds in L. monocytogenes owing to their ortho-diphenol function and that catecholamine-mediated iron acquisition does not involve specific catecholamine receptors but acts through a cell-bound ferrireductase activity. PMID:9199450

  7. Iron modulates the replication of virulent Mycobacterium bovis in resting and activated bovine and possum macrophages.

    PubMed

    Denis, Michel; Buddle, Bryce M

    2005-09-15

    Bovine and possum macrophages were infected in vitro with a virulent strain of Mycobacterium bovis, and mycobacterial replication was measured in the infected macrophages cultured under a variety of conditions. Virulent M. bovis replicated substantially in alveolar possum macrophages as well as in bovine blood monocyte-derived macrophages. Addition of recombinant bovine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) with low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) rendered bovine macrophages significantly more resistant to M. bovis replication. Disruption of iron levels in infected macrophages by addition of apotransferrin or bovine lactoferrin blocked replication of M. bovis in both bovine and possum macrophages. On the other hand, addition of exogenous iron, either in the form of iron citrate or iron-saturated transferrin, rendered macrophages of both species much more permissive for the replication of M. bovis. The impact of iron deprivation/loading on the mycobacteriostatic activity of cells was independent of nitric-oxide release, as well as independent of the generation of oxygen radical species in both possum and bovine macrophages. Exogenous iron was shown to reverse the ability of IFN-gamma/LPS pulsed bovine macrophages to restrict M. bovis replication. When autologous possum lymphocytes from animals vaccinated with M. bovis strain BCG were added to infected macrophages, they rendered the macrophages less permissive for virulent M. bovis replication. Loading the cells with iron prior to this macrophage-lymphocyte interaction, reversed this immune effect induced by sensitized cells. We conclude that, in two important animal species, intracellular iron level plays an important role in M. bovis replication in macrophages, irrespective of their activation status.

  8. Bidentate ligation of heme analogues; novel biomimetics of peroxidase active site.

    PubMed

    Ashkenasy, Gonen; Margulies, David; Felder, Clifford E; Shanzer, Abraham; Powers, Linda S

    2002-09-02

    The multifunctional nature of proteins that have iron-heme cofactors with noncovalent histidine linkage to the protein is controlled by the heme environment. Previous studies of these active-site structures show that the primary difference is the length of the iron-proximal histidine bond, which can be controlled by the degree of H-bonding to this histidine. Great efforts to mimic these functions with synthetic analogues have been made for more than two decades. The peroxidase models resulted in several catalytic systems capable of a large range of oxidative transformations. Most of these model systems modified the porphyrin ring covalently by directly binding auxiliary elements that control and facilitate reactivity; for example, electron-donating or -withdrawing substituents. A biomimetic approach to enzyme mimicking would have taken a different route, by attempting to keep the porphyrin ring system unaltered, as close as possible to its native form, and introducing all modifications at or close to the axial coordination sites. Such a model system would be less demanding synthetically, would make it easy to study the effect of a single structural modification, and might even provide a way to probe effects resulting from porphyrin exchange. We introduce here an alternative model system based on these principles. It consists of a two component system: a bis-imidazolyl ligand and an iron-porphyrin (readily substituted by a hemin). All modifications were introduced only to the ligand that engulfs the porphyrin and binds to the iron's fifth and sixth coordination sites. We describe the design, synthesis, and characterization of nine different model compounds with increased complexity. The primary tool for characterizing the environment of each complex Fe(III) center was the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurements, supported by UV/Vis, IR, and NMR spectroscopy and by molecular modeling. Introduction of asymmetry, by attaching different imidazoles

  9. Electrochemical activity of some different iron polyphthalocyanines for the oxygen reduction reaction in acidic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreja, Ludwik; Dabrowski, Roman

    The electrochemical activity of iron polyphthalocyanines (pPcFe) synthesized from pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) or tetracyanobenzene (TCB) and dicyan It was found that pPcFe derived from PMDA has the highest activity and that the temperature dependences of electrical conductivity in vacuum and oxygen

  10. Mechanochemical activation of iron ore-based catalysts for the hydrogenation of brown coal

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, P.N.; Kuznetsova, L.I.; Kartseva, N.V.; Chumakov, V.G.

    1998-12-31

    Genesis of iron based catalysts on mechanical treatment in a planetary mill was investigated. Methods for achieving satisfactory mixing of catalyst on coal were surveyed. The preferred method was to conduct mechanochemical activation in the presence of sulfur and water additives, application of activated catalyst to coal followed by drying of the contact produced.

  11. Redox-dependent open and closed forms of the active site of the bacterial respiratory nitric-oxide reductase revealed by cyanide binding studies.

    PubMed

    Grönberg, Karin L C; Watmough, Nicholas J; Thomson, Andrew J; Richardson, David J; Field, Sarah J

    2004-04-23

    The bacterial respiratory nitric-oxide reductase (NOR) catalyzes the respiratory detoxification of nitric oxide in bacteria and Archaea. It is a member of the well known super-family of heme-copper oxidases but has a [heme Fe-non-heme Fe] active site rather than the [heme Fe-Cu(B)] active site normally associated with oxygen reduction. Paracoccus denitrificans NOR is spectrally characterized by a ligand-to-metal charge transfer absorption band at 595 nm, which arises from the high spin ferric heme iron of a micro-oxo-bridged [heme Fe(III)-O-Fe(III)] active site. On reduction of the nonheme iron, the micro-oxo bridge is broken, and the ferric heme iron is hydroxylated or hydrated, depending on the pH. At present, the catalytic cycle of NOR is a matter of much debate, and it is not known to which redox state(s) of the enzyme nitric oxide can bind. This study has used cyanide to probe the nature of the active site in a number of different redox states. Our observations suggest that the micro-oxo-bridged [heme Fe(III)-O-Fe(III)] active site represents a closed or resting state of NOR that can be opened by reduction of the non-heme iron.

  12. Community Update on Site Activities, July 19, 2013

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In an effort to engage and inform community members interested in the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site cleanup, EPA will be issuing periodic topic-based fact sheets that will provide background information and updates about ongoing activities.

  13. Loss of Frataxin activates the iron/sphingolipid/PDK1/Mef2 pathway in mammals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuchuan; Ho, Tammy Szu-Yu; Lin, Guang; Tan, Kai Li; Rasband, Matthew N; Bellen, Hugo J

    2016-11-30

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in Frataxin (FXN). Loss of FXN causes impaired mitochondrial function and iron homeostasis. An elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was previously proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of FRDA. We recently showed that loss of frataxin homolog (fh), a Drosophila homolog of FXN, causes a ROS independent neurodegeneration in flies (Chen et al., 2016). In fh mutants, iron accumulation in the nervous system enhances the synthesis of sphingolipids, which in turn activates 3-phosphoinositide dependent protein kinase-1 (Pdk1) and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (Mef2) to trigger neurodegeneration of adult photoreceptors. Here, we show that loss of Fxn in the nervous system in mice also activates an iron/sphingolipid/PDK1/Mef2 pathway, indicating that the mechanism is evolutionarily conserved. Furthermore, sphingolipid levels and PDK1 activity are also increased in hearts of FRDA patients, suggesting that a similar pathway is affected in FRDA.

  14. Functional Iron Oxide-Silver Hetero-Nanocomposites: Controlled Synthesis and Antibacterial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trang, Vu Thi; Tam, Le Thi; Van Quy, Nguyen; Huy, Tran Quang; Thuy, Nguyen Thanh; Tri, Doan Quang; Cuong, Nguyen Duy; Tuan, Pham Anh; Van Tuan, Hoang; Le, Anh-Tuan; Phan, Vu Ngoc

    2017-02-01

    Iron oxide-silver nanocomposites are of great interest for their antibacterial and antifungal activities. We report a two-step synthesis of functional magnetic hetero-nanocomposites of iron oxide nanoparticles and silver nanoparticles (Fe3O4-Ag). Iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared first by a co-precipitation method followed by the deposition of silver nanoparticles via a hydrothermal route. The prepared Fe3O4-Ag hetero-nanocomposites were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. Their antibacterial activities were investigated by using paper-disc diffusion and direct-drop diffusion methods. The results indicate that the Fe3O4-Ag hetero-nanocomposites exhibit excellent antibacterial activities against two Gram-negative bacterial strains (Salmonella enteritidis and Klebsiella pneumoniae).

  15. Influence of moderate pre-oxidation treatment on the physical, chemical and phosphate adsorption properties of iron-containing activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengfang; Shi, Mo; Li, Jihua; Zheng, Zheng

    2014-03-01

    A novel adsorbent based on iron oxide dispersed over activated carbon (AC) were prepared, and used for phosphate removal from aqueous solutions. The influence of pre-oxidation treatment on the physical, chemical and phosphate adsorption properties of iron-containing AC were determined. Two series of ACs, non-oxidized and oxidized carbon modified by iron (denoted as AC-Fe and AC/O-Fe), resulted in a maximum impregnated iron of 4.03% and 7.56%, respectively. AC/O-Fe showed 34.0%-46.6% higher phosphate removal efficiency than the AC-Fe did. This was first attributed to the moderate pre-oxidation of raw AC by nitric acid, achieved by dosing Fe(II) after a pre-oxidation, to obtain higher iron loading, which is favorable for phosphate adsorption. Additionally, the in-situ formed active site on the surface of carbon, which was derived from the oxidation of Fe(II) by nitric acid dominated the remarkably high efficiency with respect to the removal of phosphate. The activation energy for adsorption was calculated to be 10.53 and 18.88 kJ/mol for AC-Fe and AC/O-Fe, respectively. The results showed that the surface mass transfer and intra-particle diffusion were simultaneously occurring during the process and contribute to the adsorption mechanism.

  16. Crystallographic Analysis of Active Site Contributions to Regiospecificity in the Diiron Enzyme Toluene 4-Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Lucas J.; Acheson, Justin F.; McCoy, Jason G.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Fox, Brian G.

    2014-10-02

    Crystal structures of toluene 4-monooxygenase hydroxylase in complex with reaction products and effector protein reveal active site interactions leading to regiospecificity. Complexes with phenolic products yield an asymmetric {mu}-phenoxo-bridged diiron center and a shift of diiron ligand E231 into a hydrogen bonding position with conserved T201. In contrast, complexes with inhibitors p-NH{sub 2}-benzoate and p-Br-benzoate showed a {mu}-1,1 coordination of carboxylate oxygen between the iron atoms and only a partial shift in the position of E231. Among active site residues, F176 trapped the aromatic ring of products against a surface of the active site cavity formed by G103, E104 and A107, while F196 positioned the aromatic ring against this surface via a {pi}-stacking interaction. The proximity of G103 and F176 to the para substituent of the substrate aromatic ring and the structure of G103L T4moHD suggest how changes in regiospecificity arise from mutations at G103. Although effector protein binding produced significant shifts in the positions of residues along the outer portion of the active site (T201, N202, and Q228) and in some iron ligands (E231 and E197), surprisingly minor shifts (<1 {angstrom}) were produced in F176, F196, and other interior residues of the active site. Likewise, products bound to the diiron center in either the presence or absence of effector protein did not significantly shift the position of the interior residues, suggesting that positioning of the cognate substrates will not be strongly influenced by effector protein binding. Thus, changes in product distributions in the absence of the effector protein are proposed to arise from differences in rates of chemical steps of the reaction relative to motion of substrates within the active site channel of the uncomplexed, less efficient enzyme, while structural changes in diiron ligand geometry associated with cycling between diferrous and diferric states are discussed for their potential

  17. Azurin as a protein scaffold for a low-coordinate non-heme iron site with a small-molecule binding pocket

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Matthew P.; Retegan, Marius; Bill, Eckhard; Payne, Thomas M.; Shafaat, Hannah S.; Peña, Salvador; Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Ensign, Amy A.; Crane, Brian R.; Neese, Frank; Holland, Patrick L.

    2012-01-01

    The apo-protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin binds iron(II) to give a 1:1 complex, which has been characterized by electronic absorption, Mössbauer, and NMR spectroscopies, as well as X-ray crystallography and quantum-chemical computations. Despite potential competition by water and other coordinating residues, iron(II) binds tightly to the low-coordinate site. The iron(II) complex does not react with chemical redox agents to undergo oxidation or reduction. Spectroscopically-calibrated quantum-chemical computations show that the complex has high-spin iron(II) in a pseudotetrahedral coordination environment, which features interactions with side chains of two histidines and a cysteine, as well as the C=O of Gly45. In the 5A1 ground state, the dz2 orbital is doubly occupied. Mutation of Met121 to Ala leaves the metal site in a similar environment, but creates a pocket for reversible binding of small anions to the iron(II) center. Specifically, azide forms a high-spin iron(II) complex and cyanide forms a low-spin iron(II) complex. PMID:23167247

  18. The Crystal Structure of a Quercetin 2,3-Dioxygenase from Bacillus subtilis Suggests Modulation of Enzyme Activity by a Change in the Metal Ion at the Active Site(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, B.; Madan, Lalima L.; Betz, Stephen F.; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.

    2010-11-10

    Common structural motifs, such as the cupin domains, are found in enzymes performing different biochemical functions while retaining a similar active site configuration and structural scaffold. The soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis has 20 cupin genes (0.5% of the total genome) with up to 14% of its genes in the form of doublets, thus making it an attractive system for studying the effects of gene duplication. There are four bicupins in B. subtilis encoded by the genes yvrK, yoaN, yxaG, and ywfC. The gene products of yvrK and yoaN function as oxalate decarboxylases with a manganese ion at the active site(s), whereas YwfC is a bacitracin synthetase. Here we present the crystal structure of YxaG, a novel iron-containing quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase with one active site in each cupin domain. Yxag is a dimer, both in solution and in the crystal. The crystal structure shows that the coordination geometry of the Fe ion is different in the two active sites of YxaG. Replacement of the iron at the active site with other metal ions suggests modulation of enzymatic activity in accordance with the Irving-Williams observation on the stability of metal ion complexes. This observation, along with a comparison with the crystal structure of YvrK determined recently, has allowed for a detailed structure-function analysis of the active site, providing clues to the diversification of function in the bicupin family of proteins.

  19. Iron and phosphorus speciation in Fe-conditioned membrane bioreactor activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi; Wang, Yuan; Waite, T David

    2015-06-01

    Iron dosing of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is widely used as a means of meeting effluent phosphorus targets but there is limited understanding of the nature of iron and phosphorus-containing solids that are formed within the bioreactor (an important issue in view of the increasing interest in recovering phosphorus from wastewaters). Of particular challenge is the complexity of the MBR system and the variety of reactions that can occur on addition of iron salts to a membrane bioreactor. In this study, the performances of bench scale MBRs with dosing of either ferrous or ferric salts were monitored for a period of four months. The distributions of Fe and P-species in the Fe-conditioned sludges were determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Fe K-edge and the P K-edge. Regardless of whether iron was dosed to the anoxic or aerobic chambers and regardless of whether ferrous (Fe(II)) or ferric (Fe(III)) iron was dosed, iron present in the minerals in the conditioned sludges was consistently in the +III oxidation state. Fitting of the Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra revealed that an Fe(III)-phosphate species was the main Fe species present in all cases with the remaining fraction dominated by lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) in the Fe(II)-dosed case and ferrihydrite (am-FeOOH) in the Fe(III)-dosed case. Approximately half the phosphorus in the activated sludge samples was present as a distinct Fe-PO4 mineral (such as strengite or an amorphous ferric hydroxyl phosphate analogue of strengite) and half as phosphorus adsorbed to an iron oxyhydroxide mineral phase indicating that both co-precipitation and adsorption of phosphorus by iron contribute to removal of phosphorus from the MBR supernatant.

  20. Effect of a carrier's nature on the activation of supported iron catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazak, V. O.; Chernavskii, P. A.; Pankina, G. V.; Khodakov, A. Y.; Ordomsky, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    The effect a carrier's nature has on the activation of supported iron catalysts in a stream of pure carbon monoxide CO is investigated. It is shown that iron is mainly present in the form of magnetite Fe3O4 in case of carbon supports and in the form of hematite Fe2O3 for silica gel supports. It is shown that all activated samples are chiefly made up of the Hägg carbide χ-Fe5C2, but its concentration is higher for the carbon supports.

  1. Antioxidant activity of a Lachnum YM226 melanin-iron complex and its influence on cytokine production in mice with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Song, Sheng; Yang, Liu; Ye, Ming; Chen, Xue; Shi, Fang; Shaikh, Farnaz

    2016-03-01

    The present study aims to investigate the protective effects of an orally administered Lachnum YM226 melanin-iron complex (LM-Fe) against iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in mice. The IDA mouse model was established by feeding mice with iron-deficient food. Different doses of LM-Fe were given to the anaemic mice via intragastric administration, with FeCl3 and FeSO4 used as positive controls. After the iron supplement administration, it was observed that LM-Fe could significantly improve the decreased haemoglobin (Hb) level, and normalize the serum iron (SI) level, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) and serum ferritin (SF) of the anaemic mice in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, treatment with LM-Fe significantly increased the antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxidase dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in plasma to normal or better. Furthermore, the levels of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were obviously decreased in the LM-Fe supplemented groups compared with the model group, while the level of interleukin-2 (IL-2) was significantly increased. In conclusion, LM-Fe was efficient at ameliorating the anemia symptoms, improving the activities of antioxidant enzymes and adjusting the immune dysfunction of anaemic mice. Thus, these results demonstrated that LM-Fe might be exploited as an efficient and multifunctional iron supplement.

  2. Uranium immobilization in an iron-rich rhizosphere of a native wetland plant from the Savannah River Site under reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyun-shik; Buettner, Shea W; Seaman, John C; Jaffé, Peter R; van Groos, Paul G Koster; Li, Dien; Peacock, Aaron D; Scheckel, Kirk G; Kaplan, Daniel I

    2014-08-19

    The hypothesis of this study was that iron plaques formed on the roots of wetland plants and their rhizospheres create environmental conditions favorable for iron reducing bacteria that promote the in situ immobilization of uranium. Greenhouse microcosm studies were conducted using native plants (Sparganium americanum) from a wetland located on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC. After iron plaques were established during a 73-day period by using an anoxic Fe(II)-rich nutrient solution, a U(VI) amended nutrient solution was added to the system for an additional two months. Compared to plant-free control microcosms, microcosms containing iron plaques successfully stimulated the growth of targeted iron reducing bacteria, Geobacter spp. Their population continuously increased after the introduction of the U(VI) nutrient solution. The reduction of some of the U(VI) to U(IV) by iron reducing bacteria was deduced based on the observations that the aqueous Fe(II) concentrations increased while the U(VI) concentrations decreased. The Fe(II) produced by the iron reducing bacteria was assumed to be reoxidized by the oxygen released from the roots. Advanced spectroscopic analyses revealed that a significant fraction of the U(VI) had been reduced to U(IV) and they were commonly deposited in association with phosphorus on the iron plaque.

  3. Ecological risk assessment of on-site soil washing with iron(III) chloride in cadmium-contaminated paddy field.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takashi; Horio, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Kamiya, Takashi; Takano, Hiroyuki; Makino, Tomoyuki

    2012-06-01

    On-site soil washing with iron(III) chloride reduces Cd levels in soil, and thus the human health risks caused by Cd in food. However, it may threaten aquatic organisms when soil washing effluent is discharged to open aquatic systems. Therefore, we conducted trial-scale on-site soil washing and ecological risk assessment in Nagano and Niigata prefectures, Japan. The ecological effect of effluent water was investigated by two methods. The first was bioassay using standard aquatic test organisms. Twice-diluted effluent water from the Nagano site and the original effluent water from the Niigata site had no significant effects on green algae, water flea, caddisfly, and fish. The safe dilution rates were estimated as 20 times and 10 times for the Nagano and Niigata sites, respectively, considering an assessment factor of 10. The second method was probabilistic effect analysis using chemical analysis and the species sensitivity distribution concept. The mixture effects of CaCl(2), Al, Zn, and Mn were considered by applying a response additive model. The safe dilution rates, assessed for a potentially affected fraction of species of 5%, were 7.1 times and 23.6 times for the Nagano and Niigata sites, respectively. The actual dilution rates of effluent water by river water at the Nagano and Niigata sites were 2200-67,000 times and 1300-110,000 times, respectively. These are much larger than the safe dilution rates derived from the two approaches. Consequently, the ecological risk to aquatic organisms of soil washing is evaluated as being below the concern level.

  4. Proteasome-mediated turnover of the transcriptional activator FIT is required for plant iron-deficiency responses.

    PubMed

    Sivitz, Alicia; Grinvalds, Claudia; Barberon, Marie; Curie, Catherine; Vert, Grégory

    2011-06-01

    Plants display a number of responses to low iron availability in order to increase iron uptake from the soil. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the ferric-chelate reductase FRO2 and the ferrous iron transporter IRT1 control iron entry from the soil into the root epidermis. To maintain iron homeostasis, the expression of FRO2 and IRT1 is tightly controlled by iron deficiency at the transcriptional level. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor FIT represents the most upstream actor known in the iron-deficiency signaling pathway, and directly regulates the expression of the root iron uptake machinery genes FRO2 and IRT1. However, how FIT is controlled by iron and acts to activate transcription of its targets remains obscure. Here we show that FIT mRNA and endogenous FIT protein accumulate in Arabidopsis roots upon iron deficiency. However, using plants constitutively expressing FIT, we observed that FIT protein accumulation is reduced in iron-limited conditions. This post-transcriptional regulation of FIT is perfectly synchronized with the accumulation of endogenous FIT and IRT1 proteins, and therefore is part of the early responses to low iron. We demonstrated that such regulation affects FIT protein stability under iron deficiency as a result of 26S proteasome-dependent degradation. In addition, we showed that FIT post-translational regulation by iron is required for FRO2 and IRT1 gene expression. Taken together our results indicate that FIT transcriptional and post-translational regulations are integrated in plant roots to ensure that the positive regulator FIT accumulates as a short-lived protein following iron shortage, and to allow proper iron-deficiency responses.

  5. Metallic Iron-Nickel Sulfide Ultrathin Nanosheets As a Highly Active Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Acidic Media.

    PubMed

    Long, Xia; Li, Guixia; Wang, Zilong; Zhu, HouYu; Zhang, Teng; Xiao, Shuang; Guo, Wenyue; Yang, Shihe

    2015-09-23

    We report on the synthesis of iron-nickel sulfide (INS) ultrathin nanosheets by topotactic conversion from a hydroxide precursor. The INS nanosheets exhibit excellent activity and stability in strong acidic solutions as a hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalyst, lending an attractive alternative to the Pt catalyst. The metallic α-INS nanosheets show an even lower overpotential of 105 mV at 10 mA/cm(2) and a smaller Tafel slope of 40 mV/dec. With the help of DFT calculations, the high specific surface area, facile ion transport and charge transfer, abundant electrochemical active sites, suitable H(+) adsorption, and H2 formation kinetics and energetics are proposed to contribute to the high activity of the INS ultrathin nanosheets toward HER.

  6. Activation and detoxification of UICC crocidolite: the effect of conversion of oxidation state of iron on the toxicity of the fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulumian, M.; De Waard, H.; Pollak, H.

    1993-04-01

    Detoxification of crocidolite, an asbestiform riebeckite with a coating of ferric salt, converted some of the ferrous ions into ferric ions and therefore decreased the activity of the fibres to catalyse the reduction of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. The H 2-activation of crocidolite fibres on the other hand, changed some of the ferric ions into ferrous ions and therefore increased the capacity of the fibres to catalyse these two reactions. Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) combined with wet chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, and neutron activation analysis enabled us to determine the site occupancies of iron and magnesium in UICC (Union Internationale Contre le Cancer) crocidolite and the ratio of the recoil-free fractions ƒ(Fe 2+)/ƒ(Fe 3+) = 0.86±0.07. These results and further MS studies with detoxified and activated fibres explained the effect of the two processes on the activity of iron in the fibres.

  7. Systematic Perturbations of Binuclear Non-heme Iron Sites: Structure and Dioxygen Reactivity of de Novo Due Ferri Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Rae Ana; Betzu, Justine; Butch, Susan E.; Reig, Amanda J.; DeGrado, William F.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2015-07-08

    We report that DFsc (single-chain due ferri) proteins allow for modeling binuclear non-heme iron enzymes with a similar fold. Three 4A → 4G variants of DFsc were studied to investigate the effects of (1) increasing the size of the substrate/solvent access channel (G4DFsc), (2) including an additional His residue in the first coordination sphere along with three additional helix-stabilizing mutations [3His-G4DFsc(Mut3)], and (3) the three helix-stabilizing mutations alone [G4DFsc-(Mut3)] on the biferrous structures and their O2 reactivities. Near-infrared circular dichroism and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy show that the 4A → 4G mutations increase coordination of the diiron site from 4-coordinate/5-coordinate to 5-coordinate/5-coordinate, likely reflecting increased solvent accessibility. While the three helix-stabilizing mutations [G4DFsc(Mut3)] do not affect the coordination number, addition of the third active site His residue [3His-G4DFsc(Mut3)] results in a 5-coordinate/6-coordinate site. Although all 4A → 4G variants have significantly slower pseudo-first-order rates when reacting with excess O2 than DFsc (~2 s₋1), G4DFsc and 3His-G4DFsc(Mut3) have rates (~0.02 and ~0.04 s₋1) faster than that of G4DFsc(Mut3) (~0.002 s₋1). These trends in the rate of O2 reactivity correlate with exchange coupling between the Fe(II) sites and suggest that the two-electron reduction of O2 occurs through end-on binding at one Fe(II) rather than through a peroxy-bridged intermediate. Finally, UV–vis absorption and MCD spectroscopies indicate that an Fe(III)Fe(III)-OH species first forms in all three variants but converts into an Fe(III)-μ-OH-Fe(III) species only in the 2-His forms, a process inhibited by the additional active site His ligand that coordinatively saturates one of the iron centers in 3His-G4DFsc(Mut3).

  8. The role of iron in cancer.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, E D

    1996-02-01

    Numerous laboratory and clinical investigations over the past few decades have observed that one of the dangers of iron is its ability to favour neoplastic cell growth. The metal is carcinogenic due to its catalytic effect on the formation of hydroxyl radicals, suppression of the activity of host defence cells and promotion of cancer cell multiplication. In both animals and humans, primary neoplasms develop at body sites of excessive iron deposits. The invaded host attempts to withhold iron from the cancer cells via sequestration of the metal in newly formed ferritin. The host also endeavours to withdraw the metal from cancer cells via macrophage synthesis of nitric oxide. Quantitative evaluation of body iron and of iron-withholding proteins has prognostic value in cancer patients. Procedures associated with lowering host iron intake and inducing host cell iron efflux can assist in prevention and management of neoplastic diseases. Pharmaceutical methods for depriving neoplastic cells of iron are being developed in experimental and clinical protocols.

  9. Site-specific management of pH-induced iron chlorosis of maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted over nine site/years in Nebraska, USA between 2004 and 2005 to evaluate the potential to predict chlorosis-prone areas within fields which are relatively stable in space and time. The study also investigated the potential benefits of site-specific cultivar management according ...

  10. TECHNICAL APPROACHES TO CHARACTERIZING AND CLEANING UP IRON AND STEEL MILL SITES UNDER THE BROWNFIELDS INITIATIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document provides brownfields planners with an overview of the technical methods that can be used to achieve successful site assessment and cleanup which are two key components of the brownfields redevelopment process. No two brownfields sites are identical and planners will...

  11. Dietary fortificant iron intake is negatively associated with quality of life in patients with mildly active inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anaemia and oral iron supplementation have been associated negatively with quality of life, and with adverse effects, respectively, in subjects with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Hence, the risk-benefit ratio of oral iron is not understood in this patient group. The present case–control study investigated whether dietary iron intake impacts on quality of life in IBD patients. Methods Quality of life, habitual dietary iron intakes and iron requirements were assessed in 29 patients with inactive or mildly active IBD as well as in 28 healthy control subjects. Results As expected, quality of life was worse in IBD patients as a whole in comparison to healthy controls according to EuroQol score and EuroQol VAS percentage (6.9 ± 1.6 vs 5.3 ± 0.6; p< 0.0001 and 77 ± 14% vs 88 ± 12%; p=0.004 respectively). For IBD subjects, 21/29 were iron deplete based upon serum iron responses to oral iron but, overall, were non-anaemic with mean haemoglobin of 13.3 ± 1.5 g/dL, and there was no difference in their quality of life compared to 8/29 iron replete subjects (Hb 14.0 ± 0.8 g/dL). Interestingly, total dietary iron intake was significantly negatively associated with quality of life in IBD patients, specifically for non-haem iron and, more specifically, for fortificant iron. Moreover, for total non-haem iron the negative association disappeared when fortificant iron values were subtracted. Finally, further sub-analysis indicated that the negative association between (fortificant) dietary iron intake and quality of life in IBD patients is driven by findings in patients with mildly active disease rather than in patients with quiescent disease. Conclusions Iron deficiency per se (i.e. without concomitant anaemia) does not appear to further affect quality of life in IBD patients with inactive or mildly active disease. However, in this preliminary study, dietary iron intake, particularly fortificant iron, appears to be significantly negatively

  12. Active site proton delivery and the lyase activity of human CYP17A1

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Yogan; Gregory, Michael C.; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •The disruption of PREG/PROG hydroxylation activity by T306A showed the participation of Cpd I. •T306A supports the involvement of a nucleophilic peroxo-anion during lyase activity. •The presence of cytochrome b{sub 5} augments C–C lyase activity. •Δ5-Steroids are preferred substrates for CYP17 catalysis. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450 CYP17A1 catalyzes a series of reactions that lie at the intersection of corticoid and androgen biosynthesis and thus occupies an essential role in steroid hormone metabolism. This multifunctional enzyme catalyzes the 17α-hydroxylation of Δ4- and Δ5-steroids progesterone and pregnenolone to form the corresponding 17α-hydroxy products through its hydroxylase activity, and a subsequent 17,20-carbon–carbon scission of pregnene-side chain produce the androgens androstenedione (AD) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). While the former hydroxylation reaction is believed to proceed through a conventional “Compound I” rebound mechanism, it has been suggested that the latter carbon cleavage is initiated by an iron-peroxy intermediate. We report on the role of Thr306 in CYP17 catalysis. Thr306 is a member of the conserved acid/alcohol pair thought to be essential for the efficient delivery of protons required for hydroperoxoanion heterolysis and formation of Compound I in the cytochromes P450. Wild type and T306A CYP17A1 self-assembled in Nanodiscs were used to quantitate turnover and coupling efficiencies of CYP17’s physiological Δ4- and Δ5-substrates. We observed that T306A co-incorporated in Nanodiscs with its redox partner cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase, coupled NADPH only by 0.9% and 0.7% compared to the wild type (97% and 22%) during the conversion of pregnenolone and progesterone, respectively, to the corresponding 17-OH products. Despite increased oxidation of pyridine nucleotide, hydroxylase activity was drastically diminished in the T306A mutant, suggesting a high degree of uncoupling in which reducing

  13. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2008-08-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes.

  14. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  15. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide.

  16. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.W.; Robinson, H.; Yeung, N.; Gao, Y.-G.; Miner, K. D.; Lei, L.; Lu, Y.

    2010-07-28

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN?-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  17. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Y Lin; N Yeung; Y Gao; K Miner; L Lei; H Robinson; Y Lu

    2011-12-31

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN{sup -}-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  18. Large zinc cation occupancy of octahedral sites in mechanically activated zinc ferrite powders

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, S. A.; Harris, V. G.; Hamdeh, H. H.; Ho, J. C.

    2000-05-08

    The cation site occupancy of a mechanically activated nanocrystalline zinc ferrite powder was determined as (Zn{sub 0.55}{sup 2+}Fe{sub 0.18}{sup 3+}){sub tet}[Zr{sub 0.45}{sup 2+}Fe{sub 1.82}{sup 3+}]{sub oct}O{sub 4} through analysis of extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements, showing a large redistribution of cations between sites compared to normal zinc ferrite samples. The overpopulation of cations in the octahedral sites was attributed to the ascendance in importance of the ionic radii over the crystal energy and bonding coordination in determining which interstitial sites are occupied in this structurally disordered powder. Slight changes are observed in the local atomic environment about the zinc cations, but not the iron cations, with respect to the spinel structure. The presence of Fe{sup 3+} on both sites is consistent with the measured room temperature magnetic properties. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 in transcriptional activation of ceruloplasmin by iron deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Mazumder, B.; Fox, P. L.

    2000-01-01

    A role of the copper protein ceruloplasmin (Cp) in iron metabolism is suggested by its ferroxidase activity and by the tissue iron overload in hereditary Cp deficiency patients. In addition, plasma Cp increases markedly in several conditions of anemia, e.g. iron deficiency, hemorrhage, renal failure, sickle cell disease, pregnancy, and inflammation. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) involved. We have reported that iron chelators increase Cp mRNA expression and protein synthesis in human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. Furthermore, we have shown that the increase in Cp mRNA is due to increased rate of transcription. We here report the results of new studies designed to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying transcriptional activation of Cp by iron deficiency. The 5'-flanking region of the Cp gene was cloned from a human genomic library. A 4774-base pair segment of the Cp promoter/enhancer driving a luciferase reporter was transfected into HepG2 or Hep3B cells. Iron deficiency or hypoxia increased luciferase activity by 5-10-fold compared with untreated cells. Examination of the sequence showed three pairs of consensus hypoxia-responsive elements (HREs). Deletion and mutation analysis showed that a single HRE was necessary and sufficient for gene activation. The involvement of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) was shown by gel-shift and supershift experiments that showed HIF-1alpha and HIF-1beta binding to a radiolabeled oligonucleotide containing the Cp promoter HRE. Furthermore, iron deficiency (and hypoxia) did not activate Cp gene expression in Hepa c4 hepatoma cells deficient in HIF-1beta, as shown functionally by the inactivity of a transfected Cp promoter-luciferase construct and by the failure of HIF-1 to bind the Cp HRE in nuclear extracts from these cells. These results are consistent with in vivo findings that iron deficiency increases plasma Cp and provides a molecular mechanism that may help to understand these

  20. The CIA Targeting Complex Is Highly Regulated and Provides Two Distinct Binding Sites for Client Iron-Sulfur Proteins.

