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Sample records for active site lysine

  1. An active-site lysine in avian liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase

    SciTech Connect

    Guidinger, P.F.; Nowak, T. )

    1991-09-10

    The participation of lysine in the catalysis by avian liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was studied by chemical modification and by a characterization of the modified enzyme. The rate of inactivation by 2,4-pentanedione is pseudo-first-order and linearly dependent on reagent concentration with a second-order rate constant of 0.36 {plus minus} 0.025 M{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}. Inactivation by pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate of the reversible reaction catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase follows bimolecular kinetics with a second-order rate constant of 7,700 {plus minus} 860 m{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}. Treatment of the enzyme or one lysine residue modified concomitant with 100% loss in activity. A stoichiometry of 1:1 is observed when either the reversible or the irreversible reactions catalyzed by the enzyme are monitored. A study of k{sub obs} vs pH suggests this active-site lysine has a pK{sub a} of 8.1 and a pH-independent rate constant of inactivation of 47,700 m{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}. Proton relaxation rate measurements suggest that pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate modification alters binding of the phosphate-containing substrates. {sup 31}P NMR relaxation rate measurements show altered binding of the substrates in the ternary enzyme {center dot}Mn{sup 2+}{center dot}substrate complex. Circular dichroism studies show little change in secondary structure of pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate modified phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. These results indicate that avian liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase has one reactive lysine at the active site and it is involved in the binding and activation of the phosphate-containing substrates.

  2. Function of the active site lysine autoacetylation in Tip60 catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Wu, Jiang; Zheng, Y George

    2012-01-01

    The 60-kDa HIV-Tat interactive protein (Tip60) is a key member of the MYST family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) that plays critical roles in multiple cellular processes. We report here that Tip60 undergoes autoacetylation at several lysine residues, including a key lysine residue (i.e. Lys-327) in the active site of the MYST domain. The mutation of K327 to arginine led to loss of both the autoacetylation activity and the cognate HAT activity. Interestingly, deacetylated Tip60 still kept a substantial degree of HAT activity. We also investigated the effect of cysteine 369 and glutamate 403 in Tip60 autoacetylation in order to understand the molecular pathway of the autoacetylation at K327. Together, we conclude that the acetylation of K327 which is located in the active site of Tip60 regulates but is not obligatory for the catalytic activity of Tip60. Since acetylation at this key residue appears to be evolutionarily conserved amongst all MYST proteins, our findings provide an interesting insight into the regulatory mechanism of MYST activities. PMID:22470428

  3. SET7/9 Catalytic Mutants Reveal the Role of Active Site Water Molecules in Lysine Multiple Methylation*

    PubMed Central

    Del Rizzo, Paul A.; Couture, Jean-François; Dirk, Lynnette M. A.; Strunk, Bethany S.; Roiko, Marijo S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Houtz, Robert L.; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2010-01-01

    SET domain lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) methylate specific lysine residues in histone and non-histone substrates. These enzymes also display product specificity by catalyzing distinct degrees of methylation of the lysine ϵ-amino group. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this specificity, we have characterized the Y245A and Y305F mutants of the human KMT SET7/9 (also known as KMT7) that alter its product specificity from a monomethyltransferase to a di- and a trimethyltransferase, respectively. Crystal structures of these mutants in complex with peptides bearing unmodified, mono-, di-, and trimethylated lysines illustrate the roles of active site water molecules in aligning the lysine ϵ-amino group for methyl transfer with S-adenosylmethionine. Displacement or dissociation of these solvent molecules enlarges the diameter of the active site, accommodating the increasing size of the methylated ϵ-amino group during successive methyl transfer reactions. Together, these results furnish new insights into the roles of active site water molecules in modulating lysine multiple methylation by SET domain KMTs and provide the first molecular snapshots of the mono-, di-, and trimethyl transfer reactions catalyzed by these enzymes. PMID:20675860

  4. Determination of lysine residues affinity labeled in the active site of yeast RNA polymerase II(B) by mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Treich, I; Carles, C; Sentenac, A; Riva, M

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study, yeast RNA polymerase II(B) was affinity labeled with two nucleotide derivatives (III and VIII) (1). In both cases, the labeled site was localized to the C-terminal part of the B150 subunit. The potential target lysyl residues of derivative III were mapped to the conserved domain H, between Asn946 and Met999. In the present work, we have mutagenized to arginine the five lysines present in domain H. Three lysines can be replaced, individually or simultaneously, without affecting cell growth, and each mutated enzyme can still be affinity labeled. Hence one or both of the other two lysyl residues, Lys979 and Lys987, is the target of the affinity reagent. These two lysines were each found to be essential for cell viability. Derivative VIII labeled another domain in addition to domain H. Supported by analogous results obtained for E. coli RNA polymerase using derivative VIII (2), we hypothesized that the second domain labeled by this derivative in the B150 subunit was domain I. Mutagenesis of the unique lysine present in domain I demonstrated that Lys 1102 was the target of derivative VIII. These results indicate that in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNA polymerases, domains H and I are in close proximity and participate to the active site. Images PMID:1408783

  5. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine

    PubMed Central

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO2. We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O2 and CO2 bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO2 defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg2+ surrounded by three H2O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming. PMID:23112176

  6. Mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by acetoacetate decarboxylase. Importance of lysine 116 in determining the pKa of active-site lysine 115.

    PubMed

    Highbarger, L A; Gerlt, J A; Kenyon, G L

    1996-01-01

    Acetoacetate decarboxylase from Clostridium acetobutylicum (AAD) catalyzes the decarboxylation of acetoacetate via a Schiff base intermediate [Hamilton, G. A., & Westheimer, F. H. (1959) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 81, 6332; Fridovich, I., & Westheimer F. H. (1962) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 84, 3208]. The pKa of the active-site lysine (Lys 115) is 6.0, 4.5 pKa units less than the pKa of lysine in solution [Kokesh, F. C., & Westheimer, F. H. (1971) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 93, 7270; Frey, P. A., Kokesh, F. C., & Westheimer, F. H. (1971) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 93, 7266; Schmidt, D. E., Jr., & Westheimer, F. H. (1971) Biochemistry 10, 1249]. Westheimer and co-workers hypothesized that the pKa of Lys 115 is decreased by its spatial proximity to the epsilon-ammonium group of Lys 116. We have investigated this proposal by studying site-directed mutants of Lys 115 and Lys 116. Two substitutions for Lys 115 (K115C and K115Q) were both catalytically inactive at pH 5.95, the pH optimum of wild type AAD, demonstrating the importance of this residue in catalysis. Activity could be restored to K115C by aminoethylation with 2-bromoethyl-ammonium bromide (2-BEAB). Substitutions for Lys 116 (K116C, K116N, and K116R) had reduced but significant activities at pH 5.95. The effects of Lys 116 on the pKa of Lys 115 in the mutant AADs were evaluated following imine formation with 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde and reduction with NaBH4. Whereas the pKa of Lys 115 in K116R is similar to that observed for wild type AAD, the pKaS of Lys 115 in K116C and K116N were elevated to > 9.2. Alkylation of Cys 116 in K116C with 2-BEAB resulted in both significant activation and restoration of the pKa of Lys 115 to 5.9. These data support Westheimer's hypothesis that the pKa of the Schiff base-forming Lys 115 is decreased by its spatial proximity to the epsilon-ammonium group of Lys 116. PMID:8555196

  7. Modification of residue 42 of the active site loop with a lysine-mimetic side chain rescues isochorismate-pyruvate lyase activity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PchB.

    PubMed

    Olucha, José; Meneely, Kathleen M; Lamb, Audrey L

    2012-09-25

    PchB is an isochorismate-pyruvate lyase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A positively charged lysine residue is located in a flexible loop that behaves as a lid to the active site, and the lysine residue is required for efficient production of salicylate. A variant of PchB that lacks the lysine at residue 42 has a reduced catalytic free energy of activation of up to 4.4 kcal/mol. Construction of a lysine isosteric residue bearing a positive charge at the appropriate position leads to the recovery of 2.5-2.7 kcal/mol (about 60%) of the 4.4 kcal/mol by chemical rescue. Exogenous addition of ethylamine to the K42A variant leads to a neglible recovery of activity (0.180 kcal/mol, roughly 7% rescue), whereas addition of propylamine caused an additional modest loss in catalytic power (0.056 kcal/mol, or 2% loss). This is consistent with the view that (a) the lysine-42 residue is required in a specific conformation to stabilize the transition state and (b) the correct conformation is achieved for a lysine-mimetic side chain at site 42 in the course of loop closure, as expected for transition-state stabilization by the side chain ammonio function. That the positive charge is the main effector of transition state stabilization is shown by the construction of a lysine-isosteric residue capable of exerting steric effects and hydrogen bonding but not electrostatic effects, leading to a modest increase of catalytic power (0.267-0.505 kcal/mol of catalytic free energy, or roughly 6-11% rescue). PMID:22970849

  8. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) Protein Regulates Long-chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase by Deacetylating Conserved Lysines Near the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Bharathi, Sivakama S.; Zhang, Yuxun; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Uppala, Radha; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Schreiber, Emanuel; Uechi, Guy; Beck, Megan E.; Rardin, Matthew J.; Vockley, Jerry; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W.; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2013-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) is a key mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation enzyme. We previously demonstrated increased LCAD lysine acetylation in SIRT3 knockout mice concomitant with reduced LCAD activity and reduced fatty acid oxidation. To study the effects of acetylation on LCAD and determine sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) target sites, we chemically acetylated recombinant LCAD. Acetylation impeded substrate binding and reduced catalytic efficiency. Deacetylation with recombinant SIRT3 partially restored activity. Residues Lys-318 and Lys-322 were identified as SIRT3-targeted lysines. Arginine substitutions at Lys-318 and Lys-322 prevented the acetylation-induced activity loss. Lys-318 and Lys-322 flank residues Arg-317 and Phe-320, which are conserved among all acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and coordinate the enzyme-bound FAD cofactor in the active site. We propose that acetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 causes a conformational change which reduces hydride transfer from substrate to FAD. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9, two related enzymes with lysines at positions equivalent to Lys-318/Lys-322, were also efficiently deacetylated by SIRT3 following chemical acetylation. These results suggest that acetylation/deacetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 is a mode of regulating fatty acid oxidation. The same mechanism may regulate other acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. PMID:24121500

  9. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) protein regulates long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase by deacetylating conserved lysines near the active site.

    PubMed

    Bharathi, Sivakama S; Zhang, Yuxun; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Uppala, Radha; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Schreiber, Emanuel; Uechi, Guy; Beck, Megan E; Rardin, Matthew J; Vockley, Jerry; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W; Hirschey, Matthew D; Goetzman, Eric S

    2013-11-22

    Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) is a key mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation enzyme. We previously demonstrated increased LCAD lysine acetylation in SIRT3 knockout mice concomitant with reduced LCAD activity and reduced fatty acid oxidation. To study the effects of acetylation on LCAD and determine sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) target sites, we chemically acetylated recombinant LCAD. Acetylation impeded substrate binding and reduced catalytic efficiency. Deacetylation with recombinant SIRT3 partially restored activity. Residues Lys-318 and Lys-322 were identified as SIRT3-targeted lysines. Arginine substitutions at Lys-318 and Lys-322 prevented the acetylation-induced activity loss. Lys-318 and Lys-322 flank residues Arg-317 and Phe-320, which are conserved among all acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and coordinate the enzyme-bound FAD cofactor in the active site. We propose that acetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 causes a conformational change which reduces hydride transfer from substrate to FAD. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9, two related enzymes with lysines at positions equivalent to Lys-318/Lys-322, were also efficiently deacetylated by SIRT3 following chemical acetylation. These results suggest that acetylation/deacetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 is a mode of regulating fatty acid oxidation. The same mechanism may regulate other acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. PMID:24121500

  10. Site-directed mutagenesis of Lysine{sup 382}, the activator-binding site, of ADP-Glucose pyrophosphorylase from Anabaena PCC 6120

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Jun; Charng, Yee-yung; Preiss, J.

    1996-03-05

    Previous studies have shown that a highly conserved lysyl residue (Lys{sup 419}) near the C-terminus of Anabaena ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is involved in the binding of 3-P-glycerate, the allosteric activator. Phosphopyridoxylation of the K419R mutant enzyme modified another conserved lysyl residue (Lys{sup 382}), suggesting that this residue might be also located within the activator-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of Lys{sup 382} of the Anabaena enzyme was performed to determine the role of this residue. Replacing Lys{sup 382} with either arginine, alanine, or glutamine produced mutant enzymes with apparent affinities for 3-P-glycerate 10-160-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme. The glutamic acid mutant enzyme was inhibited by 3-P-glycerate. These mutations had lesser impact on the kinetic constants for the substrates and inhibitor, P{sub i}, and on the thermal stability. These results indicate that both the charge and size of the residue at position 382 influence the binding of 3-P-glycerate. Site-directed mutagenesis was also performed to obtain a K382R-K419R double mutant. The apparent affinity for 3-P-glycerate of this double-mutant enzyme was 104-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme, and the specificity for activator of this mutant enzyme was altered. The K382R-K419R enzyme could not be phosphopyridoxylated, suggesting that other lysine residues are not involved in the binding of 3-P-glycerate. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Identification of essential active-site residues in ornithine decarboxylase of Nicotiana glutinosa decarboxylating both L-ornithine and L-lysine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y S; Cho, Y D

    2001-12-15

    The cDNA encoding ornithine decarboxylase (ODC; EC 4.1.1.17), a key enzyme in putrescine and polyamine biosynthesis, has been cloned from Nicotiana glutinosa (GenBank AF 323910), and was expressed in Escherichia coli. The amino acid sequence of N. glutinosa ODC showed 90% identity with Datura stramonium ODC, and 44% identity with human ODC. N. glutinosa ODC did not possess the PEST sequence [a sequence rich in proline (P), glutamic acid (E), serine (S) and threonine (T) residues] found in mammalian ODCs, which are thought to be involved in rapid degradation of the protein. The purified ODC was a homodimeric protein, having a native M(r) of 92000. Kinetic studies of ODC showed that N. glutinosa ODC decarboxylated both l-ornithine and l-lysine with K(m) values of 562 microM and 1592 microM at different optimal pH values of 8.0 and 6.8 respectively. ODC activity was completely and irreversibly inhibited by alpha-difluoromethylornithine (K(i) 1.15 microM), showing a competitive inhibition pattern. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed on ODC to introduce mutations at conserved lysine (Lys(95)) and cysteine (Cys(96), Cys(338) and Cys(377)) residues, chosen by examination of the conserved sequence, which were proven by chemical modification to be involved in enzymic activity. Except for Cys(96), each mutation caused a substantial loss in enzyme activity. Most notably, Lys(95) increased the K(m) for l-ornithine by 16-fold and for l-lysine by 3-fold, with 100-fold and 2.8-fold decreases in the k(cat) for ODC and lysine decarboxylase (LDC) activity respectively. The Cys(377)-->Ala mutant possessed a k(cat) that was lowered by 23-fold, and the K(m) value was decreased by 1.4-fold for l-ornithine. The three-dimensional model of ODC protein constructed on the basis of the crystal structure of Trypanosoma brucei, mouse and human ODCs localized the four residues in the active-site cleft. This is the first work carried out on active-site residues of plant ODC, where ODC and LDC

  12. Identification and characterization of lysine-methylated sites on histones and non-histone proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzong-Yi; Chang, Cheng-Wei; Lu, Cheng-Tzung; Cheng, Tzu-Hsiu; Chang, Tzu-Hao

    2014-06-01

    Protein methylation is a kind of post-translational modification (PTM), and typically takes place on lysine and arginine amino acid residues. Protein methylation is involved in many important biological processes, and most recent studies focused on lysine methylation of histones due to its critical roles in regulating transcriptional repression and activation. Histones possess highly conserved sequences and are homologous in most species. However, there is much less sequence conservation among non-histone proteins. Therefore, mechanisms for identifying lysine-methylated sites may greatly differ between histones and non-histone proteins. Nevertheless, this point of view was not considered in previous studies. Here we constructed two support vector machine (SVM) models by using lysine-methylated data from histones and non-histone proteins for predictions of lysine-methylated sites. Numerous features, such as the amino acid composition (AAC) and accessible surface area (ASA), were used in the SVM models, and the predictive performance was evaluated using five-fold cross-validations. For histones, the predictive sensitivity was 85.62% and specificity was 80.32%. For non-histone proteins, the predictive sensitivity was 69.1% and specificity was 88.72%. Results showed that our model significantly improved the predictive accuracy of histones compared to previous approaches. In addition, features of the flanking region of lysine-methylated sites on histones and non-histone proteins were also characterized and are discussed. A gene ontology functional analysis of lysine-methylated proteins and correlations of lysine-methylated sites with other PTMs in histones were also analyzed in detail. Finally, a web server, MethyK, was constructed to identify lysine-methylated sites. MethK now is available at http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/MethK/.

  13. The Different Inhibition Mechanisms of OXA-1 and OXA-24 β-Lactamases Are Determined by the Stability of Active Site Carboxylated Lysine*

    PubMed Central

    Che, Tao; Bethel, Christopher R.; Pusztai-Carey, Marianne; Bonomo, Robert A.; Carey, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic efficiency of class D β-lactamases depends critically on an unusual carboxylated lysine as the general base residue for both the acylation and deacylation steps of the enzyme. Microbiological and biochemical studies on the class D β-lactamases OXA-1 and OXA-24 showed that the two enzymes behave differently when reacting with two 6-methylidene penems (penem 1 and penem 3): the penems are good inhibitors of OXA-1 but act more like substrates for OXA-24. UV difference and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the respective reaction mechanisms are different. The penems form an unusual intermediate, a 1,4-thiazepine derivative in OXA-1, and undergo deacylation followed by the decarboxylation of Lys-70, rendering OXA-1 inactive. This inactivation could not be reversed by the addition of 100 mm NaHCO3. In OXA-24, under mild conditions (enzyme:inhibitor = 1:4), only hydrolyzed products were detected, and the enzyme remained active. However, under harsh conditions (enzyme:inhibitor = 1:2000), OXA-24 was inhibited via decarboxylation of Lys-84; however, the enzyme could be reactivated by the addition of 100 mm NaHCO3. We conclude that OXA-24 not only decarboxylates with difficulty but also recarboxylates with ease; in contrast, OXA-1 decarboxylates easily but recarboxylates with difficulty. Structural analysis of the active site indicates that a crystallographic water molecule may play an important role in carboxylation in OXA-24 (an analogous water molecule is not found in OXA-1), supporting the suggestion that a water molecule in the active site of OXA-24 can lower the energy barrier for carboxylation significantly. PMID:24443569

  14. The chemical properties and functional role of a lysine residue within the active site of native sodium and potassium ion-activated adenosinetriphosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, K.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The peptide, HLLVMKGAPER, which contains Lysine 501 of the {alpha} polypeptide can be released from intact sodium and potassium ion activated adenosinetriphosphatase by tryptic digestion. An immunoadsorbent directed against the carboxy-terminal, -GAPER, has been constructed. Sealed, right-side-out vesicles, prepared from canine renal kidneys, were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium ({sup 3}H)borohydride in the absence or presence of saponin, respectively. Large increases in the incorporation of radioactivity into the peptides bound by the immunoadsorbent were observed in the digest obtained from the vesicles exposed to saponin. From the results of several control experiments examining the labeling reaction it could be concluded that the increase in the extent of modification was due to the cytoplasmic disposition of this segment in the native enzyme.

  15. Evidence for proximal cysteine and lysine residues at or near the active site of arginine kinase of Stichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qin; Chen, Baoyu; Wang, Xicheng

    2004-12-01

    Inactivation of arginine kinase (AK) of Stichopus japonicus by o-phthalaldehyde (OPTA) was investigated. The modified enzyme showed an absorption peak at 337 nm and a fluorescent emission peak at 410 nm, which are characteristic of an isoindole derivative formed by OPTA binding to a thiol and an amine group in proximity within the enzyme. Loss of enzymatic activity was concomitant with an increase in fluorescence intensity at 410 nm. Stoichiometry studies by Tsou's method showed that among the cysteine residues available for OPTA modification in the enzyme, only one was essential for the enzyme activity. This cysteine residue is located in a highly hydrophobic environment, presumably near ATP and ADP binding region. This conclusion was verified by 5,5 -dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) modification. In addition, these results were supported by means of electrophoresis and ultraviolet, fluorescence, circular dichroism spectroscopy and fast performance liquid chromatography. Sequence comparison suggested that this essential cysteine residue maybe the conservative Cys274. PMID:15627388

  16. Antimicrobial activity of chicken NK-lysin against Eimeria sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yeong H; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Siragusa, Gregory R; Bannerman, Douglas D; Lillehoj, Erik P

    2008-06-01

    NK-lysin is an antimicrobial and antitumor polypeptide that is considered to play an important role in innate immunity. Chicken NK-lysin is a member of the saposin-like protein family and exhibits potent antitumor cell activity. To evaluate the antimicrobial properties of chicken NK-lysin, we examined its ability to reduce the viability of various bacterial strains and two species of Eimeria parasites. Culture supernatants from COS7 cells transfected with a chicken NK-lysin cDNA and His-tagged purified NK-lysin from the transfected cells both showed high cytotoxic activity against Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria maxima sporozoites. In contrast, no bactericidal activity was observed. Further studies using synthetic peptides derived from NK-lysin may be useful for pharmaceutical and agricultural uses in the food animal industry.

  17. Kinetics of activated thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa)-catalyzed cleavage of C-terminal lysine residues of fibrin degradation products and removal of plasminogen-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jonathan H; Cook, Paul F; Nesheim, Michael E

    2011-06-01

    Partial digestion of fibrin by plasmin exposes C-terminal lysine residues, which comprise new binding sites for both plasminogen and tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). This binding increases the catalytic efficiency of plasminogen activation by 3000-fold compared with tPA alone. The activated thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa) attenuates fibrinolysis by removing these residues, which causes a 97% reduction in tPA catalytic efficiency. The aim of this study was to determine the kinetics of TAFIa-catalyzed lysine cleavage from fibrin degradation products and the kinetics of loss of plasminogen-binding sites. We show that the k(cat) and K(m) of Glu(1)-plasminogen (Glu-Pg)-binding site removal are 2.34 s(-1) and 142.6 nm, respectively, implying a catalytic efficiency of 16.21 μm(-1) s(-1). The corresponding values of Lys(77)/Lys(78)-plasminogen (Lys-Pg)-binding site removal are 0.89 s(-1) and 96 nm implying a catalytic efficiency of 9.23 μm(-1) s(-1). These catalytic efficiencies of plasminogen-binding site removal by TAFIa are the highest of any TAFIa-catalyzed reaction with a biological substrate reported to date and suggest that plasmin-modified fibrin is a primary physiological substrate for TAFIa. We also show that the catalytic efficiency of cleavage of all C-terminal lysine residues, whether they are involved in plasminogen binding or not, is 1.10 μm(-1) s(-1). Interestingly, this value increases to 3.85 μm(-1) s(-1) in the presence of Glu-Pg. These changes are due to a decrease in K(m). This suggests that an interaction between TAFIa and plasminogen comprises a component of the reaction mechanism, the plausibility of which was established by showing that TAFIa binds both Glu-Pg and Lys-Pg. PMID:21467042

  18. Lysine Acetylation Activates Mitochondrial Aconitase in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Jolyn; Weddle, Alexis; Kinter, Caroline S.; Humphries, Kenneth M.; Mather, Timothy; Szweda, Luke I.; Kinter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    High throughput proteomics studies have identified several thousand acetylation sites on over one thousand proteins. Mitochondrial aconitase, the Krebs cycle enzyme that converts citrate to isocitrate, has been identified in many of these reports. Acetylated mitochondrial aconitase has also been identified as a target for sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) catalyzed deacetylation. However, the functional significance of mitochondrial aconitase acetylation has not been determined. Using in vitro strategies, mass spectrometric analyses, and an in vivo mouse model of obesity, we found a significant acetylation-dependent activation of aconitase. Isolated heart mitochondria subjected to in vitro chemical acetylation with either acetic anhydride or acetyl-CoA resulted in increased aconitase activity that was reversed with SIRT3 treatment. Quantitative mass spectrometry was used to measure acetylation at 21 lysine residues and found significant increases with both in vitro treatments. A high fat diet (60% kcal from fat) was used as an in vivo model and also showed significantly increased mitochondrial aconitase activity without changes in protein level. The high fat diet also produced increased aconitase acetylation at multiple sites as measured by the quantitative mass spectrometry assays. Treatment of isolated mitochondria from these mice with SIRT3 abolished the high fat diet-induced activation of aconitase and reduced acetylation. Finally, kinetic analyses found that the increase in activity was a result of increased maximal velocity and molecular modeling suggests the potential for acetylation at K144 to perturb the tertiary structure of the enzyme. The results of this study reveal a novel activation of mitochondrial aconitase by acetylation. PMID:26061789

  19. Endopeptidase and Glycosidase Activities of the Bacteriophage B30 Lysin

    PubMed Central

    Baker, John R.; Liu, Chengbao; Dong, Shengli; Pritchard, David G.

    2006-01-01

    Synthetic peptides corresponding to portions of group B streptococcal peptidoglycan were used to show that the endopeptidase activity of bacteriophage B30 lysin cleaves between d-Ala in the stem peptide and l-Ala in the cross bridge and that the minimal peptide sequence cleaved is dl-γ-Glu-Lys-d-Ala-Ala-Ala. The only glycosidase activity present is that of N-acetyl-β-d-muramidase. PMID:17021237

  20. A noncanonical function of sortase enables site-specific conjugation of small molecules to lysine residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Joseph J; Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    We provide the first demonstration that isopeptide ligation, a noncanonical activity of the enzyme sortase A, can be used to modify recombinant proteins. This reaction was used in vitro to conjugate small molecules to a peptide, an engineered targeting protein, and a full-length monoclonal antibody with an exquisite level of control over the site of conjugation. Attachment to the protein substrate occurred exclusively through isopeptide bonds at a lysine ε-amino group within a specific amino acid sequence. This reaction allows more than one molecule to be site-specifically conjugated to a protein at internal sites, thereby overcoming significant limitations of the canonical native peptide ligation reaction catalyzed by sortase A. Our method provides a unique chemical ligation procedure that is orthogonal to existing methods, supplying a new method to site-specifically modify lysine residues that will be a valuable addition to the protein conjugation toolbox. PMID:25363491

  1. A non-canonical function of sortase enables site-specific conjugation of small molecules to lysine residues in proteins**

    PubMed Central

    Bellucci, Joseph J.; Bhattacharyya, Jayanta

    2014-01-01

    We provide the first demonstration that isopeptide ligation, a non-canonical activity of the enzyme sortase A, can be used to modify recombinant proteins. This reaction was used in vitro to conjugate small molecules to a peptide, an engineered targeting protein, and a full-length monoclonal antibody with an exquisite level of control over the site of conjugation. Attachment to the protein substrate occurred exclusively through isopeptide bonds at a lysine ε-amino group within a specific amino acid sequence. This reaction allows more than one molecule to be site-specifically conjugated to a protein at internal sites, thereby overcoming significant limitations of the canonical native peptide ligation reaction catalyzed by sortase A. Our method provides a unique chemical ligation procedure that is orthogonal to existing methods, supplying a new method to site-specifically modify lysine residues that will be a valuable addition to the protein conjugation toolbox. PMID:25363491

  2. Proton transfer roles of lysine 64 and glutamic acid 64 replacing histidine 64 in the active site of human carbonic anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Engstrand, C; Forsman, C; Liang, Z; Lindskog, S

    1992-08-21

    The CO2 hydration activities of cloned human carbonic anhydrase II (carbonate hydro-lyase, EC 4.2.1.1) and variants with Lys, Glu, Gln or Ala replacing His at sequence position 64 have been measured in a variety of different buffers in the pH range 6-9. The variants with Lys-64, Gln-64 and Ala-64 showed non-Michaelis-Menten behavior under some conditions, apparent substrate inhibition being prominent near pH 9. However, asymptotic Michaelis-Menten parameters could be estimated for the limit of low substrate concentrations. All variants show distinct buffer specificities, and imidazole derivatives, Ches and phosphate buffers yield higher kcat values that Bicine, Taps and Mops buffers under otherwise similar conditions. These results are interpreted in terms of different pathways for a rate-limiting proton transfer. In unmodified enzyme, the very high catalytic activity depends on His-64 functioning as an efficient proton transfer group, but this pathway is not available in the variants with Gln-64 and Ala-64. Imidazoles, Ches and phosphate are thought to participate in a metal center-to-buffer proton transfer pathway, whereas Bicine, Taps, Mops and Mes appear to lack this capacity, so that the rate-limiting proton transfer occurs in a metal center-to-bulk water pathway for these variants. The Lys-64 and Glu-64 variants give significantly higher kcat values in Taps, Mops and Mes buffers than the Ala-64 and Gln-64 variants. The pH dependencies of these kcat values are compatible with the hypothesis that Lys-64 and Glu-64 can function as proton transfer groups. Thus, at pH near 9, Lys-64 appears to be only 5-times less efficient than His-64, while Glu-64 is inefficient. At pH 6, Lys-64 is an inefficient proton transfer group, but Glu-64 is only 2-3-times less efficient than His-64. The data indicate that Lys-64 and Glu-64 have pKa values near 8 and below 6, respectively.

  3. Lysine methylation represses p53 activity in teratocarcinoma cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiajun; Dou, Zhixun; Sammons, Morgan A; Levine, Arnold J; Berger, Shelley L

    2016-08-30

    TP53 (which encodes the p53 protein) is the most frequently mutated gene among all human cancers, whereas tumors that retain the wild-type TP53 gene often use alternative mechanisms to repress the p53 tumor-suppressive function. Testicular teratocarcinoma cells rarely contain mutations in TP53, yet the transcriptional activity of wild-type p53 is compromised, despite its high expression level. Here we report that in the teratocarcinoma cell line NTera2, p53 is subject to lysine methylation at its carboxyl terminus, which has been shown to repress p53's transcriptional activity. We show that reduction of the cognate methyltransferases reactivates p53 and promotes differentiation of the NTera2 cells. Furthermore, reconstitution of methylation-deficient p53 mutants into p53-depleted NTera2 cells results in elevated expression of p53 downstream targets and precocious loss of pluripotent gene expression compared with re-expression of wild-type p53. Our results provide evidence that lysine methylation of endogenous wild-type p53 represses its activity in cancer cells and suggest new therapeutic possibilities of targeting testicular teratocarcinoma. PMID:27535933

  4. Lysine methylation represses p53 activity in teratocarcinoma cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiajun; Dou, Zhixun; Sammons, Morgan A; Levine, Arnold J; Berger, Shelley L

    2016-08-30

    TP53 (which encodes the p53 protein) is the most frequently mutated gene among all human cancers, whereas tumors that retain the wild-type TP53 gene often use alternative mechanisms to repress the p53 tumor-suppressive function. Testicular teratocarcinoma cells rarely contain mutations in TP53, yet the transcriptional activity of wild-type p53 is compromised, despite its high expression level. Here we report that in the teratocarcinoma cell line NTera2, p53 is subject to lysine methylation at its carboxyl terminus, which has been shown to repress p53's transcriptional activity. We show that reduction of the cognate methyltransferases reactivates p53 and promotes differentiation of the NTera2 cells. Furthermore, reconstitution of methylation-deficient p53 mutants into p53-depleted NTera2 cells results in elevated expression of p53 downstream targets and precocious loss of pluripotent gene expression compared with re-expression of wild-type p53. Our results provide evidence that lysine methylation of endogenous wild-type p53 represses its activity in cancer cells and suggest new therapeutic possibilities of targeting testicular teratocarcinoma.

  5. Effect of lysine to alanine mutations on the phosphate activation and BPTES inhibition of glutaminase.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Charles J; Acheff, Eric; Kennedy, Ryan; Taylor, Lynn; Curthoys, Norman P

    2015-09-01

    The GLS1 gene encodes a mitochondrial glutaminase that is highly expressed in brain, kidney, small intestine and many transformed cells. Recent studies have identified multiple lysine residues in glutaminase that are sites of N-acetylation. Interestingly, these sites are located within either a loop segment that regulates access of glutamine to the active site or the dimer:dimer interface that participates in the phosphate-dependent oligomerization and activation of the enzyme. These two segments also contain the binding sites for bis-2[5-phenylacetamido-1,2,4-thiadiazol-2-yl]ethylsulfide (BPTES), a highly specific and potent uncompetitive inhibitor of this glutaminase. BPTES is also the lead compound for development of novel cancer chemotherapeutic agents. To provide a preliminary assessment of the potential effects of N-acetylation, the corresponding lysine to alanine mutations were constructed in the hGACΔ1 plasmid. The wild type and mutated proteins were purified by Ni(+)-affinity chromatography and their phosphate activation and BPTES inhibition profiles were analyzed. Two of the alanine substitutions in the loop segment (K311A and K328A) and the one in the dimer:dimer interface (K396A) form enzymes that require greater concentrations of phosphate to produce half-maximal activation and exhibit greater sensitivity to BPTES inhibition. By contrast, the K320A mutation results in a glutaminase that exhibits near maximal activity in the absence of phosphate and is not inhibited by BPTES. Thus, lysine N-acetylation may contribute to the acute regulation of glutaminase activity in various tissues and alter the efficacy of BPTES-type inhibitors.

  6. Improved Species-Specific Lysine Acetylation Site Prediction Based on a Large Variety of Features Set.

    PubMed

    Wuyun, Qiqige; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Yanping; Ruan, Jishou; Hu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a major post-translational modification. It plays a vital role in numerous essential biological processes, such as gene expression and metabolism, and is related to some human diseases. To fully understand the regulatory mechanism of acetylation, identification of acetylation sites is first and most important. However, experimental identification of protein acetylation sites is often time consuming and expensive. Therefore, the alternative computational methods are necessary. Here, we developed a novel tool, KA-predictor, to predict species-specific lysine acetylation sites based on support vector machine (SVM) classifier. We incorporated different types of features and employed an efficient feature selection on each type to form the final optimal feature set for model learning. And our predictor was highly competitive for the majority of species when compared with other methods. Feature contribution analysis indicated that HSE features, which were firstly introduced for lysine acetylation prediction, significantly improved the predictive performance. Particularly, we constructed a high-accurate structure dataset of H.sapiens from PDB to analyze the structural properties around lysine acetylation sites. Our datasets and a user-friendly local tool of KA-predictor can be freely available at http://sourceforge.net/p/ka-predictor. PMID:27183223

  7. Improved Species-Specific Lysine Acetylation Site Prediction Based on a Large Variety of Features Set

    PubMed Central

    Wuyun, Qiqige; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Yanping; Ruan, Jishou; Hu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a major post-translational modification. It plays a vital role in numerous essential biological processes, such as gene expression and metabolism, and is related to some human diseases. To fully understand the regulatory mechanism of acetylation, identification of acetylation sites is first and most important. However, experimental identification of protein acetylation sites is often time consuming and expensive. Therefore, the alternative computational methods are necessary. Here, we developed a novel tool, KA-predictor, to predict species-specific lysine acetylation sites based on support vector machine (SVM) classifier. We incorporated different types of features and employed an efficient feature selection on each type to form the final optimal feature set for model learning. And our predictor was highly competitive for the majority of species when compared with other methods. Feature contribution analysis indicated that HSE features, which were firstly introduced for lysine acetylation prediction, significantly improved the predictive performance. Particularly, we constructed a high-accurate structure dataset of H.sapiens from PDB to analyze the structural properties around lysine acetylation sites. Our datasets and a user-friendly local tool of KA-predictor can be freely available at http://sourceforge.net/p/ka-predictor. PMID:27183223

  8. Topography of the high-affinity lysine binding site of plasminogen as defined with a specific antibody probe

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, L.A.; Plow, E.F.

    1986-11-04

    An antibody population that reacted with the high-affinity lysine binding site of human plasminogen was elicited by immunizing rabbits with an elastase degradation product containing kringles 1-3 (EDP I). This antibody was immunopurified by affinity chromatography on plasminogen-Sepharose and elution with 0.2 M 6-aminohexanoic acid. The eluted antibodies bound (/sup 125/I)EDP I, (/sup 125/I)Glu-plasminogen, and (/sup 125/I)Lys-plasminogen in radioimmunoassays, and binding of each ligand was at least 99% inhibited by 0.2 M 6-aminohexanoic acid. The concentrations for 50% inhibition of (/sup 125/I)EDP I binding by tranexamic acid, 6-aminohexanoic acid, and lysine were 2.6, 46, and l730 ..mu..M, respectively. Similar values were obtained with plasminogen and suggested that an unoccupied high-affinity lysine binding site was required for antibody recognition. The antiserum reacted exclusively with plasminogen derivatives containing the EDP I region and did not react with those lacking an EDP I region, or with tissue plasminogen activator or prothrombin, which also contains kringles. By immunoblotting analyses, a chymotryptic degradation product of M/sub r/ 20,000 was derived from EDP I that retained reactivity with the antibody. ..cap alpha../sub 2/-Antiplasmin inhibited the binding of radiolabeled EDP I, Glu-plasminogen, or Lys-plasminogen by the antiserum, suggesting that the recognized site is involved in the noncovalent interaction of the inhibitor with plasminogen. The binding of (/sup 125/I)EDP I to fibrin was also inhibited by the antiserum. The observations provide independent evidence for the role of the high-affinity lysine binding site in the functional interactions of plasminogen with its primary substrate and inhibitor.

  9. Determinants within the C-terminal domain of Streptomyces lividans acetyl-CoA synthetase that block acetylation of its active site lysine in vitro by the protein acetyltransferase (Pat) enzyme.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Alex C; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2014-01-01

    Reversible lysine acetylation (RLA) is a widespread regulatory mechanism that modulates the function of proteins involved in diverse cellular processes. A strong case has been made for RLA control exerted by homologues of the Salmonella enterica protein acetyltransferase (SePat) enzyme on the broadly distributed AMP-forming CoA ligase (a.k.a. acyl-CoA synthetases) family of metabolic enzymes, with acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs) being the paradigm in the field. Here we investigate why the Acs homologue in Streptomyces lividans (SlAcs) is poorly acetylated in vitro by the S. lividans protein acetyltransferase (SlPat) enzyme. Chimeras of S. enterica Acs (SeAcs) and S. lividans Acs (SlAcs) constructed during the course of this work were acetylated by SlPatA in vitro, retained most of their activity, and were under RLA control in a heterologous host. We identified SeAcs residues N- and C-terminal to the target lysine that when introduced into SlAcs, rendered the latter under RLA control. These results lend further support to the idea that Pat enzymes interact with extensive surfaces of their substrates. Finally, we suggest that acetylation of SlAcs depends on factors or conditions other than those present in our in vitro system. We also discuss possible explanations why SlAcs is not controlled by RLA as defined in other bacterial species.

  10. Lysine-based structure in the proregion of procathepsin L is the recognition site for mannose phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Cuozzo, J W; Tao, K; Wu, Q L; Young, W; Sahagian, G G

    1995-06-30

    The recognition of lysosomal enzymes by UDP-GlcNAc: lysosomal-enzyme GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase (phosphotransferase) is mediated by a protein structure on lysosomal enzymes. It has been previously demonstrated that lysine residues are required for phosphorylation of procathepsin L and are a common feature of the site on many lysosomal proteins. In this work, the procathepsin L recognition structure was further defined by identification of the region of the protein containing the structure and the critical lysine residues involved. Removal of the cathepsin L propeptide by low pH-induced autocatalytic processing abolished phosphorylation. The addition of either the purified propeptide or a glutathione S-transferase-propeptide fusion protein to the processed protein restored phosphorylation. Mutagenesis of individual lysine residues demonstrated that two propeptide lysine residues (Lys-54 and Lys-99) were required for efficient phosphorylation of procathepsin L. By comparison of the phosphorylation rates of procathepsin L, lysine-modified procathepsin L, and the procathepsin L oligosaccharide, lysine residues were shown to account for most, if not all, of the protein-dependent interaction. On this basis, it is concluded that the proregion lysine residues are the major elements of the procathepsin L recognition site. In addition, lysine residues in cathepsin D were shown to be as important for phosphorylation as those in procathepsin L, supporting a general model of the recognition site as a specific three-dimensional arrangement of lysine residues exposed on the surface of lysosomal proteins. PMID:7797559

  11. Selective Deletion of the Internal Lysine Residue from the Peptide Sequence by Collisional Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shibdas; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2012-11-01

    The gas-phase peptide ion fragmentation chemistry is always the center of attraction in proteomics to analyze the amino acid sequence of peptides and proteins. In this work, we describe the formation of an anomalous fragment ion, which corresponds to the selective deletion of the internal lysine residue from a series of lysine containing peptides upon collisional activation in the ion trap. We detected several water-loss fragment ions and the maximum number of water molecules lost from a particular fragment ion was equal to the number of lysine residues in that fragment. As a consequence of this water-loss phenomenon, internal lysine residues were found to be deleted from the peptide ion. The N,N-dimethylation of all the amine functional groups of the peptide stopped the internal lysine deletion reaction, but selective N-terminal α-amino acetylation had no effect on this process indicating involvement of the side chains of the lysine residues. The detailed mechanism of the lysine deletion was investigated by multistage CID of the modified and unmodified peptides, by isotope labeling and by energy resolved CID studies. The results suggest that the lysine deletion might occur through a unimolecular multistep mechanism involving a seven-membered cyclic imine intermediate formed by the loss of water from a lysine residue in the protonated peptide. This intermediate subsequently undergoes degradation reaction to deplete the interior imine ring from the peptide backbone leading to the deletion of an internal lysine residue.

  12. Lysine Specific Demethylase 1 has Dual Functions as a Major Regulator of Androgen Receptor Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Changmeng; He, Housheng Hansen; Gao, Shuai; Chen, Sen; Yu, Ziyang; Gao, Yanfei; Chen, Shaoyong; Chen, Mei Wei; Zhang, Jesse; Ahmed, Musaddeque; Wang, Yang; Metzger, Eric; Schüle, Roland; Liu, X. Shirley; Brown, Myles; Balk, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lysine Specific Demethylase 1 (LSD1, KDM1A) functions as a transcriptional corepressor through demethylation of histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4), but has coactivator function on some genes through unclear mechanisms. We show that LSD1, interacting with CoREST, associates with and coactivates androgen receptor (AR) on a large fraction of androgen-stimulated genes. A subset of these AR/LSD1-associated enhancer sites have histone 3 threonine 6 phosphorylation (H3T6ph), and these sites are further enriched for androgen-stimulated genes. Significantly, despite its coactivator activity, LSD1 still mediates H3K4me2 demethylation at these androgen-stimulated enhancers. FOXA1 is also associated with LSD1 at AR regulated enhancer sites, and a FOXA1 interaction with LSD1 enhances binding of both proteins at these sites. These findings show LSD1 functions broadly as a regulator of AR function, that it maintains a transcriptional repression function at AR-regulated enhancers through H3K4 demethylation, and has a distinct AR-linked coactivator function mediated by demethylation of other substrates. PMID:25482560

  13. Disease-associated mutations inactivate AMP-lysine hydrolase activity of Aprataxin.

    PubMed

    Seidle, Heather F; Bieganowski, Pawel; Brenner, Charles

    2005-06-01

    Ataxia-oculomotor apraxia syndrome 1 is an early onset cerebellar ataxia that results from loss of function mutations in the APTX gene, encoding Aprataxin, which contains three conserved domains. The forkhead-associated domain of Aprataxin mediates protein-protein interactions with molecules that respond to DNA damage, but the cellular phenotype of the disease does not appear to be consistent with a major loss in DNA damage responses. Disease-associated mutations in Aprataxin target a histidine triad domain that is similar to Hint, a universally conserved AMP-lysine hydrolase, or truncate the protein NH2-terminal to a zinc finger. With novel fluorigenic substrates, we demonstrate that Aprataxin possesses an active-site-dependent AMP-lysine and GMP-lysine hydrolase activity that depends additionally on the zinc finger for protein stability and on the forkhead associated domain for enzymatic activity. Alleles carrying any of eight recessive mutations associated with ataxia and oculomotor apraxia encode proteins with huge losses in protein stability and enzymatic activity, consistent with a null phenotype. The mild presentation allele, APTX-K197Q, associated with ataxia but not oculomotor apraxia, encodes a protein with a mild defect in stability and activity, while enzyme encoded by the atypical presentation allele, APTX-R199H, retained substantial function, consistent with altered and not loss of activity. The data suggest that the essential function of Aprataxin is reversal of nucleotidylylated protein modifications, that all three domains contribute to formation of a stable enzyme, and that the in vitro behavior of cloned APTX alleles can score disease-associated mutations. PMID:15790557

  14. In vitro inhibition of lysine decarboxylase activity by organophosphate esters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sufang; Wan, Bin; Zhang, Lianying; Yang, Yu; Guo, Liang-Hong

    2014-12-01

    Organophosphate esters (OPEs), a major group of organophosphorus flame retardants, are regarded as emerging environmental contaminants of health concern. Amino acid decarboxylases catalyze the conversion of amino acids into polyamines that are essential for cell proliferation, hypertrophy and tissue growth. In this paper, inhibitory effect of twelve OPEs with aromatic, alkyl or chlorinated alkyl substituents on the activity of lysine decarboxylase (LDC) was assessed quantitatively with an economic and label-free fluorescence sensor and cell assay. The sensor comprises a macrocyclic host (cucurbit[7]uril) and a fluorescent dye (acridine orange) reporter. The twelve OPEs were found to vary in their capacity to inhibit LDC activity. Alkyl group substituted OPEs had no inhibitory effect. By contrast, six OPEs substituted with aromatic or chlorinated alkyl groups inhibited LDC activity significantly with IC50 ranging from 1.32 μM to 9.07 μM. Among them, the inhibitory effect of tri-m-cresyl phosphate (TCrP) was even more effective as an inhibitor than guanosine 5'-diphosphate-3'-diphosphate (ppGpp) (1.60 μM), an LDC natural inhibitor in vivo. Moreover, at non-cytotoxic concentrations, these six OPEs showed perceptible inhibitory effects on LDC activity in PC12 living cells, and led to a marked loss in the cadaverine content. Molecular docking analysis of the LDC/OPE complexes revealed that different binding modes contribute to the difference in their inhibitory effect. Our finding suggested that LDC, as a new potential biological target of OPEs, might be implicated in toxicological and pathogenic mechanism of OPEs. PMID:25264276

  15. Inhibitors of enzymes catalyzing modifications to histone lysine residues: structure, function and activity.

    PubMed

    Lillico, Ryan; Stesco, Nicholas; Khorshid Amhad, Tina; Cortes, Claudia; Namaka, Mike P; Lakowski, Ted M

    2016-05-01

    Gene expression is partly controlled by epigenetic mechanisms including histone-modifying enzymes. Some diseases are caused by changes in gene expression that can be mitigated by inhibiting histone-modifying enzymes. This review covers the enzyme inhibitors targeting histone lysine modifications. We summarize the enzymatic mechanisms of histone lysine acetylation, deacetylation, methylation and demethylation and discuss the biochemical roles of these modifications in gene expression and in disease. We discuss inhibitors of lysine acetylation, deacetylation, methylation and demethylation defining their structure-activity relationships and their potential mechanisms. We show that there are potentially indiscriminant off-target effects on gene expression even with the use of selective epigenetic enzyme inhibitors.

  16. Expression and purification of histone H3 proteins containing multiple sites of lysine acetylation using nonsense suppression.

    PubMed

    Young, Isaac A; Mittal, Chitvan; Shogren-Knaak, Michael A

    2016-02-01

    Lysine acetylation is a common post-translational modification, which is especially prevalent in histone proteins in chromatin. A number of strategies exist for generating histone proteins containing lysine acetylation, but an especially attractive approach is to genetically encode acetyl-lysine residues using nonsense suppression. This strategy has been successfully applied to single sites of histone acetylation. However, because histone acetylation can often occur at multiple sites simultaneously, we were interested in determining whether this approach could be extended. Here we show that we can express histone H3 proteins that incorporate up to four sites of lysine acetylation on the histone tail. Because the amount of expressed multi-acetylated histone is reduced relative to the wild type, a purification strategy involving affinity purification and ion exchange chromatography was optimized. This expression and purification strategy ultimately generates H3 histone uniformly acetylated at the desired position at levels and purity sufficient to assemble histone octamers. Histone octamers containing four sites of lysine acetylation were assembled into mononucleosomes and enzymatic assays confirmed that this acetylation largely blocks further acetylation by the yeast SAGA acetyltransferase complex.

  17. Stoichiometry of site-specific lysine acetylation in an entire proteome.

    PubMed

    Baeza, Josue; Dowell, James A; Smallegan, Michael J; Fan, Jing; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Khan, Zia; Denu, John M

    2014-08-01

    Acetylation of lysine ϵ-amino groups influences many cellular processes and has been mapped to thousands of sites across many organisms. Stoichiometric information of acetylation is essential to accurately interpret biological significance. Here, we developed and employed a novel method for directly quantifying stoichiometry of site-specific acetylation in the entire proteome of Escherichia coli. By coupling isotopic labeling and a novel pairing algorithm, our approach performs an in silico enrichment of acetyl peptides, circumventing the need for immunoenrichment. We investigated the function of the sole NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase, CobB, on both site-specific and global acetylation. We quantified 2206 peptides from 899 proteins and observed a wide distribution of acetyl stoichiometry, ranging from less than 1% up to 98%. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that metabolic enzymes, which either utilize or generate acetyl-CoA, and proteins involved in transcriptional and translational processes displayed the highest degree of acetylation. Loss of CobB led to increased global acetylation at low stoichiometry sites and induced site-specific changes at high stoichiometry sites, and biochemical analysis revealed altered acetyl-CoA metabolism. Thus, this study demonstrates that sirtuin deacetylase deficiency leads to both site-specific and global changes in protein acetylation stoichiometry, affecting central metabolism.

  18. CPLM: a database of protein lysine modifications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zexian; Wang, Yongbo; Gao, Tianshun; Pan, Zhicheng; Cheng, Han; Yang, Qing; Cheng, Zhongyi; Guo, Anyuan; Ren, Jian; Xue, Yu

    2014-01-01

    We reported an integrated database of Compendium of Protein Lysine Modifications (CPLM; http://cplm.biocuckoo.org) for protein lysine modifications (PLMs), which occur at active ε-amino groups of specific lysine residues in proteins and are critical for orchestrating various biological processes. The CPLM database was updated from our previously developed database of Compendium of Protein Lysine Acetylation (CPLA), which contained 7151 lysine acetylation sites in 3311 proteins. Here, we manually collected experimentally identified substrates and sites for 12 types of PLMs, including acetylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation, methylation, butyrylation, crotonylation, glycation, malonylation, phosphoglycerylation, propionylation, succinylation and pupylation. In total, the CPLM database contained 203 972 modification events on 189 919 modified lysines in 45 748 proteins for 122 species. With the dataset, we totally identified 76 types of co-occurrences of various PLMs on the same lysine residues, and the most abundant PLM crosstalk is between acetylation and ubiquitination. Up to 53.5% of acetylation and 33.1% of ubiquitination events co-occur at 10 746 lysine sites. Thus, the various PLM crosstalks suggested that a considerable proportion of lysines were competitively and dynamically regulated in a complicated manner. Taken together, the CPLM database can serve as a useful resource for further research of PLMs. PMID:24214993

  19. Lysine activation and functional analysis of E2-mediated conjugation in the SUMO pathway.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Ali A; Lima, Christopher D

    2006-06-01

    E2 conjugating proteins that transfer ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers to substrate lysine residues must first activate the lysine nucleophile for conjugation. Genetic complementation revealed three side chains of the E2 Ubc9 that were crucial for normal growth. Kinetic analysis revealed modest binding defects but substantially lowered catalytic rates for these mutant alleles with respect to wild-type Ubc9. X-ray structures for wild-type and mutant human Ubc9-RanGAP1 complexes showed partial loss of contacts to the substrate lysine in mutant complexes. Computational analysis predicted pK perturbations for the substrate lysine, and Ubc9 mutations weakened pK suppression through improper side chain coordination. Biochemical studies with p53, RanGAP1 and the Nup358/RanBP2 E3 were used to determine rate constants and pK values, confirming both structural and computational predictions. It seems that Ubc9 uses an indirect mechanism to activate lysine for conjugation that may be conserved among E2 family members. PMID:16732283

  20. Lysine Activation and Functional Analysis of E2-Mediated Conjugation in the SUMO Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yunus,A.; Lima, C.

    2006-01-01

    E2 conjugating proteins that transfer ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers to substrate lysine residues must first activate the lysine nucleophile for conjugation. Genetic complementation revealed three side chains of the E2 Ubc9 that were crucial for normal growth. Kinetic analysis revealed modest binding defects but substantially lowered catalytic rates for these mutant alleles with respect to wild-type Ubc9. X-ray structures for wild-type and mutant human Ubc9-RanGAP1 complexes showed partial loss of contacts to the substrate lysine in mutant complexes. Computational analysis predicted pK perturbations for the substrate lysine, and Ubc9 mutations weakened pK suppression through improper side chain coordination. Biochemical studies with p53, RanGAP1 and the Nup358/RanBP2 E3 were used to determine rate constants and pK values, confirming both structural and computational predictions. It seems that Ubc9 uses an indirect mechanism to activate lysine for conjugation that may be conserved among E2 family members.

  1. Identification, expression and antibacterial activities of an antimicrobial peptide NK-lysin from a marine fish Larimichthys crocea.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi-Jia; Wang, Jun; Liu, Min; Qiao, Ying; Hong, Wan-Shu; Su, Yong-Quan; Han, Kun-Huang; Ke, Qiao-Zhen; Zheng, Wei-Qiang

    2016-08-01

    As fundamental immunologic mechanism, the innate immunity system is more important than the specific immunity system in teleost fishes during pathogens infection. Antimicrobial peptides are integral parts of the innate immune system, and play significant roles against pathogens infection. NK-lysin, the compounds of the natural killer cells and cytotoxic T cells, are potent and effective antimicrobial peptides widely distributed in animals. In this study, we reported the sequence characteristics, expression profiles and antibacterial activities of a NK-lysin gene (Lc-NK-lysin) from a commercially important marine fish, the large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea). The open reading frame of Lc-NK-lysin cDNA sequence was 447 bp in length, coding 148 amino acids. The genomic DNA of Lc-NK-lysin has the common features of NK-lysin family, consisting of five exons and four introns, and in its deduced mature peptide, there are six well-conserved cysteine residues and a Saposin B domain. Lc-NK-lysin was expressed in all tested tissues (skin, muscle, gill, brain, head kidney, heart, liver, spleen, stomach and intestine) with different expression patterns. In pathogens infection the expression profiles of Lc-NK-lysin varied significantly in gill, head kidney, spleen and liver, indicating its role in immune response. Two peptides (Lc-NK-lysin-1 and Lc-NK-lysin-2) divided from the core region of the Lc-NK-lysin mature polypeptide were chemically synthesized and their antibacterial activities were examined; the potential function on the inhibition of bacteria propagation was revealed. Our results suggested that Lc-NK-lysin is a typical member of the NK-lysin family and as an immune-related gene it involves in the immune response when pathogens invasion. PMID:27238427

  2. Characteristics and antioxidant activity of Maillard reaction products from psicose-lysine and fructose-lysine model systems.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoxi; Guan, Yuping; Sun, Yuanxia

    2011-04-01

    D-Psicose, an epimer of D-fructose isomerized at C-3 position, is a rare ketohexose that is thought to be beneficial for obese people and diabetic patients as a noncaloric sweetener. In the present study, model Maillard reaction products were obtained from D-psicose (or D-fructose) and L-lysine heating at 120 °C up to 8 h with the initial pH 9.0. The changes in pH, UV-vis absorbance, and free amino groups during the reaction were detected. Moreover, the antioxidant potential of the Maillard reaction products at different intervals was investigated. Although there was almost no difference in the oxygen radical absorbance capacity, the Maillard reaction products from psicose performed better than that from fructose in the radical-scavenging activity of 2, 2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt and 1, 1,-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl. The reducing power of the Maillard reaction products from psicose was also stronger than that from fructose. These results indicated that psicose played an effective role in the Maillard reaction and its Maillard reaction products could act as potential antioxidants in food industry. PMID:21535806

  3. Characteristics and antioxidant activity of Maillard reaction products from psicose-lysine and fructose-lysine model systems.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoxi; Guan, Yuping; Sun, Yuanxia

    2011-04-01

    D-Psicose, an epimer of D-fructose isomerized at C-3 position, is a rare ketohexose that is thought to be beneficial for obese people and diabetic patients as a noncaloric sweetener. In the present study, model Maillard reaction products were obtained from D-psicose (or D-fructose) and L-lysine heating at 120 °C up to 8 h with the initial pH 9.0. The changes in pH, UV-vis absorbance, and free amino groups during the reaction were detected. Moreover, the antioxidant potential of the Maillard reaction products at different intervals was investigated. Although there was almost no difference in the oxygen radical absorbance capacity, the Maillard reaction products from psicose performed better than that from fructose in the radical-scavenging activity of 2, 2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt and 1, 1,-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl. The reducing power of the Maillard reaction products from psicose was also stronger than that from fructose. These results indicated that psicose played an effective role in the Maillard reaction and its Maillard reaction products could act as potential antioxidants in food industry.

  4. Application of MassSQUIRM for quantitative measurements of lysine demethylase activity.

    PubMed

    Blair, Lauren P; Avaritt, Nathan L; Tackett, Alan J

    2012-03-11

    Recently, epigenetic regulators have been discovered as key players in many different diseases (1-3). As a result, these enzymes are prime targets for small molecule studies and drug development( 4). Many epigenetic regulators have only recently been discovered and are still in the process of being classified. Among these enzymes are lysine demethylases which remove methyl groups from lysines on histones and other proteins. Due to the novel nature of this class of enzymes, few assays have been developed to study their activity. This has been a road block to both the classification and high throughput study of histone demethylases. Currently, very few demethylase assays exist. Those that do exist tend to be qualitative in nature and cannot simultaneously discern between the different lysine methylation states (un-, mono-, di- and tri-). Mass spectrometry is commonly used to determine demethylase activity but current mass spectrometric assays do not address whether differentially methylated peptides ionize differently. Differential ionization of methylated peptides makes comparing methylation states difficult and certainly not quantitative (Figure 1A). Thus available assays are not optimized for the comprehensive analysis of demethylase activity. Here we describe a method called MassSQUIRM (mass spectrometric quantitation using isotopic reductive methylation) that is based on reductive methylation of amine groups with deuterated formaldehyde to force all lysines to be di-methylated, thus making them essentially the same chemical species and therefore ionize the same (Figure 1B). The only chemical difference following the reductive methylation is hydrogen and deuterium, which does not affect MALDI ionization efficiencies. The MassSQUIRM assay is specific for demethylase reaction products with un-, mono- or di-methylated lysines. The assay is also applicable to lysine methyltransferases giving the same reaction products. Here, we use a combination of reductive

  5. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of Pal, a phage natural chimeric lysin active against pneumococci.

    PubMed

    Varea, Julio; Monterroso, Begoña; Sáiz, José L; López-Zumel, Consuelo; García, José L; Laynez, José; García, Pedro; Menéndez, Margarita

    2004-10-15

    Pal amidase, encoded by pneumococcal bacteriophage Dp-1, represents one step beyond in the modular evolution of pneumococcal murein hydrolases. It exhibits the choline-binding module attaching pneumococcal lysins to the cell wall, but the catalytic module is different from those present in the amidases coded by the host or other pneumococcal phages. Pal is also an effective antimicrobial agent against Streptococcus pneumoniae that may constitute an alternative to antibiotic prophylaxis. The structural implications of Pal singular structure and their effect on the choline-amidase interactions have been examined by means of several techniques. Pal stability is maximum around pH 8.0 (Tm approximately 50.2 degrees C; DeltaHt = 183 +/- 4 kcal mol(-1)), and its constituting modules fold as two tight interacting cooperative units whose denaturation merges into a single process in the free amidase but may proceed as two well resolved events in the choline-bound state. Choline titration curves reflect low energy ligand-protein interactions and are compatible with two sets of sites. Choline binding strongly stabilizes the cell wall binding module, and the conformational stabilization is transmitted to the catalytic region. Moreover, the high proportion of aggregates formed by the unbound amidase together with choline preferential interaction with Pal dimers suggest the existence of marginally stable regions that would become stabilized through choline-protein interactions without significantly modifying Pal secondary structure. This structural rearrangement may underlie in vitro "conversion" of Pal from the low to the full activity form triggered by choline. The Pal catalytic module secondary structure could denote folding conservation within pneumococcal lytic amidases, but the number of functional choline binding sites is reduced (2-3 sites per monomer) when compared with pneumococcal LytA amidase (4-5 sites per monomer) and displays different intermodular interactions.

  6. Biosynthesis of lysine in Saccharomyces cervisiae: properties and spectrophotometric determination of homocitrate synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Gray, G S; Bhattacharjee, J K

    1976-11-01

    A rapid assay is described for homocitrate synthase (EC 4.1.3.21) of the lysine biosynthetic pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent cleavage of acetyl-coA was measured spectrophotometrically as decrease in absorbance at 600 nm in the presence of 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol and enzyme from the wild type strain X2180. This activity was also present in citrate synthaseless glutamate auxotroph glu3, and the activity was inhibited by 5 mM L-lysine. Radioactive homocitric acid was obtained from a reaction mixture containing [1-14C]acetyl-coA. Homocitrate synthase activity was dependent upon time, both substrates, and enzyme. The activity exhibited a pH and temperature optimum of 7.5-8.0 and 32 degrees C, respectively, and was inhibited by metal-chelating and sulfhydryl-binding agents. PMID:10066

  7. Multifunctional oligomer incorporation: a potent strategy to enhance the transfection activity of poly(l-lysine).

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai; Yang, Jixiang; Ren, Hongqi; O'Keeffe-Ahern, Jonathan; Zhou, Dezhong; Zhou, Hao; Chen, Jiatong; Guo, Tianying

    2016-03-01

    Natural polycations, such as poly(l-lysine) (PLL) and chitosan (CS), have inherent superiority as non-viral vectors due to their unparalleled biocompatibility and biodegradability. However, the application was constrained by poor transfection efficiency and safety concerns. Since previous modification strategies greatly weakened the inherent advantages of natural polycations, developing a strategy for functional group introduction with broad applicability to enhance the transfection efficiency of natural polycations without compromising their cationic properties is imperative. Herein, two uncharged functional diblock oligomers P(DMAEL-b-NIPAM) and P(DMAEL-b-Vlm) were prepared from a lactose derivative, N-iso-propyl acrylamide (NIPAM) as well as 1-vinylimidazole (Vlm) and further functionalized with four small ligands folate, glutathione, cysteine and arginine, respectively, aiming to enhance the interactions of complexes with cells, which were quantified utilizing a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor, circumventing the tedious material screening process of cell transfection. Upon incorporation with PLL and DNA, the multifunctional oligomers endow the formulated ternary complexes with great properties suitable for transfection, such as anti-aggregation in serum, destabilized endosome membrane, numerous functional sites for promoted endocytosis and therefore robust transfection activity. Furthermore, different from the conventional strategy of decreasing cytotoxicity by reducing the charge density, the multifunctional oligomer incorporation strategy maintains the highly positive charge density, which is essential for efficient cellular uptake. This system develops a new platform to modify natural polycations towards clinical gene therapy. PMID:26797493

  8. Inhibition of lysine acetyltransferase KAT3B/p300 activity by a naturally occurring hydroxynaphthoquinone, plumbagin.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Kodihalli C; Selvi, B Ruthrotha; Arif, Mohammed; Reddy, B A Ashok; Thanuja, Gali R; Agrawal, Shipra; Pradhan, Suman Kalyan; Nagashayana, Natesh; Dasgupta, Dipak; Kundu, Tapas K

    2009-09-01

    Lysine acetyltransferases (KATs), p300 (KAT3B), and its close homologue CREB-binding protein (KAT3A) are probably the most widely studied KATs with well documented roles in various cellular processes. Hence, the dysfunction of p300 may result in the dysregulation of gene expression leading to the manifestation of many disorders. The acetyltransferase activity of p300/CREB-binding protein is therefore considered as a target for new generation therapeutics. We describe here a natural compound, plumbagin (RTK1), isolated from Plumbago rosea root extract, that inhibits histone acetyltransferase activity potently in vivo. Interestingly, RTK1 specifically inhibits the p300-mediated acetylation of p53 but not the acetylation by another acetyltransferase, p300/CREB-binding protein -associated factor, PCAF, in vivo. RTK1 inhibits p300 histone acetyltransferase activity in a noncompetitive manner. Docking studies and site-directed mutagenesis of the p300 histone acetyltransferase domain suggest that a single hydroxyl group of RTK1 makes a hydrogen bond with the lysine 1358 residue of this domain. In agreement with this, we found that indeed the hydroxyl group-substituted plumbagin derivatives lost the acetyltransferase inhibitory activity. This study describes for the first time the chemical entity (hydroxyl group) required for the inhibition of acetyltransferase activity.

  9. mChIP-KAT-MS, a method to map protein interactions and acetylation sites for lysine acetyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Leslie; Huard, Sylvain; Cotrut, Michael; Pourhanifeh-Lemeri, Roghayeh; Steunou, Anne-Lise; Hamza, Akil; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Zhou, Hu; Ning, Zhibin; Basu, Amrita; Côté, Jacques; Figeys, Daniel A.; Baetz, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Recent global proteomic and genomic studies have determined that lysine acetylation is a highly abundant posttranslational modification. The next challenge is connecting lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) to their cellular targets. We hypothesize that proteins that physically interact with KATs may not only predict the cellular function of the KATs but may be acetylation targets. We have developed a mass spectrometry-based method that generates a KAT protein interaction network from which we simultaneously identify both in vivo acetylation sites and in vitro acetylation sites. This modified chromatin-immunopurification coupled to an in vitro KAT assay with mass spectrometry (mChIP-KAT-MS) was applied to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae KAT nucleosome acetyltransferase of histone H4 (NuA4). Using mChIP-KAT-MS, we define the NuA4 interactome and in vitro-enriched acetylome, identifying over 70 previously undescribed physical interaction partners for the complex and over 150 acetyl lysine residues, of which 108 are NuA4-specific in vitro sites. Through this method we determine NuA4 acetylation of its own subunit Epl1 is a means of self-regulation and identify a unique link between NuA4 and the spindle pole body. Our work demonstrates that this methodology may serve as a valuable tool in connecting KATs with their cellular targets. PMID:23572591

  10. A stable phage lysin (Cpl-1) dimer with increased antipneumococcal activity and decreased plasma clearance.

    PubMed

    Resch, Gregory; Moreillon, Philippe; Fischetti, Vincent A

    2011-12-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) produce endolysins (lysins) as part of their lytic cycle in order to degrade the peptidoglycan layer of the infected bacteria for subsequent release of phage progeny. Because these enzymes maintain their lytic and lethal activity against Gram-positive bacteria when added extrinsically to the cells, they have been actively exploited as novel anti-infectives, sometimes termed enzybiotics. As with other relatively small peptides, one issue in their clinical development is their rapid inactivation through proteolytic degradation, immunological blockage and renal clearance. The antipneumococcal lysin Cpl-1 was shown to escape both proteolysis and immunological blockage. However, its short plasma half-life (20.5 min in mice) may represent a shortcoming for clinical usefulness. Here we report the construction of a Cpl-1 dimer with a view to increasing both the antipneumococcal specific activity and plasma half-life of Cpl-1. Dimerisation was achieved by introducing specific cysteine residues at the C-terminal end of the enzyme, thus favouring disulphide bonding. Compared with the native monomer, the constructed dimer demonstrated a two-fold increase in specific antipneumococcal activity and a ca. ten-fold decrease in plasma clearance. As several lysins are suspected to dimerise on contact with their cell wall substrate to be fully active, stable pre-dimerised enzymes may represent a more efficient alternative to the native monomer. PMID:21982146

  11. The MurE synthetase from Thermotoga maritima is endowed with an unusual D-lysine adding activity.

    PubMed

    Boniface, Audrey; Bouhss, Ahmed; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Blanot, Didier

    2006-06-01

    The peptidoglycan of Thermotoga maritima, an extremely thermophilic eubacterium, was shown to contain no diaminopimelic acid and approximate amounts of both enantiomers of lysine (Huber, R., Langworthy, T. A., König, H., Thomm, M., Woese, C. R., Sleytr, U. B., and Stetter, K. O. (1986) Arch. Microbiol. 144, 324-333). To assess the possible involvement of the MurE activity in the incorporation of D-lysine, the murE gene from this organism was cloned in Escherichia coli, and the corresponding protein was purified as the C-terminal His6-tagged form. In vitro assays showed that D-lysine and meso-diaminopimelic acid were added to UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-dipeptide with 25 and 10% efficiencies, respectively, relative to L-lysine. The purified enzyme was used to synthesize the L- and D-lysine-containing UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-tripeptides; chemical analysis revealed an unusual structure for the D-lysine-containing nucleotide, namely acylation of the epsilon-amino function of D-lysine by the D-glutamyl residue. In vitro assays with MurF and MraY enzymes from T. maritima showed that this novel nucleotide was not a substrate for MurF but that it could be directly processed into tripeptide lipid I by MraY, thereby substantiating the role of MurE in the incorporation of D-lysine into peptidoglycan.

