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Sample records for active site ligands

  1. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  2. N-methyl-D-aspartate recognition site ligands modulate activity at the coupled glycine recognition site.

    PubMed

    Hood, W F; Compton, R P; Monahan, J B

    1990-03-01

    In synaptic plasma membranes from rat forebrain, the potencies of glycine recognition site agonists and antagonists for modulating [3H]1-[1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl]piperidine ([3H]TCP) binding and for displacing strychnine-insensitive [3H]glycine binding are altered in the presence of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) recognition site ligands. The NMDA competitive antagonist, cis-4-phosphonomethyl-2-piperidine carboxylate (CGS 19755), reduces [3H]glycine binding, and the reduction can be fully reversed by the NMDA recognition site agonist, L-glutamate. Scatchard analysis of [3H]glycine binding shows that in the presence of CGS 19755 there is no change in Bmax (8.81 vs. 8.79 pmol/mg of protein), but rather a decrease in the affinity of glycine (KD of 0.202 microM vs. 0.129 microM). Similar decreases in affinity are observed for the glycine site agonists, D-serine and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate, in the presence of CGS 19755. In contrast, the affinity of glycine antagonists, 1-hydroxy-3-amino-2-pyrrolidone and 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylate, at this [3H]glycine recognition site increases in the presence of CGS 19755. The functional consequence of this change in affinity was addressed using the modulation of [3H]TCP binding. In the presence of L-glutamate, the potency of glycine agonists for the stimulation of [3H]TCP binding increases, whereas the potency of glycine antagonists decreases. These data are consistent with NMDA recognition site ligands, through their interactions at the NMDA recognition site, modulating activity at the associated glycine recognition site.

  3. Multiple, Ligand-Dependent Routes from the Active Site of Cytochrome P450 2C9

    SciTech Connect

    Cojocaru, Vlad; Winn, Peter J.; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-02-13

    The active site of liver-specific, drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenases is deeply buried in the protein and is connected to the protein surface through multiple tunnels, many of which were found open in different CYP crystal structures. It has been shown that different tunnels could serve as ligand passage routes in different CYPs. However, it is not understood whether one CYP uses multiple routes for substrate access and product release and whether these routes depend on ligand properties. From 300 ns of molecular dynamics simulations of CYP2C9, the second most abundant CYP in the human liver we found four main ligand exit routes, the occurrence of each depending on the ligand type and the conformation of the F-G loop, which is likely to be affected by the CYP-membrane interaction. A non-helical F-G loop favored exit towards the putative membrane-embedded region. Important protein features that direct ligand exit include aromatic residues that divide the active site and whose motions control access to two pathways. The ligands interacted with positively charged residues on the protein surface through hydrogen bonds that appear to select for acidic substrates. The observation of multiple, ligand-dependent routes in a CYP aids understanding of how CYP mutations affect drug metabolism and provides new possibilities for CYP inhibition.

  4. Computation of Rate Constants for Diffusion of Small Ligands to and from Buried Protein Active Sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, P-H; De Sancho, D; Best, R B; Blumberger, J

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of ligands to actives sites of proteins is essential to enzyme catalysis and many cellular signaling processes. In this contribution we review our recently developed methodology for calculation of rate constants for diffusion and binding of small molecules to buried protein active sites. The diffusive dynamics of the ligand obtained from molecular dynamics simulation is coarse grained and described by a Markov state model. Diffusion and binding rate constants are then obtained either from the reactive flux formalism or by fitting the time-dependent population of the Markov state model to a phenomenological rate law. The method is illustrated by applications to diffusion of substrate and inhibitors in [NiFe] hydrogenase, CO-dehydrogenase, and myoglobin. We also discuss a recently developed sensitivity analysis that allows one to identify hot spots in proteins, where mutations are expected to have the strongest effects on ligand diffusion rates.

  5. Computation of Rate Constants for Diffusion of Small Ligands to and from Buried Protein Active Sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, P-H; De Sancho, D; Best, R B; Blumberger, J

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of ligands to actives sites of proteins is essential to enzyme catalysis and many cellular signaling processes. In this contribution we review our recently developed methodology for calculation of rate constants for diffusion and binding of small molecules to buried protein active sites. The diffusive dynamics of the ligand obtained from molecular dynamics simulation is coarse grained and described by a Markov state model. Diffusion and binding rate constants are then obtained either from the reactive flux formalism or by fitting the time-dependent population of the Markov state model to a phenomenological rate law. The method is illustrated by applications to diffusion of substrate and inhibitors in [NiFe] hydrogenase, CO-dehydrogenase, and myoglobin. We also discuss a recently developed sensitivity analysis that allows one to identify hot spots in proteins, where mutations are expected to have the strongest effects on ligand diffusion rates. PMID:27497172

  6. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Cyanide (CN) is a well-studied toxic principle, known to inhibit heme-enzymes. • Inhibition is supposed to result from CN binding at the active site as a ligand. • Diverse heme enzymes’ CN inhibition profiles challenge prevailing mechanism. • Poor binding efficiency of CN at low enzyme concentrations and ligand pressures. • CN-based diffusible radicals cause ‘non-productive electron transfers’ (inhibition). - Abstract: The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins’ active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  7. Time-efficient docking of flexible ligands into active sites of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Rarey, M.; Kramer, B.; Lengauer, T.

    1995-12-31

    We present an algorithm for placing flexible molecules in active sites of proteins. The two major goals in the development of our. docking program, called FlexX, are the explicit exploitation of molecular flexibility of the ligand and the development of a model of the docking process that includes the physico-chemical properties of the molecules. The algorithm consists of three phases: The selection of a base fragment, the placement of the base fragment in the active site, and the incremental construction of the ligand inside the active site. Except for the selection of the base fragment, the algorithm runs without manual intervention. The algorithm is tested by reproducing 11 receptor-ligand complexes known from X-ray crystallography. In all cases, the algorithm predicts a placement of the ligand which is similar to the crystal structure (about 1.5 {Angstrom} RMS deviation or less) in a few minutes on a workstation, assuming that the receptor is given in the bound conformation.

  8. Modulating protein activity using tethered ligands with mutually exclusive binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Schena, Alberto; Griss, Rudolf; Johnsson, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to design proteins whose activities can be switched on and off by unrelated effector molecules would enable applications in various research areas, ranging from biosensing to synthetic biology. We describe here a general method to modulate the activity of a protein in response to the concentration of a specific effector. The approach is based on synthetic ligands that possess two mutually exclusive binding sites, one for the protein of interest and one for the effector. Tethering such a ligand to the protein of interest results in an intramolecular ligand–protein interaction that can be disrupted through the presence of the effector. Specifically, we introduce a luciferase controlled by another protein, a human carbonic anhydrase whose activity can be controlled by proteins or small molecules in vitro and on living cells, and novel fluorescent and bioluminescent biosensors. PMID:26198003

  9. The thrombin receptor extracellular domain contains sites crucial for peptide ligand-induced activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bahou, W F; Coller, B S; Potter, C L; Norton, K J; Kutok, J L; Goligorsky, M S

    1993-01-01

    A thrombin receptor (TR) demonstrating a unique activation mechanism has recently been isolated from a megakaryocytic (Dami) cell line. To further study determinants of peptide ligand-mediated activation phenomenon, we have isolated, cloned, and stably expressed the identical receptor from a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) library. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing a functional TR (CHO-TR), platelets, and HUVECs were then used to specifically characterize alpha-thrombin- and peptide ligand-induced activation responses using two different antibodies: anti-TR34-52 directed against a 20-amino acid peptide spanning the thrombin cleavage site, and anti-TR1-160 generated against the NH2-terminal 160 amino acids of the TR expressed as a chimeric protein in Escherichia coli. Activation-dependent responses to both alpha-thrombin (10 nM) and peptide ligand (20 microM) were studied using fura 2-loaded cells and microspectrofluorimetry. Whereas preincubation of CHO-TR with anti-TR34-52 abolished only alpha-thrombin-induced [Ca2+]i transients, preincubation with anti-TR1-160 abrogated both alpha-thrombin- and peptide ligand-induced responses. This latter inhibitory effect was dose dependent and similar for both agonists, with an EC50 of approximately 90 micrograms/ml. Anti-TR1-160 similarly abolished peptide ligand-induced [Ca2+]i transients in platelets and HUVECs, whereas qualitatively different responses characterized by delayed but sustained elevations in [Ca2+]i transients were evident using alpha-thrombin. Platelet aggregation to low concentrations of both ligands was nearly abolished by anti-TR1-160, although some shape change remained; anti-TR34-52 only inhibited alpha-thrombin-induced aggregation. These data establish that a critical recognition sequence for peptide ligand-mediated receptor activation is contained on the NH2-terminal portion of the receptor, upstream from the first transmembrane domain. Furthermore, alpha

  10. Selective Sirt2 inhibition by ligand-induced rearrangement of the active site.

    PubMed

    Rumpf, Tobias; Schiedel, Matthias; Karaman, Berin; Roessler, Claudia; North, Brian J; Lehotzky, Attila; Oláh, Judit; Ladwein, Kathrin I; Schmidtkunz, Karin; Gajer, Markus; Pannek, Martin; Steegborn, Clemens; Sinclair, David A; Gerhardt, Stefan; Ovádi, Judit; Schutkowski, Mike; Sippl, Wolfgang; Einsle, Oliver; Jung, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuins are a highly conserved class of NAD(+)-dependent lysine deacylases. The human isotype Sirt2 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer, inflammation and neurodegeneration, which makes the modulation of Sirt2 activity a promising strategy for pharmaceutical intervention. A rational basis for the development of optimized Sirt2 inhibitors is lacking so far. Here we present high-resolution structures of human Sirt2 in complex with highly selective drug-like inhibitors that show a unique inhibitory mechanism. Potency and the unprecedented Sirt2 selectivity are based on a ligand-induced structural rearrangement of the active site unveiling a yet-unexploited binding pocket. Application of the most potent Sirtuin-rearranging ligand, termed SirReal2, leads to tubulin hyperacetylation in HeLa cells and induces destabilization of the checkpoint protein BubR1, consistent with Sirt2 inhibition in vivo. Our structural insights into this unique mechanism of selective sirtuin inhibition provide the basis for further inhibitor development and selective tools for sirtuin biology. PMID:25672491

  11. Selective Sirt2 inhibition by ligand-induced rearrangement of the active site

    PubMed Central

    Rumpf, Tobias; Schiedel, Matthias; Karaman, Berin; Roessler, Claudia; North, Brian J.; Lehotzky, Attila; Oláh, Judit; Ladwein, Kathrin I.; Schmidtkunz, Karin; Gajer, Markus; Pannek, Martin; Steegborn, Clemens; Sinclair, David A.; Gerhardt, Stefan; Ovádi, Judit; Schutkowski, Mike; Sippl, Wolfgang; Einsle, Oliver; Jung, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuins are a highly conserved class of NAD+-dependent lysine deacylases. The human isotype Sirt2 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer, inflammation and neurodegeneration, which makes the modulation of Sirt2 activity a promising strategy for pharmaceutical intervention. A rational basis for the development of optimized Sirt2 inhibitors is lacking so far. Here we present high-resolution structures of human Sirt2 in complex with highly selective drug-like inhibitors that show a unique inhibitory mechanism. Potency and the unprecedented Sirt2 selectivity are based on a ligand-induced structural rearrangement of the active site unveiling a yet-unexploited binding pocket. Application of the most potent Sirtuin-rearranging ligand, termed SirReal2, leads to tubulin hyperacetylation in HeLa cells and induces destabilization of the checkpoint protein BubR1, consistent with Sirt2 inhibition in vivo. Our structural insights into this unique mechanism of selective sirtuin inhibition provide the basis for further inhibitor development and selective tools for sirtuin biology. PMID:25672491

  12. Ligand Displacement Reaction Paths in a Diiron Hydrogenase Active Site Model Complex.

    PubMed

    Blank, Jan H; Moncho, Salvador; Lunsford, Allen M; Brothers, Edward N; Darensbourg, Marcetta Y; Bengali, Ashfaq A

    2016-08-26

    The mechanism and energetics of CO, 1-hexene, and 1-hexyne substitution from the complexes (SBenz)2 [Fe2 (CO)6 ] (SBenz=SCH2 Ph) (1-CO), (SBenz)2 [Fe2 (CO)5 (η(2) -1-hexene)] (1-(η(2) -1-hexene)), and (SBenz)2 [Fe2 (CO)5 (η(2) -1-hexyne)] (1-(η(2) -1-hexyne)) were studied by using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. Exchange of both CO and 1-hexyne by P(OEt)3 and pyridine, respectively, proceeds by a bimolecular mechanism. As similar activation enthalpies are obtained for both reactions, the rate-determining step in both cases is assumed to be the rotation of the Fe(CO)2 L (L=CO or 1-hexyne) unit to accommodate the incoming ligand. The kinetic profile for the displacement of 1-hexene is quite different than that for the alkyne and, in this case, both reaction channels, that is, dissociative (SN 1) and associative (SN 2), were found to be competitive. Because DFT calculations predict similar binding enthalpies of alkene and alkyne to the iron center, the results indicate that the bimolecular pathway in the case of the alkyne is lower in free energy than that of the alkene. In complexes of this type, subtle changes in the departing ligand characteristics and the nature of the mercapto bridge can influence the exchange mechanism, such that more than one reaction pathway is available for ligand substitution. The difference between this and the analogous study of (μ-pdt)[Fe(CO)3 ]2 (pdt=S(CH2 )3 S) underscores the unique characteristics of a three-atom S-S linker in the active site of diiron hydrogenases. PMID:27482938

  13. Ligand-binding specificity and promiscuity of the main lignocellulolytic enzyme families as revealed by active-site architecture analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Li; Liu, Shijia; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Lushan

    2016-01-01

    Biomass can be converted into sugars by a series of lignocellulolytic enzymes, which belong to the glycoside hydrolase (GH) families summarized in CAZy databases. Here, using a structural bioinformatics method, we analyzed the active site architecture of the main lignocellulolytic enzyme families. The aromatic amino acids Trp/Tyr and polar amino acids Glu/Asp/Asn/Gln/Arg occurred at higher frequencies in the active site architecture than in the whole enzyme structure. And the number of potential subsites was significantly different among different families. In the cellulase and xylanase families, the conserved amino acids in the active site architecture were mostly found at the −2 to +1 subsites, while in β-glucosidase they were mainly concentrated at the −1 subsite. Families with more conserved binding amino acid residues displayed strong selectivity for their ligands, while those with fewer conserved binding amino acid residues often exhibited promiscuity when recognizing ligands. Enzymes with different activities also tended to bind different hydroxyl oxygen atoms on the ligand. These results may help us to better understand the common and unique structural bases of enzyme-ligand recognition from different families and provide a theoretical basis for the functional evolution and rational design of major lignocellulolytic enzymes. PMID:27009476

  14. Ligand uptake in Mycobacterium tuberculosis truncated hemoglobins is controlled by both internal tunnels and active site water molecules

    PubMed Central

    Davidge, Kelly S; Singh, Sandip; Bowman, Lesley AH; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Carballal, Sebastián; Radi, Rafael; Poole, Robert K; Dikshit, Kanak; Estrin, Dario A; Marti, Marcelo A; Boechi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis, has two proteins belonging to the truncated hemoglobin (trHb) family. Mt-trHbN presents well-defined internal hydrophobic tunnels that allow O 2 and •NO to migrate easily from the solvent to the active site, whereas Mt-trHbO possesses tunnels that are partially blocked by a few bulky residues, particularly a tryptophan at position G8. Differential ligand migration rates allow Mt-trHbN to detoxify •NO, a crucial step for pathogen survival once under attack by the immune system, much more efficiently than Mt-trHbO. In order to investigate the differences between these proteins, we performed experimental kinetic measurements, •NO decomposition, as well as molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type Mt-trHbN and two mutants, VG8F and VG8W. These mutations introduce modifications in both tunnel topologies and affect the incoming ligand capacity to displace retained water molecules at the active site. We found that a single mutation allows Mt-trHbN to acquire ligand migration rates comparable to those observed for Mt-trHbO, confirming that ligand migration is regulated by the internal tunnel architecture as well as by water molecules stabilized in the active site. PMID:26478812

  15. Ligand uptake in Mycobacterium tuberculosis truncated hemoglobins is controlled by both internal tunnels and active site water molecules.

    PubMed

    Boron, Ignacio; Bustamante, Juan Pablo; Davidge, Kelly S; Singh, Sandip; Bowman, Lesley Ah; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Carballal, Sebastián; Radi, Rafael; Poole, Robert K; Dikshit, Kanak; Estrin, Dario A; Marti, Marcelo A; Boechi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis, has two proteins belonging to the truncated hemoglobin (trHb) family. Mt-trHbN presents well-defined internal hydrophobic tunnels that allow O 2 and (•)NO to migrate easily from the solvent to the active site, whereas Mt-trHbO possesses tunnels that are partially blocked by a few bulky residues, particularly a tryptophan at position G8. Differential ligand migration rates allow Mt-trHbN to detoxify (•)NO, a crucial step for pathogen survival once under attack by the immune system, much more efficiently than Mt-trHbO. In order to investigate the differences between these proteins, we performed experimental kinetic measurements, (•)NO decomposition, as well as molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type Mt-trHbN and two mutants, VG8F and VG8W. These mutations introduce modifications in both tunnel topologies and affect the incoming ligand capacity to displace retained water molecules at the active site. We found that a single mutation allows Mt-trHbN to acquire ligand migration rates comparable to those observed for Mt-trHbO, confirming that ligand migration is regulated by the internal tunnel architecture as well as by water molecules stabilized in the active site.

  16. Effective charge on acetylcholinesterase active sites determined from the ionic strength dependence of association rate constants with cationic ligands.

    PubMed

    Nolte, H J; Rosenberry, T L; Neumann, E

    1980-08-01

    The reaction of the specific fluorescent cationic ligand N-methylacridinium with the active site of 11S acetylcholinesterase from electric eel was monitored by temperature-jump relaxation kinetics at a variety of ionic strengths. The ionic strength dependence of the bimolecular association rate constant is analyzed with a Brønsted-Debye-Hückel expression and leads to estimates of the association rate constant at zero ionic strength of K120 = 1.1 X 10(10) M-1 S-1 at 25 degrees C and the net charge number of the enzyme active site of ZE = -6.3. The ionic strength dependence of the second-order hydrolysis rate constant kcat/Kapp for acetylthiocholine under steady-state conditions is also very pronounced and indicates a value of ZE = -9. Thus, a large effective negative charge on the enzyme active site appears to be a general characteristic of its interaction with cationic ligands. The ionic strength dependence of Kcat/Kapp is identical with that of sodium chloride, sodium phosphate, and sodium citrate, thus ruling out any possibility that the phenomena arise from a specific, partially competitive binding of Na+ to the enzyme active site. Substitution of the calculated electrostatic parameters into theoretical equations indicates that the most significant effect of these ZE values is a 2-3 order of magnitude reduction in the rate constant for dissociation of the initial ligand-enzyme encounter complex; this decrease renders the bimolecular reaction diffusion controlled. The high value of k120 and the space requirements of six to nine charged groups suggest that regions of the enzyme surface area larger than the catalytic sites themselves are effective in trapping cationic ligands.

  17. Theoretical studies of [FeFe]-hydrogenase: infrared fingerprints of the dithiol-bridging ligand in the active site.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Silviu; Stiefel, Edward I; Cohen, Morrel H; Car, Roberto

    2007-02-19

    An unresolved structural issue for [FeFe]-hydrogenases is the nature of the dithiol-bridging ligand in the diiron subcluster of the active site. The two most probable candidates are 1,3-dithiopropane (propane dithiol, PDT) and di-(thiomethyl)-amine (DTN). In the latter case, the dithiol-bridging ligand is assumed to play a major role in the reaction cycle. We report density-functional theory studies of the differing roles of these dithiol-bridging ligands in the infrared spectra of synthetic models and of computational representations of the diiron cluster of the active site. Our analysis shows distinct spectral features associated with the dithiol-bridging NH mode for compounds having a DTN bridge, which, however, would have been obscured by the H2O vibrations in existing measurements. However, if indeed nitrogen is present in the dithiol-bridging ligand, a combination of selective deuteration and chemical inactivation with CO would create a unique signature in an accessible region of the infrared spectrum, whose position and intensity are predicted.

  18. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins' active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  19. A semisynthetic strategy leads to alteration of the backbone amidate ligand in the NiSOD active site

    SciTech Connect

    Campeciño, Julius O.; Dudycz, Lech W.; Tumelty, David; Berg, Volker; Cabelli, Diane E.; Maroney, Michael J.

    2015-07-01

    Computational investigations have implicated the amidate ligand in nickel superoxide dismutase (NiSOD) in stabilizing Ni-centered redox catalysis and in preventing cysteine thiolate ligand oxidation. To test these predictions, we have used an experimental approach utilizing a semisynthetic scheme that employs native chemical ligation of a pentapeptide (HCDLP) to recombinant S. coelicolor NiSOD lacking these N-terminal residues, NΔ5-NiSOD. Wild-type enzyme produced in this manner exhibits the characteristic spectral properties of recombinant WT-NiSOD and is as catalytically active. The semisynthetic scheme was also employed to construct a variant where the amidate ligand was converted to a secondary amine, H1*-NiSOD, a novel strategy that retains a backbone N-donor atom. The H1*-NiSOD variant was found to have only ~1% of the catalytic activity of the recombinant wild-type enzyme, and had altered spectroscopic properties. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals a four-coordinate planar site with N2S2-donor ligands, consistent with electronic absorption spectroscopic results indicating that the Ni center in H1*-NiSOD is mostly reduced in the as-isolated sample, as opposed to 50:50 Ni(II)/Ni(III) mixture that is typical for the recombinant wild-type enzyme. The EPR spectrum of as-isolated H1*-NiSOD accounts for ~11% of the Ni in the sample and is similar to WT-NiSOD, but more axial, with gz < gx,y. 14N-hyperfine is observed on gzligand in the Ni(III) complex. As a result, the altered electronic properties and implications for redox catalysis are discussed in light of predictions based on synthetic and computational models.

  20. A semisynthetic strategy leads to alteration of the backbone amidate ligand in the NiSOD active site

    DOE PAGES

    Campeciño, Julius O.; Dudycz, Lech W.; Tumelty, David; Berg, Volker; Cabelli, Diane E.; Maroney, Michael J.

    2015-07-01

    Computational investigations have implicated the amidate ligand in nickel superoxide dismutase (NiSOD) in stabilizing Ni-centered redox catalysis and in preventing cysteine thiolate ligand oxidation. To test these predictions, we have used an experimental approach utilizing a semisynthetic scheme that employs native chemical ligation of a pentapeptide (HCDLP) to recombinant S. coelicolor NiSOD lacking these N-terminal residues, NΔ5-NiSOD. Wild-type enzyme produced in this manner exhibits the characteristic spectral properties of recombinant WT-NiSOD and is as catalytically active. The semisynthetic scheme was also employed to construct a variant where the amidate ligand was converted to a secondary amine, H1*-NiSOD, a novel strategymore » that retains a backbone N-donor atom. The H1*-NiSOD variant was found to have only ~1% of the catalytic activity of the recombinant wild-type enzyme, and had altered spectroscopic properties. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals a four-coordinate planar site with N2S2-donor ligands, consistent with electronic absorption spectroscopic results indicating that the Ni center in H1*-NiSOD is mostly reduced in the as-isolated sample, as opposed to 50:50 Ni(II)/Ni(III) mixture that is typical for the recombinant wild-type enzyme. The EPR spectrum of as-isolated H1*-NiSOD accounts for ~11% of the Ni in the sample and is similar to WT-NiSOD, but more axial, with gz < gx,y. 14N-hyperfine is observed on gz« less

  1. A solution NMR study showing that active site ligands and nucleotides directly perturb the allosteric equilibrium in aspartate transcarbamoylase.

    PubMed

    Velyvis, Algirdas; Yang, Ying R; Schachman, Howard K; Kay, Lewis E

    2007-05-22

    The 306-kDa aspartate transcarbamoylase is a well studied regulatory enzyme, and it has emerged as a paradigm for understanding allostery and cooperative binding processes. Although there is a consensus that the cooperative binding of active site ligands follows the Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) model of allostery, there is some debate about the binding of effectors such as ATP and CTP and how they influence the allosteric equilibrium between R and T states of the enzyme. In this article, the binding of substrates, substrate analogues, and nucleotides is studied, along with their effect on the R-T equilibrium by using highly deuterated, (1)H,(13)C-methyl-labeled protein in concert with methyl-transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) NMR. Although only the T state of the enzyme can be observed in spectra of wild-type unliganded aspartate transcarbamoylase, binding of active-site substrates shift the equilibrium so that correlations from the R state become visible, allowing the equilibrium constant (L') between ligand-saturated R and T forms of the enzyme to be measured quantitatively. The equilibrium constant between unliganded R and T forms (L) also is obtained, despite the fact that the R state is "invisible" in spectra, by means of an indirect process that makes use of relations that emerge from the fact that ligand binding and the R-T equilibrium are linked. Titrations with MgATP unequivocally establish that its binding directly perturbs the R-T equilibrium, consistent with the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model. This study emphasizes the utility of modern solution NMR spectroscopy in understanding protein function, even for systems with aggregate molecular masses in the hundreds of kilodaltons.

  2. How to awaken your nanomachines: Site-specific activation of focal adhesion kinases through ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Walkiewicz, Katarzyna W; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Arold, Stefan T

    2015-10-01

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the related protein-tyrosine kinase 2-beta (Pyk2) are highly versatile multidomain scaffolds central to cell adhesion, migration, and survival. Due to their key role in cancer metastasis, understanding and inhibiting their functions are important for the development of targeted therapy. Because FAK and Pyk2 are involved in many different cellular functions, designing drugs with partial and function-specific inhibitory effects would be desirable. Here, we summarise recent progress in understanding the structural mechanism of how the tug-of-war between intramolecular and intermolecular interactions allows these protein 'nanomachines' to become activated in a site-specific manner.

  3. Enzyme-ligand interactions that drive active site rearrangements in the Helicobacter pylori 5´-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Ronning, Donald R; Iacopelli, Natalie M; Mishra, Vidhi

    2012-03-15

    The bacterial enzyme 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) plays a central role in three essential metabolic pathways in bacteria: methionine salvage, purine salvage, and polyamine biosynthesis. Recently, its role in the pathway that leads to the production of autoinducer II, an important component in quorum-sensing, has garnered much interest. Because of this variety of roles, MTAN is an attractive target for developing new classes of inhibitors that influence bacterial virulence and biofilm formation. To gain insight toward the development of new classes of MTAN inhibitors, the interactions between the Helicobacter pylori-encoded MTAN and its substrates and substrate analogs were probed using X-ray crystallography. The structures of MTAN, an MTAN-Formycin A complex, and an adenine bound form were solved by molecular replacement and refined to 1.7, 1.8, and 1.6 Å, respectively. The ribose-binding site in the MTAN and MTAN-adenine cocrystal structures contain a tris[hydroxymethyl]aminomethane molecule that stabilizes the closed form of the enzyme and displaces a nucleophilic water molecule necessary for catalysis. This research gives insight to the interactions between MTAN and bound ligands that promote closing of the enzyme active site and highlights the potential for designing new classes of MTAN inhibitors using a link/grow or ligand assembly development strategy based on the described H. pylori MTAN crystal structures.

  4. Ligand-dependent dynamics of the active-site lid in bacterial dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Masooma; Richter, Christine; Chisty, Liisa T; Kirkpatrick, John; Blackledge, Martin; Webb, Martin R; Driscoll, Paul C

    2014-02-18

    The dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) enzyme family has been the subject of substantial investigation as a potential therapeutic target for the regulation of vascular tension. DDAH enzymes catalyze the conversion of asymmetric N(η),N(η)-dimethylarginine (ADMA) to l-citrulline. Here the influence of substrate and product binding on the dynamic flexibility of DDAH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PaDDAH) has been assessed. A combination of heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy, static and time-resolved fluorescence measurements, and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations was employed. A monodisperse monomeric variant of the wild-type enzyme binds the reaction product l-citrulline with a low millimolar dissociation constant. A second variant, engineered to be catalytically inactive by substitution of the nucleophilic Cys249 residue with serine, can still convert the substrate ADMA to products very slowly. This PaDDAH variant also binds l-citrulline, but with a low micromolar dissociation constant. NMR and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the active site "lid", formed by residues Gly17-Asp27, exhibits a high degree of internal motion on the picosecond-to-nanosecond time scale. This suggests that the lid is open in the apo state and allows substrate access to the active site that is otherwise buried. l-Citrulline binding to both protein variants is accompanied by an ordering of the lid. Modification of PaDDAH with a coumarin fluorescence reporter allowed measurement of the kinetic mechanism of the PaDDAH reaction. A combination of NMR and kinetic data shows that the catalytic turnover of the enzyme is not limited by release of the l-citrulline product. The potential to develop the coumarin-PaDDAH adduct as an l-citrulline sensor is discussed. PMID:24484052

  5. Femtomolar Zn(II) affinity in a peptide-based ligand designed to model thiolate-rich metalloprotein active sites.

    PubMed

    Petros, Amy K; Reddi, Amit R; Kennedy, Michelle L; Hyslop, Alison G; Gibney, Brian R

    2006-12-11

    Metal-ligand interactions are critical components of metalloprotein assembly, folding, stability, electrochemistry, and catalytic function. Research over the past 3 decades on the interaction of metals with peptide and protein ligands has progressed from the characterization of amino acid-metal and polypeptide-metal complexes to the design of folded protein scaffolds containing multiple metal cofactors. De novo metalloprotein design has emerged as a valuable tool both for the modular synthesis of these complex metalloproteins and for revealing the fundamental tenets of metalloprotein structure-function relationships. Our research has focused on using the coordination chemistry of de novo designed metalloproteins to probe the interactions of metal cofactors with protein ligands relevant to biological phenomena. Herein, we present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of Fe(II), Co(II), Zn(II), and[4Fe-4S]2(+/+) binding to IGA, a 16 amino acid peptide ligand containing four cysteine residues, H2N-KLCEGG-CIGCGAC-GGW-CONH2. These studies were conducted to delineate the inherent metal-ion preferences of this unfolded tetrathiolate peptide ligand as well as to evaluate the role of the solution pH on metal-peptide complex speciation. The [4Fe-4S]2(+/+)-IGA complex is both an excellent peptide-based synthetic analogue for natural ferredoxins and is flexible enough to accommodate mononuclear metal-ion binding. Incorporation of a single ferrous ion provides the FeII-IGA complex, a spectroscopic model of a reduced rubredoxin active site that possesses limited stability in aqueous buffers. As expected based on the Irving-Williams series and hard-soft acid-base theory, the Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes of IGA are significantly more stable than the Fe(II) complex. Direct proton competition experiments, coupled with determinations of the conditional dissociation constants over a range of pH values, fully define the thermodynamic stabilities and speciation of each MII-IGA complex. The

  6. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-03-01

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O2 bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H2O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH bound structures have the highest calculated activity to date.

  7. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    DOE PAGES

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-03-19

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O₂ bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H₂O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH boundmore » structures have the highest calculated activity to date.« less

  8. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-03-19

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O₂ bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H₂O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH bound structures have the highest calculated activity to date.

  9. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    PubMed Central

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O2 bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H2O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH bound structures have the highest calculated activity to date. PMID:25788358

  10. The intriguing enhancement of chloroperoxidase mediated one-electron oxidations by azide, a known active-site ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, Daniel; Hager, Lowell; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Azide is a well known heme-enzyme active site ligand and inhibitor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Herein, azide is reported to enhance a set of heme-enzyme mediated reactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This effect is disconnected from native enzyme-azide binding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Azide could enhance heme-enzyme reactions via a newly proposed mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Azide contained in reagents could impact reaction outcomes in redox biochemistry. -- Abstract: Azide is a well-known inhibitor of heme-enzymes. Herein, we report the counter-intuitive observation that at some concentration regimes, incorporation of azide in the reaction medium enhances chloroperoxidase (CPO, a heme-enzyme) mediated one-electron abstractions from several substrates. A diffusible azidyl radical based mechanism is proposed for explaining the phenomenon. Further, it is projected that the finding could have significant impact on routine in situ or in vitro biochemistry studies involving heme-enzyme systems and azide.

  11. A ligand field chemistry of oxygen generation by the oxygen-evolving complex and synthetic active sites

    PubMed Central

    Betley, Theodore A; Surendranath, Yogesh; Childress, Montana V; Alliger, Glen E; Fu, Ross; Cummins, Christopher C; Nocera, Daniel G

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen–oxygen bond formation and O2 generation occur from the S4 state of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Several mechanistic possibilities have been proposed for water oxidation, depending on the formal oxidation state of the Mn atoms. All fall under two general classifications: the AB mechanism in which nucleophilic oxygen (base, B) attacks electrophilic oxygen (acid, A) of the Mn4Ca cluster or the RC mechanism in which radical-like oxygen species couple within OEC. The critical intermediate in either mechanism involves a metal oxo, though the nature of this oxo for AB and RC mechanisms is disparate. In the case of the AB mechanism, assembly of an even-electron count, high-valent metal-oxo proximate to a hydroxide is needed whereas, in an RC mechanism, two odd-electron count, high-valent metal oxos are required. Thus the two mechanisms give rise to very different design criteria for functional models of the OEC active site. This discussion presents the electron counts and ligand geometries that support metal oxos for AB and RC O–O bond-forming reactions. The construction of architectures that bring two oxygen functionalities together under the purview of the AB and RC scenarios are described. PMID:17971328

  12. Ligand K-edge x-ray adsorption spectroscopic studies of the electronic structure of inorganic model complexes and metalloprotein active sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadle, S. E.

    1994-08-01

    Ligand K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been developed as a technique for the investigation of ligand-metal bonding and has been applied to the study of electronic structure in organic model complexes and metalloprotein active sites. Ligand K-edge XAS has been measured at the chloride K-edge for a series of complexes containing chloride ligands bound to open shell d(sup 9) copper ions. The intensity of the pre-edge feature in these spectra reflects the covalency in the half-occupied d(sub x)2(sub -y)2-derived molecular orbital (HOMO) of the complex. The energy of the pre-edge feature is related to both the charge on the ligand and the HOMO energy. An analysis of the intensity and energy of the pre-edge feature as well as the energy of the rising edge absorption provides quantitative information about the covalency of the ligand-metal interaction, the charge donated by the chloride, and the energy of the copper d-manifold. The results demonstrate that ligand K-edge XAS features can be used to obtain quantitative information about ligand-metal bonding. The results also identify the chemical basis for trends in the XAS data for the complexes: D(sub 4h)CuCl4(sup 2-), D(sub 2d)CuCl4(sup 2-), planar, trans-CuCl2(pdmp)(sub 2) (pdmp=N-phenyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazole), square pyramidal CuCl5(sup 3-), the planar dimer KCuCl3, the distorted tetrahedral dimer (Ph4P)CuCl3, and two dimers with mixed ligation, one containing a bridging chloride, and the other, terminally bound chloride. A geometric distortion from square planar to distorted tetrahedral results in a decrease in the chloride-copper HOMO covalency but an increase in the total charge donation by the chlorides. Thus, while the geometry can maximize the overlap for a highly covalent HOMO, this does not necessarily reflect the overall charge donation. The Cl-Cu(II) bonding interactions are dependent on the nature of the other coordinating ligands.

  13. Supramolecular Chemistry And Self-assembly Special Feature: Selective immobilization of proteins to self-assembled monolayers presenting active site-directed capture ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodneland, Christian D.; Lee, Young-Sam; Min, Dal-Hee; Mrksich, Milan

    2002-04-01

    This paper describes a method for the selective and covalent immobilization of proteins to surfaces with control over the density and orientation of the protein. The strategy is based on binding of the serine esterase cutinase to a self-assembled monolayer presenting a phosphonate ligand and the subsequent displacement reaction that covalently binds the ligand to the enzyme active site. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy showed that cutinase binds irreversibly to a monolayer presenting the capture ligand at a density of 1% mixed among tri(ethylene glycol) groups. The covalent immobilization is specific for cutinase, and the glycol-terminated monolayer effectively prevents unwanted nonspecific adsorption of proteins. To demonstrate that the method could be used to immobilize proteins of interest, a cutinase-calmodulin fusion protein was constructed and immobilized to the monolayer. SPR showed that calcineurin selectively associated with the immobilized calmodulin. This capture ligand immobilization method combines the advantages that the immobilization reaction is highly selective for the intended protein, the tether is covalent and, hence, stable, and the method avoids the need for synthetic modification and rigorous purification of proteins before immobilization. These characteristics make the method well suited to a range of applications and, in particular, for constructing protein microarrays.

  14. ProBiS-ligands: a web server for prediction of ligands by examination of protein binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Konc, Janez; Janežič, Dušanka

    2014-01-01

    The ProBiS-ligands web server predicts binding of ligands to a protein structure. Starting with a protein structure or binding site, ProBiS-ligands first identifies template proteins in the Protein Data Bank that share similar binding sites. Based on the superimpositions of the query protein and the similar binding sites found, the server then transposes the ligand structures from those sites to the query protein. Such ligand prediction supports many activities, e.g. drug repurposing. The ProBiS-ligands web server, an extension of the ProBiS web server, is open and free to all users at http://probis.cmm.ki.si/ligands. PMID:24861616

  15. Ligand-dependent active-site closure revealed in the crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis MenB complexed with product analogues.

    PubMed

    Song, Haigang; Sung, Hoi Pang; Tse, Yuk Sing; Jiang, Ming; Guo, Zhihong

    2014-11-01

    1,4-Dihydroxy-2-naphthoyl coenzyme A (DHNA-CoA) synthase catalyzes an essential intramolecular Claisen condensation in menaquinone biosynthesis and is an important target for the development of new antibiotics. This enzyme in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is cofactor-free and is classified as a type II DHNA-CoA synthase, differing from type I enzymes, which rely on exogenous bicarbonate for catalysis. Its crystal structures in complex with product analogues have been determined at high resolution to reveal ligand-dependent structural changes, which include the ordering of a 27-residue active-site loop (amino acids 107-133) and the reorientation of the carboxy-terminal helix (amino acids 289-301) that forms part of the active site from the opposing subunit across the trimer-trimer interface. These structural changes result in closure of the active site to the bulk solution, which is likely to take place through an induced-fit mechanism, similar to that observed for type I DHNA-CoA synthases. These findings demonstrate that the ligand-dependent conformational changes are a conserved feature of all DHNA-CoA synthases, providing new insights into the catalytic mechanism of this essential tubercular enzyme.

  16. Structural analysis of the active sites of dihydrofolate reductase from two species of Candida uncovers ligand-induced conformational changes shared among species

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Janet L.; Viswanathan, Kishore; Wright, Dennis L.; Anderson, Amy C.

    2013-01-01

    A novel strategy for targeting the pathogenic organisms Candida albicans and Candida glabrata focuses on the development of potent and selective antifolates effective against dihydrofolate reductase. Crystal structure analysis suggested that an essential loop at the active site (Thr 58-Phe 66) differs from the analogous residues in the human enzyme, potentially providing a mechanism for achieving selectivity. In order to probe the role of this loop, we employed chemical synthesis, crystal structure determination and molecular dynamics simulations. The results of these analyses show that the loop residues undergo ligand-induced conformational changes that are similar among the fungal and human species. PMID:23375226

  17. Calculation of Vibrational Shifts of Nitrile Probes in the Active Site of Ketosteroid Isomerase upon Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Layfield, Joshua P.

    2012-01-01

    The vibrational Stark effect provides insight into the roles of hydrogen bonding, electrostatics, and conformational motions in enzyme catalysis. In a recent application of this approach to the enzyme ketosteroid isomerase (KSI), thiocyanate probes were introduced in site-specific positions throughout the active site. This paper implements a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach for calculating the vibrational shifts of nitrile (CN) probes in proteins. This methodology is shown to reproduce the experimentally measured vibrational shifts upon binding of the intermediate analog equilinen to KSI for two different nitrile probe positions. Analysis of the molecular dynamics simulations provides atomistic insight into the roles that key residues play in determining the electrostatic environment and hydrogen-bonding interactions experienced by the nitrile probe. For the M116C-CN probe, equilinen binding reorients an active site water molecule that is directly hydrogen bonded to the nitrile probe, resulting in a more linear CNH angle and increasing the CN frequency upon binding. For the F86C-CN probe, equilinen binding orients the Asp103 residue, decreasing the hydrogen-bonding distance between the Asp103 backbone and the nitrile probe and slightly increasing the CN frequency. This QM/MM methodology is applicable to a wide range of biological systems and has the potential to assist in the elucidation of the fundamental principles underlying enzyme catalysis. PMID:23210919

  18. High resolution crystal structures of triosephosphate isomerase complexed with its suicide inhibitors: The conformational flexibility of the catalytic glutamate in its closed, liganded active site

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Rajaram; Alahuhta, Markus; Pihko, Petri M; Wierenga, Rik K

    2011-01-01

    The key residue of the active site of triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) is the catalytic glutamate, which is proposed to be important (i) as a catalytic base, for initiating the reaction, as well as (ii) for the subsequent proton shuttling steps. The structural properties of this glutamate in the liganded complex have been investigated by studying the high resolution crystal structures of typanosomal TIM, complexed with three suicide inhibitors: (S)-glycidol phosphate ((S)-GOP, at 0.99 Å resolution), (R)-glycidol phosphate, ((R)-GOP, at 1.08 Å resolution), and bromohydroxyacetone phosphate (BHAP, at 1.97 Å resolution). The structures show that in the (S)-GOP active site this catalytic glutamate is in the well characterized, competent conformation. However, an unusual side chain conformation is observed in the (R)-GOP and BHAP complexes. In addition, Glu97, salt bridged to the catalytic lysine in the competent active site, adopts an unusual side chain conformation in these two latter complexes. The higher chemical reactivity of (S)-GOP compared with (R)-GOP, as known from solution studies, can be understood: the structures indicate that in the case of (S)-GOP, Glu167 can attack the terminal carbon of the epoxide in a stereoelectronically favored, nearly linear O–C–O arrangement, but this is not possible for the (R)-GOP isomer. These structures confirm the previously proposed conformational flexibility of the catalytic glutamate in its closed, liganded state. The importance of this conformational flexibility for the proton shuttling steps in the TIM catalytic cycle, which is apparently achieved by a sliding motion of the side chain carboxylate group above the enediolate plane, is also discussed. PMID:21633986

  19. Distinct Roles of the Active-site Mg2+ Ligands, Asp882 and Asp705, of DNA Polymerase I (Klenow Fragment) during the Prechemistry Conformational Transitions*

    PubMed Central

    Bermek, Oya; Grindley, Nigel D. F.; Joyce, Catherine M.

    2011-01-01

    DNA polymerases catalyze the incorporation of deoxynucleoside triphosphates into a growing DNA chain using a pair of Mg2+ ions, coordinated at the active site by two invariant aspartates, whose removal by mutation typically reduces the polymerase activity to barely detectable levels. Using two stopped-flow fluorescence assays that we developed previously, we have investigated the role of the carboxylate ligands, Asp705 and Asp882, of DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment) in the early prechemistry steps that prepare the active site for catalysis. We find that neither carboxylate is required for an early conformational transition, reported by a 2-aminopurine probe, that takes place in the open ternary complex after binding of the complementary dNTP. However, the subsequent fingers-closing step requires Asp882; this step converts the open ternary complex into the closed conformation, creating the active-site geometry required for catalysis. Crystal structures indicate that the Asp882 position changes very little during fingers-closing; this side chain may therefore serve as an anchor point to receive the dNTP-associated metal ion as the nucleotide is delivered into the active site. The Asp705 carboxylate is not required until after the fingers-closing step, and we suggest that its role is to facilitate the entry of the second Mg2+ into the active site. The two early prechemistry steps that we have studied take place normally at very low Mg2+ concentrations, although higher concentrations are needed for covalent nucleotide addition, consistent with the second metal ion entering the ternary complex after fingers-closing. PMID:21084297

  20. Mutagenesis of Zinc Ligand Residue Cys221 Reveals Plasticity in the IMP-1 Metallo-β-Lactamase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Lori B.; Shanker, Sreejesh; Mikulski, Rose; Brown, Nicholas G.; Phillips, Kevin J.; Lykissa, Ernest; Venkataram Prasad, B. V.

    2012-01-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases catalyze the hydrolysis of a broad range of β-lactam antibiotics and are a concern for the spread of drug resistance. To analyze the determinants of enzyme structure and function, the sequence requirements for the subclass B1 IMP-1 β-lactamase zinc binding residue Cys221 were tested by saturation mutagenesis and evaluated for protein expression, as well as hydrolysis of β-lactam substrates. The results indicated that most substitutions at position 221 destabilized the enzyme. Only the enzymes containing C221D and C221G substitutions were expressed well in Escherichia coli and exhibited catalytic activity toward β-lactam antibiotics. Despite the lack of a metal-chelating group at position 221, the C221G enzyme exhibited high levels of catalytic activity in the presence of exogenous zinc. Molecular modeling suggests the glycine substitution is unique among substitutions in that the complete removal of the cysteine side chain allows space for a water molecule to replace the thiol and coordinate zinc at the Zn2 zinc binding site to restore function. Multiple methods were used to estimate the C221G Zn2 binding constant to be 17 to 43 μM. Studies of enzyme function in vivo in E. coli grown on minimal medium showed that both IMP-1 and the C221G mutant exhibited compromised activity when zinc availability was low. Finally, substitutions at residue 121, which is the IMP-1 equivalent of the subclass B3 zinc-chelating position, failed to rescue C221G function, suggesting the coordination schemes of subclasses B1 and B3 are not interchangeable. PMID:22908171

  1. Ligand Binding at the α4-α4 Agonist-Binding Site of the α4β2 nAChR Triggers Receptor Activation through a Pre-Activated Conformational State

    PubMed Central

    Indurthi, Dinesh C.; Lewis, Trevor M.; Ahring, Philip K.; Balle, Thomas; Chebib, Mary; Absalom, Nathan L.

    2016-01-01

    The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is the most abundant subtype in the brain and exists in two functional stoichiometries: (α4)3(β2)2 and (α4)2(β2)3. A distinct feature of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor is the biphasic activation response to the endogenous agonist acetylcholine, where it is activated with high potency and low efficacy when two α4-β2 binding sites are occupied and with low potency/high efficacy when a third α4-α4 binding site is occupied. Further, exogenous ligands can bind to the third α4-α4 binding site and potentiate the activation of the receptor by ACh that is bound at the two α4-β2 sites. We propose that perturbations of the recently described pre-activation step when a third binding site is occupied are a key driver of these distinct activation properties. To investigate this, we used a combination of simple linear kinetic models and voltage clamp electrophysiology to determine whether transitions into the pre-activated state were increased when three binding sites were occupied. We separated the binding at the two different sites with ligands selective for the α4-β2 site (Sazetidine-A and TC-2559) and the α4-α4 site (NS9283) and identified that when a third binding site was occupied, changes in the concentration-response curves were best explained by an increase in transitions into a pre-activated state. We propose that perturbations of transitions into a pre-activated state are essential to explain the activation properties of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor by acetylcholine and other ligands. Considering the widespread clinical use of benzodiazepines, this discovery of a conserved mechanism that benzodiazepines and ACh potentiate receptor activation via a third binding site can be exploited to develop therapeutics with similar properties at other cys-loop receptors. PMID:27552221

  2. FRET analysis using sperm-activating peptides tagged with fluorescent proteins reveals that ligand-binding sites exist as clusters.

    PubMed

    Arcos-Hernández, César; Romero, Francisco; Sánchez-Guevara, Yoloxochitl; Beltrán, Carmen; Nishigaki, Takuya

    2016-02-01

    Long-range cellular communication between the sperm and egg is critical for external fertilization. Sperm-activating peptides (SAPs) are diffusible components of the outer layer of eggs in echinoderms, and function as chemoattractants for spermatozoa. The decapeptide named speract is the best-characterized sea urchin SAP. Biochemical and physiological actions of speract have been studied with purified or chemically synthesized peptides. In this work, we prepared recombinant speract fused to a fluorescent protein (FP; FP-speract) using three color variants: a cyan (eCFP), a yellow (mVenus) and a large Stokes shift yellow (mAmetrine) FP. Although these fluorescence tags are 20 times larger than speract, competitive binding experiments using mAmetrine-speract revealed that this FP-speract has binding affinity to the receptor that is comparable (7.6-fold less) to that of non-labeled speract. Indeed, 10 nmol l(-1) eCFP-speract induces physiological sperm responses such as membrane potential changes and increases in intracellular pH and Ca(2+) concentrations similar to those triggered by 10 nmol l(-1) speract. Furthermore, FP-speract maintains its fluorescence upon binding to its receptor. Using this property, we performed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements with eCFP-speract and mVenus-speract as probes and obtained a positive FRET signal upon binding to the receptor, which suggests that the speract receptor exists as an oligomer, at least as a dimer, or alternatively that a single speract receptor protein possesses multiple binding sites. This property could partially account for the positive and/or negative cooperative binding of speract to the receptor.

  3. The Binding Mode Prediction and Similar Ligand Potency in the Active Site of Vitamin D Receptor with QM/MM Interaction, MESP, and MD Simulation.

    PubMed

    Selvaraman, Nagamani; Selvam, Saravana Kumar; Muthusamy, Karthikeyan

    2016-08-01

    Non-secosteroidal ligands are well-known vitamin D receptor (VDR) agonists. In this study, we described a combined QM/MM to define the protein-ligand interaction energy a strong positive correlation in both QM-MM interaction energy and binding free energy against the biological activity. The molecular dynamics simulation study was performed, and specific interactions were extensively studied. The molecular docking results and surface analysis shed light on steric and electrostatic complementarities of these non-secosteroidal ligands to VDR. Finally, the drug likeness properties were also calculated and found within the acceptable range. The results show that bulky group substitutions in side chain decrease the VDR activity, whereas a small substitution increased it. Functional analyses of H393A and H301A mutations substantiate their roles in the VDR agonistic and antagonistic activities. Apart from the His393 and His301, two other amino acids in the hinge region viz. Ser233 and Arg270 acted as an electron donor/acceptor specific to the agonist in the distinct ligand potency. The results from this study disclose the binding mechanism of VDR agonists and structural modifications required to improve the selectivity.

  4. Postsynthetic Metal and Ligand Exchange in MFU-4l: A Screening Approach toward Functional Metal-Organic Frameworks Comprising Single-Site Active Centers.

    PubMed

    Denysenko, Dmytro; Jelic, Jelena; Reuter, Karsten; Volkmer, Dirk

    2015-05-26

    The isomorphous partial substitution of Zn(2+) ions in the secondary building unit (SBU) of MFU-4l leads to frameworks with the general formula [M(x)Zn(5-x)Cl4(BTDD)3], in which x≈2, M = Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), or Cu(II), and BTDD = bis(1,2,3-triazolato-[4,5-b],[4',5'-i])dibenzo-[1,4]-dioxin. Subsequent exchange of chloride ligands by nitrite, nitrate, triflate, azide, isocyanate, formate, acetate, or fluoride leads to a variety of MFU-4l derivatives, which have been characterized by using XRPD, EDX, IR, UV/Vis-NIR, TGA, and gas sorption measurements. Several MFU-4l derivatives show high catalytic activity in a liquid-phase oxidation of ethylbenzene to acetophenone with air under mild conditions, among which Co- and Cu derivatives with chloride side-ligands are the most active catalysts. Upon thermal treatment, several side-ligands can be transformed selectively into reactive intermediates without destroying the framework. Thus, at 300 °C, Co(II)-azide units in the SBU of Co-MFU-4l are converted into Co(II)-isocyanate under continuous CO gas flow, involving the formation of a nitrene intermediate. The reaction of Cu(II)-fluoride units with H2 at 240 °C leads to Cu(I) and proceeds through the heterolytic cleavage of the H2 molecule.

  5. Effect of the Active Site D25N Mutation on the Structure, Stability and Ligand Binding of the Mature HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, Jane M.; Liu, Fengling; Ishima, Rieko; Weber, Irene T.; Louis, John M.

    2008-09-03

    All aspartic proteases, including retroviral proteases, share the triplet DTG critical for the active site geometry and catalytic function. These residues interact closely in the active, dimeric structure of HIV-1 protease (PR). We have systematically assessed the effect of the D25N mutation on the structure and stability of the mature PR monomer and dimer. The D25N mutation (PR{sub D25N}) increases the equilibrium dimer dissociation constant by a factor >100-fold (1.3 {+-} 0.09 {mu}m) relative to PR. In the absence of inhibitor, NMR studies reveal clear structural differences between PR and PR{sub D25N} in the relatively mobile P1 loop (residues 79-83) and flap regions, and differential scanning calorimetric analyses show that the mutation lowers the stabilities of both the monomer and dimer folds by 5 and 7.3 C, respectively. Only minimal differences are observed in high resolution crystal structures of PR{sub D25N} complexed to darunavir (DRV), a potent clinical inhibitor, or a non-hydrolyzable substrate analogue, Ac-Thr-Ile-Nle-r-Nle-Gln-Arg-NH{sub 2} (RPB), as compared with PR{center_dot}DRV and PR{center_dot}RPB complexes. Although complexation with RPB stabilizes both dimers, the effect on their T{sub m} is smaller for PR{sub D25N} (6.2 C) than for PR (8.7 C). The T{sub m} of PR{sub D25N}{center_dot}DRV increases by only 3 C relative to free PR{sub D25N}, as compared with a 22 C increase for PR{center_dot}DRV, and the mutation increases the ligand dissociation constant of PR{sub D25N}{center_dot}DRV by a factor of {approx}10{sup 6} relative to PR{center_dot}DRV. These results suggest that interactions mediated by the catalytic Asp residues make a major contribution to the tight binding of DRV to PR.

  6. Paramagnetic Ligand Tagging To Identify Protein Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transient biomolecular interactions are the cornerstones of the cellular machinery. The identification of the binding sites for low affinity molecular encounters is essential for the development of high affinity pharmaceuticals from weakly binding leads but is hindered by the lack of robust methodologies for characterization of weakly binding complexes. We introduce a paramagnetic ligand tagging approach that enables localization of low affinity protein–ligand binding clefts by detection and analysis of intermolecular protein NMR pseudocontact shifts, which are invoked by the covalent attachment of a paramagnetic lanthanoid chelating tag to the ligand of interest. The methodology is corroborated by identification of the low millimolar volatile anesthetic interaction site of the calcium sensor protein calmodulin. It presents an efficient route to binding site localization for low affinity complexes and is applicable to rapid screening of protein–ligand systems with varying binding affinity. PMID:26289584

  7. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where "nonspecific" interactions contribute to biological function. PMID:26064949

  8. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where “nonspecific” interactions contribute to biological function. PMID:26064949

  9. Ligand-bound structures of 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate phosphatase from Moraxella catarrhalis reveal a water channel connecting to the active site for the second step of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Dhindwal, Sonali; Priyadarshini, Priyanka; Patil, Dipak N; Tapas, Satya; Kumar, Pramod; Tomar, Shailly; Kumar, Pravindra

    2015-02-01

    KdsC, the third enzyme of the 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO) biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes a substrate-specific reaction to hydrolyze 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate to generate a molecule of KDO and phosphate. KdsC is a phosphatase that belongs to the C0 subfamily of the HAD superfamily. To understand the molecular basis for the substrate specificity of this tetrameric enzyme, the crystal structures of KdsC from Moraxella catarrhalis (Mc-KdsC) with several combinations of ligands, namely metal ion, citrate and products, were determined. Various transition states of the enzyme have been captured in these crystal forms. The ligand-free and ligand-bound crystal forms reveal that the binding of ligands does not cause any specific conformational changes in the active site. However, the electron-density maps clearly showed that the conformation of KDO as a substrate is different from the conformation adopted by KDO when it binds as a cleaved product. Furthermore, structural evidence for the existence of an intersubunit tunnel has been reported for the first time in the C0 subfamily of enzymes. A role for this tunnel in transferring water molecules from the interior of the tetrameric structure to the active-site cleft has been proposed. At the active site, water molecules are required for the formation of a water bridge that participates as a proton shuttle during the second step of the two-step phosphoryl-transfer reaction. In addition, as the KDO biosynthesis pathway is a potential antibacterial target, pharmacophore-based virtual screening was employed to identify inhibitor molecules for the Mc-KdsC enzyme.

  10. Ligand-bound structures of 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate phosphatase from Moraxella catarrhalis reveal a water channel connecting to the active site for the second step of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Dhindwal, Sonali; Priyadarshini, Priyanka; Patil, Dipak N; Tapas, Satya; Kumar, Pramod; Tomar, Shailly; Kumar, Pravindra

    2015-02-01

    KdsC, the third enzyme of the 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO) biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes a substrate-specific reaction to hydrolyze 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate to generate a molecule of KDO and phosphate. KdsC is a phosphatase that belongs to the C0 subfamily of the HAD superfamily. To understand the molecular basis for the substrate specificity of this tetrameric enzyme, the crystal structures of KdsC from Moraxella catarrhalis (Mc-KdsC) with several combinations of ligands, namely metal ion, citrate and products, were determined. Various transition states of the enzyme have been captured in these crystal forms. The ligand-free and ligand-bound crystal forms reveal that the binding of ligands does not cause any specific conformational changes in the active site. However, the electron-density maps clearly showed that the conformation of KDO as a substrate is different from the conformation adopted by KDO when it binds as a cleaved product. Furthermore, structural evidence for the existence of an intersubunit tunnel has been reported for the first time in the C0 subfamily of enzymes. A role for this tunnel in transferring water molecules from the interior of the tetrameric structure to the active-site cleft has been proposed. At the active site, water molecules are required for the formation of a water bridge that participates as a proton shuttle during the second step of the two-step phosphoryl-transfer reaction. In addition, as the KDO biosynthesis pathway is a potential antibacterial target, pharmacophore-based virtual screening was employed to identify inhibitor molecules for the Mc-KdsC enzyme. PMID:25664734

  11. Structures of the Wild-Type And Activated Catalytic Domains of Brachydanio Rerio Polo-Like Kinase 1 (Plk1): Changes in the Active-Site Conformation And Interactions With Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Elling, R.A.; Fucini, R.V.; Romanowski, M.J.

    2009-05-18

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a member of a family of serine/threonine kinases involved in the regulation of cell-cycle progression and cytokinesis and is an attractive target for the development of anticancer therapeutics. A zebrafish homolog of the human Plk1 (hPlk1) kinase domain (KD) was identified that can be expressed in large quantities in bacteria and crystallizes readily, whether in a wild-type form or as a variant containing the activating Thr196-->Asp substitution, in one space group and under similar conditions both in the absence and presence of active-site compounds. This construct was validated by testing a panel of hPlk1 inhibitors against human and zebrafish proteins and it was shown that the selected small molecules inhibited the homologs with a high degree of correlation. Crystal structures of ligand-free wild-type and activated zebrafish Plk1 (zPlk1) KDs revealed the organization of the secondary structural elements around the active site and demonstrated that the activation segment was disordered in the activated form of the domain but possessed a well defined secondary structure in the wild-type enzyme. The cocrystal structure of wild-type zPlk1 KD with ADP documented the hydrolysis of ATP and revealed the phosphorylation site. The cocrystal structure of the activated KD with wortmannin, a covalent inhibitor of Plk1 and PI3 kinases, showed the binding mode of the small molecule to the enzyme and may facilitate the design of more potent Plk1 inhibitors. The work presented in this study establishes the zPlk1 KD as a useful tool for rapid low- and high-throughput structure-based screening and drug discovery of compounds specific for this mitotic target.

  12. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    PubMed

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery. PMID:23762824

  13. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    PubMed

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  14. Identification of ligands that target the HCV-E2 binding site on CD81.

    PubMed

    Olaby, Reem Al; Azzazy, Hassan M; Harris, Rodney; Chromy, Brett; Vielmetter, Jost; Balhorn, Rod

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem. While many drug companies have active R&D efforts to develop new drugs for treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV), most target the viral enzymes. The HCV glycoprotein E2 has been shown to play an essential role in hepatocyte invasion by binding to CD81 and other cell surface receptors. This paper describes the use of AutoDock to identify ligand binding sites on the large extracellular loop of the open conformation of CD81 and to perform virtual screening runs to identify sets of small molecule ligands predicted to bind to two of these sites. The best sites selected by AutoLigand were located in regions identified by mutational studies to be the site of E2 binding. Thirty-six ligands predicted by AutoDock to bind to these sites were subsequently tested experimentally to determine if they bound to CD81-LEL. Binding assays conducted using surface Plasmon resonance revealed that 26 out of 36 (72 %) of the ligands bound in vitro to the recombinant CD81-LEL protein. Competition experiments performed using dual polarization interferometry showed that one of the ligands predicted to bind to the large cleft between the C and D helices was also effective in blocking E2 binding to CD81-LEL.

  15. Prediction of ligand-binding sites of proteins by molecular docking calculation for a random ligand library.

    PubMed

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2011-01-01

    A new approach to predicting the ligand-binding sites of proteins was developed, using protein-ligand docking computation. In this method, many compounds in a random library are docked onto the whole protein surface. We assumed that the true ligand-binding site would exhibit stronger affinity to the compounds in the random library than the other sites, even if the random library did not include the ligand corresponding to the true binding site. We also assumed that the affinity of the true ligand-binding site would be correlated to the docking scores of the compounds in the random library, if the ligand-binding site was correctly predicted. We call this method the molecular-docking binding-site finding (MolSite) method. The MolSite method was applied to 89 known protein-ligand complex structures extracted from the Protein Data Bank, and it predicted the correct binding sites with about 80-99% accuracy, when only the single top-ranked site was adopted. In addition, the average docking score was weakly correlated to the experimental protein-ligand binding free energy, with a correlation coefficient of 0.44.

  16. Anatomy of protein pockets and cavities: measurement of binding site geometry and implications for ligand design.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, J.; Edelsbrunner, H.; Woodward, C.

    1998-01-01

    Identification and size characterization of surface pockets and occluded cavities are initial steps in protein structure-based ligand design. A new program, CAST, for automatically locating and measuring protein pockets and cavities, is based on precise computational geometry methods, including alpha shape and discrete flow theory. CAST identifies and measures pockets and pocket mouth openings, as well as cavities. The program specifies the atoms lining pockets, pocket openings, and buried cavities; the volume and area of pockets and cavities; and the area and circumference of mouth openings. CAST analysis of over 100 proteins has been carried out; proteins examined include a set of 51 monomeric enzyme-ligand structures, several elastase-inhibitor complexes, the FK506 binding protein, 30 HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complexes, and a number of small and large protein inhibitors. Medium-sized globular proteins typically have 10-20 pockets/cavities. Most often, binding sites are pockets with 1-2 mouth openings; much less frequently they are cavities. Ligand binding pockets vary widely in size, most within the range 10(2)-10(3)A3. Statistical analysis reveals that the number of pockets and cavities is correlated with protein size, but there is no correlation between the size of the protein and the size of binding sites. Most frequently, the largest pocket/cavity is the active site, but there are a number of instructive exceptions. Ligand volume and binding site volume are somewhat correlated when binding site volume is < or =700 A3, but the ligand seldom occupies the entire site. Auxiliary pockets near the active site have been suggested as additional binding surface for designed ligands (Mattos C et al., 1994, Nat Struct Biol 1:55-58). Analysis of elastase-inhibitor complexes suggests that CAST can identify ancillary pockets suitable for recruitment in ligand design strategies. Analysis of the FK506 binding protein, and of compounds developed in SAR by NMR (Shuker SB et

  17. FTIR studies of metal ligands, networks of hydrogen bonds, and water molecules near the active site Mn₄CaO₅ cluster in Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Debus, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    The photosynthetic conversion of water to molecular oxygen is catalyzed by the Mn₄CaO₅ cluster in Photosystem II and provides nearly our entire supply of atmospheric oxygen. The Mn₄CaO₅ cluster accumulates oxidizing equivalents in response to light-driven photochemical events within Photosystem II and then oxidizes two molecules of water to oxygen. The Mn₄CaO₅ cluster converts water to oxygen much more efficiently than any synthetic catalyst because its protein environment carefully controls the cluster's reactivity at each step in its catalytic cycle. This control is achieved by precise choreography of the proton and electron transfer reactions associated with water oxidation and by careful management of substrate (water) access and proton egress. This review describes the FTIR studies undertaken over the past two decades to identify the amino acid residues that are responsible for this control and to determine the role of each. In particular, this review describes the FTIR studies undertaken to characterize the influence of the cluster's metal ligands on its activity, to delineate the proton egress pathways that link the Mn₄CaO₅ cluster with the thylakoid lumen, and to characterize the influence of specific residues on the water molecules that serve as substrate or as participants in the networks of hydrogen bonds that make up the water access and proton egress pathways. This information will improve our understanding of water oxidation by the Mn₄CaO₅ catalyst in Photosystem II and will provide insight into the design of new generations of synthetic catalysts that convert sunlight into useful forms of storable energy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. PMID:25038513

  18. Cis-interactions between Notch and its ligands block ligand-independent Notch activity

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, William Hunt; Jia, Dongyu; Deng, Wu-Min

    2014-01-01

    The Notch pathway is integrated into numerous developmental processes and therefore is fine-tuned on many levels, including receptor production, endocytosis, and degradation. Notch is further characterized by a twofold relationship with its Delta-Serrate (DSL) ligands, as ligands from opposing cells (trans-ligands) activate Notch, whereas ligands expressed in the same cell (cis-ligands) inhibit signaling. We show that cells without both cis- and trans-ligands can mediate Notch-dependent developmental events during Drosophila oogenesis, indicating ligand-independent Notch activity occurs when the receptor is free of cis- and trans-ligands. Furthermore, cis-ligands can reduce Notch activity in endogenous and genetically induced situations of elevated trans-ligand-independent Notch signaling. We conclude that cis-expressed ligands exert their repressive effect on Notch signaling in cases of trans-ligand-independent activation, and propose a new function of cis-inhibition which buffers cells against accidental Notch activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04415.001 PMID:25486593

  19. Homology model of human retinoic acid metabolising enzyme cytochrome P450 26A1 (CYP26A1): active site architecture and ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Mohamed Sayed; Yee, Sook Wah; Milbourne, Ceri Elizabeth; Barbera, Maria Chiara; Simons, Claire; Brancale, Andrea

    2006-08-01

    Homology models of cytochrome P450 RA1 (CYP26A1) were constructed using three human P450 structures, CYP2C8, CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 as templates for the model building. Using MOE software the lowest energy CYP26A1 model was then assessed for stereochemical quality and side chain environment. Further active site optimisation of the CYP26A1 model built using the CYP3A4 template was performed by molecular dynamics to generate a final CYP26A1 model. The natural substrate, all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), and inhibitor R 15866, were docked into the model allowing further validation of the active site architecture. Using the docking studies structurally and functionally important residues were identified with subsequent characterisation of secondary structure. Multiple hydrophobic interactions, including the side chains of TRP112, PHE299, PHE222, PHE84, PHE374 and PRO371, are important for binding of atRA and R115866. Additional hydrogen bonding interactions were noted as follows: atRA-- C==O of the atRA carboxylate group and ARG86; R115866--benzothiazole nitrogen and the backbone NH of SER115.

  20. Ligand-tailored single-site silica supported titanium catalysts: Synthesis, characterization and towards cyanosilylation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wei; Li, Yani; Yu, Bo; Yang, Jindou; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Guofang Gao, Ziwei

    2015-01-15

    A successive anchoring of Ti(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4}, cyclopentadiene and a O-donor ligand, 1-hydroxyethylbenzene (PEA), 1,1′-bi-2-naphthol (Binol) or 2,3-dihydroxybutanedioic acid diethyl ester (Tartrate), on silica was conducted by SOMC strategy in moderate conditions. The silica, monitored by in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (in-situ FT-IR), was pretreated at different temperatures (200, 500 and 800 °C). The ligand tailored silica-supported titanium complexes were characterized by in-situ FT-IR, {sup 13}C CP MAS-NMR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and elemental analysis in detail, verifying that the surface titanium species are single sited. The catalytic activity of the ligand tailored single-site silica supported titanium complexes was evaluated by a cyanosilylation of benzaldehyde. The results showed that the catalytic activity is dependent strongly on the dehydroxylation temperatures of silica and the configuration of the ligands. - Graphical abstract: The ligand-tailored silica supported “single site” titanium complexes were synthesized by SOMC strategy and fully characterized. Their catalytic activity were evaluated by benzaldehyde silylcyanation. - Highlights: • Single-site silica supported Ti active species was prepared by SOMC technique. • O-donor ligand tailored Ti surface species was synthesized. • The surface species was characterized by XPS, {sup 13}C CP-MAS NMR, XANES etc. • Catalytic activity of the Ti active species in silylcyanation reaction was evaluated.

  1. Ligand electronic properties modulate tau filament binding site density

    PubMed Central

    Cisek, Katryna; Jensen, Jordan R.; Honson, Nicolette S.; Schafer, Kelsey N.; Cooper, Grace L.; Kuret, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules that bind tau-bearing neurofibrillary lesions are being sought for premortem diagnosis, staging, and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathic neurodegenerative diseases. The utility of these agents will depend on both their binding affinity and binding site density (Bmax). Previously we identified polarizability as a descriptor of protein aggregate binding affinity. To examine its contribution to binding site density, we investigated the ability of two closely related benzothiazole derivatives ((E)-2-[[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]azo]-6-methoxybenzothiazole) and ((E)-2-[2-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]ethenyl]-6-methoxybenzothiazole)) that differed in polarizability to displace probes of high (Thioflavin S) and low (radiolabeled (E,E)-1-iodo-2,5-bis(3-hydroxycarbonyl-4-methoxy)styrylbenzene; IMSB) density sites. Consistent with their site densities, Thioflavin S completely displaced radiolabeled IMSB, but IMSB was incapable of displacing Thioflavin S. Although both benzothiazoles displaced the low Bmax IMSB probe, only the highly polarizable analog displaced near saturating concentrations of the Thioflavin S probe. Quantum calculations showed that high polarizability reflected extensive pi-electron delocalization fostered by the presence of electron donating and accepting groups. These data suggest that electron delocalization promotes ligand binding at a subset of sites on tau aggregates that are present at high density, and that optimizing this aspect of ligand structure can yield tau-directed agents with superior diagnostic and therapeutic performance. PMID:23072817

  2. Evidence that estrogen receptor beta enhances MMP-13 promoter activity in HIG-82 cells and that this enhancement can be influenced by ligands and involves specific promoter sites.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ting; Achari, Yamini; Rattner, Jerome B; Hart, David A

    2007-06-01

    Degradation of articular cartilage is characteristic of osteoarthritis, and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) has been implicated in this condition. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are present in connective tissues, indicating these tissues' potential responsiveness to estrogen. We based this study on the hypothesis that estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) can modulate MMP-13 promoter activity. Transfection of cells with ERbeta constructs led to the induction of the endogenous MMP-13 gene, as evidenced by increased mRNA levels. The results also indicated that MMP-13 promoter construct activity in the HIG-82 cell line significantly increased when ERbeta was present, and that estrogen downregulated this response in a dose-dependent manner. ERbeta was shown to enhance MMP-13 expression somewhat more strongly than ERalpha, and the impact of a number of selective ER modulators (tamoxifen, raloxifene, and ICI 182,780) on ERbeta enhancement of promoter activity was found to be significantly less than that of estrogen. Furthermore, transcription regulatory sites in the MMP-13 promoter, specifically AP-1 and PEA-3, were shown to act in conjunction to mediate ERbeta effects. Thus, ERbeta likely influences MMP-13 promoter expression in normal and disease processes.