    PubMed

    Odermatt, Diana C; Gari, Kerstin

    2017-02-07

    The cytoplasmic iron-sulfur assembly (CIA) targeting complex is required for the transfer of an iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster to cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins, but how it engages with client proteins is unknown. Here, we show that the complex members MIP18 and CIAO1 associate with the C terminus of MMS19. By doing so, they form a docking site for Fe-S proteins that is disrupted in the absence of either MMS19 or MIP18. The Fe-S helicase XPD seems to be the only exception, since it can interact with MMS19 independently of MIP18 and CIAO1. We further show that the direct interaction between MMS19 and MIP18 is required to protect MIP18 from proteasomal degradation. Taken together, these data suggest a remarkably regulated interaction between the CIA targeting complex and client proteins and raise the possibility that Fe-S cluster transfer is controlled, at least in part, by the stability of the CIA targeting complex itself.

  1. Iron(II) Active Species in Iron-Bisphosphine Catalyzed Kumada and Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Couplings of Phenyl Nucleophiles and Secondary Alkyl Halides.

    PubMed

    Daifuku, Stephanie L; Kneebone, Jared L; Snyder, Benjamin E R; Neidig, Michael L

    2015-09-09

    While previous studies have identified FeMes2(SciOPP) as the active catalyst species in iron-SciOPP catalyzed Kumada cross-coupling of mesitylmagnesium bromide and primary alkyl halides, the active catalyst species in cross-couplings with phenyl nucleophiles, where low valent iron species might be prevalent due to accessible reductive elimination pathways, remains undefined. In the present study, in situ Mössbauer and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopic studies combined with inorganic syntheses and reaction studies are employed to evaluate the in situ formed iron species and identify the active catalytic species in iron-SciOPP catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura and Kumada cross-couplings of phenyl nucleophiles and secondary alkyl halides. While reductive elimination to form Fe(η(6)-biphenyl)(SciOPP) occurs upon reaction of FeCl2(SciOPP) with phenyl nucleophiles, this iron(0) species is not found to be kinetically competent for catalysis. Importantly, mono- and bis-phenylated iron(II)-SciOPP species that form prior to reductive elimination are identified, where both species are found to be reactive toward electrophile at catalytically relevant rates. The higher selectivity toward the formation of cross-coupled product observed for the monophenylated species combined with the undertransmetalated nature of the in situ iron species in both Kumada and Suzuki-Miyaura reactions indicates that Fe(Ph)X(SciOPP) (X = Br, Cl) is the predominant reactive species in cross-coupling. Overall, these studies demonstrate that low-valent iron is not required for the generation of highly reactive species for effective aryl-alkyl cross-couplings.

  2. Enhancement of the activity of enzyme immobilized on polydopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles by rational orientation of formate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Ni, Kefeng; Zhao, Chengcheng; Ren, Yuhong; Wei, Dongzhi

    2014-10-20

    Immobilization of enzymes onto nanoparticles and retention of their structure and activity, which may be related to the orientation of enzymes on nanoparticles, remain a challenge. Here, we developed a novel enzyme-orientation strategy to enhance the activity of formate dehydrogenase immobilized on polydopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles via site-directed mutation. Seven mutants were constructed based on homology modeling of formate dehydrogenase and immobilized on polydopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles to investigate the influence of these mutations on immobilization. The immobilized mutant C242A/C275V/C363V/K389C demonstrated the highest immobilization yield and retained 90% of its initial activity, which was about 3-fold higher than that of wild-type formate dehydrogenase. Moreover, co-immobilization of formate dehydrogenase and leucine dehydrogenase was performed for the synthesis of l-tert-leucine. The catalytic efficiency of the co-immobilized mutant C242A/C275V/C363V/K389C and leucine dehydrogenase increased by more than 4-fold compared to that of co-immobilized wild-type formate dehydrogenase and leucine dehydrogenase.

  3. ARE MACROPHAGES ACTIVATED AND INDUCE PULMONARY INJURY BY INTRACELLULARLY BIOAVAILABLE IRON?

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARE MACROPHAGES ACTIVATED AND INDUCE PULMONARY INJURY BY INTRACELLULARLY BIOAVAILABLE IRON? UP Kodavanti1, MCJ Schladweiler1, S Becker2, DL Costa1, P Mayer3, A Ziesenis3, WG Kreyling3, 1ETD, 2HSDivision, NHEERL, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, and 3GSF, Inhalation Biology...

  4. Iron Amendment and Fenton Oxidation of MTBE-Spent Granular Activated Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton-driven regeneration of Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent granular activated carbon (GAC) involves Fe amendment to the GAC to catalyze H2O2 reactions and to enhance the rate of MTBE oxidation and GAC regeneration. Four forms of iron (ferric sulfate, ferric chloride, fer...

  5. Bioavailability of Iron, Zinc, Phytate and Phytase Activity during Soaking and Germination of White Sorghum Varieties

    PubMed Central

    Afify, Abd El-Moneim M. R.; El-Beltagi, Hossam S.; Abd El-Salam, Samiha M.; Omran, Azza A.

    2011-01-01

    The changes in phytate, phytase activity and in vitro bioavailability of iron and zinc during soaking and germination of three white sorghum varieties (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench), named Dorado, Shandweel-6, and Giza-15 were investigated. Sorghum varieties were soaked for 20 h and germinated for 72 h after soaking for 20 h to reduce phytate content and increase iron and zinc in vitro bioavailability. The results revealed that iron and zinc content was significantly reduced from 28.16 to 32.16% and 13.78 to 26.69% for soaking treatment and 38.43 to 39.18% and 21.80 to 31.27% for germination treatments, respectively. Phytate content was significantly reduced from 23.59 to 32.40% for soaking treatment and 24.92 to 35.27% for germination treatments, respectively. Phytase enzymes will be activated during drying in equal form in all varieties. The results proved that the main distinct point is the change of phytase activity as well as specific activity during different treatment which showed no significant differences between the varieties used. The in vitro bioavailability of iron and zinc were significantly improved as a result of soaking and germination treatments. PMID:22003395

  6. IRON OPTIMIZATION FOR FENTON-DRIVEN OXIDATION OF MTBE-SPENT GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton-driven chemical regeneration of granular activated carbon (GAC) is accomplished through the addition of H2O2 and iron (Fe) to spent GAC. The overall objective of this treatment process is to transform target contaminants into less toxic byproducts, re-establish the sorpti...

  7. In-Situ Regeneration of Saturated Granular Activated Carbon by an Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) can remove trace organic pollutants and natural organic matter (NOM) from industrial and municipal waters. This paper evaluates an iron nanocatalyst approach, based on Fenton-like oxidation reactions, to regenerate spent GAC within a packed bed con...

  8. Ferricrete, manganocrete, and bog iron occurrences with selected sedge bogs and active iron bogs and springs in the upper Animas River watershed, San Juan County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Douglas B.; Church, Stanley E.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Wirt, Laurie

    2003-01-01

    During 1996 to 2000, the Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a coordinated strategy to (1) study the environmental effects of historical mining on Federal lands, and (2) remediate contaminated sites that have the greatest impact on water quality and ecosystem health. This dataset provides information that contributes to these overall objectives and is part of the USGS Abandoned Mine Lands Initiative. Data presented here represent ferricrete occurrences and selected iron bogs and springs in the upper Animas River watershed in San Juan County near Silverton, Colorado. Ferricretes (stratified iron and manganese oxyhydroxide-cemented sedimentary deposits) are one indicator of the geochemical baseline conditions as well as the effect that weathering of mineralized rocks had on water quality in the Animas River watershed prior to mining. Logs and wood fragments preserved in several ferricretes in the upper Animas River watershed, collected primarily along streams, yield radiocarbon ages of modern to 9,580 years B.P. (P.L. Verplanck, D.B. Yager, and S.E. Church, work in progress). The presence of ferricrete deposits along the current stream courses indicates that climate and physiography of the Animas River watershed have been relatively constant throughout the Holocene and that weathering processes have been ongoing for thousands of years prior to historical mining activities. Thus, by knowing where ferricrete is preserved in the watershed today, land-management agencies have an indication of (1) where metal precipitation from weathering of altered rocks has occurred in the past, and (2) where this process is ongoing and may confound remediation efforts. These data are included as two coverages-a ferricrete coverage and a bogs and springs coverage. The coverages are included in ArcInfo shapefile and Arc

  9. New direct method for evaluating recoilless f-factors of two iron-sites in Fe-bearing compounds using Mössbauer spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barrero, C A; García, K E

    2013-07-21

    We propose a new direct method for calculating simultaneously two recoilless f-factors of any iron-bearing compound relative to that of a reference material by collecting only a single-temperature Mössbauer spectrum. This methodology is comparatively much simpler than the usual one which requires taking Mössbauer spectra of the compound at several temperatures and subsequently fitting the temperature dependence of the subspectral area or the isomer shift data with a lattice vibrational model. We demonstrate the applicability of this new methodology in the case of three common iron-bearing compounds: magnetite, akaganeite and goethite, but of course this type of study can be extended to other materials. The two f-factors for each compound were related to iron ions located in sites of different origin: for magnetite, these were related to irons with two different oxidation states; for akaganeite to irons in two different crystallographic sites; and for goethite to irons in similar crystal sites but located in grains of different sizes. In the case of magnetite, we found that the f-factors for the Fe(3+) and Fe(2.5+) sites relative to that of metallic iron powder were of fFe (3+)∕fFe = 0.97 ± 0.05 and fFe (2.5+)∕fFe = 0.92 ± 0.05, respectively. Interestingly, the quotient of these two f-factors, i.e., fFe (2.5+)∕fFe (3+), is equal to 0.95 ± 0.05, which compares fairly well with a value reported in literature obtained using the complex methodology based on the temperature dependence of the absolute subspectral area and the Debye approximation. For akaganeite, the f-factors of the doublet 1, D1, and doublet 2, D2, sites relative to that of metallic iron powder were of fD 1∕fFe = 0.95 ± 0.08 and fD 2∕fFe = 0.98 ± 0.15, respectively. And for goethite we found that the f-factors of the sextet 1, G1, and sextet 2, G2, sites relative to that of metallic iron powder were of fG 1∕fFe = 0.80 ± 0.02 and fG 2∕fFe = 0.80 ± 0.02, respectively. The

  10. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2015-03-01

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5‧-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  11. Promoter-proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Pia K.; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites on transcription requires promoter proximity, as demonstrated using artificial constructs and supported by a genome-wide data set. Importantly, transcription down-regulation can be recapitulated in a gene context devoid of splice sites by placing a functional bona fide pA site/transcription terminator within ∼500 base pairs of the promoter. In contrast, promoter-proximal positioning of a pA site-independent histone gene terminator supports high transcription levels. We propose that optimal communication between a pA site-dependent gene terminator and its promoter critically depends on gene length and that short RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels. PMID:23028143

  12. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  13. Identification of an Iron-Sulfur Cluster That Modulates the Enzymatic Activity in NarE, a Neisseria meningitidis ADP-ribosyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Del Vecchio, Mariangela; Pogni, Rebecca; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Nobbs, Angela; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Balducci, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    In prokaryotes, mono-ADP-ribose transfer enzymes represent a family of exotoxins that display activity in a variety of bacterial pathogens responsible for causing disease in plants and animals, including those affecting mankind, such as diphtheria, cholera, and whooping cough. We report here that NarE, a putative ADP-ribosylating toxin previously identified from Neisseria meningitidis, which shares structural homologies with Escherichia coli heat labile enterotoxin and toxin from Vibrio cholerae, possesses an iron-sulfur center. The recombinant protein was expressed in E. coli, and when purified at high concentration, NarE is a distinctive golden brown in color. Evidence from UV-visible spectrophotometry and EPR spectroscopy revealed characteristics consistent of an iron-binding protein. The presence of iron was determined by colorimetric method and by an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. To identify the amino acids involved in binding iron, a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and UV-visible and enzymatic assays were performed. All four cysteine residues were individually replaced by serine. Substitution of Cys67 and Cys128 into serine caused a drastic reduction in the E420/E280 ratio, suggesting that these two residues are essential for the formation of a stable coordination. This modification led to a consistent loss in ADP-ribosyltransferase activity, while decrease in NAD-glycohydrolase activity was less dramatic in these mutants, indicating that the correct assembly of the iron-binding site is essential for transferase but not hydrolase activity. This is the first observation suggesting that a member of the ADP-ribosyltransferase family contains an Fe-S cluster implicated in catalysis. This observation may unravel novel functions exerted by this class of enzymes. PMID:19744927

  14. Spectroscopic insights into the nature of active sites in iron–nitrogen–carbon electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction in acid

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Qingying; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Tylus, Urszula; Strickland, Kara; Li, Jingkun; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Anibal, Jacob; Gumeci, Cenk; Barton, Scott Calabrese; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frederic; Halevi, Barr; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2016-11-01

    Developing efficient and inexpensive catalysts for the sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) constitutes one of the grand challenges in the fabrication of commercially viable fuel cell devices and metal–air batteries for future energy applications. Despite recent achievements in designing advanced Pt-based and Pt-free catalysts, current progress primarily involves an empirical approach of trial-and-error combination of precursors and synthesis conditions, which limits further progress. Rational design of catalyst materials requires proper understanding of the mechanistic origin of the ORR and the underlying surface properties under operating conditions that govern catalytic activity. Herein, several different groups of iron-based catalysts synthesized via different methods and/or precursors were systematically studied by combining multiple spectroscopic techniques under ex situ and in situ conditions in an effort to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the synthesis-products correlations, nature of active sites, and the reaction mechanisms. These catalysts include original macrocycles, macrocycle-pyrolyzed catalysts, and Fe-N–C catalysts synthesized from individual Fe, N, and C precursors including polymer-based catalysts, metal organic framework (MOF)-based catalysts, and sacrificial support method (SSM)-based catalysts. The latter group of catalysts is most promising as not only they exhibit exceptional ORR activity and/or durability, but also the final products are controllable. We show that the high activity observed for most pyrolyzed Fe-based catalysts can mainly be attributed to a single active site: non-planar Fe–N4 moiety embedded in distorted carbon matrix characterized by a high potential for the Fe2+/3+ redox transition in acidic electrolyte/environment. The high intrinsic ORR activity, or turnover frequency (TOF), of this site is shown to be accounted for by redox catalysis mechanism that highlights the dominant role

  15. Iron profiles and speciation of the upper water column at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site: a model based sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, L.; Völker, C.; Oschlies, A.; Burchard, H.

    2007-08-01

    A one-dimensional model of the biogeochemistry and speciation of iron is coupled with the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM) and a NPZD-type ecosystem model. The model is able to simulate the temporal patterns and vertical profiles of dissolved iron (dFe) in the upper ocean at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site reasonably well. Subsurface model profiles strongly depend on the parameter values chosen for the loss processes for iron, colloidal aggregation and scavenging onto particles. Estimates for these parameters based on observations in particle-rich waters result in depletion of dFe. A high stability constant of iron-binding organic ligands is required to reproduce the observed degree of organic complexation below the mixed layer. The scavenging residence time for iron in the model is shortest in spring and summer, because of the larger abundance of particles, and increases with depth towards values on the order of a hundred years. A solubility of atmospherically deposited iron higher than 2% lead to dFe concentrations incompatible with observations. Despite neglecting ultraviolet radiation, the model produces diurnal variations and mean vertical profiles of H2O2 and iron species that are in good agreement with observations.

  16. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  17. Hydrous iron oxide modified diatomite as an active filtration medium for phosphate capture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Lin, Yan; Wu, Deyi; Kong, Hainan

    2016-02-01

    A simple method to functionalize diatomite with hydrous iron oxide was attempted and its performance as a new active filtration material to remove and recover phosphate from water was investigated under varying solution conditions. The Langmuir phosphate adsorption capacity increased from 0.6 mgP/g for raw diatomite to 4.89, 14.71, 25.02 mgP/g for hydrous iron oxide modified diatomite (HIOMD), depending on the amount of iron loaded. Loading of hydrous iron oxide caused the increase in true and bulk density and a decline in filtration rate, but to a lesser extent. It was shown that the HIOMD product with suitable iron content could retain a good filtration performance with a greatly increased adsorption capacity for phosphate. The phosphate adsorption increased by decreasing pH and by increasing ionic strength at high pH levels. The adsorption process was interpreted by ligand exchange. Coexisting oxyanions of sulfate, nitrate, citrate, carbonate, silicate and humic acid showed different effects on phosphate fixation but it was presumed that their influence at their concentrations and pH levels commonly encountered in effluent or natural waters was limited, i.e., HIOMD had a reasonably good selectivity. Results in repeated adsorption, desorption and regeneration experiment showed that the adsorbed phosphate could be recovered and the material could be reused after regeneration. The column test showed that HIOMD could be potentially utilized as an adsorption filtration medium for phosphate removal and recovery from water.

  18. Removal of arsenic from water by supported nano zero-valent iron on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huijie; Jia, Yongfeng; Wu, Xing; Wang, He

    2009-12-30

    Nano-sized zero-valent iron is an effective adsorbent for arsenic removal from drinking water. However, its application may be limited in public water system and small scale water treatment system due to its tiny particle size. In the present work, nanoscale zero-valent iron was supported onto activated carbon (NZVI/AC) by impregnating carbon with ferrous sulfate followed by chemical reduction with NaBH(4). Approximate 8.2 wt% of iron was loaded onto carbon and SEM analysis showed that the iron particles in the pores of carbon were needle-shaped with the size of 30-500 x 1000-2000 nm. Kinetics study revealed that adsorption of arsenite and arsenate by NZVI/AC was fast in the first 12h and the equilibrium was achieved in approximately 72 h. The adsorption capacity of the synthesized sorbent for arsenite and arsenate at pH 6.5 calculated from Langmuir adsorption isotherms in batch experiments was 18.2 and 12.0mg/g, respectively. Phosphate and silicate markedly decreased the removal of both arsenite and arsenate, while the effect of other anions and humic acid was insignificant. Common metal cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) enhanced arsenate adsorption but ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) was found to suppress arsenite adsorption. NZVI/AC can be effectively regenerated by elution with 0.1M NaOH.

  19. Trithiocyanurate complexes of iron, manganese and nickel and their anticholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Kopel, Pavel; Dolezal, Karel; Langer, Vratislav; Jun, Daniel; Adam, Vojtech; Kuca, Kamil; Kizek, Rene

    2014-04-08

    The complexes of Fe(II), Mn(II) and Ni(II) with a combination of a Schiff base, nitrogen-donor ligand or macrocyclic ligand and trithiocyanuric acid (ttcH3) were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopies. Crystal and molecular structures of the iron complex of composition [Fe(L1)](ttcH2)(ClO4)·EtOH·H2O (1), where L1 is Schiff base derived from tris(2-aminoethyl)amine and 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, were solved. It was found that the Schiff base is coordinated to the central iron atom by six nitrogens forming deformed octahedral arrangement, whereas trithiocyanurate(1-) anion, perchlorate and solvent molecules are not coordinated. The X-ray structure of the Schiff base sodium salt is also presented and compared with the iron complex. The anticholinesterase activity of the complexes was also studied.

  20. Oxalate Blockage of Calcium and Iron: A Student Learning Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Noojin

    1988-01-01

    Describes a student learning activity used to teach the meaning of percentage composition, mole concept, selective precipitation, and limiting factors. Presents two word problems and their solutions. (CW)

  1. Active and regulatory sites of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Pesi, Rossana; Allegrini, Simone; Careddu, Maria Giovanna; Filoni, Daniela Nicole; Camici, Marcella; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2010-12-01

    Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II), which acts preferentially on 6-hydroxypurine nucleotides, is essential for the survival of several cell types. cN-II catalyses both the hydrolysis of nucleotides and transfer of their phosphate moiety to a nucleoside acceptor through formation of a covalent phospho-intermediate. Both activities are regulated by a number of phosphorylated compounds, such as diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap₄A), ADP, ATP, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) and phosphate. On the basis of a partial crystal structure of cN-II, we mutated two residues located in the active site, Y55 and T56. We ascertained that the ability to catalyse the transfer of phosphate depends on the presence of a bulky residue in the active site very close to the aspartate residue that forms the covalent phospho-intermediate. The molecular model indicates two possible sites at which adenylic compounds may interact. We mutated three residues that mediate interaction in the first activation site (R144, N154, I152) and three in the second (F127, M436 and H428), and found that Ap₄A and ADP interact with the same site, but the sites for ATP and BPG remain uncertain. The structural model indicates that cN-II is a homotetrameric protein that results from interaction through a specific interface B of two identical dimers that have arisen from interaction of two identical subunits through interface A. Point mutations in the two interfaces and gel-filtration experiments indicated that the dimer is the smallest active oligomerization state. Finally, gel-filtration and light-scattering experiments demonstrated that the native enzyme exists as a tetramer, and no further oligomerization is required for enzyme activation.

  2. [The nucleolus of the cell is the site of iron accumulation in the substantia nigra neurons of the human brain].

    PubMed

    Sukhorukova, Ye G; Grigoriev, I P; Kolos, Ye A; Korzhenevskiy, D E

    2012-01-01

    Distribution of iron in the substantia nigra of the human brain (10 men and women aged 27-78 years) was studied using Perls' histochemical method. Iron ions were demonstrated in the nigral neuropil and melanin-containing neurons. For the first time the nuclei of some neurons were found to contain iron accumulations. The intranuclear iron inclusions correspond to the nucleolus according to their sharp outline and sizes. Detection of iron in the neuronal nucleolus may contribute to the understanding of mechanisms of iron neurotoxicity for nigral dopaminergic neurons.

  3. Enhancing methane production from waste activated sludge using a novel indigenous iron activated peroxidation pre-treatment process.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xu; Wang, Qilin; Jiang, Guangming

    2015-04-01

    Methane production from anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor methane potential of WAS. This study presents a novel pre-treatment strategy based on indigenous iron (in WAS) activated peroxidation to enhance methane production from WAS. Pre-treatment of WAS for 30 min at 50mg H2O2/g total solids (dry weight) and pH 2.0 (iron concentration in WAS was 7 mg/g TS) substantially enhanced WAS solubilization. Biochemical methane potential tests demonstrated that methane production was improved by 10% at a digestion time of 16d after incorporating the indigenous iron activated peroxidation pre-treatment. Model-based analysis indicated that indigenous iron activated peroxidation pre-treatment improved the methane potential by 13%, whereas the hydrolysis rate was not significantly affected. The economic analysis showed that the proposed pre-treatment method can save the cost by $112,000 per year in a treatment plant with a population equivalent of 300,000.

  4. Degradation of toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene using heat and chelated-ferrous iron activated persulfate oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, P.; Sleep, B.

    2014-12-01

    Toluene, ethylbenze, and xylene (TEX) are common contaminants in the subsurface. Activated persulfate has shown promise for degrading a wide variety of organic compounds. However, studies of persulfate application for in situ degradation of TEX and effects on the subsequent bioremediation are limited. In this work, degradation studies of TEX in aqueous media and soil are being conducted using heat activated and chelated-ferrous iron activated persulfate oxidation in batch and flow-through column experiments. In the batch experiments, sodium persulfate is being used at different concentrations to provide an initial persulfate to TEX molar ratios between 10:1 and 100:1. Sodium persulfate solutions are being activated at 20, 37, 60, and 80 oC temperatures for the heat activated oxidation. For the chelated-ferrous iron activated oxidation, ferrous iron and citric acid, both are being used at concentration of 5 mM. In the experiments with soil slurry, a soil to water ratio of 1 to 5 is being used. Flow through water saturated column experiments are being conducted with glass columns (45 cm in length and 4 cm in diameter) uniformly packed with soils, and equilibrated with water containing TEX at the target concentrations. Both the heat activation and chelated-ferrous iron activation of persulfate are being employed in the column experiments. Future experiments are planned to determine the suitability of persulfate oxidation of TEX on the subsequent biodegradation using batch microcosms containing TEX degrading microbial cultures. In these experiments, the microbial biomass will be monitored using total phospholipids, and the microbial community will be determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) on the extracted DNA. This study is expected to provide suitable operating conditions for in situ chemical oxidation of TEX with activated persulfate followed by bioremediation.

  5. Redox Control of the Human Iron-Sulfur Repair Protein MitoNEET Activity via Its Iron-Sulfur Cluster*

    PubMed Central

    Golinelli-Cohen, Marie-Pierre; Lescop, Ewen; Mons, Cécile; Gonçalves, Sergio; Clémancey, Martin; Santolini, Jérôme; Guittet, Eric; Blondin, Geneviève; Latour, Jean-Marc; Bouton, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Human mitoNEET (mNT) is the first identified Fe-S protein of the mammalian outer mitochondrial membrane. Recently, mNT has been implicated in cytosolic Fe-S repair of a key regulator of cellular iron homeostasis. Here, we aimed to decipher the mechanism by which mNT triggers its Fe-S repair capacity. By using tightly controlled reactions combined with complementary spectroscopic approaches, we have determined the differential roles played by both the redox state of the mNT cluster and dioxygen in cluster transfer and protein stability. We unambiguously demonstrated that only the oxidized state of the mNT cluster triggers cluster transfer to a generic acceptor protein and that dioxygen is neither required for the cluster transfer reaction nor does it affect the transfer rate. In the absence of apo-acceptors, a large fraction of the oxidized holo-mNT form is converted back to reduced holo-mNT under low oxygen tension. Reduced holo-mNT, which holds a [2Fe-2S]+ with a global protein fold similar to that of the oxidized form is, by contrast, resistant in losing its cluster or in transferring it. Our findings thus demonstrate that mNT uses an iron-based redox switch mechanism to regulate the transfer of its cluster. The oxidized state is the “active state,” which reacts promptly to initiate Fe-S transfer independently of dioxygen, whereas the reduced state is a “dormant form.” Finally, we propose that the redox-sensing function of mNT is a key component of the cellular adaptive response to help stress-sensitive Fe-S proteins recover from oxidative injury. PMID:26887944

  6. Oxidative Profile and δ-Aminolevulinate Dehydratase Activity in Healthy Pregnant Women with Iron Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    De Lucca, Leidiane; Rodrigues, Fabiane; Jantsch, Letícia B.; Neme, Walter S.; Gallarreta, Francisco M. P.; Gonçalves, Thissiane L.

    2016-01-01

    An oxidative burst occurs during pregnancy due to the large consumption of oxygen in the tissues and an increase in metabolic demands in response to maternal physiological changes and fetal growth. This study aimed to determine the oxidative profile and activity of δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (δ-ALA-D) in pregnant women who received iron supplementation. Oxidative stress parameters were evaluated in 25 pregnant women with iron supplementation, 25 pregnant women without supplementation and 25 non-pregnant women. The following oxidative stress parameters were evaluated: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein thiol groups (P-SH), non-protein thiol levels (NP-SH), vitamin C levels, catalase and δ-ALA-D activity. Markers of oxidative stress and cell damage, such as TBARS in plasma were significantly higher in pregnant women without supplementation. Levels of P-SH, NP-SH and δ-ALA-D activity were significantly lower in pregnant women without supplementation compared to non-pregnant and pregnant women with supplementation, while vitamin C levels were significantly lower in pregnant women without supplementation when compared to non-pregnant women. The increase in the generation of oxidative species and decrease of antioxidants suggest the loss of physiological oxidative balance during normal pregnancy, which was not observed in pregnant women with iron supplementation, suggesting a protective effect of iron against oxidative damage. PMID:27153075

  7. Dihydroartemisinin Exerts Its Anticancer Activity through Depleting Cellular Iron via Transferrin Receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Ba, Qian; Zhou, Naiyuan; Duan, Juan; Chen, Tao; Hao, Miao; Yang, Xinying; Li, Junyang; Yin, Jun; Chu, Ruiai; Wang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Artemisinin and its main active metabolite dihydroartemisinin, clinically used antimalarial agents with low host toxicity, have recently shown potent anticancer activities in a variety of human cancer models. Although iron mediated oxidative damage is involved, the mechanisms underlying these activities remain unclear. In the current study, we found that dihydroartemisinin caused cellular iron depletion in time- and concentration-dependent manners. It decreased iron uptake and disturbed iron homeostasis in cancer cells, which were independent of oxidative damage. Moreover, dihydroartemisinin reduced the level of transferrin receptor-1 associated with cell membrane. The regulation of dihydroartemisinin to transferrin receptor-1 could be reversed by nystatin, a cholesterol-sequestering agent but not the inhibitor of clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Dihydroartemisinin also induced transferrin receptor-1 palmitoylation and colocalization with caveolin-1, suggesting a lipid rafts mediated internalization pathway was involved in the process. Also, nystatin reversed the influences of dihydroartemisinin on cell cycle and apoptosis related genes and the siRNA induced downregulation of transferrin receptor-1 decreased the sensitivity to dihydroartemisinin efficiently in the cells. These results indicate that dihydroartemisinin can counteract cancer through regulating cell-surface transferrin receptor-1 in a non-classical endocytic pathway, which may be a new action mechanism of DHA independently of oxidative damage. PMID:22900042

  8. Cold catalytic recovery of loaded activated carbon using iron oxide-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bach, Altai; Zelmanov, Grigory; Semiat, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach for the recovery of spent activated carbon by an advanced oxidation process using iron oxide-based nanocatalysts was proposed and investigated. Model organic contaminants, such as ethylene glycol and phenol, were chosen for this study as water pollutants. It was shown that there are several advantages in using catalytic oxidation recovery of activated carbon with iron oxide-based nanocatalysts: low temperature reactivity of catalytic recovery without heating; and a relatively large number of adsorption-recovery cycles, without a reduction in the adsorptive properties of the virgin activated carbon or without a performance decrease from the first adsorption-recovery cycle of the new modified adsorptive properties of the activated carbon. The catalytic recovery takes place without ultraviolet light or any visible radiation sources. Results show a high efficiency of catalytic recovery of spent activated carbon using iron oxide-based nanocatalysts. A 97-99% efficiency of spent activated carbon catalytic regeneration was achieved under chosen conditions after 15-20 min of reaction. The process may be also considered as cold in situ recovery of active carbon.

  9. Involvement of the mitogen activated protein kinase Hog1p in the response of Candida albicans to iron availability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron is an essential nutrient for almost all organisms, and generating iron limiting conditions for pathogens is one of the host defense strategies against microbial infections. Excess of iron can be toxic; therefore, iron uptake is tightly controlled. The high affinity iron uptake system of the opportunistic pathogenic yeast Candida albicans has been shown to be essential for virulence. Several transcription factors and regulators of iron uptake genes were identified, but the knowledge of signaling pathways is still limited. Gene expression profiling of the Δhog1 deletion mutant indicated an involvement of the mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase Hog1p. However, the function of Hog1p in the response of C. albicans to iron availability was not studied in detail. Thus, we analyzed phenotypic and molecular responses of C. albicans to different iron concentrations particularly with respect to the activity of the Hog1p MAP kinase module. Results We observed flocculation of yeast cells, when the iron ion concentration was equal to or higher than 5 μM. This phenotype was dependent on the MAP kinase Hog1p and the corresponding MAP kinase kinase Pbs2p. Moreover, high extracellular iron ion concentrations led to hyper-phosphorylation of Hog1p. We determined lower amounts of multicopper ferroxidase (MCFO) proteins and lower ferric reductase activity, when the iron ion concentration in the medium was increased. This effect was also observed for the Δhog1 mutant. However, the amounts of MCFO proteins and the cell surface ferric reductase activity were increased in the Δhog1 in comparison to wild type cells. This effect was independent of iron availability in growth media. Conclusions In C. albicans, the MAP kinase Hog1p is part of the network regulating the response of the organism to iron availability. Hog1p was transiently phosphorylated under high iron concentrations and was essential for a flocculent phenotype. Furthermore, deletion of HOG1 led to

  10. Young Zanzibari Children with Iron Deficiency, Iron Deficiency Anemia, Stunting, or Malaria Have Lower Motor Activity Scores and Spend Less Time in Locomotion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Motor activity improves cognitive and social-emotional development through a child’s exploration of his or her physical and social environment. This study assessed anemia, iron deficiency, hemoglobin (Hb), length-for-age Z-score (LAZ), and malaria infection as predictors of motor activity in 771 chi...

  11. In situ electrochemical quantification of active sites in Fe–N/C non-precious metal catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Malko, Daniel; Kucernak, Anthony; Lopes, Thiago

    2016-01-01

    The economic viability of low temperature fuel cells as clean energy devices is enhanced by the development of inexpensive oxygen reduction reaction catalysts. Heat treated iron and nitrogen containing carbon based materials (Fe–N/C) have shown potential to replace expensive precious metals. Although significant improvements have recently been made, their activity and durability is still unsatisfactory. The further development and a rational design of these materials has stalled due to the lack of an in situ methodology to easily probe and quantify the active site. Here we demonstrate a protocol that allows the quantification of active centres, which operate under acidic conditions, by means of nitrite adsorption followed by reductive stripping, and show direct correlation to the catalytic activity. The method is demonstrated for two differently prepared materials. This approach may allow researchers to easily assess the active site density and turnover frequency of Fe–N/C catalysts. PMID:27796287

  12. In situ electrochemical quantification of active sites in Fe-N/C non-precious metal catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malko, Daniel; Kucernak, Anthony; Lopes, Thiago

    2016-10-01

    The economic viability of low temperature fuel cells as clean energy devices is enhanced by the development of inexpensive oxygen reduction reaction catalysts. Heat treated iron and nitrogen containing carbon based materials (Fe-N/C) have shown potential to replace expensive precious metals. Although significant improvements have recently been made, their activity and durability is still unsatisfactory. The further development and a rational design of these materials has stalled due to the lack of an in situ methodology to easily probe and quantify the active site. Here we demonstrate a protocol that allows the quantification of active centres, which operate under acidic conditions, by means of nitrite adsorption followed by reductive stripping, and show direct correlation to the catalytic activity. The method is demonstrated for two differently prepared materials. This approach may allow researchers to easily assess the active site density and turnover frequency of Fe-N/C catalysts.