  12. Active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Stringer, C.D.; Milanez, S.; Lee, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Previous affinity labeling studies and comparative sequence analyses have identified two different lysines at the active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and have suggested their essentiality to function. The essential lysines occupy positions 166 and 329 in the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and positions 175 and 334 in the spinach enzyme. Based on the pH-dependencies of inactivations of the two enzymes by trinitrobenzene sulfonate, Lys-166 (R. rubrum enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 7.9 and Lys-334 (spinach enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 9.0. These low pK/sub a/ values as well as the enhanced nucleophilicities of the lysyl residues argue that both are important to catalysis rather than to substrate binding. Lys-166 may correspond to the essential base that initiates catalysis and that displays a pK/sub a/ of 7.5 in the pH-curve for V/sub max//K/sub m/. Cross-linking experiments with 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonate stilbene demonstrate that the two active-site lysines are within 12 A. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Cadmium induces histone H3 lysine methylation by inhibiting histone demethylase activity.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chunlian; Liu, Yin; Xie, Chengfeng; Tu, Wei; Xia, Yujie; Costa, Max; Zhou, Xue

    2015-05-01

    Cadmium is an established human lung carcinogen with weak mutagenicity. However, the mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced carcinogenesis remain obscure. It has been suggested that epigenetic mechanisms may play a role in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of cadmium on histone methylation and histone demethylases, and the role of histone methylation in transformation of immortalized normal human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells. Exposure to 0.625, 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0 μM of cadmium for 6, 24, and 48 h increased global trimethylated histone H3 on lysine 4 (H3K4me3) and dimethylated histone H3 on lysine 9 (H3K9me2) in BEAS-2B cells compared with untreated cells, and most of these changes remained after the removal of cadmium (P < .05 or P < .01 for most modifications). Meanwhile, cadmium inhibited the activities of histone H3 on lysine 4 (H3K4) and histone H3 on lysine 9 (H3K9) demethylases which were detected by histone demethylation assay. However, there was no significant change in the protein levels of the H3K4 demethylase lysine-specific demethylase 5A (KDM5A) and the H3K9 demethylase lysine-specific demethylase 3A (KDM3A). Interestingly, during transformation of BEAS-2B cells by 20 weeks of exposure to 2.0 μM cadmium as assessed by anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, global H3K4me3, and H3K9me2 were significantly increased at 4 weeks (P < .05 or P < .01), whereas no significant change was observed at 8, 12, 16, and 20 weeks compared with control. Our study suggests that cadmium increases global H3K4me3 and H3K9me2 by inhibiting the activities of histone demethylases, and aberrant histone methylation that occurs early (48 h) and at 4 weeks is associated with cadmium-induced transformation of BEAS-2B cells at the early stage. PMID:25673502

  14. CYLD, a deubiquitinase specific for lysine63-linked polyubiquitins, accumulates at the postsynaptic density in an activity-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Dosemeci, Ayse; Thein, Soe; Yang, Yijung; Reese, Thomas S.; Tao-Cheng, Jung-Hwa

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYLD is a deubiquitinase specific for lysine63-linked polyubiquitins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of CYLD in PSDs is established by biochemistry and immunoEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYLD accumulates on PSDs upon depolarization of neurons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Accumulation of CYLD at PSDs may regulate trafficking/degradation of synaptic proteins. -- Abstract: Polyubiquitin chains on proteins flag them for distinct fates depending on the type of polyubiquitin linkage. While lysine48-linked polyubiquitination directs proteins to proteasomal degradation, lysine63-linked polyubiquitination promotes different protein trafficking and is involved in autophagy. Here we show that postsynaptic density (PSD) fractions from adult rat brain contain deubiquitinase activity that targets both lysine48 and lysine63-linked polyubiquitins. Comparison of PSD fractions with parent subcellular fractions by Western immunoblotting reveals that CYLD, a deubiquitinase specific for lysine63-linked polyubiquitins, is highly enriched in the PSD fraction. Electron microscopic examination of hippocampal neurons in culture under basal conditions shows immunogold label for CYLD at the PSD complex in approximately one in four synapses. Following depolarization by exposure to high K+, the proportion of CYLD-labeled PSDs as well as the labeling intensity of CYLD at the PSD increased by more than eighty percent, indicating that neuronal activity promotes accumulation of CYLD at the PSD. An increase in postsynaptic CYLD following activity would promote removal of lysine63-polyubiquitins from PSD proteins and thus could regulate their trafficking and prevent their autophagic degradation.

  15. Effect of dietary lysine on growth, intestinal enzymes activities and antioxidant status of sub-adult grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Yin; Tang, Ling; Hu, Kai; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Chen, Gang-Fu; Li, Shu-Hong; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Feng, Lin; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-06-01

    The dietary lysine requirement of sub-adult grass carp (460 ± 1.5 g) was assessed by feeding diets supplemented with grade levels of lysine (6.6, 8.5, 10.8, 12.9, 15.0 and 16.7 g kg(-1) diet) for 56 days. The test diets (28% CP) contained fish meal, casein and gelatin as sources of intact protein, supplemented with crystalline amino acids. Weight gain (WG), feed intake and feed efficiency were significantly improved with increasing levels of lysine up to 12.9 g kg(-1) diet and thereafter declined (P < 0.05). Quadratic regression analysis of WG at 95% maximum response indicated lysine requirement was 10.9 g kg(-1) diet. Activities of trypsin, chymotrypsin, lipase, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and alkaline phosphatase in intestine, creatine kinase activity in proximal and mid-intestine responded similar to WG (P < 0.05). In addition, lipid and protein oxidation decreased with increasing levels of lysine up to certain values and increased thereafter (P < 0.05); the anti-hydroxyl radical capacity, dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities and glutathione content were increased with increasing dietary lysine levels up to certain values in the detected tissues, except for hepatopancreatic GST. Requirement estimated on the basis of malondialdehyde content in intestine and hepatopancreas was 10.6 and 9.53 g lysine kg(-1) diet, respectively. PMID:24174167

  16. PEGylation of lysine residues improves the proteolytic stability of fibronectin while retaining biological activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Desai, Raj; Perez-Luna, Victor; Karuri, Nancy

    2014-08-01

    Excessive proteolysis of fibronectin (FN) impairs tissue repair in chronic wounds. Since FN is essential in wound healing, our goal is to improve its proteolytic stability and at the same time preserve its biological activity. We have previously shown that reduced FN conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) at cysteine residues is more proteolytically stable than native FN. Cysteine-PEGylated FN supported cell adhesion and migration to the same extent as native FN. However, unlike native FN, cysteine-PEGylated FN was not assembled into an extracellular matrix (ECM) when immobilized. Here, we present an alternative approach in which FN is preferentially PEGylated at lysine residues using different molecular weight PEGs. We show that lysine PEGylation does not perturb FN secondary structure. PEG molecular weight, from 2 to 10 kDa, positively correlates with FN-PEG proteolytic stability. Cell adhesion, cell spreading, and gelatin binding decrease with increasing molecular weight of PEG. The 2-kDa FN-PEG conjugate shows comparable cell adhesion to native FN and binds gelatin. Moreover, immobilized FN-PEG is assembled into ECM fibrils. In summary, lysine PEGylation of FN can be used to stabilize FN against proteolytic degradation with minimal perturbation to FN structure and retained biological activity.

  17. Construction of a chimeric lysin Ply187N-V12C with extended lytic activity against staphylococci and streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qiuhua; Wang, Jing; Yang, Hang; Wei, Cuihua; Yu, Junping; Zhang, Yun; Huang, Yanling; Zhang, Xian-En; Wei, Hongping

    2015-01-01

    Developing chimeric lysins with a wide lytic spectrum would be important for treating some infections caused by multiple pathogenic bacteria. In the present work, a novel chimeric lysin (Ply187N-V12C) was constructed by fusing the catalytic domain (Ply187N) of the bacteriophage lysin Ply187 with the cell binding domain (146-314aa, V12C) of the lysin PlyV12. The results showed that the chimeric lysin Ply187N-V12C had not only lytic activity similar to Ply187N against staphylococcal strains but also extended its lytic activity to streptococci and enterococci, such as Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis, which Ply187N could not lyse. Our work demonstrated that generating novel chimeric lysins with an extended lytic spectrum was feasible through fusing a catalytic domain with a cell-binding domain from lysins with lytic spectra across multiple genera. PMID:25219798

  18. Aryl-alkyl-lysines: Membrane-Active Small Molecules Active against Murine Model of Burn Infection.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Chandradhish; Manjunath, Goutham B; Konai, Mohini M; Uppu, Divakara S S M; Paramanandham, Krishnamoorthy; Shome, Bibek R; Ravikumar, Raju; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-02-12

    Infections caused by drug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens continue to be significant contributors to human morbidity. The recent advent of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (blaNDM-1) producing pathogens, against which few drugs remain active, has aggravated the problem even further. This paper shows that aryl-alkyl-lysines, membrane-active small molecules, are effective in treating infections caused by Gram-negative pathogens. One of the compounds of the study was effective in killing planktonic cells as well as dispersing biofilms of Gram-negative pathogens. The compound was extremely effective in disrupting preformed biofilms and did not select resistant bacteria in multiple passages. The compound retained activity in different physiological conditions and did not induce any toxic effect in female Balb/c mice until concentrations of 17.5 mg/kg. In a murine model of Acinetobacter baumannii burn infection, the compound was able to bring the bacterial burden down significantly upon topical application for 7 days. PMID:27624962

  19. Role of a helix B lysine residue in the photoactive site in channelrhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai; Govorunova, Elena G; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Spudich, John L

    2014-04-15

    In most studied microbial rhodopsins two conserved carboxylic acid residues (the homologs of Asp-85 and Asp-212 in bacteriorhodopsin) and an arginine residue (the homolog of Arg-82) form a complex counterion to the protonated retinylidene Schiff base, and neutralization of the negatively charged carboxylates causes red shifts of the absorption maximum. In contrast, the corresponding neutralizing mutations in some relatively low-efficiency channelrhodopsins (ChRs) result in blue shifts. These ChRs do not contain a lysine residue in the second helix, conserved in higher efficiency ChRs (Lys-132 in the crystallized ChR chimera). By action spectroscopy of photoinduced channel currents in HEK293 cells and absorption spectroscopy of detergent-purified pigments, we found that in tested ChRs the Lys-132 homolog controls the direction of spectral shifts in the mutants of the photoactive site carboxylic acid residues. Analysis of double mutants shows that red spectral shifts occur when this Lys is present, whether naturally or by mutagenesis, and blue shifts occur when it is replaced with a neutral residue. A neutralizing mutation of the Lys-132 homolog alone caused a red spectral shift in high-efficiency ChRs, whereas its introduction into low-efficiency ChR1 from Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1) caused a blue shift. Taking into account that the effective charge of the carboxylic acid residues is a key factor in microbial rhodopsin spectral tuning, these findings suggest that the Lys-132 homolog modulates their pKa values. On the other hand, mutation of the Arg-82 homolog that fulfills this role in bacteriorhodopsin caused minimal spectral changes in the tested ChRs. Titration revealed that the pKa of the Asp-85 homolog in CaChR1 lies in the alkaline region unlike in most studied microbial rhodopsins, but is substantially decreased by introduction of a Lys-132 homolog or neutralizing mutation of the Asp-212 homolog. In the three ChRs tested the Lys-132 homolog also alters

  20. Biological and chemical assessment of antioxidant activity of sugar-lysine model maillard reaction products.

    PubMed

    Kitts, David D; Hu, Chun

    2005-06-01

    The antioxidant activity of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) is often associated with increased stability and shelf life of food systems vulnerable to oxidation reactions. In this study, nondialyzed, high-molecular weight (HMW = >3500 Da) MRPs were recovered from three model sugar-lysine (glucose-lysine, Glc-Lys; fructose-lysine, Fru-Lys; and ribose-lysine, Rib-Lys) reactions, heated at 121 degrees C for one hour. Samples were characterized by UV and fluorescence spectra and assessed for antioxidant activity using both standard chemical methods (1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl [DPPH] and oxygen radical absorbing capacity [ORAC]). In addition, biochemical (e.g., cell culture for intracellular oxidation in RAW264.7 cells and protection against metal ion-induced cytotoxicity in C3H/10T1/2 mouse embryo fibroblast cells) assays were used. Patterns of change for fluorescence and multiple colorimetric parameters corresponded to the recovery yield of HMW MRPs and indicated that Rib was more (P < 0.05) reactive than Glc, which in turn was greater (P < 0.05) than Fru. These characteristics of rate of browning did not parallel the significant (P < 0.05) antioxidant activity noted for different sugar-derived HMW MRPs to scavenge DPPH radical, or exhibit total antioxidant activity using the ORAC (e.g., 800-1000 micromol Trolox/gm MRP) method. Antioxidant activity of Glc-, Fru-, and Rib-Lys HMW-MRPs (50 microg/mL) produced protection (P < 0.05) against both H2O2- and AAPH-induced intracellular oxidation reactions in cultured RAW 264.7 cells. Metal chelating activity of all three sugar-derived HMW MRPs (0.01% w/v) was attributed to similar protection (P < 0.05) against Fe2+ and Cu2+-induced cytotoxicity in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The reducing activity of all three HMW-MRPs indicated the potential for prooxidant activity that could explain enhanced cytotoxicity of Fe3+ in cultured cells. PMID:16037272

  1. Identification of Potent, Selective, Cell-Active Inhibitors of the Histone Lysine Methyltransferase EZH2.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sharad K; Tian, Xinrong; LaFrance, Louis V; Duquenne, Céline; Suarez, Dominic P; Newlander, Kenneth A; Romeril, Stuart P; Burgess, Joelle L; Grant, Seth W; Brackley, James A; Graves, Alan P; Scherzer, Daryl A; Shu, Art; Thompson, Christine; Ott, Heidi M; Aller, Glenn S Van; Machutta, Carl A; Diaz, Elsie; Jiang, Yong; Johnson, Neil W; Knight, Steven D; Kruger, Ryan G; McCabe, Michael T; Dhanak, Dashyant; Tummino, Peter J; Creasy, Caretha L; Miller, William H

    2012-12-13

    The histone H3-lysine 27 (H3K27) methyltransferase EZH2 plays a critical role in regulating gene expression, and its aberrant activity is linked to the onset and progression of cancer. As part of a drug discovery program targeting EZH2, we have identified highly potent, selective, SAM-competitive, and cell-active EZH2 inhibitors, including GSK926 (3) and GSK343 (6). These compounds are small molecule chemical tools that would be useful to further explore the biology of EZH2. PMID:24900432

  2. The Antimicrobial Activity of Marinocine, Synthesized by Marinomonas mediterranea, Is Due to Hydrogen Peroxide Generated by Its Lysine Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lucas-Elío, Patricia; Gómez, Daniel; Solano, Francisco; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Marinocine is a broad-spectrum antibacterial protein synthesized by the melanogenic marine bacterium Marinomonas mediterranea. This work describes the basis for the antibacterial activity of marinocine and the identification of the gene coding for this protein. The antibacterial activity is inhibited under anaerobic conditions and by the presence of catalase under aerobic conditions. Marinocine is active only in culture media containing l-lysine. In the presence of this amino acid, marinocine generates hydrogen peroxide, which causes cell death as confirmed by the increased sensitivity to marinocine of Escherichia coli strains mutated in catalase activity. The gene coding for this novel enzyme was cloned using degenerate PCR with primers designed based on conserved regions in the antimicrobial protein AlpP, synthesized by Pseudoalteromonas tunicata, and some hypothetical proteins. The gene coding for marinocine has been named lodA, standing for lysine oxidase, and it seems to form part of an operon with a second gene, lodB, that codes for a putative dehydrogenase flavoprotein. The identity of marinocine as LodA has been demonstrated by N-terminal sequencing of purified marinocine and generation of lodA mutants that lose their antimicrobial activity. This is the first report on a bacterial lysine oxidase activity and the first time that a gene encoding this activity has been cloned. PMID:16547036

  3. Discovery of A-893, A New Cell-Active Benzoxazinone Inhibitor of Lysine Methyltransferase SMYD2

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A lack of useful small molecule tools has precluded thorough interrogation of the biological function of SMYD2, a lysine methyltransferase with known tumor-suppressor substrates. Systematic exploration of the structure–activity relationships of a previously known benzoxazinone compound led to the synthesis of A-893, a potent and selective SMYD2 inhibitor (IC50: 2.8 nM). A cocrystal structure reveals the origin of enhanced potency, and effective suppression of p53K370 methylation is observed in a lung carcinoma (A549) cell line. PMID:26101576

  4. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions.

    PubMed

    Picaud, Sarah; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2015-08-17

    Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation.

  5. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation. PMID:27600229

  6. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation.

  7. Mapping Lysine Acetyltransferase-Ligand Interactions by Activity-Based Capture.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, D C; Meier, J L

    2016-01-01

    Changes in reversible protein acetylation mediate many key aspects of genomic regulation and enzyme function. The catalysts for this posttranslational modification, lysine acetyltransferases (KATs), have been difficult targets for characterization due to their complex architecture and challenging reconstitution. To address this challenge, here we describe methods to profile endogenous KAT activities using activity-based probes. This method facilitates the targeted analysis of several cellular KATs and can be used to study their interactions with many different types of ligands, including acyl-CoA metabolites. This competitive activity-based capture approach provides a method to assess the selectivity of ligands for different KAT families in complex proteomic settings, and thus has the potential to offer substantial insights into the regulation of cellular KAT function. PMID:27423859

  8. Formation of radicals during heating lysine and glucose in solution with an intermediate water activity.

    PubMed

    Yin, J; Andersen, M L; Thomsen, M K; Skibsted, L H; Hedegaard, R V

    2013-08-01

    Heating glucose with lysine under alkaline conditions (pH 7.0-10.0) was found to take place with consumption of oxygen together with formation of brown-colored compounds. Highly reactive intermediary radicals were detected when lysine and glucose were heated at intermediate water activity at pH 7.0 and 8.0. The detection was based on initial trapping of highly reactive radicals by ethanol followed by spin trapping of 1-hydroxyethylradicals with α-(4-pyridyl N-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone (POBN) and Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The generation of reactive intermediary radicals from the Maillard reactions was favored by enhancing alkaline conditions (pH 8.0) and stimulated by presence of the transition metal ion Fe²⁺. The stability of the nitrone spin traps, N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone and POBN was examined in buffered aqueous solutions within the pH range 1-12, and found to be less temperature dependent at acidic pH compared to alkaline conditions. A low rate (kobs) of hydrolysis of POBN was found at the used experimental conditions of 70°C and pH 7.0 and 8.0, which made this spin trap method suitable for the detection of radicals in the Maillard reaction system. PMID:23745613

  9. Isolation and characterization of a novel phage lysin active against Paenibacillus larvae, a honeybee pathogen

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Lucy; Nezami, Sara; Yost, Diane; Tsourkas, Philippos; Amy, Penny S

    2015-01-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American foulbrood (AFB) disease which affects early larval stages during honeybee development. Due to its virulence, transmissibility, capacity to develop antibiotic resistance, and the inherent resilience of its endospores, Paenibacillus larvae is extremely difficult to eradicate from infected hives which often must be burned. AFB contributes to the worldwide decline of honeybee populations, which are crucial for pollination and the food supply. We have isolated a novel bacteriophage lysin, PlyPalA, from the genome of a novel Paenibacillus larvae bacteriophage originally extracted from an environmental sample. PlyPalA has an N-terminal N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase catalytic domain and possesses lytic activity against infectious strains of Paenibacillus larvae without harming commensal bacteria known to compose the honeybee larval microbiota. A single dose of PlyPalA rescued 75% of larvae infected with endospores, showing that it represents a powerful tool for future treatment of AFB. This represents the first time that lysins have been tested for therapeutic use in invertebrates. PMID:26904379

  10. Inhibition of bactericidal and bacteriolytic activities of poly-D-lysine and lysozyme by chitotriose and ferric iron.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, G R; O'Neill, M M; Cafarella, T G; Germaine, G R

    1991-02-01

    In a previous report from this laboratory (N. J. Laible and G. R. Germaine, Infect. Immun. 48:720-728, 1985), evidence was presented to suggest that the bactericidal actions of both reduced (i.e., muramidase-inactive) human placental lysozyme and the synthetic cationic homopolymer poly-D-lysine involved the activation of a bacterial endogenous activity that was inhibitable by N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriose (chitotriose). In the present investigation however, we found that the bactericidal and bacteriolytic action of poly-D-lysine could be prevented only by some commercially available chitotriose preparations and not by others. Analysis by physical and chemical methods failed to distinguish protective chitotriose (CTa) and nonprotective chitotriose (CTi) preparations. CTi and CTa preparations displayed equal capacities to competitively inhibit binding of [3H]chitotriose by immobilized lysozyme and were indistinguishable in their abilities to block the lytic activity of lysozyme against Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells. Elemental analysis revealed significantly higher levels of phosphorus, calcium, iron, sodium, manganese, and copper in CTa. Removal of metals from CTa by chelate chromatography completely abolished the poly-D-lysine-protective capacity. Of the metals detected, only ferric iron (5 to 10 microM) mimicked the protective action of CTa. A Fe(III) concentration of 50 microM was required to inhibit lysozyme (5 micrograms/ml). Both Fe(III) and CTa (but not CTi) quantitatively blocked the labeling of poly-D-lysine by fluorescamine, suggesting that the primary amino groups of the lysine residues participate in iron binding. Thus, it appears that the poly-D-lysine-protective capacity of certain chitotriose preparations was due not to the chitotriose itself but to contaminating metal ions which interact directly with the polycationic agent. In contrast, Fe(III) cannot account for inhibition of either the bactericidal or bacteriolytic activity of lysozyme by

  11. Enhanced HSP70 lysine methylation promotes proliferation of cancer cells through activation of Aurora kinase B.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Soo; Shimazu, Tadahiro; Toyokawa, Gouji; Daigo, Yataro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Hayami, Shinya; Ito, Akihiro; Masuda, Ken; Ikawa, Noriko; Field, Helen I; Tsuchiya, Eiju; Ohnuma, Shin-ichi; Ponder, Bruce A J; Yoshida, Minoru; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Ryuji

    2012-01-01

    Although heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70), an evolutionarily highly conserved molecular chaperone, is known to be post-translationally modified in various ways such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination and glycosylation, physiological significance of lysine methylation has never been elucidated. Here we identify dimethylation of HSP70 at Lys-561 by SETD1A. Enhanced HSP70 methylation was detected in various types of human cancer by immunohistochemical analysis, although the methylation was barely detectable in corresponding non-neoplastic tissues. Interestingly, methylated HSP70 predominantly localizes to the nucleus of cancer cells, whereas most of the HSP70 protein locates to the cytoplasm. Nuclear HSP70 directly interacts with Aurora kinase B (AURKB) in a methylation-dependent manner and promotes AURKB activity in vitro and in vivo. We also find that methylated HSP70 has a growth-promoting effect in cancer cells. Our findings demonstrate a crucial role of HSP70 methylation in human carcinogenesis. PMID:22990868

  12. Mass Spectrometry-assisted Study Reveals That Lysine Residues 1967 and 1968 Have Opposite Contribution to Stability of Activated Factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Bloem, Esther; Meems, Henriet; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; van der Zwaan, Carmen; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B.

    2012-01-01

    The A2 domain rapidly dissociates from activated factor VIII (FVIIIa) resulting in a dampening of the activity of the activated factor X-generating complex. The amino acid residues that affect A2 domain dissociation are therefore critical for FVIII cofactor function. We have now employed chemical footprinting in conjunction with mass spectrometry to identify lysine residues that contribute to the stability of activated FVIII. We hypothesized that lysine residues, which are buried in FVIII and surface-exposed in dissociated activated FVIII (dis-FVIIIa), may contribute to interdomain interactions. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that residues Lys1967 and Lys1968 of region Thr1964-Tyr1971 are buried in FVIII and exposed to the surface in dis-FVIIIa. This result, combined with the observation that the FVIII variant K1967I is associated with hemophilia A, suggests that these residues contribute to the stability of activated FVIII. Kinetic analysis revealed that the FVIII variants K1967A and K1967I exhibit an almost normal cofactor activity. However, these variants also showed an increased loss in cofactor activity over time compared with that of FVIII WT. Remarkably, the cofactor activity of a K1968A variant was enhanced and sustained for a prolonged time relative to that of FVIII WT. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that A2 domain dissociation from activated FVIII was reduced for K1968A and enhanced for K1967A. In conclusion, mass spectrometry analysis combined with site-directed mutagenesis studies revealed that the lysine couple Lys1967-Lys1968 within region Thr1964-Tyr1971 has an opposite contribution to the stability of FVIIIa. PMID:22215677

  13. Mass spectrometry-assisted study reveals that lysine residues 1967 and 1968 have opposite contribution to stability of activated factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Bloem, Esther; Meems, Henriet; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; van der Zwaan, Carmen; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B

    2012-02-17

    The A2 domain rapidly dissociates from activated factor VIII (FVIIIa) resulting in a dampening of the activity of the activated factor X-generating complex. The amino acid residues that affect A2 domain dissociation are therefore critical for FVIII cofactor function. We have now employed chemical footprinting in conjunction with mass spectrometry to identify lysine residues that contribute to the stability of activated FVIII. We hypothesized that lysine residues, which are buried in FVIII and surface-exposed in dissociated activated FVIII (dis-FVIIIa), may contribute to interdomain interactions. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that residues Lys(1967) and Lys(1968) of region Thr(1964)-Tyr(1971) are buried in FVIII and exposed to the surface in dis-FVIIIa. This result, combined with the observation that the FVIII variant K1967I is associated with hemophilia A, suggests that these residues contribute to the stability of activated FVIII. Kinetic analysis revealed that the FVIII variants K1967A and K1967I exhibit an almost normal cofactor activity. However, these variants also showed an increased loss in cofactor activity over time compared with that of FVIII WT. Remarkably, the cofactor activity of a K1968A variant was enhanced and sustained for a prolonged time relative to that of FVIII WT. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that A2 domain dissociation from activated FVIII was reduced for K1968A and enhanced for K1967A. In conclusion, mass spectrometry analysis combined with site-directed mutagenesis studies revealed that the lysine couple Lys(1967)-Lys(1968) within region Thr(1964)-Tyr(1971) has an opposite contribution to the stability of FVIIIa. PMID:22215677

  14. A Highly Active and Negatively Charged Streptococcus pyogenes Lysin with a Rare d-Alanyl-l-Alanine Endopeptidase Activity Protects Mice against Streptococcal Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Lood, Rolf; Raz, Assaf; Molina, Henrik; Euler, Chad W.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage endolysins have shown great efficacy in killing Gram-positive bacteria. PlyC, a group C streptococcal phage lysin, represents the most efficient lysin characterized to date, with a remarkably high specificity against different streptococcal species, including the important pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. However, PlyC is a unique lysin, in terms of both its high activity and structure (two distinct subunits). We sought to discover and characterize a phage lysin active against S. pyogenes with an endolysin architecture distinct from that of PlyC to determine if it relies on the same mechanism of action as PlyC. In this study, we identified and characterized an endolysin, termed PlyPy (phage lysin from S. pyogenes), from a prophage infecting S. pyogenes. By in silico analysis, PlyPy was found to have a molecular mass of 27.8 kDa and a pI of 4.16. It was active against a majority of group A streptococci and displayed high levels of activity as well as binding specificity against group B and C streptococci, while it was less efficient against other streptococcal species. PlyPy showed the highest activity at neutral pH in the presence of calcium and NaCl. Surprisingly, its activity was not affected by the presence of the group A-specific carbohydrate, while the activity of PlyC was partly inhibited. Additionally, PlyPy was active in vivo and could rescue mice from systemic bacteremia. Finally, we developed a novel method to determine the peptidoglycan bond cleaved by lysins and concluded that PlyPy exhibits a rare d-alanyl-l-alanine endopeptidase activity. PlyPy thus represents the first lysin characterized from Streptococcus pyogenes and has a mechanism of action distinct from that of PlyC. PMID:24637688

  15. Anti-angiogenic poly-L-lysine dendrimer binds heparin and neutralizes its activity.

    PubMed

    Al-Jamal, Khuloud T; Al-Jamal, Wafa T; Kostarelos, Kostas; Turton, John A; Florence, Alexander T

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between heparin, a polyanion, and a polycationic dendrimer with a glycine core and lysine branches Gly-Lys63(NH2)64 has been investigated. Complexation was assessed by transmission electron microscopy, size and zeta potential measurements, methylene blue spectroscopy, and measuring the anti-coagulant activity of heparin in vitro and in vivo. Complete association between the heparin and the dendrimer occurred a 1:1 mass ratio (2:1 molar ratio or +/-charge ratio) with formation of quasi-spherical complexes in the size range of 99-147 nm with a negative zeta potential (-47 mV). Heparin-dendrimer (dendriplex) formation led to a concentration-dependent neutralization of the anticoagulant activity of heparin in human plasma in vitro, with complete loss of activity at a 1:1 mass ratio. The anticoagulant activity of the dendriplexes in Sprague-Dawley rats was also evaluated after subcutaneous administration with uncomplexed heparin as a comparator. The in vivo anticoagulant activity of heparin in plasma, evaluated using an antifactor Xa assay, was abolished after complexation. Measurement of [(3)H]-heparin showed that both free heparin and dendriplexes were present in plasma and in organs. Such data confirmed stably the formation of dendriplexes, which could be essential in developing novel dendrimer-based anti-angiogenic therapeutics suitable in combinatory therapeutics and theranostics. PMID:25755989

  16. Characterization and crystal structure of lysine insensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydrodipicolinate synthase (cDHDPS) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, E.A.; Bannon, G.A.; Glenn, K.C.; Jeong, S.S.; Sturman, E.J.; Rydel, T.J.

    2008-11-21

    The lysine insensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydrodipicolinate synthase enzyme (cDHDPS) was recently successfully introduced into maize plants to enhance the level of lysine in the grain. To better understand lysine insensitivity of the cDHDPS, we expressed, purified, kinetically characterized the protein, and solved its X-ray crystal structure. The cDHDPS enzyme has a fold and overall structure that is highly similar to other DHDPS proteins. A noteworthy feature of the active site is the evidence that the catalytic lysine residue forms a Schiff base adduct with pyruvate. Analyses of the cDHDPS structure in the vicinity of the putative binding site for S-lysine revealed that the allosteric binding site in the Escherichia coli DHDPS protein does not exist in cDHDPS due to three non-conservative amino acids substitutions, and this is likely why cDHDPS is not feedback inhibited by lysine.

  17. A novel prophage lysin Ply5218 with extended lytic activity and stability against Streptococcus suis infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hang; Zhang, Chuanpeng; Wang, Hengan; Yan, Ya Xian; Sun, Jianhe

    2016-09-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is an emerging zoonotic agent that exhibits high level resistance to classic antibiotics and a heavy burden in the swine industry. Therefore alternative antibacterial agents need to be developed. A novel endolysin derived from the S. suis temperate phage phi5218, termed Ply5218, was identified. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Ply5218 was 2.5 μg ml(-1) against S. suis strain HA9801, an activity many times greater than the lysins reported previously (MIC of LY7917 and Ply30 against HA9801 were 80 and 64 μg ml(-1), respectively). Ply5218 at 10 μg ml(-1) in vitro exerted broad antibacterial activities against S. suis strains with OD600 ratios decreased from 1 to <0.2 within 1 h. Moreover, Ply5218 showed favorable thermal stability. It was stable at 50°C >30 min, 4°C >30 days, -80°C >7 months, and >60% of the enzyme activity remained after 5 min pre-incubation at 70°C. In vivo, a 0.2 mg dose of Ply5218 protected 90% (9/10) of mice after infection with S. suis HA9801. Finally, Ply5218 maintained high antibacterial activity in some bio-matrices, such as culture media and milk. The data indicate that Ply5218 has all the characteristics to be an effective therapeutic agent against multiple S. suis infections. PMID:27481700

  18. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 promotes brown adipose tissue thermogenesis via repressing glucocorticoid activation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xing; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Chen, Yi; Serag, Sara; Lavery, Gareth G; Gygi, Steve P; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2016-08-15

    Brown adipocytes display phenotypic plasticity, as they can switch between the active states of fatty acid oxidation and energy dissipation versus a more dormant state. Cold exposure or β-adrenergic stimulation favors the active thermogenic state, whereas sympathetic denervation or glucocorticoid administration promotes more lipid accumulation. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these switches is incomplete. Here we found that LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1), a histone demethylase, regulates brown adipocyte metabolism in two ways. On the one hand, LSD1 associates with PRDM16 to repress expression of white fat-selective genes. On the other hand, LSD1 represses HSD11B1 (hydroxysteroid 11-β-dehydrogenase isozyme 1), a key glucocorticoid-activating enzyme, independently from PRDM16. Adipose-specific ablation of LSD1 impaired mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation capacity of the brown adipose tissue, reduced whole-body energy expenditure, and increased fat deposition, which can be significantly alleviated by simultaneously deleting HSD11B1. These findings establish a novel regulatory pathway connecting histone modification and hormone activation with mitochondrial oxidative capacity and whole-body energy homeostasis. PMID:27566776

  19. Acetylation of Lysine92 Improves the Chaperone and Anti-apoptotic Activities of Human αB-Crystallin

    PubMed Central

    Nahomi, Rooban B.; Huang, Rong; Nandi, Sandip K.; Wang, Benlian; Padmanabha, Smitha; Santhoshkumar, Puttur; Filipek, Slawomir; Biswas, Ashis; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2013-01-01

    αB-Crystallin is a chaperone and an anti-apoptotic protein that is highly expressed in many tissues, including the lens, retina, heart and kidney. In the human lens, several lysine residues in αB-crystallin are acetylated. We have previously shown that such acetylation is predominant at lysine92 (K92) and K166. We have investigated the effect of lysine acetylation on the structure and functions of αB-crystallin by the specific introduction of an Nε-acetyllysine (AcK) mimic at K92. The introduction of AcK slightly altered the secondary and tertiary structures of the protein. AcK introduction also resulted in an increase in the molar mass and hydrodynamic radius of the protein, and the protein became structurally more open and more stable than the native protein. The acetyl protein acquired higher surface hydrophobicity and exhibited 25-55% higher chaperone activity than the native protein. The acetyl protein had higher client protein binding per subunit of the protein and higher binding affinity relative to the native protein. The acetyl protein was at least 20% more effective in inhibiting chemically induced apoptosis than the native protein. Molecular modeling suggests that acetylation of K92 makes the ‘α-crystallin domain’ more hydrophobic. Together, our results reveal that the acetylation of a single lysine residue in αB-crystallin makes the protein structurally more stable and improves its chaperone and anti-apoptotic activities. Our findings suggest that lysine acetylation of αB-crystallin is an important chemical modification to enhance αB-crystallin’s protective functions in the eye. PMID:24128140

  20. Saturation Mutagenesis of Lysine 12 Leads to the Identification of Derivatives of Nisin A with Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, Evelyn M.; Field, Des; Connor, Paula M. O'.; Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin; Ross, R. Paul

    2013-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that innovations from the “golden age” of antibiotics are becoming ineffective, resulting in a pressing need for novel therapeutics. The bacteriocin family of antimicrobial peptides has attracted much attention in recent years as a source of potential alternatives. The most intensively studied bacteriocin is nisin, a broad spectrum lantibiotic that inhibits Gram-positive bacteria including important food pathogens and clinically relevant antibiotic resistant bacteria. Nisin is gene-encoded and, as such, is amenable to peptide bioengineering, facilitating the generation of novel derivatives that can be screened for desirable properties. It was to this end that we used a site-saturation mutagenesis approach to create a bank of producers of nisin A derivatives that differ with respect to the identity of residue 12 (normally lysine; K12). A number of these producers exhibited enhanced bioactivity and the nisin A K12A producer was deemed of greatest interest. Subsequent investigations with the purified antimicrobial highlighted the enhanced specific activity of this modified nisin against representative target strains from the genera Streptococcus, Bacillus, Lactococcus, Enterococcus and Staphylococcus. PMID:23505531

  1. Saturation mutagenesis of lysine 12 leads to the identification of derivatives of nisin A with enhanced antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Evelyn M; Field, Des; O' Connor, Paula M; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2013-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that innovations from the "golden age" of antibiotics are becoming ineffective, resulting in a pressing need for novel therapeutics. The bacteriocin family of antimicrobial peptides has attracted much attention in recent years as a source of potential alternatives. The most intensively studied bacteriocin is nisin, a broad spectrum lantibiotic that inhibits gram-positive bacteria including important food pathogens and clinically relevant antibiotic resistant bacteria. Nisin is gene-encoded and, as such, is amenable to peptide bioengineering, facilitating the generation of novel derivatives that can be screened for desirable properties. It was to this end that we used a site-saturation mutagenesis approach to create a bank of producers of nisin A derivatives that differ with respect to the identity of residue 12 (normally lysine; K12). A number of these producers exhibited enhanced bioactivity and the nisin A K12A producer was deemed of greatest interest. Subsequent investigations with the purified antimicrobial highlighted the enhanced specific activity of this modified nisin against representative target strains from the genera Streptococcus, Bacillus, Lactococcus, Enterococcus and Staphylococcus. PMID:23505531

  2. Biological activities of racemomycin-B, beta-lysine rich streptothricin antibiotic, the main component of Streptomyces lavendulae OP-2.

    PubMed

    Inamori, Y; Amino, H; Tsuboi, M; Yamaguchi, S; Tsujibo, H

    1990-08-01

    Racemomycin-B (RM-B), the main component of Streptomyces lavendulae OP-2 which is the basis of 50% of the antibiotics produced, is a streptothricin antibiotic which contains three beta-lysine moieties in the molecule. RM-B had antimicrobial activity against plant-pathogenic microorganisms and growth-inhibitory activity against the root of Brassica rapa L. at the concentration of 50 ppm. It strongly inhibited the growth of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci IFO-3508 (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC): 0.4 microgram/ml), and also showed antifungal activity against six kinds of Fusarium oxysporum species (MIC: 0.1-2.0 micrograms/ml). The antimicrobial activity of RM-B was much stronger than those of RM-A and -C which contain, respectively, one and two beta-lysine moieties in their molecules. The above activities of RM-A, -C and -B were thus in the order of -B greater than -C greater than -A: namely, the biological activity of racemomycin compounds tended to be stronger with increase in the number of beta-lysine moieties in the molecule.

  3. Role of the lysine-rich cluster of the C2 domain in the phosphatidylserine-dependent activation of PKCalpha.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Alfaro, Jose A; Gomez-Fernandez, Juan C; Corbalan-Garcia, Senena

    2004-01-23

    The C2 domain of PKCalpha is a Ca(2+)-dependent membrane-targeting module involved in the plasma membrane localization of the enzyme. Recent findings have shown an additional area located in the beta3-beta4 strands, named the lysine-rich cluster, which has been demonstrated to be involved in the PtdIns(4,5)P(2)-dependent activation of the enzyme. Nevertheless, whether other anionic phospholipids can bind to this region and contribute to the regulation of the enzyme's function is not clear. To study other possible roles for this cluster, we generated double and triple mutants that substituted the lysine by alanine residues, and studied their binding and activation properties in a Ca(2+)/phosphatidylserine-dependent manner and compared them with the wild-type protein. It was found that some of the mutants exerted a constitutive activation independently of membrane binding. Furthermore, the constructs were fused to green fluorescent protein and were expressed in fibroblast cells. It was shown that none of the mutants was able to translocate to the plasma membrane, even in saturating conditions of Ca(2+) and diacylglycerol, suggesting that the interactions performed by this lysine-rich cluster are a key event in the subcellular localization of PKCalpha. Taken together, the results obtained showed that these lysine residues might be involved in two functions: one to establish an intramolecular interaction that keeps the enzyme in an inactive conformation; and the second, once the enzyme has been partially activated, to establish further interactions with diacylglycerol and/or acidic phospholipids, leading to the full activation of PKCalpha.

  4. HDAC3-dependent reversible lysine acetylation of cardiac myosin heavy chain isoforms modulates their enzymatic and motor activity.

    PubMed

    Samant, Sadhana A; Courson, David S; Sundaresan, Nagalingam R; Pillai, Vinodkumar B; Tan, Minjia; Zhao, Yingming; Shroff, Sanjeev G; Rock, Ronald S; Gupta, Mahesh P

    2011-02-18

    Reversible lysine acetylation is a widespread post-translational modification controlling the activity of proteins in different subcellular compartments. We previously demonstrated that a class II histone deacetylase (HDAC), HDAC4, and a histone acetyltransferase, PCAF, associate with cardiac sarcomeres, and a class I and II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A, enhances contractile activity of myofilaments. In this study, we show that a class I HDAC, HDAC3, is also present at cardiac sarcomeres. By immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analyses, we found that HDAC3 was localized to the A band of sarcomeres and was capable of deacetylating myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. The motor domains of both cardiac α- and β-MHC isoforms were found to be reversibly acetylated. Biomechanical studies revealed that lysine acetylation significantly decreased the K(m) for the actin-activated ATPase activity of both α- and β-MHC isoforms. By an in vitro motility assay, we found that lysine acetylation increased the actin sliding velocity of α-myosin by 20% and β-myosin by 36%, compared to their respective non-acetylated isoforms. Moreover, myosin acetylation was found to be sensitive to cardiac stress. During induction of hypertrophy, myosin isoform acetylation increased progressively with duration of stress stimuli, independent of isoform shift, suggesting that lysine acetylation of myosin could be an early response of myofilaments to increase contractile performance of the heart. These studies provide the first evidence for localization of HDAC3 at myofilaments and uncover a novel mechanism modulating the motor activity of cardiac MHC isoforms.

  5. Expression of the Bovine NK-Lysin Gene Family and Activity against Respiratory Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junfeng; Yang, Chingyuan; Tizioto, Polyana C.; Huang, Huan; Lee, Mi O. K.; Payne, Harold R.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Womack, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the genomes of many mammals that have a single NK-lysin gene, the cattle genome contains a family of four genes, one of which is expressed preferentially in the lung. In this study, we compared the expression of the four bovine NK-lysin genes in healthy animals to animals challenged with pathogens known to be associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). The expression of several NK-lysins, especially NK2C, was elevated in challenged relative to control animals. The effects of synthetic peptides corresponding to functional region helices 2 and 3 of each gene product were tested on both model membranes and bio-membranes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that these peptides adopted a more helical secondary structure upon binding to an anionic model membrane and liposome leakage assays suggested that these peptides disrupt membranes. Bacterial killing assays further confirmed the antimicrobial effects of these peptides on BRD-associated bacteria, including both Pasteurella multocida and Mannhemia haemolytica and an ultrastructural examination of NK-lysin-treated P. multocida cells by transmission electron microscopy revealed the lysis of target membranes. These studies demonstrate that the expanded bovine NK-lysin gene family is potentially important in host defense against pathogens involved in bovine respiratory disease. PMID:27409794

  6. Expression of the Bovine NK-Lysin Gene Family and Activity against Respiratory Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junfeng; Yang, Chingyuan; Tizioto, Polyana C; Huang, Huan; Lee, Mi O K; Payne, Harold R; Lawhon, Sara D; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Taylor, Jeremy F; Womack, James E

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the genomes of many mammals that have a single NK-lysin gene, the cattle genome contains a family of four genes, one of which is expressed preferentially in the lung. In this study, we compared the expression of the four bovine NK-lysin genes in healthy animals to animals challenged with pathogens known to be associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). The expression of several NK-lysins, especially NK2C, was elevated in challenged relative to control animals. The effects of synthetic peptides corresponding to functional region helices 2 and 3 of each gene product were tested on both model membranes and bio-membranes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that these peptides adopted a more helical secondary structure upon binding to an anionic model membrane and liposome leakage assays suggested that these peptides disrupt membranes. Bacterial killing assays further confirmed the antimicrobial effects of these peptides on BRD-associated bacteria, including both Pasteurella multocida and Mannhemia haemolytica and an ultrastructural examination of NK-lysin-treated P. multocida cells by transmission electron microscopy revealed the lysis of target membranes. These studies demonstrate that the expanded bovine NK-lysin gene family is potentially important in host defense against pathogens involved in bovine respiratory disease. PMID:27409794

  7. Lysine and Arginine Reduce the Effects of Cerebral Ischemic Insults and Inhibit Glutamate-Induced Neuronal Activity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kondoh, Takashi; Kameishi, Makiko; Mallick, Hruda Nanda; Ono, Taketoshi; Torii, Kunio

    2010-01-01

    Intravenous administration of arginine was shown to be protective against cerebral ischemic insults via nitric oxide production and possibly via additional mechanisms. The present study aimed at evaluating the neuroprotective effects of oral administration of lysine (a basic amino acid), arginine, and their combination on ischemic insults (cerebral edema and infarction) and hemispheric brain swelling induced by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion in rats. Magnetic resonance imaging and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining were performed 2 days after ischemia induction. In control animals, the major edematous areas were observed in the cerebral cortex and striatum. The volumes associated with cortical edema were significantly reduced by lysine (2.0 g/kg), arginine (0.6 g/kg), or their combined administration (0.6 g/kg each). Protective effects of these amino acids on infarction were comparable to the inhibitory effects on edema formation. Interestingly, these amino acids, even at low dose (0.6 g/kg), were effective to reduce hemispheric brain swelling. Additionally, the effects of in vivo microiontophoretic (juxtaneuronal) applications of these amino acids on glutamate-evoked neuronal activity in the ventromedial hypothalamus were investigated in awake rats. Glutamate-induced neuronal activity was robustly inhibited by microiontophoretic applications of lysine or arginine onto neuronal membranes. Taken together, our results demonstrate the neuroprotective effects of oral ingestion of lysine and arginine against ischemic insults (cerebral edema and infarction), especially in the cerebral cortex, and suggest that suppression of glutamate-induced neuronal activity might be the primary mechanism associated with these neuroprotective effects. PMID:20589237

  8. iUbiq-Lys: prediction of lysine ubiquitination sites in proteins by extracting sequence evolution information via a gray system model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wang-Ren; Xiao, Xuan; Lin, Wei-Zhong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most important posttranslational modifications (PTMs), ubiquitination plays an important role in regulating varieties of biological processes, such as signal transduction, cell division, apoptosis, and immune response. Ubiquitination is also named "lysine ubiquitination" because it occurs when an ubiquitin is covalently attached to lysine (K) residues of targeting proteins. Given an uncharacterized protein sequence that contains many lysine residues, which one of them is the ubiquitination site, and which one is of non-ubiquitination site? With the avalanche of protein sequences generated in the postgenomic age, it is highly desired for both basic research and drug development to develop an automated method for rapidly and accurately annotating the ubiquitination sites in proteins. In view of this, a new predictor called "iUbiq-Lys" was developed based on the evolutionary information, gray system model, as well as the general form of pseudo-amino acid composition. It was demonstrated via the rigorous cross-validations that the new predictor remarkably outperformed all its counterparts. As a web-server, iUbiq-Lys is accessible to the public at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iUbiq-Lys . For the convenience of most experimental scientists, we have further provided a protocol of step-by-step guide, by which users can easily get their desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematics that were presented in this paper just for the integrity of its development process.

  9. Synthesis and biological activity of a lysine-containing cyclic analog of (Leu/sup 5/)enkephalin

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrova, I.V.; Abissova, N.A.; Rozental', G.F.; Nikiforovich, G.V.; Chipens, G.I.

    1986-09-01

    A cyclic analog of enkephalin - cyclo(Lys-Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu) -- and two corresponding linear hexapeptides containing a residue of the amino acid lysine at the beginning and the end of the molecule - Lys-Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu and Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu-Lys - have been synthesized by the classical methods of peptide chemistry. The addition of a lysine residue to the N-end of the enkephalin molecule or the cyclization of this hexapeptide decreased the action of the analogs on the central and peripheral opiate receptors. The addition of lysine through the epsilon-amino group to the C-end of the enkephalin molecule scarcely changed the interaction of the analog with the ..mu..-type of opiate receptor but lowered its affinity for the delta-type of receptor approximately 10-fold. All three analogs that were synthesized possessed an analgesic activity comparable in magnitude with the activity of (Leu/sup 5/)enkephalin determined by the tail pinch method on intracisternal administration to mice.

  10. Arabidopsis Receptor of Activated C Kinase1 Phosphorylation by WITH NO LYSINE8 KINASE

    DOE PAGES

    Urano, Daisuke; Czarnecki, Olaf; Wang, Xiaoping; Jones, Alan M.; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2014-12-08

    Receptor of activated C kinase1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that binds to numerous proteins to regulate diverse cellular pathways in mammals. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), RACK1 has been shown to regulate plant hormone signaling, stress responses, and multiple processes of growth and development. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. In this paper, we show that an atypical serine (Ser)/threonine (Thr) protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE8 (WNK8), phosphorylates RACK1. WNK8 physically interacted with and phosphorylated RACK1 proteins at two residues: Ser-122 and Thr-162. Genetic epistasis analysis of rack1 wnk8 double mutants indicated that RACK1more » acts downstream of WNK8 in the glucose responsiveness and flowering pathways. The phosphorylation-dead form, RACK1AS122A/T162A, but not the phosphomimetic form, RACK1AS122D/T162E, rescued the rack1a null mutant, implying that phosphorylation at Ser-122 and Thr-162 negatively regulates RACK1A function. The transcript of RACK1AS122D/T162E accumulated at similar levels as those of RACK1S122A/T162A. However, although the steady-state level of the RACK1AS122A/T162A protein was similar to wild-type RACK1A protein, the RACK1AS122D/T162E protein was nearly undetectable, suggesting that phosphorylation affects the stability of RACK1A proteins. In conclusion, these results suggest that RACK1 is phosphorylated by WNK8 and that phosphorylation negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability.« less

  11. Arabidopsis Receptor of Activated C Kinase1 Phosphorylation by WITH NO LYSINE8 KINASE

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, Daisuke; Czarnecki, Olaf; Wang, Xiaoping; Jones, Alan M.; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2014-12-08

    Receptor of activated C kinase1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that binds to numerous proteins to regulate diverse cellular pathways in mammals. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), RACK1 has been shown to regulate plant hormone signaling, stress responses, and multiple processes of growth and development. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. In this paper, we show that an atypical serine (Ser)/threonine (Thr) protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE8 (WNK8), phosphorylates RACK1. WNK8 physically interacted with and phosphorylated RACK1 proteins at two residues: Ser-122 and Thr-162. Genetic epistasis analysis of rack1 wnk8 double mutants indicated that RACK1 acts downstream of WNK8 in the glucose responsiveness and flowering pathways. The phosphorylation-dead form, RACK1AS122A/T162A, but not the phosphomimetic form, RACK1AS122D/T162E, rescued the rack1a null mutant, implying that phosphorylation at Ser-122 and Thr-162 negatively regulates RACK1A function. The transcript of RACK1AS122D/T162E accumulated at similar levels as those of RACK1S122A/T162A. However, although the steady-state level of the RACK1AS122A/T162A protein was similar to wild-type RACK1A protein, the RACK1AS122D/T162E protein was nearly undetectable, suggesting that phosphorylation affects the stability of RACK1A proteins. In conclusion, these results suggest that RACK1 is phosphorylated by WNK8 and that phosphorylation negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability.

  12. Polygalacturonase-Inhibiting Protein Interacts with Pectin through a Binding Site Formed by Four Clustered Residues of Arginine and Lysine1

    PubMed Central

    Spadoni, Sara; Zabotina, Olga; Di Matteo, Adele; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Mattei, Benedetta; Bellincampi, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) is a cell wall protein that inhibits fungal polygalacturonases (PGs) and retards the invasion of plant tissues by phytopathogenic fungi. Here, we report the interaction of two PGIP isoforms from Phaseolus vulgaris (PvPGIP1 and PvPGIP2) with both polygalacturonic acid and cell wall fractions containing uronic acids. We identify in the three-dimensional structure of PvPGIP2 a motif of four clustered arginine and lysine residues (R183, R206, K230, and R252) responsible for this binding. The four residues were mutated and the protein variants were expressed in Pichia pastoris. The ability of both wild-type and mutated proteins to bind pectins was investigated by affinity chromatography. Single mutations impaired the binding and double mutations abolished the interaction, thus indicating that the four clustered residues form the pectin-binding site. Remarkably, the binding of PGIP to pectin is displaced in vitro by PGs, suggesting that PGIP interacts with pectin and PGs through overlapping although not identical regions. The specific interaction of PGIP with polygalacturonic acid may be strategic to protect pectins from the degrading activity of fungal PGs. PMID:16648220

  13. Profiling of histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation levels predicts transcription factor activity and survival in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Hascher, Antje; Isken, Fabienne; Tickenbrock, Lara; Thoennissen, Nils; Agrawal-Singh, Shuchi; Tschanter, Petra; Disselhoff, Christine; Wang, Yipeng; Becker, Anke; Thiede, Christian; Ehninger, Gerhard; zur Stadt, Udo; Koschmieder, Steffen; Seidl, Matthias; Müller, Frank U.; Schmitz, Wilhelm; Schlenke, Peter; McClelland, Michael; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Dugas, Martin; Serve, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is commonly associated with alterations in transcription factors because of altered expression or gene mutations. These changes might induce leukemia-specific patterns of histone modifications. We used chromatin-immunoprecipitation on microarray to analyze histone 3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) patterns in primary AML (n = 108), acute lymphoid leukemia (n = 28), CD34+ cells (n = 21) and white blood cells (n = 15) specimens. Hundreds of promoter regions in AML showed significant alterations in H3K9me3 levels. H3K9me3 deregulation in AML occurred preferentially as a decrease in H3K9me3 levels at core promoter regions. The altered genomic regions showed an overrepresentation of cis-binding sites for ETS and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response elements (CREs) for transcription factors of the CREB/CREM/ATF1 family. The decrease in H3K9me3 levels at CREs was associated with increased CRE-driven promoter activity in AML blasts in vivo. AML-specific H3K9me3 patterns were not associated with known cytogenetic abnormalities. But a signature derived from H3K9me3 patterns predicted event-free survival in AML patients. When the H3K9me3 signature was combined with established clinical prognostic markers, it outperformed prognosis prediction based on clinical parameters alone. These findings demonstrate widespread changes of H3K9me3 levels at gene promoters in AML. Signatures of histone modification patterns are associated with patient prognosis in AML. PMID:20498303

  14. Identification of lysine-411 in the human reduced folate carrier as an important determinant of substrate selectivity and carrier function by systematic site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Witt, Teah L; Matherly, Larry H

    2002-12-23

    Site-directed mutagenesis was used to characterize the functional role of lysine-411, a conserved amino acid located in putative transmembrane domain (TMD) 11 of the human reduced folate carrier (hRFC). Lysine-411 was mutagenized to arginine, glutamate, and leucine, and the mutant constructs (K411R-, K411E-, and K411L-hRFC, respectively) were transfected into hRFC-deficient K562 cells. The mutant hRFC constructs were all expressed at high levels and restored 22-36% of the methotrexate (MTX) transport level in wild-type (K43-6) hRFC transfectants. Although 5-formyl tetrahydrofolate (5-CHO-H(4)PteGlu) uptake levels for both the K411E- and K411L-hRFCs were also impaired (approximately 33% and 28%, respectively), a complete restoration of the wild-type level was observed for K411R-hRFC. While loss of MTX transport activity for the K411R-hRFC transfectant was associated with an incomplete restoration of MTX sensitivity compared to K43-6 cells, these cells were similarly sensitive to Tomudex. The K411R-hRFC transfectants showed an approximately threefold decreased growth requirement for 5-CHO-H(4)PteGlu compared to K43-6 cells. The 5-CHO-H(4)PteGlu transport stimulation observed for the wild-type carrier in chloride-free buffer was also observed for K411R-hRFC, however, this response was decreased for the K411E- and K411L-hRFCs. The preservation of low levels of transport for the K411E- and K411L-hRFCs suggest that the amino acid at position 411 does not directly participate in the binding of anionic hRFC substrates. However, a functionally important role for a basic amino acid at position 411 was, nonetheless, implied by the increased MTX transport for wild-type hRFC over the K411 mutant hRFCs, and the highly selective uptake of 5-CHO-H(4)PteGlu over MTX for K411R-hRFC. PMID:12488038

  15. Antibacterial activity and mechanism of action of ε-poly-L-lysine

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Ruosong; Xu, Hengyi; Wan, Cuixiang; Peng, Shanshan; Wang, Lijun; Xu, Hong; Aguilar, Zoraida P.; Xiong, Yonghua; Zeng, Zheling; Wei, Hua

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •Antibacterial activity and mechanism of ε-PL against E. coli O157:H7 was investigated. •Critical inhibitory factors toward the growth of E. coli O157:H7 by ε-PL was analyzed. •Cell membrane integrity and cell morphology of E. coli O157:H7 was affected by ε-PL. •A positive correlation between reactive oxygen species levels and ε-PL concentration in E. coli O157:H7 cells. •ε-PL induced the expression of different genes related to oxidative/redox stress, SOS response, virulence. -- Abstract: ε-Poly-L-lysine (ε-PL) is widely used as an antibacterial agent because of its broad antimicrobial spectrum. However, the mechanism of ε-PL against pathogens at the molecular level has not been elucidated. This study investigated the antibacterial activity and mechanism of ε-PL against Escherichia coli O157:H7 CMCC44828. Propidium monoazide-PCR test results indicated that the threshold condition of ε-PL for complete membrane lysis of E. coli O157:H7 was 10 μg/mL (90% mortality for 5 μg/mL). Further verification of the destructive effect of ε-PL on cell structure was performed by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Results showed a positive correlation between reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and ε-PL concentration in E. coli O157:H7 cells. Moreover, the mortality of E. coli O157:H7 was reduced when antioxidant N-acetylcysteine was added. Results from real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) indicated that the expression levels of oxidative stress genes sodA and oxyR were up-regulated 4- and 16-fold, respectively, whereas virulence genes eaeA and espA were down-regulated after ε-PL treatment. Expression of DNA damage response (SOS response) regulon genes recA and lexA were also affected by ε-PL. In conclusion, the antibacterial mechanism of ε-PL against E. coli O157:H7 may be attributed to disturbance on membrane integrity, oxidative stress by ROS, and effects on various gene expressions, such as regulation of

  16. Lysine nutrition in swine and the related monogastric animals: muscle protein biosynthesis and beyond.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shengfa F; Wang, Taiji; Regmi, Naresh

    2015-01-01

    Improving feed efficiency of pigs with dietary application of amino acids (AAs) is becoming increasingly important because this practice can not only secure the plasma AA supply for muscle growth but also protect the environment from nitrogen discharge with feces and urine. Lysine, the first limiting AA in typical swine diets, is a substrate for generating body proteins, peptides, and non-peptide molecules, while excess lysine is catabolized as an energy source. From a regulatory standpoint, lysine is at the top level in controlling AA metabolism, and lysine can also affect the metabolism of other nutrients. The effect of lysine on hormone production and activities is reflected by the change of plasma concentrations of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1. Lysine residues in peptides are important sites for protein post-translational modification involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression. An inborn error of a cationic AA transporter in humans can lead to a lysinuric protein intolerance condition. Dietary deficiency of lysine will impair animal immunity and elevate animal susceptibility to infectious diseases. Because lysine deficiency has negative impact on animal health and growth performance and it appears that dietary lysine is non-toxic even at a high dose of supplementation, nutritional emphasis should be put on lysine supplementation to avoid its deficiency rather than toxicity. Improvement of muscle growth of monogastric animals such as pigs via dietary lysine supply may be due to a greater increase in protein synthesis rather than a decrease in protein degradation. Nevertheless, the underlying metabolic and molecular mechanisms regarding lysine effect on muscle protein accretion merits further clarification. Future research undertaken to fully elucidate the metabolic and regulatory mechanisms of lysine nutrition could provide a sound scientific foundation necessary for developing novel nutritional strategies to enhance the muscle growth and

  17. Lysine-Based Small Molecules That Disrupt Biofilms and Kill both Actively Growing Planktonic and Nondividing Stationary Phase Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Konai, Mohini M; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-10-01

    The emergence of bacterial resistance is a major threat to global health. Alongside this issue, formation of bacterial biofilms is another cause of concern because most antibiotics are ineffective against these recalcitrant microbial communities. Ideal future antibacterial therapeutics should possess both antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities. In this study we engineered lysine-based small molecules, which showed not only commendable broad-spectrum antibacterial activity but also potent biofilm-disrupting properties. Synthesis of these lipophilic lysine-norspermidine conjugates was achieved in three simple reaction steps, and the resultant molecules displayed potent antibacterial activity against various Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) including drug-resistant superbugs MRSA (methicillin-resistant S. aureus), VRE (vancomycin-resistant E. faecium), and β-lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. An optimized compound in the series showed activity against planktonic bacteria in the concentration range of 3-10 μg/mL, and bactericidal activity against stationary phase S. aureus was observed within an hour. The compound also displayed about 120-fold selectivity toward both classes of bacteria (S. aureus and E. coli) over human erythrocytes. This rapidly bactericidal compound primarily acts on bacteria by causing significant membrane depolarization and K(+) leakage. Most importantly, the compound disrupted preformed biofilms of S. aureus and did not trigger bacterial resistance. Therefore, this class of compounds has high potential to be developed as future antibacterial drugs for treating infections caused by planktonic bacteria as well as bacterial biofilms. PMID:27623313

  18. Lysine-Based Small Molecules That Disrupt Biofilms and Kill both Actively Growing Planktonic and Nondividing Stationary Phase Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Konai, Mohini M; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-10-01

    The emergence of bacterial resistance is a major threat to global health. Alongside this issue, formation of bacterial biofilms is another cause of concern because most antibiotics are ineffective against these recalcitrant microbial communities. Ideal future antibacterial therapeutics should possess both antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities. In this study we engineered lysine-based small molecules, which showed not only commendable broad-spectrum antibacterial activity but also potent biofilm-disrupting properties. Synthesis of these lipophilic lysine-norspermidine conjugates was achieved in three simple reaction steps, and the resultant molecules displayed potent antibacterial activity against various Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) including drug-resistant superbugs MRSA (methicillin-resistant S. aureus), VRE (vancomycin-resistant E. faecium), and β-lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. An optimized compound in the series showed activity against planktonic bacteria in the concentration range of 3-10 μg/mL, and bactericidal activity against stationary phase S. aureus was observed within an hour. The compound also displayed about 120-fold selectivity toward both classes of bacteria (S. aureus and E. coli) over human erythrocytes. This rapidly bactericidal compound primarily acts on bacteria by causing significant membrane depolarization and K(+) leakage. Most importantly, the compound disrupted preformed biofilms of S. aureus and did not trigger bacterial resistance. Therefore, this class of compounds has high potential to be developed as future antibacterial drugs for treating infections caused by planktonic bacteria as well as bacterial biofilms.