  3. Organic solvents identify specific ligand binding sites on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liepinsh, E; Otting, G

    1997-03-01

    Enzymes frequently recognize substrates and pharmaceutical drugs through specific binding interactions in deep pockets on the protein surface. We show how the specificity-determining substrate binding site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) can be readily identified in aqueous solution by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using small organic solvent molecules as detection probes. Exchange of magnetization between the 1H nuclei of the protein and the ligands through dipole-dipole interactions is observed which allows the modeling of their position and orientation at the binding site. Combined with site-specific binding constants measured by titration experiments with different organic solvents, the method can provide important information for rational drug design. In addition, the lifetime of nonspecific interactions of HEWL with organic solvents is shown to be in the sub-nanosecond time range. PMID:9062927

  4. Supramolecular coordination and antimicrobial activities of constructed mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sonbati, A. Z.; Diab, M. A.; El-Bindary, A. A.; Abou-Dobara, M. I.; Seyam, H. A.

    2013-03-01

    A novel series of copper(II) and palladium(II) with 4-derivatives benzaldehyde pyrazolone (Ln) were synthesized. The mixed ligand complexes were prepared by using 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) as second ligand. The structure of these complexes was identified and confirm by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, UV-Vis, IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy and magnetic moment measurements as well as thermal analysis. The ligand behaves as a neutral bidentate ligand through ON donor sites. ESR spectra show the simultaneous presence of a planar trans and a nearly planar cis isomers in the 1:2 ratio for all N,O complexes [Cu(Ln)2]Cl2ṡ2H2O. Schiff bases (Ln) were tested against bacterial species; namely two Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) and two Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and fungal species (Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporium, Penicillium italicum and Alternaria alternata). The tested compounds have antibacterial activity against S. aureus, B. cereus and K. pneumoniae.

  5. Identifying and quantifying two ligand-binding sites while imaging native human membrane receptors by AFM

    PubMed Central

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Wieneke, Ralph; Zhang, Cheng; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Tampé, Robert; Kobilka, Brian K.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    A current challenge in life sciences is to image cell membrane receptors while characterizing their specific interactions with various ligands. Addressing this issue has been hampered by the lack of suitable nanoscopic methods. Here we address this challenge and introduce multifunctional high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image human protease-activated receptors (PAR1) in the functionally important lipid membrane and to simultaneously localize and quantify their binding to two different ligands. Therefore, we introduce the surface chemistry to bifunctionalize AFM tips with the native receptor-activating peptide and a tris-N-nitrilotriacetic acid (tris-NTA) group binding to a His10-tag engineered to PAR1. We further introduce ways to discern between the binding of both ligands to different receptor sites while imaging native PAR1s. Surface chemistry and nanoscopic method are applicable to a range of biological systems in vitro and in vivo and to concurrently detect and localize multiple ligand-binding sites at single receptor resolution. PMID:26561004

  6. Ligand-tailored single-site silica supported titanium catalysts: Synthesis, characterization and towards cyanosilylation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Li, Yani; Yu, Bo; Yang, Jindou; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Guofang; Gao, Ziwei

    2015-01-01

    A successive anchoring of Ti(NMe2)4, cyclopentadiene and a O-donor ligand, 1-hydroxyethylbenzene (PEA), 1,1‧-bi-2-naphthol (Binol) or 2,3-dihydroxybutanedioic acid diethyl ester (Tartrate), on silica was conducted by SOMC strategy in moderate conditions. The silica, monitored by in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (in-situ FT-IR), was pretreated at different temperatures (200, 500 and 800 °C). The ligand tailored silica-supported titanium complexes were characterized by in-situ FT-IR, 13C CP MAS-NMR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and elemental analysis in detail, verifying that the surface titanium species are single sited. The catalytic activity of the ligand tailored single-site silica supported titanium complexes was evaluated by a cyanosilylation of benzaldehyde. The results showed that the catalytic activity is dependent strongly on the dehydroxylation temperatures of silica and the configuration of the ligands.

  7. Identifying and quantifying two ligand-binding sites while imaging native human membrane receptors by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Wieneke, Ralph; Zhang, Cheng; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Tampé, Robert; Kobilka, Brian K.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    A current challenge in life sciences is to image cell membrane receptors while characterizing their specific interactions with various ligands. Addressing this issue has been hampered by the lack of suitable nanoscopic methods. Here we address this challenge and introduce multifunctional high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image human protease-activated receptors (PAR1) in the functionally important lipid membrane and to simultaneously localize and quantify their binding to two different ligands. Therefore, we introduce the surface chemistry to bifunctionalize AFM tips with the native receptor-activating peptide and a tris-N-nitrilotriacetic acid (tris-NTA) group binding to a His10-tag engineered to PAR1. We further introduce ways to discern between the binding of both ligands to different receptor sites while imaging native PAR1s. Surface chemistry and nanoscopic method are applicable to a range of biological systems in vitro and in vivo and to concurrently detect and localize multiple ligand-binding sites at single receptor resolution.

  8. Rosetta and the Design of Ligand Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Rocco; Bender, Brian J; Allison, Brittany; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Proteins that bind small molecules (ligands) can be used as biosensors, signal modulators, and sequestering agents. When naturally occurring proteins for a particular target ligand are not available, artificial proteins can be computationally designed. We present a protocol based on RosettaLigand to redesign an existing protein pocket to bind a target ligand. Starting with a protein structure and the structure of the ligand, Rosetta can optimize both the placement of the ligand in the pocket and the identity and conformation of the surrounding sidechains, yielding proteins that bind the target compound.

  9. Rosetta and the Design of Ligand Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Rocco; Bender, Brian J; Allison, Brittany; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Proteins that bind small molecules (ligands) can be used as biosensors, signal modulators, and sequestering agents. When naturally occurring proteins for a particular target ligand are not available, artificial proteins can be computationally designed. We present a protocol based on RosettaLigand to redesign an existing protein pocket to bind a target ligand. Starting with a protein structure and the structure of the ligand, Rosetta can optimize both the placement of the ligand in the pocket and the identity and conformation of the surrounding sidechains, yielding proteins that bind the target compound. PMID:27094285

  10. The active enhancer network operated by liganded RXR supports angiogenic activity in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Bence; Hah, Nasun; Horvath, Attila; Czimmerer, Zsolt; Poliska, Szilard; Gyuris, Tibor; Keirsse, Jiri; Gysemans, Conny; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.; Balint, Balint L.; Evans, Ronald M.; Barta, Endre; Nagy, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    RXR signaling is predicted to have a major impact in macrophages, but neither the biological consequence nor the genomic basis of its ligand activation is known. Comprehensive genome-wide studies were carried out to map liganded RXR-mediated transcriptional changes, active binding sites, and cistromic interactions in the context of the macrophage genome architecture. The macrophage RXR cistrome has 5200 genomic binding sites, which are not impacted by ligand. Active enhancers are characterized by PU.1 binding, an increase of enhancer RNA, and P300 recruitment. Using these features, 387 liganded RXR-bound enhancers were linked to 226 genes, which predominantly reside in CTCF/cohesin-limited functional domains. These findings were molecularly validated using chromosome conformation capture (3C) and 3C combined with sequencing (3C-seq), and we show that selected long-range enhancers communicate with promoters via stable or RXR-induced loops and that some of the enhancers interact with each other, forming an interchromosomal network. A set of angiogenic genes, including Vegfa, has liganded RXR-controlled enhancers and provides the macrophage with a novel inducible program. PMID:25030696

  11. Elimination of a ligand gating site generates a supersensitive olfactory receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kanika; Ahuja, Gaurav; Hussain, Ashiq; Balfanz, Sabine; Baumann, Arnd; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2016-01-01

    Olfaction poses one of the most complex ligand-receptor matching problems in biology due to the unparalleled multitude of odor molecules facing a large number of cognate olfactory receptors. We have recently deorphanized an olfactory receptor, TAAR13c, as a specific receptor for the death-associated odor cadaverine. Here we have modeled the cadaverine/TAAR13c interaction, exchanged predicted binding residues by site-directed mutagenesis, and measured the activity of the mutant receptors. Unexpectedly we observed a binding site for cadaverine at the external surface of the receptor, in addition to an internal binding site, whose mutation resulted in complete loss of activity. In stark contrast, elimination of the external binding site generated supersensitive receptors. Modeling suggests this site to act as a gate, limiting access of the ligand to the internal binding site and thereby downregulating the affinity of the native receptor. This constitutes a novel mechanism to fine-tune physiological sensitivity to socially relevant odors. PMID:27323929

  12. The active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. II. Redox properties, light sensitivity and CO-ligand exchange as observed by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Roseboom, Winfried; De Lacey, Antonio L; Fernandez, Victor M; Hatchikian, E Claude; Albracht, Simon P J

    2006-01-01

    In [FeFe]-hydrogenases, the H cluster (hydrogen-activating cluster) contains a di-iron centre ([2Fe]H subcluster, a (L)(CO)(CN)Fe(mu-RS2)(mu-CO)Fe(CysS)(CO)(CN) group) covalently attached to a cubane iron-sulphur cluster ([4Fe-4S]H subcluster). The Cys-thiol functions as the link between one iron (called Fe1) of the [2Fe]H subcluster and one iron of the cubane subcluster. The other iron in the [2Fe]H subcluster is called Fe2. The light sensitivity of the Desulfovibrio desulfuricans enzyme in a variety of states has been studied with infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The aerobic inactive enzyme (H(inact) state) and the CO-inhibited active form (H(ox)-CO state) were stable in light. Illumination of the H(ox) state led to a kind of cannibalization; in some enzyme molecules the H cluster was destroyed and the released CO was captured by the H clusters in other molecules to form the light-stable H(ox)-CO state. Illumination of active enzyme under 13CO resulted in the complete exchange of the two intrinsic COs bound to Fe2. At cryogenic temperatures, light induced the photodissociation of the extrinsic CO and the bridging CO of the enzyme in the H(ox)-CO state. Electrochemical redox titrations showed that the enzyme in the H(inact) state converts to the transition state (H(trans)) in a reversible one-electron redox step (E (m, pH 7) = -75 mV). IR spectra demonstrate that the added redox equivalent not only affects the [4Fe-4S]H subcluster, but also the di-iron centre. Enzyme in the H(trans) state reacts with extrinsic CO, which binds to Fe2. The H(trans) state converts irreversibly into the H(ox) state in a redox-dependent reaction most likely involving two electrons (E (m, pH 7) = -261 mV). These electrons do not end up on any of the six Fe atoms of the H cluster; the possible destiny of the two redox equivalents is discussed. An additional reversible one-electron redox reaction leads to the H(red) state (E (m, pH 7) = -354 mV), where both Fe atoms of the [2Fe]H subcluster

  13. Multipurpose ligand, DAKLI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (. kappa. opioid) binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, A.; Nestor, J.J. Jr.; Naidu, A.; Newman, S.R. )

    1988-10-01

    The authors describe a synthetic ligand, DALKI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as {sup 125}I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin ({kappa} opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites.

  14. Methionine Ligand Interaction in a Blue Copper Protein Characterized by Site-Selective Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Le Sueur, Amanda L; Schaugaard, Richard N; Baik, Mu-Hyun; Thielges, Megan C

    2016-06-01

    The reactivity of metal sites in proteins is tuned by protein-based ligands. For example, in blue copper proteins such as plastocyanin (Pc), the structure imparts a highly elongated bond between the Cu and a methionine (Met) axial ligand to modulate its redox properties. Despite extensive study, a complete understanding of the contribution of the protein to redox activity is challenged by experimentally accessing both redox states of metalloproteins. Using infrared (IR) spectroscopy in combination with site-selective labeling with carbon-deuterium (C-D) vibrational probes, we characterized the localized changes at the Cu ligand Met97 in the oxidized and reduced states, as well as the Zn(II) or Co(II)-substituted, the pH-induced low-coordinate, the apoprotein, and the unfolded states. The IR absorptions of (d3-methyl)Met97 are highly sensitive to interaction of the sulfur-based orbitals with the metal center and are demonstrated to be useful reporters of its modulation in the different states. Unrestricted Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations performed on a model of the Cu site of Pc confirm the observed dependence. IR spectroscopy was then applied to characterize the impact of binding to the physiological redox partner cytochrome (cyt) f. The spectral changes suggest a slightly stronger Cu-S(Met97) interaction in the complex with cyt f that has potential to modulate the electron transfer properties. Besides providing direct, molecular-level comparison of the oxidized and reduced states of Pc from the perspective of the axial Met ligand and evidence for perturbation of the Cu site properties by redox partner binding, this study demonstrates the localized spatial information afforded by IR spectroscopy of selectively incorporated C-D probes. PMID:27164303

  15. ABS–Scan: In silico alanine scanning mutagenesis for binding site residues in protein–ligand complex

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Praveen; Nagarajan, Deepesh; Mukherjee, Sumanta; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2014-01-01

    Most physiological processes in living systems are fundamentally regulated by protein–ligand interactions. Understanding the process of ligand recognition by proteins is a vital activity in molecular biology and biochemistry. It is well known that the residues present at the binding site of the protein form pockets that provide a conducive environment for recognition of specific ligands. In many cases, the boundaries of these sites are not well defined. Here, we provide a web-server to systematically evaluate important residues in the binding site of the protein that contribute towards the ligand recognition through in silico alanine-scanning mutagenesis experiments. Each of the residues present at the binding site is computationally mutated to alanine. The ligand interaction energy is computed for each mutant and the corresponding ΔΔG values are calculated by comparing it to the wild type protein, thus evaluating individual residue contributions towards ligand interaction. The server will thus provide a ranked list of residues to the user in order to obtain loss-of-function mutations. This web-tool can be freely accessed through the following address: http://proline.biochem.iisc.ernet.in/abscan/. PMID:25685322

  16. Characterization of a Ligand Binding Site in the Human Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 Pore

    PubMed Central

    Klement, Göran; Eisele, Lina; Malinowsky, David; Nolting, Andreas; Svensson, Mats; Terp, Gitte; Weigelt, Dirk; Dabrowski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacology and regulation of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) ion channel activity is intricate due to the physiological function as an integrator of multiple chemical, mechanical, and temperature stimuli as well as differences in species pharmacology. In this study, we describe and compare the current inhibition efficacy of human TRPA1 on three different TRPA1 antagonists. We used a homology model of TRPA1 based on Kv1.2 to select pore vestibule residues available for interaction with ligands entering the vestibule. Site-directed mutation constructs were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and their functionality and pharmacology assessed to support and improve our homology model. Based on the functional pharmacology results we propose an antagonist-binding site in the vestibule of the TRPA1 ion channel. We use the results to describe the proposed intravestibular ligand-binding site in TRPA1 in detail. Based on the single site substitutions, we designed a human TRPA1 receptor by substituting several residues in the vestibule and adjacent regions from the rat receptor to address and explain observed species pharmacology differences. In parallel, the lack of effect on HC-030031 inhibition by the vestibule substitutions suggests that this molecule interacts with TRPA1 via a binding site not situated in the vestibule. PMID:23442958

  17. Characterization of a ligand binding site in the human transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 pore.

    PubMed

    Klement, Göran; Eisele, Lina; Malinowsky, David; Nolting, Andreas; Svensson, Mats; Terp, Gitte; Weigelt, Dirk; Dabrowski, Michael

    2013-02-19

    The pharmacology and regulation of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) ion channel activity is intricate due to the physiological function as an integrator of multiple chemical, mechanical, and temperature stimuli as well as differences in species pharmacology. In this study, we describe and compare the current inhibition efficacy of human TRPA1 on three different TRPA1 antagonists. We used a homology model of TRPA1 based on Kv1.2 to select pore vestibule residues available for interaction with ligands entering the vestibule. Site-directed mutation constructs were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and their functionality and pharmacology assessed to support and improve our homology model. Based on the functional pharmacology results we propose an antagonist-binding site in the vestibule of the TRPA1 ion channel. We use the results to describe the proposed intravestibular ligand-binding site in TRPA1 in detail. Based on the single site substitutions, we designed a human TRPA1 receptor by substituting several residues in the vestibule and adjacent regions from the rat receptor to address and explain observed species pharmacology differences. In parallel, the lack of effect on HC-030031 inhibition by the vestibule substitutions suggests that this molecule interacts with TRPA1 via a binding site not situated in the vestibule.

  18. Classification and comparison of ligand-binding sites derived from grid-mapped knowledge-based potentials.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Christian; Steinbeck, Christoph; Wohlfahrt, Gerd

    2006-03-01

    We describe the application of knowledge-based potentials implemented in the MOE program to compare the ligand-binding sites of several proteins. The binding probabilities for a polar and a hydrophobic probe are calculated on a grid to allow easy comparison of binding sites of superimposed related proteins. The method is fast and simple enough to simultaneously use structural information of multiple proteins of a target family. The method can be used to rapidly cluster proteins into subfamilies according to the similarity of hydrophobic and polar fields of their ligand-binding sites. Regions of the binding site which are common within a protein family can be identified and analysed for the design of family-targeted libraries or those which differ for improvement of ligand selectivity. The field-based hierarchical clustering is demonstrated for three protein families: the ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors, the ATP-binding sites of protein kinases and the substrate binding sites of proteases. More detailed comparisons are presented for serine proteases of the chymotrypsin family, for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor subfamily of nuclear receptors and for progesterone and androgen receptor. The results are in good accordance with structure-based analysis and highlight important differences of the binding sites, which have been also described in the literature.

  19. DNA cleavage at the AP site via β-elimination mediated by the AP site-binding ligands.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yukiko S; Sasaki, Shigeki

    2016-02-15

    DNA is continuously damaged by endogenous and exogenous factors such as oxidation and alkylation. In the base excision repair pathway, the damaged nucleobases are removed by DNA N-glycosylase to form the abasic sites (AP sites). The alkylating antitumor agent exhibits cytotoxicity through the formation of the AP site. Therefore blockage or modulation of the AP site repair pathway may enhance the antitumor efficacy of DNA alkylating agents. In this study, we have examined the effects of the nucleobase-polyamine conjugated ligands (G-, A-, C- and T-ligands) on the cleavage of the AP site. The G- and A-ligands cleaved DNA at the AP site by promoting β-elimination in a non-selective manner by the G-ligand, and in a selective manner for the opposing dT by the A-ligand. These results suggest that the nucleobase-polyamine conjugate ligands may have the potential for enhancement of the cytotoxicities of the AP site.

  20. Mixed ligand complexes of bis(phenylimine) Schiff base ligands incorporating pyridinium moiety. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Gehad G.; El-Wahab, Zeinab H. Abd

    2005-04-01

    The synthesis and structural characterization of mixed ligand complexes derived from 2,6-pyridinedicarboxaldehydebis( o-hydroxyphenylimine), 2,6-pyridinedicarboxaldehydebis( p-hydroxyphenylimine) (1 ry ligands) and 2-aminopyridne (2 ry ligand) are reported. The ligands and their transition metal complexes were characterized on the bases of their elemental analyses, IR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance and thermal analysis (TGA). The mixed ligand complexes are formed in the 1:1:1 (M:L 1 or L 2:L') ratio as found from the elemental analyses and found to have the formulae [MX 2(L 1 or L 2)(L')]· nH 2O where M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II), L 1 = 2,6-pyridinedicarboxaldehydebis( p-hydroxyphenylimine), L 2 = 2,6-pyridine dicarboxaldehydebis( o-hydroxyphenylimine), L' = 2-aminopyridine, X = Cl - in case of Cu(II) complex and Br - in case of Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes and y = 0-3. The molar conductance data reveal that the chelates are non-electrolytes. IR spectra show that the Schiff bases are coordinated to the metal ions in a terdentate manner with NNN donor sites of the pyridine- N and two azomethine- N. While 2-aminopyridine coordinated to the metal ions via its pyridine- N. Magnetic and solid reflectance spectra are used to infer the coordinating capacity of the ligand and the geometrical structure of these complexes are found to be octahedral. The thermal behaviour of these chelates shows that the hydrated water molecules and the anions are removed in a successive two steps followed immediately by decomposition of the ligands (L 1, L 2 and L') in the subsequent steps. The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, E*, Δ H*, Δ S* and Δ G* are calculated from the TG curves and discussed. The ligands and their metal chelates have been screened for their antimicrobial activities and the findings have been reported, explained and compared with some known antibiotics.

  1. The ligand binding site of the synaptosomal choline transporter: a provisional model based on inhibition studies.

    PubMed

    Roberts, E; Tamaru, M

    1992-05-01

    A topographic model of the ligand binding site of the choline transporter was deduced from inhibition studies with the help of CPK molecular models. It is posited that there are two identical or closely similar hydrophilic anionic sites separated from each other by an hinged, essentially planar but conformationally flexible cationic hydrophobic domain. Subsequently to attachment of external choline to either one of the anionic sites, both sites cooperate in enveloping the ligand by a Venus fly-trap mechanism. This leads to rapid configurational changes by which the closed-liganded form of the transporter opens up to the interior to release the bound choline. Intracellular K+, a ligand for the choline-binding site, is proposed to be counter-transported by a reversal of the above mechanism.

  2. Crystallographic studies of the binding of ligands to the dicarboxylate site of Complex II, and the identity of the ligand in the "oxaloacetate-inhibited" state.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Shar; Shen, John T; Wang, Andy C; Berry, Edward A

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial Complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is purified in a partially inactivated state, which can be activated by removal of tightly bound oxaloacetate (E.B. Kearney, et al., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 49 1115-1121). We crystallized Complex II in the presence of oxaloacetate or with the endogenous inhibitor bound. The structure showed a ligand essentially identical to the "malate-like intermediate" found in Shewanella Flavocytochrome c crystallized with fumarate (P. Taylor, et al., Nat. Struct. Biol. 6 1108-1112) Crystallization of Complex II in the presence of excess fumarate also gave the malate-like intermediate or a mixture of that and fumarate at the active site. In order to more conveniently monitor the occupation state of the dicarboxylate site, we are developing a library of UV/Vis spectral effects induced by binding different ligands to the site. Treatment with fumarate results in rapid development of the fumarate difference spectrum and then a very slow conversion into a species spectrally similar to the OAA-liganded complex. Complex II is known to be capable of oxidizing malate to the enol form of oxaloacetate (Y.O. Belikova, et al., Biochim. Biophys. Acta 936 1-9). The observations above suggest it may also be capable of interconverting fumarate and malate. It may be useful for understanding the mechanism and regulation of the enzyme to identify the malate-like intermediate and its pathway of formation from oxaloacetate or fumarate.

  3. Crystallographic Studies of the Binding of Ligands to theDicarboxylate Site of Complex II, and the Identity of the Ligand in the'Oxaloacetate-Inhibited' State

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-Shar; Shen, John T.; Wang, Andy C.; Berry, Edward A.

    2006-07-01

    Mitochondrial Complex II (succinate:ubiquinoneoxidoreductase) is purified in a partially innactivated state, which canbe activated by removal of tightly bound oxaloacetate (Kearney, E.B. etal. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 49, 1115-1121). We crystallized Complex IIin the presence of oxaloacetate or with the endogenous inhibitor bound.The structure showed a ligand essentially identical to the "malate-likeintermediate" found in Shewanella Flavocytochrome c crystallized withfumarate (Taylor, P., et al. Nat Struct Biol 6, 1108-1112.)Crystallization of Complex II in the presence of excess fumarate alsogave the malate-like intermediate or a mixture of that and fumarate atthe active site. In order to more conveniently monitor the occupationstate of the dicarboxylate site, we are developing a library of UV/Visspectral effects induced by binding different ligands to the site.Treatment with fumarate results in rapid development of the fumaratedifference spectrum and then a very slow conversion into a speciesspectrally similar to the OAA liganded complex. Complex II is known to becapable of oxidizing malate to the enol form of oxaloacetate (Belikova,Y.O., et al. Biochim Biophys Acta 936, 1-9). The observations abovesuggest it may also be capable of interconverting fumarate and malate. Itmay be useful for understanding the mechanism and regulation of theenzyme to identify the malate-like intermediate and its pathway offormation from oxaloacetate or fumarate.

  4. Identifying ligand binding sites and poses using GPU-accelerated Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Yang, Yanzhi; Chodera, John D.; Shirts, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to identify small molecule ligand binding sites and orientations to a given protein crystal structure using GPU-accelerated Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. The Hamiltonians used vary from the physical end state of protein interacting with the ligand to a unphysical end state where the ligand does not interact with the protein. As replicas explore the space of Hamiltonians interpolating between these states the ligand can rapidly escape local minima and explore potential binding sites. Geometric restraints keep the ligands within the protein volume, and a potential energy pathway designed to increase phase space overlap between intermediates ensures good mixing. Because of the rigorous statistical mechanical nature of the Hamiltonian exchange framework, we can also extract binding free energy estimates at all putative binding sites, which agree well with free energies computed from occupation probabilities. We present results of this methodology on the T4 lysozyme L99A model system with four ligands, including one non-binder as a control. We find that our methodology identifies the crystallographic binding sites consistently and accurately for the small number of ligands considered here and gives free energies consistent with experiment. We are also able to analyze the contribution of individual binding sites on the overall binding affinity. Our methodology points to near term potential applications in early-stage drug discovery. PMID:24297454

  5. Uncoupling the Structure-Activity Relationships of β2 Adrenergic Receptor Ligands from Membrane Binding.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Callum J; Hornak, Viktor; Velez-Vega, Camilo; McKay, Daniel J J; Reilly, John; Sandham, David A; Shaw, Duncan; Fairhurst, Robin A; Charlton, Steven J; Sykes, David A; Pearlstein, Robert A; Duca, Jose S

    2016-06-23

    Ligand binding to membrane proteins may be significantly influenced by the interaction of ligands with the membrane. In particular, the microscopic ligand concentration within the membrane surface solvation layer may exceed that in bulk solvent, resulting in overestimation of the intrinsic protein-ligand binding contribution to the apparent/measured affinity. Using published binding data for a set of small molecules with the β2 adrenergic receptor, we demonstrate that deconvolution of membrane and protein binding contributions allows for improved structure-activity relationship analysis and structure-based drug design. Molecular dynamics simulations of ligand bound membrane protein complexes were used to validate binding poses, allowing analysis of key interactions and binding site solvation to develop structure-activity relationships of β2 ligand binding. The resulting relationships are consistent with intrinsic binding affinity (corrected for membrane interaction). The successful structure-based design of ligands targeting membrane proteins may require an assessment of membrane affinity to uncouple protein binding from membrane interactions. PMID:27239696

  6. Proteus and the Design of Ligand Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Polydorides, Savvas; Michael, Eleni; Mignon, David; Druart, Karen; Archontis, Georgios; Simonson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the organization and use of Proteus, a multitool computational suite for the optimization of protein and ligand conformations and sequences, and the calculation of pK α shifts and relative binding affinities. The software offers the use of several molecular mechanics force fields and solvent models, including two generalized Born variants, and a large range of scoring functions, which can combine protein stability, ligand affinity, and ligand specificity terms, for positive and negative design. We present in detail the steps for structure preparation, system setup, construction of the interaction energy matrix, protein sequence and structure optimizations, pK α calculations, and ligand titration calculations. We discuss illustrative examples, including the chemical/structural optimization of a complex between the MHC class II protein HLA-DQ8 and the vinculin epitope, and the chemical optimization of the compstatin analog Ac-Val4Trp/His9Ala, which regulates the function of protein C3 of the complement system. PMID:27094287

  7. Redox-Active-Ligand-Mediated Formation of an Acyclic Trinuclear Ruthenium Complex with Bridging Nitrido Ligands.

    PubMed

    Bagh, Bidraha; Broere, Daniël L J; Siegler, Maxime A; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2016-07-11

    Coordination of a redox-active pyridine aminophenol ligand to Ru(II) followed by aerobic oxidation generates two diamagnetic Ru(III) species [1 a (cis) and 1 b (trans)] with ligand-centered radicals. The reaction of 1 a/1 b with excess NaN3 under inert atmosphere resulted in the formation of a rare bis(nitrido)-bridged trinuclear ruthenium complex with two nonlinear asymmetrical Ru-N-Ru fragments. The spontaneous reduction of the ligand centered radical in the parent 1 a/1 b supports the oxidation of a nitride (N(3-) ) to half an equivalent of N2 . The trinuclear omplex is reactive toward TEMPO-H, tin hydrides, thiols, and dihydrogen. PMID:27321547

  8. Ligand reorganization and activation energies in nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianjun; Wang, Jianji; Stell, George

    2006-10-01

    The activation energy and ligand reorganization energy for nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions in chemical and biological systems are investigated in this paper. The free energy surfaces and the activation energy are derived exactly in the general case in which the ligand vibration frequencies are not equal. The activation energy is derived by free energy minimization at the transition state. Our formulation leads to the Marcus-Hush [J. Chem. Phys. 24, 979 (1956); 98, 7170 (1994); 28, 962 (1958)] results in the equal-frequency limit and also generalizes the Marcus-Sumi [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] model in the context of studying the solvent dynamic effect on electron transfer reactions. It is found that when the ligand vibration frequencies are different, the activation energy derived from the Marcus-Hush formula deviates by 5%-10% from the exact value. If the reduced reorganization energy approximation is introduced in the Marcus-Hush formula, the result is almost exact.

  9. The heterodimeric sweet taste receptor has multiple potential ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Maillet, Emeline; Max, Marianna; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman

    2006-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of two G protein coupled receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. This discovery has increased our understanding at the molecular level of the mechanisms underlying sweet taste. Previous experimental studies using sweet receptor chimeras and mutants show that there are at least three potential binding sites in this heterodimeric receptor. Receptor activity toward the artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame depends on residues in the amino terminal domain of human T1R2. In contrast, receptor activity toward the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole depends on residues within the transmembrane domain of human T1R3. Furthermore, receptor activity toward the sweet protein brazzein depends on the cysteine rich domain of human T1R3. Although crystal structures are not available for the sweet taste receptor, useful homology models can be developed based on appropriate templates. The amino terminal domain, cysteine rich domain and transmembrane helix domain of T1R2 and T1R3 have been modeled based on the crystal structures of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1, tumor necrosis factor receptor, and bovine rhodopsin, respectively. We have used homology models of the sweet taste receptors, molecular docking of sweet ligands to the receptors, and site-directed mutagenesis of the receptors to identify potential ligand binding sites of the sweet taste receptor. These studies have led to a better understanding of the structure and function of this heterodimeric receptor, and can act as a guide for rational structure-based design of novel non-caloric sweeteners, which can be used in the fighting against obesity and diabetes. PMID:17168764

  10. The heterodimeric sweet taste receptor has multiple potential ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Maillet, Emeline; Max, Marianna; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman

    2006-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of two G protein coupled receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. This discovery has increased our understanding at the molecular level of the mechanisms underlying sweet taste. Previous experimental studies using sweet receptor chimeras and mutants show that there are at least three potential binding sites in this heterodimeric receptor. Receptor activity toward the artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame depends on residues in the amino terminal domain of human T1R2. In contrast, receptor activity toward the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole depends on residues within the transmembrane domain of human T1R3. Furthermore, receptor activity toward the sweet protein brazzein depends on the cysteine rich domain of human T1R3. Although crystal structures are not available for the sweet taste receptor, useful homology models can be developed based on appropriate templates. The amino terminal domain, cysteine rich domain and transmembrane helix domain of T1R2 and T1R3 have been modeled based on the crystal structures of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1, tumor necrosis factor receptor, and bovine rhodopsin, respectively. We have used homology models of the sweet taste receptors, molecular docking of sweet ligands to the receptors, and site-directed mutagenesis of the receptors to identify potential ligand binding sites of the sweet taste receptor. These studies have led to a better understanding of the structure and function of this heterodimeric receptor, and can act as a guide for rational structure-based design of novel non-caloric sweeteners, which can be used in the fighting against obesity and diabetes.

  11. In silico Identification and Characterization of Protein-Ligand Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel Barry; McGuffin, Liam James

    2016-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding site prediction methods aim to predict, from amino acid sequence, protein-ligand interactions, putative ligands, and ligand binding site residues using either sequence information, structural information, or a combination of both. In silico characterization of protein-ligand interactions has become extremely important to help determine a protein's functionality, as in vivo-based functional elucidation is unable to keep pace with the current growth of sequence databases. Additionally, in vitro biochemical functional elucidation is time-consuming, costly, and may not be feasible for large-scale analysis, such as drug discovery. Thus, in silico prediction of protein-ligand interactions must be utilized to aid in functional elucidation. Here, we briefly discuss protein function prediction, prediction of protein-ligand interactions, the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) and the Continuous Automated EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) competitions, along with their role in shaping the field. We also discuss, in detail, our cutting-edge web-server method, FunFOLD for the structurally informed prediction of protein-ligand interactions. Furthermore, we provide a step-by-step guide on using the FunFOLD web server and FunFOLD3 downloadable application, along with some real world examples, where the FunFOLD methods have been used to aid functional elucidation. PMID:27094282

  12. A Guided Inquiry Activity for Teaching Ligand Field Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Brian J.; Graham, Kate J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe a guided inquiry activity for teaching ligand field theory. Previous research suggests the guided inquiry approach is highly effective for student learning. This activity familiarizes students with the key concepts of molecular orbital theory applied to coordination complexes. Students will learn to identify factors that…

  13. Selective photocrosslinking of functional ligands to antibodies via the conserved nucleotide binding site.

    PubMed

    Alves, Nathan J; Champion, Matthew M; Stefanick, Jared F; Handlogten, Michael W; Moustakas, Demetri T; Shi, Yunhua; Shaw, Bryan F; Navari, Rudolph M; Kiziltepe, Tanyel; Bilgicer, Basar

    2013-07-01

    The conserved nucleotide binding site (NBS), found in the Fab variable domain of all antibody isotypes, remains a not-so-widely known and under-utilized site. Here, we describe a UV photocrosslinking method (UV-NBS) that utilizes the NBS for site-specific covalent functionalization of antibodies, while preserving antibody activity. We identified a small molecule, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), which has affinity for the NBS (K(d) = 1-8 μM) and can be photocrosslinked to antibodies upon UV energy exposure. By synthesizing their IBA conjugated versions, we have successfully photocrosslinked various types of functional ligands to antibodies at the NBS, including affinity tags (biotin), fluorescent molecules (FITC), peptides (iRGD), and chemotherapeutics (paclitaxel). An optimal UV exposure of 1-2 J/cm(2) yielded the most efficient photocrosslinking and resulted in 1-2 conjugations per antibody, while preserving the antigen binding activity and Fc related functions. Analysis of the photocrosslinked conjugates using western blotting, mass spectrometry, and computational docking simulations demonstrated that the photocrosslinking specifically takes place at the Y/F42 residue in framework region 2 of the antibody light chain. Taken together, the UV-NBS method provides a practical, site-specific, and chemically efficient method to functionalize antibodies with significant implications in diagnostic and therapeutic settings.

  14. LASSO-ligand activity by surface similarity order: a new tool for ligand based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Reid, Darryl; Sadjad, Bashir S; Zsoldos, Zsolt; Simon, Aniko

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Ligand Screening (VLS) has become an integral part of the drug discovery process for many pharmaceutical companies. Ligand similarity searches provide a very powerful method of screening large databases of ligands to identify possible hits. If these hits belong to new chemotypes the method is deemed even more successful. eHiTS LASSO uses a new interacting surface point types (ISPT) molecular descriptor that is generated from the 3D structure of the ligand, but unlike most 3D descriptors it is conformation independent. Combined with a neural network machine learning technique, LASSO screens molecular databases at an ultra fast speed of 1 million structures in under 1 min on a standard PC. The results obtained from eHiTS LASSO trained on relatively small training sets of just 2, 4 or 8 actives are presented using the diverse directory of useful decoys (DUD) dataset. It is shown that over a wide range of receptor families, eHiTS LASSO is consistently able to enrich screened databases and provides scaffold hopping ability.

  15. The good, the bad and the dubious: VHELIBS, a validation helper for ligands and binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many Protein Data Bank (PDB) users assume that the deposited structural models are of high quality but forget that these models are derived from the interpretation of experimental data. The accuracy of atom coordinates is not homogeneous between models or throughout the same model. To avoid basing a research project on a flawed model, we present a tool for assessing the quality of ligands and binding sites in crystallographic models from the PDB. Results The Validation HElper for LIgands and Binding Sites (VHELIBS) is software that aims to ease the validation of binding site and ligand coordinates for non-crystallographers (i.e., users with little or no crystallography knowledge). Using a convenient graphical user interface, it allows one to check how ligand and binding site coordinates fit to the electron density map. VHELIBS can use models from either the PDB or the PDB_REDO databank of re-refined and re-built crystallographic models. The user can specify threshold values for a series of properties related to the fit of coordinates to electron density (Real Space R, Real Space Correlation Coefficient and average occupancy are used by default). VHELIBS will automatically classify residues and ligands as Good, Dubious or Bad based on the specified limits. The user is also able to visually check the quality of the fit of residues and ligands to the electron density map and reclassify them if needed. Conclusions VHELIBS allows inexperienced users to examine the binding site and the ligand coordinates in relation to the experimental data. This is an important step to evaluate models for their fitness for drug discovery purposes such as structure-based pharmacophore development and protein-ligand docking experiments. PMID:23895374

  16. "DAKLI": a multipurpose ligand with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (kappa opioid) binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, A; Nestor, J J; Naidu, A; Newman, S R

    1988-01-01

    We describe a synthetic ligand, "DAKLI" (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as 125I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin (kappa opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites. PMID:2902630

  17. Removal and recovery of toxic metal ions from aqueous waste sites using polymer pendant ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, D.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the use of polymer pendant ligand technology to remove and recover toxic metal ions from DOE aqueous waste sites. Polymer pendant lgiands are organic ligands, anchored to crosslinked, modified divinylbenzene-polystyrene beads, that can selectively complex metal ions. The metal ion removal step usually occurs through a complexation or ion exchange phenomena, thus recovery of the metal ions and reuse of the beads is readily accomplished.

  18. Development of a protein-ligand-binding site prediction method based on interaction energy and sequence conservation.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Hiroto; Sato, Kenta; Wei, Cao; Saad, Gul; Sumikoshi, Kazuya; Nakamura, Shugo; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2016-09-01

    We present a new method for predicting protein-ligand-binding sites based on protein three-dimensional structure and amino acid conservation. This method involves calculation of the van der Waals interaction energy between a protein and many probes placed on the protein surface and subsequent clustering of the probes with low interaction energies to identify the most energetically favorable locus. In addition, it uses amino acid conservation among homologous proteins. Ligand-binding sites were predicted by combining the interaction energy and the amino acid conservation score. The performance of our prediction method was evaluated using a non-redundant dataset of 348 ligand-bound and ligand-unbound protein structure pairs, constructed by filtering entries in a ligand-binding site structure database, LigASite. Ligand-bound structure prediction (bound prediction) indicated that 74.0 % of predicted ligand-binding sites overlapped with real ligand-binding sites by over 25 % of their volume. Ligand-unbound structure prediction (unbound prediction) indicated that 73.9 % of predicted ligand-binding residues overlapped with real ligand-binding residues. The amino acid conservation score improved the average prediction accuracy by 17.0 and 17.6 points for the bound and unbound predictions, respectively. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the combined use of the interaction energy and amino acid conservation in the ligand-binding site prediction. PMID:27400687

  19. Aluminum complexes of the redox-active [ONO] pincer ligand.

    PubMed

    Szigethy, Géza; Heyduk, Alan F

    2012-07-14

    A series of aluminum complexes containing the tridentate, redox-active ligand bis(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-phenol)amine ([ONO]H(3)) in three different oxidation states were synthesized. The aluminum halide salts AlCl(3) and AlBr(3) were reacted with the doubly deprotonated form of the ligand to afford five-coordinate [ONHO(cat)]AlX(solv) complexes (1a, X = Cl, solv = OEt(2); 1b, X = Br, solv = THF), each having a trigonal bipyramidal coordination geometry at the aluminum and containing the [ONHO(cat)](2-) ligand with a protonated, sp(3)-hybridized nitrogen donor. The [ONO] ligand platform may also be added to aluminum through the use of the oxidized ligand salt [ONO(q)]K, which was reacted with AlCl(3) in the presence of either diphenylacetylacetonate (acacPh(2)(-)) or 8-oxyquinoline (quinO(-)) to afford [ONO(q)]Al(acacPh(2))Cl (2) or [ONO(q)]Al(quinO)Cl (3), respectively, with well-defined [ONO(q)](-) ligands. Quinonate complexes 2 and 3 were reduced by one electron to afford the corresponding complexes K{[ONO(sq)]Al(acacPh(2))(py)} (4) and K{[ONO(sq)]Al(quinO)(py)} (5), respectively, containing well-defined [ONO(sq)](2-) ligands. The addition of tetrachloro-1,2-quinone to 1a in the presence of pyridine resulted in the expulsion of HCl and the formation of an aluminum complex with two different redox active ligands, [ONO]Al(o-O(2)C(6)Cl(4))(py) (6). Similar results were obtained when 1a was reacted with 9,10-phenanthrenequinone to afford [ONO]Al(o-O(2)C(14)H(8))(py) (7) or with pyrene-4,5-dione to afford [ONO]Al(o-O(2)C(16)H(8))(py) (8). Structural, spectroscopic and preliminary magnetic measurements on 6-8 suggest ligand non-innocent redox behavior in these complexes. PMID:22669327

  20. Activation of Neuropeptide FF Receptors by Kisspeptin Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Shinya; Misu, Ryosuke; Tomita, Kenji; Setsuda, Shohei; Masuda, Ryo; Ohno, Hiroaki; Naniwa, Yousuke; Ieda, Nahoko; Inoue, Naoko; Ohkura, Satoshi; Uenoyama, Yoshihisa; Tsukamura, Hiroko; Maeda, Kei-Ichiro; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2011-01-13

    Kisspeptin is a member of the RFamide neuropeptide family that is implicated in gonadotropin secretion. Because kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling is implicated in the neuroendocrine regulation of reproduction, GPR54 ligands represent promising therapeutic agents against endocrine secretion disorders. In the present study, the selectivity profiles of GPR54 agonist peptides were investigated for several GPCRs, including RFamide receptors. Kisspeptin-10 exhibited potent binding and activation of neuropeptide FF receptors (NPFFR1 and NPFFR2). In contrast, short peptide agonists bound with much lower affinity to NPFFRs while showing relatively high selectivity toward GPR54. The possible localization of secondary kisspeptin targets was also demonstrated by variation in the levels of GnRH release from the median eminence and the type of GPR54 agonists used. Negligible affinity of the reported NPFFR ligands to GPR54 was observed and indicates the unidirectional cross-reactivity between both ligands.

  1. Common Internal Allosteric Network Links Anesthetic Binding Sites in a Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Thomas T.

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics bind reversibly to ion channels, modifying their global conformational distributions, but the underlying atomic mechanisms are not completely known. We examine this issue by way of the model protein Gloeobacter violaceous ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC) using computational molecular dynamics, with a coarse-grained model to enhance sampling. We find that in flooding simulations, both propofol and a generic particle localize to the crystallographic transmembrane anesthetic binding region, and that propofol also localizes to an extracellular region shared with the crystallographic ketamine binding site. Subsequent simulations to probe these binding modes in greater detail demonstrate that ligand binding induces structural asymmetry in GLIC. Consequently, we employ residue interaction correlation analysis to describe the internal allosteric network underlying the coupling of ligand and distant effector sites necessary for conformational change. Overall, the results suggest that the same allosteric network may underlie the actions of various anesthetics, regardless of binding site. PMID:27403526

  2. Common Internal Allosteric Network Links Anesthetic Binding Sites in a Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Thomas T; Mincer, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics bind reversibly to ion channels, modifying their global conformational distributions, but the underlying atomic mechanisms are not completely known. We examine this issue by way of the model protein Gloeobacter violaceous ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC) using computational molecular dynamics, with a coarse-grained model to enhance sampling. We find that in flooding simulations, both propofol and a generic particle localize to the crystallographic transmembrane anesthetic binding region, and that propofol also localizes to an extracellular region shared with the crystallographic ketamine binding site. Subsequent simulations to probe these binding modes in greater detail demonstrate that ligand binding induces structural asymmetry in GLIC. Consequently, we employ residue interaction correlation analysis to describe the internal allosteric network underlying the coupling of ligand and distant effector sites necessary for conformational change. Overall, the results suggest that the same allosteric network may underlie the actions of various anesthetics, regardless of binding site. PMID:27403526

  3. eFindSite: Enhanced Fingerprint-Based Virtual Screening Against Predicted Ligand Binding Sites in Protein Models.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Wei P; Brylinski, Michal

    2014-02-01

    A standard practice for lead identification in drug discovery is ligand virtual screening, which utilizes computing technologies to detect small compounds that likely bind to target proteins prior to experimental screens. A high accuracy is often achieved when the target protein has a resolved crystal structure; however, using protein models still renders significant challenges. Towards this goal, we recently developed eFindSite that predicts ligand binding sites using a collection of effective algorithms, including meta-threading, machine learning and reliable confidence estimation systems. Here, we incorporate fingerprint-based virtual screening capabilities in eFindSite in addition to its flagship role as a ligand binding pocket predictor. Virtual screening benchmarks using the enhanced Directory of Useful Decoys demonstrate that eFindSite significantly outperforms AutoDock Vina as assessed by several evaluation metrics. Importantly, this holds true regardless of the quality of target protein structures. As a first genome-wide application of eFindSite, we conduct large-scale virtual screening of the entire proteome of Escherichia coli with encouraging results. In the new approach to fingerprint-based virtual screening using remote protein homology, eFindSite demonstrates its compelling proficiency offering a high ranking accuracy and low susceptibility to target structure deformations. The enhanced version of eFindSite is freely available to the academic community at http://www.brylinski.org/efindsite. PMID:27485570

  4. Rapid binding of a cationic active site inhibitor to wild type and mutant mouse acetylcholinesterase: Brownian dynamics simulation including diffusion in the active site gorge.

    PubMed

    Tara, S; Elcock, A H; Kirchhoff, P D; Briggs, J M; Radic, Z; Taylor, P; McCammon, J A

    1998-12-01

    It is known that anionic surface residues play a role in the long-range electrostatic attraction between acetylcholinesterase and cationic ligands. In our current investigation, we show that anionic residues also play an important role in the behavior of the ligand within the active site gorge of acetylcholinesterase. Negatively charged residues near the gorge opening not only attract positively charged ligands from solution to the enzyme, but can also restrict the motion of the ligand once it is inside of the gorge. We use Brownian dynamics techniques to calculate the rate constant kon, for wild type and mutant acetylcholinesterase with a positively charged ligand. These calculations are performed by allowing the ligand to diffuse within the active site gorge. This is an extension of previously reported work in which a ligand was allowed to diffuse only to the enzyme surface. By setting the reaction criteria for the ligand closer to the active site, better agreement with experimental data is obtained. Although a number of residues influence the movement of the ligand within the gorge, Asp74 is shown to play a particularly important role in this function. Asp74 traps the ligand within the gorge, and in this way helps to ensure a reaction.

  5. Magnetic Nanoparticles as Mediators of Ligand-Free Activation of EGFR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Cornelia; Klaver, Arjen; Kanger, Johannes S.; Jovin, Thomas M.; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are of particular interest in biomedical research, and have been exploited for molecular separation, gene/drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging, and hyperthermic cancer therapy. In the case of cultured cells, magnetic manipulation of NPs provides the means for studying processes induced by mechanotransduction or by local clustering of targeted macromolecules, e.g. cell surface receptors. The latter are normally activated by binding of their natural ligands mediating key signaling pathways such as those associated with the epidermal growth factor (EGFR). However, it has been reported that EGFR may be dimerized and activated even in the absence of ligands. The present study assessed whether receptor clustering induced by physical means alone suffices for activating EGFR in quiescent cells. Methodology/Principal Findings The EGFR on A431 cells was specifically targeted by superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs) carrying either a ligand-blocking monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody or a streptavidin molecule for targeting a chimeric EGFR incorporating a biotinylated amino-terminal acyl carrier peptide moiety. Application of a magnetic field led to SPION magnetization and clustering, resulting in activation of the EGFR, a process manifested by auto and transphosphorylation and downstream signaling. The magnetically-induced early signaling events were similar to those inherent to the ligand dependent EGFR pathways. Magnetization studies indicated that the NPs exerted magnetic dipolar forces in the sub-piconewton range with clustering dependent on Brownian motion of the receptor-SPION complex and magnetic field strength. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that EGFR on the cell surface that have their ligand binding-pocket blocked by an antibody are still capable of transphosphorylation and initiation of signaling cascades if they are clustered by SPIONs either attached locally or targeted to another site of the receptor

  6. Peripheral ligand-binding site in cytochrome P450 3A4 located with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET).

    PubMed

    Davydov, Dmitri R; Rumfeldt, Jessica A O; Sineva, Elena V; Fernando, Harshica; Davydova, Nadezhda Y; Halpert, James R

    2012-02-24

    The mechanisms of ligand binding and allostery in the major human drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) were explored with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) using a laser dye, fluorol-7GA (F7GA), as a model substrate. Incorporation into the enzyme of a thiol-reactive FRET probe, pyrene iodoacetamide, allowed us to monitor the binding by FRET from the pyrene donor to the F7GA acceptor. Cooperativity of the interactions detected by FRET indicates that the enzyme possesses at least two F7GA-binding sites that have different FRET efficiencies and are therefore widely separated. To probe spatial localization of these sites, we studied FRET in a series of mutants bearing pyrene iodoacetamide at different positions, and we measured the distances from each of the sites to the donor. Our results demonstrate the presence of a high affinity binding site at the enzyme periphery. Analysis of the set of measured distances complemented with molecular modeling and docking allowed us to pinpoint the most probable peripheral site. It is located in the vicinity of residues 217-220, similar to the position of the progesterone molecule bound at the distal surface of the CYP3A4 in a prior x-ray crystal structure. Peripheral binding of F7GA causes a substantial spin shift and serves as a prerequisite for the binding in the active site. This is the first indication of functionally important ligand binding outside of the active site in cytochromes P450. The findings strongly suggest that the mechanisms of CYP3A4 cooperativity involve a conformational transition triggered by an allosteric ligand.

  7. Evidence for chemoreceptors with bimodular ligand-binding regions harboring two signal-binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Pineda-Molina, Estela; Reyes-Darias, José-Antonio; Lacal, Jesús; Ramos, Juan L.; García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Gavira, Jose A.; Krell, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Chemoreceptor-based signaling is a central mechanism in bacterial signal transduction. Receptors are classified according to the size of their ligand-binding region. The well-studied cluster I proteins have a 100- to 150-residue ligand-binding region that contains a single site for chemoattractant recognition. Cluster II receptors, which contain a 220- to 300-residue ligand-binding region and which are almost as abundant as cluster I receptors, remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we report high-resolution structures of the ligand-binding region of the cluster II McpS chemotaxis receptor (McpS-LBR) of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 in complex with different chemoattractants. The structure of McpS-LBR represents a small-molecule binding domain composed of two modules, each able to bind different signal molecules. Malate and succinate were found to bind to the membrane-proximal module, whereas acetate binds to the membrane-distal module. A structural alignment of the two modules revealed that the ligand-binding sites could be superimposed and that amino acids involved in ligand recognition are conserved in both binding sites. Ligand binding to both modules was shown to trigger chemotactic responses. Further analysis showed that McpS-like receptors were found in different classes of proteobacteria, indicating that this mode of response to different carbon sources may be universally distributed. The physiological relevance of the McpS architecture may lie in its capacity to respond with high sensitivity to the preferred carbon sources malate and succinate and, at the same time, mediate lower sensitivity responses to the less preferred but very abundant carbon source acetate. PMID:23112148

  8. Ligand-apomyoglobin interactions. Configurational adaptability of the haem-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Lind, K E; Moller, J V

    1976-01-01

    1. The interaction of the haem-binding region of apomyoglobin with different ligands was examined by ultrafiltration, equilibrium dialysis and spectrophotometry, to study unspecific features of protein-ligand interactions such as they occur in, for example, serum albumin binding. 2. Apomyoglobin, in contrast with metmyoglobin, binds at pH 7, with a high affinity, one molecule of Bromophenol Blue, bilirubin and protoporphyrin IX, two molecules of n-dodecanoate and n-decyl sulphate and four molecules of n-dodecyl sulphate and n-tetradecyl sulphate. 3. The number of high-affinity sites and/or association constants for the alkyl sulphates are enhanced by an increase of hydrocarbon length, indicating hydrophobic interactions with the protein. 4. Measurements of the temperature-dependence of the association constants of the high-affinity sites imply that the binding processes are largely entropy-driven. 5. Binding studies in the presence of two ligands show that bilirubin plus Bromophenol Blue and dodecanoate plus Bromophenol Blue can be simultaneously bound by apomyoglobin, but with decreased affinities. By contrast, the apomyoglobin-protoporphyrin IX complex does not react with Bromophenol Blue. 6. Optical-rotatory-dispersion measurements show that the laevorotation of apomyoglobin is increased towards that of metmyglobin in the presence of haemin and protoporphyrin IX. Small changes in the optical-rotatory-dispersion spectrum of apomyoglobin are observed in the presence of the other ligands. 7. It is concluded that the binding sites on apomyoglobin probably do not pre-exist but appear to be moulded from predominantly non-polar amino acid residues by reaction with hydrophobic ligands. 8. Comparison with data in the literature indicates that apomyoglobin on a weight basis has a larger hydrophobic area avaialble for binding of ligands than has human serum albumin. On the other hand, the association constants of serum for the ligands used in this study are generally

  9. A structural view of ligand-dependent activation in thermoTRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Ximena; Lespay-Rebolledo, Carolyne; Brauchi, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) proteins are a large family of ion channels, grouped into seven sub-families. Although great advances have been made regarding the activation and modulation of TRP channel activity, detailed molecular mechanisms governing TRP channel gating are still needed. Sensitive to electric, chemical, mechanical, and thermal cues, TRP channels are tightly associated with the detection and integration of sensory input, emerging as a model to study the polymodal activation of ion channel proteins. Among TRP channels, the temperature-activated kind constitute a subgroup by itself, formed by Vanilloid receptors 1–4, Melastatin receptors 2, 4, 5, and 8, TRPC5, and TRPA1. Some of the so-called “thermoTRP” channels participate in the detection of noxious stimuli making them an interesting pharmacological target for the treatment of pain. However, the poor specificity of the compounds available in the market represents an important obstacle to overcome. Understanding the molecular mechanics underlying ligand-dependent modulation of TRP channels may help with the rational design of novel synthetic analgesics. The present review focuses on the structural basis of ligand-dependent activation of TRPV1 and TRPM8 channels. Special attention is drawn to the dissection of ligand-binding sites within TRPV1, PIP2-dependent modulation of TRP channels, and the structure of natural and synthetic ligands. PMID:24847275

  10. Site-directed spin labeling reveals pentameric ligand-gated ion channel gating motions.

    PubMed

    Dellisanti, Cosma D; Ghosh, Borna; Hanson, Susan M; Raspanti, James M; Grant, Valerie A; Diarra, Gaoussou M; Schuh, Abby M; Satyshur, Kenneth; Klug, Candice S; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2013-11-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are neurotransmitter-activated receptors that mediate fast synaptic transmission. In pLGICs, binding of agonist to the extracellular domain triggers a structural rearrangement that leads to the opening of an ion-conducting pore in the transmembrane domain and, in the continued presence of neurotransmitter, the channels desensitize (close). The flexible loops in each subunit that connect the extracellular binding domain (loops 2, 7, and 9) to the transmembrane channel domain (M2-M3 loop) are essential for coupling ligand binding to channel gating. Comparing the crystal structures of two bacterial pLGIC homologues, ELIC and the proton-activated GLIC, suggests channel gating is associated with rearrangements in these loops, but whether these motions accurately predict the motions in functional lipid-embedded pLGICs is unknown. Here, using site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and functional GLIC channels reconstituted into liposomes, we examined if, and how far, the loops at the ECD/TMD gating interface move during proton-dependent gating transitions from the resting to desensitized state. Loop 9 moves ∼9 Å inward toward the channel lumen in response to proton-induced desensitization. Loop 9 motions were not observed when GLIC was in detergent micelles, suggesting detergent solubilization traps the protein in a nonactivatable state and lipids are required for functional gating transitions. Proton-induced desensitization immobilizes loop 2 with little change in position. Proton-induced motion of the M2-M3 loop was not observed, suggesting its conformation is nearly identical in closed and desensitized states. Our experimentally derived distance measurements of spin-labeled GLIC suggest ELIC is not a good model for the functional resting state of GLIC, and that the crystal structure of GLIC does not correspond to a desensitized state. These findings advance our understanding

  11. Why do receptor-ligand bonds in cell adhesion cluster into discrete focal-adhesion sites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Gao, Yanfei

    2016-10-01

    Cell adhesion often exhibits the clustering of the receptor-ligand bonds into discrete focal-adhesion sites near the contact edge, thus resembling a rosette shape or a contracting membrane anchored by a small number of peripheral forces. The ligands on the extracellular matrix are immobile, and the receptors in the cell plasma membrane consist of two types: high-affinity integrins (that bond to the substrate ligands and are immobile) and low-affinity integrins (that are mobile and not bonded to the ligands). Thus the adhesion energy density is proportional to the high-affinity integrin density. This paper provides a mechanistic explanation for the clustering/assembling of the receptor-ligand bonds from two main points: (1) the cellular contractile force leads to the density evolution of these two types of integrins, and results into a large high-affinity integrin density near the contact edge and (2) the front of a propagating crack into a decreasing toughness field will be unstable and wavy. From this fracture mechanics perspective, the chemomechanical equilibrium is reached when a small number of patches with large receptor-ligand bond density are anticipated to form at the cell periphery, as opposed to a uniform distribution of bonds on the entire interface. Cohesive fracture simulations show that the de-adhesion force can be significantly enhanced by this nonuniform bond density field, but the de-adhesion force anisotropy due to the substrate elastic anisotropy is significantly reduced.

  12. Site-specific and covalent attachment of his-tagged proteins by chelation assisted photoimmobilization: a strategy for microarraying of protein ligands.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Emma M; Enander, Karin; Bui, Lan; Lundström, Ingemar; Konradsson, Peter; Liedberg, Bo

    2013-09-17

    A novel strategy for site-specific and covalent attachment of proteins has been developed, intended for robust and controllable immobilization of histidine (His)-tagged ligands in protein microarrays. The method is termed chelation assisted photoimmobilization (CAP) and was demonstrated using human IgG-Fc modified with C-terminal hexahistidines (His-IgGFc) as the ligand and protein A as the analyte. Alkanethiols terminated with either nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), benzophenone (BP), or oligo(ethylene glycol) were synthesized and mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were prepared on gold and thoroughly characterized by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), ellipsometry, and contact angle goniometry. In the process of CAP, NTA chelates Ni(2+) and the complex coordinates the His-tagged ligand in an oriented assembly. The ligand is then photoimmobilized via BP, which forms covalent bonds upon UV light activation. In the development of affinity biosensors and protein microarrays, site-specific attachment of ligands in a fashion where analyte binding sites are available is often preferred to random coupling. Analyte binding performance of ligands immobilized either by CAP or by standard amine coupling was characterized by surface plasmon resonance in combination with IRAS. The relative analyte response with randomly coupled ligand was 2.5 times higher than when site-specific attachment was used. This is a reminder that also when immobilizing ligands via residues far from the binding site, there are many other factors influencing availability and activity. Still, CAP provides a valuable expansion of protein immobilization techniques since it offers attractive microarraying possibilities amenable to applications within proteomics. PMID:24007525

  13. Automated Site Preparation in Physics-Based Rescoring of Receptor Ligand Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, Chaya S.; Schonbrun, Cheryl; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Huang, Niu

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen atoms are not typically observable in xray crystal structures but inferring their locations is often important in structure-based drug design. In addition, protonation states of the protein can change in response to ligand binding, as can the orientations of OH groups, a subtle form of “induced fit”. We implement and evaluate an automated procedure for optimizing polar hydrogens in protein binding sites in complex with ligands. Specifically, we apply the previously described ICDA algorithm (Proteins 66: 824–837), which assigns the ionization states of titratable residues, the amide orientations of Asn/Gln side chains, the imidazole ring orientation in His, and the orientations of OH/SH groups, in a unified algorithm. We test the utility of this method for identifying native-like ligand poses using 247 protein-ligand complexes from an established database of docked decoys. Pose selection is performed with a physics-based scoring function based on a molecular mechanics energy function and a Generalized Born implicit solvent model. The use of the ICDA receptor preparation protocol, implemented with no knowledge of the native ligand pose, increases the accuracy of pose selection significantly, with the average RMSD over all complexes decreasing from 2.7 to 1.5 Å when applying ICDA. Large improvements are seen for specific classes of binding sites with titratable groups, such as aspartyl proteases. PMID:19382204

  14. Automated site preparation in physics-based rescoring of receptor ligand complexes.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Chaya S; Schonbrun, Cheryl; Jacobson, Matthew P; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Huang, Niu

    2009-10-01

    Hydrogen atoms are not typically observable in X-ray crystal structures, but inferring their locations is often important in structure-based drug design. In addition, protonation states of the protein can change in response to ligand binding, as can the orientations of OH groups, a subtle form of "induced fit." We implement and evaluate an automated procedure for optimizing polar hydrogens in protein-binding sites in complex with ligands. Specifically, we apply the previously described Independent Cluster Decomposition Algorithm (ICDA) algorithm (Li et al., Proteins 2007;66:824-837), which assigns the ionization states of titratable residues, the amide orientations of Asn/Gln side chains, the imidazole ring orientation in His, and the orientations of OH/SH groups, in a unified algorithm. We test the utility of this method for identifying nativelike ligand poses using 247 protein-ligand complexes from an established database of docked decoys. Pose selection is performed with a physics-based scoring function based on a molecular mechanics energy function and a Generalized Born implicit solvent model. The use of the ICDA receptor preparation protocol, implemented with no knowledge of the native ligand pose, increases the accuracy of pose selection significantly, with the average RMSD over all complexes decreasing from 2.7 to 1.5 A when applying ICDA. Large improvements are seen for specific classes of binding sites with titratable groups, such as aspartyl proteases.

  15. Electrostatic coupling to pH-titrating sites as a source of cooperativity in protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed Central

    Spassov, V.; Bashford, D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes an alternative mechanism for the cooperative binding of charged ligands to proteins. The ligand-binding sites are electrostatically coupled to protein side chains that can undergo protonation and deprotonation. The binding of one ligand alters the protein's protonation equilibrium in a manner that makes the the binding of the second ligand more favorable. This mechanism requires no conformational change to produce a cooperative effect, although it is not exclusive of conformational change. We present a theoretical description of the mechanism, and calculations on three kinds of systems: A model system containing one protonation site and two ligand-binding sites; a model system containing two protonation sites and two ligand-binding sites; and calbindin D9k, which contains two Ca2+-binding sites and 30 protonation sites. For the one-protonation-site model, it is shown that the influence of the protonation site can only be cooperative. The competition of this effect with the anticooperative effect of ligand-ligand repulsion is studied in detail. For the two-protonation site model, the effect can be either cooperative or, in special cases, anticooperative. For calbindin D9k, the calculations predict that six protonation sites in or near the ligand-binding sites make a cooperative contribution that approximately cancels the anticooperative effect of Ca2+-Ca2+ repulsion, accounting for more than half of the total cooperative effect that is needed to overcome repulsion and produce the net cooperativity observed experimentally. We argue that cooperative mechanisms of the kind described here are likely when there is more than one ligand-binding site in a protein domain. PMID:9761483

  16. Ligand binding and proton exchange dynamics in site-specific mutants of human myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Lambright, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Site specific mutagenesis was used to make substitutions of four residues in the distal heme pocket of human myoglobin: Val68, His64, Lys45, and Asp60. Strongly diffracting crystals of the conservative mutation K45R in the met aquo form were grown in the trigonal space group P3[sub 2]21 and the X-ray crystal structure determined at 1.6 [angstrom] resolution. The overall structure is similar to that of sperm whale met aquo myoglobin. Several of the mutant proteins were characterized by 2-D NMR spectroscopy. The NMR data suggest the structural changes are localized to the region of the mutation. The dynamics of ligand binding to myoglobin mutants were studied by transient absorption spectroscopy following photolysis of the CO complexes. Transient absorption kinetics and spectra on the ns to ms timescale were measured in aqueous solution from 280 K to 310 K and in 75% glycerol: water from 250 K to 310 K. Two significant basis spectra were obtained from singular value decomposition of the matrix of time dependent spectra. The information was used to obtain approximations for the extent of ligand rebinding and the kinetics of conformational relaxation. Except for K45R, substitutions at Lys45 or Asp60 produce changes in the kinetics for ligand rebinding. Replacement of Lys45 with Arg increases the rate of ligand rebinding from the protein matrix by a factor of 2, but does not alter the rates for ligand escape or entry into the protein or the dynamics of the conformational relaxation. Substitutions at His64 and Val68 influence the kinetics of ligand rebinding and the dynamics of conformational relaxation. The results do not support the hypothesis that ligand migration between the heme pocket and solvent is determined solely by fluctuations of Arg45 and His64 between open and closed conformations of the heme pocket but can be rationalized if ligand diffusion through the protein matrix involves multiple competing pathways.

  17. Predicting Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity through Ligand-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Ferino, Giulio; Quezada, Elias; Santana, Lourdes; Friedman, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of bio- and cheminformatics associated with the development of specialized software and increasing computer power has produced a great interest in theoretical in silico methods applied in drug rational design. These techniques apply the concept that “similar molecules have similar biological properties” that has been exploited in Medicinal Chemistry for years to design new molecules with desirable pharmacological profiles. Ligand-based methods are not dependent on receptor structural data and take into account two and three-dimensional molecular properties to assess similarity of new compounds in regards to the set of molecules with the biological property under study. Depending on the complexity of the calculation, there are different types of ligand-based methods, such as QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) with 2D and 3D descriptors, CoMFA (Comparative Molecular Field Analysis) or pharmacophoric approaches. This work provides a description of a series of ligand-based models applied in the prediction of the inhibitory activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes. The controlled regulation of the enzymes’ function through the use of MAO inhibitors is used as a treatment in many psychiatric and neurological disorders, such as depression, anxiety, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. For this reason, multiple scaffolds, such as substituted coumarins, indolylmethylamine or pyridazine derivatives were synthesized and assayed toward MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition. Our intention is to focus on the description of ligand-based models to provide new insights in the relationship between the MAO inhibitory activity and the molecular structure of the different inhibitors, and further study enzyme selectivity and possible mechanisms of action. PMID:23231398

  18. Structural insights into ligand-induced activation of the insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.; Lawrence, M.; Streltsov, V.; Garrett, T.; McKern, N.; Lou, M.-Z.; Lovrecz, G.; Adams, T.

    2008-04-29

    The current model for insulin binding to the insulin receptor proposes that there are two binding sites, referred to as sites 1 and 2, on each monomer in the receptor homodimer and two binding surfaces on insulin, one involving residues predominantly from the dimerization face of insulin (the classical binding surface) and the other residues from the hexamerization face. High-affinity binding involves one insulin molecule using its two surfaces to make bridging contacts with site 1 from one receptor monomer and site 2 from the other. Whilst the receptor dimer has two identical site 1-site 2 pairs, insulin molecules cannot bridge both pairs simultaneously. Our structures of the insulin receptor (IR) ectodomain dimer and the L1-CR-L2 fragments of IR and insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) explain many of the features of ligand-receptor binding and allow the two binding sites on the receptor to be described. The IR dimer has an unexpected folded-over conformation which places the C-terminal surface of the first fibronectin-III domain in close juxtaposition to the known L1 domain ligand-binding surface suggesting that the C-terminal surface of FnIII-1 is the second binding site involved in high-affinity binding. This is very different from previous models based on three-dimensional reconstruction from scanning transmission electron micrographs. Our single-molecule images indicate that IGF-1R has a morphology similar to that of IR. In addition, the structures of the first three domains (L1-CR-L2) of the IR and IGF-1R show that there are major differences in the two regions governing ligand specificity. The implications of these findings for ligand-induced receptor activation will be discussed. This review summarizes the key findings regarding the discovery and characterization of the insulin receptor, the identification and arrangement of its structural domains in the sequence and the key features associated with ligand binding. The remainder of the review

  19. Mixed ligand ruthenium(III) complexes of benzaldehyde 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazones with triphenylphosphine/triphenylarsine co-ligands: Synthesis, DNA binding, DNA cleavage, antioxidative and cytotoxic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, K.; Sathiyaraj, S.; Raja, G.; Jayabalakrishnan, C.

    2013-08-01

    The new ruthenium(III) complexes with 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone ligands, (E)-2-(2-chlorobenzylidene)-N-methylhydrazinecarbothioamide (HL1) and (E)-2-(2-nitrobenzylidene)-N-methylhydrazinecarbothioamide (HL2), were prepared and characterized by various physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The title compounds act as bidentate, monobasic chelating ligands with S and N as the donor sites and are preferably found in the thiol form in all the complexes studied. The molecular structure of HL1 and HL2 were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction method. DNA binding of the ligands and complexes were investigated by absorption spectroscopy and IR spectroscopy. It reveals that the compounds bind to nitrogenous bases of DNA via intercalation. The oxidative cleavage of the complexes with CT-DNA inferred that the effects of cleavage are dose dependent. Antioxidant study of the ligands and complexes showed the significant antioxidant activity against DPPH radical. In addition, the in vitro cytotoxicity of the ligands and complexes against MCF-7 cell line was assayed which showed higher cytotoxic activity with the lower IC50 values indicating their efficiency in killing the cancer cells even at low concentrations.

  20. Dissecting allosteric effects of activator-coactivator complexes using a covalent small molecule ligand.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ningkun; Lodge, Jean M; Fierke, Carol A; Mapp, Anna K

    2014-08-19

    Allosteric binding events play a critical role in the formation and stability of transcriptional activator-coactivator complexes, perhaps in part due to the often intrinsically disordered nature of one or more of the constituent partners. The kinase-inducible domain interacting (KIX) domain of the master coactivator CREB binding protein/p300 is a conformationally dynamic domain that complexes with transcriptional activators at two discrete binding sites in allosteric communication. The complexation of KIX with the transcriptional activation domain of mixed-lineage leukemia protein leads to an enhancement of binding by the activation domain of CREB (phosphorylated kinase-inducible domain of CREB) to the second site. A transient kinetic analysis of the ternary complex formation aided by small molecule ligands that induce positive or negative cooperative binding reveals that positive cooperativity is largely governed by stabilization of the bound complex as indicated by a decrease in koff. Thus, this suggests the increased binding affinity for the second ligand is not due to an allosteric creation of a more favorable binding interface by the first ligand. This is consistent with data from us and from others indicating that the on rates of conformationally dynamic proteins approach the limits of diffusion. In contrast, negative cooperativity is manifested by alterations in both kon and koff, suggesting stabilization of the binary complex.