  13. The role of catalyst activation on the activity and attrition of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Datye, A.K.; Shroff, M.D.; Harrington, M.S.; Coulter, K.E.; Sault, A.G.; Jackson, N.B.

    1995-12-31

    The results of this work indicate that magnetite is not catalytically active for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) in precipitated, unsupported iron catalysts, but the formation of the carbide phase is necessary to obtain FTS activity. The transformation of magnetite to carbide, though essential to obtain FTS activity, also causes the catalyst to break down. This can lead to severe problems during operation in a commercial slurry phase reactor. The results presented here imply that activation and attrition are simultaneous and complementary processes. In another study, we show that the catalyst can also under go attrition on a micron scale which is caused by lack of strength of the forces binding the catalyst primary particles in the agglomerates. Both these processes can make wax separation and product recovery extremely difficult. In this study, we have also shown that H{sub 2} reduction of this catalyst to metallic iron is detrimental to subsequent catalyst activity and causes a loss of surface area due to sintering of the iron crystallites. Reduction to metallic Fe also causes impurities such as S to segregate to the surface causing a complete loss of FTS activity. It has been shown that even submonolayer amounts of S can cause a dramatic decrease in FTS activity, hence reduction to metallic Fe should be avoided during activation of these catalysts. We have shown, however, that a mild H{sub 2} reduction to magnetite does not lead to S segregation to the surface, and is therefore acceptable.

  14. BAX Activation is Initiated at a Novel Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Suzuki, Motoshi; Davis, Marguerite L.; Pitter, Kenneth; Bird, Gregory H.; Katz, Samuel G.; Tu, Ho-Chou; Kim, Hyungjin; Cheng, Emily H.-Y.; Tjandra, Nico; Walensky, Loren D.

    2008-01-01

    BAX is a pro-apoptotic protein of the BCL-2 family stationed in the cytosol until activated by a diversity of stress stimuli to induce cell death. Anti-apoptotic proteins such as BCL-2 counteract BAX-mediated cell death. Although an interaction site that confers survival functionality has been defined for anti-apoptotic proteins, an activation site has not been identified for BAX, rendering its explicit trigger mechanism unknown. We previously developed Stabilized Alpha-Helix of BCL-2 domains (SAHBs) that directly initiate BAX-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis. Here we demonstrate by NMR analysis that BIM SAHB binds BAX at an interaction site that is distinct from the canonical binding groove characterized for anti-apoptotic proteins. The specificity of the BIM SAHB-BAX interaction is highlighted by point mutagenesis that abrogates functional activity, confirming that BAX activation is initiated at this novel structural location. Thus, we have now defined a BAX interaction site for direct activation, establishing a new target for therapeutic modulation of apoptosis. PMID:18948948

  15. Iron site occupancies in magnetite-ulvospinel solid solution: A new approach using XMCD

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, C. I.; Henderson, C. M. B.; Telling, N. D.; Pattrick, R. A.D.; Vaughan, D. J.; Charnock, J. M.; Arenholz, E.; Tuna, F.; Coker, V.S.; Laan, G. van der

    2009-06-22

    Ordering of Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} between octahedral (Oh) and tetrahedral (Td) sites in synthetic members of the magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) - ulvoespinel (Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 4}) solid-solution series was determined using Fe L{sub 2,3}-edge X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) coupled with electron microprobe and chemical analysis, Ti L-edge spectroscopy, Fe K-edge EXAFS and XANES, Fe{sub 57} Moessbauer spectroscopy, and unit cell parameters. Microprobe analysis, cell edges and chemical FeO determinations showed that the bulk compositions of the samples were stoichiometric magnetite-ulvoespinel solid-solutions. Surface sensitive XMCD showed that the surfaces of these oxide minerals were more sensitive to redox conditions and some samples required re-equilibration with suitable solid-solid buffers. Detailed site-occupancy analysis of these samples gave XMCD-Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} ratios very close to stoichiometric values. L{sub 2,3}-edge spectroscopy showed that Ti{sup 4+} was restricted to Oh sites. XMCD results showed that significant Fe{sup 2+} only entered Td when the Ti content was > 0.40 apfu while Fe{sup 2+} in Oh increased from 1 a.p.f.u in magnetite to a maximum of {approx}1.4 apfu in USP45. As the Ti content increased from this point, the steady increase in Fe{sup 2+} in Td sites was clearly observable in the XMCD spectra, concurrent with a slow decrease in Fe{sup 2+} in Oh sites. Calculated magnetic moments showed a steady decrease from magnetite (4.06 {mu}{sub B}) to USP45 (1.5 {mu}{sub B}) and then a slower decrease towards the value for ulvoespinel (0 {mu}{sub B}). Two of the synthesized samples were also partially maghemitized by re-equilibrating with an oxidizing Ni-NiO buffer and XMCD showed that Fe{sup 2+} oxidation only occurred at Oh sites, with concomitant vacancy formation restricted to this site. This study shows the advantage of using XMCD as a direct measurement of Fe oxidation state in these complex magnetic spinels. These results

  16. Astragalus polysaccharide upregulates hepcidin and reduces iron overload in mice via activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Ren, Feng; Qian, Xin-Hua; Qian, Xin-Lai

    2016-03-25

    Thalassemia is a genetic disease characterized by iron overload which is a major detrimental factor contributing to mortality and organ damage. The hepcidin secreted by liver plays an essential role in orchestrating iron metabolism. Lowering iron load in thalassemia patients by means of increasing hepcidin might be a therapeutic strategy. In this study, we first found that astragalus polysaccharide (APS) significantly increased hepcidin expression in HepG2 and L-02 cell lines originating from hepatocytes and mice liver, respectively. Following treatment with APS, the iron concentrations in serum, liver, spleen, and heart were significantly reduced in comparison to saline treated control mice. In further experiments, upregulation of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and enhanced p38 MAPK phosphorylation were detected in APS treated cells and mice, and as documented in previous studies, IL-6 and P38 MAPK phosphorylation are involved in the regulation of hepcidin expression. We also found that the effects of APS on upregulating hepcidin and IL-6 expressions could be antagonized by pretreatment with SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK signaling. These findings suggest that activation of p38 MAPK and release of IL-6 might mediate induction of hepcidin by APS. It is concluded that APS might have therapeutic implications in patients with iron overload, especially for thalassemia patients.

  17. Involvement of novel autophosphorylation sites in ATM activation.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Graham, Mark E; Peng, Cheng; Chen, Philip; Robinson, Phillip J; Lavin, Martin F

    2006-08-09

    ATM kinase plays a central role in signaling DNA double-strand breaks to cell cycle checkpoints and to the DNA repair machinery. Although the exact mechanism of ATM activation remains unknown, efficient activation requires the Mre11 complex, autophosphorylation on S1981 and the involvement of protein phosphatases and acetylases. We report here the identification of several additional phosphorylation sites on ATM in response to DNA damage, including autophosphorylation on pS367 and pS1893. ATM autophosphorylates all these sites in vitro in response to DNA damage. Antibodies against phosphoserine 1893 revealed rapid and persistent phosphorylation at this site after in vivo activation of ATM kinase by ionizing radiation, paralleling that observed for S1981 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation was dependent on functional ATM and on the Mre11 complex. All three autophosphorylation sites are physiologically important parts of the DNA damage response, as phosphorylation site mutants (S367A, S1893A and S1981A) were each defective in ATM signaling in vivo and each failed to correct radiosensitivity, genome instability and cell cycle checkpoint defects in ataxia-telangiectasia cells. We conclude that there are at least three functionally important radiation-induced autophosphorylation events in ATM.

  18. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  19. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 nitrogenase active site to increase photobiological hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Masukawa, Hajime; Inoue, Kazuhito; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Wolk, C Peter; Hausinger, Robert P

    2010-10-01

    Cyanobacteria use sunlight and water to produce hydrogen gas (H₂), which is potentially useful as a clean and renewable biofuel. Photobiological H₂ arises primarily as an inevitable by-product of N₂ fixation by nitrogenase, an oxygen-labile enzyme typically containing an iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) active site. In Anabaena sp. strain 7120, the enzyme is localized to the microaerobic environment of heterocysts, a highly differentiated subset of the filamentous cells. In an effort to increase H₂ production by this strain, six nitrogenase amino acid residues predicted to reside within 5 Å of the FeMo-co were mutated in an attempt to direct electron flow selectively toward proton reduction in the presence of N₂. Most of the 49 variants examined were deficient in N₂-fixing growth and exhibited decreases in their in vivo rates of acetylene reduction. Of greater interest, several variants examined under an N₂ atmosphere significantly increased their in vivo rates of H₂ production, approximating rates equivalent to those under an Ar atmosphere, and accumulated high levels of H₂ compared to the reference strains. These results demonstrate the feasibility of engineering cyanobacterial strains for enhanced photobiological production of H₂ in an aerobic, nitrogen-containing environment.

  20. Enhancement of bacterial iron and sulfate respiration for in situ bioremediation of acid mine drainage sites: a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Bilgin, A.A.; Harrington, J.M.; Silverstein, J.

    2007-08-15

    The prevention of acid mine drainage (AMD) in situ is more attractive than down-gradient treatment alternatives that do not involve source control. AMD source control can be achieved by shifting the microbial activity in the sulfidic rock from pyrite oxidation to anaerobic heterotrophic activity. This is achieved by adding biodegradable organic carbon amendments to the sulfidic rock. This technique was applied to an abandoned coal mine pool in Pennsylvania. The pool had a pH of 3.0 to 3.5. Following treatment, near-neutral pH and decreased effluent heavy metal concentrations were achieved. In situ bioremediation by the enhancement of bacterial iron and sulfate reduction is a promising technology for AMD prevention.

  1. Paenibacillus polymyxa BFKC01 enhances plant iron absorption via improved root systems and activated iron acquisition mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cheng; Guo, Jiansheng; Zhu, Lin; Xiao, Xin; Xie, Yue; Zhu, Jian; Ma, Zhongyou; Wang, Jianfei

    2016-08-01

    Despite the high abundance of iron (Fe) in most earth's soils, Fe is the major limiting factor for plant growth and development due to its low bioavailability. With an increasing recognition that soil microbes play important roles in plant growth, several strains of beneficial rhizobactria have been applied to improve plant nutrient absorption, biomass, and abiotic or biotic stress tolerance. In this study, we report the mechanisms of microbe-induced plant Fe assimilation, in which the plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) Paenibacillus polymyxa BFKC01 stimulates plant's Fe acquisition machinery to enhance Fe uptake in Arabidopsis plants. Mechanistic studies show that BFKC01 transcriptionally activates the Fe-deficiency-induced transcription factor 1 (FIT1), thereby up-regulating the expression of IRT1 and FRO2. Furthermore, BFKC01 has been found to induce plant systemic responses with the increased transcription of MYB72, and the biosynthetic pathways of phenolic compounds are also activated. Our data reveal that abundant phenolic compounds are detected in root exudation of the BFKC01-inoculated plants, which efficiently facilitate Fe mobility under alkaline conditions. In addition, BFKC01 can secret auxin and further improved root systems, which enhances the ability of plants to acquire Fe from soils. As a result, BFKC01-inoculated plants have more endogenous Fe and increased photosynthetic capacity under alkaline conditions as compared to control plants. Our results demonstrate the potential roles of BFKC01 in promoting Fe acquisition in plants and underline the intricate integration of microbial signaling in controlling plant Fe acquisition.

  2. [Removal of arsenite from drinking water by activated carbon supported nano zero-valent iron].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui-Jie; Jia, Yong-Feng; Wu, Xing; Wang, He

    2009-06-15

    Nano zero-valent iron was loaded onto activated carbon by deoxidizing Fe2+ in aqueous solution and approximately 8.2% (wt) of iron was loaded it. The size of the needle-shaped iron particles in the pores of carbon was (30-500) x (1 000-3 000) nm. The adsorption capacity for arsenic was approximately 1.997 mg/g activated carbon supported nano zero-valent iron (NZVI/AC) in the 2 mg/L As(III) solution at pH 6.5 and (25 +/- 2) degrees C. The uptake of arsenic by NZVI/AC was rapid in the first 12 h (94.3%) and equilibrium was achieved at 72 h (99.86%). As(III) was partly oxidized by the absorbent in the process of absorption. The presence of phosphate and silicate ions significantly decreased arsenic removal rate while the effect of other common ions such as sulfate, carbonate and oxalate was insignificant. NZVI/AC was effectively regenerated after adsorption of arsenic when elution was applied with 0.1 mol/L NaOH solution. The results suggest that NZVI/AC is an ideal candidate for the treatment of arsenic contaminated drinking water.

  3. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  4. Spectroscopic studies of the active site of galactose oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, P.F.; Brown, R.D. III; Koenig, S.H.

    1995-07-19

    X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopy have been used to probe the copper site structure in galactose oxidase at pH 4.5 and 7.0. the results suggest that there are no major differences in the structure of the tetragonal Cu(II) site at these pH values. Analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicates that four N,O scatterers are present at approximately 2 {Angstrom}; these are presumably the equatorial ligands. In addition, the EXAFS data establish that oxidative activation to produce the active-site tyrosine radical does not cause major changes in the copper coordination environment. Therefore results obtained on the one-electron reduced enzyme, containing Cu(II) but not the tyrosine radical, probably also apply to the catalytically active Cu(II)/tyrosine radical state. Solvent water exchange, inhibitor binding, and substrate binding have been probed via nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) measurements. The NMRD profile of galactose oxidase is quantitatively consistent with the rapid exchange of a single, equatorial water ligand with a Cu(II)-O separation of about 2.4 {Angstrom}. Azide and cyanide displace this coordinated water. The binding of azide and the substrate dihydroxyacetone produce very similar effects on the NMRD profile of galactose oxidase, indicating that substrates also bind to the active site Cu(II) in an equatorial position.

  5. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  6. Iron Mineral Catalyzed C-H Activation As a Potential Pathway for Halogenation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubbesing, C.; Schoeler, H. F.; Benzing, K.; Krause, T.; Lippe, S.; Rudloff, M.

    2014-12-01

    Due to increasing drinking water demand of mankind and an expected climate change the impact of salt lakes and salt deserts will increase within the next decades. Furthermore, a rising sea level influences coastal areas like salt marshes and abets processes which will lead to elevated organohalogen formation. An additional increase of the global warming potential, of particle formation and stratospheric ozone depletion is expected. Understanding these multifaceted processes is essential for mankind to be prepared for these alterations of the atmosphere. For example, Keppler et al. (2000) described the production of volatile halogenated organic compounds via oxidation of organic matter driven by ferric iron. However, the formation of long-chained alkyl halides in salt lakes is yet undisclosed. Despite the relative "inertness" of alkanes a direct halogenation of these compounds might be envisaged. In 2005 Vaillancourt et al. discovered a nonheme iron enzyme which is able to halogenate organic compounds via generating the high valent ferryl cation as reaction center. Based on various publications about C-H activation (Bergman, 2007) we postulate a halogenation process in which an iron containing minerals catalyse the C-H bond cleavage of organic compounds in soils. The generated organic radicals are highly reactive towards halides connected to the iron complex. We suggest that next to diagenetically altered iron containing enzymes, minerals such as oxides, hydroxides and sulfides are involved in abiotic halogenation processes. We applied the amino acid methionine as organic model compound and soluble iron species as reactants. All samples were incubated in aqueous phases containing various NaCl concentrations. As a result various halogenated ethanes and ethenes were identified as reaction products. References Bergman, R. G. (2007) Nature, 446(7134) 391-393 Keppler, F., et al. (2000) Nature, 403(6767) 298-301 Vaillancourt, F. H., et al. (2005) Nature, 436(7054) 1191-1194

  7. Characterization and identification of the sources of chromium, zinc, lead, cadmium, nickel, manganese and iron in PM10 particulates at the two sites of Kolkata, India.

    PubMed

    Karar, Kakoli; Gupta, A K; Kumar, Animesh; Biswas, Arun Kanti

    2006-09-01

    Monitoring of ambient PM10 (particulate matter which passes through a size selective impactor inlet with a 50% efficiency cut-off at 10 microm aerodynamic diameter) has been done at residential (Kasba) and industrial (Cossipore) sites of an urban region of Kolkata during November 2003 to November 2004. These sites were selected depending on the dominant anthropogenic activities. Metal constituents of atmospheric PM10 deposited on glass fibre filter paper were estimated using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES). Chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) are the seven toxic trace metals quantified from the measured PM10 concentrations. The 24 h average concentrations of Cr, Zn, Pb, Cd, Ni, Mn and Fe from ninety PM10 particulate samples of Kolkata were found to be 6.9, 506.1, 79.1, 3.3, 7.4, 2.4 and 103.6 ng/m3, respectively. The 24 h average PM10 concentration exceeded national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) as specified by central pollution control board, India at both residential (Kasba) and industrial (Cossipore) areas with mean concentration of 140.1 and 196.6 microg/m3, respectively. A simultaneous meteorology study was performed to assess the influence of air masses by wind speed, wind direction, rainfall, relative humidity and temperature. The measured toxic trace metals generally showed inverse relationship with wind speed, relative humidity and temperature. Factor analysis, a receptor modeling technique has been used for identification of the possible sources contributing to the PM10. Varimax rotated factor analysis identified four possible sources of measured trace metals comprising solid waste dumping, vehicular traffic with the influence of road dust, road dust and soil dust at residential site (Kasba), while vehicular traffic with the influence of soil dust, road dust, galvanizing and electroplating industry, and tanning industry at industrial site (Cossipore).

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS USING ZERO-VALENT IRON: AN EVALUATION AT TWO SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geochemical and microbiological factors that control long-term performance of subsurface permeable reactive barriers were evaluated at the Elizabeth City, NC and the Denver Federal Center, CO sites. These groundwater treatment systems use zero-valent iron filings to intercept an...

  9. Electromagnetic Borehole Flowmeter Surveys at Selected In Situ Redox Manipulation Barrier Wells, Zero-Valent Iron Site, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2009-02-09

    Ambient (i.e., static) and dynamic (i.e., pumping-induced) electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF) surveys were performed in 10 selected In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier wells to characterize the distribution of in-well vertical flow conditions and to infer the relative hydraulic conductivity distribution in the upper-part of the unconfined aquifer. These wells are located in two areas where the aquifer is targeted for testing of zero-valent iron injection to mend a failed portion of the ISRM barrier at the 100 D Area, Hanford Site. Each of these two areas consists of a group of five wells, one group to the southwest and one group to the northeast. The upper ~15 to 20 ft (~4.6 to 6.1 m) of the unconfined aquifer was characterized for in-well vertical flow conditions and vertical profile information regarding relative hydraulic conductivity. At some well site locations, the upper ~2 to 3 ft (~0.6 to 1 m) of the well-screen interval could not be characterized under pumping (dynamic) conditions because of the presence of the pump.

  10. Heterogeneous Activation Of Peroxymonosulfate With Iron-Cobalt Bimetallic Nanocatalysts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation technologies (SR-AOTs) are attracting considerable attention due to the high oxidizing ability of sulfate radicals (SRs) to degrade various organic pollutants. It was found that SRs could be generated via homogeneous activation of peroxym...

  11. In vivo anti-radiation activities of the Ulva pertusa polysaccharides and polysaccharide-iron(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jinming; Cheng, Cuilin; Zhao, Haitian; Jing, Jing; Gong, Ning; Lu, Weihong

    2013-09-01

    Polysaccharides with different molecular weights were extracted from Ulva pertusa and fractionated by ultrafiltration. Iron(III) complex of the low molecular-weight U. pertusa polysaccharides were synthesized. Atomic absorption spectrum showed that the iron content of iron(III)-polysaccharide complex was 27.4%. The comparison between U. pertusa polysaccharides and their iron(III) complex showed that iron chelating altered the structural characteristics of the polysaccharides. The bioactivity analysis showed that polysaccharide with low molecular weight was more effective than polysaccharide with high molecular weight in protecting mice from radiation induced damages on bone marrow cells and immune system. Results also proved that the anti-radiation and anti-oxidative activity of iron(III) complex of low molecular-weight polysaccharides were not less than that of low molecular-weight polysaccharides.

  12. There's Iron in Them Thar Hills: A Geologic Look at the Aristarchus Plateau as a Potential Landing Site for Human Lunar Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, Cassandra R.; McKay, David S.

    1997-01-01

    Lunar pyroclastic deposits are unique among lunar soils. Composed of very fine grained glass beads rich in Fe, Ti and Mg they yield unique spectral signatures. From the spectra two major classes and five subclasses of lunar dark mantling deposits have been identified. Recent work by me and others has shown that the larger regional deposits are more numerous, extensive, thicker, and widely distributed than previously thought, leading us to suggest that they would make ideal resource feedstock for future lunar surface activities. Returned sample studies and the recently collected Galileo and Clementine data also corroborate these findings. Recent planning for return to the Moon indicates that large cost savings can result from using locally produced oxygen, and recent JSC laboratory results indicate that iron-rich pyroclastic dark mantling deposits may be the richest oxygen resource on the Moon. My earlier work demonstrated that instead of using regolith, bulk lunar pyroclastic deposits are better suited for beneficiation as they are thick (lO's m's), unconsolidated, fine-grained deposits. In addition, the lack of rocks and boulders and the typically flat to gently rolling terrain will facilitate their mining and processing. In preparation for the Human Lunar Return (HLR) I have characterized the Aristarchus Plateau (24 deg. N 52 deg. W) as a potential landing site for an in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) demonstration. The geologic diversity and large volume of Fe-rich pyroclastic material present at the Aristarchus site make it an ideal target for extracting O2, H2 and halogens. This paper (1) describes the current understanding of the geology of Aristarchus plateau; (2) describes the resource potential of the Aristarchus plateau; and (3) presents several candidate landing sites on the plateau for future lunar activities.

  13. Crystal Structure of Albaflavenone Monooxygenase Containing a Moonlighting Terpene Synthase Active Site*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bin; Lei, Li; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.; Lin, Xin; Cane, David E.; Kelly, Steven L.; Yuan, Hang; Lamb, David C.; Waterman, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Albaflavenone synthase (CYP170A1) is a monooxygenase catalyzing the final two steps in the biosynthesis of this antibiotic in the soil bacterium, Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). Interestingly, CYP170A1 shows no stereo selection forming equal amounts of two albaflavenol epimers, each of which is oxidized in turn to albaflavenone. To explore the structural basis of the reaction mechanism, we have studied the crystal structures of both ligand-free CYP170A1 (2.6 Å) and complex of endogenous substrate (epi-isozizaene) with CYP170A1 (3.3 Å). The structure of the complex suggests that the proximal epi-isozizaene molecules may bind to the heme iron in two orientations. In addition, much to our surprise, we have found that albaflavenone synthase also has a second, completely distinct catalytic activity corresponding to the synthesis of farnesene isomers from farnesyl diphosphate. Within the cytochrome P450 α-helical domain both the primary sequence and x-ray structure indicate the presence of a novel terpene synthase active site that is moonlighting on the P450 structure. This includes signature sequences for divalent cation binding and an α-helical barrel. This barrel is unusual because it consists of only four helices rather than six found in all other terpene synthases. Mutagenesis establishes that this barrel is essential for the terpene synthase activity of CYP170A1 but not for the monooxygenase activity. This is the first bifunctional P450 discovered to have another active site moonlighting on it and the first time a terpene synthase active site is found moonlighting on another protein. PMID:19858213

  14. Effects of iron on growth, antioxidant enzyme activity, bound extracellular polymeric substances and microcystin production of Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Xun; Wang, Peifang; Chen, Bin; Hou, Jun; Qian, Jin; Yang, Yangyang

    2016-10-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have occurred in various water bodies during recent decades and made serious health hazards to plants, animals and humans. Iron is an important micronutrient for algal growth and recently, the concentration of which has increased remarkably in freshwaters. In this paper, the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905 was cultivated under non-iron (0μM), iron-limited (10μM) and iron-replete (100μM) conditions to investigate the effects of iron on growth, antioxidant enzyme activity, EPS and microcystin production. The results showed that algal cell density and chlorophyll-a content were maximal at the highest iron concentration. Antioxidant enzymes activity increased notably under all three conditions in the early stage of experiment, of which the SOD activity recovered soon from oxidative stress in 10μM group. The productions of some protein-like substances and humic acid-like substances of bound EPS were inhibited in iron-containing groups in the early stage of experiment while promoted after the adaptation period of Microcystis aeruginosa. Iron addition is a factor affecting the formation of cyanobacterial blooms through its impact on the content of LB-EPS and the composition of TB-EPS. The intracellular MC-LR concentration and the productivity potential of MC-LR were the lowest in 0μM group and highest in 10μM group. No obvious extracellular release of MC-LR was observed during the cultivation time. Therefore, iron addition can promote the physiological activities of M. aeruginosa, but a greater harm could be brought into environment under iron-limited (10μM) condition than under iron-replete (100μM) condition.

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of M. tuberculosis salicylate synthase (MbtI) inhibitors designed to probe plasticity in the active site.

    PubMed

    Manos-Turvey, Alexandra; Cergol, Katie M; Salam, Noeris K; Bulloch, Esther M M; Chi, Gamma; Pang, Angel; Britton, Warwick J; West, Nicholas P; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun; Payne, Richard J

    2012-12-14

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis salicylate synthase (MbtI) catalyses the first committed step in the biosynthesis of mycobactin T, an iron-chelating siderophore essential for the virulence and survival of M. tuberculosis. Co-crystal structures of MbtI with members of a first generation inhibitor library revealed large inhibitor-induced rearrangements within the active site of the enzyme. This plasticity of the MbtI active site was probed via the preparation of a library of inhibitors based on a 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate scaffold with a range of substituted phenylacrylate side chains appended to the C3 position. Most compounds exhibited moderate inhibitory activity against the enzyme, with inhibition constants in the micromolar range, while several dimethyl ester variants possessed promising anti-tubercular activity in vitro.

  16. Biogeochemical Reactions and Mineralogical Characteristics in an Iron Reactive Barrier at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, B.; Watson, D.; Phillips, D.

    2001-12-01

    A permeable iron reactive barrier was installed in late November, 1997 at the U.S. Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The biogeochemical reactions and mineralogical and hydrological characteristics in the barrier were investigated over an extended field operation ( ~3 years). Results indicated that zero-valent iron (Fe0) reacts with a number of groundwater constituents such as bicarbonates, nitrate, and sulfate in addition to its effectiveness in removing contaminant metals or radionuclides such as uranium and technetium. Both nitrate and sulfate were reduced within or in the influence zone of the Fe0 with a low redox potential (i.e., low Eh). An increased anaerobic microbial population was also observed within and in the vicinity of the Fe0 barrier, and these microorganisms were at least partially responsible for the reduction of nitrate and sulfate in groundwater. Decreased concentrations of Ca2+ and bicarbonate in groundwater occurred as a result of the formation of minerals such as aragonite (CaCO3) and siderite (FeCO3), which coincided with the Fe0 corrosion and an increased groundwater pH. A suite of mineral precipitates was identified in the Fe0 barrier system, including amorphous iron oxyhydroxides, goethite, ferrous carbonates and sulfides, aragonite, and green rusts. These minerals were found to be responsible for the cementation and possibly clogging of Fe0 filings observed in a number of core samples from the barrier. Significant increases in cementation of the Fe0 occurred between two coring events conducted at ~1 year apart and appeared to correspond to the changes in an apparent decrease in hydraulic connectivity. The present study concludes that, while Fe0 may be used as an effective reactive medium for the retention or degradation of many redox-sensitive contaminants, its long-term reactivity and performance could be severely hindered by its reactions with other groundwater constituents; and groundwater

  17. Removal of arsenic from Janghang smelter site and energy crops-grown soil with soil washing using magnetic iron oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jaemaro; Zhao, Xin; Lee, Jong Keun; Kim, Jae Young

    2014-05-01

    Arsenic compounds are considered carcinogen and easily enter drinking water supplies with their natural abundance. US Environmental Protection Agency is finalizing a regulation to reduce the public health risks from arsenic in drinking water by revising the current drinking water standard for arsenic from 50 ppb to 10 ppb in 2001 (USEPA, 2001). Therefore, soil remediation is also growing field to prevent contamination of groundwater as well as crop cultivation. Soil washing is adjusted as ex-situ soil remediation technique which reduces volume of the contaminated soil. The technique is composed of physical separation and chemical extraction to extract target metal contamination in the soil. Chemical extraction methods have been developed solubilizing contaminants containing reagents such as acids or chelating agents. And acid extraction is proven as the most commonly used technology to treat heavy metals in soil, sediment, and sludge (FRTR, 2007). Due to the unique physical and chemical properties, magnetic iron oxide have been used in diverse areas including information technology and biomedicine. Magnetic iron oxides also can be used as adsorbent to heavy metal enhancing removal efficiency of arsenic concentration. In this study, magnetite is used as the washing agent with acid extraction condition so that the injected oxide can be separated by magnetic field. Soil samples were collected from three separate areas in the Janghang smelter site and energy crops-grown soil to have synergy effect with phytoremediation. Each sample was air-dried and sieved (2mm). Soil washing condition was adjusted on pH in the range of 0-12 with hydrogen chloride and sodium hydroxide. After performing soil washing procedure, arsenic-extracted samples were analyzed for arsenic concentration by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). All the soils have exceeded worrisome level of soil contamination for region 1 (25mg/kg) so the soil remediation techniques are

  18. Moessbauer study of iron-carbide growth and Fischer-Tropsch activity

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.

    1995-12-31

    There is a need to establish a correlation between the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) activity of an iron-based catalyst and the catalyst phase during FT synthesis. The nature of iron phases formed during activation and FT synthesis is influenced by the gas used for activation. Moessbauer investigations of iron-based catalysts subjected to pretreatment in gas atmospheres containing mixtures of CO, H{sub 2}, and He have been carried out. Studies on UCI 1185-57 catalyst indicate that activation of the catalyst in CO leads to the formation of 100% magnetite and the magnetite formed gets rapidly converted to at least 90% of x-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} during activation. The x-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} formed during activation gets partly (= 25%) converted back to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} during FT synthesis and both x-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} reach constant values. On the other hand, activation of the catalyst in synthesis gas leads to formation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and which is slowly converted to x-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and e-Fe{sub 2.2}C during activation, and both carbide phases increase slowly during FT synthesis. FT synthesis activity is found to give rise to {approx} 70% (H2+CO) conversion in the case of CO activated catalyst as compared to {approx} 20% (H2+CO) conversion in the case of synthesis gas-activated catalyst.

  19. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-06

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions.

  20. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C.; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F.; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W.; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa. Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  1. Biological methane oxidation: regulation, biochemistry, and active site structure of particulate methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Raquel L; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2004-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is a three-subunit integral membrane enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of methane to methanol. Although pMMO is the predominant methane oxidation catalyst in nature, it has proved difficult to isolate, and most questions regarding its molecular structure, active site composition, chemical mechanism, and genetic regulation remain unanswered. Copper ions are believed to play a key role in both pMMO regulation and catalysis, and there is some evidence that the enzyme contains iron as well. A number of research groups have solubilized and purified or partially purified pMMO. These preparations have been characterized by biochemical and biophysical methods. In addition, aspects of methane monooxygenase gene regulation and copper accumulation in methanotrophs have been studied. This review summarizes for the first time the often controversial pMMO literature, focusing on recent progress and highlighting unresolved issues.

  2. Iron profiles and speciation of the upper water column at the Bermuda Atlantic time-series Study site: a model based sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, L.; Völker, C.; Oschlies, A.; Burchard, H.

    2007-03-01

    A one-dimensional model of the biogeochemistry and speciation of iron is coupled with the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM) and a NPZD-type ecosystem model. The model is able to simulate the temporal patterns and vertical profiles of dissolved iron (dFe) in the upper ocean at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site reasonably well. Subsurface model profiles strongly depend on the parameter values chosen for the loss processes for iron, colloidal aggregation and scavenging onto particles. Current estimates for these parameters result in depletion of dFe. A high stability constant of iron-binding organic ligands is required to reproduce the observed degree of organic complexation below the mixed layer. A solubility of atmospherically deposited iron higher than 2% lead to dFe concentrations incompatible with observations. Despite neglecting ultraviolet radiation, the model produces diurnal variations and mean vertical profiles of H2O2 and iron species that are in good agreement with observations.

  3. An Iron Reservoir to the Catalytic Metal

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fange; Geng, Jiafeng; Gumpper, Ryan H.; Barman, Arghya; Davis, Ian; Ozarowski, Andrew; Hamelberg, Donald; Liu, Aimin

    2015-01-01

    The rubredoxin motif is present in over 74,000 protein sequences and 2,000 structures, but few have known functions. A secondary, non-catalytic, rubredoxin-like iron site is conserved in 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase (HAO), from single cellular sources but not multicellular sources. Through the population of the two metal binding sites with various metals in bacterial HAO, the structural and functional relationship of the rubredoxin-like site was investigated using kinetic, spectroscopic, crystallographic, and computational approaches. It is shown that the first metal presented preferentially binds to the catalytic site rather than the rubredoxin-like site, which selectively binds iron when the catalytic site is occupied. Furthermore, an iron ion bound to the rubredoxin-like site is readily delivered to an empty catalytic site of metal-free HAO via an intermolecular transfer mechanism. Through the use of metal analysis and catalytic activity measurements, we show that a downstream metabolic intermediate can selectively remove the catalytic iron. As the prokaryotic HAO is often crucial for cell survival, there is a need for ensuring its activity. These results suggest that the rubredoxin-like site is a possible auxiliary iron source to the catalytic center when it is lost during catalysis in a pathway with metabolic intermediates of metal-chelating properties. A spare tire concept is proposed based on this biochemical study, and this concept opens up a potentially new functional paradigm for iron-sulfur centers in iron-dependent enzymes as transient iron binding and shuttling sites to ensure full metal loading of the catalytic site. PMID:25918158

  4. Probing the promiscuous active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase using synthetic substrates, homology modeling, and active site modification.