  19. Lysine-specific demethylase-1 contributes to malignant behavior by regulation of invasive activity and metabolic shift in esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kosumi, Keisuke; Baba, Yoshifumi; Sakamoto, Akihisa; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Harada, Kazuto; Nakamura, Kenichi; Kurashige, Junji; Hiyoshi, Yukiharu; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Iwagami, Shiro; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Miyamoto, Yuji; Yoshida, Naoya; Oki, Eiji; Watanabe, Masayuki; Hino, Shinjiro; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Baba, Hideo

    2016-01-15

    Lysine-specific demethylase-1 (LSD1) removes the methyl groups from mono- and di-methylated lysine 4 of histone H3. Previous studies have linked LSD1 to malignancy in several human tumors, and LSD1 is considered to epigenetically regulate the energy metabolism genes in adipocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma. This study investigates the function of LSD1 in the invasive activity and the metabolism of esophageal cancer cells. We investigated whether LSD1 immunohistochemical expression levels are related to clinical and pathological features, including the maximum standard uptake value in fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography assay. The influence of LSD1 on cell proliferation, invasion and glucose uptake was evaluated in vitro by using specific small interfering RNA for LSD1, and an LSD1 inhibitor. We also evaluated two major energy pathways (glycolytic pathway and mitochondrial respiration) by measuring the extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) and the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) with an extracellular flux analyzer. High LSD1 immunohistochemical expression was significantly associated with high tumor stage, lymphovascular invasion, poor prognosis, and high maximum standard uptake value in esophageal cancer patients. In the in vitro analysis, LSD1 knockdown significantly suppressed the invasive activity and glucose uptake of cancerous cells, reduced their ECAR and increased their OCR and OCR/ECAR. LSD1 may contribute to malignant behavior by regulating the invasive activity and metabolism, activating the glycolytic pathway and inhibiting the mitochondrial respiration of esophageal cancer cells. The results support LSD1 as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26240060

  20. Activation of neuronal Kv7/KCNQ/M-channels by the opener QO58-lysine and its anti-nociceptive effects on inflammatory pain in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Bo-chuan; Song, Yan; Zhang, Fan; Ma, Tian-yang; Qi, Jin-long; Zhang, Hai-lin; Li, Gang; Wang, KeWei

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the activation of neuronal Kv7/KCNQ channels by a novel modified Kv7 opener QO58-lysine and to test the anti-nociceptive effects of QO58-lysine on inflammatory pain in rodent models. Methods: Assays including whole-cell patch clamp recordings, HPLC, and in vivo pain behavioral evaluations were employed. Results: QO58-lysine caused instant activation of Kv7.2/7.3 currents, and increasing the dose of QO58-lysine resulted in a dose-dependent activation of Kv7.2/Kv7.3 currents with an EC50 of 1.2±0.2 μmol/L. QO58-lysine caused a leftward shift of the voltage-dependent activation of Kv7.2/Kv7.3 to a hyperpolarized potential at V1/2=-54.4±2.5 mV from V1/2=-26.0±0.6 mV. The half-life in plasma (t1/2) was derived as 2.9, 2.7, and 3.0 h for doses of 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/kg, respectively. The absolute bioavailabilities for the three doses (12.5, 25, and 50 mg/kg) of QO58-lysine (po) were determined as 13.7%, 24.3%, and 39.3%, respectively. QO58-lysine caused a concentration-dependent reduction in the licking times during phase II pain induced by the injection of formalin into the mouse hindpaw. In the Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain model in rats, oral or intraperitoneal administration of QO58-lysine resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the paw withdrawal threshold, and the anti-nociceptive effect on mechanical allodynia could be reversed by the channel-specific blocker XE991 (3 mg/kg). Conclusion: Taken together, our findings show that a modified QO58 compound (QO58-lysine) can specifically activate Kv7.2/7.3/M-channels. Oral or intraperitoneal administration of QO58-lysine, which has improved bioavailability and a half-life of approximately 3 h in plasma, can reverse inflammatory pain in rodent animal models. PMID:27264315

  1. Degradation of Activated K-Ras Orthologue via K-Ras-specific Lysine Residues Is Required for Cytokinesis*

    PubMed Central

    Sumita, Kazutaka; Yoshino, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Mika; Majd, Nazanin; Kahoud, Emily Rose; Takahashi, Hidenori; Takeuchi, Koh; Kuroda, Taruho; Lee, Susan; Charest, Pascale G.; Takeda, Kosuke; Asara, John M.; Firtel, Richard A.; Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Sasaki, Atsuo T.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian cells encode three closely related Ras proteins, H-Ras, N-Ras, and K-Ras. Oncogenic K-Ras mutations frequently occur in human cancers, which lead to dysregulated cell proliferation and genomic instability. However, mechanistic role of the Ras isoform regulation have remained largely unknown. Furthermore, the dynamics and function of negative regulation of GTP-loaded K-Ras have not been fully investigated. Here, we demonstrate RasG, the Dictyostelium orthologue of K-Ras, is targeted for degradation by polyubiquitination. Both ubiquitination and degradation of RasG were strictly associated with RasG activity. High resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis indicated that RasG ubiquitination occurs at C-terminal lysines equivalent to lysines found in human K-Ras but not in H-Ras and N-Ras homologues. Substitution of these lysine residues with arginines (4KR-RasG) diminished RasG ubiquitination and increased RasG protein stability. Cells expressing 4KR-RasG failed to undergo proper cytokinesis and resulted in multinucleated cells. Ectopically expressed human K-Ras undergoes polyubiquitin-mediated degradation in Dictyostelium, whereas human H-Ras and a Dictyostelium H-Ras homologue (RasC) are refractory to ubiquitination. Our results indicate the existence of GTP-loaded K-Ras orthologue-specific degradation system in Dictyostelium, and further identification of the responsible E3-ligase may provide a novel therapeutic approach against K-Ras-mutated cancers. PMID:24338482

  2. Expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinases in wounds: modulation by the tripeptide-copper complex glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine-Cu2+.

    PubMed

    Siméon, A; Monier, F; Emonard, H; Gillery, P; Birembaut, P; Hornebeck, W; Maquart, F X

    1999-06-01

    We investigated the expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinases in a model of experimental wounds in rats, and their modulation by glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine-Cu(II), a potent activator of wound repair. Wound chambers were inserted under the skin of Sprague-Dawley rats and received serial injections of either 2 mg glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine-Cu(II) or the same volume of saline. The wound fluid and the neosynthetized connective tissue deposited in the chambers were collected and analyzed for matrix metalloproteinase expression and/or activity. Interstitial collagenase increased progressively in the wound fluid throughout the experiment. Glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine-Cu(II) treatment did not alter its activity. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (gelatinase B) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (gelatinase A) were the two main gelatinolytic activities expressed during the healing process. Pro-matrix metalloproteinase (pro-form of matrix metalloproteinase)-9 was strongly expressed during the early stages of wound healing (day 3). In the wound fluid, it decreased rapidly and disappeared after day 18, whereas in the wound tissue, matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression persisted in the glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine-Cu(II) injected chamber until day 22. Pro-matrix metalloproteinase-2 was expressed at low levels at the beginning of the healing process, increased progressively until day 7, then decreased until day 18. Activated matrix metalloproteinase-2 was present in wound fluid and wound tissue. It increased until day 12, then decreased progressively. Glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine-Cu(II) injections increased pro-matrix metalloproteinase-2 and activated matrix metalloproteinase-2 during the later stages of healing (days 18 and/or 22). These results demonstrate that various types of matrix metalloproteinases are selectively expressed or activated at the various periods of wound healing. Glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine-Cu(II) is able to modulate their expression and might significantly alter

  3. Role of hMOF-dependent histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation in the maintenance of TMS1/ASC gene activity1

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor-Vazirani, Priya; Kagey, Jacob D.; Powell, Doris R.; Vertino, Paula M.

    2008-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes in human cancers is associated with aberrant methylation of promoter region CpG islands and local alterations in histone modifications. However, the mechanisms that drive these events remain unclear. Here, we establish an important role for histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation (H4K16Ac) and the histone acetyltransferase hMOF in the regulation of TMS1/ASC, a proapoptotic gene that undergoes epigenetic silencing in human cancers. In the unmethylated and active state, the TMS1 CpG island is spanned by positioned nucleosomes and marked by histone H3K4 methylation. H4K16Ac was uniquely localized to two sharp peaks that flanked the unmethylated CpG island and corresponded to strongly positioned nucleosomes. Aberrant methylation and silencing of TMS1 was accompanied by loss of the H4K16Ac peaks, loss of nucleosome positioning, hypomethylation of H3K4 and hypermethylation of H3K9. In addition, a single peak of histone H4 lysine 20 trimethylation was observed near the transcription start site. Downregulation of hMOF or another component of the MSL complex resulted in a gene-specific decrease in H4K16Ac, loss of nucleosome positioning and silencing of TMS1. Gene silencing induced by H4K16 deacetylation occurred independently of changes in histone methylation and DNA methylation and was reversed upon hMOF re-expression. These results indicate that the selective marking of nucleosomes flanking the CpG island by hMOF is required to maintain TMS1 gene activity, and suggest that the loss of H4K16Ac, mobilization of nucleosomes and transcriptional downregulation may be important events in the epigenetic silencing of certain tumor suppressor genes in cancer. PMID:18701507

  4. The N-Terminal Region of the Oenococcus oeni Bacteriophage fOg44 Lysin Behaves as a Bona Fide Signal Peptide in Escherichia coli and as a cis-Inhibitory Element, Preventing Lytic Activity on Oenococcal Cells

    PubMed Central

    São-José, Carlos; Parreira, Ricardo; Vieira, Graça; Santos, Mário A.

    2000-01-01

    The function of the N-terminal region of the Oenococcus oeni phage fOg44 lysin (Lys44) as an export signal was investigated. We observed that when induced in Escherichia coli, Lys44 was cleaved between residues 27 and 28 in a SecA-dependent manner. Lys44 processing could be blocked by a specific signal peptidase inhibitor and was severely reduced by modification of the cleavage site. The lethal effect of Lys44 expression observed in E. coli was ascribed to the presence of its N-terminal 27-residue sequence, as its deletion resulted in the production of a nontoxic, albeit active, product. We have further established that lytic activity in oenococcal cells was dependent on Lys44 processing. An active protein with the molecular mass expected for the cleaved enzyme was detected in extracts from O. oeni-infected cells. The temporal pattern of its appearance suggests that synthesis and export of Lys44 in the infected host progress along with phage maturation. Overall, these results provide, for the first time, experimental evidence for the presence of a signal peptide in a bacteriophage lysin. Database searches and alignment of protein sequences support the prediction that other known O. oeni and Lactococcus lactis phages also encode secretory lysins. The evolutionary significance of a putative phage lysis mechanism relying on secretory lytic enzymes is tentatively discussed, on the basis of host cell wall structure and autolytic capacity. PMID:11004183

  5. Human IgG is produced in a pro-form that requires clipping of C-terminal lysines for maximal complement activation

    PubMed Central

    van den Bremer, Ewald TJ; Beurskens, Frank J; Voorhorst, Marleen; Engelberts, Patrick J; de Jong, Rob N; van der Boom, Burt G; Cook, Erika M; Lindorfer, Margaret A; Taylor, Ronald P; van Berkel, Patrick HC; Parren, Paul WHI

    2015-01-01

    Human IgG is produced with C-terminal lysines that are cleaved off in circulation. The function of this modification was unknown and generally thought not to affect antibody function. We recently reported that efficient C1q binding and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) requires IgG hexamerization at the cell surface. Here we demonstrate that C-terminal lysines may interfere with this process, leading to suboptimal C1q binding and CDC of cells opsonized with C-terminal lysine-containing IgG. After we removed these lysines with a carboxypeptidase, maximal complement activation was observed. Interestingly, IgG1 mutants containing either a negative C-terminal charge or multiple positive charges lost CDC almost completely; however, CDC was fully restored by mixing C-terminal mutants of opposite charge. Our data indicate a novel post-translational control mechanism of human IgG: human IgG molecules are produced in a pro-form in which charged C-termini interfere with IgG hexamer formation, C1q binding and CDC. To allow maximal complement activation, C-terminal lysine processing is required to release the antibody's full cytotoxic potential. PMID:26037225

  6. Affecting proton mobility in activated peptide and whole protein ions via lysine guanidination.

    PubMed

    Pitteri, Sharon J; Reid, Gavin E; McLuckey, Scott A

    2004-01-01

    We have evaluated the effect of lysine guanidination in peptides and proteins on the dissociation of protonated ions in the gas phase. The dissociation of guanidinated model peptide ions compared to their unmodified forms showed behavior consistent with concepts of proton mobility as a major factor in determining favored fragmentation channels. Reduction of proton mobility associated with lysine guanidination was reflected by a relative increase in cleavages occurring C-terminal to aspartic acid residues as well as increases in small molecule losses. To evaluate the effect of guanidination on the dissociation behavior of whole protein ions, bovine ubiquitin was selected as a model. Essentially, all of the amide bond cleavages associated with the +10 charge state of fully guanidinated ubiquitin were observed to occur C-terminal to aspartic acid residues, unlike the dissociation behavior of the +10 ion of the unmodified protein, where competing cleavage N-terminal to proline and nonspecific amide bond cleavages were also observed. The +8 and lower charge states of the guanidinated protein showed prominent losses of small neutral molecules. This overall fragmentation behavior is consistent with current hypotheses regarding whole protein dissociation that consider proton mobility and intramolecular charge solvation as important factors in determining favored dissociation channels, and are also consistent with the fragmentation behaviors observed for the guanidinated model peptide ions. Further evaluation of the utility of condensed phase guanidination of whole proteins is necessary but the results described here confirm that guanidination can be an effective strategy for enhancing C-terminal aspartic acid cleavages. Gas phase dissociation exclusively at aspartic acid residues, especially for whole protein ions, could be useful in identifying and characterizing proteins via tandem mass spectrometry of whole protein ions.

  7. Michael addition of dehydroalanine-containing MAPK peptides to catalytic lysine inhibits the activity of phosphothreonine lyase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Ru; Huang, Juan; Liang, Qiujin; Guo, Yanmin; Bian, Weixiang; Luo, Lingfei; Li, Hongtao

    2015-11-30

    The phosphothreonine lyases OspF and SpvC irreversibly inactivate host dual-phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) [pThr-X-pTyr motif] through β-elimination. We found that dual-phosphorylated (pSer-X-pTyr) MAPK substrate peptides and their resulting catalytic products cross-link to OspF and SpvC. Mass spectrometry results revealed that these linkages form between lysine, which acts as a general base, and dehydroalanine (Dha) on catalytic products. The nucleophilic addition efficiency is dependent on the K136 residue being in a deprotonated state. Peptide cross-linking inhibits the activity of SpvC and blocks the inactivation of MAPK signaling by SpvC. Small compounds mimicking these sequences may act as phosphothreonine lyase inhibitors. PMID:26519561

  8. [L-Lysine-α-Oxidase in vitro Activity in Experiments on Models of Viruses Sindbis, Forest-Spring Encephalitis, Western Nile, Tyaginya and Dhori].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, I P; Larichev, V F; Shneider, Yu A

    2015-01-01

    The antitumor effect of L-lysine-α-oxidase from the culture fluid of Trichoderma harzianum Rifai F-180 was investigated for the first time. The in vitro studies revealed its high activity on a model of the forest-spring encephalitis virus and no activity against the Sindbis, Western Nile, Tyaginya and Dhori viruses. PMID:26415376

  9. Functional constituents of the active site of human neutrophil collagenase.

    PubMed

    Mookhtiar, K A; Wang, F; Van Wart, H E

    1986-05-01

    A series of chemical modification reactions has been carried out to identify functional constituents of the active site of human neutrophil collagenase. The enzyme is reversibly inhibited by the transition metal chelating agent 1,10-phenanthroline, and inhibition is fully reversed by zinc. Removal of weakly bound metal ions by gel filtration inactivates collagenase, and activity is fully restored on immediate readdition of calcium. The enzyme is unaffected by reagents that modify serine, cysteine, and arginine residues. However, reaction with the carboxyl reagents cyclohexylmorpholinocarbodiimide and Woodward's Reagent K lowers the activity of the enzyme substantially. Acetylimidazole inactivates the enzyme, but activity is completely restored on addition of hydroxylamine. The enzyme is also inactivated by tetranitromethane, indicating that it contains an essential tyrosine residue. Acylation of collagenase with diethyl pyrocarbonate, diketene, acetic anhydride, or trinitrobenzenesulfonate inactivates the enzyme, and activity is not restored on addition of hydroxylamine, indicating the presence of an essential lysine residue.

  10. Novel bacteriophage lysin with broad lytic activity protects against mixed infection by Streptococcus pyogenes and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Gilmer, Daniel B; Schmitz, Jonathan E; Euler, Chad W; Fischetti, Vincent A

    2013-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GrAS]) cause serious and sometimes fatal human diseases. They are among the many Gram-positive pathogens for which resistance to leading antibiotics has emerged. As a result, alternative therapies need to be developed to combat these pathogens. We have identified a novel bacteriophage lysin (PlySs2), derived from a Streptococcus suis phage, with broad lytic activity against MRSA, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), Streptococcus suis, Listeria, Staphylococcus simulans, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus equi, Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]), S. pyogenes, Streptococcus sanguinis, group G streptococci (GGS), group E streptococci (GES), and Streptococcus pneumoniae. PlySs2 has an N-terminal cysteine-histidine aminopeptidase (CHAP) catalytic domain and a C-terminal SH3b binding domain. It is stable at 50 °C for 30 min, 37 °C for >24 h, 4°C for 15 days, and -80 °C for >7 months; it maintained full activity after 10 freeze-thaw cycles. PlySs2 at 128 μg/ml in vitro reduced MRSA and S. pyogenes growth by 5 logs and 3 logs within 1 h, respectively, and exhibited a MIC of 16 μg/ml for MRSA. A single, 2-mg dose of PlySs2 protected 92% (22/24) of the mice in a bacteremia model of mixed MRSA and S. pyogenes infection. Serially increasing exposure of MRSA and S. pyogenes to PlySs2 or mupirocin resulted in no observed resistance to PlySs2 and resistance to mupirocin. To date, no other lysin has shown such notable broad lytic activity, stability, and efficacy against multiple, leading, human bacterial pathogens; as such, PlySs2 has all the characteristics to be an effective therapeutic.

  11. Copper complexes of glycyl-histidyl-lysine and two of its synthetic analogues: chemical behaviour and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Conato, C; Gavioli, R; Guerrini, R; Kozlowski, H; Mlynarz, P; Pasti, C; Pulidori, F; Remelli, M

    2001-05-01

    Copper complex formation equilibria of glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine (Gly-His-Lys, GHK) and of two synthetic analogues, where the histidine residue was replaced with a synthetic amino acid (L-spinacine or L-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-isoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid), have been carefully investigated using different experimental techniques: potentiometry, solution calorimetry, UV-VIS spectrophotometry, circular dichroism and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies. All the ligands formed complexes having different stoichiometries and stabilities; evidence for the formation of binuclear species is also shown. The structures of the main complexes are discussed. It is suggested that the lateral lysine amino group participates in complex formation, but only at alkaline pH values: at physiological pH this group is protonated and available for possible interactions with cellular receptors. The above tripeptides have been tested for their enzymatic stability in human serum: the synthetic compounds showed no significant degradation for at least 3 h. Finally, their activity as growth factor has been studied in vitro. The two synthetic analogues showed an activity comparable to or even higher than that of GHK, thus suggesting their possible use as additives in cell culture media, even in the presence of serum. Relevant information on the GHK action mechanism as cell growth factor has been obtained: the formation of copper complexes, driven by the first (Gly) residue, appears necessary while the second residue (His) does not appear to play a specific role; the presence of the free side chain of the third residue (Lys) appears to be of fundamental importance. PMID:11325542

  12. A lysine-to-arginine mutation on NEDD8 markedly reduces the activity of cullin RING E3 ligase through the impairment of neddylation cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Yiyan; Liu, Yaobin; Xu, Guoqiang

    2015-06-12

    Neural-precursor-cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 8 (NEDD8) is a ubiquitin-like modifier, which forms covalent conjugates on lysines of its substrates. This post-translational modification, neddylation, plays important roles in tumor cell proliferation and viability. Ubiquitin can form diverse polyubiquitin chains, on its seven lysines, which play important functions in various biological processes. However, the roles of lysines in NEDD8 have not been explored. Here, we generated nine NEDD8 point mutants, each with one lysine replaced by an arginine, to study the putative function of lysines in NEDD8. Our experiments discover that Lys27 in NEDD8 is a critical residue for protein neddylation. Replacement of this residue with arginine almost completely eliminates the conjugation of NEDD8 to its substrates. Furthermore, we find that the K27R mutant impairs NEDD8 conjugation to the E2 enzyme, which normally forms thioester bonds for further transferring NEDD8 to its ligases and substrates. Therefore, this mutation completely inhibits global protein neddylation, including neddylation of cullin family proteins, resulting in decreased activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases. This work sheds new light on the roles of NEDD8 lysines on neddylation cascades and provides a dominant negative mutant for the study of neddylation and its biological functions. - Highlights: • Lys27 in NEDD8 is critical for protein neddylation. • NEDD8 K27R mutant impairs the NEDD8 conjugation. • NEDD8 K27R mutant significantly reduces the activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases.

  13. Parasiticidal activity of a novel synthetic peptide from the core a-helical region of NK-lysin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NK-lysin is an anti-microbial peptide that plays a critical role during innate immunity against infectious pathogens through its selective membrane disruptive property. We previously expressed and purified a full-length chicken NK-lysin (cNKL) recombinant protein, and demonstrated its in vitro anti-...

  14. Lysine carboxylation in proteins: OXA-10 beta-lactamase.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Cross, Jason B; Vreven, Thom; Meroueh, Samy O; Mobashery, Shahriar; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2005-11-01

    An increasing number of proteins are being shown to have an N(zeta)-carboxylated lysine in their structures, a posttranslational modification of proteins that proceeds without the intervention of a specific enzyme. The role of the carboxylated lysine in these proteins is typically structural (hydrogen bonding or metal coordination). However, carboxylated lysines in the active sites of OXA-10 and OXA-1 beta-lactamases and the sensor domain of BlaR signal-transducer protein serve in proton transfer events required for the functions of these proteins. These examples demonstrate the utility of this unusual amino acid in acid-base chemistry, in expansion of function beyond those of the 20 standard amino acids. In this study, the ONIOM quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical (QM/MM) method is used to study the carboxylation of lysine in the OXA-10 beta-lactamase. Lys-70 and the active site of the OXA-10 beta-lactamase were treated with B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) density functional calculations and the remainder of the enzyme with the AMBER molecular mechanics force field. The barriers for unassisted carboxylation of neutral lysine by carbon dioxide or bicarbonate are high. However, when the reaction with CO2 is catalyzed by a molecule of water in the active site, it is exothermic by about 13 kcal/mol, with a barrier of approximately 14 kcal/mol. The calculations show that the carboxylation and decarboxylation of Lys-70 are likely to be accompanied by deprotonation and protonation of the carbamate, respectively. The analysis may also be relevant for other proteins with carboxylated lysines, a feature that may be more common in nature than previously appreciated.

  15. Global Profiling of Protein Lysine Malonylation in Escherichia coli Reveals Its Role in Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lili; Nie, Litong; Chen, Ming; Liu, Ping; Zhu, Jun; Zhai, Linhui; Tao, Sheng-Ce; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhao, Yingming; Tan, Minjia

    2016-06-01

    Protein lysine malonylation is a recently identified post-translational modification (PTM), which is evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to mammals. Although analysis of lysine malonylome in mammalians suggested that this modification was related to energy metabolism, the substrates and biological roles of malonylation in prokaryotes are still poorly understood. In this study, we performed qualitative and quantitative analyses to globally identify lysine malonylation substrates in Escherichia coli. We identified 1745 malonylation sites in 594 proteins in E. coli, representing the first and largest malonylome data set in prokaryotes up to date. Bioinformatic analyses showed that lysine malonylation was significantly enriched in protein translation, energy metabolism pathways and fatty acid biosynthesis, implying the potential roles of protein malonylation in bacterial physiology. Quantitative proteomics by fatty acid synthase inhibition in both auxotrophic and prototrophic E. coli strains revealed that lysine malonylation is closely associated with E. coli fatty acid metabolism. Protein structural analysis and mutagenesis experiment suggested malonylation could impact enzymatic activity of citrate synthase, a key enzyme in citric acid (TCA) cycle. Further comparative analysis among lysine malonylome, succinylome and acetylome data showed that these three modifications could participate in some similar enriched metabolism pathways, but they could also possibly play distinct roles such as in fatty acid synthesis. These data expanded our knowledge of lysine malonylation in prokaryotes, providing a resource for functional study of lysine malonylation in bacteria. PMID:27183143

  16. Hydrogen Peroxide Linked to Lysine Oxidase Activity Facilitates Biofilm Differentiation and Dispersal in Several Gram-Negative Bacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Lucas-Elio, Patricia; Egan, Suhelen; Thomas, Torsten; Webb, Jeremy S.; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    The marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas tunicata produces an antibacterial and autolytic protein, AlpP, which causes death of a subpopulation of cells during biofilm formation and mediates differentiation, dispersal, and phenotypic variation among dispersal cells. The AlpP homologue (LodA) in the marine bacterium Marinomonas mediterranea was recently identified as a lysine oxidase which mediates cell death through the production of hydrogen peroxide. Here we show that AlpP in P. tunicata also acts as a lysine oxidase and that the hydrogen peroxide generated is responsible for cell death within microcolonies during biofilm development in both M. mediterranea and P. tunicata. LodA-mediated biofilm cell death is shown to be linked to the generation of phenotypic variation in growth and biofilm formation among M. mediterranea biofilm dispersal cells. Moreover, AlpP homologues also occur in several other gram-negative bacteria from diverse environments. Our results show that subpopulations of cells in microcolonies also die during biofilm formation in two of these organisms, Chromobacterium violaceum and Caulobacter crescentus. In all organisms, hydrogen peroxide was implicated in biofilm cell death, because it could be detected at the same time as the killing occurred, and the addition of catalase significantly reduced biofilm killing. In C. violaceum the AlpP-homologue was clearly linked to biofilm cell death events since an isogenic mutant (CVMUR1) does not undergo biofilm cell death. We propose that biofilm killing through hydrogen peroxide can be linked to AlpP homologue activity and plays an important role in dispersal and colonization across a range of gram-negative bacteria. PMID:18502869

  17. Importance of lysine 125 for heparin binding and activation of antithrombin.

    PubMed

    Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Desai, Umesh R; Bock, Susan C; Gettins, Peter G W; Olson, Steven T; Björk, Ingemar

    2002-04-16

    The anticoagulant sulfated polysaccharide, heparin, binds to the plasma coagulation proteinase inhibitor, antithrombin, and activates it by a conformational change that results in a greatly increased rate of inhibition of target proteinases. Lys125 of antithrombin has previously been implicated in this binding by chemical modification and site-directed mutagenesis and by the crystal structure of a complex between antithrombin and a pentasaccharide constituting the antithrombin-binding region of heparin. Replacement of Lys125 with Met or Gln in this work reduced the affinity of antithrombin for full-length heparin or the pentasaccharide by 150-600-fold at I = 0.15, corresponding to a loss of 25-33% of the total binding energy. The affinity decrease was due both to disruption of approximately three ionic interactions, indicating that Lys125 and two other basic residues of antithrombin act cooperatively in binding to heparin, and to weakened nonionic interactions. The mutations caused a 10-17-fold decrease in the affinity of the initial, weak binding step of the two-step mechanism of heparin binding to antithrombin. They also increased the reverse rate constant of the second, conformational change step by 10-50-fold. Lys125 is thus a major heparin-binding residue of antithrombin, contributing an amount of binding energy comparable to that of Arg129, but less energy than Lys114. It is the first residue identified so far that has a critical role in the initial recognition of heparin by antithrombin, but also appreciably stabilizes the heparin-induced activated state of the inhibitor. These effects are exerted by interactions of Lys125 with the nonreducing end of the heparin pentasaccharide. PMID:11939772

  18. Identification of essential lysines involved in substrate binding of vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chien-Hsien; Pan, Yih-Jiuan; Huang, Yun-Tzu; Liu, Tseng-Huang; Hsu, Shen-Hsing; Lee, Ching-Hung; Chen, Yen-Wei; Lin, Shih-Ming; Huang, Lin-Kun; Pan, Rong-Long

    2011-04-01

    H+-translocating pyrophosphatase (H+-PPase; EC 3.6.1.1) drives proton transport against an electrochemical potential gradient by hydrolyzing pyrophosphate (PPi) and is found in various endomembranes of higher plants, bacteria, and some protists. H+-PPase contains seven highly conserved lysines. We examined the functional roles of these lysines, which are, for the most part, found in the cytosolic regions of mung bean H+-PPase by site-directed mutagenesis. Construction of mutants that each had a cytosolic and highly conserved lysine substituted with an alanine resulted in dramatic drops in the PPi hydrolytic activity. The effects caused by ions on the activities of WT and mutant H+-PPases suggest that Lys-730 may be in close proximity to the Mg2+-binding site, and the great resistance of the K694A and K695A mutants to fluoride inhibition suggests that these lysines are present in the active site. The modifier fluorescein 5'-isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled a lysine at the H+-PPase active site but did not inhibit the hydrolytic activities of K250A, K250N, K250T, and K250S, which suggested that Lys-250 is essential for substrate binding and may be involved in proton translocation. Analysis of tryptic digests indicated that Lys-711 and Lys-717 help maintain the conformation of the active site. Proteolytic evidence also demonstrated that Lys-250 is the primary target of trypsin and confirmed its crucial role in H+-PPase hydrolysis.

  19. Research on a novel poly (vinyl alcohol)/lysine/vanillin wound dressing: Biocompatibility, bioactivity and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gang; A, Ruhan; Ge, Heng; Wang, Lin; Liu, Meili; Wang, Binbin; Su, Haisheng; Yan, Ming; Xi, Yuan; Fan, Yubo

    2014-12-01

    Burn wound dressings have played significant roles in daily clinical practice. An "ideal" burn wound dressing is non-adhesion, absorbency and antimicrobial activity. However, such a dressing is currently not available. A novel composite hydrogel was based on poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) containing lysine (Lys) and vanillin (V) using freezing-thawing method. The properties of this hydrogel were characterized by environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), tensile testing, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and water vapour transmission rate (WVTR). Then the antibacterial activity of PVA/Lys/V composite hydrogel was examined by bacteriolytic plate. In vivo experiment, a burn rat model was used to evaluate the histological analysis of this hydrogel. In results, the Schiff base formed in the three-phase system. It improved the tensile strength and crystallization of the PVA/Lys/V composite hydrogel. Meanwhile, this hydrogel showed excellent bactericidal activities to both gram-negative bacteria (E. coli) and gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus) due to the Schiff base. And the antibacterial activity toward gram-negative bacteria was better than another. On Day 7, 95-100% of the surface areas of PVA/Lys/V composite treated burns were covered with regenerating epidermis. And the new tissue and capillary vessel formed around the wounds after treatment. Therefore, it is suggested that treatment with PVA/Lys/V composite hydrogel will be effective also in patients with burns and other skin wounds.

  20. Research on a novel poly (vinyl alcohol)/lysine/vanillin wound dressing: Biocompatibility, bioactivity and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gang; A, Ruhan; Ge, Heng; Wang, Lin; Liu, Meili; Wang, Binbin; Su, Haisheng; Yan, Ming; Xi, Yuan; Fan, Yubo

    2014-12-01

    Burn wound dressings have played significant roles in daily clinical practice. An "ideal" burn wound dressing is non-adhesion, absorbency and antimicrobial activity. However, such a dressing is currently not available. A novel composite hydrogel was based on poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) containing lysine (Lys) and vanillin (V) using freezing-thawing method. The properties of this hydrogel were characterized by environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), tensile testing, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and water vapour transmission rate (WVTR). Then the antibacterial activity of PVA/Lys/V composite hydrogel was examined by bacteriolytic plate. In vivo experiment, a burn rat model was used to evaluate the histological analysis of this hydrogel. In results, the Schiff base formed in the three-phase system. It improved the tensile strength and crystallization of the PVA/Lys/V composite hydrogel. Meanwhile, this hydrogel showed excellent bactericidal activities to both gram-negative bacteria (E. coli) and gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus) due to the Schiff base. And the antibacterial activity toward gram-negative bacteria was better than another. On Day 7, 95-100% of the surface areas of PVA/Lys/V composite treated burns were covered with regenerating epidermis. And the new tissue and capillary vessel formed around the wounds after treatment. Therefore, it is suggested that treatment with PVA/Lys/V composite hydrogel will be effective also in patients with burns and other skin wounds. PMID:24953436

  1. Posttranslational Modifications of the Histone 3 Tail and Their Impact on the Activity of Histone Lysine Demethylases In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lohse, Brian; Leurs, Ulrike; Cloos, Paul A. C.; Kristensen, Jesper L.; Clausen, Rasmus P.

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of the histone H3 tail such as methylation, acetylation and phosphorylation play important roles in epigenetic signaling. Here we study the effect of some of these PTMs on the demethylation rates of methylated lysine 9 in vitro using peptide substrates mimicking histone H3. Various combinations with other PTMs were employed to study possible cross-talk effects by comparing enzyme kinetic characteristics. We compared the kinetics of histone tail substrates for truncated histone lysine demethylases KDM4A and KDM4C containing only the catalytic core (cc) and some combinations were characterized on full length (FL) KDM4A and KDM4C. We found that the substrates combining trimethylated K4 and K9 resulted in a significant increase in the catalytic activity for FL-KDM4A. For the truncated versions of KDM4A and KDM4C a two-fold increase in the catalytic activity toward bis-trimethylated substrates could be observed. Furthermore, a significant difference in the catalytic activity between dimethylated and trimethylated substrates was found for full length demethylases in line with what has been reported previously for truncated demethylases. Histone peptide substrates phosphorylated at T11 could not be demethylated by neither truncated nor full length KDM4A and KDM4C, suggesting that phosphorylation of threonine 11 prevents demethylation of the H3K9me3 mark on the same peptide. Acetylation of K14 was also found to influence demethylation rates significantly. Thus, for truncated KDM4A, acetylation on K14 of the substrate leads to an increase in enzymatic catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km), while for truncated KDM4C it induces a decrease, primarily caused by changes in Km. This study demonstrates that demethylation activities towards trimethylated H3K9 are significantly influenced by other PTMs on the same peptide, and emphasizes the importance of studying these interactions at the peptide level to get a more detailed understanding of the

  2. Intramuscular bioavailability of ketoprofen lysine salt in horses.

    PubMed

    Anfossi, P; Villa, R; Montesissa, C; Carli, S

    1997-06-01

    Lysine salts are often used in human pharmaceuticals to increase the solubility and absorption of acidic drugs when these are administered parenterally. In this study the intramuscular bioavailability of ketoprofen administered as the lysine salt was evaluated in horses (n = 5) treated intravenously and intramuscularly (2.2 mg/kg active substance) in a cross-over study. The absorption rate of ketoprofen administered as the lysine salt was rather low: the mean residence time increased from 31.7 min after IV injection to 128.9 min (after IM injection), and the bioavailability was high (mean 92.4%). The calculated steady state plasma concentrations of ketoprofen during multiple dosage were much higher after intramuscular (0.106 g/ml) than after intravenous (0.066 microgram/ml) administration. Intramuscular injections of the ketoprofen lysine salt can therefore be given to horses, which are particularly prone to develop soft tissue reactions, since use of the lysine salt markedly reduced local irritation at the injection site.

  3. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  4. Methylation of translation-associated proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Identification of methylated lysines and their methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Couttas, Timothy A; Raftery, Mark J; Padula, Matthew P; Herbert, Ben R; Wilkins, Marc R

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to identify sites of lysine methylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the associated methyltransferases. Hexapeptide ligand affinity chromatography was used to normalize the abundance levels of proteins in whole cell lysate. MS/MS, in association with antibody-based detection, was then used to identify lysine methylated proteins and the precise sites of modification. Lysine methylation was found on the proteins elongation factor (EF) 1-α, 2, and 3A, as well as ribosomal proteins 40S S18-A/B, 60S L11-A/B, L18-A/B, and L42-A/B. Precise sites were mapped in all cases. Single-gene knockouts of known and putative methyltransferase(s), in association with MS/MS, showed that EF1-α is monomethylated by Efm1 at lysin 30 and dimethylated by See1 at lysine 316. Methyltransferase Rkm1 was found to monomethylate 40S ribosomal protein S18-A/B at lysine 48. Knockout analysis also revealed that putative methyltransferase YBR271W affects the methylation of proteins EF2 and 3A; this was detected by Western blotting and immunodetection. This methyltransferase shows strong interspecies conservation and a tryptophan-containing motif associated with its active site. We suggest that enzyme YBR271W is named EF methyltransferase 2 (Efm2), in line with the recent naming of YHL039W as Efm1. PMID:22522802

  5. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  6. The catabolic function of the alpha-aminoadipic acid pathway in plants is associated with unidirectional activity of lysine-oxoglutarate reductase, but not saccharopine dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, X; Tang, G; Galili, G

    2000-01-01

    Whereas plants and animals use the alpha-aminoadipic acid pathway to catabolize lysine, yeast and fungi use the very same pathway to synthesize lysine. These two groups of organisms also possess structurally distinct forms of two enzymes in this pathway, namely lysine-oxoglutarate reductase (lysine-ketoglutarate reductase; LKR) and saccharopine dehydrogenase (SDH): in plants and animals these enzymes are linked on to a single bifunctional polypeptide, while in yeast and fungi they exist as separate entities. In addition, yeast LKR and SDH possess bi-directional activities, and their anabolic function is regulated by complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional controls, which apparently ascertain differential accumulation of intermediate metabolites; in plants, the regulation of the catabolic function of these two enzymes is not known. To elucidate the regulation of the catabolic function of plant bifunctional LKR/SDH enzymes, we have used yeast as an expression system to test whether a plant LKR/SDH also possesses bi-directional LKR and SDH activities, similar to the yeast enzymes. The Arabidopsis enzyme complemented a yeast SDH, but not LKR, null mutant. Identical results were obtained when deletion mutants encoding only the LKR or SDH domains of this bifunctional polypeptide were expressed individually in the yeast cells. Moreover, activity assays showed that the Arabidopsis LKR possessed catabolic, but not anabolic, activity, and its uni-directional activity stems from its structure rather than its linkage to SDH. Our results suggest that the uni-directional activity of LKR plays an important role in regulating the catabolic function of the alpha-amino adipic acid pathway in plants. PMID:10998364

  7. Histone Deacetylase 3 (HDAC3)-dependent Reversible Lysine Acetylation of Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms Modulates Their Enzymatic and Motor Activity.

    PubMed

    Samant, Sadhana A; Pillai, Vinodkumar B; Sundaresan, Nagalingam R; Shroff, Sanjeev G; Gupta, Mahesh P

    2015-06-19

    Reversible lysine acetylation is a widespread post-translational modification controlling the activity of proteins in different subcellular compartments. We previously demonstrated that a class II histone deacetylase (HDAC), HDAC4, and a histone acetyltransferase, p300/CREB-binding protein-associated factor, associate with cardiac sarcomeres and that a class I and II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A, enhances contractile activity of myofilaments. In this study we show that a class I HDAC, HDAC3, is also present at cardiac sarcomeres. By immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analyses, we found that HDAC3 was localized to A-band of sarcomeres and capable of deacetylating myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. The motor domains of both cardiac α- and β-MHC isoforms were found to be reversibly acetylated. Biomechanical studies revealed that lysine acetylation significantly decreased the Km for the actin-activated ATPase activity of MHC isoforms. By in vitro motility assay, we found that lysine acetylation increased the actin-sliding velocity of α-myosin by 20% and β-myosin by 36% compared with their respective non-acetylated isoforms. Moreover, myosin acetylation was found to be sensitive to cardiac stress. During induction of hypertrophy, myosin isoform acetylation increased progressively with duration of stress stimuli independently of isoform shift, suggesting that lysine acetylation of myosin could be an early response of myofilaments to increase contractile performance of the heart. These studies provide the first evidence for localization of HDAC3 at myofilaments and uncover a novel mechanism modulating the motor activity of cardiac MHC isoforms.

  8. Key Role of Ubc5 and Lysine-63 Polyubiquitination in Viral Activation of IRF3

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wenwen; Xu, Ming; Liu, Siqi; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS; also known as IPS-1, VISA and CARDIF) is essential for innate immune response against RNA viruses. MAVS transduces signals from the cytosolic RIG-I-like receptors, which bind to viral RNAs, but how MAVS activates downstream transcription factors such as IRF3 to induce type-I interferons is not well understood. We have established a cell-free system in which mitochondria derived from virus-infected cells activates IRF3 in the cytosol. Fractionation of the cytosol led to the identification of Ubc5 as a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) required for IRF3 activation. Using an inducible RNAi strategy, we demonstrate that catalytically active Ubc5 is required for IRF3 activation by viral infection. The activation of IRF3 also requires two ubiquitin-binding domains of NEMO. Furthermore, we show that replacement of endogenous ubiquitin with its K63R mutant abolishes viral activation of IRF3, demonstrating that K63 polyubiquitination plays a key role in IRF3 activation. PMID:19854139

  9. NK-lysin, a novel effector peptide of cytotoxic T and NK cells. Structure and cDNA cloning of the porcine form, induction by interleukin 2, antibacterial and antitumour activity.

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, M; Gunne, H; Agerberth, B; Boman, A; Bergman, T; Sillard, R; Jörnvall, H; Mutt, V; Olsson, B; Wigzell, H

    1995-01-01

    A 78 residue antimicrobial, basic peptide, NK-lysin, with three intrachain disulfide bonds was purified from pig small intestine and characterized. A corresponding clone was isolated from a porcine bone marrow cDNA library. The 780 bp DNA sequence had a reading frame of 129 amino acids which corresponded to NK-lysin. The clone was used to show that stimulation with human interleukin-2 induced synthesis of NK-lysin-specific mRNA in a lymphocyte fraction enriched for T and NK cells. Lower levels of mRNA were detected in tissues known to contain T and NK cells, such as small intestine, spleen and colon. Interleukin-2 also induced both proliferation of the lymphocyte fraction and cytolytic function in these cells. Immunostaining showed that NK-lysin was present in cells positive for CD8, CD2 and CD4. NK-lysin showed high anti-bacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Bacillus megaterium and moderate activity against Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Streptococcus pyogenes. The peptide showed a marked lytic activity against an NK-sensitive mouse tumour cell line, YAC-1, but it did not lyse red blood cells. The amino acid sequence of NK-lysin exhibits 33% identity with a putative human preproprotein, NKG5, of unknown function but derived from a cDNA clone of activated NK cells. We suggest that NK-lysin is a new effector molecule of cytotoxic T and NK cells. Images PMID:7737114

  10. Differential trace labeling of calmodulin: investigation of binding sites and conformational states by individual lysine reactivities. Effects of beta-endorphin, trifluoperazine, and ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Giedroc, D.P.; Sinha, S.K.; Brew, K.; Puett, D.

    1985-11-05

    The CaS -dependent association of beta-endorphin and trifluoperazine with porcine testis calmodulin, as well as the effects of removing CaS by ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) treatment, were investigated by the procedure of differential kinetic labeling. This technique permitted determination of the relative rates of acylation of each of the epsilon-amino groups of the seven lysyl residues on calmodulin by (TH)acetic anhydride under the different conditions. In all cases, less than 0.52 mol of lysyl residue/mol of calmodulin was modified, thus ensuring that the labeling pattern reflects the microenvironments of these groups in the native protein. Lysines 75 and 94 were found to be the most reactive amino groups in CaS -saturated calmodulin. In the presence of CaS and under conditions where beta-endorphin and calmodulin were present at a molar ratio of 2.5:1, the amino groups of lysines 75 and 148 were significantly reduced in reactivity compared to calmodulin alone. At equimolar concentrations of peptides and proteins, essentially the same result was obtained except that the magnitudes of the perturbation of these two lysines were less pronounced. With trifluoperazine, at a molar ratio to calmodulin of 2.5:1, significant perturbations of lysines 75 and 148, as well as Lys 77, were also found. These results further substantiate previous observations of a commonality between phenothiazine and peptide binding sites on calmodulin. Lastly, an intriguing difference in CaS -mediated reactivities between lysines 75 and 77 of calmodulin is demonstrated. In the CaS -saturated form of the protein, both lysines are part of the long connecting helix between the two homologous halves of the protein.

  11. Structural Basis for l-Lysine Feedback Inhibition of Homocitrate Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; Scott, Erin M.; Pillus, Lorraine; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2010-09-02

    The {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway of lysine biosynthesis is modulated at the transcriptional and biochemical levels by feedback inhibition. The first enzyme in the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway, homocitrate synthase (HCS), is the target of the feedback regulation and is strongly inhibited by L-lysine. Here we report the structure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe HCS (SpHCS) in complex with L-lysine. The structure illustrates that the amino acid directly competes with the substrate 2-oxoglutarate for binding within the active site of HCS. Differential recognition of the substrate and inhibitor is achieved via a switch position within the ({alpha}/{beta}){sub 8} TIM barrel of the enzyme that can distinguish between the C5-carboxylate group of 2-oxoglutarate and the {epsilon}-ammonium group of L-lysine. In vitro and in vivo assays demonstrate that mutations of the switch residues, which interact with the L-lysine {epsilon}-ammonium group, abrogate feedback inhibition, as do substitutions of residues within the C-terminal domain that were identified in a previous study of L-lysine-insensitive HCS mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Together, these results yield new insights into the mechanism of feedback regulation of an enzyme central to lysine biosynthesis.

  12. LLY-507, a Cell-active, Potent, and Selective Inhibitor of Protein-lysine Methyltransferase SMYD2*

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hannah; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Antonysamy, Stephen; Chang, Shawn; Chen, Lisa Hong; Curtis, Carmen; Emtage, Spencer; Fan, Li; Gheyi, Tarun; Li, Fengling; Liu, Shichong; Martin, Joseph R.; Mendel, David; Olsen, Jonathan B.; Pelletier, Laura; Shatseva, Tatiana; Wu, Song; Zhang, Feiyu Fred; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Brown, Peter J.; Campbell, Robert M.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Mader, Mary; Vedadi, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    SMYD2 is a lysine methyltransferase that catalyzes the monomethylation of several protein substrates including p53. SMYD2 is overexpressed in a significant percentage of esophageal squamous primary carcinomas, and that overexpression correlates with poor patient survival. However, the mechanism(s) by which SMYD2 promotes oncogenesis is not understood. A small molecule probe for SMYD2 would allow for the pharmacological dissection of this biology. In this report, we disclose LLY-507, a cell-active, potent small molecule inhibitor of SMYD2. LLY-507 is >100-fold selective for SMYD2 over a broad range of methyltransferase and non-methyltransferase targets. A 1.63-Å resolution crystal structure of SMYD2 in complex with LLY-507 shows the inhibitor binding in the substrate peptide binding pocket. LLY-507 is active in cells as measured by reduction of SMYD2-induced monomethylation of p53 Lys370 at submicromolar concentrations. We used LLY-507 to further test other potential roles of SMYD2. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics showed that cellular global histone methylation levels were not significantly affected by SMYD2 inhibition with LLY-507, and subcellular fractionation studies indicate that SMYD2 is primarily cytoplasmic, suggesting that SMYD2 targets a very small subset of histones at specific chromatin loci and/or non-histone substrates. Breast and liver cancers were identified through in silico data mining as tumor types that display amplification and/or overexpression of SMYD2. LLY-507 inhibited the proliferation of several esophageal, liver, and breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that LLY-507 serves as a valuable chemical probe to aid in the dissection of SMYD2 function in cancer and other biological processes. PMID:25825497

  13. A new family of covalent inhibitors block nucleotide binding to the active site of pyruvate kinase

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Hugh P.; Walsh, Martin J.; Blackburn, Elizabeth A.; Wear, Martin A.; Boxer, Matthew B.; Shen, Min; Mcnae, Iain W.; Nowicki, Matthew W.; Michels, Paul A. M.; Auld, Douglas S.; Fothergill-Gilmore, Linda A.; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Pyruvate kinase (PYK) plays a central role in the metabolism of many organisms and cell types, but the elucidation of the details of its function in a systems biology context has been hampered by the lack of specific high-affinity small molecule inhibitors. High-throughput screening has been used to identify a family of saccharin derivatives which inhibit Leishmania mexicana PYK (LmPYK) activity in a time- (and dose-) dependent manner; a characteristic of irreversible inhibition. The crystal structure of 4-[(1,1-dioxo-1,2-benzothiazol-3-yl)sulfanyl]benzoic acid (DBS) complexed with LmPYK shows that the saccharin moiety reacts with an active-site lysine residue (Lys335), forming a covalent bond and sterically hindering the binding of ADP/ATP. Mutation of the lysine residue to an arginine residue eliminated the effect of the inhibitor molecule, providing confirmation of the proposed inhibitor mechanism. This lysine residue is conserved in the active sites of the four human PYK isoenzymes, which were also found to be irreversibly inhibited by DBS. X-ray structures of PYK isoforms show structural differences at the DBS binding pocket, and this covalent inhibitor of PYK provides a chemical scaffold for the design of new families of potentially isoform-specific irreversible inhibitors. PMID:22906073

  14. iSuc-PseOpt: Identifying lysine succinylation sites in proteins by incorporating sequence-coupling effects into pseudo components and optimizing imbalanced training dataset.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jianhua; Liu, Zi; Xiao, Xuan; Liu, Bingxiang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-03-15

    Succinylation is a posttranslational modification (PTM) where a succinyl group is added to a Lys (K) residue of a protein molecule. Lysine succinylation plays an important role in orchestrating various biological processes, but it is also associated with some diseases. Therefore, we are challenged by the following problem from both basic research and drug development: given an uncharacterized protein sequence containing many Lys residues, which one of them can be succinylated, and which one cannot? With the avalanche of protein sequences generated in the postgenomic age, the answer to the problem has become even more urgent. Fortunately, the statistical significance experimental data for succinylated sites in proteins have become available very recently, an indispensable prerequisite for developing a computational method to address this problem. By incorporating the sequence-coupling effects into the general pseudo amino acid composition and using KNNC (K-nearest neighbors cleaning) treatment and IHTS (inserting hypothetical training samples) treatment to optimize the training dataset, a predictor called iSuc-PseOpt has been developed. Rigorous cross-validations indicated that it remarkably outperformed the existing method. A user-friendly web-server for iSuc-PseOpt has been established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iSuc-PseOpt, where users can easily get their desired results without needing to go through the complicated mathematical equations involved.

  15. Developments in the synthesis and biological activity of glycyl-L-histydyl- L-lysine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kukowska, M; Dzierzbicka, K

    2014-01-01

    Three decades of extensive research on biological activity of natural tripeptide Gly-His-Lys has established the substructure for development of its novel derivatives which give hope for widening the application in the field of medicine and dermatology. Synthetic approaches to obtain Gly-His-Lys and its modifications provide both classical solution method and solid phase peptide synthesis, usage of different protecting groups and methods of peptide bond formation. In our present review, we emphasize on the methods of the synthesis described in the literature and present the aspects of Gly-His-Lys structure modifications that played a key role in scientific research. PMID:24350846

  16. Antimicrobial, antioxidant, and antitumor activity of epsilon-poly-L-lysine and citral, alone or in combination

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ce; Zhao, Xingchen; Liu, Zonghui; Meng, Rizeng; Chen, Xiangrong; Guo, Na

    2016-01-01

    Background Food safety is an important worldwide public health concern, and microbial contamination in foods not only leads to food deterioration and shelf life reduction but also results in economic losses and disease. Objective The main aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of epsilon-poly-L-lysine (ε-PL) and citral combination against Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli O157:H7) strains. The preliminary antioxidant and antitumor activities were also studied. Design Synergism is a positive interaction created when two compounds combine and exert an inhibitory effect that is greater than the sum of their individual effects. The synergistic antimicrobial effect of ε-PL and citral was studied using the checkerboard method against E. coli O157:H7. The minimal inhibitory concentration, time-kill, and scanning electron microscope assays were used to determine the antimicrobial activity of ε-PL and citral alone or in combination; 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl-scavenging assay and western blotting were used in antioxidant activity assays; cell viability assay was carried out to finish preliminary antitumor test. Results Minimal inhibitory concentrations of ε-PL and citral resisted to the five E. coli O157:H7 strains were 2–4 µg/mL and 0.5–1 µg/mL, and the fractional inhibitory concentration indices were 0.25–0.375. The results of time-kill assay revealed that a stronger bactericidal effect in a laboratory medium might be exerted in the combination against E. coli O157:H7 than that in a food model. The compounds alone or in combination exhibited a potential 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical–scavenging activity, and the expression of superoxide dismutase 1 and glutathione peroxidase 1 protein increased. The preliminary antitumor activity effect of the combination was better than ε-PL or citral alone. Conclusions These findings indicated that the combination of ε-PL and citral could not only be used as a promising naturally sourced food

  17. Characterization and sequencing of the active site of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Wing-Kin; Dong, Jian-Guo; Yang, S.F. ); Kenny, J.W.; Thompson, G.A. )

    1990-10-01

    The pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase the key enzyme in ethylene biosynthesis, is inactivated by its substrate S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet). Apple ACC synthase was purified with an immunoaffinity gel, and its active site was probed with NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} or Ado({sup 14}C)Met. Peptide sequencing of both {sup 3}H- and {sup 14}C-labeled peptides revealed a common dodecapeptide of Ser-Leu-Ser-Xaa-Asp-Leu-Gly-Leu-Pro-Gly-Phe-Arg, where Xaa was the modified, radioactive residue in each case. Acid hydrolysis of the {sup 3}H-labeled enzyme released radioactive N-pyridoxyllysine, indicating that the active-site peptide contained lysine at position 4. Mass spectrometry of the {sup 14}C-labeled peptide indicated a protonated molecular ion at m/z 1390.6, from which the mass of Xaa was calculated to be 229, a number that is equivalent to the mass of a lysine residue alkylated by the 2-aminobutyrate portion of AdoMet, as we previously proposed. These results indicate that the same active-site lysine binds the PLP and convalently links to the 2-aminobutyrate portion of AdoMet during inactivation. The active site of tomato ACC synthase was probed in the same manner with Ado ({sup 14}C)Met. Sequencing of the tomato active-site peptide revealed two highly conserved dodecapeptides; the minor peptide possessed a sequence identical to that of the apple enzyme, whereas the major peptide differed from the minor peptide in that methionine replaced leucine at position 6.

  18. Lysine biosynthesis and nitrogen metabolism in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa): study of enzymes and nitrogen-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Varisi, Vanderlei A; Camargos, Liliane S; Aguiar, Leandro F; Christofoleti, Renata M; Medici, Leonardo O; Azevedo, Ricardo A

    2008-01-01

    Aspartate kinase (AK, EC 2.7.2.4), homoserine dehydrogenase (HSDH, EC 1.1.1.3) and dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS, EC 4.2.1.52) were isolated and partially purified from immature Chenopodium quinoa Willd seeds. Enzyme activities were studied in the presence of the aspartate-derived amino acids lysine, threonine and methionine and also the lysine analogue S-2-aminoethyl-l-cysteine (AEC), at 1 mM and 5 mM. The results confirmed the existence of, at least, two AK isoenzymes, one inhibited by lysine and the other inhibited by threonine, the latter being predominant in quinoa seeds. HSDH activity was also shown to be partially inhibited by threonine, whereas some of the activity was resistant to the inhibitory effect, indicating the presence of two isoenzymes, one resistant and another sensitive to threonine inhibition. Only one DHDPS isoenzyme highly sensitive to lysine inhibition was detected. The results suggest that the high concentration of lysine observed in quinoa seeds is possibly due to a combined effect of increased lysine synthesis and accumulation in the soluble form and/or as protein lysine. Nitrogen assimilation was also investigated and based on nitrate content, nitrate reductase activity, amino acid distribution and ureide content, the leaves were identified as the predominant site of nitrate reduction in this plant species. The amino acid profile analysis in leaves and roots also indicated an important role of soluble glutamine as a nitrogen transporting compound.

  19. Properties of a recombinant human hemoglobin with aspartic acid 99(beta), an important intersubunit contact site, substituted by lysine.

    PubMed Central

    Yanase, H.; Cahill, S.; Martin de Llano, J. J.; Manning, L. R.; Schneider, K.; Chait, B. T.; Vandegriff, K. D.; Winslow, R. M.; Manning, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of an important subunit contact site, Asp-99(beta), by a Lys residue (D99K(beta)) was proven by sequencing the entire beta-globin gene and the mutant tryptic peptide. Oxygen equilibrium curves of the mutant hemoglobin (Hb) (2-15 mM in heme) indicated that it had an increased oxygen affinity and a lowered but significant amount of cooperativity compared to native HbA. However, in contrast to normal HbA, oxygen binding of the recombinant mutant Hb was only marginally affected by the allosteric regulators 2,3-diphosphoglycerate or inositol hexaphosphate and was not at all responsive to chloride. The efficiency of oxygen binding by HbA in the presence of allosteric regulators was limited by the mutant Hb. At concentrations of 0.2 mM or lower in heme, the mutant D99K(beta) Hb was predominantly a dimer as demonstrated by gel filtration, haptoglobin binding, fluorescence quenching, and light scattering. The purified dimeric recombinant Hb mutant exists in 2 forms that are separable on isoelectric focusing by about 0.1 pH unit, in contrast to tetrameric hemoglobin, which shows 1 band. These mutant forms, which were present in a ratio of 60:40, had the same masses for their heme and globin moieties as determined by mass spectrometry. The elution positions of the alpha- and beta-globin subunits on HPLC were identical. Circular dichroism studies showed that one form of the mutant Hb had a negative ellipticity at 410 nm and the other had positive ellipticity at this wavelength. The findings suggest that the 2 D99K(beta) recombinant mutant forms have differences in their heme-protein environments. PMID:7987216

  20. Human METTL20 Is a Mitochondrial Lysine Methyltransferase That Targets the β Subunit of Electron Transfer Flavoprotein (ETFβ) and Modulates Its Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Małecki, Jędrzej; Ho, Angela Y. Y.; Moen, Anders; Dahl, Helge-André; Falnes, Pål Ø.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are frequently modified by post-translational methylation of lysine residues, catalyzed by S-adenosylmethionine-dependent lysine methyltransferases (KMTs). Lysine methylation of histone proteins has been extensively studied, but it has recently become evident that methylation of non-histone proteins is also abundant and important. The human methyltransferase METTL20 belongs to a group of 10 established and putative human KMTs. We here found METTL20 to be associated with mitochondria and determined that recombinant METTL20 methylated a single protein in extracts from human cells. Using an methyltransferase activity-based purification scheme, we identified the β-subunit of the mitochondrially localized electron transfer flavoprotein (ETFβ) as the substrate of METTL20. Furthermore, METTL20 was found to specifically methylate two adjacent lysine residues, Lys200 and Lys203, in ETFβ both in vitro and in cells. Interestingly, the residues methylated by METTL20 partially overlap with the so-called “recognition loop” in ETFβ, which has been shown to mediate its interaction with various dehydrogenases. Accordingly, we found that METTL20-mediated methylation of ETFβ in vitro reduced its ability to receive electrons from the medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and the glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase. In conclusion, the present study establishes METTL20 as the first human KMT localized to mitochondria and suggests that it may regulate cellular metabolism through modulating the interaction between its substrate ETFβ and dehydrogenases. Based on the previous naming of similar enzymes, we suggest the renaming of human METTL20 to ETFβ-KMT. PMID:25416781

  1. Lipoprotein(A) with An Intact Lysine Binding Site Protects the Retina From an Age-Related Macular Degeneration Phenotype in Mice (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Handa, James T.; Tagami, Mizuki; Ebrahimi, Katayoon; Leibundgut, Gregor; Janiak, Anna; Witztum, Joseph L.; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the accumulation of oxidized phospholipids (OxPL) in the macula is toxic to the retina unless neutralized by a variety of mechanisms, including binding by lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], which is composed of apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] and apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB). Methods: Human maculas and eyes from two Lp(a) transgenic murine models were subjected to morphologic, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical analysis. “Wild-type Lp(a)” mice, which express human apoB-100 and apo(a) that contains oxidized phospholipid, and “mutant LBS− Lp(a)” mice with a defective apo(a) lysine binding site (LBS) for oxidized phospholipid binding, were fed a chow or high-fat diet for 2 to 12 months. Oxidized phospholipid–containing lipoproteins were detected by immunoreactivity to E06, a murine monoclonal antibody binding to the phosphocholine headgroup of oxidized, but not native, phospholipids. Results: Oxidized phospholipids, apo(a), and apoB accumulate in maculas, including drusen, of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) samples and age-matched controls. Lp(a) mice fed a high-fat diet developed age-related changes. However, mutant LBS− Lp(a) mice fed a high-fat diet developed retinal pigment epithelial cell degeneration and drusen. These changes were associated with increased OxPL, decreased antioxidant defenses, increased complement, and decreased complement regulators. Conclusions: Human maculas accumulate Lp(a) and OxPL. Mutant LBS− Lp(a) mice, lacking the ability to bind E06-detectable oxidized phospholipid, develop AMD-like changes. The ability of Lp(a) to bind E06-detectable OxPL may play a protective role in AMD. PMID:26538774

  2. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of Surface-Exposed Lysine Residues Leads to Improved Transduction by AAV2, But Not AAV8, Vectors in Murine Hepatocytes In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Baozheng; Ma, Wenqin; Ling, Chen; Van Vliet, Kim; Huang, Lin-Ya; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Srivastava, Arun; Aslanidi, George V

    2015-12-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays a critical role in the intracellular trafficking of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors, which negatively impacts the transduction efficiency of these vectors. Because ubiquitination occurs on lysine (K) residues, we performed site-directed mutagenesis where we replaced each of 10 surface-exposed K residues (K258, K490, K507, K527, K532, K544, K549, K556, K665, and K706) with glutamic acid (E) because of similarity of size and lack of recognition by modifying enzymes. The transduction efficiency of K490E, K544E, K549E, and K556E scAAV2 vectors increased in HeLa cells in vitro up to 5-fold compared with wild-type (WT) AAV2 vectors, with the K556E mutant being the most efficient. Intravenous delivery of WT and K-mutant ssAAV2 vectors further corroborated these results in murine hepatocytes in vivo. Because AAV8 vectors transduce murine hepatocytes exceedingly well, and because some of the surface-exposed K residues are conserved between these serotypes, we generated and tested two single mutants (K547E and K569E), and one double-mutant (K547 + 569E) AAV8 vector. However, no significant increase in the transduction efficiency of any of these mutant AAV8 vectors was observed in murine hepatocytes in vivo. These studies suggest that although targeting the surface-exposed K residues is yet another strategy to improve the transduction efficiency of AAV vectors, phenotypic outcome is serotype specific.

  3. Mineral composition of seawater bittern nigari products and their effects on changing of browning and antioxidant activity in the glucose/lysine maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Kuda, Takashi; Yano, Toshihiro

    2014-03-01

    Seawater bittern (nigari) is a concentrated solution remaining after the crystallization process of salt that has been used as a coagulant for tofu. Recently, various nigari products are distributed in the East Asia. To clarify the properties of nigari products, major mineral composition of six nigari products was determined. Then, effects of the nigari on the browning and antioxidant activity during the glucose/lysine Maillard reaction were investigated. Though the predominant cation was Mg(2+), the content was varied by each product (0.88-6.49 mol/L). The other major ion contents were also varied. Each 0.5 mol/L of D-glucose and L-lysine were incubated with the nigari (5-50% (v/v)) or nigari-related salts (1 or 2 mol/L). The browning (OD at 465 nm) and antioxidant activity (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging capacity and ferrous-reducing power) were increased remarkably by the nigari containing high Mg(2+) content. The browning tended to be high with sulfates (Na2SO4, (NH4)2SO4). On the other hand, high content of MgCl2 decreased slightly the browning and antioxidant activity. These results suggest that the reaction and antioxidant activities were affected not only by salinity and cations but also by anions and other elements in the nigari.

  4. Bacterial Lysine Decarboxylase Influences Human Dental Biofilm Lysine Content, Biofilm Accumulation and Sub-Clinical Gingival Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lohinai, Z.; Keremi, B.; Szoko, E.; Tabi, T.; Szabo, C.; Tulassay, Z.; Levine, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dental biofilms contain a protein that inhibits mammalian cell growth, possibly lysine decarboxylase from Eikenella corrodens. This enzyme decarboxylates lysine, an essential amino acid for dentally attached cell turnover in gingival sulci. Lysine depletion may stop this turnover, impairing the barrier to bacterial compounds. The aims of this study were to determine biofilm lysine and cadaverine contents before oral hygiene restriction (OHR), and their association with plaque index (PI) and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) after OHR for a week. Methods Laser-induced fluorescence after capillary electrophoresis was used to determine lysine and cadaverine contents in dental biofilm, tongue biofilm and saliva before OHR and in dental biofilm after OHR. Results Before OHR, lysine and cadaverine contents of dental biofilm were similar and 10-fold greater than in saliva or tongue biofilm. After a week of OHR, the biofilm content of cadaverine increased and that of lysine decreased, consistent with greater biofilm lysine decarboxylase activity. Regression indicated that PI and GCF exudation were positively related to biofilm lysine post-OHR, unless biofilm lysine exceeded the minimal blood plasma content in which case PI was further increased but GCF exudation was reduced. Conclusions After OHR, lysine decarboxylase activity seems to determine biofilm lysine content and biofilm accumulation. When biofilm lysine exceeds minimal blood plasma content after OHR, less GCF appeared despite more biofilm. Lysine appears important for biofilm accumulation and the epithelial barrier to bacterial proinflammatory agents. Clinical Relevance Inhibiting lysine decarboxylase may retard the increased GCF exudation required for microbial development and gingivitis. PMID:22141361

  5. Structural insights into the recovery of aldolase activity in N-acetylneuraminic acid lyase by replacement of the catalytically active lysine with γ-thialysine by using a chemical mutagenesis strategy.

    PubMed

    Timms, Nicole; Windle, Claire L; Polyakova, Anna; Ault, James R; Trinh, Chi H; Pearson, Arwen R; Nelson, Adam; Berry, Alan

    2013-03-01

    Chemical modification has been used to introduce the unnatural amino acid γ-thialysine in place of the catalytically important Lys165 in the enzyme N-acetylneuraminic acid lyase (NAL). The Staphylococcus aureus nanA gene, encoding NAL, was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The protein, purified in high yield, has all the properties expected of a class I NAL. The S. aureus NAL which contains no natural cysteine residues was subjected to site-directed mutagenesis to introduce a cysteine in place of Lys165 in the enzyme active site. Subsequently chemical mutagenesis completely converted the cysteine into γ-thialysine through dehydroalanine (Dha) as demonstrated by ESI-MS. Initial kinetic characterisation showed that the protein containing γ-thialysine regained 17 % of the wild-type activity. To understand the reason for this lower activity, we solved X-ray crystal structures of the wild-type S. aureus NAL, both in the absence of, and in complex with, pyruvate. We also report the structures of the K165C variant, and the K165-γ-thialysine enzyme in the presence, or absence, of pyruvate. These structures reveal that γ-thialysine in NAL is an excellent structural mimic of lysine. Measurement of the pH-activity profile of the thialysine modified enzyme revealed that its pH optimum is shifted from 7.4 to 6.8. At its optimum pH, the thialysine-containing enzyme showed almost 30 % of the activity of the wild-type enzyme at its pH optimum. The lowered activity and altered pH profile of the unnatural amino acid-containing enzyme can be rationalised by imbalances of the ionisation states of residues within the active site when the pK(a) of the residue at position 165 is perturbed by replacement with γ-thialysine. The results reveal the utility of chemical mutagenesis for the modification of enzyme active sites and the exquisite sensitivity of catalysis to the local structural and electrostatic environment in NAL.

  6. Improved synthesis of lysine- and arginine-derived Amadori and Heyns products and in vitro measurement of their angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Sudhanva M; Harohally, Nanishankar V

    2012-02-15

    The L-lysine- and L-arginine-derived Amadori and Heyns products consisting of N-(1-deoxy-d-fructos-1-yl)amino acid and N-(2-deoxy-d-glucos-2-yl)amino acid were prepared by reaction of d-fructose and d-glucose with l-lysine hydrochloride and l-arginine hydrochloride using commercial zinc powder as deprotonating reagent and also as catalyst precursor in a simple synthetic route in high yield. These compounds were screened for angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity using a high-throughput colorimetric assay (utilizing porcine kidney ACE). The IC(50) values fall in the range of 1030-1175 μM, with N(α)-(1-deoxy-d-fructos-1-yl)arginine showing the best IC(50) value (1030 ± 38 μM). This study demonstrates an improved synthetic method for simple Amadori and Heyns products and their moderate ACE inhibitor activity. PMID:22242891

  7. Site-saturation engineering of lysine 47 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Paenibacillus macerans to enhance substrate specificity towards maltodextrin for enzymatic synthesis of 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G).