  1. Predicting protein ligand binding sites by combining evolutionary sequence conservation and 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Capra, John A; Laskowski, Roman A; Thornton, Janet M; Singh, Mona; Funkhouser, Thomas A

    2009-12-01

    Identifying a protein's functional sites is an important step towards characterizing its molecular function. Numerous structure- and sequence-based methods have been developed for this problem. Here we introduce ConCavity, a small molecule binding site prediction algorithm that integrates evolutionary sequence conservation estimates with structure-based methods for identifying protein surface cavities. In large-scale testing on a diverse set of single- and multi-chain protein structures, we show that ConCavity substantially outperforms existing methods for identifying both 3D ligand binding pockets and individual ligand binding residues. As part of our testing, we perform one of the first direct comparisons of conservation-based and structure-based methods. We find that the two approaches provide largely complementary information, which can be combined to improve upon either approach alone. We also demonstrate that ConCavity has state-of-the-art performance in predicting catalytic sites and drug binding pockets. Overall, the algorithms and analysis presented here significantly improve our ability to identify ligand binding sites and further advance our understanding of the relationship between evolutionary sequence conservation and structural and functional attributes of proteins. Data, source code, and prediction visualizations are available on the ConCavity web site (http://compbio.cs.princeton.edu/concavity/).

  2. Inclusion of multiple fragment types in the Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) approach

    PubMed Central

    Raman, E. Prabhu; Yu, Wenbo; Lakkaraju, Sirish K.; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    The Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) method identifies the location and approximate affinities of small molecular fragments on a target macromolecular surface by performing Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of the target in an aqueous solution of small molecules representative of different chemical functional groups. In this study, we introduce a set of small molecules to map potential interactions made by neutral hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, and charged donor and acceptor fragments in addition to nonpolar fragments. The affinity pattern is obtained in the form of discretized probability or, equivalently, free energy maps, called FragMaps, which can be visualized with the target surface. We performed SILCS simulations for four proteins for which structural and thermodynamic data is available for multiple, diverse ligands. Good overlap is shown between high affinity regions identified by the FragMaps and the crystallographic positions of ligand functional groups with similar chemical functionality, thus demonstrating the validity of the qualitative information obtained from the simulations. To test the ability of FragMaps in providing quantitative predictions, we calculate the previously introduced Ligand Grid Free Energy (LGFE) metric and observe its correspondence with experimentally measured binding affinity. LGFE is computed for different conformational ensembles and improvement in prediction is shown with increasing ligand conformational sampling. Ensemble generation includes a Monte Carlo sampling approach that uses the GFE FragMaps directly as the energy function. The results show some, but not all experimental trends are predicted, and warrant improvements in the scoring methodology. In addition, the potential utility of atom-based free energy contributions to the LGFE scores and the use of multiple ligands in SILCS to identify displaceable water molecules during ligand design are discussed. PMID:24245913

  3. Surface chemistry on small ruthenium nanoparticles: evidence for site selective reactions and influence of ligands.

    PubMed

    Novio, Fernando; Monahan, Daniele; Coppel, Yannick; Antorrena, Guillermo; Lecante, Pierre; Philippot, Karine; Chaudret, Bruno

    2014-01-27

    The reactivity of two classes of ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru NPs) of small size, either sterically stabilized by a polymer (polyvinylpyrrolidone, PVP) or electronically stabilized by a ligand (bisdiphenylphosphinobutane, dppb) was tested towards standard reactions, namely CO oxidation, CO2 reduction and styrene hydrogenation. The aim of the work was to identify the sites of reactivity on the nanoparticles and to study how the presence of ancillary ligands can influence the course of these catalytic reactions by using NMR and IR spectroscopies. It was found that CO oxidation proceeds at room temperature (RT) on Ru NPs but that the system deactivates rapidly in the absence of ligands because of the formation of RuO2. In the presence of ligands, the reaction involves exclusively the bridging CO groups and no bulk oxidation is observed at RT under catalytic conditions. The reverse reaction, CO2 reduction, is achieved at 120 °C in the presence of H2 and leads to CO, which coordinates exclusively in a bridging mode, hence evidencing the competition between hydrides and CO for coordination on Ru NPs. The effect of ligands localized on the surface is also evidenced in catalytic reactions. Thus, styrene is slowly hydrogenated at RT by the two systems Ru/PVP and Ru/dppb, first into ethylbenzene and then into ethylcyclohexane. Selectively poisoning the nanoparticles with bridging CO groups leads to catalysts that are only able to reduce the vinyl group of styrene whereas a full poisoning with both terminal and bridging CO groups leads to inactive catalysts. These results are interpreted in terms of location of the ligands on the particles surface, and evidence site selectivity for both CO oxidation and arene hydrogenation. PMID:24458912

  4. Label-free molecular beacon system based on DNAs containing abasic sites and fluorescent ligands that bind abasic sites.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yusuke; Nishizawa, Seiichi; Teramae, Norio

    2011-10-01

    A new class of label-free molecular beacon (MB) system based on DNA strands that contain abasic (AP) sites (AP-DNA) and adopt stem-loop structures, in combination with fluorescent ligands that bind these AP sites, has been developed. Unlike a conventional MB, which requires covalent labeling of the MB with a fluorophore and a quencher, the developed system (APMB) does not require covalent attachment of signal transduction units. Detailed sensing functions of a series of APMB systems were examined with the aid of the fluorescent ligand named ATMND to provide insight into the design strategy for APMB systems. The effects of the stem length and the position of the AP site in the stem moiety on the fluorescence response of the APMB system were examined. Genotyping of a G/C SNP of PCR amplification products was successfully demonstrated with the APMB system and blue-fluorescent ATMND as a ligand. The APMB system was further extended to a system that utilized green-fluorescent lumiflavin.

  5. Exploration of Gated Ligand Binding Recognizes an Allosteric Site for Blocking FABP4-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Xiang; Dong, Zigang

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), reversibly binding to fatty acids and other lipids with high affinities, is a potential target for treatment of cancers. The binding site of FABP4 is buried in an interior cavity and thereby ligand binding/unbinding is coupled with opening/closing of FABP4. It is a difficult task both experimentally and computationally to illuminate the entry or exit pathway, especially with the conformational gating. In this report we combine extensive computer simulations, clustering analysis, and Markov state model to investigate the binding mechanism of FABP4 and troglitazone. Our simulations capture spontaneous binding and unbinding events as well as the conformational transition of FABP4 between the open and closed states. An allosteric binding site on the protein surface is recognized for development of novel FABP4 inhibitors. The binding affinity is calculated and compared with the experimental value. The kinetic analysis suggests that ligand residence on the protein surface may delay the binding process. Overall, our results provide a comprehensive picture of ligand diffusion on the protein surface, ligand migration into the buried cavity, and the conformational change of FABP4 at an atomic level. PMID:26580122

  6. Blind prediction of charged ligand binding affinities in a model binding site

    PubMed Central

    Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Boyce, Sarah E.; Fischer, Marcus; Fish, Inbar; Mobley, David L.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Dill, Ken A.

    2013-01-01

    Predicting absolute protein-ligand binding affinities remains a frontier challenge in ligand discovery and design. This becomes more difficult when ionic interactions are involved, because of the large opposing solvation and electrostatic attraction energies. In a blind test, we examined whether alchemical free energy calculations could predict binding affinities of 14 charged and 5 neutral compounds previously untested as ligands for a cavity binding site in Cytochrome C Peroxidase. In this simplified site, polar and cationic ligands compete with solvent to interact with a buried aspartate. Predictions were tested by calorimetry, spectroscopy, and crystallography. Of the 15 compounds predicted to bind, 13 were experimentally confirmed, while four compounds were false negative predictions. Predictions had an RMSE of 1.95 kcal/mol to the experimental affinities, and predicted poses had an average RMSD of 1.7 Å to the crystallographic poses. This test serves as a benchmark for these thermodynamically rigorous calculations at predicting binding affinities for charged compounds, and gives insights into the existing sources of error, which are primarily electrostatic interactions inside proteins. Our experiments also provide a useful set of ionic binding affinities in a simplified system for testing new affinity prediction methods. PMID:23896298

  7. Computational Analysis of the Ligand Binding Site of the Extracellular ATP Receptor, DORN1

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yangrong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Xu, Dong; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    DORN1 (also known as P2K1) is a plant receptor for extracellular ATP, which belongs to a large gene family of legume-type (L-type) lectin receptor kinases. Extracellular ATP binds to DORN1 with strong affinity through its lectin domain, and the binding triggers a variety of intracellular activities in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, information on the tertiary structure of the ligand binding site of DORN1is lacking, which hampers efforts to fully elucidate the mechanism of receptor action. Available data of the crystal structures from more than 50 L-type lectins enable us to perform an in silico study of molecular interaction between DORN1 and ATP. In this study, we employed a computational approach to develop a tertiary structure model of the DORN1 lectin domain. A blind docking analysis demonstrated that ATP binds to a cavity made by four loops (defined as loops A B, C and D) of the DORN1 lectin domain with high affinity. In silico target docking of ATP to the DORN1 binding site predicted interaction with 12 residues, located on the four loops, via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The ATP binding pocket is structurally similar in location to the carbohydrate binding pocket of the canonical L-type lectins. However, four of the residues predicted to interact with ATP are not conserved between DORN1 and the other carbohydrate-binding lectins, suggesting that diversifying selection acting on these key residues may have led to the ATP binding activity of DORN1. The in silico model was validated by in vitro ATP binding assays using the purified extracellular lectin domain of wild-type DORN1, as well as mutated DORN1 lacking key ATP binding residues. PMID:27583834

  8. Computational Analysis of the Ligand Binding Site of the Extracellular ATP Receptor, DORN1.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong The; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Cao, Yangrong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Xu, Dong; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    DORN1 (also known as P2K1) is a plant receptor for extracellular ATP, which belongs to a large gene family of legume-type (L-type) lectin receptor kinases. Extracellular ATP binds to DORN1 with strong affinity through its lectin domain, and the binding triggers a variety of intracellular activities in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, information on the tertiary structure of the ligand binding site of DORN1is lacking, which hampers efforts to fully elucidate the mechanism of receptor action. Available data of the crystal structures from more than 50 L-type lectins enable us to perform an in silico study of molecular interaction between DORN1 and ATP. In this study, we employed a computational approach to develop a tertiary structure model of the DORN1 lectin domain. A blind docking analysis demonstrated that ATP binds to a cavity made by four loops (defined as loops A B, C and D) of the DORN1 lectin domain with high affinity. In silico target docking of ATP to the DORN1 binding site predicted interaction with 12 residues, located on the four loops, via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The ATP binding pocket is structurally similar in location to the carbohydrate binding pocket of the canonical L-type lectins. However, four of the residues predicted to interact with ATP are not conserved between DORN1 and the other carbohydrate-binding lectins, suggesting that diversifying selection acting on these key residues may have led to the ATP binding activity of DORN1. The in silico model was validated by in vitro ATP binding assays using the purified extracellular lectin domain of wild-type DORN1, as well as mutated DORN1 lacking key ATP binding residues. PMID:27583834

  9. Computational Analysis of the Ligand Binding Site of the Extracellular ATP Receptor, DORN1.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong The; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Cao, Yangrong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Xu, Dong; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    DORN1 (also known as P2K1) is a plant receptor for extracellular ATP, which belongs to a large gene family of legume-type (L-type) lectin receptor kinases. Extracellular ATP binds to DORN1 with strong affinity through its lectin domain, and the binding triggers a variety of intracellular activities in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, information on the tertiary structure of the ligand binding site of DORN1is lacking, which hampers efforts to fully elucidate the mechanism of receptor action. Available data of the crystal structures from more than 50 L-type lectins enable us to perform an in silico study of molecular interaction between DORN1 and ATP. In this study, we employed a computational approach to develop a tertiary structure model of the DORN1 lectin domain. A blind docking analysis demonstrated that ATP binds to a cavity made by four loops (defined as loops A B, C and D) of the DORN1 lectin domain with high affinity. In silico target docking of ATP to the DORN1 binding site predicted interaction with 12 residues, located on the four loops, via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The ATP binding pocket is structurally similar in location to the carbohydrate binding pocket of the canonical L-type lectins. However, four of the residues predicted to interact with ATP are not conserved between DORN1 and the other carbohydrate-binding lectins, suggesting that diversifying selection acting on these key residues may have led to the ATP binding activity of DORN1. The in silico model was validated by in vitro ATP binding assays using the purified extracellular lectin domain of wild-type DORN1, as well as mutated DORN1 lacking key ATP binding residues.

  10. Identification of Ligand Binding Sites of Proteins Using the Gaussian Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Tuzmen, Ceren; Erman, Burak

    2011-01-01

    The nonlocal nature of the protein-ligand binding problem is investigated via the Gaussian Network Model with which the residues lying along interaction pathways in a protein and the residues at the binding site are predicted. The predictions of the binding site residues are verified by using several benchmark systems where the topology of the unbound protein and the bound protein-ligand complex are known. Predictions are made on the unbound protein. Agreement of results with the bound complexes indicates that the information for binding resides in the unbound protein. Cliques that consist of three or more residues that are far apart along the primary structure but are in contact in the folded structure are shown to be important determinants of the binding problem. Comparison with known structures shows that the predictive capability of the method is significant. PMID:21283550

  11. Predicting Ligand Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces by 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Jhih-Wei; Elumalai, Pavadai; Pitti, Thejkiran; Wu, Chih Yuan; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Peng, Hung-Pin; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Predicting ligand binding sites (LBSs) on protein structures, which are obtained either from experimental or computational methods, is a useful first step in functional annotation or structure-based drug design for the protein structures. In this work, the structure-based machine learning algorithm ISMBLab-LIG was developed to predict LBSs on protein surfaces with input attributes derived from the three-dimensional probability density maps of interacting atoms, which were reconstructed on the query protein surfaces and were relatively insensitive to local conformational variations of the tentative ligand binding sites. The prediction accuracy of the ISMBLab-LIG predictors is comparable to that of the best LBS predictors benchmarked on several well-established testing datasets. More importantly, the ISMBLab-LIG algorithm has substantial tolerance to the prediction uncertainties of computationally derived protein structure models. As such, the method is particularly useful for predicting LBSs not only on experimental protein structures without known LBS templates in the database but also on computationally predicted model protein structures with structural uncertainties in the tentative ligand binding sites. PMID:27513851

  12. Proteins and Their Interacting Partners: An Introduction to Protein–Ligand Binding Site Prediction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Daniel Barry; Brackenridge, Danielle Allison; McGuffin, Liam James

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the biological and biochemical roles of proteins, and subsequently determining their interacting partners, can be difficult and time consuming using in vitro and/or in vivo methods, and consequently the majority of newly sequenced proteins will have unknown structures and functions. However, in silico methods for predicting protein–ligand binding sites and protein biochemical functions offer an alternative practical solution. The characterisation of protein–ligand binding sites is essential for investigating new functional roles, which can impact the major biological research spheres of health, food, and energy security. In this review we discuss the role in silico methods play in 3D modelling of protein–ligand binding sites, along with their role in predicting biochemical functionality. In addition, we describe in detail some of the key alternative in silico prediction approaches that are available, as well as discussing the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) and the Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) projects, and their impact on developments in the field. Furthermore, we discuss the importance of protein function prediction methods for tackling 21st century problems. PMID:26694353

  13. Allosteric modulation of ligand binding to [3H](+)pentazocine-defined sigma recognition sites by phenytoin.

    PubMed

    DeHaven-Hudkins, D L; Ford-Rice, F Y; Allen, J T; Hudkins, R L

    1993-01-01

    The allosteric modulation of sigma recognition sites by phenytoin (diphenylhydantoin) has been demonstrated by the ability of phenytoin to stimulate binding of various [3H] sigma ligands, as well as to slow dissociation from sigma sites and to shift sigma sites from a low- to a high-affinity state. Phenytoin stimulated the binding of the sigma 1- selective ligand [3H](+)pentazocine in a dose-dependent manner. Stimulation of binding at a final concentration of 250 microM phenytoin was associated with a decrease in the KD. The affinities of the sigma reference compounds caramiphen, dextromethorphan, dextrophan, (+)3-PPP and (+)SKF-10,047 were three- to eight-fold higher, while the affinities of benzetimide, BMY-14802, carbetapentane, DTG and haloperidol were unchanged in the presence of 250 microM phenytoin. The relative sensitivity of sigma compounds to allosteric modulation by phenytoin is not a property of all sigma ligands, and may provide an in vitro basis for distinguishing actions of sigma compounds and predicting sigma effects in vivo. PMID:8515681

  14. Proteins and Their Interacting Partners: An Introduction to Protein-Ligand Binding Site Prediction Methods.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel Barry; Brackenridge, Danielle Allison; McGuffin, Liam James

    2015-12-15

    Elucidating the biological and biochemical roles of proteins, and subsequently determining their interacting partners, can be difficult and time consuming using in vitro and/or in vivo methods, and consequently the majority of newly sequenced proteins will have unknown structures and functions. However, in silico methods for predicting protein-ligand binding sites and protein biochemical functions offer an alternative practical solution. The characterisation of protein-ligand binding sites is essential for investigating new functional roles, which can impact the major biological research spheres of health, food, and energy security. In this review we discuss the role in silico methods play in 3D modelling of protein-ligand binding sites, along with their role in predicting biochemical functionality. In addition, we describe in detail some of the key alternative in silico prediction approaches that are available, as well as discussing the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) and the Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) projects, and their impact on developments in the field. Furthermore, we discuss the importance of protein function prediction methods for tackling 21st century problems.

  15. Two disparate ligand binding sites in the human P2Y1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dandan; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Zhang, Kaihua; Kiselev, Evgeny; Crane, Steven; Wang, Jiang; Paoletta, Silvia; Yi, Cuiying; Ma, Limin; Zhang, Wenru; Han, Gye Won; Liu, Hong; Cherezov, Vadim; Katritch, Vsevolod; Jiang, Hualiang; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili

    2015-01-01

    In response to adenosine 5′-diphosphate, the P2Y1 receptor (P2Y1R) facilitates platelet aggregation, and thus serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Here we report the crystal structures of the human P2Y1R in complex with a nucleotide antagonist MRS2500 at 2.7Å resolution, and with a non-nucleotide antagonist BPTU at 2.2Å resolution. The structures reveal two distinct ligand binding sites, providing atomic details of P2Y1R’s unique ligand binding modes. MRS2500 recognizes a binding site within the seven transmembrane bundle of P2Y1R, which, however, is different in shape and location from the nucleotide binding site in previously determined P2Y12R structure. BPTU binds to an allosteric pocket on the external receptor interface with the lipid bilayer, making it the first structurally characterized selective G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand located entirely outside of the helical bundle. These high-resolution insights into P2Y1R should enable discovery of new orthosteric and allosteric antithrombotic drugs with reduced adverse effects. PMID:25822790

  16. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ (PPARγ) and Ligand Choreography: Newcomers Take the Stage.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vallvé, Santiago; Guasch, Laura; Tomas-Hernández, Sarah; del Bas, Josep Maria; Ollendorff, Vincent; Arola, Lluís; Pujadas, Gerard; Mulero, Miquel

    2015-07-23

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), such as rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) full agonists that have been widely used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite the demonstrated beneficial effect of reducing glucose levels in the plasma, TZDs also induce several adverse effects. Consequently, the search for new compounds with potent antidiabetic effects but fewer undesired effects is an active field of research. Interestingly, the novel proposed mechanisms for the antidiabetic activity of PPARγ agonists, consisting of PPARγ Ser273 phosphorylation inhibition, ligand and receptor mutual dynamics, and the presence of an alternate binding site, have recently changed the view regarding the optimal characteristics for the screening of novel PPARγ ligands. Furthermore, transcriptional genomics could bring essential information about the genome-wide effects of PPARγ ligands. Consequently, facing the new mechanistic scenario proposed for these compounds is essential for resolving the paradoxes among their agonistic function, antidiabetic activities, and side effects and should allow the rational development of better and safer PPARγ-mediated antidiabetic drugs. PMID:25734377

  17. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ (PPARγ) and Ligand Choreography: Newcomers Take the Stage.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vallvé, Santiago; Guasch, Laura; Tomas-Hernández, Sarah; del Bas, Josep Maria; Ollendorff, Vincent; Arola, Lluís; Pujadas, Gerard; Mulero, Miquel

    2015-07-23

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), such as rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) full agonists that have been widely used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite the demonstrated beneficial effect of reducing glucose levels in the plasma, TZDs also induce several adverse effects. Consequently, the search for new compounds with potent antidiabetic effects but fewer undesired effects is an active field of research. Interestingly, the novel proposed mechanisms for the antidiabetic activity of PPARγ agonists, consisting of PPARγ Ser273 phosphorylation inhibition, ligand and receptor mutual dynamics, and the presence of an alternate binding site, have recently changed the view regarding the optimal characteristics for the screening of novel PPARγ ligands. Furthermore, transcriptional genomics could bring essential information about the genome-wide effects of PPARγ ligands. Consequently, facing the new mechanistic scenario proposed for these compounds is essential for resolving the paradoxes among their agonistic function, antidiabetic activities, and side effects and should allow the rational development of better and safer PPARγ-mediated antidiabetic drugs.

  18. A search for site-filling ligands in the Mcg Bence-Jones dimer: crystal binding studies of fluorescent compounds.

    PubMed

    Edmundson, A B; Ely, K R; Herron, J N

    1984-07-01

    In trigonal crystals grown in 1.9 M ammonium sulfate buffered at pH 6.2, the Mcg light-chain (Bence-Jones) dimer has a highly aromatic binding cavity accessible to a wide range of hydrophobic and aromatic ligands. A search was made for site-filling ligands by diffusing compounds into the crystals and determining their locations, orientations and relative occupancies by difference Fourier analysis at 2.7-A resolution. 1-Anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate, a small ligand in comparison with the rest of the series, initially occupied a site in the main binding cavity. With time, however, this ligand changed its position to the deep binding pocket beyond the floor of the main cavity. The original binding site remained vacant, despite the presence of a large excess of ligand in the soaking solution. Ligands increasing in size from fluorescein to bis(N-methyl)acridine (lucigenin) to dimers of carboxytetramethylrhodamine were found to bind with stringent stereospecificity in the main cavity, but the mode of binding was different in each case. The dimer of the 6-isomer of carboxytetramethylrhodamine, in which the two carboxyl groups are in para positions on the phenyl moiety, proved to be an effective site-filling ligand. The differences in the binding properties of dimers of 5- and 6-carboxytetramethylrhodamine led to an explanation for isomeric discrimination in the binding site. There were extensive conformational changes in the binding cavity to accommodate the ligands, particularly 6-carboxytetramethylrhodamine. The second and third hypervariable loops proved very flexible, and moved in ways to expand the binding site. The side chains of key tyrosine and phenylalanine residues in the site were also highly mobile. Their orientations adjusted to optimize complementarity with the ligands. These conformational adjustments are consistent with the tenets of a limited neo-instructive theory of ligand binding.

  19. Mono- and binuclear copper(II) complexes of new hydrazone ligands derived from 4,6-diacetylresorcinol: Synthesis, spectral studies and antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebl, Magdy; El-ghamry, Mosad A.; Khalil, Saied M. E.; Kishk, Mona A. A.

    Two new hydrazone ligands, H2L1 and H2L2, were synthesized by the condensation of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol with 3-hydrazino-5,6-diphenyl-1,2,4-triazine and isatin monohydrazone, respectively. The structures of the ligands were elucidated by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, electronic and mass spectra. Reactions of the ligands with several copper(II) salts, including AcO-, NO3-, SO42-, Cl- and Br- afforded mono- and binuclear metal complexes. Also, the ligands were allowed to react with Cu(II) ion in the presence of a secondary ligand (L‧) [N,O-donor; 8-hydroxyquinoline, N,N-donor; 1,10-phenanthroline or O,O-donor; benzoylacetone]. Characterization and structure elucidation of the prepared complexes were achieved by elemental and thermal analyses, IR, electronic, mass and ESR spectra as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The ESR spin Hamiltonian parameters of some complexes were calculated. The spectroscopic data showed that the H2L1 ligand acts as a neutral or monobasic tridentate ligand while the H2L2 ligand acts as a bis(monobasic tridentate) ligand. The coordination sites with the copper(II) ion are phenolic oxygen, azomethine nitrogen and triazinic nitrogen (H2L1 ligand) or isatinic oxygen (H2L2 ligand). The metal complexes exhibited octahedral and square planar geometrical arrangements depending on the nature of the anion. The ligands and some metal complexes showed antimicrobial activity.

  20. Structure-Activity Relationships of Constrained Phenylethylamine Ligands for the Serotonin 5-HT2 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Isberg, Vignir; Paine, James; Leth-Petersen, Sebastian; Kristensen, Jesper L.; Gloriam, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonergic ligands have proven effective drugs in the treatment of migraine, pain, obesity, and a wide range of psychiatric and neurological disorders. There is a clinical need for more highly 5-HT2 receptor subtype-selective ligands and the most attention has been given to the phenethylamine class. Conformationally constrained phenethylamine analogs have demonstrated that for optimal activity the free lone pair electrons of the 2-oxygen must be oriented syn and the 5-oxygen lone pairs anti relative to the ethylamine moiety. Also the ethyl linker has been constrained providing information about the bioactive conformation of the amine functionality. However, combined 1,2-constriction by cyclization has only been tested with one compound. Here, we present three new 1,2-cyclized phenylethylamines, 9–11, and describe their synthetic routes. Ligand docking in the 5-HT2B crystal structure showed that the 1,2-heterocyclized compounds can be accommodated in the binding site. Conformational analysis showed that 11 can only bind in a higher-energy conformation, which would explain its absent or low affinity. The amine and 2-oxygen interactions with D3.32 and S3.36, respectively, can form but shift the placement of the core scaffold. The constraints in 9–11 resulted in docking poses with the 4-bromine in closer vicinity to 5.46, which is polar only in the human 5-HT2A subtype, for which 9–11 have the lowest affinity. The new ligands, conformational analysis and docking expand the structure-activity relationships of constrained phenethylamines and contributes towards the development of 5-HT2 receptor subtype-selective ligands. PMID:24244317

  1. Detecting Local Ligand-Binding Site Similarity in Non-Homologous Proteins by Surface Patch Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Functional elucidation of proteins is one of the essential tasks in biology. Function of a protein, specifically, small ligand molecules that bind to a protein, can be predicted by finding similar local surface regions in binding sites of known proteins. Here, we developed an alignment free local surface comparison method for predicting a ligand molecule which binds to a query protein. The algorithm, named Patch-Surfer, represents a binding pocket as a combination of segmented surface patches, each of which is characterized by its geometrical shape, the electrostatic potential, the hydrophobicity, and the concaveness. Representing a pocket by a set of patches is effective to absorb difference of global pocket shape while capturing local similarity of pockets. The shape and the physicochemical properties of surface patches are represented using the 3D Zernike descriptor, which is a series expansion of mathematical 3D function. Two pockets are compared using a modified weighted bipartite matching algorithm, which matches similar patches from the two pockets. Patch-Surfer was benchmarked on three datasets, which consist in total of 390 proteins that bind to one of 21 ligands. Patch-Surfer showed superior performance to existing methods including a global pocket comparison method, Pocket-Surfer, which we have previously introduced. Particularly, as intended, the accuracy showed large improvement for flexible ligand molecules, which bind to pockets in different conformations. PMID:22275074

  2. Benzene Probes in Molecular Dynamics Simulations Reveal Novel Binding Sites for Ligand Design.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yaw Sing; Reeks, Judith; Brown, Christopher J; Thean, Dawn; Ferrer Gago, Fernando Jose; Yuen, Tsz Ying; Goh, Eunice Tze Leng; Lee, Xue Er Cheryl; Jennings, Claire E; Joseph, Thomas L; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Lane, David P; Noble, Martin E M; Verma, Chandra S

    2016-09-01

    Protein flexibility poses a major challenge in binding site identification. Several computational pocket detection methods that utilize small-molecule probes in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been developed to address this issue. Although they have proven hugely successful at reproducing experimental structural data, their ability to predict new binding sites that are yet to be identified and characterized has not been demonstrated. Here, we report the use of benzenes as probe molecules in ligand-mapping MD (LMMD) simulations to predict the existence of two novel binding sites on the surface of the oncoprotein MDM2. One of them was serendipitously confirmed by biophysical assays and X-ray crystallography to be important for the binding of a new family of hydrocarbon stapled peptides that were specifically designed to target the other putative site. These results highlight the predictive power of LMMD and suggest that predictions derived from LMMD simulations can serve as a reliable basis for the identification of novel ligand binding sites in structure-based drug design. PMID:27532490

  3. Ligand and structure-based approaches for the identification of SIRT1 activators.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Vivek K; Goel, Ashutosh; Ghate, Manjunath; Patel, Palak

    2015-02-25

    SIRT1 is a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase that involved in various important metabolic pathways. Combined ligand and structure-based approach was utilized for identification of SIRT1 activators. Pharmacophore models were developed using DISCOtech and refined with GASP module of Sybyl X software. Pharmacophore models were composed of two hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA) atoms, two hydrogen bond donor (HBD) sites and one hydrophobic (HY) feature. The pharmacophore models were validated through receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and Güner-Henry (GH) scoring methods. Model-2 was selected as best model among the model 1-3, based on ROC and GH score value, and found reliable in identification of SIRT1 activators. Model-2 (3D search query) was searched against Zinc database. Several compounds with different chemical scaffold were retrieved as hits. Currently, there is no experimental SIRT1 3D structure available, therefore, we modeled SIRT1 protein structure using homology modeling. Compounds with Qfit value of more than 86 were selected for docking study into the SIRT1 homology model to explore the binding mode of retrieved hits in the active allosteric site. Finally, in silico ADMET prediction study was performed with two best docked compounds. Combination of ligand and structure-based modeling methods identified active hits, which may be good lead compounds to develop novel SIRT1 activators. PMID:25595223

  4. Ligand-dependent localization and function of ORP-VAP complexes at membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Kentala, Henriikka; Peränen, Johan; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2015-05-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein/OSBP-related proteins (ORPs) constitute a conserved family of sterol/phospholipid-binding proteins with lipid transporter or sensor functions. We investigated the spatial occurrence and regulation of the interactions of human OSBP/ORPs or the S. cerevisiae orthologs, the Osh (OSBP homolog) proteins, with their endoplasmic reticulum (ER) anchors, the VAMP-associated proteins (VAPs), by employing bimolecular fluorescence complementation and pull-down set-ups. The ORP-VAP interactions localize frequently at distinct subcellular sites, shown in several cases to represent membrane contact sites (MCSs). Using established ORP ligand-binding domain mutants and pull-down assays with recombinant proteins, we show that ORP liganding regulates the ORP-VAP association, alters the subcellular targeting of ORP-VAP complexes, or modifies organelle morphology. There is distinct protein specificity in the effects of the mutants on subcellular targeting of ORP-VAP complexes. We provide evidence that complexes of human ORP2 and VAPs at ER-lipid droplet interfaces regulate the hydrolysis of triglycerides and lipid droplet turnover. The data suggest evolutionarily conserved, complex ligand-dependent functions of ORP-VAP complexes at MCSs, with implications for cellular lipid homeostasis and signaling.

  5. Ligand-dependent localization and function of ORP-VAP complexes at membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Kentala, Henriikka; Peränen, Johan; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2015-05-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein/OSBP-related proteins (ORPs) constitute a conserved family of sterol/phospholipid-binding proteins with lipid transporter or sensor functions. We investigated the spatial occurrence and regulation of the interactions of human OSBP/ORPs or the S. cerevisiae orthologs, the Osh (OSBP homolog) proteins, with their endoplasmic reticulum (ER) anchors, the VAMP-associated proteins (VAPs), by employing bimolecular fluorescence complementation and pull-down set-ups. The ORP-VAP interactions localize frequently at distinct subcellular sites, shown in several cases to represent membrane contact sites (MCSs). Using established ORP ligand-binding domain mutants and pull-down assays with recombinant proteins, we show that ORP liganding regulates the ORP-VAP association, alters the subcellular targeting of ORP-VAP complexes, or modifies organelle morphology. There is distinct protein specificity in the effects of the mutants on subcellular targeting of ORP-VAP complexes. We provide evidence that complexes of human ORP2 and VAPs at ER-lipid droplet interfaces regulate the hydrolysis of triglycerides and lipid droplet turnover. The data suggest evolutionarily conserved, complex ligand-dependent functions of ORP-VAP complexes at MCSs, with implications for cellular lipid homeostasis and signaling. PMID:25420878

  6. Sigma ligand S14905 and locomotor activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hascoet, M; Bourin, M; Payeur, R; Lombet, A; Peglion, J L

    1995-12-01

    The binding and locomotor profile of a new sigma ligand, S14905, (isobutyl-N-(1-indan-2yl-piperid-4-yl)N-methyl carbamate, furamate) was studied. The binding data revealed that S14905 has a high affinity for sigma receptors and very low affinity for both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. We have demonstrated that this sigma ligand prevents the locomotor stimulation induced by morphine (32 and 64 mg/kg), cocaine (16 mg/kg), amphetamine (4 mg/kg) and adrafinil (32 mg/kg) at doses lower than those required to depress spontaneous locomotor activity. The antagonism observed in the present study seems to be more specific of morphine induced hyperlocomotion. The high affinity of this compound for sigma receptors makes it a good choice to study the role of this receptor in the CNS. In addition, S14905 does not directly block dopamine receptors but may modulate them in some manner, and would thus warrant further study as a potential atypical antipsychotic agent, and an antagonist for the hyperactivity induced by opiate drug. PMID:8998401

  7. Sigma ligand S14905 and locomotor activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hascoet, M; Bourin, M; Payeur, R; Lombet, A; Peglion, J L

    1995-12-01

    The binding and locomotor profile of a new sigma ligand, S14905, (isobutyl-N-(1-indan-2yl-piperid-4-yl)N-methyl carbamate, furamate) was studied. The binding data revealed that S14905 has a high affinity for sigma receptors and very low affinity for both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. We have demonstrated that this sigma ligand prevents the locomotor stimulation induced by morphine (32 and 64 mg/kg), cocaine (16 mg/kg), amphetamine (4 mg/kg) and adrafinil (32 mg/kg) at doses lower than those required to depress spontaneous locomotor activity. The antagonism observed in the present study seems to be more specific of morphine induced hyperlocomotion. The high affinity of this compound for sigma receptors makes it a good choice to study the role of this receptor in the CNS. In addition, S14905 does not directly block dopamine receptors but may modulate them in some manner, and would thus warrant further study as a potential atypical antipsychotic agent, and an antagonist for the hyperactivity induced by opiate drug.

  8. High-affinity benzodiazepine receptor ligands among benzodiazepines and betacarbolines with different intrinsic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yliniemelae, A.; Gynther, J. ); Konschin, H.; Tylli, H. ); Rouvinen, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Structural and electrostatic features of diazepam, flumazenil, and methyl betacarboline-3-carboxylate (BCCM) have been investigated using the molecular superimposition method. These high-affinity benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor ligands are structurally unrelated and they have different intrinsic activity. These ligands are superimposed in such a way that common structural and electrostatic features essential for the high receptor binding affinity overlap. In addition to this binding pharmacophore, there are roughly three separate binding zones in the BZ receptor, one for each class of ligands. The intrinsic activity of BZ receptor ligands depends on the molecular structures and the way the ligand approaches the receptor.

  9. Magnetic circular dichroism studies of the active site heme coordination sphere of exogenous ligand-free ferric cytochrome c peroxidase from yeast: effects of sample history and pH.

    PubMed

    Pond, A E; Sono, M; Elenkova, E A; McRee, D E; Goodin, D B; English, A M; Dawson, J H

    1999-09-30

    Electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopic data at 4 degrees C are reported for exogenous ligand-free ferric forms of cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) in comparison with two other histidine-ligated heme proteins, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and myoglobin (Mb). In particular, we have examined the ferric states of yeast wild-type CCP (YCCP), CCP (MKT) which is the form of the enzyme that is expressed in and purified from E. coli, and contains Met-Lys-Thr (MKT) at the N-terminus, CCP (MKT) in the presence of 60% glycerol, lyophilized YCCP, and alkaline CCP (MKT). The present study demonstrates that, while having similar electronic absorption spectra, the MCD spectra of ligand-free ferric YCCP and CCP (MKT) are somewhat varied from one another. Detailed spectral analyses reveal that the ferric form of YCCP, characterized by a long wavelength charge transfer (CT) band at 645 nm, exists in a predominantly penta-coordinate state with spectral features similar to those of native ferric HRP rather than ferric Mb (His/water hexa-coordinate). The electronic absorption spectrum of ferric CCP (MKT) is similar to those of the penta-coordinate states of ferric YCCP and ferric HRP including a CT band at 645 nm. However, its MCD spectrum shows a small trough at 583 nm that is absent in the analogous spectra of YCCP and HRP. Instead, this trough is similar to that seen for ferric myoglobin at about 585 nm, and is attributed (following spectral simulations) to a minor contribution (< or = 5%) in the spectrum of CCP (MKT) from a hexa-coordinate low-spin species in the form of a hydroxide-ligated heme. The MCD data indicate that the lyophilized sample of ferric YCCP (lambda CT = 637 nm) contains considerably increased amounts of hexa-coordinate low-spin species including both His/hydroxide and bis-His species. The crystal structure of a spectroscopically similar sample of CCP (MKT) (lambda CT = 637 nm) solved at 2.0 A resolution is consistent with His

  10. Molecular determinants of ligand binding modes in the histamine H(4) receptor: linking ligand-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models to in silico guided receptor mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Istyastono, Enade P; Nijmeijer, Saskia; Lim, Herman D; van de Stolpe, Andrea; Roumen, Luc; Kooistra, Albert J; Vischer, Henry F; de Esch, Iwan J P; Leurs, Rob; de Graaf, Chris

    2011-12-01

    The histamine H(4) receptor (H(4)R) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that plays an important role in inflammation. Similar to the homologous histamine H(3) receptor (H(3)R), two acidic residues in the H(4)R binding pocket, D(3.32) and E(5.46), act as essential hydrogen bond acceptors of positively ionizable hydrogen bond donors in H(4)R ligands. Given the symmetric distribution of these complementary pharmacophore features in H(4)R and its ligands, different alternative ligand binding mode hypotheses have been proposed. The current study focuses on the elucidation of the molecular determinants of H(4)R-ligand binding modes by combining (3D) quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), protein homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, and site-directed mutagenesis studies. We have designed and synthesized a series of clobenpropit (N-(4-chlorobenzyl)-S-[3-(4(5)-imidazolyl)propyl]isothiourea) derivatives to investigate H(4)R-ligand interactions and ligand binding orientations. Interestingly, our studies indicate that clobenpropit (2) itself can bind to H(4)R in two distinct binding modes, while the addition of a cyclohexyl group to the clobenpropit isothiourea moiety allows VUF5228 (5) to adopt only one specific binding mode in the H(4)R binding pocket. Our ligand-steered, experimentally supported protein modeling method gives new insights into ligand recognition by H(4)R and can be used as a general approach to elucidate the structure of protein-ligand complexes.

  11. Design of a Fluorescent Ligand Targeting the S-adenosylmethioine Binding Site of the Histone Methyltransferase MLL1

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Yepeng; Blazer, Levi L.; Hu, Hao; Hajian, Taraneh; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Hong; Houliston, Scott; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Vedadi, Masoud; Zheng, Yujun George

    2015-01-01

    The histone methyltransferase MLL1 has been linked to translocation-associated gene fusion in childhood leukemias and is an attractive drug target. High-throughput biochemical analysis of MLL1 methyltransferase activity requires the production of at least a trimeric complex of MLL1, RbBP5 and WDR5 to elicit robust activity. Production of trimeric and higher order MLL1 complexes in the quantities and reproducibility required for high-throughput screening presents a significant impediment to MLL1 drug discovery efforts. We present here a small molecule fluorescent ligand (FL-NAH, 6) that is able to bind to the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) binding site of MLL1 in a manner independent of the associated complex members. We have used FL-NAH to develop a fluorescence polarization-based SAM displacement assay in a 384-well format targeting the MLL1 SET domain in the absence of associated complex members. FL-NAH competes with SAM and is displaced from the MLL1 SET domain by other SAM-binding site ligands with Kdisp values similar to the higher-order complexes, but is unaffected by the H3 peptide substrate. This assay enables screening for SAM-competitive MLL1 inhibitors without requiring the use of trimeric or higher order MLL1 complexes, significantly reducing screening time and cost. PMID:26541578

  12. Structural models of ligand-gated ion channels: sites of action for anesthetics and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Richard W; Li, Guo-Dong; Wallner, Martin; Trudell, James R; Bertaccini, Edward J; Lindahl, Erik; Miller, Keith W; Alkana, Ronald L; Davies, Daryl L

    2014-03-01

    The molecular mechanism(s) of action of anesthetic, and especially, intoxicating doses of alcohol (ethanol [EtOH]) have been of interest even before the advent of the Research Society on Alcoholism. Recent physiological, genetic, and biochemical studies have pin-pointed molecular targets for anesthetics and EtOH in the brain as ligand-gated ion channel (LGIC) membrane proteins, especially the pentameric (5 subunit) Cys-loop superfamily of neurotransmitter receptors including nicotinic acetylcholine (nAChRs), GABAA (GABAA Rs), and glycine receptors (GlyRs). The ability to demonstrate molecular and structural elements of these proteins critical for the behavioral effects of these drugs on animals and humans provides convincing evidence for their role in the drugs' actions. Amino acid residues necessary for pharmacologically relevant allosteric modulation of LGIC function by anesthetics and EtOH have been identified in these channel proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed potential allosteric modulatory sites in both the trans-membrane domain (TMD) and extracellular domain (ECD). Potential sites of action and binding have been deduced from homology modeling of other LGICs with structures known from crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy studies. Direct information about ligand binding in the TMD has been obtained by photoaffinity labeling, especially in GABAA Rs. Recent structural information from crystallized procaryotic (ELIC and GLIC) and eukaryotic (GluCl) LGICs allows refinement of the structural models including evaluation of possible sites of EtOH action.

  13. The Role of Protein-Ligand Contacts in Allosteric Regulation of the Escherichia coli Catabolite Activator Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Philip D.; Rodgers, Thomas L.; Glover, Laura C.; Korhonen, Heidi J.; Richards, Shane A.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Pohl, Ehmke; Wilson, Mark R.; Hodgson, David R. W.; McLeish, Tom C. B.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distant site. Both experimental and theoretical evidence demonstrate that allostery can be communicated through altered slow relaxation protein dynamics without conformational change. The catabolite activator protein (CAP) of Escherichia coli is an exemplar for the analysis of such entropically driven allostery. Negative allostery in CAP occurs between identical cAMP binding sites. Changes to the cAMP-binding pocket can therefore impact the allosteric properties of CAP. Here we demonstrate, through a combination of coarse-grained modeling, isothermal calorimetry, and structural analysis, that decreasing the affinity of CAP for cAMP enhances negative cooperativity through an entropic penalty for ligand binding. The use of variant cAMP ligands indicates the data are not explained by structural heterogeneity between protein mutants. We observe computationally that altered interaction strength between CAP and cAMP variously modifies the change in allosteric cooperativity due to second site CAP mutations. As the degree of correlated motion between the cAMP-contacting site and a second site on CAP increases, there is a tendency for computed double mutations at these sites to drive CAP toward noncooperativity. Naturally occurring pairs of covarying residues in CAP do not display this tendency, suggesting a selection pressure to fine tune allostery on changes to the CAP ligand-binding pocket without a drive to a noncooperative state. In general, we hypothesize an evolutionary selection pressure to retain slow relaxation dynamics-induced allostery in proteins in which evolution of the ligand-binding site is occurring. PMID:26187469

  14. Spectroscopic Definition of the Ferroxidase Site in M Ferritin: Comparison of Binuclear Substrate vs. Cofactor Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jennifer K.; Liu, Xiaofeng S.; Tosha, Takehiko; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2008-01-01

    Maxi ferritins, 24 subunit protein nanocages, are essential in humans, plants, bacteria, and other animals for the concentration and storage of iron as hydrated ferric oxide, while minimizing free radical generation or use by pathogens. Formation of the precursors to these ferric oxides is catalyzed at a non-heme biferrous substrate site, which has some parallels with the cofactor sites in other biferrous enzymes. A combination of circular dichroism (CD), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH MCD) has been used to probe Fe(II) binding to the substrate active site in frog M ferritin. These data determined that the active site within each subunit consists of two inequivalent five-coordinate (5C) ferrous centers that are weakly anti-ferromagnetically coupled, consistent with a μ-1,3 carboxylate bridge. The active site ligand set is unusual and likely includes a terminal water bound to each Fe(II) center. The Fe(II) ions bind to the active sites in a concerted manner, and cooperativity among the sites in each subunit is observed, potentially providing a mechanism for the control of ferritin iron loading. Differences in geometric and electronic structure – including a weak ligand field, availability of two water ligands at the biferrous substrate site, and the single carboxylate bridge in ferritin – coincide with the divergent reaction pathways observed between this substrate site and the previously studied cofactor active sites. PMID:18576633

  15. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  16. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gorfe, Alemayehu A.

    2015-01-01

    Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation. PMID:26506102

  17. Predicted structure of the extracellular region of ligand-gated ion-channel receptors shows SH2-like and SH3-like domains forming the ligand-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Gready, J. E.; Ranganathan, S.; Schofield, P. R.; Matsuo, Y.; Nishikawa, K.

    1997-01-01

    Fast synaptic neurotransmission is mediated by ligand-gated ion-channel (LGIC) receptors, which include receptors for acetylcholine, serotonin, GABA, glycine, and glutamate. LGICs are pentamers with extracellular ligand-binding domains and form integral membrane ion channels that are selective for cations (acetylcholine and serotonin 5HT3 receptors) or anions (GABAA and glycine receptors and the invertebrate glutamate-binding chloride channel). They form a protein superfamily with no sequence similarity to any protein of known structure. Using a 1D-3D structure mapping approach, we have modeled the extracellular ligand-binding domain based on a significant match with the SH2 and SH3 domains of the biotin repressor structure. Refinement of the model based on knowledge of the large family of SH2 and SH3 structures, sequence alignments, and use of structure templates for loop building, allows the prediction of both monomer and pentamer models. These are consistent with medium-resolution electron microscopy structures and with experimental structure/function data from ligand-binding, antibody-binding, mutagenesis, protein-labeling and subunit-linking studies, and glycosylation sites. Also, the predicted polarity of the channel pore calculated from electrostatic potential maps of pentamer models of superfamily members is consistent with known ion selectivities. Using the glycine receptor alpha 1 subunit, which forms homopentamers, the monomeric and pentameric models define the agonist and antagonist (strychnine) binding sites to a deep crevice formed by an extended loop, which includes the invariant disulfide bridge, between the SH2 and SH3 domains. A detailed binding site for strychnine is reported that is in strong agreement with known structure/function data. A site for interaction of the extracellular ligand-binding domain with the activation of the M2 transmembrane helix is also suggested. PMID:9144769

  18. Vasopeptidase-activated latent ligands of the histamine receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Gera, Lajos; Roy, Caroline; Charest-Morin, Xavier; Marceau, François

    2013-11-01

    Whether peptidases present in vascular cells can activate prodrugs active on vascular cells has been tested with 2 potential latent ligands of the histamine H1 receptor (H1R). First, a peptide consisting of the antihistamine cetirizine (CTZ) condensed at the N-terminus of ε-aminocaproyl-bradykinin (εACA-BK) was evaluated for an antihistamine activity that could be revealed by degradation of the peptide part of the molecule. CTZ-εACA-BK had a submicromolar affinity for the BK B2 receptor (B2R; IC50 of 590 nM, [(3)H]BK binding competition), but a non-negligible affinity for the human H1 receptor (H1R; IC50 of 11 μM for [(3)H]pyrilamine binding). In the human isolated umbilical vein, a system where both endogenous B2R and H1R mediate strong contractions, CTZ-εACA-BK exerted mild antagonist effects on histamine-induced contraction that were not modified by omapatrilat or by a B2R antagonist that prevents endocytosis of the BK conjugate. Cells expressing recombinant ACE or B2R incubated with CTZ-εACA-BK did not release a competitor of [(3)H]pyrilamine binding to H1Rs. Thus, there is no evidence that CTZ-εACA-BK can release free cetirizine in biological environments. The second prodrug was a blocked agonist, L-alanyl-histamine, potentially activated by aminopeptidase N (APN). This compound did not compete for [(3)H]pyrilamine binding to H1Rs. The human umbilical vein contractility assay responded to L-alanyl-histamine (EC50 54.7 μM), but the APN inhibitor amastatin massively (17-fold) reduced its apparent potency. Amastatin did not influence the potency of histamine as a contractile agent. One of the 2 tested latent H1R ligands, L-alanyl-histamine, supported the feasibility of pro-drug activation by vascular ectopeptidases.

  19. On the Question of Site-Selective Ligand Exchange in Carboxylate-Substituted Metal Oxo Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Kreutzer, Johannes; Czakler, Matthias; Puchberger, Michael; Pittenauer, Ernst; Schubert, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Reaction of [Ti4Zr4O6(OBu)4(OMc)16] (OMc = methacrylate) with acetylacetone (acacH) resulted in dissection of the cluster and formation of [Ti(OBu)2(acac)2] and the smaller cluster [Ti2Zr4O4(OMc)16]. In contrast, the same reaction with [Zr6O4(OH)4(OOCR)12]2·6RCOOH (R = Et, CH2CH=CH2) led to site-selective substitution of two carboxylate ligands and formation of isostructural [Zr6O4(OH)4(OOCR)12–x(acac)x]2·6RCOOH (x ≤ 1). PMID:26300687

  20. Mutations of fumarase that distinguish between the active site and a nearby dicarboxylic acid binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, T.; Lees, M.; Banaszak, L.

    1997-01-01

    Two mutant forms of fumarase C from E. coli have been made using PCR and recombinant DNA. The recombinant form of the protein included a histidine arm on the C-terminal facilitating purification. Based on earlier studies, two different carboxylic acid binding sites, labeled A- and B-, were observed in crystal structures of the wild type and inhibited forms of the enzyme. A histidine at each of the sites was mutated to an asparagine. H188N at the A-site resulted in a large decrease in specific activity, while the H129N mutation at the B-site had essentially no effect. From the results, we conclude that the A-site is indeed the active site, and a dual role for H188 as a potential catalytic base is proposed. Crystal structures of the two mutant proteins produced some unexpected results. Both mutations reduced the affinity for the carboxylic acids at their respective sites. The H129N mutant should be particularly useful in future kinetic studies because it sterically blocks the B-site with the carboxyamide of asparagine assuming the position of the ligand's carboxylate. In the H188N mutation at the active site, the new asparagine side chain still interacts with an active site water that appears to have moved slightly as a result of the mutation. PMID:9098893

  1. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of ferrocene-based Schiff base ligands and their metal (II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Lian, Gui-Dan; Yin, Da-Wei; Su, Bao-Jun

    Metal (II) complexes derived from S-benzyl-N-(1-ferrocenyl-3-(4-methylbenzene)acrylketone) dithiocarbazate; HL1, S-benzyl-N-(1-ferrocenyl-3-(4-chlorobenzene)acrylketone)dithiocarbazate; HL2, all the compounds were characterized using various spectroscopic techniques. The molar conductance data revealed that the chelates were non-electrolytes. IR spectra showed that the Schiff bases were coordinated to the metal ions in a bidentate manner with N, S donor sites. The ligands and their metal complexes have been screened for in vitro antibacterial, antifungal properties. The result of these studies have revealed that zinc (II) complexes 6 and 13 of both the ligands and copper (II) complexes 9 of the HL2 were observed to be the most active against all bacterial strains, antifungal activity was overall enhanced after complexation of the ligands.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of ferrocene-based Schiff base ligands and their metal (II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Lian, Gui-Dan; Yin, Da-Wei; Su, Bao-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Metal (II) complexes derived from S-benzyl-N-(1-ferrocenyl-3-(4-methylbenzene)acrylketone) dithiocarbazate; HL(1), S-benzyl-N-(1-ferrocenyl-3-(4-chlorobenzene)acrylketone)dithiocarbazate; HL(2), all the compounds were characterized using various spectroscopic techniques. The molar conductance data revealed that the chelates were non-electrolytes. IR spectra showed that the Schiff bases were coordinated to the metal ions in a bidentate manner with N, S donor sites. The ligands and their metal complexes have been screened for in vitro antibacterial, antifungal properties. The result of these studies have revealed that zinc (II) complexes 6 and 13 of both the ligands and copper (II) complexes 9 of the HL(2) were observed to be the most active against all bacterial strains, antifungal activity was overall enhanced after complexation of the ligands.

  3. Rational design of a protein that binds integrin αvβ3 outside the ligand binding site

    PubMed Central

    Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Yin, Lu; Yang, Jenny J.; Lee, Hsiauwei; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Yan, Chunli; Yang, Hua; Grossniklaus, Hans E.; Wang, Siming; Ma, Cheng; Sun, Li; Liu, Zhi-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Integrin αvβ3 expression is altered in various diseases and has been proposed as a drug target. Here we use a rational design approach to develop a therapeutic protein, which we call ProAgio, that binds to integrin αvβ3 outside the classical ligand-binding site. We show ProAgio induces apoptosis of integrin αvβ3-expressing cells by recruiting and activating caspase 8 to the cytoplasmic domain of integrin αvβ3. ProAgio also has anti-angiogenic activity and strongly inhibits growth of tumour xenografts, but does not affect the established vasculature. Toxicity analyses demonstrate that ProAgio is not toxic to mice. Our study reports a new integrin-targeting agent with a unique mechanism of action, and provides a template for the development of integrin-targeting therapeutics. PMID:27241473

  4. Rational design of a protein that binds integrin αvβ3 outside the ligand binding site.

    PubMed

    Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Yin, Lu; Yang, Jenny J; Lee, Hsiauwei; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Yan, Chunli; Yang, Hua; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Wang, Siming; Ma, Cheng; Sun, Li; Liu, Zhi-Ren

    2016-05-31

    Integrin αvβ3 expression is altered in various diseases and has been proposed as a drug target. Here we use a rational design approach to develop a therapeutic protein, which we call ProAgio, that binds to integrin αvβ3 outside the classical ligand-binding site. We show ProAgio induces apoptosis of integrin αvβ3-expressing cells by recruiting and activating caspase 8 to the cytoplasmic domain of integrin αvβ3. ProAgio also has anti-angiogenic activity and strongly inhibits growth of tumour xenografts, but does not affect the established vasculature. Toxicity analyses demonstrate that ProAgio is not toxic to mice. Our study reports a new integrin-targeting agent with a unique mechanism of action, and provides a template for the development of integrin-targeting therapeutics.

  5. Creation of recognition sites for organophosphate esters based on charge transfer and ligand exchange imprinting methods.

    PubMed

    Say, Ridvan

    2006-10-01

    This manuscript describes a method for the selective binding behavior of paraoxan and parathion compounds on surface imprinted polymers which were prepared using both charge transfer (CT) (methacryloyl-antipyrine, MAAP) and ligand-exchange (LE) (methacryloyl-antipyrine-gadalonium, MAAP-Gd) monomers. These polymers were prepared in the presence of azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as an initiator and crosslinking EDMA and were imprinted with organophosphate esters. Influence of CT and LE imprinting on the creation of recognition sites toward paraoxan and parathion was determined applying adsorption isotherms. The effect of initial concentration of paraoxan and parathion, adsorption time and imprinting efficiency on adsorption selectivity for MIP-CT and MIP-LE was investigated. Association constant (K(ass)), number of accessible sites (Q(max)), relative selectivity coefficient (k') and binding ability were also evaluated.

  6. Structural basis of activation-dependent binding of ligand-mimetic antibody AL-57 to integrin LFA-1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongmin; Liu, Jin-huan; Yang, Wei; Springer, Timothy; Shimaoka, Motomu; Wang, Jia-huai

    2010-09-21

    The activity of integrin LFA-1 ({alpha}{sub L}{beta}{sub 2}) to its ligand ICAM-1 is regulated through the conformational changes of its ligand-binding domain, the I domain of {alpha}{sub L} chain, from an inactive, low-affinity closed form (LA), to an intermediate-affinity form (IA), and then finally, to a high-affinity open form (HA). A ligand-mimetic human monoclonal antibody AL-57 (activated LFA-1 clone 57) was identified by phage display to specifically recognize the affinity-upregulated I domain. Here, we describe the crystal structures of the Fab fragment of AL-57 in complex with IA, as well as in its unligated form. We discuss the structural features conferring AL-57's strong selectivity for the high affinity, open conformation of the I domain. The AL-57-binding site overlaps the ICAM-1 binding site on the I domain. Furthermore, an antibody Asp mimics an ICAM Glu by forming a coordination to the metal-ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS). The structure also reveals better shape complementarity and a more hydrophobic interacting interface in AL-57 binding than in ICAM-1 binding. The results explain AL-57's antagonistic mimicry of LFA-1's natural ligands, the ICAM molecules.

  7. Disulfide bridge regulates ligand-binding site selectivity in liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Clelia; Tomaselli, Simona; Assfalg, Michael; Pedò, Massimo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Zetta, Lucia; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Bile acid-binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones that play central roles in driving bile flow, as well as in the adaptation to various pathological conditions, contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Understanding the mode of binding of bile acids with their cytoplasmic transporters is a key issue in providing a model for the mechanism of their transfer from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, for delivery to nuclear receptors. A number of factors have been shown to modulate bile salt selectivity, stoichiometry, and affinity of binding to BABPs, e.g. chemistry of the ligand, protein plasticity and, possibly, the formation of disulfide bridges. Here, the effects of the presence of a naturally occurring disulfide bridge on liver BABP ligand-binding properties and backbone dynamics have been investigated by NMR. Interestingly, the disulfide bridge does not modify the protein-binding stoichiometry, but has a key role in modulating recognition at both sites, inducing site selectivity for glycocholic and glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Protein conformational changes following the introduction of a disulfide bridge are small and located around the inner binding site, whereas significant changes in backbone motions are observed for several residues distributed over the entire protein, both in the apo form and in the holo form. Site selectivity appears, therefore, to be dependent on protein mobility rather than being governed by steric factors. The detected properties further establish a parallelism with the behaviour of human ileal BABP, substantiating the proposal that BABPs have parallel functions in hepatocytes and enterocytes. PMID:19754879

  8. Disulfide bridge regulates ligand-binding site selectivity in liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Clelia; Tomaselli, Simona; Assfalg, Michael; Pedò, Massimo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Zetta, Lucia; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Bile acid-binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones that play central roles in driving bile flow, as well as in the adaptation to various pathological conditions, contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Understanding the mode of binding of bile acids with their cytoplasmic transporters is a key issue in providing a model for the mechanism of their transfer from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, for delivery to nuclear receptors. A number of factors have been shown to modulate bile salt selectivity, stoichiometry, and affinity of binding to BABPs, e.g. chemistry of the ligand, protein plasticity and, possibly, the formation of disulfide bridges. Here, the effects of the presence of a naturally occurring disulfide bridge on liver BABP ligand-binding properties and backbone dynamics have been investigated by NMR. Interestingly, the disulfide bridge does not modify the protein-binding stoichiometry, but has a key role in modulating recognition at both sites, inducing site selectivity for glycocholic and glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Protein conformational changes following the introduction of a disulfide bridge are small and located around the inner binding site, whereas significant changes in backbone motions are observed for several residues distributed over the entire protein, both in the apo form and in the holo form. Site selectivity appears, therefore, to be dependent on protein mobility rather than being governed by steric factors. The detected properties further establish a parallelism with the behaviour of human ileal BABP, substantiating the proposal that BABPs have parallel functions in hepatocytes and enterocytes.

  9. ProBiS-CHARMMing: Web Interface for Prediction and Optimization of Ligands in Protein Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Konc, Janez; Miller, Benjamin T; Štular, Tanja; Lešnik, Samo; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R; Janežič, Dušanka

    2015-11-23

    Proteins often exist only as apo structures (unligated) in the Protein Data Bank, with their corresponding holo structures (with ligands) unavailable. However, apoproteins may not represent the amino-acid residue arrangement upon ligand binding well, which is especially problematic for molecular docking. We developed the ProBiS-CHARMMing web interface by connecting the ProBiS ( http://probis.cmm.ki.si ) and CHARMMing ( http://www.charmming.org ) web servers into one functional unit that enables prediction of protein-ligand complexes and allows for their geometry optimization and interaction energy calculation. The ProBiS web server predicts ligands (small compounds, proteins, nucleic acids, and single-atom ligands) that may bind to a query protein. This is achieved by comparing its surface structure against a nonredundant database of protein structures and finding those that have binding sites similar to that of the query protein. Existing ligands found in the similar binding sites are then transposed to the query according to predictions from ProBiS. The CHARMMing web server enables, among other things, minimization and potential energy calculation for a wide variety of biomolecular systems, and it is used here to optimize the geometry of the predicted protein-ligand complex structures using the CHARMM force field and to calculate their interaction energies with the corresponding query proteins. We show how ProBiS-CHARMMing can be used to predict ligands and their poses for a particular binding site, and minimize the predicted protein-ligand complexes to obtain representations of holoproteins. The ProBiS-CHARMMing web interface is freely available for academic users at http://probis.nih.gov.

  10. Ligand-incorporation site in 5-methylcytosine-detection probe modulating the site of osmium complexation with the target DNA.

    PubMed

    Sugizaki, Kaori; Nakamura, Akiko; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2012-09-01

    ICON Probes, short DNA strands containing an adenine linked to a bipyridine ligand, formed an interstrand cross-link with 5-methylcytosine located opposite the modified adenine in the presence of an osmium oxidant. The location of a bipyridine-tethered adenine in the probes varied the selectivity of the reactive base. An ICON probe where the modified adenine was located at the probe center showed a 5-methylcytosine-selective osmium complexation, whereas an ICON probe with the modified adenine at the strand end exhibited high reactivity towards thymine as well as 5-methylcytosine. The modulation of reactive bases by the incorporation of a bipyridine-tethered adenine site made facilitates design of ICON probes for the fluorometric detection of 5-methylcytosine.

  11. A tail of two sites: a bipartite mechanism for recognition of notch ligands by mind bomb E3 ligases.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Brian J; Schnute, Björn; Ohlenhard, Nadja; Zimmerman, Brandon; Miles, Laura; Beglova, Natalia; Klein, Thomas; Blacklow, Stephen C

    2015-03-01

    Mind bomb (Mib) proteins are large, multi-domain E3 ligases that promote ubiquitination of the cytoplasmic tails of Notch ligands. This ubiquitination step marks the ligand proteins for epsin-dependent endocytosis, which is critical for in vivo Notch receptor activation. We present here crystal structures of the substrate recognition domains of Mib1, both in isolation and in complex with peptides derived from Notch ligands. The structures, in combination with biochemical, cellular, and in vivo assays, show that Mib1 contains two independent substrate recognition domains that engage two distinct epitopes from the cytoplasmic tail of the ligand Jagged1, one in the intracellular membrane proximal region and the other near the C terminus. Together, these studies provide insights into the mechanism of ubiquitin transfer by Mind bomb E3 ligases, illuminate a key event in ligand-induced activation of Notch receptors, and identify a potential target for therapeutic modulation of Notch signal transduction in disease.

  12. Pharmacophore modeling using Site-Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) with multiple probe molecules

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wenbo; Lakkaraju, Sirish Kaushik; Raman, E. Prabhu; Fang, Lei; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    Receptor-based pharmacophore modeling is an efficient computer-aided drug design technique that uses the structure of the target protein to identify novel leads. However, most methods consider protein flexibility and desolvation effects in a very approximate way, which may limit their use in practice. The Site-Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) assisted pharmacophore modeling protocol (SILCS-Pharm) was introduced recently to address these issues as SILCS naturally takes both protein flexibility and desolvation effects into account by using full MD simulations to determine 3D maps of the functional group-affinity patterns on a target receptor. In the present work, the SILCS-Pharm protocol is extended to use a wider range of probe molecules including benzene, propane, methanol, formamide, acetaldehyde, methylammonium, acetate and water. This approach removes the previous ambiguity brought by using water as both the hydrogen-bond donor and acceptor probe molecule. The new SILCS-Pharm protocol is shown to yield improved screening results as compared to the previous approach based on three target proteins. Further validation of the new protocol using five additional protein targets showed improved screening compared to those using common docking methods, further indicating improvements brought by the explicit inclusion of additional feature types associated with the wider collection of probe molecules in the SILCS simulations. The advantage of using complementary features and volume constraints, based on exclusion maps of the protein defined from the SILCS simulations, is presented. In addition, re-ranking using SILCS-based ligand grid free energies is shown to enhance the diversity of identified ligands for the majority of targets. These results suggest that the SILCS-Pharm protocol will be of utility in rational drug design. PMID:25622696

  13. eMatchSite: Sequence Order-Independent Structure Alignments of Ligand Binding Pockets in Protein Models

    PubMed Central

    Brylinski, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Detecting similarities between ligand binding sites in the absence of global homology between target proteins has been recognized as one of the critical components of modern drug discovery. Local binding site alignments can be constructed using sequence order-independent techniques, however, to achieve a high accuracy, many current algorithms for binding site comparison require high-quality experimental protein structures, preferably in the bound conformational state. This, in turn, complicates proteome scale applications, where only various quality structure models are available for the majority of gene products. To improve the state-of-the-art, we developed eMatchSite, a new method for constructing sequence order-independent alignments of ligand binding sites in protein models. Large-scale benchmarking calculations using adenine-binding pockets in crystal structures demonstrate that eMatchSite generates accurate alignments for almost three times more protein pairs than SOIPPA. More importantly, eMatchSite offers a high tolerance to structural distortions in ligand binding regions in protein models. For example, the percentage of correctly aligned pairs of adenine-binding sites in weakly homologous protein models is only 4–9% lower than those aligned using crystal structures. This represents a significant improvement over other algorithms, e.g. the performance of eMatchSite in recognizing similar binding sites is 6% and 13% higher than that of SiteEngine using high- and moderate-quality protein models, respectively. Constructing biologically correct alignments using predicted ligand binding sites in protein models opens up the possibility to investigate drug-protein interaction networks for complete proteomes with prospective systems-level applications in polypharmacology and rational drug repositioning. eMatchSite is freely available to the academic community as a web-server and a stand-alone software distribution at http://www.brylinski.org/ematchsite. PMID

  14. Identification of a ligand-binding site in an immunoglobulin fold domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae adhesion protein alpha-agglutinin.

    PubMed Central

    de Nobel, H; Lipke, P N; Kurjan, J

    1996-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae adhesion protein alpha-agglutinin (Ag alpha 1p) is expressed by alpha cells and binds to the complementary a-agglutinin expressed by a cells. The N-terminal half of alpha-agglutinin is sufficient for ligand binding and has been proposed to contain an immunoglobulin (Ig) fold domain. Based on a structural homology model for this domain and a previously identified critical residue (His292), we made Ag alpha 1p mutations in three discontinuous patches of the domain that are predicted to be in close proximity to His292 in the model. Residues in each of the three patches were identified that are important for activity and therefore define a putative ligand binding site, whereas mutations in distant loops had no effect on activity. This putative binding site is on a different surface of the Ig fold than the defined binding sites of immunoglobulins and other members of the Ig superfamily. Comparison of protein interaction sites by structural and mutational analysis has indicated that the area of surface contact is larger than the functional binding site identified by mutagenesis. The putative alpha-agglutinin binding site is therefore likely to identify residues that contribute to the functional binding site within a larger area that contacts a-agglutinin. Images PMID:8741846

  15. TIM-4 structures identify a Metal Ion-dependent Ligand Binding Site where phosphatidylserine binds

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Cesar; Ballesteros, Angela; Martinez-Muñoz, Laura; Mellado, Mario; Kaplan, Gerardo G.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Casasnovas, José M.

    2008-01-01

    The T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM) proteins are important regulators of T cell responses. They have been linked to autoimmunity and cancer. Structures of the murine TIM-4 identified a Metal Ion-dependent Ligand Binding Site (MILIBS) in the immunoglobulin (Ig) domain of the TIM family. The characteristic CC’ loop of the TIM domain and the hydrophobic FG loop shaped a narrow cavity where acidic compounds penetrate and coordinate to a metal ion bound to conserved residues in the TIM proteins. The structure of phosphatidylserine bound to the Ig domain showed that the hydrophilic head penetrates into the MILIBS and coordinates with the metal ion, while the aromatic residues on the tip of the FG loop interacted with the fatty acid chains and could insert into the lipid bilayer. Our results also revealed a significant role of the MILIBS in trafficking of TIM-1 to the cell surface. PMID:18083575

  16. Protonation Equilibria of Biologically Active Ligands in Mixed Aqueous Organic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherif, Ahmed A.; Shoukry, Mohamed M.; Abd Elkarim, Abeer T.; Barakat, Mohammad H.