    PubMed

    Daniellou, Richard; Zheng, Hongyan; Langill, David M; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2007-06-26

    The active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase (IDH, EC 1.1.1.18) from Bacillus subtilis recognizes a variety of mono- and disaccharides, as well as 1l-4-O-substituted inositol derivatives. It catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the axial alcohol of these substrates with comparable kinetic constants. We have found that 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol does not act as a substrate for IDH, in contrast to structurally similar compounds such as those bearing substituted benzyl substituents in the same position. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol and 4-O-(2-naphthyl)methyl-myo-inositol, which is a substrate for IDH, shows a distinct difference in the preferred conformation of the aryl substituent. Conformational analysis of known substrates of IDH suggests that this conformational difference may account for the difference in reactivity of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol in the presence of IDH. A sequence alignment of IDH with the homologous glucose-fructose oxidoreductase allowed the construction of an homology model of inositol dehydrogenase, to which NADH and 4-O-benzyl-scyllo-inosose were docked and the active site energy minimized. The active site model is consistent with all experimental results and suggests that a conserved tyrosine-glycine-tyrosine motif forms the hydrophobic pocket adjoining the site of inositol recognition. Y233F and Y235F retain activity, while Y233R and Y235R do not. A histidine-aspartate pair, H176 and D172, are proposed to act as a dyad in which H176 is the active site acid/base. The enzyme is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate, and the mutants H176A and D172N show a marked loss of activity. Kinetic isotope effect experiments with D172N indicate that chemistry is rate-determining for this mutant.

  5. Active sites, deactivation and stabilization of Fe-ZSM-5 for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH(3).

    PubMed

    Kröcher, Oliver; Brandenberger, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    Fe-ZSM-5 has been systematically investigated as catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH(3), concentrating on the active sites, the deactivation mechanism during hydrothermal aging and the chemical possibilities to stabilize this type of SCR catalyst. Regarding the active SCR sites, it could be shown that monomeric species start to become active at the lowest temperatures (E(a,app) ≈ 36.3 ± 0.2 kJ/mol), followed by dimeric species at intermediate temperatures (E(a,app) ≈ 77 ± 16 kJ/mol) and oligomeric species at high temperatures. Experiments with Fe-ZSM-5 samples, in which the Brønsted acidity was specifically removed, proved that Brønsted acidity is not required for high SCR activity and that NH(3) can also be adsorbed on other acidic sites on the zeolite surface. The hydrothermal deactivation of Fe-ZSM-5 could be explained by the migration of active iron ions from the exchange sites. Parallel to the iron migration dealumination of the zeolite framework occurs, which has to be regarded as an independent process. The migration of iron can be reduced by the targeted reaction of the aluminum hydroxide groups in the lattice with trimethylaluminium followed by calcination. With respect to the application of iron zeolites in the SCR process in diesel vehicles, the most efficient stabilization method would be to switch from the ZSM-5 to the BEA structure type. The addition of NO(2) to the feed gas is another effective measure to increase the activity of even strongly deactivated iron zeolites tremendously.

  6. The active site structure and mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Arginine specific reagents showed irreversible inhibition of avian liver mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Potent protection against modification was elicited by CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} in the presence of other substrates. Labeling of enzyme with (7-{sup 14}C) phenylglyoxal showed that 1 or 2 arginines are involved in CO{sub 2} binding and activation. Peptide map studies showed this active site arginine residues is located at position 289. Histidine specific reagents showed pseudo first order inhibition of avian mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity. The best protection against modification was elicited by IDP or IDP and Mn{sup +2}. One histidine residue is at or near the phosphoenolpyruvate binding site as demonstrated in the increased absorbance at 240 nm and proton relaxation rate studies. Circular dichroism studies reveal that enzyme structure was perturbed by diethylpyrocarbonate modification. Metal binding studies suggest that this enzyme has only one metal binding site. The putative binding sites from several GTP and phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes are observed in P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase from different species.

  7. Remediation of Nitrate-contaminated Groundwater by a Mixture of Iron and Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guoxin; Liu, Fei; Jin, Aifang; Qin, Xiaopeng

    2010-11-01

    Nitrate contamination in groundwater has become a major environmental and health problem worldwide. The aim of the present study is to remediate groundwater contaminated by nitrate and develop potential reactive materials to be used in PRBs (Permeable Reactive Barriers). A new approach was proposed for abiotic groundwater remediation by reactive materials of iron chips and granular activated carbon particles. Batch tests were conducted and remediation mechanisms were discussed. The results show that nitrate decreases from 86.31 to 33.79 mgṡL-1 under the conditions of near neutral pH and reaction time of 1h. The combination of iron chips and activated carbon particles is cost-effective and suitable for further use as denitrification media in PRBs. Nitrogen species don't change significantly with the further increase in reaction time (>1 h). The iron-activated carbon-water-nitrate system tends to be steady-state. Small amounts of ammonium and nitrite (0.033-0.039 and 0.14-3.54 mgṡL-1, respectively) appear at reaction time from 0 h to 5 h. There is no substantial accumulation of nitrogen products in the system. The removal rate of nitrate only reaches 16.11% by sole iron chips at reaction time of 5 h, while 63.57% by the mixture of iron chips and activated carbon particles. There is significantly synergistic and promotive effect of mixing the two different types of materials on nitrate treatment. Fe/C ratio (1/1.5-1/2.5) doesn't cause dramatically different residual nitrate concentrations (24.09-26.70 mgṡL-1). Nitrate can't be limitlessly decreased with decreasing Fe/C ratio. The concomitant occurrences of chemical reduction, galvanic cell reaction, electrophoretic accumulation, chemical coagulation, and physical adsorption are all responsible for the overall nitrate removal by iron allied with activated carbon. To accurately quantify various nitrogen species, further studies on adsorption mechanisms of nitrite and nitrate are needed.

  8. Alleviation of iron induced oxidative stress by the grape fruit flavanone naringin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Reddy, Tiyagura Koti

    2011-04-25

    Iron is an essential element that participates in several metabolic activities of cells; however, excess iron is a major cause of iron-induced oxidative stress and several human diseases. The protective effect of naringin, a grape fruit flavanone, was studied in iron overloaded isolated mouse liver mitochondria, where the isolated mitochondrial fraction was incubated with various concentrations of naringin before ferric ion loading. Iron overloading of mitochondrial fraction resulted in an increase in lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and DNA damage, whereas iron overload reduced the glutathione (GSH) concentration, glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. Pretreatment of mitochondrial fraction with naringin inhibited iron-induced lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and DNA damage. Conversely, naringin supplementation arrested iron-induced depletion in the GSH contents, GSHPx, GST, SOD and catalase activities significantly. Ferric iron reduction assay revealed that naringin could not reduce ferric iron into ferrous iron indicating that it did not exhibit prooxidant activity. Iron free coordination site assay indicated that naringin was unable to occupy all the active sites of iron indicating that naringin did not completely chelate iron. Our study demonstrates that naringin was able to share the burden of endogenous oxidants by inhibiting the iron-induced depletion of all important antioxidant enzymes as well as GSH and may act as a good antioxidant.

  9. Occurrence and activity of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms in alkaline coal strip mine spoils.

    PubMed

    Olson, G J; McFeters, G A; Temple, K L

    1981-03-01

    Spoils samples collected from a coal strip mine in southeastern Montana were examined for populations and activities of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Spoils examined were of three types: (a) acidic pyrite-rich waste coal, (b) oxidation halo material, and (c) alkaline material, which was the most widespread type. Bacterial numbers, sulfur oxidation, and(14)CO2 uptake activity declined to low levels in the summer when spoils were dry. Even in wetter spring months pyritic spoils contained relatively low numbers of acidophilic iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, probably indicative of water stress since the same spoils incubated with excess water or dilute mineral salts showed considerably greater bacterial numbers and activity. Certain wells in coal and spoils aquifers contained substantial populations of iron-oxidizing acidophilic bacteria. However, these wells were always of alkaline or neutral pH, indicating that bacterial pyrite oxidation occurred where groundwaters contacted either replaced spoils or coal that contained pyrite or other metal sulfides. Bacterial activity may contribute to trace metal and sulfate leaching in the area.

  10. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    DOE PAGES

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; ...

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active sitemore » metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.« less

  11. Iron sensitizes keratinocytes and fibroblasts to UVA-mediated matrix metalloproteinase-1 through TNF-α and ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Jian, Jinlong; Pelle, Edward; Yang, Qing; Pernodet, Nadine; Maes, Daniel; Huang, Xi

    2011-03-01

    Oestrogen deficiency is regarded as the main causative factor in postmenopausal skin ageing and photoageing. While women after menopause experience low levels of oestrogen because of cease of ovarian function, they are also exposed to high levels of iron as a result of cessation of menstruation. In this study, we investigated whether this increase in iron presents a risk to the postmenopausal skin. Because of the lack of appropriate animal models to closely mimic the low oestrogen and high iron conditions, we tested the hypothesis in a high iron and low oestrogen culture model. Here, we showed that primary human dermal fibroblasts exposed to iron did not affect the baseline levels of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) activity. However, the iron-exposed fibroblasts were sensitized to UVA exposure, which resulted in a synergistic increase in MMP-1. UVA activated the three members of MAPK family: ERKs, p38, and JNKs. Additional activation of ERKs by iron contributed to the synergistic increases. Primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) did not respond to iron or UVA exposure as measured by MMP-1, but produced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the media, which then stimulated MMP-1 in fibroblasts. Our results indicate that iron and UVA increase MMP-1 activity in dermal fibroblasts not only directly through ERK activation but also by an indirect paracrine loop through TNF-α released by NHEK. We conclude that in addition to oestrogen deficiency, increased iron as a result of menopause could be a novel risk factor by sensitizing postmenopausal skin to solar irradiation.

  12. Iron sensitizes keratinocytes and fibroblasts to UVA-mediated matrix metalloproteinase-1 through TNF-α and ERK activation

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Jinlong; Pelle, Edward; Yang, Qing; Pernodet, Nadine; Maes, Daniel; Huang, Xi

    2010-01-01

    Oestrogen deficiency is regarded as the main causative factor in postmenopausal skin ageing and photoageing. While women after menopause experience low levels of oestrogen because of cease of ovarian function, they are also exposed to high levels of iron as a result of cessation of menstruation. In this study, we investigated whether this increase in iron presents a risk to the postmenopausal skin. Because of the lack of appropriate animal models to closely mimic the low oestrogen and high iron conditions, we tested the hypothesis in a high iron and low oestrogen culture model. Here, we showed that primary human dermal fibroblasts exposed to iron did not affect the baseline levels of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) activity. However, the iron-exposed fibroblasts were sensitized to UVA exposure, which resulted in a synergistic increase in MMP-1. UVA activated the three members of MAPK family: ERKs, p38, and JNKs. Additional activation of ERKs by iron contributed to the synergistic increases. Primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) did not respond to iron or UVA exposure as measured by MMP-1, but produced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the media, which then stimulated MMP-1 in fibroblasts. Our results indicate that iron and UVA increase MMP-1 activity in dermal fibroblasts not only directly through ERK activation but also by an indirect paracrine loop through TNF-α released by NHEK. We conclude that in addition to oestrogen deficiency, increased iron as a result of menopause could be a novel risk factor by sensitizing postmenopausal skin to solar irradiation. PMID:20701626

  13. Elementary steps of iron catalysis: exploring the links between iron alkyl and iron olefin complexes for their relevance in C-H activation and C-C bond formation.

    PubMed

    Casitas, Alicia; Krause, Helga; Goddard, Richard; Fürstner, Alois

    2015-01-26

    The alkylation of complexes 2 and 7 with Grignard reagents containing β-hydrogen atoms is a process of considerable relevance for the understanding of C-H activation as well as C-C bond formation mediated by low-valent iron species. Specifically, reaction of 2 with EtMgBr under an ethylene atmosphere affords the bis-ethylene complex 1 which is an active precatalyst for prototype [2+2+2] cycloaddition reactions and a valuable probe for mechanistic studies. This aspect is illustrated by its conversion into the bis-alkyne complex 6 as an unprecedented representation of a cycloaddition catalyst loaded with two substrates molecules. On the other hand, alkylation of 2 with 1 equivalent of cyclohexylmagnesium bromide furnished the unique iron alkyl species 11 with a 14-electron count, which has no less than four β-H atoms but is nevertheless stable at low temperature against β-hydride elimination. In contrast, the exhaustive alkylation of 1 with cyclohexylmagnesium bromide triggers two consecutive C-H activation reactions mediated by a single iron center. The resulting complex has a diene dihydride character in solution (15), whereas its structure in the solid state is more consistent with an η(3) -allyl iron hydride rendition featuring an additional agostic interaction (14). Finally, the preparation of the cyclopentadienyl iron complex 25 illustrates how an iron-mediated C-H activation cascade can be coaxed to induce a stereoselective CC bond formation. The structures of all relevant new iron complexes in the solid state are presented.

  14. Quenching Effects on Iron Site Partitioning in the Apollo 17 Orange Glass Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyar, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    Mare petrogenesis and the structure of the lunar interior were studied. Analyses of the spectral signatures of glasses was useful to remote sensing applications in areas of the moon where glass is in significant proportions in the lunar soil. The studies provided information on Fe site occupancies in glasses, which are used to construe oxygen fugacities at the lunar surface. Data were obtained through work on synthetic analogues of lunar glasses. However, recent Mossbauer studies of an Apollo 15 green glass composition have shown that synthetic glasses are extremely sensitive to variations in quenching media. Glass structure and Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) ratios are strongly controlled by quenching conditions, which may mask the effects of the original glass' formation temperature or oxygen partial pressure. Synthetic glasses were often run at low fugacities on Pt wires. The effects of quench media on the Apollo 17 orange glass composition are considered.

  15. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Binding to Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle—Covalent Versus Adsorptive Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Ralf P.; Zaloga, Jan; Schreiber, Eveline; Tóth, Ildikó Y.; Tombácz, Etelka; Lyer, Stefan; Alexiou, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are frequently used to develop vehicles for drug delivery, hyperthermia, and photodynamic therapy and as tools used for magnetic separation and purification of proteins or for biomolecular imaging. Depending on the application, there are various possible covalent and non-covalent approaches for the functionalization of particles, each of them shows different advantages and disadvantages for drug release and activity at the desired location.

  16. Plasmonics Resonance Enhanced Active Photothermal Effects of Aluminum and Iron Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chong, Xinyuan; Abboud, Jacques; Zhang, Zhili

    2015-03-01

    Localized Surface Plasmonics Resonance (LSPR) enhanced active photothermal effects of both aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs) and iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs) are experimentally observed. Photothermally activated motion and ignition by low-energy xenon flash are quantitatively measured. For nanoparticles of comparable sizes, photothermally activated motion height of Fe NPs is about 60% lower than that of Al NPs, while photothermal Minimum Ignition Energy (MIE) of Fe NPs is about 50% lower than that of Al NPs. Joule heating by LSPR enhanced photothermal effects among nanoparticles and subsequently triggered oxidation reactions are found responsible for the motion and ignition of the nanoparticles.

  17. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Observation Of Catalytically Active Intermediates Produced By Laser Photolysis Of Iron Pentacarbonyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquette, Michael S.

    1984-05-01

    The pulsed laser excitation of iron pentacarbonyl in solutions of 1-pentene photoinitiates a highly active catalytic process for isomerization of the olefin. This process is observed in situ by rapid scanning FTIR spectroscopy, allowing subsecond acquisition of spectra. These are deconvoluted into discrete spectral components which are assigned molecular formulas. Specific activities have been obtained for two catalytically significant complexes from a correlation of catalytic activity with compositional changes. A similar interpretation of multipulse and cw experiments allowed development of a comprehensive cycle of thermal and photochemical interconversions among components.

  18. Effect of alloying on the self-diffusion activation energy in γ-iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, A. A.; Sokolov, S. F.; Kolbasnikov, N. G.; Sokolov, D. F.

    2011-11-01

    The experimental data on the self-diffusion coefficient of austenite with different chemical compositions obtained by the radioactive isotope method have been analyzed quantitatively. The self-diffusion activation energy in pure γ-iron is shown to be ˜312 kJ/mol. Alloying of austenite with such elements as Mn, Mo, Nb, Ti, and Si (to a lower degree) increases the self-diffusion activation energy, and alloying with C, V, or Cr (for the element content ≥3 at %) decreases it. The empirical formula is derived for calculation of the self-diffusion activation energy in austenite solid solutions with complex composition.

  19. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Silicate Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts [1-3]. Nevertheless, among those structures K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. In this study, the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars were investigated in closer details. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. We give a potential explanation of the increased ice nucleation activity of K-feldspar. The ice nucleating sites are very much dependent on the alkali ion present by altering the water structure and the feldspar surface. The higher activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to the presence of potassium ions on the surface and surface bilayer. The alkali-ions have different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar. Chaotropic behavior of Calcium and Sodium ions are lowering the ice nucleation potential of the other feldspars, while kosmotropic Potassium has a neutral or even positive effect. Furthermore we investigated the influence of milling onto the ice nucleation of quartz particles. The ice nucleation activity can be increased by mechanical milling, by introducing more molecular, nucleation active defects to the particle surface. This effect is larger than expected by plane surface increase. [1] Atkinson et al. The Importance of Feldspar for Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust in Mixed-Phase Clouds. Nature 2013, 498, 355-358. [2] Yakobi-Hancock et al.. Feldspar Minerals as Efficient Deposition Ice Nuclei. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2013, 13, 11175-11185. [3] Zolles et al. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015 accepted.

  20. Loss of Frataxin activates the iron/sphingolipid/PDK1/Mef2 pathway in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuchuan; Ho, Tammy Szu-Yu; Lin, Guang; Tan, Kai Li; Rasband, Matthew N; Bellen, Hugo J

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in Frataxin (FXN). Loss of FXN causes impaired mitochondrial function and iron homeostasis. An elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was previously proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of FRDA. We recently showed that loss of frataxin homolog (fh), a Drosophila homolog of FXN, causes a ROS independent neurodegeneration in flies (Chen et al., 2016). In fh mutants, iron accumulation in the nervous system enhances the synthesis of sphingolipids, which in turn activates 3-phosphoinositide dependent protein kinase-1 (Pdk1) and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (Mef2) to trigger neurodegeneration of adult photoreceptors. Here, we show that loss of Fxn in the nervous system in mice also activates an iron/sphingolipid/PDK1/Mef2 pathway, indicating that the mechanism is evolutionarily conserved. Furthermore, sphingolipid levels and PDK1 activity are also increased in hearts of FRDA patients, suggesting that a similar pathway is affected in FRDA. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20732.001 PMID:27901468

  1. Face the Edges: Catalytic Active Sites of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Edges are special sites in nanomaterials. The atoms residing on the edges have different environments compared to those in other parts of a nanomaterial and, therefore, they may have different properties. Here, recent progress in nanomaterial fields is summarized from the viewpoint of the edges. Typically, edge sites in MoS2 or metals, other than surface atoms, can perform as active centers for catalytic reactions, so the method to enhance performance lies in the optimization of the edge structures. The edges of multicomponent interfaces present even more possibilities to enhance the activities of nanomaterials. Nanoframes and ultrathin nanowires have similarities to conventional edges of nanoparticles, the application of which as catalysts can help to reduce the use of costly materials. Looking beyond this, the edge structures of graphene are also essential for their properties. In short, the edge structure can influence many properties of materials. PMID:27980960

  2. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  3. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  4. Nest predation increases with parental activity: separating nest site and parental activity effects.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T E; Scott, J; Menge, C

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection. PMID:11413645

  5. Discerning the antioxidant mechanism of rapanone: A naturally occurring benzoquinone with iron complexing and radical scavenging activities.

    PubMed

    de la Vega-Hernández, Karen; Antuch, Manuel; Cuesta-Rubio, Osmany; Núñez-Figueredo, Yanier; Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L

    2017-05-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from iron and reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis breakdown has been implicated in several diseases. Therefore, molecules capable of binding iron and/or scavenging ROS may be reasonable strategies for protecting cells. Rapanone is a naturally occurring hydroxyl-benzoquinone with a privileged chelating structure. In this work, we addressed the antioxidant properties of rapanone concerning its iron-chelating and scavenging activities, and its protective potential against iron and tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced damage to mitochondria. Experimental determinations revealed the formation of rapanone-Fe(II)/Fe(III) complexes. Additionally, the electrochemical assays indicated that rapanone oxidized Fe(II) and O2(-), thus inhibiting Fenton-Haber-Weiss reactions. Furthermore, rapanone displayed an increased 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging ability in the presence of Fe(II). The above results explained the capacity of rapanone to provide near-full protection against iron and tert-butyl hydroperoxide induced mitochondrial lipid peroxidation in energized organelles, which fail under non-energized condition. We postulate that rapanone affords protection against iron and reactive oxygen species by means of both iron chelating and iron-stimulated free radical scavenging activity.

  6. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  7. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  8. [Mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2012-04-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent for inhibiting arginine-auxotrophic tumors (such as melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas) in phase III clinical trials. In this work, we studied the molecular mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutation sites, A128, H404 and 1410, were introduced into wild-type ADI gene by QuikChange site-directed mutagenesis method, and four ADI mutants M1 (A128T), M2 (H404R), M3 (I410L), and M4 (A128T, H404R) were obtained. The ADI mutants were individually expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the enzymatic properties of the purified mutant proteins were determined. The results show that both A128T and H404R had enhanced optimum pH, higher activity and stability of ADI under physiological condition (pH 7.4), as well as reduced K(m) value. This study provides an insight into the molecular mechanism of the ADI activity, and also the experimental evidence for the rational protein evolution in the future.

  9. Antioxidant Activity of Caffeic Acid against Iron-Induced Free Radical Generation—A Chemical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Genaro-Mattos, Thiago C.; Maurício, Ângelo Q.; Rettori, Daniel; Alonso, Antonio; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA) is a phenolic compound widely found in coffee beans with known beneficial effects in vivo. Many studies showed that CA has anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenic, antibacterial and anti-carcinogenic properties, which could be linked to its antioxidant activity. Taking in consideration the reported in vitro antioxidant mechanism of other polyphenols, our working hypothesis was that the CA antioxidant activity could be related to its metal-chelating property. With that in mind, we sought to investigate the chemical antioxidant mechanism of CA against in vitro iron-induced oxidative damage under different assay conditions. CA was able to prevent hydroxyl radical formation promoted by the classical Fenton reaction, as determined by 2-deoxyribose (2-DR) oxidative degradation and DMPO hydroxylation. In addition to its ability to prevent hydroxyl radical formation, CA had a great inhibition of membrane lipid peroxidation. In the lipid peroxidation assays CA acted as both metal-chelator and as hydrogen donor, preventing the deleterious action promoted by lipid-derived peroxyl and alkoxyl radicals. Our results indicate that the observed antioxidant effects were mostly due to the formation of iron-CA complexes, which are able to prevent 2-DR oxidation and DMPO hydroxylation. Noteworthy, the formation of iron-CA complexes and prevention of oxidative damage was directly related to the pH of the medium, showing better antioxidant activity at higher pH values. Moreover, in the presence of lipid membranes the antioxidant potency of CA was much higher, indicating its enhanced effectiveness in a hydrophobic environment. Overall, our results show that CA acts as an antioxidant through an iron chelating mechanism, preventing the formation of free hydroxyl radicals and, therefore, inhibiting Fenton-induced oxidative damage. The chemical properties of CA described here—in association with its reported signaling effects—could be an explanation to its beneficial effects

  10. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J.; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  11. MESOPOROUS IRON PHOSPHATE AS AN ACTIVE, SELECTIVE AND RECYCLABLE CATALYST FOR THE SYNTHESIS OF NOPOL BY PRINS CONDENSATION

    EPA Science Inventory


    Mesoporous iron phosphate is found to be a highly active and recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for the selective synthesis of nopol by Prins condensation of ?-pinene and paraformaldehyde in acetonitrile at 80 oC.



  12. Effect Of Reaction Environments On The Reactivity Of PCB (2-Chlorobiphenyl) Over Activated Carbon Impregnated With Palladized Iron

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron nanoparticles has been developed to treat polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In this study, we evaluated the effects of various reaction environments on the adsorption-mediated dechlorination of 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-...

  13. Effects Of Aging And Oxidation Of Palladized Iron Embedded In Activated Carbon On The Dechlorination Of 2-Chlorobiphenyl

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron has been developed to effectively treat polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the environment by coupling adsorption and dechlorination of PCBs. In this study, we addressed the dechlorination reactivity and capacity ...

  14. MSK1 activity is controlled by multiple phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    McCOY, Claire E.; Campbell, David G.; Deak, Maria; Bloomberg, Graham B.; Arthur, J. Simon C.

    2004-01-01

    MSK1 (mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase) is a kinase activated in cells downstream of both the ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades. In the present study, we show that, in addition to being phosphorylated on Thr-581 and Ser-360 by ERK1/2 or p38, MSK1 can autophosphorylate on at least six sites: Ser-212, Ser-376, Ser-381, Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758. Of these sites, the N-terminal T-loop residue Ser-212 and the ‘hydrophobic motif’ Ser-376 are phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain of MSK1, and their phosphorylation is essential for the catalytic activity of the N-terminal kinase domain of MSK1 and therefore for the phosphorylation of MSK1 substrates in vitro. Ser-381 is also phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain, and mutation of Ser-381 decreases MSK1 activity, probably through the inhibition of Ser-376 phosphorylation. Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758 are phosphorylated by the N-terminal kinase domain; however, their function is not known. The activation of MSK1 in cells therefore requires the activation of the ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK cascades and does not appear to require additional signalling inputs. This is in contrast with the closely related RSK (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase) proteins, whose activity requires phosphorylation by PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1) in addition to phosphorylation by ERK1/2. PMID:15568999

  15. Effects of Iron Overload on the Activity of Na,K-ATPase and Lipid Profile of the Human Erythrocyte Membrane.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Leilismara; Garcia, Israel J P; Costa, Tamara G F; Silva, Lilian N D; Renó, Cristiane O; Oliveira, Eneida S; Tilelli, Cristiane Q; Santos, Luciana L; Cortes, Vanessa F; Santos, Herica L; Barbosa, Leandro A

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential chemical element for human life. However, in some pathological conditions, such as hereditary hemochromatosis type 1 (HH1), iron overload induces the production of reactive oxygen species that may lead to lipid peroxidation and a change in the plasma-membrane lipid profile. In this study, we investigated whether iron overload interferes with the Na,K-ATPase activity of the plasma membrane by studying erythrocytes that were obtained from the whole blood of patients suffering from iron overload. Additionally, we treated erythrocytes of normal subjects with 0.8 mM H2O2 and 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h. We then analyzed the lipid profile, lipid peroxidation and Na,K-ATPase activity of plasma membranes derived from these cells. Iron overload was more frequent in men (87.5%) than in women and was associated with an increase (446%) in lipid peroxidation, as indicated by the amount of the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and an increase (327%) in the Na,K-ATPase activity in the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. Erythrocytes treated with 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h showed an increase (132%) in the Na,K-ATPase activity but no change in the TBARS levels. Iron treatment also decreased the cholesterol and phospholipid content of the erythrocyte membranes and similar decreases were observed in iron overload patients. In contrast, erythrocytes treated with 0.8 mM H2O2 for 24 h showed no change in the measured parameters. These results indicate that erythrocytes from patients with iron overload exhibit higher Na,K-ATPase activity compared with normal subjects and that this effect is specifically associated with altered iron levels.

  16. Effects of Iron Overload on the Activity of Na,K-ATPase and Lipid Profile of the Human Erythrocyte Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Leilismara; Garcia, Israel J. P.; Costa, Tamara G. F.; Silva, Lilian N. D.; Renó, Cristiane O.; Oliveira, Eneida S.; Tilelli, Cristiane Q.; Santos, Luciana L.; Cortes, Vanessa F.; Santos, Herica L.; Barbosa, Leandro A.

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential chemical element for human life. However, in some pathological conditions, such as hereditary hemochromatosis type 1 (HH1), iron overload induces the production of reactive oxygen species that may lead to lipid peroxidation and a change in the plasma-membrane lipid profile. In this study, we investigated whether iron overload interferes with the Na,K-ATPase activity of the plasma membrane by studying erythrocytes that were obtained from the whole blood of patients suffering from iron overload. Additionally, we treated erythrocytes of normal subjects with 0.8 mM H2O2 and 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h. We then analyzed the lipid profile, lipid peroxidation and Na,K-ATPase activity of plasma membranes derived from these cells. Iron overload was more frequent in men (87.5%) than in women and was associated with an increase (446%) in lipid peroxidation, as indicated by the amount of the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and an increase (327%) in the Na,K-ATPase activity in the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. Erythrocytes treated with 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h showed an increase (132%) in the Na,K-ATPase activity but no change in the TBARS levels. Iron treatment also decreased the cholesterol and phospholipid content of the erythrocyte membranes and similar decreases were observed in iron overload patients. In contrast, erythrocytes treated with 0.8 mM H2O2 for 24 h showed no change in the measured parameters. These results indicate that erythrocytes from patients with iron overload exhibit higher Na,K-ATPase activity compared with normal subjects and that this effect is specifically associated with altered iron levels. PMID:26197432

  17. NIR-activated iron oxides as a new multi-functional contrast agent of photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Pei-Hsien; Huang, Chih-Chia; Li, Meng-Lin

    2014-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are commonly used contrast agents for theranostic nanomedicines because of their advantages of good biocompatibility, high stability in physiological conditions, low cytotoxicity and excellent safety record in clinical settings for human use. In this study, we developed a NIR-activated iron oxide (NIR-Fe3O4) nanoparticle as a new multi-functional contrast agent of photoacoustic (PA) imaging. Unlike traditional iron oxides, the developed NIR-Fe3O4 owns biocompatibility and optical tunability capable of providing strong optical absorption in the NIR range for PA signal generation. Its intrinsic magnetic property enables the active magnetic tumor targeting. Phantom experiments were performed to confirm the tunability of NIR-Fe3O4's optical absorption in NIR and demonstrate its magnetic targeting capability. The PA signal response of NIR-Fe3O4 as a function of concentration was also investigated. The results showed that the PA signal of NIR-Fe3O4 with OD=1.25 was comparable to that of blood at 715 nm - the wavelength of peak absorption of the used NIR-Fe3O4. Moreover, the PA signal from NIR-Fe3O4 could be further improved by magnetic targeting. Overall, we proved that the potential of the developed NIR-Fe3O4 as a good tumor targeting contrast agent of PA imaging.

  18. [Removal of arsenate from drinking water by activated carbon supported nano zero-valent iron].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui-jie; Jia, Yong-feng; Yao, Shu-hu; Wu, Xing; Wang, Shu-ying

    2009-12-01

    A new adsorbent, activated carbon impregnated with nano zero-valent iron was prepared, which size of the needle-shaped iron particles in the pores of carbon was (30-500) nm x (1000-3000) nm and approximately 8.2% of iron was loaded onto it. The arsenate removal percentage was 99.5% by 1.5 g/L NZVI/AC in the 2 mg/L arsenic solution at pH 6.5 and (25 +/- 2) degrees C. The adsorption capacity was about 15.4 mg/g when equilibrium concentration was 1.0 mg/L. Kinetics revealed that uptake of arsenate ion by NZVI/AC was 91.4% in the first 12 h and equilibrium time was about 72 h. The intraparticle diffusion model was applied to study the mechanics of arsenate in the activated carbon. The presence of phosphate and silicate could significantly decrease arsenate removal while the effects of the other anions and cations on the arsenic removal were neglectable. NZVI/AC can be effectively regenerated when elution is done with 0.1 mol/L NaOH solution. Our results suggest that NZVI/AC is a suitable candidate for drinking water treatment due to its high reactivity.

  19. Removal of metals from landfill leachate by sorption to activated carbon, bone meal and iron fines.

    PubMed

    Modin, Hanna; Persson, Kenneth M; Andersson, Anna; van Praagh, Martijn

    2011-05-30

    Sorption filters based on granular activated carbon, bone meal and iron fines were tested for their efficiency of removing metals from landfill leachate. Removal of Al, As, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn were studied in a laboratory scale setup. Activated carbon removed more than 90% of Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni. Ca, Pb, Sr and Zn were removed but less efficiently. Bone meal removed over 80% of Cr, Fe, Hg, Mn and Sr and 20-80% of Al, Ca, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb and Zn. Iron fines removed most metals (As, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Pb, Sr and Zn) to some extent but less efficiently. All materials released unwanted substances (metals, TOC or nutrients), highlighting the need to study the uptake and release of a large number of compounds, not only the target metals. To remove a wide range of metals using these materials two or more filter materials may need to be combined. Sorption mechanisms for all materials include ion exchange, sorption and precipitation. For iron fines oxidation of Fe(0) seems to be important for metal immobilisation.

  20. Oxygenation of Organoboronic Acids by a Nonheme Iron(II) Complex: Mimicking Boronic Acid Monooxygenase Activity.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sayanti; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2015-10-19

    Phenolic compounds are important intermediates in the bacterial biodegradation of aromatic compounds in the soil. An Arthrobacter sp. strain has been shown to exhibit boronic acid monooxygenase activity through the conversion of different substituted phenylboronic acids to the corresponding phenols using dioxygen. While a number of methods have been reported to cleave the C-B bonds of organoboronic acids, there is no report on biomimetic iron complex exhibiting this activity using dioxygen as the oxidant. In that direction, we have investigated the reactivity of a nucleophilic iron-oxygen oxidant, generated upon oxidative decarboxylation of an iron(II)-benzilate complex [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(benzilate)] (Tp(Ph2) = hydrotris(3,5-diphenyl-pyrazol-1-yl)borate), toward organoboronic acids. The oxidant converts different aryl/alkylboronic acids to the corresponding oxygenated products with the incorporation of one oxygen atom from dioxygen. This method represents an efficient protocol for the oxygenation of boronic acids with dioxygen as the terminal oxidant.