    PubMed

    Han, Ruizhi; Liu, Long; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-07-01

    In this work, the site-saturation engineering of lysine 47 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) from Paenibacillus macerans was conducted to improve the specificity of CGTase towards maltodextrin, which can be used as a cheap and easily soluble glycosyl donor for the enzymatic synthesis of 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G) by CGTase. When using maltodextrin as glycosyl donor, four mutants K47F (lysine→ phenylalanine), K47L (lysine→ leucine), K47V (lysine→ valine) and K47W (lysine→ tryptophan) showed higher AA-2G yield as compared with that produced by the wild-type CGTase. The transformation conditions (temperature, pH and the mass ratio of L-ascorbic acid to maltodextrin) were optimized and the highest titer of AA-2G produced by the mutant K47L could reach 1.97 g/l, which was 64.2% higher than that (1.20 g/l) produced by the wild-type CGTase. The reaction kinetics analysis confirmed the enhanced maltodextrin specificity, and it was also found that compared with the wild-type CGTase, the four mutants had relatively lower cyclization activities and higher disproportionation activities, which was favorable for AA-2G synthesis. The mechanism responsible for the enhanced substrate specificity was further explored by structure modeling and it was indicated that the enhancement of maltodextrin specificity may be due to the short residue chain and the removal of hydrogen bonding interactions between the side chain of residue 47 and the sugar at -3 subsite. Here the obtained mutant CGTases, especially the K47L, has a great potential in the production of AA-2G with maltodextrin as a cheap and easily soluble substrate.

  8. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  9. A kinetic and stereochemical investigation of the role of lysine-32 in the phenylpyruvate tautomerase activity catalyzed by macrophage migration inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W H; Czerwinski, R M; Stamps, S L; Whitman, C P

    1999-11-30

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), an immunoregulatory protein, exhibits a phenylpyruvate tautomerase (PPT) activity. The catalytic mechanism of this activity has recently attracted attention in an effort to determine whether there is a relationship between the PPT activity and the role of MIF in various immune and inflammatory processes. One of the active site residues is lysine-32, which is postulated to play two roles: it assists in substrate binding through an interaction with a carboxylate oxygen at C-1 of phenylpyruvate, and it may be partially responsible for lowering the pK(a) of the catalytic base, Pro-1. The role of Lys-32 has been investigated by changing it to an alanine and an arginine and determining the kinetic parameters, the stereoselectivity, the competitive inhibition, and the pH dependence of the resulting K32A- and K32R-catalyzed reactions. For the K32R mutant, these properties are mostly comparable to those determined for the wild type with two exceptions. There is a modest decrease in the stereoselectivity of the reaction and in the binding affinity of the competitive inhibitor, (E)-2-fluoro-p-hydroxycinnamate. These differences are likely due to the increased steric bulk of arginine. For the K32A mutant, there are 11- and 12-fold decreases in k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m), respectively, using phenylenolpyruvate. Part of the decrease in activity can be attributed to the observed increase of 1. 3 units in the pK(a) of Pro-1. It was also found that the loss of the electrostatic interaction did not significantly affect the stereoselectivity of the K32A-catalyzed reaction, although it did result in a decrease in the binding affinity of the competitive inhibitor. The combination of these results indicates that the primary function of Lys-32 in the PPT activity of MIF is to lower the pK(a) of Pro-1. The interactions responsible for the stereoselectivity of the PPT activity were further delineated by examining the wild type- and K32A

  10. Using catalytic atom maps to predict the catalytic functions present in enzyme active sites.

    PubMed

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R; Houk, K N

    2012-09-18

    Catalytic atom maps (CAMs) are minimal models of enzyme active sites. The structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were examined to determine if proteins with CAM-like geometries in their active sites all share the same catalytic function. We combined the CAM-based search protocol with a filter based on the weighted contact number (WCN) of the catalytic residues, a measure of the "crowdedness" of the microenvironment around a protein residue. Using this technique, a CAM based on the Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad of trypsin was able to correctly identify catalytic triads in other enzymes within 0.5 Å rmsd of the CAM with 96% accuracy. A CAM based on the Cys-Arg-(Asp/Glu) active site residues from the tyrosine phosphatase active site achieved 89% accuracy in identifying this type of catalytic functionality. Both of these CAMs were able to identify active sites across different fold types. Finally, the PDB was searched to locate proteins with catalytic functionality similar to that present in the active site of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase), whose mechanism is not known with certainty. A CAM, based on the conserved Lys-Asp-Lys-Asp tetrad in the ODCase active site, was used to search the PDB for enzymes with similar active sites. The ODCase active site has a geometry similar to that of Schiff base-forming Class I aldolases, with lowest aldolase rmsd to the ODCase CAM at 0.48 Å. The similarity between this CAM and the aldolase active site suggests that ODCase has the correct catalytic functionality present in its active site for the generation of a nucleophilic lysine. PMID:22909276

  11. Using Catalytic Atom Maps to Predict the Catalytic Functions Present in Enzyme Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R.; Houk, K. N.

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic Atom Maps (CAMs) are minimal models of enzyme active sites. The structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were examined to determine if proteins with CAM-like geometries in their active sites all share the same catalytic function. We combined the CAM-based search protocol with a filter based on the weighted contact number (WCN) of the catalytic residues, a measure of the “crowdedness” of the microenvironment around a protein residue. Using this technique, a CAM based on the Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad of trypsin was able to correctly identify catalytic triads in other enzymes within 0.5 Å RMSD of the Catalytic Atom Map with 96% accuracy. A CAM based on the Cys-Arg-(Asp/Glu) active site residues from the tyrosine phosphatase active site achieved 89% accuracy in identifying this type of catalytic functionality. Both of these Catalytic Atom Maps were able to identify active sites across different fold types. Finally, the PDB was searched to locate proteins with catalytic functionality similar to that present in the active site of orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase), whose mechanism is not known with certainty. A CAM, based on the conserved Lys-Asp-Lys-Asp tetrad in the ODCase active site, was used to search the PDB for enzymes with similar active sites. The ODCase active site has a geometry similar to that of Schiff base-forming Class I aldolases, with lowest aldolase RMSD to the ODCase CAM at 0.48 Å. The similarity between this CAM and the aldolase active site suggests that ODCase has the correct catalytic functionality present in its active site for the generation of a nucleophilic lysine. PMID:22909276

  12. ε-Polylysine and next-generation dendrigraft poly-L-lysine: chemistry, activity, and applications in biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; He, Yu; Feng, Xiaobo; Fu, Dehao

    2015-01-01

    Polylysine is an important class of polyamino acids with a broad spectrum of applications in biomedical research and development. It can be divided into two classes, α-polylysine and ε-polylysine, the former is synthesized by artificial chemical synthesis and has limited applications due to its high toxicity, and the latter is produced by microbial synthesis as a class of natural polymers and is widely used in various food, medicinal, and electronics products. Another major class of synthetic polymers is dendrimers (after linear, cross-linked, and branched polymers). Dendrigraft poly-L-lysine (DGL) has the favorable properties of polylysine and dendrimers, with a broad spectrum of applications in drug discovery and development, including drug delivery, gene carriers, diagnostic imaging, diagnostics, biosensors, and special cancer therapies (such as boron neutron capture therapy and photodynamic therapy). As there are still some problems with the development of DGL, further research is warranted for its broad applications.

  13. Circadian rhythm transcription factor CLOCK regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor by acetylating its hinge region lysine cluster: potential physiological implications

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Nancy; Chrousos, George P.; Kino, Tomoshige

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, end products of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, influence functions of virtually all organs and tissues through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Circulating levels of glucocorticoids fluctuate naturally in a circadian fashion and regulate the transcriptional activity of GR in target tissues. The basic helix-loop-helix protein CLOCK, a histone acetyltransferase (HAT), and its heterodimer partner BMAL1 are self-oscillating transcription factors that generate circadian rhythms in both the central nervous system and periphery. We found that CLOCK/BMAL1 repressed GR-induced transcriptional activity in a HAT-activity- dependent fashion. In serum-shock-synchronized cells, transactivational activity of GR, accessed by mRNA expression of an endogenous-responsive gene, fluctuated spontaneously in a circadian fashion in reverse phase with CLOCK/BMAL1 mRNA expression. CLOCK and GR interacted with each other physically, and CLOCK suppressed binding of GR to its DNA recognition sequences by acetylating multiple lysine residues located in its hinge region. These findings indicate that CLOCK/BMAL1 functions as a reverse-phase negative regulator of glucocorticoid action in target tissues, possibly by antagonizing biological actions of diurnally fluctuating circulating glucocorticoids. Further, these results suggest that a peripheral target tissue circadian rhythm indirectly influences the functions of every organ and tissue inside the body through modulation of the ubiquitous and diverse actions of glucocorticoids.—Nader, N., Chrousos, G. P., Kino, T. Circadian rhythm transcription factor CLOCK regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor by acetylating its hinge region lysine cluster: potential physiological implications. PMID:19141540

  14. Crystal Structure of the Lysine Riboswitch Regulatory mRNA Element*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Garst, Andrew D.; Héroux, Annie; Rambo, Robert P.; Batey, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Riboswitches are metabolite-sensitive elements found in mRNAs that control gene expression through a regulatory secondary structural switch. Along with regulation of lysine biosynthetic genes, mutations within the lysine-responsive riboswitch (L-box) play a role in the acquisition of resistance to antimicrobial lysine analogs. To understand the structural basis for lysine binding, we have determined the 2.8Å resolution crystal structure of lysine bound to the Thermotoga maritima asd lysine riboswitch ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals a complex architecture scaffolding a binding pocket completely enveloping lysine. Mutations conferring antimicrobial resistance cluster around this site as well as highly conserved long range interactions, indicating that they disrupt lysine binding or proper folding of the RNA. Comparison of the free and bound forms by x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and chemical probing reveals almost identical structures, indicating that lysine induces only limited and local conformational changes upon binding. PMID:18593706

  15. Crystal structure of the lysine riboswitch regulatory mRNA element.

    PubMed

    Garst, Andrew D; Héroux, Annie; Rambo, Robert P; Batey, Robert T

    2008-08-15

    Riboswitches are metabolite-sensitive elements found in mRNAs that control gene expression through a regulatory secondary structural switch. Along with regulation of lysine biosynthetic genes, mutations within the lysine-responsive riboswitch (L-box) play a role in the acquisition of resistance to antimicrobial lysine analogs. To understand the structural basis for lysine binding, we have determined the 2.8 angstroms resolution crystal structure of lysine bound to the Thermotoga maritima asd lysine riboswitch ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals a complex architecture scaffolding a binding pocket completely enveloping lysine. Mutations conferring antimicrobial resistance cluster around this site as well as highly conserved long range interactions, indicating that they disrupt lysine binding or proper folding of the RNA. Comparison of the free and bound forms by x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and chemical probing reveals almost identical structures, indicating that lysine induces only limited and local conformational changes upon binding. PMID:18593706

  16. Crystal Structure of the Lysine Riboswitch Regulatory mRNA Element

    SciTech Connect

    Garst, A.; Heroux, A; Rambo, R; Batey, R

    2008-01-01

    Riboswitches are metabolite-sensitive elements found in mRNAs that control gene expression through a regulatory secondary structural switch. Along with regulation of lysine biosynthetic genes, mutations within the lysine-responsive riboswitch (L-box) play a role in the acquisition of resistance to antimicrobial lysine analogs. To understand the structural basis for lysine binding, we have determined the 2.8{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of lysine bound to the Thermotoga maritima asd lysine riboswitch ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals a complex architecture scaffolding a binding pocket completely enveloping lysine. Mutations conferring antimicrobial resistance cluster around this site as well as highly conserved long range interactions, indicating that they disrupt lysine binding or proper folding of the RNA. Comparison of the free and bound forms by x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and chemical probing reveals almost identical structures, indicating that lysine induces only limited and local conformational changes upon binding.

  17. Lysine Acetylation of CREBH Regulates Fasting-Induced Hepatic Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunbae; Mendez, Roberto; Chen, Xuequn; Fang, Deyu; Zhang, Kezhong

    2015-12-01

    Cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein 3-like 3, hepatocyte specific (CREBH), is a hepatic transcription factor that functions as a key regulator of energy homeostasis. Here, we defined a regulatory CREBH posttranslational modification process, namely, lysine-specific acetylation, and its functional involvement in fasting-induced hepatic lipid metabolism. Fasting induces CREBH acetylation in mouse livers in a time-dependent manner, and this event is critical for CREBH transcriptional activity in regulating hepatic lipid homeostasis. The histone acetyltransferase PCAF-mediated acetylation and the deacetylase sirtuin-1-mediated deacetylation coexist to maintain CREBH acetylation states under fasting conditions. Site-directed mutagenesis and functional analyses revealed that the lysine (K) residue at position 294 (K294) within the bZIP domain of the CREBH protein is the site where fasting-induced acetylation/deacetylation occurs. Introduction of the acetylation-deficient (K294R) or acetylation-mimicking (K294Q) mutation inhibited or enhanced CREBH transcriptional activity, respectively. Importantly, CREBH acetylation at lysine 294 was required for the interaction and synergy between CREBH and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in activating their target genes upon fasting or glucagon stimulation. Introduction of the CREBH lysine 294 mutation in the liver leads to hepatic steatosis and hyperlipidemia in animals under prolonged fasting. In summary, our study reveals a molecular mechanism by which fasting or glucagon stimulation modulates lipid homeostasis through acetylation of CREBH.

  18. Lysine Acetylation of CREBH Regulates Fasting-Induced Hepatic Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunbae; Mendez, Roberto; Chen, Xuequn; Fang, Deyu

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein 3-like 3, hepatocyte specific (CREBH), is a hepatic transcription factor that functions as a key regulator of energy homeostasis. Here, we defined a regulatory CREBH posttranslational modification process, namely, lysine-specific acetylation, and its functional involvement in fasting-induced hepatic lipid metabolism. Fasting induces CREBH acetylation in mouse livers in a time-dependent manner, and this event is critical for CREBH transcriptional activity in regulating hepatic lipid homeostasis. The histone acetyltransferase PCAF-mediated acetylation and the deacetylase sirtuin-1-mediated deacetylation coexist to maintain CREBH acetylation states under fasting conditions. Site-directed mutagenesis and functional analyses revealed that the lysine (K) residue at position 294 (K294) within the bZIP domain of the CREBH protein is the site where fasting-induced acetylation/deacetylation occurs. Introduction of the acetylation-deficient (K294R) or acetylation-mimicking (K294Q) mutation inhibited or enhanced CREBH transcriptional activity, respectively. Importantly, CREBH acetylation at lysine 294 was required for the interaction and synergy between CREBH and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in activating their target genes upon fasting or glucagon stimulation. Introduction of the CREBH lysine 294 mutation in the liver leads to hepatic steatosis and hyperlipidemia in animals under prolonged fasting. In summary, our study reveals a molecular mechanism by which fasting or glucagon stimulation modulates lipid homeostasis through acetylation of CREBH. PMID:26438600

  19. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  20. Computational Construction of Antibody–Drug Conjugates Using Surface Lysines as the Antibody Conjugation Site and a Non-cleavable Linker

    PubMed Central

    Filntisi, Arianna; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Matsopoulos, George K; Kossida, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    Antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) constitute a category of anticancer targeted therapy that has gathered great interest during the last few years because of their potential to kill cancer cells while causing significantly fewer side effects than traditional chemotherapy. In this paper, a process of computational construction of ADCs is described, using the surface lysines of an antibody and a non-covalent linker molecule, as well as a cytotoxic substance, as files in Protein Data Bank format. Also, aspects related to the function, properties, and development of ADCs are discussed. PMID:25506200

  1. Global analysis of lysine acetylation in strawberry leaves.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xianping; Chen, Wenyue; Zhao, Yun; Ruan, Songlin; Zhang, Hengmu; Yan, Chengqi; Jin, Liang; Cao, Lingling; Zhu, Jun; Ma, Huasheng; Cheng, Zhongyi

    2015-01-01

    Protein lysine acetylation is a reversible and dynamic post-translational modification. It plays an important role in regulating diverse cellular processes including chromatin dynamic, metabolic pathways, and transcription in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although studies of lysine acetylome in plants have been reported, the throughput was not high enough, hindering the deep understanding of lysine acetylation in plant physiology and pathology. In this study, taking advantages of anti-acetyllysine-based enrichment and high-sensitive-mass spectrometer, we applied an integrated proteomic approach to comprehensively investigate lysine acetylome in strawberry. In total, we identified 1392 acetylation sites in 684 proteins, representing the largest dataset of acetylome in plants to date. To reveal the functional impacts of lysine acetylation in strawberry, intensive bioinformatic analysis was performed. The results significantly expanded our current understanding of plant acetylome and demonstrated that lysine acetylation is involved in multiple cellular metabolism and cellular processes. More interestingly, nearly 50% of all acetylated proteins identified in this work were localized in chloroplast and the vital role of lysine acetylation in photosynthesis was also revealed. Taken together, this study not only established the most extensive lysine acetylome in plants to date, but also systematically suggests the significant and unique roles of lysine acetylation in plants. PMID:26442052

  2. Role of several histone lysine methyltransferases in tumor development

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIFU; ZHU, SHUNQIN; KE, XIAO-XUE; CUI, HONGJUAN

    2016-01-01

    The field of cancer epigenetics has been evolving rapidly in recent decades. Epigenetic mechanisms include DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs. Histone modifications are important markers of function and chromatin state. Aberrant histone methylation frequently occurs in tumor development and progression. Multiple studies have identified that histone lysine methyltransferases regulate gene transcription through the methylation of histone, which affects cell proliferation and differentiation, cell migration and invasion, and other biological characteristics. Histones have variant lysine sites for different levels of methylation, catalyzed by different lysine methyltransferases, which have numerous effects on human cancers. The present review focused on the most recent advances, described the key function sites of histone lysine methyltransferases, integrated significant quantities of data to introduce several compelling histone lysine methyltransferases in various types of human cancers, summarized their role in tumor development and discussed their potential mechanisms of action. PMID:26998265

  3. Catalysis: Elusive active site in focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labinger, Jay A.

    2016-08-01

    The identification of the active site of an iron-containing catalyst raises hopes of designing practically useful catalysts for the room-temperature conversion of methane to methanol, a potential fuel for vehicles. See Letter p.317

  4. Lysine-tagged peptide coupling onto polylactide nanoparticles coated with activated ester-based amphiphilic copolymer: a route to highly peptide-functionalized biodegradable carriers.

    PubMed

    Handké, Nadège; Ficheux, Damien; Rollet, Marion; Delair, Thierry; Mabrouk, Kamel; Bertin, Denis; Gigmes, Didier; Verrier, Bernard; Trimaille, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Efficient biomolecule conjugation to the surface of biodegradable colloidal carriers is crucial for their targeting efficiency in drug/vaccine delivery applications. We here propose a potent strategy to drastically improve peptide immobilization on biodegradable polylactide (PLA) nanoparticles (NPs). Our approach particularly relies on the use of an amphiphilic block copolymer PLA-b-poly(N-acryloxysuccinimide-co-N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PLA-b-P(NAS-co-NVP)) as NP surface modifier, whose the N-succinimidyl (NS) ester functions of the NAS units along the polymer chain ensure N-terminal amine peptide coupling. The well-known immunostimulatory peptide sequence derived from the human interleukin 1β (IL-1β), VQGEESNDK, was coupled on the NPs of 169 nm mean diameter in phosphate buffer (pH 8, 10 mM). A maximum amount of 2 mg immobilized per gram of NPs (i.e. 0.042 peptidenm(-2)) was obtained. Introduction of a three lysine tag at the peptide N-terminus (KKKVQGEESNDK) resulted in a dramatic improvement of the immobilized peptide amounts (27.5 mg/g NP, i.e. 0.417 peptidenm(-2)). As a comparison, the density of tagged peptide achievable on surfactant free PLA NPs of similar size (140 nm), through classical EDC or EDC/NHS activation of the surface PLA carboxylic end-groups, was found to be 6 mg/g NP (i.e. 0.075 peptidenm(-2)), showing the decisive impact of the P(NAS-co-NVP)-based hairy corona for high peptide coupling. These results demonstrate that combined use of lysine tag and PLA-b-P(NAS-co-NVP) surfactant represents a valuable platform to tune and optimize surface bio-functionalization of PLA-based biodegradable carriers.

  5. Lysine carboxylation: unveiling a spontaneous post-translational modification

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Adamian, Larisa; Shi, Dashuang; Liang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    A computational method for the prediction of lysine carboxylation (KCX) in protein structures is described. The method accurately identifies misreported KCXs and predicts previously unknown KCX sites. The carboxylation of lysine residues is a post-translational modification (PTM) that plays a critical role in the catalytic mechanisms of several important enzymes. It occurs spontaneously under certain physicochemical conditions, but is difficult to detect experimentally. Its full impact is unknown. In this work, the signature microenvironment of lysine-carboxylation sites has been characterized. In addition, a computational method called Predictor of Lysine Carboxylation (PreLysCar) for the detection of lysine carboxylation in proteins with available three-dimensional structures has been developed. The likely prevalence of lysine carboxylation in the proteome was assessed through large-scale computations. The results suggest that about 1.3% of large proteins may contain a carboxylated lysine residue. This unexpected prevalence of lysine carboxylation implies an enrichment of reactions in which it may play functional roles. The results also suggest that by switching enzymes on and off under appropriate physicochemical conditions spontaneous PTMs may serve as an important and widely used efficient biological machinery for regulation.

  6. Transition state stabilization by six arginines clustered in the active site of creatine kinase.

    PubMed

    Jourden, Michael J; Geiss, Paul R; Thomenius, Michael J; Horst, Lindsay A; Barty, Melissa M; Brym, Melissa J; Mulligan, Guy B; Almeida, Ryan M; Kersteen, Betsy A; Myers, Nichole R; Snider, Mark J; Borders, Charles L; Edmiston, Paul L

    2005-08-10

    Six fully conserved arginine residues (R129, R131, R235, R291, R319, and R340) closely grouped in the nucleotide binding site of rabbit muscle creatine kinase (rmCK) were mutated; four to alanine and all six to lysine. Kinetic analyses in the direction of phosphocreatine formation showed that all four alanine mutants led to substantial losses of activity with three (R129A, R131A, and R235A) having no detectable activity. All six lysine mutants retained variable degrees of reduced enzymatic activity. Static quenching of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence was used to measure the binding constants for MgADP and MgATP. Nucleotide binding was at most only modestly affected by mutation of the arginine residues. Thus, the cluster of arginines seem to be primarily responsible for transition state stabilization which is further supported by the observation that none of the inactive mutants demonstrated the ability to form a transition analogue complex of MgADP.nitrate.creatine as determined by fluorescence quenching assays. As a whole, the results suggest that the most important role these residues play is to properly align the substrates for stabilization of the phosphoryl transfer reaction.

  7. Lysine N[superscript zeta]-Decarboxylation Switch and Activation of the [beta]-Lactam Sensor Domain of BlaR1 Protein of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Borbulevych, Oleg; Kumarasiri, Malika; Wilson, Brian; Llarrull1, Leticia I.; Lee, Mijoon; Hesek, Dusan; Shi, Qicun; Peng, Jeffrey; Baker, Brian M.; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2012-10-29

    The integral membrane protein BlaR1 of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus senses the presence of {beta}-lactam antibiotics in the milieu and transduces the information to the cytoplasm, where the biochemical events that unleash induction of antibiotic resistance mechanisms take place. We report herein by two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR experiments of the sensor domain of BlaR1 in solution and by determination of an x-ray structure for the apo protein that Lys-392 of the antibiotic-binding site is posttranslationally modified by N{sup {zeta}}-carboxylation. Additional crystallographic and NMR data reveal that on acylation of Ser-389 by antibiotics, Lys-392 experiences N{sup {zeta}}-decarboxylation. This unique process, termed the lysine N{sup {zeta}}-decarboxylation switch, arrests the sensor domain in the activated ('on') state, necessary for signal transduction and all the subsequent biochemical processes. We present structural information on how this receptor activation process takes place, imparting longevity to the antibiotic-receptor complex that is needed for the induction of the antibiotic-resistant phenotype in methicillin-resistant S. aureus.

  8. The roles of selected arginine and lysine residues of TAFI (Pro-CPU) in its activation to TAFIa by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengliang; Kim, Paul Y; Manuel, Reg; Seto, Marian; Whitlow, Marc; Nagashima, Mariko; Morser, John; Gils, Ann; Declerck, Paul; Nesheim, Michael E

    2009-03-13

    Thrombomodulin (TM) increases the catalytic efficiency of thrombin (IIa)-mediated activation of thrombin-activable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) 1250-fold. Negatively charged residues of the C-loop of TM-EGF-like domain 3 are required for TAFI activation. Molecular models suggested several positively charged residues of TAFI with which the C-loop residues could interact. Seven TAFI mutants were constructed to determine if these residues are required for efficient TAFI activation. TAFI wild-type or mutants were activated in the presence or absence of TM and the kinetic parameters of TAFI activation were determined. When the three consecutive lysine residues in the activation peptide of TAFI were substituted with alanine (K42/43/44A), the catalytic efficiencies for TAFI activation with TM decreased 8-fold. When other positively charged surface residues of TAFI (Lys-133, Lys-211, Lys-212, Arg-220, Lys-240, or Arg-275) were mutated to alanine, the catalytic efficiencies for TAFI activation with TM decreased by 1.7-2.7-fold. All decreases were highly statistically significant. In the absence of TM, catalytic efficiencies ranged from 2.8-fold lower to 1.24-fold higher than wild-type. None of these, except the 2.8-fold lower value, was statistically significant. The average half-life of the TAFIa mutants was 8.1+/-0.6 min, and that of wild type was 8.4+/-0.3 min at 37 degrees C. Our data show that these residues are important in the activation of TAFI by IIa, especially in the presence of TM. Whether the mutated residues promote a TAFI-TM or TAFI-IIa interaction remains to be determined. In addition, these residues do not influence spontaneous inactivation of TAFIa.

  9. A chemical proteomics approach for global analysis of lysine monomethylome profiling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhixiang; Cheng, Zhongyi; Sun, Mingwei; Wan, Xuelian; Liu, Ping; He, Tieming; Tan, Minjia; Zhao, Yingming

    2015-02-01

    Methylation of lysine residues on histone proteins is known to play an important role in chromatin structure and function. However, non-histone protein substrates of this modification remain largely unknown. An effective approach for system-wide analysis of protein lysine methylation, particularly lysine monomethylation, is lacking. Here we describe a chemical proteomics approach for global screening for monomethyllysine substrates, involving chemical propionylation of monomethylated lysine, affinity enrichment of the modified monomethylated peptides, and HPLC/MS/MS analysis. Using this approach, we identified with high confidence 446 lysine monomethylation sites in 398 proteins, including three previously unknown histone monomethylation marks, representing the largest data set of protein lysine monomethylation described to date. Our data not only confirms previously discovered lysine methylation substrates in the nucleus and spliceosome, but also reveals new substrates associated with diverse biological processes. This method hence offers a powerful approach for dynamic study of protein lysine monomethylation under diverse cellular conditions and in human diseases. PMID:25505155

  10. Low dielectric response in enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Edward L.; Krishtalik, Lev I.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of charge transfer depend crucially on the dielectric reorganization of the medium. In enzymatic reactions that involve charge transfer, atomic dielectric response of the active site and of its surroundings determines the efficiency of the protein as a catalyst. We report direct spectroscopic measurements of the reorganization energy associated with the dielectric response in the active site of α-chymotrypsin. A chromophoric inhibitor of the enzyme is used as a spectroscopic probe. We find that water strongly affects the dielectric reorganization in the active site of the enzyme in solution. The reorganization energy of the protein matrix in the vicinity of the active site is similar to that of low-polarity solvents. Surprisingly, water exhibits an anomalously high dielectric response that cannot be described in terms of the dielectric continuum theory. As a result, sequestering the active site from the aqueous environment inside low-dielectric enzyme body dramatically reduces the dielectric reorganization. This reduction is particularly important for controlling the rate of enzymatic reactions. PMID:10681440

  11. Thiolation of protein-bound carcinogenic aldehyde. An electrophilic acrolein-lysine adduct that covalently binds to thiols.

    PubMed

    Furuhata, Atsunori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Osawa, Toshihiko; Uchida, Koji

    2002-08-01

    Acrolein, a representative carcinogenic aldehyde that could be ubiquitously generated in biological systems under oxidative stress, shows facile reactivity with the epsilon-amino group of lysine to form N(epsilon)-(3-formyl-3,4-dehydropiperidino)lysine (FDP-lysine) as the major product (Uchida, K., Kanematsu, M., Morimitsu, Y., Osawa, T., Noguchi, N., and Niki, E. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 16058-16066). In the present study, we determined the electrophilic potential of FDP-lysine and established a novel mechanism of protein thiolation in which the FDP-lysine generated in the acrolein-modified protein reacts with sulfhydryl groups to form thioether adducts. When a sulfhydryl enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, was incubated with acrolein-modified bovine serum albumin in sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at 37 degrees C, a significant loss of sulfhydryl groups, which was accompanied by the loss of enzyme activity and the formation of high molecular mass protein species (>200 kDa), was observed. The FDP-lysine adduct generated in the acrolein-modified protein was suggested to represent a thiol-reactive electrophile based on the following observations. (i) N(alpha)-acetyl-FDP-lysine, prepared from the reaction of N(alpha)-acetyl lysine with acrolein, was covalently bound to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. (ii) The FDP-lysine derivative reacted with glutathione to form a GSH conjugate. (iii) The acrolein-modified bovine serum albumin significantly reacted with GSH to form a glutathiolated protein. Furthermore, the observation that the glutathiolated acrolein-modified protein showed decreased immunoreactivity with an anti-FDP-lysine monoclonal antibody suggested that the FDP-lysine residues in the acrolein-modified protein served as the binding site of GSH. These data suggest that thiolation of the protein-bound acrolein may be involved in redox alteration under oxidative stress, whereby oxidative stress generates the increased production of

  12. Carnitine biosynthesis. Hydroxylation of N6-trimethyl-lysine to 3-hydroxy-N6-trimethyl-lysine.

    PubMed

    Sachan, D S; Hoppel, C L

    1980-05-15

    Rat kidney homogenates metabolize N6-trimethyl-lysine to N-trimethylammoniobutyrate, but not to carnitine. The first step in this conversion is the hydroxylation of trimethyl-lysine to form 3-hydroxy-N6-trimethyl-lysine. An assay system was developed in which hydroxylation of trimethyl-lysine is linear with respect to both time and homogenate protein concentration. The rate is 5 nmol of 3-hydroxy-N6-trimethyl-lysine formed/min per mg of homogenate protein. The cofactors required are ascorbate, alpha-oxoglutarate, FeSO4, and O2. Catalase and dithiothreitol give a 20% stimulation. Ca2+ produces a 2-fold increase in specific activity and cannot be replaced by Mg2+, Mn2+ or Zn2+. These last three bivalent cations lead to a decreased activity. Subcellular distribution studies demonstrate that trimethyl-lysine hydroxylase activity parallels the distribution profile of succinate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. Thus trimethyl-lysine hydroxylase has a mitochondrial localization. Distribution of trimethyl-lysine hydroxylase activity between cortex and medulla of kidney if 67 and 33% respectively, similar to mitochondrial distribution.

  13. Bioorthogonal Chemical Activation of Kinases in Living Systems

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective manipulation of protein kinases under living conditions is highly desirable yet extremely challenging, particularly in a gain-of-function fashion. Here we employ our recently developed bioorthogonal cleavage reaction as a general strategy for intracellular activation of individual kinases. Site-specific incorporation of trans-cyclooctene-caged lysine in place of the conserved catalytic lysine, in conjunction with the cleavage partner dimethyl-tetrazine, allowed efficient lysine decaging with the kinase activity chemically rescued in living systems. PMID:27280167

  14. Dual Genetic Encoding of Acetyl-lysine and Non-deacetylatable Thioacetyl-lysine Mediated by Flexizyme.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hai; Reynolds, Noah M; Fan, Chenguang; Englert, Markus; Hoyer, Denton; Miller, Scott J; Söll, Dieter

    2016-03-14

    Acetylation of lysine residues is an important post-translational protein modification. Lysine acetylation in histones and its crosstalk with other post-translational modifications in histone and non-histone proteins are crucial to DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. We incorporated acetyl-lysine (AcK) and the non-hydrolyzable thioacetyl-lysine (ThioAcK) into full-length proteins in vitro, mediated by flexizyme. ThioAcK and AcK were site-specifically incorporated at different lysine positions into human histone H3, either individually or in pairs. We demonstrate that the thioacetyl group in histone H3 could not be removed by the histone deacetylase sirtuin type 1. This method provides a powerful tool to study protein acetylation and its role in crosstalk between post-translational modifications. PMID:26914285

  15. The bifunctional active site of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase. Roles of the basic residues.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J C; Markham, G D

    2000-02-11

    S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzes a unique two-step enzymatic reaction leading to formation of the primary biological alkylating agent. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli AdoMet synthetase shows that the active site, which lies between two subunits, contains four lysines and one histidine as basic residues. In order to test the proposed charge and hydrogen bonding roles in catalytic function, each lysine has been changed to an uncharged methionine or alanine, and the histidine has been altered to asparagine. The resultant enzyme variants are all tetramers like the wild type enzyme; however, circular dichroism spectra show reductions in helix content for the K245*M and K269M mutants. (The asterisk denotes that the residue is in the second subunit.) Four mutants have k(cat) reductions of approximately 10(3)-10(4)-fold in AdoMet synthesis; however, the k(cat) of K165*M variant is only reduced 2-fold. In each mutant, there is a smaller catalytic impairment in the partial reaction of tripolyphosphate hydrolysis. The K165*A enzyme has a 100-fold greater k(cat) for tripolyphosphate hydrolysis than the wild type enzyme, but this mutant is not activated by AdoMet in contrast to the wild type enzyme. The properties of these mutants require reassessment of the catalytic roles of these residues. PMID:10660564

  16. Active site studies of Escherichia coli 2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate aldolase

    SciTech Connect

    Vlahos, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    The data presented delineate the complete amino acid sequence of E. coli KHG aldolase and also identify Lys-133, Glu-45, and Arg-49 as aminoacyl residues required for catalytic activity. Incubation of E. coli KHG aldolase with (/sup 14/C)pyruvate in the presence of NaCNBH/sub 3/ results in the incorporation of one mol of /sup 14/C per mol of enzyme subunit. Digestion of this enzyme-adduct with trypsin, followed by purification of the peptides, allowed for the isolation of a unique radioactive peptide. Its amino acid sequence showed that the pyruvate-binding (i.e., Schiff-base forming) lysine residue is located at position 133 in the intact enzyme. E. coli KHG aldolase activity is lost when the enzyme is reacted with bromopyruvate; saturation kinetics are observed. The substrates, pyruvate and KHG, protect the enzyme from inactivation. Both facts suggest that the reagent is active-site specific. Incubation of the aldolase with (3-/sup 14/C)bromopyruvate is associated with a concomitant loss of enzymatic activity and esterification of Glu-45; if the enzyme is denatured in the presence of excess bromopyruvate, Cys-159 and Cys-180 are also alkylated. Blocking the active-site lysine residue with pyruvate prevents Glu-45 from being esterified but does not eliminate alkylation of these two cysteine residues. Woodward's Reagent K was also found to inactivate the aldolase under conditions that are usually specific for carboxyl group modification. This aldolase is also inactivated by 1,2-cyclohexanedione. Loss of enzymatic activity occurs concomitantly with modification of one arginine residue per enzyme subunit. Treatment of the aldolase with the arginine-specific reagent, 4-(oxyacetyl)phenoxyacetic acid, followed by digestion with trypsin allowed for the isolation of a unique peptide and the identification of Arg-49 as the specific residue involved.

  17. Effect of substituting arginine and lysine with alanine on antimicrobial activity and the mechanism of action of a cationic dodecapeptide (CL(14-25)), a partial sequence of cyanate lyase from rice.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Takahashi, Nobuteru; Takayanagi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Atsuo; Ishiyama, Yohei; Saitoh, Eiichi; Kato, Tetsuo; Ochiai, Akihito; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of analogs obtained by substituting arginine and lysine in CL(14-25), a cationic α-helical dodecapeptide, with alanine against Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, varied significantly depending on the number and position of cationic amino acids. The alanine-substituted analogs had no hemolytic activity, even at a concentration of 1 mM. The antimicrobial activities of CL(K20A) and CL(K20A, K25A) were 3.8-fold and 9.1-fold higher, respectively, than that of CL(14-25). The antimicrobial activity of CL(R15A) was slightly lower than that of CL(14-25), suggesting that arginine at position 15 is not essential but is important for the antimicrobial activity. The experiments in which the alanine-substituted analogs bearing the replacement of arginine at position 24 and/or lysine at position 25 were used showed that arginine at position 24 was crucial for the antimicrobial activity whenever lysine at position 25 was substituted with alanine. Helical wheel projections of the alanine-substituted analogs indicate that the hydrophobicity in the vicinity of leucine at position 16 and alanines at positions 18 and/or 21 increased by substituting lysine at positions 20 and 25 with alanine, respectively. The degrees of diSC3 -5 release from P. gingivalis cells and disruption of GUVs induced by the alanine-substituted analogs with different positive charges were not closely related to their antimicrobial activities. The enhanced antimicrobial activities of the alanine-substituted analogs appear to be mainly attributable to the changes in properties such as hydrophobicity and amphipathic propensity due to alanine substitution and not to their extents of positive charge (cationicity).

  18. Extensive lysine acetylation occurs in evolutionarily conserved metabolic pathways and parasite-specific functions during Plasmodium falciparum intraerythrocytic development

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Jun; Lawrence, Matthew; Jeffers, Victoria; Zhao, Fangqing; Parker, Daniel; Ge, Ying; Sullivan, William J.; Cui, Liwang

    2013-01-01

    Summary Lysine acetylation has emerged as a major posttranslational modification involved in diverse cellular functions. Using a combination of immunoisolation and liquid chromatography coupled to accurate mass spectrometry, we determined the first acetylome of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum during its active proliferation in erythrocytes with 421 acetylation sites identified in 230 proteins. Lysine-acetylated proteins are distributed in the nucleus, cytoplasm, mitochondrion, and apicoplast. Whereas occurrence of lysine acetylation in a similarly wide range of cellular functions suggests conservation of lysine acetylation through evolution, the Plasmodium acetylome also revealed significant divergence from those of other eukaryotes and even the closely-related parasite Toxoplasma. This divergence is reflected in the acetylation of a large number of Plasmodium-specific proteins and different acetylation sites in evolutionarily conserved acetylated proteins. A prominent example is the abundant acetylation of proteins in the glycolysis pathway but relatively deficient acetylation of enzymes in the citrate cycle. Using specific transgenic lines and inhibitors, we determined that the acetyltransferase PfMYST and lysine deacetylases play important roles in regulating the dynamics of cytoplasmic protein acetylation. The Plasmodium acetylome provides an exciting start point for further exploration of functions of acetylation in the biology of malaria parasites. PMID:23796209

  19. The effect of the distance between acidic site and basic site immobilized on mesoporous solid on the activity in catalyzing aldol condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Xiaofang; Yu Xiaobo; Wu Shujie; Liu Bo; Liu Heng; Guan Jingqi; Kan Qiubin

    2011-02-15

    Acid-base bifunctional heterogeneous catalysts containing carboxylic and amine groups, which were immobilized at defined distance from one another on the mesoporous solid were synthesized by immobilizing lysine onto carboxyl-SBA-15. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron micrographs (SEM), transmission electron micrographs (TEM), elemental analysis, and back titration. Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance was more active than maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance in aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes. It appears that the distance between acidic site and basic site immobilized on mesoporous solid should be an essential factor for catalysis optimization. -- Graphical abstract: Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance and maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance were synthesized by immobilizing lysine onto carboxyl-SBA-15. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance. {yields} Maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance. {yields} Compared to maximum-C-A-SBA-15, proximal-C-A-SBA-15 was more active toward aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes.

  20. Protein Footprinting by the Combined Use of Reversible and Irreversible Lysine Modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanai, Ryo; Wang, James C.

    1994-12-01

    A two-step lysine-modification procedure has been devised to chemically footprint protein surfaces involved in macromolecular interactions. A protein tagged at one particular end, in the free state or in a complex, is first treated lightly with a reversible lysine-modifying reagent. The protein is then unfolded and treated extensively with an irreversible lysine reagent to block those lysines that did not react previously; next, the first lysine modification is reversed, and a lysine-specific endoproteinase is used to cleave the tagged polypeptide at the deblocked lysines. Separation of the proteolytic products by size and identification of the tagged fragments map the positions of these lysines. In this procedure, the reversible lysine reagent serves as the chemical footprinting agent, as cleavage of the polypeptide ensues only at the sites of reaction with this reagent. Lysines involved in macromolecular contacts are identified from differences in proteolytic patterns of the tagged protein when the first lysine modification is done with the protein in the free form and in a complex. Application of the method to vaccinia virus topoisomerase identifies a number of lysines that are involved in its binding to DNA.

  1. Grafting of poly-L-lysine dendrigrafts onto polypropylene surface using plasma activation for ATP immobilization - Nanomaterial for potential applications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Couturaud, Benoit; Molero Bondia, Andrea; Faye, Clément; Garrelly, Laurent; Mas, André; Robin, Jean Jacques

    2013-10-15

    The present work describes a new environmental friendly strategy for the development of surfaces with high amine density via the grafting of native or modified poly-L-lysine dendrigraft (DGL G3) onto plasma activated polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polyimide, and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface. Modified DGL G3 was prepared by replacement of few peripheral amines by various functionalities. Grafting efficiency was determined by wettability measurements, IRTF, XPS, AFM, and by colorimetry using optimized Coomassie Brilliant Blue method tailored for surface analysis. It was shown that a 4-7nm DGL G3 monolayer with 4×10(14)aminecm(-)(2) was covalently grafted onto various surfaces. Immobilization of adenosine triphosphate on the DGL-g-PP material from dilute solution was studied by bioluminescence and proved the ability of the material to interact with polyanionic biological compounds: 1 ATP complex with 5 amine groups. So, this material has a potential use in diagnostic and more widely for biotechnology due to its high capacity for biomolecule immobilization.

  2. Synthesis of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Chunngai; Ye, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and non-histone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery. PMID:26258118

  3. Measurement of lysine-specific demethylase-1 activity in the nuclear extracts by flow-injection based time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sakane, Chiharu; Ohta, Hiromichi; Shidoji, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1/KDM1A), a histone-modifying enzyme, is upregulated in many cancers, especially in neuroblastoma, breast cancer and hepatoma. We have established a simple method to measure LSD1 activity using a synthetic N-terminal 21-mer peptide of histone H3, which is dimethylated at Lys-4 (H3K4me2). After the enzyme reaction, a substrate of H3K4me2 and two demethylated products, H3K4me1 and H3K4me0, were quantitatively determined by flow injection time-of-flight mass spectrometry (FI-TOF/MS). By using recombinant human LSD1, a nonlinear fitting simulation of the data obtained by FI-TOF/MS produced typical consecutive-reaction kinetics. Apparent Km and kcat values of hLSD1 for the first and second demethylation reactions were found to be in the range of reported values. Tranylcypromine was shown to inhibit LSD1 activity with an IC50 of 6.9 µM for the first demethylation reaction and 5.8 µM for the second demethylation reaction. The FI-TOF/MS assay revealed that the endogenous LSD1 activity was higher in the nuclear extracts of SH-SY5Y cells than in HeLa or PC-3 cells, and this is in accordance with the immunoblotting data using an anti-LSD1 antibody. A simple, straightforward FI-TOF/MS assay is described to efficiently measure LSD1 activity in the nuclear extracts of cultured cells. PMID:25759518

  4. Chemical trapping of ternary complexes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase, divalent metal, and DNA substrates containing an abasic site. Implications for the role of lysine 136 in DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, A; Neamati, N; Pilon, A A; Sunder, S; Pommier, Y

    1996-11-01

    We report a novel assay for monitoring the DNA binding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase and the effect of cofactors and inhibitors. The assay uses depurinated oligonucleotides that can form a Schiff base between the aldehydic abasic site and a nearby enzyme lysine epsilon-amino group which can subsequently be trapped by reduction with sodium borohydride. Chemically depurinated duplex substrates representing the U5 end of the HIV-1 DNA were initially used. We next substituted an enzymatically generated abasic site for each of 10 nucleotides normally present in a 21-mer duplex oligonucleotide representing the U5 end of the HIV-1 DNA. Using HIV-1, HIV-2, or simian immunodeficiency virus integrases, the amount of covalent enzyme-DNA complex trapped decreased as the abasic site was moved away from the conserved CA dinucleotide. The enzyme-DNA complexes formed in the presence of manganese were not reversed by subsequent addition of EDTA, indicating that the divalent metal required for integrase catalysis is tightly bound in a ternary enzyme-metal-DNA complex. Both the N- and C-terminal domains of integrase contributed to efficient DNA binding, and mutation of Lys-136 significantly reduced Schiff base formation, implicating this residue in viral DNA binding.

  5. Crystal Structure of a Novel Viral Protease with a Serine/Lysine Catalytic Dyad Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman,A.; Lee, J.; Delmas, B.; Paetzel, M.

    2006-01-01

    The blotched snakehead virus (BSNV), an aquatic birnavirus, encodes a polyprotein (NH2-pVP2-X-VP4-VP3-COOH) that is processed through the proteolytic activity of its own protease (VP4) to liberate itself and the viral proteins pVP2, X and VP3. The protein pVP2 is further processed by VP4 to give rise to the capsid protein VP2 and four structural peptides. We report here the crystal structure of a VP4 protease from BSNV, which displays a catalytic serine/lysine dyad in its active site. This is the first crystal structure of a birnavirus protease and the first crystal structure of a viral protease that utilizes a lysine general base in its catalytic mechanism. The topology of the VP4 substrate binding site is consistent with the enzymes substrate specificity and a nucleophilic attack from the si-face of the substrates scissile bond. Despite low levels of sequence identity, VP4 shows similarities in its active site to other characterized Ser/Lys proteases such as signal peptidase, LexA protease and Lon protease. Together, the structure of VP4 provides insights into the mechanism of a recently characterized clan of serine proteases that utilize a lysine general base and reveals the structure of potential targets for antiviral therapy, especially for other related and economically important viruses, such as infectious bursal disease virus in poultry and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in aquaculture.

  6. Evidence that pyridoxal phosphate modification of lysine residues (Lys-55 and Lys-59) causes inactivation of hydroxymethylbilane synthase (porphobilinogen deaminase).

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A D; Packman, L C; Hart, G J; Alefounder, P R; Abell, C; Battersby, A R

    1989-01-01

    A recombinant strain of Escherichia coli has been constructed that produces approx. 200 times the amount of hydroxymethylbilane synthase found in wild-type E. coli [Hart, Abell & Battersby (1986) Biochem. J. 240, 273-276]. Enzyme purified from this strain is shown to be permanently inactivated by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate/NaB1H3(3)H1. The inactivation is not complete despite the fact that approx. 1 mol of lysine residues is modified per mol of enzyme. Evidence is gained showing that (a) modification of one of two conserved lysine residues (Lys-55 or Lys-59) results in inactivation of hydroxymethylbilane synthase and (b) these lysine residues are present in or close to the active site. PMID:2510713

  7. The ribotoxin restrictocin recognizes its RNA substrate by selective engagement of active site residues.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Matthew J; Korennykh, Alexei V; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Correll, Carl C

    2011-04-12

    Restrictocin and related fungal endoribonucleases from the α-sarcin family site-specifically cleave the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) on the ribosome to inhibit translation and ultimately trigger cell death. Previous studies showed that the SRL folds into a bulged-G motif and tetraloop, with restrictocin achieving a specificity of ∼1000-fold by recognizing both motifs only after the initial binding step. Here, we identify contacts within the protein-RNA interface and determine the extent to which each one contributes to enzyme specificity by examining the effect of protein mutations on the cleavage of the SRL substrate compared to a variety of other RNA substrates. As with other biomolecular interfaces, only a subset of contacts contributes to specificity. One contact of this subset is critical, with the H49A mutation resulting in quantitative loss of specificity. Maximum catalytic activity occurs when both motifs of the SRL are present, with the major contribution involving the bulged-G motif recognized by three lysine residues located adjacent to the active site: K110, K111, and K113. Our findings support a kinetic proofreading mechanism in which the active site residues H49 and, to a lesser extent, Y47 make greater catalytic contributions to SRL cleavage than to suboptimal substrates. This systematic and quantitative analysis begins to elucidate the principles governing RNA recognition by a site-specific endonuclease and may thus serve as a mechanistic model for investigating other RNA modifying enzymes. PMID:21417210

  8. Elicitin-Induced Distal Systemic Resistance in Plants is Mediated Through the Protein–Protein Interactions Influenced by Selected Lysine Residues

    PubMed Central

    Uhlíková, Hana; Obořil, Michal; Klempová, Jitka; Šedo, Ondrej; Zdráhal, Zbyněk; Kašparovský, Tomáš; Skládal, Petr; Lochman, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Elicitins are a family of small proteins with sterol-binding activity that are secreted by Phytophthora and Pythium sp. classified as oomycete PAMPs. Although α- and β-elicitins bind with the same affinity to one high affinity binding site on the plasma membrane, β-elicitins (possessing 6–7 lysine residues) are generally 50- to 100-fold more active at inducing distal HR and systemic resistance than the α-isoforms (with only 1–3 lysine residues). To examine the role of lysine residues in elicitin biological activity, we employed site-directed mutagenesis to prepare a series of β-elicitin cryptogein variants with mutations on specific lysine residues. In contrast to direct infiltration of protein into leaves, application to the stem revealed a rough correlation between protein’s charge and biological activity, resulting in protection against Phytophthora parasitica. A detailed analysis of proteins’ movement in plants showed no substantial differences in distribution through phloem indicating differences in consequent apoplastic or symplastic transport. In this process, an important role of homodimer formation together with the ability to form a heterodimer with potential partner represented by endogenous plants LTPs is suggested. Our work demonstrates a key role of selected lysine residues in these interactions and stresses the importance of processes preceding elicitin recognition responsible for induction of distal systemic resistance. PMID:26904041

  9. SIRT5 regulates the mitochondrial lysine succinylome and metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Rardin, Matthew J.; He, Wenjuan; Nishida, Yuya; Newman, John C.; Carrico, Chris; Danielson, Steven R.; Guo, Ailan; Gut, Philipp; Sahu, Alexandria K.; Li, Biao; Uppala, Radha; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Timothy; Zhu, Lei; Zhou, Jing; Mulhern, Daniel; Stevens, Robert D.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Hellerstein, Marc; Goetzman, Eric S.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Verdin, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reversible posttranslational modifications are emerging as critical regulators of mitochondrial proteins and metabolism. Here, we use a label-free quantitative proteomic approach to characterize the lysine succinylome in liver mitochondria and its regulation by the desuccinylase SIRT5. A total of 1190 unique sites were identified as succinylated, and 386 sites across 140 proteins representing several metabolic pathways including β-oxidation and ketogenesis were significantly hypersuccinylated in Sirt5−/− animals. Loss of SIRT5 leads to accumulation of medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines and decreased β-hydroxybutyrate production in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that SIRT5 regulates succinylation of the rate-limiting ketogenic enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2) both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, mutation of hypersuccinylated residues K83 and K310 on HMGCS2 to glutamic acid strongly inhibits enzymatic activity. Taken together, these findings establish SIRT5 as a global regulator of lysine succinylation in mitochondria and present a mechanism for inhibition of ketogenesis through HMGCS2. PMID:24315375

  10. SIRT5 regulates the mitochondrial lysine succinylome and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Rardin, Matthew J; He, Wenjuan; Nishida, Yuya; Newman, John C; Carrico, Chris; Danielson, Steven R; Guo, Ailan; Gut, Philipp; Sahu, Alexandria K; Li, Biao; Uppala, Radha; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Timothy; Zhu, Lei; Zhou, Jing; Mulhern, Daniel; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Newgard, Christopher B; Jacobson, Matthew P; Hellerstein, Marc; Goetzman, Eric S; Gibson, Bradford W; Verdin, Eric

    2013-12-01

    Reversible posttranslational modifications are emerging as critical regulators of mitochondrial proteins and metabolism. Here, we use a label-free quantitative proteomic approach to characterize the lysine succinylome in liver mitochondria and its regulation by the desuccinylase SIRT5. A total of 1,190 unique sites were identified as succinylated, and 386 sites across 140 proteins representing several metabolic pathways including β-oxidation and ketogenesis were significantly hypersuccinylated in Sirt5(-/-) animals. Loss of SIRT5 leads to accumulation of medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines and decreased β-hydroxybutyrate production in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that SIRT5 regulates succinylation of the rate-limiting ketogenic enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2) both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, mutation of hypersuccinylated residues K83 and K310 on HMGCS2 to glutamic acid strongly inhibits enzymatic activity. Taken together, these findings establish SIRT5 as a global regulator of lysine succinylation in mitochondria and present a mechanism for inhibition of ketogenesis through HMGCS2.

  11. SIRT5 regulates the mitochondrial lysine succinylome and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Rardin, Matthew J; He, Wenjuan; Nishida, Yuya; Newman, John C; Carrico, Chris; Danielson, Steven R; Guo, Ailan; Gut, Philipp; Sahu, Alexandria K; Li, Biao; Uppala, Radha; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Timothy; Zhu, Lei; Zhou, Jing; Mulhern, Daniel; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Newgard, Christopher B; Jacobson, Matthew P; Hellerstein, Marc; Goetzman, Eric S; Gibson, Bradford W; Verdin, Eric

    2013-12-01

    Reversible posttranslational modifications are emerging as critical regulators of mitochondrial proteins and metabolism. Here, we use a label-free quantitative proteomic approach to characterize the lysine succinylome in liver mitochondria and its regulation by the desuccinylase SIRT5. A total of 1,190 unique sites were identified as succinylated, and 386 sites across 140 proteins representing several metabolic pathways including β-oxidation and ketogenesis were significantly hypersuccinylated in Sirt5(-/-) animals. Loss of SIRT5 leads to accumulation of medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines and decreased β-hydroxybutyrate production in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that SIRT5 regulates succinylation of the rate-limiting ketogenic enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2) both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, mutation of hypersuccinylated residues K83 and K310 on HMGCS2 to glutamic acid strongly inhibits enzymatic activity. Taken together, these findings establish SIRT5 as a global regulator of lysine succinylation in mitochondria and present a mechanism for inhibition of ketogenesis through HMGCS2. PMID:24315375

  12. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Action levels

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, J.S.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1991-10-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide for early leak detection and to monitor performance of the active low-level waste disposal facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and the transuranic waste storage areas in SWSA 5 North. Early leak detection is accomplished by sampling runoff, groundwater, and perched water in burial trenches. Sample results are compared to action levels that represent background contamination by naturally occurring and fallout-derived radionuclides. 15 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. Hyperglycemia Induces a Dynamic Cooperativity of Histone Methylase and Demethylase Enzymes Associated With Gene-Activating Epigenetic Marks That Coexist on the Lysine Tail

    PubMed Central

    Brasacchio, Daniella; Okabe, Jun; Tikellis, Christos; Balcerczyk, Aneta; George, Prince; Baker, Emma K.; Calkin, Anna C.; Brownlee, Michael; Cooper, Mark E.; El-Osta, Assam

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Results from the Diabetes Control Complications Trial (DCCT) and the subsequent Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) Study and more recently from the U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) have revealed that the deleterious end-organ effects that occurred in both conventional and more aggressively treated subjects continued to operate >5 years after the patients had returned to usual glycemic control and is interpreted as a legacy of past glycemia known as “hyperglycemic memory.” We have hypothesized that transient hyperglycemia mediates persistent gene-activating events attributed to changes in epigenetic information. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Models of transient hyperglycemia were used to link NFκB-p65 gene expression with H3K4 and H3K9 modifications mediated by the histone methyltransferases (Set7 and SuV39h1) and the lysine-specific demethylase (LSD1) by the immunopurification of soluble NFκB-p65 chromatin. RESULTS The sustained upregulation of the NFκB-p65 gene as a result of ambient or prior hyperglycemia was associated with increased H3K4m1 but not H3K4m2 or H3K4m3. Furthermore, glucose was shown to have other epigenetic effects, including the suppression of H3K9m2 and H3K9m3 methylation on the p65 promoter. Finally, there was increased recruitment of the recently identified histone demethylase LSD1 to the p65 promoter as a result of prior hyperglycemia. CONCLUSIONS These studies indicate that the active transcriptional state of the NFκB-p65 gene is linked with persisting epigenetic marks such as enhanced H3K4 and reduced H3K9 methylation, which appear to occur as a result of effects of the methyl-writing and methyl-erasing histone enzymes. PMID:19208907

  14. The discovery of novel histone lysine methyltransferase G9a inhibitors (part 1): molecular design based on a series of substituted 2,4-diamino-7- aminoalkoxyquinazoline by molecular-docking-guided 3D quantitative structure-activity relationship studies.

    PubMed

    Feng, Taotao; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Xiaojin; Sun, Haopeng; You, Qidong

    2014-06-01

    Protein lysine methyltransferase G9a, which catalyzes methylation of lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9) and lysine 373 (K373) of p53, is overexpressed in human cancers. This suggests that small molecular inhibitors of G9a might be attractive antitumor agents. Herein we report our efforts on the design of novel G9a inhibitor based on the 3D quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) analysis of a series of 2,4-diamino-7-aminoalkoxyquinazolineas G9a inhibitors. The 3D-QSAR model was generated from 47 compounds using docking based molecular alignment. The best predictions were obtained with CoMFA standard model (q2 =0.700, r2 = 0.952) and CoMSIA model combined with steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic, hydrogen bond donor and acceptor fields (q2 = 0.724, r2 =0.960). The structural requirements for substituted 2,4-diamino-7-aminoalkoxyquinazoline for G9a inhibitory activity can be obtained by analysing the COMSIA plots. Based on the information, six novel follow-up analogs were designed.

  15. Characterization of active sites in zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, J.; Bug, A.; Nicol, J.M.

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Atomic-level details of the interaction of adsorbed molecules with active sites in catalysts are urgently needed to facilitate development of more effective and/or environmentally benign catalysts. To this end the authors have carried out neutron scattering studies combined with theoretical calculations of the dynamics of small molecules inside the cavities of zeolite catalysts. The authors have developed the use of H{sub 2} as a probe of adsorption sites by observing the hindered rotations of the adsorbed H{sub 2} molecule, and they were able to show that an area near the four-rings is the most likely adsorption site for H{sub 2} in zeolite A while adsorption of H{sub 2} near cations located on six-ring sites decreases in strength as Ni {approximately} Co > Ca > Zn {approximately} Na. Vibrational and rotational motions of ethylene and cyclopropane adsorption complexes were used as a measure for zeolite-adsorbate interactions. Preliminary studies of the binding of water, ammonia, and methylamines were carried out in a number of related guest-host materials.

  16. Reversible lysine acetylation is involved in DNA replication initiation by regulating activities of initiator DnaA in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiufen; Zhou, Aiping; Li, Shuxian; Ni, Jinjing; Tao, Jing; Lu, Jie; Wan, Baoshan; Li, Shuai; Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Shimin; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Shao, Feng; Yao, Yu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of chromosomal replication is critical and the activation of DnaA by ATP binding is a key step in replication initiation. However, it remains unclear whether and how the process of ATP-binding to DnaA is regulated. Here, we show that DnaA can be acetylated, and its acetylation level varies with cell growth and correlates with DNA replication initiation frequencies in E. coli. Specifically, the conserved K178 in Walker A motif of DnaA can be acetylated and its acetylation level reaches the summit at the stationary phase, which prevents DnaA from binding to ATP or oriC and leads to inhibition of DNA replication initiation. The deacetylation process of DnaA is catalyzed by deacetylase CobB. The acetylation process of DnaA is mediated by acetyltransferase YfiQ, and nonenzymatically by acetyl-phosphate. These findings suggest that the reversible acetylation of DnaA ensures cells to respond promptly to environmental changes. Since Walker A motif is universally distributed across organisms, acetylation of Walker A motif may present a novel regulatory mechanism conserved from bacteria to eukaryotes. PMID:27484197

  17. Effect of the tripeptide glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine on the proliferation and synthetic activity of chick embryo chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pesáková, V; Novotná, J; Adam, M

    1995-08-01

    Under certain conditions chondrocytes form lattices with cartilage collagens, which may serve as cartilage implants. It is necessary to find the optimal conditions for culturing chondrocytes. Three different supports are compared: (a) plastic; (b) cartilage collagens; and (c) insoluble skin collagen solubilized under denaturing conditions (ISC-40). The effect of culture medium supplementation with the tripeptide (Gly-His-Lys)2.Cu.2H2O.2NaCl (GHK) on chondrocyte proliferation and synthetic activity is studied, with particular attention paid to collagen types I, II and III. The collagen supports stimulated chondrocyte proliferation, but on the ISC-40 support they started to dedifferentiate rather early. In the primary culture, chondrocytes on all three supports synthesized mainly collagen type II, and only small amounts of types I and III. In the first passage the synthesis of these two collagen types increased, relative to collagen type II, at least on the cartilage collagen support. Supplementation of culture medium with GHK stimulated chondrocyte proliferation in the primary structure mostly on the ISC-40 support. On the other two types of supports the stimulatory effect of GHK was expressed mostly in the first passages. The collagen synthetic rate was increased by GHK on both of the collagen supports; on the cartilage collagen support collagen type II was synthesized predominantly and on the ISC-40 support types I and III were mostly formed. It is suggested that supplementation of culture medium with GHK may be useful in the preparation of cartilage implants. PMID:8562779

  18. NMR determination of lysine pKa values in the Pol lambda lyase domain: mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guanghua; DeRose, Eugene F; Kirby, Thomas W; London, Robert E

    2006-02-14

    The base excision repair (BER) process requires removal of an abasic deoxyribose-5-phosphate group, a catalytic activity that has been demonstrated for the N-terminal 8 kDa domain of DNA polymerase beta (Pol beta), and for the homologous domain of DNA polymerase lambda (Pol lambda). Previous studies have demonstrated that this activity results from formation of a Schiff base adduct of the abasic deoxyribose C-1' with a lysine residue (K312 in the case of Pol lambda), followed by a beta-elimination reaction. To better understand the underlying chemistry, we have determined pKa values for the lysine residues in the Pol lambda lyase domain labeled with [epsilon-13C]lysine. At neutral pH, the H(epsilon) protons on 3 of the 10 lysine residues in this domain, K287, K291, and K312, exhibit chemical shift inequivalence that results from immobilization of the lysyl side chains. For K287 and K291, this results from the K287-E261 and K291-E298 salt bridge interactions, while for K312, immobilization apparently results from steric and hydrogen-bonding interactions that constrain the position of the lysine side chain. The pKa value of K312 is depressed to 9.58, a value indicating that at physiological pH K312 will exist predominantly in the protonated form. Titration of the domain with hairpin DNA containing a 5'-tetrahydrofuran terminus to model the abasic site produced shifts of the labeled lysine resonances that were in fast exchange but appeared to be complete at a stoichiometry of approximately 1:1.3, consistent with a dissociation constant of approximately 1 microM. The epsilon-proton shifts of K273 were the most sensitive to the addition of the DNA, apparently due to changes in the relative orientation between K273 and W274 in the DNA complex. The average pKa values increased by 0.55, consistent with the formation of some DNA-lysine salt bridges and with the general pH increase expected to result from a reduction in the net positive charge of the complex. A general

  19. A Proteomic Strategy Identifies Lysine Methylation of Splicing Factor snRNP70 by the SETMAR Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Scott M; Moore, Kaitlyn E; Sankaran, Saumya M; Reynoird, Nicolas; Elias, Joshua E; Gozani, Or

    2015-05-01

    The lysine methyltransferase (KMT) SETMAR is implicated in the response to and repair of DNA damage, but its molecular function is not clear. SETMAR has been associated with dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36) at sites of DNA damage. However, SETMAR does not methylate H3K36 in vitro. This and the observation that SETMAR is not active on nucleosomes suggest that H3K36 methylation is not a physiologically relevant activity. To identify potential non-histone substrates, we utilized a strategy on the basis of quantitative proteomic analysis of methylated lysine. Our approach identified lysine 130 of the mRNA splicing factor snRNP70 as a SETMAR substrate in vitro, and we show that the enzyme primarily generates monomethylation at this position. Furthermore, we show that SETMAR methylates snRNP70 Lys-130 in cells. Because snRNP70 is a key early regulator of 5' splice site selection, our results suggest a model in which methylation of snRNP70 by SETMAR regulates constitutive and/or alternative splicing. In addition, the proteomic strategy described here is broadly applicable and is a promising route for large-scale mapping of KMT substrates.

  20. A Proteomic Strategy Identifies Lysine Methylation of Splicing Factor snRNP70 by the SETMAR Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Scott M.; Moore, Kaitlyn E.; Sankaran, Saumya M.; Reynoird, Nicolas; Elias, Joshua E.; Gozani, Or

    2015-01-01

    The lysine methyltransferase (KMT) SETMAR is implicated in the response to and repair of DNA damage, but its molecular function is not clear. SETMAR has been associated with dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36) at sites of DNA damage. However, SETMAR does not methylate H3K36 in vitro. This and the observation that SETMAR is not active on nucleosomes suggest that H3K36 methylation is not a physiologically relevant activity. To identify potential non-histone substrates, we utilized a strategy on the basis of quantitative proteomic analysis of methylated lysine. Our approach identified lysine 130 of the mRNA splicing factor snRNP70 as a SETMAR substrate in vitro, and we show that the enzyme primarily generates monomethylation at this position. Furthermore, we show that SETMAR methylates snRNP70 Lys-130 in cells. Because snRNP70 is a key early regulator of 5′ splice site selection, our results suggest a model in which methylation of snRNP70 by SETMAR regulates constitutive and/or alternative splicing. In addition, the proteomic strategy described here is broadly applicable and is a promising route for large-scale mapping of KMT substrates. PMID:25795785

  1. PL3 Amidase, a Tailor-made Lysin Constructed by Domain Shuffling with Potent Killing Activity against Pneumococci and Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Blázquez, Blas; Fresco-Taboada, Alba; Iglesias-Bexiga, Manuel; Menéndez, Margarita; García, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is pushing the need of alternative treatments. In this context, phage therapy is already a reality to successfully fight certain multiresistant bacteria. Among different phage gene products, murein hydrolases responsible of phage progeny liberation (also called lysins or endolysins) are weapons that target specific peptidoglycan bonds, leading to lysis and death of susceptible bacteria when added from the outside. In the pneumococcal system, all but one phage murein hydrolases reported to date share a choline-binding domain that recognizes cell walls containing choline residues in the (lipo)teichoic acids. Some purified pneumococcal or phage murein hydrolases, as well as several chimeric proteins combining natural catalytic and cell wall-binding domains (CBDs) have been used as effective antimicrobials. In this work we have constructed a novel chimeric N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (PL3) by fusing the catalytic domain of the Pal amidase (a phage-coded endolysin) to the CBD of the LytA amidase, the major pneumococcal autolysin. The physicochemical properties of PL3 and the bacteriolytic effect against several pneumococci (including 48 multiresistant representative strain) and related species, like Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus mitis, and Streptococcus oralis, have been studied. Results have shown that low doses of PL3, in the range of 0.5–5 μg/ml, are enough to practically sterilize all choline-containing strains tested. Moreover, a single 20-μg dose of PL3 fully protected zebrafish embryos from infection by S. pneumoniae D39 strain. Importantly, PL3 keeps 95% enzymatic activity after 4 weeks at 37°C and can be lyophilized without losing activity, demonstrating a remarkable robustness. Such stability, together with a prominent efficacy against a narrow spectrum of human pathogens, confers to PL3 the characteristic to be an effective therapeutic. In addition, our results demonstrate

  2. PL3 Amidase, a Tailor-made Lysin Constructed by Domain Shuffling with Potent Killing Activity against Pneumococci and Related Species.