    2014-01-01

    The review is mainly concerned with the protonation equilibria of biologically active ligands like amino acids, peptides, DNA constituents, and amino acid esters in nonaqueous media. Equilibrium concentrations of proton-ligand formation as a function of pH were investigated. Also, thermodynamics associated with protonation equilibria were also discussed. PMID:25197267

  17. Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) simulations for fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Faller, Christina E; Raman, E Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D; Guvench, Olgun

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) involves screening low molecular weight molecules ("fragments") that correspond to functional groups found in larger drug-like molecules to determine their binding to target proteins or nucleic acids. Based on the principle of thermodynamic additivity, two fragments that bind nonoverlapping nearby sites on the target can be combined to yield a new molecule whose binding free energy is the sum of those of the fragments. Experimental FBDD approaches, like NMR and X-ray crystallography, have proven very useful but can be expensive in terms of time, materials, and labor. Accordingly, a variety of computational FBDD approaches have been developed that provide different levels of detail and accuracy.The Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) method of computational FBDD uses all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to identify fragment binding. The target is "soaked" in an aqueous solution with multiple fragments having different identities. The resulting computational competition assay reveals what small molecule types are most likely to bind which regions of the target. From SILCS simulations, 3D probability maps of fragment binding called "FragMaps" can be produced. Based on the probabilities relative to bulk, SILCS FragMaps can be used to determine "Grid Free Energies (GFEs)," which provide per-atom contributions to fragment binding affinities. For essentially no additional computational overhead relative to the production of the FragMaps, GFEs can be used to compute Ligand Grid Free Energies (LGFEs) for arbitrarily complex molecules, and these LGFEs can be used to rank-order the molecules in accordance with binding affinities. PMID:25709034

  18. Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) Simulations for Fragment-Based Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Faller, Christina E.; Raman, E. Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Guvench, Olgun

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) involves screening low molecular weight molecules (“fragments”) that correspond to functional groups found in larger drug-like molecules to determine their binding to target proteins or nucleic acids. Based on the principle of thermodynamic additivity, two fragments that bind non-overlapping nearby sites on the target can be combined to yield a new molecule whose binding free energy is the sum of those of the fragments. Experimental FBDD approaches, like NMR and X-ray crystallography, have proven very useful but can be expensive in terms of time, materials, and labor. Accordingly, a variety of computational FBDD approaches have been developed that provide different levels of detail and accuracy. The Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) method of computational FBDD uses all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to identify fragment binding. The target is “soaked” in an aqueous solution with multiple fragments having different identities. The resulting computational competition assay reveals what small molecule types are most likely to bind which regions of the target. From SILCS simulations, 3D probability maps of fragment binding called “FragMaps” can be produced. Based on the probabilities relative to bulk, SILCS FragMaps can be used to determine “Grid Free Energies (GFEs),” which provide per-atom contributions to fragment binding affinities. For essentially no additional computational overhead relative to the production of the FragMaps, GFEs can be used to compute Ligand Grid Free Energies (LGFEs) for arbitrarily complex molecules, and these LGFEs can be used to rank-order the molecules in accordance with binding affinities. PMID:25709034

  19. Functional Selectivity and Antidepressant Activity of Serotonin 1A Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Bojarski, Andrzej Jacek; Pilc, Andrzej; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter that plays an important role in physiological functions. 5-HT has been implicated in sleep, feeding, sexual behavior, temperature regulation, pain, and cognition as well as in pathological states including disorders connected to mood, anxiety, psychosis and pain. 5-HT1A receptors have for a long time been considered as an interesting target for the action of antidepressant drugs. It was postulated that postsynaptic 5-HT1A agonists could form a new class of antidepressant drugs, and mixed 5-HT1A receptor ligands/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors seem to possess an interesting pharmacological profile. It should, however, be noted that 5-HT1A receptors can activate several different biochemical pathways and signal through both G protein-dependent and G protein-independent pathways. The variables that affect the multiplicity of 5-HT1A receptor signaling pathways would thus result from the summation of effects specific to the host cell milieu. Moreover, receptor trafficking appears different at pre- and postsynaptic sites. It should also be noted that the 5-HT1A receptor cooperates with other signal transduction systems (like the 5-HT1B or 5-HT2A/2B/2C receptors, the GABAergic and the glutaminergic systems), which also contribute to its antidepressant and/or anxiolytic activity. Thus identifying brain specific molecular targets for 5-HT1A receptor ligands may result in a better targeting, raising a hope for more effective medicines for various pathologies. PMID:26262615

  20. Functional Selectivity and Antidepressant Activity of Serotonin 1A Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Bojarski, Andrzej Jacek; Pilc, Andrzej; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter that plays an important role in physiological functions. 5-HT has been implicated in sleep, feeding, sexual behavior, temperature regulation, pain, and cognition as well as in pathological states including disorders connected to mood, anxiety, psychosis and pain. 5-HT1A receptors have for a long time been considered as an interesting target for the action of antidepressant drugs. It was postulated that postsynaptic 5-HT1A agonists could form a new class of antidepressant drugs, and mixed 5-HT1A receptor ligands/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors seem to possess an interesting pharmacological profile. It should, however, be noted that 5-HT1A receptors can activate several different biochemical pathways and signal through both G protein-dependent and G protein-independent pathways. The variables that affect the multiplicity of 5-HT1A receptor signaling pathways would thus result from the summation of effects specific to the host cell milieu. Moreover, receptor trafficking appears different at pre- and postsynaptic sites. It should also be noted that the 5-HT1A receptor cooperates with other signal transduction systems (like the 5-HT1B or 5-HT2A/2B/2C receptors, the GABAergic and the glutaminergic systems), which also contribute to its antidepressant and/or anxiolytic activity. Thus identifying brain specific molecular targets for 5-HT1A receptor ligands may result in a better targeting, raising a hope for more effective medicines for various pathologies. PMID:26262615

  1. The ligand for osteoprotegerin (OPGL) directly activates mature osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Burgess, T L; Qian, Y; Kaufman, S; Ring, B D; Van, G; Capparelli, C; Kelley, M; Hsu, H; Boyle, W J; Dunstan, C R; Hu, S; Lacey, D L

    1999-05-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) and OPG-ligand (OPGL) potently inhibit and stimulate, respectively, osteoclast differentiation (Simonet, W.S., D.L. Lacey, C.R. Dunstan, M. Kelley, M.-S. Chang, R. Luethy, H.Q. Nguyen, S. Wooden, L. Bennett, T. Boone, et al. 1997. Cell. 89:309-319; Lacey, D.L., E. Timms, H.-L. Tan, M.J. Kelley, C.R. Dunstan, T. Burgess, R. Elliott, A. Colombero, G. Elliott, S. Scully, et al. 1998. Cell. 93: 165-176), but their effects on mature osteoclasts are not well understood. Using primary cultures of rat osteoclasts on bone slices, we find that OPGL causes approximately sevenfold increase in total bone surface erosion. By scanning electron microscopy, OPGL-treated osteoclasts generate more clusters of lacunae on bone suggesting that multiple, spatially associated cycles of resorption have occurred. However, the size of individual resorption events are unchanged by OPGL treatment. Mechanistically, OPGL binds specifically to mature OCs and rapidly (within 30 min) induces actin ring formation; a marked cytoskeletal rearrangement that necessarily precedes bone resorption. Furthermore, we show that antibodies raised against the OPGL receptor, RANK, also induce actin ring formation. OPGL-treated mice exhibit increases in blood ionized Ca++ within 1 h after injections, consistent with immediate OC activation in vivo. Finally, we find that OPG blocks OPGL's effects on both actin ring formation and bone resorption. Together, these findings indicate that, in addition to their effects on OC precursors, OPGL and OPG have profound and direct effects on mature OCs and indicate that the OC receptor, RANK, mediates OPGL's effects. PMID:10225954

  2. Binding site and ligand flexibility revealed by high resolution crystal structures of GluK1 competitive antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Alushin, Gregory M.; Jane, David; Mayer, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The availability of crystal structures for the ligand binding domains of ionotropic glutamate receptors, combined with their key role in synaptic function in the normal and diseased brain, offers a unique selection of targets for pharmaceutical research compared to other drug targets for which the atomic structure of the ligand binding sites is not known. Currently only a few antagonist structures have been solved, and these reveal ligand specific conformational changes that hinder rational drug design. Here we report high resolution crystal structures for three kainate receptor GluK1 antagonist complexes which reveal new and unexpected modes of binding, highlighting the continued need for experimentally determined receptor-ligand complexes. PMID:20558186

  3. DSL ligand endocytosis physically dissociates Notch1 heterodimers before activating proteolysis can occur.

    PubMed

    Nichols, James T; Miyamoto, Alison; Olsen, Samantha L; D'Souza, Brendan; Yao, Christine; Weinmaster, Gerry

    2007-02-12

    Cleavage of Notch by furin is required to generate a mature, cell surface heterodimeric receptor that can be proteolytically activated to release its intracellular domain, which functions in signal transduction. Current models propose that ligand binding to heterodimeric Notch (hNotch) induces a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) proteolytic release of the Notch extracellular domain (NECD), which is subsequently shed and/or endocytosed by DSL ligand cells. We provide evidence for NECD release and internalization by DSL ligand cells, which, surprisingly, did not require ADAM activity. However, losses in either hNotch formation or ligand endocytosis significantly decreased NECD transfer to DSL ligand cells, as well as signaling in Notch cells. Because endocytosis-defective ligands bind hNotch, but do not dissociate it, additional forces beyond those produced through ligand binding must function to disrupt the intramolecular interactions that keep hNotch intact and inactive. Based on our findings, we propose that mechanical forces generated during DSL ligand endocytosis function to physically dissociate hNotch, and that dissociation is a necessary step in Notch activation.

  4. Binding site multiplicity with fatty acid ligands: implications for the regulation of PKR kinase autophosphorylation with palmitate.

    PubMed

    Fang, Liang; Cho, Hyun Ju; Chan, Christina; Feig, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Saturated long chain-free fatty acids (FFAs), especially palmitate, have been implicated in apoptosis by inhibiting the activity of PKR (double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase). We recently found evidence that palmitate interacts directly with the kinase domain of PKR, subsequently inhibiting the autophosphorylation of PKR. To investigate the interactions of palmitate with PKR and its effects on PKR autophosphorylation, we performed extensive unbiased MD simulations combined with biochemical and biophysical experiments. The simulations predict multiple putative binding sites of palmitate on both the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated PKR with similar binding affinities. Ligand-protein interactions involving a large variety of different binding modes challenge the conventional view of highly specific, single binding sites. Key interactions of palmitate involve the αC-helix of PKR, especially near residue R307. Experimental mutation of R307 was found to affect palmitate binding and reduce its inhibitory effect. Based on this study a new allosteric mechanism is proposed where palmitate binding to the αC-helix prevents the inactive-to-active transition of PKR and subsequently reduces its ability to autophosphorylate.

  5. Mono- and binuclear copper(II) complexes of new hydrazone ligands derived from 4,6-diacetylresorcinol: Synthesis, spectral studies and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Shebl, Magdy; El-ghamry, Mosad A; Khalil, Saied M E; Kishk, Mona A A

    2014-05-21

    Two new hydrazone ligands, H2L(1) and H2L(2), were synthesized by the condensation of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol with 3-hydrazino-5,6-diphenyl-1,2,4-triazine and isatin monohydrazone, respectively. The structures of the ligands were elucidated by elemental analyses, IR, (1)H NMR, electronic and mass spectra. Reactions of the ligands with several copper(II) salts, including AcO(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), Cl(-) and Br(-) afforded mono- and binuclear metal complexes. Also, the ligands were allowed to react with Cu(II) ion in the presence of a secondary ligand (L') [N,O-donor; 8-hydroxyquinoline, N,N-donor; 1,10-phenanthroline or O,O-donor; benzoylacetone]. Characterization and structure elucidation of the prepared complexes were achieved by elemental and thermal analyses, IR, electronic, mass and ESR spectra as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The ESR spin Hamiltonian parameters of some complexes were calculated. The spectroscopic data showed that the H2L(1) ligand acts as a neutral or monobasic tridentate ligand while the H2L(2) ligand acts as a bis(monobasic tridentate) ligand. The coordination sites with the copper(II) ion are phenolic oxygen, azomethine nitrogen and triazinic nitrogen (H2L(1) ligand) or isatinic oxygen (H2L(2) ligand). The metal complexes exhibited octahedral and square planar geometrical arrangements depending on the nature of the anion. The ligands and some metal complexes showed antimicrobial activity. PMID:24607473

  6. Selective Electrocatalytic Activity of Ligand Stabilized Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, Douglas R; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Kail, Brian W; Matranga, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Ligand stabilization can influence the surface chemistry of Cu oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and provide unique product distributions for electrocatalytic methanol (MeOH) oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction reactions. Oleic acid (OA) stabilized Cu{sub 2}O and CuO NPs promote the MeOH oxidation reaction with 88% and 99.97% selective HCOH formation, respectively. Alternatively, CO{sub 2} is the only reaction product detected for bulk Cu oxides and Cu oxide NPs with no ligands or weakly interacting ligands. We also demonstrate that OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs can reduce CO{sub 2} into CO with a {approx}1.7-fold increase in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to bulk Cu oxides. The OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs also show 7.6 and 9.1-fold increases in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to weakly stabilized and non-stabilized Cu oxide NPs, respectively. Our data illustrates that the presence and type of surface ligand can substantially influence the catalytic product selectivity of Cu oxide NPs.

  7. FAM150A and FAM150B are activating ligands for anaplastic lymphoma kinase.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jikui; Umapathy, Ganesh; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Wolfstetter, Georg; Mendoza, Patricia; Pfeifer, Kathrin; Mohammed, Ateequrrahman; Hugosson, Fredrik; Zhang, Hongbing; Hsu, Amy W; Halenbeck, Robert; Hallberg, Bengt; Palmer, Ruth H

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been described in a range of human cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer and neuroblastoma (Hallberg and Palmer, 2013). Vertebrate ALK has been considered to be an orphan receptor and the identity of the ALK ligand(s) is a critical issue. Here we show that FAM150A and FAM150B are potent ligands for human ALK that bind to the extracellular domain of ALK and in addition to activation of wild-type ALK are able to drive 'superactivation' of activated ALK mutants from neuroblastoma. In conclusion, our data show that ALK is robustly activated by the FAM150A/B ligands and provide an opportunity to develop ALK-targeted therapies in situations where ALK is overexpressed/activated or mutated in the context of the full length receptor.

  8. Site-specific DOTA/europium-labeling of recombinant human relaxin-3 for receptor-ligand interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Jie; Luo, Xiao; Liu, Ya-Li; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Wade, John D; Bathgate, Ross A D; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2012-08-01

    Relaxin-3 (also known as INSL7) is a recently identified neuropeptide belonging to the insulin/relaxin superfamily. It has putative roles in the regulation of stress responses, food intake, and reproduction by activation of its cognate G-protein-coupled receptor RXFP3. It also binds and activates the relaxin family peptide receptors RXFP1 and RXFP4 in vitro. To obtain a europium-labeled relaxin-3 as tracer for studying the interaction of these receptors with various ligands, in the present work we propose a novel site-specific labeling strategy for the recombinant human relaxin-3 that has been previously prepared in our laboratory. First, the N-terminal 6 × His-tag of the single-chain relaxin-3 precursor was removed by Aeromonas aminopeptidase and all of the primary amines of the resultant peptide were reversibly blocked by citroconic anhydride. Second, the A-chain N-terminus of the blocked peptide was released by endoproteinase Asp-N cleavage that removed the linker peptide between the B- and A-chains. Third, an alkyne moiety was introduced to the newly released A-chain N-terminus by reaction with the highly active primary amine-specific N-hydroxysuccinimide ester. Fourth, after removal of the reversible blockage under mild acidic condition, europium-loaded DOTA with an azide moiety was introduced to the two-chain relaxin-3 carrying the alkyne moiety through click chemistry. Using this site-specific labeling strategy, homogeneous monoeuropium-labeled human relaxin-3 could be obtained with good overall yield. In contrast, conventional random labeling resulted in a complex mixture that was poorly resolved because human relaxin-3 has four primary amine moieties that all react with the modification reagent. Both saturation and competition binding assays demonstrated that the DOTA/Eu(3+)-labeled relaxin-3 retained high binding affinity for human RXFP3, RXFP4, and RXFP1 and was therefore a suitable non-radioactive and stable tracer to study the interaction of various

  9. Molecular models of site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium catalysts supported on zeolites: Ligand bond dissociation energies

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Mingyang; Serna, Pedro; Lu, Jing; Gates, Bruce C.; Dixon, David A.

    2015-09-28

    The chemistry of zeolite-supported site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium complexes that are essentially molecular was investigated with density functional theory (DFT) and the results compared with experimentally determined spectra characterizing rhodium and iridium species formed by the reactions of Rh(C2H4)2(acac) and Ir(C2H4)2(acac) (acac = acetylacetonate) with acidic zeolites such as dealuminated HY zeolite. The experimental results characterize ligand exchange reactions and catalytic reactions of adsorbed ligands, including olefin hydrogenation and dimerization. Two molecular models were used to characterize various binding sites of the metal complexes in the zeolites, and the agreement between experimental and calculated infrared frequencies and metal-ligand distancesmore » determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was generally very good. The calculated structures and energies indicate a metal-support-oxygen (M(I)-O) coordination number of two for most of the supported complexes and a value of three when the ligands include the radicals C2H5 or H. The results characterizing various isomers of the supported metal complexes incorporating hydrocarbon ligands indicate that some carbene and carbyne ligands could form. Ligand bond dissociation energies (LDEs) are reported to explain the observed reactivity trends. The experimental observations of a stronger M-CO bond than M-(C2H4) bond for both Ir and Rh match the calculated LDEs, which show that the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual-ligand complexes for CO are similar to 12 and similar to 15 kcal/mol higher in energy (when the metal is Rh) and similar to 17 and similar to 20 kcal/mol higher (when the metal is Ir) than the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual ligand complexes for C2H4, respectively. The results provide a foundation for the prediction of the catalytic properties of numerous supported metal complexes, as summarized in detail here.« less

  10. Molecular models of site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium catalysts supported on zeolites: Ligand bond dissociation energies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mingyang; Serna, Pedro; Lu, Jing; Gates, Bruce C.; Dixon, David A.

    2015-09-28

    The chemistry of zeolite-supported site-isolated cobalt, rhodium, and iridium complexes that are essentially molecular was investigated with density functional theory (DFT) and the results compared with experimentally determined spectra characterizing rhodium and iridium species formed by the reactions of Rh(C2H4)2(acac) and Ir(C2H4)2(acac) (acac = acetylacetonate) with acidic zeolites such as dealuminated HY zeolite. The experimental results characterize ligand exchange reactions and catalytic reactions of adsorbed ligands, including olefin hydrogenation and dimerization. Two molecular models were used to characterize various binding sites of the metal complexes in the zeolites, and the agreement between experimental and calculated infrared frequencies and metal-ligand distances determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was generally very good. The calculated structures and energies indicate a metal-support-oxygen (M(I)-O) coordination number of two for most of the supported complexes and a value of three when the ligands include the radicals C2H5 or H. The results characterizing various isomers of the supported metal complexes incorporating hydrocarbon ligands indicate that some carbene and carbyne ligands could form. Ligand bond dissociation energies (LDEs) are reported to explain the observed reactivity trends. The experimental observations of a stronger M-CO bond than M-(C2H4) bond for both Ir and Rh match the calculated LDEs, which show that the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual-ligand complexes for CO are similar to 12 and similar to 15 kcal/mol higher in energy (when the metal is Rh) and similar to 17 and similar to 20 kcal/mol higher (when the metal is Ir) than the single-ligand LDEs of the mono and dual ligand complexes for C2H4, respectively. The results provide a foundation for the prediction

  11. 'Unconventional' coordination chemistry by metal chelating fragments in a metalloprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Martin, David P; Blachly, Patrick G; Marts, Amy R; Woodruff, Tessa M; de Oliveira, César A F; McCammon, J Andrew; Tierney, David L; Cohen, Seth M

    2014-04-01

    The binding of three closely related chelators: 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-thione (allothiomaltol, ATM), 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-thione (thiomaltol, TM), and 3-hydroxy-4H-pyran-4-thione (thiopyromeconic acid, TPMA) to the active site of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) has been investigated. Two of these ligands display a monodentate mode of coordination to the active site Zn(2+) ion in hCAII that is not recapitulated in model complexes of the enzyme active site. This unprecedented binding mode in the hCAII-thiomaltol complex has been characterized by both X-ray crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy. In addition, the steric restrictions of the active site force the ligands into a 'flattened' mode of coordination compared with inorganic model complexes. This change in geometry has been shown by density functional computations to significantly decrease the strength of the metal-ligand binding. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the mode of binding by small metal-binding groups can be significantly influenced by the protein active site. Diminishing the strength of the metal-ligand bond results in unconventional modes of metal coordination not found in typical coordination compounds or even carefully engineered active site models, and understanding these effects is critical to the rational design of inhibitors that target clinically relevant metalloproteins.

  12. Synthesis and antimalarial activity of metal complexes of cross-bridged tetraazamacrocyclic ligands

    PubMed Central

    Hubin, Timothy J.; Amoyaw, Prince N. -A.; Roewe, Kimberly D.; Simpson, Natalie C.; Maples, Randall D.; Carder Freeman, TaRynn N.; Cain, Amy N.; Le, Justin G.; Archibald, Stephen J.; Khan, Shabana I.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Khan, M. O. Faruk

    2014-01-01

    Using transition metals such as manganese(II), iron(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), and zinc(II), several new metal complexes of cross-bridged tetraazamacrocyclic chelators namely, cyclen- and cyclam-analogs with benzyl groups, were synthesized and screened for in vitro antimalarial activity against chloroquine-resistant (W2) and chloroquine-sensitive (D6) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The metal-free chelators tested showed little or no antimalarial activity. All the metal complexes of the dibenzyl cross-bridged cyclam ligand exhibited potent antimalarial activity. The Mn2+ complex of this ligand was the most potent with IC50s of 0.127 and 0.157 µM against the chloroquine-sensitive (D6) and chloroquine-resistant (W2) P. falciparum strains, respectively. In general, the dibenzyl hydrophobic ligands showed better antimalarial activity compared to the activity of monobenzyl ligands, potentially because of their higher lipophilicity and thus better cell penetration ability. The higher antimalarial activity displayed by the manganese complex for the cyclam ligand in comparison to that of the cyclen, correlates with the larger pocket of cyclam compared to that of cyclen which produces a more stable complex with the Mn2+. Few of the Cu2+ and Fe2+ complexes also showed improvement in activity but Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ complexes did not show any improvement in activity upon the metal-free ligands for anti-malarial development. PMID:24857776

  13. A radioiodinated, intracellularly trapped ligand for determining the sites of plasma protein degradation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, R C; Carew, T E; Glass, C K; Green, S R; Taylor, C A; Attie, A D

    1983-01-01

    We recently developed a general method for determining tissue sites of degradation of plasma proteins in vivo that made use of covalently attached radioactive sucrose. On degradation of the protein, the sucrose remained trapped in the cells as a cumulative marker of protein degradation. The method described here depends on the same principles, but uses an adduct of cellobiose and tyramine that is radioiodinated to high specific radioactivity and then covalently attached to protein. Use of the radioiodinated ligand increases the sensitivity of the method at least 100-fold and allows simplified tissue analysis. Proteins derivatized with the radioiodinated ligand were recognized as underivatized proteins both in vitro and in vivo. On degradation of derivatized low-density lipoprotein, the rate of leakage from cultured fibroblasts was only 5% during 24 h. Similarly, on injection of labelled proteins into rats and rabbits, urinary excretion of the label was in all cases less than 10% of total labelled catabolic products recovered 24 h after injection. Examination of the tissue contents of label at two times after injection of labelled asialofetuin or apolipoprotein A1 in rats, and asialotransferrin in rabbits showed that the label did not detectably redistribute between tissues after initial uptake and catabolism; a significant leakage from liver was quantitatively accounted for by label appearing in gut contents and faeces. A simple double-label method was devised to provide a correction for intact protein in trapped plasma, the extravascular spaces, and within cells. By using this method it becomes unnecessary to fractionate tissue samples. PMID:6882394

  14. Recognition of Mannosylated Ligands and Influenza A Virus by Human Surfactant Protein D: Contributions of an Extended Site and Residue 343

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, E.; Hartshorn, K; Horlacher, T; McDonald, B; Smith, K; Cafarella, T; Seaton, B; Seeberger, P; Head, J

    2009-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in antiviral host defense. Although SP-D shows a preference for glucose/maltose, the protein also recognizes d-mannose and a variety of mannose-rich microbial ligands. This latter preference prompted an examination of the mechanisms of mannose recognition, particularly as they relate to high-mannose viral glycans. Trimeric neck plus carbohydrate recognition domains from human SP-D (hNCRD) preferred ?1-2-linked dimannose (DM) over the branched trimannose (TM) core, ?1-3 or ?1-6 DM, or d-mannose. Previous studies have shown residues flanking the carbohydrate binding site can fine-tune ligand recognition. A mutant with valine at 343 (R343V) showed enhanced binding to mannan relative to wild type and R343A. No alteration in affinity was observed for d-mannose or for ?1-3- or ?1-6-linked DM; however, substantially increased affinity was observed for ?1-2 DM. Both proteins showed efficient recognition of linear and branched subdomains of high-mannose glycans on carbohydrate microarrays, and R343V showed increased binding to a subset of the oligosaccharides. Crystallographic analysis of an R343V complex with 1,2-DM showed a novel mode of binding. The disaccharide is bound to calcium by the reducing sugar ring, and a stabilizing H-bond is formed between the 2-OH of the nonreducing sugar ring and Arg349. Although hNCRDs show negligible binding to influenza A virus (IAV), R343V showed markedly enhanced viral neutralizing activity. Hydrophobic substitutions for Arg343 selectively blocked binding of a monoclonal antibody (Hyb 246-05) that inhibits IAV binding activity. Our findings demonstrate an extended ligand binding site for mannosylated ligands and the significant contribution of the 343 side chain to specific recognition of multivalent microbial ligands, including high-mannose viral glycans.

  15. Exploring the role of water in molecular recognition: predicting protein ligandability using a combinatorial search of surface hydration sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Brennan, Paul E.; Huggins, David J.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between any two biological molecules must compete with their interaction with water molecules. This makes water the most important molecule in medicine, as it controls the interactions of every therapeutic with its target. A small molecule binding to a protein is able to recognize a unique binding site on a protein by displacing bound water molecules from specific hydration sites. Quantifying the interactions of these water molecules allows us to estimate the potential of the protein to bind a small molecule. This is referred to as ligandability. In the study, we describe a method to predict ligandability by performing a search of all possible combinations of hydration sites on protein surfaces. We predict ligandability as the summed binding free energy for each of the constituent hydration sites, computed using inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory. We compared the predicted ligandability with the maximum observed binding affinity for 20 proteins in the human bromodomain family. Based on this comparison, it was determined that effective inhibitors have been developed for the majority of bromodomains, in the range from 10 to 100 nM. However, we predict that more potent inhibitors can be developed for the bromodomains BPTF and BRD7 with relative ease, but that further efforts to develop inhibitors for ATAD2 will be extremely challenging. We have also made predictions for the 14 bromodomains with no reported small molecule K d values by isothermal titration calorimetry. The calculations predict that PBRM1(1) will be a challenging target, while others such as TAF1L(2), PBRM1(4) and TAF1(2), should be highly ligandable. As an outcome of this work, we assembled a database of experimental maximal K d that can serve as a community resource assisting medicinal chemistry efforts focused on BRDs. Effective prediction of ligandability would be a very useful tool in the drug discovery process.

  16. Exploring the role of water in molecular recognition: predicting protein ligandability using a combinatorial search of surface hydration sites.

    PubMed

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Brennan, Paul E; Huggins, David J

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between any two biological molecules must compete with their interaction with water molecules. This makes water the most important molecule in medicine, as it controls the interactions of every therapeutic with its target. A small molecule binding to a protein is able to recognize a unique binding site on a protein by displacing bound water molecules from specific hydration sites. Quantifying the interactions of these water molecules allows us to estimate the potential of the protein to bind a small molecule. This is referred to as ligandability. In the study, we describe a method to predict ligandability by performing a search of all possible combinations of hydration sites on protein surfaces. We predict ligandability as the summed binding free energy for each of the constituent hydration sites, computed using inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory. We compared the predicted ligandability with the maximum observed binding affinity for 20 proteins in the human bromodomain family. Based on this comparison, it was determined that effective inhibitors have been developed for the majority of bromodomains, in the range from 10 to 100 nM. However, we predict that more potent inhibitors can be developed for the bromodomains BPTF and BRD7 with relative ease, but that further efforts to develop inhibitors for ATAD2 will be extremely challenging. We have also made predictions for the 14 bromodomains with no reported small molecule K d values by isothermal titration calorimetry. The calculations predict that PBRM1(1) will be a challenging target, while others such as TAF1L(2), PBRM1(4) and TAF1(2), should be highly ligandable. As an outcome of this work, we assembled a database of experimental maximal K d that can serve as a community resource assisting medicinal chemistry efforts focused on BRDs. Effective prediction of ligandability would be a very useful tool in the drug discovery process.

  17. Conformational Transitions in Human AP Endonuclease 1 and Its Active Site Mutant during Abasic Site Repair†

    PubMed Central

    Kanazhevskaya, Lyubov Yu.; Koval, Vladimir V.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Strauss, Phyllis R.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2010-01-01

    AP endonuclease 1 (APE 1) is a crucial enzyme of the base excision repair pathway (BER) in human cells. APE1 recognizes apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and makes a nick in the phosphodiester backbone 5′ to them. The conformational dynamics and presteady-state kinetics of wild-type APE1 and its active site mutant, Y171F-P173L-N174K, have been studied. To observe conformational transitions occurring in the APE1 molecule during the catalytic cycle, we detected intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the enzyme under single turnover conditions. DNA duplexes containing a natural AP site, its tetrahydrofuran analogue, or a 2′-deoxyguanosine residue in the same position were used as specific substrates or ligands. The stopped-flow experiments have revealed high flexibility of the APE1 molecule and the complexity of the catalytic process. The fluorescent traces indicate that wild-type APE1 undergoes at least four conformational transitions during the processing of abasic sites in DNA. In contrast, nonspecific interactions of APE1 with undamaged DNA can be described by a two-step kinetic scheme. Rate and equilibrium constants were extracted from the stopped-flow and fluorescence titration data for all substrates, ligands, and products. A replacement of three residues at the enzymatic active site including the replacement of tyrosine 171 with phenylalanine in the enzyme active site resulted in a 2 × 104-fold decrease in the reaction rate and reduced binding affinity. Our data indicate the important role of conformational changes in APE1 for substrate recognition and catalysis. PMID:20575528

  18. Implication of crystal water molecules in inhibitor binding at ALR2 active site.

    PubMed

    Hymavati; Kumar, Vivek; Sobhia, M Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Water molecules play a crucial role in mediating the interaction between a ligand and a macromolecule. The solvent environment around such biomolecule controls their structure and plays important role in protein-ligand interactions. An understanding of the nature and role of these water molecules in the active site of a protein could greatly increase the efficiency of rational drug design approaches. We have performed the comparative crystal structure analysis of aldose reductase to understand the role of crystal water in protein-ligand interaction. Molecular dynamics simulation has shown the versatile nature of water molecules in bridge H bonding during interaction. Occupancy and life time of water molecules depend on the type of cocrystallized ligand present in the structure. The information may be useful in rational approach to customize the ligand, and thereby longer occupancy and life time for bridge H-bonding. PMID:22649481

  19. Composition change of uranium perchlorates with organic ligands upon mechanochemical activation of exchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zazhogin, A. P.; Zazhogin, A. A.; Komyak, A. I.; Umreiko, D. S.

    2008-03-01

    Results of studies on the effect of mechanochemical activation of ligand exchange processes in uranyl perchlorate-dimethylsulfoxide are presented. Spectroscopic data show that mechanical activation of the exchange process in this system results in the replacement of H2O in the first coordination sphere of uranyl UO{2/2+} by DMSO to form nanocrystals with a defined ligand sphere. Possible factors governing the noted features are considered.

  20. Multidentate terephthalamidate and hydroxypyridonate ligands: towards new orally active chelators.

    PubMed

    Abergel, Rebecca J; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2011-01-01

    The limitations of current therapies for the treatment of iron overload or radioisotope contamination have stimulated efforts to develop new orally bioavailable iron and actinide chelators. Siderophore-inspired tetradentate, hexadentate and octadentate terephthalamidate and hydroxypyridonate ligands were evaluated in vivo as selective and efficacious iron or actinide chelating agents, with several metal loading and ligand assessment procedures, using (59)Fe, (238)Pu, and (241)Am as radioactive tracers. The compounds presented in this study were compared to commercially available therapeutic sequestering agents [deferoxamine (DFO) for iron and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DPTA) for actinides] and are unrivaled in terms of affinity, selectivity and decorporation efficacy, which attests to the fact that high metal affinity may overcome the low bioavailability properties commonly associated to multidenticity. PMID:21599440

  1. MULTIDENTATE TEREPHTHALAMIDATE AND HYDROXYPYRIDONATE LIGANDS: TOWARDS NEW ORALLY ACTIVE CHELATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Abergel, Rebecca J.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2011-07-13

    The limitations of current therapies for the treatment of iron overload or radioisotope contamination have stimulated efforts to develop new orally bioavailable iron and actinide chelators. Siderophore-inspired tetradentate, hexadentate and octadentate terephthalamidate and hydroxypyridonate ligands were evaluated in vivo as selective and efficacious iron or actinide chelating agents, with several metal loading and ligand assessment procedures, using {sup 59}Fe, {sup 238}Pu, and {sup 241}Am as radioactive tracers. The compounds presented in this study were compared to commercially available therapeutic sequestering agents [deferoxamine (DFO) for iron and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DPTA) for actinides] and are unrivaled in terms of affinity, selectivity and decorporation efficacy, which attests to the fact that high metal affinity may overcome the low bioavailability properties commonly associated to multidenticity.

  2. Unconventional Human T Cells Accumulate at the Site of Infection in Response to Microbial Ligands and Induce Local Tissue Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Liuzzi, Anna Rita; Kift-Morgan, Ann; Lopez-Anton, Melisa; Friberg, Ida M.; Zhang, Jingjing; Brook, Amy C.; Roberts, Gareth W.; Donovan, Kieron L.; Colmont, Chantal S.; Toleman, Mark A.; Bowen, Timothy; Johnson, David W.; Topley, Nicholas; Moser, Bernhard; Fraser, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial responsiveness and function of unconventional human T cells are poorly understood, with only limited access to relevant specimens from sites of infection. Peritonitis is a common and serious complication in individuals with end-stage kidney disease receiving peritoneal dialysis. By analyzing local and systemic immune responses in peritoneal dialysis patients presenting with acute bacterial peritonitis and monitoring individuals before and during defined infectious episodes, our data show that Vγ9/Vδ2+ γδ T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells accumulate at the site of infection with organisms producing (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate and vitamin B2, respectively. Such unconventional human T cells are major producers of IFN-γ and TNF-α in response to these ligands that are shared by many microbial pathogens and affect the cells lining the peritoneal cavity by triggering local inflammation and inducing tissue remodeling with consequences for peritoneal membrane integrity. Our data uncover a crucial role for Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells in bacterial infection and suggest that they represent a useful predictive marker for important clinical outcomes, which may inform future stratification and patient management. These findings are likely to be applicable to other acute infections where local activation of unconventional T cells contributes to the antimicrobial inflammatory response. PMID:27527598

  3. Peripheral site ligand conjugation to a non-quaternary oxime enhances reactivation of nerve agent-inhibited human acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    de Koning, Martijn C; van Grol, Marco; Noort, Daan

    2011-09-25

    Commonly employed pyridinium-oxime (charged) reactivators of nerve agent inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) do not readily pass the blood brain barrier (BBB) because of the presence of charge(s). Conversely, non-ionic oxime reactivators often suffer from a lack of reactivating potency due to a low affinity for the active site of AChE. It was therefore hypothesized that an extra contribution in affinity may be achieved by covalently connecting a peripheral site ligand (PSL) to a non-ionic reactivator, which may result in a higher reactivation potency of the total construct. This validity of this approach, which proved successful for charged pyridinium oximes in earlier work, is now further exemplified with the covalent linkage of a neutral PSL via a spacer to a non-ionic and otherwise almost non-reactivating α-ketoaldoxime. It is demonstrated that the linkage of the PSL resulted in a remarkable increase in reactivation potency of the hybrid compounds. Although the molecules reported here are still inefficient reactivators compared to the current pyridinium oximes, the presented approach holds promise for the future design and synthesis of non-ionic oxime reactivators with improved BBB penetration and may be suited as well for non-oxime reactivators thus further widening the scope in the ongoing search for broad-spectrum reactivators. PMID:21504785

  4. Effect of axial ligands on the molecular configurations, stability, reactivity, and photodynamic activities of silicon phthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Luan, Liqiang; Ding, Lanlan; Shi, Jiawei; Fang, Wenjuan; Ni, Yuxing; Liu, Wei

    2014-12-01

    To demonstrate the effect of axial ligands on the structure-activity relationship, a series of axially substituted silicon phthalocyanines (SiPcs) have been synthesized with changes to the axial ligands. The reactivity of the axial ligand upon shielding by the phthalocyanine ring current, along with their stability, photophysical, and photodynamic therapy (PDT) activities were compared and evaluated for the first time. As revealed by single-crystal XRD analysis, rotation of the axial -OMe ligands was observed in SiPc 3, which resulted in two molecular configurations coexisting synchronously in both the solid and solution states and causing a split of the phthalocyanine α protons in the (1)H NMR spectra that is significantly different from all SiPcs reported so far. The remarkable photostability, good singlet oxygen quantum yield, and efficient in vitro photodynamic activity synergistically show that compound 3 is one of the most promising photosensitizers for PDT.

  5. Structural basis for PPAR partial or full activation revealed by a novel ligand binding mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Davide; Cerchia, Carmen; Montanari, Roberta; Loiodice, Fulvio; Tortorella, Paolo; Laghezza, Antonio; Cervoni, Laura; Pochetti, Giorgio; Lavecchia, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors involved in the regulation of the metabolic homeostasis and therefore represent valuable therapeutic targets for the treatment of metabolic diseases. The development of more balanced drugs interacting with PPARs, devoid of the side-effects showed by the currently marketed PPARγ full agonists, is considered the major challenge for the pharmaceutical companies. Here we present a structure-based virtual screening approach that let us identify a novel PPAR pan-agonist with a very attractive activity profile and its crystal structure in the complex with PPARα and PPARγ, respectively. In PPARα this ligand occupies a new pocket whose filling is allowed by the ligand-induced switching of the F273 side chain from a closed to an open conformation. The comparison between this pocket and the corresponding cavity in PPARγ provides a rationale for the different activation of the ligand towards PPARα and PPARγ, suggesting a novel basis for ligand design.

  6. Water oxidation chemistry of a synthetic dinuclear ruthenium complex containing redox-active quinone ligands.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Koji; Shen, Jian-Ren; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2014-04-21

    We investigated theoretically the catalytic mechanism of electrochemical water oxidation in aqueous solution by a dinuclear ruthenium complex containing redox-active quinone ligands, [Ru2(X)(Y)(3,6-tBu2Q)2(btpyan)](m+) [X, Y = H2O, OH, O, O2; 3,6-tBu2Q = 3,6-di-tert-butyl-1,2-benzoquinone; btpyan =1,8-bis(2,2':6',2″-terpyrid-4'-yl)anthracene] (m = 2, 3, 4) (1). The reaction involves a series of electron and proton transfers to achieve redox leveling, with intervening chemical transformations in a mesh scheme, and the entire molecular structure and motion of the catalyst 1 work together to drive the catalytic cycle for water oxidation. Two substrate water molecules can bind to 1 with simultaneous loss of one or two proton(s), which allows pH-dependent variability in the proportion of substrate-bound structures and following pathways for oxidative activation of the aqua/hydroxo ligands at low thermodynamic and kinetic costs. The resulting bis-oxo intermediates then undergo endothermic O-O radical coupling between two Ru(III)-O(•) units in an anti-coplanar conformation leading to bridged μ-peroxo or μ-superoxo intermediates. The μ-superoxo species can liberate oxygen with the necessity for the preceding binding of a water molecule, which is possible only after four-electron oxidation is completed. The magnitude of catalytic current would be limited by the inherent sluggishness of the hinge-like bending motion of the bridged μ-superoxo complex that opens up the compact, hydrophobic active site of the catalyst and thereby allows water entry under dynamic conditions. On the basis of a newly proposed mechanism, we rationalize the experimentally observed behavior of electrode kinetics with respect to potential and discuss what causes a high overpotential for water oxidation by 1.

  7. Ligand-selective activation of heterologously-expressed mammalian olfactory receptor.

    PubMed

    Ukhanov, K; Bobkov, Y; Corey, E A; Ache, B W

    2014-10-01

    Mammalian olfactory receptors (ORs) appear to have the capacity to couple to multiple G protein-coupled signaling pathways in a ligand-dependent selective manner. To better understand the mechanisms and molecular range of such ligand selectivity, we expressed the mouse eugenol OR (mOR-EG) in HEK293T cells together with Gα15 to monitor activation of the phospholipase-C (PLC) signaling pathway and/or Gαolf to monitor activation of the adenylate cyclase (AC) signaling pathway, resulting in intracellular Ca(2+) release and/or Ca(2+) influx through a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, respectively. PLC-dependent responses differed dynamically from AC-dependent responses, allowing them to be distinguished when Gα15 and Gαolf were co-expressed. The dynamic difference in readout was independent of the receptor, the heterologous expression system, and the ligand concentration. Of 17 reported mOR-EG ligands tested, including eugenol, its analogs, and structurally dissimilar compounds (mousse cristal, nootkatone, orivone), some equally activated both signaling pathways, some differentially activated both signaling pathways, and some had no noticeable effect even at 1-5mM. Our findings argue that mOR-EG, when heterologously expressed, can couple to two different signaling pathways in a ligand selective manner. The challenge now is to determine the potential of mOR-EG, and perhaps other ORs, to activate multiple signaling pathways in a ligand selective manner in native ORNs. PMID:25149566

  8. Ligand-selective activation of heterologously-expressed mammalian olfactory receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ukhanov, K.; Bobkov, Y.; Corey, E.A.; Ache, B.W.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian olfactory receptors (ORs) appear to have the capacity to couple to multiple G protein-coupled signaling pathways in a ligand-dependent selective manner. To better understand the mechanisms and molecular range of such ligand selectivity, we expressed the mouse eugenol OR (mOR-EG) in HEK293T cells together with Gα15 to monitor activation of the phospholipase-C (PLC) signaling pathway and/or Gαolf to monitor activation of the adenylate cyclase (AC) signaling pathway, resulting in intracellular Ca2+ release and/or Ca2+ influx through a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, respectively. PLC-dependent responses differed dynamically from AC-dependent responses, allowing them to be distinguished when Gα15 and Gαolf were co-expressed. The dynamic difference in readout was independent of the receptor, the heterologous expression system, and the ligand concentration. Of 17 reported mOR-EG ligands tested, including eugenol, its analogs, and structurally dissimilar compounds (mousse cristal, nootkatone, orivone), some equally activated both signaling pathways, some differentially activated both signaling pathways, and some had no noticeable effect even at 1-5 mM. Our findings argue that mOR-EG, when heterologously expressed, can couple to two different signaling pathways in a ligand selective manner. The challenge now is to determine the potential of mOR-EG, and perhaps other ORs, to activate multiple signaling pathways in a ligand selective manner in native ORNs. PMID:25149566

  9. Fragment-Based Design of Ligands Targeting a Novel Site on the Integrase Enzyme of Human Immunodeficiency Virus;#8197;1

    SciTech Connect

    Wielens, Jerome; Headey, Stephen J.; Deadman, John J.; Rhodes, David I.; Parker, Michael W.; Chalmers, David K.; Scanlon, Martin J.

    2011-08-17

    Fragment-based screening has been used to identify a novel ligand binding site on HIV-1 integrase. Crystal structures of fragments bound at this site (shown) have been used to design elaborated second-generation compounds that bind with higher affinity and good ligand efficiency.

  10. Hybrid [FeFe]-hydrogenases with modified active sites show remarkable residual enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Siebel, Judith F; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Weber, Katharina; Rumpel, Sigrun; Reijerse, Edward; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-02-24

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are to date the only enzymes for which it has been demonstrated that the native inorganic binuclear cofactor of the active site Fe2(adt)(CO)3(CN)2 (adt = azadithiolate = [S-CH2-NH-CH2-S](2-)) can be synthesized on the laboratory bench and subsequently inserted into the unmaturated enzyme to yield fully functional holo-enzyme (Berggren, G. et al. (2013) Nature 499, 66-70; Esselborn, J. et al. (2013) Nat. Chem. Biol. 9, 607-610). In the current study, we exploit this procedure to introduce non-native cofactors into the enzyme. Mimics of the binuclear subcluster with a modified bridging dithiolate ligand (thiodithiolate, N-methylazadithiolate, dimethyl-azadithiolate) and three variants containing only one CN(-) ligand were inserted into the active site of the enzyme. We investigated the activity of these variants for hydrogen oxidation as well as proton reduction and their structural accommodation within the active site was analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Interestingly, the monocyanide variant with the azadithiolate bridge showed ∼50% of the native enzyme activity. This would suggest that the CN(-) ligands are not essential for catalytic activity, but rather serve to anchor the binuclear subsite inside the protein pocket through hydrogen bonding. The inserted artificial cofactors with a propanedithiolate and an N-methylazadithiolate bridge as well as their monocyanide variants also showed residual activity. However, these activities were less than 1% of the native enzyme. Our findings indicate that even small changes in the dithiolate bridge of the binuclear subsite lead to a rather strong decrease of the catalytic activity. We conclude that both the Brønsted base function and the conformational flexibility of the native azadithiolate amine moiety are essential for the high catalytic activity of the native enzyme. PMID:25633077

  11. Site Directed Spin Labeling and EPR Spectroscopic Studies of Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Basak, Sandip; Chatterjee, Soumili; Chakrapani, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Ion channel gating is a stimulus-driven orchestration of protein motions that leads to transitions between closed, open, and desensitized states. Fundamental to these transitions is the intrinsic flexibility of the protein, which is critically modulated by membrane lipid-composition. To better understand the structural basis of channel function, it is necessary to study protein dynamics in a physiological membrane environment. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is an important tool to characterize conformational transitions between functional states. In comparison to NMR and X-ray crystallography, the information obtained from EPR is intrinsically of lower resolution. However, unlike in other techniques, in EPR there is no upper-limit to the molecular weight of the protein, the sample requirements are significantly lower, and more importantly the protein is not constrained by the crystal lattice forces. Therefore, EPR is uniquely suited for studying large protein complexes and proteins in reconstituted systems. In this article, we will discuss general protocols for site-directed spin labeling and membrane reconstitution using a prokaryotic proton-gated pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel (pLGIC) from Gloeobacter violaceus (GLIC) as an example. A combination of steady-state Continuous Wave (CW) and Pulsed (Double Electron Electron Resonance-DEER) EPR approaches will be described that will enable a complete quantitative characterization of channel dynamics. PMID:27403967

  12. New avenues for ligand-mediated processes--expanding metal reactivity by the use of redox-active catechol, o-aminophenol and o-phenylenediamine ligands.

    PubMed

    Broere, Daniël L J; Plessius, Raoul; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2015-10-01

    Redox-active ligands have evolved from being considered spectroscopic curiosities - creating ambiguity about formal oxidation states in metal complexes - to versatile and useful tools to expand on the reactivity of (transition) metals or to even go beyond what is generally perceived possible. This review focusses on metal complexes containing either catechol, o-aminophenol or o-phenylenediamine type ligands. These ligands have opened up a new area of chemistry for metals across the periodic table. The portfolio of ligand-based reactivity invoked by these redox-active entities will be discussed. This ranges from facilitating oxidative additions upon d(0) metals or cross coupling reactions with cobalt(iii) without metal oxidation state changes - by functioning as an electron reservoir - to intramolecular ligand-to-substrate single-electron transfer to create a reactive substrate-centered radical on a Pd(ii) platform. Although the current state-of-art research primarily consists of stoichiometric and exploratory reactions, several notable reports of catalysis facilitated by the redox-activity of the ligand will also be discussed. In conclusion, redox-active ligands containing catechol, o-aminophenol or o-phenylenediamine moieties show great potential to be exploited as reversible electron reservoirs, donating or accepting electrons to activate substrates and metal centers and to enable new reactivity with both early and late transition as well as main group metals. PMID:26148803

  13. New avenues for ligand-mediated processes--expanding metal reactivity by the use of redox-active catechol, o-aminophenol and o-phenylenediamine ligands.

    PubMed

    Broere, Daniël L J; Plessius, Raoul; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2015-10-01

    Redox-active ligands have evolved from being considered spectroscopic curiosities - creating ambiguity about formal oxidation states in metal complexes - to versatile and useful tools to expand on the reactivity of (transition) metals or to even go beyond what is generally perceived possible. This review focusses on metal complexes containing either catechol, o-aminophenol or o-phenylenediamine type ligands. These ligands have opened up a new area of chemistry for metals across the periodic table. The portfolio of ligand-based reactivity invoked by these redox-active entities will be discussed. This ranges from facilitating oxidative additions upon d(0) metals or cross coupling reactions with cobalt(iii) without metal oxidation state changes - by functioning as an electron reservoir - to intramolecular ligand-to-substrate single-electron transfer to create a reactive substrate-centered radical on a Pd(ii) platform. Although the current state-of-art research primarily consists of stoichiometric and exploratory reactions, several notable reports of catalysis facilitated by the redox-activity of the ligand will also be discussed. In conclusion, redox-active ligands containing catechol, o-aminophenol or o-phenylenediamine moieties show great potential to be exploited as reversible electron reservoirs, donating or accepting electrons to activate substrates and metal centers and to enable new reactivity with both early and late transition as well as main group metals.

  14. Switching on oxygen activation by cobalt complexes of pentadentate ligands.

    PubMed

    Vad, Mads S; Nielsen, Anne; Lennartson, Anders; Bond, Andrew D; McGrady, John E; McKenzie, Christine J

    2011-10-28

    The monoanionic N(4)O ligand N-methyl-N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine-N'-acetate (mebpena(-)) undergoes oxidative C-N bond cleavage in the presence of Co(II) and O(2). The two resultant fragments are coordinated to the metal ion in the product [Co(III)(2-pyridylformate)(mepena)]ClO(4) (mepena(-) = N-methyl-N'-(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine-N'-acetato). Bond cleavage does not occur in the presence of chloride ions and [Co(III)(mebpena)Cl](+), containing intact mebpena(-), can be isolated. The oxidative instability of the mebpena(-) in the presence of Co(II) and air stands in contrast to the oxidative stability of the family of very closely related penta- and hexa-dentate ligands in their cobalt complexes. Cyclic voltammetry on the matched pair [Co(III)Cl(mebpena)](+) and [Co(II)Cl(bztpen)](+), bztpen = N-benzyl-N,N',N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine, shows that substitution of a pyridine donor for a carboxylato donor results in a relatively small cathodic shift of 150 mV in the E°(Co(II)/Co(III)) oxidation potential, presumably this is enough to determine the contrasting metal oxidation state in the complexes isolated under ambient conditions. DFT calculations support a proposal that [Co(II)(mebpena)](+) reacts with O(2) to form a Co(III)-superoxide complex which can abstract an H atom from a ligand methylene C atom as the initial step towards the observed oxidative C-N bond cleavage.

  15. Histidine at the active site of Neurospora tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Pfiffner, E; Lerch, K

    1981-10-13

    The involvement of histidyl residues as potential ligands to the binuclear active-site copper of Neurospora tyrosinase was explored by dye-sensitized photooxidation. The enzymatic activity of the holoenzyme was shown to be unaffected by exposure to light in the presence of methylene blue; however, irradiation of the apoenzyme under the same conditions led to a progressive loss of its ability to be reactivated with Cu2+. This photoinactivation was paralleled by a decrease in the histidine content whereas the number of histidyl residues in the holoenzyme remained constant. Copper measurements of photooxidized, reconstituted apoenzyme demonstrated the loss of binding of one copper atom per mole of enzyme as a consequence of photosensitized oxidation of three out of nine histidine residues. Their sequence positions were determined by a comparison of the relative yields of the histidine containing peptides of photooxidized holo- and apotyrosinases. The data obtained show the preferential modification of histidyl residues 188, 193, and 289 and suggest that they constitute metal ligands to one of the two active-site copper atoms. Substitution of copper by cobalt was found to afford complete protection of the histidyl residues from being modified by dye-sensitized photooxidation. PMID:6458322

  16. An Accurate Method for Prediction of Protein-Ligand Binding Site on Protein Surface Using SVM and Statistical Depth Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kui; Gao, Jianzhao; Shen, Shiyi; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Ruan, Jishou

    2013-01-01

    Since proteins carry out their functions through interactions with other molecules, accurately identifying the protein-ligand binding site plays an important role in protein functional annotation and rational drug discovery. In the past two decades, a lot of algorithms were present to predict the protein-ligand binding site. In this paper, we introduce statistical depth function to define negative samples and propose an SVM-based method which integrates sequence and structural information to predict binding site. The results show that the present method performs better than the existent ones. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity on training set are 77.55%, 56.15%, and 87.96%, respectively; on the independent test set, the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity are 80.36%, 53.53%, and 92.38%, respectively. PMID:24195070

  17. Water in the Active Site of Ketosteroid Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Hanoian, Philip; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to investigate the structural and dynamical properties of water in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) to provide insight into the role of these water molecules in the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. This reaction is thought to proceed via a dienolate intermediate that is stabilized by hydrogen bonding with residues Tyr16 and Asp103. A comparative study was performed for the wild-type (WT) KSI and the Y16F, Y16S, and Y16F/Y32F/Y57F (FFF) mutants. These systems were studied with three different bound ligands: equilenin, which is an intermediate analog, and the intermediate states of two steroid substrates. Several distinct water occupation sites were identified in the active site of KSI for the WT and mutant systems. Three additional sites were identified in the Y16S mutant that were not occupied in WT KSI or the other mutants studied. The number of water molecules directly hydrogen bonded to the ligand oxygen was approximately two waters in the Y16S mutant, one water in the Y16F and FFF mutants, and intermittent hydrogen bonding of one water molecule in WT KSI. The molecular dynamics trajectories of the Y16F and FFF mutants reproduced the small conformational changes of residue 16 observed in the crystal structures of these two mutants. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations of 1H NMR chemical shifts of the protons in the active site hydrogen-bonding network suggest that the presence of water in the active site does not prevent the formation of short hydrogen bonds with far-downfield chemical shifts. The molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the active site water molecules exchange much more frequently for WT KSI and the FFF mutant than for the Y16F and Y16S mutants. This difference is most likely due to the hydrogen-bonding interaction between Tyr57 and an active site water molecule that is persistent in the Y16F and Y16S mutants but absent in the FFF mutant and significantly less

  18. Inhibition of ligand-independent constitutive activation of the Met oncogenic receptor by the engineered chemically-modified antibody DN30.

    PubMed

    Vigna, Elisa; Chiriaco, Cristina; Cignetto, Simona; Fontani, Lara; Basilico, Cristina; Petronzelli, Fiorella; Comoglio, Paolo M

    2015-11-01

    An awesome number of experimental and clinical evidences indicate that constitutive activation of the Met oncogenic receptor plays a critical role in the progression of cancer toward metastasis and/or resistance to targeted therapies. While mutations are rare, the common mechanism of Met activation is overexpression, either by gene amplification ('addiction') or transcriptional activation ('expedience'). In the first instance ligand-independent kinase activation plays a major role in sustaining the transformed phenotype. Anti-Met antibodies directed against the receptor binding site behave essentially as ligand (Hepatocyte Growth Factor, HGF) antagonists and are ineffective to counteract ligand-independent activation. The monovalent chimeric MvDN30 antibody fragment, PEGylated to extend its half-life, binds the fourth IPT domain and induces 'shedding' of the Met extracellular domain, dramatically reducing both the number of receptors on the surface and their phosphorylation. Downstream signaling is thus inhibited, both in the absence or in the presence of the ligand. In vitro, MvDN30 is a strong inhibitor not only of ligand-dependent invasive growth, sustained by both paracrine and autocrine HGF, but notably, also of ligand-independent growth of 'Met-addicted' cells. In immunocompromised mice, lacking expression of Hepatocyte Growth Factor cross-reacting with the human receptor - thus providing, by definition, a model of 'ligand-independent' Met activation - PEGylated MvDN30 impairs growth of Met 'addicted' human gastric carcinoma cells. In a Met-amplified patient-derived colo-rectal tumor (xenopatient) MvDN30-PEG overcomes the resistance to EGFR targeted therapy (Cetuximab). The PEGylated MvDN30 is thus a strong candidate for targeting tumors sustained by ligand-independent Met oncogenic activation. PMID:26119717

  19. Observation of multiple, identical binding sites in the exchange of carboxylic acid ligands with CdS nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Nichols, Valerie M; Zhou, Dapeng; Lim, Cynthia; Pau, George Shu Heng; Bardeen, Christopher J; Tang, Ming L

    2014-06-11

    We study ligand exchange between the carboxylic acid group and 5.0 nm oleic-acid capped CdS nanocrystals (NCs) using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). This is the first measurement of the initial binding events between cadmium chalcogenide NCs and carboxylic acid groups. The binding behavior can be described as an interaction between a ligand with single binding group and a substrate with multiple, identical binding sites. Assuming Poissonian binding statistics, our model fits both steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence (SSPL and TRPL, respectively) data well. A modified Langmuir isotherm reveals that a CdS nanoparticle has an average of 3.0 new carboxylic acid ligands and binding constant, Ka, of 3.4 × 10(5) M(-1).

  20. The bifunctional active site of s-adenosylmethionine synthetase. Roles of the active site aspartates.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J C; Markham, G D

    1999-11-12

    S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzes the biosynthesis of AdoMet in a unique enzymatic reaction. Initially the sulfur of methionine displaces the intact tripolyphosphate chain (PPP(i)) from ATP, and subsequently PPP(i) is hydrolyzed to PP(i) and P(i) before product release. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli AdoMet synthetase shows that the active site contains four aspartate residues. Aspartate residues Asp-16* and Asp-271 individually provide the sole protein ligand to one of the two required Mg(2+) ions (* denotes a residue from a second subunit); aspartates Asp-118 and Asp-238* are proposed to interact with methionine. Each aspartate has been changed to an uncharged asparagine, and the metal binding residues were also changed to alanine, to assess the roles of charge and ligation ability on catalytic efficiency. The resultant enzyme variants all structurally resemble the wild type enzyme as indicated by circular dichroism spectra and are tetramers. However, all have k(cat) reductions of approximately 10(3)-fold in AdoMet synthesis, whereas the MgATP and methionine K(m) values change by less than 3- and 8-fold, respectively. In the partial reaction of PPP(i) hydrolysis, mutants of the Mg(2+) binding residues have >700-fold reduced catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)), whereas the D118N and D238*N mutants are impaired less than 35-fold. The catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by Mg(2+) site mutants is improved by AdoMet, like the wild type enzyme. In contrast AdoMet reduces the catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by the D118N and D238*N mutants, indicating that the events involved in AdoMet activation are hindered in these methionyl binding site mutants. Ca(2+) uniquely activates the D271A mutant enzyme to 15% of the level of Mg(2+), in contrast to the approximately 1% Ca(2+) activation of the wild type enzyme. This indicates that the Asp-271 side chain size is a discriminator between the activating ability of Ca(2+) and the

  1. A shed NKG2D ligand that promotes natural killer cell activation and tumor rejection

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Weiwen; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Zhang, Li; Wang, Lin; Lau, Stephanie; Iannello, Alexandre; Xu, Jianfeng; Rovis, Tihana L.; Xiong, Na; Raulet, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells, recognize transformed cells and eliminate them in a process termed immunosurveillance. It is thought that tumor cells evade immunosurveillance by shedding membrane ligands that bind to the NKG2D activating receptor on NK cells and/or T cells, and desensitize these cells. In contrast, we show that in mice, shedding of MULT1, a high affinity NKG2D ligand, causes NK cell activation and tumor rejection. Recombinant soluble MULT1 stimulated tumor rejection in mice. Soluble MULT1 functions, at least in part, by competitively reversing a global desensitization of NK cells imposed by engagement of membrane NKG2D ligands on tumor-associated cells, such as myeloid cells. The results overturn conventional wisdom that soluble ligands are inhibitory, and suggest a new approach for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25745066

  2. Examining the critical roles of human CB2 receptor residues Valine 3.32 (113) and Leucine 5.41 (192) in ligand recognition and downstream signaling activities.

    PubMed

    Alqarni, Mohammed; Myint, Kyaw Zeyar; Tong, Qin; Yang, Peng; Bartlow, Patrick; Wang, Lirong; Feng, Rentian; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2014-09-26

    We performed molecular modeling and docking to predict a putative binding pocket and associated ligand-receptor interactions for human cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2). Our data showed that two hydrophobic residues came in close contact with three structurally distinct CB2 ligands: CP-55,940, SR144528 and XIE95-26. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments and subsequent functional assays implicated the roles of Valine residue at position 3.32 (V113) and Leucine residue at position 5.41 (L192) in the ligand binding function and downstream signaling activities of the CB2 receptor. Four different point mutations were introduced to the wild type CB2 receptor: V113E, V113L, L192S and L192A. Our results showed that mutation of Val113 with a Glutamic acid and Leu192 with a Serine led to the complete loss of CB2 ligand binding as well as downstream signaling activities. Substitution of these residues with those that have similar hydrophobic side chains such as Leucine (V113L) and Alanine (L192A), however, allowed CB2 to retain both its ligand binding and signaling functions. Our modeling results validated by competition binding and site-directed mutagenesis experiments suggest that residues V113 and L192 play important roles in ligand binding and downstream signaling transduction of the CB2 receptor.

  3. Impaired ergosterol biosynthesis mediated fungicidal activity of Co(II) complex with ligand derived from cinnamaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Shreaz, Sheikh; Shiekh, Rayees A; Raja, Vaseem; Wani, Waseem A; Behbehani, Jawad M

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have used aldehyde function of cinnamaldehyde to synthesize N, N'-Bis (cinnamaldehyde) ethylenediimine [C20H20N2] and Co(II) complex of the type [Co(C40H40N4)Cl2]. The structures of the synthesized compounds were determined on the basis of physiochemical analysis and spectroscopic data ((1)H NMR, FTIR, UV-visible and mass spectra) along with molar conductivity measurements. Anticandidal activity of cinnamaldehyde its ligand [L] and Co(II) complex was investigated by determining MIC80, time-kill kinetics, disc diffusion assay and ergosterol extraction and estimation assay. Ligand [L] and Co(II) complex are found to be 4.55 and 21.0 folds more efficient than cinnamaldehyde in a liquid medium. MIC80 of Co(II) complex correlated well with ergosterol inhibition suggesting ergosterol biosynthesis to be the primary site of action. In comparison to fluconazole, the test compounds showed limited toxicity against H9c2 rat cardiac myoblasts. In confocal microscopy propidium iodide (PI) penetrates the yeast cells when treated with MIC of metal complex, indicating a disruption of cell membrane that results in imbibition of dye. TEM analysis of metal complex treated cells exhibited notable alterations or damage to the cell membrane and the cell wall. The structural disorganization within the cell cytoplasm was noted. It was concluded that fungicidal activity of Co(II) complex originated from loss of membrane integrity and a decrease in ergosterol content is only one consequence of this.

  4. A method for the second-site screening of K-Ras in the presence of a covalently attached first-site ligand

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qi; Phan, Jason; Friberg, Anders R.; Camper, DeMarco V.; Olejniczak, Edward T.; Fesik, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras is a well-validated cancer target but is considered to be “undruggable” due to the lack of suitable binding pockets. We previously discovered small molecules that bind weakly to K-Ras but wanted to improve their binding affinities by identifying ligands that bind near our initial hits that we could link together. Here we describe an approach for identifying second site ligands that uses a cysteine residue to covalently attach a compound for tight binding to the first site pocket followed by a fragment screen for binding to a second site. This approach could be very useful for targeting Ras and other challenging drug targets. PMID:25087006

  5. Engineering and optimization of an allosteric biosensor protein for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ ligands.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Gierach, Izabela; Gillies, Alison R; Warden, Charles D; Wood, David W

    2011-11-15

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ or PPARG) belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, and is a potential drug target for a variety of diseases. In this work, we constructed a series of bacterial biosensors for the identification of functional PPARγ ligands. These sensors entail modified Escherichia coli cells carrying a four-domain fusion protein, comprised of the PPARγ ligand binding domain (LBD), an engineered mini-intein domain, the E. coli maltose binding protein (MBD), and a thymidylate synthase (TS) reporter enzyme. E. coli cells expressing this protein exhibit hormone ligand-dependent growth phenotypes. Unlike our published estrogen (ER) and thyroid receptor (TR) biosensors, the canonical PPARγ biosensor cells displayed pronounced growth in the absence of ligand. They were able to distinguish agonists and antagonists, however, even in the absence of agonist. To improve ligand sensitivity of this sensor, we attempted to engineer and optimize linker peptides flanking the PPARγ LBD insertion point. Truncation of the original linkers led to decreased basal growth and significantly enhanced ligand sensitivity of the PPARγ sensor, while substitution of the native linkers with optimized G(4)S (Gly-Gly-Gly-Gly-Ser) linkers further increased the sensitivity. Our studies demonstrate that the properties of linkers, especially the C-terminal linker, greatly influence the efficiency and fidelity of the allosteric signal induced by ligand binding. Our work also suggests an approach to increase allosteric behavior in this multidomain sensor protein, without modification of the functional LBD. PMID:21893405

  6. Characterization of the active site of chloroperoxidase using physical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    Chloroperoxidase (CPO) and Cytochrome P-450, two very different hemeproteins, have been shown to have similar active sites by several techniques. Recent work has demonstrated thiolate ligation from a cysteine residue to the iron in P-450. A major portion of this research has been devoted to obtaining direct evidence that CPO also has a thiolate 5th ligand from a cysteine residue. This information will provide the framework for a detailed analysis of the structure-function relationships between peroxidases, catalase and cytochrome P-450 hemeproteins. To determine whether the 5th ligand is a cysteine, methionine or a unique amino acid, specific isotope enrichment experiments were used. Preliminary /sup 1/H-NMR studies show that the carbon monoxide-CPO complex has a peak in the upfield region corresponding to alpha-protons of a thiolate amino acid. C. fumago was grown on 95% D/sub 2/O media with a small amount of /sup 1/H-cysteine added. Under these conditions C. fumago slows down the biosynthesis of cysteine by at least 50% and utilizes the exogenous cysteine in the media. GC-MS was able to show that the methylene protons next to the sulfur atom in cysteine are 80-90% protonated while these positions in methionine are approximately 73% deuterated. Comparison of the /sup 1/H-NMR spectra of CO-CPO and CO-CPO indicate the presence of a cysteine ligand in chloroperoxidase.

  7. Automatic generation of bioinformatics tools for predicting protein–ligand binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Banno, Masaki; Ueki, Kokoro; Saad, Gul; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Predictive tools that model protein–ligand binding on demand are needed to promote ligand research in an innovative drug-design environment. However, it takes considerable time and effort to develop predictive tools that can be applied to individual ligands. An automated production pipeline that can rapidly and efficiently develop user-friendly protein–ligand binding predictive tools would be useful. Results: We developed a system for automatically generating protein–ligand binding predictions. Implementation of this system in a pipeline of Semantic Web technique-based web tools will allow users to specify a ligand and receive the tool within 0.5–1 day. We demonstrated high prediction accuracy for three machine learning algorithms and eight ligands. Availability and implementation: The source code and web application are freely available for download at http://utprot.net. They are implemented in Python and supported on Linux. Contact: shimizu@bi.a.u-tokyo.ac.jp Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26545824

  8. Vaulted Biaryls in Catalysis: A Structure-Activity Relationship Guided Tour of the Immanent Domain of the VANOL Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yong; Ding, Zhensheng

    2013-01-01

    The active site in the BOROX catalyst is a chiral polyborate anion (boroxinate) that is assembled in-situ from three equivalents of B(OPh)3 and one of the VANOL ligand by a molecule of substrate. The substrates are bound to the boroxinate by H-bonds to oxygens O1-O3. The effects of introducing substituents at each position of the naphthalene core of the VANOL ligand are systematically investigated in an aziridination reaction. Substituents in the 4,4′- and 8,8′-positions have a negative effect on catalyst performance, whereas, substituents in the 7- and 7′-positions have the biggest impact in a positive direction. PMID:24123264

  9. Pharmacophore modeling improves virtual screening for novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma ligands

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Stephanie N.; Garcia, Zulma; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Bevan, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in regulating various metabolic and immune processes. The PPAR family of receptors possesses a large binding cavity that imparts promiscuity of ligand binding not common to other nuclear receptors. This feature increases the challenge of using computational methods to identify PPAR ligands that will dock favorably into a structural model. Utilizing both ligand- and structure-based pharmacophore methods, we sought to improve agonist prediction by grouping ligands according to pharmacophore features, and pairing models derived from these features with receptor structures for docking. For 22 of the 33 receptor structures evaluated we observed an increase in true positive rate (TPR) when screening was restricted to compounds sharing molecular features found in rosiglitazone. A combination of structure models used for docking resulted in a higher TPR (40%) when compared to docking with a single structure model (less than 20%). Prediction was also improved when specific protein-ligand interactions between the docked ligands and structure models were given greater weight than the calculated free energy of binding. A large-scale screen of compounds using a marketed drug database verified the predictive ability of the selected structure models. This study highlights the steps necessary to improve screening for PPARγ ligands using multiple structure models, ligand-based pharmacophore data, evaluation of protein-ligand interactions, and comparison of docking datasets. The unique combination of methods presented here holds potential for more efficient screening of compounds with unknown affinity for PPARγ that could serve as candidates for therapeutic development. PMID:25616366

  10. Critical role of the H6-H7 loop in the conformational adaptation of all-trans retinoic acid and synthetic retinoids within the ligand-binding site of RARalpha.

    PubMed

    Mailfait, S; Thoreau, E; Belaiche, D; Formstecher And B Sablonniè, P

    2000-06-01

    The pleiotropic effects of the natural and synthetic retinoids are mediated by the activation of the two subfamilies of nuclear receptors, the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and the retinoic X receptors (RXRs). At the molecular level, these events begin with the specific ligand recognition by a nuclear receptor subtype. The adaptation of ligands to the receptor binding site leads to an optimal number of interactions for binding and selectivity which justifies elucidation of the structural requirements of the ligand binding pocket. To explore the contribution of H6-H7 loop folding in the ligand-induced conformational changes explained by the mouse-trap model, four RARalpha mutants were constructed. Ligand binding and transactivation studies revealed that three residues from the H6-H7 loop (Gly(301), Phe(302) and Gly(303)) are critical for the conformational adaptation of both synthetic agonists and antagonists. Model building and analysis of both RARalpha-ATRA and RARalpha-CD367 complexes demonstrate that accommodation of CD367 results in a less tight contact of the saturated ring of this ligand with the amino acid side chains of the receptor ligand-binding pocket compared with that of ATRA. According to the flexibility of the agonists tested (ATRA>TTNPB=Am580> CD367), we observed a decrease in binding that was dependent on ligand structure rigidity. In contrast, the binding and transactivating activities of the L266A mutant confirmed the structural constraints imposed by synthetic ligands on binding affinity for the receptor and revealed that subtle local rearrangements induced by specific conformational adaptation changes result in different binding affinities. Our results illustrate the dynamic nature of the interaction between RARalpha and its ligands and demonstrate the critical role of the H6-H7 loop in the binding of both synthetic retinoid agonists and antagonists.

  11. Structural determinants of ligand binding selectivity between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H. Eric; Lambert, Millard H.; Montana, Valerie G.; Plunket, Kelli D.; Moore, Linda B.; Collins, Jon L.; Oplinger, Jeffery A.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Gampe, Robert T.; McKee, David D.; Moore, John T.; Willson, Timothy M.

    2001-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are transcriptional regulators of glucose, lipid, and cholesterol metabolism. We report the x-ray crystal structure of the ligand binding domain of PPARα (NR1C1) as a complex with the agonist ligand GW409544 and a coactivator motif from the steroid receptor coactivator 1. Through comparison of the crystal structures of the ligand binding domains of the three human PPARs, we have identified molecular determinants of subtype selectivity. A single amino acid, which is tyrosine in PPARα and histidine in PPARγ, imparts subtype selectivity for both thiazolidinedione and nonthiazolidinedione ligands. The availability of high-resolution cocrystal structures of the three PPAR subtypes will aid the design of drugs for the treatments of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:11698662

  12. Structural characteristics of the recognition site for cholinergic ligands in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from squid optical ganglia

    SciTech Connect

    Plyashkevich, Yu.G.; Demushkin, V.P.