  1. The Olefin Metathesis Reactions Combined with Organo-Iron Arene Activation Towards Dendrimers, and Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astruc, Didier; Martinez, Victor

    The subjects treated in the two lectures of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) summer course are (1) the combination of arene activation and perfunctionalization using organo-iron chemistry with olefin metathesis incuding metathesis of dendritic polyolefin molecules; (2) the synthesis of metallodendritic benzylidene complexes that catalyse ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) under ambient conditions and the formation of dendritic stars; (3) the use of stoichiometric and catalytic electron-transfer processes with standard reservoirs of electrons (reductants) or electron holes (oxidants) iron complexes to achieve noteworthy metathesis reactions or synthesize compounds that are useful in metathesis. Only the two first topics are treated in this chapter, and interested readers can find references concerning the third aspect called in the introduction and subsequently cited in the reference list.

  2. Iron-induced epigenetic abnormalities of mouse bone marrow through aberrant activation of aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masayo; Tanaka, Hiroki; Toki, Yasumichi; Hatayama, Mayumi; Ito, Satoshi; Addo, Lynda; Shindo, Motohiro; Sasaki, Katsunori; Ikuta, Katsuya; Ohtake, Takaaki; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Torimoto, Yoshihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2016-10-01

    Iron overload remains a concern in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients. Iron chelation therapy (ICT) thus plays an integral role in the management of these patients. Moreover, ICT has been shown to prolong leukemia-free survival in MDS patients; however, the mechanisms responsible for this effect are unclear. Iron is a key molecule for regulating cytosolic aconitase 1 (ACO1). Additionally, the mutation of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH), the enzyme downstream of ACO1 in the TCA cycle, is associated with epigenetic abnormalities secondary to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) and DNA methylation. However, epigenetic abnormalities observed in many MDS patients occur without IDH mutation. We hypothesized that iron itself activates the ACO1-IDH pathway, which may increase 2-HG and DNA methylation, and eventually contribute to leukemogenesis without IDH mutation. Using whole RNA sequencing of bone marrow cells in iron-overloaded mice, we observed that the enzymes, phosphoglucomutase 1, glycogen debranching enzyme, and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (Idh1), which are involved in glycogen and glucose metabolism, were increased. Digital PCR further showed that Idh1 and Aco1, enzymes involved in the TCA cycle, were also elevated. Additionally, enzymatic activities of TCA cycle and methylated DNA were increased. Iron chelation reversed these phenomena. In conclusion, iron activation of glucose metabolism causes an increase of 2-HG and DNA methylation.

  3. Mineralogy and environmental geochemistry of historical iron slag, Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Pennsylvania, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatak, N.M.; Seal, R.R.

    2012-01-01

    The Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site in southeastern Pennsylvania, which features an Fe smelter that was operational in the 18th and 19th centuries, is dominated by three slag piles. Pile 1 slag, from the Hopewell Furnace, and pile 2 slag, likely from the nearby Cornwall Furnace, were both produced in cold-blast charcoal-fired smelters. In contrast, pile 3 slag was produced in an anthracite furnace. Ore samples from the nearby Jones and Hopewell mines that fed the smelter are mainly magnetite-rich with some sulfides (pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite) and accessory silicates (quartz, garnet, feldspar, and clay minerals). Slag piles 1 and 2 are similar mineralogically containing predominantly skeletal and dendritic aluminian diopside and augite, skeletal forsteritic olivine, glass, rounded blebs of metallic Fe, and exotic quartz. Olivine is a major phase in all samples from pile 2, whereas it occurs in only a few samples from pile 1. Samples of the <2mm-size fraction of surface composite slag material or crushed slag from at depth in piles 1 and 2 are mineralogically similar to the large surface slag fragments from those piles with the addition of phases such as feldspars, Fe oxides, and clay minerals that are either secondary weathering products or entrained from the underlying bedrock. Pile 3 slag contains mostly skeletal forsteritic olivine and Ti-bearing aluminian diopside, dendritic or fine-grained subhedral melilite, glass, euhedral spinel, metallic Fe, alabandite-oldhamite solid solution, as well as a sparse Ti carbonitride phase. The bulk chemistry of the slag is dominated by Al 2O 3 (8.5-16.2wt.%), CaO (8.2-26.2wt.%), MgO (4.2-24.7wt.%), and SiO 2 (36.4-59.8wt.%), constituting between 81% and 97% of the mass of the samples. Piles 1 and 2 are chemically similar; pile 1 slag overall contains the highest Fe 2O 3, K 2O and MnO, and the lowest MgO concentrations. Pile 3 slag is high in Al 2O 3, CaO and S, and low in Fe 2O 3, K 2O and SiO 2 compared to the

  4. The effect of haem biosynthesis inhibitors and inducers on intestinal iron absorption and liver haem biosynthetic enzyme activities

    SciTech Connect

    Laftah, A.H.; Simpson, R.J. Peters, T.J.; Raja, K.B.

    2008-06-15

    The relation between haem biosynthesis and intestinal iron absorption is not well understood, we therefore investigated the effect of compounds that alter haem metabolism on duodenal iron absorption. CD1 mice were treated with either an inhibitor (succinyl acetone (SA)) or stimulator (2-allyl-2-isopropylacetamide (AIA)) of haem biosynthesis. 5-Aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) dehydratase and urinary ALA and porphobilinogen (PBG) levels, were determined. Intestinal iron absorption was assayed with in vivo and in vitro techniques. Liver hepcidin (Hamp1) and duodenal iron transporter mRNA levels were measured using RT-PCR. AIA caused increased hepatic ALA synthase (1.6-fold) and ALA dehydratase (1.4-fold, both p < 0.005) activities and increased urinary ALA and PBG excretion (2.1- and 1.4-fold, p < 0.005, p < 0.05, respectively). In vivo intestinal iron absorption was reduced to 49% of control (p < 0.005). Mice treated with SA showed decreased urinary ALA and PBG levels (75 and 55% control, both p < 0.005) and reductions in both ALA synthase and ALA dehydratase activities (77 and 56% control, p < 0.05, p < 0.005, respectively) in the liver. Liver and duodenal haem and cytochrome oxidase levels were not significantly decreased. Iron absorption was enhanced (1.26-fold, p < 0.05) and hepatic Hamp1 mRNA was reduced (53% of control, p < 0.05). In vitro duodenal iron uptake after mice were injected with SA also demonstrated an increase in Fe(III) reduction and uptake (1.27- and 1.41-fold, p < 0.01 respectively). Simultaneous injections of SA and ALA blocked the enhancing effect on iron absorption seen with SA alone. We conclude that alterations in haem biosynthesis can influence iron absorption and in particular, the intermediate ALA seems to be an inhibitor of iron absorption.

  5. Moessbauer study of iron-carbide growth and Fischer-Tropsch activity

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.

    1995-12-31

    There is a need to establish a correlation between the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) activity of an iron-based catalyst and the catalyst phase during FT synthesis. The nature of iron phases formed during activation and FT synthesis is influenced by the nature of the gas and pressure apart from other parameters like temperature, flow rate etc., used for activation. Moessbauer investigations of iron-based catalysts subjected to pretreatment at two different pressures in gas atmospheres containing mixtures of CO, H{sub 2}, and He have been carried out. Studies on UCI 1185-57 (64%Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/5%CuO/1%K{sub 2}O/30% Kaolin) catalyst indicate that activation of the catalyst in CO at 12 atms. leads to the formation of 100% magnetite and the magnetite formed gets rapidly converted to at least 90% of {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} during activation. The FT activity was found to be good at 70-80% of (H{sub 2}+CO) conversion. On the other hand, activation. The FT activity was found to be good at 70-80% of (H{sub 2}+CO) conversion. On the other hand, activation of the catalyst in synthesis gas at 12 atms. leads to formation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and it gets sluggishly converted to {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and {epsilon}-Fe{sub 2.2}C during activation and both continue to grow slowly during FT synthesis. FT activity is found to be poor. Pretreatment of the catalyst, 100fe/3.6Si/0.71K at a low pressure of 1 atms. in syngas gave rise to the formation of {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and good FT activity. On the other hand, pretreatment of the catalyst, 100Fe/3.6Si/0.71K at a relatively high pressure of 12 atms. in syngas did not give rise to the formation any carbide and FT activity was poor.

  6. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  7. Vitamin K epoxide reductase: homology, active site and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P

    2004-06-01

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) recycles reduced vitamin K, which is used subsequently as a co-factor in the gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid residues in blood coagulation enzymes. VKORC1, a subunit of the VKOR complex, has recently been shown to possess this activity. Here, we show that VKORC1 is a member of a large family of predicted enzymes that are present in vertebrates, Drosophila, plants, bacteria and archaea. Four cysteine residues and one residue, which is either serine or threonine, are identified as likely active-site residues. In some plant and bacterial homologues the VKORC1 homologous domain is fused with domains of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. These might reduce disulfide bonds of VKORC1-like enzymes as a prerequisite for their catalytic activities.

  8. Redox-dependent complex formation by an ATP-dependent activator of the corrinoid/iron-sulfur protein

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Sandra E.; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Goetzl, Sebastian; Dobbek, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Movement, cell division, protein biosynthesis, electron transfer against an electrochemical gradient, and many more processes depend on energy conversions coupled to the hydrolysis of ATP. The reduction of metal sites with low reduction potentials (E0′ < -500 mV) is possible by connecting an energetical uphill electron transfer with the hydrolysis of ATP. The corrinoid-iron/sulfur protein (CoFeSP) operates within the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway by transferring a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate bound to a methyltransferase to the [Ni-Ni-Fe4S4] cluster of acetyl-CoA synthase. Methylation of CoFeSP only occurs in the low-potential Co(I) state, which can be sporadically oxidized to the inactive Co(II) state, making its reductive reactivation necessary. Here we show that an open-reading frame proximal to the structural genes of CoFeSP encodes an ATP-dependent reductive activator of CoFeSP. Our biochemical and structural analysis uncovers a unique type of reductive activator distinct from the electron-transferring ATPases found to reduce the MoFe-nitrogenase and 2-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratases. The CoFeSP activator contains an ASKHA domain (acetate and sugar kinases, Hsp70, and actin) harboring the ATP-binding site, which is also present in the activator of 2-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratases and a ferredoxin-like [2Fe-2S] cluster domain acting as electron donor. Complex formation between CoFeSP and its activator depends on the oxidation state of CoFeSP, which provides evidence for a unique strategy to achieve unidirectional electron transfer between two redox proteins. PMID:22431597

  9. Characterization of quinol-dependent nitric oxide reductase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus: enzymatic activity and active site structure.

    PubMed

    Terasaka, Erina; Okada, Norihiro; Sato, Nozomi; Sako, Yoshihiko; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Tosha, Takehiko

    2014-07-01

    Nitric oxide reductase (NOR) catalyzes the reduction of nitric oxide to generate nitrous oxide. We recently reported on the crystal structure of a quinol-dependent NOR (qNOR) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus [Y. Matsumoto, T. Tosha, A.V. Pisliakov, T. Hino, H. Sugimoto, S. Nagano, Y. Sugita and Y. Shiro, Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 19 (2012) 238-246], and suggested that a water channel from the cytoplasm, which is not observed in cytochrome c-dependent NOR (cNOR), functions as a pathway transferring catalytic protons. Here, we further investigated the functional and structural properties of qNOR, and compared the findings with those for cNOR. The pH optimum for the enzymatic reaction of qNOR was in the alkaline range, whereas Pseudomonas aeruginosa cNOR showed a higher activity at an acidic pH. The considerably slower reduction rate, and a correlation of the pH dependence for enzymatic activity and the reduction rate suggest that the reduction process is the rate-determining step for the NO reduction by qNOR, while the reduction rate for cNOR was very fast and therefore is unlikely to be the rate-determining step. A close examination of the heme/non-heme iron binuclear center by resonance Raman spectroscopy indicated that qNOR has a more polar environment at the binuclear center compared with cNOR. It is plausible that a water channel enhances the accessibility of the active site to solvent water, creating a more polar environment in qNOR. This structural feature could control certain properties of the active site, such as redox potential, which could explain the different catalytic properties of the two NORs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference.

  10. Iron binding to human heavy-chain ferritin.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Cecilia; Di Pisa, Flavio; Bernacchioni, Caterina; Ciambellotti, Silvia; Turano, Paola; Mangani, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Maxi-ferritins are ubiquitous iron-storage proteins with a common cage architecture made up of 24 identical subunits of five α-helices that drive iron biomineralization through catalytic iron(II) oxidation occurring at oxidoreductase sites (OS). Structures of iron-bound human H ferritin were solved at high resolution by freezing ferritin crystals at different time intervals after exposure to a ferrous salt. Multiple binding sites were identified that define the iron path from the entry ion channels to the oxidoreductase sites. Similar data are available for another vertebrate ferritin: the M protein from Rana catesbeiana. A comparative analysis of the iron sites in the two proteins identifies new reaction intermediates and underlines clear differences in the pattern of ligands that define the additional iron sites that precede the oxidoreductase binding sites along this path. Stopped-flow kinetics assays revealed that human H ferritin has different levels of activity compared with its R. catesbeiana counterpart. The role of the different pattern of transient iron-binding sites in the OS is discussed with respect to the observed differences in activity across the species.

  11. Iron Deficiency Decreases Suberization in Bean Roots through a Decrease in Suberin-Specific Peroxidase Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Sijmons, Peter C.; Kolattukudy, P. E.; Bienfait, H. Frits

    1985-01-01

    The suberin content of young root parts of iron-deficient and iron-sufficient Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Prélude was determined. The aliphatic components that could be released from suberin-enriched fractions by LiAID4 depolymerization were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In the normal roots, the major aliphatic components were ω-hydroxy acids and dicarboxylic acids in which saturated C16 and monounsaturated C18 were the dominant homologues. Iron-deficient bean roots contained only 11% of the aliphatic components of suberin found in control roots although the relative composition of the constituents was not significantly affected by iron deficiency. Analysis of the aromatic components of the suberin polymer that could be released by alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation of bean root samples showed a 95% decrease in p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, vanillin, and syringaldehyde under iron-deficient conditions. The inhibition of suberin synthesis in bean roots was not due to a decrease in Fe-dependent ω-hydroxylase activity since normal ω-hydroxylation could be demonstrated, both in vitro with microsomal preparations and in situ by labeling of ω-hydroxy and dicarboxylic acids with [14C]acetate. The level of the isozyme of peroxidase that is specifically associated with suberization was suppressed by iron deficiency to 25% of that found in control roots. None of the other extracted isozymes of peroxidase was affected by the iron nutritional status. The activity of the suberin-associated peroxidase was restored within 3 to 4 days after application of iron to the growth medium. The results suggest that, in bean roots, iron deficiency causes inhibition of suberization by causing a decrease in the level of isoperoxidase activity which is required for polymerization of the aromatic domains of suberin, while the ability to synthesize the aliphatic components of the suberin polymer is not impaired. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16664183

  12. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  13. Iron Opacity Bump Changes the Stability and Structure of Accretion Disks in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.

    2016-08-01

    Accretion disks around supermassive black holes have regions where the Rosseland mean opacity can be larger than the electron scattering opacity due to the large number of bound-bound transitions in iron. We study the effects of this iron opacity “bump” on the thermal stability and vertical structure of radiation-pressure-dominated accretion disks, utilizing three-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations in the local shearing box approximation. The simulations self-consistently calculate the heating due to MHD turbulence caused by magneto-rotational instability and radiative cooling by using the radiative transfer module based on a variable Eddington tensor in Athena. For a 5 × 108 solar mass black hole with ˜3% of the Eddington luminosity, a model including the iron opacity bump maintains its structure for more than 10 thermal times without showing significant signs of thermal runaway. In contrast, if only electron scattering and free-free opacity are included as in the standard thin disk model, the disk collapses on the thermal timescale. The difference is caused by a combination of (1) an anti-correlation between the total optical depth and the midplane pressure, and (2) enhanced vertical advective energy transport. These results suggest that the iron opacity bump may have a strong impact on the stability and structure of active galactic nucleus (AGN) accretion disks, and may contribute to a dependence of AGN properties on metallicity. Since this opacity is relevant primarily in UV emitting regions of the flow, it may help to explain discrepancies between observation and theory that are unique to AGNs.

  14. Target-classification approach applied to active UXO sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Shamatava, Irma; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study is designed to illustrate the discrimination performance at two UXO active sites (Oklahoma's Fort Sill and the Massachusetts Military Reservation) of a set of advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) inversion/discrimination models which include the orthonormalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS), joint diagonalization (JD), and differential evolution (DE) approaches and whose power and flexibility greatly exceed those of the simple dipole model. The Fort Sill site is highly contaminated by a mix of the following types of munitions: 37-mm target practice tracers, 60-mm illumination mortars, 75-mm and 4.5'' projectiles, 3.5'', 2.36'', and LAAW rockets, antitank mine fuzes with and without hex nuts, practice MK2 and M67 grenades, 2.5'' ballistic windshields, M2A1-mines with/without bases, M19-14 time fuzes, and 40-mm practice grenades with/without cartridges. The site at the MMR site contains targets of yet different sizes. In this work we apply our models to EMI data collected using the MetalMapper (MM) and 2 × 2 TEMTADS sensors. The data for each anomaly are inverted to extract estimates of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters associated with each buried target. (The latter include the total volume magnetic source or NVMS, which relates to size, shape, and material properties; the former includes location, depth, and orientation). The estimated intrinsic parameters are then used for classification performed via library matching and the use of statistical classification algorithms; this process yielded prioritized dig-lists that were submitted to the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) for independent scoring. The models' classification performance is illustrated and assessed based on these independent evaluations.

  15. Influence of iron precipitated condition and light intensity on microalgae activated sludge based wastewater remediation.

    PubMed

    Anbalagan, Anbarasan; Schwede, Sebastian; Lindberg, Carl-Fredrik; Nehrenheim, Emma

    2017-02-01

    The indigenous microalgae-activated sludge (MAAS) process during remediation of municipal wastewater was investigated by studying the influence of iron flocculation step and light intensity. In addition, availability of total phosphorous (P) and photosynthetic activity was examined in fed-batch and batch mode under northern climatic conditions and limited lighting. This was followed by a semi-continuous operation with 4 d of hydraulic retention time and mean cell residence time of 6.75 d in a photo-bioreactor (PBR) with varying P availability. The fed-batch condition showed that P concentrations of 3-4 mg L(-1) were effective for photosynthetic chl. a development in iron flocculated conditions. In the PBR, the oxygen evolution rate increased with increase in the concentration of MAAS (from 258 to 573 mg TSS L(-1)) at higher surface photosynthetic active radiation (250 and 500 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). Additionally, the rate approached a saturation phase at low MAAS (110 mg L(-1)) with higher light intensities. Semi-continuous operation with luxury P uptake and effective P condition showed stable average total nitrogen removal of 88 and 92% respectively, with residual concentrations of 3.77 and 2.21 mg L(-1). The corresponding average P removal was 68 and 59% with residual concentrations of 2.32 and 1.75 mg L(-1). The semi-continuous operation produced a rapidly settleable MAAS under iron flocculated condition with a settling velocity of 92-106 m h(-1) and sludge volume index of 31-43 ml g(-1) in the studied cases.

  16. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Altering Pollen Soluble Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Deborah J; Haque, Tamanna; Tudor, Richard L; Barron, Yoshimi; Zampronio, Cleidiane G; Cotton, Nicholas P J; de Graaf, Barend H J; White, Scott A; Cooper, Helen J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Harper, Jeffery F; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2017-03-01

    Protein phosphorylation regulates numerous cellular processes. Identifying the substrates and protein kinases involved is vital to understand how these important posttranslational modifications modulate biological function in eukaryotic cells. Pyrophosphatases catalyze the hydrolysis of inorganic phosphate (PPi) to inorganic phosphate Pi, driving biosynthetic reactions; they are essential for low cytosolic inorganic phosphate. It was suggested recently that posttranslational regulation of Family I soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (sPPases) may affect their activity. We previously demonstrated that two pollen-expressed sPPases, Pr-p26.1a and Pr-p26.1b, from the flowering plant Papaver rhoeas were inhibited by phosphorylation. Despite the potential significance, there is a paucity of data on sPPase phosphorylation and regulation. Here, we used liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry to map phosphorylation sites to the otherwise divergent amino-terminal extensions on these pollen sPPases. Despite the absence of reports in the literature on mapping phosphorylation sites on sPPases, a database survey of various proteomes identified a number of examples, suggesting that phosphorylation may be a more widely used mechanism to regulate these enzymes. Phosphomimetic mutants of Pr-p26.1a/b significantly and differentially reduced PPase activities by up to 2.5-fold at pH 6.8 and 52% in the presence of Ca(2+) and hydrogen peroxide over unmodified proteins. This indicates that phosphoregulation of key sites can inhibit the catalytic responsiveness of these proteins in concert with key intracellular events. As sPPases are essential for many metabolic pathways in eukaryotic cells, our findings identify the phosphorylation of sPPases as a potential master regulatory mechanism that could be used to attenuate metabolism.

  17. Evidence for segmental mobility in the active site of pepsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, J.; Strop, P.; Senn, H.; Foundling, S.; Kostka, V.

    1986-05-01

    The low hydrolytic activity (k/sub cat/ < 0.001 s/sup -1/) of chicken pepsin (CP) towards tri- and tetrapeptides is enhanced at least 100 times by modification of its single sulfhydryl group of Cys-115, with little effect on K/sub m/-values. Modification thus simulates the effect of secondary substrate binding on pepsin catalysis. The rate of Cys-115 modification is substantially decreased in the presence of some competitive inhibitors, suggesting its active site location. Experiments with CP alkylated at Cys-115 with Acrylodan as a fluorescent probe or with N-iodoacetyl-(4-fluoro)-aniline as a /sup 19/F-nmr probe suggest conformation change around Cys-115 to occur on substrate or substrate analog binding. The difference /sup 1/H-nmr spectra (500 MHz) of unmodified free and inhibitor-complexed CP reveal chemical shifts almost exclusively in the aromatic region. The effects of Cu/sup + +/ on /sup 19/F- and /sup 1/H-nmr spectra have been studied. Examination of a computer graphics model of CP based on E. parasitica pepsin-inhibitor complex X-ray coordinates suggests that Cys-115 is located near the S/sub 3//S/sub 5/ binding site. The results are interpreted in favor of segmental mobility of this region important for pepsin substrate binding and catalysis.

  18. First Principles Computational Study of the Active Site of Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Ivaylo; Klien, Micheal

    2004-01-14

    Ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to investigate the structural features of the active site of the binuclear enzyme rat liver arginase. Special emphasis was placed on the crucial role of the second shell ligand interactions. These interactions were systematically studied by performing calculations on models of varying size. It was determined that a water molecule, and not hydroxide, is the bridging exogenous ligand. The carboxylate ligands facilitate the close approach of the Mn (II) ions by attenuating the metal-metal electrostatic repulsion. Of the two metals, MnA was shown to carry a larger positive charge. Analysis of the electronic properties of the active site revealed that orbitals involving the terminal Asp234 residue, as well as the flexible -1,1 bridging Asp232, lie at high energies, suggesting weaker coordination. This is reflected in certain structural variability present in our models and is also consistent with recent experimental findings. Finally, implications of our findings for the biological function of the enzyme are delineated.

  19. Elucidating Oxygen Reduction Active Sites in Pyrolyzed Metal–Nitrogen Coordinated Non-Precious-Metal Electrocatalyst Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Detailed understanding of the nature of the active centers in non-precious-metal-based electrocatalyst, and their role in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanistic pathways will have a profound effect on successful commercialization of emission-free energy devices such as fuel cells. Recently, using pyrolyzed model structures of iron porphyrins, we have demonstrated that a covalent integration of the Fe–Nx sites into π-conjugated carbon basal plane modifies electron donating/withdrawing capability of the carbonaceous ligand, consequently improving ORR activity. Here, we employ a combination of in situ X-ray spectroscopy and electrochemical methods to identify the various structural and functional forms of the active centers in non-heme Fe/N/C catalysts. Both methods corroboratively confirm the single site 2e– × 2e– mechanism in alkaline media on the primary Fe2+–N4 centers and the dual-site 2e– × 2e– mechanism in acid media with the significant role of the surface bound coexisting Fe/FexOy nanoparticles (NPs) as the secondary active sites. PMID:24817921

  20. Elucidating Oxygen Reduction Active Sites in Pyrolyzed Metal-Nitrogen Coordinated Non-Precious-Metal Electrocatalyst Systems.

    PubMed

    Tylus, Urszula; Jia, Qingying; Strickland, Kara; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Serov, Alexey; Atanassov, Plamen; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    Detailed understanding of the nature of the active centers in non-precious-metal-based electrocatalyst, and their role in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanistic pathways will have a profound effect on successful commercialization of emission-free energy devices such as fuel cells. Recently, using pyrolyzed model structures of iron porphyrins, we have demonstrated that a covalent integration of the Fe-N x sites into π-conjugated carbon basal plane modifies electron donating/withdrawing capability of the carbonaceous ligand, consequently improving ORR activity. Here, we employ a combination of in situ X-ray spectroscopy and electrochemical methods to identify the various structural and functional forms of the active centers in non-heme Fe/N/C catalysts. Both methods corroboratively confirm the single site 2e(-) × 2e(-) mechanism in alkaline media on the primary Fe(2+)-N4 centers and the dual-site 2e(-) × 2e(-) mechanism in acid media with the significant role of the surface bound coexisting Fe/Fe x O y nanoparticles (NPs) as the secondary active sites.

  1. Ligand discrimination of myoglobin in solution: an iron L-edge X-ray absorption study of the active centre.

    PubMed

    Lange, Kathrin M; Golnak, Ronny; Bonhommeau, Sébastien; Aziz, Emad F

    2013-05-14

    Iron L-edge X-ray absorption spectra of the active centre of myoglobin in the met-form, in the reduced form and upon ligation to O2, CO, NO and CN are presented. The strength of ligation with the iron centre is finger-printed through the variation of the L3 : L2 intensity ratio. Charge Transfer Multiplet calculations are performed and give qualitative information about oxidation states as well as charge transfer.

  2. Content of total iron, copper and manganese in liver of animals during hypokinesia, muscle activity and process of recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapovich, G. M.; Taneyeva, G. V.; Uteshev, A. B.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that the content of total iron, copper and manganese in the liver of animals is altered depending on the intensity and duration of their swimming. Hypodynamia for 7 days does not alter the concentration of iron, but sufficiently increases the content of copper and manganese. The barometric factor effectively influences the maintenance of constancy in the content of microelements accumulated in the liver after intensive muscle activity.

  3. An innovative method for nondestructive analysis of cast iron artifacts at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Martin f. Helmke,

    2014-01-01

    Sampling cast iron produced by the furnace posed two problems. First, verification that the iron was actually cast at Hopewell Furnace was necessary, as some iron objects found at Hopewell may not have originated there. This was accomplished by using artifacts on display at the Hopewell visitor center (fig. 2). All artifacts on display have been positively attributed to the furnace, and stoves produced by the furnace are easily recognized by the name “Hopewell” cast into them. The second problem was the analysis of the trace metal content of the cast iron, because it was not possible to break off part of a historically important artifact and send it to a laboratory for analysis. This problem was solved when the USGS collaborated with West Chester University, which owns a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer.

  4. Why copper is preferred over iron for oxygen activation and reduction in haem-copper oxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagi-Damodaran, Ambika; Michael, Matthew A.; Zhu, Qianhong; Reed, Julian; Sandoval, Braddock A.; Mirts, Evan N.; Chakraborty, Saumen; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Haem-copper oxidase (HCO) catalyses the natural reduction of oxygen to water using a haem-copper centre. Despite decades of research on HCOs, the role of non-haem metal and the reason for nature's choice of copper over other metals such as iron remains unclear. Here, we use a biosynthetic model of HCO in myoglobin that selectively binds different non-haem metals to demonstrate 30-fold and 11-fold enhancements in the oxidase activity of Cu- and Fe-bound HCO mimics, respectively, as compared with Zn-bound mimics. Detailed electrochemical, kinetic and vibrational spectroscopic studies, in tandem with theoretical density functional theory calculations, demonstrate that the non-haem metal not only donates electrons to oxygen but also activates it for efficient O-O bond cleavage. Furthermore, the higher redox potential of copper and the enhanced weakening of the O-O bond from the higher electron density in the d orbital of copper are central to its higher oxidase activity over iron. This work resolves a long-standing question in bioenergetics, and renders a chemical-biological basis for the design of future oxygen-reduction catalysts.

  5. Why the White Bear is Still There: Electrophysiological Evidence for Ironic Semantic Activation during Thought Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Ryan J.; Wicha, Nicole Y. Y.

    2010-01-01

    Much research has focused on the paradoxical effects of thought suppression, leading to the viewpoint that increases in unwanted thoughts are due to an ironic monitoring process which increases the activation of the very thoughts one is trying to rid from consciousness. However, it remains unclear from behavioral findings whether suppressed thoughts become more accessible during the act of suppression. In the current study, event-related potentials were recorded while participants suppressed or expressed thoughts of a focus word during a simple lexical decision task. Modulations in the N400 component reported here demonstrate the paradoxical effects occurring at the semantic level during suppression, as well as some evidence for the rebound effect after suppression periods. Interestingly, semantic activation was greater for focus words during suppression than expression, despite differences in the N1 window suggesting that expression elicited greater perceptual processing than suppression. Results provide electrophysiological evidence for the Ironic Process model and support recent claims of asymmetric network activation during thought suppression. PMID:20044982

  6. Why copper is preferred over iron for oxygen activation and reduction in haem-copper oxidases.

    PubMed

    Bhagi-Damodaran, Ambika; Michael, Matthew A; Zhu, Qianhong; Reed, Julian; Sandoval, Braddock A; Mirts, Evan N; Chakraborty, Saumen; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Yi

    2017-03-01

    Haem-copper oxidase (HCO) catalyses the natural reduction of oxygen to water using a haem-copper centre. Despite decades of research on HCOs, the role of non-haem metal and the reason for nature's choice of copper over other metals such as iron remains unclear. Here, we use a biosynthetic model of HCO in myoglobin that selectively binds different non-haem metals to demonstrate 30-fold and 11-fold enhancements in the oxidase activity of Cu- and Fe-bound HCO mimics, respectively, as compared with Zn-bound mimics. Detailed electrochemical, kinetic and vibrational spectroscopic studies, in tandem with theoretical density functional theory calculations, demonstrate that the non-haem metal not only donates electrons to oxygen but also activates it for efficient O-O bond cleavage. Furthermore, the higher redox potential of copper and the enhanced weakening of the O-O bond from the higher electron density in the d orbital of copper are central to its higher oxidase activity over iron. This work resolves a long-standing question in bioenergetics, and renders a chemical-biological basis for the design of future oxygen-reduction catalysts.

  7. C-H Activation on Co,O Sites: Isolated Surface Sites versus Molecular Analogs.

    PubMed

    Estes, Deven P; Siddiqi, Georges; Allouche, Florian; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Safonova, Olga V; Trigub, Alexander L; Koptyug, Igor V; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-11-16

    The activation and conversion of hydrocarbons is one of the most important challenges in chemistry. Transition-metal ions (V, Cr, Fe, Co, etc.) isolated on silica surfaces are known to catalyze such processes. The mechanisms of these processes are currently unknown but are thought to involve C-H activation as the rate-determining step. Here, we synthesize well-defined Co(II) ions on a silica surface using a metal siloxide precursor followed by thermal treatment under vacuum at 500 °C. We show that these isolated Co(II) sites are catalysts for a number of hydrocarbon conversion reactions, such as the dehydrogenation of propane, the hydrogenation of propene, and the trimerization of terminal alkynes. We then investigate the mechanisms of these processes using kinetics, kinetic isotope effects, isotopic labeling experiments, parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) NMR, and comparison with a molecular analog. The data are consistent with all of these reactions occurring by a common mechanism, involving heterolytic C-H or H-H activation via a 1,2 addition across a Co-O bond.

  8. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  9. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  10. Determination of iron sites and the amount of amorphization in radiation-damaged titanite (CaSiTiO5).

    PubMed

    Salje, E K H; Safarik, D J; Taylor, R D; Pasternak, M P; Modic, K A; Groat, L A; Lashley, J C

    2011-03-16

    Iron is a ubiquitous impurity in metamict (radiation-damaged and partially amorphized) materials such as titanite (CaSiTiO(5)). Using (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy we find that iron in metamict titanite is partitioned between amorphous and crystalline regions based on valence. Trivalent iron exists in the crystalline titanite matrix whereas divalent iron exists almost exclusively in radiation-amorphized regions. We find that the relative abundances of the oxidation states correlate with the volume fraction of amorphous and crystalline regions. Our data also show that oxidation of iron proceeds along with the recrystallization of the amorphized regions. Recrystallization is confirmed to occur over the range 700 °C < T < 925 °C, and no further structural changes are observed at higher temperatures. It is surprising that our Mössbauer measurements show divalent iron to be surrounded by titanite with a high degree of short-range structural order in the amorphized regions. This observation is fundamentally different from other metamict materials such as zircon (ZrSiO(4)), where amorphized regions show no short-range order.