    PubMed

    Blázquez, Blas; Fresco-Taboada, Alba; Iglesias-Bexiga, Manuel; Menéndez, Margarita; García, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is pushing the need of alternative treatments. In this context, phage therapy is already a reality to successfully fight certain multiresistant bacteria. Among different phage gene products, murein hydrolases responsible of phage progeny liberation (also called lysins or endolysins) are weapons that target specific peptidoglycan bonds, leading to lysis and death of susceptible bacteria when added from the outside. In the pneumococcal system, all but one phage murein hydrolases reported to date share a choline-binding domain that recognizes cell walls containing choline residues in the (lipo)teichoic acids. Some purified pneumococcal or phage murein hydrolases, as well as several chimeric proteins combining natural catalytic and cell wall-binding domains (CBDs) have been used as effective antimicrobials. In this work we have constructed a novel chimeric N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (PL3) by fusing the catalytic domain of the Pal amidase (a phage-coded endolysin) to the CBD of the LytA amidase, the major pneumococcal autolysin. The physicochemical properties of PL3 and the bacteriolytic effect against several pneumococci (including 48 multiresistant representative strain) and related species, like Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus mitis, and Streptococcus oralis, have been studied. Results have shown that low doses of PL3, in the range of 0.5-5 μg/ml, are enough to practically sterilize all choline-containing strains tested. Moreover, a single 20-μg dose of PL3 fully protected zebrafish embryos from infection by S. pneumoniae D39 strain. Importantly, PL3 keeps 95% enzymatic activity after 4 weeks at 37°C and can be lyophilized without losing activity, demonstrating a remarkable robustness. Such stability, together with a prominent efficacy against a narrow spectrum of human pathogens, confers to PL3 the characteristic to be an effective therapeutic. In addition, our results demonstrate

  3. Proteomic Investigations of Lysine Acetylation Identify Diverse Substrates of Mitochondrial Deacetylase Sirt3

    PubMed Central

    Weinert, Brian T.; Kumar, Amit; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Deng, Chu-Xia; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2012-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a posttranslational modification that is dynamically regulated by the activity of acetyltransferases and deacetylases. The human and mouse genomes encode 18 different lysine deacetylases (KDACs) which are key regulators of many cellular processes. Identifying substrates of KDACs and pinpointing the regulated acetylation sites on target proteins may provide important information about the molecular basis of their functions. Here we apply quantitative proteomics to identify endogenous substrates of the mitochondrial deacetylase Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3) by comparing site-specific acetylation in wild-type murine embryonic fibroblasts to Sirt3 knockout cells. We confirm Sirt3-regulated acetylation of several mitochondrial proteins in human cells by comparing acetylation in U2OS cells overexpressing Sirt3 to U2OS cells in which Sirt3 expression was reduced by shRNA. Our data demonstrate that ablation of Sirt3 significantly increases acetylation at dozens of sites on mitochondrial proteins. Substrates of Sirt3 are implicated in various metabolic pathways, including fatty acid metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. These results imply broader regulatory roles of Sirt3 in the mitochondria by modulating acetylation on diverse substrates. The experimental strategy described here is generic and can be applied to identify endogenous substrates of other lysine deacetylases. PMID:23236377

  4. Succinylome Analysis Reveals the Involvement of Lysine Succinylation in Metabolism in Pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mingkun; Wang, Yan; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhongyi; Gu, Jing; Deng, Jiaoyu; Bi, Lijun; Chen, Chuangbin; Mo, Ran; Wang, Xude; Ge, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of human tuberculosis, remains one of the most prevalent human pathogens and a major cause of mortality worldwide. Metabolic network is a central mediator and defining feature of the pathogenicity of Mtb. Increasing evidence suggests that lysine succinylation dynamically regulates enzymes in carbon metabolism in both bacteria and human cells; however, its extent and function in Mtb remain unexplored. Here, we performed a global succinylome analysis of the virulent Mtb strain H37Rv by using high accuracy nano-LC-MS/MS in combination with the enrichment of succinylated peptides from digested cell lysates and subsequent peptide identification. In total, 1545 lysine succinylation sites on 626 proteins were identified in this pathogen. The identified succinylated proteins are involved in various biological processes and a large proportion of the succinylation sites are present on proteins in the central metabolism pathway. Site-specific mutations showed that succinylation is a negative regulatory modification on the enzymatic activity of acetyl-CoA synthetase. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that succinylation affects the conformational stability of acetyl-CoA synthetase, which is critical for its enzymatic activity. Further functional studies showed that CobB, a sirtuin-like deacetylase in Mtb, functions as a desuccinylase of acetyl-CoA synthetase in in vitro assays. Together, our findings reveal widespread roles for lysine succinylation in regulating metabolism and diverse processes in Mtb. Our data provide a rich resource for functional analyses of lysine succinylation and facilitate the dissection of metabolic networks in this life-threatening pathogen. PMID:25605462

  5. The positional specificity of EXXK motifs within an amphipathic α-helix dictates preferential lysine modification by acrolein: implications for the design of high-density lipoprotein mimetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Kim, Sea H; Patel, Arti B; Narayanaswami, Vasanthy; Iavarone, Anthony T; Hura, Gregory L; Bielicki, John K

    2012-08-14

    Despite the ability of acrolein to damage proteins, factors governing its reactivity with the ε-amino group of lysine are poorly understood. We used a small 26-mer α-helical peptide (ATI-5261) to evaluate the influence of acidic glutamate (E) residues on site-specific lysine modification by acrolein and if this targeting played a major role in inhibiting the cholesterol efflux activity of the peptide. Exposure of ATI-5261 to acrolein resulted in N-(3-formyl-3,4-dehydropiperidino) (FDP)-lysine adducts at positions 5 and 25 and led to a concentration-dependent reduction in cholesterol efflux activity (55 ± 7 and 83 ± 3% decrease with 5:1 and 20:1 acrolein:peptide molar ratios, respectively). Amino acid substitution (K → R) experiments and mass spectrometry revealed neither K5 nor K25 was preferentially modified by acrolein, despite the location of K5 within a putative EXXK motif. Moreover, both lysine residues remained equally reactive when the lipidated peptide was exposed to acrolein. In contrast, placement of EXXK in the center of ATI-5261 resulted in site-specific modification of lysine. The latter was dependent on glutamate, thus establishing that acidic residues facilitate lysine modification and form the molecular basis of the EXXK motif. Preferential targeting of lysine, however, failed to augment the inhibitory effect of the aldehyde. Overall, the inhibitory effects of acrolein on cholesterol efflux activity were largely dependent on the number of lysine residue modifications and cross-linking of α-helical strands that restricted dissociation of the peptide to active forms.

  6. Mutational analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis lysine ɛ-aminotransferase and inhibitor co-crystal structures, reveals distinct binding modes.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Sarvind Mani; Agarwal, Aparna; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    Lysine ɛ-aminotransferase (LAT) converts lysine to α-aminoadipate-δ-semialdehyde in a PLP-mediated reaction. We mutated active-site T330, N328 and E243, and structurally rationalized their properties. T330A and T330S mutants cannot bind PLP and are inactive. N328A although inactive, binds to PLP. E243A retains activity, but binds α-ketoglutarate in a different conformation. We had earlier identified 2-aminomethyl piperidine derivative as a LAT inhibitor. The co-crystal structure reveals that it mimics binding of C5 substrates and exhibits two binding modes. E243, that shields R422 in the apo enzyme, exhibits conformational changes to permit the binding of the inhibitor in one of the binding modes. Structure-based analysis of bound water in the active site suggests optimization strategies for synthesis of improved inhibitors. PMID:26003725

  7. Regeneration of active enzyme by formation of hybrids from inactive derivatives: implications for active sites shared between polypeptide chains of aspartate transcarbamoylase.

    PubMed Central

    Robey, E A; Schachman, H K

    1985-01-01

    Crystallographic studies of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (aspartate carbamoyltransferase, EC 2.1.3.2) in conjunction with chemical modification experiments have led to the suggestion that the active sites of the enzyme are at the interfaces between adjacent polypeptide chains of the catalytic trimers and involve joint participation of amino acid residues from the adjoining chains. However, the precise locations of the active sites and of the residues involved in catalysis are not known. To test the hypothesis that the active sites are shared between chains, we constructed hybrid trimers in which two chains were modified at one presumed active site residue and the third chain was altered at a different active site residue. One parental trimer was a reduced pyridoxal phosphate derivative in which lysine-84 was modified and the other was a mutant protein in which tyrosine-165 was converted to serine by site-directed mutagenesis. Incubating mixtures of these two virtually inactive derivatives under conditions promoting interchain exchange led to a large increase in enzyme activity corresponding approximately to the formation of one active site per trimer. The purified hybrid trimers, containing either two pyridoxylated and one mutant chain or vice versa, had 23% and 28%, respectively, the activity of native wild-type catalytic trimers, compared to 5% and 3% for the parental trimers. The most likely explanation for this large increase in activity is the formation of one "native" active site in each of the hybrid trimers. The results constitute strong evidence for shared active sites in aspartate transcarbamoylase. Images PMID:3881763

  8. A kinesin switch I arginine to lysine mutation rescues microtubule function.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Lisa M; Mackey, Andrew T; Farrell, Christopher M; Rosenberg, John M; Gilbert, Susan P

    2003-10-01

    Switch I and II are key active site structural elements of kinesins, myosins, and G-proteins. Our analysis of a switch I mutant (R210A) in Drosophila melanogaster kinesin showed a reduction in microtubule affinity, a loss in cooperativity between the motor domains, and an ATP hydrolysis defect leading to aberrant detachment from the microtubule. To investigate the conserved arginine in switch I further, a lysine substitution mutant was generated. The R210K dimeric motor has lost the ability to hydrolyze ATP; however, it has rescued microtubule function. Our results show that R210K has restored microtubule association kinetics, microtubule affinity, ADP release kinetics, and motor domain cooperativity. Moreover, the active site at head 1 is able to distinguish ATP, ADP, and AMP-PNP to signal head 2 to bind the microtubule and release mantADP with kinetics comparable with wild-type. Therefore, the structural pathway of communication from head 1 to head 2 is restored, and head 2 can respond to this signal by binding the microtubule and releasing mantADP. Structural modeling revealed that lysine could retain some of the hydrogen bonds made by arginine but not all, suggesting a structural hypothesis for the ability of lysine to rescue microtubule function in the Arg210 mutant. PMID:12860992

  9. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  10. Platform engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum with reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity for improved production of L-lysine, L-valine, and 2-ketoisovalerate.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Jens; Schwentner, Andreas; Brunnenkan, Britta; Gabris, Christina; Grimm, Simon; Gerstmeir, Robert; Takors, Ralf; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Blombach, Bastian

    2013-09-01

    Exchange of the native Corynebacterium glutamicum promoter of the aceE gene, encoding the E1p subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC), with mutated dapA promoter variants led to a series of C. glutamicum strains with gradually reduced growth rates and PDHC activities. Upon overexpression of the l-valine biosynthetic genes ilvBNCE, all strains produced l-valine. Among these strains, C. glutamicum aceE A16 (pJC4 ilvBNCE) showed the highest biomass and product yields, and thus it was further improved by additional deletion of the pqo and ppc genes, encoding pyruvate:quinone oxidoreductase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, respectively. In fed-batch fermentations at high cell densities, C. glutamicum aceE A16 Δpqo Δppc (pJC4 ilvBNCE) produced up to 738 mM (i.e., 86.5 g/liter) l-valine with an overall yield (YP/S) of 0.36 mol per mol of glucose and a volumetric productivity (QP) of 13.6 mM per h [1.6 g/(liter × h)]. Additional inactivation of the transaminase B gene (ilvE) and overexpression of ilvBNCD instead of ilvBNCE transformed the l-valine-producing strain into a 2-ketoisovalerate producer, excreting up to 303 mM (35 g/liter) 2-ketoisovalerate with a YP/S of 0.24 mol per mol of glucose and a QP of 6.9 mM per h [0.8 g/(liter × h)]. The replacement of the aceE promoter by the dapA-A16 promoter in the two C. glutamicum l-lysine producers DM1800 and DM1933 improved the production by 100% and 44%, respectively. These results demonstrate that C. glutamicum strains with reduced PDHC activity are an excellent platform for the production of pyruvate-derived products.

  11. Comprehensive profiling of lysine acetylproteome analysis reveals diverse functions of lysine acetylation in common wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumei; Song, Limin; Liang, Wenxing; Mu, Ping; Wang, Shu; Lin, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation of proteins, a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification, plays a critical regulatory role in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Several researches have been carried out on acetylproteome in plants. However, until now, there have been no data on common wheat, the major cereal crop in the world. In this study, we performed a global acetylproteome analysis of common wheat variety (Triticum aestivum L.), Chinese Spring. In total, 416 lysine modification sites were identified on 277 proteins, which are involved in a wide variety of biological processes. Consistent with previous studies, a large proportion of the acetylated proteins are involved in metabolic process. Interestingly, according to the functional enrichment analysis, 26 acetylated proteins are involved in photosynthesis and Calvin cycle, suggesting an important role of lysine acetylation in these processes. Moreover, protein interaction network analysis reveals that diverse interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. These data represent the first report of acetylome in common wheat and serve as an important resource for exploring the physiological role of lysine acetylation in this organism and likely in all plants. PMID:26875666

  12. Targeting Lysine Deacetylases (KDACs) in Parasites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Rosa, Bruce A; Nare, Bakela; Powell, Kerrie; Valente, Sergio; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Marshall, Garland R; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-01-01

    Due to an increasing problem of drug resistance among almost all parasites species ranging from protists to worms, there is an urgent need to explore new drug targets and their inhibitors to provide new and effective parasitic therapeutics. In this regard, there is growing interest in exploring known drug leads of human epigenetic enzymes as potential starting points to develop novel treatments for parasitic diseases. This approach of repurposing (starting with validated targets and inhibitors) is quite attractive since it has the potential to reduce the expense of drug development and accelerate the process of developing novel drug candidates for parasite control. Lysine deacetylases (KDACs) are among the most studied epigenetic drug targets of humans, and a broad range of small-molecule inhibitors for these enzymes have been reported. In this work, we identify the KDAC protein families in representative species across important classes of parasites, screen a compound library of 23 hydroxamate- or benzamide-based small molecules KDAC inhibitors, and report their activities against a range of parasitic species, including the pathogen of malaria (Plasmodium falciparum), kinetoplastids (Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania donovani), and nematodes (Brugia malayi, Dirofilaria immitis and Haemonchus contortus). Compound activity against parasites is compared to that observed against the mammalian cell line (L929 mouse fibroblast) in order to determine potential parasite-versus-host selectivity). The compounds showed nanomolar to sub-nanomolar potency against various parasites, and some selectivity was observed within the small panel of compounds tested. The possible binding modes of the active compounds at the different protein target sites within different species were explored by docking to homology models to help guide the discovery of more selective, parasite-specific inhibitors. This current work supports previous studies that explored the use of KDAC inhibitors in

  13. Participation and strength of interaction of lysine 95(beta) in the polymerization of hemoglobin S as determined by its site-directed substitution by isoleucine.

    PubMed

    Himanen, J P; Schneider, K; Chait, B; Manning, J M

    1995-06-01

    The role of Lys-95(beta), which is on the exterior of the hemoglobin (HbS) tetramer, in the aggregation process has been addressed because there is a lack of agreement on its importance. The early studies on the aggregation of HbS in the presence of other mutant hemoglobins are consistent with the subsequent electron microscopic studies in demonstrating the participation of Lys-95(beta) in gelation; the results of the crystal structure do not agree with these conclusions. Therefore, with the objective of clarifying its role we have carried out site-directed substitution of Lys-95(beta) to an isoleucine residue. The mutation was introduced by polymerase chain reaction recombination methodology, and the absence of other mutations in the beta-globin gene was established by sequencing the gene in its entirety. The recombinant mutant hemoglobin was expressed in yeast and characterized by peptide mapping and sequencing, which demonstrated that the only different tryptic peptide had the Ile substitution at position 95(beta). The recombinant hemoglobin had the correct amino acid composition and molecular weight by mass spectrometric analysis. It was also pure as judged by isoelectric focusing. It was fully functional because it had an average Hill coefficient of 3.1 and responded normally to the allosteric regulators, chloride, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, and inositol hexaphosphate. Of particular interest was the finding that this hemoglobin mutant aggregated at a concentration of about 40 g/dl, nearly twice that at which HbS itself aggregated (24 g/dl). Therefore, Lys-95(beta) has a very important role in the aggregation process and is a good candidate site for the design of a therapeutic agent for sickle cell anemia. PMID:7775447

  14. Cardiolipin binds selectively but transiently to conserved lysine residues in the rotor of metazoan ATP synthases.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Anna L; Robinson, Alan J; Walker, John E

    2016-08-01

    The anionic lipid cardiolipin is an essential component of active ATP synthases. In metazoans, their rotors contain a ring of eight c-subunits consisting of inner and outer circles of N- and C-terminal α-helices, respectively. The beginning of the C-terminal α-helix contains a strictly conserved and fully trimethylated lysine residue in the lipid head-group region of the membrane. Larger rings of known structure, from c9-c15 in eubacteria and chloroplasts, conserve either a lysine or an arginine residue in the equivalent position. In computer simulations of hydrated membranes containing trimethylated or unmethylated bovine c8-rings and bacterial c10- or c11-rings, the head-groups of cardiolipin molecules became associated selectively with these modified and unmodified lysine residues and with adjacent polar amino acids and with a second conserved lysine on the opposite side of the membrane, whereas phosphatidyl lipids were attracted little to these sites. However, the residence times of cardiolipin molecules with the ring were brief and sufficient for the rotor to turn only a fraction of a degree in the active enzyme. With the demethylated c8-ring and with c10- and c11-rings, the density of bound cardiolipin molecules at this site increased, but residence times were not changed greatly. These highly specific but brief interactions with the rotating c-ring are consistent with functional roles for cardiolipin in stabilizing and lubricating the rotor, and, by interacting with the enzyme at the inlet and exit of the transmembrane proton channel, in participation in proton translocation through the membrane domain of the enzyme. PMID:27382158

  15. Cardiolipin binds selectively but transiently to conserved lysine residues in the rotor of metazoan ATP synthases

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Anna L.

    2016-01-01

    The anionic lipid cardiolipin is an essential component of active ATP synthases. In metazoans, their rotors contain a ring of eight c-subunits consisting of inner and outer circles of N- and C-terminal α-helices, respectively. The beginning of the C-terminal α-helix contains a strictly conserved and fully trimethylated lysine residue in the lipid head-group region of the membrane. Larger rings of known structure, from c9-c15 in eubacteria and chloroplasts, conserve either a lysine or an arginine residue in the equivalent position. In computer simulations of hydrated membranes containing trimethylated or unmethylated bovine c8-rings and bacterial c10- or c11-rings, the head-groups of cardiolipin molecules became associated selectively with these modified and unmodified lysine residues and with adjacent polar amino acids and with a second conserved lysine on the opposite side of the membrane, whereas phosphatidyl lipids were attracted little to these sites. However, the residence times of cardiolipin molecules with the ring were brief and sufficient for the rotor to turn only a fraction of a degree in the active enzyme. With the demethylated c8-ring and with c10- and c11-rings, the density of bound cardiolipin molecules at this site increased, but residence times were not changed greatly. These highly specific but brief interactions with the rotating c-ring are consistent with functional roles for cardiolipin in stabilizing and lubricating the rotor, and, by interacting with the enzyme at the inlet and exit of the transmembrane proton channel, in participation in proton translocation through the membrane domain of the enzyme. PMID:27382158

  16. Topological dispositions of lysine. alpha. 380 and lysine. gamma. 486 in the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.P. )

    1991-04-23

    The locations have been determined, with respect to the plasma membrane, of lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 in the {alpha} subunit and the {gamma} subunit, respectively, of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica. Immunoadsorbents were constructed that recognize the carboxy terminus of the peptide GVKYIAE released by proteolytic digestion from positions 378-384 in the amino acid sequence of the {alpha} subunit of the acetylcholine receptor and the carboxy terminus of the peptide KYVP released by proteolytic digestion from positions 486-489 in the amino acid sequence of the {gamma} subunit. They were used to isolate these peptides from proteolytic digests of polypeptides from the acetylcholine receptor. Sealed vesicles containing the native acetylcholine receptor were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium ({sup 3}H)-borohydride. The effect of saponin on the incorporation of pyridoxamine phosphate into lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 from the acetylcholine receptor in these vesicles was assessed with the immunoadsorbents. The conclusions that follow from these results are that lysine {alpha}380 is on the inside surface of a vesicle and lysine {gamma}486 is on the outside surface. Because a majority (85%) of the total binding sites for {alpha}-bungarotoxin bind the toxin in the absence of saponin, the majority of the vesicles are right side out with the inside of the vesicle corresponding to the cytoplasmic surface and the outside of the vesicle corresponding to the extracytoplasmic, synaptic surface. Because lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 lie on opposite sides of the membrane, a membrane-spanning segment must be located between the two positions occupied by these two amino acids in the common sequence of a polypeptide of the acetylcholine receptor.

  17. Identification of lysine residue involved in inactivation of brain glutamate dehydrogenase isoproteins by o-phthalaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ahn, J Y; Choi, S; Cho, S W

    1999-12-01

    Incubation of two types of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) isoproteins from bovine brain with o-phthalaldehyde resulted in a time-dependent loss of enzyme activity. The inactivation was partially prevented by preincubation of the GDH isoproteins with 2-oxoglutarate or NADH. Spectrophotometric studies indicated that the inactivation of GDH isoproteins with o-phthalaldehyde resulted in isoindole derivatives characterized by typical fluorescence emission spectra with a stoichiometry of one isoindole derivative per molecule of enzyme subunit. There were no differences between the two GDH isoproteins in sensitivities to inactivation by o-phthalaldehyde indicating that the microenvironmental structures of the GDH isoproteins are very similar to each other. Tryptic peptides of the isoproteins, modified with and without protection, identified a selective modification of one lysine as in the region containing the sequence L-Q-H-G-S-I-L-G-F-P-X-A-K for both GDH isoproteins. The symbol X indicates a position for which no phenylthiohydantoin-amino acid could be assigned. The missing residue, however, can be designated as an o-phthalaldehyde-labeled lysine since the sequences including the lysine residue in question have a complete identity with those of the other mammalian GDHs. Also, trypsin was unable to cleave the labeled peptide at this site. Both amino acid sequencing and compositional analysis identified Lys-306 as the site of o-phthalaldehyde binding within the brain GDH isoproteins. PMID:10607407

  18. Systematic identification of the lysine succinylation in the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolong; Hu, Xin; Wan, Yujing; Xie, Guizhen; Li, Xiangzhi; Chen, Di; Cheng, Zhongyi; Yi, Xingling; Liang, Shaohui; Tan, Feng

    2014-12-01

    Lysine succinylation is a new posttranslational modification identified in histone proteins of Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa. However, very little is known about their scope and cellular distribution. Here, using LC-MS/MS to identify parasite peptides enriched by immunopurification with succinyl lysine antibody, we produced the first lysine succinylome in this parasite. Overall, a total of 425 lysine succinylation sites that occurred on 147 succinylated proteins were identified in extracellular Toxoplasma tachyzoites, which is a proliferative stage that results in acute toxoplasmosis. With the bioinformatics analysis, it is shown that these succinylated proteins are evolutionarily conserved and involved in a wide variety of cellular functions such as metabolism and epigenetic gene regulation and exhibit diverse subcellular localizations. Moreover, we defined five types of definitively conserved succinylation site motifs, and the results imply that lysine residue of a polypeptide with lysine on the +3 position and without lysine at the -1 to +2 position is a preferred substrate of lysine succinyltransferase. In conclusion, our findings suggest that lysine succinylation in Toxoplasma involves a diverse array of cellular functions, although the succinylation occurs at a low level.

  19. Structural basis for phosphorylation and lysine acetylation cross-talk in a kinase motif associated with myocardial ischemia and cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Parker, Benjamin L; Shepherd, Nicholas E; Trefely, Sophie; Hoffman, Nolan J; White, Melanie Y; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Hambly, Brett D; Larsen, Martin R; James, David E; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2014-09-12

    Myocardial ischemia and cardioprotection by ischemic pre-conditioning induce signal networks aimed at survival or cell death if the ischemic period is prolonged. These pathways are mediated by protein post-translational modifications that are hypothesized to cross-talk with and regulate each other. Phosphopeptides and lysine-acetylated peptides were quantified in isolated rat hearts subjected to ischemia or ischemic pre-conditioning, with and without splitomicin inhibition of lysine deacetylation. We show lysine acetylation (acetyl-Lys)-dependent activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, AKT, and PKA kinases during ischemia. Phosphorylation and acetyl-Lys sites mapped onto tertiary structures were proximal in >50% of proteins investigated, yet they were mutually exclusive in 50 ischemic pre-conditioning- and/or ischemia-associated peptides containing the KXXS basophilic protein kinase consensus motif. Modifications in this motif were modeled in the C terminus of muscle-type creatine kinase. Acetyl-Lys increased proximal dephosphorylation by 10-fold. Structural analysis of modified muscle-type creatine kinase peptide variants by two-dimensional NMR revealed stabilization via a lysine-phosphate salt bridge, which was disrupted by acetyl-Lys resulting in backbone flexibility and increased phosphatase accessibility.

  20. Insights into the regulatory landscape of the lysine riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Garst, Andrew D.; Porter, Ely B.; Batey, Robert T.

    2012-01-01

    A prevalent means of regulating gene expression in bacteria is by riboswitches found within mRNA leader sequences. Like protein repressors these RNA elements must bind an effector molecule with high specificity against a background of other cellular metabolites of similar chemical structure to elicit the appropriate regulatory response. Current crystal structures of the lysine riboswitch do not provide a complete understanding of selectivity as recognition is substantially mediated through main chain atoms of the amino acid. Using a directed set of lysine analogs and other amino acids, the relative contributions of the polar functional groups to binding affinity and the regulatory response have been determined. Our results reveal that the lysine riboswitch has >1,000-fold specificity for lysine over other amino acids. To achieve this specificity, the aptamer is highly sensitive to the precise placement of the ε-amino group and relatively tolerant of alterations to the main chain functional groups. At low NTP concentrations, we observe good agreement between the half-maximal regulatory activity (T50) and the affinity of the receptor for lysine (KD) as well many of its analogs. However, above 400 µM [NTP] the concentration of lysine required to elicit transcription termination rises, moving into the riboswitch into a kinetic control regime. These data demonstrate that under physiologically relevant conditions riboswitches can integrate both effector and NTP concentrations to generate a regulatory response appropriate for global metabolic state of the cell. PMID:22771573

  1. Insights into the regulatory landscape of the lysine riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Garst, Andrew D; Porter, Ely B; Batey, Robert T

    2012-10-12

    A prevalent means of regulating gene expression in bacteria is by riboswitches found within mRNA leader sequences. Like protein repressors, these RNA elements must bind an effector molecule with high specificity against a background of other cellular metabolites of similar chemical structure to elicit the appropriate regulatory response. Current crystal structures of the lysine riboswitch do not provide a complete understanding of selectivity as recognition is substantially mediated through main-chain atoms of the amino acid. Using a directed set of lysine analogs and other amino acids, we have determined the relative contributions of the polar functional groups to binding affinity and the regulatory response. Our results reveal that the lysine riboswitch has >1000-fold specificity for lysine over other amino acids. The aptamer is highly sensitive to the precise placement of the ε-amino group and relatively tolerant of alterations to the main-chain functional groups in order to achieve this specificity. At low nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) concentrations, we observe good agreement between the half-maximal regulatory activity (T(50)) and the affinity of the receptor for lysine (K(d)), as well as many of its analogs. However, above 400 μM [NTP], the concentration of lysine required to elicit transcription termination rises, moving into the riboswitch into a kinetic control regime. These data demonstrate that, under physiologically relevant conditions, riboswitches can integrate both effector and NTP concentrations to generate a regulatory response appropriate for global metabolic state of the cell. PMID:22771573

  2. Degradation signals in the lysine-asparagine sequence space.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Varshavsky, A

    1999-11-01

    The N-degrons, a set of degradation signals recognized by the N-end rule pathway, comprise a protein's destabilizing N-terminal residue and an internal lysine residue. We show that the strength of an N-degron can be markedly increased, without loss of specificity, through the addition of lysine residues. A nearly exhaustive screen was carried out for N-degrons in the lysine (K)-asparagine (N) sequence space of the 14-residue peptides containing either K or N (16 384 different sequences). Of these sequences, 68 were found to function as N-degrons, and three of them were at least as active and specific as any of the previously known N-degrons. All 68 K/N-based N-degrons lacked the lysine at position 2, and all three of the strongest N-degrons contained lysines at positions 3 and 15. The results support a model of the targeting mechanism in which the binding of the E3-E2 complex to the substrate's destabilizing N-terminal residue is followed by a stochastic search for a sterically suitable lysine residue. Our strategy of screening a small library that encompasses the entire sequence space of two amino acids should be of use in many settings, including studies of protein targeting and folding. PMID:10545113

  3. Characterization and expression profile of complete functional domain of granulysin/NK-lysin homologue (buffalo-lysin) gene of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Sukumar; Mitra, Abhijit

    2009-04-15

    Granulysin (GNLY)/NK-lysin (NKL) is an effector antimicrobial cationic peptide expressed in the cytotoxic and natural killer lymphocytes. We report here cDNA sequence (405bp) encoding the complete functional domain of buffalo-lysin (bu-lysin), and its expression profile in the various tissues. The nucleotide sequence of bu-lysin exhibited >85% identity with the bovine lysin. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of bu-lysin with those of GNLY/NKL of different species revealed the conservation of six cysteine (Cys) residues and five alpha helices. Unlike the homologues in other species, bu-lysin composed of 11 positively charged Lys residues as in equine. The expression of bu-lysin mRNA in the in vitro cultured lymphocytes was inducible and increased markedly (p<0.05) in a dose dependant manner when incubated with Concanavalin A (ConA). The expression of bu-lysin mRNA in the different tissues was variable: comparatively higher in the spleen and lymph node, moderate in the uterine endometrium and low in the liver and kidney. These results indicate the existence and active expression of GNLY/NKL homologue in water buffalo having a significant influence in immune response.

  4. Control of active sites in flocculation: Concept of equivalent active sites''

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Flocculation and dispersion of solids are strong functions of the amount and conformation of the adsorbed polymer. Regions of dispersion and flocculation of solids with particular polymer molecules may be deduced from saturation adsorption data. The concept of equivalent active sites'' is proposed to explain flocculation and dispersion behavior irrespective of the amount or conformation of the adsorbed polymer. The concept has been further extended to study the selective flocculation process.

  5. KDM1 Class Flavin-Dependent Protein Lysine Demethylases

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Jonathan M.; Link, Jennifer E.; Morgan, Brittany S.; Heller, Frederick J.; Hargrove, Amanda E.; McCafferty, Dewey G.

    2015-01-01

    Flavin-dependent, lysine-specific protein demethylases (KDM1s) are a subfamily of amine oxidases that catalyze the selective posttranslational oxidative demethylation of methyllysine side chains within protein and peptide substrates. KDM1s participate in the widespread epigenetic regulation of both normal and disease state transcriptional programs. Their activities are central to various cellular functions, such as hematopoietic and neuronal differentiation, cancer proliferation and metastasis, and viral lytic replication and establishment of latency. Interestingly, KDM1s function as catalytic subunits within complexes with coregulatory molecules that modulate enzymatic activity of the demethylases and coordinate their access to specific substrates at distinct sites within the cell and chromatin. Although several classes of KDM1 -selective small molecule inhibitors have been recently developed, these pan-active site inhibition strategies lack the ability to selectively discriminate between KDM1 activity in specific, and occasionally opposing, functional contexts within these complexes. Here we review the discovery of this class of demethylases, their structures, chemical mechanisms, and specificity. Additionally, we review inhibition of this class of enzymes as well as emerging interactions with coregulatory molecules that regulate demethylase activity in highly specific functional contexts of biological and potential therapeutic importance. PMID:25787087

  6. Crystal structures of SIRT3 reveal that the α2-α3 loop and α3-helix affect the interaction with long-chain acyl lysine.

    PubMed

    Gai, Wei; Li, He; Jiang, Hualiang; Long, Yaqiu; Liu, Dongxiang

    2016-09-01

    SIRT1-7 play important roles in many biological processes and age-related diseases. In addition to a NAD(+) -dependent deacetylase activity, they can catalyze several other reactions, including the hydrolysis of long-chain fatty acyl lysine. To study the binding modes of sirtuins to long-chain acyl lysines, we solved the crystal structures of SIRT3 bound to either a H3K9-myristoylated- or a H3K9-palmitoylated peptide. Interaction of SIRT3 with the palmitoyl group led to unfolding of the α3-helix. The myristoyl and palmitoyl groups bind to the C-pocket and an allosteric site near the α3-helix, respectively. We found that the residues preceding the α3-helix determine the size of the C-pocket. The flexibility of the α2-α3 loop and the plasticity of the α3-helix affect the interaction with long-chain acyl lysine. PMID:27501476

  7. Recombinant bacteriophage lysins as antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Mark; Ross, Paul; McAuliffe, Olivia; O'Mahony, Jim

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing worldwide prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, bacteriophage endolysins (lysins) represent a very promising novel alternative class of antibacterial in the fight against infectious disease. Lysins are phage-encoded peptidoglycan hydrolases which, when applied exogenously (as purified recombinant proteins) to Gram-positive bacteria, bring about rapid lysis and death of the bacterial cell. A number of studies have recently demonstrated the strong potential of these enzymes in human and veterinary medicine to control and treat pathogens on mucosal surfaces and in systemic infections. They also have potential in diagnostics and detection, bio-defence, elimination of food pathogens and control of phytopathogens. This review discusses the extensive research on recombinant bacteriophage lysins in the context of antibacterials, and looks forward to future development and potential. PMID:21327123

  8. Dissecting the active site of a photoreceptor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Wouter; Hara, Miwa; Ren, Jie; Moghadam, Farzaneh; Xie, Aihua; Kumauchi, Masato

    While enzymes are quite large molecules, functionally important chemical events are often limited to a small region of the protein: the active site. The physical and chemical properties of residues at such active sites are often strongly altered compared to the same groups dissolved in water. Understanding such effects is important for unraveling the mechanisms underlying protein function and for protein engineering, but has proven challenging. Here we report on our ongoing efforts on using photoactive yellow protein (PYP), a bacterial photoreceptor, as a model system for such effects. We will report on the following questions: How many residues affect active site properties? Are these residues in direct physical contact with the active site? Can functionally important residues be recognized in the crystal structure of a protein? What structural resolution is needed to understand active sites? What spectroscopic techniques are most informative? Which weak interactions dominate active site properties?

  9. Histone Deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) Promotes the Pro-survival Activity of 14-3-3ζ via Deacetylation of Lysines within the 14-3-3ζ Binding Pocket*

    PubMed Central

    Mortenson, Jeffrey B.; Heppler, Lisa N.; Banks, Courtney J.; Weerasekara, Vajira K.; Whited, Matthew D.; Piccolo, Stephen R.; Johnson, William E.; Thompson, J. Will; Andersen, Joshua L.

    2015-01-01

    The phospho-binding protein 14-3-3ζ acts as a signaling hub controlling a network of interacting partners and oncogenic pathways. We show here that lysines within the 14-3-3ζ binding pocket and protein-protein interface can be modified by acetylation. The positive charge on two of these lysines, Lys49 and Lys120, is critical for coordinating 14-3-3ζ-phosphoprotein interactions. Through screening, we identified HDAC6 as the Lys49/Lys120 deacetylase. Inhibition of HDAC6 blocks 14-3-3ζ interactions with two well described interacting partners, Bad and AS160, which triggers their dephosphorylation at Ser112 and Thr642, respectively. Expression of an acetylation-refractory K49R/K120R mutant of 14-3-3ζ rescues both the HDAC6 inhibitor-induced loss of interaction and Ser112/Thr642 phosphorylation. Furthermore, expression of the K49R/K120R mutant of 14-3-3ζ inhibits the cytotoxicity of HDAC6 inhibition. These data demonstrate a novel role for HDAC6 in controlling 14-3-3ζ binding activity. PMID:25770209

  10. Lysine fortification: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Pellett, Peter L; Ghosh, Shibani

    2004-06-01

    Fortification with lysine to improve the protein value of human diets that are heavily based on cereals has received support from the results of these recent studies [1,2]. Support also comes from examination of average food and nutrient availability data derived from food balance sheets. Whereas nutritional status is influenced by the nutrient content of foods consumed in relation to need, the requirements for protein and amino acids are influenced by many additional factors [10, 12, 14, 28, 29]. These include age, sex, body size, physical activity, growth, pregnancy and lactation, infection, and the efficiency of nutrient utilization. Even if the immune response was influenced by the added lysine, adequate water and basic sanitation would remain essential. Acute and chronic undernutrition and most micronutrient deficiencies primarily affect poor and deprived people who do not have access to food of adequate nutritional value, live in unsanitary environments without access to clean water and basic services, and lack access to appropriate education and information [30]. A further variable is the possible interaction between protein and food energy availability [31]. This could affect the protein value of diets when food energy is limiting to a significant degree. Thus, the additional effects of food energy deficiency on protein utilization could well be superimposed on the very poorest. The improvement of dietary diversity must be the long-term aim, with dietary fortification considered only a short-term solution. The former should take place as wealth improves and the gaps between rich and poor diminish. Although such changes are taking place, they are highly uneven. Over the last several decades, increases have occurred in the availability of food energy, total protein, and animal protein for both developed and developing countries. However, for the very poorest developing countries over the same period, changes have been almost nonexistent, and the values for

  11. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program --now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human Exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines be opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  12. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program -- now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history. The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines the opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  13. Substrate-Induced Transcriptional Activation of the MoCel7C Cellulase Gene Is Associated with Methylation of Histone H3 at Lysine 4 in the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Ba Van; Pham, Kieu Thi Minh

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in substrate-dependent regulation of a Magnaporthe oryzae gene encoding a cellulase which we designate MoCel7C (MGG_14954) were investigated. The levels of MoCel7C transcript were dramatically increased more than 1,000-fold, 16 to 24 h after transfer to a medium containing 2% carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), while levels were very low or undetectable in conventional rich medium. Green fluorescent protein reporter assays showed that the MoCel7C promoter was activated by cello-oligosaccharides larger than a pentamer. CMC-induced activation of the MoCel7C promoter was suppressed by glucose and cellobiose. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that histone H3 methylation on lysine 4 (H3K4) at the MoCel7C locus was associated with activation of the gene by CMC. Consistently, CMC-induced MoCel7C gene activation was drastically diminished in a knockout (KO) mutant of the MoSET1 gene, which encodes a histone lysine methyltransferase that catalyzes H3K4 methylation in M. oryzae. Interestingly, however, MoCel7C transcript levels under noninducing conditions were significantly increased in the MoSET1 KO mutant, suggesting that MoSET1 directly or indirectly plays a role in both activation and suppression of the MoCel7C gene in response to environmental signals. In addition, gene expression and silencing vectors using the MoCel7C promoter were constructed. PMID:23995923

  14. Selective Sirt2 inhibition by ligand-induced rearrangement of the active site.

    PubMed

    Rumpf, Tobias; Schiedel, Matthias; Karaman, Berin; Roessler, Claudia; North, Brian J; Lehotzky, Attila; Oláh, Judit; Ladwein, Kathrin I; Schmidtkunz, Karin; Gajer, Markus; Pannek, Martin; Steegborn, Clemens; Sinclair, David A; Gerhardt, Stefan; Ovádi, Judit; Schutkowski, Mike; Sippl, Wolfgang; Einsle, Oliver; Jung, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuins are a highly conserved class of NAD(+)-dependent lysine deacylases. The human isotype Sirt2 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer, inflammation and neurodegeneration, which makes the modulation of Sirt2 activity a promising strategy for pharmaceutical intervention. A rational basis for the development of optimized Sirt2 inhibitors is lacking so far. Here we present high-resolution structures of human Sirt2 in complex with highly selective drug-like inhibitors that show a unique inhibitory mechanism. Potency and the unprecedented Sirt2 selectivity are based on a ligand-induced structural rearrangement of the active site unveiling a yet-unexploited binding pocket. Application of the most potent Sirtuin-rearranging ligand, termed SirReal2, leads to tubulin hyperacetylation in HeLa cells and induces destabilization of the checkpoint protein BubR1, consistent with Sirt2 inhibition in vivo. Our structural insights into this unique mechanism of selective sirtuin inhibition provide the basis for further inhibitor development and selective tools for sirtuin biology. PMID:25672491

  15. Selective Sirt2 inhibition by ligand-induced rearrangement of the active site

    PubMed Central

    Rumpf, Tobias; Schiedel, Matthias; Karaman, Berin; Roessler, Claudia; North, Brian J.; Lehotzky, Attila; Oláh, Judit; Ladwein, Kathrin I.; Schmidtkunz, Karin; Gajer, Markus; Pannek, Martin; Steegborn, Clemens; Sinclair, David A.; Gerhardt, Stefan; Ovádi, Judit; Schutkowski, Mike; Sippl, Wolfgang; Einsle, Oliver; Jung, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuins are a highly conserved class of NAD+-dependent lysine deacylases. The human isotype Sirt2 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer, inflammation and neurodegeneration, which makes the modulation of Sirt2 activity a promising strategy for pharmaceutical intervention. A rational basis for the development of optimized Sirt2 inhibitors is lacking so far. Here we present high-resolution structures of human Sirt2 in complex with highly selective drug-like inhibitors that show a unique inhibitory mechanism. Potency and the unprecedented Sirt2 selectivity are based on a ligand-induced structural rearrangement of the active site unveiling a yet-unexploited binding pocket. Application of the most potent Sirtuin-rearranging ligand, termed SirReal2, leads to tubulin hyperacetylation in HeLa cells and induces destabilization of the checkpoint protein BubR1, consistent with Sirt2 inhibition in vivo. Our structural insights into this unique mechanism of selective sirtuin inhibition provide the basis for further inhibitor development and selective tools for sirtuin biology. PMID:25672491

  16. Activation of Inhibitors by Sortase Triggers Irreversible Modification of the Active Site*S

    PubMed Central

    Maresso, Anthony W.; Wu, Ruiying; Kern, Justin W.; Zhang, Rongguang; Janik, Dorota; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Schneewind, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Sortases anchor surface proteins to the cell wall of Gram-positive pathogens through recognition of specific motif sequences. Loss of sortase leads to large reductions in virulence, which identifies sortase as a target for the development of antibacterials. By screening 135,625 small molecules for inhibition, we report here that aryl (β-amino)ethyl ketones inhibit sortase enzymes from staphylococci and bacilli. Inhibition of sortases occurs through an irreversible, covalent modification of their active site cysteine. Sortases specifically activate this class of molecules via β-elimination, generating a reactive olefin intermediate that covalently modifies the cysteine thiol. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of Bacillus anthracis sortase B with and without inhibitor provides insights into the mechanism of inhibition and reveals binding pockets that can be exploited for drug discovery. PMID:17545669

  17. Targeting Lysine Deacetylases (KDACs) in Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Rosa, Bruce A.; Nare, Bakela; Powell, Kerrie; Valente, Sergio; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Marshall, Garland R.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-01-01

    Due to an increasing problem of drug resistance among almost all parasites species ranging from protists to worms, there is an urgent need to explore new drug targets and their inhibitors to provide new and effective parasitic therapeutics. In this regard, there is growing interest in exploring known drug leads of human epigenetic enzymes as potential starting points to develop novel treatments for parasitic diseases. This approach of repurposing (starting with validated targets and inhibitors) is quite attractive since it has the potential to reduce the expense of drug development and accelerate the process of developing novel drug candidates for parasite control. Lysine deacetylases (KDACs) are among the most studied epigenetic drug targets of humans, and a broad range of small-molecule inhibitors for these enzymes have been reported. In this work, we identify the KDAC protein families in representative species across important classes of parasites, screen a compound library of 23 hydroxamate- or benzamide-based small molecules KDAC inhibitors, and report their activities against a range of parasitic species, including the pathogen of malaria (Plasmodium falciparum), kinetoplastids (Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania donovani), and nematodes (Brugia malayi, Dirofilaria immitis and Haemonchus contortus). Compound activity against parasites is compared to that observed against the mammalian cell line (L929 mouse fibroblast) in order to determine potential parasite-versus-host selectivity). The compounds showed nanomolar to sub-nanomolar potency against various parasites, and some selectivity was observed within the small panel of compounds tested. The possible binding modes of the active compounds at the different protein target sites within different species were explored by docking to homology models to help guide the discovery of more selective, parasite-specific inhibitors. This current work supports previous studies that explored the use of KDAC inhibitors in

  18. Targeting Lysine Deacetylases (KDACs) in Parasites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Rosa, Bruce A; Nare, Bakela; Powell, Kerrie; Valente, Sergio; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Marshall, Garland R; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-01-01

    Due to an increasing problem of drug resistance among almost all parasites species ranging from protists to worms, there is an urgent need to explore new drug targets and their inhibitors to provide new and effective parasitic therapeutics. In this regard, there is growing interest in exploring known drug leads of human epigenetic enzymes as potential starting points to develop novel treatments for parasitic diseases. This approach of repurposing (starting with validated targets and inhibitors) is quite attractive since it has the potential to reduce the expense of drug development and accelerate the process of developing novel drug candidates for parasite control. Lysine deacetylases (KDACs) are among the most studied epigenetic drug targets of humans, and a broad range of small-molecule inhibitors for these enzymes have been reported. In this work, we identify the KDAC protein families in representative species across important classes of parasites, screen a compound library of 23 hydroxamate- or benzamide-based small molecules KDAC inhibitors, and report their activities against a range of parasitic species, including the pathogen of malaria (Plasmodium falciparum), kinetoplastids (Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania donovani), and nematodes (Brugia malayi, Dirofilaria immitis and Haemonchus contortus). Compound activity against parasites is compared to that observed against the mammalian cell line (L929 mouse fibroblast) in order to determine potential parasite-versus-host selectivity). The compounds showed nanomolar to sub-nanomolar potency against various parasites, and some selectivity was observed within the small panel of compounds tested. The possible binding modes of the active compounds at the different protein target sites within different species were explored by docking to homology models to help guide the discovery of more selective, parasite-specific inhibitors. This current work supports previous studies that explored the use of KDAC inhibitors in

  19. The bifunctional active site of s-adenosylmethionine synthetase. Roles of the active site aspartates.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J C; Markham, G D

    1999-11-12

    S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzes the biosynthesis of AdoMet in a unique enzymatic reaction. Initially the sulfur of methionine displaces the intact tripolyphosphate chain (PPP(i)) from ATP, and subsequently PPP(i) is hydrolyzed to PP(i) and P(i) before product release. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli AdoMet synthetase shows that the active site contains four aspartate residues. Aspartate residues Asp-16* and Asp-271 individually provide the sole protein ligand to one of the two required Mg(2+) ions (* denotes a residue from a second subunit); aspartates Asp-118 and Asp-238* are proposed to interact with methionine. Each aspartate has been changed to an uncharged asparagine, and the metal binding residues were also changed to alanine, to assess the roles of charge and ligation ability on catalytic efficiency. The resultant enzyme variants all structurally resemble the wild type enzyme as indicated by circular dichroism spectra and are tetramers. However, all have k(cat) reductions of approximately 10(3)-fold in AdoMet synthesis, whereas the MgATP and methionine K(m) values change by less than 3- and 8-fold, respectively. In the partial reaction of PPP(i) hydrolysis, mutants of the Mg(2+) binding residues have >700-fold reduced catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)), whereas the D118N and D238*N mutants are impaired less than 35-fold. The catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by Mg(2+) site mutants is improved by AdoMet, like the wild type enzyme. In contrast AdoMet reduces the catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by the D118N and D238*N mutants, indicating that the events involved in AdoMet activation are hindered in these methionyl binding site mutants. Ca(2+) uniquely activates the D271A mutant enzyme to 15% of the level of Mg(2+), in contrast to the approximately 1% Ca(2+) activation of the wild type enzyme. This indicates that the Asp-271 side chain size is a discriminator between the activating ability of Ca(2+) and the

  20. Accommodation of GDP-Linked Sugars in the Active Site of GDP-Perosamine Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Paul D.; Carney, Amanda E.; Holden, Hazel M.

    2009-01-12

    Perosamine (4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-d-mannose), or its N-acetylated form, is one of several dideoxy sugars found in the O-antigens of such infamous Gram-negative bacteria as Vibrio cholerae O1 and Escherichia coli O157:H7. It is added to the bacterial O-antigen via a nucleotide-linked version, namely GDP-perosamine. Three enzymes are required for the biosynthesis of GDP-perosamine starting from mannose 1-phosphate. The focus of this investigation is GDP-perosamine synthase from Caulobacter crescentus, which catalyzes the final step in GDP-perosamine synthesis, the conversion of GDP-4-keto-6-deoxymannose to GDP-perosamine. The enzyme is PLP-dependent and belongs to the aspartate aminotransferase superfamily. It contains the typically conserved active site lysine residue, which forms a Schiff base with the PLP cofactor. Two crystal structures were determined for this investigation: a site-directed mutant protein (K186A) complexed with GDP-perosamine and the wild-type enzyme complexed with an unnatural ligand, GDP-3-deoxyperosamine. These structures, determined to 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively, revealed the manner in which products, and presumably substrates, are accommodated within the active site pocket of GDP-perosamine synthase. Additional kinetic analyses using both the natural and unnatural substrates revealed that the K{sub m} for the unnatural substrate was unperturbed relative to that of the natural substrate, but the k{sub cat} was lowered by a factor of approximately 200. Taken together, these studies shed light on why GDP-perosamine synthase functions as an aminotransferase whereas another very similar PLP-dependent enzyme, GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-mannose 3-dehydratase or ColD, catalyzes a dehydration reaction using the same substrate.

  1. Locating Active-site Hydrogen Atoms in D-Xylose Isomerase: Time-of-Flight Neutron Diffraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Bunick, G J

    2006-01-01

    Time-of-flight neutron diffraction has been used to locate hydrogen atoms that define the ionization states of amino acids in crystals of D-xylose isomerase. This enzyme, from Streptomyces rubiginosus, is one of the largest enzymes studied to date at high resolution (1.8 ) by this method. We have determined the position and orientation of a metal ion-bound water molecule that is located in the active site of the enzyme; this water has been thought to be involved in the isomerization step in which D-xylose is converted to D-xylulose or D-glucose to D-fructose. It is shown to be water (rather than a hydroxyl group) under the conditions of measurement (pH 8.0). Our analyses also reveal that one lysine probably has an -NH2 terminal group (rather than NH3+). The ionization state of each histidine residue was also determined.

  2. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Mapping and genotypic analysis of NK-lysin gene in chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Antimicrobial peptides (AMP) are important elements of the first line of defence against pathogens in animals. NK-lysin is a cationic AMP that plays a critical role in innate immunity. The chicken NK-lysin gene has been cloned and its antimicrobial and anticancer activity has been descri...

  4. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  5. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  6. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  7. Acetylome analysis reveals the involvement of lysine acetylation in diverse biological processes in Phytophthora sojae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Delong; Lv, Binna; Tan, Lingling; Yang, Qianqian; Liang, Wenxing

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a dynamic and highly conserved post-translational modification that plays an important regulatory role in almost every aspects of cell metabolism in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Phytophthora sojae is one of the most important plant pathogens due to its huge economic impact. However, to date, little is known about the functions of lysine acetylation in this Phytopthora. Here, we conducted a lysine acetylome in P. sojae. Overall, 2197 lysine acetylation sites in 1150 proteins were identified. The modified proteins are involved in diverse biological processes and are localized to multiple cellular compartments. Importantly, 7 proteins involved in the pathogenicity or the secretion pathway of P. sojae were found to be acetylated. These data provide the first comprehensive view of the acetylome of P. sojae and serve as an important resource for functional analysis of lysine acetylation in plant pathogens. PMID:27412925

  8. Mutations of fumarase that distinguish between the active site and a nearby dicarboxylic acid binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, T.; Lees, M.; Banaszak, L.

    1997-01-01

    Two mutant forms of fumarase C from E. coli have been made using PCR and recombinant DNA. The recombinant form of the protein included a histidine arm on the C-terminal facilitating purification. Based on earlier studies, two different carboxylic acid binding sites, labeled A- and B-, were observed in crystal structures of the wild type and inhibited forms of the enzyme. A histidine at each of the sites was mutated to an asparagine. H188N at the A-site resulted in a large decrease in specific activity, while the H129N mutation at the B-site had essentially no effect. From the results, we conclude that the A-site is indeed the active site, and a dual role for H188 as a potential catalytic base is proposed. Crystal structures of the two mutant proteins produced some unexpected results. Both mutations reduced the affinity for the carboxylic acids at their respective sites. The H129N mutant should be particularly useful in future kinetic studies because it sterically blocks the B-site with the carboxyamide of asparagine assuming the position of the ligand's carboxylate. In the H188N mutation at the active site, the new asparagine side chain still interacts with an active site water that appears to have moved slightly as a result of the mutation. PMID:9098893

  9. Ionizable Side Chains at Catalytic Active Sites of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic active sites of enzymes of known structure can be well defined by a modern program of computational geometry. The CASTp program was used to define and measure the volume of the catalytic active sites of 573 enzymes in the Catalytic Site Atlas database. The active sites are identified as catalytic because the amino acids they contain are known to participate in the chemical reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Acid and base side chains are reliable markers of catalytic active sites. The catalytic active sites have 4 acid and 5 base side chains, in an average volume of 1072 Å3. The number density of acid side chains is 8.3 M (in chemical units); the number density of basic side chains is 10.6 M. The catalytic active site of these enzymes is an unusual electrostatic and steric environment in which side chains and reactants are crowded together in a mixture more like an ionic liquid than an ideal infinitely dilute solution. The electrostatics and crowding of reactants and side chains seems likely to be important for catalytic function. In three types of analogous ion channels, simulation of crowded charges accounts for the main properties of selectivity measured in a wide range of solutions and concentrations. It seems wise to use mathematics designed to study interacting complex fluids when making models of the catalytic active sites of enzymes. PMID:22484856

  10. Substitution of lysine for arginine in the N-terminal 217th amino acid residue of the H gamma II of Staphylococcal gamma-hemolysin lowers the activity of the toxin.

    PubMed

    Sudo, K; Choorit, W; Asami, I; Kaneko, J; Muramoto, K; Kamio, Y

    1995-09-01

    The staphylococcal toxin gamma-hemolysin consists of two protein components, LukF and H gamma II. Staphylococcus aureus P83 was found to have five components, LukF, LukF-PV, LukM, LukS, and H gamma II for leukocidin or gamma-hemolysin. H gamma II of S. aureus P83 was demonstrated to be a naturally-occurring analogous molecule of H gamma II [H gamma II(P83)], in which the 217th arginine residue was replaced by lysine. The H gamma II(P83) showed about 50% of the hemolytic activity of normal H gamma II in the presence of LukF.

  11. Aspirin inhibits glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D. Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F.; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G. Jayarama

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT-29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin-mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT-29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT-29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin-acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH. PMID:27356773

  12. Widespread occurrence of lysine methylation in Plasmodium falciparum proteins at asexual blood stages

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Inderjeet; Zeeshan, Mohammad; Saini, Ekta; Kaushik, Abhinav; Mohmmed, Asif; Gupta, Dinesh; Malhotra, Pawan

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications play a major role in Plasmodium life cycle regulation. Lysine methylation of histone proteins is well documented in several organisms, however in recent years lysine methylation of proteins outside histone code is emerging out as an important post-translational modification (PTM). In the present study we have performed global analysis of lysine methylation of proteins in asexual blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum development. We immunoprecipitated stage specific Plasmodium lysates using anti-methyl lysine specific antibodies that immunostained the asexual blood stage parasites. Using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry analysis, 570 lysine methylated proteins at three different blood stages were identified. Analysis of the peptide sequences identified 605 methylated sites within 422 proteins. Functional classification of the methylated proteins revealed that the proteins are mainly involved in nucleotide metabolic processes, chromatin organization, transport, homeostatic processes and protein folding. The motif analysis of the methylated lysine peptides reveals novel motifs. Many of the identified lysine methylated proteins are also interacting partners/substrates of PfSET domain proteins as revealed by STRING database analysis. Our findings suggest that the protein methylation at lysine residues is widespread in Plasmodium and plays an important regulatory role in diverse set of the parasite pathways. PMID:27762281

  13. Contribution of active-site glutamine to rate enhancement in ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Boudreaux, David; Chaney, Joseph; Maiti, Tushar K.; Das, Chittaranjan

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases (UCHs) are cysteine proteases featuring a classical cysteine-histidine-aspartate catalytic triad, also a highly conserved glutamine thought to be a part of the oxyanion hole. However, the contribution of this side chain to the catalysis by UCH enzymes is not known. Herein, we demonstrate that the glutamine side chain contributes to rate enhancement in UCHL1, UCHL3 and UCHL5. Mutation of the glutamine to alanine in these enzymes impairs the catalytic efficiency mainly due to a 16 to 30-fold reduction in kcat, which is consistent with a loss of approximately 2 kcal/mol in transition-state stabilization. However, the contribution to transition-state stabilization observed here is rather modest for the side chain’s role in oxyanion stabilization. Interestingly, we discovered that the carbonyl oxygen of this side chain is engaged in a C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding contact with the CεH group of the catalytic histidine. Upon further analysis, we found that this interaction is a common active-site structural feature in most cysteine proteases, including papain, belonging to families with the QCH(N/D) type of active-site configuration. It is possible that removal of the glutamine side chain might have abolished the C—H•••O interaction, which typically accounts for 2 kcal/mol of stabilization, leading to the effect on catalysis observed here. Additional studies performed on UCHL3 by mutating the glutamine to glutamate (strong C—H•••O acceptor but oxyanion destabilizer) and to lysine (strong oxyanion stabilizer but lacking C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding property) suggest that the C—H•••O hydrogen bond could contribute to catalysis. PMID:22284438

  14. Glutamates 78 and 122 in the active site of saccharopine dehydrogenase contribute to reactant binding and modulate the basicity of the acid-base catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ekanayake, Devi K; Andi, Babak; Bobyk, Kostyantyn D; West, Ann H; Cook, Paul F

    2010-07-01

    Saccharopine dehydrogenase catalyzes the NAD-dependent oxidative deamination of saccharopine to give l-lysine and alpha-ketoglutarate. There are a number of conserved hydrophilic, ionizable residues in the active site, all of which must be important to the overall reaction. In an attempt to determine the contribution to binding and rate enhancement of each of the residues in the active site, mutations at each residue are being made, and double mutants are being made to estimate the interrelationship between residues. Here, we report the effects of mutations of active site glutamate residues, Glu(78) and Glu(122), on reactant binding and catalysis. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate E78Q, E122Q, E78Q/E122Q, E78A, E122A, and E78A/E122A mutant enzymes. Mutation of these residues increases the positive charge of the active site and is expected to affect the pK(a) values of the catalytic groups. Each mutant enzyme was completely characterized with respect to its kinetic and chemical mechanism. The kinetic mechanism remains the same as that of wild type enzymes for all of the mutant enzymes, with the exception of E78A, which exhibits binding of alpha-ketoglutarate to E and E.NADH. Large changes in V/K(Lys), but not V, suggest that Glu(78) and Glu(122) contribute binding energy for lysine. Shifts of more than a pH unit to higher and lower pH of the pK(a) values observed in the V/K(Lys) pH-rate profile of the mutant enzymes suggests that the presence of Glu(78) and Glu(122) modulates the basicity of the catalytic groups.

  15. Therapeutic use of chimeric bacteriophage (phage) lysins in staphylococcal endophthalmitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: Phage endolysins are peptidoglycan hydrolases that are produced at the end of the phage lytic cycle to digest the host bacterial cell wall, facilitating the release of mature phage progeny. The aim of this study is to determine the antimicrobial activity of chimeric phage lysins against cli...

  16. Molecular recognition at the active site of subtilisin BPN': crystallographic studies using genetically engineered proteinaceous inhibitor SSI (Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitor).

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Y; Noguchi, S; Satow, Y; Kojima, S; Kumagai, I; Miura, K; Nakamura, K T; Mitsui, Y

    1991-06-01

    Unlike trypsin-like serine proteases having only one conspicuous binding pocket in the active site, subtilisin BPN' has two such pockets, the S1 and S4 pockets, which accommodate the P1 and P4 residues of ligands (after Schechter and Berger notation) respectively. Using computer graphics, the geometrical nature of the two pockets was carefully examined and strategies for site-directed mutagenesis studies were set up against a protein SSI (Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitor), which is a strong proteinaceous inhibitor (or a substrate analogue) of subtilisin BPN'. It was decided to convert the P1 residue, methionine 73, into lysine (M73K) with or without additional conversion of the P4 residue, methionine 70, into glycine (M70G). The crystal structures of the two complexes of subtilisin BPN', one with the single mutant SSI (M73K) and the other with the double mutant SSI (M73K, M70G) were solved showing that (i) small 'electrostatic induced-fit movement' occurs in the S1 pocket upon introducing the terminal plus charge of the lysine side chain, and (ii) large 'mechanical induced-fit movement' occurs in the S4 pocket upon reducing the size of the P4 side chain from methionine to glycine. In both (i) and (ii), the induced-fit movement occurred in a concerted fashion involving both the enzyme and 'substrate' amino acid residues. The term 'substrate-assisted stabilization' was coined to stress the cooperative nature of the induced-fit movements. PMID:1891457

  17. Site-specific albumination of a therapeutic protein with multi-subunit to prolong activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Hahn, Young S.; Kwon, Inchan

    2015-01-01

    Albumin fusion/conjugation (albumination) has been an effective method to prolong in vivo half-life of therapeutic proteins. However, its broader application to proteins with complex folding pathway or multi-subunit is restricted by incorrect folding, poor expression, heterogeneity, and loss of native activity of the proteins linked to albumin. We hypothesized that the site-specific conjugation of albumin to a permissive site of a target protein will expand the utilities of albumin as a therapeutic activity extender to proteins with a complex structure. We show here the genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid (NNAA) followed by chemoselective albumin conjugation to prolong therapeutic activity in vivo. Urate oxidase (Uox), a therapeutic enzyme for treatment of hyperuricemia, is a homotetramer with multiple surface lysines, limiting conventional approaches for albumination. Incorporation of p-azido-l-phenylalanine into two predetermined positions of Uox allowed site-specific linkage of dibenzocyclooctyne-derivatized human serum albumin (HSA) through strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC). The bio-orthogonality of SPAAC resulted in the production of a chemically well-defined conjugate, Uox-HSA, with a retained enzymatic activity. Uox-HSA had a half-life of 8.8 h in mice, while wild-type Uox had a half-life of 1.3 h. The AUC increased 5.5-fold (1657 vs. 303 mU/mL × h). These results clearly demonstrated that site-specific albumination led to the prolonged enzymatic activity of Uox in vivo. Site-specific albumination enabled by NNAA incorporation and orthogonal chemistry demonstrates its promise for the development of long-acting protein therapeutics with high potency and safety. PMID:25862515

  18. Site-specific albumination of a therapeutic protein with multi-subunit to prolong activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung In; Hahn, Young S; Kwon, Inchan

    2015-06-10

    Albumin fusion/conjugation (albumination) has been an effective method to prolong in vivo half-life of therapeutic proteins. However, its broader application to proteins with complex folding pathway or multi-subunit is restricted by incorrect folding, poor expression, heterogeneity, and loss of native activity of the proteins linked to albumin. We hypothesized that the site-specific conjugation of albumin to a permissive site of a target protein will expand the utilities of albumin as a therapeutic activity extender to proteins with a complex structure. We show here the genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid (NNAA) followed by chemoselective albumin conjugation to prolong therapeutic activity in vivo. Urate oxidase (Uox), a therapeutic enzyme for treatment of hyperuricemia, is a homotetramer with multiple surface lysines, limiting conventional approaches for albumination. Incorporation of p-azido-l-phenylalanine into two predetermined positions of Uox allowed site-specific linkage of dibenzocyclooctyne-derivatized human serum albumin (HSA) through strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC). The bio-orthogonality of SPAAC resulted in the production of a chemically well-defined conjugate, Uox-HSA, with a retained enzymatic activity. Uox-HSA had a half-life of 8.8 h in mice, while wild-type Uox had a half-life of 1.3 h. The AUC increased 5.5-fold (1657 vs. 303 mU/mL x h). These results clearly demonstrated that site-specific albumination led to the prolonged enzymatic activity of Uox in vivo. Site-specific albumination enabled by NNAA incorporation and orthogonal chemistry demonstrates its promise for the development of long-acting protein therapeutics with high potency and safety.

  19. Histone H4 lysine 20 acetylation is associated with gene repression in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaimori, Jun-Ya; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Harada, Akihito; Fukuda, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Satoko; Ichimaru, Naotsugu; Umehara, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Matsuda, Ryo; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Nagao, Koji; Obuse, Chikashi; Nozaki, Naohito; Takahara, Shiro; Takao, Toshifumi; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Hiroshi; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation is generally associated with gene activation and chromatin decondensation. Recent mass spectrometry analysis has revealed that histone H4 lysine 20, a major methylation site, can also be acetylated. To understand the function of H4 lysine 20 acetylation (H4K20ac), we have developed a specific monoclonal antibody and performed ChIP-seq analysis using HeLa-S3 cells. H4K20ac was enriched around the transcription start sites (TSSs) of minimally expressed genes and in the gene body of expressed genes, in contrast to most histone acetylation being enriched around the TSSs of expressed genes. The distribution of H4K20ac showed little correlation with known histone modifications, including histone H3 methylations. A motif search in H4K20ac-enriched sequences, together with transcription factor binding profiles based on ENCODE ChIP-seq data, revealed that most transcription activators are excluded from H4K20ac-enriched genes and a transcription repressor NRSF/REST co-localized with H4K20ac. These results suggest that H4K20ac is a unique acetylation mark associated with gene repression. PMID:27064113

  20. Histone H4 lysine 20 acetylation is associated with gene repression in human cells.

    PubMed

    Kaimori, Jun-Ya; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Harada, Akihito; Fukuda, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Satoko; Ichimaru, Naotsugu; Umehara, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Matsuda, Ryo; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Nagao, Koji; Obuse, Chikashi; Nozaki, Naohito; Takahara, Shiro; Takao, Toshifumi; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Hiroshi; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation is generally associated with gene activation and chromatin decondensation. Recent mass spectrometry analysis has revealed that histone H4 lysine 20, a major methylation site, can also be acetylated. To understand the function of H4 lysine 20 acetylation (H4K20ac), we have developed a specific monoclonal antibody and performed ChIP-seq analysis using HeLa-S3 cells. H4K20ac was enriched around the transcription start sites (TSSs) of minimally expressed genes and in the gene body of expressed genes, in contrast to most histone acetylation being enriched around the TSSs of expressed genes. The distribution of H4K20ac showed little correlation with known histone modifications, including histone H3 methylations. A motif search in H4K20ac-enriched sequences, together with transcription factor binding profiles based on ENCODE ChIP-seq data, revealed that most transcription activators are excluded from H4K20ac-enriched genes and a transcription repressor NRSF/REST co-localized with H4K20ac. These results suggest that H4K20ac is a unique acetylation mark associated with gene repression. PMID:27064113

  1. Superoxide reduction by a superoxide reductase lacking the highly conserved lysine residue

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, Miguel; Cabelli, Diane; Pinto, Ana F.; Romao, Celia V.; Pinto, Liliana C.; Huber, Harald; Saraiva, Ligia M.; Todorovic, Smilja

    2014-12-05

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are the most recently identified superoxide detoxification systems, being found in microorganisms from the three domains of life. These enzymes are characterized by a catalytic mononuclear iron site, with one cysteine and four histidine ligands of the ferrous active form. A lysine residue in the –EKHVP– motif, located close to the active site, has been considered to be essential for the enzyme function, by contributing to the positive surface patch that attracts the superoxide anion and by controlling the chemistry of the catalytic mechanism through a hydrogen bond network. However, we show here that this residue is substituted by non-equivalent amino acids in several putative SORs from Archaea and unicellular Eukarya. In this work, we focus on mechanistic and spectroscopic studies of one of these less common enzymes, the SOR from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis. We employ pulse radiolysis fast kinetics and spectroscopic approaches to study the wild-type enzyme (₋E₂₃T₂₄HVP₋), and two mutants, T24K and E23A, the later mimicking enzymes lacking both the lysine and glutamate (a ferric ion ligand) of the motif. The efficiency of the wild type protein and mutants in reducing superoxide is comparable to other SORs, revealing the robustness of these enzymes to single mutations.