    1986-01-20

    The influence of chemical modification on the parameters of the binding of cholinergic ligands by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of squid optical ganglia was investigated. The presence of two subpopulations of recognition sites, differing in the composition of the groups contained in them, was detected. It was established with high probability that subpopulation I contains arginine and tyrosine residues and a carboxyl group while subpopulation II contains an amino group, a thyrosine residue, and a carboxyl group. Moreover, in both subpopulations there is an amino group important only for the binding of tubocurarin. On the basis of the results obtained, a model of the recognition sites for cholinergic ligands of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of squid optical ganglia is proposed.

  13. Ruthenium Dihydroxybipyridine Complexes are Tumor Activated Prodrugs Due to Low pH and Blue Light Induced Ligand Release

    PubMed Central

    Hufziger, Kyle T.; Thowfeik, Fathima Shazna; Charboneau, David J.; Nieto, Ismael; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. Scott; Dudley, Timothy J.; Merino, Edward J.; Papish, Elizabeth T.; Paul, Jared J.

    2013-01-01

    Ruthenium drugs are potent anti-cancer agents, but inducing drug selectivity and enhancing their modest activity remain challenging. Slow Ru ligand loss limits the formation of free sites and subsequent binding to DNA base pairs. Herein, we designed a ligand that rapidly dissociates upon irradiation at low pH. Activation at low pH can lead to cancer selectivity, since many cancer cells have higher metabolism (and thus lower pH) than non-cancerous cells. We have used the pH sensitive ligand, 6,6′-dihydroxy-2,2′-bipyridine (66′bpy(OH)2), to generate [Ru(bpy)2(66′(bpy(OH)2)]2+, which contains two acidic hydroxyl groups with pKa1 = 5.26 and pKa2 = 7.27. Irradiation when protonated leads to photo-dissociation of the 66′bpy(OH)2 ligand. An in-depth study of the structural and electronic properties of the complex was carried out using X-Ray crystallography, electrochemistry, UV/visible spectroscopy, and computational techniques. Notably, Ru-N bond lengths in the 66′bpy(OH)2 complex are longer (by ~0.3 Å) than in polypyridyl complexes that lack 6 and 6′ substitution. Thus, the longer bond length predisposes the complex for photo-dissociation and leads to the anti-cancer activity. When the complex is deprotonated, the 66′bpy(O−)2 ligand molecular orbitals mix heavily with the ruthenium orbitals, making new mixed metal-ligand orbitals that lead to a higher bond order. We investigated the anti-cancer activities of [Ru(bpy)2(66′(bpy(OH)2)]2+, [Ru(bpy)2(44′(bpy(OH)2)]2+, and [Ru(bpy)3]2+ (44′(bpy(OH)2 = 4,4′-dihydroxy-2,2′-bipyridine) in HeLa cells, which have a relatively low pH. It is found that [Ru(bpy)2(66′(bpy(OH)2)]2+ is more cytotoxic than the other ruthenium complexes studied. Thus, we have identified a pH sensitive ruthenium scaffold that can be exploited for photo-induced anti-cancer activity. PMID:24184694

  14. Activation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes reduces their adhesion to P-selectin and causes redistribution of ligands for P-selectin on their surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Lorant, D E; McEver, R P; McIntyre, T M; Moore, K L; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A

    1995-01-01

    In acute inflammatory responses, selectins mediate initial rolling of neutrophils (PMNs) along the endothelial surface. This is followed by tight adhesion that requires activation-dependent up-regulation of CD11/CD18 integrins on PMNs. For emigration to occur, the initial bonds that are established at the endothelial surface must be disengaged. We show that activation of PMNs results in their detachment from P-selectin, a glycoprotein expressed at the surface of inflamed endothelium that mediates initial tethering of PMNs. Loosening of the bond occurs when PMNs are activated by platelet-activating factor, which is coexpressed with P-selectin, or by other signaling molecules. The time course of reduced adhesion to P-selectin, when compared to up-regulation of CD11/CD18 integrins, suggests that "bond trading" may occur as activated PMNs transmigrate in vivo. Activation of PMNs did not alter binding of fluid-phase P-selectin, indicating that the ligand(s) for P-selectin is not shed or internalized. Using microspheres coated with P-selectin, we found that ligands for P-selectin were randomly distributed over the surfaces of rounded, unactivated PMNs. An antibody against P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) completely inhibited binding of P-selectin-coated beads suggesting that P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 is the critical binding site in this assay. In contrast to the dispersed pattern on unactivated PMNs, the ligands for P-selectin were localized on the uropods of activated, polarized cells. Pretreating PMNs with cytochalasin D before activation prevented the change in cell shape, the redistribution of binding sites for P-selectin-coated beads, and the decrease in cellular adhesiveness for P-selectin. These experiments indicate that the distribution of ligands for P-selectin is influenced by cellular activation and by cytoskeletal interactions, and that redistribution of these ligands may influence adhesive interactions. Activation of PMNs may cause loosening

  15. SMAP-WS: a parallel web service for structural proteome-wide ligand-binding site comparison.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jingyuan; Xie, Lei; Li, Wilfred W; Bourne, Philip E

    2010-07-01

    The proteome-wide characterization and analysis of protein ligand-binding sites and their interactions with ligands can provide pivotal information in understanding the structure, function and evolution of proteins and for designing safe and efficient therapeutics. The SMAP web service (SMAP-WS) meets this need through parallel computations designed for 3D ligand-binding site comparison and similarity searching on a structural proteome scale. SMAP-WS implements a shape descriptor (the Geometric Potential) that characterizes both local and global topological properties of the protein structure and which can be used to predict the likely ligand-binding pocket [Xie,L. and Bourne,P.E. (2007) A robust and efficient algorithm for the shape description of protein structures and its application in predicting ligand-binding sites. BMC bioinformatics, 8 (Suppl. 4.), S9.]. Subsequently a sequence order independent profile-profile alignment (SOIPPA) algorithm is used to detect and align similar pockets thereby finding protein functional and evolutionary relationships across fold space [Xie, L. and Bourne, P.E. (2008) Detecting evolutionary relationships across existing fold space, using sequence order-independent profile-profile alignments. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 105, 5441-5446]. An extreme value distribution model estimates the statistical significance of the match [Xie, L., Xie, L. and Bourne, P.E. (2009) A unified statistical model to support local sequence order independent similarity searching for ligand-binding sites and its application to genome-based drug discovery. Bioinformatics, 25, i305-i312.]. These algorithms have been extensively benchmarked and shown to outperform most existing algorithms. Moreover, several predictions resulting from SMAP-WS have been validated experimentally. Thus far SMAP-WS has been applied to predict drug side effects, and to repurpose existing drugs for new indications. SMAP-WS provides both a user-friendly web interface and

  16. SMAP-WS: a parallel web service for structural proteome-wide ligand-binding site comparison.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jingyuan; Xie, Lei; Li, Wilfred W; Bourne, Philip E

    2010-07-01

    The proteome-wide characterization and analysis of protein ligand-binding sites and their interactions with ligands can provide pivotal information in understanding the structure, function and evolution of proteins and for designing safe and efficient therapeutics. The SMAP web service (SMAP-WS) meets this need through parallel computations designed for 3D ligand-binding site comparison and similarity searching on a structural proteome scale. SMAP-WS implements a shape descriptor (the Geometric Potential) that characterizes both local and global topological properties of the protein structure and which can be used to predict the likely ligand-binding pocket [Xie,L. and Bourne,P.E. (2007) A robust and efficient algorithm for the shape description of protein structures and its application in predicting ligand-binding sites. BMC bioinformatics, 8 (Suppl. 4.), S9.]. Subsequently a sequence order independent profile-profile alignment (SOIPPA) algorithm is used to detect and align similar pockets thereby finding protein functional and evolutionary relationships across fold space [Xie, L. and Bourne, P.E. (2008) Detecting evolutionary relationships across existing fold space, using sequence order-independent profile-profile alignments. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 105, 5441-5446]. An extreme value distribution model estimates the statistical significance of the match [Xie, L., Xie, L. and Bourne, P.E. (2009) A unified statistical model to support local sequence order independent similarity searching for ligand-binding sites and its application to genome-based drug discovery. Bioinformatics, 25, i305-i312.]. These algorithms have been extensively benchmarked and shown to outperform most existing algorithms. Moreover, several predictions resulting from SMAP-WS have been validated experimentally. Thus far SMAP-WS has been applied to predict drug side effects, and to repurpose existing drugs for new indications. SMAP-WS provides both a user-friendly web interface and

  17. The utility of geometrical and chemical restraint information extracted from predicted ligand binding sites in protein structure refinement

    PubMed Central

    Brylinski, Michal; Lee, Seung Yup; Zhou, Hongyi

    2010-01-01

    Exhaustive exploration of molecular interactions at the level of complete proteomes requires efficient and reliable computational approaches to protein function inference. Ligand docking and ranking techniques show considerable promise in their ability to quantify the interactions between proteins and small molecules. Despite the advances in the development of docking approaches and scoring functions, the genome-wide application of many ligand docking/screening algorithms is limited by the quality of the binding sites in theoretical receptor models constructed by protein structure prediction. In this study, we describe a new template-based method for the local refinement of ligand-binding regions in protein models using remotely related templates identified by threading. We designed a Support Vector Regression (SVR) model that selects correct binding site geometries in a large ensemble of multiple receptor conformations. The SVR model employs several scoring functions that impose geometrical restraints on the Cα positions, account for the specific chemical environment within a binding site and optimize the interactions with putative ligands. The SVR score is well correlated with the RMSD from the native structure; in 47% (70%) of the cases, the Pearson’s correlation coefficient is >0.5 (>0.3). When applied to weakly homologous models, the average heavy atom, local RMSD from the native structure of the top-ranked (best of top five) binding site geometries is 3.1 Å (2.9 Å) for roughly half of the targets; this represents a 0.1 (0.3) Å average improvement over the original predicted structure. Focusing on the subset of strongly conserved residues, the average heavy atom RMSD is 2.6 Å (2.3 Å). Furthermore, we estimate the upper bound of template-based binding site refinement using only weakly related proteins to be ~2.6 Å RMSD. This value also corresponds to the plasticity of the ligand-binding regions in distant homologues. The Binding Site Refinement (BSR

  18. A yeast surface display system for the discovery of ligands that trigger cell activation.

    PubMed

    Cho, B K; Kieke, M C; Boder, E T; Wittrup, K D; Kranz, D M

    1998-11-01

    Opposing cells often communicate signalling events using multivalent interactions between receptors present on their cell surface. For example, T cells are typically activated when the T cell receptor (TCR) and its associated costimulatory molecules are multivalently engaged by the appropriate ligands present on an antigen presenting cell. In this report, yeast expressing high cell-surface levels of a TCR ligand (a recombinant antibody to the TCR Vbeta domain) were shown to act as 'pseudo' antigen presenting cells and induce T cell activation as monitored by increased levels of CD25 and CD69 and by downregulation of cell surface TCR. Similar levels of T cell activation could occur even when a 30-fold excess of irrelevant yeast was present, suggesting that such a yeast display system, by virtue of its ability to present ligands multivalently, may be used in highly sensitive procedures to identify novel polypeptides that interact multivalently with cell surface receptors and thereby trigger specific cellular responses.

  19. Evidence for surface Ag + complexes as the SERS-active sites on Ag electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Kawanami, O.; Honda, K.; Pettinger, B.

    1983-12-01

    Evidence is given that SERS-active sites at Ag electrodes are associated with Ag + ions, forming sparingly soluble surface complexes with ligands such as pyridine molecules and halide ions. Such surface Ag + complexes contribute a factor of >800 to the overall (10 7-fold) enhancement, possibly via a resonance Raman effect.

  20. Ligand substitutions between ruthenium–cymene compounds can control protein versus DNA targeting and anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Adhireksan, Zenita; Davey, Gabriela E.; Campomanes, Pablo; Groessl, Michael; Clavel, Catherine M.; Yu, Haojie; Nazarov, Alexey A.; Yeo, Charmian Hui Fang; Ang, Wee Han; Dröge, Peter; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Dyson, Paul J.; Davey, Curt A.

    2014-01-01

    Ruthenium compounds have become promising alternatives to platinum drugs by displaying specific activities against different cancers and favourable toxicity and clearance properties. Nonetheless, their molecular targeting and mechanism of action are poorly understood. Here we study two prototypical ruthenium-arene agents—the cytotoxic antiprimary tumour compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(ethylene-diamine)Cl]PF6 and the relatively non-cytotoxic antimetastasis compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane)Cl2]—and discover that the former targets the DNA of chromatin, while the latter preferentially forms adducts on the histone proteins. Using a novel ‘atom-to-cell’ approach, we establish the basis for the surprisingly site-selective adduct formation behaviour and distinct cellular impact of these two chemically similar anticancer agents, which suggests that the cytotoxic effects arise largely from DNA lesions, whereas the protein adducts may be linked to the other therapeutic activities. Our study shows promise for developing new ruthenium drugs, via ligand-based modulation of DNA versus protein binding and thus cytotoxic potential, to target distinguishing epigenetic features of cancer cells. PMID:24637564

  1. Mimicking enzymatic active sites on surfaces for energy conversion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gutzler, Rico; Stepanow, Sebastian; Grumelli, Doris; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Kern, Klaus

    2015-07-21

    Metal-organic supramolecular chemistry on surfaces has matured to a point where its underlying growth mechanisms are well understood and structures of defined coordination environments of metal atoms can be synthesized in a controlled and reproducible procedure. With surface-confined molecular self-assembly, scientists have a tool box at hand which can be used to prepare structures with desired properties, as for example a defined oxidation number and spin state of the transition metal atoms within the organic matrix. From a structural point of view, these coordination sites in the supramolecular structure resemble the catalytically active sites of metallo-enzymes, both characterized by metal centers coordinated to organic ligands. Several chemical reactions take place at these embedded metal ions in enzymes and the question arises whether these reactions also take place using metal-organic networks as catalysts. Mimicking the active site of metal atoms and organic ligands of enzymes in artificial systems is the key to understanding the selectivity and efficiency of enzymatic reactions. Their catalytic activity depends on various parameters including the charge and spin configuration in the metal ion, but also on the organic environment, which can stabilize intermediate reaction products, inhibits catalytic deactivation, and serves mostly as a transport channel for the reactants and products and therefore ensures the selectivity of the enzyme. Charge and spin on the transition metal in enzymes depend on the one hand on the specific metal element, and on the other hand on its organic coordination environment. These two parameters can carefully be adjusted in surface confined metal-organic networks, which can be synthesized by virtue of combinatorial mixing of building synthons. Different organic ligands with varying functional groups can be combined with several transition metals and spontaneously assemble into ordered networks. The catalytically active metal

  2. New Synthesis and Tritium Labeling of a Selective Ligand for Studying High-affinity γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Vogensen, Stine B.; Marek, Aleš; Bay, Tina; Wellendorph, Petrine; Kehler, Jan; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Frølund, Bente; Pedersen, Martin H.F.; Clausen, Rasmus P.

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroxycyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid (HOCPCA, 1) is a potent ligand for the high-affinity GHB binding sites in the CNS. An improved synthesis of 1 together with a very efficient synthesis of [3H]-1 is described. The radiosynthesis employs in situ generated lithium trimethoxyborotritide. Screening of 1 against different CNS targets establishes a high selectivity and we demonstrate in vivo brain penetration. In vitro characterization of [3H]-1 binding shows high specificity to the high-affinity GHB binding sites. PMID:24053696

  3. Catalysis: Elusive active site in focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labinger, Jay A.

    2016-08-01

    The identification of the active site of an iron-containing catalyst raises hopes of designing practically useful catalysts for the room-temperature conversion of methane to methanol, a potential fuel for vehicles. See Letter p.317

  4. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand and osteoprotegerin levels in gingival crevicular fluid

    PubMed Central

    Sarlati, Fatemeh; Sattari, Mandana; Razzaghi, Shilan; Nasiri, Malihe

    2012-01-01

    Background: Osteoclastogenesis is coordinated by the interaction of three members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily: Osteoprotegerin (OPG)/receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL)/receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK). The aim of this study was to investigate RANKL and OPG levels, and their relative ratio in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of patients with chronic and aggressive periodontitis, as well as healthy controls. Materials and Methods: In this analytical study, GCF was obtained from healthy (n = 10), mild chronic periodontitis (n = 18), moderate chronic periodontitis (n = 18), severe chronic periodontitis (n = 20), and generalized aggressive periodontitis (n = 20) subjects. RANKL and OPG concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Statistical tests used were Kruskal–Wallis test, Mann–Whitney U rank sum test, and Spearman's rank correlation analysis. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: Mean RANKL concentration showed no statistically significant differences between groups (P = 0.58). There were also no significant differences between mean OPG concentration in the five groups (P = 0.0.56). Moreover, relative RANKL/OPG ratio did not reveal a significant difference between the three study group subjects: healthy, chronic periodontitis (mild, moderate, severe), and aggressive periodontitis (P = 0.41). There was statistically significant correlation between the concentration of sRANKL and Clinical Attachment Level (CAL) in moderate chronic periodontitis patients (R = 0.48, P = 0.04). There was also negative correlation between OPG concentration and CAL in moderate chronic periodontitis patients, although not significant (R = −0.13). Conclusion: RANKL was prominent in periodontitis sites, especially in moderate periodontitis patients, whereas OPG was not detectable in some diseased sites with bleeding on probing, supporting the role of these two molecules in

  5. Synthesis, Characterization, and Reactivity Studies of Iron Complexes Supported by the Redox-Active [ONO] Ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Janice Lin

    The work reported herein primarily focuses on the development of new platforms for multi-electron reactivity using iron complexes supported by a redox-active pincer-type ligand. This dissertation details the synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of iron complexes coordinated to the redox-active [ONO] ([ONO]H3 = bis(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-phenol)amine) ligand. Chapter 1 provides a general background on ligand-centered and metal-centered redox reactivity. Specifically, the characteristics of redox-active ligands and their ability to promote multi-electron reactivity at redox-inert metal centers is presented. In addition, iron-catalyzed organic transformations in which the metal center undergoes redox changes is also discussed. Finally, ligand-enabled redox reactions mediated by iron complexes containing redox-active ligands is described. Chapter 2 reports on the complexation of bis(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-phenoxy)amine, [ONHO], and the redox-active [ONO] ligands by iron centers to afford a new family of iron complexes. Characterizations of each compound through a battery of analytical techniques reveal the oxidation states of the metal center and ligand. Furthermore, the electronic properties of each complex were investigated in order to evaluate their potential to facilitate multi-electron reactivity. Chapter 3 details the reactivity of the [ONO]Fe platform. Metathesis reactions are conducted with [ONOq]FeIIIX 2 (X = Cl, N[SiMe3]2) complexes, demonstrating the capability of the fully-oxidized [ONOq]1-- to act as a two-electron acceptor to generate the fully reduced [ONO cat]3-- that is coordinated to an iron(III) center. Similarly, oxidation of [ONOcat]FeIII(py) 3 (py = pyridine) using dihalogens result in two-electron oxidations of the tridentate ligand while the metal oxidation state remains the same. These redox reactions showcase the ability of the [ONO] ligand platform to undergo reversible two-electron oxidation state changes, allowing multi-electron reactivity

  6. The high affinity melationin binding site probed with conformationally restricted ligand--I. Pharmacophore and minireceptor models.

    PubMed

    Jansen, J M; Copinga, S; Gruppen, G; Molinari, E J; Dubocovich, M L; Grol, C J

    1996-08-01

    The affinities of enantiomers of conformationally restricted melatonin analogues for the ML-1 and ML-2 putative melatonin receptor subtypes are reported. Most ligands exhibited reversed stereoselectivity when competing with 125I 2-iodomelatonin binding to chicken retinal (ML-1) and hamster brain (ML-2) membranes, further supporting the biochemical and pharmacological differences reported for these two sites. Based on the data for the ML-1 site and thorough conformational analyses of several ligands, two pharmacophore models were derived using the program APOLLO. The pharmacophoric elements included were putative receptor points from the amide NH, the amide CO, and the methoxy-O, together with the normal through the phenyl ring. The large drop in ML-1 affinity observed for 4-methoxy-2-acetamido-indan (6a) could not be explained from either of these models. Minireceptors were subsequently built around the two pharmacophores using Yak. Analysis of the resulting ligand-minireceptor interactions offered an explanation for the low affinity of 6a and allowed one of the pharmacophore models to be selected for use in future drug design. PMID:8879554

  7. Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial activities of mixed ligand transition metal complexes with isatin monohydrazone Schiff base ligands and heterocyclic nitrogen base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Jai; Batra, Nisha

    2015-01-01

    Mixed ligand complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) with various uninegative tridentate ligands derived from isatin monohydrazone with 2-hydroxynapthaldehyde/substituted salicylaldehyde and heterocyclic nitrogen base 8-hydroxyquinoline have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, conductometric studies, magnetic susceptibility and spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-VIS, NMR, mass and ESR). On the basis of these characterizations, it was revealed that Schiff base ligands existed as monobasic tridentate ONO bonded to metal ion through oxygen of carbonyl group, azomethine nitrogen and deprotonated hydroxyl oxygen and heterocyclic nitrogen base 8-hydroxyquinoline existed as monobasic bidentate ON bonded through oxygen of hydroxyl group and nitrogen of quinoline ring with octahedral or distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion. All the compounds have been tested in vitro against various pathogenic Gram positive bacteria, Gram negative bacteria and fungi using different concentrations (25, 50, 100, 200 μg/mL) of ligands and their complexes. Comparative study of antimicrobial activity of ligands, and their mixed complexes indicated that complexes exhibit enhanced activity as compared to free ligands and copper(II) Cu(LIV)(Q)ṡH2O complex was found to be most potent antimicrobial agent.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial activities of mixed ligand transition metal complexes with isatin monohydrazone Schiff base ligands and heterocyclic nitrogen base.

    PubMed

    Devi, Jai; Batra, Nisha

    2015-01-25

    Mixed ligand complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) with various uninegative tridentate ligands derived from isatin monohydrazone with 2-hydroxynapthaldehyde/substituted salicylaldehyde and heterocyclic nitrogen base 8-hydroxyquinoline have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, conductometric studies, magnetic susceptibility and spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-VIS, NMR, mass and ESR). On the basis of these characterizations, it was revealed that Schiff base ligands existed as monobasic tridentate ONO bonded to metal ion through oxygen of carbonyl group, azomethine nitrogen and deprotonated hydroxyl oxygen and heterocyclic nitrogen base 8-hydroxyquinoline existed as monobasic bidentate ON bonded through oxygen of hydroxyl group and nitrogen of quinoline ring with octahedral or distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion. All the compounds have been tested in vitro against various pathogenic Gram positive bacteria, Gram negative bacteria and fungi using different concentrations (25, 50, 100, 200 μg/mL) of ligands and their complexes. Comparative study of antimicrobial activity of ligands, and their mixed complexes indicated that complexes exhibit enhanced activity as compared to free ligands and copper(II) Cu(LIV)(Q)⋅H2O complex was found to be most potent antimicrobial agent. PMID:25129626

  9. Inhibition and active-site modelling of prolidase.

    PubMed

    King, G F; Crossley, M J; Kuchel, P W

    1989-03-15

    Consideration of the active-site model of prolidase led us to examine azetidine, pyrrolidine and piperidine substrate analogs as potential in vivo inhibitors of the enzyme. One of these, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-proline, was shown to be a potent competitive inhibitor of porcine kidney prolidase (Ki = 90 microM); its rapid protein-mediated permeation of human and sheep erythrocytes suggests that it may be effective in vivo. The higher homolog, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-pipecolic acid, was also a potent inhibitor of the enzyme while the antihypertensive drugs, captopril and enalaprilat, were shown to have mild and no inhibitory effects, respectively. Analysis of inhibitor action and consideration of X-ray crystallographic data of relevant Mn2+ complexes allowed the active-site model of prolidase to be further refined; a new model is presented in which the substrate acts as a bidentate ligand towards the active-site manganous ion. Various aspects of the new model help to explain why Mn2+ has been 'chosen' by the enzyme in preference to other biologically available metal ions. PMID:2924773

  10. Recognition of Mannosylated Ligands and Influenza A Virus by Human SP-D: Contributions of an Extended Site and Residue 343 †

    PubMed Central

    Crouch, Erika; Hartshorn, Kevan; Horlacher, Tim; McDonald, Barbara; Smith, Kelly; Cafarella, Tanya; Seaton, Barbara; Seeberger, Peter H.; Head, James

    2009-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in antiviral host defense. Although SP-D shows a preference for glucose/maltose, the protein also recognizes D-mannose and a variety of mannose-rich microbial ligands. This latter preference prompted an examination of the mechanisms of mannose recognition, particularly as they relate to high-mannose viral glycans. Trimeric neck+carbohydrate recognition domains from human SP-D (hNCRD) preferred alpha1–2 linked dimannose (DM) over the branched trimannose (TM) core, alpha1–3 or alpha1–6 DM, or D-mannose. Previous studies have shown residues flanking the carbohydrate binding site can fine-tune ligand recognition. A mutant with valine at 343 (R343V) showed enhanced binding to mannan relative to wild-type and R343A. No alteration in affinity was observed for D-mannose or for alpha1–3 or alpha1–6 linked DM; however, substantially increased affinity was observed for alpha1–2DM. Both proteins showed efficient recognition of linear and branched sub-domains of high-mannose glycans on carbohydrate microarrays, and R343V showed increased binding to a subset of the oligosaccharides. Crystallographic analysis of an R343V complex with 1,2-DM showed a novel mode of binding. The disaccharide is bound to calcium by the reducing sugar ring, and a stabilizing H-bond is formed between the 2-OH of the non-reducing sugar ring and Arg349. Although hNCRDs show negligible binding to influenza A virus (IAV), R343V showed markedly enhanced viral neutralizing activity. Hydrophobic substitutions for Arg343 selectively blocked binding of a monoclonal antibody (Hyb 246-05) that inhibits IAV binding activity. Our findings demonstrate an extended ligand binding site for mannosylated ligands and the significant contribution of the 343 side chain to specific recognition of multivalent microbial ligands, including high-mannose viral glycans. PMID:19249874

  11. Differential regulation of protein subdomain activity with caged bivalent ligands.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Günter; Müller, Jens; Mack, Timo; Freitag, Daniel F; Höver, Thomas; Pötzsch, Bernd; Heckel, Alexander

    2009-03-01

    Subtle change: Spatiotemporal modulation of individual protein subdomains with light as the trigger signal becomes possible by using bivalent aptamers and introducing photolabile "caging groups" to switch individual aptamer modules ON or OFF differentially. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show that it is possible to modulate individual domain activity in aptamers, and thus also domain activity in proteins, with light.

  12. AutoDockFR: Advances in Protein-Ligand Docking with Explicitly Specified Binding Site Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, Pradeep Anand; Forli, Stefano; Goodsell, David S.; Olson, Arthur J.; Sanner, Michel F.

    2015-01-01

    Automated docking of drug-like molecules into receptors is an essential tool in structure-based drug design. While modeling receptor flexibility is important for correctly predicting ligand binding, it still remains challenging. This work focuses on an approach in which receptor flexibility is modeled by explicitly specifying a set of receptor side-chains a-priori. The challenges of this approach include the: 1) exponential growth of the search space, demanding more efficient search methods; and 2) increased number of false positives, calling for scoring functions tailored for flexible receptor docking. We present AutoDockFR–AutoDock for Flexible Receptors (ADFR), a new docking engine based on the AutoDock4 scoring function, which addresses the aforementioned challenges with a new Genetic Algorithm (GA) and customized scoring function. We validate ADFR using the Astex Diverse Set, demonstrating an increase in efficiency and reliability of its GA over the one implemented in AutoDock4. We demonstrate greatly increased success rates when cross-docking ligands into apo receptors that require side-chain conformational changes for ligand binding. These cross-docking experiments are based on two datasets: 1) SEQ17 –a receptor diversity set containing 17 pairs of apo-holo structures; and 2) CDK2 –a ligand diversity set composed of one CDK2 apo structure and 52 known bound inhibitors. We show that, when cross-docking ligands into the apo conformation of the receptors with up to 14 flexible side-chains, ADFR reports more correctly cross-docked ligands than AutoDock Vina on both datasets with solutions found for 70.6% vs. 35.3% systems on SEQ17, and 76.9% vs. 61.5% on CDK2. ADFR also outperforms AutoDock Vina in number of top ranking solutions on both datasets. Furthermore, we show that correctly docked CDK2 complexes re-create on average 79.8% of all pairwise atomic interactions between the ligand and moving receptor atoms in the holo complexes. Finally, we show that

  13. AutoDockFR: Advances in Protein-Ligand Docking with Explicitly Specified Binding Site Flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Pradeep Anand; Forli, Stefano; Goodsell, David S; Olson, Arthur J; Sanner, Michel F

    2015-12-01

    Automated docking of drug-like molecules into receptors is an essential tool in structure-based drug design. While modeling receptor flexibility is important for correctly predicting ligand binding, it still remains challenging. This work focuses on an approach in which receptor flexibility is modeled by explicitly specifying a set of receptor side-chains a-priori. The challenges of this approach include the: 1) exponential growth of the search space, demanding more efficient search methods; and 2) increased number of false positives, calling for scoring functions tailored for flexible receptor docking. We present AutoDockFR-AutoDock for Flexible Receptors (ADFR), a new docking engine based on the AutoDock4 scoring function, which addresses the aforementioned challenges with a new Genetic Algorithm (GA) and customized scoring function. We validate ADFR using the Astex Diverse Set, demonstrating an increase in efficiency and reliability of its GA over the one implemented in AutoDock4. We demonstrate greatly increased success rates when cross-docking ligands into apo receptors that require side-chain conformational changes for ligand binding. These cross-docking experiments are based on two datasets: 1) SEQ17 -a receptor diversity set containing 17 pairs of apo-holo structures; and 2) CDK2 -a ligand diversity set composed of one CDK2 apo structure and 52 known bound inhibitors. We show that, when cross-docking ligands into the apo conformation of the receptors with up to 14 flexible side-chains, ADFR reports more correctly cross-docked ligands than AutoDock Vina on both datasets with solutions found for 70.6% vs. 35.3% systems on SEQ17, and 76.9% vs. 61.5% on CDK2. ADFR also outperforms AutoDock Vina in number of top ranking solutions on both datasets. Furthermore, we show that correctly docked CDK2 complexes re-create on average 79.8% of all pairwise atomic interactions between the ligand and moving receptor atoms in the holo complexes. Finally, we show that down

  14. Lamellipodial tension, not integrin/ligand binding, is the crucial factor to realise integrin activation and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Carsten; Ferraris, Gian Maria Sarra; Oldani, Amanda; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Podestà, Alessandro; Puricelli, Luca; de Lorenzi, Valentina; Lenardi, Cristina; Milani, Paolo; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2016-01-01

    The molecular clutch (MC) model proposes that actomyosin-driven force transmission permits integrin-dependent cell migration. To investigate the MC, we introduced diverse talin (TLN) and integrin variants into Flp-In™ T-Rex™ HEK293 cells stably expressing uPAR. Vitronectin variants served as substrate providing uPAR-mediated cell adhesion and optionally integrin binding. This particular system allowed us to selectively analyse key MC proteins and interactions, effectively from the extracellular matrix substrate to intracellular f-actin, and to therewith study mechanobiological aspects of MC engagement also uncoupled from integrin/ligand binding. With this experimental approach, we found that for the initial PIP2-dependent membrane/TLN/f-actin linkage and persistent lamellipodia formation the C-terminal TLN actin binding site (ABS) is dispensable. The establishment of an adequate MC-mediated lamellipodial tension instead depends predominantly on the coupling of this C-terminal TLN ABS to the actomyosin-driven retrograde actin flow force. This lamellipodial tension is crucial for full integrin activation eventually determining integrin-dependent cell migration. In the integrin/ligand-independent condition the frictional membrane resistance participates to these processes. Integrin/ligand binding can also contribute but is not necessarily required.

  15. Lamellipodial tension, not integrin/ligand binding, is the crucial factor to realise integrin activation and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Carsten; Ferraris, Gian Maria Sarra; Oldani, Amanda; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Podestà, Alessandro; Puricelli, Luca; de Lorenzi, Valentina; Lenardi, Cristina; Milani, Paolo; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2016-01-01

    The molecular clutch (MC) model proposes that actomyosin-driven force transmission permits integrin-dependent cell migration. To investigate the MC, we introduced diverse talin (TLN) and integrin variants into Flp-In™ T-Rex™ HEK293 cells stably expressing uPAR. Vitronectin variants served as substrate providing uPAR-mediated cell adhesion and optionally integrin binding. This particular system allowed us to selectively analyse key MC proteins and interactions, effectively from the extracellular matrix substrate to intracellular f-actin, and to therewith study mechanobiological aspects of MC engagement also uncoupled from integrin/ligand binding. With this experimental approach, we found that for the initial PIP2-dependent membrane/TLN/f-actin linkage and persistent lamellipodia formation the C-terminal TLN actin binding site (ABS) is dispensable. The establishment of an adequate MC-mediated lamellipodial tension instead depends predominantly on the coupling of this C-terminal TLN ABS to the actomyosin-driven retrograde actin flow force. This lamellipodial tension is crucial for full integrin activation eventually determining integrin-dependent cell migration. In the integrin/ligand-independent condition the frictional membrane resistance participates to these processes. Integrin/ligand binding can also contribute but is not necessarily required. PMID:26616200

  16. A computational study of the protein-ligand interactions in CDK2 inhibitors: using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics interaction energy as a predictor of the biological activity.

    PubMed

    Alzate-Morales, Jans H; Contreras, Renato; Soriano, Alejandro; Tuñon, Iñaki; Silla, Estanislao

    2007-01-15

    We report a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study to determine the protein-ligand interaction energy between CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2) and five inhibitors with the N(2)-substituted 6-cyclohexyl-methoxy-purine scaffold. The computational results in this work show that the QM/MM interaction energy is strongly correlated to the biological activity and can be used as a predictor, at least within a family of substrates. A detailed analysis of the protein-ligand structures obtained from molecular dynamics simulations shows specific interactions within the active site that, in some cases, have not been reported before to our knowledge. The computed interaction energy gauges the strength of protein-ligand interactions. Finally, energy decomposition and multiple regression analyses were performed to check the contribution of the electrostatic and van der Waals energies to the total interaction energy and to show the capabilities of the computational model to identify new potent inhibitors.

  17. Antitumor and antiparasitic activity of novel ruthenium compounds with polycyclic aromatic ligands.

    PubMed

    Miserachs, Helena Guiset; Cipriani, Micaella; Grau, Jordi; Vilaseca, Marta; Lorenzo, Julia; Medeiros, Andrea; Comini, Marcelo A; Gambino, Dinorah; Otero, Lucía; Moreno, Virtudes

    2015-09-01

    Five novel ruthenium(II)-arene complexes with polycyclic aromatic ligands were synthesized, comprising three compounds of the formula [RuCl(η(6)-p-cym)(L)][PF6], where p-cym = 1-isopropyl-4-methylbenzene and L are the bidentate aromatic ligands 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione, 1, 5-amine-1,10-phenanthroline, 4, or 5,6-epoxy-5,6-dihydro-phenanthroline, 5. In the other two complexes [RuCl2(η(6)-p-cym)(L')], the metal is coordinated to a monodentate ligand L', where L' is phenanthridine, 2, or 9-carbonylanthracene, 3. All compounds were fully characterized by mass spectrometry and elemental analysis, as well as NMR and IR spectroscopic techniques. Obtained ruthenium compounds as well as their respective ligands were tested for their antiparasitic and antitumoral activities. Even though all compounds showed lower Trypanosoma brucei activity than the free ligands, they also resulted less toxic on mammalian cells. Cytotoxicity assays on HL60 cells showed a moderate antitumoral activity for all ruthenium compounds. Compound 1 was the most potent antitumoral (IC50 = 1.26±0.78 μM) and antiparasitic (IC50 = 0.19 ± 0.05 μM) agent, showing high selectivity towards the parasites (selectivity index >100). As complex 1 was the most promising antitumoral compound, its interaction with ubiquitin as potential target was also studied. In addition, obtained ruthenium compounds were found to bind DNA, and they are thought to interact with this macromolecule mainly through intercalation of the aromatic ligand.

  18. Ligand determinants of nisin for its induction activity.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiaoxuan; Teng, Kunling; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Fangyuan; Wang, Fangfang; Zhang, Jie; Zhong, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Nisin has been widely used in the food industry as a safe and natural preservative and has the potential to be used as a biomedicine. Improving nisin production is important for its enormous applications. Nisin A is produced in Lactococcus lactis and its biosynthesis is induced through the regulation of the 2-component system NisKR. In this study, alanine-scanning mutagenesis was applied to study the key structure or AA in nisin for inducing the 2-component system NisKR to regulate downstream gene expression. Assay of β-galactosidase activity revealed that either ring A or ring B was necessary for nisin to induce lacZ reporter gene expression. A substituted first ring formed by Thr2 and Cys7 in S3A instead of ring A (formed by Ser3 and Cys7) fully retained nisin induction activity. Mutation of cationic AA and addition of cationic ions hardly affected nisin induction activity. These results demonstrated that the N-terminal ring structures in nisin were involved in activating NisKR to act as an inducing molecule, whereas the electrostatic force might not contribute to this process. In addition, 2 specific residues were revealed to have potential for improving both nisin induction and antimicrobial activity, which might be used for increasing nisin production. PMID:27132090

  19. Ligand determinants of nisin for its induction activity.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiaoxuan; Teng, Kunling; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Fangyuan; Wang, Fangfang; Zhang, Jie; Zhong, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Nisin has been widely used in the food industry as a safe and natural preservative and has the potential to be used as a biomedicine. Improving nisin production is important for its enormous applications. Nisin A is produced in Lactococcus lactis and its biosynthesis is induced through the regulation of the 2-component system NisKR. In this study, alanine-scanning mutagenesis was applied to study the key structure or AA in nisin for inducing the 2-component system NisKR to regulate downstream gene expression. Assay of β-galactosidase activity revealed that either ring A or ring B was necessary for nisin to induce lacZ reporter gene expression. A substituted first ring formed by Thr2 and Cys7 in S3A instead of ring A (formed by Ser3 and Cys7) fully retained nisin induction activity. Mutation of cationic AA and addition of cationic ions hardly affected nisin induction activity. These results demonstrated that the N-terminal ring structures in nisin were involved in activating NisKR to act as an inducing molecule, whereas the electrostatic force might not contribute to this process. In addition, 2 specific residues were revealed to have potential for improving both nisin induction and antimicrobial activity, which might be used for increasing nisin production.

  20. Synthesis and antitumor activity of a series of osmium(VI) nitrido complexes bearing quinolinolato ligands.

    PubMed

    Tang, Quan; Ni, Wen-Xiu; Leung, Chi-Fai; Man, Wai-Lun; Lau, Kenneth King-Kwan; Liang, Yimin; Lam, Yun-Wah; Wong, Wai-Yeung; Peng, Shie-Ming; Liu, Gui-Jian; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2013-11-01

    A series of osmium(VI) nitrido complexes supported by quinolinolato ligands have been prepared and they exhibit promising in vitro anti-cancer activities. These results establish that Os(VI)≡N is a potentially versatile and promising platform for the design of a variety of high-valent anti-cancer drugs.

  1. Voltage clustering in redox-active ligand complexes: mitigating electronic communication through choice of metal ion

    DOE PAGES

    Zarkesh, Ryan A.; Ichimura, Andrew S.; Monson, Todd C.; Tomson, Neil C.; Anstey, Mitchell R.

    2016-02-01

    We used the redox-active bis(imino)acenapthene (BIAN) ligand to synthesize homoleptic aluminum, chromium, and gallium complexes of the general formula (BIAN)3M. The resulting compounds were characterized using X-ray crystallography, NMR, EPR, magnetic susceptibility and cyclic voltammetry measurements and modeled using both DFT and ab initio wavefunction calculations to compare the orbital contributions of main group elements and transition metals in ligand-based redox events. Ultimately, complexes of this type have the potential to improve the energy density and electrolyte stability of grid-scale energy storage technologies, such as redox flow batteries, through thermodynamically-clustered redox events.

  2. Voltage clustering in redox-active ligand complexes: mitigating electronic communication through choice of metal ion.

    PubMed

    Zarkesh, Ryan A; Ichimura, Andrew S; Monson, Todd C; Tomson, Neil C; Anstey, Mitchell R

    2016-06-14

    The redox-active bis(imino)acenapthene (BIAN) ligand was used to synthesize homoleptic aluminum, chromium, and gallium complexes of the general formula (BIAN)3M. The resulting compounds were characterized using X-ray crystallography, NMR, EPR, magnetic susceptibility and cyclic voltammetry measurements and modeled using both DFT and ab initio wavefunction calculations to compare the orbital contributions of main group elements and transition metals in ligand-based redox events. Complexes of this type have the potential to improve the energy density and electrolyte stability of grid-scale energy storage technologies, such as redox flow batteries, through thermodynamically-clustered redox events. PMID:26998892

  3. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  4. The Novel Dipeptide Translocator Protein Ligand, Referred to As GD-23, Exerts Anxiolytic and Nootropic Activities.

    PubMed

    Povarnina, P Yu; Yarkov, S A; Gudasheva, T A; Yarkova, M A; Seredenin, S B

    2015-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO) promotes the translocation of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane and mediates steroid formation. In this study, we first report on a biological evaluation of the dipeptide GD-23 (N-carbobenzoxy-L tryptophanyl-L isoleucine amide), a structural analogue of Alpidem, the principal TSPO ligand. We show that GD-23 in a dose range of 0.05 to 0.5 mg/kg (i.p.) exhibits anxiolytic activity in the elevated plus maze test and nootropic activity in the object recognition test in scopolamine-induced amnesia in rodents. It was shown that GD-23 did not affect spontaneous locomotor activity, holding promise as a nonsedative anxiolytic agent. The anxiolytic and nootropic activities of GD-23 were abrogated by the TSPO specific ligand PK11195, which thus suggests a role for TSPO in mediating the pharmacological activity of GD-23. PMID:26483966

  5. Stochastic description of the ligand-receptor interaction of biologically active substances at extremely low doses.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, Konstantin G; Agutter, Paul S; Wheatley, Denys N

    2003-04-01

    Signalling molecules can be effective at extraordinarily low concentrations (down to attomolar levels). To handle such cases, probabilistic methods have been used to describe the formal kinetics of action of biologically active substances in these low doses, although it has been necessary to review what is meant by such a term. The mean numbers of transformed/degraded molecules and their dispersions were calculated for the possible range of ligand-receptor binding schemes. We used both analytical equations and numerical simulations to calculate the coefficients of variation (ratio of standard deviation to mean) and demonstrated that the distribution of the coefficient is highly dependent on the reaction scheme. It may, therefore, be used as an additional factor for discriminating between cooperative and noncooperative models of ligand-receptor interaction over extreme ranges of ligand dilution. The relevance to signalling behaviour is discussed.

  6. Ligand activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ suppresses liver tumorigenesis in hepatitis B transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Balandaram, Gayathri; Kramer, Lance R; Kang, Boo-Hyon; Murray, Iain A; Perdew, Gary H; Gonzalez, Frank J; Peters, Jeffrey M

    2016-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ/δ) inhibits steatosis and inflammation, known risk factors for liver cancer. In this study, the effect of ligand activation of PPARβ/δ in modulating liver tumorigenesis in transgenic hepatitis B virus (HBV) mice was examined. Activation of PPARβ/δ in HBV mice reduced steatosis, the average number of liver foci, and tumor multiplicity. Reduced expression of hepatic CYCLIN D1 and c-MYC, tumor necrosis factor alpha (Tnfa) mRNA, serum levels of alanine aminotransaminase, and an increase in apoptotic signaling was also observed following ligand activation of PPARβ/δ in HBV mice compared to controls. Inhibition of Tnfa mRNA expression was not observed in wild-type hepatocytes. Ligand activation of PPARβ/δ inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mRNA expression of Tnfa in wild-type, but not in Pparβ/δ-null Kupffer cells. Interestingly, LPS-induced expression of Tnfa mRNA was also inhibited in Kupffer cells from a transgenic mouse line that expressed a DNA binding mutant form of PPARβ/δ compared to controls. Combined, these results suggest that ligand activation of PPARβ/δ attenuates hepatic tumorigenesis in HBV transgenic mice by inhibiting steatosis and cell proliferation, enhancing hepatocyte apoptosis, and modulating anti-inflammatory activity in Kupffer cells. PMID:27427494

  7. Ligand activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ suppresses liver tumorigenesis in hepatitis B transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Balandaram, Gayathri; Kramer, Lance R; Kang, Boo-Hyon; Murray, Iain A; Perdew, Gary H; Gonzalez, Frank J; Peters, Jeffrey M

    2016-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ/δ) inhibits steatosis and inflammation, known risk factors for liver cancer. In this study, the effect of ligand activation of PPARβ/δ in modulating liver tumorigenesis in transgenic hepatitis B virus (HBV) mice was examined. Activation of PPARβ/δ in HBV mice reduced steatosis, the average number of liver foci, and tumor multiplicity. Reduced expression of hepatic CYCLIN D1 and c-MYC, tumor necrosis factor alpha (Tnfa) mRNA, serum levels of alanine aminotransaminase, and an increase in apoptotic signaling was also observed following ligand activation of PPARβ/δ in HBV mice compared to controls. Inhibition of Tnfa mRNA expression was not observed in wild-type hepatocytes. Ligand activation of PPARβ/δ inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mRNA expression of Tnfa in wild-type, but not in Pparβ/δ-null Kupffer cells. Interestingly, LPS-induced expression of Tnfa mRNA was also inhibited in Kupffer cells from a transgenic mouse line that expressed a DNA binding mutant form of PPARβ/δ compared to controls. Combined, these results suggest that ligand activation of PPARβ/δ attenuates hepatic tumorigenesis in HBV transgenic mice by inhibiting steatosis and cell proliferation, enhancing hepatocyte apoptosis, and modulating anti-inflammatory activity in Kupffer cells.

  8. Improving the performance of the PLB index for ligand-binding site prediction using dihedral angles and the solvent-accessible surface area

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chen; Xu, Shutan

    2016-01-01

    Protein ligand-binding site prediction is highly important for protein function determination and structure-based drug design. Over the past twenty years, dozens of computational methods have been developed to address this problem. Soga et al. identified ligand cavities based on the preferences of amino acids for the ligand-binding site (RA) and proposed the propensity for ligand binding (PLB) index to rank the cavities on the protein surface. However, we found that residues exhibit different RAs in response to changes in solvent exposure. Furthermore, previous studies have suggested that some dihedral angles of amino acids in specific regions of the Ramachandran plot are preferred at the functional sites of proteins. Based on these discoveries, the amino acid solvent-accessible surface area and dihedral angles were combined with the RA and PLB to obtain two new indexes, multi-factor RA (MF-RA) and multi-factor PLB (MF-PLB). MF-PLB, PLB and other methods were tested using two benchmark databases and two particular ligand-binding sites. The results show that MF-PLB can improve the success rate of PLB for both ligand-bound and ligand-unbound structures, particularly for top choice prediction. PMID:27619067

  9. Improving the performance of the PLB index for ligand-binding site prediction using dihedral angles and the solvent-accessible surface area.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chen; Xu, Shutan

    2016-01-01

    Protein ligand-binding site prediction is highly important for protein function determination and structure-based drug design. Over the past twenty years, dozens of computational methods have been developed to address this problem. Soga et al. identified ligand cavities based on the preferences of amino acids for the ligand-binding site (RA) and proposed the propensity for ligand binding (PLB) index to rank the cavities on the protein surface. However, we found that residues exhibit different RAs in response to changes in solvent exposure. Furthermore, previous studies have suggested that some dihedral angles of amino acids in specific regions of the Ramachandran plot are preferred at the functional sites of proteins. Based on these discoveries, the amino acid solvent-accessible surface area and dihedral angles were combined with the RA and PLB to obtain two new indexes, multi-factor RA (MF-RA) and multi-factor PLB (MF-PLB). MF-PLB, PLB and other methods were tested using two benchmark databases and two particular ligand-binding sites. The results show that MF-PLB can improve the success rate of PLB for both ligand-bound and ligand-unbound structures, particularly for top choice prediction. PMID:27619067

  10. CD4 ligands inhibit the formation of multifunctional transduction complexes involved in T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Jabado, N; Pallier, A; Le Deist, F; Bernard, F; Fischer, A; Hivroz, C

    1997-01-01

    Ligands binding to the CD4 molecule can inhibit TCR-mediated T cell activation. We have previously reported that transcription factors regulating the expression of the IL-2 gene, NF-AT, NF-kappaB, and AP-1, are targets of this inhibitory effect in an in vitro model using peripheral human CD4+ T cells activated by a CD3 mAb. Two T cell activation pathways involved in the regulation of these transcription factors, calcium flux and the p21ras pathway, were investigated as potential targets. Binding of HIV envelope glycoprotein gp160/gp120 or a CD4 mAb to the CD4+ T cells, prior to TCR/CD3 activation, inhibited the intracellular calcium elevation. This event strongly suggested an inhibition of PLCgamma1 activity. Tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCgamma1, induced by CD3 activation, was not affected, but its association with tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins, including a 62-kDa protein, was disrupted. This PLCgamma1-associated p62 was found to be immunoreactive to p62-Sam68 Abs. The activation-induced phosphorylation of two p21ras effectors, Raf-1 and Erk2, was inhibited by the CD4 ligands, indirectly pointing to inhibition of the p21ras activation pathway. In addition, we demonstrate that TCR activation of normal CD4+ T cells induced the formation of p120GAP and PLCgamma1-containing complexes. These complexes also contain other unidentified proteins. CD4 ligand binding induced a defective formation of these transduction complexes. This may result in inefficient signaling, partially accounting for the inhibitory effects of the CD4 ligands on both p21ras and calcium-activation pathways.

  11. Low dielectric response in enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Edward L.; Krishtalik, Lev I.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of charge transfer depend crucially on the dielectric reorganization of the medium. In enzymatic reactions that involve charge transfer, atomic dielectric response of the active site and of its surroundings determines the efficiency of the protein as a catalyst. We report direct spectroscopic measurements of the reorganization energy associated with the dielectric response in the active site of α-chymotrypsin. A chromophoric inhibitor of the enzyme is used as a spectroscopic probe. We find that water strongly affects the dielectric reorganization in the active site of the enzyme in solution. The reorganization energy of the protein matrix in the vicinity of the active site is similar to that of low-polarity solvents. Surprisingly, water exhibits an anomalously high dielectric response that cannot be described in terms of the dielectric continuum theory. As a result, sequestering the active site from the aqueous environment inside low-dielectric enzyme body dramatically reduces the dielectric reorganization. This reduction is particularly important for controlling the rate of enzymatic reactions. PMID:10681440

  12. The divergent DSL ligand Dll3 does not activate Notch signaling but cell autonomously attenuates signaling induced by other DSL ligands.

    PubMed

    Ladi, Ena; Nichols, James T; Ge, Weihong; Miyamoto, Alison; Yao, Christine; Yang, Liang-Tung; Boulter, Jim; Sun, Yi E; Kintner, Chris; Weinmaster, Gerry

    2005-09-12

    Mutations in the DSL (Delta, Serrate, Lag2) Notch (N) ligand Delta-like (Dll) 3 cause skeletal abnormalities in spondylocostal dysostosis, which is consistent with a critical role for N signaling during somitogenesis. Understanding how Dll3 functions is complicated by reports that DSL ligands both activate and inhibit N signaling. In contrast to other DSL ligands, we show that Dll3 does not activate N signaling in multiple assays. Consistent with these findings, Dll3 does not bind to cells expressing any of the four N receptors, and N1 does not bind Dll3-expressing cells. However, in a cell-autonomous manner, Dll3 suppressed N signaling, as was found for other DSL ligands. Therefore, Dll3 functions not as an activator as previously reported but rather as a dedicated inhibitor of N signaling. As an N antagonist, Dll3 promoted Xenopus laevis neurogenesis and inhibited glial differentiation of mouse neural progenitors. Finally, together with the modulator lunatic fringe, Dll3 altered N signaling levels that were induced by other DSL ligands.

  13. Prodomains regulate the synthesis, extracellular localisation and activity of TGF-β superfamily ligands.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Craig A; Al-Musawi, Sara L; Walton, Kelly L

    2011-10-01

    All transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) ligands are synthesised as precursor molecules consisting of a signal peptide, an N-terminal prodomain and a C-terminal mature domain. During synthesis, prodomains interact non-covalently with mature domains, maintaining the molecules in a conformation competent for dimerisation. Dimeric precursors are cleaved by proprotein convertases, and TGF-β ligands are secreted from the cell non-covalently associated with their prodomains. Extracellularly, prodomains localise TGF-β ligands within the vicinity of their target cells via interactions with extracellular matrix proteins, including fibrillin and perlecan. For some family members (TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, myostatin, GDF-11 and BMP-10), prodomains bind with high enough affinity to suppress biological activity. The subsequent mechanism of activation of these latent TGF-β ligands varies according to cell type and context, but all activating mechanisms directly target prodomains. Thus, prodomains control many aspects of TGF-β superfamily biology, and alterations in prodomain function are often associated with disease.

  14. Acetylation of pregnane X receptor protein determines selective function independent of ligand activation

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Arunima; Pasquel, Danielle; Tyagi, Rakesh Kumar; Mani, Sridhar

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Pregnane X receptor (PXR), a major regulatory protein, is modified by acetylation. {yields} PXR undergoes dynamic deacetylation upon ligand-mediated activation. {yields} SIRT1 partially mediates PXR deacetylation. {yields} PXR deacetylation per se induces lipogenesis mimicking ligand-mediated activation. -- Abstract: Pregnane X receptor (PXR), like other members of its class of nuclear receptors, undergoes post-translational modification [PTM] (e.g., phosphorylation). However, it is unknown if acetylation (a major and common form of protein PTM) is observed on PXR and, if it is, whether it is of functional consequence. PXR has recently emerged as an important regulatory protein with multiple ligand-dependent functions. In the present work we show that PXR is indeed acetylated in vivo. SIRT1 (Sirtuin 1), a NAD-dependent class III histone deacetylase and a member of the sirtuin family of proteins, partially mediates deacetylation of PXR. Most importantly, the acetylation status of PXR regulates its selective function independent of ligand activation.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Reveal the Mechanisms of Allosteric Activation of Hsp90 by Designed Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Vettoretti, Gerolamo; Moroni, Elisabetta; Sattin, Sara; Tao, Jiahui; Agard, David A.; Bernardi, Anna; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Controlling biochemical pathways through chemically designed modulators may provide novel opportunities to develop therapeutic drugs and chemical tools. The underlying challenge is to design new molecular entities able to act as allosteric chemical switches that selectively turn on/off functions by modulating the conformational dynamics of their target protein. We examine the origins of the stimulation of ATPase and closure kinetics in the molecular chaperone Hsp90 by allosteric modulators through atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and analysis of protein-ligand interactions. In particular, we focus on the cross-talk between allosteric ligands and protein conformations and its effect on the dynamic properties of the chaperone’s active state. We examine the impact of different allosteric modulators on the stability, structural and internal dynamics properties of Hsp90 closed state. A critical aspect of this study is the development of a quantitative model that correlates Hsp90 activation to the presence of a certain compound, making use of information on the dynamic adaptation of protein conformations to the presence of the ligand, which allows to capture conformational states relevant in the activation process. We discuss the implications of considering the conformational dialogue between allosteric ligands and protein conformations for the design of new functional modulators. PMID:27032695

  16. Metal Complexes of Macrocyclic Schiff-Base Ligand: Preparation, Characterisation, and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Riyadh M.; Yousif, Enaam I.; Hasan, Hasan A.; Al-Jeboori, Mohamad J.

    2013-01-01

    A new macrocyclic multidentate Schiff-base ligand Na4L consisting of two submacrocyclic units (10,21-bis-iminomethyl-3,6,14,17-tricyclo[17.3.1.18,12]tetracosa-1(23),2,6,8,10,12(24),13,17,19,21,-decaene-23,24-disodium) and its tetranuclear metal complexes with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) are reported. Na4L was prepared via a template approach, which is based on the condensation reaction of sodium 2,4,6-triformyl phenolate with ethylenediamine in mole ratios of 2 : 3. The tetranuclear macrocyclic-based complexes were prepared from the reaction of the corresponding metal chloride with the ligand. The mode of bonding and overall geometry of the compounds were determined through physicochemical and spectroscopic methods. These studies revealed tetrahedral geometries about Mn, Co, and Zn atoms. However, square planar geometries have been suggested for NiII and CuII complexes. Biological activity of the ligand and its metal complexes against Gram positive bacterial strain Staphylococcus aureus and Gram negative bacteria Escherichia coli revealed that the metal complexes become more potentially resistive to the microbial activities as compared to the free ligand. However, these metal complexes do not exhibit any effects on the activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. There is therefore no inhibition zone. PMID:23935414

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Reveal the Mechanisms of Allosteric Activation of Hsp90 by Designed Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettoretti, Gerolamo; Moroni, Elisabetta; Sattin, Sara; Tao, Jiahui; Agard, David A.; Bernardi, Anna; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    Controlling biochemical pathways through chemically designed modulators may provide novel opportunities to develop therapeutic drugs and chemical tools. The underlying challenge is to design new molecular entities able to act as allosteric chemical switches that selectively turn on/off functions by modulating the conformational dynamics of their target protein. We examine the origins of the stimulation of ATPase and closure kinetics in the molecular chaperone Hsp90 by allosteric modulators through atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and analysis of protein-ligand interactions. In particular, we focus on the cross-talk between allosteric ligands and protein conformations and its effect on the dynamic properties of the chaperone’s active state. We examine the impact of different allosteric modulators on the stability, structural and internal dynamics properties of Hsp90 closed state. A critical aspect of this study is the development of a quantitative model that correlates Hsp90 activation to the presence of a certain compound, making use of information on the dynamic adaptation of protein conformations to the presence of the ligand, which allows to capture conformational states relevant in the activation process. We discuss the implications of considering the conformational dialogue between allosteric ligands and protein conformations for the design of new functional modulators.

  18. Structural basis for PPAR partial or full activation revealed by a novel ligand binding mode

    PubMed Central

    Capelli, Davide; Cerchia, Carmen; Montanari, Roberta; Loiodice, Fulvio; Tortorella, Paolo; Laghezza, Antonio; Cervoni, Laura; Pochetti, Giorgio; Lavecchia, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors involved in the regulation of the metabolic homeostasis and therefore represent valuable therapeutic targets for the treatment of metabolic diseases. The development of more balanced drugs interacting with PPARs, devoid of the side-effects showed by the currently marketed PPARγ full agonists, is considered the major challenge for the pharmaceutical companies. Here we present a structure-based virtual screening approach that let us identify a novel PPAR pan-agonist with a very attractive activity profile and its crystal structure in the complex with PPARα and PPARγ, respectively. In PPARα this ligand occupies a new pocket whose filling is allowed by the ligand-induced switching of the F273 side chain from a closed to an open conformation. The comparison between this pocket and the corresponding cavity in PPARγ provides a rationale for the different activation of the ligand towards PPARα and PPARγ, suggesting a novel basis for ligand design. PMID:27708429

  19. Validation of a computational docking methodology to identify the non-covalent binding site of ligands to DNA.

    PubMed

    Deligkaris, Christos; Ascone, Anthony Thomas; Sweeney, Kevin Joseph; Greene, Alan Jonathan Quentin

    2014-08-01

    Despite the biomedical consequences of carcinogen-DNA interactions and the potential of DNA as a drug target in medicinal chemistry, only a small number of studies have validated or used docking methods for the prediction of the physical binding of small molecules to DNA. Knowledge of the DNA-physically-bound ligand geometry can lead to the elucidation of the molecular-level mechanism of drugs as well as predicting the subsequent chemical interactions that lead to DNA damage from carcinogens. We sought to validate AutoDock 4.2, a docking method that includes a physics-based free energy function and a Lamarckian Genetic Algorithm, for the prediction of ligand geometries upon physical binding to DNA. We performed simulations by systematically changing the length of the search process for a comprehensive set of 32 ligand-DNA molecular systems with different physico-chemical properties, and we used a free-energy-based convergence criterion to terminate our simulations. For 11 out of 28 molecular systems for which convergence was achieved, the lowest binding free energy geometries were within 2 Å of the experimentally determined geometry. Considering all predicted sites with free energy changes within 20% of the lowest binding free energy site, we found a site within 2 Å of the experimentally determined geometry for 24 out of the 28 systems. However, the predicted hydrogen bonding interactions were different for most molecular systems compared to the same interactions in the experimentally determined geometry. We discuss reasons for the successes and failures, implications, and the importance of ensuring an adequate search in docking calculations. Overall, we concluded that AutoDock 4.2 can be used to predict the non-covalent binding geometry of a small molecule to DNA with some limitations.

  20. Computational design of an endo-1,4-[beta]-xylanase ligand binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, Andrew; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Fortenberry, Carie; Harp, Joel M.; Mizoue, Laura S.; Meiler, Jens

    2012-09-05

    The field of computational protein design has experienced important recent success. However, the de novo computational design of high-affinity protein-ligand interfaces is still largely an open challenge. Using the Rosetta program, we attempted the in silico design of a high-affinity protein interface to a small peptide ligand. We chose the thermophilic endo-1,4-{beta}-xylanase from Nonomuraea flexuosa as the protein scaffold on which to perform our designs. Over the course of the study, 12 proteins derived from this scaffold were produced and assayed for binding to the target ligand. Unfortunately, none of the designed proteins displayed evidence of high-affinity binding. Structural characterization of four designed proteins revealed that although the predicted structure of the protein model was highly accurate, this structural accuracy did not translate into accurate prediction of binding affinity. Crystallographic analyses indicate that the lack of binding affinity is possibly due to unaccounted for protein dynamics in the 'thumb' region of our design scaffold intrinsic to the family 11 {beta}-xylanase fold. Further computational analysis revealed two specific, single amino acid substitutions responsible for an observed change in backbone conformation, and decreased dynamic stability of the catalytic cleft. These findings offer new insight into the dynamic and structural determinants of the {beta}-xylanase proteins.

  1. Toll-like receptor ligand activation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Dearman, Rebecca J; Cumberbatch, Marie; Maxwell, Gavin; Basketter, David A; Kimber, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the initiation of primary immune responses. The pattern of Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression on various subsets of these cells has been shown to differ, suggestive of distinct roles in influencing immune responses. We have examined here the responses of immature DCs derived from murine bone marrow (BMDCs) to a range of TLR ligands. BMDCs cultured for 6 days in the presence of granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor were stimulated for 24 hr with ligands to TLR1-2 [Pam3Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 (PAM)], TLR2-6 (macrophage-activating lipopeptide-2 (MALP-2); zymosan or peptidoglycan (PG)], TLR3 (polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid), TLR4 [lipopolysaccharide R515 (LPS)], TLR5 (flagellin), TLR7 (polyuridylic acid) and TLR9 [CpG ODN2395 (CpG)]. DC activation was monitored using membrane marker expression and analysis of culture supernatants for cytokine/chemokine release. Ligands to TLR3 and TLR7 failed to activate BMDCs. All other TLR ligands caused elevated expression of membrane markers. PAM, MALP-2 and LPS induced high-level expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Treatment with CpG was associated with a preferential type 1 cytokine and chemokine profile. Zymosan and PG were proinflammatory but also skewed towards a type 2 pattern of cytokines and chemokines. In contrast, flagellin did not cause marked secretion by BMDCs of cytokines or chemokines. These data for BMDCs are largely consistent with the reported TLR repertoire of freshly isolated murine Langerhans cells. In addition, murine BMDCs show selective responses to TLR ligands with respect to general activation, with differentiated cytokine patterns suggestive of potential priming for divergent immune responses. PMID:18778283

  2. Metavanadate at the active site of the phosphatase VHZ.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav I; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Hengge, Alvan C

    2012-09-01

    Vanadate is a potent modulator of a number of biological processes and has been shown by crystal structures and NMR spectroscopy to interact with numerous enzymes. Although these effects often occur under conditions where oligomeric forms dominate, the crystal structures and NMR data suggest that the inhibitory form is usually monomeric orthovanadate, a particularly good inhibitor of phosphatases because of its ability to form stable trigonal-bipyramidal complexes. We performed a computational analysis of a 1.14 Å structure of the phosphatase VHZ in complex with an unusual metavanadate species and compared it with two classical trigonal-bipyramidal vanadate-phosphatase complexes. The results support extensive delocalized bonding to the apical ligands in the classical structures. In contrast, in the VHZ metavanadate complex, the central, planar VO(3)(-) moiety has only one apical ligand, the nucleophilic Cys95, and a gap in electron density between V and S. A computational analysis showed that the V-S interaction is primarily ionic. A mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of metavanadate in the active site from a dimeric vanadate species that previous crystallographic evidence has shown to be able to bind to the active sites of phosphatases related to VHZ. Together, the results show that the interaction of vanadate with biological systems is not solely reliant upon the prior formation of a particular inhibitory form in solution. The catalytic properties of an enzyme may act upon the oligomeric forms primarily present in solution to generate species such as the metavanadate ion observed in the VHZ structure. PMID:22876963

  3. Spectroscopic studies of single and double variants of M ferritin: lack of conversion of a biferrous substrate site into a cofactor site for O2 activation.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Yeonju; Schwartz, Jennifer K; Haldar, Suranjana; Behera, Rabindra K; Tosha, Takehiko; Theil, Elizabeth C; Solomon, Edward I

    2014-01-28

    Ferritin has a binuclear non-heme iron active site that functions to oxidize iron as a substrate for formation of an iron mineral core. Other enzymes of this class have tightly bound diiron cofactor sites that activate O2 to react with substrate. Ferritin has an active site ligand set with 1-His/4-carboxylate/1-Gln rather than the 2-His/4-carboxylate set of the cofactor site. This ligand variation has been thought to make a major contribution to this biferrous substrate rather than cofactor site reactivity. However, the Q137E/D140H double variant of M ferritin, has a ligand set that is equivalent to most of the diiron cofactor sites, yet did not rapidly react with O2 or generate the peroxy intermediate observed in the cofactor sites. Therefore, in this study, a combined spectroscopic methodology of circular dichroism (CD)/magnetic CD (MCD)/variable temperature, variable field (VTVH) MCD has been applied to evaluate the factors required for the rapid O2 activation observed in cofactor sites. This methodology defines the coordination environment of each iron and the bridging ligation of the biferrous active sites in the double and corresponding single variants of frog M ferritin. Based on spectral changes, the D140H single variant has the new His ligand binding, and the Q137E variant has the new carboxylate forming a μ-1,3 bridge. The spectra for the Q137E/D140H double variant, which has the cofactor ligand set, however, reflects a site that is more coordinately saturated than the cofactor sites in other enzymes including ribonucleotide reductase, indicating the presence of additional water ligation. Correlation of this double variant and the cofactor sites to their O2 reactivities indicates that electrostatic and steric changes in the active site and, in particular, the hydrophobic nature of a cofactor site associated with its second sphere protein environment, make important contributions to the activation of O2 by the binuclear non-heme iron enzymes.

  4. Antagonism of ligand-gated ion channel receptors: two domains of the glycine receptor alpha subunit form the strychnine-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberg, R J; French, C R; Barry, P H; Shine, J; Schofield, P R

    1992-01-01

    The inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR) is a member of the ligand-gated ion channel receptor superfamily. Glycine activation of the receptor is antagonized by the convulsant alkaloid strychnine. Using in vitro mutagenesis and functional analysis of the cDNA encoding the alpha 1 subunit of the human GlyR, we have identified several amino acid residues that form the strychnine-binding site. These residues were identified by transient expression of mutated cDNAs in mammalian (293) cells and examination of resultant [3H]strychnine binding, glycine displacement of [3H]strychnine, and electrophysiological responses to the application of glycine and strychnine. This mutational analysis revealed that residues from two separate domains within the alpha 1 subunit form the binding site for the antagonist strychnine. The first domain includes the amino acid residues Gly-160 and Tyr-161, and the second domain includes the residues Lys-200 and Tyr-202. These results, combined with analyses of other ligand-gated ion channel receptors, suggest a conserved tertiary structure and a common mechanism for antagonism in this receptor superfamily. PMID:1311851

  5. Enhanced dimerization drives ligand-independent activity of mutant epidermal growth factor receptor in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Christopher C.; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.; Karedla, Narain; Steinkamp, Mara P.; Chizhik, Alexey I.; Hlavacek, William S.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Lidke, Keith A.; Lidke, Diane S.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations within the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/erbB1/Her1) are often associated with tumorigenesis. In particular, a number of EGFR mutants that demonstrate ligand-independent signaling are common in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including kinase domain mutations L858R (also called L834R) and exon 19 deletions (e.g., ΔL747-P753insS), which collectively make up nearly 90% of mutations in NSCLC. The molecular mechanisms by which these mutations confer constitutive activity remain unresolved. Using multiple subdiffraction-limit imaging modalities, we reveal the altered receptor structure and interaction kinetics of NSCLC-associated EGFR mutants. We applied two-color single quantum dot tracking to quantify receptor dimerization kinetics on living cells and show that, in contrast to wild-type EGFR, mutants are capable of forming stable, ligand-independent dimers. Two-color superresolution localization microscopy confirmed ligand-independent aggregation of EGFR mutants. Live-cell Förster resonance energy transfer measurements revealed that the L858R kinase mutation alters ectodomain structure such that unliganded mutant EGFR adopts an extended, dimerization-competent conformation. Finally, mutation of the putative dimerization arm confirmed a critical role for ectodomain engagement in ligand-independent signaling. These data support a model in which dysregulated activity of NSCLC-associated kinase mutants is driven by coordinated interactions involving both the kinase and extracellular domains that lead to enhanced dimerization. PMID:26337388

  6. Ligand Binding and Activation of PPARγ by Firemaster® 550: Effects on Adipogenesis and Osteogenesis in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Hari K.; Fang, Mingliang; Beglov, Dmitri; Kozakov, Dima; Vajda, Sandor; Stapleton, Heather M.; Webster, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of alternative flame retardants has increased since the phase out of pentabromodiphenyl ethers (pentaBDEs). One alternative, Firemaster® 550 (FM550), induces obesity in rats. Triphenyl phosphate (TPP), a component of FM550, has a structure similar to that of organotins, which are obesogenic in rodents. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that components of FM550 are biologically active peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) ligands and estimated indoor exposure to TPP. Methods: FM550 and its components were assessed for ligand binding to and activation of human PPARγ. Solvent mapping was used to model TPP in the PPARγ binding site. Adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation were assessed in bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell models. We estimated exposure of children to TPP using a screening-level indoor exposure model and house dust concentrations determined previously. Results: FM550 bound human PPARγ, and binding appeared to be driven primarily by TPP. Solvent mapping revealed that TPP interacted with binding hot spots within the PPARγ ligand binding domain. FM550 and its organophosphate components increased human PPARγ1 transcriptional activity in a Cos7 reporter assay and induced lipid accumulation and perilipin protein expression in BMS2 cells. FM550 and TPP diverted osteogenic differentiation toward adipogenesis in primary mouse bone marrow cultures. Our estimates suggest that dust ingestion is the major route of exposure of children to TPP. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that FM550 components bind and activate PPARγ. In addition, in vitro exposure initiated adipocyte differentiation and antagonized osteogenesis. TPP likely is a major contributor to these biological actions. Given that TPP is ubiquitous in house dust, further studies are warranted to investigate the health effects of FM550. Citation: Pillai HK, Fang M, Beglov D, Kozakov D, Vajda S, Stapleton HM, Webster TF, Schlezinger JJ. 2014

  7. Rational Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (RQSAR) Screen for PXR and CAR Isoform-Specific Nuclear Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Dring, Ann M.; Anderson, Linnea E.; Qamar, Saima; Stoner, Matthew A.