  11. Correlation between Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, Free Iron Content and Lipid Oxidation in Four Lines of Korean Native Chicken Meat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Chang-Yeon; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to observe the association between antioxidant enzyme activity, free iron content and lipid oxidation of Korean native chicken (KNC) meat during refrigerated storage. Four lines of KNC (Yeonsan ogye, Hyunin black, Hoengseong yakdak and Hwangbong) were raised under similar conditions. A total of 16 roosters were randomly sampled and slaughtered at the age of 12 mon. The breast and thigh meats were stored aerobically for 10 d at 4℃. Although thigh meat had higher antioxidant enzyme activity, it was more susceptible to lipid oxidation and released more iron during storage than breast meat. Aerobic refrigerated storage for 10 d significantly decreased the activity of antioxidant enzymes and increased the amount of free iron and malondialdehyde. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were negatively correlated with lipid oxidation, whereas that of catalase was not. The amount of free iron was positively associated with lipid oxidation. We concluded that chicken line did not affect strongly on antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid oxidation in breast meat of KNC. However, the thigh meat of Hwangbong and Hyunin black had higher SOD and GSH-Px activity, respectively, and lower malondialdehyde contents than that of other chickens. SOD, GSH-Px and free iron play significant roles in meat lipid oxidation during refrigerated storage. PMID:27499663

  12. Anaemia, Serum Iron Concentrations and δ-Aminolevulinate Dehydratase Activity in Laying Hens Infected Naturally by Salmonella Gallinarum.

    PubMed

    Machado, A C; Boiago, M M; do Carmo, G M; Bottari, N B; Araujo, D N; Giuriatti, J; Morsch, V M; Schetinger, M R C; Casagrande, R A; Wisser, C S; Stefani, L M; Alves, M S; Da Silva, A S

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate anaemia, serum iron concentrations and δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALA-D) activity in laying hens infected naturally by Salmonella Gallinarum and having severe hepatic lesions. Liver and serum samples were collected from 27 laying hens (20 infected and seven uninfected). The δ-ALA-D activity, haematocrit and serum iron concentrations were evaluated. There were significant decreases in δ-ALA-D activity, haematocrit and serum iron concentrations (P <0.01) in birds infected by S. Gallinarum when compared with uninfected birds. There was a positive correlation (P <0.001) between serum iron concentration, haematocrit (r(2) = 0.82) and δ-ALA-D activity (r(2) = 0.75). A positive correlation was also observed between δ-ALA-D activity and haematocrit (r(2) = 0.78; P <0.01). Liver samples showed moderate focal coagulative necrosis associated with infiltration of lymphoplasmacytic cells, macrophages and heterophils. The anaemia in the infected hens may be related to reduction in δ-ALA-D activity and serum iron concentrations, since both are important for haemopoiesis.

  13. Indications of Coupled Carbon and Iron Cycling at a Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Site from Time-Lapse Magnetic Susceptibility (MS) Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, A.; Slater, L. D.; Atekwana, E. A.; Rossbach, S.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Bekins, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) data acquired at hydrocarbon contaminated sites have documented enhanced MS within the smear zone (zone of water table fluctuation at hydrocarbon contaminated location) coincident with the free phase (mobile or free liquids moving down through the unsaturated zone independent of the direction of flow of the groundwater or surface water) hydrocarbon plume These studies suggest that magnetic susceptibility can be used as a tool to: (1) infer regions of hydrocarbon contamination, and (2) investigate intrinsic bioremediation by iron reducing bacteria. We performed a campaign of time-lapse MS monitoring at the National Crude Oil Spill Fate and Natural Attenuation Research Site (Bemidji, MN) between July 2011 and August 2015. This highly instrumented site has multiple boreholes installed through the free phase, dissolved phase and uncontaminated portions of the aquifer impacted by an oil spill resulting from a pipeline rupture in 1979. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) data acquired in 2011 showed that MS values in the smear zone are higher than in the dissolved phase plume and background, leading to the hypothesis that MS measurements could be used to monitor the long-term progress of biodegradation at the site. However, repeated MS data acquired in 2014 and 2015 showed strong changes in the character of the MS signal in the smear zone with multiple free phase contamination locations showing a strong suppression of the signal relative to that observed in 2011. Other locations in the dissolved phase of the plume show evidence for vertical migration of the zone of enhanced MS, possibly due to changes in the redox profiles driven by hydrology. Such changes in the MS signal are hypothesized to result from either variations in Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratios in the magnetite or changes in the magnetite concentration associated with coupled carbon and iron biogeochemistry. This work is generating a unique time-lapse geophysical dataset providing information on

  14. Uniform 2 nm gold nanoparticles supported on iron oxides as active catalysts for CO oxidation reaction: Structure-activity relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yu; Senanayake, Sanjaya; Gu, Dong; Jin, Zhao; Du, Pei -Pei; Si, Rui; Xu, Wen -Qian; Huang, Yu -Ying; Tao, Jing; Song, Qi -Sheng; Jia, Chun -Jia; Schueth, Ferdi

    2015-01-12

    Uniform Au nanoparticles (~2 nm) with narrow size-distribution (standard deviation: 0.5–0.6 nm) supported on both hydroxylated (Fe_OH) and dehydrated iron oxide (Fe_O) have been prepared by either deposition-precipitation (DP) or colloidal-deposition (CD) methods. Different structural and textural characterizations were applied to the dried, calcined and used gold-iron oxide samples. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) described the high homogeneity in the supported Au nanoparticles. The ex-situ and in-situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) characterization monitored the electronic and short-range local structure of active gold species. The synchrotron-based in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), together with the corresponding temperature-programmed reduction by hydrogen (H₂-TPR), indicated a structural evolution of the iron-oxide supports, correlating to their reducibility. An inverse order of catalytic activity between DP (Au/Fe_OH < Au/Fe_O) and CD (Au/Fe_OH > Au/Fe_O) was observed. Effective gold-support interaction results in a high activity for gold nanoparticles, locally generated by the sintering of dispersed Au atoms on the oxide support in the DP synthesis, while a hydroxylated surface favors the reactivity of externally introduced Au nanoparticles on Fe_OH support for the CD approach. This work reveals why differences in the synthetic protocol translate to differences in the catalytic performance of Au/FeOx catalysts with very similar structural characteristics in CO oxidation.

  15. Uniform 2 nm gold nanoparticles supported on iron oxides as active catalysts for CO oxidation reaction: Structure-activity relationship

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Yu; Senanayake, Sanjaya; Gu, Dong; ...

    2015-01-12

    Uniform Au nanoparticles (~2 nm) with narrow size-distribution (standard deviation: 0.5–0.6 nm) supported on both hydroxylated (Fe_OH) and dehydrated iron oxide (Fe_O) have been prepared by either deposition-precipitation (DP) or colloidal-deposition (CD) methods. Different structural and textural characterizations were applied to the dried, calcined and used gold-iron oxide samples. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) described the high homogeneity in the supported Au nanoparticles. The ex-situ and in-situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) characterization monitored the electronic and short-range local structure of active gold species. The synchrotron-based in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), together with the corresponding temperature-programmed reductionmore » by hydrogen (H₂-TPR), indicated a structural evolution of the iron-oxide supports, correlating to their reducibility. An inverse order of catalytic activity between DP (Au/Fe_OH < Au/Fe_O) and CD (Au/Fe_OH > Au/Fe_O) was observed. Effective gold-support interaction results in a high activity for gold nanoparticles, locally generated by the sintering of dispersed Au atoms on the oxide support in the DP synthesis, while a hydroxylated surface favors the reactivity of externally introduced Au nanoparticles on Fe_OH support for the CD approach. This work reveals why differences in the synthetic protocol translate to differences in the catalytic performance of Au/FeOx catalysts with very similar structural characteristics in CO oxidation.« less

  16. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  17. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  18. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  19. An active site water network in the plasminogen activator pla from Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-07-14

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 A. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  20. Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, Iron Content and Lipid Oxidation of Raw and Cooked Meat of Korean Native Chickens and Other Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Muhlisin; Utama, Dicky Tri; Lee, Jae Ho; Choi, Ji Hye; Lee, Sung Ki

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to observe antioxidant enzyme activity, iron content and lipid oxidation of Korean native chickens and other poultry. The breast and thigh meat of three Korean native chicken breeds including Woorimatdak, Hyunin black and Yeonsan ogye, and three commercial poultry breeds including the broiler, White Leghorn and Pekin duck (Anasplatyrhyncos domesticus) were studied. The analyses of the antioxidant enzymes activity, iron content and lipid oxidation were performed in raw and cooked samples. The activity of catalase (CAT) in the thigh meat was higher than that of the breast meat of three Korean native chickens and the broiler, respectively. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the uncooked thigh meat of three Korean native chickens was higher than that of the breasts. The breast meat of Woorimatdak and Pekin duck had higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity than the others, while only the thigh meat of Pekin duck had the highest activity. Cooking inactivated CAT and decreased the activity of GPx and SOD. The thigh meat of Woorimatdak, White Leghorn, Yeonsan ogye and Hyunin black contained more total iron than the breast meat of those breeds. The heme-iron lost during cooking ranged from 3.2% to 14.8%. It is noted that the thigh meat had higher thiobarbituric acid reactive substances values than the breast in all chicken breeds. Though Woorimatdak showed higher antioxidant enzyme activity and lower released-iron percentage among Korean native chickens, no differences were found on lipid oxidation. We confirm that the dark meat of poultry exhibited higher antioxidant enzyme activity and contained more iron than the white meat. PMID:26954148

  1. The influence of iron limitation on the growth and activity of Crocosphaera watsonii, an unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacq, V.; Ridame, C.

    2012-04-01

    Diazotrophic cyanobacteria are able to use atmospheric dinitrogen (N2) dissolved in seawater as source of nitrogen for primary production. This metabolic function confers an ecological advantage for such organisms in N-limited environments, such as tropical oligotrophic regions. There, N2 fixation represents a significant source of new nitrogen in the euphotic zone which is available for the non diazotrophic phytoplankton community. Thus, diazotrophic cyanobacteria contribute significantly to new production and play a key role in the global cycling of carbon and nitrogen. The filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacterium Trichodesmium is the best known and most studied marine diazotroph. However, recent research has highlighted the biogeochemical importance of unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria (UCYN), such as Crocosphaera watsonii. The factors that control N2 fixation have been intensively studied. Due to the high iron content of the nitrogenase enzyme complex, N2 fixation and growth of diazotrophic cyanobacteria can be controlled by iron bioavailability. Many studies have been conducted on the impact of iron limitation on Trichodesmium, but less is known for UCYN. Here, for the first time, we address the issue of iron limitation on the N2 fixation and growth of UCYN, namely Crocosphaera watsonii. We have designed a study on cultures of Crocosphaera watsonii strain WH8501 grown under a range of dissolved iron, from 2 nM to 400 nM, with a constant EDTA concentration of 2 µM. Our experiment encompasses low iron concentrations (2 nM), representative of those measured in the field. Preliminary findings demonstrate a major control of iron availability on the biomass and growth of Crocosphaera watsonii. These results, complemented with data on photosynthetic and diazotrophic activities, significantly contribute to our understanding of the dynamics of N2 fixation by unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria and of the role of iron in controlling this process. Keywords: N2

  2. Contribution of chlorogenic acids to the iron-reducing activity of coffee beverages.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Daniel P; Monteiro, Mariana C; Ribeiro-Alves, Mirna; Donangelo, Carmen M; Trugo, Luiz C

    2005-03-09

    The iron-reducing activity of coffee beverages was determined by the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. The influence on FRAP due to the degree of roasting (light, medium, and dark), species (Coffea arabica and Coffea robusta), and caffeine content (regular and decaffeinated) was investigated using ground and soluble coffee samples. The concentration of specific chlorogenic acids and caffeine in the beverages was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and related to FRAP using Pearson correlation coefficients. All measurements were expressed per unit of soluble solids. Beverages prepared with ground coffee had, on average, 27% higher FRAP values than those prepared with soluble coffee (p < 0.05). In the former beverages, FRAP of C. robusta samples was significantly higher (on average, 50.3%) when compared to that of C. arabica samples, and FRAP values decreased with increasing degree of roasting (p < 0.05). A strong correlation (r > 0.91) was found between FRAP and the total content of chlorogenic acids, particularly that of the caffeoylquinic acid isomers. The iron-reducing activity of coffee beverages was not influenced by caffeine.

  3. Preparation of iron oxide nanoparticles-decorated carbon nanotube using laser ablation in liquid and their antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Khashan, Khawla S; Sulaiman, Ghassan M; Mahdi, Rafal

    2017-02-01

    The antimicrobial activity was investigated for iron oxide IO nanoparticles (NPs)-decorated carbon nanotubes CNT prepared successfully by Nd:YAG-pulsed laser ablation in the liquid process. TEM reveals the composite NP and exhibits semispherical of iron oxide NPs, which aggregate around rolled and unrolled graphene sheet. XRD pattern proved the presence of carbon and different phases of IO NPs. Then, the antibacterial activity of the NPs was examined against different bacteria using nutrient broth and nutrient agar methods, which was enhanced using IO. In addition, the wound-healing activity for the best antibacterial concentration is tested by using animal models successfully.

  4. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  5. Formation mechanism and biological activity of novel thiolated human-like collagen iron complex.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chenhui; Liu, Lingyun; Deng, Jianjun; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Hui, Junfeng; Fan, Daidi

    2016-03-01

    To develop an iron supplement that is effectively absorbed and utilized, thiolated human-like collagen was created to improve the iron binding capacity of human-like collagen. A thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex was prepared in a phosphate buffer, and one mole of thiolated human-like collagen-iron possessed approximately 28.83 moles of iron. The characteristics of thiolated human-like collagen-iron were investigated by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry. The results showed that the thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex retained the secondary structure of human-like collagen and had greater thermodynamic stability than human-like collagen, although interactions between iron ions and human-like collagen occurred during the formation of the complex. In addition, to evaluate the bioavailability of thiolated human-like collagen-iron, an in vitro Caco-2 cell model and an in vivo iron deficiency anemia mouse model were employed. The data demonstrated that the thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex exhibited greater bioavailability and was more easily utilized than FeSO4, ferric ammonium citrate, or ferrous glycinate. These results indicated that the thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex is a potential iron supplement in the biomedical field.

  6. Characterization of the active site of ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munshi, C; Thiel, D J; Mathews, I I; Aarhus, R; Walseth, T F; Lee, H C

    1999-10-22

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase synthesizes two Ca(2+) messengers by cyclizing NAD to produce cyclic ADP-ribose and exchanging nicotinic acid with the nicotinamide group of NADP to produce nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Recombinant Aplysia cyclase was expressed in yeast and co-crystallized with a substrate, nicotinamide. x-ray crystallography showed that the nicotinamide was bound in a pocket formed in part by a conserved segment and was near the central cleft of the cyclase. Glu(98), Asn(107) and Trp(140) were within 3.5 A of the bound nicotinamide and appeared to coordinate it. Substituting Glu(98) with either Gln, Gly, Leu, or Asn reduced the cyclase activity by 16-222-fold, depending on the substitution. The mutant N107G exhibited only a 2-fold decrease in activity, while the activity of W140G was essentially eliminated. The base exchange activity of all mutants followed a similar pattern of reduction, suggesting that both reactions occur at the same active site. In addition to NAD, the wild-type cyclase also cyclizes nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide to cyclic GDP-ribose. All mutant enzymes had at least half of the GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity of the wild type, some even 2-3-fold higher, indicating that the three coordinating amino acids are responsible for positioning of the substrate but not absolutely critical for catalysis. To search for the catalytic residues, other amino acids in the binding pocket were mutagenized. E179G was totally devoid of GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity, and both its ADP-ribosyl cyclase and the base exchange activities were reduced by 10,000- and 18,000-fold, respectively. Substituting Glu(179) with either Asn, Leu, Asp, or Gln produced similar inactive enzymes, and so was the conversion of Trp(77) to Gly. However, both E179G and the double mutant E179G/W77G retained NAD-binding ability as shown by photoaffinity labeling with [(32)P]8-azido-NAD. These results indicate that both Glu(179) and Trp(77) are crucial for catalysis and

  7. Activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels enhances DMT1-mediated iron uptake in SK-N-SH cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xixun; Xu, Huamin; Shi, Limin; Jiang, Zhifeng; Song, Ning; Jiang, Hong; Xie, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Iron importer divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) plays a crucial role in the nigal iron accumulation in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Membrane hyperpolarization is one of the factors that could affect its iron transport function. Besides iron, selective activation of the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels also contributes to the vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons in PD. Interestingly, activation of KATP channels could induce membrane hyperpolarization. Therefore, it is of vital importance to study the effects of activation of KATP channels on DMT1-mediated iron uptake function. In the present study, activation of KATP channels by diazoxide resulted in the hyperpolarization of the membrane potential and increased DMT1-mediated iron uptake in SK-N-SH cells. This led to an increase in intracellular iron levels and a subsequent decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in ROS production. Delayed inactivation of the Fe2+-evoked currents by diazoxide was recorded by patch clamp in HEK293 cells, which demonstrated that diazoxide could prolonged DMT1-facilitated iron transport. While inhibition of KATP channels by glibenclamide could block ferrous iron influx and the subsequent cell damage. Overexpression of Kir6.2/SUR1 resulted in an increase in iron influx and intracellular iron levels, which was markedly increased after diazoxide treatment. PMID:27646472

  8. The iron complex of Dp44mT is redox-active and induces hydroxyl radical formation: an EPR study.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Patric J; Hawkins, Clare L; Lovejoy, David B; Richardson, Des R

    2010-11-01

    Iron chelation therapy was initially designed to alleviate the toxic effects of excess iron evident in iron-overload diseases. However, some iron chelator-metal complexes have also gained interest due to their high redox activity and toxicological properties that have potential for cancer chemotherapy. This communication addresses the conflicting results published recently on the ability of the iron chelator, Dp44mT, to induce hydroxyl radical formation upon complexation with iron (B.B. Hasinoff and D. Patel, J Inorg. Biochem.103 (2009), 1093-1101). This previous study used EPR spin-trapping to show that Dp44mT-iron complexes were not able to generate hydroxyl radicals. Here, we demonstrate the opposite by using the same technique under very similar conditions to show the Dp44mT-iron complex is indeed redox-active and induces hydroxyl radical formation. This was studied directly in an iron(II)/H(2)O(2) reaction system or using a reducing iron(III)/ascorbate system implementing several different buffers at pH 7.4. The demonstration by EPR that the Dp44mT-iron complex is redox-active confirms our previous studies using cyclic voltammetry, ascorbate oxidation, benzoate hydroxylation and a plasmid DNA strand-break assay. We discuss the relevance of the redox activity to the biological effects of Dp44mT.

  9. Mutations inducing an active-site aperture in Rhizobium sp. sucrose isomerase confer hydrolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Alexandra; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Robert, Xavier; Rhimi, Moez; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Aghajari, Nushin

    2013-02-01

    Sucrose isomerase is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of sucrose isomers of high biotechnological and pharmaceutical interest. Owing to the complexity of the chemical synthesis of these isomers, isomaltulose and trehalulose, enzymatic conversion remains the preferred method for obtaining these products. Depending on the microbial source, the ratio of the sucrose-isomer products varies significantly. In studies aimed at understanding and explaining the underlying molecular mechanisms of these reactions, mutations obtained using a random-mutagenesis approach displayed a major hydrolytic activity. Two of these variants, R284C and F164L, of sucrose isomerase from Rhizobium sp. were therefore crystallized and their crystal structures were determined. The three-dimensional structures of these mutants allowed the identification of the molecular determinants that favour hydrolytic activity compared with transferase activity. Substantial conformational changes resulting in an active-site opening were observed, as were changes in the pattern of water molecules bordering the active-site region.

  10. Disposal of iron by a mutant form of lipocalin 2

    PubMed Central

    Barasch, Jonathan; Hollmen, Maria; Deng, Rong; Hod, Eldad A.; Rupert, Peter B.; Abergel, Rebecca J.; Allred, Benjamin E.; Xu, Katherine; Darrah, Shaun F.; Tekabe, Yared; Perlstein, Alan; Wax, Rebecca; Bruck, Efrat; Stauber, Jacob; Corbin, Kaitlyn A.; Buchen, Charles; Slavkovich, Vesna; Graziano, Joseph; Spitalnik, Steven L.; Bao, Guanhu; Strong, Roland K.; Qiu, Andong

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload damages many organs. Unfortunately, therapeutic iron chelators also have undesired toxicity and may deliver iron to microbes. Here we show that a mutant form (K3Cys) of endogenous lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is filtered by the kidney but can bypass sites of megalin-dependent recapture, resulting in urinary excretion. Because K3Cys maintains recognition of its cognate ligand, the iron siderophore enterochelin, this protein can capture and transport iron even in the acidic conditions of urine. Mutant LCN2 strips iron from transferrin and citrate, and delivers it into the urine. In addition, it removes iron from iron overloaded mice, including models of acquired (iron-dextran or stored red blood cells) and primary (Hfe−/−) iron overload. In each case, the mutants reduce redox activity typical of non-transferrin-bound iron. In summary, we present a non-toxic strategy for iron chelation and urinary elimination, based on manipulating an endogenous protein:siderophore:iron clearance pathway. PMID:27796299

  11. Iron-Targeting Antitumor Activity of Gallium Compounds and Novel Insights Into Triapine®-Metal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Antholine, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Despite advances made in the treatment of cancer, a significant number of patients succumb to this disease every year. Hence, there is a great need to develop new anticancer agents. Recent Advances: Emerging data show that malignant cells have a greater requirement for iron than normal cells do and that proteins involved in iron import, export, and storage may be altered in cancer cells. Therefore, strategies to perturb these iron-dependent steps in malignant cells hold promise for the treatment of cancer. Recent studies show that gallium compounds and metal-thiosemicarbazone complexes inhibit tumor cell growth by targeting iron homeostasis, including iron-dependent ribonucleotide reductase. Chemical similarities of gallium(III) with iron(III) enable the former to mimic the latter and interpose itself in critical iron-dependent steps in cellular proliferation. Newer gallium compounds have emerged with additional mechanisms of action. In clinical trials, the first-generation-compound gallium nitrate has exhibited activity against bladder cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, while the thiosemicarbazone Triapine® has demonstrated activity against other tumors. Critical Issues: Novel gallium compounds with greater cytotoxicity and a broader spectrum of antineoplastic activity than gallium nitrate should continue to be developed. Future Directions: The antineoplastic activity and toxicity of the existing novel gallium compounds and thiosemicarbazone-metal complexes should be tested in animal tumor models and advanced to Phase I and II clinical trials. Future research should identify biologic markers that predict tumor sensitivity to gallium compounds. This will help direct gallium-based therapy to cancer patients who are most likely to benefit from it. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000–000. PMID:22900955

  12. Expression of the iron-activated nspA and secY genes in Neisseria meningitidis group B by Fur-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Yazdani B; Grogan, Susan; Davey, Michael; Sebastian, Shite; Goswami, Sulip; Szmigielski, Borys; Genco, Caroline A

    2007-01-01

    Our whole-genome microarray studies of Neisseria meningitidis MC58 previously identified a set of 153 genes whose transcription was activated during growth in iron. In this study, Fur-mediated regulation of the iron-activated nspA gene was confirmed, whereas iron-activated regulation of the secY gene was demonstrated to be Fur independent. Analysis of the Fur binding sequences in the nspA gene and an additional iron-activated and Fur-regulated gene identified a hexameric (G/T)ATAAT unit in the operator regions of these genes similar to that observed in Fur- and iron-repressed genes. These studies indicate that the expression of the iron-activated nspA and secY genes in N. meningitidis occur by Fur-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively.

  13. Expression of the Iron-Activated nspA and secY Genes in Neisseria meningitidis Group B by Fur-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms▿

    PubMed Central

    Shaik, Yazdani B.; Grogan, Susan; Davey, Michael; Sebastian, Shite; Goswami, Sulip; Szmigielski, Borys; Genco, Caroline A.

    2007-01-01

    Our whole-genome microarray studies of Neisseria meningitidis MC58 previously identified a set of 153 genes whose transcription was activated during growth in iron. In this study, Fur-mediated regulation of the iron-activated nspA gene was confirmed, whereas iron-activated regulation of the secY gene was demonstrated to be Fur independent. Analysis of the Fur binding sequences in the nspA gene and an additional iron-activated and Fur-regulated gene identified a hexameric (G/T)ATAAT unit in the operator regions of these genes similar to that observed in Fur- and iron-repressed genes. These studies indicate that the expression of the iron-activated nspA and secY genes in N. meningitidis occur by Fur-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. PMID:17085550

  14. Relationship between the properties of iron sulfides and their catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F. V.; Granoff, B.

    1981-01-01

    Iron sulfides, such as pyrite, are known catalysts in coal liquefaction and produce significant increases in both conversion and distillate (850 F/sup -/) yield. The main objective of this work is to increase the catalytic activity of iron sulfides by systematically changing the following properties: composition, source, particle size, surface area, morphology and defect level. Several iron sulfides have been synthesized including pyrite (FeS/sub 2/) with 46.6 wt % Fe, pyrrhotite (Fe/sub 1-x/S) with about 60 wt % Fe and mackinawite (Fe/sub 9/S/sub 8/) with 66.2 wt % Fe. The source variations have included commercial material and minerals. The pyrite particle sizes ranged from -350 to -5..mu..m, the pyrite surface areas varied from 2 to >10 m/sup 2//g, the mackinawite surface areas ranged from 40 to 80 m/sup 2//g, and pyrite morphologies included massive material and a concentrate of framboids from Iowa coal. Moessbauer studies of the pyrrhotites in coal liquefaction residues have shown that there is a direct correlation between conversion and the number of vacancies in the pyrrhotite. Pyrites with enhanced defect levels were prepared by explosively shock loading Robena pyrite at 15 GPa. All these materials have been tested in either tubing reactor or autoclave runs with West Virginia Blacksville No. 2 coal and SRC-II heavy distillate (550/sup 0/F/sup +/). The runs were carried out at 425/sup 0/C, 500 psi H/sub 2/ (cold charge) for 30 minutes with a 7.5 wt % catalyst loading. All these materials have shown catalytic effects as compared to uncatalyzed thermal runs.

  15. Characterization of the active site topography of manganese peroxidase using mechanism based inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.; Wartishi, H.; Gold. M.; de Montellano, P.O. Oregon Graduate Inst. of Science and Technology, Beaverton )

    1991-03-11

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP), extracellular heme enzyme from the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium, normally oxidizes Mn(II) to Mn(III). MnP is rapidly and completely inactivated in a H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-dependent reaction by 2 equivalents of sodium azide. The inactivation is paralleled by formation of azidyl radicals and high yield conversion of the prosthetic heme into a mexo-azido adduct. The meso-azido enzyme is oxidized by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to a Compound II-like species. MnP is also inactivated by phenyl-, methyl- and ethylhydrazine. The phenylhydrazine reaction is too rapid for kinetic analysis, but K{sub I} = 402 mM and k{sub inact} = 0.22 min{sup {minus}1} for the inactivation by methylhydrazine. Reaction with phenylhydrazine at pH 4.5 does not yield iron-phenyl, N-phenyl, or meso-phenyl heme adducts. Ethylhydrazine inactivates the enzyme both at pH 4.5 and 7.0 but a {delta}-meso-ethylheme product is detected only at pH 7.0. Reconstitution of apo-MnP with {delta}-meso-ethylheme yields enzyme still capable of forming a Compound II-like species yet having diminished catalytic activity. Finally, Co(II) inhibits the enzyme competitively with respect to Mn(II) but does not inhibit its inactivation by azide or the alkylhydrazines. The results argue that substrates interact with the heme edge in the vicinity of the {delta}-meso carbon. They also suggest that Mn(II) and Co(II) bind to a common site close to the {delta}-meso carbon without blocking the approach of small molecules to the heme edge. An active site model is proposed that accommodates these results.

  16. Stimulating short-chain fatty acids production from waste activated sludge by nano zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jingyang; Feng, Leiyu; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hong; Xiao, Naidong; Wang, Dongbo

    2014-10-10

    An efficient and green strategy, i.e. adding nano zero-valent iron into anaerobic fermentation systems to remarkably stimulate the accumulation of short-chain fatty acids from waste activated sludge via accelerating the solubilization and hydrolysis processes has been developed. In the presence of nano zero-valent iron, not only the short-chain fatty acids production was significantly improved, but also the fermentation time for maximal short-chain fatty acids was shortened compared with those in the absence of nano zero-valent iron. Mechanism investigations showed that the solubilization of sludge, hydrolysis of solubilized substances and acidification of hydrolyzed products were all enhanced by addition of nano zero-valent iron. Also, the general microbial activity of anaerobes and relative activities of key enzymes with hydrolysis and acidification of organic matters were improved than those in the control. 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing analysis suggested that the abundance of bacteria responsible for waste activated sludge hydrolysis and short-chain fatty acids production was greatly enhanced due to nano zero-valent iron addition.

  17. Antiproliferative Activity of a New Nitrosyl Iron Complex with Cysteamine in Human Tumor Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhukova, O S; Smirnova, Z S; Chikileva, I O; Kiselevskii, M V

    2017-02-01

    We studied cytotoxic activity of a new NO-releasing tetranitrosyl binuclear iron complex with cysteamine (CysAm) for human tumor cells, the relationship between the expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and cell sensitivity to CysAm, and apoptosis-inducing capacity of this preparation. It was found that histogenetically different cell lines are characterized by different sensitivity to CysAm, and this parameter correlated with the basal level of MGMT. CysAm induced apoptosis via activation of caspases 3 and 7. These data suggest that CysAm can be considered as a potential antitumor agent, but definitive conclusions can be made after preclinical trials.

  18. Studies of the kinetics and mechanisms of perfluoroether reactions on iron and oxidized iron surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Napier, Mary E.; Stair, Peter C.

    1992-01-01

    Polymeric perfluoroalkylethers are being considered for use as lubricants in high temperature applications, but have been observed to catalytically decompose in the presence of metals. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to explore the decomposition of three model fluorinated ethers on clean polycrystalline iron surfaces and iron surfaces chemically modified with oxygen. Low temperature adsorption of the model fluorinated ethers on the clean, oxygen modified and oxidized iron surfaces was molecular. Thermally activated defluorination of the three model compounds was observed on the clean iron surface at remarkably low temperatures, 155 K and below, with formation of iron fluoride. Preferential C-F bond scission occurred at the terminal fluoromethoxy, CF3O, of perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy ethane and perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy propane and at CF3/CF2O of perfluoro-1,3-diethoxy propane. The reactivity of the clean iron toward perfluoroalkylether decomposition when compared to other metals is due to the strength of the iron fluoride bond and the strong electron donating ability of the metallic iron. Chemisorption of an oxygen overlayer lowered the reactivity of the iron surface to the adsorption and decomposition of the three model fluorinated ethers by blocking active sites on the metal surface. Incomplete coverage of the iron surface with chemisorbed oxygen results in a reaction which resembles the defluorination reaction observed on the clean iron surface. Perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy ethane reacts on the oxidized iron surface at 138 K, through a Lewis acid assisted cleavage of the carbon oxygen bond, with preferential attack at the terminal fluoromethoxy, CF3O. The oxidized iron surface did not passivate, but became more reactive with time. Perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy propane and perfluoro-1,3-diethoxy propane desorbed prior to the observation of decomposition on the oxidized iron surface.

  19. [Effects of chlorophyllin-iron on osmotic adjustment and activities of antioxidantive enzymes in cucumber seedlings under suboptimal temperature].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Wang, Xiu-feng; Zhang, Fan-yang; Wei, Min; Shi, Qing-hua; Yang, Feng-juan; Li, Yan

    2014-12-01

    Cucumber cultivar 'Jinyan 4' was subjected to suboptimal temperature treatment of 18/12 degrees C (day/night) in the growth chambers. A solution culture experiment was conducted to study the effect of exogenously spraying 5 mg x L(-1) chlorophyllin-iron solution on plant growth, the content of proline, soluble sugar, MDA and activity of peroxidase in the leaves of cucumber seedling under suboptimal temperature. Application of chlorophyllin-iron showed prominent effects on mitigating the stress of suboptimal temperature on growth of the cucumber seedlings, significantly increasing the plant height, leaf area, shoot dry mass, the contents of soluble sugar and proline and the activities of SOD, POD, CAT and APX. Exogenously spraying chlorophyllin-iron could promote the accumulation of proline and soluble sugar, raise the activities of antioxidant enzymes, decrease the membrane lipid peroxidation and improve the adaptability of cucumber seedlings under suboptimal temperature.

  20. Site-specific PEGylation of lidamycin and its antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Shang, Boyang; Hu, Lei; Shao, Rongguang; Zhen, Yongsu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, N-terminal site-specific mono-PEGylation of the recombinant lidamycin apoprotein (rLDP) of lidamycin (LDM) was prepared using a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) derivative (Mw 20 kDa) through a reactive terminal aldehyde group under weak acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The biochemical properties of mPEG-rLDP-AE, an enediyne-integrated conjugate, were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of mPEG-rLDP-AE was evaluated by MTT assays and in xenograft model. The results indicated that mPEG-rLDP-AE showed significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. After PEGylation, mPEG-rLDP still retained the binding capability to the enediyne AE and presented the physicochemical characteristics similar to that of native LDP. It is of interest that the PEGylation did not diminish the antitumor efficacy of LDM, implying the possibility that this derivative may function as a payload to deliver novel tumor-targeted drugs. PMID:26579455

  1. Anti-plasmodial activity of aroylhydrazone and thiosemicarbazone iron chelators: effect on erythrocyte membrane integrity, parasite development and the intracellular labile iron pool.