  2. Superoxide reduction by a superoxide reductase lacking the highly conserved lysine residue

    DOE PAGES

    Teixeira, Miguel; Cabelli, Diane; Pinto, Ana F.; Romao, Celia V.; Pinto, Liliana C.; Huber, Harald; Saraiva, Ligia M.; Todorovic, Smilja

    2014-12-05

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are the most recently identified superoxide detoxification systems, being found in microorganisms from the three domains of life. These enzymes are characterized by a catalytic mononuclear iron site, with one cysteine and four histidine ligands of the ferrous active form. A lysine residue in the –EKHVP– motif, located close to the active site, has been considered to be essential for the enzyme function, by contributing to the positive surface patch that attracts the superoxide anion and by controlling the chemistry of the catalytic mechanism through a hydrogen bond network. However, we show here that this residue ismore » substituted by non-equivalent amino acids in several putative SORs from Archaea and unicellular Eukarya. In this work, we focus on mechanistic and spectroscopic studies of one of these less common enzymes, the SOR from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis. We employ pulse radiolysis fast kinetics and spectroscopic approaches to study the wild-type enzyme (₋E₂₃T₂₄HVP₋), and two mutants, T24K and E23A, the later mimicking enzymes lacking both the lysine and glutamate (a ferric ion ligand) of the motif. The efficiency of the wild type protein and mutants in reducing superoxide is comparable to other SORs, revealing the robustness of these enzymes to single mutations.« less

  3. Significance of lysine/glycine cluster structure in gastric H+,K+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Asano, S; Miwa, K; Yashiro, H; Tabuchi, Y; Takeguchi, N

    2000-08-01

    Gastric H+,K+-ATPase consists of alpha- and beta-subunits. The catalytic alpha-subunit contains a very unique structure consisting of lysine and glycine clusters, KKK(or KKKK)AG(G/R)GGGK-(K/R)K, in the amino-terminal cytoplasmic region. This structure is well conserved in all gastric H+,K+-ATPases from different animal species, and was postulated to be the site controlling the access of cations (or proton) to its binding site. In this report, we studied the role of this unique structure by expressing several H+,K+-ATPase mutants of the alpha-subunit together with the wild-type beta-subunit in HEK-293 cells. Even after replacing all the positively-charged amino acid residues (six lysines and one arginine) in the cluster with alanine or removing all the glycine residues in the cluster, the mutants preserved the H+,K+-ATPase activity, and showed similar affinity for ATP and K+ as well as similar pH profiles as those of wild-type H+,K+-ATPase, indicating that the cluster is not indispensable for H+,K+-ATPase activity and not directly involved in determination of the affinity for cation (proton).

  4. Neurospora tryptophan synthase: N-terminal analysis and the sequence of the pyridoxal phosphate active site peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, M.L.; Hsu, P.Y.; DeMoss, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Tryptophan synthase (TS), which catalyzes the final step of tryptophan biosynthesis, is a multifunctional protein requiring pyridoxal phosphate (B6P) for two of its three distinct enzyme activities. TS from Neurospora has a blocked N-terminal, is a homodimer of 150 KDa and binds one mole of B6P per mole of subunit. The authors shown the N-terminal residue to be acyl-serine. The B6P-active site of holoenzyme was labelled by reduction of the B6P-Schiff base with (/sup 3/H)-NaBH/sub 4/, and resulted in a proportionate loss of activity in the two B6P-requiring reactions. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of CNBr-generated peptides showed the labelled, active site peptide to be 6 KDa. The sequence of this peptide, purified to apparent homogeneity by a combination of C-18 reversed phase and TSK gel filtration HPLC is: gly-arg-pro-gly-gln-leu-his-lys-ala-glu-arg-leu-thr-glu-tyr-ala-gly-gly-ala-gln-ile-xxx-leu-lys-arg-glu-asp-leu-asn-his-xxx-gly-xxx-his-/sub ***/-ile-asn-asn-ala-leu. Although four residues (xxx, /sub ***/) are unidentified, this peptide is minimally 78% homologous with the corresponding peptide from yeast TS, in which residue (/sub ***/) is the lysine that binds B6P.

  5. Cysteine-S-conjugate beta-lyase activity and pyridoxal phosphate binding site of onion alliin lyase.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, N; Shimomura, N; Iseki, J; Honma, M; Chiba, S; Tahara, S; Mizutani, J

    1997-08-01

    Purification of onion alliin lyase gave two fractions by cation exchange chromatography. Both fractions showed the comparable high catalytic activity of cysteine-S-conjugate beta-lyase with that of alliin lyase using S-(2-chloro-6-nitrophenyl)-L-cysteine and alliin, S-allyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide as substrates. All the active substrates tested with onion alliin lyase were also active to the cysteine-S-conjugate beta-lyase of Mucor javanicus, but the catalytic activity of the Mucor enzyme was lower for all the substrates. The pyridoxal phosphate binding site of the onion alliin lyase was identified as Lys 285 in the amino acid sequence deduced from cDNA which has been reported. This lysine was conserved in all the sequences from the alliin lyase cDNAs, while similarity was not found between the sequences around pyridoxal phosphate binding sites of both the onion alliin lyase and the Mucor cysteine-S-conjugate beta-lyase. PMID:9301115

  6. Post-translational modification of serine/threonine kinase LKB1 via Adduction of the Reactive Lipid Species 4-Hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE) at lysine residue 97 directly inhibits kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Calamaras, Timothy D; Lee, Charlie; Lan, Fan; Ido, Yasuo; Siwik, Deborah A; Colucci, Wilson S

    2012-12-01

    Oxidative stress is pathogenic in a variety of diseases, but the mechanism by which cellular signaling is affected by oxidative species has yet to be fully characterized. Lipid peroxidation, a secondary process that occurs during instances of free radical production, may play an important role in modulating cellular signaling under conditions of oxidative stress. 4-Hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE) is an electrophilic aldehyde produced during lipid peroxidation that forms covalent adducts on proteins, altering their activity and function. One such target, LKB1, has been reported to be inhibited by HNE adduction. We tested the hypothesis that HNE inhibits LKB1 activity through adduct formation on a specific reactive residue of the protein. To elucidate the mechanism of the inhibitory effect, HEK293T cells expressing LKB1 were treated with HNE (10 μm for 1 h) and assayed for HNE-LKB1 adduct formation and changes in LKB1 kinase activity. HNE treatment resulted in the formation of HNE-LKB1 adducts and decreased LKB1 kinase activity by 31 ± 9% (S.E.) but had no effect on the association of LKB1 with its adaptor proteins sterile-20-related adaptor and mouse protein 25. Mutation of LKB1 lysine residue 97 reduced HNE adduct formation and attenuated the effect of HNE on LKB1 activity. Taken together, our results suggest that adduction of LKB1 Lys-97 mediates the inhibitory effect of HNE. PMID:23086944

  7. Active site - a site of binding of affinity inhibitors in baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Svyato, I.E.; Sklyankina, V.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-03-20

    The interaction of the enzyme-substrate complex with methyl phosphate, O-phosphoethanolamine, O-phosphopropanolamine, N-acetylphosphoserine, and phosphoglyolic acid, as well as pyrophosphatase, modified by monoesters of phosphoric acid, with pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate, was investigated. It was shown that the enzyme containing the substrate in the active site does not react with monophosphates, but modified pyrophosphatase entirely retains the ability to bind polyanions to the regulatory site. It is concluded that the inactivation of baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase by monoesters of phosphoric acid, which are affinity inhibitors of it, is the result of modification of the active site of the enzyme.

  8. A novel approach to predict active sites of enzyme molecules.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kuo-Chen; Cai, Yu-dong

    2004-04-01

    Enzymes are critical in many cellular signaling cascades. With many enzyme structures being solved, there is an increasing need to develop an automated method for identifying their active sites. However, given the atomic coordinates of an enzyme molecule, how can we predict its active site? This is a vitally important problem because the core of an enzyme molecule is its active site from the viewpoints of both pure scientific research and industrial application. In this article, a topological entity was introduced to characterize the enzymatic active site. Based on such a concept, the covariant discriminant algorithm was formulated for identifying the active site. As a paradigm, the serine hydrolase family was demonstrated. The overall success rate by jackknife test for a data set of 88 enzyme molecules was 99.92%, and that for a data set of 50 independent enzyme molecules was 99.91%. Meanwhile, it was shown through an example that the prediction algorithm can also be used to find any typographic error of a PDB file in annotating the constituent amino acids of catalytic triad and to suggest a possible correction. The very high success rates are due to the introduction of a covariance matrix in the prediction algorithm that makes allowance for taking into account the coupling effects among the key constituent atoms of active site. It is anticipated that the novel approach is quite promising and may become a useful high throughput tool in enzymology, proteomics, and structural bioinformatics. PMID:14997541

  9. Discovery of novel small molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferase G9a and their mechanism in leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kondengaden, Shukkoor M; Luo, Liu-Fei; Huang, Kenneth; Zhu, Mengyuan; Zang, Lanlan; Bataba, Eudoxie; Wang, Runling; Luo, Cheng; Wang, Binghe; Li, Keqin Kathy; Wang, Peng George

    2016-10-21

    Lysine methyltransferase G9a regulates the transcription of multiple genes by primarily catalyzing mono- and di-methylation of histone H3 lysine 9, as well as several non-histone lysine sites. An attractive therapeutic target in treating leukemia, knockout studies of G9a in mice have found dramatically slowed proliferation and self-renewal of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells due to the attenuation of HoxA9-dependent transcription. In this study, a series of compounds were identified as potential inhibitors through structure-based virtual screening. Among these compounds, a new G9a inhibitor, DCG066, was confirmed by in vitro biochemical, and cell based enzyme assays. DCG066 has a novel molecular scaffold unlike other G9a inhibitors presently available. Similar to G9a's histone substrate, DCG066 can bind directly to G9a and inhibit methyltransferase activity in vitro. In addition to suppressing G9a methyltransferase activity and reducing histone H3 methylation levels, DCG066 displays low cytotoxicity in leukemia cell lines with high levels of G9a expression, including K562. This work presents DCG066 as an inhibitor of G9a with a novel structure, providing both a lead in G9a inhibitor design and a means for probing the functionality of G9a. PMID:27393948

  10. Growth exponents in surface models with non-active sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Figueiredo, W.; Aarão Reis, F. D. A.

    2006-11-01

    In this work, we studied the role played by the inactive sites present on the substrate of a growing surface. In our model, one particle sticks at the surface if the site where it falls is an active site. However, we allow the deposited particle to diffuse along the surface in accordance with some mechanism previously defined. Using Monte Carlo simulations, and some analytical results, we have investigated the model in (1+1) and (2+1) dimensions considering different relaxation mechanisms. We show that the consideration of non-active sites is a crucial point in the model. In fact, we have seen that the saturation regime is not observed for any value of the density of inactive sites. Besides, the growth exponent β turns to be one, at long times, whatever the mechanism of diffusion we consider in one and two dimensions.

  11. A small ribozyme with dual-site kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Elisa; Maxwell, Adam W.R.; Burke, Donald H.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoryl transfer onto backbone hydroxyls is a recognized catalytic activity of nucleic acids. We find that kinase ribozyme K28 possesses an unusually complex active site that promotes (thio)phosphorylation of two residues widely separated in primary sequence. After allowing the ribozyme to radiolabel itself by phosphoryl transfer from [γ-32P]GTP, DNAzyme-mediated cleavage yielded two radiolabeled cleavage fragments, indicating phosphorylation sites within each of the two cleavage fragments. These sites were mapped by alkaline digestion and primer extension pausing. Enzymatic digestion and mutational analysis identified nucleotides important for activity and established the active structure as being a constrained pseudoknot with unusual connectivity that may juxtapose the two reactive sites. Nuclease sensitivities for nucleotides near the pseudoknot core were altered in the presence of GTPγS, indicating donor-induced folding. The 5′ target site was more strongly favored in full-length ribozyme K28 (128 nt) than in truncated RNAs (58 nt). Electrophoretic mobilities of self-thiophosphorylated products on organomercurial gels are distinct from the 5′ mono-thiophosphorylated product produced by reaction with polynucleotide kinase, potentially indicating simultaneous labeling of both sites within individual RNA strands. Our evidence supports a single, compact structure with local dynamics, rather than global rearrangement, as being responsible for dual-site phosphorylation. PMID:22618879

  12. Bovine NK-lysin: Copy number variation and functional diversification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junfeng; Huddleston, John; Buckley, Reuben M; Malig, Maika; Lawhon, Sara D; Skow, Loren C; Lee, Mi Ok; Eichler, Evan E; Andersson, Leif; Womack, James E

    2015-12-29

    NK-lysin is an antimicrobial peptide and effector protein in the host innate immune system. It is coded by a single gene in humans and most other mammalian species. In this study, we provide evidence for the existence of four NK-lysin genes in a repetitive region on cattle chromosome 11. The NK2A, NK2B, and NK2C genes are tandemly arrayed as three copies in ∼30-35-kb segments, located 41.8 kb upstream of NK1. All four genes are functional, albeit with differential tissue expression. NK1, NK2A, and NK2B exhibited the highest expression in intestine Peyer's patch, whereas NK2C was expressed almost exclusively in lung. The four peptide products were synthesized ex vivo, and their antimicrobial effects against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were confirmed with a bacteria-killing assay. Transmission electron microcopy indicated that bovine NK-lysins exhibited their antimicrobial activities by lytic action in the cell membranes. In summary, the single NK-lysin gene in other mammals has expanded to a four-member gene family by tandem duplications in cattle; all four genes are transcribed, and the synthetic peptides corresponding to the core regions are biologically active and likely contribute to innate immunity in ruminants. PMID:26668394

  13. Bovine NK-lysin: Copy number variation and functional diversification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junfeng; Huddleston, John; Buckley, Reuben M.; Malig, Maika; Lawhon, Sara D.; Skow, Loren C.; Lee, Mi Ok; Eichler, Evan E.; Andersson, Leif; Womack, James E.

    2015-01-01

    NK-lysin is an antimicrobial peptide and effector protein in the host innate immune system. It is coded by a single gene in humans and most other mammalian species. In this study, we provide evidence for the existence of four NK-lysin genes in a repetitive region on cattle chromosome 11. The NK2A, NK2B, and NK2C genes are tandemly arrayed as three copies in ∼30–35-kb segments, located 41.8 kb upstream of NK1. All four genes are functional, albeit with differential tissue expression. NK1, NK2A, and NK2B exhibited the highest expression in intestine Peyer’s patch, whereas NK2C was expressed almost exclusively in lung. The four peptide products were synthesized ex vivo, and their antimicrobial effects against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were confirmed with a bacteria-killing assay. Transmission electron microcopy indicated that bovine NK-lysins exhibited their antimicrobial activities by lytic action in the cell membranes. In summary, the single NK-lysin gene in other mammals has expanded to a four-member gene family by tandem duplications in cattle; all four genes are transcribed, and the synthetic peptides corresponding to the core regions are biologically active and likely contribute to innate immunity in ruminants. PMID:26668394

  14. Charge Stabilization and Entropy Reduction of Central Lysine Residues in

    SciTech Connect

    St-Jean, M.; Blonski, C; Sygusch, J

    2009-01-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate muscle aldolase is an essential glycolytic enzyme that catalyzes reversible carbon-carbon bond formation by cleaving fructose 1,6-bisphosphate to yield dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and d-glyceraldehyde phosphate. To elucidate the mechanistic role of conserved amino acid Asp-33, Asn-33 and Ser-33 mutants were examined by kinetic and structural analyses. The mutations significantly compromised enzymatic activity and carbanion oxidation in presence of DHAP. Detailed structural analysis demonstrated that, like native crystals, Asp-33 mutant crystals, soaked in DHAP solutions, trapped Schiff base-derived intermediates covalently attached to Lys-229. The mutant structures, however, exhibited an abridged conformational change with the helical region (34-65) flanking the active site as well as pK{sub a} reductions and increased side chain disorder by central lysine residues, Lys-107 and Lys-146. These changes directly affect their interaction with the C-terminal Tyr-363, consistent with the absence of active site binding by the C-terminal region in the presence of phosphate. Lys-146 pKa reduction and side chain disorder would further compromise charge stabilization during C-C bond cleavage and proton transfer during enamine formation. These mechanistic impediments explain diminished catalytic activity and a reduced level of carbanion oxidation and are consistent with rate-determining proton transfer observed in the Asn-33 mutant. Asp-33 reduces the entropic cost and augments the enthalpic gain during catalysis by rigidifying Lys-107 and Lys-146, stabilizing their protonated forms, and promoting a conformational change triggered by substrate or obligate product binding, which lower kinetic barriers in C-C bond cleavage and Schiff base-enamine interconversion.

  15. Hemoglobin Labeled by Radioactive Lysine

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; DeLaVergne, L.; Miller, L. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1949-12-08

    This paper reports on the utilization of tagged epsilon carbon of DL-lysine by a dog both anemic and hypoproteinemic due to repeated bleeding plus a diet low in protein. The experiment extended over period of 234 days, a time sufficient to indicate an erythrocyte life span of at least 115 days based upon the rate of replacement of labeled red cell proteins. The proteins of broken down red cells seem not to be used with any great preference for the synthesis of new hemoglobin.

  16. Architecture and active site of particulate methane monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Culpepper, Megen A.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria, organisms that live on methane gas as their sole carbon source. Understanding pMMO function has important implications for bioremediation applications and for the development of new, environmentally friendly catalysts for the direct conversion of methane to methanol. Crystal structures of pMMOs from three different methanotrophs reveal a trimeric architecture, consisting of three copies each of the pmoB, pmoA, and pmoC subunits. There are three distinct metal centers in each protomer of the trimer, mononuclear and dinuclear copper sites in the periplasmic regions of pmoB and a mononuclear site within the membrane that can be occupied by copper or zinc. Various models for the pMMO active site have been proposed within these structural constraints, including dicopper, tricopper, and diiron centers. Biochemical and spectroscopic data on pMMO and recombinant soluble fragments, denoted spmoB proteins, indicate that the active site involves copper and is located at the site of the dicopper center in the pmoB subunit. Initial spectroscopic evidence for O2 binding at this site has been obtained. Despite these findings, questions remain about the active site identity and nuclearity and will be the focus of future studies. PMID:22725967

  17. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  18. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  19. Engineering the substrate specificity of rhizopuspepsin: the role of Asp 77 of fungal aspartic proteinases in facilitating the cleavage of oligopeptide substrates with lysine in P1.

    PubMed Central

    Lowther, W. T.; Majer, P.; Dunn, B. M.

    1995-01-01

    Rhizopuspepsin and other fungal aspartic proteinases are distinct from the mammalian enzymes in that they are able to cleave substrates with lysine in the P1 position. Sequence and structural comparisons suggest that two aspartic acid residues, Asp 30 and Asp 77 (pig pepsin numbering), may be responsible for generating this unique specificity. Asp 30 and Asp 77 were changed to the corresponding residues in porcine pepsin, Ile 30 and Thr 77, to create single and double mutants. The zymogen forms of the wild-type and mutant enzymes were overexpressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies. Following solubilization, denaturation, refolding, activation, and purification to homogeneity, structural and kinetic comparisons were made. The mutant enzymes exhibited a high degree of structural similarity to the wild-type recombinant protein and a native isozyme. The catalytic activities of the recombinant proteins were analyzed with chromogenic substrates containing lysine in the P1, P2, or P3 positions. Mutation of Asp 77 resulted in a loss of 7 kcal mol-1 of transition-state stabilization energy in the hydrolysis of the substrate containing lysine in P1. An inhibitor containing the positively charged P1-lysine side chain inhibited only the enzymes containing Asp 77. Inhibition of the Asp 77 mutants of rhizopuspepsin and several mammalian enzymes was restored upon acetylation of the lysine side chain. These results suggest that an exploitation of the specific electrostatic interaction of Asp 77 in the active site of fungal enzymes may lead to the design of compounds that preferentially inhibit a variety of related Candida proteinases in immunocompromised patients. PMID:7613467

  20. Investigation of Lysine-Functionalized Dendrimers as Dichlorvos Detoxification Agents.

    PubMed

    Durán-Lara, Esteban F; Marple, Jennifer L; Giesen, Joseph A; Fang, Yunlan; Jordan, Jacobs H; Godbey, W Terrence; Marican, Adolfo; Santos, Leonardo S; Grayson, Scott M

    2015-11-01

    Lysine-containing polymers have seen broad application due to their amines' inherent ability to bind to a range of biologically relevant molecules. The synthesis of multiple generations of polyester dendrimers bearing lysine groups on their periphery is described in this report. Their hydrolytic stabilities with respect to pH and time, their toxicity to a range of cell lines, and their possible application as nano-detoxification agents of organophosphate compounds are all investigated. These zeroth-, first-, and second-generation water-soluble dendrimers have been designed to bear exactly 4, 8, and 16 lysine groups, respectively, on their dendritic periphery. Such monodisperse bioactive polymers show potential for a range of applications including drug delivery, gene delivery, heavy metal binding, and the sequestration of organic toxins. These monodisperse bioactive dendrimers were synthesized using an aliphatic ester dendritic core (prepared from pentaerythritol) and protected amino acid moieties. This library of lysine-conjugated dendrimers showed the ability to efficiently capture the pesticide dichlorvos, confirming the potential of dendrimer-based antidotes to maintain acetylcholinesterase activity in response to poisoning events. PMID:26460283

  1. Spectrophotometric assays for L-lysine alpha-oxidase and gamma-glutamylamine cyclotransferase.

    PubMed

    Danson, Jedidah W; Trawick, Mary Lynn; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2002-04-15

    A new assay for l-lysine alpha-oxidase is described. In this assay, the oxidized product generated from l-lysine is reacted with semicarbazide to form alpha-keto-epsilon-aminocaproate semicarbazone. Formation of the alpha-keto acid semicarbazone is continuously monitored spectrophotometrically at 248 nm (epsilon 10,160 +/- 240 M(-1) cm(-1)). The method was adapted to provide a new assay for gamma-glutamylamine cyclotransferase. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of many l-gamma-glutamylamines to 5-oxo-l-proline and free amine. A biologically important substrate is N(epsilon)-(gamma-l-glutamyl)-l-lysine, which is converted to 5-oxo-l-proline and l-lysine by the action of gamma-glutamylamine cyclotransferase. The l-lysine generated from N(epsilon)-(gamma-l-glutamyl)-l-lysine in an endpoint assay is converted to alpha-keto epsilon-aminocaproate semicarbazone in the presence of semicarbazide, excess l-lysine alpha-oxidase, and catalase. The methods were applied to the determination of gamma-glutamylamine cyclotransferase activity of partially purified preparations of the bovine kidney enzyme and to detect gamma-glutamylamine cyclotransferase activity in rat kidney and liver homogenates. PMID:11950211

  2. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  3. Amine oxidation mediated by lysine-specific demethylase 1: quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics insights into mechanism and role of lysine 661.

    PubMed

    Karasulu, Bora; Patil, Mahendra; Thiel, Walter

    2013-09-11

    We report classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations to elucidate the catalytic mechanism of the rate-determining amine oxidation step in the lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1)-catalyzed demethylation of the histone tail lysine (H3K4), with flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) acting as cofactor. The oxidation of substrate lysine (sLys) involves the cleavage of an α-CH bond accompanied by the transfer of a hydride ion equivalent to FAD, leading to an imine intermediate. This hydride transfer pathway is shown to be clearly favored for sLys oxidation over other proposed mechanisms, including the radical (or single-electron transfer) route as well as carbanion and polar-nucleophilic mechanisms. MD simulations on six NVT ensembles (covering different protonation states of sLys and K661 as well as the K661M mutant) identify two possible orientations of the reacting sLys and FAD subunits (called "downward" and "upward"). Calculations at the QM(B3LYP-D/6-31G*)/CHARMM22 level provide molecular-level insights into the mechanism, helping to understand how LSD1 achieves the activation of the rather inert methyl-CH bond in a metal-free environment. Factors such as proper alignment of sLys (downward orientation), transition-state stabilization (due to the protein environment and favorable orbital interactions), and product stabilization via adduct formation are found to be crucial for facilitating the oxidative α-CH bond cleavage. The current study also sheds light on the role of important active-site residues (Y761, K661, and W695) and of the conserved water-bridge motif. The steric influence of Y761 helps to position the reaction partners properly, K661 is predicted to get deprotonated prior to substrate binding and to act as an active-site base that accepts a proton from sLys to enable the subsequent amine oxidation, and the water bridge that is stabilized by K661 and W695 mediates this proton

  4. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  5. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined. PMID:27243042

  6. Engineering a Lysine-ON Riboswitch for Metabolic Control of Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Bang; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-12-18

    Riboswitches are natural RNA elements that regulate gene expression by binding a ligand. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of altering a natural lysine-OFF riboswitch from Eschericia coli (ECRS) to a synthetic lysine-ON riboswitch and using it for metabolic control. To this end, a lysine-ON riboswitch library was constructed using tetA-based dual genetic selection. After screening the library, the functionality of the selected lysine-ON riboswitches was examined using a report gene, lacZ. Selected lysine-ON riboswitches were introduced into the lysE gene (encoding a lysine transport protein) of Corynebacterium glutamicum and used to achieve dynamic control of lysine transport in a recombinant lysine-producing strain, C. glutamicum LPECRS, which bears a deregulated aspartokinase and a lysine-OFF riboswitch for dynamic control of the enzyme citrate synthase. Batch fermentation results of the strains showed that the C. glutamicum LPECRS strain with an additional lysine-ON riboswitch for the control of lysE achieved a 21% increase in the yield of lysine compared to that of the C. glutamicum LPECRS strain and even a 89% increase in yield compared to that of the strain with deregulated aspartokinase. This work provides a useful approach to generate lysine-ON riboswitches for C. glutamicum metabolic engineering and demonstrates for the first time a synergetic effect of lysine-ON and -OFF riboswitches for improving lysine production in this industrially important microorganism. The approach can be used to dynamically control other genes and can be applied to other microorganisms. PMID:26300047

  7. Active Site Loop Dynamics of a Class IIa Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pegan, Scott D.; Rukseree, Kamolchanok; Capodagli, Glenn C.; Baker, Erica A.; Krasnykh, Olga; Franzblau, Scott G.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2013-01-08

    The class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs, EC 4.1.2.13) comprises one of two families of aldolases. Instead of forming a Schiff base intermediate using an ε-amino group of a lysine side chain, class II FBAs utilize Zn(II) to stabilize a proposed hydroxyenolate intermediate (HEI) in the reversible cleavage of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, forming glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP). As class II FBAs have been shown to be essential in pathogenic bacteria, focus has been placed on these enzymes as potential antibacterial targets. Although structural studies of class II FBAs from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtFBA), other bacteria, and protozoa have been reported, the structure of the active site loop responsible for catalyzing the protonation–deprotonation steps of the reaction for class II FBAs has not yet been observed. We therefore utilized the potent class II FBA inhibitor phosphoglycolohydroxamate (PGH) as a mimic of the HEI- and DHAP-bound form of the enzyme and determined the X-ray structure of the MtFBA–PGH complex to 1.58 Å. Remarkably, we are able to observe well-defined electron density for the previously elusive active site loop of MtFBA trapped in a catalytically competent orientation. Utilization of this structural information and site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic studies conducted on a series of residues within the active site loop revealed that E169 facilitates a water-mediated deprotonation–protonation step of the MtFBA reaction mechanism. Furthermore, solvent isotope effects on MtFBA and catalytically relevant mutants were used to probe the effect of loop flexibility on catalytic efficiency. Additionally, we also reveal the structure of MtFBA in its holoenzyme form.

  8. Active site loop dynamics of a class IIa fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pegan, Scott D; Rukseree, Kamolchanok; Capodagli, Glenn C; Baker, Erica A; Krasnykh, Olga; Franzblau, Scott G; Mesecar, Andrew D

    2013-02-01

    Class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs, EC 4.1.2.13) comprise one of two families of aldolases. Instead of forming a Schiff base intermediate using an ε-amino group of a lysine side chain, class II FBAs utilize Zn(II) to stabilize a proposed hydroxyenolate intermediate (HEI) in the reversible cleavage of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, forming glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP). As class II FBAs have been shown to be essential in pathogenic bacteria, focus has been placed on these enzymes as potential antibacterial targets. Although structural studies of class II FBAs from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtFBA), other bacteria, and protozoa have been reported, the structure of the active site loop responsible for catalyzing the protonation-deprotonation steps of the reaction for class II FBAs has not yet been observed. We therefore utilized the potent class II FBA inhibitor phosphoglycolohydroxamate (PGH) as a mimic of the HEI- and DHAP-bound form of the enzyme and determined the X-ray structure of the MtFBA-PGH complex to 1.58 Å. Remarkably, we are able to observe well-defined electron density for the previously elusive active site loop of MtFBA trapped in a catalytically competent orientation. Utilization of this structural information and site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic studies conducted on a series of residues within the active site loop revealed that E169 facilitates a water-mediated deprotonation-protonation step of the MtFBA reaction mechanism. Also, solvent isotope effects on MtFBA and catalytically relevant mutants were used to probe the effect of loop flexibility on catalytic efficiency. Additionally, we also reveal the structure of MtFBA in its holoenzyme form.

  9. Studies on the active site of pig plasma amine oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Collison, D; Knowles, P F; Mabbs, F E; Rius, F X; Singh, I; Dooley, D M; Cote, C E; McGuirl, M

    1989-01-01

    Amine oxidase from pig plasma (PPAO) has two bound Cu2+ ions and at least one pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) moiety as cofactors. It is shown that recovery of activity by copper-depleted PPAO is linear with respect to added Cu2+ ions. Recovery of e.s.r. and optical spectral characteristics of active-site copper parallel the recovery of catalytic activity. These results are consistent with both Cu2+ ions contributing to catalysis. Further e.s.r. studies indicate that the two copper sites in PPAO, unlike those in amine oxidases from other sources, are chemically distinct. These comparative studies establish that non-identity of the Cu2+ ions in PPAO is not a requirement for amine oxidase activity. It is shown through the use of a new assay procedure that there are two molecules of PQQ bound per molecule of protein in PPAO; only the more reactive of these PQQ moieties is required for activity. PMID:2559715

  10. Bromopyruvate, an active site-directed inactivator of E. coli 2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate(KHG) aldolase, modifies glutamic acid residue-45

    SciTech Connect

    Vlahos, C.J.; Dekker, E.E.

    1987-05-01

    E. coli KHG-aldolase (2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate in equilibrium pyruvate + glyoxylate), a novel trimeric Class I aldolase, requires one active-site lysine residue (Lys 133)/subunit for Schiff-base formation as well as one arginine residue (Arg 49)/subunit for catalytic activity. The substrate analog, 3-bromopyruvate (BRPY), causes a time- and concentration-dependent loss of KHG-aldolase activity. This inactivation is regarded as active site-directed since: (a) BRPY modification results in complete loss of enzymatic activity; (b) saturation kinetics are exhibited, suggesting that a reversible complex is formed between the aldolase and BRPY prior to the rate-limiting inactivation step; (c) over 90% of the initial aldolase activity is protected by either substrate, pyruvate or KHG; (d) 1.1 mol of /sup 14/C-BRPY is bound/enzyme subunit. Peptide isolation and sequencing show that the incorporated radioactivity is associated with residue Glu-45. Denaturation of the enzyme with guanidine x HCl following treatment with excess /sup 14/C-BRPY allows for the incorporation of carbon-14 at Cys-159 and Cys-180 as well. The presence of pyruvate protects Glu-45 from being esterified but does not prevent the alkylation of the two cysteine residues. These results suggest that Glu-45 is essential for the catalytic activity of E. coli KHG-aldolase, most likely functioning as the active-site amphoteric proton donor/acceptor moiety that is involved in the overall mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by this enzyme.

  11. Role of arginine 285 in the active site of Rhodotorula gracilis D-amino acid oxidase. A site-directed mutagenesis study.

    PubMed

    Molla, G; Porrini, D; Job, V; Motteran, L; Vegezzi, C; Campaner, S; Pilone, M S; Pollegioni, L

    2000-08-11

    Arg(285), one of the very few conserved residues in the active site of d-amino acid oxidases, has been mutated to lysine, glutamine, aspartate, and alanine in the enzyme from the yeast Rhodotorula gracilis (RgDAAO). The mutated proteins are all catalytically competent. Mutations of Arg(285) result in an increase ( approximately 300-fold) of K(m) for the d-amino acid and in a large decrease ( approximately 500-fold) of turnover number. Stopped-flow analysis shows that the decrease in turnover is paralleled by a similar decrease in the rate of flavin reduction (k(2)), the latter still being the rate-limiting step of the reaction. In agreement with data from the protein crystal structure, loss of the guanidinium group of Arg(285) in the mutated DAAOs drastically reduces the binding of several carboxylic acids (e.g. benzoate). These results highlight the importance of this active site residue in the precise substrate orientation, a main factor in this redox reaction. Furthermore, Arg(285) DAAO mutants have spectral properties similar to those of the wild-type enzyme, but show a low degree of stabilization of the flavin semiquinone and a change in the redox properties of the free enzyme. From this, we can unexpectedly conclude that Arg(285) in the free enzyme form is involved in the stabilization of the negative charge on the N(1)-C(2)=O locus of the isoalloxazine ring of the flavin. We also suggest that the residue undergoes a conformational change in order to bind the carboxylate portion of the substrate/ligand in the complexed enzyme. PMID:10821840

  12. LambdaSa1 and LambdaSa2 Prophage Lysins of Streptococcus agalactiae▿

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, David G.; Dong, Shengli; Kirk, Marion C.; Cartee, Robert T.; Baker, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Putative N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase genes from LambdaSa1 and LambdaSa2 prophages of Streptococcus agalactiae were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes lysed the cell walls of Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus. The peptidoglycan digestion products in the cell wall lysates were not consistent with amidase activity. Instead, the structure of the muropeptide digestion fragments indicated that both the LambdaSa1 and LambdaSa2 lysins exhibited γ-d-glutaminyl-l-lysine endopeptidase activity. The endopeptidase cleavage specificity of the lysins was confirmed using a synthetic peptide substrate corresponding to a portion of the stem peptide and cross bridge of Streptococcus agalactiae peptidoglycan. The LambdaSa2 lysin also displayed β-d-N-acetylglucosaminidase activity. PMID:17905888

  13. Proteome-wide analysis reveals widespread lysine acetylation of major protein complexes in the malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Cobbold, Simon A.; Santos, Joana M.; Ochoa, Alejandro; Perlman, David H.; Llinás, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification in many organisms including the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, yet the full extent of acetylation across the parasite proteome remains unresolved. Moreover, the functional significance of acetylation or how specific acetyl-lysine sites are regulated is largely unknown. Here we report a seven-fold expansion of the known parasite ‘acetylome’, characterizing 2,876 acetylation sites on 1,146 proteins. We observe that lysine acetylation targets a diverse range of protein complexes and is particularly enriched within the Apicomplexan AP2 (ApiAP2) DNA-binding protein family. Using quantitative proteomics we determined that artificial perturbation of the acetate/acetyl-CoA balance alters the acetyl-lysine occupancy of several ApiAP2 DNA-binding proteins and related transcriptional proteins. This metabolic signaling could mediate significant downstream transcriptional responses, as we show that acetylation of an ApiAP2 DNA-binding domain ablates its DNA-binding propensity. Lastly, we investigated the acetyl-lysine targets of each class of lysine deacetylase in order to begin to explore how each class of enzyme contributes to regulating the P. falciparum acetylome. PMID:26813983

  14. Proteome-Wide Identification of Lysine Succinylation in the Proteins of Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Weibo; Wu, Fangli

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins through lysine succinylation plays important regulatory roles in living cells. Lysine succinylation was recently identified as a novel post-translational modification in Escherichia coli, yeast, Toxoplasma gondii, HeLa cells, and mouse liver. Interestingly, only a few sites of lysine succinylation have been detected in plants to date. In this study, we identified 347 sites of lysine succinylation in 202 proteins in tomato by using high-resolution mass spectrometry. Succinylated proteins are implicated in the regulation of diverse metabolic processes, including chloroplast and mitochondrial metabolism. Bioinformatic analysis showed that succinylated proteins are evolutionarily conserved and involved in various cellular functions such as metabolism and epigenetic regulation. Moreover, succinylated proteins exhibit diverse subcellular localizations. We also defined six types of definitively conserved succinylation motifs. These results provide the first in-depth analysis of the lysine succinylome and novel insights into the role of succinylation in tomato, thereby elucidating lysine succinylation in the context of cellular physiology and metabolite biosynthesis in plants. PMID:26828863

  15. Proteome-wide analysis of lysine acetylation in the plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Binna; Yang, Qianqian; Li, Delong; Liang, Wenxing; Song, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification that plays an important role in diverse cellular processes. Botrytis cinerea is the most thoroughly studied necrotrophic species due to its broad host range and huge economic impact. However, to date, little is known about the functions of lysine acetylation in this plant pathogen. In this study, we determined the lysine acetylome of B. cinerea through the combination of affinity enrichment and high-resolution LC-MS/MS analysis. Overall, 1582 lysine acetylation sites in 954 proteins were identified. Bioinformatics analysis shows that the acetylated proteins are involved in diverse biological functions and show multiple cellular localizations. Several particular amino acids preferred near acetylation sites, including KacY, KacH, Kac***R, KacF, FKac and Kac***K, were identified in this organism. Protein interaction network analysis demonstrates that a variety of interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. Interestingly, 6 proteins involved in virulence of B. cinerea, including 3 key components of the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway, were found to be acetylated, suggesting that lysine acetylation plays regulatory roles in pathogenesis. These data provides the first comprehensive view of the acetylome of B. cinerea and serves as a rich resource for functional analysis of lysine acetylation in this plant pathogen. PMID:27381557

  16. Proteome-Wide Identification of Lysine Succinylation in the Proteins of Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    PubMed

    Jin, Weibo; Wu, Fangli

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins through lysine succinylation plays important regulatory roles in living cells. Lysine succinylation was recently identified as a novel post-translational modification in Escherichia coli, yeast, Toxoplasma gondii, HeLa cells, and mouse liver. Interestingly, only a few sites of lysine succinylation have been detected in plants to date. In this study, we identified 347 sites of lysine succinylation in 202 proteins in tomato by using high-resolution mass spectrometry. Succinylated proteins are implicated in the regulation of diverse metabolic processes, including chloroplast and mitochondrial metabolism. Bioinformatic analysis showed that succinylated proteins are evolutionarily conserved and involved in various cellular functions such as metabolism and epigenetic regulation. Moreover, succinylated proteins exhibit diverse subcellular localizations. We also defined six types of definitively conserved succinylation motifs. These results provide the first in-depth analysis of the lysine succinylome and novel insights into the role of succinylation in tomato, thereby elucidating lysine succinylation in the context of cellular physiology and metabolite biosynthesis in plants. PMID:26828863

  17. Computer simulation of the active site of human serum cholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Kefang Jiao; Song Li; Zhengzheng Lu

    1996-12-31

    The first 3D-structure of acetylchelinesterase from Torpedo California electric organ (T.AChE) was published by JL. Sussman in 1991. We have simulated 3D-structure of human serum cholinesterase (H.BuChE) and the active site of H.BuChE. It is discovered by experiment that the residue of H.BuChE is still active site after a part of H.BuChE is cut. For example, the part of 21KD + 20KD is active site of H.BuChE. The 20KD as it is. Studies on these peptides by Hemelogy indicate that two active peptides have same negative electrostatic potential maps diagram. These negative electrostatic areas attached by acetyl choline with positive electrostatic potency. We predict that 147...236 peptide of AChE could be active site because it was as 20KD as with negative electrostatic potential maps. We look forward to proving from other ones.

  18. Crystal Structure and Functional Analysis of Homocitrate Synthase, an Essential Enzyme in Lysine Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; Scott, Erin M.; Couture, Jean-François; Pillus, Lorraine; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2010-01-12

    Homocitrate synthase (HCS) catalyzes the first and committed step in lysine biosynthesis in many fungi and certain Archaea and is a potential target for antifungal drugs. Here we report the crystal structure of the HCS apoenzyme from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and two distinct structures of the enzyme in complex with the substrate 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG). The structures reveal that HCS forms an intertwined homodimer stabilized by domain-swapping between the N- and C-terminal domains of each monomer. The N-terminal catalytic domain is composed of a TIM barrel fold in which 2-OG binds via hydrogen bonds and coordination to the active site divalent metal ion, whereas the C-terminal domain is composed of mixed {alpha}/{beta} topology. In the structures of the HCS apoenzyme and one of the 2-OG binary complexes, a lid motif from the C-terminal domain occludes the entrance to the active site of the neighboring monomer, whereas in the second 2-OG complex the lid is disordered, suggesting that it regulates substrate access to the active site through its apparent flexibility. Mutations of the active site residues involved in 2-OG binding or implicated in acid-base catalysis impair or abolish activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, these results yield new insights into the structure and catalytic mechanism of HCSs and furnish a platform for developing HCS-selective inhibitors.

  19. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  20. Identification of Lysine Acetylation in Mycobacterium abscessus Using LC-MS/MS after Immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jintao; Wang, Changwei; Han, Yi; Liu, Zhiyong; Wu, Tian; Liu, Yan; Liu, Yang; Tan, Yaoju; Cai, Xinshan; Cao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Bangxing; Zhang, Buchang; Liu, Chunping; Tan, Shouyong; Zhang, Tianyu

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus (MAB), which manifests in the pulmonary system, is one of the neglected causes of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection. Treatment against MAB is difficult, characterized by its intrinsic antibiotic drug resistance. Lysine acetylation can alter the physiochemical property of proteins in living organisms. This study aimed to determine if this protein post-translational modification (PTM) exists in a clinical isolate M. abscessus GZ002. We used the antiacetyl-lysine immunoprecipitation to enrich the low-abundant PTM proteins, followed by the LC-MS/MS analysis. The lysine acetylome of M. abscessus GZ002 was determined. There were 459 lysine acetylation sites found in 289 acetylated proteins. Lysine acetylation occurred in 5.87% of the M. abscessus GZ002 proteome, and at least 25% of them were growth essential. Aerobic respiration and carbohydrate metabolic pathways of M. abscessus GZ002 were enriched with lysine acetylation. Through bioinformatics analysis, we identified four major acetyl motif logos (K(ac)Y, K(ac)F, K(ac)H, and DK(ac)). Further comparison of the reported M. tuberculosis (MTB) acetylomes and that of MAB GZ002 revealed several common features between these two species. The lysine residues of several antibiotic-resistance, virulence, and persistence-related proteins were acetylated in both MAB GZ002 and MTB. There were 51 identical acetylation sites in 37 proteins found in common between MAB GZ002 and MTB. Overall, we demonstrate a profile of lysine acetylation in MAB GZ002 proteome that shares similarities with MTB. Interventions that target at these conserved sections may be valuable as anti-NTM or anti-TB therapies. PMID:27323652

  1. Multi-site Phosphorylation Regulates Bim Stability and Apoptotic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Anette; Barrett, Tamera; Flavell, Richard A.; Davis, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim is established to be an important mediator of signaling pathways that induce cell death. Multi-site phosphorylation of Bim by several members of the MAP kinase group is implicated as a regulatory mechanism that controls the apoptotic activity of Bim. To test the role of Bim phosphorylation in vivo, we constructed mice with a series of mutant alleles that express phosphorylation-defective Bim proteins. We show that mutation of the phosphorylation site Thr-112 causes decreased binding of Bim to the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 and can increase cell survival. In contrast, mutation of the phosphorylation sites Ser-55, Ser-65, and Ser-73 can cause increased apoptosis because of reduced proteasomal degradation of Bim. Together, these data indicate that phosphorylation can regulate Bim by multiple mechanisms and that the phosphorylation of Bim on different sites can contribute to the sensitivity of cellular apoptotic responses. PMID:18498746

  2. Lysine-based structure responsible for selective mannose phosphorylation of cathepsin D and cathepsin L defines a common structural motif for lysosomal enzyme targeting.

    PubMed

    Cuozzo, J W; Tao, K; Cygler, M; Mort, J S; Sahagian, G G

    1998-08-14

    Previous studies have shown that lysine residues on the surface of cathepsins and other lysosomal proteins are a shared component of the recognition structure involved in mannose phosphorylation. In this study, the involvement of specific lysine residues in mannose phosphorylation of cathepsin D was explored by site-directed mutagenesis. Mutation of two lysine residues in the mature portion of the protein, Lys-203 and Lys-293, cooperated to inhibit mannose phosphorylation by 70%. Other positively charged residues could not substitute for lysine at these positions, and comparison of thermal denaturation curves for the wild type and mutant proteins indicated that the inhibition could not be explained by alterations in protein folding. Structural comparisons of the two lysine residues with those required for phosphorylation of cathepsin L, using models generated from recently acquired crystal structures, revealed several relevant similarities. On both molecules, the lysine residues were positioned approximately 34 A apart (34.06 A for cathepsin D and 33.80 A for cathepsin L). When the lysine pairs were superimposed, N-linked glycosylation sites on the two proteins were found to be oriented so that oligosaccharides extending out from the sites could share a common region of space. Further similarities in the local environments of the critical lysines were also observed. These results provide details for a common lysosomal targeting structure based on a specific arrangement of lysine residues with respect to each other and to glycosylation sites on the surface of lysosomal proteins. PMID:9694859

  3. Identification of lysine 153 as a functionally important residue in UDP-galactose 4-epimerase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Swanson, B A; Frey, P A

    1993-12-01

    The role of lysine 153 in the action of UDP-galactose 4-epimerase from Escherichia coli has been investigated by site specific mutagenesis and kinetic and spectrophotometric analysis of the mutant enzymes. The crystal structure of UDP-galactose 4-epimerase shows that the binding of NAD+ to the coenzyme site includes the hydrogen bonded interaction of the epsilon-ammonium group of lysine 153 with the 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups of the nicotinamide riboside. Mutation of this residue to methionine or alanine decreases the catalytic activity of the enzyme by a factor of more than 10(3). The NAD+ associated with the wild type enzyme is subject to UMP-dependent reduction by sugars such as glucose and arabinose, but the mutant proteins K153M and K153A are not reduced by sugars in the presence or absence of UMP. NAD+ associated with the wild type enzyme is also subject to UMP-dependent reduction by sodium cyanoborohydride. However, although the mutant proteins bind UMP very well, the rate at which NAD+ associated with them is reduced by sodium cyanoborohydride is almost insensitive to the presence of UMP. The purified wild type enzyme contains significant amounts of NADH bound to the coenzyme site; however, the purified mutants K153M and K153A contain very little NADH. We conclude that lysine 153 plays an important role in increasing the chemical reactivity of enzyme-bound NAD+ in the uridine nucleotide-dependent conformational change associated with reductive inactivation and the catalytic activity of UDP-galactose 4-epimerase.

  4. Biofortification of rice with the essential amino acid lysine: molecular characterization, nutritional evaluation, and field performance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing-Qing; Zhang, Chang-Quan; Chan, Man-Ling; Zhao, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Jin-Zhu; Wang, Qing; Li, Qian-Feng; Yu, Heng-Xiu; Gu, Ming-Hong; Sun, Samuel Sai-Ming; Liu, Qiao-Quan

    2016-07-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.), a major staple crop worldwide, has limited levels of the essential amino acid lysine. We previously produced engineered rice with increased lysine content by expressing bacterial aspartate kinase and dihydrodipicolinate synthase and inhibiting rice lysine ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase activity. However, the grain quality, field performance, and integration patterns of the transgenes in these lysine-enriched lines remain unclear. In the present study, we selected several elite transgenic lines with endosperm-specific or constitutive regulation of the above key enzymes but lacking the selectable marker gene. All target transgenes were integrated into the intragenic region in the rice genome. Two pyramid transgenic lines (High Free Lysine; HFL1 and HFL2) with free lysine levels in seeds up to 25-fold that of wild type were obtained via a combination of the above two transgenic events. We observed a dramatic increase in total free amino acids and a slight increase in total protein content in both pyramid lines. Moreover, the general physicochemical properties were improved in pyramid transgenic rice, but the starch composition was not affected. Field trials indicated that the growth of HFL transgenic rice was normal, except for a slight difference in plant height and grain colour. Taken together, these findings will be useful for the potential commercialization of high-lysine transgenic rice. PMID:27252467

  5. Water in the Active Site of Ketosteroid Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Hanoian, Philip; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to investigate the structural and dynamical properties of water in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) to provide insight into the role of these water molecules in the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. This reaction is thought to proceed via a dienolate intermediate that is stabilized by hydrogen bonding with residues Tyr16 and Asp103. A comparative study was performed for the wild-type (WT) KSI and the Y16F, Y16S, and Y16F/Y32F/Y57F (FFF) mutants. These systems were studied with three different bound ligands: equilenin, which is an intermediate analog, and the intermediate states of two steroid substrates. Several distinct water occupation sites were identified in the active site of KSI for the WT and mutant systems. Three additional sites were identified in the Y16S mutant that were not occupied in WT KSI or the other mutants studied. The number of water molecules directly hydrogen bonded to the ligand oxygen was approximately two waters in the Y16S mutant, one water in the Y16F and FFF mutants, and intermittent hydrogen bonding of one water molecule in WT KSI. The molecular dynamics trajectories of the Y16F and FFF mutants reproduced the small conformational changes of residue 16 observed in the crystal structures of these two mutants. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations of 1H NMR chemical shifts of the protons in the active site hydrogen-bonding network suggest that the presence of water in the active site does not prevent the formation of short hydrogen bonds with far-downfield chemical shifts. The molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the active site water molecules exchange much more frequently for WT KSI and the FFF mutant than for the Y16F and Y16S mutants. This difference is most likely due to the hydrogen-bonding interaction between Tyr57 and an active site water molecule that is persistent in the Y16F and Y16S mutants but absent in the FFF mutant and significantly less

  6. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  7. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  8. An arginine-aspartate network in the active site of bacterial TruB is critical for catalyzing pseudouridine formation

    PubMed Central

    Friedt, Jenna; Leavens, Fern M. V.; Mercier, Evan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Kothe, Ute

    2014-01-01

    Pseudouridine synthases introduce the most common RNA modification and likely use the same catalytic mechanism. Besides a catalytic aspartate residue, the contributions of other residues for catalysis of pseudouridine formation are poorly understood. Here, we have tested the role of a conserved basic residue in the active site for catalysis using the bacterial pseudouridine synthase TruB targeting U55 in tRNAs. Substitution of arginine 181 with lysine results in a 2500-fold reduction of TruB’s catalytic rate without affecting tRNA binding. Furthermore, we analyzed the function of a second-shell aspartate residue (D90) that is conserved in all TruB enzymes and interacts with C56 of tRNA. Site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical and kinetic studies reveal that this residue is not critical for substrate binding but influences catalysis significantly as replacement of D90 with glutamate or asparagine reduces the catalytic rate 30- and 50-fold, respectively. In agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of TruB wild type and TruB D90N, we propose an electrostatic network composed of the catalytic aspartate (D48), R181 and D90 that is important for catalysis by fine-tuning the D48-R181 interaction. Conserved, negatively charged residues similar to D90 are found in a number of pseudouridine synthases, suggesting that this might be a general mechanism. PMID:24371284

  9. An arginine-aspartate network in the active site of bacterial TruB is critical for catalyzing pseudouridine formation.

    PubMed

    Friedt, Jenna; Leavens, Fern M V; Mercier, Evan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Kothe, Ute

    2014-04-01

    Pseudouridine synthases introduce the most common RNA modification and likely use the same catalytic mechanism. Besides a catalytic aspartate residue, the contributions of other residues for catalysis of pseudouridine formation are poorly understood. Here, we have tested the role of a conserved basic residue in the active site for catalysis using the bacterial pseudouridine synthase TruB targeting U55 in tRNAs. Substitution of arginine 181 with lysine results in a 2500-fold reduction of TruB's catalytic rate without affecting tRNA binding. Furthermore, we analyzed the function of a second-shell aspartate residue (D90) that is conserved in all TruB enzymes and interacts with C56 of tRNA. Site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical and kinetic studies reveal that this residue is not critical for substrate binding but influences catalysis significantly as replacement of D90 with glutamate or asparagine reduces the catalytic rate 30- and 50-fold, respectively. In agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of TruB wild type and TruB D90N, we propose an electrostatic network composed of the catalytic aspartate (D48), R181 and D90 that is important for catalysis by fine-tuning the D48-R181 interaction. Conserved, negatively charged residues similar to D90 are found in a number of pseudouridine synthases, suggesting that this might be a general mechanism.

  10. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  11. Conformational Transitions in Human AP Endonuclease 1 and Its Active Site Mutant during Abasic Site Repair†

    PubMed Central

    Kanazhevskaya, Lyubov Yu.; Koval, Vladimir V.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Strauss, Phyllis R.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2010-01-01

    AP endonuclease 1 (APE 1) is a crucial enzyme of the base excision repair pathway (BER) in human cells. APE1 recognizes apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and makes a nick in the phosphodiester backbone 5′ to them. The conformational dynamics and presteady-state kinetics of wild-type APE1 and its active site mutant, Y171F-P173L-N174K, have been studied. To observe conformational transitions occurring in the APE1 molecule during the catalytic cycle, we detected intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the enzyme under single turnover conditions. DNA duplexes containing a natural AP site, its tetrahydrofuran analogue, or a 2′-deoxyguanosine residue in the same position were used as specific substrates or ligands. The stopped-flow experiments have revealed high flexibility of the APE1 molecule and the complexity of the catalytic process. The fluorescent traces indicate that wild-type APE1 undergoes at least four conformational transitions during the processing of abasic sites in DNA. In contrast, nonspecific interactions of APE1 with undamaged DNA can be described by a two-step kinetic scheme. Rate and equilibrium constants were extracted from the stopped-flow and fluorescence titration data for all substrates, ligands, and products. A replacement of three residues at the enzymatic active site including the replacement of tyrosine 171 with phenylalanine in the enzyme active site resulted in a 2 × 104-fold decrease in the reaction rate and reduced binding affinity. Our data indicate the important role of conformational changes in APE1 for substrate recognition and catalysis. PMID:20575528

  12. Critical lysine residues of Klf4 required for protein stabilization and degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Key-Hwan; Kim, So-Ra; Ramakrishna, Suresh; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • Klf4 undergoes the 26S proteasomal degradation by ubiquitination on its multiple lysine residues. • Essential Klf4 ubiquitination sites are accumulated between 190–263 amino acids. • A mutation of lysine at 232 on Klf4 elongates protein turnover. • Klf4 mutants dramatically suppress p53 expression both under normal and UV irradiated conditions. - Abstract: The transcription factor, Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4) plays a crucial role in generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). As the ubiquitination and degradation of the Klf4 protein have been suggested to play an important role in its function, the identification of specific lysine sites that are responsible for protein degradation is of prime interest to improve protein stability and function. However, the molecular mechanism regulating proteasomal degradation of the Klf4 is poorly understood. In this study, both the analysis of Klf4 ubiquitination sites using several Klf4 deletion fragments and bioinformatics predictions showed that the lysine sites which are signaling for Klf4 protein degradation lie in its N-terminal domain (aa 1–296). The results also showed that Lys32, 52, 232, and 252 of Klf4 are responsible for the proteolysis of the Klf4 protein. These results suggest that Klf4 undergoes proteasomal degradation and that these lysine residues are critical for Klf4 ubiquitination.

  13. N-methyl-D-aspartate recognition site ligands modulate activity at the coupled glycine recognition site.

    PubMed

    Hood, W F; Compton, R P; Monahan, J B

    1990-03-01

    In synaptic plasma membranes from rat forebrain, the potencies of glycine recognition site agonists and antagonists for modulating [3H]1-[1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl]piperidine ([3H]TCP) binding and for displacing strychnine-insensitive [3H]glycine binding are altered in the presence of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) recognition site ligands. The NMDA competitive antagonist, cis-4-phosphonomethyl-2-piperidine carboxylate (CGS 19755), reduces [3H]glycine binding, and the reduction can be fully reversed by the NMDA recognition site agonist, L-glutamate. Scatchard analysis of [3H]glycine binding shows that in the presence of CGS 19755 there is no change in Bmax (8.81 vs. 8.79 pmol/mg of protein), but rather a decrease in the affinity of glycine (KD of 0.202 microM vs. 0.129 microM). Similar decreases in affinity are observed for the glycine site agonists, D-serine and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate, in the presence of CGS 19755. In contrast, the affinity of glycine antagonists, 1-hydroxy-3-amino-2-pyrrolidone and 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylate, at this [3H]glycine recognition site increases in the presence of CGS 19755. The functional consequence of this change in affinity was addressed using the modulation of [3H]TCP binding. In the presence of L-glutamate, the potency of glycine agonists for the stimulation of [3H]TCP binding increases, whereas the potency of glycine antagonists decreases. These data are consistent with NMDA recognition site ligands, through their interactions at the NMDA recognition site, modulating activity at the associated glycine recognition site.

  14. Linkages in thermal copolymers of lysine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Suzuki, F.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal copolymerization of lysine with other alpha-amino acids was studied. The identity of the second amino acid influences various properties of the polymer obtained, including the proportion of alpha and epsilon linkages of lysine. A review of linkages in proteinoids indicates alpha and beta linkages for aspartic acid, alpha and gamma linkages for glutamic acid, alpha and epsilon linkages for lysine, and alpha linkages for other amino acids. Thermal proteinoids are thus more complex in types of linkage than are proteins.

  15. Arginine-to-lysine substitutions influence recombinant horseradish peroxidase stability and immobilisation effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Barry J; Ó'Fágáin, Ciarán

    2007-01-01

    Background Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP) plays important roles in many biotechnological fields, including diagnostics, biosensors and biocatalysis. Often, it is used in immobilised form. With conventional immobilisation techniques, the enzyme adheres in random orientation: the active site may face the solid phase rather than bulk medium, impeding substrate access and leading to sub-optimal catalytic performance. The ability to immobilise HRP in a directional manner, such that the active site would always face outwards from the insoluble matrix, would maximise the immobilised enzyme's catalytic potential and could increase HRP's range of actual and potential applications. Results We have replaced arginine residues on the face of glycan-free recombinant HRP opposite to the active site by lysines. Our strategy differs from previous reports of specific HRP immobilisation via an engineered affinity tag or single reactive residue. These conservative Arg-to-Lys substitutions provide a means of multipoint covalent immobilisation such that the active site will always face away from the immobilisation matrix. One triple and one pentuple mutant were generated by substitution of solvent-exposed arginines on the "back" of the polypeptide (R118, R159 and R283) and of residues known to influence stability (K232 and K241). Orientated HRP immobilisation was demonstrated using a modified polyethersulfone (PES) membrane; the protein was forced to orientate its active site away from the membrane and towards the bulk solution phase. Mutant properties and bioinformatic analysis suggested the reversion of K283R to improve stability, thus generating two additional mutants (K118/R159K and R118K/K232N/K241F/R283K). While most mutants were less stable in free solution than wild type rHRP, the quadruple revertant regained some stability over its mutant counterparts. A greater degree of immobilisation on CNBr-activated Sepharose™ was noted with increased lysine content; however, only marginal

  16. Insights into K-Ras 4B regulation by post-translational lysine acetylation.

    PubMed

    Knyphausen, Philipp; Lang, Franziska; Baldus, Linda; Extra, Antje; Lammers, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Ras is a molecular switch cycling between an active, GTP-bound and an inactive, GDP-bound state. Mutations in Ras, mostly affecting the off-switch, are found in many human tumours. Recently, it has been shown that K-Ras 4B is targeted by lysine acetylation at K104. Based on results obtained for an acetylation mimetic Ras mutant (K104Q), it was hypothesised that K104-acetylation might interfere with its oncogenicity by impairing SOS-catalysed guanine-nucleotide exchange. We prepared site-specifically K104-acetylated K-Ras 4B and the corresponding oncogenic mutant protein G12V using the genetic-code expansion concept. We found that SOS-catalysed nucleotide exchange, also of allosterically activated SOS, was neither affected by acetylation of K104 in wildtype K-Ras 4B nor in the G12V mutant, suggesting that glutamine is a poor mimetic for acetylation at this site. In vitro, the lysine-acetyltransferases CBP and p300 were able to acetylate both, wildtype and G12V K-Ras 4B. In addition to K104 we identified further acetylation sites in K-Ras 4B, including K147, within the important G5/SAK-motif. However, the intrinsic and the SOS-catalysed nucleotide exchange was not affected by K147-acetylation of K-Ras 4B. Finally, we show that Sirt2 and HDAC6 do neither deacetylate K-Ras 4B if acetylated at K104 nor if acetylated at K147 in vitro.

  17. HTLV-1 Tax Stimulates Ubiquitin E3 Ligase, Ring Finger Protein 8, to Assemble Lysine 63-Linked Polyubiquitin Chains for TAK1 and IKK Activation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yik-Khuan; Zhi, Huijun; Bowlin, Tara; Dorjbal, Batsukh; Philip, Subha; Zahoor, Muhammad Atif; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Semmes, Oliver John; Schaefer, Brian; Glover, J N Mark; Giam, Chou-Zen

    2015-08-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) trans-activator/oncoprotein, Tax, impacts a multitude of cellular processes, including I-κB kinase (IKK)/NF-κB signaling, DNA damage repair, and mitosis. These activities of Tax have been implicated in the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) in HTLV-1-infected individuals, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. IKK and its upstream kinase, TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), contain ubiquitin-binding subunits, NEMO and TAB2/3 respectively, which interact with K63-linked polyubiquitin (K63-pUb) chains. Recruitment to K63-pUb allows cross auto-phosphorylation and activation of TAK1 to occur, followed by TAK1-catalyzed IKK phosphorylation and activation. Using cytosolic extracts of HeLa and Jurkat T cells supplemented with purified proteins we have identified ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8), and E2 conjugating enzymes, Ubc13:Uev1A and Ubc13:Uev2, to be the cellular factors utilized by Tax for TAK1 and IKK activation. In vitro, the combination of Tax and RNF8 greatly stimulated TAK1, IKK, IκBα and JNK phosphorylation. In vivo, RNF8 over-expression augmented while RNF8 ablation drastically reduced canonical NF-κB activation by Tax. Activation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway by Tax, however, is unaffected by the loss of RNF8. Using purified components, we further demonstrated biochemically that Tax greatly stimulated RNF8 and Ubc13:Uev1A/Uev2 to assemble long K63-pUb chains. Finally, co-transfection of Tax with increasing amounts of RNF8 greatly induced K63-pUb assembly in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, Tax targets RNF8 and Ubc13:Uev1A/Uev2 to promote the assembly of K63-pUb chains, which signal the activation of TAK1 and multiple downstream kinases including IKK and JNK. Because of the roles RNF8 and K63-pUb chains play in DNA damage repair and cytokinesis, this mechanism may also explain the genomic instability of HTLV-1-transformed T cells and ATL cells.

  18. Control of active sites in selective flocculation: I -- Mathematical model

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M.; Prakash, T.S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Heteroflocculation has been determined to be another major reason for loss in selectivity for flocculation process. In a mathematical model developed earlier, conditions for controlling heteroflocculation were discussed. Blocking active sites to control selective adsorption of a flocculant oil a desirable solid surface is discussed. It has been demonstrated that the lower molecular weight fraction of a flocculant which is incapable of flocculating the particles is an efficient site blocking agent. The major application of selective flocculation has been in mineral processing but many potential uses exist in biological and other colloidal systems. These include purification of ceramic powders, separating hazardous solids from chemical waste, and removal of deleterious components from paper pulp.