    2010-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are closely related orphan nuclear receptor proteins that share several ligands and target overlapping sets of genes involved in homeostasis and all phases of drug metabolism. CAR and PXR are involved in the development of certain diseases, including diabetes, metabolic syndrome and obesity. Ligand screens for these receptors so far have typically focused on steroid hormone analogs with pharmacophore-based approaches, only to find relatively few new hits. Multiple CAR isoforms have been detected in human liver, with the most abundant being the constitutively active reference, CAR1, and the ligand-dependent isoform CAR3. It has been assumed that any compound that binds CAR1 should also activate CAR3, and so CAR3 can be used as a ligand-activated surrogate for CAR1 studies. The possibility of CAR3-specific ligands has not, so far, been addressed. To investigate the differences between CAR1, CAR3 and PXR, and to look for more CAR ligands that may be of use in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies, we performed a luciferase transactivation assay screen of 60 mostly non-steroid compounds. Known active compounds with different core chemistries were chosen as starting points and structural variants were rationally selected for screening. Distinct differences in agonist versus inverse agonist/antagonist effects were seen in 49 compounds that had some ligand effect on at least one receptor and 18 that had effects on all three receptors; eight were CAR1 ligands only, three were CAR3 only ligands and four affected PXR only. This work provides evidence for new CAR ligands, some of which have CAR3-specific effects, and provides observational data on CAR and PXR ligands with which to inform in silico strategies. Compounds that demonstrated unique activity on any one receptor are potentially valuable diagnostic tools for the investigation of in vivo molecular targets. PMID:20869355

  8. Ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors facilitate tight control of split CRISPR activity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Duy P.; Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Gilbert, Luke A.; Mayerl, Steven J.; Lee, Brian H.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Wells, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Cas9-based RNA-guided nuclease (RGN) has emerged to be a versatile method for genome editing due to the ease of construction of RGN reagents to target specific genomic sequences. The ability to control the activity of Cas9 with a high temporal resolution will facilitate tight regulation of genome editing processes for studying the dynamics of transcriptional regulation or epigenetic modifications in complex biological systems. Here we show that fusing ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors to split Cas9 protein fragments can provide chemical control over split Cas9 activity. The method has allowed us to control Cas9 activity in a tunable manner with no significant background, which has been challenging for other inducible Cas9 constructs. We anticipate that our design will provide opportunities through the use of different ligand-binding domains to enable multiplexed genome regulation of endogenous genes in distinct loci through simultaneous chemical regulation of orthogonal Cas9 variants. PMID:27363581

  9. Mapping Lysine Acetyltransferase-Ligand Interactions by Activity-Based Capture.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, D C; Meier, J L

    2016-01-01

    Changes in reversible protein acetylation mediate many key aspects of genomic regulation and enzyme function. The catalysts for this posttranslational modification, lysine acetyltransferases (KATs), have been difficult targets for characterization due to their complex architecture and challenging reconstitution. To address this challenge, here we describe methods to profile endogenous KAT activities using activity-based probes. This method facilitates the targeted analysis of several cellular KATs and can be used to study their interactions with many different types of ligands, including acyl-CoA metabolites. This competitive activity-based capture approach provides a method to assess the selectivity of ligands for different KAT families in complex proteomic settings, and thus has the potential to offer substantial insights into the regulation of cellular KAT function. PMID:27423859

  10. Computational and biochemical docking of the irreversible cocaine analog RTI 82 directly demonstrates ligand positioning in the dopamine transporter central substrate-binding site.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Rejwi Acharya; Pramod, Akula Bala; Sharma, Babita; Krout, Danielle; Foster, James D; Cha, Joo Hwan; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy Hauck; Lever, John R; Vaughan, Roxanne A; Henry, L Keith

    2014-10-24

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) functions as a key regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission via re-uptake of synaptic dopamine (DA). Cocaine binding to DAT blocks this activity and elevates extracellular DA, leading to psychomotor stimulation and addiction, but the mechanisms by which cocaine interacts with DAT and inhibits transport remain incompletely understood. Here, we addressed these questions using computational and biochemical methodologies to localize the binding and adduction sites of the photoactivatable irreversible cocaine analog 3β-(p-chlorophenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid, 4'-azido-3'-iodophenylethyl ester ([(125)I]RTI 82). Comparative modeling and small molecule docking indicated that the tropane pharmacophore of RTI 82 was positioned in the central DA active site with an orientation that juxtaposed the aryliodoazide group for cross-linking to rat DAT Phe-319. This prediction was verified by focused methionine substitution of residues flanking this site followed by cyanogen bromide mapping of the [(125)I]RTI 82-labeled mutants and by the substituted cysteine accessibility method protection analyses. These findings provide positive functional evidence linking tropane pharmacophore interaction with the core substrate-binding site and support a competitive mechanism for transport inhibition. This synergistic application of computational and biochemical methodologies overcomes many uncertainties inherent in other approaches and furnishes a schematic framework for elucidating the ligand-protein interactions of other classes of DA transport inhibitors. PMID:25179220

  11. Computational and Biochemical Docking of the Irreversible Cocaine Analog RTI 82 Directly Demonstrates Ligand Positioning in the Dopamine Transporter Central Substrate-binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Rejwi Acharya; Pramod, Akula Bala; Sharma, Babita; Krout, Danielle; Foster, James D.; Cha, Joo Hwan; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy Hauck; Lever, John R.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.; Henry, L. Keith

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) functions as a key regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission via re-uptake of synaptic dopamine (DA). Cocaine binding to DAT blocks this activity and elevates extracellular DA, leading to psychomotor stimulation and addiction, but the mechanisms by which cocaine interacts with DAT and inhibits transport remain incompletely understood. Here, we addressed these questions using computational and biochemical methodologies to localize the binding and adduction sites of the photoactivatable irreversible cocaine analog 3β-(p-chlorophenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid, 4′-azido-3′-iodophenylethyl ester ([125I]RTI 82). Comparative modeling and small molecule docking indicated that the tropane pharmacophore of RTI 82 was positioned in the central DA active site with an orientation that juxtaposed the aryliodoazide group for cross-linking to rat DAT Phe-319. This prediction was verified by focused methionine substitution of residues flanking this site followed by cyanogen bromide mapping of the [125I]RTI 82-labeled mutants and by the substituted cysteine accessibility method protection analyses. These findings provide positive functional evidence linking tropane pharmacophore interaction with the core substrate-binding site and support a competitive mechanism for transport inhibition. This synergistic application of computational and biochemical methodologies overcomes many uncertainties inherent in other approaches and furnishes a schematic framework for elucidating the ligand-protein interactions of other classes of DA transport inhibitors. PMID:25179220

  12. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine

    PubMed Central

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO2. We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O2 and CO2 bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO2 defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg2+ surrounded by three H2O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming. PMID:23112176

  13. Investigation of the Copper Binding Site and the Role of Histidine as a Ligand in Riboflavin Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sheila R.; Bencze, Krisztina Z.; Russ, Kristen A.; Wasiukanis, Kristen; Benore-Parsons, Marilee; Stemmler, Timothy L.

    2008-01-01

    Riboflavin Binding Protein (RBP) binds copper in a 1:1 molar ratio, forming a distinct well-ordered type II site. The nature of this site has been examined using X-ray absorption and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies, revealing a four coordinate oxygen/nitrogen rich environment. On the basis of analysis of the Cambridge Structural Database, the average protein bound copper-ligand bond length of 1.96 Å, obtained by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), is consistent with four coordinate Cu(I) and Cu(II) models that utilize mixed oxygen and nitrogen ligand distributions. These data suggest a Cu–O3N coordination state for copper bound to RBP. While pulsed EPR studies including hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy and electron nuclear double resonance show clear spectroscopic evidence for a histidine bound to the copper, inclusion of a histidine in the EXAFS simulation did not lead to any significant improvement in the fit. PMID:18593109

  14. Binding Sites for Acylated Trehalose Analogs of Glycolipid Ligands on an Extended Carbohydrate Recognition Domain of the Macrophage Receptor Mincle*

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Hadar; Rambaruth, Neela D. S.; Jégouzo, Sabine A. F.; Jacobsen, Kristian M.; Djurhuus, Rasmus; Poulsen, Thomas B.; Weis, William I.; Taylor, Maureen E.; Drickamer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The macrophage receptor mincle binds to trehalose dimycolate on the surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Signaling initiated by this interaction leads to cytokine production, which underlies the ability of mycobacteria to evade the immune system and also to function as adjuvants. In previous work the mechanism for binding of the sugar headgroup of trehalose dimycolate to mincle has been elucidated, but the basis for enhanced binding to glycolipid ligands, in which hydrophobic substituents are attached to the 6-hydroxyl groups, has been the subject of speculation. In the work reported here, the interaction of trehalose derivatives with bovine mincle has been probed with a series of synthetic mimics of trehalose dimycolate in binding assays, in structural studies by x-ray crystallography, and by site-directed mutagenesis. Binding studies reveal that, rather than reflecting specific structural preference, the apparent affinity of mincle for ligands with hydrophobic substituents correlates with their overall size. Structural and mutagenesis analysis provides evidence for interaction of the hydrophobic substituents with multiple different portions of the surface of mincle and confirms the presence of three Ca2+-binding sites. The structure of an extended portion of the extracellular domain of mincle, beyond the minimal C-type carbohydrate recognition domain, also constrains the way the binding domains may interact on the surface of macrophages. PMID:27542410

  15. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors via their allosteric binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, J; Bacáková, L; Lisá, V; el-Fakahany, E E; Tucek, S

    1996-01-01

    Ligands that bind to the allosteric-binding sites on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors alter the conformation of the classical-binding sites of these receptors and either diminish or increase their affinity for muscarinic agonists and classical antagonists. It is not known whether the resulting conformational change also affects the interaction between the receptors and the G proteins. We have now found that the muscarinic receptor allosteric modulators alcuronium, gallamine, and strychnine (acting in the absence of an agonist) alter the synthesis of cAMP in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the M2 or the M4 subtype of muscarinic receptors in the same direction as the agonist carbachol. In addition, most of their effects on the production of inositol phosphates in CHO cells expressing the M1 or the M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes are also similar to (although much weaker than) those of carbachol. The agonist-like effects of the allosteric modulators are not observed in CHO cells that have not been transfected with the gene for any of the subtypes of muscarinic receptors. The effects of alcuronium on the formation of cAMP and inositol phosphates are not prevented by the classical muscarinic antagonist quinuclidinyl benzilate. These observations demonstrate for the first time that the G protein-mediated functional responses of muscarinic receptors can be evoked not only from their classical, but also from their allosteric, binding sites. This represents a new mechanism of receptor activation. PMID:8710935

  16. The CXCL12/CXCR4 axis promotes ligand-independent activation of the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Kasina, Sathish; Macoska, Jill A

    2012-04-01

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for the transition of some prostate cancers from androgen ligand-dependent to androgen ligand-independent are incompletely established. Molecules that are ligands for G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been implicated in ligand-independent androgen receptor (AR) activation. The purpose of this study was to examine whether CXCL12, the ligand for the GPCR, CXCR4, might mediate prostate cancer cell proliferation through AR-dependent mechanisms involving functional transactivation of the AR in the absence of androgen. The results of these studies showed that activation of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis promoted: The nuclear accumulation of both wild-type and mutant AR in several prostate epithelial cell lines; AR-dependent proliferative responses; nuclear accumulation of the AR co-regulator SRC-1 protein; SRC-1:AR protein:protein association; co-localization of AR and SRC-1 on the promoters of AR-regulated genes; AR- and SRC-1 dependent transcription of AR-regulated genes; AR-dependent secretion of the AR-regulated PSA protein; P13K-dependent phosphorylation of AR; MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of SRC-1, and both MAPK- and P13K-dependent secretion of the PSA protein, in the absence of androgen. Taken together, these studies identify CXCL12 as a novel, non-steroidal growth factor that promotes the growth of prostate epithelial cells through AR-dependent mechanisms in the absence of steroid hormones. These findings support the development of novel therapeutics targeting the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis as an ancillary to those targeting the androgen/AR axis to effectively treat castration resistant/recurrent prostate tumors.

  17. Active Site Metal Occupancy and Cyclic Di-GMP Phosphodiesterase Activity of Thermotoga maritima HD-GYP.

    PubMed

    Miner, Kyle D; Kurtz, Donald M

    2016-02-16

    HD-GYPs make up a subclass of the metal-dependent HD phosphohydrolase superfamily and catalyze conversion of cyclic di(3',5')-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) to 5'-phosphoguanylyl-(3'→5')-guanosine (pGpG) and GMP. Until now, the only reported crystal structure of an HD-GYP that also exhibits c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity contains a His/carboxylate ligated triiron active site. However, other structural and phylogenetic correlations indicate that some HD-GYPs contain dimetal active sites. Here we provide evidence that an HD-GYP c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase, TM0186, from Thermotoga maritima can accommodate both di- and trimetal active sites. We show that an as-isolated iron-containing TM0186 has an oxo/carboxylato-bridged diferric site, and that the reduced (diferrous) form is necessary and sufficient to catalyze conversion of c-di-GMP to pGpG, but that conversion of pGpG to GMP requires more than two metals per active site. Similar c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activities were obtained with divalent iron or manganese. On the basis of activity correlations with several putative metal ligand residue variants and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that TM0186 can accommodate both di- and trimetal active sites. Our results also suggest that a Glu residue conserved in a subset of HD-GYPs is required for formation of the trimetal site and can also serve as a labile ligand to the dimetal site. Given the anaerobic growth requirement of T. maritima, we suggest that this HD-GYP can function in vivo with either divalent iron or manganese occupying di- and trimetal sites.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and anti-proliferative activity of Cd(II) complexes with NNN type pyrazole-based ligand and pseudohalide ligands as coligand.

    PubMed

    Hopa, Cigdem; Yildirim, Hatice; Kara, Hulya; Kurtaran, Raif; Alkan, Mahir

    2014-01-01

    Cd(II) complexes of tridentate nitrogen donor ligand, 2,6-bis(3,4,5-trimethylpyrazolyl)pyridine (btmpp), Cd(btmpp)X2 (X:Cl, ONO or N(CN)2) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental and spectral (FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, UV-Vis) analyses, differential thermal analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The molecular structure of reported complex 1, revealed distorted square-pyramidal geometry around Cadmium. Complexes 1-3 and corresponding ligand were tested for cytotoxic activity against the human carcinoma cell lines HEP3B (hepatocellular carcinoma), PC3 (prostate adenocarcinoma), MCF7 (breast adenocarcinoma) and Saos2 (osteosarcoma). The results show that, complexes are more cytotoxic than the free ligand and complex 2 is the most cytotoxic complex for PC3.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and anti-proliferative activity of Cd(II) complexes with NNN type pyrazole-based ligand and pseudohalide ligands as coligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopa, Cigdem; Yildirim, Hatice; Kara, Hulya; Kurtaran, Raif; Alkan, Mahir

    2014-03-01

    Cd(II) complexes of tridentate nitrogen donor ligand, 2,6-bis(3,4,5-trimethylpyrazolyl)pyridine (btmpp), Cd(btmpp)X2 (X:Cl, ONO or N(CN)2) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental and spectral (FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-Vis) analyses, differential thermal analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The molecular structure of reported complex 1, revealed distorted square-pyramidal geometry around Cadmium. Complexes 1-3 and corresponding ligand were tested for cytotoxic activity against the human carcinoma cell lines HEP3B (hepatocellular carcinoma), PC3 (prostate adenocarcinoma), MCF7 (breast adenocarcinoma) and Saos2 (osteosarcoma). The results show that, complexes are more cytotoxic than the free ligand and complex 2 is the most cytotoxic complex for PC3.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and anti-proliferative activity of Cd(II) complexes with NNN type pyrazole-based ligand and pseudohalide ligands as coligand.

    PubMed

    Hopa, Cigdem; Yildirim, Hatice; Kara, Hulya; Kurtaran, Raif; Alkan, Mahir

    2014-01-01

    Cd(II) complexes of tridentate nitrogen donor ligand, 2,6-bis(3,4,5-trimethylpyrazolyl)pyridine (btmpp), Cd(btmpp)X2 (X:Cl, ONO or N(CN)2) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental and spectral (FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, UV-Vis) analyses, differential thermal analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The molecular structure of reported complex 1, revealed distorted square-pyramidal geometry around Cadmium. Complexes 1-3 and corresponding ligand were tested for cytotoxic activity against the human carcinoma cell lines HEP3B (hepatocellular carcinoma), PC3 (prostate adenocarcinoma), MCF7 (breast adenocarcinoma) and Saos2 (osteosarcoma). The results show that, complexes are more cytotoxic than the free ligand and complex 2 is the most cytotoxic complex for PC3. PMID:24252293

  1. Characterization of binding sites for [3H]-DTG, a selective sigma receptor ligand, in the sheep pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Abreu, P; Sugden, D

    1990-09-14

    Specific binding sites for [3H]-1,3 di-ortho-tolylguanidine ([3H]-DTG), a selective radiolabeled sigma receptor ligand, were detected and characterized in sheep pineal gland membranes. The binding of [3H]-DTG to sheep pineal membranes was rapid and reversible with a rate constant for association (K+1) at 25 degrees C of 0.0052 nM-1.min-1 and rate constant for dissociation (K-1) 0.0515 min-1, giving a Kd (K-1/K+1) of 9.9 nM. Saturation studies demonstrated that [3H]-DTG binds to a single class of sites with an affinity constant (Kd) of 27 +/- 3.4 nM, and a total binding capacity (Bmax) of 1.39 +/- 0.03 pmol/mg protein. Competition experiments showed that the relative order of potency of compounds for inhibition of [3H]-DTG binding to sheep pineal membranes was as follows: trifluoperazine = DTG greater than haloperidol greater than pentazocine greater than (+)-3-PPP greater than (+/-)SKF 10,047. Some steroids (testosterone, progesterone, deoxycorticosterone) previously reported to bind to the sigma site in brain membranes were very weak inhibitors of [3H]-DTG binding in the present study. The results indicate that [3H]-DTG binding sites having the characteristics of sigma receptors are present in sheep pineal gland. The physiological importance of these sites in regulating the synthesis of the pineal hormone melatonin awaits further study. PMID:2169739

  2. Eel calcitonin binding site distribution and antinociceptive activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Guidobono, F.; Netti, C.; Sibilia, V.; Villa, I.; Zamboni, A.; Pecile, A.

    1986-03-01

    The distribution of binding site for (/sup 125/I)-eel-calcitonin (ECT) to rat central nervous system, studied by an autoradiographic technique, showed concentrations of binding in the diencephalon, the brain stem and the spinal cord. Large accumulations of grains were seen in the hypothalamus, the amygdala, in the fasciculus medialis prosencephali, in the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, in the ventrolateral part of the periventricular gray matter, in the lemniscus medialis and in the raphe nuclei. The density of grains in the reticular formation and in the nucleus tractus spinalis nervi trigemini was more moderate. In the spinal cord, grains were scattered throughout the dorsal horns. Binding of the ligand was displaced equally by cold ECT and by salmon CT(sCT), indicating that both peptides bind to the same receptors. Human CT was much weaker than sCT in displacing (/sup 125/I)-ECT binding. The administration of ECT into the brain ventricles of rats dose-dependently induced a significant and long-lasting enhancement of hot-plate latencies comparable with that obtained with sCT. The antinociceptive activity induced by ECT is compatible with the topographical distribution of binding sites for the peptide and is a further indication that fish CTs are active in the mammalian brain.

  3. Synthesis and biological activity of novel small peptides with aminophosphonates moiety as NOP receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Naydenova, Emilia D; Todorov, Petar T; Mateeva, Polina I; Zamfirova, Rositza N; Pavlov, Nikola D; Todorov, Simeon B

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the present study was the synthesis and the biological screening of new analogs of Ac-RYYRWK-NH2, modified at the N-terminal with 1-[(methoxyphosphono)methylamino]cycloalkanecarboxylic acids. The four newly synthesized ligands for the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) receptor (NOP) have been prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis--Fmoc-strategy. These compounds were tested for agonistic activity in vitro on electrically stimulated smooth-muscle preparations isolated from vas deferens of Wistar rats. Our data showed that substitution of Arg at position 1 with aminophosphonates moiety decreased significantly the affinity of ligands to the NOP receptor. Furthermore, the enlargement of the cycle (with 5-8 carbon atoms) additionally diminished both the activity and the selectivity for NOP-receptor.

  4. Ligand Biological Activity Predictions Using Fingerprint-Based Artificial Neural Networks (FANN-QSAR)

    PubMed Central

    Myint, Kyaw Z.; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2015-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the fingerprint-based artificial neural networks QSAR (FANN-QSAR) approach to predict biological activities of structurally diverse compounds. Three types of fingerprints, namely ECFP6, FP2, and MACCS, were used as inputs to train the FANN-QSAR models. The results were benchmarked against known 2D and 3D QSAR methods, and the derived models were used to predict cannabinoid (CB) ligand binding activities as a case study. In addition, the FANN-QSAR model was used as a virtual screening tool to search a large NCI compound database for lead cannabinoid compounds. We discovered several compounds with good CB2 binding affinities ranging from 6.70 nM to 3.75 μM. The studies proved that the FANN-QSAR method is a useful approach to predict bioactivities or properties of ligands and to find novel lead compounds for drug discovery research. PMID:25502380

  5. Ligands and Regulatory Modes of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARγ) in Avians.

    PubMed

    Navidshad, Bahman; Royan, M

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient and gene interaction is an important aspect of poultry metabolism that determines performance capacity. New technological tools in biochemistry and biotechnology make it possible to explore the molecular base of phenotypic characteristics of poultry production. Fats act as energy deposits in the poultry body and are an essential constituent of animal cell membranes. From a functional standpoint, it has been suggested that ingested lipids change liver fatty acid synthesis and other lipogenic enzymes by regulating mRNA synthesis. Nuclear hormone receptors are ligand-activated transcription factors that control several genes involved in lipid metabolism. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors. Three separate PPAR genes have been identified; they are known as α, δ, and γ. The most important metabolic effect of PPARγ in chicken is its task in adipogenesis. Reviewing the ligands of chicken PPARγ gene can be useful to a better understanding of PPARγ regulatory functions.

  6. Aspartate 46, a second sphere ligand to the catalytic zinc, is essential for activity of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ganzhorn, A.J.; Plapp, B.V.

    1987-05-01

    The crystal structure of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) shows a hydrogen bond between the imidazole of His-67, a ligand to the active site zinc, and the carboxylate of Asp-49. Both residues are conserved in alcohol dehydrogenases. Directed mutagenesis was used to replace the homologous Asp-46 in ADH I from S. cerevisiae with asparagine. The substitution did not alter the overall structure of the enzyme, as judged by CD measurements, but the removal of a negative charge was evident in electrophoresis, and in the absorption and fluorescence spectra. The mutant and wild-type enzymes had similar zinc contents as determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Active site titration and steady state kinetics indicated that binding of coenzymes, substrates and substrate analogs is 4-24 fold weaker in the asparagine enzyme. The turnover numbers were reduced by a factor of 70 for ethanol oxidation and 30 for acetaldehyde reduction at pH 7.3, 30/sup 0/C. Dead end inhibition studies and the kinetic isotope effect showed that NAD and ethanol binding follow a rapid equilibrium random mechanism as opposed to the ordered mechanism found for ADH I. They conclude that the carboxyl group of Asp-46 is essential for the electrostatic environment near the active site zinc. Amidation may affect the geometry and/or coordination of the metal complex.

  7. A Frontier Molecular Orbital determination of the active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on a dispersed metal catalysts. The basis for these calculations is the reported finding that a large number of catalyzed reactions take place on single atom active sites on the metal surface. Thus, these sites can be considered as surface complexes made up of the central active atom surrounded by near-neighbor metal atom ``ligands`` with localized surface orbitals perturbed only by these ``ligands``. These ``complexes`` are based on a twelve coordinate species with the ``ligands`` attached to the t{sub 2g} orbitals and the coordinate axes coincident with the direction of the e{sub g} orbitals on the central atom. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  8. A Frontier Molecular Orbital determination of the active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on a dispersed metal catalysts. The basis for these calculations is the reported finding that a large number of catalyzed reactions take place on single atom active sites on the metal surface. Thus, these sites can be considered as surface complexes made up of the central active atom surrounded by near-neighbor metal atom ligands'' with localized surface orbitals perturbed only by these ligands''. These complexes'' are based on a twelve coordinate species with the ligands'' attached to the t{sub 2g} orbitals and the coordinate axes coincident with the direction of the e{sub g} orbitals on the central atom. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  9. Opioid ligands having delayed long-term antagonist activity: potential pharmacotherapies for opioid abuse.

    PubMed

    Husbands, Stephen M; Lewis, John W

    2003-03-01

    Buprenorphine is a partial agonist at the micro -opioid receptor with long duration of action and also exhibits delayed antagonist activity. Buprenorphine is finding increasing use as a treatment agent for opioid abuse, though its low efficacy is not well tolerated by all addicts. There is interest in developing a higher efficacy version of buprenorphine and in this mini-review some of the ligands recently discovered, that share with buprenorphine a profile of agonism followed by delayed antagonism, are discussed.

  10. Multi-ligand poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles inhibit activation of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Kona, Soujanya; Su, Lee-Chun; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Dong, Jing-Fei; Brilakis, Emmanouil S; Tang, Liping; Banerjee, Subhash; Nguyen, Kytai T

    2013-08-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) activation and inflammation is a key step in the initiation and progression of many cardiovascular diseases. Targeted delivery of therapeutic reagents to inflamed EC using nanoparticles is challenging as nanoparticles do not arrest on EC efficiently under high shear stress. In this study, we developed a novel polymeric platelet-mimicking nanoparticle for strong particle adhesion onto ECs and enhanced particle internalization by ECs. This nanoparticle was encapsulated with dexamethasone as the anti-inflammatory drug, and conjugated with polyethylene glycol, glycoprotein 1b, and trans-activating transcriptional peptide. The multi-ligand nanoparticle showed significantly greater adhesion on P-selectin, von Willebrand Factor, than the unmodified particles, and activated EC in vitro under both static and flow conditions. Treatment of injured rat carotid arteries with these multi-ligand nanoparticles suppressed neointimal stenosis more than unconjugated nanoparticles did. These results indicate that this novel multi-ligand nanoparticle is efficient to target inflamed EC and inhibit inflammation and subsequent stenosis.

  11. Membrane-displayed peptide ligand activates the pheromone response pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hara, Keisuke; Ono, Takuya; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2012-05-01

    The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is an attractive host for studying G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We developed a system in which a peptide ligand specific for GPCR is displayed on yeast plasma membrane. The model system described here is based on yeast plasma membrane display of an analogue of α-factor, which is a peptide ligand for Ste2p, the GPCR that activates the yeast pheromone response pathway. α-Factor analogues, containing linkers of varying lengths and produced in yeast cells, became attached to the cell plasma membrane by linking to the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored plasma membrane protein Yps1p. We were able to demonstrate that an optimized α-factor analogue activated the pheromone response pathway in S. cerevisiae, as assessed by a fluorescent reporter assay. Furthermore, it was shown that linker length strongly influenced signalling pathway activation. To our knowledge, this is the first report documenting functional signalling by a plasma membrane-displayed ligand in S. cerevisiae.

  12. Overcoming Statistical Complexity: Selective Coordination of Three Different Metal Ions to a Ligand with Three Different Coordination Sites.

    PubMed

    Akine, Shigehisa; Matsumoto, Takashi; Nabeshima, Tatsuya

    2016-01-18

    In general, it is difficult to selectively introduce different metal ions at specific positions of a cluster-like structure. This is mainly due to statistical problems as well as the reversibility of the formation of coordination bonds. To overcome this statistical problem, we used a carefully designed ligand, H6 L, which can accommodate three different kinds of metal ions in three types of coordination sites. The complex [LNiZn2La](3+), which contains three different metals, was quantitatively obtained by a stepwise procedure, but different products were obtained when the metal ions were added in a different order. However, equilibration studies indicated that this complex was almost solely formed among 54 (=3×3×3H2) possible products upon heating; the formation efficiency (ca. 100%) was significantly higher than the statistical probability (2.47%). Such carefully designed ligands should be useful for the synthesis multimetallic systems, which are of interest because of the interplay between the different metals.

  13. Syntheses, crystal structures, anticancer activities of three reduce Schiff base ligand based transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hui-Qin; Jia, Lei; Xu, Jun; Zhu, Tao-Feng; Xu, Zhou-Qing; Chen, Ru-Hua; Ma, Tie-Liang; Wang, Yuan; Wu, Wei-Na

    2016-02-01

    Three nickel(II) complexes, [Ni2(L1)2(tren)2(H2O)](ClO4)3 (1), [NiL2(tren)2](ClO4)·2.5H2O (2), [NiL2(tren)2]I·1.5H2O·CH3OH (3) based on amino acid reduced Schiff ligands are synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The results show that in all complexes, the amino acid ligand is deprotonated and acts as an anionic ligand. In the dinuclear complex 1, each Ni(II) atom has a distorted octahedron geometry while with different coordination environment. However, the complexes 2 and 3 are mononuclear, almost with the same coordination environment. Furthermore, in vitro experiments are carried out, including MTT assay, Annexin V/PI flow cytometry and western blotting, to assess whether the complexes have antitumor effect. And the results show that all the three complexes have moderate anticancer activity towards human hepatic cancer (HepG2), human cervical cancer (HeLa) and human prostate (PC3) cell lines, in a concentration dependent way. The complex 1 exhibit higher cytotoxicity than the other two complexes and can induce human hepatic cancer cell (HepG2) to cell apoptosis by activating caspase 3.

  14. NK cell activating receptor ligand expression in lymphangioleiomyomatosis is associated with lung function decline

    PubMed Central

    Osterburg, Andrew R.; Nelson, Rebecca L.; Yaniv, Benyamin Z.; Foot, Rachel; Donica, Walter R.F.; Nashu, Madison A.; Liu, Huan; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A.; Moss, Joel; McCormack, Francis X.; Borchers, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare lung disease of women that leads to progressive cyst formation and accelerated loss of pulmonary function. Neoplastic smooth muscle cells from an unknown source metastasize to the lung and drive destructive remodeling. Given the role of NK cells in immune surveillance, we postulated that NK cell activating receptors and their cognate ligands are involved in LAM pathogenesis. We found that ligands for the NKG2D activating receptor UL-16 binding protein 2 (ULBP2) and ULBP3 are localized in cystic LAM lesions and pulmonary nodules. We found elevated soluble serum ULBP2 (mean = 575 pg/ml ± 142) in 50 of 100 subjects and ULBP3 in 30 of 100 (mean = 8,300 pg/ml ± 1,515) subjects. LAM patients had fewer circulating NKG2D+ NK cells and decreased NKG2D surface expression. Lung function decline was associated with soluble NKG2D ligand (sNKG2DL) detection. The greatest rate of decline forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, –124 ± 30 ml/year) in the 48 months after enrollment (NHLBI LAM Registry) occurred in patients expressing both ULBP2 and ULBP3, whereas patients with undetectable sNKG2DL levels had the lowest rate of FEV1 decline (–32.7 ± 10 ml/year). These data suggest a role for NK cells, sNKG2DL, and the innate immune system in LAM pathogenesis. PMID:27734028

  15. Syntheses, crystal structures, anticancer activities of three reduce Schiff base ligand based transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hui-Qin; Jia, Lei; Xu, Jun; Zhu, Tao-Feng; Xu, Zhou-Qing; Chen, Ru-Hua; Ma, Tie-Liang; Wang, Yuan; Wu, Wei-Na

    2016-02-01

    Three nickel(II) complexes, [Ni2(L1)2(tren)2(H2O)](ClO4)3 (1), [NiL2(tren)2](ClO4)·2.5H2O (2), [NiL2(tren)2]I·1.5H2O·CH3OH (3) based on amino acid reduced Schiff ligands are synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The results show that in all complexes, the amino acid ligand is deprotonated and acts as an anionic ligand. In the dinuclear complex 1, each Ni(II) atom has a distorted octahedron geometry while with different coordination environment. However, the complexes 2 and 3 are mononuclear, almost with the same coordination environment. Furthermore, in vitro experiments are carried out, including MTT assay, Annexin V/PI flow cytometry and western blotting, to assess whether the complexes have antitumor effect. And the results show that all the three complexes have moderate anticancer activity towards human hepatic cancer (HepG2), human cervical cancer (HeLa) and human prostate (PC3) cell lines, in a concentration dependent way. The complex 1 exhibit higher cytotoxicity than the other two complexes and can induce human hepatic cancer cell (HepG2) to cell apoptosis by activating caspase 3.

  16. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Action levels

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, J.S.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1991-10-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide for early leak detection and to monitor performance of the active low-level waste disposal facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and the transuranic waste storage areas in SWSA 5 North. Early leak detection is accomplished by sampling runoff, groundwater, and perched water in burial trenches. Sample results are compared to action levels that represent background contamination by naturally occurring and fallout-derived radionuclides. 15 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. New structure-activity relationships of N-acetamide substituted pyrazolopyrimidines as pharmacological ligands of TSPO.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Schulte, Michael L; Nickels, Michael L; Manning, H Charles

    2016-08-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO) represents an attractive target for molecular imaging and therapy due to its prevalence and critical roles played in oncology and other pathologies. Based upon our previously optimized pyrazolopyrimidine scaffold, we elucidated new structure activity relationships related to N,N-disubstitutions of the terminal acetamide on pyrazolopyrimidines and further explored the impacts of these substituents on lipophilicity and plasma protein binding. Several novel chemical probes reported here exhibited significantly increased binding affinity, suitable lipophilicity and protein binding compared with contemporary TSPO ligands. We illustrate that N,N-acetamide disubstitution affords opportunities to introduce diverse chemical moieties distal to the central pyrazolopyrimidine core, without sacrificing TSPO affinity. We anticipate that further exploration of N-acetamide substitutions may yield additional TSPO ligands capable of furthering the field of precision medicine.

  18. Antiproliferative activity of ruthenium(ii) arene complexes with mono- and bidentate pyridine-based ligands.

    PubMed

    Richter, Stefan; Singh, Sushma; Draca, Dijana; Kate, Anup; Kumbhar, Anupa; Kumbhar, Avinash S; Maksimovic-Ivanic, Danijela; Mijatovic, Sanja; Lönnecke, Peter; Hey-Hawkins, Evamarie

    2016-08-16

    A series of Ru(II) arene complexes of mono- and bidentate N-donor ligands with carboxyl or ester groups and chlorido ancillary ligands were synthesised and structurally characterised. The complexes have a distorted tetrahedral piano-stool geometry. The binding interaction was studied with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) by absorption titration, viscosity measurement, thermal melting, circular dichroism, ethidium bromide displacement assay and DNA cleavage of plasmid DNA (pBR322), investigated by gel electrophoresis. The dichlorido complexes bind covalently to DNA in the dark, similar to cisplatin, while the monochlorido complexes bind covalently on irradiation, similar to cisplatin analogues. The compounds are selectively cytotoxic against several tumour cell lines and show specific nonlinear correlation between dose and activity. This phenomenon is closely related to their potential to act preferentially as inhibitors of cell division. PMID:27264161

  19. Electronic and geometric effects of phosphatriazaadamantane ligands on the catalytic activity of an [FeFe] hydrogenase inspired complex.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, Aaron K; Wang, Shihua; Nichol, Gary S; Lichtenberger, Dennis L; Evans, Dennis H; Glass, Richard S

    2010-03-28

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase enzyme active site inspired complexes [Fe(2)(mu-C(6)H(4)S(2))(CO)(5)PTA] (1PTA) and [Fe(2)(mu-C(6)H(4)S(2))(CO)(4)PTA(2)] (1PTA(2)) (PTA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane) were synthesized and characterized. The ability of 1PTA and 1PTA(2) to catalytically produce molecular hydrogen in solution from the weak acid acetic acid was examined electrochemically and compared to previous studies on the all carbonyl containing analogue [Fe(2)(mu-C(6)H(4)S(2))(CO)(6)] (1). Computational methods and cyclic voltammograms indicated that the substitution of CO ligands by PTA in 1 resulted in markedly different reduction chemistry. Both 1PTA and 1PTA(2) catalytically produce molecular hydrogen from acetic acid, however, the mechanism by which and 1PTA and 1PTA(2) catalyze hydrogen differ in the initial reductive processes. PMID:20221539

  20. Synthesis, spectroscopic, coordination and biological activities of some organometallic complexes derived from thio-Schiff base ligands

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Hussein, Azza A.; Linert, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Two series of mono- and binuclear complexes cyclic or acyclic thio-ferocine Schiff base ligands, derived from the condensation of 2-aminobenzenthiol (L) with monoacetyl ferrocene in the molar ratio 1:1 or in the molar ratio 1:2 for diacetyl ferocine have been prepared. The condensation reactions yield the corresponding Schiff Base ligands, HLa-Maf and H2Lb-Daf. The chelation of the ligands to metal ions occurs through the sulfur of the thiol group as well as the nitrogen atoms of the azomethine group of the ligands. HLa-Maf acts as monobasic bidentate or dibasic tetradentate, while H2Lb-Daf behaves as twice negatively cargend tetradentate ligand. The structures of these ligands were elucidated by elemental analysis, infrared, ultraviolet–visible spectra, as well as 1H NMR spectra. Reactions of the Schiff bases ligands with ruthenium(III), oxovanadium(IV) and dioxouranium(VI) afforded the corresponding transition metal complexes. The properties of the newly prepared complexes were analyse by elemental analyses, infrared, electronic spectra, 1H NMR as well as the magnetic susceptibility and conductivity measurement. The metal complexes exhibits different geometrical arrangements such as octahedral and square pyramidal coordination. Schiff base ligands and their metal complexes were tested against two pathogenic bacteria as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as one kind of fungi to study their biological activity. All the complexes exhibit antibacterial and antifungal activities against these organisms. PMID:24070648

  1. Synthesis, spectroscopic, coordination and biological activities of some organometallic complexes derived from thio-Schiff base ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Hussein, Azza A.; Linert, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Two series of mono- and binuclear complexes cyclic or acyclic thio-ferocine Schiff base ligands, derived from the condensation of 2-aminobenzenthiol (L) with monoacetyl ferrocene in the molar ratio 1:1 or in the molar ratio 1:2 for diacetyl ferocine have been prepared. The condensation reactions yield the corresponding Schiff Base ligands, HLa-Maf and H2Lb-Daf. The chelation of the ligands to metal ions occurs through the sulfur of the thiol group as well as the nitrogen atoms of the azomethine group of the ligands. HLa-Maf acts as monobasic bidentate or dibasic tetradentate, while H2Lb-Daf behaves as twice negatively cargend tetradentate ligand. The structures of these ligands were elucidated by elemental analysis, infrared, ultraviolet-visible spectra, as well as 1H NMR spectra. Reactions of the Schiff bases ligands with ruthenium(III), oxovanadium(IV) and dioxouranium(VI) afforded the corresponding transition metal complexes. The properties of the newly prepared complexes were analyse by elemental analyses, infrared, electronic spectra, 1H NMR as well as the magnetic susceptibility and conductivity measurement. The metal complexes exhibits different geometrical arrangements such as octahedral and square pyramidal coordination. Schiff base ligands and their metal complexes were tested against two pathogenic bacteria as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as one kind of fungi to study their biological activity. All the complexes exhibit antibacterial and antifungal activities against these organisms.

  2. Small Molecule Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase γ (RPTPγ) Ligands That Inhibit Phosphatase Activity via Perturbation of the Tryptophan-Proline-Aspartate (WPD) Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Sheriff, Steven; Beno, Brett R; Zhai, Weixu; Kostich, Walter A; McDonnell, Patricia A; Kish, Kevin; Goldfarb, Valentina; Gao, Mian; Kiefer, Susan E; Yanchunas, Joseph; Huang, Yanling; Shi, Shuhao; Zhu, Shirong; Dzierba, Carolyn; Bronson, Joanne; Macor, John E; Appiah, Kingsley K; Westphal, Ryan S; O’Connell, Jonathan; Gerritz, Samuel W

    2012-11-09

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) catalyze the dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues, a process that involves a conserved tryptophan-proline-aspartate (WPD) loop in catalysis. In previously determined structures of PTPs, the WPD-loop has been observed in either an 'open' conformation or a 'closed' conformation. In the current work, X-ray structures of the catalytic domain of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase γ (RPTPγ) revealed a ligand-induced 'superopen' conformation not previously reported for PTPs. In the superopen conformation, the ligand acts as an apparent competitive inhibitor and binds in a small hydrophobic pocket adjacent to, but distinct from, the active site. In the open and closed WPD-loop conformations of RPTPγ, the side chain of Trp1026 partially occupies this pocket. In the superopen conformation, Trp1026 is displaced allowing a 3,4-dichlorobenzyl substituent to occupy this site. The bound ligand prevents closure of the WPD-loop over the active site and disrupts the catalytic cycle of the enzyme.

  3. Monitoring Solution Structures of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ upon Ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Rico; Tänzler, Dirk; Ihling, Christian H; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been intensively studied as drug targets to treat type 2 diabetes, lipid disorders, and metabolic syndrome. This study is part of our ongoing efforts to map conformational changes in PPARs in solution by a combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (MS). To our best knowledge, we performed the first studies addressing solution structures of full-length PPAR-β/δ. We monitored the conformations of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ upon binding of two agonists. (Photo-) cross-linking relied on (i) a variety of externally introduced amine- and carboxyl-reactive linkers and (ii) the incorporation of the photo-reactive amino acid p-benzoylphenylalanine (Bpa) into PPAR-β/δ by genetic engineering. The distances derived from cross-linking experiments allowed us to monitor conformational changes in PPAR-β/δ upon ligand binding. The cross-linking/MS approach proved highly advantageous to study nuclear receptors, such as PPARs, and revealed the interplay between DBD (DNA-binding domain) and LDB in PPAR-β/δ. Our results indicate the stabilization of a specific conformation through ligand binding in PPAR-β/δ LBD as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ. Moreover, our results suggest a close distance between the N- and C-terminal regions of full-length PPAR-β/δ in the presence of GW1516. Chemical cross-linking/MS allowed us gaining detailed insights into conformational changes that are induced in PPARs when activating ligands are present. Thus, cross-linking/MS should be added to the arsenal of structural methods available for studying nuclear receptors.

  4. Monitoring Solution Structures of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ upon Ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Rico; Tänzler, Dirk; Ihling, Christian H; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been intensively studied as drug targets to treat type 2 diabetes, lipid disorders, and metabolic syndrome. This study is part of our ongoing efforts to map conformational changes in PPARs in solution by a combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (MS). To our best knowledge, we performed the first studies addressing solution structures of full-length PPAR-β/δ. We monitored the conformations of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ upon binding of two agonists. (Photo-) cross-linking relied on (i) a variety of externally introduced amine- and carboxyl-reactive linkers and (ii) the incorporation of the photo-reactive amino acid p-benzoylphenylalanine (Bpa) into PPAR-β/δ by genetic engineering. The distances derived from cross-linking experiments allowed us to monitor conformational changes in PPAR-β/δ upon ligand binding. The cross-linking/MS approach proved highly advantageous to study nuclear receptors, such as PPARs, and revealed the interplay between DBD (DNA-binding domain) and LDB in PPAR-β/δ. Our results indicate the stabilization of a specific conformation through ligand binding in PPAR-β/δ LBD as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ. Moreover, our results suggest a close distance between the N- and C-terminal regions of full-length PPAR-β/δ in the presence of GW1516. Chemical cross-linking/MS allowed us gaining detailed insights into conformational changes that are induced in PPARs when activating ligands are present. Thus, cross-linking/MS should be added to the arsenal of structural methods available for studying nuclear receptors. PMID:26992147

  5. Monitoring Solution Structures of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ upon Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Rico; Tänzler, Dirk; Ihling, Christian H.; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been intensively studied as drug targets to treat type 2 diabetes, lipid disorders, and metabolic syndrome. This study is part of our ongoing efforts to map conformational changes in PPARs in solution by a combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (MS). To our best knowledge, we performed the first studies addressing solution structures of full-length PPAR-β/δ. We monitored the conformations of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ upon binding of two agonists. (Photo-) cross-linking relied on (i) a variety of externally introduced amine- and carboxyl-reactive linkers and (ii) the incorporation of the photo-reactive amino acid p-benzoylphenylalanine (Bpa) into PPAR-β/δ by genetic engineering. The distances derived from cross-linking experiments allowed us to monitor conformational changes in PPAR-β/δ upon ligand binding. The cross-linking/MS approach proved highly advantageous to study nuclear receptors, such as PPARs, and revealed the interplay between DBD (DNA-binding domain) and LDB in PPAR-β/δ. Our results indicate the stabilization of a specific conformation through ligand binding in PPAR-β/δ LBD as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ. Moreover, our results suggest a close distance between the N- and C-terminal regions of full-length PPAR-β/δ in the presence of GW1516. Chemical cross-linking/MS allowed us gaining detailed insights into conformational changes that are induced in PPARs when activating ligands are present. Thus, cross-linking/MS should be added to the arsenal of structural methods available for studying nuclear receptors. PMID:26992147

  6. Characterization of the ligand binding site of the bovine IgA Fc receptor (bFc alpha R).

    PubMed

    Morton, H Craig; Pleass, Richard J; Woof, Jenny M; Brandtzaeg, Per

    2004-12-24

    Recently, we identified a bovine IgA Fc receptor (bFc alpha R), which shows high homology to the human myeloid Fc alpha R, CD89. IgA binding has previously been shown to depend on several specific residues located in the B-C and F-G loops of the membrane-distal extracellular domain 1 of CD89. To compare the ligand binding properties of these two Fc alpha Rs, we have mapped the IgA binding site of bFc alpha R. We show that, in common with CD89, Tyr-35 in the B-C loop is essential for IgA binding. However, in contrast to earlier observations on CD89, mutation of residues in the F-G loop did not significantly inhibit IgA binding.

  7. Aspects of C-H Activation in Metal Complexes Containing Sulfur Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski-DuBois, Mary C.

    2004-10-08

    The research project proposed to synthesize new metal complexes with sulfido, disulfido and other types of reactive sulfur ligands, and to explore the joint reactivity of metal and sulfur ligands with hydrogen and organic molecules. The overall objective was to investigate reaction pathways relevant to those observed for the heterogeneous metal sulfide catalysts which promote hydrogen activation, hydrogenation-dehydrogenation of organic substrates, and hydrogenolysis of carbon-heteroatom bonds. Particular emphasis was placed on CpRe derivatives (where Cp might be C5H5 or alkylated versions) so that comparisons could be made with the previously studied CpMo complexes, which showed extensive reactivity at the sulfur ligands. Heterogeneous rhenium sulfides generally show higher catalytic activity than molybdenum sulfides, and this is attributed, in part, to the weaker Re-S bond strength, relative to the moybdenum-sulfur bond. In our studies of discrete Re-sulfide complexes, we have also observed evidence for weaker Re-S bonds relative to the molybdenum systems. In addition we have characterized novel hydrogen activation by rhenium sulfido complexes, as well as carbon-hydrogen, carbon-sulfur and metal sulfur bond cleavage reactions. Hydrogen Activation. The complex Cp{prime}ReCl2S3 was synthesized in ca 70% yield and characterized by an X-ray diffraction study which confirms that the complex contains a {eta}2-trisulfide ligand. The cyclic voltammogram of Cp{prime}ReCl2S3 shows a wide window of redox stability with an irreversible reduction wave at -0.97 V and an irreversible oxidation at +1.03 V vs Fc. Nevertheless, the complex undergoes a facile reaction with hydrogen at 50 C to form H2S and a new dinuclear sulfido bridged rhenium complex. This reaction is of interest because it is the first example of the hydrogenolysis of a discrete metal polysulfide complex to produce H2S, a reaction also observed for heterogeneous rhenium sulfides. The reaction contrasts with

  8. Structural Diversity of Cadmium(II) Coordination Polymers Induced by Tuning the Coordination Sites of Isomeric Ligands.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Zhou, Hui-Fang; Hou, Lei; Wang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Yao-Yu; Zhu, Zhonghua

    2016-09-01

    When the coordination sites of ligands were shifted, the solvothermal reactions of four positional isomeric asymmetrical pyridyldicarboxylatic acids with Cd(NO3)2 generated four new coordination polymers, [Cd(L1)(DMF)3]·DMF·H2O (1), [H2N(CH3)2]2[Cd(L2)2]·3DMF·H2O (2), [Cd(L3)(H2O)2] (3), and [Cd(L4)]·1.5DMF (4), where DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide, H2L1 = 2-(3'-carboxylphenyl)isonicotinic acid, H2L2 = 2-(4'-carboxylphenyl)isonicotinic acid, H2L3 = 5-(3'-carboxylphenyl)nicotic acid, and H2L4 = 2-(3'-pyridyl)terephthalic acid. 1 shows a rare 2D fabric structure. 2 discloses a grid-layer structure with heterochiral helical chains and in which three sets of layers stack in different directions, affording an unprecedented 2D + 2D + 2D → 3D polycatenating framework with 3D intersecting porous systems. 3 also displays a 2D layer possessing strong intralayer π···π interactions and interlayer hydrogen bonds. 4 contains a rare Cd2(COO)4 paddle-wheel unit and forms a 3D framework with 1D open channels. The carboxyl and pyridyl groups of the positional isomeric H2L1-H2L4 ligands show distinct bridging fashions, which leads to the production of versatile architectures of 1-4, and their effects on the crystal structures are discussed. 1-4 reveal solid-state photoluminescence stemming from intraligand charge transfer. 2 and 4 show high selectivity for CO2 over CH4 but with different CO2 adsorption enthalpies. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations identified the multiple adsorption sites in 2 for CO2. PMID:27513092

  9. Differential Effects of Methoxy Group on the Interaction of Curcuminoids with Two Major Ligand Binding Sites of Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hiroki; Chuang, Victor Tuan Giam; Yamasaki, Keishi; Yamaotsu, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Nagumo, Kohei; Anraku, Makoto; Kadowaki, Daisuke; Ishima, Yu; Hirono, Shuichi; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Curcuminoids are a group of compounds with a similar chemical backbone structure but containing different numbers of methoxy groups that have therapeutic potential due to their anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties. They mainly bind to albumin in plasma. These findings influence their body disposition and biological activities. Spectroscopic analysis using site specific probes on human serum albumin (HSA) clearly indicated that curcumin (Cur), demethylcurcumin (Dmc) and bisdemethoxycurcumin (Bdmc) bind to both Site I (sub-site Ia and Ib) and Site II on HSA. At pH 7.4, the binding constants for Site I were relatively comparable between curcuminoids, while the binding constants for Site II at pH 7.4 were increased in order Cur < Dmc < Bdmc. Binding experiments using HSA mutants showed that Trp214 and Arg218 at Site I, and Tyr411 and Arg410 at Site II are involved in the binding of curcuminoids. The molecular docking of all curcuminoids to the Site I pocket showed that curcuminoids stacked with Phe211 and Trp214, and interacted with hydrophobic and aromatic amino acid residues. In contrast, each curcuminoid interacted with Site II in a different manner depending whether a methoxy group was present or absent. A detailed analysis of curcuminoids-albumin interactions would provide valuable information in terms of understanding the pharmacokinetics and the biological activities of this class of compounds. PMID:24498401

  10. Characterization of active sites in zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, J.; Bug, A.; Nicol, J.M.

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Atomic-level details of the interaction of adsorbed molecules with active sites in catalysts are urgently needed to facilitate development of more effective and/or environmentally benign catalysts. To this end the authors have carried out neutron scattering studies combined with theoretical calculations of the dynamics of small molecules inside the cavities of zeolite catalysts. The authors have developed the use of H{sub 2} as a probe of adsorption sites by observing the hindered rotations of the adsorbed H{sub 2} molecule, and they were able to show that an area near the four-rings is the most likely adsorption site for H{sub 2} in zeolite A while adsorption of H{sub 2} near cations located on six-ring sites decreases in strength as Ni {approximately} Co > Ca > Zn {approximately} Na. Vibrational and rotational motions of ethylene and cyclopropane adsorption complexes were used as a measure for zeolite-adsorbate interactions. Preliminary studies of the binding of water, ammonia, and methylamines were carried out in a number of related guest-host materials.

  11. Characterization of a second ligand binding site of the insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hao Caili; Whittaker, Linda; Whittaker, Jonathan . E-mail: jonathan.whittaker@case.edu

    2006-08-18

    Insulin binding to its receptor is characterized by high affinity, curvilinear Scatchard plots, and negative cooperativity. These properties may be the consequence of binding of insulin to two receptor binding sites. The N-terminal L1 domain and the C-terminus of the {alpha} subunit contain one binding site. To locate a second site, we examined the binding properties of chimeric receptors in which the L1 and L2 domains and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat of the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor were replaced by corresponding regions of the insulin receptor. Substitutions of the L2 domain and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat together with the L1 domain produced 80- and 300-fold increases in affinity for insulin. Fusion of these domains to human immunoglobulin Fc fragment produced a protein which bound insulin with a K {sub d} of 2.9 nM. These data strongly suggest that these domains contain an insulin binding site.

  12. Drosophila Epsin mediates a select endocytic pathway that DSL ligands must enter to activate Notch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weidong; Struhl, Gary

    2004-11-01

    Recent findings suggest that Delta/Serrate/Lag2 (DSL) signals activate Notch by an unprecedented mechanism that requires the ligands to be endocytosed in signal-sending cells to activate the receptor in signal-receiving cells. Here, we show that cells devoid of Epsin, a conserved adaptor protein for Clathrin-mediated endocytosis, behave normally except that they cannot send DSL signals. Surprisingly, we find that Epsin is not required for bulk endocytosis of DSL proteins. Instead, Epsin appears to be essential for targeting DSL proteins to a special endocytic pathway that they must enter to acquire signaling activity. We present evidence that DSL proteins must be mono-ubiquitinated to be targeted by Epsin to this pathway. Furthermore, we show that the requirements for both Epsin and mono-ubiquitination can be bypassed by introducing the internalization signal that mediates endocytosis and recycling of the Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) receptor. We propose that Epsin is essential for DSL signaling because it targets mono-ubiquitinated DSL proteins to an endocytic recycling compartment that they must enter to be converted into active ligands. Alternatively Epsin may be required to target mono-ubiquitinated DSL proteins to a particular subclass of coated pits that have special properties essential for Notch activation.

  13. Highly Active and Selective Manganese C=O Bond Hydrogenation Catalysts: The Importance of the Multidentate Ligand, the Ancillary Ligands, and the Oxidation State.

    PubMed

    Kallmeier, Fabian; Irrgang, Torsten; Dietel, Thomas; Kempe, Rhett

    2016-09-19

    The replacement of expensive noble metals by earth-abundant transition metals is a central topic in catalysis. Herein, we introduce a highly active and selective homogeneous manganese-based C=O bond hydrogenation catalyst. Our catalyst has a broad substrate scope, it is able to hydrogenate aryl-alkyl, diaryl, dialkyl, and cycloalkyl ketones as well as aldehydes. A very good functional group tolerance including the quantitative and selective hydrogenation of a ketone in the presence of a non-shielded olefin is observed. In Mn hydrogenation catalysis, the combination of the multidentate ligand, the oxidation state of the metal, and the choice of the right ancillary ligand is crucial for high activity. This observation emphasizes an advantage and the importance of homogeneous catalysts in 3d-metal catalysis. For coordination compounds, fine-tuning of a complex coordination environment is easily accomplished in comparison to enzyme and/or heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:27571701

  14. Calorimetric studies of the interactions of metalloenzyme active site mimetics with zinc-binding inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sophia G; Burns, Philip T; Miceli, Amanda M; Grice, Kyle A; Karver, Caitlin E; Jin, Lihua

    2016-07-19

    The binding of drugs to metalloenzymes is an intricate process that involves several interactions, including binding of the drug to the enzyme active site metal, as well as multiple interactions between the drug and the enzyme residues. In order to determine the free energy contribution of Zn(2+) binding by known metalloenzyme inhibitors without the other interactions, valid active site zinc structural mimetics must be formed and binding studies need to be performed in biologically relevant conditions. The potential of each of five ligands to form a structural mimetic with Zn(2+) was investigated in buffer using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). All five ligands formed strong 1 : 1 (ligand : Zn(2+)) binary complexes. The complexes were used in further ITC experiments to study their interaction with 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) and/or acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), two bidentate anionic zinc-chelating enzyme inhibitors. It was found that tetradentate ligands were not suitable for creating zinc structural mimetics for inhibitor binding in solution due to insufficient coordination sites remaining on Zn(2+). A stable binary complex, [Zn(BPA)](2+), which was formed by a tridentate ligand, bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (BPA), was found to bind one AHA in buffer or a methanol : buffer mixture (60 : 40 by volume) at pH 7.25 or one 8-HQ in the methanol : buffer mixture at pH 6.80, making it an effective structural mimetic for the active site of zinc metalloenzymes. These results are consistent with the observation that metalloenzyme active site zinc ions have three residues coordinated to them, leaving one or two sites open for inhibitors to bind. Our findings indicate that Zn(BPA)X2 can be used as an active site structural mimetic for zinc metalloenzymes for estimating the free energy contribution of zinc binding to the overall inhibitor active site interactions. Such use will help aid in the rational design of inhibitors to a variety of zinc metalloenzymes

  15. New Ru(II) Complex for Dual Activity: Photoinduced Ligand Release and (1)O2 Production.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Lauren M; White, Jessica K; Albani, Bryan A; Kohler, Lars; Kodanko, Jeremy J; Thummel, Randolph P; Dunbar, Kim R; Turro, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    The new complex [Ru(pydppn)(biq)(py)](2+) (1) undergoes both py photodissociation in CH3CN with Φ500 =0.0070(4) and (1)O2 production with ΦΔ =0.75(7) in CH3 OH from a long-lived (3) ππ* state centered on the pydppn ligand (pydppn=3-(pyrid-2-yl)benzo[i]dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine; biq = 2,2'-biquinoline; py=pyridine). This represents an order of magnitude decrease in the Φ500 compared to the previously reported model compound [Ru(tpy)(biq)(py)](2+) (3) (tpy=2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) that undergoes only ligand exchange. The effect on the quantum yields by the addition of a second deactivation pathway through the low-lying (3) ππ* state necessary for dual reactivity was investigated using ultrafast and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, revealing a significantly shorter (3) MLCT lifetime in 1 relative to that of the model complex 3. Due to the structural similarities between the two compounds, the lower values of Φ500 and ΦΔ compared to that of [Ru(pydppn)(bpy)(py)](2+) (2) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) are attributed to a competitive excited state population between the (3) LF states involved in ligand dissociation and the long-lived (3) ππ* state in 1. Complex 1 represents a model compound for dual activity that may be applied to photochemotherapy. PMID:26715085

  16. Synthesis, structural, thermal studies and biological activity of a tridentate Schiff base ligand and their transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Abd El-halim, Hanan F; Omar, M M; Mohamed, Gehad G

    2011-01-01

    Schiff base (L) ligand is prepared via condensation of pyridine-2,6-dicarboxaldehyde with -2-aminopyridine. The ligand and its metal complexes are characterized based on elemental analysis, mass, IR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance, and thermal analyses (TG, DTG and DTA). The molar conductance reveals that all the metal chelates are non-electrolytes. IR spectra shows that L ligand behaves as neutral tridentate ligand and bind to the metal ions via the two azomethine N and pyridine N. From the magnetic and solid reflectance spectra, it is found that the geometrical structures of these complexes are octahedral (Cr(III), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Th(IV)) and tetrahedral (Mn(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), and UO2(II)). The thermal behaviour of these chelates shows that the hydrated complexes losses water molecules of hydration in the first step followed immediately by decomposition of the anions and ligand molecules in the subsequent steps. The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, E*, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* are calculated from the DTG curves using Coats-Redfern method. The synthesized ligand, in comparison to their metal complexes also was screened for its antibacterial activity against bacterial species, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus pyogones and Fungi (Candida). The activity data shows that the metal complexes to be more potent/antibacterial than the parent Schiff base ligand against one or more bacterial species.

  17. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases, TYRO3, AXL, and MER, Demonstrate Distinct Patterns and Complex Regulation of Ligand-induced Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Wen-I; Nguyen, Khanh-Quynh N.; Calarese, Daniel A.; Garforth, Scott J.; Antes, Anita L.; Smirnov, Sergey V.; Almo, Steve C.; Birge, Raymond B.; Kotenko, Sergei V.

    2014-01-01

    TYRO3, AXL, and MER receptors (TAMs) are three homologous type I receptor-tyrosine kinases that are activated by endogenous ligands, protein S (PROS1) and growth arrest-specific gene 6 (GAS6). These ligands can either activate TAMs as soluble factors, or, in turn, opsonize phosphatidylserine (PS) on apoptotic cells (ACs) and serve as bridging molecules between ACs and TAMs. Abnormal expression and activation of TAMs have been implicated in promoting proliferation and survival of cancer cells, as well as in suppressing anti-tumor immunity. Despite the fact that TAM receptors share significant similarity, little is known about the specificity of interaction between TAM receptors and their ligands, particularly in the context of ACs, and about the functional diversity of TAM receptors. To study ligand-mediated activation of TAMs, we generated a series of reporter cell lines expressing chimeric TAM receptors. Using this system, we found that each TAM receptor has a unique pattern of interaction with and activation by GAS6 and PROS1, which is also differentially affected by the presence of ACs, PS-containing lipid vesicles and enveloped virus. We also demonstrated that γ-carboxylation of ligands is essential for the full activation of TAMs and that soluble immunoglobulin-like TAM domains act as specific ligand antagonists. These studies demonstrate that, despite their similarity, TYRO3, AXL, and MER are likely to perform distinct functions in both immunoregulation and the recognition and removal of ACs. PMID:25074926

  18. Electrophilic Activation of Oxidized Sulfur Ligands and Implications for the Biological Activity of Ruthenium(II) Arene Anticancer Complexes.

    PubMed

    Sriskandakumar, Thamayanthy; Behyan, Shirin; Habtemariam, Abraha; Sadler, Peter J; Kennepohl, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Surprisingly, the anticancer activity of half-sandwich Ru arene complexes [(η(6)-arene)Ru(en)Cl](+) appears to be promoted and not inhibited by binding to the intracellular thiol glutathione. Labilization of the Ru-S bond allowing DNA binding appeared to be initiated by oxygenation of the thiolate ligand, although oxidation by itself did not seem to weaken the Ru-S bond. In this study, we have investigated the solvation and acidic perturbations of mono (sulfenato) and bis (sulfinato) oxidized species of [(η(6)-arene)Ru(en) (SR)](+) complex in the presence of Brønsted and Lewis acids. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy together with density functional theory calculations show that solvation and acidic perturbation of sulfenato species produce a significant decrease in the S3p character of the Ru-S bond (Ru4dσ* ← S1s charge donation). Also there is a drastic fall in the overall ligand charge donation to the metal center in both sulfenato and sulfinato species. Our investigation clearly shows that mono oxidized sulfenato species are most susceptible to ligand exchange, hence providing a possible pathway for in vivo activation and biological activity.

  19. Discovery and Characterization of Non-ATP Site Inhibitors of the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Comess, Kenneth M.; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R.; Gum, Rebecca J.; Borhani, David W.; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R.; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E.; Haasch, Deanna L.; Smith, Harriet T.; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L.; Cloutier, Timothy E.; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I.; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J.; Calderwood, David J.; Hajduk, Philip J.

    2012-03-02

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38{alpha} (involved in the formation of TNF{alpha} and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38{alpha} both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in

  20. A modular treatment of molecular traffic through the active site of cholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Botti, SA; Felder, CE; Lifson, S; Sussman, JL; Silman, I

    1999-01-01

    We present a model for the molecular traffic of ligands, substrates, and products through the active site of cholinesterases (ChEs). First, we describe a common treatment of the diffusion to a buried active site of cationic and neutral species. We then explain the specificity of ChEs for cationic ligands and substrates by introducing two additional components to this common treatment. The first module is a surface trap for cationic species at the entrance to the active-site gorge that operates through local, short-range electrostatic interactions and is independent of ionic strength. The second module is an ionic-strength-dependent steering mechanism generated by long-range electrostatic interactions arising from the overall distribution of charges in ChEs. Our calculations show that diffusion of charged ligands relative to neutral isosteric analogs is enhanced approximately 10-fold by the surface trap, while electrostatic steering contributes only a 1.5- to 2-fold rate enhancement at physiological salt concentration. We model clearance of cationic products from the active-site gorge as analogous to the escape of a particle from a one-dimensional well in the presence of a linear electrostatic potential. We evaluate the potential inside the gorge and provide evidence that while contributing to the steering of cationic species toward the active site, it does not appreciably retard their clearance. This optimal fine-tuning of global and local electrostatic interactions endows ChEs with maximum catalytic efficiency and specificity for a positively charged substrate, while at the same time not hindering clearance of the positively charged products. PMID:10545346

  1. A study of in vitro antibacterial activity of lanthanides complexes with a tetradentate Schiff base ligand

    PubMed Central

    Al Momani, Waleed Mahmoud; Taha, Ziyad Ahmed; Ajlouni, Abdulaziz Mahmoud; Shaqra, Qasem Mohammad Abu; Al Zouby, Muaz

    2013-01-01

    Objective To establish the antibacterial activity of lanthanides complexes with a tetradentate Schiff base ligand L. Methods (N, N′-bis (1-naphthaldimine)-o-phenylenediamine) was prepared from the condensation of 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde with o-phenylenediamine in a molar ratio of 2:1. The antimicrobial activity of the resultant Ln (III) complexes was investigated using agar well diffusion and micro-broth dilution techniques; the latter was used to establish the minimum inhibitory concentrations for each compound investigated. Results Most of Ln (III) complexes were found to exhibit antibacterial activities against a number of pathogenic bacteria with MICs ranging between 1.95-250.00 µg/mL. Staphylococcus aureus was the most susceptible bacterial species to [LaL(NO3)2(H2O)](NO3) complex while Shigella dysenteriae and Escherichia coli required a relatively higher MIC (250 µg/mL). The complexes La (III) and Pr (III) were effective inhibitors against Staphylococcus aureus, whereas Sm (III) complex was effective against Serratia marcescens. On the other hand, Gd (III), La (III) and Nd (III) were found to be more potent inhibitors against Pseudomonas aeruginosa than two of commonly used antibiotics. The remaining Ln (III) complexes showed no remarkable activity as compared to the two standard drugs used. Conclusions Tetradentate Schiff base ligand L and its complexes could be a potential antibacterial compounds after further investigation. PMID:23646299

  2. Ligand stimulation of CD95 induces activation of Plk3 followed by phosphorylation of caspase-8

    PubMed Central

    Helmke, Christina; Raab, Monika; Rödel, Franz; Matthess, Yves; Oellerich, Thomas; Mandal, Ranadip; Sanhaji, Mourad; Urlaub, Henning; Rödel, Claus; Becker, Sven; Strebhardt, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Upon interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand, sequential association of the adaptor molecule FADD (MORT1), pro-forms of caspases-8/10, and the caspase-8/10 regulator c-FLIP leads to the formation of a death-inducing signaling complex. Here, we identify polo-like kinase (Plk) 3 as a new interaction partner of the death receptor CD95. The enzymatic activity of Plk3 increases following interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand. Knockout (KO) or knockdown of caspase-8, CD95 or FADD prevents activation of Plk3 upon CD95 stimulation, suggesting a requirement of a functional DISC for Plk3 activation. Furthermore, we identify caspase-8 as a new substrate for Plk3. Phosphorylation occurs on T273 and results in stimulation of caspase-8 proapoptotic function. Stimulation of CD95 in cells expressing a non-phosphorylatable caspase-8-T273A mutant in a rescue experiment or in Plk3-KO cells generated by CRISPR/Cas9 reduces the processing of caspase-8 prominently. Low T273 phosphorylation correlates significantly with low Plk3 expression in a cohort of 95 anal tumor patients. Our data suggest a novel mechanism of kinase activation within the Plk family and propose a new model for the stimulation of the extrinsic death pathway in tumors with high Plk3 expression. PMID:27325299

  3. Ligand stimulation of CD95 induces activation of Plk3 followed by phosphorylation of caspase-8.

    PubMed

    Helmke, Christina; Raab, Monika; Rödel, Franz; Matthess, Yves; Oellerich, Thomas; Mandal, Ranadip; Sanhaji, Mourad; Urlaub, Henning; Rödel, Claus; Becker, Sven; Strebhardt, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    Upon interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand, sequential association of the adaptor molecule FADD (MORT1), pro-forms of caspases-8/10, and the caspase-8/10 regulator c-FLIP leads to the formation of a death-inducing signaling complex. Here, we identify polo-like kinase (Plk) 3 as a new interaction partner of the death receptor CD95. The enzymatic activity of Plk3 increases following interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand. Knockout (KO) or knockdown of caspase-8, CD95 or FADD prevents activation of Plk3 upon CD95 stimulation, suggesting a requirement of a functional DISC for Plk3 activation. Furthermore, we identify caspase-8 as a new substrate for Plk3. Phosphorylation occurs on T273 and results in stimulation of caspase-8 proapoptotic function. Stimulation of CD95 in cells expressing a non-phosphorylatable caspase-8-T273A mutant in a rescue experiment or in Plk3-KO cells generated by CRISPR/Cas9 reduces the processing of caspase-8 prominently. Low T273 phosphorylation correlates significantly with low Plk3 expression in a cohort of 95 anal tumor patients. Our data suggest a novel mechanism of kinase activation within the Plk family and propose a new model for the stimulation of the extrinsic death pathway in tumors with high Plk3 expression. PMID:27325299

  4. Dual ligand/receptor interactions activate urothelial defenses against uropathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Mémet, Sylvie; Saban, Ricardo; Kong, Xiangpeng; Aprikian, Pavel; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Sun, Tung-Tien; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2015-11-09

    During urinary tract infection (UTI), the second most common bacterial infection, dynamic interactions take place between uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) and host urothelial cells. While significant strides have been made in the identification of the virulence factors of UPEC, our understanding of how the urothelial cells mobilize innate defenses against the invading UPEC remains rudimentary. Here we show that mouse urothelium responds to the adhesion of type 1-fimbriated UPEC by rapidly activating the canonical NF-κB selectively in terminally differentiated, superficial (umbrella) cells. This activation depends on a dual ligand/receptor system, one between FimH adhesin and uroplakin Ia and another between lipopolysaccharide and Toll-like receptor 4. When activated, all the nuclei (up to 11) of a multinucleated umbrella cell are affected, leading to significant amplification of proinflammatory signals. Intermediate and basal cells of the urothelium undergo NF-κB activation only if the umbrella cells are detached or if the UPEC persistently express type 1-fimbriae. Inhibition of NF-κB prevents the urothelium from clearing the intracellular bacterial communities, leading to prolonged bladder colonization by UPEC. Based on these data, we propose a model of dual ligand/receptor system in innate urothelial defenses against UPEC.