    PubMed

    Walcourt, Asikiya; Kurantsin-Mills, Joseph; Kwagyan, John; Adenuga, Babafemi B; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Lovejoy, David B; Lane, Darius J R; Richardson, Des R

    2013-12-01

    Iron chelators inhibit the growth of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, in culture and in animal and human studies. We previously reported the anti-plasmodial activity of the chelators, 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311), 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (N4mT), and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde 4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (N4pT). In fact, these ligands showed greater growth inhibition of chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) and chloroquine-resistant (7G8) strains of P. falciparum in culture compared to desferrioxamine (DFO). The present study examined the effects of 311, N4mT and N4pT on erythrocyte membrane integrity and asexual parasite development. While the characteristic biconcave disk shape of the erythrocytes was unaffected, the chelators caused very slight hemolysis at IC50 values that inhibited parasite growth. The chelators 311, N4mT and N4pT affected all stages of the intra-erythrocytic development cycle (IDC) of P. falciparum in culture. However, while these ligands primarily affected the ring-stage, DFO inhibited primarily trophozoite and schizont-stages. Ring, trophozoite and schizont-stages of the IDC were inhibited by significantly lower concentrations of 311, N4mT, and N4pT (IC50=4.45±1.70, 10.30±4.40, and 3.64±2.00μM, respectively) than DFO (IC50=23.43±3.40μM). Complexation of 311, N4mT and N4pT with iron reduced their anti-plasmodial activity. Estimation of the intracellular labile iron pool (LIP) in erythrocytes showed that the chelation efficacy of 311, N4mT and N4pT corresponded to their anti-plasmodial activities, suggesting that the LIP may be a potential source of non-heme iron for parasite metabolism within the erythrocyte. This study has implications for malaria chemotherapy that specifically disrupts parasite iron utilization.

  2. Allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a using Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside and its combination.

    PubMed

    Rani, Nidhi; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; P T V, Lakshmi; Arunachalam, Annamalai

    2016-08-01

    Recent crystallographic study revealed the involvement of allosteric site in active site inhibition of penicillin binding protein (PBP2a), where one molecule of Ceftaroline (Cef) binds to the allosteric site of PBP2a and paved way for the other molecule (Cef) to bind at the active site. Though Cef has the potency to inhibit the PBP2a, its adverse side effects are of major concern. Previous studies have reported the antibacterial property of Quercetin derivatives, a group of natural compounds. Hence, the present study aims to evaluate the effect of Quercetin 3-o-rutinoside (Rut) in allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a. The molecular docking studies between allosteric site and ligands (Rut, Que, and Cef) revealed a better binding efficiency (G-score) of Rut (-7.790318) and Cef (-6.194946) with respect to Que (-5.079284). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies showed significant changes at the active site in the presence of ligands (Rut and Cef) at allosteric site. Four different combinations of Rut and Cef were docked and their G-scores ranged between -6.320 and -8.623. MD studies revealed the stability of the key residue (Ser403) with Rut being at both sites, compared to other complexes. Morphological analysis through electron microscopy confirmed that combination of Rut and Cefixime was able to disturb the bacterial cell membrane in a similar fashion to that of Rut and Cefixime alone. The results of this study indicate that the affinity of Rut at both sites were equally good, with further validations Rut could be considered as an alternative for inhibiting MRSA growth.

  3. Relation between iron metabolism and antioxidants enzymes and δ-ALA-D activity in rats experimentally infected by Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Nathieli B; Mendes, Ricardo E; Baldissera, Matheus D; Bochi, Guilherme V; Moresco, Rafael N; Leal, Marta L R; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria R C; Christ, Ricardo; Gheller, Larissa; Marques, Éder J; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the iron metabolism in serum, as well as antioxidant enzymes, in addition to the Delta-Aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase (δ-ALA-D) activity in the liver of rats experimentally infected by Fasciola hepatica. Thirty male adult rats (Wistar) specific pathogen free were divided into four groups: two uninfected group (CTRL 1 and CTRL 2) with five animals each and two infected groups (INF 1 and INF 2) with 10 animals each. Infection was performed orally with 20 metacercariae at day 1. On day 15 (CTRL 1 and INF 1 groups) and 87 PI (CTRL 2 and INF 2 groups) blood and bone marrow were collected and the animals were subsequently euthanized for liver sampling. Blood was allocated in tubes without anticoagulant for serum acquisition to measure iron, transferrin and unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC). δ-ALA-D, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activities were measured in the liver. A decrease in iron, transferrin and UIBC levels was observed in all infected animals compared to control groups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, iron accumulation was observed in bone marrow of infected mice. Infected animals showed an increase in δ-ALA-D activity at 87 post-infection (PI) (INF 2) as well as in SOD activity at days 15 (INF 1) and 87 PI (INF 2). On the other hand, CAT activity was reduced in rats infected by F. hepatica during acute and chronic phase of fasciolosis (INF 1 and INF 2 groups), when moderate (acute) and severe necrosis in the liver histopathology were observed. These results may suggest that oxidative damage to tissues along with antioxidant mechanisms might have taken part in fasciolosis pathogenesis and are also involved in iron deficiency associated to changes in δ-ALA-D activity during chronic phase of disease.

  4. The Biginelli reaction with an imidazolium-tagged recyclable iron catalyst: kinetics, mechanism, and antitumoral activity.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Luciana M; Guido, Bruna C; Nobrega, Catharine C; Corrêa, José R; Silva, Rafael G; de Oliveira, Heibbe C B; Gomes, Alexandre F; Gozzo, Fábio C; Neto, Brenno A D

    2013-03-25

    The present work describes the synthesis, characterization, and application of a new ion-tagged iron catalyst. The catalyst was employed in the Biginelli reaction with impressive performance. High yields have been achieved when the reaction was carried out in imidazolium-based ionic liquids (BMI⋅PF6, BMI⋅NTf2, and BMI⋅BF4), thus showing that the ionic-liquid effects play a role in the reaction. Moreover, the ion-tagged catalyst could be recovered and reused up to eight times without any noticeable loss in activity. Mechanistic studies performed by using high-resolution electrospray-ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass (HR-EI-QTOF) spectrometry and kinetic experiments indicate only one reaction pathway and rule out the other two possibilities under the development conditions. The theoretical calculations are in accordance with the proposed mechanism of action of the iron catalyst. Finally, the 37 dihydropyrimidinone derivatives, products of the Biginelli reaction, had their cytotoxicity evaluated in assays against MCF-7 cancer cell linages with encouraging results of some derivatives, which were virtually non-toxic against healthy cell linages (fibroblasts).

  5. Electrochemical analyses of redox-active iron minerals: a review of nonmediated and mediated approaches.

    PubMed

    Sander, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B; Gorski, Christopher A

    2015-05-19

    Redox-active minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and are involved in numerous electron transfer reactions that significantly affect biogeochemical processes and cycles as well as pollutant dynamics. As a consequence, research in different scientific disciplines is devoted to elucidating the redox properties and reactivities of minerals. This review focuses on the characterization of mineral redox properties using electrochemical approaches from an applied (bio)geochemical and environmental analytical chemistry perspective. Establishing redox equilibria between the minerals and working electrodes is a major challenge in electrochemical measurements, which we discuss in an overview of traditional electrochemical techniques. These issues can be overcome with mediated electrochemical analyses in which dissolved redox mediators are used to increase the rate of electron transfer and to facilitate redox equilibration between working electrodes and minerals in both amperometric and potentiometric measurements. Using experimental data on an iron-bearing clay mineral, we illustrate how mediated electrochemical analyses can be employed to derive important thermodynamic and kinetic data on electron transfer to and from structural iron. We summarize anticipated methodological advancements that will further contribute to advance an improved understanding of electron transfer to and from minerals in environmentally relevant redox processes.

  6. Enhanced high-solids anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge by the addition of scrap iron.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaobin; Feng, Yinghong; Yu, Qilin; Xu, Zibin; Quan, Xie

    2014-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge usually requires pretreatment procedure to improve the bioavailability of sludge, which involves considerable energy and high expenditures. This study proposes a cost-effective method for enhanced anaerobic digestion of sludge without a pretreatment by directly adding iron into the digester. The results showed that addition of Fe(0) powder could enhance 14.46% methane yield, and Fe scrap (clean scrap) could further enhance methane yield (improving rate 21.28%) because the scrap has better mass transfer efficiency with sludge and liquid than Fe(0) powder. The scrap of Fe with rust (rusty scrap) could induce microbial Fe(III) reduction, which resulted in achieving the highest methane yield (improving rate 29.51%), and the reduction rate of volatile suspended solids (VSS) was also highest (48.27%) among Fe powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap. PCR-DGGE proved that the addition of rusty scrap could enhance diversity of acetobacteria and enrich iron-reducing bacteria to enhance degradation of complex substrates.

  7. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site

    PubMed Central

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called ‘catalytic residues’ are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06181.001 PMID:25902402

  8. In vitro Antioxidant Activities of Sodium Zinc and
Sodium Iron Chlorophyllins from Pine Needles

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Ruzhen; Wu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Summary Chlorophyll was extracted from pine needles, and then sodium zinc chlorophyllin (SZC) and sodium iron chlorophyllin (SIC) were synthesised by saponification, purification and substitution reaction, using sodium copper chlorophyllin (SCC) as a control. Their crystalline structures were verified by atomic absorbance spectroscopy, UV-VIS spectroscopy and HPLC. Moreover, their antioxidant activities were evaluated and compared with that of ascorbic acid through four biochemical assays: DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging activity, reducing power, inhibition of β-carotene bleaching and O2– scavenging activity. SZC had better antioxidant properties at a lower dosage than SIC and SCC in all assays. In the β-carotene bleaching assay, EC50 of SZC, SIC and SCC was 0.04, 0.38 and 0.90 mg/mL, respectively, much lower than that of ascorbic acid (4.0 mg/mL). SZC showed a better result (p<0.05) than ascorbic acid in the O2– scavenging activity assay. The results obtained from reducing power determination were also excellent: the absorbance values were all about 1.0 at 0.5 mg/mL, about half of that of ascorbic acid. In the investigation of DPPH radical scavenging activity, all chlorophyllins had lower activities than ascorbic acid. These results demonstrated the potential bioactivities of chlorophyll derivatives and supported their possible role in human health protection and disease prevention. PMID:27904324

  9. A split active site couples cap recognition by Dcp2 to activation

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N.; Jones, Brittnee N.; Hernandez, Gail A.; Gross, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Decapping by Dcp2 is an essential step in 5′-3′ mRNA decay. In yeast, decapping requires an open-to-closed transition in Dcp2, though the link between closure and catalysis remains elusive. Here we show using NMR that cap binds conserved residues on both the catalytic and regulatory domains of Dcp2. Lesions in the cap-binding site on the regulatory domain reduce the catalytic step two orders of magnitude and block formation of the closed state whereas Dcp1 enhances the catalytic step by a factor of ten and promotes closure. We conclude that closure occurs during the rate-limiting catalytic step of decapping, juxtaposing the cap-binding region of each domain to form a composite active site. This work suggests a model for regulation of decapping, where coactivators trigger decapping by stabilizing a labile composite active site. PMID:20711189

  10. KatB, a cyanobacterial Mn-catalase with unique active site configuration: Implications for enzyme function.

    PubMed

    Bihani, Subhash C; Chakravarty, Dhiman; Ballal, Anand

    2016-04-01

    Manganese catalases (Mn-catalases), a class of H2O2 detoxifying proteins, are structurally and mechanistically distinct from the commonly occurring catalases, which contain heme. Active site of Mn-catalases can serve as template for the synthesis of catalase mimetics for therapeutic intervention in oxidative stress related disorders. However, unlike the heme catalases, structural aspects of Mn-catalases remain inadequately explored. The genome of the ancient cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC7120, shows the presence of two Mn-catalases, KatA and KatB. Here, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of KatB. The KatB protein (with a C-terminal his-tag) was over-expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. On the addition of Mn(2+) to the E. coli growth medium, a substantial increase in production of the soluble KatB protein was observed. The purified KatB protein was an efficient catalase, which was relatively insensitive to inhibition by azide. Crystal structure of KatB showed a hexameric assembly with four-helix bundle fold, characteristic of the Ferritin-like superfamily. With canonical Glu4His2 coordination geometry and two terminal water ligands, the KatB active site was distinctly different from that of other Mn-catalases. Interestingly, the KatB active site closely resembled the active sites of ruberythrin/bacterioferritin, bi-iron members of the Ferritin-like superfamily. The KatB crystal structure provided fundamental insights into the evolutionary relationship within the Ferritin-like superfamily and further showed that Mn-catalases can be sub-divided into two groups, each with a distinct active site configuration.

  11. Effects of iron supplementation on blood adenine deaminase activity and oxidative stress in Trypanosoma evansi infection of rats.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Nathieli B; Baldissera, Matheus D; Tonin, Alexandre A; França, Raqueli T; Zanini, Danieli; Leal, Marta L R; Lopes, Sonia T A; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Morsch, Vera M; Monteiro, Silvia G; Guarda, Naiara S; Moresco, Rafael N; Aires, Adelina R; Stefani, Lenita M; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of iron supplementation on oxidative stress and on the activity of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) in rats experimentally infected by Trypanosoma evansi. For this purpose, 20 rats were divided into four experimental groups with five animals each as follows: groups A and B were composed by healthy animals, while animals from groups C and D were infected by T. evansi. Additionally, groups B and D received two subcutaneous doses of iron (60 mg kg(-1)) within an interval of 5 days. Blood samples were drawn on day 8 post infection in order to assess hematological and biochemical variables. Among the main results are: (1) animals from group C showed reduced erythrogram (with tendency to anemia); however the same results were not observed for group D; this might be a direct effect of free iron on trypanosomes which helped to reduce the parasitemia and the damage to erythrocytes caused by the infection; (2) iron supplementation was able to reduce NOx levels by inhibiting iNOS, and thus, providing an antioxidant action and, indirectly, reducing the ALT levels in groups Band D; (3) increase FRAP levels in group D; (4) reduce ADA activity in serum and erythrocytes in group C; however, this supplementation (5) increased the protein oxidation in groups B and D, as well as group C (positive control). Therefore, iron showed antioxidant and oxidant effects on animals that received supplementation; and it maintained the activity of E-ADA stable in infected/supplemented animals.

  12. Iron phthalocyanine supported on amidoximated PAN fiber as effective catalyst for controllable hydrogen peroxide activation in oxidizing organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhenbang; Han, Xu; Zhao, Xiaoming; Yu, Jiantao; Xu, Hang

    2016-12-15

    Iron(II) phthalocyanine was immobilized onto amidoximated polyacrylonitrile fiber to construct a bioinspired catalytic system for oxidizing organic dyes by H2O2 activation. The amidoxime groups greatly helped to anchor Iron(II) phthalocyanine molecules onto the fiber through coordination interaction, which has been confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy analyses. Electron spin resonance studies indicate that the catalytic process of physically anchored Iron(II) phthalocyanine performed via a hydroxyl radical pathway, while the catalyst bonded Iron(II) phthalocyanine through coordination effect could selectively catalyze the H2O2 decomposition to generate high-valent iron-oxo species. This may result from the amidoxime groups functioning as the axial fifth ligands to favor the heterolytic cleavage of the peroxide OO bond. This feature also enables the catalyst to only degrade the dyes adjacent to the catalytic active centers and enhances the efficient utilization of H2O2. In addition, this catalyst could effectively catalyze the mineralization of organic dyes and can be easily recycled without any loss of activity.

  13. Mössbauer study of the evolution of a laterite iron mineral based catalyst: Effect of the activation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubeiro, M. L.; Goldwasser, M. R.; Zurita, M. J. Perez; Franco, C.; González-Jiménez, F.; Jaimes, E.

    1994-12-01

    The syngas reaction has been studied using a laterite iron mineral, promoted with K and Mn. In situ activation under syngas, as well as pre-treatment with H2 followed by CO under mild and more severe conditions were tested. These activation procedures led to different iron phase compositions and to different catalytic selectivities. The C2-C4/CH4 ratio was significantly lower for those catalysts which after reaction showed the presence of hexagonal carbide and magnetite compared to the solid, which showed the highest proportion of Hägg carbide.

  14. Variation and inheritance of iron reductase activity in the roots of common vean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and association with seed iron accumulation QTL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron deficiency anemia is a global problem, which often affects women and children of developing countries and is based on diets that are low in iron. Strategy I plants, such as common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) take up iron through a process that involves an iron reduction mechanism in their root...

  15. Efficient degradation of trichloroethylene in water using persulfate activated by reduced graphene oxide-iron nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ayyaz; Gu, Xiaogang; Li, Li; Lv, Shuguang; Xu, Yisheng; Guo, Xuhong

    2015-11-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) and nano-sized zero-valent iron-reduced graphene oxide (nZVI-rGO) composite were prepared. The GO and nZVI-rGO composite were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and Raman spectroscopy. The size of nZVI was about 6 nm as observed by TEM. The system of nZVI-rGO and persulfate (PS) was used for the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in water, and showed 26.5% more efficiency as compared to nZVI/PS system. The different parameters were studied to determine the efficiency of nZVI-rGO to activate the PS system for the TCE degradation. By increasing the PS amount, TCE removal was also improved while no obvious effect was observed by varying the catalyst loading. Degradation was decreased as the TCE initial concentration was increased from 20 to 100 mg/L. Moreover, when initial solution pH was increased, efficiency deteriorated to 80%. Bicarbonate showed more negative effect on TCE removal among the solution matrix. To better understand the effects of radical species in the system, the scavenger tests were performed. The •SO4(-) and •O2(-) were predominant species responsible for TCE removal. The nZVI-rGO-activated PS process shows potential applications in remediation of highly toxic organic contaminants such as TCE present in the groundwater. Graphical abstract Persulfate activated by reduced graphene oxide and nano-sized zero-valent iron composite can be used for efficient degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in water.

  16. Activated Oncogenic Pathway Modifies Iron Network in Breast Epithelial Cells: A Dynamic Modeling Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lemler, Erica; Kochen, Michael A.; Akman, Steven A.; Torti, Frank M.; Torti, Suzy V.; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulation of iron metabolism in cancer is well documented and it has been suggested that there is interdependence between excess iron and increased cancer incidence and progression. In an effort to better understand the linkages between iron metabolism and breast cancer, a predictive mathematical model of an expanded iron homeostasis pathway was constructed that includes species involved in iron utilization, oxidative stress response and oncogenic pathways. The model leads to three predictions. The first is that overexpression of iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) recapitulates many aspects of the alterations in free iron and iron-related proteins in cancer cells without affecting the oxidative stress response or the oncogenic pathways included in the model. This prediction was validated by experimentation. The second prediction is that iron-related proteins are dramatically affected by mitochondrial ferritin overexpression. This prediction was validated by results in the pertinent literature not used for model construction. The third prediction is that oncogenic Ras pathways contribute to altered iron homeostasis in cancer cells. This prediction was validated by a combination of simulation experiments of Ras overexpression and catalase knockout in conjunction with the literature. The model successfully captures key aspects of iron metabolism in breast cancer cells and provides a framework upon which more detailed models can be built. PMID:28166223

  17. Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation of dibutyl phthalate in aqueous solution in the presence of iron-loaded activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanxing; Cui, Chenchen; Zhang, Daofang; Li, Liang; Pan, Ding

    2015-01-01

    Iron-loaded activated carbon was prepared and used as catalyst in heterogeneous catalytic ozonation of dibutyl phthalate (DBP). The catalytic activity of iron-loaded activated carbon was investigated under various conditions and the mechanisms of DBP removal were deduced. Characterization of catalyst indicated that the iron loaded on activated carbon was mainly in the form of goethite, which reduced its surface area, pore volume and pore diameter. The presence of metals on activated carbon positively contributed to its catalytic activity in ozonation of DBP. Iron loading content of 15% and initial water pH of 8 achieved highest DBP removal among all the tried conditions. Catalyst dosage of 10 mg L(-1) led to approximately 25% of increase in DBP (initial concentration 2 mg L(-1)) removal in 60 min as compared with ozone alone, and when catalyst dosage increased to 100 mg L(-1), the DBP removal was further improved by 46%. Based on a comparison of reaction rates for direct and indirect transformation of DBP, the increased removal of DBP in this study likely occurred via transformation of ozone into hydroxyl radicals on the catalyst surface.

  18. Zinc and iron concentration and SOD activity in human semen and seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Marzec-Wróblewska, Urszula; Kamiński, Piotr; Lakota, Paweł; Szymański, Marek; Wasilow, Karolina; Ludwikowski, Grzegorz; Kuligowska-Prusińska, Magdalena; Odrowąż-Sypniewska, Grażyna; Stuczyński, Tomasz; Michałkiewicz, Jacek

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to measure zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) concentration in human semen and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in seminal plasma and correlate the results with sperm quality. Semen samples were obtained from men (N = 168) undergoing routine infertility evaluation. The study design included two groups based on the ejaculate parameters. Group I (n = 39) consisted of males with normal ejaculate (normozoospermia), and group II (n = 129) consisted of males with pathological spermiogram. Seminal Zn and Fe were measured in 162 samples (group I, n = 38; group II, n = 124) and SOD activity in 149 samples (group I, n = 37; group II, n = 112). Correlations were found between SOD activity and Fe and Zn concentration, and between Fe and Zn concentration. SOD activity was negatively associated with volume of semen and positively associated with rapid progressive motility, nonprogressive motility, and concentration. Negative correlation was stated between Fe concentration and normal morphology. Mean SOD activity in seminal plasma of semen from men of group I was higher than in seminal plasma of semen from men of group II. Fe concentration was higher in teratozoospermic males than in males with normal morphology of spermatozoa in group II. Our results suggest that Fe may influence spermatozoa morphology.

  19. Propene activation by the oxo-iron active species of taurine/alpha-ketoglutarate dioxygenase (TauD) enzyme. How does the catalysis compare to heme-enzymes?

    PubMed

    de Visser, Sam P

    2006-08-02

    Density functional calculations on the oxygenation reaction of propene by a model for taurine/alpha-ketoglutarate dioxygenase (TauD) enzyme are presented. The oxo-iron active species of TauD is shown to be a powerful and aggressive oxidant, which is able to hydroxylate C-H bonds and epoxidize C=C bonds with low barriers. In the case of propene oxygenation, the hydroxylation and epoxidation mechanisms are competitive on a dominant quintet spin state surface. We have compared the mechanism and thermodynamics of TauD with oxo-iron heme catalysts, such as the cytochromes P450, and found some critical differences. The TauD model is found to be much more reactive toward oxygenation of substrates than oxo-iron complexes in a heme environment with much lower reaction barriers. We have analyzed this and assigned this to the strength of the O-H bond formed after hydrogen abstraction from a substrate, which is at least 10 kcal mol(-)(1) stronger in five-coordinated oxo-iron nonheme complexes than in six-coordinated oxo-iron heme complexes. Since, the metal in TauD enzymes is five-coordinated, whereas in heme-enzymes it is six-coordinated there are some critical differences in the valence molecular orbitals. Thus, in oxo-iron heme catalysts one of the antibonding pi orbitals is replaced by a low-lying nonbonding delta orbital resulting in a lower overall spin state. Moreover, heme-enzymes have an extra oxidation equivalent located on the heme, which is missing in non-heme oxo-iron catalysts. As a result, the oxo-iron species of TauD reacts via single-state reactivity on a dominant quintet spin state surface, whereas oxo-iron heme catalysts react via two-state reactivity on competing doublet and quartet spin states.

  20. Analyzing the catalytic role of active site residues in the Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Salette; Wu, Rui; Krzywda, Karoline; Opalka, Veronika; Chan, Hei; Liu, Dali; Holz, Richard C

    2015-07-01

    A strictly conserved active site arginine residue (αR157) and two histidine residues (αH80 and αH81) located near the active site of the Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1 (CtNHase), were mutated. These mutant enzymes were examined for their ability to bind iron and hydrate acrylonitrile. For the αR157A mutant, the residual activity (k cat = 10 ± 2 s(-1)) accounts for less than 1% of the wild-type activity (k cat = 1100 ± 30 s(-1)) while the K m value is nearly unchanged at 205 ± 10 mM. On the other hand, mutation of the active site pocket αH80 and αH81 residues to alanine resulted in enzymes with k cat values of 220 ± 40 and 77 ± 13 s(-1), respectively, and K m values of 187 ± 11 and 179 ± 18 mM. The double mutant (αH80A/αH81A) was also prepared and provided an enzyme with a k cat value of 132 ± 3 s(-1) and a K m value of 213 ± 61 mM. These data indicate that all three residues are catalytically important, but not essential. X-ray crystal structures of the αH80A/αH81A, αH80W/αH81W, and αR157A mutant CtNHase enzymes were solved to 2.0, 2.8, and 2.5 Å resolutions, respectively. In each mutant enzyme, hydrogen-bonding interactions crucial for the catalytic function of the αCys(104)-SOH ligand are disrupted. Disruption of these hydrogen bonding interactions likely alters the nucleophilicity of the sulfenic acid oxygen and the Lewis acidity of the active site Fe(III) ion.

  1. Characterization of Active Site Residues of Nitroalkane Oxidase†

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Michael P.; Fenny, Nana S.; Ali, Shah R.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of primary and secondary nitrolkanes to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones plus nitrite. The structure of the enzyme shows that Serl71 forms a hydrogen bond to the flavin N5, suggesting that it plays a role in catalysis. Cys397 and Tyr398 were previously identified by chemical modification as potential active site residues. To more directly probe the roles of these residues, the S171A, S171V, S171T, C397S, and Y398F enzymes have been characterized with nitroethane as substrate. The C397S and Y398 enzymes were less stable than the wild-type enzyme, and the C397S enzyme routinely contained a substoichiometric amount of FAD. Analysis of the steady-state kinetic parameters for the mutant enzymes, including deuterium isotope effects, establishes that all of the mutations result in decreases in the rate constants for removal of the substrate proton by ~5-fold and decreases in the rate constant for product release of ~2-fold. Only the S171V and S171T mutations alter the rate constant for flavin oxidation. These results establish that these residues are not involved in catalysis, but rather are required for maintaining the protein structure. PMID:20056514

  2. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  3. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems.

  4. RELATIVISTIC BROADENING OF IRON EMISSION LINES IN A SAMPLE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Brenneman, Laura W.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2009-09-10

    We present a uniform X-ray spectral analysis of eight type-1 active galactic nuclei that have been previously observed with relativistically broadened iron emission lines. Utilizing data from the XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC-pn) we carefully model the spectral continuum, taking complex intrinsic absorption and emission into account. We then proceed to model the broad Fe K{alpha} feature in each source with two different accretion disk emission line codes, as well as a self-consistent, ionized accretion disk spectrum convolved with relativistic smearing from the inner disk. Comparing the results, we show that relativistic blurring of the disk emission is required to explain the spectrum in most sources, even when one models the full reflection spectrum from the photoionized disk.

  5. Adsorption of Trametes versicolor laccase to soil iron and aluminum minerals: enzyme activity, kinetics and stability studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Jiang, Ying; Jiao, Jiaguo; Liu, Manqiang; Hu, Feng; Griffiths, Bryan S; Li, Huixin

    2014-02-01

    Laccases play an important role in the degradation of soil phenol or phenol-like substance and can be potentially used in soil remediation through immobilization. Iron and aluminum minerals can adsorb extracellular enzymes in soil environment. In the present study, we investigated the adsorptive interaction of laccase, from the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor, with soil iron and aluminum minerals and characterized the properties of the enzyme after adsorption to minerals. Results showed that both soil iron and aluminum minerals adsorbed great amount of laccase, independent of the mineral specific surface areas. Adsorbed laccases retained 26-64% of the activity of the free enzyme. Compared to the free laccase, all adsorbed laccases showed higher Km values and lower Vmax values, indicating a reduced enzyme-substrate affinity and a lower rate of substrate conversion in reactions catalyzed by the adsorbed laccase. Adsorbed laccases exhibited increased catalytic activities compared to the free laccase at low pH, implying the suitable application of iron and aluminum mineral-adsorbed T. versicolor laccase in soil bioremediation, especially in acid soils. In terms of the thermal profiles, adsorbed laccases showed decreased thermal stability and higher temperature sensitivity relative to the free laccase. Moreover, adsorption improved the resistance of laccase to proteolysis and extended the lifespan of laccase. Our results implied that adsorbed T. versicolor laccase on soil iron and aluminum minerals had promising potential in soil remediation.

  6. Enhanced Fenton-like removal of nitrobenzene via internal microelectrolysis in nano zerovalent iron/activated carbon composite.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sihai; Wu, Yaoguo; Yao, Hairui; Lu, Cong; Zhang, Chengjun

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of Fenton-like catalysis using nano zerovalent iron (nZVI) is limited by nZVI aggregation and activity loss due to inactive ferric oxide forming on the nZVI surface, which hinders electron transfer. A novel iron-carbon composite catalyst consisting of nZVI and granular activated carbon (GAC), which can undergo internal iron-carbon microelectrolysis spontaneously, was successfully fabricated by the adsorption-reduction method. The catalyst efficiency was evaluated in nitrobenzene (NB) removal via the Fenton-like process (H2O2-nZVI/GAC). The results showed that nZVI/GAC composite was good for dispersing nZVI on the surface of GAC, which permitted much better removal efficiency (93.0%) than nZVI (31.0%) or GAC (20.0%) alone. Moreover, iron leaching decreased from 1.28 to 0.58 mg/L after reaction of 240 min and the oxidation kinetic of the Fenton-like reaction can be described well by the second-order reaction kinetic model (R2=0.988). The composite catalyst showed sustainable catalytic ability and GAC performed as a medium for electron transfer in internal iron-carbon microelectrolysis to promote Fe2+ regeneration and Fe3+/Fe2+ cycles. Therefore, this study represents an important method to design a low cost and high efficiency Fenton-like catalyst in practical application.

  7. Review of iron-free Fenton-like systems for activating H2O2 in advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Bokare, Alok D; Choi, Wonyong

    2014-06-30

    Iron-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide decomposition for in situ generation of hydroxyl radicals (HO(•)) has been extensively developed as advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) for environmental applications. A variety of catalytic iron species constituting metal salts (in Fe(2+) or Fe(3+) form), metal oxides (e.g., Fe2O3, Fe3O4), and zero-valent metal (Fe(0)) have been exploited for chemical (classical Fenton), photochemical (photo-Fenton) and electrochemical (electro-Fenton) degradation pathways. However, the requirement of strict acidic conditions to prevent iron precipitation still remains the bottleneck for iron-based AOPs. In this article, we present a thorough review of alternative non-iron Fenton catalysts and their reactivity towards hydrogen peroxide activation. Elements with multiple redox states (like chromium, cerium, copper, cobalt, manganese and ruthenium) all directly decompose H2O2 into HO(•) through conventional Fenton-like pathways. The in situ formation of H2O2 and decomposition into HO(•) can be also achieved using electron transfer mechanism in zero-valent aluminum/O2 system. Although these Fenton systems (except aluminum) work efficiently even at neutral pH, the H2O2 activation mechanism is very specific to the nature of the catalyst and critically depends on its composition. This review describes in detail the complex mechanisms and emphasizes on practical limitations influencing their environmental applications.

  8. Effect of cold exposure on thyroxine 5 prime -deiodinase activity in iron-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, D.E.; Beard, J.L. )

    1991-03-11

    When exposed to cold, severely anemic iron-deficient (ID) rats become hypothermic, fail to adequately increase metabolic rate, and have lower interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT) thyroxine 5{prime}-deiodinase (5{prime}-DI) activity compared to control (CN) rats. Less severely anemic rats and CN rats were exposed to 4C for 6h. Rectal temperatures were measured hourly, and VO{sub 2} was measured both prior to and throughout the cold exposure period. IBAT 5{prime}-DI activity was measured in cold-exposed ID and CN rats and compared to ID and CN rats that were not cold exposed. During cold exposure, both ID and CN rats increased metabolic rate similarly. IBAT 5{prime}-DI activity also increased similarly in both groups after cold exposure. These results show that moderately anemic DI rats acutely increase metabolic rate and IBAT 5{prime}-DI activity in the cold. This suggests brown fat production of thyroid hormone is not limiting thermoregulatory performance.

  9. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  10. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  11. Structural analysis of peroxide-soaked MnSOD crystals reveals side-on binding of peroxide to active-site manganese.

    PubMed

    Porta, Jason; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Borgstahl, Gloria E O

    2010-06-11

    The superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes are important antioxidant agents that protect cells from reactive oxygen species. The SOD family is responsible for catalyzing the disproportionation of superoxide radical to oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. Manganese- and iron-containing SOD exhibit product inhibition whereas Cu/ZnSOD does not. Here, we report the crystal structure of Escherichia coli MnSOD with hydrogen peroxide cryotrapped in the active site. Crystallographic refinement to 1.55 A and close inspection revealed electron density for hydrogen peroxide in three of the four active sites in the asymmetric unit. The hydrogen peroxide molecules are in the position opposite His26 that is normally assumed by water in the trigonal bipyramidal resting state of the enzyme. Hydrogen peroxide is present in active sites B, C, and D and is side-on coordinated to the active-site manganese. In chains B and D, the peroxide is oriented in the plane formed by manganese and ligands Asp167 and His26. In chain C, the peroxide is bound, making a 70 degrees angle to the plane. Comparison of the peroxide-bound active site with the hydroxide-bound octahedral form shows a shifting of residue Tyr34 towards the active site when peroxide is bound. Comparison with peroxide-soaked Cu/ZnSOD indicates end-on binding of peroxide when the SOD does not exhibit inhibition by peroxide and side-on binding of peroxide in the product-inhibited state of MnSOD.