  19. The site of activation of factor X by cancer procoagulant.

    PubMed

    Gordon, S G; Mourad, A M

    1991-12-01

    Cancer procoagulant (CP) is a cysteine proteinase found in a variety of malignant cells and tissues and in human amnion-chorion tissue. It initiates coagulation by activating factor X. However, the amino acid sequence of the substrate protein that determines the cleavage site of cysteine proteinases is different from that of the serine proteinases that normally activate factor X, such as factor IXa, VIIa and Russell's Viper Venom (RVV). Therefore, it was of interest to determine the site of cleavage of human factor X by CP. Purified CP was incubated with purified factor X and the reaction mixture was electrophoresed on a 10% Tris-tricine SDS-PAGE gel. The proteins were electroeluted on to a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane, and stained with Coomassie blue. The heavy chain of activated factor X was cut out of the PVDF membrane and sequenced with an Applied Biosystems 477A with on-line HPLC. The primary cleavage sequence was Asp-Ala-Ala-Asp-Leu-Asp-Pro-; two other secondary sequences Ser-Ile-Thr-Trp-Lys-Pro- and Glu-Asn-Pro-Phe-Asp-Leu were found. The penultimate amino acid on the carbonyl side of the hydrolysed amide bond plays a critical role for the recognition of the cleavage site of cysteine proteinases. These data indicate that the penultimate amino acid for the primary cleavage site of factor X by CP is proline-20 and for the secondary sites, proline-13 and proline-28. This is in contrast to arginine-52 that determines the specificity of the cleavage by normal serine proteinase activation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Favored and disfavored pathways of protein crosslinking by glucose: glucose lysine dimer (GLUCOLD) and crossline versus glucosepane

    PubMed Central

    Nemet, Ina; Strauch, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the isolation and molecular characterization of a novel glucose-lysine dimer crosslink 1,3-bis-(5-amino-5-carboxypentyl)-4-(1′,2′,3′,4′-tetrahydroxybutyl)-3H-imidazolium salt, named GLUCOLD. GLUCOLD was easily formed from the Amadori product (fructose–lysine). However, when BSA was incubated with 100 mM glucose for 25 days, the levels of the lysine-lysine glucose crosslinks GLUCOLD and CROSSLINE were only 21 and <1 pmol/mg, respectively, compared to 611 pmol/mg protein for the lysine-arginine GLUCOSEPANE crosslink, in spite of more than 20 potential lysine-lysine crosslinking sites in the protein. Mechanistic investigation revealed that metal-free phosphate ions catalyzed formation of fructose–lysine and all three crosslinks from amino acids, while cationic MOPS buffer had an opposite effect. This together with the rapid formation of N6-1,4-dideoxy-5,6-dioxoglucosone derivatives by dicarbonyl trapping agents, such as 1,2-diaminobenzene or γ-guanidinobutyric acid, strongly suggests that enolization of the Amadori product and trapping of the 5,6-dioxo derivative by arginine residues constitutes the major pathway for glucose-mediated crosslinking in proteins. PMID:20607325

  1. Lysine acetylation stabilizes SP2 protein in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wu, Chengcheng; Sheng, Qing; Jiang, Caiying; Chen, Qin; Lv, Zhengbing; Yao, Juming; Nie, Zuoming

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation (Kac) is a vital post-translational modification that plays an important role in many cellular processes in organisms. In the present study, the nutrient storage proteins in hemolymph were first found to be highly acetylated-particularly SP2 protein, which contains 20 potential Kac sites. Further results confirmed that lysine acetylation could stabilize and up-regulate the protein level of anti-apoptosis protein SP2, thereby improving the survival of H2O2-treated BmN cells and suppressing the apoptosis induced by H2O2. The potential mechanism involved in the inhibition of ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation by crosstalk between lysine acetylation and ubiquitination. Our results showed that the increase in the acetylation level by TSA could decrease the ubiquitination and improve the protein level of SP2, indicating that lysine acetylation could influence the SP2 protein level through competition between ubiquitination and the suppression of ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation, thereby stabilizing the protein. SP2 is a major nutrient storage protein from hemolymph for amino acid storage and utilization. The crosstalk between lysine acetylation and ubiquitination of SP2 might imply an important role of lysine acetylation for nutrient storage and utilization in silkworm. PMID:27374983

  2. Active-Site-Accessible, Porphyrinic Metal;#8722;Organic Framework Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Omar K.; Shultz, Abraham M.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2012-02-06

    On account of their structural similarity to cofactors found in many metallo-enzymes, metalloporphyrins are obvious potential building blocks for catalytically active, metal-organic framework (MOF) materials. While numerous porphyrin-based MOFs have already been described, versions featuring highly accessible active sites and permanent microporosity are remarkably scarce. Indeed, of the more than 70 previously reported porphyrinic MOFs, only one has been shown to be both permanently microporous and contain internally accessible active sites for chemical catalysis. Attempts to generalize the design approach used in this single successful case have failed. Reported here, however, is the synthesis of an extended family of MOFs that directly incorporate a variety of metalloporphyrins (specifically Al{sup 3+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Pd{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 3+}, and Fe{sup 3+} complexes). These robust porphyrinic materials (RPMs) feature large channels and readily accessible active sites. As an illustrative example, one of the manganese-containing RPMs is shown to be catalytically competent for the oxidation of alkenes and alkanes.

  3. Accessibility and mobility of lysine residues in. beta. -lactoglobulin

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.M.; Pfeffer, P.E.; Kumosinski, T.F.; Greenberg, R.

    1988-07-26

    N/sup epsilon/-(/sup 2/H/sub 6/)Isopropyllysyl-..beta..-lactoglobulin was prepared by reductive alkylation of ..beta..-lactoglobulin with (/sup 2/H/sub 6/)acetone and NaBH/sub 4/ to provide a /sup 2/H (NMR) probe for the study of lysine involvement in lipid-protein interactions. Amino acid analysis showed 80% of the protein's 15 lysine residues to be labeled. Unmodified lysine residues were located through peptide maps produced from CNBr, tryptic, and chymotryptic digests of the labeled protein. Average correlation times calculated from /sup 2/H NMR spectra were 20 and 320 ps for 8.7 and 3.3 residues, respectively, in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride; in nondenaturing solution, values of 70 and 320 ps were obtained for 6.5 and 3.2 residues, respectively, with the remaining 2.3 modified residues not observed, suggesting that side chains of lysine residues in unordered or flexible regions were more mobile than those in stable periodic structures. /sup 2/H NMR spectra of the protein complexed with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine confirmed the extrinsic membrane protein type behavior of ..beta..-lactoglobulin previously reported from /sup 31/P NMR studies of the phospholipids complexed with ..beta..-lactoglobulin. Although no physiological function has yet been identified, comparison of these results with the X-ray structure supports the hypothesis that residues not accessible for modification may help to stabilize the cone-shaped ..beta..-barrel thought to contain binding sites for small lipid-soluble molecules.

  4. Inhibition of p300 lysine acetyltransferase activity by luteolin reduces tumor growth in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Selvi, Ruthrotha B.; Swaminathan, Amrutha; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Shanmugam, Muthu K.; Li, Feng; Ramakrishnan, Gowsica B.; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M. Emam; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Basha, Jeelan; Bhat, Akshay; Vasudevan, Madavan; Dharmarajan, Arunasalam; Sethi, Gautam; Kundu, Tapas K.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin acetylation is attributed with distinct functional relevance with respect to gene expression in normal and diseased conditions thereby leading to a topical interest in the concept of epigenetic modulators and therapy. We report here the identification and characterization of the acetylation inhibitory potential of an important dietary flavonoid, luteolin. Luteolin was found to inhibit p300 acetyltransferase with competitive binding to the acetyl CoA binding site. Luteolin treatment in a xenografted tumor model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), led to a dramatic reduction in tumor growth within 4 weeks corresponding to a decrease in histone acetylation. Cells treated with luteolin exhibit cell cycle arrest and decreased cell migration. Luteolin treatment led to an alteration in gene expression and miRNA profile including up-regulation of p53 induced miR-195/215, let7C; potentially translating into a tumor suppressor function. It also led to down-regulation of oncomiRNAs such as miR-135a, thereby reflecting global changes in the microRNA network. Furthermore, a direct correlation between the inhibition of histone acetylation and gene expression was established using chromatin immunoprecipitation on promoters of differentially expressed genes. A network of dysregulated genes and miRNAs was mapped along with the gene ontology categories, and the effects of luteolin were observed to be potentially at multiple levels: at the level of gene expression, miRNA expression and miRNA processing. PMID:26517526

  5. A Method to determine lysine acetylation stoichiometries

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles

    2014-07-21

    A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the lack of stoichiometry information. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of lysine acetylation on proteins globally. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy on hundreds of acetylated peptides from cell lysates and cross-validated the measurements via immunoblotting.

  6. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  7. Lysine requirement of growing male Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Bons, A; Timmler, R; Jeroch, H

    2002-12-01

    1. One growth experiment and one balance test were conducted to study the response to increasing levels of dietary lysine supplementation in male Pekin ducks with special reference to the growth periods from 1 to 3 weeks and 4 to 7 weeks of age. 2. Two different low-lysine diets were used as basal diets in both periods. The basal lysine levels were 7.6 g/kg (d 1 to 21) and 6.2 g/kg (d 22 to 49) and the ranges in lysine concentration were 7.6 to 12.6 g/kg (d 1 to 21) and 6.2 to 11.2 g/kg (d 22 to 49). 3. Growth performance, feed conversion efficiency and meat yield increased (P < 0.05) with increasing lysine concentration (requirement defined as 95% of the asymptote). 4. It is concluded that the dietary lysine concentration should be 0.93 g/MJ nitrogen corrected apparent metabolisable energy (AMEN) (11.7 g/kg) for the starter period (until d 21) and 0.75 g/MJ AMEN (10.0 g/kg) for the grower period (from d 22 onwards).

  8. Discovery of a Novel Inhibitor of Histone Lysine-Specific Demethylase 1A (KDM1A/LSD1) as Orally Active Antitumor Agent.

    PubMed

    Vianello, Paola; Botrugno, Oronza A; Cappa, Anna; Dal Zuffo, Roberto; Dessanti, Paola; Mai, Antonello; Marrocco, Biagina; Mattevi, Andrea; Meroni, Giuseppe; Minucci, Saverio; Stazi, Giulia; Thaler, Florian; Trifiró, Paolo; Valente, Sergio; Villa, Manuela; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro

    2016-02-25

    We report the stereoselective synthesis and biological activity of a novel series of tranylcypromine (TCPA) derivatives (14a-k, 15, 16), potent inhibitors of KDM1A. The new compounds strongly inhibit the clonogenic potential of acute leukemia cell lines. In particular three molecules (14d, 14e, and 14g) showing selectivity versus MAO A and remarkably inhibiting colony formation in THP-1 human leukemia cells, were assessed in mouse for their preliminary pharmacokinetic. 14d and 14e were further tested in vivo in a murine acute promyelocytic leukemia model, resulting 14d the most effective. Its two enantiomers were synthesized: the (1S,2R) enantiomer 15 showed higher activity than its (1R,2S) analogue 16, in both biochemical and cellular assays. Compound 15 exhibited in vivo efficacy after oral administration, determining a 62% increased survival in mouse leukemia model with evidence of KDM1A inhibition. The biological profile of compound 15 supports its further investigation as a cancer therapeutic.

  9. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  10. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  11. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Hicks, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from April 1991 through September 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations (SWO) and the Environmental Sciences Division, both of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level (radioactive) waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. A new set of action levels was developed on the basis of a statistical analysis of background contamination. These new action levels have been used to evaluate results in this report. Results of ASEMP monitoring continue to demonstrate that no LLW (except [sup 3]H) is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II, which began in early FY 1991, was >90% complete at the end of September 1991. Results of sampling of groundwater and surface waters is presented.

  12. Inhibition and active-site modelling of prolidase.

    PubMed

    King, G F; Crossley, M J; Kuchel, P W

    1989-03-15

    Consideration of the active-site model of prolidase led us to examine azetidine, pyrrolidine and piperidine substrate analogs as potential in vivo inhibitors of the enzyme. One of these, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-proline, was shown to be a potent competitive inhibitor of porcine kidney prolidase (Ki = 90 microM); its rapid protein-mediated permeation of human and sheep erythrocytes suggests that it may be effective in vivo. The higher homolog, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-pipecolic acid, was also a potent inhibitor of the enzyme while the antihypertensive drugs, captopril and enalaprilat, were shown to have mild and no inhibitory effects, respectively. Analysis of inhibitor action and consideration of X-ray crystallographic data of relevant Mn2+ complexes allowed the active-site model of prolidase to be further refined; a new model is presented in which the substrate acts as a bidentate ligand towards the active-site manganous ion. Various aspects of the new model help to explain why Mn2+ has been 'chosen' by the enzyme in preference to other biologically available metal ions. PMID:2924773

  13. Acetylproteomic analysis reveals functional implications of lysine acetylation in human spermatozoa (sperm).

    PubMed

    Yu, Heguo; Diao, Hua; Wang, Chunmei; Lin, Yan; Yu, Fudong; Lu, Hui; Xu, Wei; Li, Zheng; Shi, Huijuan; Zhao, Shimin; Zhou, Yuchuan; Zhang, Yonglian

    2015-04-01

    Male infertility is a medical condition that has been on the rise globally. Lysine acetylation of human sperm, an essential posttranslational modification involved in the etiology of sperm abnormality, is not fully understood. Therefore, we first generated a qualified pan-anti-acetyllysine monoclonal antibody to characterize the global lysine acetylation of uncapacitated normal human sperm with a proteomics approach. With high enrichment ratios that were up to 31%, 973 lysine-acetylated sites that matched to 456 human sperm proteins, including 671 novel lysine acetylation sites and 205 novel lysine-acetylated proteins, were identified. These proteins exhibited conserved motifs XXXKYXXX, XXXKFXXX, and XXXKHXXX, were annotated to function in multiple metabolic processes, and were localized predominantly in the mitochondrion and cytoplasmic fractions. Between the uncapacitated and capacitated sperm, different acetylation profiles in regard to functional proteins involved in sperm capacitation, sperm-egg recognition, sperm-egg plasma fusion, and fertilization were observed, indicating that acetylation of functional proteins may be required during sperm capacitation. Bioinformatics analysis revealed association of acetylated proteins with diseases and drugs. Novel acetylation of voltage-dependent anion channel proteins was also found. With clinical sperm samples, we observed differed lysine acetyltransferases and lysine deacetylases expression between normal sperm and abnormal sperm of asthenospermia or necrospermia. Furthermore, with sperm samples impaired by epigallocatechin gallate to mimic asthenospermia, we observed that inhibition of sperm motility was partly through the blockade of voltage-dependent anion channel 2 Lys-74 acetylation combined with reduced ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential. Taken together, we obtained a qualified pan-anti-acetyllysine monoclonal antibody, analyzed the acetylproteome of uncapacitated human sperm, and revealed

  14. Acetylproteomic Analysis Reveals Functional Implications of Lysine Acetylation in Human Spermatozoa (sperm)*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Heguo; Diao, Hua; Wang, Chunmei; Lin, Yan; Yu, Fudong; Lu, Hui; Xu, Wei; Li, Zheng; Shi, Huijuan; Zhao, Shimin; Zhou, Yuchuan; Zhang, Yonglian

    2015-01-01

    Male infertility is a medical condition that has been on the rise globally. Lysine acetylation of human sperm, an essential posttranslational modification involved in the etiology of sperm abnormality, is not fully understood. Therefore, we first generated a qualified pan-anti-acetyllysine monoclonal antibody to characterize the global lysine acetylation of uncapacitated normal human sperm with a proteomics approach. With high enrichment ratios that were up to 31%, 973 lysine-acetylated sites that matched to 456 human sperm proteins, including 671 novel lysine acetylation sites and 205 novel lysine-acetylated proteins, were identified. These proteins exhibited conserved motifs XXXKYXXX, XXXKFXXX, and XXXKHXXX, were annotated to function in multiple metabolic processes, and were localized predominantly in the mitochondrion and cytoplasmic fractions. Between the uncapacitated and capacitated sperm, different acetylation profiles in regard to functional proteins involved in sperm capacitation, sperm-egg recognition, sperm-egg plasma fusion, and fertilization were observed, indicating that acetylation of functional proteins may be required during sperm capacitation. Bioinformatics analysis revealed association of acetylated proteins with diseases and drugs. Novel acetylation of voltage-dependent anion channel proteins was also found. With clinical sperm samples, we observed differed lysine acetyltransferases and lysine deacetylases expression between normal sperm and abnormal sperm of asthenospermia or necrospermia. Furthermore, with sperm samples impaired by epigallocatechin gallate to mimic asthenospermia, we observed that inhibition of sperm motility was partly through the blockade of voltage-dependent anion channel 2 Lys-74 acetylation combined with reduced ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential. Taken together, we obtained a qualified pan-anti-acetyllysine monoclonal antibody, analyzed the acetylproteome of uncapacitated human sperm, and revealed

  15. Druggability analysis and classification of protein tyrosine phosphatase active sites

    PubMed Central

    Ghattas, Mohammad A; Raslan, Noor; Sadeq, Asil; Al Sorkhy, Mohammad; Atatreh, Noor

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many diseases. The fact that no PTP inhibitors have reached the market so far has raised many questions about their druggability. In this study, the active sites of 17 PTPs were characterized and assessed for its ability to bind drug-like molecules. Consequently, PTPs were classified according to their druggability scores into four main categories. Only four members showed intermediate to very druggable pocket; interestingly, the rest of them exhibited poor druggability. Particularly focusing on PTP1B, we also demonstrated the influence of several factors on the druggability of PTP active site. For instance, the open conformation showed better druggability than the closed conformation, while the tight-bound water molecules appeared to have minimal effect on the PTP1B druggability. Finally, the allosteric site of PTP1B was found to exhibit superior druggability compared to the catalytic pocket. This analysis can prove useful in the discovery of new PTP inhibitors by assisting researchers in predicting hit rates from high throughput or virtual screening and saving unnecessary cost, time, and efforts via prioritizing PTP targets according to their predicted druggability. PMID:27757011

  16. Aspirin inhibits glucose‑6‑phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-08-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT‑29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin‑mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT‑29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT‑29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin‑acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH. PMID:27356773

  17. Aspirin inhibits glucose‑6‑phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-08-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT‑29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin‑mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT‑29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT‑29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin‑acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH.

  18. Simultaneous analysis of Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine, reducing sugars, and lysine during the dairy thermal process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xian-Bing; Ma, Fei; Yu, Shu-Juan; Guan, Yong-Guang

    2013-09-01

    A new analytical method allowing the simultaneous quantification of Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), lysine, and reducing sugars (glucose, lactose, and galactose) is described. It is based on high performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric electrochemical detection. This method demonstrated a low limit of quantification (0.385 to 0.866 mg/L), excellent linear correlation (R(2)>0.997), and desired calibration range (3.125 to 25 mg/L). In addition, lactose-lysine solutions containing sulfite (4 to 400 mmol/L) were heated at 110°C for 2h. The results showed that sulfite inhibited the formation of CML and promoted the consumption of reducing sugars and lysine in the Maillard reaction model. The method proved to be useful for simultaneous analysis of CML, lysine, and reducing sugars (glucose, galactose, and lactose) in the Maillard reaction system. Moreover, sulfite was an effective inhibitor of CML formation.

  19. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  20. The Construction and Expression of Lysine-Rich Gene in the Mammary Gland of Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Zhang, Peng; Song, Guangqi; Chen, Yue; Wang, Zhongwei; Yin, Yupeng; Kong, Delong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhao, Zhihui; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2012-01-01

    Lysine is the limiting amino acid in cereal grains, which represent a major source of human food and animal feed worldwide, and is considered the most important of the essential amino acids. In this study, β-casein, αS2-casein, and lactotransferrin cDNA clone fragments encoding lysine-rich peptides were fused together to generate a lysine-rich (LR) gene and the mammary gland-specific expression vector pBC1-LR-NEOr was constructed. Transgenic mice were generated by pronuclear microinjection of the linearized expression vectors harboring the LR transgene. The transgenic mice and their offspring were examined using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blotting, reverse transcriptase–PCR, in situ hybridization, and Western blotting techniques. Our results showed that the LR gene was successfully integrated into the mouse genome and was transmitted stably. The specific LR gene expression was restricted to the mammary gland, active alveoli of the transgenic female mice during lactation. The lysine level of the two transgenic lines was significantly higher than that of nontransgenic controls (p<0.05). In addition, the growth performance of transgenic pups was enhanced by directly feeding them the LR protein-enriched transgenic milk. Our results demonstrated that lysine-rich gene was successfully constructed and expressed in mammary gland of transgenic mice. This study will provide a better understanding of how mammary gland expression systems that increase the lysine content of milk can be applied to other mammals, such as cows. PMID:22577831

  1. Electrostatic fields in the active sites of lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Sun, D P; Liao, D I; Remington, S J

    1989-07-01

    Considerable experimental evidence is in support of several aspects of the mechanism that has been proposed for the catalytic activity of lysozyme. However, the enzymatically catalyzed hydrolysis of polysaccharides proceeds over 5 orders of magnitude faster than that of model compounds that mimic the configuration of the substrate in the active site of the enzyme. Although several possible explanations for this rate enhancement have been discussed elsewhere, a definitive mechanism has not emerged. Here we report striking results obtained by classical electrodynamics, which suggest that bond breakage and the consequent separation of charge in lysozyme is promoted by a large electrostatic field across the active site cleft, produced in part by a very asymmetric distribution of charged residues on the enzyme surface. Lysozymes unrelated in amino acid sequence have similar distributions of charged residues and electric fields. The results reported here suggest that the electrostatic component of the rate enhancement is greater than 9 kcal.mol-1. Thus, electrostatic interactions may play a more important role in the enzymatic mechanism than has generally been appreciated.

  2. Histidine at the active site of Neurospora tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Pfiffner, E; Lerch, K

    1981-10-13

    The involvement of histidyl residues as potential ligands to the binuclear active-site copper of Neurospora tyrosinase was explored by dye-sensitized photooxidation. The enzymatic activity of the holoenzyme was shown to be unaffected by exposure to light in the presence of methylene blue; however, irradiation of the apoenzyme under the same conditions led to a progressive loss of its ability to be reactivated with Cu2+. This photoinactivation was paralleled by a decrease in the histidine content whereas the number of histidyl residues in the holoenzyme remained constant. Copper measurements of photooxidized, reconstituted apoenzyme demonstrated the loss of binding of one copper atom per mole of enzyme as a consequence of photosensitized oxidation of three out of nine histidine residues. Their sequence positions were determined by a comparison of the relative yields of the histidine containing peptides of photooxidized holo- and apotyrosinases. The data obtained show the preferential modification of histidyl residues 188, 193, and 289 and suggest that they constitute metal ligands to one of the two active-site copper atoms. Substitution of copper by cobalt was found to afford complete protection of the histidyl residues from being modified by dye-sensitized photooxidation. PMID:6458322

  3. A Method to Determine Lysine Acetylation Stoichiometries

    DOE PAGES

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong-Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; et al

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a common protein posttranslational modification that regulates a variety of biological processes. A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the difficulty in measuring the proportion of lysine residues that are acetylated. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of protein lysine acetylation. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy for ~750 acetylated peptides from mammalian cell lysates. Furthermore, the acetylation on N-terminal tail of histone H4 was cross-validated by treating cells with sodiummore » butyrate, a potent deacetylase inhibitor, and comparing changes in stoichiometry levels measured by our method with immunoblotting measurements. Of note we observe that acetylation stoichiometry is high in nuclear proteins, but very low in mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins. In summary, our method opens new opportunities to study in detail the relationship of lysine acetylation levels of proteins with their biological functions.« less

  4. A combination of both arginine- and lysine-specific gingipain activity of Porphyromonas gingivalis is necessary for the generation of the micro-oxo bishaem-containing pigment from haemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Smalley, John W; Thomas, Michael F; Birss, Andrew J; Withnall, Robert; Silver, Jack

    2004-01-01

    The black pigment of Porphyromonas gingivalis is composed of the mu-oxo bishaem complex of Fe(III) protoporphyrin IX (mu-oxo oligomer, dimeric haem), namely [Fe(III)PPIX]2O. P. gingivalis W50 and Rgp (Arg-gingipain)- and Kgp (Lys-gingipain)-deficient mutants K1A, D7, E8 and W501 [Aduse-Opoku, Davies, Gallagher, Hashim, Evans, Rangarajan, Slaney and Curtis (2000) Microbiology 146, 1933-1940] were grown on horse blood/agar for 14 days and examined for the production of mu-oxo bishaem. Mu-oxo Bishaem was detected by UV-visible, Mössbauer and Raman spectroscopies in wild-type W50 and in the black-pigmented RgpA- and RgpB-deficient mutants (W501 and D7 respectively), whereas no haem species were detected in the straw-coloured colonies of Kgp-deficient strain K1A. The dark brown pigment of the double RgpA/RgpB knockout mutant (E8) was not composed of mu-oxo bishaem, but of a high-spin monomeric Fe(III) protoporphyrin IX species (possibly a haem-albumin complex). In vitro incubation of oxyhaemoglobin with cells of the W50 strain and the RgpA- and RgpB-deficient mutants (W501 and D7) resulted in the formation of mu-oxo bishaem via methaemoglobin as an intermediate. Although the Kgp-deficient strain K1A converted oxyhaemoglobin into methaemoglobin, this was not further degraded into mu-oxo bishaem. The double RgpA/RgpB knockout was also not capable of producing mu-oxo bishaem from oxyhaemoglobin, but instead generated a haemoglobin haemichrome. Inhibition of Arg-X protease activity of W50, W501, D7 and K1A with leupeptin, under conditions where Lys-X protease activity was unaffected, prevented the production of mu-oxo bishaem from oxyhaemoglobin, but resulted in the formation of a haemoglobin haemichrome. These results show that one or both of RgpA and RgpB gingipains, in addition to the lysine-specific gingipain, is necessary for the production of mu-oxo bishaem from haemoglobin by whole cells of P. gingivalis. PMID:14741050

  5. Staphylokinase as a Plasminogen Activator Component in Recombinant Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Szarka, S. J.; Sihota, E. G.; Habibi, H. R.; Wong, S.-L.

    1999-01-01

    The plasminogen activator staphylokinase (SAK) is a promising thrombolytic agent for treatment of myocardial infarction. It can specifically stimulate the thrombolysis of both erythrocyte-rich and platelet-rich clots. However, SAK lacks fibrin-binding and thrombin inhibitor activities, two functions which would supplement and potentially improve its thrombolytic potency. Creating a recombinant fusion protein is one approach for combining protein domains with complementary functions. To evaluate SAK for use in a translational fusion protein, both N- and C-terminal fusions to SAK were constructed by using hirudin as a fusion partner. Recombinant fusion proteins were secreted from Bacillus subtilis and purified from culture supernatants. The rate of plasminogen activation by SAK was not altered by the presence of an additional N- or C-terminal protein sequence. However, cleavage at N-terminal lysines within SAK rendered the N-terminal fusion unstable in the presence of plasmin. The results of site-directed mutagenesis of lysine 10 and lysine 11 in SAK suggested that a plasmin-resistant variant cannot be created without interfering with the plasmin processing necessary for activation of SAK. Although putative plasmin cleavage sites are located at the C-terminal end of SAK at lysine 135 and lysine 136, these sites were resistant to plasmin cleavage in vitro. Therefore, C-terminal fusions represent stable configurations for developing improved thrombolytic agents based on SAK as the plasminogen activator component. PMID:9925575

  6. Trichodiene synthase. Identification of active site residues by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Cane, D E; Shim, J H; Xue, Q; Fitzsimons, B C; Hohn, T M

    1995-02-28

    Derivatization of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-treated trichodiene synthase with [methyl-14C]methyl methanethiosulfonate and analysis of the derived tryptic peptides suggested the presence of two cysteine residues at the active site. The corresponding C146A and C190A mutants were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The C190A mutant displayed partial but significantly reduced activity, with a reduction in kcat/Km of 3000 compared to the wild-type trichodiene synthase, while the C146A mutant was essentially inactive. A hybrid trichodiene synthase, constructed from amino acids 1-309 of the Fusarium sporotrichioides enzyme and amino acids 310-383 of the Gibberella pulicaris cyclase, had steady state kinetic parameters nearly identical to those of the wild-type F. sporotrichioides enzyme. From this parent hybrid, a series of mutants was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis in which the amino acids in the base-rich region, 302-306 (DRRYR), were systematically modified. Three of these mutants were overexpressed and purified to homogeneity. The importance of Arg304 for catalysis was established by the observation that the R304K mutant showed a more than 25-fold increase in Km, as well as a 200-fold reduction in kcat. In addition, analysis of the incubation products of the R304K mutant by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) indicated that farnesyl diphosphate was converted not only to trichodiene but to at least two additional C15H24 hydrocarbons, mle 204. Replacement of the Tyr305 residue of trichodiene synthase with Phe had little effect on kcat, while increasing the Km by a factor of ca. 7-8.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7873527

  7. The copper active site of CBM33 polysaccharide oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Hemsworth, Glyn R; Taylor, Edward J; Kim, Robbert Q; Gregory, Rebecca C; Lewis, Sally J; Turkenburg, Johan P; Parkin, Alison; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2013-04-24

    The capacity of metal-dependent fungal and bacterial polysaccharide oxygenases, termed GH61 and CBM33, respectively, to potentiate the enzymatic degradation of cellulose opens new possibilities for the conversion of recalcitrant biomass to biofuels. GH61s have already been shown to be unique metalloenzymes containing an active site with a mononuclear copper ion coordinated by two histidines, one of which is an unusual τ-N-methylated N-terminal histidine. We now report the structural and spectroscopic characterization of the corresponding copper CBM33 enzymes. CBM33 binds copper with high affinity at a mononuclear site, significantly stabilizing the enzyme. X-band EPR spectroscopy of Cu(II)-CBM33 shows a mononuclear type 2 copper site with the copper ion in a distorted axial coordination sphere, into which azide will coordinate as evidenced by the concomitant formation of a new absorption band in the UV/vis spectrum at 390 nm. The enzyme's three-dimensional structure contains copper, which has been photoreduced to Cu(I) by the incident X-rays, confirmed by X-ray absorption/fluorescence studies of both aqueous solution and intact crystals of Cu-CBM33. The single copper(I) ion is ligated in a T-shaped configuration by three nitrogen atoms from two histidine side chains and the amino terminus, similar to the endogenous copper coordination geometry found in fungal GH61. PMID:23540833

  8. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors via their allosteric binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, J; Bacáková, L; Lisá, V; el-Fakahany, E E; Tucek, S

    1996-01-01

    Ligands that bind to the allosteric-binding sites on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors alter the conformation of the classical-binding sites of these receptors and either diminish or increase their affinity for muscarinic agonists and classical antagonists. It is not known whether the resulting conformational change also affects the interaction between the receptors and the G proteins. We have now found that the muscarinic receptor allosteric modulators alcuronium, gallamine, and strychnine (acting in the absence of an agonist) alter the synthesis of cAMP in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the M2 or the M4 subtype of muscarinic receptors in the same direction as the agonist carbachol. In addition, most of their effects on the production of inositol phosphates in CHO cells expressing the M1 or the M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes are also similar to (although much weaker than) those of carbachol. The agonist-like effects of the allosteric modulators are not observed in CHO cells that have not been transfected with the gene for any of the subtypes of muscarinic receptors. The effects of alcuronium on the formation of cAMP and inositol phosphates are not prevented by the classical muscarinic antagonist quinuclidinyl benzilate. These observations demonstrate for the first time that the G protein-mediated functional responses of muscarinic receptors can be evoked not only from their classical, but also from their allosteric, binding sites. This represents a new mechanism of receptor activation. PMID:8710935

  9. Adaptation of the behaviour of an aspartic proteinase inhibitor by relocation of a lysine residue by one helical turn.

    PubMed

    Winterburn, Tim J; Wyatt, David M; Phylip, Lowri H; Berry, Colin; Bur, Daniel; Kay, John

    2006-08-01

    In addition to self-inhibition of aspartic proteinase zymogens by their intrinsic proparts, the activity of certain members of this enzyme family can be modulated through active-site occupation by extrinsic polypeptides such as the small IA3 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The unprecedented mechanism by which IA3 helicates to inhibit its sole target aspartic proteinase locates an i, i+4 pair of charged residues (Lys18+Asp22) on an otherwise-hydrophobic face of the amphipathic helix. The nature of these residues is not crucial for effective inhibition, but re-location of the lysine residue by one turn (+4 residues) in the helical IA3 positions its side chain in the mutant IA3-proteinase complex in an orientation essentially identical to that of the key lysine residue in zymogen proparts. The binding of the extrinsic mutant IA3 shows pH dependence reminiscent of that required for the release of intrinsic zymogen proparts so that activation can occur. PMID:16895485

  10. The preRC protein ORCA organizes heterochromatin by assembling histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferases on chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Sumanprava; Aggarwal, Vasudha; Pontis, Julien; Shen, Zhen; Chakraborty, Arindam; Khan, Abid; Mizzen, Craig; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane; Ha, Taekjip; Prasanth, Supriya G

    2015-01-01

    Heterochromatic domains are enriched with repressive histone marks, including histone H3 lysine 9 methylation, written by lysine methyltransferases (KMTs). The pre-replication complex protein, origin recognition complex-associated (ORCA/LRWD1), preferentially localizes to heterochromatic regions in post-replicated cells. Its role in heterochromatin organization remained elusive. ORCA recognizes methylated H3K9 marks and interacts with repressive KMTs, including G9a/GLP and Suv39H1 in a chromatin context-dependent manner. Single-molecule pull-down assays demonstrate that ORCA-ORC (Origin Recognition Complex) and multiple H3K9 KMTs exist in a single complex and that ORCA stabilizes H3K9 KMT complex. Cells lacking ORCA show alterations in chromatin architecture, with significantly reduced H3K9 di- and tri-methylation at specific chromatin sites. Changes in heterochromatin structure due to loss of ORCA affect replication timing, preferentially at the late-replicating regions. We demonstrate that ORCA acts as a scaffold for the establishment of H3K9 KMT complex and its association and activity at specific chromatin sites is crucial for the organization of heterochromatin structure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06496.001 PMID:25922909

  11. Class I Lysine Deacetylases Facilitate Glucocorticoid-induced Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Kadiyala, Vineela; Patrick, Nina M.; Mathieu, Wana; Jaime-Frias, Rosa; Pookhao, Naruekamol; An, Lingling; Smith, Catharine L.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors use lysine acetyltransferases and lysine deacetylases (KDACs) in regulating transcription through histone acetylation. Lysine acetyltransferases interact with steroid receptors upon binding of an agonist and are recruited to target genes. KDACs have been shown to interact with steroid receptors upon binding to an antagonist. We have shown previously that KDAC inhibitors (KDACis) potently repress the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter through transcriptional mechanisms and impair the ability of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to activate it, suggesting that KDACs can play a positive role in GR transactivation. In the current study, we extended this analysis to the entire GR transcriptome and found that the KDACi valproic acid impairs the ability of agonist-bound GR to activate about 50% of its target genes. This inhibition is largely due to impaired transcription rather than defective GR processing and was also observed using a structurally distinct KDACi. Depletion of KDAC1 expression mimicked the effects of KDACi in over half of the genes found to be impaired in GR transactivation. Simultaneous depletion of KDACs 1 and 2 caused full or partial impairment of several more GR target genes. Altogether we found that Class I KDAC activity facilitates GR-mediated activation at a sizable fraction of GR-activated target genes and that KDAC1 alone or in coordination with KDAC2 is required for efficient GR transactivation at many of these target genes. Finally, our work demonstrates that KDACi exposure has a significant impact on GR signaling and thus has ramifications for the clinical use of these drugs. PMID:23946490

  12. Radiation inactivation study of aminopeptidase: probing the active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamadar, V. K.; Jamdar, S. N.; Mohan, Hari; Dandekar, S. P.; Harikumar, P.

    2004-04-01

    Ionizing radiation inactivated purified chicken intestinal aminopeptidase in media saturated with gases in the order N 2O>N 2>air. The D 37 values in the above conditions were 281, 210 and 198 Gy, respectively. OH radical scavengers such as t-butanol and isopropanol effectively nullified the radiation-induced damage in N 2O. The radicals (SCN) 2•-, Br 2•- and I 2•- inactivated the enzyme, pointing to the involvement of aromatic amino acids and cysteine in its catalytic activity. The enzyme exhibited fluorescence emission at 340 nm which is characteristic of tryptophan. The radiation-induced loss of activity was accompanied by a decrease in the fluorescence of the enzyme suggesting a predominant influence on tryptophan residues. The enzyme inhibition was associated with a marked increase in the Km and a decrease in the Vmax and kcat values, suggesting an irreversible alteration in the catalytic site. The above observations were confirmed by pulse radiolysis studies.

  13. Mimicking enzymatic active sites on surfaces for energy conversion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gutzler, Rico; Stepanow, Sebastian; Grumelli, Doris; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Kern, Klaus

    2015-07-21

    Metal-organic supramolecular chemistry on surfaces has matured to a point where its underlying growth mechanisms are well understood and structures of defined coordination environments of metal atoms can be synthesized in a controlled and reproducible procedure. With surface-confined molecular self-assembly, scientists have a tool box at hand which can be used to prepare structures with desired properties, as for example a defined oxidation number and spin state of the transition metal atoms within the organic matrix. From a structural point of view, these coordination sites in the supramolecular structure resemble the catalytically active sites of metallo-enzymes, both characterized by metal centers coordinated to organic ligands. Several chemical reactions take place at these embedded metal ions in enzymes and the question arises whether these reactions also take place using metal-organic networks as catalysts. Mimicking the active site of metal atoms and organic ligands of enzymes in artificial systems is the key to understanding the selectivity and efficiency of enzymatic reactions. Their catalytic activity depends on various parameters including the charge and spin configuration in the metal ion, but also on the organic environment, which can stabilize intermediate reaction products, inhibits catalytic deactivation, and serves mostly as a transport channel for the reactants and products and therefore ensures the selectivity of the enzyme. Charge and spin on the transition metal in enzymes depend on the one hand on the specific metal element, and on the other hand on its organic coordination environment. These two parameters can carefully be adjusted in surface confined metal-organic networks, which can be synthesized by virtue of combinatorial mixing of building synthons. Different organic ligands with varying functional groups can be combined with several transition metals and spontaneously assemble into ordered networks. The catalytically active metal

  14. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-06-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work.

  15. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  16. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug for pulmonary administration: design and investigation of ketoprofen lysinate fine dry powders.

    PubMed

    Stigliani, Mariateresa; Aquino, Rita P; Del Gaudio, Pasquale; Mencherini, Teresa; Sansone, Francesca; Russo, Paola

    2013-05-01

    Pulmonary inflammation is an important therapeutic target in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, aiming to limit and delay the lung damage. The purpose of the present research was to produce respirable engineered particles of ketoprofen lysinate, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug able to fight lung inflammatory status by direct administration to the site of action. Micronized drug powders containing leucine as dispersibility enhancer were prepared by co-spray drying the active compound and the excipient from water or hydro-alcoholic feeds. Microparticles were fully characterized in terms of process yield, particle size distribution, morphology and drug content. The ability of the drug to reach the deepest airways after aerosolization of spray-dried formulations was evaluated by Andersen cascade impactor, using the monodose DPI as device. In order to investigate the behaviour of the drug once in contact with lung fluid, an artificial CF mucus was prepared. Drug permeation properties were evaluated interposing the mucus layer between the drug and a synthetic membrane mounted in Franz-type diffusion cells. Finally, the effect of the engineered particles on vitality of human airway epithelial cells of patients homozygous for ΔF 508 CF (CuFi1) was studied and compared to that of raw active compound. Results indicated that powders engineering changed the diameter and shape of the particles, making them suitable for inhalation. The mucus layer in the donor compartment of vertical diffusion cells slowed down drug dissolution and permeation, leucine having no influence. Cell proliferation studies evidenced that the spray drying process together with the addition of leucine reduced the cytotoxic effect of ketoprofen lysine salt as raw material, making the ketoprofen lysinate DPI a very promising product for the inflammation control in CF patients.

  17. Spectroscopic Definition of the Ferroxidase Site in M Ferritin: Comparison of Binuclear Substrate vs. Cofactor Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jennifer K.; Liu, Xiaofeng S.; Tosha, Takehiko; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2008-01-01

    Maxi ferritins, 24 subunit protein nanocages, are essential in humans, plants, bacteria, and other animals for the concentration and storage of iron as hydrated ferric oxide, while minimizing free radical generation or use by pathogens. Formation of the precursors to these ferric oxides is catalyzed at a non-heme biferrous substrate site, which has some parallels with the cofactor sites in other biferrous enzymes. A combination of circular dichroism (CD), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH MCD) has been used to probe Fe(II) binding to the substrate active site in frog M ferritin. These data determined that the active site within each subunit consists of two inequivalent five-coordinate (5C) ferrous centers that are weakly anti-ferromagnetically coupled, consistent with a μ-1,3 carboxylate bridge. The active site ligand set is unusual and likely includes a terminal water bound to each Fe(II) center. The Fe(II) ions bind to the active sites in a concerted manner, and cooperativity among the sites in each subunit is observed, potentially providing a mechanism for the control of ferritin iron loading. Differences in geometric and electronic structure – including a weak ligand field, availability of two water ligands at the biferrous substrate site, and the single carboxylate bridge in ferritin – coincide with the divergent reaction pathways observed between this substrate site and the previously studied cofactor active sites. PMID:18576633

  18. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth.

  19. Eel calcitonin binding site distribution and antinociceptive activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Guidobono, F.; Netti, C.; Sibilia, V.; Villa, I.; Zamboni, A.; Pecile, A.

    1986-03-01

    The distribution of binding site for (/sup 125/I)-eel-calcitonin (ECT) to rat central nervous system, studied by an autoradiographic technique, showed concentrations of binding in the diencephalon, the brain stem and the spinal cord. Large accumulations of grains were seen in the hypothalamus, the amygdala, in the fasciculus medialis prosencephali, in the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, in the ventrolateral part of the periventricular gray matter, in the lemniscus medialis and in the raphe nuclei. The density of grains in the reticular formation and in the nucleus tractus spinalis nervi trigemini was more moderate. In the spinal cord, grains were scattered throughout the dorsal horns. Binding of the ligand was displaced equally by cold ECT and by salmon CT(sCT), indicating that both peptides bind to the same receptors. Human CT was much weaker than sCT in displacing (/sup 125/I)-ECT binding. The administration of ECT into the brain ventricles of rats dose-dependently induced a significant and long-lasting enhancement of hot-plate latencies comparable with that obtained with sCT. The antinociceptive activity induced by ECT is compatible with the topographical distribution of binding sites for the peptide and is a further indication that fish CTs are active in the mammalian brain.

  20. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  1. Oligonucleotides containing a lysine residue as 3'-3' junction for alternate strand triple helix formation.

    PubMed

    Barone, G; De Napoli, L; Di Fabio, G; Giancola, C; Messere, A; Montesarchio, D; Petraccone, L; Piccialli, G

    2001-11-01

    Oligonucleotides with a 3'-3' inversion of polarity site assured by one lysine residue have been synthesized, characterized and used as third strands in alternate strand triple helix formation. UV melting studies and molecular mechanics calculations have been carried out to investigate the stability and the geometry of these new triplexes.

  2. First Comprehensive Proteome Analyses of Lysine Acetylation and Succinylation in Seedling Leaves of Brachypodium distachyon L.

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Shoumin; Deng, Xiong; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Gengrui; Cao, Hui; Yuan, Linlin; Yan, Yueming

    2016-01-01

    Protein acetylation and succinylation are the most crucial protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) involved in the regulation of plant growth and development. In this study, we present the first lysine-acetylation and lysine-succinylation proteome analysis of seedling leaves in Brachypodium distachyon L (Bd). Using high accuracy nano LC-MS/MS combined with affinity purification, we identified a total of 636 lysine-acetylated sites in 353 proteins and 605 lysine-succinylated sites in 262 proteins. These proteins participated in many biology processes, with various molecular functions. In particular, 119 proteins and 115 sites were found to be both acetylated and succinylated, simultaneously. Among the 353 acetylated proteins, 148 had acetylation orthologs in Oryza sativa L., Arabidopsis thaliana, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and Glycine max L. Among the 262 succinylated proteins, 170 of them were found to have homologous proteins in Oryza sativa L., Escherichia coli, Sacchayromyces cerevisiae, or Homo sapiens. Motif-X analysis of the acetylated and succinylated sites identified two new acetylated motifs (K---K and K-I-K) and twelve significantly enriched succinylated motifs for the first time, which could serve as possible binding loci for future studies in plants. Our comprehensive dataset provides a promising starting point for further functional analysis of acetylation and succinylation in Bd and other plant species. PMID:27515067

  3. Metabolite proofreading in carnosine and homocarnosine synthesis: molecular identification of PM20D2 as β-alanyl-lysine dipeptidase.

    PubMed

    Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Chevalier, Nathalie; Stroobant, Vincent; Vertommen, Didier; Van Schaftingen, Emile

    2014-07-11

    Carnosine synthase is the ATP-dependent ligase responsible for carnosine (β-alanyl-histidine) and homocarnosine (γ-aminobutyryl-histidine) synthesis in skeletal muscle and brain, respectively. This enzyme uses, also at substantial rates, lysine, ornithine, and arginine instead of histidine, yet the resulting dipeptides are virtually absent from muscle or brain, suggesting that they are removed by a "metabolite repair" enzyme. Using a radiolabeled substrate, we found that rat skeletal muscle, heart, and brain contained a cytosolic β-alanyl-lysine dipeptidase activity. This enzyme, which has the characteristics of a metalloenzyme, was purified ≈ 200-fold from rat skeletal muscle. Mass spectrometry analysis of the fractions obtained at different purification stages indicated parallel enrichment of PM20D2, a peptidase of unknown function belonging to the metallopeptidase 20 family. Western blotting showed coelution of PM20D2 with β-alanyl-lysine dipeptidase activity. Recombinant mouse PM20D2 hydrolyzed β-alanyl-lysine, β-alanyl-ornithine, γ-aminobutyryl-lysine, and γ-aminobutyryl-ornithine as its best substrates. It also acted at lower rates on β-alanyl-arginine and γ-aminobutyryl-arginine but virtually not on carnosine or homocarnosine. Although acting preferentially on basic dipeptides derived from β-alanine or γ-aminobutyrate, PM20D2 also acted at lower rates on some "classic dipeptides" like α-alanyl-lysine and α-lysyl-lysine. The same activity profile was observed with human PM20D2, yet this enzyme was ∼ 100-200-fold less active on all substrates tested than the mouse enzyme. Cotransfection in HEK293T cells of mouse or human PM20D2 together with carnosine synthase prevented the accumulation of abnormal dipeptides (β-alanyl-lysine, β-alanyl-ornithine, γ-aminobutyryl-lysine), thus favoring the synthesis of carnosine and homocarnosine and confirming the metabolite repair role of PM20D2.

  4. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  5. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  6. Brain uptake of ketoprofen-lysine prodrug in rats.

    PubMed

    Gynther, Mikko; Jalkanen, Aaro; Lehtonen, Marko; Forsberg, Markus; Laine, Krista; Ropponen, Jarmo; Leppänen, Jukka; Knuuti, Johanna; Rautio, Jarkko

    2010-10-31

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) controls the entry of xenobiotics into the brain. Often the development of central nervous system drugs needs to be terminated because of their poor brain uptake. We describe a way to achieve large neutral amino acid transporter (LAT1)-mediated drug transport into the rat brain. We conjugated ketoprofen to an amino acid l-lysine so that the prodrug could access LAT1. The LAT1-mediated brain uptake of the prodrug was demonstrated with in situ rat brain perfusion technique. The ability of the prodrug to deliver ketoprofen into the site of action, the brain intracellular fluid, was determined combining in vivo and in vitro experiments. A rapid brain uptake from blood and cell uptake was seen both in in situ and in vivo experiments. Therefore, our results show that a prodrug approach can achieve uptake of drugs via LAT1 into the brain intracellular fluid. The distribution of the prodrug in the brain parenchyma and the site of parent drug release in the brain were shown with in vivo and in vitro studies. In addition, our results show that although lysine or ketoprofen are not LAT1-substrates themselves, by combining these molecules, the formed prodrug has affinity for LAT1. PMID:20727958

  7. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  8. Site-Selective Recording of Spontaneous Activity from Cultured Small Neuronal Circuits by Means of Spray-Patterning and a Mobile Microelectrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Tamai, Nobuhiro; Takayama, Yuzo; Kurashima, Toshiaki; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    In order to precisely grasp the self-organization process of functional neuronal circuits from individual immature neurons, electrical activity of neuronal circuits should be continuously recorded with their well-defined inner structures and boundary conditions. Standing on this viewpoint, we have developed a series of practical experimental methods for the non-invasive recording of electrical activity from cultured small neuronal circuits by combining a simple micropatterning method of cultured neurons and a site-selective extracellular recording method. The micropatterning was demonstrated with a commercially available spray, and thousands of small neuronal circuits were formed in a 35-mm polystyrene dish by spraying PDL (poly-D-lysine) solution onto the BSA (bovine serum albumin)-coated culture surface. These small neuronal circuits consisted of several neurons and kept well-patterned for more than two weeks. The site-selective recording was demonstrated by means of a handmade mobile microelectrode, and spontaneous firings were detected at multiple recording sites in a small neuronal circuit. This series of experimental methods can be directly applicable to the investigation into the developmental process of the morphology and the functions of various electrically excitable multicellular organisms.

  9. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  10. Two protein lysine methyltransferases methylate outer membrane protein B from Rickettsia.

    PubMed

    Abeykoon, Amila H; Chao, Chien-Chung; Wang, Guanghui; Gucek, Marjan; Yang, David C H; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2012-12-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii, the etiologic agent of epidemic typhus, is a potential biological threat agent. Its outer membrane protein B (OmpB) is an immunodominant antigen and plays roles as protective envelope and as adhesins. The observation of the correlation between methylation of lysine residues in rickettsial OmpB and bacterial virulence has suggested the importance of an enzymatic system for the methylation of OmpB. However, no rickettsial lysine methyltransferase has been characterized. Bioinformatic analysis of genomic DNA sequences of Rickettsia identified putative lysine methyltransferases. The genes of the potential methyltransferases were synthesized, cloned, and expressed in Escherichia coli, and expressed proteins were purified by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) affinity chromatography. The methyltransferase activities of the purified proteins were analyzed by methyl incorporation of radioactively labeled S-adenosylmethionine into recombinant fragments of OmpB. Two putative recombinant methyltransferases (rRP789 and rRP027-028) methylated recombinant OmpB fragments. The specific activity of rRP789 is 10- to 30-fold higher than that of rRP027-028. Western blot analysis using specific antibodies against trimethyl lysine showed that both rRP789 and rRP027-028 catalyzed trimethylation of recombinant OmpB fragments. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) analysis showed that rRP789 catalyzed mono-, di-, and trimethylation of lysine, while rRP027-028 catalyzed exclusively trimethylation. To our knowledge, rRP789 and rRP027-028 are the first biochemically characterized lysine methyltransferases of outer membrane proteins from Gram-negative bacteria. The production and characterization of rickettsial lysine methyltransferases provide new tools to investigate the mechanism of methylation of OmpB, effects of methylation on the structure and function of OmpB, and development of methylated OmpB-based diagnostic assays and vaccine candidates.

  11. Mapping and genotypic analysis of the NK-lysin gene in chicken

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial peptides (AMP) are important elements of the first line of defence against pathogens in animals. NK-lysin is a cationic AMP that plays a critical role in innate immunity. The chicken NK-lysin gene has been cloned and its antimicrobial and anticancer activity has been described but its location in the chicken genome remains unknown. Here, we mapped the NK-lysin gene and examined the distribution of a functionally significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) among different chicken inbred lines and heritage breeds. Results A 6000 rad radiation hybrid panel (ChickRH6) was used to map the NK-lysin gene to the distal end of chromosome 22. Two additional genes, the adipocyte enhancer-binding protein 1-like gene (AEBP1) and the DNA polymerase delta subunit 2-like (POLD2) gene, are located in the same NW_003779909 contig as NK-lysin, and were thus indirectly mapped to chromosome 22 as well. Previously, we reported a functionally significant SNP at position 271 of the NK-lysin coding sequence in two different chicken breeds. Here, we examined this SNP and found that the A allele appears to be more common than the G allele in these heritage breeds and inbred lines. Conclusions The chicken NK-lysin gene mapped to the distal end of chromosome 22. Two additional genes, AEBP1 and POLD2, were indirectly mapped to chromosome 22 also. SNP analyses revealed that the A allele, which encodes a peptide with a higher antimicrobial activity, is more common than the G allele in our tested inbred lines and heritage breeds. PMID:25001618

  12. Active site loop conformation regulates promiscuous activity in a lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a "hot spot" in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity.

  13. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  14. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site.

    PubMed

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called 'catalytic residues' are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. PMID:25902402

  15. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site.

    PubMed

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called 'catalytic residues' are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes.

  16. Bioavailability of free lysine and protein-bound lysine from casein and fishmeal in juvenile turbot (Psetta maxima).

    PubMed

    Kroeckel, Saskia; Dietz, Carsten; Schulz, Carsten; Susenbeth, Andreas

    2015-03-14

    In the present study, a linear regression analysis between lysine intake and lysine retention was conducted to investigate the efficiency of lysine utilisation (k(Lys)) at marginal lysine intake of either protein-bound or free lysine sources in juvenile turbot (Psetta maxima). For this purpose, nine isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets were formulated to contain 2·25-4·12 g lysine/100 g crude protein (CP) to ensure that lysine was the first-limiting amino acid in all diets. The basal diet contained 2·25 g lysine/100 g CP. Graded levels of casein (Cas), fishmeal (FM) and L-lysine HCl (Lys) were added to the experimental diets to achieve stepwise lysine increments. A total of 240 fish (initial weight 50·1 g) were hand-fed all the experimental diets once daily until apparent satiation over a period of 56 d. Feed intake was significantly affected by dietary lysine concentration rather than by dietary lysine source. Specific growth rate increased significantly at higher lysine concentrations (P< 0·001). CP, crude lipid and crude ash contents in the whole body were affected by the dietary treatments. The linear regression slope between lysine retention and lysine intake (k(Lys)) was similar between all the dietary lysine sources. The k(Lys) values for the diets supplemented with Cas, Lys or FM were 0·833, 0·857 and 0·684, respectively. The bioavailability of lysine from the respective lysine sources was determined by a slope-ratio approach. The bioavailability of lysine (relative to the reference lysine source Cas) from FM and Lys was 82·1 and 103 %, respectively. Nutrient requirement for maintenance was in the range of 16·7-23·4 mg/kg(0·8) per d, and did not differ between the treatments. There were no significant differences in lysine utilisation efficiency or bioavailability of protein-bound or crystalline lysine from the respective sources observed when lysine was confirmed to be the first-limiting nutrient.

  17. Lysine Propionylation Is a Prevalent Post-translational Modification in Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Okanishi, Hiroki; Kim, Kwang; Masui, Ryoji; Kuramitsu, Seiki

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies of protein post-translational modifications revealed that various types of lysine acylation occur in eukaryotic and bacterial proteins. Lysine propionylation, a newly discovered type of acylation, occurs in several proteins, including some histones. In this study, we identified 361 propionylation sites in 183 mid-exponential phase and late stationary phase proteins from Thermus thermophilus HB8, an extremely thermophilic eubacterium. Functional classification of the propionylproteins revealed that the number of propionylation sites in metabolic enzymes increased in late stationary phase, irrespective of protein abundance. The propionylation sites on proteins expressed in mid-exponential and late stationary phases partially overlapped. Furthermore, amino acid frequencies in the vicinity of propionylation sites differed, not only between the two growth phases but also relative to acetylation sites. In addition, 33.8% of mid-exponential phase–specific and 80.0% of late stationary phase–specific propionylations (n ≥ 2) implied that specific mechanisms regulate propionylation in the cell. Moreover, the limited degree of overlap between lysine propionylation (36.8%) and acetylation (49.2%) sites in 67 proteins that were both acetylated and propionylated strongly suggested that the two acylation reactions are regulated separately by specific enzymes and may serve different functions. Finally, we also found that eight propionylation sites overlapped with acetylation sites critical for protein functions such as Schiff-base formation and ligand binding. PMID:24938286

  18. Recombinant expression, molecular characterization and crystal structure of antitumor enzyme, L-lysine α-oxidase from Trichoderma viride.

    PubMed

    Amano, Marie; Mizuguchi, Haruka; Sano, Tadahisa; Kondo, Hiroki; Shinyashiki, Kengo; Inagaki, Junko; Tamura, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Kusakabe, Hitoshi; Imada, Katsumi; Inagaki, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    L-Lysine α-oxidase (LysOX) from Trichoderma viride is a homodimeric 112 kDa flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-lysine to form α-keto-ε-aminocaproate. LysOX severely inhibited growth of cancer cells but showed relatively low cytotoxicity for normal cells. We have determined the cDNA nucleotide sequence encoding LysOX from T. viride. The full-length cDNA consists of 2,119 bp and encodes a possible signal peptide (Met1-Arg77) and the mature protein (Ala78-Ile617). The LysOX gene have been cloned and heterologously expressed in Streptomyces lividans TK24 with the enzyme activity up to 9.8 U/ml. The enzymatic properties of the purified recombinant LysOX, such as substrate specificity and thermal stability, are same as those of native LysOX. The crystal structure of LysOX at 1.9 Å resolution revealed that the overall structure is similar to that of snake venom L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO), and the residues involved in the interaction with the amino or carboxy group of the substrate are structurally conserved. However, the entrance and the inner surface structures of the funnel to the active site, as well as the residues involved in the substrate side-chain recognition, are distinct from LAAOs. These structural differences well explain the unique substrate specificity of LysOX. PMID:25648943

  19. Mechanism of adenylate kinase. Are the essential lysines essential?

    PubMed

    Tian, G C; Yan, H G; Jiang, R T; Kishi, F; Nakazawa, A; Tsai, M D

    1990-05-01

    Using site-specific mutagenesis, we have probed the structural and functional roles of lysine-21 and lysine-27 of adenylate kinase (AK) from chicken muscle expressed in Escherichia coli. The two residues were chosen since according to the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) model [Mildvan, A. S., & Fry, D. C. (1987) Adv. Enzymol. 58, 241-313], they are located near the alpha- and the gamma-phosphates, respectively, of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) in the AK-MgATP complex. In addition, a lysine residue (Lys-21 in the case of AK) along with a glycine-rich loop is considered "essential" in the catalysis of kinases and other nucleotide binding proteins. The Lys-27 to methionine (K27M) mutant showed only slight increases in kcat and Km, but a substantial increase (1.8 kcal/mol) in the free energy of unfolding, relative to the WT AK. For proper interpretation of the steady-state kinetic data, viscosity-dependent kinetics was used to show that the chemical step is partially rate-limiting in the catalysis of AK. Computer modeling suggested that the folded form of K27M could gain stability (relative to the wild type) via hydrophobic interactions of Met-27 with Val-179 and Phe-183 and/or formation of a charge-transfer complex between Met-27 and Phe-183. The latter was supported by an upfield shift of the methyl protons of Met-27 in 1H NMR. Other than this, the 1H NMR spectrum of K27M is very similar to that of WT, suggesting little perturbation in the global or even local conformations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2161682

  20. Co- and Post-Treatment with Lysine Protects Primary Fish Enterocytes against Cu-Induced Oxidative Damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Yin; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the work was primarily to explore the protective activity pathways of lysine against oxidative damage in fish in vivo and in enterocytes in vitro. First, grass carp were fed diets containing six graded levels of lysine (7.1-19.6 g kg-1 diet) for 56 days. Second, the enterocytes were treated with different concentrations of lysine (0-300 mg/L in media) prior to (pre-treatment), along with (co-treatment) or following (post-treatment) with 6 mg/L of Cu for 24 h. The results indicated that lysine improved grass carp growth performance. Meanwhile, lysine ameliorated lipid and protein oxidation by elevating the gene expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathioneperoxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and reductase (GR)), and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) mRNA levels in fish intestine. The in vitro studies showed that co- and post-treatment with lysine conferred significant protection against Cu-induced oxidative damage in fish primary enterocytes as measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) OD values, along with alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase activities, and the depletion of protein carbonyl (PC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine contents. Moreover, lysine co-treatment decreased the activities and mRNA level of cellular SOD, GPx, GST and GR compared with the Cu-only exposed group. Gene expression of the signalling molecule Nrf2 showed the same pattern as that of SOD activity, whereas Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1b (Keap1b) followed the opposite trend, indicating that co-treatment with lysine induced antioxidant enzymes that protected against oxidative stress through Nrf2 pathway. In addition, post-treatment with lysine increased proteasomal activity and blocked the Cu-stimulated increase in mRNA levels of GST and associated catalase (CAT) and GST activities (P<0.01 and P<0.001). GR activity and gene

  1. Co- and Post-Treatment with Lysine Protects Primary Fish Enterocytes against Cu-Induced Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-Yin; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the work was primarily to explore the protective activity pathways of lysine against oxidative damage in fish in vivo and in enterocytes in vitro. First, grass carp were fed diets containing six graded levels of lysine (7.1–19.6 g kg-1 diet) for 56 days. Second, the enterocytes were treated with different concentrations of lysine (0–300 mg/L in media) prior to (pre-treatment), along with (co-treatment) or following (post-treatment) with 6 mg/L of Cu for 24 h. The results indicated that lysine improved grass carp growth performance. Meanwhile, lysine ameliorated lipid and protein oxidation by elevating the gene expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathioneperoxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and reductase (GR)), and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) mRNA levels in fish intestine. The in vitro studies showed that co- and post-treatment with lysine conferred significant protection against Cu-induced oxidative damage in fish primary enterocytes as measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) OD values, along with alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase activities, and the depletion of protein carbonyl (PC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine contents. Moreover, lysine co-treatment decreased the activities and mRNA level of cellular SOD, GPx, GST and GR compared with the Cu-only exposed group. Gene expression of the signalling molecule Nrf2 showed the same pattern as that of SOD activity, whereas Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1b (Keap1b) followed the opposite trend, indicating that co-treatment with lysine induced antioxidant enzymes that protected against oxidative stress through Nrf2 pathway. In addition, post-treatment with lysine increased proteasomal activity and blocked the Cu-stimulated increase in mRNA levels of GST and associated catalase (CAT) and GST activities (P<0.01 and P<0.001). GR activity and gene

  2. Metals in the active site of native protein phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Heroes, Ewald; Rip, Jens; Beullens, Monique; Van Meervelt, Luc; De Gendt, Stefan; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a major protein Ser/Thr phosphatase in eukaryotic cells. Its activity depends on two metal ions in the catalytic site, which were identified as manganese in the bacterially expressed phosphatase. However, the identity of the metal ions in native PP1 is unknown. In this study, total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to detect iron and zinc in PP1 that was purified from rabbit skeletal muscle. Metal exchange experiments confirmed that the distinct substrate specificity of recombinant and native PP1 is determined by the nature of their associated metals. We also found that the iron level associated with native PP1 is decreased by incubation with inhibitor-2, consistent with a function of inhibitor-2 as a PP1 chaperone. PMID:25890482

  3. Comprehensive profiling of lysine acetylation suggests the widespread function is regulated by protein acetylation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zuoming; Zhu, Honglin; Zhou, Yong; Wu, Chengcheng; Liu, Yue; Sheng, Qing; Lv, Zhengbing; Zhang, Wenping; Yu, Wei; Jiang, Caiying; Xie, Longfei; Zhang, Yaozhou; Yao, Juming

    2015-09-01

    Lysine acetylation in proteins is a dynamic and reversible PTM and plays an important role in diverse cellular processes. In this study, using lysine-acetylation (Kac) peptide enrichment coupled with nano HPLC/MS/MS, we initially identified the acetylome in the silkworms. Overall, a total of 342 acetylated proteins with 667 Kac sites were identified in silkworm. Sequence motifs analysis around Kac sites revealed an enrichment of Y, F, and H in the +1 position, and F was also enriched in the +2 and -2 positions, indicating the presences of preferred amino acids around Kac sites in the silkworm. Functional analysis showed the acetylated proteins were primarily involved in some specific biological processes. Furthermore, lots of nutrient-storage proteins, such as apolipophorin, vitellogenin, storage proteins, and 30 K proteins, were highly acetylated, indicating lysine acetylation may represent a common regulatory mechanism of nutrient utilization in the silkworm. Interestingly, Ser2 proteins, the coating proteins of larval silk, were found to contain many Kac sites, suggesting lysine acetylation may be involved in the regulation of larval silk synthesis. This study is the first to identify the acetylome in a lepidoptera insect, and expands greatly the catalog of lysine acetylation substrates and sites in insects.

  4. Metavanadate at the active site of the phosphatase VHZ.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav I; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Hengge, Alvan C

    2012-09-01

    Vanadate is a potent modulator of a number of biological processes and has been shown by crystal structures and NMR spectroscopy to interact with numerous enzymes. Although these effects often occur under conditions where oligomeric forms dominate, the crystal structures and NMR data suggest that the inhibitory form is usually monomeric orthovanadate, a particularly good inhibitor of phosphatases because of its ability to form stable trigonal-bipyramidal complexes. We performed a computational analysis of a 1.14 Å structure of the phosphatase VHZ in complex with an unusual metavanadate species and compared it with two classical trigonal-bipyramidal vanadate-phosphatase complexes. The results support extensive delocalized bonding to the apical ligands in the classical structures. In contrast, in the VHZ metavanadate complex, the central, planar VO(3)(-) moiety has only one apical ligand, the nucleophilic Cys95, and a gap in electron density between V and S. A computational analysis showed that the V-S interaction is primarily ionic. A mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of metavanadate in the active site from a dimeric vanadate species that previous crystallographic evidence has shown to be able to bind to the active sites of phosphatases related to VHZ. Together, the results show that the interaction of vanadate with biological systems is not solely reliant upon the prior formation of a particular inhibitory form in solution. The catalytic properties of an enzyme may act upon the oligomeric forms primarily present in solution to generate species such as the metavanadate ion observed in the VHZ structure. PMID:22876963

  5. Zymogen Activation and Subcellular Activity of Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme 1/Site 1 Protease*

    PubMed Central

    da Palma, Joel Ramos; Burri, Dominique Julien; Oppliger, Joël; Salamina, Marco; Cendron, Laura; de Laureto, Patrizia Polverino; Seidah, Nabil Georges; Kunz, Stefan; Pasquato, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin isozyme 1 (SKI-1)/site 1 protease (S1P) plays crucial roles in cellular homeostatic functions and is hijacked by pathogenic viruses for the processing of their envelope glycoproteins. Zymogen activation of SKI-1/S1P involves sequential autocatalytic processing of its N-terminal prodomain at sites B′/B followed by the herein newly identified C′/C sites. We found that SKI-1/S1P autoprocessing results in intermediates whose catalytic domain remains associated with prodomain fragments of different lengths. In contrast to other zymogen proprotein convertases, all incompletely matured intermediates of SKI-1/S1P showed full catalytic activity toward cellular substrates, whereas optimal cleavage of viral glycoproteins depended on B′/B processing. Incompletely matured forms of SKI-1/S1P further process cellular and viral substrates in distinct subcellular compartments. Using a cell-based sensor for SKI-1/S1P activity, we found that 9 amino acid residues at the cleavage site (P1–P8) and P1′ are necessary and sufficient to define the subcellular location of processing and to determine to what extent processing of a substrate depends on SKI-1/S1P maturation. In sum, our study reveals novel and unexpected features of SKI-1/S1P zymogen activation and subcellular specificity of activity toward cellular and pathogen-derived substrates. PMID:25378398

  6. 21 CFR 582.5411 - Lysine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lysine. 582.5411 Section 582.5411 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5411 - Lysine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lysine. 582.5411 Section 582.5411 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5411 - Lysine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lysine. 582.5411 Section 582.5411 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5411 - Lysine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lysine. 582.5411 Section 582.5411 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5411 - Lysine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lysine. 582.5411 Section 582.5411 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  11. Radioactive Lysine in Protein Metabolism Studies

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Miller, L. L.; Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; Masters, R. E.; Tishkoff, G. H.; Whipple,, G. H.

    1950-01-09

    Studies of incorporation of DL-lysine in various body proteins of the dog; the time course of labeled blood proteins; and apparent rate of disappearance of labeled plasma proteins for comparison of behavior of the plasma albumin and globulin fractions; shows more rapid turn over of globulin fraction.