  5. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-01-01

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand. PMID:25916672

  6. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-01-01

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand.

  7. A potential endogenous ligand for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor has potent agonist activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Henry, E C; Bemis, J C; Henry, O; Kende, A S; Gasiewicz, T A

    2006-06-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is best known as a mediator of toxicity of a diverse family of xenobiotic chemicals such as dioxins and PCBs. However, many naturally occurring compounds also activate AhR. One such compound, 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), was isolated from tissue and found to be potent in preliminary tests [J. Song, M. Clagett-Dame, R.E. Peterson, M.E. Hahn, W.M. Westler, R.R. Sicinski, H.F. DeLuca, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 14694-14699]. We have synthesized ITE and [(3)H]ITE and further evaluated its AhR activity in several in vitro and in vivo assays in comparison with the toxic ligand, TCDD. AhR in Hepa1c1c7 cell cytosol bound [(3)H]ITE with high affinity and the AhR.ITE complex formed in vitro bound dioxin response element (DRE) oligonucleotide as potently as TCDD.AhR. In cells treated with ITE, nuclear translocation of AhR, and induction of CYP1A1 protein and of a DRE-dependent luciferase reporter gene were observed. ITE administered to pregnant DRE-LacZ transgenic mice activated fetal AhR, observed as X-gal staining in the same sites as in TCDD-treated mice. However, unlike TCDD, ITE did not induce cleft palate or hydronephrosis. TCDD but not ITE induced thymic atrophy in young adult mice, but both ITE and TCDD caused similar loss of cells and alterations of cell profiles in cultured fetal thymi. These data demonstrate that ITE is a potent AhR agonist in cell extracts, cultured cells, and intact animals, but does not cause the toxicity associated with the more stable xenobiotic ligand, TCDD.

  8. Dendrimers and Polyamino-Phenolic Ligands: Activity of New Molecules Against Legionella pneumophila Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Andreozzi, Elisa; Barbieri, Federica; Ottaviani, Maria F.; Giorgi, Luca; Bruscolini, Francesca; Manti, Anita; Battistelli, Michela; Sabatini, Luigia; Pianetti, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires’ disease is a potentially fatal pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila, an aquatic bacterium often found within the biofilm niche. In man-made water systems microbial biofilms increase the resistance of legionella to disinfection, posing a significant threat to public health. Disinfection methods currently used in water systems have been shown to be ineffective against legionella over the long-term, allowing recolonization by the biofilm-protected microorganisms. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of previously fabricated polyamino-phenolic ligands and polyamidoamine dendrimers was investigated against legionella mono-species and multi-species biofilms formed by L. pneumophila in association with other bacteria that can be found in tap water (Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae). Bacterial ability to form biofilms was verified using a crystal violet colorimetric assay and testing cell viability by real-time quantitative PCR and Plate Count assay. The concentration of the chemicals tested as anti-biofilm agents was chosen based on cytotoxicity assays: the highest non-cytotoxic chemical concentration was used for biofilm inhibition assays, with dendrimer concentration 10-fold higher than polyamino-phenolic ligands. While Macrophen and Double Macrophen were the most active substances among polyamino-phenolic ligands, dendrimers were overall twofold more effective than all other compounds with a reduction up to 85 and 73% of legionella and multi-species biofilms, respectively. Chemical interaction with matrix molecules is hypothesized, based on SEM images and considering the low or absent anti-microbial activity on planktonic bacteria showed by flow cytometry. These data suggest that the studied compounds, especially dendrimers, could be considered as novel molecules in the design of research projects aimed at the development of efficacious anti-biofilm disinfection treatments of water systems

  9. Catalposide is a natural agonistic ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji Hae; Jun, Hee-jin; Hoang, Minh-Hien; Jia, Yaoyao; Han, Xiang Hua; Lee, Dong-Ho; Lee, Hak-Ju; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalposide is a novel ligand for PPAR{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell stimulated with catalposide improved fatty acid uptake, regulated target genes in fatty acid {beta}-oxidation and synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalposdie reduces hepatic triacylglycerides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theses demonstrate catalposide could ameliorate hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is a nuclear receptor that regulates the expression of genes related to cellular lipid uptake and oxidation. Thus, PPAR{alpha} agonists may be important in the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis. In this study, we demonstrated that catalposide is a novel natural PPAR{alpha} agonist, identified from reporter gene assay-based activity screening with approximately 900 natural plant and seaweed extracts. Results of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses suggested that the compound interacted directly with the ligand-binding domain of PPAR{alpha}. Cultured hepatocytes stimulated with catalposide exhibited significantly reduced cellular triglyceride concentrations, by 21%, while cellular uptake of fatty acids was increased, by 70% (P < 0.05). Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the increase in cellular fatty acid uptake was due to upregulation of fatty acid transporter protein-4 (+19% vs. the control) in cells stimulated with catalposide. Additionally, expression of genes related to fatty acid oxidation and high-density lipoprotein metabolism were upregulated, while that of genes related to fatty acid synthesis were suppressed. In conclusion, catalposide is hypolipidemic by activation of PPAR{alpha} via a ligand-mediated mechanism that modulates the expression of in lipid metabolism genes in hepatocytes.

  10. Dendrimers and Polyamino-Phenolic Ligands: Activity of New Molecules Against Legionella pneumophila Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Andreozzi, Elisa; Barbieri, Federica; Ottaviani, Maria F; Giorgi, Luca; Bruscolini, Francesca; Manti, Anita; Battistelli, Michela; Sabatini, Luigia; Pianetti, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a potentially fatal pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila, an aquatic bacterium often found within the biofilm niche. In man-made water systems microbial biofilms increase the resistance of legionella to disinfection, posing a significant threat to public health. Disinfection methods currently used in water systems have been shown to be ineffective against legionella over the long-term, allowing recolonization by the biofilm-protected microorganisms. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of previously fabricated polyamino-phenolic ligands and polyamidoamine dendrimers was investigated against legionella mono-species and multi-species biofilms formed by L. pneumophila in association with other bacteria that can be found in tap water (Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae). Bacterial ability to form biofilms was verified using a crystal violet colorimetric assay and testing cell viability by real-time quantitative PCR and Plate Count assay. The concentration of the chemicals tested as anti-biofilm agents was chosen based on cytotoxicity assays: the highest non-cytotoxic chemical concentration was used for biofilm inhibition assays, with dendrimer concentration 10-fold higher than polyamino-phenolic ligands. While Macrophen and Double Macrophen were the most active substances among polyamino-phenolic ligands, dendrimers were overall twofold more effective than all other compounds with a reduction up to 85 and 73% of legionella and multi-species biofilms, respectively. Chemical interaction with matrix molecules is hypothesized, based on SEM images and considering the low or absent anti-microbial activity on planktonic bacteria showed by flow cytometry. These data suggest that the studied compounds, especially dendrimers, could be considered as novel molecules in the design of research projects aimed at the development of efficacious anti-biofilm disinfection treatments of water systems in

  11. Spatiotemporal Regulation of Hsp90-Ligand Complex Leads to Immune Activation.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yasuaki; Yoneda, Akihiro; Takei, Norio; Sawada, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    Although heat shock proteins (HSPs) primarily play a pivotal role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis while reducing extracellular as well as intracellular stresses, their role in immunologically relevant scenarios, including activation of innate immunity as danger signals, antitumor immunity, and autoimmune diseases, is now gaining much attention. The most prominent feature of HSPs is that they function both in their own and as an HSP-ligand complex. We here show as a unique feature of extracellular HSPs that they target chaperoned molecules into a particular endosomal compartment of dendritic cells, thereby inducing innate and adaptive immune responses via spatiotemporal regulation. PMID:27252703

  12. Spatiotemporal Regulation of Hsp90–Ligand Complex Leads to Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Yasuaki; Yoneda, Akihiro; Takei, Norio; Sawada, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    Although heat shock proteins (HSPs) primarily play a pivotal role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis while reducing extracellular as well as intracellular stresses, their role in immunologically relevant scenarios, including activation of innate immunity as danger signals, antitumor immunity, and autoimmune diseases, is now gaining much attention. The most prominent feature of HSPs is that they function both in their own and as an HSP–ligand complex. We here show as a unique feature of extracellular HSPs that they target chaperoned molecules into a particular endosomal compartment of dendritic cells, thereby inducing innate and adaptive immune responses via spatiotemporal regulation. PMID:27252703

  13. Design of Peptide and Peptidomimetic Ligands with Novel Pharmacological Activity Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Hruby, Victor J.; Cai, Minying

    2016-01-01

    Peptide hormones and neurotransmitters are of central importance in most aspects of intercellular communication and are involved in virtually all degenerative diseases. In this review, we discuss physicochemical approaches to the design of novel peptide and peptidomimetic agonists, antagonists, inverse agonists, and related compounds that have unique biological activity profiles, reduced toxic side effects, and, if desired, the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Designing ligands for specific biological and medical needs is emphasized, as is the close collaboration of chemists and biologists to maximize the chances for success. Special emphasis is placed on the use of conformational (φ-ψ space) and topographical (χ space) considerations in design. PMID:23294313

  14. Ligand-free palladium-mediated site-specific protein labeling inside gram-negative bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Lin, Shixian; Wang, Jie; Jia, Shang; Yang, Maiyun; Hao, Ziyang; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Peng R

    2013-05-15

    Palladium, a key transition metal in advancing modern organic synthesis, mediates diverse chemical conversions including many carbon-carbon bond formation reactions between organic compounds. However, expanding palladium chemistry for conjugation of biomolecules such as proteins, particularly within their native cellular context, is still in its infancy. Here we report the site-specific protein labeling inside pathogenic Gram-negative bacterial cells via a ligand-free palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction. Two rationally designed pyrrolysine analogues bearing an aliphatic alkyne or an iodophenyl handle were first encoded in different enteric bacteria, which offered two facial handles for palladium-mediated Sonogashira coupling reaction on proteins within these pathogens. A GFP-based bioorthogonal reaction screening system was then developed, allowing evaluation of both the efficiency and the biocompatibilty of various palladium reagents in promoting protein-small molecule conjugation. The identified simple compound-Pd(NO3)2 exhibited high efficiency and biocompatibility for site-specific labeling of proteins in vitro and inside living E. coli cells. This Pd-mediated protein coupling method was further utilized to label and visualize a Type-III Secretion (T3S) toxin-OspF in Shigella cells. Our strategy may be generally applicable for imaging and tracking various virulence proteins within Gram-negative bacterial pathogens.

  15. Hydration properties of ligands and drugs in protein binding sites: tightly-bound, bridging water molecules and their effects and consequences on molecular design strategies.

    PubMed

    García-Sosa, Alfonso T

    2013-06-24

    Some water molecules in binding sites are important for intermolecular interactions and stability. The way binding site explicit water molecules are dealt with affects the diversity and nature of designed ligand chemical structures and properties. The strategies commonly employed frequently assume that a gain in binding affinity will be achieved by their targeting or neglect. However, in the present work, 2332 high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of hydrated and nonhydrated, drug and nondrug compounds in biomolecular complexes with reported Ki or Kd show that compounds that use tightly bound, bridging water molecules are as potent as those that do not. The distribution of their energies, physicochemical properties, and ligand efficiency indices were compared for statistical significance, and the results were confirmed using 2000 permutation runs. Ligand cases were also split into agonists and antagonists, and crystal structure pairs with differing tightly bound water molecules were also compared. In addition, agonists and antagonists that use tightly bound water bridges are smaller, less lipophilic, and less planar; have deeper ligand efficiency indices; and in general, possess better physicochemical properties for further development. Therefore, tightly bound, bridging water molecules may in some cases be replaced and targeted as a strategy, though sometimes keeping them as bridges may be better from a pharmacodynamic perspective. The results suggest general indications on tightly hydrated and nontightly hydrated compounds in binding sites and practical considerations to adopt a strategy in drug and molecular design when faced with this special type of water molecules. There are also benefits of lower log P and better developability for tightly hydrated compounds, while stronger potency is not always required or beneficial. The hydrated binding site may be one of the many structure conformations available to the receptor, and different ligands will have a

  16. Active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Stringer, C.D.; Milanez, S.; Lee, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Previous affinity labeling studies and comparative sequence analyses have identified two different lysines at the active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and have suggested their essentiality to function. The essential lysines occupy positions 166 and 329 in the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and positions 175 and 334 in the spinach enzyme. Based on the pH-dependencies of inactivations of the two enzymes by trinitrobenzene sulfonate, Lys-166 (R. rubrum enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 7.9 and Lys-334 (spinach enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 9.0. These low pK/sub a/ values as well as the enhanced nucleophilicities of the lysyl residues argue that both are important to catalysis rather than to substrate binding. Lys-166 may correspond to the essential base that initiates catalysis and that displays a pK/sub a/ of 7.5 in the pH-curve for V/sub max//K/sub m/. Cross-linking experiments with 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonate stilbene demonstrate that the two active-site lysines are within 12 A. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Metal & Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Interfaced With Ligand Complexes Of 8-Hydroxyquinoline And α-Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanjana, Gaurav; Kumar, Neeraj; Thakur, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Kumar, Sandeep

    2011-12-01

    Antimicrobial nanotechnology is a recent addition to the fight against disease causing organisms, replacing heavy metals and toxins. In the present work, mixed ligand complexes of metals like zinc, silver etc. and metal oxide have been synthesized using 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ) as a primary ligand and N-and/O-donor amino acids such as L-serine, L-alanine, glycine, cysteine and histidine as secondary ligands. These complexes were characterized using different spectroscopic techniques. The complexes were tested for antifungal and antibacterial activity by using agar well diffusion bioassay.

  18. Modulation of Active Site Electronic Structure by the Protein Matrix to Control [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Raugei, Simone; Squier, Thomas C.

    2014-09-30

    Control of the reactivity of the nickel center of the [NiFe] hydrogenase and other metalloproteins commonly involves outer coordination sphere ligands that act to modify the geometry and physical properties of the active site metal centers. We carried out a combined set of classical molecular dynamics and quantum/classical mechanics calculations to provide quantitative estimates of how dynamic fluctuations of the active site within the protein matrix modulate the electronic structure at the catalytic center. Specifically we focused on the dynamics of the inner and outer coordination spheres of the cysteinate-bound Ni–Fe cluster in the catalytically active Ni-C state. There are correlated movements of the cysteinate ligands and the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, which modulate the electron affinity at the active site and the proton affinity of a terminal cysteinate. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesize a coupling between protein dynamics and electron and proton transfer reactions critical to dihydrogen production.

  19. Redox mechanism as alternative to ligand binding for receptor activation delivering disregulated cellular signals.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, I; Pu, M Y; Nishizaki, A; Rosila, I; Ma, L; Katano, Y; Ohkusu, K; Rahman, S M; Isobe, K; Hamaguchi, M

    1994-02-01

    Cross-linking with specific ligand is a general requirement for ordered activation of cell surface receptors. In this study we demonstrated a novel pathway for disregulated receptor activation through a redox mechanism. Treatment of murine thymocytes or spleen cells with thiol-reactive HgCl2, a known inducer of autoimmune proliferative lymphocyte disorders in rodents, was found to induce tyrosine phosphorylation of several cellular proteins, which was up to 100 times as extensive as that triggered by stimulation with antireceptor antibody or mitogen. Through the cross-linkage by thiol-reactive bivalent mercury, transmembrane CD4, CD3, and CD45 and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored Thy-1 were aggregated together on thymocytes or T lymphocytes. Along with the aggregation of Thy-1 and CD4, nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase p56lck was aggregated and activated. These events were linked to extensive protein tyrosine phosphorylation, which was visualized as a well localized spot beneath the membrane. Under appropriate conditions, this novel pathway of multiple receptor aggregation delivered a disregulated signal into T lymphocytes, which cross-talked to the antireceptor antibody-induced signal, for prolonged cell proliferation and IL-2 production. These results suggest a novel mechanism of disregulation of the ligand-dependent receptor function.

  20. A Series of Diamagnetic Pyridine Monoimine Rhenium Complexes with Different Degrees of Metal-to-Ligand Charge Transfer: Correlating (13) C NMR Chemical Shifts with Bond Lengths in Redox-Active Ligands.

    PubMed

    Sieh, Daniel; Kubiak, Clifford P

    2016-07-18

    A set of pyridine monoimine (PMI) rhenium(I) tricarbonyl chlorido complexes with substituents of different steric and electronic properties was synthesized and fully characterized. Spectroscopic (NMR and IR) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses of these complexes showed that the redox-active PMI ligands are neutral and that the overall electronic structure is little affected by the choices of the substituent at the ligand backbone. One- and two-electron reduction products were prepared from selected starting compounds and could also be characterized by multiple spectroscopic methods and X-ray diffraction. The final product of a one-electron reduction in THF is a diamagnetic metal-metal-bonded dimer after loss of the chlorido ligand. Bond lengths in and NMR chemical shifts of the PMI ligand backbone indicate partial electron transfer to the ligand. Two-electron reduction in THF also leads to the loss of the chlorido ligand and a pentacoordinate complex is obtained. The comparison with reported bond lengths and (13) C NMR chemical shifts of doubly reduced free pyridine monoaldimine ligands indicates that both redox equivalents in the doubly reduced rhenium complex investigated here are located in the PMI ligand. With diamagnetic complexes varying over three formal reduction stages at the PMI ligand we were, for the first time, able to establish correlations of the (13) C NMR chemical shifts with the relevant bond lengths in redox-active ligands over a full redox series. PMID:27319753

  1. A Series of Diamagnetic Pyridine Monoimine Rhenium Complexes with Different Degrees of Metal-to-Ligand Charge Transfer: Correlating (13) C NMR Chemical Shifts with Bond Lengths in Redox-Active Ligands.

    PubMed

    Sieh, Daniel; Kubiak, Clifford P

    2016-07-18

    A set of pyridine monoimine (PMI) rhenium(I) tricarbonyl chlorido complexes with substituents of different steric and electronic properties was synthesized and fully characterized. Spectroscopic (NMR and IR) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses of these complexes showed that the redox-active PMI ligands are neutral and that the overall electronic structure is little affected by the choices of the substituent at the ligand backbone. One- and two-electron reduction products were prepared from selected starting compounds and could also be characterized by multiple spectroscopic methods and X-ray diffraction. The final product of a one-electron reduction in THF is a diamagnetic metal-metal-bonded dimer after loss of the chlorido ligand. Bond lengths in and NMR chemical shifts of the PMI ligand backbone indicate partial electron transfer to the ligand. Two-electron reduction in THF also leads to the loss of the chlorido ligand and a pentacoordinate complex is obtained. The comparison with reported bond lengths and (13) C NMR chemical shifts of doubly reduced free pyridine monoaldimine ligands indicates that both redox equivalents in the doubly reduced rhenium complex investigated here are located in the PMI ligand. With diamagnetic complexes varying over three formal reduction stages at the PMI ligand we were, for the first time, able to establish correlations of the (13) C NMR chemical shifts with the relevant bond lengths in redox-active ligands over a full redox series.

  2. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  3. Enhanced Active Targeting via Cooperative Binding of Ligands on Liposomes to Target Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Tomoki; Asai, Tomohiro; Nedachi, Yuki Murase; Katanasaka, Yasufumi; Shimizu, Kosuke; Maeda, Noriyuki; Oku, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    To achieve effective active targeting in a drug delivery system, we previously developed dual-targeting (DT) liposomes decorated with both vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1)-targeted APRPG and CD13-targeted GNGRG peptide ligands for tumor neovessels, and observed the enhanced suppression of tumor growth in Colon26 NL-17 tumor-bearing mice by the treatment with the DT liposomes encapsulating doxorubicin. In this present study, we examined the binding characteristics of DT liposomes having a different couple of ligands, namely, APRPG and integrin αvβ3-targeted GRGDS peptides. These DT liposomes synergistically associated to stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells compared with single-targeting (ST) liposomes decorated with APRPG or GRGDS. The results of a surface plasmon resonance assay showed that ST liposomes modified with APRPG or GRGDS peptide selectively bound to immobilized VEGFR-1 or integrin αvβ3, respectively. DT liposomes showed a higher affinity for a mixture of VEGFR-1 and integrin αvβ3 compared with ST liposomes, suggesting the cooperative binding of these 2 kinds of ligand on the liposomal surface. In a biodistribution assay, the DT liposomes accumulated to a significantly greater extent in the tumors of Colon26 NL-17 tumor-bearing mice compared with other liposomes. Moreover, the intratumoral distribution of the liposomes examined by confocal microscopy suggested that the DT liposomes targeted not only angiogenic endothelial cells but also tumor cells due to GRGDS-decoration. These findings suggest that "dual-targeting" augmented the affinity of the liposomes for the target cells and would thus be useful for active-targeting drug delivery for cancer treatment. PMID:23840738

  4. High throughput screening of high-affinity ligands for proteins with anion-binding sites using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin; Ning, Baoming; He, Dacheng; Huang, Lingyun; Yue, Xiangjun; Zhang, Qiming; Huang, Haiwei; Liu, Yang; He, Lan; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-03-01

    A high throughput screening system involving a linear ion trap (LTQ) analyzer, a house-made platform and a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) source was established to screen ligands with a high affinity for proteins with anion-binding sites. The complexes were analyzed after incubation, ultrafiltration, washing, and displacement. A new anionic region inhibited dissociation (ARID) mechanism that was suitable for a protein with anion-binding site was proposed. We utilized the differences in detectable dissociation of protein-ligand complexes, combined with displacement experiments, to distinguish free ligands displaced from anion-binding sites from liberated ligands dissociated from nonspecific interactions. The method was validated by α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and (R), (S)-amlodipine. Site-specific enantioselectivity shown in our experiments was consistent with earlier studies. Obtaining all of the qualitative information of 15*3 samples in 2.3 min indicates that the analysis process is no longer the time-limiting step in the initial stage of drug discovery. Quantitative information verified that our method was at least a semiquantitative method.

  5. High Throughput Screening of High-Affinity Ligands for Proteins with Anion-Binding Sites using Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin; Ning, Baoming; He, Dacheng; Huang, Lingyun; Yue, Xiangjun; Zhang, Qiming; Huang, Haiwei; Liu, Yang; He, Lan; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-03-01

    A high throughput screening system involving a linear ion trap (LTQ) analyzer, a house-made platform and a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) source was established to screen ligands with a high affinity for proteins with anion-binding sites. The complexes were analyzed after incubation, ultrafiltration, washing, and displacement. A new anionic region inhibited dissociation (ARID) mechanism that was suitable for a protein with anion-binding site was proposed. We utilized the differences in detectable dissociation of protein-ligand complexes, combined with displacement experiments, to distinguish free ligands displaced from anion-binding sites from liberated ligands dissociated from nonspecific interactions. The method was validated by α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and (R), (S)-amlodipine. Site-specific enantioselectivity shown in our experiments was consistent with earlier studies. Obtaining all of the qualitative information of 15*3 samples in 2.3 min indicates that the analysis process is no longer the time-limiting step in the initial stage of drug discovery. Quantitative information verified that our method was at least a semiquantitative method.

  6. Crystallographic evidence of a large ligand-induced hinge-twist motion between the two domains of the maltodextrin binding protein involved in active transport and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Sharff, A J; Rodseth, L E; Spurlino, J C; Quiocho, F A

    1992-11-10

    The periplasmic maltodextrin binding protein of Escherichia coli serves as an initial receptor for the active transport of and chemotaxis toward maltooligosaccharides. The three-dimensional structure of the binding protein complexed with maltose has been previously reported [Spurlino, J. C., Lu, G.-Y., & Quiocho, F. A. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 5202-5219]. Here we report the structure of the unliganded form of the binding protein refined to 1.8-A resolution. This structure, combined with that for the liganded form, provides the first crystallographic evidence that a major ligand-induced conformational change occurs in a periplasmic binding protein. The unliganded structure shows a rigid-body "hinge-bending" between the two globular domains by approximately 35 degrees, relative to the maltose-bound structure, opening the sugar binding site groove located between the two domains. In addition, there is an 8 degrees twist of one domain relative to the other domain. The conformational changes observed between this structure and the maltose-bound structure are consistent with current models of maltose/maltodextrin transport and maltose chemotaxis and solidify a mechanism for receptor differentiation between the ligand-free and ligand-bound forms in signal transduction.

  7. Allosteric binding site in a Cys-loop receptor ligand-binding domain unveiled in the crystal structure of ELIC in complex with chlorpromazine

    PubMed Central

    Nys, Mieke; Wijckmans, Eveline; Farinha, Ana; Yoluk, Özge; Andersson, Magnus; Brams, Marijke; Spurny, Radovan; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Lindahl, Erik; Ulens, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels or Cys-loop receptors are responsible for fast inhibitory or excitatory synaptic transmission. The antipsychotic compound chlorpromazine is a widely used tool to probe the ion channel pore of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, which is a prototypical Cys-loop receptor. In this study, we determine the molecular determinants of chlorpromazine binding in the Erwinia ligand-gated ion channel (ELIC). We report the X-ray crystal structures of ELIC in complex with chlorpromazine or its brominated derivative bromopromazine. Unexpectedly, we do not find a chlorpromazine molecule in the channel pore of ELIC, but behind the β8–β9 loop in the extracellular ligand-binding domain. The β8–β9 loop is localized downstream from the neurotransmitter binding site and plays an important role in coupling of ligand binding to channel opening. In combination with electrophysiological recordings from ELIC cysteine mutants and a thiol-reactive derivative of chlorpromazine, we demonstrate that chlorpromazine binding at the β8–β9 loop is responsible for receptor inhibition. We further use molecular-dynamics simulations to support the X-ray data and mutagenesis experiments. Together, these data unveil an allosteric binding site in the extracellular ligand-binding domain of ELIC. Our results extend on previous observations and further substantiate our understanding of a multisite model for allosteric modulation of Cys-loop receptors. PMID:27791038

  8. Synthesis, structural elucidation, biological, antioxidant and nuclease activities of some 5-Fluorouracil-amino acid mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobana, Sutha; Subramaniam, Perumal; Mitu, Liviu; Dharmaraja, Jeyaprakash; Arvind Narayan, Sundaram

    2015-01-01

    Some biologically active mixed ligand complexes (1-9) have been synthesized from 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU; A) and amino acids (B) such as glycine (gly), L-alanine (ala) and L-valine (val) with Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions. The synthesized mixed ligand complexes (1-9) were characterized by various physico-chemical, spectral, thermal and morphological studies. 5-Fluorouracil and its mixed ligand complexes have been tested for their in vitro biological activities against some pathogenic bacterial and fungal species by the agar well diffusion method. The in vitro antioxidant activities of 5-Fluorouracil and its complexes have also been investigated by using the DPPH assay method. The results demonstrate that Cu(II) mixed ligand complexes (4-6) exhibit potent biological as well as antioxidant activities compared to 5-Fluorouracil and Ni(II) (1-3) and Zn(II) (7-9) mixed ligand complexes. Further, the cleaving activities of CT DNA under aerobic conditions show moderate activity with the synthesized Cu(II) and Ni(II) mixed ligand complexes (1-6) while no activity is seen with Zn(II) complexes (7-9). Binding studies of CT DNA with these complexes show a decrease in intensity of the charge transfer band to the extent of 5-15% along with a minor red shift. The free energy change values (Δ‡G) calculated from intrinsic binding constants indicate that the interaction between mixed ligand complex and DNA is spontaneous.

  9. A Dynamic Zn Site in Helicobacter pylori HypA: A Potential Mechanism for Metal-Specific Protein Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy,D.; Herbst, R.; Iwig, J.; Chivers, P.; Maroney, M.

    2007-01-01

    HypA is an accessory protein and putative metallochaperone that is critical for supplying nickel to the active site of NiFe hydrogenases. In addition to binding Ni(II), HypA is known to contain a Zn site that has been suggested to play a structural role. X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been used to show that the Zn site changes structure upon binding nickel, from a S{sub 3}(O/N)-donor ligand environment to an S{sub 4}-donor ligand environment. This provides a potential mechanism for discriminating Ni(II) from other divalent metal ions. The Ni(II) site is shown to be a six-coordinate complex composed of O/N-donors including two histidines. As such, it resembles the nickel site in UreE, a nickel metallochaperone involved in nickel incorporation into urease.

  10. Ligand exclusion on acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Berman, H A; Leonard, K

    1990-11-27

    This paper examines covalent reactivity of AchE with respect to cationic and uncharged methylphosphonates and substrates in the absence and presence of cationic ligands selective for the active center and the peripheral anionic site. The organophosphorus inhibitors are enantiomeric alkyl methylphosphonothioates (1-5) containing cycloheptyl and isopropyl phosphono ester groups and S-methyl, S-n-pentyl, and S-[beta-(trimethylammonio)ethyl] leaving groups; these agents differ in their configuration about phosphorus and their steric, hydrophobic, and electrostatic characteristics. The synthetic substrates examined are acetylthiocholine, p-nitrophenyl acetate, and 7-acetoxy-4-methylcoumarin (7AMC). Antagonism of the methylphosphonothioate reaction by cationic ligands is strongly dependent on the nature of both the cation and the methylphosphonate but independent of the configuration about phosphorus. While all cations cause linear mixed inhibition of acetylthiocholine hydrolysis, there are observed a variety of inhibition patterns of 7AMC and p-nitrophenyl acetate hydrolysis that are distinctly nonlinear, as well as patterns in which the reciprocal plots intersect in the upper right quadrant. Strong antagonism of cationic (methylphosphonyl)thiocholines correlates very well with linear inhibition of acetylthiocholine. Ligands that cause only negligible antagonism of the uncharged methylphosphonates display nonlinear inhibition of uncharged substrates. These relationships, since they are most pronounced for peripheral site ligands and are strongly dependent on the charge carried by the reactant, suggest that the peripheral anionic site alters enzyme reactivity through an electrostatic interaction with the net negative active center. Such behavior indicates a potential role for the peripheral anionic site in conserving AchE catalytic efficiency within a narrow range of values. PMID:2271673

  11. Studies of anti-fibrillogenic activity of phthalocyanines of zirconium containing out-of-plane ligands.

    PubMed

    Kovalska, Vladyslava; Losytskyy, Mykhaylo; Chernii, Viktor; Volkova, Kateryna; Tretyakova, Iryna; Cherepanov, Vsevolod; Yarmoluk, Sergiy; Volkov, Sergiy

    2012-01-01

    Series of phthalocyanines of zirconium containing lysine, citric, nonanoic acid residues and dibenzolylmethane groups as out-of-plane ligands are firstly studied as inhibitors of fibrillogenesis using cyanine-based fluorescent inhibitory assay. It was shown that studied phthalocyanines at concentration of 20μM inhibited aggregation reaction on 38.5-57.6% and inhibitory activity of phthalocyanines depended on the chemical nature of out-of-plane ligand. For the most active compound PcZrLys(2) (zirconium phthalocyanine containing lysine fragment) the efficient inhibitor concentration was estimated to be 37μM. AFM studies have shown that in the presence of PcZrLys(2) the inhibition of fibrils formation and formation of spherical oligomeric aggregates took place. Due to the ability of phthalocyanines to decrease efficiently protein aggregation into the amyloid fibrils, modification of phthalocyanine molecules via out-of-plane substitutions was proposed as approach for design of anti-fibrillogenic agents with required properties.

  12. Site specific ligand substitution in cubane-type Mo3FeS(4)(4+) clusters: kinetics and mechanism of reaction and isolation of mixed ligand Cl/SPh complexes.

    PubMed

    Algarra, Andrés G; Basallote, Manuel G; Fernandez-Trujillo, M J; Llusar, Rosa; Pino-Chamorro, Jose A; Sorribes, Ivan; Vicent, Cristian

    2010-04-21

    The synthesis, crystal structure and solution characterization of the cubane-type [Mo(3)(FeCl)S(4)(dmpe)(3)Cl(3)] (1) (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphophane-ethane)) cluster are reported and the ligand substitution processes of chloride by thiophenolate investigated. The kinetics and the intimate mechanism of these substitutions reveal that compound 1 undergoes a number of Fe and Mo site specific ligand substitution reactions in acetonitrile solutions. In particular, PhS(-) coordination at the tetrahedral Fe site proceeds in a single resolved kinetic step whereas such substitutions at the Mo sites proceed more slowly. The effect of the presence of acids in the reaction media is also investigated and reveals that an acid excess hinders substitution reactions both at the Fe and Mo sites; however, an acid-promoted solvolysis of the Fe-Cl bonds is observed. Electrospray ionization (ESI) and tandem (ESI-MS/MS) mass spectrometry allow the identification of all the reaction intermediates proposed on the basis of stopped-flow measurements. The distinctive site specific reactivity made it possible to isolate two new clusters of the Mo(3)FeS(4)(4+) family featuring mixed chlorine/thiophenolate ligands, namely Mo(3)S(4)(FeSPh)(dmpe)(3)Cl(3) (2) and [Mo(3)S(4)(FeSPh)(dmpe)(3)(SPh)(3)] (3). A detailed computational study has also been carried out to understand the details of the mechanism of substitution at the M-Cl (M = Mo and Fe) bonds as well as the solvolysis at the Fe-Cl sites, with particular emphasis on the role of acids on the substitution process. The results of the calculations are in agreement with the experimental observations, thus justifying the non-existence of an accelerating effect of acids on the thiophenolate substitution reaction, which differs from previous proposals for the Fe(4)S(4) and MoFe(3)S(4) clusters and some related compounds.

  13. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  14. Mixed Ligand Complexes of N-Methyl-N-phenyl Dithiocarbamate: Synthesis, Characterisation, Antifungal Activity, and Solvent Extraction Studies of the Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Ekennia, Anthony C.; Onwudiwe, Damian C.; Ume, Cyril; Ebenso, Eno E.

    2015-01-01

    A series of mixed ligand dithiocarbamate complexes with a general formula [ML2(py)2], where M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II), py = pyridine, and L = N-methyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate have been prepared and characterised by elemental analysis, FTIR and Uv spectroscopy, magnetic moment, and thermogravimetric and conductance analysis. The infrared spectra showed that symmetrical bidentate coordination occurred with the dithiocarbamate moiety through the sulfur atoms, while neutral monodentate coordination occurred through the nitrogen atom for the pyridine molecule in the complexes. The electronic spectra, elemental analysis, and magnetic moment results proved that the complexes adopted octahedral geometry. The conductance measurement showed that the complexes are nonelectrolytes proving their nonionic nature. The compounds were screened for three human pathogenic fungi: Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, and Candida albicans. The cobalt complex showed the best antifungal activity among the test compounds. Liquid-liquid extractive abilities of the ligand towards copper and nickel ions in different solvent media were investigated. The ligand showed a strong binding affinity towards the metals ions with an extractive efficiency of about 99%. PMID:26543441

  15. Activation of epidermal growth factor receptor by metal-ligand complexes decreases levels of extracellular amyloid beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Price, Katherine A; Filiz, Gulay; Caragounis, Aphrodite; Du, Tai; Laughton, Katrina M; Masters, Colin L; Sharples, Robyn A; Hill, Andrew F; Li, Qiao-Xin; Donnelly, Paul S; Barnham, Kevin J; Crouch, Peter J; White, Anthony R

    2008-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor is a receptor tyrosine kinase expressed in a range of tissues and cell-types. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor by a number of ligands induces downstream signalling that modulates critical cell functions including growth, survival and differentiation. Abnormal epidermal growth factor receptor expression and activation is also involved in a number of cancers. In addition to its cognate ligands, the epidermal growth factor receptor can be activated by metals such as zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu). Due to the important role of these metals in a number of diseases including neurodegenerative disorders, therapeutic approaches are being developed based on the use of lipid permeable metal-complexing molecules. While these agents are showing promising results in animal models and clinical trials, little is known about the effects of metal-ligand complexes on cell signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated the effects of clioquinol (CQ)-metal complexes on activation of epidermal growth factor receptor. We show here that CQ-Cu complexes induced potent epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation resulting in downstream activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Similar levels of epidermal growth factor receptor activation were observed with alternative lipid permeable metal-ligands including neocuproine and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate. We found that CQ-Cu complexes induced a significant reduction in the level of extracellular Abeta1-40 in cell culture. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor activation by PD153035 blocked extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation and restored Abeta1-40 levels. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor by CQ-Cu was mediated through up-regulation of src kinase activity by a cognate ligand-independent process involving membrane integrins. These findings provide the first evidence that metal-ligand complexes can activate the epidermal growth

  16. New RuII Complex for Dual Activity: Photoinduced Ligand Release and 1O2 Production

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Lauren M.; White, Jessica K.; Albani, Bryan A.; Kohler, Lars; Kodanko, Jeremy J.; Thummel, Randolph P.

    2016-01-01

    The new complex [Ru(pydppn)(biq)(py)]2+ (1) undergoes both py photodissociation in CH3CN with Φ500=0.0070(4) and 1O2 production with ΦΔ=0.75(7) in CH3OH from a long-lived 3ππ* state centered on the pydppn ligand (pydppn=3-(pyrid-2-yl)benzo[i]dipyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c]phenazine; biq = 2,2′-biquinoline; py= pyridine). This represents an order of magnitude decrease in the Φ500 compared to the previously reported model compound [Ru(tpy)(biq)(py)]2+ (3) (tpy=2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine) that undergoes only ligand exchange. The effect on the quantum yields by the addition of a second deactivation pathway through the low-lying 3ππ* state necessary for dual reactivity was investigated using ultrafast and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, revealing a significantly shorter 3MLCT lifetime in 1 relative to that of the model complex 3. Due to the structural similarities between the two compounds, the lower values of Φ500 and ΦΔ compared to that of [Ru(pydppn)(bpy)(py)]2+ (2) (bpy=2,2′-bipyridine) are attributed to a competitive excited state population between the 3LF states involved in ligand dissociation and the long-lived 3ππ* state in 1. Complex 1 represents a model compound for dual activity that may be applied to photochemotherapy. PMID:26715085

  17. Controlling the Growth and Catalytic Activity of Platinum Nanoparticles Using Peptide and Polymer Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Lauren Marie

    Heterogeneous catalysts have widespread industrial applications. Platinum nanomaterials in particular, due to their particularly high electrocatalytic activity and durability, are used to catalyze a wide variety of reactions, including oxygen reduction, which is frequently used as the cathode reaction in fuel cells. As platinum is a very expensive material, a high priority in fuel cell research is the exploration of less expensive, more efficient catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). We demonstrate here the use of phage display to identify peptides that bind to Pt (100) which were then used to synthesize platinum cubes in solution. However, while the peptides were able to control particle growth, the bio-synthesized Pt particles showed extremely poor activity when tested for ORR. This could be attributed to peptide coverage on the surface or strong interactions between particular amino acids and the metal that are detrimental for catalysis. To investigate this further, we decided to investigate the role of individual amino acids on Pt nanocrystal synthesis and catalysis. For this, we conjugated the R-groups of single amino acids to polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains. Through this work we have determined that the identity of the amino acid R-group is important in both the synthesis and the catalytic activity of the particles. For Pt nanoparticle synthesis, we found that the hydrophobicity of the functional groups affected their ability to interact well with the particles during nucleation and growth, and thus only the hydrophilic functional groups were capable of mediating the synthesis to produce well-defined faceted particles. With respect to ORR, we found distinct trends that showed that the inclusion of certain amino acids could significantly enhance catalysis---even at high polymer loadings. This work presents evidence that counters the common conception that organic capping ligands decrease catalytic activity; in fact activity may actually be

  18. Preparation and characterization of half-apo dopamine-[beta]-hydroxylase by selective removal of Cu[sub A]. Identification of a sulfur ligand at the dioxygen binding site by EXAFS and FTIR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, B.J.; Blackburn, N.J. )

    1994-03-09

    Progress has been made in determining the individual coordination of each of the copper sites (Cu[sub A] and Cu[sub B]) which comprise the active center in dopamine-[beta]-hydroxylase. Previous studies have determined the average ligand environment per copper in the fully metalated enzyme as two to three histidines and one to two O/N donors in the Cu(II) form changing to 2-3 histidines and 0.5 sulfur donors upon reduction to the Cu(I) form. Derivatives of the Cu(I) form of DBH have been made in which Cu[sub A] has been selectively removed, allowing Cu[sub B], the O[sub 2] binding center to be studied by EXAFS and FTIR. Cu[sub B] has been found to be coordinated to two histidines (Cu-N = 1.99 [+-] 0.03 [angstrom]), a S-donor ligand (Cu-S = 2.25 [+-] 0.03 [angstrom]), and a fourth, as yet unidentified ligand X (Cu-X = 2.53 [+-] 0.03 [angstrom]). The FTIR spectrum of the carbonyl derivative of Cu[sub B] indicates that V[sub CO] (2089 cm[sup [minus]1]) is identical to that found for the fully metalated enzyme, providing strong evidence that the Cu[sub B] site is not perturbed by Cu[sub A] removal. EXAFS results on Cu[sub B]-CO indicate that CO binding does not displace the S ligand but appears to displace the weakly bound ligand X. 44 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Pincer Ligand Modifications To Tune the Activation Barrier for H2 Elimination in Water Splitting Milstein Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Sandhya, Karakkadparambil S; Remya, Geetha S; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2015-12-01

    Modifications on the ligand environment of Milstein ruthenium(II) pincer hydride catalysts have been proposed to fine-tune the activation free energy, ΔG(⧧) for the key step of H2 elimination in the water splitting reaction. This study conducted at the B3LYP level of density functional theory including the solvation effect reveals that changing the bulky t-butyl group at the P-arm of the pincer ligand by methyl or ethyl group can reduce the ΔG(⧧) by a substantial margin, ∼ 10 kcal/mol. The reduction in the steric effect of the pincer ligand causes exothermic association of the water molecule to the metal center and leads to significant stabilization of all the subsequent reaction intermediates and the transition state compared to those of the original Milstein catalyst that promotes endothermic association of the water molecule. Though electron donating groups on the pyridyl unit of the pincer ligand are advantageous for reducing the activation barrier in the gas phase, the effect is only 1-1.4 kcal/mol compared to that of an electron withdrawing group. The absolute minimum of the electrostatic potential at the hydride ligand and carbonyl stretching frequency of the catalyst are useful parameters to gauge the effect of ligand environment on the H2 elimination step of the water splitting reaction. PMID:26575086

  20. N2 activation by an iron complex with a strong electron-donating iminophosphorane ligand.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tatsuya; Wasada-Tsutsui, Yuko; Ogawa, Takahiko; Inomata, Tomohiko; Ozawa, Tomohiro; Sakai, Yoichi; Fryzuk, Michael D; Masuda, Hideki

    2015-10-01

    A new tridentate cyclopentane-bridged iminophosphorane ligand, N-(2-diisopropylphosphinophenyl)-P,P-diisopropyl-P-(2-(2,6-diisopropylphenylamido)cyclopent-1-enyl)phosphoranimine (NpNPiPr), was synthesized and used in the preparation of a diiron dinitrogen complex. The reaction of the iron complex FeBr(NpNPiPr) with KC8 under dinitrogen yielded the dinuclear dinitrogen Fe complex [Fe(NpNPiPr)]2(μ-N2), which was characterized by X-ray analysis and resonance Raman and NMR spectroscopies. The X-ray analysis revealed a diiron complex bridged by the dinitrogen molecule, with each metal center coordinated by an NpNPiPr ligand and dinitrogen in a trigonal-monopyramidal geometry. The N–N bond length is 1.184(6) Å, and resonance Raman spectra indicate that the N–N stretching mode ν(14N2/15N2) is 1755/1700 cm–1. The magnetic moment of [Fe(NpNPiPr)]2(μ-N2) in benzene-d6 solution, as measured by 1H NMR spectroscopy by the Evans method, is 6.91μB (S = 3). The Mössbauer spectrum at 78 K showed δ = 0.73 mm/s and ΔEQ = 1.83 mm/s. These findings suggest that the iron ions are divalent with a high-spin configuration and that the N2 molecule has (N═N)2– character. Density functional theory calculations performed on [Fe(NpNPiPr)]2(μ-N2) also suggested that the iron is in a high-spin divalent state and that the coordinated dinitrogen molecule is effectively activated by π back-donation from the two iron ions (dπ) to the dinitrogen molecule (πx* and πy*). This is supported by cooperation between a large negative charge on the iminophosphorane ligand and strong electron donation and effective orbital overlap between the iron dπ orbitals and N2 π* orbitals supplied by the phosphine ligand. PMID:26135343

  1. The major human pregnane X receptor (PXR) splice variant, PXR.2, exhibits significantly diminished ligand-activated transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yvonne S; Yasuda, Kazuto; Assem, Mahfoud; Cline, Cynthia; Barber, Joe; Li, Chia-Wei; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Ai, Ni; Chen, J Don; Welsh, William J; Ekins, Sean; Schuetz, Erin G

    2009-06-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR; PXR.1) can be activated by structurally diverse lipophilic ligands. PXR.2, an alternatively spliced form of PXR, lacks 111 nucleotides encoding 37 amino acids in the ligand binding domain. PXR.2 bound a classic CYP3A4 PXR response element (PXRE) in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, but transfected PXR.2 failed to transactivate a CYP3A4-promoter-luciferase reporter plasmid in HepG2 cells treated with various PXR ligands. Cotransfection experiments showed that PXR.2 behaved as a dominant negative, interfering with PXR.1/rifampin activation of CYP3A4-PXRE-LUC. In HepG2 and LS180 cells stably transduced with PXR.1, PXR target genes (CYP3A4, MDR1, CYP2B6, and UGT1A1) were higher than mock-transduced cells in the absence of ligand and were further induced in the presence of rifampin. In contrast, PXR.2 stably introduced into the same host cells failed to induce target genes over levels in mock-transfected cells after drug treatment. Our homology modeling suggests that ligands bind PXR.1 more favorably, probably because of the presence of a key disordered loop region, which is missing in PXR.2. Yeast two-hybrid assays revealed that, even in the presence of ligand, the corepressors remain tightly bound to PXR.2, and coactivators are unable to bind at helix 12. In summary, PXR.2 can bind to PXREs but fails to transactivate target genes because ligands do not bind the ligand binding domain of PXR.2 productively, corepressors remain tightly bound, and coactivators are not recruited to PXR.2. PMID:19251824

  2. Tripyrrindione as a Redox-Active Ligand: Palladium(II) Coordination in Three Redox States.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Ritika; Loughrey, Jonathan J; Astashkin, Andrei V; Shearer, Jason; Tomat, Elisa

    2015-12-01

    The tripyrrin-1,14-dione scaffold of urinary pigment uroerythrin coordinates divalent palladium as a planar tridentate ligand. Spectroscopic, structural and computational investigations reveal that the tripyrrindione ligand binds as a dianionic radical, and the resulting complex is stable at room temperature. One-electron oxidation and reduction reactions do not alter the planar coordination sphere of palladium(II) and lead to the isolation of two additional complexes presenting different redox states of the ligand framework. Unaffected by stability problems common to tripyrrolic fragments, the tripyrrindione ligand offers a robust platform for ligand-based redox chemistry.

  3. Hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acids from the Pacific krill show high ligand activities for PPARs[S

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hidetoshi; Oshiro, Eriko; Kikuchi, Sayaka; Hakozaki, Mayuka; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kimura, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    PPARs regulate the expression of genes for energy metabolism in a ligand-dependent manner. PPARs can influence fatty acid oxidation, the level of circulating triglycerides, glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity. Here, we demonstrate that 5-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (HEPE), 8-HEPE, 9-HEPE, 12-HEPE and 18-HEPE (hydroxylation products of EPA) obtained from methanol extracts of Pacific krill (Euphausia pacifica) can act as PPAR ligands. Two of these products, 8-HEPE and 9-HEPE, enhanced the transcription levels of GAL4-PPARs to a significantly greater extent than 5-HEPE, 12-HEPE, 18-HEPE, EPA, and EPA ethyl-ester. 8-HEPE also activated significantly higher transcription of GAL4-PPARα, GAL4-PPARγ, and GAL4-PPARδ than EPA at concentrations greater than 4, 64, and 64 μM, respectively. We also demonstrated that 8-HEPE increased the expression levels of genes regulated by PPARs in FaO, 3T3-F442A, and C2C12 cells. Furthermore, 8-HEPE enhanced adipogenesis and glucose uptake. By contrast, at the same concentrations, EPA showed weak or little effect, indicating that 8-HEPE was the more potent inducer of physiological effects. PMID:24668940

  4. Functional characterization of a chimeric soluble Fas ligand polymer with in vivo anti-tumor activity.

    PubMed

    Daburon, Sophie; Devaud, Christel; Costet, Pierre; Morello, Aurore; Garrigue-Antar, Laure; Maillasson, Mike; Hargous, Nathalie; Lapaillerie, Delphine; Bonneu, Marc; Dechanet-Merville, Julie; Legembre, Patrick; Capone, Myriam; Moreau, Jean-François; Taupin, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Binding of ligand FasL to its receptor Fas triggers apoptosis via the caspase cascade. FasL itself is homotrimeric, and a productive apoptotic signal requires that FasL be oligomerized beyond the homotrimeric state. We generated a series of FasL chimeras by fusing FasL to domains of the Leukemia Inhibitory Factor receptor gp190 which confer homotypic oligomerization, and analyzed the capacity of these soluble chimeras to trigger cell death. We observed that the most efficient FasL chimera, called pFasL, was also the most polymeric, as it reached the size of a dodecamer. Using a cellular model, we investigated the structure-function relationships of the FasL/Fas interactions for our chimeras, and we demonstrated that the Fas-mediated apoptotic signal did not solely rely on ligand-mediated receptor aggregation, but also required a conformational adaptation of the Fas receptor. When injected into mice, pFasL did not trigger liver injury at a dose which displayed anti-tumor activity in a model of human tumor transplanted to immunodeficient animals, suggesting a potential therapeutic use. Therefore, the optimization of the FasL conformation has to be considered for the development of efficient FasL-derived anti-cancer drugs targeting Fas. PMID:23326557

  5. Binding site structure of one LRP-RAP complex: implications for a common ligand-receptor binding motif.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Gitte A; Andersen, Olav M; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Bjerrum-Bohr, Ida; Etzerodt, Michael; Thøgersen, Hans C; O'Shea, Charlotte; Poulsen, Flemming M; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2006-09-29

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) interacts with more than 30 ligands of different sizes and structures that can all be replaced by the receptor-associated protein (RAP). The double module of complement type repeats, CR56, of LRP binds many ligands including all three domains of RAP and alpha2-macroglobulin, which promotes the catabolism of the Abeta-peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease. To understand the receptor-ligand cross-talk, the NMR structure of CR56 has been solved and ligand binding experiments with RAP domain 1 (RAPd1) have been performed. From chemical shift perturbations of both binding partners upon complex formation, a HADDOCK model of the complex between CR56 and RAPd1 has been obtained. The binding residues are similar to a common binding motif suggested from alpha2-macroglobulin binding studies and provide evidence for an understanding of their mutual cross-competition pattern. The present structural results convey a simultaneous description of both binding partners of an LRP-ligand complex and open a route to a broader understanding of the binding specificity of the LRP receptor, which may involve a general four-residue receptor-ligand recognition motif common to all LRP ligands. The present result may be beneficial in the design of antagonists of ligand binding to the LDL receptor family, and especially of drugs for treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Ligand activation of cannabinoid receptors attenuates hypertrophy of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Akinwumi, Bolanle C; Shao, Zongjun; Anderson, Hope D

    2014-11-01

    : Endocannabinoids are bioactive amides, esters, and ethers of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Evidence suggests that activation of the endocannabinoid pathway offers cardioprotection against myocardial ischemia, arrhythmias, and endothelial dysfunction of coronary arteries. As cardiac hypertrophy is a convergence point of risk factors for heart failure, we determined a role for endocannabinoids in attenuating endothelin-1-induced hypertrophy and probed the signaling pathways involved. The cannabinoid receptor ligand anandamide and its metabolically stable analog, R-methanandamide, suppressed hypertrophic indicators including cardiomyocyte enlargement and fetal gene activation (ie, the brain natriuretic peptide gene) elicited by endothelin-1 in isolated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. The ability of R-methanandamide to suppress myocyte enlargement and fetal gene activation was mediated by CB2 and CB1 receptors, respectively. Accordingly, a CB2-selective agonist, JWH-133, prevented only myocyte enlargement but not brain natriuretic peptide gene activation. A CB1/CB2 dual agonist with limited brain penetration, CB-13, inhibited both hypertrophic indicators. CB-13 activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and, in an AMPK-dependent manner, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Disruption of AMPK signaling, using compound C or short hairpinRNA knockdown, and eNOS inhibition using L-NIO abolished the antihypertrophic actions of CB-13. In conclusion, CB-13 inhibits cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through AMPK-eNOS signaling and may represent a novel therapeutic approach to cardioprotection. PMID:24979612

  7. Caged vanilloid ligands for activation of TRPV1 receptors by 1- and 2-photon excitation†

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun; Gover, Tony D.; Muralidharan, Sukumaran; Auston, Darryl A.; Weinreich, Daniel; Kao, Joseph P. Y.

    2008-01-01

    Nociceptive neurons in the peripheral nervous system detect noxious stimuli and report the information to the central nervous system. Most nociceptive neurons express the vanilloid receptor, TRPV1, a non-selective cation channel gated by vanilloid ligands such as capsaicin, the pungent essence of chili peppers. Here, we report the synthesis and biological application of two caged vanilloids—biologically inert precursors that, when photolyzed, release bioactive vanilloid ligands. The two caged vanilloids, Nb-VNA and Nv-VNA, are photoreleased with quantum efficiency of 0.13 and 0.041, respectively. Under flash photolysis conditions, photorelease of Nb-VNA and Nv-VNA is 95% complete in ∼40 μs and ∼125 μs, respectively. Through 1-photon excitation with ultraviolet light (360 nm), or 2-photon excitation with red light (720 nm), the caged vanilloids can be photoreleased in situ to activate TRPV1 receptors on nociceptive neurons. The consequent increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) can be visualized by laser-scanning confocal imaging of neurons loaded with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, fluo-3. Stimulation results from TRPV1 receptor activation, because the response is blocked by capsazepine, a selective TRPV1 antagonist. In Ca2+-free extracellular medium, photoreleased vanilloid can still elevate [Ca2+]i, which suggests that TRPV1 receptors also reside on endomembranes in neurons and can mediate Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. Notably, whole-cell voltage clamp measurements showed that flash photorelease of vanilloid can activate TRPV1 channels in < 4 msec at 22°C. In combination with 1- or 2-photon excitation, caged vanilloids are a powerful tool for probing morphologically distinct structures of nociceptive sensory neurons with high spatial and temporal precision. PMID:16605259

  8. Differential immunomodulatory activity of tumor cell death induced by cancer therapeutic toll-like receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Klein, Johanna C; Wild, Clarissa A; Lang, Stephan; Brandau, Sven

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands stimulate defined immune cell subsets and are currently tested as novel immunotherapeutic agents against cancer with, however, varying clinical efficacy. Recent data showed the expression of TLR receptors also on tumor cells. In this study we investigated immunological events associated with the induction of tumor cell death by poly(I:C) and imiquimod. A human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell line was exposed to poly(I:C) and imiquimod, which were delivered exogenously via culture medium or via electroporation. Cell death and cell biological consequences thereof were analyzed. For in vivo analyses, a human xenograft and a syngeneic immunocompetent mouse model were used. Poly(I:C) induced cell death only if delivered by electroporation into the cytosol. Cell death induced by poly(I:C) resulted in cytokine release and activation of monocytes in vitro. Monocytes activated by the supernatant of cancer cells previously exposed to poly(I:C) recruited significantly more Th1 cells than monocytes exposed to control supernatants. If delivered exogenously, imiquimod also induced tumor cell death and some release of interleukin-6, but cell death was not associated with release of Th1 cytokines, interferons, monocyte activation and Th1 recruitment. Interestingly, intratumoral injection of poly(I:C) triggered tumor cell death in tumor-bearing mice and reduced tumor growth independent of TLR signaling on host cells. Imiquimod did not affect tumor size. Our data suggest that common cancer therapeutic RNA compounds can induce functionally diverse types of cell death in tumor cells with implications for the use of TLR ligands in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27034235

  9. Characterization of the interaction constants for the binding of two unlabelled ligands to the sites of a receptor. An experimental strategy.

    PubMed

    Swillens, S; Gourdin, A; Delahaut, O

    1989-05-01

    The model describing the binding of three ligands to the sites of a receptor is theoretically studied in order to characterize the binding interaction between two unlabelled ligands. For this, the binding of a third labelled ligand, the affinity of which is dependent on the presence of the unlabelled ligands, must be measured in different conditions. This paper describes an experimental strategy leading to an accurate determination of the equilibrium parameters of the model. This strategy, which assumes that the model is compatible with the data, rests on the determination of the optimal experimental conditions, i.e. the choice of the ligand concentrations which minimize the error of the parameter estimates. For this purpose, a computer program which runs on a microcomputer under the MS-DOS operating system has been elaborated on the basis of the D-optimization criterion. This work shows that such a computer analysis is essential to the determination of the optimal experimental design, even when very simple biochemical systems are considered. PMID:2770883

  10. The Dynamics of Ligand Barrier Crossing Inside the Acetylcholinesterase Gorge

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, Jennifer M.; Henchman, Richard H.; Mccammon, Andy

    2003-10-01

    The dynamics of ligand movement through the constricted region of the acetylcholinesterase gorge is important in understanding how the ligand gains access to and is released from the active site of the enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations of the simple ligand, tetramethylammonium, crossing this bottleneck region are conducted using umbrella potential sampling and activated .ux techniques. The low potential of mean force obtained is consistent with the fast reaction rate of acetylcholinesterase observed experimentally. From the results of the activated dynamics simulations, local conformational .uctuations of the gorge residues and larger scale collective motions of the protein are found to correlate highly with the ligand crossing.

  11. Ruthenium-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH-responsive ligands: External control of catalyst solubility and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balof, Shawna Lynn

    2011-12-01

    Sixteen novel, Ru-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH responsive ligands were synthesized. The pH-responsive groups employed with these catalysts included dimethylamino (NMe2) modified NHC ligands as well as N-donor dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) and 3-(o-pyridyl)propylidene ligands. These pH-responsive ligands provided the means by which the solubility and/or activity profiles of the catalysts produced could be controlled via acid addition. The main goal of this dissertation was to design catalyst systems capable of performing ring opening metathesis (ROMP) and ring closing metathesis (RCM) reactions in both organic and aqueous media. In an effort to quickly gain access to new catalyst structures, a template synthesis for functionalized NHC ligand precursors was designed, in addition to other strategies, to obtain ligand precursors with ancillary NMe2 groups. Kinetic studies for the catalysts produced from these precursors showed external control of catalyst solubility was afforded via protonation of the NMe2 groups of their NHC ligands. Additionally, this protonation afforded external control of catalyst propagation rates for several catalysts. This is the first known independent external control for the propagation rates of ROMP catalysts. The incorporation of pH-responsive N-donor ligands into catalyst structures also provided the means for the external control of metathesis activity, as the protonation of these ligands resulted in an increased initiation rate based on their fast and irreversible dissociation from the metal center. The enhanced external control makes these catalysts applicable to a wide range of applications, some of which have been explored by us and/or through collaboration. Three of the catalysts designed showed remarkable metathesis activity in aqueous media. These catalysts displayed comparable RCM activity in aqueous media to a class of water-soluble catalysts reported by Grubbs et al., considered to be the most active catalyst for

  12. Pi-interaction tuning of the active site properties of metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Crowley, Peter B; Firbank, Susan J; Lawler, Anne T; Hunter, David M; McFarlane, William; Li, Chan; Kohzuma, Takamitsu; Banfield, Mark J; Dennison, Christopher

    2008-11-19

    The influence of pi-interactions with a His ligand have been investigated in a family of copper-containing redox metalloproteins. The Met16Phe and Met16Trp pseudoazurin, and Leu12Phe spinach and Leu14Phe Phormidium laminosum plastocyanin variants possess active-site pi-contacts between the introduced residue and His81 and His87/92 respectively. The striking overlap of the side chain of Phe16 in the Met16Phe variant and that of Met16 in wild type pseudoazurin identifies that this position provides an important second coordination sphere interaction in both cases. His-ligand protonation and dissociation from Cu(I) occurs in the wild type proteins resulting in diminished redox activity, providing a [H(+)]-driven switch for regulating electron transfer. The introduced pi-interaction has opposing effects on the pKa for the His ligand in pseudoazurin and plastocyanin due to subtle differences in the pi-contact, stabilizing the coordinated form of pseudoazurin whereas in plastocyanin protonation and dissociation is favored. Replacement of Pro36, a residue that has been suggested to facilitate structural changes upon His ligand protonation, with a Gly, has little effect on the pKa of His87 in spinach plastocyanin. The mutations at Met16 have a significant influence on the reduction potential of pseudoazurin. Electron self-exchange is enhanced, whereas association with the physiological partner, nitrite reductase, is only affected by the Met16Phe mutation, but kcat is halved in both the Met16Phe and Met16Trp variants. Protonation of the His ligand is the feature most affected by the introduction of a pi-interaction.

  13. C-H functionalization: thoroughly tuning ligands at a metal ion, a chemist can greatly enhance catalyst's activity and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Shul'pin, Georgiy B

    2013-09-28

    This brief essay consists of a few "exciting stories" devoted to relations within a metal-complex catalyst between a metal ion and a coordinated ligand. When, as in the case of a human couple, the rapport of the partners is cordial and a love cements these relations, a chemist finds an ideal married couple, in other words he obtains a catalyst of choice which allows him to functionalize C-H bonds very efficiently and selectively. Examples of such lucky marriages in the catalytic world of ions and ligands are discussed here. Activity of the catalyst is characterized by turnover number (TON) or turnover frequency (TOF) as well as by yield of a target product. Introducing a chelating N,N- or N,O-ligand to the catalyst molecule (this can be an iron or manganese derivative) sharply enhances its activity. However, the activity of vanadium derivatives (with additionally added to the solution pyrazinecarboxylic acid, PCA) as well as of various osmium complexes does not dramatically depend on the nature of ligands surrounding metal ions. Complexes of these metals are very efficient catalysts in oxidations with H2O2. Osmium derivatives are record-holders exhibiting extremely high TONs whereas vanadium complexes are on the second position. Finally, elegant examples of alkane functionalization on the ions of non-transition metals (aluminium, gallium etc.) are described when one ligand within the metal complex (namely, hydroperoxyl ligand HOO(-)) helps other ligand of this complex (H2O2 molecule coordinated to the metal) to disintegrate into two species, generating very reactive hydroxyl radical. Hydrogen peroxide molecule, even ligated to the metal ion, is perfectly stable without the assistance of the neighboring HOO(-) ligand. This ligand can be easily oxidized donating an electron to its partner ligand (H2O2). In an analogous case, when the central ion in the catalyst is a transition metal, this ion changing its oxidation state can donate an electron to the coordinated H2O2

  14. Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural characterization, electrochemical and antimicrobial activity studies of the Schiff base ligand and its transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslantaş, Mehmet; Kendi, Engin; Demir, Necmettin; Şabik, Ali E.; Tümer, Mehmet; Kertmen, Metin

    2009-10-01

    In this study, the Schiff base ligand trans-N,N'-bis[(2,4-dichlorophenyl) methylidene] cyclohexane-1,2-diamine (L) and its copper(II), nickel(II) and palladium(II) transition metal complexes were prepared and characterized by the analytical and spectroscopic methods. The 1H( 13C) NMR spectra of the ligand and its diamagnetic complexes were recorded in DMSO-d 6 solvent and obtained data confirm that the nitrogen atoms of the imine groups coordinated to the metal ions. Electrochemical properties of the ligand and its metal complexes were investigated in the DMF solvent at the 100 and 250 mV s -1 scan rates. The ligand and metal complexes showed both reversible and irreversible processes at these scan rates. The single crystal of the ligand (L) was obtained from MeOH solution, and its crystal structure was determined by X-ray diffraction. The C-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonding interactions in the molecule were seen which increase the stability of the crystal structure. The antimicrobial activity studies of the ligand and its metal complexes were carried out by using the various bacteria and fungi.

  15. Active Site Structure and Peroxidase Activity of Oxidatively Modified Cytochrome c Species in Complexes with Cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Capdevila, Daiana A; Oviedo Rouco, Santiago; Tomasina, Florencia; Tortora, Verónica; Demicheli, Verónica; Radi, Rafael; Murgida, Daniel H

    2015-12-29

    We report a resonance Raman and UV-vis characterization of the active site structure of oxidatively modified forms of cytochrome c (Cyt-c) free in solution and in complexes with cardiolipin (CL). The studied post-translational modifications of Cyt-c include methionine sulfoxidation and tyrosine nitration, which lead to altered heme axial ligation and increased peroxidase activity with respect to those of the wild-type protein. In spite of the structural and activity differences between the protein variants free in solution, binding to CL liposomes induces in all cases the formation of a spectroscopically identical bis-His axial coordination conformer that more efficiently promotes lipid peroxidation. The spectroscopic results indicate that the bis-His form is in equilibrium with small amounts of high-spin species, thus suggesting a labile distal His ligand as the basis for the CL-induced increase in enzymatic activity observed for all protein variants. For Cyt-c nitrated at Tyr74 and sulfoxidized at Met80, the measured apparent binding affinities for CL are ∼4 times larger than for wild-type Cyt-c. On the basis of these results, we propose that these post-translational modifications may amplify the pro-apoptotic signal of Cyt-c under oxidative stress conditions at CL concentrations lower than for the unmodified protein.

  16. The Next Generation Non-competitive Active Polyester Nanosystems for Transferrin Receptor-mediated Peroral Transport Utilizing Gambogic Acid as a Ligand.

    PubMed

    Saini, P; Ganugula, R; Arora, M; Kumar, M N V Ravi

    2016-01-01

    The current methods for targeted drug delivery utilize ligands that must out-compete endogenous ligands in order to bind to the active site facilitating the transport. To address this limitation, we present a non-competitive active transport strategy to overcome intestinal barriers in the form of tunable nanosystems (NS) for transferrin receptor (TfR) utilizing gambogic acid (GA), a xanthanoid, as its ligand. The NS made using GA conjugated poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) have shown non-competitive affinity to TfR evaluated in cell/cell-free systems. The fluorescent PLGA-GA NS exhibited significant intestinal transport and altered distribution profile compared to PLGA NS in vivo. The PLGA-GA NS loaded with cyclosporine A (CsA), a model peptide, upon peroral dosing to rodents led to maximum plasma concentration of CsA at 6 h as opposed to 24 h with PLGA-NS with at least 2-fold higher levels in brain at 72 h. The proposed approach offers new prospects for peroral drug delivery and beyond.

  17. Norfloxacin and N-Donor Mixed-Ligand Copper(II) Complexes: Synthesis, Albumin Interaction, and Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activity

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Darliane A.; Gouvea, Ligiane R.; Muniz, Gabriel S. Vignoli; Louro, Sonia R. W.; Batista, Denise da Gama Jaen; Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré C.; Teixeira, Letícia R.

    2016-01-01

    Copper(II) complexes with the first-generation quinolone antibacterial agent norfloxacin containing a nitrogen donor heterocyclic ligand 2,2′-bipyridine (bipy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) were prepared and characterized by IR, EPR spectra, molar conductivity, and elemental analyses. The experimental data suggest that norfloxacin was coordinated to copper(II) through the carboxylato and ketone oxygen atoms. The interaction of the copper(II) complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated using fluorescence quenching of the tryptophan residues and copper(II) EPR spectroscopy. The results of fluorescence titration revealed that copper(II) complexes have a moderate ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of the albumins through a static quenching mechanism. EPR experiments showed that BSA and HSA Cu(II) sites compete with NOR for Cu(II)-bipy and Cu(II)-phen to form protein mixed-ligand complexes. Copper(II) complexes, together with the corresponding ligands, were evaluated for their trypanocidal activity in vitro against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. The tests performed using bloodstream trypomastigotes showed that the Cu(II)-N-donor precursors and the metal complexes were more active than the free fluoroquinolone. PMID:26924953

  18. The Next Generation Non-competitive Active Polyester Nanosystems for Transferrin Receptor-mediated Peroral Transport Utilizing Gambogic Acid as a Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Saini, P.; Ganugula, R.; Arora, M.; Kumar, M. N. V. Ravi

    2016-01-01

    The current methods for targeted drug delivery utilize ligands that must out-compete endogenous ligands in order to bind to the active site facilitating the transport. To address this limitation, we present a non-competitive active transport strategy to overcome intestinal barriers in the form of tunable nanosystems (NS) for transferrin receptor (TfR) utilizing gambogic acid (GA), a xanthanoid, as its ligand. The NS made using GA conjugated poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) have shown non-competitive affinity to TfR evaluated in cell/cell-free systems. The fluorescent PLGA-GA NS exhibited significant intestinal transport and altered distribution profile compared to PLGA NS in vivo. The PLGA-GA NS loaded with cyclosporine A (CsA), a model peptide, upon peroral dosing to rodents led to maximum plasma concentration of CsA at 6 h as opposed to 24 h with PLGA-NS with at least 2-fold higher levels in brain at 72 h. The proposed approach offers new prospects for peroral drug delivery and beyond. PMID:27388994

  19. The Next Generation Non-competitive Active Polyester Nanosystems for Transferrin Receptor-mediated Peroral Transport Utilizing Gambogic Acid as a Ligand.