  12. Long-term Performance of Permeable Reactive Barriers Using Zero-valent Iron: An Evaluation at Two Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    limited by the formation of a stable hydrogen film produced from the reduction of protons on the metal surface. However, processes that consume hydrogen...gas and thereby interfere with the formation of this hydrogen film , such as mixing with water that is undersaturated with respect to hydrogen or the...extractable carbon. Total sulfur measurements were made with a UIC sulfur coulometer system. Iron samples were covered with V2O5 and combusted in the

  13. Additive effects of maternal iron deficiency and prenatal immune activation on adult behaviors in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Louise; Boksa, Patricia

    2014-08-01

    Both iron deficiency (ID) and infection are common during pregnancy and studies have described altered brain development in offspring as a result of these individual maternal exposures. Given their high global incidence, these two insults may occur simultaneously during pregnancy. We recently described a rat model which pairs dietary ID during pregnancy and prenatal immune activation. Pregnant rats were placed on iron sufficient (IS) or ID diets from embryonic day 2 (E2) until postnatal day 7, and administered the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline on E15/16. In this model, LPS administration on E15 caused greater induction of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in ID dams compared to IS dams. This suggested that the combination of prenatal immune activation on a background of maternal ID might have more adverse neurodevelopmental consequences for the offspring than exposure to either insult alone. In this study we used this model to determine whether combined exposure to maternal ID and prenatal immune activation interact to affect juvenile and adult behaviors in the offspring. We assessed behaviors relevant to deficits in humans or animals that have been associated with exposure to either maternal ID or prenatal immune activation alone. Adult offspring from ID dams displayed significant deficits in pre-pulse inhibition of acoustic startle and in passive avoidance learning, together with increases in cytochrome oxidase immunohistochemistry, a marker of metabolic activity, in the ventral hippocampus immediately after passive avoidance testing. Offspring from LPS treated dams showed a significant increase in social behavior with unfamiliar rats, and subtle locomotor changes during exploration in an open field and in response to amphetamine. Surprisingly, there was no interaction between effects of the two insults on the behaviors assessed, and few observed alterations in juvenile behavior. Our findings

  14. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  15. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  16. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  17. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  18. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  19. Robotics and Automation Activities at the Savannah River Site: A Site Report for SUBWOG 39F

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.

    1995-09-28

    The Savannah River Site has successfully used robots, teleoperators, and remote video to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, improve worker safety, and improve the quality of operations. Previous reports have described the use of mobile teleoperators in coping with a high level liquid waste spill, the removal of highly contaminated equipment, and the inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. This report will cover recent applications at the Savannah River, as well as systems which SRS has delivered to other DOE site customers.

  20. GAS HYDRATES AT TWO SITES OF AN ACTIVE CONTINENTAL MARGIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart on the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m.

  1. Temporal-spatial distribution of archaeological sites in the Nihewan-Huliu Basin during the Paleolithic-Neolithic and Iron Age in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. X.; Wang, X. Y.; Yang, R. X.; Li, X. Z.; Zhang, W.

    2016-11-01

    The Nihewan-Huliu Basin is one of the great regions of human evolution, located in geographical transition zone. This study reveals the temporal-spatial distribution of archaeological sites based on the DEM (Digital Elevation Model) data, and analyses the changes for four periods (Paleolithic-Neolithic transition, Neolithic Age, Bronze Age and Iron Age). These sites expanded from the Sanggan River to the Huliu River and from the central and lower Huliu River to its upper reaches. The population and cultural development in the Nihewan Basin gradually lagged behind the Huliu River Baisin after the Paleolithic-Neolithic transition Age, because of the environmental impacts. The results may aid the understanding and study of the cultural heritage and civilization evolution in northern China.

  2. Iron Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... detect and help diagnose iron deficiency or iron overload. In people with anemia , these tests can help ... also be ordered when iron deficiency or iron overload is suspected. Early iron deficiency often goes unnoticed. ...

  3. Lidar research activities and observations at NARL site, Gadanki, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellapragada, Bhavani Kumar

    2016-05-01

    The National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), a unit of Department of Space (DOS), located at Gadanki village (13.5°N, 79.2°E, 370 m AMSL) in India, is involved in the development of lidar remote sensing technologies for atmospheric research. Several advanced lidar technologies employing micropulse, polarization, Raman and scanning have been developed at this site and demonstrated for atmospheric studies during the period between 2008 and 2015. The technology of micropulse lidar, operates at 532 nm wavelength, was successfully transferred to an industry and the commercial version has been identified for Indian Lidar network (I-LINK) programme. Under this lidar network activity, several lidar units were installed at different locations in India to study tropospheric aerosols and clouds. The polarization sensitive lidar technology was realized using a set of mini photomultiplier tube (PMT) units and has the capability to operate during day and night without a pause. The lidar technology uses a compact flashlamp pumped Qswitched laser and employs biaxial configuration between the transmitter and receiver units. The lidar technology has been utilized for understanding the polarization characteristics of boundary layer aerosols during the mixed layer development. The demonstrated Raman lidar technology, uses the third harmonic wavelength of Nd:YAG laser, provides the altitude profiles of aerosol backscattering, extinction and water vapor covering the boundary layer range and allows operation during nocturnal periods. The Raman lidar derived height profiles of aerosol backscattering and extinction coefficient, lidar ratio, and watervapor mixing ratio inform the tropical boundary layer aerosol characteristics. The scanning lidar technology uses a near infrared laser wavelength for probing the lower atmosphere and has been utilized for high resolution cloud profiling during convective periods. The lidar technology is also used for rain rate measurement during

  4. Dynamically achieved active site precision in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes' enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme-substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C-H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed.

  5. Iron-independent phosphorylation of iron regulatory protein 2 regulates ferritin during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Wallander, Michelle L; Zumbrennen, Kimberly B; Rodansky, Eva S; Romney, S Joshua; Leibold, Elizabeth A

    2008-08-29

    Iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) is a key iron sensor that post-transcriptionally regulates mammalian iron homeostasis by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs) in mRNAs that encode proteins involved in iron metabolism (e.g. ferritin and transferrin receptor 1). During iron deficiency, IRP2 binds IREs to regulate mRNA translation or stability, whereas during iron sufficiency IRP2 is degraded by the proteasome. Here, we identify an iron-independent IRP2 phosphorylation site that is regulated by the cell cycle. IRP2 Ser-157 is phosphorylated by Cdk1/cyclin B1 during G(2)/M and is dephosphorylated during mitotic exit by the phosphatase Cdc14A. Ser-157 phosphorylation during G(2)/M reduces IRP2 RNA-binding activity and increases ferritin synthesis, whereas Ser-157 dephosphorylation during mitotic exit restores IRP2 RNA-binding activity and represses ferritin synthesis. These data show that reversible phosphorylation of IRP2 during G(2)/M has a role in modulating the iron-independent expression of ferritin and other IRE-containing mRNAs during the cell cycle.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a hyperthermophilic Rieske protein variant (SDX-triple) with an engineered rubredoxin-like mononuclear iron site

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Toshio Kounosu, Asako; Ohmori, Daijiro; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2006-10-01

    A hyperthermophilic archaeal Rieske iron–sulfur protein (sulredoxin) variant, SDX-triple (H44I/A45C/H64C), having a rationally designed rubredoxin-like mononuclear iron site in place of a Rieske [2Fe–2S] centre, has been crystallized. The P1 crystals of the SDX-triple variant diffract to 1.63 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. In place of the Rieske [2Fe–2S] cluster, an archetypal mononuclear iron site has rationally been designed into a hyperthermophilic archaeal Rieske [2Fe–2S] protein (sulredoxin) from Sulfolobus tokodaii by three residue replacements with reference to the Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin sequence. The resulting sulredoxin variant, SDX-triple (H44I/A45C/H64C), has been purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using 65%(v/v) 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol, 0.025 M citric acid and 0.075 M sodium acetate trihydrate pH 4.3. The crystals diffract to 1.63 Å resolution and belong to the triclinic space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 43.56, b = 76.54, c = 80.28 Å, α = 88.12, β = 78.82, γ = 73.46°. The asymmetric unit contains eight protein molecules.

  7. The fenton activity of iron(III) in the presence of deferiprone.

    PubMed

    Devanur, Lakshmi D; Neubert, Hendrik; Hider, Robert C

    2008-04-01

    Hydroxyl radical production from a range of clinically relevant iron chelators in the presence of hydrogen peroxide was measured using the deoxyribose oxidation assay. Hydroxyl radical production from an iron complex is dependent on whether the ligand is able to completely surround the iron, thereby preventing access of reductants to the coordinated iron cation. The partially coordinated [(deferiprone)(2)Fe(III)](+) complex is able to generate hydroxyl radicals in the presence of oxidants, whereas the fully coordinated [(deferiprone)(3)Fe(III)](0) complex is not. Hydroxyl radical production from iron(III)deferiprone complexes is dependent on the molar ratio of iron to deferiprone, which, in turn, affects the speciation of the complex. Mass spectrometry data have confirmed the presence of the [(deferiprone)(2)Fe(III)](+) complex in aqueous solution. Hydroxyl radical production from the [(deferiprone)(2)Fe(III)](+) complex is maximal in the presence of equimolar ascorbate and hydrogen peroxide and is abolished in the absence of hydrogen peroxide. Under biological conditions, any [(deferiprone)(2)Fe(III)](+) complex formed intracellularly will be rapidly reduced by ascorbate. The resulting unstable iron(II) complex will dissociate to hexa-aquo iron(II), a major component of the endogenous intracellular labile iron pool.

  8. Ferritin: the protein nanocage and iron biomineral in health and in disease.

    PubMed

    Theil, Elizabeth C

    2013-11-04

    At the center of iron and oxidant metabolism is the ferritin superfamily: protein cages with Fe(2+) ion channels and two catalytic Fe/O redox centers that initiate the formation of caged Fe2O3·H2O. Ferritin nanominerals, initiated within the protein cage, grow inside the cage cavity (5 or 8 nm in diameter). Ferritins contribute to normal iron flow, maintenance of iron concentrates for iron cofactor syntheses, sequestration of iron from invading pathogens, oxidant protection, oxidative stress recovery, and, in diseases where iron accumulates excessively, iron chelation strategies. In eukaryotic ferritins, biomineral order/crystallinity is influenced by nucleation channels between active sites and the mineral growth cavity. Animal ferritin cages contain, uniquely, mixtures of catalytically active (H) and inactive (L) polypeptide subunits with varied rates of Fe(2+)/O2 catalysis and mineral crystallinity. The relatively low mineral order in liver ferritin, for example, coincides with a high percentage of L subunits and, thus, a low percentage of catalytic sites and nucleation channels. Low mineral order facilitates rapid iron turnover and the physiological role of liver ferritin as a general iron source for other tissues. Here, current concepts of ferritin structure/function/genetic regulation are discussed and related to possible therapeutic targets such as mini-ferritin/Dps protein active sites (selective pathogen inhibition in infection), nanocage pores (iron chelation in therapeutic hypertransfusion), mRNA noncoding, IRE riboregulator (normalizing the ferritin iron content after therapeutic hypertransfusion), and protein nanovessels to deliver medicinal or sensor cargo.

  9. Interactions between organic additives and active powders in water-based lithium iron phosphate electrode slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chia-Chen; Lin, Yu-Sheng

    2012-12-01

    The interactions of organic additives with active powders are investigated and are found to have great influence on the determination of the mixing process for preparing electrode slurries with good dispersion and electrochemical properties of lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) electrodes. Based on the analyses of zeta potential, sedimentation, and rheology, it is shown that LiFePO4 prefers to interact with styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) relative to other organic additives such as sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (SCMC), and thus shows preferential adsorption by SBR, whereas SBR has much lower efficiency than SCMC in dispersing LiFePO4. Therefore, for SCMC to interact with and disperse LiFePO4 before the interaction of LiFePO4 with SBR, it is suggested to mix SCMC with LiFePO4 prior to the addition of SBR during the slurry preparation process. For the electrode prepared via the suggested process, i.e., the sequenced adding process in which SCMC is mixed with active powders prior to the addition of SBR, a much better electrochemical performance is obtained than that of the one prepared via the process referred as the simultaneous adding process, in which mixing of SCMC and SBR with active powders in simultaneous.

  10. Arsenate removal from water by zero-valent iron/activated carbon galvanic couples.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiaomin; Li, Rui; Zhao, Bei; Liang, Wenyan

    2010-10-15

    Galvanic couples composed of zero-valent iron and activated carbon (Fe(0)/AC) were investigated for As(V) removal from water. The effects of Fe(0) to AC mass ratio (FCR), solution pH, ionic strength and co-existing anions (phosphate, carbonate, silicate, nitrate, chloride and sulfate) and humic acid (HA) on As(V) removal were evaluated. The results showed that the optimum mass ratio was 1:1, and Fe(0)/AC with this ratio was more effective for As(V) removal than Fe(0) and AC alone at pH of 7 and ion strength of 0.03 M NaCl. The enhanced performance for As(V) removal was fulfilled through an accelerated corrosion process of Fe(0), which meant more corrosion products for efficient As(V) removal. The As(V) removal followed a pseudo-first order reaction. The rate constants (k) for 1:1 Fe(0)/AC and Fe(0) alone were 0.802 and 0.330 h(-1), respectively. Potentiodynamic polarization scans further confirmed that Fe(0) corrosion was promoted when Fe(0) was coupled with AC. Except silicates, other co-existing anions promoted As(V) removal. No reduction form of As (As(III) or As(0)) could be detected on iron corrosion products (ICPs) and in solutions. Identified ICPs included poorly crystallized lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) and magnetite/maghemite (Fe(3)O(4)/gamma-Fe(2)O(3)) for both of Fe(0)/AC and Fe(0) systems. In conclusion, the Fe(0)/AC couple exhibited higher As removal performance than that of Fe(0) alone from water.

  11. Enzyme activity alteration by cadmium administration to rats: the possibility of iron involvement in lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Casalino, E; Sblano, C; Landriscina, C

    1997-10-15

    The specific activities of D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BDH) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) are reduced in the liver and kidney of rats intoxicated with 2.5 mg Cd/kg body wt and sacrificed after 24 h; conversely ketone-body concentration is strongly increased in both of these organs and blood. In the same animals a great stimulation of antioxidant enzymes glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase occurs. The prooxidant state induced by cadmium in liver mitochondria and microsomes is unaffected by superoxide dismutase, catalase, or mannitol, whereas it is completely blocked by vitamin E thus excluding the involvement of reactive oxygen species in this process. The mechanism by which cadmium induces lipid peroxidation has been investigated by measuring the effect of this metal on liposomes. Ninety-minute treatment of liposomes with CdCl2 does not induce any lipid peroxidation. In contrast, Fe2+ ions under the same conditions cause strong liposome peroxidation. It has also been observed that cadmium promotes a time-dependent iron release from biological membranes. When lipid peroxidation is induced by a low concentration (5 microM) of FeCl2, in place of CdCl2, the characteristics of this process and the sensitivity to the various antioxidants used are similar to those observed with Cd. From these results we conclude that the prooxidative effect of cadmium is an indirect one since it is mediated by iron. With regard to the inhibitory effect on BDH and GDH following cadmium intoxication, it does not appear to be imputable to lipid peroxidation since in vitro investigations indicate that the presence of vitamin E does not remove the inhibition at all.

  12. Effect of initial microstructure on the activation energy of second stage during austempering of ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Campos-Cambranis, R.E.; Narvaez Hernandez, L.; Cisneros-Guerrero, M.M.; Perez-Lopez, M.J.

    1998-03-13

    The good balance among mechanical properties of austempered ductile irons (ADI) mainly depends on the matrix microstructure, which basically consists of acicular ferrite and carbon-enriched austenite. This structure is produced by isothermal transformation of the austenite over the temperature range of 523 to 673 K. It is well accepted that during the isothermal holding, the transformation takes place in two stages. In the first stage, the austenite decomposes into acicular ferrite and carbon-enriched austenite. When the austenite is transformed at temperatures higher than 623 K, the acicular ferrite is free of carbides; at temperatures below 623 K, besides the formation of the acicular ferrite and austenite, precipitation of carbides takes place over the plates of the acicular ferrite. The mixture of ferrite and austenite is known as ausferrite being the responsible for the good mechanical properties of ADI. In this work, the ausferrite obtained above and below 623 K will be termed high and low temperature ausferrite respectively. Although ausferrite does not transform at room temperature, it is not a thermodynamically stable structure. Consequently, if the isothermal holding is extended, or if ADI is heated at high temperatures (523 to 800 K), the second stage of the austempering reaction will occur. During this stage, the carbon rich austenite will decompose into ferrite and carbides. In order to establish the maximum working temperature of ADI, it is necessary to characterize the thermal stability of ausferrite microstructure, since once stage II takes place, the mechanical properties, in particular ductility and toughness, are adversely affected. In the present work the influence of previous ausferrite microstructure (that obtained during first stage) of an alloyed ductile iron (0.6%Ni, 0.15%Mo) on the empirical activation energy of stage II is studied.

  13. Anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activity of iron hepta-tungsten phosphate oxygen clusters complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bisong; Qiu, Jianping; Wu, Changsheng; Li, Yunxia; Liu, Zhenxiang

    2015-12-01

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) have attracted a considerable attention due to their unique structural characteristics, physicochemical properties and biological activities. In this study, iron hepta-tungsten phosphate oxygen clusters complex Na12H[Fe(HPW7O28)2]·44H2O (IHTPO) was synthesized and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxic activities on human hepatoma HepG2, leukemia K562, lung carcinoma A549, and large cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells, therapeutic efficacies on mice transplantable tumor, and immunomodulatory potentials on the immune response in tumor-bearing mice. IHTPO exhibited lower in vitro cytotoxic activities against four human tumor cell lines, with the IC50 values being higher than 62.5μM (ca. 300μg/ml). IHTPO, however, significantly inhibited the growth of S180 sarcoma transplanted in mice. It was further showed that IHTPO could not only significantly promote splenocytes proliferation, NK cell and CTL activity from splenocytes, but remarkably enhance serum antigen-specific IgG, IgG2a and IgG2b antibody levels in S180-bearing mice. IHTPO also significantly promoted Th1 cytokines IFN-γ and IL-2 production, and up-regulated the mRNA expression levels of IFN-γ, IL-2 and Th1 transcription factors T-bet and STAT-4 in splenocytes from the S180-bearing mice. These results suggested that IHTPO significantly inhibited the growth of mice transplantable tumor, and that its in vivo antitumor activity might be achieved by improving Th1 protective cell-mediated immunity. IHTPO could act as antitumor agent with immunomodulatory activity.

  14. Active-site zinc ligands and activated H2O of zinc enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Vallee, B L; Auld, D S

    1990-01-01

    The x-ray crystallographic structures of 12 zinc enzymes have been chosen as standards of reference to identify the ligands to the catalytic and structural zinc atoms of other members of their respective enzyme families. Universally, H2O is a ligand and critical component of the catalytically active zinc sites. In addition, three protein side chains bind to the catalytic zinc atom, whereas four protein ligands bind to the structural zinc atom. The geometry and coordination number of zinc can vary greatly to accommodate particular ligands. Zinc forms complexes with nitrogen and oxygen just as readily as with sulfur, and this is reflected in catalytic zinc sites having a binding frequency of His much greater than Glu greater than Asp = Cys, three of which bind to the metal atom. The systematic spacing between the ligands is striking. For all catalytic zinc sites except the coenzyme-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase, the first two ligands are separated by a "short-spacer" consisting of 1 to 3 amino acids. These ligands are separated from the third ligand by a "long spacer" of approximately 20 to approximately 120 amino acids. The spacer enables formation of a primary bidentate zinc complex, whereas the long spacer contributes flexibility to the coordination sphere, which can poise the zinc for catalysis as well as bring other catalytic and substrate binding groups into apposition with the active site. The H2O is activated by ionization, polarization, or poised for displacement. Collectively, the data imply that the preferred mechanistic pathway for activating the water--e.g., zinc hydroxide or Lewis acid catalysis--will be determined by the identity of the other three ligands and their spacing. Images PMID:2104979

  15. Simultaneous Activation of Iron- and Thiol-Based Sensor-Regulator Systems by Redox-Active Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang-Lok; Yoo, Ji-Sun; Oh, Gyeong-Seok; Singh, Atul K.; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria in natural habitats are exposed to myriad redox-active compounds (RACs), which include producers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive electrophile species (RES) that alkylate or oxidize thiols. RACs can induce oxidative stress in cells and activate response pathways by modulating the activity of sensitive regulators. However, the effect of a certain compound on the cell has been investigated primarily with respect to a specific regulatory pathway. Since a single compound can exert multiple chemical effects in the cell, its effect can be better understood by time-course monitoring of multiple sensitive regulatory pathways that the compound induces. We investigated the effect of representative RACs by monitoring the activity of three sensor-regulators in the model actinobacterium Streptomyces coelicolor; SoxR that senses reactive compounds directly through oxidation of its [2Fe–2S] cluster, CatR/PerR that senses peroxides through bound iron, and an anti-sigma factor RsrA that senses RES via disulfide formation. The time course and magnitude of induction of their target transcripts were monitored to predict the chemical activities of each compound in S. coelicolor. Phenazine methosulfate (PMS) was found to be an effective RAC that directly activated SoxR and an effective ROS-producer that induced CatR/PerR with little thiol-perturbing activity. p-Benzoquinone was an effective RAC that directly activated SoxR, with slower ROS-producing activity, and an effective RES that induced the RsrA-SigR system. Plumbagin was an effective RAC that activated SoxR, an effective ROS-producer, and a less agile but effective RES. Diamide was an RES that effectively formed disulfides and a weak RAC that activated SoxR. Monobromobimane was a moderately effective RES and a slow producer of ROS. Interestingly, benzoquinone induced the SigR system by forming adducts on cysteine thiols in RsrA, revealing a new pathway to modulate RsrA activity. Overall, this study showed

  16. Ferric reductase activity of low molecular weight human milk fraction is associated with enhanced iron solubility and uptake in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Pullakhandam, Raghu; Nair, Madhavan Krishnapillai; Kasula, Sunanda; Kilari, Sreenivasulu; Thippande, Tippeswamy Gowda

    2008-09-19

    It is known that the fractional absorption of extrinsic iron from human milk is higher in infants and adults. A low molecular weight milk fraction has been proposed to increase the bioavailability of iron from human milk. Nevertheless, the mechanisms remained elusive. Here in we demonstrate ferric reductase activity (Km7.73x10(-6)M) in low molecular weight human milk fraction (10kF, filtrate derived from ultra filtration of milk whey through 10kDa cutoff membrane), which increased ferric iron solubility and iron uptake in Caco-2 cells. The 10kF fraction was as effective as ascorbic acid (1:20 iron to ascorbic acid) in increasing the ferric iron solubility and uptake in Caco-2 cells. Further, gel filtration chromatography on peptide column led to co-elution of ferric reductase and iron solubilization activities at an apparent molecular mass of <1500Da. Interestingly, only these fractions containing ferric reductase activity also stimulated the uptake of iron in Caco-2 cells. Thus, it is concluded that human milk possesses ferric reductase activity and is associated with ferric iron solubilization and enhanced absorption.

  17. Activated iron-containing microglia in the human hippocampus identified by magnetic resonance imaging in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Zeineh, Michael M.; Chen, Yuanxin; Kitzler, Hagen H.; Hammond, Robert; Vogel, Hannes; Rutt, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    Although amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary pathology play important roles in Alzheimer disease (AD), our understanding of AD is incomplete, and the contribution of microglia and iron to neurodegeneration is unknown. High-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is exquisitely sensitive to microscopic iron. To explore iron-associated neuroinflammatory AD pathology, we studied AD and control human brain specimens by (1) performing ultra-high resolution ex vivo 7 Tesla MRI, (2) coregistering the MRI with successive histologic staining for iron, microglia, amyloid beta, and tau, and (3) quantifying the relationship between magnetic resonance signal intensity and histological staining. In AD, we identified numerous small MR hypointensities primarily within the subiculum that were best explained by the combination of microscopic iron and activated microglia (p = 0.025), in contradistinction to the relatively lesser contribution of tau or amyloid. Neuropathologically, this suggests that microglial-mediated neurodegeneration may occur in the hippocampal formation in AD and is detectable by ultra-high resolution MRI. PMID:26190634

  18. Zero Valent Iron Significantly Enhances Methane Production from Waste Activated Sludge by Improving Biochemical Methane Potential Rather Than Hydrolysis Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion has been widely applied for waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment. However, methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS is usually limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor biochemical methane potential of WAS. This work systematically studied the effects of three different types of zero valent iron (i.e., iron powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap) on methane production from WAS in anaerobic digestion, by using both experimental and mathematical approaches. The results demonstrated that both the clean and the rusty iron scrap were more effective than the iron powder for improving methane production from WAS. Model-based analysis showed that ZVI addition significantly enhanced methane production from WAS through improving the biochemical methane potential of WAS rather than its hydrolysis rate. Economic analysis indicated that the ZVI-based technology for enhancing methane production from WAS is economically attractive, particularly considering that iron scrap can be freely acquired from industrial waste. Based on these results, the ZVI-based anaerobic digestion process of this work could be easily integrated with the conventional chemical phosphorus removal process in wastewater treatment plant to form a cost-effective and environment-friendly approach, enabling maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving enhanced methane production in wastewater treatment system.

  19. Zero Valent Iron Significantly Enhances Methane Production from Waste Activated Sludge by Improving Biochemical Methane Potential Rather Than Hydrolysis Rate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion has been widely applied for waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment. However, methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS is usually limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor biochemical methane potential of WAS. This work systematically studied the effects of three different types of zero valent iron (i.e., iron powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap) on methane production from WAS in anaerobic digestion, by using both experimental and mathematical approaches. The results demonstrated that both the clean and the rusty iron scrap were more effective than the iron powder for improving methane production from WAS. Model-based analysis showed that ZVI addition significantly enhanced methane production from WAS through improving the biochemical methane potential of WAS rather than its hydrolysis rate. Economic analysis indicated that the ZVI-based technology for enhancing methane production from WAS is economically attractive, particularly considering that iron scrap can be freely acquired from industrial waste. Based on these results, the ZVI-based anaerobic digestion process of this work could be easily integrated with the conventional chemical phosphorus removal process in wastewater treatment plant to form a cost-effective and environment-friendly approach, enabling maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving enhanced methane production in wastewater treatment system. PMID:25652244

  20. Myocardial Iron Loading Assessment by Automatic Left Ventricle Segmentation with Morphological Operations and Geodesic Active Contour on T2* images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yun-Gang; Ko, Jacky Kl; Shi, Lin; Guan, Yuefeng; Li, Linong; Qin, Jing; Heng, Pheng-Ann; Chu, Winnie Cw; Wang, Defeng

    2015-07-01

    Myocardial iron loading thalassemia patients could be identified using T2* magnetic resonance images (MRI). To quantitatively assess cardiac iron loading, we proposed an effective algorithm to segment aligned free induction decay sequential myocardium images based on morphological operations and geodesic active contour (GAC). Nine patients with thalassemia major were recruited (10 male and 16 female) to undergo a thoracic MRI scan in the short axis view. Free induction decay images were registered for T2* mapping. The GAC were utilized to segment aligned MR images with a robust initialization. Segmented myocardium regions were divided into sectors for a region-based quantification of cardiac iron loading. Our proposed automatic segmentation approach achieve a true positive rate at 84.6% and false positive rate at 53.8%. The area difference between manual and automatic segmentation was 25.5% after 1000 iterations. Results from T2* analysis indicated that regions with intensity lower than 20 ms were suffered from heavy iron loading in thalassemia major patients. The proposed method benefited from abundant edge information of the free induction decay sequential MRI. Experiment results demonstrated that the proposed method is feasible in myocardium segmentation and was clinically applicable to measure myocardium iron loading.

  1. Zero valent iron significantly enhances methane production from waste activated sludge by improving biochemical methane potential rather than hydrolysis rate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-02-05

    Anaerobic digestion has been widely applied for waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment. However, methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS is usually limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor biochemical methane potential of WAS. This work systematically studied the effects of three different types of zero valent iron (i.e., iron powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap) on methane production from WAS in anaerobic digestion, by using both experimental and mathematical approaches. The results demonstrated that both the clean and the rusty iron scrap were more effective than the iron powder for improving methane production from WAS. Model-based analysis showed that ZVI addition significantly enhanced methane production from WAS through improving the biochemical methane potential of WAS rather than its hydrolysis rate. Economic analysis indicated that the ZVI-based technology for enhancing methane production from WAS is economically attractive, particularly considering that iron scrap can be freely acquired from industrial waste. Based on these results, the ZVI-based anaerobic digestion process of this work could be easily integrated with the conventional chemical phosphorus removal process in wastewater treatment plant to form a cost-effective and environment-friendly approach, enabling maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving enhanced methane production in wastewater treatment system.

  2. Cellular imaging at 1.5 T: detecting cells in neuroinflammation using active labeling with superparamagnetic iron oxide.

    PubMed

    Oweida, Ayman J; Dunn, Elizabeth A; Foster, Paula J

    2004-04-01

    The ability to visualize cell infiltration in experimental auto-immune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a well-known animal model for multiple sclerosis in humans, was investigated using a clinical 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, a custom-built, high-strength gradient coil insert, a 3-D fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) imaging sequence and a superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) contrast agent. An "active labeling" approach was used with SPIO administered intravenously during inflammation in EAE. Our results show that small, discrete regions of signal void corresponding to iron accumulation in EAE brain can be detected using FIESTA at 1.5 T. This work provides early evidence that cellular abnormalities that are the basis of diseases can be probed using cellular MRI and supports our earlier work which indicates that tracking of iron-labeled cells will be possible using clinical MR scanners.

  3. Modelling the cis-oxo-labile binding site motif of non-heme iron oxygenases. Water exchange and remarkable oxidation reactivity of a novel non-heme iron(IV)-oxo compound bearing a tripodal tetradentate ligand

    PubMed Central

    Company, Anna; Prat, Irene; Frisch, Jonathan R.; Ballesté, Ruben Mas; Güell, Mireia; Juhász, Gergely; Ribas, Xavi; Münck, Eckard; Luis, Josep M.; Que, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    The spectroscopic and chemical characterization of a new synthetic non-heme iron(IV)-oxo species [FeIV(O)(Me,HPytacn)(S)]2+ (2, Me,HPytacn = 1-(2′-pyridylmethyl)-4,7-dimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, S = CH3CN or H2O) is described. 2 has been prepared by reaction of [FeII(CF3SO3)2(Me,HPytacn)] (1) with peracetic acid. Complex 2 bears a tetradentate N4 ligand that leaves two cis- sites available for binding an oxo group and a second external ligand but, unlike related iron(IV)-oxo of tetradentate ligands, it is remarkably stable at room temperature (t1/2 > 2h at 288 K). Its ability to exchange the oxygen atom of the oxo ligand with water has been analyzed in detail by means of kinetic studies, and a mechanism has been proposed on the basis of DFT calculations. Hydrogen-atom abstraction from C-H bonds and oxygen atom transfer to sulfides by 2 have also been studied. Despite its thermal stability, 2 proves to be a very powerful oxidant that is capable of breaking the strong C-H bond of cyclohexane (BDE = 99.3 kcal·mol−1). PMID:21268165

  4. Abundance and phylogenetic affiliation of iron reducers in activated sludge as assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and microautoradiography.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Juretschko, Stefan; Wagner, Michael; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer

    2002-09-01

    Microautoradiography (MAR) was used to enumerate acetate-consuming bacteria under Fe(III)-reducing conditions in activated sludge. This population is believed to consist of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, because the applied incubation conditions and the use of specific inhibitors excluded consumption of radiolabeled acetate by other physiological groups such as sulfate reducers. By use of this approach, dissimilatory iron reducers were found in a concentration of 1.1 x 10(8) cells per ml, corresponding to approximately 3% of the total cell count as determined by DAPI (4',6'-diamino-2-phenylindoledihydrochloride-dilactate) staining. The MAR enumeration method was compared to the traditional most-probable-number (MPN) method (FeOOH-MPN) and a modified MPN method, which contains Ferrozine directly within the MPN dilutions to determine the production of small amounts of ferrous iron (Ferrozine-MPN). The Ferrozine-MPN method yielded values 6 to 10 times higher than those obtained by the FeOOH-MPN method. Nevertheless, the MAR approach yielded counts that were 100 to 1,000 times higher than those obtained by the Ferrozine-MPN method. Specific in situ Fe(III) reduction rates per cell (enumerated by the MAR method) were calculated and found to be comparable to the respective rates for pure cultures of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, suggesting that the new MAR method is most reliable. A combination of MAR and fluorescence in situ hybridization was used for phylogenetic characterization of the putative iron-reducing bacteria. All activated-sludge cells able to consume acetate under iron-reducing conditions were targeted by the bacterial oligonucleotide probe EUB338. Around 20% were identified as gamma Proteobacteria, and 10% were assigned to the delta subclass of Proteobacteria.

  5. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  6. The yeast regulator of transcription protein Rtr1 lacks an active site and phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kehui; Manley, James L; Tong, Liang

    2012-07-10

    The activity of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is controlled in part by the phosphorylation state of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Recent reports have suggested that yeast regulator of transcription protein, Rtr1, and its human homologue RPAP2, possess Pol II CTD Ser5 phosphatase activity. Here we report the crystal structure of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1, which reveals a new type of zinc finger protein and does not have any close structural homologues. Importantly, the structure does not show evidence of an active site, and extensive experiments to demonstrate its CTD phosphatase activity have been unsuccessful, suggesting that Rtr1 has a non-catalytic role in CTD dephosphorylation.

  7. Smog Chamber Investigation on the Iron-Catalyzed Activation of Chloride from Modeled Saltpans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, Julian; Bleicher, Sergej; Oeste <, Franz Dietrich; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2014-05-01

    Halogen activation on sea spray aerosols and other halide surfaces and thus the formation of reactive halogen species (RHS), influencing trace and greenhouse gases, has become an important topic of research in recent years. In this context the chloride and bromide activation, in particular the formation of RHS by photochemically induced halogen release from (sea) salt surface and reactions with ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NOx), came into focus [1,2]. Our studies concentrate on the quantification of atomic chlorine (Cl), bromine (Br) and hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the gas phase above lab-models of salt pans, enriched in iron(III) chloride (FeCl3), that are exposed to simulated sunlight in a smog chamber. The applied radical clock method [3] results in time profiles and source strengths for Cl, Br and OH, which are combined with the various compositions of humidified salts. In particular, the influence of bromine, sulfate