  12. How modification of accessible lysines to phenylalanine modulates the structural and functional properties of horseradish peroxidase: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Navapour, Leila; Mogharrab, Navid; Amininasab, Mehriar

    2014-01-01

    Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP) is one of the most studied peroxidases and a great number of chemical modifications and genetic manipulations have been carried out on its surface accessible residues to improve its stability and catalytic efficiency necessary for biotechnological applications. Most of the stabilized derivatives of HRP reported to date have involved chemical or genetic modifications of three surface-exposed lysines (K174, K232 and K241). In this computational study, we altered these lysines to phenylalanine residues to model those chemical modifications or genetic manipulations in which these positively charged lysines are converted to aromatic hydrophobic residues. Simulation results implied that upon these substitutions, the protein structure becomes less flexible. Stability gains are likely to be achieved due to the increased number of stable hydrogen bonds, improved heme-protein interactions and more integrated proximal Ca2+ binding pocket. We also found a new persistent hydrogen bond between the protein moiety (F174) and the heme prosthetic group as well as two stitching hydrogen bonds between the connecting loops GH and F'F″ in mutated HRP. However, detailed analysis of functionally related structural properties and dynamical features suggests reduced reactivity of the enzyme toward its substrates. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that substitutions narrow the bottle neck entry of peroxide substrate access channel and reduce the surface accessibility of the distal histidine (H42) and heme prosthetic group to the peroxide and aromatic substrates, respectively. Results also demonstrated that the area and volume of the aromatic-substrate binding pocket are significantly decreased upon modifications. Moreover, the hydrophobic patch functioning as a binding site or trap for reducing aromatic substrates is shrunk in mutated enzyme. Together, the results of this simulation study could provide possible structural clues to explain those experimental

  13. A method for systematic mapping of protein lysine methylation identifies new functions for HP1β in DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huadong; Galka, Marek; Liu, Xuguang; Lin, Yu-fen; Pittock, Paula; Voss, Courtney; Dhami, Gurpreet; Li, Xing; Miyaji, Masaaki; Lajoie, Gilles; Chen, Benjamin; Li, Shawn S.-C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lysine methylation occurs on both histone and non-histone proteins. However, our knowledge on the prevalence and function of non-histone protein methylation is poor. We describe here an approach that combines peptide array, bioinformatic and mass spectrometric analyses to systematically identify lysine methylation sites in proteins and methyllysine-mediated protein-protein interactions. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by identifying a methyllysine-driven interactome of the heterochromatin protein (HP) 1β and uncovering, simultaneously, numerous methyllysine sites on non-histone proteins. The HP1β interactome is enriched with proteins involved in DNA damage repair and RNA splicing. We showed that lysine methylation played a pivotal role in the function of the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and its interaction with HP1β during DNA damage response. Moreover, by combining heavy methyl SILAC with Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry (MS), we showed that lysine methylation underwent widespread and large changes in response to DNA damage. Our work indicates that lysine methylation is a highly dynamic post-translational modification occurring frequently on non-histone proteins and that the approach presented herein may be extended to many methyllysine-binding modules to systematically uncover lysine methylation events in the cell. PMID:23707759

  14. Lysine-acetylation as a fundamental regulator of Ran function: Implications for signaling of proteins of the Ras-superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Knyphausen, Philipp; Kuhlmann, Nora; de Boor, Susanne; Lammers, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The small GTP-binding protein Ran is involved in the regulation of essential cellular processes in interphase but also in mitotic cells: Ran controls the nucleocytoplasmic transport of proteins and RNA, it regulates mitotic spindle formation and nuclear envelope assembly. Deregulations in Ran dependent processes were implicated in the development of severe diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. To understand how Ran-function is regulated is therefore of highest importance. Recently, several lysine-acetylation sites in Ran were identified by quantitative mass-spectrometry, some being located in highly important regions such as the P-loop, switch I, switch II and the G5/SAK motif. We recently reported that lysine-acetylation regulates nearly all aspects of Ran-function such as RCC1 catalyzed nucleotide exchange, intrinsic nucleotide hydrolysis, its interaction with NTF2 and the formation of import- and export-complexes. As a hint for its biological importance, we identified Ran-specific lysine-deacetylases (KDACs) and -acetyltransferases (KATs). Also for other small GTPases such as Ras, Rho, Cdc42, and for many effectors and regulators thereof, lysine-acetylation sites were discovered. However, the functional impact of lysine-acetylation as a regulator of protein function has only been marginally investigated so far. We will discuss recent findings of lysine-acetylation as a novel modification to regulate Ras-protein signaling. PMID:26507377

  15. [Lysine production by Brevibacterium divaricatum NTU-2 and its recovery from the fermentation broth].

    PubMed

    Su, Y C; Hwang, S M; Huang, J H

    1990-08-01

    An accumulation of L-lysine of about 42 g/l (as L-lysine-HCl) was obtained by cultivating Brevibacterium divaricatum NTU-2 in a medium containing 10.0% glucose, 4.0% (NH4)2 SO4, 0.1% KH2 PO4, 0.04% Mg SO4.7H2 O, 30 ml/l soybean meal hydrolysate, 50 mg/l DL-methionine, 100 micrograms/l d-biotin, 100 micrograms/l thiamine-HCl and 5% CaCO3 at pH 7.0. The yield was about 48.8% based on consumed glucose. The L-lysine accumulated in the broth was recovered and purified by simply using a strong cation-exchange resin, Diaion SK1B. The absorbed L-lysine was eluted with 4% ammonia water, and the average adsorption and desorption rates estimated (by 10 repeated experiments) were found to be 96.1% and 97.5%, respectively. The eluate was concentrated to about 50% by volume and adjusted to pH 4.0 with 8 N HCl. The solution was concentrated again to one half volume and followed by adding three volumes of 95% ethanol. The crude crystals of L-lysine-HCl in purity of 89.5% were obtained by filtration. The recovery was 93.5%. The resulting crude crystals were then dissolved in water, and subjected to decolorization with 0.5% active carbon. The decolorized solution thus obtained was recrystalized by concentration and 95% ethanol addition. After filtration and drying at 80 degrees C for 3 hr, white crystalline L-lysine with purity of 99.2% was finally obtained. The overall recovery of L-lysine was up to 86.7%. PMID:2128693

  16. Enhanced L-lysine production from pretreated beet molasses by engineered Escherichia coli in fed-batch fermentation.

    PubMed

    He, Xun; Chen, Kequan; Li, Yan; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Hong; Qian, Juan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2015-08-01

    Faster sugar consumption rate and low-cost nitrogen source are required for the chemical biosynthesis using molasses. Five pretreatment methods were applied to beet molasses prior to fermentation through engineered Escherichia coli, respectively, and corn steep liquid was used as an organic nitrogen source to replace expensive yeast extract. Furthermore, the effects of different feeding strategy in fed-batch fermentation on L-lysine production were investigated. The experimental results showed that combined tricalcium phosphate, sulfuric acid, and activated carbon pretreatment method (TPSA) pretreatment could improve the sugar consumption rate most greatly, and the initial total sugar concentration of 35 g/L from TPSA-pretreated beet molasses gave the best results with respect to L-lysine production, dry cell weight concentration, and L-lysine yield in batch fermentation. Moreover, a mixture of low-cost corn steep liquid and yeast extract containing equal amount of nitrogen could be used as the organic nitrogen source for effective L-lysine fermentation, and constant speed feeding strategy of TPSA-pretreated beet molasses promoted L-lysine production by engineered E. coli. The TPSA-pretreated beet molasses had a sugar consumption rate of 1.75 g/(L h), and a L-lysine yield of 27.81% was achieved, compared with the theoretical yield of 62% by glucose. It was clarified that the pretreatment significantly enhanced the conversion of sugars in beet molasses to L-lysine.

  17. Site-specific PEGylation of lidamycin and its antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Shang, Boyang; Hu, Lei; Shao, Rongguang; Zhen, Yongsu

    2015-05-01

    In this study, N-terminal site-specific mono-PEGylation of the recombinant lidamycin apoprotein (rLDP) of lidamycin (LDM) was prepared using a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) derivative (M w 20 kDa) through a reactive terminal aldehyde group under weak acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The biochemical properties of mPEG-rLDP-AE, an enediyne-integrated conjugate, were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of mPEG-rLDP-AE was evaluated by MTT assays and in xenograft model. The results indicated that mPEG-rLDP-AE showed significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. After PEGylation, mPEG-rLDP still retained the binding capability to the enediyne AE and presented the physicochemical characteristics similar to that of native LDP. It is of interest that the PEGylation did not diminish the antitumor efficacy of LDM, implying the possibility that this derivative may function as a payload to deliver novel tumor-targeted drugs. PMID:26579455

  18. Lysines 3241 and 3260 of DNA-PKcs are important for genomic stability and radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Mori, Eiichiro; Davis, Anthony J; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Chen, David J

    2016-08-19

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine kinase that plays an essential role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. The DNA-PK holoenzyme consists of a catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and DNA-binding subunit (Ku70/80, Ku). Ku is a molecular sensor for double-stranded DNA and once bound to DSB ends it recruits DNA-PKcs to the DSB site. Subsequently, DNA-PKcs is activated and heavily phosphorylated, with these phosphorylations modulating DNA-PKcs. Although phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs is well studied, other post-translational modifications of DNA-PKcs are not. In this study, we aimed to determine if acetylation of DNA-PKcs regulates DNA-PKcs-dependent DSB repair. We report that DNA-PKcs is acetylated in vivo and identified two putative acetylation sites, lysine residues 3241 and 3260. Mutating these sites to block potential acetylation results in increased radiosensitive, a slight decrease in DSB repair capacity as assessed by γH2AX resolution, and increased chromosomal aberrations, especially quadriradial chromosomes. Together, our results provide evidence that acetylation potentially regulates DNA-PKcs. PMID:27297111

  19. Hybrid [FeFe]-hydrogenases with modified active sites show remarkable residual enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Siebel, Judith F; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Weber, Katharina; Rumpel, Sigrun; Reijerse, Edward; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-02-24

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are to date the only enzymes for which it has been demonstrated that the native inorganic binuclear cofactor of the active site Fe2(adt)(CO)3(CN)2 (adt = azadithiolate = [S-CH2-NH-CH2-S](2-)) can be synthesized on the laboratory bench and subsequently inserted into the unmaturated enzyme to yield fully functional holo-enzyme (Berggren, G. et al. (2013) Nature 499, 66-70; Esselborn, J. et al. (2013) Nat. Chem. Biol. 9, 607-610). In the current study, we exploit this procedure to introduce non-native cofactors into the enzyme. Mimics of the binuclear subcluster with a modified bridging dithiolate ligand (thiodithiolate, N-methylazadithiolate, dimethyl-azadithiolate) and three variants containing only one CN(-) ligand were inserted into the active site of the enzyme. We investigated the activity of these variants for hydrogen oxidation as well as proton reduction and their structural accommodation within the active site was analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Interestingly, the monocyanide variant with the azadithiolate bridge showed ∼50% of the native enzyme activity. This would suggest that the CN(-) ligands are not essential for catalytic activity, but rather serve to anchor the binuclear subsite inside the protein pocket through hydrogen bonding. The inserted artificial cofactors with a propanedithiolate and an N-methylazadithiolate bridge as well as their monocyanide variants also showed residual activity. However, these activities were less than 1% of the native enzyme. Our findings indicate that even small changes in the dithiolate bridge of the binuclear subsite lead to a rather strong decrease of the catalytic activity. We conclude that both the Brønsted base function and the conformational flexibility of the native azadithiolate amine moiety are essential for the high catalytic activity of the native enzyme. PMID:25633077

  20. Active site peptide of beta-lactamase from Shigella flexneri UCSF-129.

    PubMed

    Campos, M; González, H; Bocaz, G; Vásquez, O

    1997-01-01

    The peptide containing the catalytic serine of beta-lactamase from Shigella flexneri was determined as V-D-E-R-F-P-M-M-S*-T-F-K. It is a local pathogenic strain which produces intestinal problems, especially in children. The highly purified enzyme was prepared by affinity chromatography in phenylboronic acid-agarose gels. The peptide was obtained by tryptic hydrolysis, with further purification by Bio-Gel P-4, Sephadex QAE-25 and Sephadex SP-25. The relevance of the serine, lysine and arginine residues was mainly shown by the loss of enzymatic activity after specific chemical modifications. Finally, this enzyme was classified as A, according to the similarity of this peptide with that of class A beta-lactamases such as R-TEM 1 and 2. PMID:9301069

  1. Gastroprotective effects of L-lysine salification of ketoprofen in ethanol-injured gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Cimini, Annamaria; Brandolini, Laura; Gentile, Roberta; Cristiano, Loredana; Menghini, Paola; Fidoamore, Alessia; Antonosante, Andrea; Benedetti, Elisabetta; Giordano, Antonio; Allegretti, Marcello

    2015-04-01

    Ketoprofen L-lysine salt (KLS), a NSAID, is widely used for its analgesic efficacy and tolerability. L-lysine salification was reported to increase the solubility and the gastric absorption and tolerance of ketoprofen. Since the management of NSAIDs gastrotoxicity still represents a major limitation in prolonged therapies, mainly when gastric lesions are present, this study investigated the gastro-protective activity of L-lysine by using a well-established model of gastric mucosa injury, the ethanol-gastric injury model. Several evidences show that the damaging action of ethanol could be attributed to the increase of ROS, which plays a key role in the increase of lipid peroxidation products, including malonyldialdehyde and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal. With the aim to unravel the mechanism of L-lysine gastroprotection, cellular MDA levels and 4-HNE protein adducts as markers of lipid peroxidation and a panel of key endogenous gastro-protective proteins were assayed. The data obtained indicate a gastroprotective effect of L-lysine on gastric mucosa integrity.

  2. A lysinated thiophene-based semiconductor as a multifunctional neural bioorganic interface.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Simone; Pistone, Assunta; Brucale, Marco; Karges, Saskia; Favaretto, Laura; Zambianchi, Massimo; Posati, Tamara; Sagnella, Anna; Caprini, Marco; Toffanin, Stefano; Zamboni, Roberto; Camaioni, Nadia; Muccini, Michele; Melucci, Manuela; Benfenati, Valentina

    2015-06-01

    Lysinated molecular organic semiconductors are introduced as valuable multifunctional platforms for neural cells growth and interfacing. Cast films of quaterthiophene (T4) semiconductor covalently modified with lysine-end moieties (T4Lys) are fabricated and their stability, morphology, optical/electrical, and biocompatibility properties are characterized. T4Lys films exhibit fluorescence and electronic transport as generally observed for unsubstituted oligothiophenes combined to humidity-activated ionic conduction promoted by the charged lysine-end moieties. The Lys insertion in T4 enables adhesion of primary culture of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG), which is not achievable by plating cells on T4. Notably, on T4Lys, the number on adhering neurons/area is higher and displays a twofold longer neurite length than neurons plated on glass coated with poly-l-lysine. Finally, by whole-cell patch-clamp, it is shown that the biofunctionality of neurons cultured on T4Lys is preserved. The present study introduces an innovative concept for organic material neural interface that combines optical and iono-electronic functionalities with improved biocompatibility and neuron affinity promoted by Lys linkage and the softness of organic semiconductors. Lysinated organic semiconductors could set the scene for the fabrication of simplified bioorganic devices geometry for cells bidirectional communication or optoelectronic control of neural cells biofunctionality. PMID:25721438

  3. A lysinated thiophene-based semiconductor as a multifunctional neural bioorganic interface.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Simone; Pistone, Assunta; Brucale, Marco; Karges, Saskia; Favaretto, Laura; Zambianchi, Massimo; Posati, Tamara; Sagnella, Anna; Caprini, Marco; Toffanin, Stefano; Zamboni, Roberto; Camaioni, Nadia; Muccini, Michele; Melucci, Manuela; Benfenati, Valentina

    2015-06-01

    Lysinated molecular organic semiconductors are introduced as valuable multifunctional platforms for neural cells growth and interfacing. Cast films of quaterthiophene (T4) semiconductor covalently modified with lysine-end moieties (T4Lys) are fabricated and their stability, morphology, optical/electrical, and biocompatibility properties are characterized. T4Lys films exhibit fluorescence and electronic transport as generally observed for unsubstituted oligothiophenes combined to humidity-activated ionic conduction promoted by the charged lysine-end moieties. The Lys insertion in T4 enables adhesion of primary culture of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG), which is not achievable by plating cells on T4. Notably, on T4Lys, the number on adhering neurons/area is higher and displays a twofold longer neurite length than neurons plated on glass coated with poly-l-lysine. Finally, by whole-cell patch-clamp, it is shown that the biofunctionality of neurons cultured on T4Lys is preserved. The present study introduces an innovative concept for organic material neural interface that combines optical and iono-electronic functionalities with improved biocompatibility and neuron affinity promoted by Lys linkage and the softness of organic semiconductors. Lysinated organic semiconductors could set the scene for the fabrication of simplified bioorganic devices geometry for cells bidirectional communication or optoelectronic control of neural cells biofunctionality.

  4. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase of Neisseria meningitidis binds human plasminogen via its C-terminal lysine residue.

    PubMed

    Shams, Fariza; Oldfield, Neil J; Lai, Si Kei; Tunio, Sarfraz A; Wooldridge, Karl G; Turner, David P J

    2016-04-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of fatal sepsis and meningitis worldwide. As for commensal species of human neisseriae, N. meningitidis inhabits the human nasopharynx and asymptomatic colonization is ubiquitous. Only rarely does the organism invade and survive in the bloodstream leading to disease. Moonlighting proteins perform two or more autonomous, often dissimilar, functions using a single polypeptide chain. They have been increasingly reported on the surface of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and shown to interact with a variety of host ligands. In some organisms moonlighting proteins perform virulence-related functions, and they may play a role in the pathogenesis of N. meningitidis. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA) was previously shown to be surface-exposed in meningococci and involved in adhesion to host cells. In this study, FBA was shown to be present on the surface of both pathogenic and commensal neisseriae, and surface localization and anchoring was demonstrated to be independent of aldolase activity. Importantly, meningococcal FBA was found to bind to human glu-plasminogen in a dose-dependent manner. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the C-terminal lysine residue of FBA was required for this interaction, whereas subterminal lysine residues were not involved.

  5. Differential lysine acetylation profiles of Erwinia amylovora strains revealed by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xia; Vellaichamy, Adaikkalam; Wang, Dongping; Zamdborg, Leonid; Kelleher, Neil L; Huber, Steven C; Zhao, Youfu

    2013-02-21

    Protein lysine acetylation (LysAc) has recently been demonstrated to be widespread in E. coli and Salmonella, and to broadly regulate bacterial physiology and metabolism. However, LysAc in plant pathogenic bacteria is largely unknown. Here we first report the lysine acetylome of Erwinia amylovora, an enterobacterium causing serious fire blight disease of apples and pears. Immunoblots using generic anti-lysine acetylation antibodies demonstrated that growth conditions strongly affected the LysAc profiles in E. amylovora. Differential LysAc profiles were also observed for two E. amylovora strains, known to have differential virulence in plants, indicating translational modification of proteins may be important in determining virulence of bacterial strains. Proteomic analysis of LysAc in two E. amylovora strains identified 141 LysAc sites in 96 proteins that function in a wide range of biological pathways. Consistent with previous reports, 44% of the proteins are involved in metabolic processes, including central metabolism, lipopolysaccharide, nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. Interestingly, for the first time, several proteins involved in E. amylovora virulence, including exopolysaccharide amylovoran biosynthesis- and type III secretion-associated proteins, were found to be lysine acetylated, suggesting that LysAc may play a major role in bacterial virulence. Comparative analysis of LysAc sites in E. amylovora and E. coli further revealed the sequence and structural commonality for LysAc in the two organisms. Collectively, these results reinforce the notion that LysAc of proteins is widespread in bacterial metabolism and virulence. PMID:23234799

  6. Rational design of allosteric regulation of homoserine dehydrogenase by a nonnatural inhibitor L-lysine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Rappert, Sugima; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-02-20

    Allosteric proteins, which can sense different signals, are interesting biological parts for synthetic biology. In particular, the design of an artificial allosteric enzyme to sense an unnatural signal is both challenging and highly desired, for example, for a precise and dynamical control of fluxes of growth-essential but byproduct pathways in metabolic engineering of industrial microorganisms. In this work, we used homoserine dehydrogenase (HSDH) of Corynebacterium glutamicum, which is naturally allosterically regulated by threonine and isoleucine, as an example to demonstrate the feasibility of reengineering an allosteric enzyme to respond to an unnatural inhibitor L-lysine. For this purpose, the natural threonine binding sites of HSD were first predicted and verified by mutagenesis experiments. The threonine binding sites were then engineered to a lysine binding pocket. The reengineered HSD only responds to lysine inhibition but not to threonine. This is a significant step toward the construction of artificial molecular circuits for dynamic control of growth-essential byproduct formation pathway for lysine biosynthesis. PMID:24344690

  7. High-lysine corn as a source of protein and energy for finishing calves.

    PubMed

    Ladely, S R; Stock, R A; Klopfenstein, T J; Sindt, M H

    1995-01-01

    Three trials evaluated the protein and energy value of high-lysine corn for finishing calves. In Trial 1, 60 finishing steer calves were used to evaluate corn source (high-lysine vs control) and protein source (urea, blood meal [BM], corn gluten meal [CGM]) and level (BM and CGM addition; low, medium, high). Calves were individually fed using Calan gates for 102 d, and then were pen-fed (two pens per corn treatment) the remaining 83 d. During the initial 102 d, calves fed high-lysine corn had similar gains but were 6% more efficient (P < .10) compared with calves fed control corn. Performance did not differ (P > .10) among sources or levels of protein supplementation. Over the entire feeding period (185 d), calves fed high-lysine corn were 10% more efficient (P < .10) than calves fed control corn. In the second study, in situ starch disappearance was faster (P < .10) and the proportion of CP degraded by 12 h was 27% greater (P < .10) for high-lysine corn than for control corn. In a metabolism trial, five steers fitted with ruminal, duodenal, and ileal cannulas were used in a randomized block design to evaluate the effect of corn source on site and extent of digestion. Intake and ruminal and total tract digestibility of OM and N did not differ (P > .10) between corn sources. Steers fed high-lysine corn tended to have greater ruminal (P = .23) and postruminal (P = .18) starch digestion, resulting in greater (P < .10) total tract starch digestibility.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7601739

  8. Acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 64 regulates nucleosome dynamics and facilitates transcription.

    PubMed

    Di Cerbo, Vincenzo; Mohn, Fabio; Ryan, Daniel P; Montellier, Emilie; Kacem, Salim; Tropberger, Philipp; Kallis, Eleni; Holzner, Monika; Hoerner, Leslie; Feldmann, Angelika; Richter, Florian Martin; Bannister, Andrew J; Mittler, Gerhard; Michaelis, Jens; Khochbin, Saadi; Feil, Robert; Schuebeler, Dirk; Owen-Hughes, Tom; Daujat, Sylvain; Schneider, Robert

    2014-03-25

    Post-translational modifications of proteins have emerged as a major mechanism for regulating gene expression. However, our understanding of how histone modifications directly affect chromatin function remains limited. In this study, we investigate acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 64 (H3K64ac), a previously uncharacterized acetylation on the lateral surface of the histone octamer. We show that H3K64ac regulates nucleosome stability and facilitates nucleosome eviction and hence gene expression in vivo. In line with this, we demonstrate that H3K64ac is enriched in vivo at the transcriptional start sites of active genes and it defines transcriptionally active chromatin. Moreover, we find that the p300 co-activator acetylates H3K64, and consistent with a transcriptional activation function, H3K64ac opposes its repressive counterpart H3K64me3. Our findings reveal an important role for a histone modification within the nucleosome core as a regulator of chromatin function and they demonstrate that lateral surface modifications can define functionally opposing chromatin states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01632.001.

  9. Acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 64 regulates nucleosome dynamics and facilitates transcription

    PubMed Central

    Di Cerbo, Vincenzo; Mohn, Fabio; Ryan, Daniel P; Montellier, Emilie; Kacem, Salim; Tropberger, Philipp; Kallis, Eleni; Holzner, Monika; Hoerner, Leslie; Feldmann, Angelika; Richter, Florian Martin; Bannister, Andrew J; Mittler, Gerhard; Michaelis, Jens; Khochbin, Saadi; Feil, Robert; Schuebeler, Dirk; Owen-Hughes, Tom; Daujat, Sylvain; Schneider, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins have emerged as a major mechanism for regulating gene expression. However, our understanding of how histone modifications directly affect chromatin function remains limited. In this study, we investigate acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 64 (H3K64ac), a previously uncharacterized acetylation on the lateral surface of the histone octamer. We show that H3K64ac regulates nucleosome stability and facilitates nucleosome eviction and hence gene expression in vivo. In line with this, we demonstrate that H3K64ac is enriched in vivo at the transcriptional start sites of active genes and it defines transcriptionally active chromatin. Moreover, we find that the p300 co-activator acetylates H3K64, and consistent with a transcriptional activation function, H3K64ac opposes its repressive counterpart H3K64me3. Our findings reveal an important role for a histone modification within the nucleosome core as a regulator of chromatin function and they demonstrate that lateral surface modifications can define functionally opposing chromatin states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01632.001 PMID:24668167

  10. Characterization of the active site of chloroperoxidase using physical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    Chloroperoxidase (CPO) and Cytochrome P-450, two very different hemeproteins, have been shown to have similar active sites by several techniques. Recent work has demonstrated thiolate ligation from a cysteine residue to the iron in P-450. A major portion of this research has been devoted to obtaining direct evidence that CPO also has a thiolate 5th ligand from a cysteine residue. This information will provide the framework for a detailed analysis of the structure-function relationships between peroxidases, catalase and cytochrome P-450 hemeproteins. To determine whether the 5th ligand is a cysteine, methionine or a unique amino acid, specific isotope enrichment experiments were used. Preliminary /sup 1/H-NMR studies show that the carbon monoxide-CPO complex has a peak in the upfield region corresponding to alpha-protons of a thiolate amino acid. C. fumago was grown on 95% D/sub 2/O media with a small amount of /sup 1/H-cysteine added. Under these conditions C. fumago slows down the biosynthesis of cysteine by at least 50% and utilizes the exogenous cysteine in the media. GC-MS was able to show that the methylene protons next to the sulfur atom in cysteine are 80-90% protonated while these positions in methionine are approximately 73% deuterated. Comparison of the /sup 1/H-NMR spectra of CO-CPO and CO-CPO indicate the presence of a cysteine ligand in chloroperoxidase.

  11. N6-Methyldeoxyadenosine Marks Active Transcription Start Sites in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Deng, Xin; Yu, Miao; Han, Dali; Hao, Ziyang; Liu, Jianzhao; Lu, Xingyu; Dore, Louis C; Weng, Xiaocheng; Ji, Quanjiang; Mets, Laurens; He, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY N6-methyldeoxyadenosine (6mA or m6A) is a DNA modification preserved in prokaryotes to eukaryotes. It is widespread in bacteria, and functions in DNA mismatch repair, chromosome segregation, and virulence regulation. In contrast, the distribution and function of 6mA in eukaryotes have been unclear. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the 6mA landscape in the genome of Chlamydomonas using new sequencing approaches. We identified the 6mA modification in 84% of genes in Chlamydomonas. We found that 6mA mainly locates at ApT dinucleotides around transcription start sites (TSS) with a bimodal distribution, and appears to mark active genes. A periodic pattern of 6mA deposition was also observed at base resolution, which is associated with nucleosome distribution near the TSS, suggesting a possible role in nucleosome positioning. The new genome-wide mapping of 6mA and its unique distribution in the Chlamydomonas genome suggest potential regulatory roles of 6mA in gene expression in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:25936837

  12. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  13. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems. PMID:25727891

  14. Active Site Characterization of Proteases Sequences from Different Species of Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Morya, V K; Yadav, Virendra K; Yadav, Sangeeta; Yadav, Dinesh

    2016-09-01

    A total of 129 proteases sequences comprising 43 serine proteases, 36 aspartic proteases, 24 cysteine protease, 21 metalloproteases, and 05 neutral proteases from different Aspergillus species were analyzed for the catalytically active site residues using MEROPS database and various bioinformatics tools. Different proteases have predominance of variable active site residues. In case of 24 cysteine proteases of Aspergilli, the predominant active site residues observed were Gln193, Cys199, His364, Asn384 while for 43 serine proteases, the active site residues namely Asp164, His193, Asn284, Ser349 and Asp325, His357, Asn454, Ser519 were frequently observed. The analysis of 21 metalloproteases of Aspergilli revealed Glu298 and Glu388, Tyr476 as predominant active site residues. In general, Aspergilli species-specific active site residues were observed for different types of protease sequences analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis of these 129 proteases sequences revealed 14 different clans representing different types of proteases with diverse active site residues.

  15. A proposed definition of the 'activity' of surface sites on lactose carriers for dry powder inhalation.

    PubMed

    Grasmeijer, Floris; Frijlink, Henderik W; de Boer, Anne H

    2014-06-01

    A new definition of the activity of surface sites on lactose carriers for dry powder inhalation is proposed which relates to drug detachment during dispersion. The new definition is expected to improve the understanding of 'carrier surface site activity', which stimulates the unambiguous communication about this subject and may aid in the rational design and interpretation of future formulation studies. In contrast to the currently prevailing view on carrier surface site activity, it follows from the newly proposed definition that carrier surface site activity depends on more variables than just the physicochemical properties of the carrier surface. Because the term 'active sites' is ambiguous, it is recommended to use the term 'highly active sites' instead to denote carrier surface sites with a relatively high activity. PMID:24613490

  16. [Efficacy and tolerability 80 mg granulated ketoprofen lysine salt in posttraumatic orodental pain: double blind vs placebo study].

    PubMed

    Balzanelli, B; de Lorenzi, C

    1996-01-01

    A randomized, double-blind parallel group, placebo-controlled study was carried out in order to evaluate the analgesic and antiin-flammatory activity of ketoprofen lysine salt as granular formulation. Sixty patients undergoing extraction of an impacted third molar were treated orally with 80 mg ketoprofen lysine salt sachet or placebo t.i.d. for 3 days. The inflammation related local signs (pain, flare, local heat and wheal) were evaluated by scores at 1th and 3th day of observation; to study the time-course of analgesic activity, pain intensity was evalauted by Visual Analogic-Scale (VAS) by Scott-Huskisson before and 0.30 minutes, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 hours after the first administration. Ketoprofen lysine salt was significantly superior to placebo in reducing all inflmamtory signs and symptoms starting from the first day of treatment; the analgesic effect was evident already 30 minutes after administration. Investigator's and patient's global evaluations of efficacy resulted favourable for ketoprofen lysine salt in 96.6% and for placebo in 26.7%. The three adverse events reported were limited to gastric pyrosis (ketoprofen lysine salt, two patients; placebo one patient) and posed no problem to patient management. These data demonstrate the pronouced and rapid analgesic and antinflammatory activity of 80 mg ketoprofen lysine salt granular formulation in post-operative pain and inflammation associated with dental surgery.

  17. Bioavailability of lysine in Maillard browned protein as determined by plasma lysine response in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri).

    PubMed

    Plakas, S M; Lee, T C; Wolke, R E

    1988-01-01

    The bioavailability of lysine in Maillard browned protein was investigated by plasma lysine response in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri). The concentrations of free lysine in the plasma were measured after feeding control and browned protein diets supplemented with graded levels of lysine. Bioavailability of lysine was estimated based on the amounts of supplemental lysine in the diets that resulted in rapid increases in plasma lysine. An approximately 80% loss in bioavailable lysine content was determined by this method in a fish protein isolate subjected to the Maillard browning reaction under mild conditions (40 d incubation at 37 degrees C). The nutritional damage to lysine determined by plasma lysine response was similar to that estimated in vitro by enzymatic hydrolysis and fluorodinitrobenzene reagent, but was underestimated by acid hydrolysis and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid reagent. Rainbow trout are similar to other animals in their inability to utilize the deoxyketosyl (Amadori) compound of lysine formed in early Maillard reaction, and in their plasma response to dietary levels of essential amino acids. PMID:3121813

  18. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  19. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  20. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  1. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  2. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  3. SUMOylation of the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 occurs at multiple nonconsensus sites within the B domain and is linked to its activity cycle

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Romero, Claudia; Iñiguez-Lluhí, Jorge A.; Stadler, Julia; Chang, Chuang-Rung; Arnoult, Damien; Keller, Peter J.; Hong, Yu; Blackstone, Craig; Feldman, Eva L.

    2009-01-01

    Dynamin-related protein (Drp) 1 is a key regulator of mitochondrial fission and is composed of GTP-binding, Middle, insert B, and C-terminal GTPase effector (GED) domains. Drp1 associates with mitochondrial fission sites and promotes membrane constriction through its intrinsic GTPase activity. The mechanisms that regulate Drp1 activity remain poorly understood but are likely to involve reversible post-translational modifications, such as conjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins. Through a detailed analysis, we find that Drp1 interacts with the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 via multiple regions and demonstrate that Drp1 is a direct target of SUMO modification by all three SUMO isoforms. While Drp1 does not harbor consensus SUMOylation sequences, our analysis identified2 clusters of lysine residues within the B domain that serve as noncanonical conjugation sites. Although initial analysis indicates that mitochondrial recruitment of ectopically expressed Drp1 in response to staurosporine is unaffected by loss of SUMOylation, we find that Drp1 SUMOylation is enhanced in the context of the K38A mutation. This dominant-negative mutant, which is deficient in GTP binding and hydrolysis, does not associate with mitochondria and prevents normal mitochondrial fission. This finding suggests that SUMOylation of Drp1 is linked to its activity cycle and is influenced by Drp1 localization.—Figueroa-Romero, C., Iñiguez-Lluhí, J. A., Stadler, J., Chang, C.-R., Arnoult, D., Keller, P. J., Hong, Y., Blackstone, C., Feldman, E. L. SUMOylation of the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 occurs at multiple nonconsensus sites within the B domain and is linked to its activity cycle. PMID:19638400

  4. GAS HYDRATES AT TWO SITES OF AN ACTIVE CONTINENTAL MARGIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart on the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m.

  5. Control of active sites in selective flocculation: III -- Mechanism of site blocking

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    It has been shown in Parts I and II of this paper that heteroflocculation can be controlled by poisoning the sites for flocculant adsorption using a site blocking agent (SBA). An efficient SBA was determined to be the lower molecular weight fraction of the flocculant. In this paper, the underlying mechanism of SBA action is described. Also, the mathematical model detailed in Part I is used to determine the effect of different SBAs on apatite-dolomite separation efficiency. It has been demonstrated that the depression in flocculation is directly related to the site blocking parameter ([bar [Phi

  6. Dynamically achieved active site precision in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes' enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme-substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C-H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed.

  7. Trichoderma L-Lysine-α-Oxidase Producer Strain Culture Fluid Inhibits Impatiens Necrotic Spot Virus.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, I P; Shneider, Yu A; Karimova, E V

    2016-01-01

    A method for PCR diagnosis of impatiens necrotic spot virus is developed. Concentrated culture fluid with active L-lysine-α-oxidase (0.54 U/ml) from Trichoderma harzianum Rifai fungus producer strain F-180 inhibits vitally hazardous impatiens necrotic spot phytovirus. PMID:26742733

  8. Acetylation of Conserved Lysines in Bovine Papillomavirus E2 by p300

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Edward J.; Culleton, Sara P.; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The p300, CBP, and pCAF lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) proteins have been reported to physically interact with bovine (BPV) and human (HPV) papillomavirus E2 proteins. While overexpression of these KAT proteins enhances E2-dependent transcription, the mechanism has not been determined. Using RNA interference (RNAi) to deplete these factors, we demonstrated that E2 transcriptional activity requires physiological levels of p300, CBP, and pCAF. Each protein appears to have a unique function in E2-dependent transcription, since overexpression of one KAT failed to compensate for RNAi knockdown of another KAT. Using an in vitro acetylation assay, we identified highly conserved lysines that are targeted by p300 for acetylation. The conservative changes of lysines at positions 111 and 112 to arginine were of particular interest. The K111R and the K111R/K112R mutants showed reduced transcriptional activity that was not responsive to p300 overexpression, while the K112R mutant retained activity. p300 and CBP were detected at the viral promoter; however, pCAF was not. We propose a model by which E2 transcriptional activity is controlled by p300-mediated acetylation of lysine 111. This model represents a novel mechanism regulating papillomavirus gene expression. PMID:23152516

  9. Trichoderma L-Lysine-α-Oxidase Producer Strain Culture Fluid Inhibits Impatiens Necrotic Spot Virus.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, I P; Shneider, Yu A; Karimova, E V

    2016-01-01

    A method for PCR diagnosis of impatiens necrotic spot virus is developed. Concentrated culture fluid with active L-lysine-α-oxidase (0.54 U/ml) from Trichoderma harzianum Rifai fungus producer strain F-180 inhibits vitally hazardous impatiens necrotic spot phytovirus.

  10. Monoclonal antibody against the active site of caeruloplasmin and the ELISA system detecting active caeruloplasmin.

    PubMed

    Hiyamuta, S; Ito, K

    1994-04-01

    Serum caeruloplasmin deficiency is a characteristic biochemical abnormality found in patients with Wilson's disease, but the mechanism of this disease is unknown. Although the phenylenediamine oxidase activity of serum caeruloplasmin is markedly low in patients with Wilson's disease, mRNA of caeruloplasmin exists to some extent. To investigate the deficiency of caeruloplasmin oxidase activity in Wilson's disease, we generated 14 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and selected ID1, which had the strongest reactivity, and ID2, which had neutralizing ability. We also established a system to measure active caeruloplasmin specifically using these MAbs. These MAbs and the system will be useful tools in analyzing the active site of caeruloplasmin in patients with Wilson's disease.

  11. Enhancing L-Lysine Production of Beet Molasses by Engineered Escherichia coli Using an In Situ Pretreatment Method.

    PubMed

    He, Xun; Qi, Yanbin; Chen, Kequan; Li, Yan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2016-07-01

    Reducing the viscosity of molasses environmentally and selectively removing the harmful ingredients for microbes are the keys to promoting the bioavailability of molasses. A simple and environmental in situ pretreatment method integrating surfactants and alkali was developed to reduce the viscosity of molasses prior to L-lysine production using Escherichia coli ZY0217. Adding activated carbon and modified orange peel based on the in situ pretreatment process effectively removed pigments and excessive zinc in the molasses and also significantly increased the cell growth and L-lysine yield from E. coli ZY0217. The experimental results showed that a mixture of secondary alkane sulfonate, an anionic surfactant, and HodagCB-6, a non-ionic surfactant, effectively reduced the viscosity of the molasses more so than any single surfactant. When the surfactant mixture was added at a concentration of 0.04 g/L to the molasses, the ω value was 0.4, and when ammonia was added at 0.6 %, the lowest viscosity of 705 mPa · s was obtained. Further, 91.5 % of the color and 86.68 % of the original levels of zinc were removed using an activated carbon and modified orange peel treatment on the molasses with the lowest viscosity, which further promoted cell growth and L-lysine production. In the fed-batch cultivation process, the L-lysine concentration achieved using a constant-speed feeding strategy was 45.89 g/L, with an L-lysine yield of 27.18 %, whereas the L-lysine yield from untreated molasses was only 10.13 %. The increase in L-lysine yield was related to the reduced viscosity and the detoxification of the molasses. Lastly, the pretreatment was found to significantly enhance the conversion of sugars in the molasses to L-lysine.

  12. Robotics and Automation Activities at the Savannah River Site: A Site Report for SUBWOG 39F

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.

    1995-09-28

    The Savannah River Site has successfully used robots, teleoperators, and remote video to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, improve worker safety, and improve the quality of operations. Previous reports have described the use of mobile teleoperators in coping with a high level liquid waste spill, the removal of highly contaminated equipment, and the inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. This report will cover recent applications at the Savannah River, as well as systems which SRS has delivered to other DOE site customers.

  13. Control of active sites in selective flocculation: II -- Role of site blocking agents

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Control of heteroflocculation using a lower molecular weight fraction of the flocculant as a site blocking agent is demonstrated in the apatite-dolomite-polyethylene oxide system. The most effective SBA (site blocking agent) was determined to be the highest molecular weight fraction of the flocculant itself which was not capable of flocculating any of the components of the mixture. In the presence of the SBA, flocculant adsorption decreased significantly on apatite particles, thereby inhibiting coflocculation.

  14. Elucidating the effects of arginine and lysine on a monoclonal antibody C-terminal lysine variation in CHO cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xintao; Tang, Hongping; Sun, Ya-Ting; Liu, Xuping; Tan, Wen-Song; Fan, Li

    2015-08-01

    C-terminal lysine variants are commonly observed in monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and found sensitive to process conditions, especially specific components in culture medium. The potential roles of media arginine (Arg) and lysine (Lys) in mAb heavy chain C-terminal lysine processing were investigated by monitoring the lysine variant levels under various Arg and Lys concentrations. Both Arg and Lys were found to significantly affect lysine variant level. Specifically, lysine variant level increased from 18.7 to 31.8 % when Arg and Lys concentrations were increased from 2 to 10 mM. Since heterogeneity of C-terminal lysine residues is due to the varying degree of proteolysis by basic carboxypeptidases (Cps), enzyme (basic Cps) level, pH conditions, and product (Arg and Lys) inhibition, which potentially affect the enzymatic reaction, were investigated under various Arg and Lys conditions. Enzyme level and pH conditions were found not to account for the different lysine variant levels, which was evident from the minimal variation in transcription level and intracellular pH. On the other hand, product inhibition effect of Arg and Lys on basic Cps was evident from the notable intracellular and extracellular Arg and Lys concentrations comparable with Ki values (inhibition constant) of basic Cps and further confirmed by cell-free assays. Additionally, a kinetic study of lysine variant level during the cell culture process enabled further characterization of the C-terminal lysine processing.

  15. Identification of functional modules of AKMT, a novel lysine methyltransferase regulating the motility of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Sivagurunathan, Senthilkumar; Heaslip, Aoife; Liu, Jun; Hu, Ke

    2013-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii is a leading cause of congenital neurological defects. To cause disease, it must reiterate its lytic cycle through host cell invasion, replication,and parasite egress. This requires the parasite to sense changes in its environment and switch between the non-motile (for replication) and motile (for invasion and egress) states appropriately. Recently, we discovered a previously unknown mechanism of motility regulation in T. gondii, mediated by a lysine methyltransferase, AKMT (for Apical complex lysine (K) methyltransferase). When AKMT is absent, activation of motility is inhibited, which compromises parasite invasion and egress, and thus severely impairs the lytic cycle. Although the methyltransferase activity of AKMT has been established, the phylogenetic relationship of AKMT with other better studied lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) was not known. Also unknown was the functional relationships between different domains of AKMT. In this work we carried out phylogenetic analyses, which show that AKMT orthologs form a new subfamily of KMTs. We systematically generated truncation mutants of AKMT, and discovered that the predicted enzymatic domain alone is a very poor enzyme and cannot complement the function of AKMT in vivo. Interestingly, the N- and C-terminal domains of the AKMT have drastically different impacts on its enzyme activity, localization as well as in vivo function. Our results thus reveal that AKMT is an unusual, parasite-specific enzyme and identified regions and interactions within this novel lysine methyltransferase that can be used as drug targets. PMID:23685344

  16. Dysregulation of AKT Pathway by SMYD2-Mediated Lysine Methylation on PTEN.

    PubMed

    Nakakido, Makoto; Deng, Zhenzhong; Suzuki, Takehiro; Dohmae, Naoshi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Ryuji

    2015-04-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), one of the well-characterized tumor suppressor proteins, counteracts the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT pathway through its unique lipid phosphatase activity. The functions of PTEN are regulated by a variety of posttranslational modifications such as acetylation, oxidation, ubiquitylation, phosphorylation, and SUMOylation. However, methylation of PTEN has not been reported so far. In this study, we demonstrated that the oncogenic protein lysine methyltransferase SET and MYND domain containing 2 (SMYD2) methylates PTEN at lysine 313 in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown of SMYD2 suppressed the cell growth of breast cancer cells and attenuated phosphorylation levels of AKT, indicating that SMYD2-mediated methylation negatively regulates PTEN tumor suppressor activity and results in activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT pathway. Furthermore, PTEN protein with lysine 313 substitution diminished phosphorylation of PTEN at serine 380, which is known to inactivate tumor suppressor functions of PTEN. Taken together, our findings unveil a novel mechanism of PTEN dysregulation regulated by lysine methylation in human cancer. PMID:25925379

  17. Arginine demethylation is catalysed by a subset of JmjC histone lysine demethylases

    PubMed Central

    Walport, Louise J.; Hopkinson, Richard J.; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Schiller, Rachel; Ge, Wei; Kawamura, Akane; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    While the oxygen-dependent reversal of lysine Nɛ-methylation is well established, the existence of bona fide Nω-methylarginine demethylases (RDMs) is controversial. Lysine demethylation, as catalysed by two families of lysine demethylases (the flavin-dependent KDM1 enzymes and the 2-oxoglutarate- and oxygen-dependent JmjC KDMs, respectively), proceeds via oxidation of the N-methyl group, resulting in the release of formaldehyde. Here we report detailed biochemical studies clearly demonstrating that, in purified form, a subset of JmjC KDMs can also act as RDMs, both on histone and non-histone fragments, resulting in formaldehyde release. RDM catalysis is studied using peptides of wild-type sequences known to be arginine-methylated and sequences in which the KDM's methylated target lysine is substituted for a methylated arginine. Notably, the preferred sequence requirements for KDM and RDM activity vary even with the same JmjC enzymes. The demonstration of RDM activity by isolated JmjC enzymes will stimulate efforts to detect biologically relevant RDM activity. PMID:27337104

  18. High resolution crystal structures of triosephosphate isomerase complexed with its suicide inhibitors: The conformational flexibility of the catalytic glutamate in its closed, liganded active site

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Rajaram; Alahuhta, Markus; Pihko, Petri M; Wierenga, Rik K

    2011-01-01

    The key residue of the active site of triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) is the catalytic glutamate, which is proposed to be important (i) as a catalytic base, for initiating the reaction, as well as (ii) for the subsequent proton shuttling steps. The structural properties of this glutamate in the liganded complex have been investigated by studying the high resolution crystal structures of typanosomal TIM, complexed with three suicide inhibitors: (S)-glycidol phosphate ((S)-GOP, at 0.99 Å resolution), (R)-glycidol phosphate, ((R)-GOP, at 1.08 Å resolution), and bromohydroxyacetone phosphate (BHAP, at 1.97 Å resolution). The structures show that in the (S)-GOP active site this catalytic glutamate is in the well characterized, competent conformation. However, an unusual side chain conformation is observed in the (R)-GOP and BHAP complexes. In addition, Glu97, salt bridged to the catalytic lysine in the competent active site, adopts an unusual side chain conformation in these two latter complexes. The higher chemical reactivity of (S)-GOP compared with (R)-GOP, as known from solution studies, can be understood: the structures indicate that in the case of (S)-GOP, Glu167 can attack the terminal carbon of the epoxide in a stereoelectronically favored, nearly linear O–C–O arrangement, but this is not possible for the (R)-GOP isomer. These structures confirm the previously proposed conformational flexibility of the catalytic glutamate in its closed, liganded state. The importance of this conformational flexibility for the proton shuttling steps in the TIM catalytic cycle, which is apparently achieved by a sliding motion of the side chain carboxylate group above the enediolate plane, is also discussed. PMID:21633986

  19. ERAD of proteins containing aberrant transmembrane domains requires ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Kit; Koay, Yee-Hui; Otsuka, Yuka; Swanton, Eileithyia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clearance of misfolded proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in a process known as ER-associated degradation (ERAD). The mechanisms through which proteins containing aberrant transmembrane domains are degraded by ERAD are poorly understood. To address this question, we generated model ERAD substrates based on CD8 with either a non-native transmembrane domain but a folded ER luminal domain (CD8TMD*), or the native transmembrane domain but a misfolded luminal domain (CD8LUM*). Although both chimeras were degraded by ERAD, we found that the location of the folding defect determined the initial site of ubiquitylation. Ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues was required for the extraction of CD8TMD* from the ER membrane during ERAD, whereas CD8LUM* continued to be degraded in the absence of cytoplasmic lysine residues. Cytoplasmic lysine residues were also required for degradation of an additional ERAD substrate containing an unassembled transmembrane domain and when a non-native transmembrane domain was introduced into CD8LUM*. Our results suggest that proteins with defective transmembrane domains are removed from the ER through a specific ERAD mechanism that depends upon ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues. PMID:26446255

  20. Lysine Ubiquitination and Acetylation of Human Cardiac 20S Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Edward; Choi, Howard JH; Ng, Dominic CM; Meyer, David; Fang, Caiyun; Li, Haomin; Wang, Ding; Zelaya, Ivette M; Yates, John R; Lam, Maggie PY

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Altered proteasome functions are associated with multiple cardiomyopathies. While the proteasome targets poly-ubiquitinated proteins for destruction, it itself is modifiable by ubiquitination. We aim to identify the exact ubiquitination sites on cardiac proteasomes and examine whether they are also subject to acetylations. Experimental design Assembled cardiac 20S proteasome complexes were purified from five human hearts with ischemic cardiomyopathy, then analyzed by high-resolution MS to identify ubiquitination and acetylation sites. We developed a library search strategy that may be used to complement database search in identifying PTM in different samples. Results We identified 63 ubiquitinated lysines from intact human cardiac 20S proteasomes. In parallel, 65 acetylated residues were also discovered, 39 of which shared with ubiquitination sites. Conclusion and clinical relevance This is the most comprehensive characterization of cardiac proteasome ubiquitination to-date. There are significant overlaps between the discovered ubiquitination and acetylation sites, permitting potential crosstalk in regulating proteasome functions. The information presented here will aid future therapeutic strategies aimed at regulating the functions of cardiac proteasomes. PMID:24957502

  1. Lysine biosynthesis in selected pathogenic fungi: characterization of lysine auxotrophs and the cloned LYS1 gene of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Garrad, R C; Bhattacharjee, J K

    1992-01-01

    The alpha-aminoadipate pathway for the biosynthesis of lysine is present only in fungi and euglena. Until now, this unique metabolic pathway has never been investigated in the opportunistic fungal pathogens Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus. Five of the eight enzymes (homocitrate synthase, homoisocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-aminoadipate reductase, saccharopine reductase, and saccharopine dehydrogenase) of the alpha-aminoadipate pathway and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, a glycolytic enzyme used as a control, were demonstrated in wild-type cells of these organisms. All enzymes were present in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the pathogenic organisms except C. neoformans 32608 serotype C, which exhibited no saccharopine reductase activity. The levels of enzyme activity varied considerably from strain to strain. Variation among organisms was also observed for the control enzyme. Among the pathogens, C. albicans exhibited much higher homocitrate synthase, homoisocitrate dehydrogenase, and alpha-aminoadipate reductase activities. Seven lysine auxotrophs of C. albicans and one of Candida tropicalis were characterized biochemically to determine the biochemical blocks and gene-enzyme relationships. Growth responses to alpha-aminoadipate- and lysine-supplemented media, accumulation of alpha-aminoadipate semialdehyde, and the lack of enzyme activity revealed that five of the mutants (WA104, WA153, WC7-1-3, WD1-31-2, and A5155) were blocked at the alpha-aminoadipate reductase step, two (STN57 and WD1-3-6) were blocked at the saccharopine dehydrogenase step, and the C. tropicalis mutant (X-16) was blocked at the saccharopine reductase step. The cloned LYS1 gene of C. albicans in the recombinant plasmid YpB1078 complemented saccharopine dehydrogenase (lys1) mutants of S. cerevisiae and C. albicans. The Lys1+ transformed strains exhibited significant saccharopine dehydrogenase activity in comparison with untransformed mutants. The cloned LYS1

  2. Mutation at a Strictly Conserved, Active Site Tyrosine in the Copper Amine Oxidase Leads to Uncontrolled Oxygenase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhi-wei; Datta, Saumen; DuBois, Jennifer L.; Klinman, Judith P.; Mathews, F. Scott

    2010-09-07

    The copper amine oxidases carry out two copper-dependent processes: production of their own redox-active cofactor (2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine quinone, TPQ) and the subsequent oxidative deamination of substrate amines. Because the same active site pocket must facilitate both reactions, individual active site residues may serve multiple roles. We have examined the roles of a strictly conserved active site tyrosine Y305 in the copper amine oxidase from Hansenula polymorpha kinetically, spetroscopically (Dubois and Klinman (2006) Biochemistry 45, 3178), and, in the present work, structurally. While the Y305A enzyme is almost identical to the wild type, a novel, highly oxygenated species replaces TPQ in the Y305F active sites. This new structure not only provides the first direct detection of peroxy intermediates in cofactor biogenesis but also indicates the critical control of oxidation chemistry that can be conferred by a single active site residue.

  3. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  4. Characterization of the grappa Gene, the Drosophila Histone H3 Lysine 79 Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Shanower, Gregory A.; Muller, Martin; Blanton, Jason L.; Honti, Viktor; Gyurkovics, Henrik; Schedl, Paul

    2005-01-01

    We have identified a novel gene named grappa (gpp) that is the Drosophila ortholog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene Dot1, a histone methyltransferase that modifies the lysine (K)79 residue of histone H3. gpp is an essential gene identified in a genetic screen for dominant suppressors of pairing-dependent silencing, a Polycomb-group (Pc-G)-mediated silencing mechanism necessary for the maintenance phase of Bithorax complex (BX-C) expression. Surprisingly, gpp mutants not only exhibit Pc-G phenotypes, but also display phenotypes characteristic of trithorax-group mutants. Mutations in gpp also disrupt telomeric silencing but do not affect centric heterochromatin. These apparent contradictory phenotypes may result from loss of gpp activity in mutants at sites of both active and inactive chromatin domains. Unlike the early histone H3 K4 and K9 methylation patterns, the appearance of methylated K79 during embryogenesis coincides with the maintenance phase of BX-C expression, suggesting that there is a unique role for this chromatin modification in development. PMID:15371351

  5. Enzymatic production of 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine using l-lysine monooxygenase and 5-aminovaleramide amidohydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pan; Zhang, Haiwei; Lv, Min; Hu, Mandong; Li, Zhong; Gao, Chao; Xu, Ping; Ma, Cuiqing

    2014-01-01

    5-Aminovalerate is a potential C5 platform chemical for synthesis of valerolactam, 5-hydroxyvalerate, glutarate, and 1,5-pentanediol. It is a metabolite of l-lysine catabolism through the aminovalerate pathway in Pseudomonas putida. l-Lysine monooxygenase (DavB) and 5-aminovaleramide amidohydrolase (DavA) play key roles in the biotransformation of l-lysine into 5-aminovalerate. Here, DavB and DavA of P. putida KT2440 were expressed, purified, and coupled for the production of 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine. Under optimal conditions, 20.8 g/L 5-aminovalerate was produced from 30 g/L l-lysine in 12 h. Because l-lysine is an industrial fermentation product, the two-enzyme coupled system presents a promising alternative for the production of 5-aminovalerate. PMID:25012259

  6. An ionizable active-site tryptophan imparts catalase activity to a peroxidase core.

    PubMed

    Loewen, Peter C; Carpena, Xavi; Vidossich, Pietro; Fita, Ignacio; Rovira, Carme

    2014-05-21

    Catalase peroxidases (KatG's) are bifunctional heme proteins that can disproportionate hydrogen peroxide (catalatic reaction) despite their structural dissimilarity with monofunctional catalases. Using X-ray crystallography and QM/MM calculations, we demonstrate that the catalatic reaction of KatG's involves deprotonation of the active-site Trp, which plays a role similar to that of the distal His in monofunctional catalases. The interaction of a nearby mobile arginine with the distal Met-Tyr-Trp essential adduct (in/out) acts as an electronic switch, triggering deprotonation of the adduct Trp.

  7. A non-active-site SET domain surface crucial for the interaction of MLL1 and the RbBP5/Ash2L heterodimer within MLL family core complexes.

    PubMed

    Shinsky, Stephen A; Hu, Michael; Vought, Valarie E; Ng, Sarah B; Bamshad, Michael J; Shendure, Jay; Cosgrove, Michael S

    2014-06-12

    The mixed lineage leukemia-1 (MLL1) enzyme is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) monomethyltransferase and has served as a paradigm for understanding the mechanism of action of the human SET1 family of enzymes that include MLL1-MLL4 and SETd1a,b. Dimethylation of H3K4 requires a sub-complex including WRAD (WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30), which binds to each SET1 family member forming a minimal core complex that is required for multiple lysine methylation. We recently demonstrated that WRAD is a novel histone methyltransferase that preferentially catalyzes H3K4 dimethylation in a manner that is dependent on an unknown non-active-site surface from the MLL1 SET domain. Recent genome sequencing studies have identified a number of human disease-associated missense mutations that localize to the SET domains of several MLL family members. In this investigation, we mapped many of these mutations onto the three-dimensional structure of the SET domain and noticed that a subset of MLL2 (KMT2D, ALR, MLL4)-associated Kabuki syndrome missense mutations map to a common solvent-exposed surface that is not expected to alter enzymatic activity. We introduced these mutations into the MLL1 SET domain and observed that all are defective for H3K4 dimethylation by the MLL1 core complex, which is associated with a loss of the ability of MLL1 to interact with WRAD or with the RbBP5/Ash2L heterodimer. Our results suggest that amino acids from this surface, which we term the Kabuki interaction surface or KIS, are required for formation of a second active site within SET1 family core complexes. PMID:24680668

  8. Bacteriophage phi11 lysin: physicochemical characterization and comparison with phage phi80a lysin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phage lytic enzymes are promising antimicrobial agents. Lysins of phage phi11 (LysPhi11) and phi80a (LysPhi80a) can lyse (destroy) biofilms and cells of antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Stability of enzymes is one of the parameters making their practical use possible. The obj...

  9. Nuclear Site Security in the Event of Terrorist Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M.L.; Sims, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper, presented as a poster, identifies why ballistic protection should now be considered at nuclear sites to counter terrorist threats. A proven and flexible form of multi purpose protection is described in detail with identification of trial results that show its suitability for this role. (authors)

  10. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  11. Active Layer and Moisture Measurements for Intensive Site 0 and 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-04-17

    These are measurements of Active Layer Thickness collected along several lines beginning in September, 2011 to the present. The data were collected at several time periods along the Site0 L2 Line, the Site1 AB Line, and an ERT Monitoring Line near Area A in Site1.

  12. Lys63-linked polyubiquitination of BRAF at lysine 578 is required for BRAF-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    An, Lei; Jia, Wei; Yu, Yang; Zou, Ning; Liang, Li; Zhao, Yanling; Fan, Yihui; Cheng, Jin; Shi, Zhongcheng; Xu, Gufeng; Li, Grace; Yang, Jianhua; Zhang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    The RAF kinase family is essential in mediating signal transduction from RAS to ERK. BRAF constitutively active mutations correlate with human cancer development. However, the precise molecular regulation of BRAF activation is not fully understood. Here we report that BRAF is modified by Lys63-linked polyubiquitination at lysine 578 within its kinase domain once it is activated by gain of constitutively active mutation or epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation. Substitution of BRAF lysine 578 with arginine (K578R) inhibited BRAF-mediated ERK activation. Furthermore, ectopic expression of BRAF K578R mutant inhibited anchorage-independent colony formation of MCF7 breast cancer cell line. Our studies have identified a previously unrecognized regulatory role of Lys63-linked polyubiquitination in BRAF-mediated normal and oncogenic signalings. PMID:23907581

  13. Mass spectrometry-based glycoproteomic approach involving lysine derivatization for structural characterization of recombinant human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Cindrić, Mario; Bindila, Laura; Cepo, Tina; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna

    2006-11-01

    Lysine-containing peptides comprising glycosylation sites derived from recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) by trypsin or Lys-C and PNGase F dual digestion were derivatized with 2-methoxy-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazole and its deuterated analogues. In the same reaction, under reducing conditions (beta-mercaptoethanol), cysteines were converted into methyl-cysteines and lysines into Lys-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazole. Both modifications on cysteines and lysines simplified the CID-MS/MS spectra, while preserving the structural information by yielding y-series ions and improved the mass spectral signal intensity up to 25 times. Moreover, by this approach, the N-glycan occupation sites were unambiguously determined. O-Glycosylation sites as well as O-glycan structures were determined by a LC-MS/MS experiment carried out on dually digested rHuEPO. N-Glycan mixture purified on a graphitized carbon column using a newly developed method that extracted only sialylated carbohydrates was analyzed first using MALDI-TOF in negative linear ion mode with low mass accuracy but without interferences and metastabile ions and then a reflectron with high mass accuracy. After defining the precursor ions, we performed the nanoESI QTOF MS/MS analysis on N-glycans, mainly targeting the distinction between carbohydrates with sialylated antennae and those lacking sialic acid moieties.

  14. Functional diversity of anti-lipopolysaccharide factor isoforms in shrimp and their characters related to antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Shihao; Guo, Shuyue; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-05-01

    Anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) is a small protein with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, which has potential application in the disease control. Previously, we isolated seven ALF isoforms from the Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis. In the present study, their distributions in tissues of shrimp were analyzed and the data showed that different isoforms had different expression profiles, which suggested that they might have different functions. Then, the functions of different isoforms were studied by analyzing the antibacterial and antiviral activities of the functional domain of ALFs, the LPS-binding domain (LBD), which were synthesized by chemical methods. Different ALFs showed distinct antibacterial and antiviral activities, which were consistent with their diverse tissue distribution patterns. Sequence analysis on the LBD domain of different isoforms revealed that an identical lysine residue site was specifically conserved in peptides with anti-WSSV activity. In order to confirm whether this lysine residue is critical to the antiviral activity of the peptide, new peptides were synthesized by changing residues at this site. Changing the lysine residue at the specific site to other amino acid residue, the antiviral activity of the peptide apparently decreased. While replacing other residue with a lysine residue at this site in LBD peptide without anti-WSSV activity, the peptide will obtain the antiviral activity to WSSV. These results not only showed us a comprehensive understanding on the function of ALFs from F. chinensis, but also provided clues for the development of ALFs as potential therapeutic drugs to WSSV. PMID:25923317

  15. Functional Diversity of Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Factor Isoforms in Shrimp and Their Characters Related to Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shihao; Guo, Shuyue; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-01-01

    Anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) is a small protein with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, which has potential application in the disease control. Previously, we isolated seven ALF isoforms from the Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis. In the present study, their distributions in tissues of shrimp were analyzed and the data showed that different isoforms had different expression profiles, which suggested that they might have different functions. Then, the functions of different isoforms were studied by analyzing the antibacterial and antiviral activities of the functional domain of ALFs, the LPS-binding domain (LBD), which were synthesized by chemical methods. Different ALFs showed distinct antibacterial and antiviral activities, which were consistent with their diverse tissue distribution patterns. Sequence analysis on the LBD domain of different isoforms revealed that an identical lysine residue site was specifically conserved in peptides with anti-WSSV activity. In order to confirm whether this lysine residue is critical to the antiviral activity of the peptide, new peptides were synthesized by changing residues at this site. Changing the lysine residue at the specific site to other amino acid residue, the antiviral activity of the peptide apparently decreased. While replacing other residue with a lysine residue at this site in LBD peptide without anti-WSSV activity, the peptide will obtain the antiviral activity to WSSV. These results not only showed us a comprehensive understanding on the function of ALFs from F. chinensis, but also provided clues for the development of ALFs as potential therapeutic drugs to WSSV. PMID:25923317

  16. Active-Site Hydration and Water Diffusion in Cytochrome P450cam: A Highly Dynamic Process

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome Y

    2011-01-01

    Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (300 ns) are performed on both the apo- (i.e., camphor-free) and camphor-bound cytochrome P450cam (CYP101). Water diffusion into and out of the protein active site is observed without biased sampling methods. During the course of the molecular dynamics simulation, an average of 6.4 water molecules is observed in the camphor-binding site of the apo form, compared to zero water molecules in the binding site of the substrate-bound form, in agreement with the number of water molecules observed in crystal structures of the same species. However, as many as 12 water molecules can be present at a given time in the camphor-binding region of the active site in the case of apo-P450cam, revealing a highly dynamic process for hydration of the protein active site, with water molecules exchanging rapidly with the bulk solvent. Water molecules are also found to exchange locations frequently inside the active site, preferentially clustering in regions surrounding the water molecules observed in the crystal structure. Potential-of-mean-force calculations identify thermodynamically favored trans-protein pathways for the diffusion of water molecules between the protein active site and the bulk solvent. Binding of camphor in the active site modifies the free-energy landscape of P450cam channels toward favoring the diffusion of water molecules out of the protein active site.

  17. Parameterization of an Active Thermal Erosion Site, Caribou Creek, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busey, R.; Bolton, W. R.; Cherry, J. E.; Hinzman, L. D.

    2012-12-01

    Thermokarst features are thought to be an important mechanism for landscape change in permafrost-dominated cold regions, but few such features have been incorporated into full featured landscape models. The root of this shortcoming is that historic observations are not detailed enough to parameterize a model, and the models typically do not include the relevant processes for thermal erosion. A new, dynamic thermokarst feature has been identified at the Caribou-Poker Creek Research Watershed (CPCRW) in the boreal forest of Interior Alaska. Located adjacent to a traditional use trail, this feature terminates directly in Caribou Creek. Erosion within the feature is driven predominantly by fluvial interflow. CPCRW is a Long-Term Ecological Research site underlain by varying degrees of relatively warm, discontinuous permafrost. This poster will describe the suite of measurements that have been undertaken to parameterize the ERODE model for this site, including thorough surveys, time lapse- and aerial photography, and 3-D structure from motion algorithms.

  18. Lysine methylation regulates the pRb tumour suppressor protein.

    PubMed

    Munro, S; Khaire, N; Inche, A; Carr, S; La Thangue, N B

    2010-04-22

    The pRb tumour suppressor protein has a central role in coordinating early cell cycle progression. An important level of control imposed on pRb occurs through post-translational modification, for example, phosphorylation. We describe here a new level of regulation on pRb, mediated through the targeted methylation of lysine residues, by the methyltransferase Set7/9. Set7/9 methylates the C-terminal region of pRb, both in vitro and in cells, and methylated pRb interacts with heterochromatin protein HP1. pRb methylation is required for pRb-dependent cell cycle arrest and transcriptional repression, as well as pRb-dependent differentiation. Our results indicate that methylation can influence the properties of pRb, and raise the interesting possibility that methylation modulates pRb tumour suppressor activity.

  19. Blogs and Social Network Sites as Activity Systems: Exploring Adult Informal Learning Process through Activity Theory Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heo, Gyeong Mi; Lee, Romee

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses an Activity Theory framework to explore adult user activities and informal learning processes as reflected in their blogs and social network sites (SNS). Using the assumption that a web-based space is an activity system in which learning occurs, typical features of the components were investigated and each activity system then…

  20. Independent Mechanisms Target SMCHD1 to Trimethylated Histone H3 Lysine 9-Modified Chromatin and the Inactive X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Brideau, Nicholas J.; Coker, Heather; Gendrel, Anne-Valerie; Siebert, C. Alistair; Bezstarosti, Karel; Demmers, Jeroen; Poot, Raymond A.; Nesterova, Tatyana B.

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomal protein SMCHD1 plays an important role in epigenetic silencing at diverse loci, including the inactive X chromosome, imprinted genes, and the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy locus. Although homology with canonical SMC family proteins suggests a role in chromosome organization, the mechanisms underlying SMCHD1 function and target site selection remain poorly understood. Here we show that SMCHD1 forms an active GHKL-ATPase homodimer, contrasting with canonical SMC complexes, which exist as tripartite ring structures. Electron microscopy analysis demonstrates that SMCHD1 homodimers structurally resemble prokaryotic condensins. We further show that the principal mechanism for chromatin loading of SMCHD1 involves an LRIF1-mediated interaction with HP1γ at trimethylated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me3)-modified chromatin sites on the chromosome arms. A parallel pathway accounts for chromatin loading at a minority of sites, notably the inactive X chromosome. Together, our results provide key insights into SMCHD1 function and target site selection. PMID:26391951

  1. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  2. Active Site Structure and Peroxidase Activity of Oxidatively Modified Cytochrome c Species in Complexes with Cardiolipin.