    PubMed

    Saini, P; Ganugula, R; Arora, M; Kumar, M N V Ravi

    2016-01-01

    The current methods for targeted drug delivery utilize ligands that must out-compete endogenous ligands in order to bind to the active site facilitating the transport. To address this limitation, we present a non-competitive active transport strategy to overcome intestinal barriers in the form of tunable nanosystems (NS) for transferrin receptor (TfR) utilizing gambogic acid (GA), a xanthanoid, as its ligand. The NS made using GA conjugated poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) have shown non-competitive affinity to TfR evaluated in cell/cell-free systems. The fluorescent PLGA-GA NS exhibited significant intestinal transport and altered distribution profile compared to PLGA NS in vivo. The PLGA-GA NS loaded with cyclosporine A (CsA), a model peptide, upon peroral dosing to rodents led to maximum plasma concentration of CsA at 6 h as opposed to 24 h with PLGA-NS with at least 2-fold higher levels in brain at 72 h. The proposed approach offers new prospects for peroral drug delivery and beyond. PMID:27388994

  20. Para-aminobenzamidine linked regenerated cellulose membranes for plasminogen activator purification: Effect of spacer arm length and ligand density

    PubMed Central

    Fasoli, Ezio; Reyes, Yiaslin Ruiz; Guzman, Osiris Martinez; Rosado, Alexandra; Cruz, Vivian Rodriguez; Borges, Amaris; Martinez, Edmarie; Bansal, Vibha

    2013-01-01

    Despite membrane-based separations offering superior alternative to packed bed chromatographic processes, there has been a substantial lacuna in their actual application to separation processes. One of the major reasons behind this is the lack of availability of appropriately modified or end-group modifiable membranes. In this paper, an affinity membrane was developed using a commercially available serine protease inhibitor, para-aminobenzamidine (pABA). The membrane modification was optimized for protein binding capacity by varying: i) the length of the spacer arm (SA; 5-atoms, 7-atoms, and 14-atoms) linking the ligand to membrane surface; ii) the affinity ligand (pABA) density on membrane surface (5–25 nmoles per cm2). Resulting membranes were tested for their ability to bind plasminogen activators (PAs) from mono- and multi- component systems in batch mode. The membrane containing pABA linked through 7-atoms SA but similar ligand density as in the case of 5- or 14- atoms long SA was found to bind up to 1.6-times higher amounts of PA per nmole of immobilized ligand from conditioned HeLa cell culture media. However, membranes with similar ligand densities but different lengths of SA, showed comparable binding capacities in monocomponent system. In addition, the length of SA did not affect the selectivity of the ligand for PA. A clear inverse linear correlation was observed between ligand density and binding capacity until the point of PA binding optima was reached (11±1.0 nmoles per cm2) in mono- and multi- component systems for 7- as well as 14- atoms SA. Up to 200-fold purification was achieved in a single step separation of PA from HeLa conditioned media using these affinity membranes. The issues of ligand leaching and reuse of the membranes were also investigated. An extensive regeneration procedure allowed the preservation of approximately 95% of the PA binding capacity of the membranes even after five cycles of use. PMID:23703544

  1. Effective virtual screening strategy toward covalent ligands: identification of novel NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengping; Tan, Jiani; Lai, Zhonghui; Li, Ying; Pang, Junxia; Xiao, Jianhu; Huang, Zhangjian; Zhang, Yihua; Ji, Hui; Lai, Yisheng

    2014-06-23

    The NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) is an emerging target for cancer therapy, which regulates the degradation and turnover of a variety of cancer-related proteins by activating the cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases. Among a limited number of known NAE inhibitors, the covalent inhibitors have demonstrated the most potent efficacy through their covalently linked adducts with NEDD8. Inspired by this unique mechanism, in this study, a novel combined strategy of virtual screening (VS) was adopted with the aim to identify diverse covalent inhibitors of NAE. To be specific, a docking-enabled pharmacophore model was first built from the possible active conformations of chosen covalent inhibitors. Meanwhile, a dynamic structure-based phamacophore was also established based on the snapshots derived from molecular dynamic simulation. Subsequent screening of a focused ZINC database using these pharmacophore models combined with covalent docking discovered three novel active compounds. Among them, compound LZ3 exhibited the most potent NAE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 1.06 ± 0.18 μM. Furthermore, a cell-based washout experiment proved the proposed covalent binding mechanism for compound LZ3, which confirmed the successful application of our combined VS strategy, indicating it may provide a viable solution to systematically discover novel covalent ligands.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of human IRE1 activation through dimerization and ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Amar; Newbatt, Yvette; McAndrew, P. Craig; Stubbs, Mark; Burke, Rosemary; Richards, Mark W.; Bhatia, Chitra; Caldwell, John J.; McHardy, Tatiana; Collins, Ian; Bayliss, Richard

    2015-01-01

    IRE1 transduces the unfolded protein response by splicing XBP1 through its C-terminal cytoplasmic kinase-RNase region. IRE1 autophosphorylation is coupled to RNase activity through formation of a back-to-back dimer, although the conservation of the underlying molecular mechanism is not clear from existing structures. We have crystallized human IRE1 in a back-to-back conformation only previously seen for the yeast homologue. In our structure the kinase domain appears primed for catalysis but the RNase domains are disengaged. Structure-function analysis reveals that IRE1 is autoinhibited through a Tyr-down mechanism related to that found in the unrelated Ser/Thr protein kinase Nek7. We have developed a compound that potently inhibits human IRE1 kinase activity while stimulating XBP1 splicing. A crystal structure of the inhibitor bound to IRE1 shows an increased ordering of the kinase activation loop. The structures of hIRE in apo and ligand-bound forms are consistent with a previously proposed model of IRE1 regulation in which formation of a back-to-back dimer coupled to adoption of a kinase-active conformation drive RNase activation. The structures provide opportunities for structure-guided design of IRE1 inhibitors. PMID:25968568

  3. Comparison of the active-site design of molybdenum oxo-transfer enzymes by quantum mechanical calculations.

    PubMed

    Li, Jilai; Ryde, Ulf

    2014-11-17

    There are three families of mononuclear molybdenum enzymes that catalyze oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactions, named after a typical example from each family, viz., dimethyl sulfoxide reductase (DMSOR), sulfite oxidase (SO), and xanthine oxidase (XO). These families differ in the construction of their active sites, with two molybdopterin groups in the DMSOR family, two oxy groups in the SO family, and a sulfido group in the XO family. We have employed density functional theory calculations on cluster models of the active sites to understand the selection of molybdenum ligands in the three enzyme families. Our calculations show that the DMSOR active site has a much stronger oxidative power than the other two sites, owing to the extra molybdopterin ligand. However, the active sites do not seem to have been constructed to make the OAT reaction as exergonic as possible, but instead to keep the reaction free energy close to zero (to avoid excessive loss of energy), thereby making the reoxidation (SO and XO) or rereduction of the active sites (DMSOR) after the OAT reaction facile. We also show that active-site models of the three enzyme families can all catalyze the reduction of DMSO and that the DMSOR model does not give the lowest activation barrier. Likewise, all three models can catalyze the oxidation of sulfite, provided that the Coulombic repulsion between the substrate and the enzyme model can be overcome, but for this harder reaction, the SO model gives the lowest activation barrier, although the differences are not large. However, only the XO model can catalyze the oxidation of xanthine, owing to its sulfido ligand.

  4. WISP-3 functions as a ligand and promotes superoxide dismutase activity.

    PubMed

    Davis, Leila; Chen, Yi; Sen, Malini

    2006-03-31

    WISP-3 (Wnt1 inducible secreted protein-3) mutations have been linked to the connective tissue diseases progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia and polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, both of which are accompanied by disorders in cartilage maintenance/homeostasis. The molecular mechanism of WISP-3 mediated effects in the sustenance of cartilage has not been described in detail. Our previous study illustrates the potential role of WISP-3 in regulating the expression of cartilage-specific molecules that sustain chondrocyte growth and cartilage integrity. The present study was conducted to investigate the mode of action of WISP-3 in greater detail. Experimental results depicted here suggest that WISP-3 can function as a ligand and signal via autocrine and/or paracrine modes upon being secreted by chondrocytes. Furthermore, apart from regulating collagen II and aggrecan expression, WISP-3 may also promote superoxide dismutase expression and activity in chondrocytes.

  5. Another Piece in the Fibrotic Puzzle: TSLP as a Novel Ligand for Fibrocyte Activation.

    PubMed

    Christmann, Romy Beatriz

    2016-02-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has emerged as an important cytokine in the pathogenesis of nonallergic diseases, especially in diseases that include fibrosis. It has been shown to be upregulated in both cutaneous and lung fibrotic conditions. Shin et al. report that TSLP may also play a role in the pathogenesis of keloids. The main mechanism of TSLP profibrotic effects is not as yet fully understood, although the data suggest that it involves collagen production through transforming growth factor-β, at least in the case of dermal fibroblasts. The authors also report that TSLP is able to activate fibrocytes, probably by inducing stromal cell-derived factor-1 (also termed CXCL12), one of its main ligands. These findings support the concept that TSLP plays a role in the development of fibrosis, and they should lead to mechanistic studies on TSLP profibrotic signaling. PMID:26802232

  6. Characterization and biological activities of two copper(II) complexes with dipropylenetriamine and diamine as ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Noaimi, Mousa; Choudhary, Mohammad I.; Awwadi, Firas F.; Talib, Wamidh H.; Hadda, Taibi Ben; Yousuf, Sammer; Sawafta, Ashraf; Warad, Ismail

    2014-06-01

    Two new mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes, [Cu(dipn)(Nsbnd N)]Br2(1-2) [dipn = dipropylenetriamine, Nsbnd N = ethylenediamine (en) (1) and propylenediamine (pn) (2)], have been synthesized. These complexes were characterized by spectroscopic and thermal techniques. Crystal structure for 2 shows a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal geometry around Cu(II) ion with one solvate water molecule. Antimicrobial and antiproliferative assays were conducted to evaluate the biological activities of these complexes. The complexes exhibit a promising antimicrobial effect against an array of microbes at 200 μg/mL concentration. The antiproliferative assay shows a high potential of these complexes to target Human keratinocyte cell line with IC50 values of 155 and 152 μM. The absorption spectrum of 2 in water was modeled by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT).

  7. Wnt ligands regulate Tkv expression to constrain Dpp activity in the Drosophila ovarian stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Lichao; Wang, Huashan; Fan, Chao; Liu, Sen

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell self-renewal versus differentiation is regulated by the niche, which provides localized molecules that favor self-renewal. In the Drosophila melanogaster female germline stem cell (GSC) niche, Decapentaplegic (Dpp), a fly transforming growth factor β molecule and well-established long-range morphogen, acts over one cell diameter to maintain the GSCs. Here, we show that Thickveins (Tkv; a type I receptor of Dpp) is highly expressed in stromal cells next to Dpp-producing cells and functions to remove excess Dpp outside the niche, thereby spatially restricting its activity. Interestingly, Tkv expression in these stromal cells is regulated by multiple Wnt ligands that are produced by the niche. Our data demonstrate a self-restraining mechanism by which the Drosophila ovarian GSC niche acts to define its own boundary. PMID:26008746

  8. Antibacterial activity of Pd(II) complexes with salicylaldehyde-amino acids Schiff bases ligands.

    PubMed

    Rîmbu, Cristina; Danac, Ramona; Pui, Aurel

    2014-01-01

    Palladium(II) complexes with Schiff bases ligands derived from salicylaldehyde and amino acids (Ala, Gly, Met, Ser, Val) have been synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform (FT)-IR, UV-Vis and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. The electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) spectrometry confirms the formation of palladium(II) complexes in 1/2 (M/L) molar ratio. All the Pd(II) complexes 1, [Pd(SalAla)2]Cl2; 2, [Pd(SalGly)2]Cl2; 3, [Pd(SalMet)2]Cl2; 4, [Pd(SalSer)2]Cl2; 5, [Pd(SalVal)2]Cl2; have shown antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli.

  9. Activation requirements and responses to TLR ligands in human CD4+ T cells: comparison of two T cell isolation techniques.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Christina L; Thomas, Jeremy J; Rojas, Roxana E

    2009-05-15

    Direct regulation of T cell function by microbial ligands through Toll-like receptors (TLR) is an emerging area of T cell biology. Currently either immunomagnetic cell sorting (IMACS) or fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), are utilized to isolate T-cell subsets for such studies. However, it is unknown to what extent differences in T cell purity between these isolation techniques influence T cell functional assays. We compared the purity, response to mitogen, activation requirements, and response to TLR ligands between human CD4(+) T cells isolated either by IMACS (IMACS-CD4(+)) or by IMACS followed by FACS (IMACS/FACS-CD4(+)). As expected, IMACS-CD4(+) were less pure than IMACS/FACS-CD4(+) (92.5%+/-1.4% versus 99.7%+/-0.2%, respectively). Consequently, IMACS-CD4(+) proliferated and produced cytokines in response to mitogen alone and had lower activation requirements compared to IMACS/FACS-CD4(+). In addition IMACS-CD4(+) but not IMACS/FACS-CD4(+) responses were upregulated by the TLR-4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). On the other hand, TLR-2 and TLR-5 engagement induced costimulation in both IMACS-CD4(+) and highly purified IMACS-/FACS-CD4(+). Altogether these results indicate that small differences in cell purity can significantly alter T cell responses to TLR ligands. This study stresses the importance of a stringent purification method when investigating the role of microbial ligands in T cell function. PMID:19272393

  10. Ga(III) complexes as models for the M(III) site of purple acid phosphatase: ligand effects on the hydrolytic reactivity toward bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl) phosphate.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Fergal; Hynes, Michael J; Erxleben, Andrea

    2010-07-19

    The effects of a series of Ga(III) complexes with tripodal ligands on the hydrolysis rate of the activated phosphate diester bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl)phosphate (BDNPP) have been investigated. In particular, the influence of the nature of the ligand donor sites on the reactivity of Ga(III) which represents a mimic of the Fe(III) ion in purple acid phosphatase has been evaluated. It has been shown that replacing neutral nitrogen donor atoms and carboxylate groups by phenolate groups enhanced the reactivity of the Ga complexes. Bell-shaped pH-rate profiles and the measured solvent deuterium isotope effects are indicative of a mechanism that involves nucleophilic attack on the coordinated substrate by Ga-OH. The trend in reactivity found for the different Ga complexes reveals that of the two effects of the metal, Lewis acid activation of the substrate and nucleophile activation, the latter one is more important in determining the intrinsic reactivity of the metal catalyst. The relevance of the present findings for the modulation of the activity of the M(III) ion in purple acid phosphatase whose active site contains a phenolate (tyrosine side chain) is discussed. PMID:20565083

  11. Structural insights into a novel interkingdom signaling circuit by cartography of the ligand-binding sites of the homologous quorum sensing LuxR-family.

    PubMed

    Covaceuszach, Sonia; Degrassi, Giuliano; Venturi, Vittorio; Lamba, Doriano

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have identified a novel interkingdom signaling circuit, via plant signaling molecules, and a bacterial sub-family of LuxR proteins, bridging eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Indeed pivotal plant-bacteria interactions are regulated by the so called Plant Associated Bacteria (PAB) LuxR solo regulators that, although closely related to the quorum sensing (QS) LuxR family, do not bind or respond to canonical quorum sensing N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), but only to specific host plant signal molecules. The large body of structural data available for several members of the QS LuxR family complexed with different classes of ligands (AHLs and other compounds), has been exploited to dissect the cartography of their regulatory domains through structure-based multiple sequence alignments, structural superimposition and a comparative analysis of the contact residues involved in ligand binding. In the absence of experimentally determined structures of members of the PAB LuxR solos subfamily, an homology model of its prototype OryR is presented, aiming to elucidate the architecture of its ligand-binding site. The obtained model, in combination with the cartography of the regulatory domains of the homologous QS LuxRs, provides novel insights into the 3D structure of its ligand-binding site and unveils the probable molecular determinants responsible for differences in selectivity towards specific host plant signal molecules, rather than to canonical QS compounds.

  12. Defining the Role of the Axial Ligand of the Type 1 Copper Site in Amicyanin by Replacement of Methionine with Leucine

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Moonsung; Sukumar, Narayanasami; Liu, Aimin; Davidson, Victor L.

    2010-01-12

    The effects of replacing the axial methionine ligand of the type 1 copper site with leucine on the structure and function of amicyanin have been characterized. The crystal structures of the oxidized and reduced forms of the protein reveal that the copper site is now tricoordinate with no axial ligand, and that the copper coordination distances for the two ligands provided by histidines are significantly increased. Despite these structural changes, the absorption and EPR spectra of M98L amicyanin are only slightly altered and still consistent with that of a typical type 1 site. The oxidation-reduction midpoint potential (E{sub m}) value becomes 127 mV more positive as a consequence of the M98L mutation, most likely because of the increased hydrophobicity of the copper site. The most dramatic effect of the mutation was on the electron transfer (ET) reaction from reduced M98L amicyanin to cytochrome c{sub 551i} within the protein ET complex. The rate decreased 435-fold, which was much more than expected from the change in E{sub m}. Examination of the temperature dependence of the ET rate (k{sub ET}) revealed that the mutation caused a 13.6-fold decrease in the electronic coupling (H{sub AB}) for the reaction. A similar decrease was predicted from a comparative analysis of the crystal structures of reduced M98L and native amicyanins. The most direct route of ET for this reaction is through the Met98 ligand. Inspection of the structures suggests that the major determinant of the large decrease in the experimentally determined values of H{sub AB} and k{sub ET} is the increased distance from the copper to the protein within the type 1 site of M98L amicyanin.

  13. Control of active sites in flocculation: Concept of equivalent active sites''

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Flocculation and dispersion of solids are strong functions of the amount and conformation of the adsorbed polymer. Regions of dispersion and flocculation of solids with particular polymer molecules may be deduced from saturation adsorption data. The concept of equivalent active sites'' is proposed to explain flocculation and dispersion behavior irrespective of the amount or conformation of the adsorbed polymer. The concept has been further extended to study the selective flocculation process.

  14. Porous capsules with a large number of active sites: nucleation/growth under confined conditions.

    PubMed

    Garai, Somenath; Rubčić, Mirta; Bögge, Hartmut; Gouzerh, Pierre; Müller, Achim

    2015-03-01

    This work deals with the generation of large numbers of active sites and with ensuing nucleation/ growth processes on the inside wall of the cavity of porous nanocapsules of the type (pentagon)12(linker)30≡{(Mo(VI))Mo(VI)5}12{Mo(V)2(ligand)}30. A first example refers to sulfur dioxide capture through displacement of acetate ligands, while the grafted sulfite ligands are able to trap {MoO3H}(+) units thereby forming unusual {(O2SO)3MoO3H}(5-) assemblies. A second example relates to the generation of open coordination sites through release of carbon dioxide upon mild acidification of a carbonate-type capsule. When the reaction is performed in the presence of heptamolybdate ions, MoO4(2-) ions enter the cavity where they bind to the inside wall while forming new types of polyoxomolybdate architectures, thereby extending the molybdenum oxide skeleton of the capsule. Parallels can be drawn with Mo-storage proteins and supported MoO3 catalysts, making the results relevant to molybdenum biochemistry and to catalysis. PMID:25653204

  15. Antimalarial activity of ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) arene complexes with mono- and bidentate chloroquine analogue ligands.

    PubMed

    Ekengard, Erik; Glans, Lotta; Cassells, Irwin; Fogeron, Thibault; Govender, Preshendren; Stringer, Tameryn; Chellan, Prinessa; Lisensky, George C; Hersh, William H; Doverbratt, Isa; Lidin, Sven; de Kock, Carmen; Smith, Peter J; Smith, Gregory S; Nordlander, Ebbe

    2015-11-28

    Eight new ruthenium and five new osmium p-cymene half-sandwich complexes have been synthesized, characterized and evaluated for antimalarial activity. All complexes contain ligands that are based on a 4-chloroquinoline framework related to the antimalarial drug chloroquine. Ligands HL(1-8) are salicylaldimine derivatives, where HL(1) = N-(2-((2-hydroxyphenyl)methylimino)ethyl)-7-chloroquinolin-4-amine, and HL(2-8) contain non-hydrogen substituents in the 3-position of the salicylaldimine ring, viz. F, Cl, Br, I, NO2, OMe and (t)Bu for HL(2-8), respectively. Ligand HL(9) is also a salicylaldimine-containing ligand with substitutions in both 3- and 5-positions of the salicylaldimine moiety, i.e. N-(2-((2-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)methyl-imino)ethyl)-7-chloroquinolin-4-amine, while HL(10) is N-(2-((1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)methylamino)ethyl)-7-chloroquinolin-4-amine) The half sandwich metal complexes that have been investigated are [Ru(η(6)-cym)(L(1-8))Cl] (Ru-1-Ru-8, cym = p-cymene), [Os(η(6)-cym)(L(1-3,5,7))Cl] (Os-1-Os-3, Os-5, and Os-7), [M(η(6)-cym)(HL(9))Cl2] (M = Ru, Ru-HL(9); M = Os, Os-HL(9)) and [M(η(6)-cym)(L(10))Cl]Cl (M = Ru, Ru-10; M = Os, Os-10). In complexes Ru-1-Ru-8 and Ru-10, Os-1-Os-3, Os-5 and Os-7 and Os-10, the ligands were found to coordinate as bidentate N,O- and N,N-chelates, while in complexes Ru-HL(9) and Os-HL(9), monodentate coordination of the ligands through the quinoline nitrogen was established. The antimalarial activity of the new ligands and complexes was evaluated against chloroquine sensitive (NF54 and D10) and chloroquine resistant (Dd2) Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite strains. Coordination of ruthenium and osmium arene moieties to the ligands resulted in lower antiplasmodial activities relative to the free ligands, but the resistance index is better for the ruthenium complexes compared to chloroquine. Overall, osmium complexes appeared to be less active than the corresponding ruthenium complexes. PMID:26491831

  16. Phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase activation induced upon Fc gamma RIIIA- ligand interaction

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Induced activation of protein tyrosine kinase(s) is a central event in signal transduction mediated via the low affinity receptor for IgG (Fc gamma RIIIA, CD16) in natural killer (NK) cells. Tyrosine phosphorylation may affect the function of several protein directly, or indirectly by inducing their association with other tyrosine phosphorylated proteins. Here, we report that Fc gamma RIII stimulation induces activation of phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3 kinase in NK cells. Phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitates from Fc gamma RIII-stimulated NK cells contain PI-kinase activity and PI-3 kinase can be directly precipitated from them. Conversely, a series of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins is coprecipitated with PI-3 kinase from the stimulated, but not from control cells. Analogous results obtained using Jurkat T cells expressing transfected Fc gamma RIIIA alpha ligand binding chain in association with gamma 2 or zeta 2 homodimers indicate that both complexes transduce this effect, although the Fc gamma RIIIA-zeta 2 complexes do so with greater efficiency. Accumulation of phosphoinositide D3 phosphorylated products in stimulated cells confirms PI-3 kinase activation, indicating the participation of this enzyme in Fc gamma RIIIA-mediated signal transduction. PMID:8294866

  17. Functional Analysis of the Citrate Activator CitO from Enterococcus faecalis Implicates a Divalent Metal in Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Blancato, Víctor S.; Pagliai, Fernando A.; Magni, Christian; Gonzalez, Claudio F.; Lorca, Graciela L.

    2016-01-01

    The regulator of citrate metabolism, CitO, from Enterococcus faecalis belongs to the FCD family within the GntR superfamily. In the presence of citrate, CitO binds to cis-acting sequences located upstream of the cit promoters inducing the expression of genes involved in citrate utilization. The quantification of the molecular binding affinities, performed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), indicated that CitO has a high affinity for citrate (KD = 1.2 ± 0.2 μM), while it did not recognize other metabolic intermediates. Based on a structural model of CitO where a putative small molecule and a metal binding site were identified, it was hypothesized that the metal ion is required for citrate binding. In agreement with this model, citrate binding to CitO sharply decreased when the protein was incubated with EDTA. This effect was reverted by the addition of Ni2+, and Zn2+ to a lesser extent. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis was conducted and it was found that changes to alanine in residues Arg97 and His191 resulted in decreased binding affinities for citrate, as determined by EMSA and ITC. Further assays using lacZ fusions confirmed that these residues in CitO are involved in sensing citrate in vivo. These results indicate that the molecular modifications induced by a ligand and a metal binding in the C-terminal domain of CitO are required for optimal DNA binding activity, and consequently, transcriptional activation. PMID:26903980

  18. Crystallographic Analysis of Active Site Contributions to Regiospecificity in the Diiron Enzyme Toluene 4-Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Lucas J.; Acheson, Justin F.; McCoy, Jason G.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Fox, Brian G.

    2014-10-02

    Crystal structures of toluene 4-monooxygenase hydroxylase in complex with reaction products and effector protein reveal active site interactions leading to regiospecificity. Complexes with phenolic products yield an asymmetric {mu}-phenoxo-bridged diiron center and a shift of diiron ligand E231 into a hydrogen bonding position with conserved T201. In contrast, complexes with inhibitors p-NH{sub 2}-benzoate and p-Br-benzoate showed a {mu}-1,1 coordination of carboxylate oxygen between the iron atoms and only a partial shift in the position of E231. Among active site residues, F176 trapped the aromatic ring of products against a surface of the active site cavity formed by G103, E104 and A107, while F196 positioned the aromatic ring against this surface via a {pi}-stacking interaction. The proximity of G103 and F176 to the para substituent of the substrate aromatic ring and the structure of G103L T4moHD suggest how changes in regiospecificity arise from mutations at G103. Although effector protein binding produced significant shifts in the positions of residues along the outer portion of the active site (T201, N202, and Q228) and in some iron ligands (E231 and E197), surprisingly minor shifts (<1 {angstrom}) were produced in F176, F196, and other interior residues of the active site. Likewise, products bound to the diiron center in either the presence or absence of effector protein did not significantly shift the position of the interior residues, suggesting that positioning of the cognate substrates will not be strongly influenced by effector protein binding. Thus, changes in product distributions in the absence of the effector protein are proposed to arise from differences in rates of chemical steps of the reaction relative to motion of substrates within the active site channel of the uncomplexed, less efficient enzyme, while structural changes in diiron ligand geometry associated with cycling between diferrous and diferric states are discussed for their potential

  19. Palladium(II) and platinum(II) derivatives of benzothiazoline ligands: Synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial and antispermatogenic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Krishna; Singh, R. V.; Fahmi, Nighat

    2011-01-01

    A series of Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes with two N ∩S donor ligands, 5-chloro-3-(indolin-2-one)benzothiazoline and 6-nitro-3-(indolin-2-one)benzothiazoline, have been synthesized by the reaction of metal chlorides (PdCl 2 and PtCl 2) with ligands in 1:2 molar ratios. All the synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, melting point determinations and a combination of electronic, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques for structure elucidation. In order to evaluate the effect of metal ions upon chelation, both the ligands and their complexes have been screened for their antimicrobial activity against the various pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains. The metal complexes have shown to be more antimicrobial against the microbial species as compared to free ligands. One of the ligands, 5-chloro-3-(indolin-2-one)benzothiazoline and its corresponding palladium and platinum complexes have been tested for their antifertility activity in male albino rats. The marked reduction in sperm motility and density resulted in infertility by 62-90%. Significant alterations were found in biochemical parameters of reproductive organs in treated animals as compared to control group. It is concluded that all these effects may finally impair the fertility of male rats.

  20. A unified statistical model to support local sequence order independent similarity searching for ligand-binding sites and its application to genome-based drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lei; Xie, Li; Bourne, Philip E.

    2009-01-01

    Functional relationships between proteins that do not share global structure similarity can be established by detecting their ligand-binding-site similarity. For a large-scale comparison, it is critical to accurately and efficiently assess the statistical significance of this similarity. Here, we report an efficient statistical model that supports local sequence order independent ligand–binding-site similarity searching. Most existing statistical models only take into account the matching vertices between two sites that are defined by a fixed number of points. In reality, the boundary of the binding site is not known or is dependent on the bound ligand making these approaches limited. To address these shortcomings and to perform binding-site mapping on a genome-wide scale, we developed a sequence-order independent profile–profile alignment (SOIPPA) algorithm that is able to detect local similarity between unknown binding sites a priori. The SOIPPA scoring integrates geometric, evolutionary and physical information into a unified framework. However, this imposes a significant challenge in assessing the statistical significance of the similarity because the conventional probability model that is based on fixed-point matching cannot be applied. Here we find that scores for binding-site matching by SOIPPA follow an extreme value distribution (EVD). Benchmark studies show that the EVD model performs at least two-orders faster and is more accurate than the non-parametric statistical method in the previous SOIPPA version. Efficient statistical analysis makes it possible to apply SOIPPA to genome-based drug discovery. Consequently, we have applied the approach to the structural genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to construct a protein–ligand interaction network. The network reveals highly connected proteins, which represent suitable targets for promiscuous drugs. Contact: lxie@sdsc.edu PMID:19478004

  1. Ligand-independent canonical Wnt activity in canine mammary tumor cell lines associated with aberrant LEF1 expression.

    PubMed

    Gracanin, Ana; Timmermans-Sprang, Elpetra P M; van Wolferen, Monique E; Rao, Nagesha A S; Grizelj, Juraj; Vince, Silvijo; Hellmen, Eva; Mol, Jan A

    2014-01-01

    Pet dogs very frequently develop spontaneous mammary tumors and have been suggested as a good model organism for breast cancer research. In order to obtain an insight into underlying signaling mechanisms during canine mammary tumorigenesis, in this study we assessed the incidence and the mechanism of canonical Wnt activation in a panel of 12 canine mammary tumor cell lines. We show that a subset of canine mammary cell lines exhibit a moderate canonical Wnt activity that is dependent on Wnt ligands, similar to what has been described in human breast cancer cell lines. In addition, three of the tested canine mammary cell lines have a high canonical Wnt activity that is not responsive to inhibitors of Wnt ligand secretion. Tumor cell lines with highly active canonical Wnt signaling often carry mutations in key members of the Wnt signaling cascade. These cell lines, however, carry no mutations in the coding regions of intracellular Wnt pathway components (APC, β-catenin, GSK3β, CK1α and Axin1) and have a functional β-catenin destruction complex. Interestingly, however, the cell lines with high canonical Wnt activity specifically overexpress LEF1 mRNA and the knock-down of LEF1 significantly inhibits TCF-reporter activity. In addition, LEF1 is overexpressed in a subset of canine mammary carcinomas, implicating LEF1 in ligand-independent activation of canonical Wnt signaling in canine mammary tumors. We conclude that canonical Wnt activation may be a frequent event in canine mammary tumors both through Wnt ligand-dependent and novel ligand-independent mechanisms.

  2. Ligand-independent canonical Wnt activity in canine mammary tumor cell lines associated with aberrant LEF1 expression.

    PubMed

    Gracanin, Ana; Timmermans-Sprang, Elpetra P M; van Wolferen, Monique E; Rao, Nagesha A S; Grizelj, Juraj; Vince, Silvijo; Hellmen, Eva; Mol, Jan A

    2014-01-01

    Pet dogs very frequently develop spontaneous mammary tumors and have been suggested as a good model organism for breast cancer research. In order to obtain an insight into underlying signaling mechanisms during canine mammary tumorigenesis, in this study we assessed the incidence and the mechanism of canonical Wnt activation in a panel of 12 canine mammary tumor cell lines. We show that a subset of canine mammary cell lines exhibit a moderate canonical Wnt activity that is dependent on Wnt ligands, similar to what has been described in human breast cancer cell lines. In addition, three of the tested canine mammary cell lines have a high canonical Wnt activity that is not responsive to inhibitors of Wnt ligand secretion. Tumor cell lines with highly active canonical Wnt signaling often carry mutations in key members of the Wnt signaling cascade. These cell lines, however, carry no mutations in the coding regions of intracellular Wnt pathway components (APC, β-catenin, GSK3β, CK1α and Axin1) and have a functional β-catenin destruction complex. Interestingly, however, the cell lines with high canonical Wnt activity specifically overexpress LEF1 mRNA and the knock-down of LEF1 significantly inhibits TCF-reporter activity. In addition, LEF1 is overexpressed in a subset of canine mammary carcinomas, implicating LEF1 in ligand-independent activation of canonical Wnt signaling in canine mammary tumors. We conclude that canonical Wnt activation may be a frequent event in canine mammary tumors both through Wnt ligand-dependent and novel ligand-independent mechanisms. PMID:24887235

  3. Metal-ligand cooperation by aromatization-dearomatization: a new paradigm in bond activation and "green" catalysis.

    PubMed

    Gunanathan, Chidambaram; Milstein, David

    2011-08-16

    In view of global concerns regarding the environment and sustainable energy resources, there is a strong need for the discovery of new, green catalytic reactions. For this purpose, fresh approaches to catalytic design are desirable. In recent years, complexes based on "cooperating" ligands have exhibited remarkable catalytic activity. These ligands cooperate with the metal center by undergoing reversible structural changes in the processes of substrate activation and product formation. We have discovered a new mode of metal-ligand cooperation, involving aromatization-dearomatization of ligands. Pincer-type ligands based on pyridine or acridine exhibit such cooperation, leading to unusual bond activation processes and to novel, environmentally benign catalysis. Bond activation takes place with no formal change in the metal oxidation state, and so far the activation of H-H, C-H (sp(2) and sp(3)), O-H, and N-H bonds has been demonstrated. Using this approach, we have demonstrated a unique water splitting process, which involves consecutive thermal liberation of H(2) and light-induced liberation of O(2), using no sacrificial reagents, promoted by a pyridine-based pincer ruthenium complex. An acridine pincer complex displays unique "long-range" metal-ligand cooperation in the activation of H(2) and in reaction with ammonia. In this Account, we begin by providing an overview of the metal-ligand cooperation based on aromatization-dearomatization processes. We then describe a range of novel catalytic reactions that we developed guided by these new modes of metal-ligand cooperation. These reactions include the following: (1) acceptorless dehydrogenation of secondary alcohols to ketones, (2) acceptorless dehydrogenative coupling of alcohols to esters, (3) acylation of secondary alcohols by esters with dihydrogen liberation, (4) direct coupling of alcohols and amines to form amides and polyamides with liberation of dihydrogen, (5) coupling of esters and amines to form amides

  4. Quantitative, directional measurement of electric field heterogeneity in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase.

    PubMed

    Fafarman, Aaron T; Sigala, Paul A; Schwans, Jason P; Fenn, Timothy D; Herschlag, Daniel; Boxer, Steven G

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the electrostatic forces and features within highly heterogeneous, anisotropic, and chemically complex enzyme active sites and their connection to biological catalysis remains a longstanding challenge, in part due to the paucity of incisive experimental probes of electrostatic properties within proteins. To quantitatively assess the landscape of electrostatic fields at discrete locations and orientations within an enzyme active site, we have incorporated site-specific thiocyanate vibrational probes into multiple positions within bacterial ketosteroid isomerase. A battery of X-ray crystallographic, vibrational Stark spectroscopy, and NMR studies revealed electrostatic field heterogeneity of 8 MV/cm between active site probe locations and widely differing sensitivities of discrete probes to common electrostatic perturbations from mutation, ligand binding, and pH changes. Electrostatic calculations based on active site ionization states assigned by literature precedent and computational pK(a) prediction were unable to quantitatively account for the observed vibrational band shifts. However, electrostatic models of the D40N mutant gave qualitative agreement with the observed vibrational effects when an unusual ionization of an active site tyrosine with a pK(a) near 7 was included. UV-absorbance and (13)C NMR experiments confirmed the presence of a tyrosinate in the active site, in agreement with electrostatic models. This work provides the most direct measure of the heterogeneous and anisotropic nature of the electrostatic environment within an enzyme active site, and these measurements provide incisive benchmarks for further developing accurate computational models and a foundation for future tests of electrostatics in enzymatic catalysis.

  5. Activation of human 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptors via an allosteric transmembrane site.

    PubMed

    Lansdell, Stuart J; Sathyaprakash, Chaitra; Doward, Anne; Millar, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    In common with other members of the Cys-loop family of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptors (5-HT3Rs) are activated by the binding of a neurotransmitter to an extracellular orthosteric site, located at the interface of two adjacent receptor subunits. In addition, a variety of compounds have been identified that modulate agonist-evoked responses of 5-HT3Rs, and other Cys-loop receptors, by binding to distinct allosteric sites. In this study, we examined the pharmacological effects of a group of monoterpene compounds on recombinant 5-HT3Rs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Two phenolic monoterpenes (carvacrol and thymol) display allosteric agonist activity on human homomeric 5-HT3ARs (64 ± 7% and 80 ± 4% of the maximum response evoked by the endogenous orthosteric agonist 5-HT, respectively). In addition, at lower concentrations, where agonist effects are less apparent, carvacrol and thymol act as potentiators of responses evoked by submaximal concentrations of 5-HT. By contrast, carvacrol and thymol have no agonist or potentiating activity on the closely related mouse 5-HT3ARs. Using subunit chimeras containing regions of the human and mouse 5-HT3A subunits, and by use of site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified transmembrane amino acids that either abolish the agonist activity of carvacrol and thymol on human 5-HT3ARs or are able to confer this property on mouse 5-HT3ARs. By contrast, these mutations have no significant effect on orthosteric activation of 5-HT3ARs by 5-HT. We conclude that 5-HT3ARs can be activated by the binding of ligands to an allosteric transmembrane site, a conclusion that is supported by computer docking studies. PMID:25338672

  6. Molecular simulations of β-lactoglobulin complexed with fatty acids reveal the structural basis of ligand affinity to internal and possible external binding sites.

    PubMed

    Evoli, Stefania; Guzzi, Rita; Rizzuti, Bruno

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of saturated fatty acids of different length (C8:0 to C18:0) with β-lactoglobulin (βLG) was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation and docking approaches. The results show that the presence of such ligands in the hydrophobic central cavity of βLG, known as the protein calyx, determines an enhancement of atomic fluctuations compared with the unliganded form, especially for loops at the entrance of the binding site. Concerted motions are evidenced for protein regions that could favor the binding of ligands. The mechanism of anchoring of fatty acids of different length is similar for the carboxylate head-group, through electrostatic interactions with the side chains of Lys60/Lys69. The key protein residues to secure the hydrocarbon chain are Phe105/Met107, which adapt their conformation upon ligand binding. In particular, Phe105 provides an additional hydrophobic clamp only for the tail of the two fatty acids with the longest chains, palmitic, and stearic acid, which are known to bind βLG with a high affinity. The search of additional external binding sites for fatty acids, distinct from the calyx, was also carried out for palmitic acid. Two external sites with a lower affinity were identified as secondary sites, one consisting in a hydrophobic cavity allowing two distinct binding modes for the fatty acid, and the other corresponding to a surface crevice close to the protein α-helix. The overall results provide a comprehensive picture of the dynamical behavior of βLG in complex with fatty acids, and elucidate the structural basis of the binding of these physiological ligands.

  7. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structures and catecholase activity investigation of new chalcone ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thabti, Salima; Djedouani, Amel; Rahmouni, Samra; Touzani, Rachid; Bendaas, Abderrahmen; Mousser, Hénia; Mousser, Abdelhamid

    2015-12-01

    The reaction of dehydroacetic acid DHA carboxaldehyde and RCHO derivatives (R = quinoleine-8-; indole-3-; pyrrol-2- and 4-(dimethylamino)phenyl - afforded four new chalcone ligands (4-hydroxy-6-methyl-3-[(2E)-3-quinolin-8-ylprop-2-enoyl]-2H-pyran-2-one) L1, (4-hydroxy-3-[(2E)-3-(1H-indol-3-yl)prop-2-enoyl]-6-methyl-2H-pyran-2-one) L2, (4-hydroxy-6-methyl-3-[(2E)-3-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)prop-2-enoyl]-2H-pyran-2-one) L3, and (3-{(2E)-3-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]prop-2-enoyl}-4-hydroxy-6-methyl-2H-pyran-2-one) L4. L3 and L4 were characterized by X-ray crystallography. Molecules crystallize with four and two molecules in the asymmetric unit, respectively and adopt an E conformation about the Cdbnd C bond. Both structures are stabilized by an extended network O-H … O. Furthermore, N-H … O and C-H … O hydrogen bonds are observed in L3 and L4 structures, respectively. The in situ generated copper (II) complexes of the four compounds L1, L2, L3 and L4 were examined for their catalytic activities and were found to catalyze the oxidation reaction of catechol to o-quinone under atmospheric dioxygen. The rates of this oxidation depend on three parameters: ligand, ion salts and solvent nature and the combination L2[Cu (CH3COO)2] leads to the faster catalytic process.

  8. Dendritic cell exosomes directly kill tumor cells and activate natural killer cells via TNF superfamily ligands

    PubMed Central

    Munich, Stephan; Sobo-Vujanovic, Andrea; Buchser, William J.; Beer-Stolz, Donna; Vujanovic, Nikola L.

    2012-01-01

    Autocrine and paracrine cell communication can be conveyed by multiple mediators, including membrane-associate proteins, secreted proteins and exosomes. Exosomes are 30–100 nm endosome-derived vesicles consisting in cytosolic material surrounded by a lipid bilayer containing transmembrane proteins. We have previously shown that dendritic cells (DCs) express on their surface multiple TNF superfamily ligands (TNFSFLs), by which they can induce the apoptotic demise of tumor cells as well as the activation of natural killer (NK) cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that, similar to DCs, DC-derived exosomes (DCex) express on their surface TNF, FasL and TRAIL, by which they can trigger caspase activation and apoptosis in tumor cells. We also show that DCex activate NK cells and stimulate them to secrete interferonγ (IFNγ) upon the interaction of DCex TNF with NK-cell TNF receptors. These data demonstrate that DCex can mediate essential innate immune functions that were previously ascribed to DCs. PMID:23170255

  9. Voltammetric determination of ruthenium in the form of complexes with biologically active ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Medyantseva, E.P.; Budnikov, G.K.; Balakaeva, T.A.

    1992-02-10

    The interest in the analytical chemistry of ruthenium and its compounds has recently been increasing. Ruthenium compounds can be used an antitumor agents and in the treatment of tuberculosis and fungal infections. It has been suggested that there is a specific relationship between the reduction potentials of the compounds and their biological activity. Of greatest interest among the biologically active compounds are the compounds with nitrogen-containing heterocycles. In order to obtain information on the degree of oxidation of the central atom in the complexes and to select the optimum conditions for the determination of the mono- and bi-nuclear complexes of ruthenium compounds with biologically active ligands such as imidazole (Im), histidine (His), benzimidazole (BIm) and its methyl derivative [1,2(CH{sub 3}){sub 2} - BIm], benzohyroxamic acid (Bha), and 1-phenyl-2-methylamino-1-propanol or ephedrine (Eph) in the present work, the authors studied their electrochemical behavior at dropping mercury (dme) and a platinum electrodes. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. Human Collagen Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Is Activated by Ligands for Its Iron Center.

    PubMed

    Vasta, James D; Raines, Ronald T

    2016-06-14

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. The posttranslational hydroxylation of proline residues in collagen contributes greatly to its conformational stability. Deficient hydroxylation is associated with a variety of disease states, including scurvy. The hydroxylation of proline residues in collagen is catalyzed by an Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase (CP4H). CP4H has long been known to suffer oxidative inactivation during catalysis, and the cofactor ascorbate (vitamin C) is required to reactivate the enzyme by reducing its iron center from Fe(III) to Fe(II). Herein, we report on the discovery of the first synthetic activators of CP4H. Specifically, we find that 2,2'-bipyridine-4-carboxylate and 2,2'-bipyridine-5-carboxylate serve as ligands for the iron center in human CP4H that enhance the rate of ascorbate-dependent reactivation. This new mode of CP4H activation is available to other biheteroaryl compounds but does not necessarily extend to other prolyl 4-hydroxylases. As collagen is weakened in many indications, analogous activators of CP4H could have therapeutic benefits. PMID:27183028

  11. Flexibility of active-site gorge aromatic residues and non-gorge aromatic residues in acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Ghattyvenkatakrishna, Pavan K; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    The presence of an unusually large number of aromatic residues in the active site gorge of acetylcholinesterase has been a topic of great interest. Flexibility of these residues has been suspected to be a key player in controlling ligand traversal in the gorge. This raises the question of whether the over representation of aromatic residues in the gorge implies higher than normal flexibility of those residues. The current study suggests that it does not. Large changes in the hydrophobic cross sectional area due to dihedral oscillations are probably the reason behind their presence in the gorge.

  12. Binding hotspots on K-ras: consensus ligand binding sites and other reactive regions from probe-based molecular dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Priyanka; Hancock, John F; Gorfe, Alemayehu A

    2015-05-01

    We have used probe-based molecular dynamics (pMD) simulations to search for interaction hotspots on the surface of the therapeutically highly relevant oncogenic K-Ras G12D. Combining the probe-based query with an ensemble-based pocket identification scheme and an analysis of existing Ras-ligand complexes, we show that (i) pMD is a robust and cost-effective strategy for binding site identification, (ii) all four of the previously reported ligand binding sites are suitable for structure-based ligand design, and (iii) in some cases probe binding and expanded sampling of configurational space enable pocket expansion and increase the likelihood of site identification. Furthermore, by comparing the distribution of hotspots in nonpocket-like regions with known protein- and membrane-interacting interfaces, we propose that pMD has the potential to predict surface patches responsible for protein-biomolecule interactions. These observations have important implications for future drug design efforts and will facilitate the search for potential interfaces responsible for the proposed transient oligomerization or interaction of Ras with other biomolecules in the cellular milieu.

  13. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and antimicrobial activity of mono-, bi- and tri-nuclear metal complexes of a new Schiff base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebl, Magdy; Khalil, Saied M. E.; Ahmed, Saleh A.; Medien, Hesham A. A.

    2010-09-01

    Condensation of o-acetoacetylphenol and 1,2-diaminopropane in 1:1 molar ratio under condition of high dilution yielded the mono-condensed dibasic Schiff base ligand with a N 2O 2 donors. The mono-condensed ligand has been used for further condensation with 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzaldehyde to obtain the new asymmetrical dicompartmental Schiff base ligand, H 3L, with N 2O 3 donors. The structure of the ligand was elucidated by analytical and spectroscopic tools (IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectra) which indicated that the coordinating sites are oxygen atoms of the phenolic OH groups, nitrogen atoms of the azomethine groups and the oxygen atom of the ketonic group. Reactions of the ligand with metal salts yielded mono- and homo-bi-nuclear complexes formulated as [M(HL)], where M dbnd Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II), [Fe(H 2L)Cl 2(H 2O)]ṡ2½H 2O, [Fe 2(HL)(ox)Cl 3(H 2O) 2]ṡ5H 2O, [UO 2(H 2L)(OAc)(H 2O) 2], [VO(H 3L)(SO 4)(H 2O)]ṡH 2O, [M 2(L)Cl(H 2O) 2]ṡ½H 2O, where M dbnd Co(II) and Ni(II) and [Cu(H 2L)Cl]. The mononuclear Ni(II) complex, [Ni(HL)], was used to synthesize homo- and hetero-bi- and tri-nuclear complexes with the molecular formulae [Ni 2(L)Cl(H 2O) 2], [Ni 2(L) 2FeCl(H 2O)]ṡH 2O and [Ni 2(HL) 2CoCl 2]. The structures of the complexes were characterized by various techniques such as elemental and thermal analyses, IR, 1H and 13C NMR, mass and electronic spectra as well as conductivity and magnetic moment measurements. Square-planar and octahedral geometries are suggested for the Cu(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes, octahedral geometry for the Fe(III) and VO 2+ complexes while uranium(VI) ion is octa-coordinated in its complex. The Schiff base and its metal complexes were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria ( Staphylococcus aureus), Gram negative bacteria ( Escherichia coli) and fungi ( Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus). The ligand and some of its complexes were found to be biologically active.

  14. Design of a Water Soluble Fluorescent 3-Hydroxy-4-Pyridinone Ligand Active at Physiological pH Values.

    PubMed

    Leite, Andreia; Silva, Ana M G; Coutinho, Catarina; Cunha-Silva, Luís; de Castro, Baltazar; Rangel, Maria

    2016-09-01

    In the present work we report the structure and the spectroscopic characterization of a new fluorescent 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone ligand D-3,4-HPO. The synthesis of the compound was performed in two steps, which involve the reaction of the commercially available fluorophore dansyl chloride with a 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone chelating unit and further deprotection. The new fluorescent chelator was characterized in the solid state by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and in solution by NMR, MS, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies. The analysis of the variation of the absorption spectrum with pH allowed the determination of four pK a values (pK a1  = 3.50, pK a2  = 4.50, pK a3  = 9.60, pK a4  = 10.20) and establishment of the corresponding distribution diagram. The study of the fluorescence properties of the ligand show that in the pH range between 4 and 9 the fluorescence intensity is constant and has its maximum value thus allowing its further use at physiological pH values. The interaction of the ligand with copper(II) was accessed by fluorescence spectroscopy in MOPS buffer and the results show that the presence of copper(II) quenches the fluorescence of the ligand in ca 94 % at a ligand: metal ratio of 2:1. The latter result is consistent with the formation of a copper(II) complex with the bidentate ligand, as confirmed by the EPR spectroscopy. Graphical Abstract New water soluble fluorescent ligand active at physiological pH values. PMID:27357392

  15. Design of a Water Soluble Fluorescent 3-Hydroxy-4-Pyridinone Ligand Active at Physiological pH Values.

    PubMed

    Leite, Andreia; Silva, Ana M G; Coutinho, Catarina; Cunha-Silva, Luís; de Castro, Baltazar; Rangel, Maria

    2016-09-01

    In the present work we report the structure and the spectroscopic characterization of a new fluorescent 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone ligand D-3,4-HPO. The synthesis of the compound was performed in two steps, which involve the reaction of the commercially available fluorophore dansyl chloride with a 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone chelating unit and further deprotection. The new fluorescent chelator was characterized in the solid state by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and in solution by NMR, MS, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies. The analysis of the variation of the absorption spectrum with pH allowed the determination of four pK a values (pK a1  = 3.50, pK a2  = 4.50, pK a3  = 9.60, pK a4  = 10.20) and establishment of the corresponding distribution diagram. The study of the fluorescence properties of the ligand show that in the pH range between 4 and 9 the fluorescence intensity is constant and has its maximum value thus allowing its further use at physiological pH values. The interaction of the ligand with copper(II) was accessed by fluorescence spectroscopy in MOPS buffer and the results show that the presence of copper(II) quenches the fluorescence of the ligand in ca 94 % at a ligand: metal ratio of 2:1. The latter result is consistent with the formation of a copper(II) complex with the bidentate ligand, as confirmed by the EPR spectroscopy. Graphical Abstract New water soluble fluorescent ligand active at physiological pH values.

  16. Current Challenges for Modeling Enzyme Active Sites by Biomimetic Synthetic Diiron Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Friedle, Simone; Reisner, Erwin; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    This tutorial review describes recent progress in modeling the active sites of carboxylate-rich non-heme diiron enzymes that activate dioxygen to carry out several key reactions in nature. The chemistry of soluble methane monooxygenase, which catalyzes the selective oxidation of methane to methanol, is of particular interest for (bio)technological applications. Novel synthetic diiron complexes that mimic structural, and, to a lesser extent, functional features of these diiron enzymes are discussed. The chemistry of the enzymes is also briefly summarized. A particular focus of this review is on models that mimic characteristics of the diiron systems that were previously not emphasized, including systems that contain (i) aqua ligands, (ii) different substrates tethered to the ligand framework, (iii) dendrimers attached to carboxylates to mimic the protein environment, (iv) two N-donors in a syn-orientation with respect to the iron-iron vector, and (v) a N-rich ligand environment capable of accessing oxygenated high-valent diiron intermediates. PMID:20485834

  17. Outside-binding site mutations modify the active site's shapes in neuraminidase from influenza A H1N1.

    PubMed

    Tolentino-Lopez, Luis; Segura-Cabrera, Aldo; Reyes-Loyola, Paola; Zimic, Mirko; Quiliano, Miguel; Briz, Veronica; Muñoz-Fernández, Angeles; Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario; Ilizaliturri-Flores, Ian; Correa-Basurto, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The recent occurrence of 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic as well as others has raised concern of a far more dangerous outcome should this virus becomes resistant to current drug therapies. The number of clinical cases that are resistant to oseltamivir (Tamiflu®) is larger than the limited number of neuraminidase (NA) mutations (H275Y, N295S, and I223R) that have been identified at the active site and that are associated to oseltamivir resistance. In this study, we have performed a comparative analysis between a set of NAs that have the most representative mutations located outside the active site. The recently crystallized NA-oseltamivir complex (PDB ID: 3NSS) was used as a wild-type structure. After selecting the target NA sequences, their three-dimensional (3D) structure was built using 3NSS as a template by homology modeling. The 3D NA models were refined by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The refined models were used to perform a docking study, using oseltamivir as a ligand. Furthermore, the docking results were refined by free-energy analysis using the MM-PBSA method. The analysis of the MD simulation results showed that the NA models reached convergence during the first 10 ns. Visual inspection and structural measures showed that the mutated NA active sites show structural variations. The docking and MM-PBSA results from the complexes showed different binding modes and free energy values. These results suggest that distant mutations located outside the active site of NA affect its structure and could be considered to be a new source of resistance to oseltamivir, which agrees with reports in the clinical literature.

  18. Targeting Large Kinase Active Site with Rigid, Bulky Octahedral Ruthenium Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimoska, Jasna; Feng, Li; Harms, Klaus; Yi, Chunling; Kissil, Joseph; Marmorstein, Ronen; Meggers, Eric

    2009-09-02

    A strategy for targeting protein kinases with large ATP-binding sites by using bulky and rigid octahedral ruthenium complexes as structural scaffolds is presented. A highly potent and selective GSK3 and Pim1 half-sandwich complex NP309 was successfully converted into a PAK1 inhibitor by making use of the large octahedral compounds {Lambda}-FL172 and {Lambda}-FL411 in which the cyclopentadienyl moiety of NP309 is replaced by a chloride and sterically demanding diimine ligands. A 1.65 {angstrom}cocrystal structure of PAK1 with {Lambda}-FL172 reveals how the large coordination sphere of the ruthenium complex matches the size of the active site and serves as a yardstick to discriminate between otherwise closely related binding sites.

  19. Catalytic dioxygen activation by Co(II) complexes employing a coordinatively versatile ligand scaffold.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Savita K; May, Philip S; Jones, Matthew B; Lense, Sheri; Hardcastle, Kenneth I; MacBeth, Cora E

    2011-02-14

    The ligand bis(2-isobutyrylamidophenyl)amine has been prepared and used to stabilize both mononuclear and dinuclear cobalt(II) complexes. The nuclearity of the cobalt product is regulated by the deprotonation state of the ligand. Both complexes catalytically oxidize triphenylphosphine to triphenylphosphine oxide in the presence of O(2).

  20. Dissecting the active site of a photoreceptor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Wouter; Hara, Miwa; Ren, Jie; Moghadam, Farzaneh; Xie, Aihua; Kumauchi, Masato

    While enzymes are quite large molecules, functionally important chemical events are often limited to a small region of the protein: the active site. The physical and chemical properties of residues at such active sites are often strongly altered compared to the same groups dissolved in water. Understanding such effects is important for unraveling the mechanisms underlying protein function and for protein engineering, but has proven challenging. Here we report on our ongoing efforts on using photoactive yellow protein (PYP), a bacterial photoreceptor, as a model system for such effects. We will report on the following questions: How many residues affect active site properties? Are these residues in direct physical contact with the active site? Can functionally important residues be recognized in the crystal structure of a protein? What structural resolution is needed to understand active sites? What spectroscopic techniques are most informative? Which weak interactions dominate active site properties?

  1. Activity landscape modeling of PPAR ligands with dual-activity difference maps.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Lucio, Oscar; Pérez-Villanueva, Jaime; Castillo, Rafael; Medina-Franco, José L

    2012-06-01

    Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) subtypes offers a promising strategy for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and metabolic diseases. Selective and dual PPAR agonists have been developed and the systematic characterization of their structure-activity relationships (SAR) is of major significance. Herein, we report a systematic description of the SAR of 168 compounds screened against the three PPAR subtypes using the principles of activity landscape modeling. As part of our effort to develop and apply chemoinformatic tools to navigate through activity landscapes, we employed consensus dual-activity difference maps recently reported. The analysis is based on pairwise relationships of potency difference and structure-similarity which were calculated from the combination of four different 2D and 3D structure representations. Dual-activity difference maps uncovered regions in the landscape with similar SAR for two or three receptor subtypes as well as regions with inverse SAR, that is, changes in structure that increase activity for one subtype but decrease activity for the other subtype. Analysis of pairs of compounds with high structure similarity revealed the presence of single-, dual-, and 'pan-receptor' activity cliffs, that is, small changes in structure with high changes in potency for one, two, or three receptor subtypes, respectively. Single-, dual-, and pan-receptor scaffold hops are also discussed. The analysis of the chemical structures of selected data points reported in this paper points to specific structural features that are helpful for the design of new PPAR agonists. The approach presented in this work is general and can be extended to analyze larger data sets. PMID:22564380

  2. The Extracellular Loop 2 (ECL2) of the Human Histamine H4 Receptor Substantially Contributes to Ligand Binding and Constitutive Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wifling, David; Bernhardt, Günther; Dove, Stefan; Buschauer, Armin

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the corresponding mouse and rat orthologs, the human histamine H4 receptor (hH4R) shows extraordinarily high constitutive activity. In the extracellular loop (ECL), replacement of F169 by V as in the mouse H4R significantly reduced constitutive activity. Stabilization of the inactive state was even more pronounced for a double mutant, in which, in addition to F169V, S179 in the ligand binding site was replaced by M. To study the role of the FF motif in ECL2, we generated the hH4R-F168A mutant. The receptor was co-expressed in Sf9 insect cells with the G-protein subunits Gαi2 and Gβ1γ2, and the membranes were studied in [3H]histamine binding and functional [35S]GTPγS assays. The potency of various ligands at the hH4R-F168A mutant decreased compared to the wild-type hH4R, for example by 30- and more than 100-fold in case of the H4R agonist UR-PI376 and histamine, respectively. The high constitutive activity of the hH4R was completely lost in the hH4R-F168A mutant, as reflected by neutral antagonism of thioperamide, a full inverse agonist at the wild-type hH4R. By analogy, JNJ7777120 was a partial inverse agonist at the hH4R, but a partial agonist at the hH4R-F168A mutant, again demonstrating the decrease in constitutive activity due to F168A mutation. Thus, F168 was proven to play a key role not only in ligand binding and potency, but also in the high constitutive activity of the hH4R. PMID:25629160

  3. Using low-frequency IR spectra for the unambiguous identification of metal ion-ligand coordination sites in purpose-built complexes.

    PubMed

    Varga, Gábor; Csendes, Zita; Peintler, Gábor; Berkesi, Ottó; Sipos, Pál; Pálinkó, István

    2014-03-25

    One of the aims of our long-term research is the identification of metal ion-ligand coordination sites in bioinspired metal ion-C- or N-protected amino acid (histidine, tyrosine, cysteine or cystine) complexes immobilised on the surface of chloropropylated silica gel or Merrifield resin. In an attempt to reach this goal, structurally related, but much simpler complexes have been prepared and their metal ion-ligand vibrations were determined from their low-frequency IR spectra. The central ions were Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) or Cu(II) and the ligands (imidazole, isopropylamine, monosodium malonate) were chosen to possess only one-type of potential donor group. The low-frequency IR spectra were taken of the complexes for each ion-ligand combination and the typical metal ion-functional group vibration bands were selected and identified. The usefulness of the obtained assignments is demonstrated on exemplary immobilised metal ion-protected amino acid complexes.

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma ligands induce growth inhibition and apoptosis of human B lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zang, Chuanbing; Liu, Hongyu; Posch, Maximilian G; Waechter, Maries; Facklam, Margit; Fenner, Martin H; Ruthardt, Martin; Possinger, Kurt; Phillip Koeffler, H; Elstner, Elena

    2004-04-01

    This study examined the expression and structural intactness of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) in human acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) cells and determined the effect of PPARgamma ligands on growth and apoptosis of these cells. We noted that all lymphocytic leukemia cell lines expressed PPARgamma and no PPARgamma mutations were found in these cell lines as indicated by SSCP analysis. Effect of the PPARgamma ligands on the proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of B type ALL cells was further examined. Treatment of these cells with the PPARgamma ligands Pioglitazone (PGZ) and 15-deoxy-delta (12,14)-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) resulted in growth inhibition in a dose-dependent manner which was associated with a G1 to S cell cycle arrest. However, this effect appeared to be PPARgamma-independent since several PPARgamma antagonists could not reverse this effect. No differentiation was induced by this treatment. Four out of five cell lines underwent apoptosis after culture with the PPARgamma ligands. This effect was partially caspase-dependent because a pan-caspase inhibitor partially reversed this effect. In conclusion, our results suggest that PPARgamma ligands may offer a new therapeutic approach to aid in the treatment of ALL. PMID:15109539

  5. Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial activity of 3d transition metal complexes of a biambidentate ligand containing quinoxaline moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantha Lakshmi, P. V.; Reddy, P. Saritha; Raju, V. Jayatyaga

    2009-09-01

    A new series of oxovanadium(IV), chromium(III), manganese(II), iron(III), cobalt(II), nickel(II), and copper(II) complexes of the 3-hydrazino quinoxaline-2-one (HQO) were prepared and characterized. The ligand exhibits biambidenticity. It behaves as a bidentate ON donor in oxovanadium(IV), iron(III) and copper(II) complexes and as a bis bidentate ONNN donor in chromium(III), manganese(II), cobalt(II) and nickel(II) complexes. The nature of bonding and the stereochemistry of the complexes have been deduced from elemental analyses, thermal, infrared, 1H NMR, electronic spectra, magnetic susceptibility and conductivity measurements. An octahedral geometry was suggested for all the complexes. All the complexes show subnormal magnetic moments. The ligand, HQO, and its complexes were tested against one strain Gram +ve bacteria ( Staphylococcus aureus), Gram -ve bacteria ( Escherichia coli). The prepared metal complexes exhibited higher antimicrobial activities than the parent ligand.

  6. Volume-confined synthesis of ligand-free gold nanoparticles with tailored sizes for enhanced catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaik, Firdoz; Zhang, Weiqing; Niu, Wenxin; Lu, Xianmao

    2014-10-01

    Ligand-free Au nanoparticles with controlled sizes are synthesized via a volume-confined method. In this synthesis, mesoporous hollow silica shells (mHSS) are used as nano-containers for the impregnation of HAuCl4 solution before they are separated from the bulk solution. With a simple heating process, the Au precursor confined within the cavity of the isolated hollow shells is converted into ligand-free Au nanoparticles. The size of the Au nanoparticles can be tuned precisely by loading HAuCl4 solution of different concentrations, or by using mHSS with different cavity volumes. The ligand-free Au nanoparticles demonstrate superior catalytic activity than sodium citrate-capped Au nanoparticles.

  7. Elevated autocrine chemokine ligand 18 expression promotes oral cancer cell growth and invasion via Akt activation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yun; Wu, Tong; Chen, Xiaobing; Xia, Juan; Cheng, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 18 (CCL18) has been implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of various cancers; however, in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), the role of CCL18 is unknown. In this study, we found that CCL18 was overexpressed in primary OSCC tissues and was associated with an advanced clinical stage. CCL18 was found in both the cytoplasm and cell membrane of OSCC cells and was predominantly produced by cancer epithelial cells, as opposed to tumor-infiltrating macrophages. In vitro studies indicated that the effects of endogenous CCL18 on OSCC cell growth, migration, and invasion could be blocked by treatment with a neutralizing anti-CCL18 antibody or CCL18 knockdown, while exogenous recombinant CCL18 (rCCL18) rescued those effects. Akt was activated in rCCL18-treated OSCC cells, while LY294002, a pan-PI3K inhibitor, abolished both endogenous and exogenous CCL18-induced OSCC cell invasion. In vivo, LY294002 treatment attenuated rCCL18-induced OSCC cell growth. Our results indicate that CCL18 acts in an autocrine manner via Akt activation to stimulate OSCC cell growth and invasion during OSCC progression. They also provide a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of oral cancer. PMID:26919103

  8. Penile erectile activity of dinitrosyl iron complexes with thiol-containing ligands.

    PubMed

    Andreyev-Andriyevsky, Alexander A; Mikoyan, Vasak D; Serezhenkov, Vladimir A; Vanin, Anatoly F

    2011-05-31

    It has been established that intracavernous injections of water-soluble dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC) with glutathione or cysteine (0.4-6.0μmoles/kg) to male rats induce short-term (2-3 min) penile erection along with a short-term drop of arterial pressure and appearance of protein-bound DNIC in cavernous tissue and circulating blood. The duration of erection and the hypotensive activity of DNIC increase dramatically after simultaneous intracavernous injection of DNIC and the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor papaverine. Surgical denervation of cavernous bodies does not influence the erectile activity of DNIC. No penile erection takes place after intravenous (instead of intracavernous) injection of the same dose of DNIC; in this case, protein-bound DNIC are detected only in the blood. These findings suggest that water-soluble DNIC with thiol-containing ligands (cysteine or glutathione) can be used as a basis in the design of a novel class of drugs for treating erectile dysfunctions. PMID:21530670

  9. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program --now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human Exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines be opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  10. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program -- now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history. The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines the opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  11. Characterizing Active Site Conformational Heterogeneity along the Trajectory of an Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeymer, Cathleen; Werbeck, Nicolas D; Zimmermann, Sabine; Reinstein, Jochen; Hansen, D Flemming

    2016-09-12

    States along the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by the nucleoside monophosphate kinase UmpK were captured and changes in the conformational heterogeneity of conserved active site arginine side-chains were quantified by NMR spin-relaxation methods. In addition to apo and ligand-bound UmpK, a transition state analog (TSA) complex was utilized to evaluate the extent to which active site conformational entropy contributes to the transition state free energy. The catalytically essential arginine side-chain guanidino groups were found to be remarkably rigid in the TSA complex, indicating that the enzyme has evolved to restrict the conformational freedom along its reaction path over the energy landscape, which in turn allows the phosphoryl transfer to occur selectively by avoiding side reactions. PMID:27534930

  12. The selenium metabolite methylselenol regulates the expression of ligands that trigger immune activation through the lymphocyte receptor NKG2D.

    PubMed

    Hagemann-Jensen, Michael; Uhlenbrock, Franziska; Kehlet, Stephanie; Andresen, Lars; Gabel-Jensen, Charlotte; Ellgaard, Lars; Gammelgaard, Bente; Skov, Søren

    2014-11-01

    For decades, selenium research has been focused on the identification of active metabolites, which are crucial for selenium chemoprevention of cancer. In this context, the metabolite methylselenol (CH3SeH) is known for its action to selectively kill transformed cells through mechanisms that include increased formation of reactive oxygen species, induction of DNA damage, triggering of apoptosis, and inhibition of angiogenesis. Here we reveal that CH3SeH modulates the cell surface expression of NKG2D ligands. The expression of NKG2D ligands is induced by stress-associated pathways that occur early during malignant transformation and enable the recognition and elimination of tumors by activating the lymphocyte receptor NKG2D. CH3SeH regulated NKG2D ligands both on the transcriptional and the posttranscriptional levels. CH3SeH induced the transcription of MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence MICA/B and ULBP2 mRNA. However, the induction of cell surface expression was restricted to the ligands MICA/B. Remarkably, our studies showed that CH3SeH inhibited ULBP2 surface transport through inhibition of the autophagic transport pathway. Finally, we identified extracellular calcium as being essential for CH3SeH regulation of NKG2D ligands. A balanced cell surface expression of NKG2D ligands is considered to be an innate barrier against tumor development. Therefore, our work indicates that the application of selenium compounds that are metabolized to CH3SeH could improve NKG2D-based immune therapy. PMID:25258323

  13. New 15-membered tetraaza (N4) macrocyclic ligand and its transition metal complexes: Spectral, magnetic, thermal and anticancer activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Boraey, Hanaa A.; EL-Gammal, Ohyla A.

    2015-03-01

    Novel tetraamidemacrocyclic 15-membered ligand [L] i.e. naphthyl-dibenzo[1,5,9,12]tetraazacyclopentadecine-6,10,11,15-tetraoneand its transition metal complexes with Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Ru(III) and Pd(II) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, spectral, thermal as well as magnetic and molar conductivity measurements. On the basis of analytical, spectral (IR, MS, UV-Vis, 1H NMR and EPR) and thermal studies distorted octahedral or square planar geometry has been proposed for the complexes. The antitumor activity of the synthesized ligand and some complexes against human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7) and human hepatocarcinoma cell lines (HepG2) has been studied. The complexes (IC50 = 2.27-2.7, 8.33-31.1 μg/mL, respectively) showed potent antitumor activity, towards the former cell lines comparable with their ligand (IC50 = 13, 26 μg/mL, respectively). The results show that the activity of the ligand towards breast cancer cell line becomes more pronounced and significant when coordinated to the metal ion.

  14. A 25 kDa polypeptide is the ligand for p185neu and is secreted by activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tarakhovsky, A; Zaichuk, T; Prassolov, V; Butenko, Z A

    1991-12-01

    Medium conditioned by mouse peritoneal macrophages, activated by muramyl dipeptide (MDP), was used as a possible source of p185neu-specific ligand. MDP-activated macrophage-conditioned medium (MDP-CM) was shown to induce p185neu down-regulation in NEU-expressing NIH3T3 cells in a dose-dependent and temperature-sensitive manner. To exclude the possibility of an indirect action of proteins/metabolites present in MDP-CM on p185neu turnover, a ligand-trapping approach was used. Secreted NEU protein possessing only the extracellular domain but lacking transmembrane and protein kinase domains was expressed in HeLa cells and then purified from conditioned medium, using affinity chromatography on WGA-Sepharose. Co-incubation of the truncated, soluble NEU protein preparation with MDP-CM abolished MDP-CM-induced p185neu down-regulation and reduced self-phosphorylation. It is concluded that a putative p185neu-specific ligand is produced by macrophages activated by MDP. Using MDP-CM, the presence of a 25 kDa polypeptide distinct from EGF, PDGF, FGF, IGF, TGF-alpha and TGF-beta and TNF-alpha, could be demonstrated by decorating a Western blot with soluble NEU and anti-NEU antibodies. Thus, a 25 kDa (non-reduced) p185neu ligand has been described.

  15. How a redox-innocent metal promotes the formal reductive elimination of biphenyl using redox-active ligands.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Daniel Charles; Baik, Mu-Hyun

    2015-03-01

    One of the most compelling strategies for utilizing redox-active ligands is to perform redox events at the ligands to avoid accessing prohibitively high energy oxidation states at the metal center. This has been demonstrated experimentally in many systems, yet there is little understanding of the fundamental electronic structures involved with these transformations or how to control them. Here, the reductive elimination of biphenyl from [M(isq)2Ph2] (M = Ti, Zr, and Hf and isq = 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-tert-butyliminosemiquinone) was studied computationally. It was found that the metal remains in the +IV oxidation state and all redox chemistry was mediated by the redox-active ligands. Two types of electron-transfer mechanisms were identified, an asymmetric unpaired electron transfer (UET) and a symmetric pairwise electron transfer (PET), the former always being lower in energy. The energetic differences between these two mechanisms were explained through simple molecular orbital theory arguments. Despite the metal's redox-inactivity, it still has a marked influence on the calculated energetics of the reaction, with the Ti systems being much more reactive than the Zr/Hf systems. This primarily originates from the shorter Ti-Ph bond, which leads to a stronger filled-filled interaction between these ligands at the reactant state. This greater reactant destabilization leads to the lower activation energies.

  16. Activation of Inhibitors by Sortase Triggers Irreversible Modification of the Active Site*S

    PubMed Central

    Maresso, Anthony W.; Wu, Ruiying; Kern, Justin W.; Zhang, Rongguang; Janik, Dorota; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Schneewind, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Sortases anchor surface proteins to the cel